WorldWideScience

Sample records for previous cancer history

  1. Patients with a Previous History of Malignancy Undergoing Lung Cancer Screening: Clinical Characteristics and Radiologic Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpenny, Darragh F; Cunningham, Jane D; Long, Niamh M; Sosa, Ramon E; Ginsberg, Michelle S

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and radiologic findings in patients with a previous history of malignancy who underwent computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer. Patients with a previous history of malignancy and a life expectancy of at least 5 years who were referred for lung cancer screening between May 2, 2011, and September 24, 2014, were included. CT scan features assessed included nodule size, morphologic features, and number. The Lung-CT Reporting and Data System scoring system was retrospectively applied to all studies. A total of 139 patients were studied (mean age of 66 years and median smoking history of 50 pack-years). All had a previous history of cancer, most often breast cancer (60 patients [43%]), head or neck cancer (26 patients [19%]), and lung cancer (16 patients [12%]). Of these patients, 42 (30%) had a positive screening study result. Lung cancer was diagnosed in seven patients (5%), and a radiation-induced chest wall sarcoma was diagnosed in one patient (1%); 42 patients (30%) had a positive chest CT scan per the National Comprehensive Cancer Network lung cancer screening nodule follow-up algorithm. The rate of diagnosis of lung cancer in our patient population is higher than in several previously published studies. Smokers with a history of malignancy may be a group at particularly high risk for the development of subsequent lung cancer. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Incidence of thyroid cancer in women in relation to previous exposure to radiation therapy and history of thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McTiernan, A.M.; Weiss, N.S.; Daling, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Female residents of 13 counties of Western Washington, in whom papillary, follicular, or mixed papillary-follicular thyroid carcinomas had been diagnosed between 1974 and 1979 were interviewed regarding their medical and reproductive histories and past exposure to radiation treatments. For comparison, a random sample of women from the same population was interviewed. Women who had received radiation treatments to the head or neck prior to 5 years before interview were 16.5 times (95% confidence interval . 8.1-33.5) more likely than unexposed women to develop cancer. The relative risk (RR) was highest for papillary cancer (19.4) but also was elevated substantially for follicular and mixed papillary-follicular tumors. Women first irradiated at age 19 years or younger had a much higher RR than did women irradiated at age 20 or older. Regardless of prior radiation exposure, women who ever had had a goiter were at increased risk of developing thyroid cancer. Women who had ever developed a goiter had 17 times the risk of developing follicular cancer and almost 7 times the risk of developing papillary cancer as compared with women who never had had a goiter. Risk of thyroid cancer was elevated even among women who had had a history of goiter many years prior to diagnosis. A history of thyroid nodules was also a risk factor for papillary and mixed thyroid cancer. Neither a history of hypothyroidism nor hyperthyroidism was found to increase the risk of thyroid cancer

  3. High incidence of BRCA1-2 germline mutations, previous breast cancer and familial cancer history in Jewish patients with uterine serous papillary carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biron-Shental, T; Drucker, L; Altaras, M; Bernheim, J; Fishman, A

    2006-12-01

    To test the carrier status of the three germline founder mutations in Jewish patients with uterine serous papillary carcinoma (USPC) and to evaluate its association to their personal and familial cancer records. Retrospective analysis of histologically confirmed USPC Jewish patients diagnosed between April 1, 1997 and December 31, 2003. All cases were genetically tested for the three BRCA1-2 founder germline mutations (185delAG and 5382insC in BRCA1 and 6174delT in BRCA2). The analysis was performed on genomic DNA extracted from whole blood or paraffin embedded normal tissue of these patients, employing PCR amplification of target sequences and differential digestion with restriction enzymes. The carrier frequency was compared to the known population frequency of these mutations. The study group comprised 22 Jewish patients with USPC diagnosed within this timeframe. The mean age was 71.8 years (range 56-79). FIGO surgical stage distribution revealed 59% at stages III-IV. Seven USPC patients (32%) with a previous diagnosis of breast cancer were identified. Familial cancer history was recorded in 23% of the patients (four with breast cancer and one with ovarian cancer). DNA analysis revealed six BRCA1-2 germline mutation carriers (27%) as follows: three with BRCA2-6174delT, two with BRCA1-185delAG, and one with BRCA1-5382insC mutation. Three of the carriers had a previous diagnosis of breast cancer. Four carriers had familial cancer history in first-degree relative (three with breast cancer and one with ovarian cancer). The high rate of BRCA germline mutations in USPC patients observed in the present study, coupled with the strong personal and familial cancer history as well as the histological and clinical resemblance to the ovarian cancer, may indicate that USPC is a part or an expression of the hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome. This option may have implications in our clinical recommendations for non-affected BRCA1-2 carriers.

  4. High 15-F2t-Isoprostane Levels in Patients with a Previous History of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer: The Effects of Supplementary Antioxidant Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betânia de Jesus e Silva de Almendra Freitas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Phase I of this study was aimed at comparing the profiles of oxidative stress biomarkers in patients with history of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC, previously treated with surgery, to the healthy subjects. Phase II aimed to evaluate the effects of supplementary antioxidant therapy on the levels of biomarkers in the case group. Materials and Methods. In Phase I, oxidative stress biomarkers were measured in blood samples obtained from 24 healthy subjects and 60 patients with history of NMSC previously treated with surgery. In Phase II, the 60 patients with history of NMSC were randomized into two subgroups, one receiving placebo (n=34 and the other (n=26 receiving vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc supplementation for 8 weeks, followed by reevaluation of biomarkers. Results. In Phase I, patients with history of NMSC showed increased plasma concentrations of all biomarkers, but only 15-F2t-isoprostane was significantly higher than in the healthy subjects. Risk of NMSC increased by 4% for each additional 1 pg/mL increase in 15-F2t-isoprostane. In Phase II, supplementation did not significantly reduce levels of oxidative stress biomarkers. Conclusion. Patients with history of NMSC had significantly high 15-F2t-isoprostane plasma levels; supplementation did not result in significant reduction of oxidative stress biomarkers. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (ID NCT02248584.

  5. A genomic and transcriptomic approach for a differential diagnosis between primary and secondary ovarian carcinomas in patients with a previous history of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyniel, Jean-Philippe; Alran, Séverine; Rapinat, Audrey; Gentien, David; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Mignot, Laurent; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Cottu, Paul H; Decraene, Charles; Stern, Marc-Henri; Couturier, Jérôme; Lebigot, Ingrid; Nicolas, André; Weber, Nina; Fourchotte, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    The distinction between primary and secondary ovarian tumors may be challenging for pathologists. The purpose of the present work was to develop genomic and transcriptomic tools to further refine the pathological diagnosis of ovarian tumors after a previous history of breast cancer. Sixteen paired breast-ovary tumors from patients with a former diagnosis of breast cancer were collected. The genomic profiles of paired tumors were analyzed using the Affymetrix GeneChip ® Mapping 50 K Xba Array or Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 (for one pair), and the data were normalized with ITALICS (ITerative and Alternative normaLIzation and Copy number calling for affymetrix Snp arrays) algorithm or Partek Genomic Suite, respectively. The transcriptome of paired samples was analyzed using Affymetrix GeneChip ® Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays, and the data were normalized with gc-Robust Multi-array Average (gcRMA) algorithm. A hierarchical clustering of these samples was performed, combined with a dataset of well-identified primary and secondary ovarian tumors. In 12 of the 16 paired tumors analyzed, the comparison of genomic profiles confirmed the pathological diagnosis of primary ovarian tumor (n = 5) or metastasis of breast cancer (n = 7). Among four cases with uncertain pathological diagnosis, genomic profiles were clearly distinct between the ovarian and breast tumors in two pairs, thus indicating primary ovarian carcinomas, and showed common patterns in the two others, indicating metastases from breast cancer. In all pairs, the result of the transcriptomic analysis was concordant with that of the genomic analysis. In patients with ovarian carcinoma and a previous history of breast cancer, SNP array analysis can be used to distinguish primary and secondary ovarian tumors. Transcriptomic analysis may be used when primary breast tissue specimen is not available

  6. Factors Influencing Clinical Follow-Up for Individuals with a Personal History of Breast and/or Ovarian Cancer and Previous Uninformative BRCA1 and BRCA2 Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwell, Sarah E; He, Hua; Knapke, Sara; Lewis, Jaime; Sisson, Rebecca; Hopper, Jennifer

    2018-03-17

    Genetic testing for inherited cancer risk has recently improved through the advent of multi-gene panels and the addition of deletion and duplication analysis of the BRCA genes. The primary aim of this study was to determine which factors influence the intent of individuals with a personal history of breast and/or ovarian cancer and negative or uncertain BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing to return to a hereditary cancer program for additional genetic risk assessment, counseling, and testing. Surveys were sent to 1197 individuals and 257 were returned. Of those participants who were planning to return to clinic, most cited having family members who could benefit from the test result as the primary motivation to return. Many participants who were not planning to return to clinic cited the cost of testing as a barrier to return. Cost of testing and concerns about insurance coverage were the most commonly cited barriers for the group of participants who were undecided about returning to clinic. Results from this study may be used to guide re-contact efforts by clinicians to increase patient uptake to return to clinic for up-to-date genetic risk assessment, counseling, and testing.

  7. Previously Funded Teams | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The first group of NCI-supported Tumor Glycomics Laboratories teams offered different approaches and concentrations to exploit the potential of glycomics to yield biomarkers for early cancer detection, and used various technologies to investigate complex carbohydrate biochemistry. They are listed here with links to more information about each laboratory, including publications related to their Alliance work. |

  8. Recommendations for breast imaging follow-up of women with a previous history of breast cancer: position paper from the Italian Group for Mammography Screening (GISMa) and the Italian College of Breast Radiologists (ICBR) by SIRM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucchi, Lauro; Belli, Paolo; Benelli, Eva; Bernardi, Daniela; Brancato, Beniamino; Calabrese, Massimo; Carbonaro, Luca A; Caumo, Francesca; Cavallo-Marincola, Beatrice; Clauser, Paola; Fedato, Chiara; Frigerio, Alfonso; Galli, Vania; Giordano, Livia; Golinelli, Paola; Mariscotti, Giovanna; Martincich, Laura; Montemezzi, Stefania; Morrone, Doralba; Naldoni, Carlo; Paduos, Adriana; Panizza, Pietro; Pediconi, Federica; Querci, Fiammetta; Rizzo, Antonio; Saguatti, Gianni; Tagliafico, Alberto; Trimboli, Rubina M; Zuiani, Chiara; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Women who were previously treated for breast cancer (BC) are an important particular subgroup of women at intermediate BC risk. Their breast follow-up should be planned taking in consideration a 1.0-1.5 % annual rate of loco-regional recurrences and new ipsilateral or contralateral BCs during 15-20 years, and be based on a regional/district invitation system. This activity should be carried out by a Department of Radiology integrating screening and diagnostics in the context of a Breast Unit. We recommend the adoption of protocols dedicated to women previously treated for BC, with a clear definition of responsibilities, methods for invitation, site(s) of visits, methods for clinical and radiological evaluation, follow-up duration, role and function of family doctors and specialists. These women will be invited to get a mammogram in dedicated sessions starting from the year after the end of treatment. The planned follow-up duration will be at least 10 years and will be defined on the basis of patient's age and preferences, taking into consideration organizational matters. Special agreements can be defined in the case of women who have their follow-up planned at other qualified centers. Dedicated screening sessions should include: evaluation of familial/personal history (if previously not done) for identifying high-risk conditions which could indicate a different screening strategy; immediate evaluation of mammograms by one or, when possible, two breast radiologists with possible addition of supplemental mammographic views, digital breast tomosynthesis, clinical breast examination, breast ultrasound; and prompt planning of possible further workup. Results of these screening sessions should be set apart from those of general female population screening and presented in dedicated reports. The following research issues are suggested: further risk stratification and effectiveness of follow-up protocols differentiated also for BC pathologic subtype and molecular

  9. Multispecies Coevolution Particle Swarm Optimization Based on Previous Search History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danping Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid coevolution particle swarm optimization algorithm with dynamic multispecies strategy based on K-means clustering and nonrevisit strategy based on Binary Space Partitioning fitness tree (called MCPSO-PSH is proposed. Previous search history memorized into the Binary Space Partitioning fitness tree can effectively restrain the individuals’ revisit phenomenon. The whole population is partitioned into several subspecies and cooperative coevolution is realized by an information communication mechanism between subspecies, which can enhance the global search ability of particles and avoid premature convergence to local optimum. To demonstrate the power of the method, comparisons between the proposed algorithm and state-of-the-art algorithms are grouped into two categories: 10 basic benchmark functions (10-dimensional and 30-dimensional, 10 CEC2005 benchmark functions (30-dimensional, and a real-world problem (multilevel image segmentation problems. Experimental results show that MCPSO-PSH displays a competitive performance compared to the other swarm-based or evolutionary algorithms in terms of solution accuracy and statistical tests.

  10. Surgical treatment of breast cancer in previously augmented patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanas, Yvonne L; Leong, Darren S; Da Lio, Andrew; Waldron, Kathleen; Watson, James P; Chang, Helena; Shaw, William W

    2003-03-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is increasing each year. Concomitantly, cosmetic breast augmentation has become the second most often performed cosmetic surgical procedure. As the augmented patient population ages, an increasing number of breast cancer cases among previously augmented women can be anticipated. The surgical treatment of these patients is controversial, with several questions remaining unanswered. Is breast conservation therapy feasible in this patient population and can these patients retain their implants? A retrospective review of all breast cancer patients with a history of previous augmentation mammaplasty who were treated at the Revlon/UCLA Breast Center between 1991 and 2001 was performed. During the study period, 58 patients were treated. Thirty patients (52 percent) were treated with a modified radical mastectomy with implant removal. Twenty-eight patients (48 percent) underwent breast conservation therapy, which consisted of lumpectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and radiotherapy. Twenty-two of the patients who underwent breast conservation therapy initially retained their implants. Eleven of those 22 patients (50 percent) ultimately required completion mastectomies with implant removal because of implant complications (two patients), local recurrences (five patients), or the inability to obtain negative margins (four patients). Nine additional patients experienced complications resulting from their implants, including contracture, erosion, pain, and rupture. The data illustrate that breast conservation therapy with maintenance of the implant is not ideal for the majority of augmented patients. Breast conservation therapy with explantation and mastopexy might be appropriate for rare patients with large volumes of native breast tissue. Mastectomy with immediate reconstruction might be a more suitable choice for these patients.

  11. Cancer-Specific and All-Cause Mortality in Kidney Transplant Recipients With and Without Previous Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viecelli, Andrea K; Lim, Wai H; Macaskill, Petra; Chapman, Jeremy R; Craig, Jonathan C; Clayton, Philip; Cohney, Solomon; Carroll, Robert; Wong, Germaine

    2015-12-01

    For dialysis patients with a cancer history, a period of surveillance is generally recommended before listing for transplantation. However, the outcomes of patients with cancer recurrence and/or a second primary cancer after transplantation are unknown. To determine the prognosis of kidney transplant recipients who developed cancer after transplantation and whether this varied with cancer types (first cancer, recurrence, second primary cancer). Using data from the Australian and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry, we compared the cancer-specific and all-cause mortality among recipients with different cancer types using adjusted Cox proportional hazard models. Of the 21,415 recipients transplanted between 1965 and 2012, 3% (651 of 21,415) had a previous cancer history. A total of 2840 (13%) recipients developed cancer after the first transplant, of whom 2760 (97.2%) developed a first cancer, 23 (0.8%) experienced cancer recurrence, and 57 (2%) developed a second primary cancer. There were no significant differences in the risks of cancer-specific and all-cause mortality between recipients who developed their first cancer after transplant, those with cancer recurrence (adjusted hazard ratios [aHRs], 0.79; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.38-1.67; P = 0.54 and aHRs, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.45-1.66; P = 0.66, respectively) and recipients who developed a second primary cancer after transplantation (aHRs, 1.01; 95%CI, 0.63-1.62; P = 0.95 and aHRs, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.79-1.69; P = 0.45, respectively). Among patients with a previous history of malignancy, recurrent and second primary cancers are infrequent after renal transplantation. A history of previous malignancy does not have an additive effect on the cancer-specific and overall survival of kidney transplant recipients who develop cancer.

  12. Is Previous Respiratory Disease a Risk Factor for Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denholm, Rachel; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Stücker, Isabelle; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Brenner, Darren R.; De Matteis, Sara; Boffetta, Paolo; Guida, Florence; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Siemiatycki, Jack; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Zaridze, David; Field, John K.; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Dumitru, Rodica Stanescu; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Kendzia, Benjamin; Peters, Susan; Behrens, Thomas; Vermeulen, Roel; Brüning, Thomas; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Previous respiratory diseases have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Respiratory conditions often co-occur and few studies have investigated multiple conditions simultaneously. Objectives: Investigate lung cancer risk associated with chronic bronchitis, emphysema, tuberculosis, pneumonia, and asthma. Methods: The SYNERGY project pooled information on previous respiratory diseases from 12,739 case subjects and 14,945 control subjects from 7 case–control studies conducted in Europe and Canada. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to investigate the relationship between individual diseases adjusting for co-occurring conditions, and patterns of respiratory disease diagnoses and lung cancer. Analyses were stratified by sex, and adjusted for age, center, ever-employed in a high-risk occupation, education, smoking status, cigarette pack-years, and time since quitting smoking. Measurements and Main Results: Chronic bronchitis and emphysema were positively associated with lung cancer, after accounting for other respiratory diseases and smoking (e.g., in men: odds ratio [OR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20–1.48 and OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.21–1.87, respectively). A positive relationship was observed between lung cancer and pneumonia diagnosed 2 years or less before lung cancer (OR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.33–4.70 for men), but not longer. Co-occurrence of chronic bronchitis and emphysema and/or pneumonia had a stronger positive association with lung cancer than chronic bronchitis “only.” Asthma had an inverse association with lung cancer, the association being stronger with an asthma diagnosis 5 years or more before lung cancer compared with shorter. Conclusions: Findings from this large international case–control consortium indicate that after accounting for co-occurring respiratory diseases, chronic bronchitis and emphysema continue to have a positive association with lung cancer. PMID:25054566

  13. Incidence of and survival after subsequent cancers in carriers of pathogenic MMR variants with previous cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Pål; Seppälä, Toni; Bernstein, Inge

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Today most patients with Lynch syndrome (LS) survive their first cancer. There is limited information on the incidences and outcome of subsequent cancers. The present study addresses three questions: (i) what is the cumulative incidence of a subsequent cancer; (ii) in which organs do s...... subsequent cancers validated continued follow-up to prevent death from cancer. The interactive website http://lscarisk.org was expanded to calculate the risks by gender, genetic variant and age for subsequent cancer for any patient with LS with previous cancer....

  14. Lung cancer in Hodgkin's disease: association with previous radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    List, A.F.; Doll, D.C.; Greco, F.A.

    1985-01-01

    Seven cases of lung cancer were observed in patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) since 1970. The risk ratio for the development of lung cancer among HD patients was 5.6 times that expected in the general population. The pertinent clinical data from these patients are described and compared to 28 additional patients reported from other institutions. Small-cell lung cancer represented the predominant histologic type of lung cancer encountered in both smoking and nonsmoking patients with HD, accounting for 42% of cases overall and greater than 55% of cases reported in reviews of second malignancies. Tobacco use was noted in only 53% of patients. Twenty-eight (94%) of 30 patients developing metachronous lung cancer received supradiaphragmatic irradiation as primary therapy for HD. Nineteen (68%) of these patients received subsequent chemotherapy salvage. The median age at diagnosis of HD and lung cancer was 39 and 45 years, respectively. The interval between diagnosis of HD and metachronous lung cancer averaged seven years but appeared to vary inversely with age. HD patients treated with supradiaphragmatic irradiation or combined modality therapy may be at increased risk for developing lung cancer. The high frequency of in-field malignancies that the authors observed and the prevalence of small-cell lung cancer in both smoking and nonsmoking patients suggests that chest irradiation may influence the development of metachronous lung cancer in these patients. The finding of a mean latent interval in excess of seven years emphasizes the need for close long-term observation

  15. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissouni, Soundouss; Raissouni, Ferdaous; Rais, Ghizlane; Aitelhaj, Meryem; Lkhoyaali, Siham; Latib, Rachida; Mohtaram, Amina; Rais, Fadoua; Mrabti, Hind; Kabbaj, Nawal; Amrani, Naima; Errihani, Hassan

    2012-08-09

    Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. A 56 year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4 months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders.

  16. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raissouni Soundouss

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. Case presentation A 56 year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4 months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. Conclusion We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders.

  17. Erlotinib in previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smrdel, U.; Kovac, V.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Erlotinib is a novel biological anti-tumour agent in the treatment of advanced non small cell lung cancer. It represents the molecularly-targeted therapy which has been studied extensively. Case report. We present a case of a patient who suffered from advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. After the progress of disease following a prior chemotherapy he was treated with erlotinib with remarkable effect which was shown at chest x ray and symptoms were quite reduced. Conclusions. In selected patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer Erlotinib improves survival and symptom control as it results in presented case. (author)

  18. Risk of oesophageal cancer among patients previously hospitalised with eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, David H; Nowell, Siân L; Clark, David N

    2015-06-01

    It has been suggested that the risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma might be increased in patients with a history of eating disorders due to acidic damage to oesophageal mucosa caused by self-induced vomiting practiced as a method of weight control. Eating disorders have also been associated with risk factors for squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus, including alcohol use disorders, as well as smoking and nutritional deficiencies, which have been associated with both main sub-types of oesophageal cancer. There have been several case reports of oesophageal cancer (both main sub-types) arising in patients with a history of eating disorders. We used linked records of hospitalisation, cancer registration and mortality in Scotland spanning 1981-2012 to investigate the risk of oesophageal cancer among patients with a prior history of hospitalisation with eating disorder. The cohort was restricted to patients aged ≥10 years and eating disorder. Disregarding the first year of follow-up, we calculated indirectly standardised incidence ratios using the general population as the reference group to generate expected numbers of cases (based on age-, sex-, socio-economic deprivation category-, and calendar period-specific rates of disease). After exclusions, the cohort consisted of 3617 individuals contributing 52,455 person-years at risk. The median duration of follow-up was 13.9 years. Seven oesophageal cancers were identified, as compared with 1.14 expected, yielding a standardised incidence ratio of 6.1 (95% confidence interval: 2.5-12.6). All were squamous cell carcinomas arising in females with a prior history of anorexia nervosa. Patients hospitalised previously with eating disorders are at increased risk of developing oesophageal cancer. Confounding by established risk factors (alcohol, smoking, and nutritional deficiency) seems a more likely explanation than acidic damage through self-induced vomiting because none of the incident cases of oesophageal cancer were

  19. Vietnam military service history and prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritschi Lin

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three decades after US and Australian forces withdrew from Vietnam, there has been much public interest in the health consequences of service in Vietnam. One controversial question is whether the risk of prostate cancer amongst Vietnam veterans is increased. This paper examines relationships between military history, family history and risk of prostate cancer in a population-based case control study. Methods Cases were selected from the Cancer Registry of Western Australia as incident cases of histologically-confirmed prostate cancer, and controls were age-matched and selected from the Western Australian electoral roll. Study participants were asked to report any military service history and details about that service. Results Between January 2001 and September 2002, 606 cases and 471 controls aged between 40–75 years were recruited. An increased prostate cancer risk was observed in men reporting they were deployed in Vietnam although this was not statistically significant (OR = 2.12; 95% CI 0.88–5.06. An increased risk was also observed in men reporting prostate cancer in fathers (OR = 1.90; 95% CI 1.20–3.00 or brothers (OR = 2.05; 95% CI 1.20–3.50 diagnosed with prostate cancer. Conclusion These findings support a positive association between prostate cancer and military service history in the Vietnam war and a first degree relative family history of prostate cancer.

  20. História prévia de realização de teste de Papanicolaou e câncer do colo do útero: estudo caso-controle na Baixada Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Previous history of Pap smears and cervical cancer: a case-control study in the Baixada Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel do Nascimento

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo caso-controle hospitalar foi realizado de 2007 a 2010 para estimar a associação de história prévia de colpocitologia e câncer do colo do útero na Baixada Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. A amostra consistiu de 152 casos histologicamente confirmados e 169 controles selecionados no mesmo hospital dos casos. A análise foi feita de acordo com um modelo em três níveis hierárquicos; considerando as variáveis sociodemográficas (nível distal, sexual/reprodutivas e de estilo de vida (nível intermediário e a história prévia de colpocitologia (nível proximal. Odds ratios (OR e respectivos intervalos de 95% de confiança (IC95% foram calculados pela regressão logística não condicional. Ter história prévia de três ou mais colpocitologias conferiu uma proteção de 84% (OR = 0,16; IC95%: 0,074; 0,384 após ajuste pelas variáveis selecionadas. Os resultados acentuam a importância do exame preventivo ginecológico no risco desse câncer e fortalecem a necessidade de aumentar a aderência às normas do programa brasileiro, bem como de identificar e capturar mulheres relutantes para o rastreamento da doença.This hospital-based case-control study (2007-2010 aimed to estimate the association between previous Pap smear and cervical cancer diagnosis in the Baixada Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. The sample consisted of 152 histologically confirmed cases and 169 controls from the same hospital as the cases. The analysis was conducted according to a model in three hierarchical levels considering sociodemographic characteristics (distal, sexual/reproductive and lifestyle factors (intermediate, and previous Pap smear (proximal. Odds ratios (OR and respective 95% confidence intervals (95%CI were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. History of three or more Pap smears was associated with an 84% reduction in cervical cancer risk (OR = 0.16; 95%CI: 0.074; 0.384 after adjusting for selected variables. The

  1. Visual pathway abnormalities were found in most multiple sclerosis patients despite history of previous optic neuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Maris Costa Castro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective It was to investigate visual field (VF abnormalities in a group of multiple sclerosis (MS patients in the remission phase and the presence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI lesions in the optic radiations. Methods VF was assessed in 60 participants (age range 20-51 years: 35 relapsing-remitting MS patients [20 optic neuritis (+, 15 optic neuritis (-] and 25 controls. MRI (3-Tesla was obtained in all patients. Results Visual parameters were abnormal in MS patients as compared to controls. The majority of VF defects were diffuse. All patients except one had posterior visual pathways lesions. No significant difference in lesion number, length and distribution was noted between patients with and without history of optic neuritis. One patient presented homonymous hemianopsia. Conclusion Posterior visual pathway abnormalities were found in most MS patients despite history of previous optic neuritis.

  2. Association between urinary incontinence in women and a previous history of surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mommsen, S.; Foldspang, Anders; Elving, L.

    1993-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study, 85% of 3114 women responded to a questionnaire on urinary incontinence and a history of abdominal, gynaecological and urological surgery. In 1987 the prevalence of urinary incontinence was 17%; 63% had undergone surgery, mainly gynaecological, and almost one-third of t......In a cross-sectional study, 85% of 3114 women responded to a questionnaire on urinary incontinence and a history of abdominal, gynaecological and urological surgery. In 1987 the prevalence of urinary incontinence was 17%; 63% had undergone surgery, mainly gynaecological, and almost one......-third of the respondents had had more than one operation. Bivariate and multivariate analysis showed stress urinary incontinence to be associated with previous exposure to surgery....

  3. Life-history traits in an evergreen Mediterranean oak respond differentially to previous experimental environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Rey Benayas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms respond both to current and previous environments, which can have important consequences on population dynamics. However, there is little experimental evidence based on long-term field studies of the effects of previous environments on the performance of individuals. We tested the hypothesis that trees that establish under different environmental conditions perform differently under similar post-establishment conditions. We used the slow-growing, evergreen Mediterranean oak Quercus ilex subsp. rotundifolia as target species. We analyzed the effects of previous environments, competition effects and tradeoffs among life-history traits (survival, growth, and reproduction. We enhanced seedling establishment for three years by reducing abiotic environmental harshness by means of summer irrigation and artificial shading in 12 experimental plots, while four plots remained as controls. Then these treatments were interrupted for ten years. Seedlings under ameliorated environmental conditions survived and grew faster during early establishment. During the post-management period, previous treatments 1 did not have any effect on survival, 2 experienced a slower above-ground growth, 3 decreased root biomass as indicated from reflectivity of Ground Penetration Radar, 4 increased acorn production mostly through a greater canopy volume and 5 increased acorn production effort. The trees exhibited a combination of effects related to acclimation for coping with abiotic stress and effects of intra-specific competition. In accordance with our hypothesis, tree performance overall depended on previous environmental conditions, and the response was different for different life-history traits. We recommend early management because it increased plot cover, shortened the time to attain sexual maturity and increased the amount of acorn production. Plots such as those assessed in this study may act as sources of propagules in deforested

  4. Central venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients without a previous history of catheter placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguzkurt, Levent; Tercan, Fahri; Yildirim, Sedat; Torun, Dilek

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate dialysis history, imaging findings and outcome of endovascular treatment in six patients with central venous stenosis without a history of previous catheter placement. Material and methods: Between April 2000 and June 2004, six (10%) of 57 haemodialysis patients had stenosis of a central vein without a previous central catheter placement. Venography findings and outcome of endovascular treatment in these six patients were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were three women (50%) and three men aged 32-60 years (mean age: 45 years) and all had massive arm swelling as the main complaint. The vascular accesses were located at the elbow in five patients and at the wrist in one patient. Results: Three patients had stenosis of the left subclavian vein and three patients had stenosis of the left brachiocephalic vein. The mean duration of the vascular accesses from the time of creation was 25.1 months. Flow volumes of the vascular access were very high in four patients who had flow volume measurement. The mean flow volume was 2347 ml/min. One of three patients with brachiocephalic vein stenosis had compression of the vein by the brachiocephalic artery. All the lesions were first treated with balloon angioplasty and two patients required stent placement on long term. Number of interventions ranged from 1 to 4 (mean: 2.1). Symptoms resolved in five patients and improved in one patient who had a stent placed in the left BCV. Conclusion: Central venous stenosis in haemodialysis patients without a history of central venous catheterization tends to occur or be manifested in patients with a proximal permanent vascular access with high flow rates. Balloon angioplasty with or without stent placement offers good secondary patency rates in mid-term

  5. The Relationship Between Functional Movement, Balance Deficits, and Previous Injury History in Deploying Marine Warfighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Motte, Sarah J; Lisman, Peter; Sabatino, Marc; Beutler, Anthony I; OʼConnor, Francis G; Deuster, Patricia A

    2016-06-01

    Screening for primary musculoskeletal injury (MSK-I) is costly and time-consuming. Both the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and the Y-Balance Test (YBT) have been shown to predict future MSK-I. With a goal of optimizing the efficiency of primary MSK-I screening, we studied associations between performance on the FMS and YBT and whether history of MSK-I influenced FMS and YBT scores. In total, 365 deploying Marines performed the FMS and YBT as prescribed. Composite and individual scores were each categorized as high risk or low risk using published injury thresholds: High-risk FMS included composite scores ≤14 and right-to-left (R/L) asymmetry for Shoulder Mobility, In-Line Lunge, Straight Leg Raise, Hurdle Step, or Rotary Stability. High-risk YBT consisted of anterior, posteromedial, and/or posterolateral R/L differences >4 cm and/or composite differences ≥12 cm. Pearson's χ tests evaluated associations between: (a) all FMS and YBT risk groups and (b) previous MSK-I and all FMS and YBT risk groups. Marines with high-risk FMS were twice as likely to have high-risk YBT posteromedial scores (χ = 10.2, p = 0.001; odds ratio [OR] = 2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-3.2). History of any MSK-I was not associated with high-risk FMS or high-risk YBT. However, previous lower extremity MSK-I was associated with In-Line Lunge asymmetries (χ = 9.8, p = 0.002, OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.3-3.6). Overall, we found limited overlap in FMS and YBT risk. Because both methods seem to assess different risk factors for injury, we recommend FMS and YBT continue to be used together in combination with a thorough injury history until their predictive capacities are further established.

  6. Natural History of HPV and Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-12

    Dr. Phil Castle, an intramural research scientist at the National Institutes of Health, talks about the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, and cervical cancer and other anogenital cancers.  Created: 10/12/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  7. Participation in physical activity: perceptions of women with a previous history of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graco, Marnie; Garrard, Jan; Jasper, Andrea E

    2009-04-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Regular physical activity plays an important role in preventing T2DM. This study aimed to explore the perceptions of physical activity among women with previous GDM, in the context of preventing T2DM. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 women with previous GDM who had not been diagnosed with T2DM. Data were analysed using a modified grounded theory approach. Women perceived diet to be significantly more important for the prevention of T2DM than physical activity. They underestimated the role of physical activity in preventing diabetes, which may have resulted from the lack of information they received following their pregnancy. Women consistently placed the needs of their families before their own, despite acknowledging their future health risks. The most commonly cited constraints on physical activity participation were lack of time, partner support, and appropriate childcare. They identified a need for 'family-friendly' community-based physical activity programs for mothers, more accessible childcare, and more information about the role of physical activity in diabetes prevention. Awareness of the role of physical activity for the prevention of diabetes was low. Physical activity promotion for women with previous GDM needs to be shaped around the opportunities and constraints identified by this population group.

  8. [A brief history of resuscitation - the influence of previous experience on modern techniques and methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucmin, Tomasz; Płowaś-Goral, Małgorzata; Nogalski, Adam

    2015-02-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is relatively novel branch of medical science, however first descriptions of mouth-to-mouth ventilation are to be found in the Bible and literature is full of descriptions of different resuscitation methods - from flagellation and ventilation with bellows through hanging the victims upside down and compressing the chest in order to stimulate ventilation to rectal fumigation with tobacco smoke. The modern history of CPR starts with Kouwenhoven et al. who in 1960 published a paper regarding heart massage through chest compressions. Shortly after that in 1961Peter Safar presented a paradigm promoting opening the airway, performing rescue breaths and chest compressions. First CPR guidelines were published in 1966. Since that time guidelines were modified and improved numerously by two leading world expert organizations ERC (European Resuscitation Council) and AHA (American Heart Association) and published in a new version every 5 years. Currently 2010 guidelines should be obliged. In this paper authors made an attempt to present history of development of resuscitation techniques and methods and assess the influence of previous lifesaving methods on nowadays technologies, equipment and guidelines which allow to help those women and men whose life is in danger due to sudden cardiac arrest. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  9. Pregnancy outcomes in pregnant women with previous history of gestational diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masomeh Rezaie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the pregnancy outcomes in pregnant women with a history of previous gestational diabetes and its related recurrence risk factors. This study was conducted on 180 pregnant women with history of gestational diabetes in previous pregnancy that referred to Besat hospital, Sanandaj, Iran. They were divided into two groups (recurrence of gestational diabetes group and non-recurrence of gestational diabetes group .The data were recorded in the check list and analyzed using SPSS software Ver.18. To analyze quantitative variables such as mother`s age, mother`s BMI, interval between pregnancies, Apgar score and neonatal hypoglycemia independent t-tests was used and to compare qualitative variables between the two groups chi square test was used. The results showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of mother`s age (P = 0.22. In terms of mother’s BMI and interval between pregnancies there was statistically significant difference between the two groups (p<0.05. In terms of mode of delivery, after excluding 61 mothers who were replicate Cesarean section the percentage of Caesarean section in recurrence of gestational diabetes group was 15.4%4 and in non- recurrence of gestational diabetes group it was2.4% which difference was statistically significant (P <0.05. In terms of incidence of macrosomia (P <0.001 and neonatal hypoglycemia (p <0.05 there were statistically significant differences between two groups. The recurrence rate of diabetes was 66.6%.Regarding the results of this study in order to prevent maternal and fetal complications, monitoring and giving extra care to mothers with diabetes is recommended.

  10. Effects of anticoagulant therapy on pregnancy outcomes in patients with thrombophilia and previous poor obstetric history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Ilknur; Mutlu, Mehmet Firat; Biri, Aydan; Bulut, Berk; Erdem, Mehmet; Erdem, Ahmet

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the effects of anticoagulant therapy on pregnancy outcomes in 204 patients with thrombophilia and previous poor obstetric outcomes. Patients with poor obstetric history (pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth retardation, fetal death, placental abruption, recurrent pregnancy loss) and having hereditary thrombophilia were included in this study. Poor obstetric outcomes were observed more frequently in patients who had not taken anticogulant therapy compared with treated group. Live birth rate, gestational age at birth and Apgar scores were significantly higher in the treated group when compared with the untreated group. There were no significant differences in terms of birthweight, mode of delivery and admission rates to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) plus acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) had higher gestational age at birth, Apgar scores, live birth rate and a lower abortion rates when compared with controls; in contrast, no significant difference was observed in terms of birthweight, mode of delivery, obstetric complications and admission rates to NICU. There were no significant differences between control group and both LMWH only and ASA only groups in terms of gestational age at birth, Apgar scores, birthweight, mode of delivery, obstetric complications and admission rates to NICU. Only LMWH group had higher live birth rate as compared with control group. The use of only ASA did not seem to affect the perinatal complication rates and outcomes. In conclusion, anticoagulant therapy with both LMWH and ASA seems to provide better obstetric outcomes in pregnant women with thrombophilia and previous poor obstetric outcomes.

  11. History of Depression in Lung Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iachina, M; Brønserud, M M; Jakobsen, E

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the influence of a history of depression in the process of diagnostic evaluation and the choice of treatment in lung cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The analysis was based on all patients with non-small cell lung cancer who were registered in 2008-2014; in total, 27 234 patients....... To estimate the effect of depression on the diagnostic process and the choice of treatment in lung cancer we fitted a logistic regression model and a Cox regression model adjusting for age, gender, resection and stage. RESULTS: Depression in a patient's anamnesis had no significant effect on the delay...... that patients with a history of periodic depression need special attention when diagnosed with lung cancer....

  12. Increased Symptom Reporting in Young Athletes Based on History of Previous Concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Rosemarie Scolaro; Schatz, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Research documents increased symptoms in adolescents with a history of two or more concussions. This study examined baseline evaluations of 2,526 younger athletes, ages 10 to 14. Between-groups analyses examined Post Concussion Symptom Scale symptoms by concussion history group (None, One, Two+) and clusters of Physical, Cognitive, Emotional, and Sleep symptoms. Healthy younger athletes with a concussion history reported greater physical, emotional, and sleep-related symptoms than those with no history of concussion, with a greater endorsement in physical/sleep symptom clusters. Findings suggest younger athletes with a history of multiple concussions may experience residual symptoms.

  13. Natural history of breast cancers detected in the Swedish mammography screening programme: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahl, Per-Henrik; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Mæhlen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The natural history of screen-detected breast cancers is not well understood. A previous analysis of the incidence change during the introduction of the Norwegian screening programme in the late 1990s suggested that the natural history of many screen-detected invasive breast cancers is to regress...

  14. Characteristics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC pulmonary disease in previously treated lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Meier

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: MAC pulmonary disease in previously treated lung cancer can occur without apparent risk factors for this NTM infection. Symptomatic improvement with MAC antimicrobial therapy appears to be lower than expected but comorbidities might influence outcomes in this patient population.

  15. Association of Previous Clinical Breast Examination With Reduced Delays and Earlier-Stage Breast Cancer Diagnosis Among Women in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanoff, Anya; Constant, Tara Hayes; Johnson, Kay M; Guadiamos, Manuel Cedano; Vega, Ana María Burga; Zunt, Joseph; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2017-11-01

    Mammographic screening is impractical in most of the world where breast cancers are first identified based on clinical signs and symptoms. Clinical breast examination may improve early diagnosis directly by finding breast cancers at earlier stages or indirectly by heightening women's awareness of breast health concerns. To investigate factors that influence time to presentation and stage at diagnosis among patients with breast cancer to determine whether history of previous clinical breast examination is associated with earlier presentation and/or earlier cancer stage at diagnosis. In this cross-sectional analysis of individual patient interviews using a validated Breast Cancer Delay Questionnaire, 113 (71.1%) of 159 women with breast cancer treated at a federally funded tertiary care referral cancer center in Trujillo, Peru, from February 1 through May 31, 2015, were studied. Method of breast cancer detection and factors that influence time to and stage at diagnosis. Of 113 women with diagnosed cancer (mean [SD] age, 54 [10.8] years; age range, 32-82 years), 105 (92.9%) had self-detected disease. Of the 93 women for whom stage was documented, 45 (48.4%) were diagnosed with early-stage disease (American Joint Committee on Cancer [AJCC] stage 0, I, or II), and 48 (51.6%) were diagnosed with late-stage disease (AJCC stage III or IV). Mean (SD) total delay from symptom onset to initiation of treatment was 407 (665) days because of patient (mean [SD], 198 [449] days) and health care system (mean [SD], 241 [556] days) delay. Fifty-two women (46.0%) had a history of clinical breast examination, and 23 (20.4%) had undergone previous mammography. Women who underwent a previous clinical breast examination were more likely to have shorter delays from symptom development to presentation compared with women who had never undergone a previous clinical breast examination (odds ratio, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.30-6.60; P = .01). Women diagnosed with shorter patient delay were more

  16. Survival after early-stage breast cancer of women previously treated for depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, Nis Frederik Palm; Johansen, Christoffer; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this nationwide, register-based cohort study was to determine whether women treated for depression before primary early-stage breast cancer are at increased risk for receiving treatment that is not in accordance with national guidelines and for poorer survival. Material...... and Methods We identified 45,325 women with early breast cancer diagnosed in Denmark from 1998 to 2011. Of these, 744 women (2%) had had a previous hospital contact (as an inpatient or outpatient) for depression and another 6,068 (13%) had been treated with antidepressants. Associations between previous...... treatment of depression and risk of receiving nonguideline treatment of breast cancer were assessed in multivariable logistic regression analyses. We compared the overall survival, breast cancer-specific survival, and risk of death by suicide of women who were and were not treated for depression before...

  17. Tick-borne encephalitis in a child with previous history of completed primary vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlamy, Manuela; Haberlandt, Edda; Brunner, Jürgen; Dozcy, Ludwig; Rostasy, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 13-year-old girl who presented with fever, headache, nausea and pain behind the right ear. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF; leukocytes 227/μL), electroencephalogram and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging were indicative of meningoencephalitis. Despite intensive therapy the general condition worsened and the patient was admitted to the intensive care unit. Serological analysis of CSF and serum indicated acute tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) infection (IgG and IgM positive). TBEV infection has been reported after incomplete and complete vaccination. TBEV vaccination breakthrough in childhood has been shown to cause severe disease. It has been suggested that immunized patients develop more severe disease due to altered immune response, but the exact mechanism is unknown. In the presence of typical symptoms and a history of vaccination, possible vaccination breakthrough or missing booster vaccination should be considered. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  18. Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in elderly patients with previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer: single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocvirk Janja

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC is mainly a disease of elderly, however, geriatric population is underrepresented in clinical trials. Patient registries represent a tool to assess and follow treatment outcomes in this patient population. The aim of the study was with the help of the patients’ register to determine the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in elderly patients who had previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer.

  19. Human papilloma virus identification in breast cancer patients with previous cervical neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sutherland Lawson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Women with human papilloma virus (HPV associated cervical neoplasia have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than the general female population. The purpose of this study was to (i identify high risk for cancer HPVs in cervical neoplasia and subsequent HPV positive breast cancers which developed in the same patients and (ii determine if these HPVs were biologically active.Methods: A range of polymerase chain reaction (PCR and immunohistochemical techniques were used to conduct a retrospective cohort study of cervical precancers and subsequent breast cancers in the same patients. Results: The same high risk HPV types were identified in both the cervical and breast specimens in 13 (46% of 28 patients. HPV type 18 was the most prevalent. HPVs appeared to be biologically active as demonstrated by the expression of HPV E7 proteins and the presence of HPV associated koilocytes. The average age of these patients diagnosed with breast cancer following prior cervical precancer was 51 years, as compared to 60 years for all women with breast cancer (p for difference = 0.001. Conclusions: These findings indicate that high risk HPVs can be associated with cervical neoplasia and subsequent young age breast cancer. However these associations are unusual and are a very small proportion of breast cancers. These outcomes confirm and extend the observations of 2 similar previous studies and offer one explanation for the increased prevalence of serious invasive breast cancer among young women.

  20. Executive Functioning and Visuospatial Abilities in Bulimia Nervosa with or without a Previous History of Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degortes, Daniela; Tenconi, Elena; Santonastaso, Paolo; Favaro, Angela

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate executive functioning and visuospatial abilities in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN), with a particular interest in exploring the impact of a previous diagnosis of anorexia nervosa (AN). Several neuropsychological tasks were administered to 89 BN patients (52 with a previous history of AN and 37 without previous AN) and 160 healthy women. A poorer performance on set-shifting measures (Wisconsin Card Sorting Test) was found only in BN patients with a previous history of AN. Decision-making abilities (Iowa Gambling Task) were significantly impaired in the whole sample of BN patients, but difficulties were more pronounced in the subgroup with previous AN. Finally, we did not find any differences in response inhibition and visuospatial abilities between the two samples of BN patients and healthy women. Our findings support the idea that cognitive abilities in patients with BN are more impaired in the presence of a prior history of AN. The clinical and treatment implications of our findings should be explored in future studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  1. Alteration of distortion product otoacoustic emission input/output functions in subjects with a previous history of middle ear dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De P Campos, Ualace; Sanches, Seisse G; Hatzopoulos, Stavros; Carvallo, Renata M M; Kochanek, Krzysztof; Skarżyński, Henryk

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sub-clinical alterations on the amplitudes and slopes of the DPOAE input-output responses from subjects with previous history of middle ear dysfunction. The study included 15 subjects with and 15 subjects without a history of otitis media in the last 10 years. All participants were assessed with acoustic immittance, pure-tone audiometry, and DPOAEs. For the later, I/O functions and I/O slopes were estimated at 1501, 2002, 3174, 4004 and 6384 Hz. No statistically significant differences were found between the 2 groups in terms of behavioral thresholds. The group with a previous history of middle ear dysfunction presented significantly lower mean DPOAE amplitudes at 2002, 3174 and 4004 Hz. In terms of DPOAE slopes, no statistically significant differences were observed at the tested frequencies, except at 3174 Hz. Middle ear pathologies can produce subclinical alterations that are undetectable with traditional pure-tone audiometry. The data from the present study show that reduced amplitude DPOAEs are associated with a previous history of middle ear complications. The corresponding DPOAE slopes were affected at only 1 tested frequency, suggesting that the cochlear non-linearity is preserved. Considering these results, it remains to be elucidated to what degree the DPOAE amplitude attenuation interferes with higher-order auditory tasks.

  2. Reirradiation, surgery and IORT for recurrent rectal cancer in previously irradiated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermaas, Maarten; Nuyttens, Joost J.M.E.; Ferenschild, Floris T.J.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M.M.; Wilt, Johannes H.W. de

    2008-01-01

    A total of 11 patients with recurrent rectal cancer who had been previously irradiated were treated with preoperative reirradiation (median dose 30 Gy), surgery and IORT. This treatment was related with high morbidity, a short pain-free survival (5 months) and poor local control (27% after 3 years), although some patients have long-term distant control and survival

  3. Family history of cancer, personal history of medical conditions and risk of oral cavity cancer in France: the ICARE study.

    OpenAIRE

    Radoï, Loredana; Paget-Bailly, Sophie; Guida, Florence; Cyr, Diane; Menvielle, Gwenn; Schmaus, Annie; Carton, Matthieu; Cénée, Sylvie; Sanchez, Marie; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Trétarre, Brigitte; Stücker, Isabelle; Luce, Danièle

    2013-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of family history of cancer and personal history of other medical conditions in the aetiology of the oral cavity cancer in France. METHODS: We used data from 689 cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma and 3481 controls included in a population-based case--control study, the ICARE study. Odds-ratios (ORs) associated with family history of cancer and personal medical conditions and their 95% confidence inte...

  4. Incidence of cancer in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients treated 25 years previously

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simony, Ane; Hansen, Emil Jesper; Christensen, Steen Bach

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report the incidence of cancer in a cohort of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients treated 25 years previously. METHODS: 215 consecutive AIS patients treated between 1983 and 1990 were identified and requested to return for clinical and radiographic examination. The incidence...... of cancer was determined through chart review and follow-up interviews. Using the original radiographic log file that included patient position, mAs, kV and the total number of X-rays taken, a radiation physicist calculated the total radiation dose during treatment and follow-up adjusted for BMI and sex...

  5. Initial results of CyberKnife treatment for recurrent previously irradiated head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himei, Kengo; Katsui, Kuniaki; Yoshida, Atsushi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of CyberKnife for recurrent previously irradiated head and neck cancer. Thirty-one patients with recurrent previously irradiated head and neck cancer were treated with a CyberKnife from July 1999 to March 2002 at Okayama Kyokuto Hospital were retrospectively studied. The accumulated dose was 28-80 Gy (median 60 Gy). The interval between CyberKnife treatment and previous radiotherapy was 0.4-429.5 months (median 16.3 months). Primary lesions were nasopharynx: 7, maxillary sinus: 6, tongue: 5, ethmoid sinus: 3, and others: 1. The pathology was squamous cell carcinoma: 25, adenoid cystic carcinoma: 4, and others: 2. Symptoms were pain: 8, and nasal bleeding: 2. The prescribed dose was 15.0-40.3 Gy (median 32.3 Gy) as for the marginal dose. The response rate (complete response (CR)+partial response (PR)) and local control rate (CR+PR+no change (NC)) was 74% and 94% respectively. Pain disappeared for 4 cases, relief was obtained for 4 cases and no change for 2 cases and nasal bleeding disappeared for 2 cases for an improvement of symptoms. An adverse effects were observed as mucositis in 5 cases and neck swelling in one case. Prognosis of recurrent previously irradiated head and neck cancer was estimated as poor. Our early experience shows that CyberKnife is expected to be feasible treatment for recurrent previously irradiated head and neck cancer, and for the reduction adverse effects and maintenance of useful quality of life (QOL) for patients. (author)

  6. History of psychosis and previous episodes as potential explanatory factors for neurocognitive impairment in first-treatment bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmo, Christine; Lagerberg, Trine Vik; Aminoff, Sofie R; Hellvin, Tone; Kvitland, Levi R; Simonsen, Carmen; Andreassen, Ole A; Melle, Ingrid; Ueland, Torill

    2016-03-01

    Explanatory factors for the observed neurocognitive impairment in early-stage bipolar I disorder (BD-I) have received little attention. The current study investigated neurocognitive functioning in first-treatment (FT) BD-I compared to FT schizophrenia (SCZ), and healthy controls (HCs), and the effect of history of psychosis and previous episodes in the two clinical groups. A total of 202 FT patients with BD-I (n = 101) and SCZ spectrum disorder (n = 101), in addition to HCs (n = 101), were included. A comprehensive neurocognitive test battery was used to assess verbal learning and memory, executive functioning, processing speed, and attention and working memory. Neurocognitive functioning and the effect of history of psychosis and number of previous episodes were analyzed using separate multivariate analyses of variance and correlation analysis. FT patients with BD-I performed intermediately between FT SCZ spectrum patients and HCs on all measures. Compared to HCs, FT BD-I showed impaired functioning across all neurocognitive domains. No differences in neurocognitive functioning were observed in psychotic versus nonpsychotic FT patients with BD-I. With the exception of an association between number of manic episodes and two measures of executive function in FT BD-I, no associations were found between number of episodes and neurocognitive performance. Neurocognitive impairments were present in FT BD-I, and were not explained by history of psychosis or number of previous psychotic or depressive episodes. There were indications that executive function could be associated with number of previous manic episodes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Pertuzumab and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Locally Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  8. Relationships between lumbar flexibility, sit-and-reach test, and a previous history of low back discomfort in industrial workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Sylvain G; Russell, Caryl; McGill, Stuart M

    2003-04-01

    The sit-and-reach (S&R) test is often included in standard fitness tests (e.g., Canadian Physical Activity, Fitness and Lifestyle Appraisal [CPAFLA]), justified on the assumption that it is an indicator of low back health. Two issues were examined here: Is low back flexibility linked to having a history of low back disorders? And is the S&R test an indicator of low back flexibility? The relationship between S&R test scores, lumbar range of motion, and having a history of low back discomfort was examined in 72 asymptomatic (at test time) industrial workers (70 M, 2 F; mean age 35 ys; height 1.79 m; mass 84.7 kg). The S&R test, among many collected, was performed according to the CPAFLA guidelines. History of low back discomfort (LBD) was categorized based on whether or not time was lost from work. The S&R test was unable to distinguish between those with a history of LBD and those without. Specific lumbar sagittal range of motion could make this distinction. A moderate correlation (r = 0.42) surfaced between S&R and lumbar flexibility. This study suggests that the value of S&R as an indicator of previous back discomfort is questionable and there may be better indicators for inclusion in the CPAFLA.

  9. A Comparative Investigation of the Previous and New Secondary History Curriculum: The Issues of the Definition of the Aims and Objectives and the Selection of Curriculum Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinc, Erkan

    2011-01-01

    Discussions on history teaching in Turkey indicate that the previous versions of the history curriculum and the pedagogy of history in the country bear many problems and deficiencies. The problems of Turkish history curriculum mainly arise from the perspectives it takes and the selection of its content. Since 2003, there have been extensive…

  10. The relationship of colorectal cancer with familial history of gastrointestinal cancers and personal history of colon polyps in Khorramabad(2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    korosh Ghanadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of familial history of gastrointestinal cancers and personal history of colon polyps with colorectal cancer incidence in khorramabad in 2012. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 50 patients with definite diagnosis of colon cancer based on colonoscopy and pathology in 2012. The control group included 56 persons from outpatients without a history of gastrointestinal diseases admitted to the skin and eye clinics of shohada ashayer hospital, who were matched with the patients for age and gender. The two groups were studied in terms of familial history of gastrointestinal diseases in immediate relatives and personal history of colorectal polyps using a self-constructed questionnaire. Fisher exact test and odds ratio estimate was used for data analysis. Results: The mean age of the patients was 52.8±15.5 years old, and 56% were male. A significant relationship was found between familial history of gastric and colon cancers in immediate relatives and colorectal cancer incidence in the patients (p<0.05. The odds ratio estimate of colorectal cancer incidence in the individuals with a positive history of gastric cancer and colon cancers in immediate relatives were respectively 3.96(CI=1.44-6.61 and 6.75 (CI=2.4-11.1 times of the estimate in the control individuals. No significant relationship was found between a history of esophageal cancers in immediate relatives with colon cancer incidence in the patients (p=0.61. Moreover, a significant relationship was found between a history of colon polyps and colorectal cancer incidence (p=0.004. Conclusion: The results of the present study should be confirmed in the further studies with larger sample sizes, so that serious measures to control the cancer can be taken through developing comprehensive prevention programs based on screening.

  11. Prevalence of Depression and Associated Factors in Non-institutionalized Older Adults With a Previous History of Falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer-García, Begoña; Antón-Solanas, Isabel; Moreno-González, Sergio; Castro-Sánchez, Enrique; Juárez-Vela, Raúl

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this paper was to estimate the prevalence of depression and associated factors in people aged 65 or older with a history of falling in the last 12months. A cross-sectional descriptive study was performed involving a random sample of 213 participants from two social centers for older adults in the city of Zaragoza (Spain). The mean age of the participants was 77.3years (SD±7.0). Our findings reveal a prevalence of depression of 28.2% in the study sample, with older adults who were at a high risk of falling being more susceptible to developing depression. In conclusion, one in three elderly people who were at risk of suffering a fall in the 12months prior to data collection had symptoms of depression. This is in agreement with the results from previous studies, which confirm that there is a high prevalence of depression in elderly patients with a previous history of falls. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Changes in mammographic features of breast cancer; Comparison with previous films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Tadaharu; Hagiwara, Kei (Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer Detection Center (Japan)); Kimura, Kohzaburo; Kusama, Mikihiro

    1992-11-01

    Mammographic features of 87 breast cancer patients were studied in comparison with their previous survey films. Changes in the mammographic features included microcalcification (28 cases), tumor shadow (35 cases) and intratumorous microcalcifications (6 cases). Seven cases had several extremely high calcifications on the previous films, and three of six cases with clustered and scattered microcalcifications that extended over an entire breast quadrant had increased in number, density and extent. Eight cases in which clustered microcalcifications had increased in number, density and extent suggested a relationship between the increase in the extent of microcalcifications and length of time between visits. In most cases with tumor shadow, a slight localized increase in mammary gland density, irregular margins and strainghtened trabeculae were overlooked because of breast density. (author).

  13. Influence of previous breast surgery in sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Prior, V; Díaz-Expósito, R; Casáns Tormo, I

    The aim of this study was to review the feasibility of selective sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with previous surgery for breast cancer, as well as to examine the factors that may interfere with sentinel node detection. A retrospective review was performed on 91 patients with breast cancer and previous breast surgery, and who underwent sentinel lymph node biopsy. Patients were divided into two groups according to their previous treatment: aesthetic breast surgery in 30 patients (group I) and breast-conserving surgery in 61 (group II). Lymphoscintigraphy was performed after an intra-tumour injection in 21 cases and a peri-areolar injection in 70 cases. An analysis was made of lymphatic drainage patterns and overall sentinel node detection according to clinical, pathological and surgical variables. The overall detection of the sentinel lymph node in the lymphoscintigraphy was 92.3%, with 7.7% of extra-axillary drainages. The identification rate was similar after aesthetic breast surgery (93.3%) and breast-conserving surgery (91.8%). Sentinel lymph nodes were found in the contralateral axilla in two patients (2.2%), and they were included in the histopathology study. The non-identification rate in the lymphoscintigraphy was 7.7%. There was a significantly higher non-detection rate in the highest histological grade tumours (28.6% grade III, 4.5% grade I and 3.6% grade II). Sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with previous breast surgery is feasible and deserves further studies to assess the influence of different aspects in sentinel node detection in this clinical scenario. A high histological grade was significantly associated with a lower detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  14. Family History of Cancer in Relation to Breast Cancer Subtypes in African American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, Traci N; Rosenberg, Lynn; Castro-Webb, Nelsy; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Charlot, Marjory; Park, Song-Yi; Bandera, Elisa V; Troester, Melissa A; Ambrosone, Christine B; Palmer, Julie R

    2016-02-01

    The evidence on the relation of family history of cancers other than breast cancer to breast cancer risk is conflicting, and most studies have not assessed specific breast cancer subtypes. We assessed the relation of first-degree family history of breast, prostate, lung, colorectal, ovarian, and cervical cancer and lymphoma or leukemia, to the risk of estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)), ER(-), and triple-negative breast cancer in data from the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk Consortium. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to calculate ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI). There were 3,023 ER(+) and 1,497 ER(-) breast cancer cases (including 696 triple-negative cases) and 17,420 controls. First-degree family history of breast cancer was associated with increased risk of each subtype: OR = 1.76 (95% CI, 1.57-1.97) for ER(+), 1.67 (1.42-1.95) for ER(-), and 1.72 (1.38-2.13) for triple-negative breast cancer. Family history of cervical cancer was associated with increased risk of ER(-) (OR = 2.39; 95% CI, 1.36-4.20), but not ER(+) cancer. Family history of both breast and prostate cancer was associated with increased risk of ER(+) (3.40; 2.42-4.79) and ER(-) (2.09; 1.21-3.63) cancer, but family history of both breast and lung cancer was associated only with ER(-) cancer (2.11; 1.29-3.46). A family history of cancers other than breast may influence the risk of breast cancer, and associations may differ by subtype. Greater surveillance and counseling for additional screening may be warranted for women with a family history of cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Analysis of over 10,000 Cases finds no association between previously reported candidate polymorphisms and ovarian cancer outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Kristin L; Vierkant, Robert A; Fogarty, Zachary C

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death among women. In an effort to understand contributors to disease outcome, we evaluated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) previously associated with ovarian cancer recurrence or survival, specifically in angiogenesis, inflammation, mitosis...

  16. Prognostic significance of cancer family history for patients with gastric cancer: a single center experience from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaowen; Cai, Hong; Yu, Lin; Huang, Hua; Long, Ziwen; Wang, Yanong

    2016-06-14

    Family history of cancer is a risk factor for gastric cancer. In this study, we investigated the prognoses of gastric cancer patients with family history of cancer. A total of 1805 gastric cancer patients who underwent curative gastrectomy from 2000 to 2008 were evaluated. The clinicopathologic parameters and prognoses of gastric cancer patients with a positive family history (PFH) of cancer were compared with those with a negative family history (NFH). Of 1805 patients, 382 (21.2%) patients had a positive family history of cancer. Positive family history of cancer correlated with younger age, more frequent alcohol and tobacco use, worse differentiation, smaller tumor size, and more frequent tumor location in the lower 1/3 of the stomach. The prognoses of patients with a positive family history of cancer were better than that of patients with a negative family history. Family history of cancer independently correlated with better prognosis after curative gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients.

  17. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer as a Second Primary Among Patients With Previous Malignancy: Who Is at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Geena X; Nelson, Rebecca A; Kim, Jae Y; Raz, Dan J

    2017-09-01

    Patients with previous malignancies could be at increased risk of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the extent of the risk is unknown for many cancer types; thus, it is unclear who might benefit from screening. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data set from 1992 to 2012 was used to identify patients with previous malignancies who received a diagnosis of NSCLC ≥ 6 months after their initial cancer diagnosis. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for NSCLC were calculated as a ratio of the observed to expected cases adjusted by person-years at risk. Cancers with a SIR > 1.0 had a risk of NSCLC greater than expected. The analyses were stratified by sex, radiation therapy use, and histologic type. Among the cancer survivors, 32,058 developed NSCLC. Smoking-related (lung, head and neck, bladder) and hematologic malignancies, regardless of previous radiation therapy, had the greatest SIR for NSCLC (range, 1.97-4.88). Colorectal and renal cancer survivors also had an increased SIR for NSCLC (1.16 and 1.21, respectively). Women with previous pancreatic cancer treated with radiation, breast cancer with or without radiation therapy, and those with thyroid cancer demonstrated a greater SIR for lung adenocarcinoma. Men with previous irradiated prostate cancer also had an elevated SIR (1.08; 99% confidence interval, 1.01-1.15) for lung adenocarcinoma. Patients with melanoma, prostate or uterine cancer had a lower SIR for NSCLC than expected. Smoking-related malignancies had the greatest risk of NSCLC. Radiation therapy conferred an elevated risk of NSCLC for certain cancers. Melanoma, prostate, and uterine cancer survivors had a low risk of NSCLC. These results could help identify high-risk screening candidates in the growing population of cancer survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. History of uterine leiomyoma and risk of endometrial cancer in black women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Lauren A; Sponholtz, Todd R; Rosenberg, Lynn; Adams-Campbell, Lucile L; Kuohung, Wendy; LaValley, Michael P; Palmer, Julie R

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have found an association between uterine leiomyomata (UL) and uterine malignancies. This relation has not been studied in black women, who are disproportionately affected by UL. We investigated prospectively the association between self-reported physician-diagnosed UL and endometrial cancer in the Black Women's Health Study. During 1995-2013, 47,267 participants with intact uteri completed biennial health questionnaires. Reports of endometrial cancer were confirmed by pathology data from medical records and cancer registries. Cox regression was used to derive incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). There were 300 incident endometrial cancer cases during 689,546 person-years of follow-up. In multivariable models, UL history was associated with a 42% greater incidence of endometrial cancer compared with no such history (95% CI 1.12-1.80). IRRs for cancer diagnosed 0-2, 3-9, and ≥10 years after UL diagnosis were 3.20 (95% CI 2.06-4.98), 0.95 (95% CI 0.60-1.52), and 1.35 (95% CI 1.03-1.77), respectively. Stronger overall associations between UL history and endometrial cancer were observed for later stages at cancer diagnosis (IRR = 2.25, 95% CI 1.09-4.63) and type II/III cancers (IRR = 3.13, 95% CI 1.64-5.99). In this large cohort of black women, a history of UL was positively associated with endometrial cancer, particularly type II/III tumors. The strongest association was observed for cancer diagnosed within 2 years of UL diagnosis, a finding that might be explained by greater surveillance of women with UL or misdiagnosis of cancer as UL. However, an association was also observed for cancer reported ≥10 years after UL diagnosis.

  19. Peritoneal lymphomatosis confounded by prior history of colon cancer: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yun Gi; Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Sun Young; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Park, Weon Seo; Kwon, Youngmee; Kim, Min Ju; Kang, Jeehoon; Lee, Joo Myung

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract are frequently associated with peritoneal carcinomatosis. In contrast to that entity extensive involvement of the peritoneal cavity with malignant lymphoma is rare. This is the first case reporting coexistence of peritoneal lymphomatosis and a previous history of colon cancer, which is a highly challenging clinical situation. If not aware of this unusual condition medical history, radiologic finding and laboratory data alone can lead to wrong diagnosis as in this case

  20. Accuracy of family history of cancer : clinical genetic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, RH; Boonstra, AE; Reefhuis, J; Hordijk-Hos, JM; de Walle, HEK; Oosterwijk, JC; Cornel, MC

    Family medical history is the cornerstone of clinical genetic diagnosis and management in cases of familial cancer. The soundness of medical decisions can be compromised if reports by the family on affected relatives are inaccurate. Although very time consuming, family medical histories are

  1. History of uterine leiomyomata and incidence of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Lauren A; Radin, Rose G; Rosenberg, Lynn; Adams-Campbell, Lucile; Palmer, Julie R

    2015-10-01

    Uterine leiomyomata (UL), benign tumors of the myometrium, are influenced by sex steroid hormones. A history of UL diagnosis has been associated with a higher risk of uterine malignancies. The relation between UL and breast cancer, another hormonally responsive cancer, has not been studied. We investigated the association between self-reported physician-diagnosed UL and incidence of breast cancer in the Black Women's Health Study, a prospective cohort study. We followed 57,747 participants without a history of breast cancer from 1995 to 2013. UL diagnoses were reported at baseline and biennially. Breast cancer was reported on biennial questionnaires and confirmed by pathology data from medical records or cancer registries. Cox regression was used to derive incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) and adjust for potential confounders. There were 2,276 incident cases of breast cancer (1,699 invasive, 394 in situ, and 183 unknown) during 879,672 person-years of follow-up. The multivariable IRR for the overall association between history of UL and breast cancer incidence was 0.99 (95 % CI 0.90-1.08), with similar results for ER + (IRR = 1.03) and ER - breast cancer (IRR = 1.05). IRRs for early diagnosis of UL (before age 30) were slightly above 1.0, with IRRs of 1.14 (95 % CI 0.99-1.31) for overall breast cancer, 1.14 (95 % CI 0.93-1.40) for ER + breast cancer, and 1.20 (95 % CI 0.89-1.61) for ER - breast cancer. IRRs for early diagnosis of UL were elevated for breast cancer diagnosed before 40 years of age (IRR = 1.39, 95 % CI 0.97-1.99) and premenopausal breast cancer (IRR = 1.26, 95 % CI 1.01-1.58). No consistent patterns in risk were observed across estrogen receptor subtypes, and IRRs did not differ appreciably within strata of BMI, female hormone use, mammography recency, or family history of breast cancer. The present study of US black women suggests that a history of UL diagnosis is unrelated to the incidence of breast cancer overall. The

  2. Family history in breast cancer is not a prognostic factor?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobsen, J.J.; Meerwaldt, J.H.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if breast conservative treatment is justified for patients with a positive family history of breast cancer and to investigate whether they have a worse prognosis. We performed a prospective cohort study of breast cancer patients, treated with breast conservative

  3. Thyroid cancer: Natural history, management strategies and outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaha, Ashok R.

    1997-01-01

    Objectives: To understand the natural history of thyroid cancer and high risk groups; To define the biological behavior of thyroid cancer and relate it to various prognostic factors and risk groups; To divide the management strategies into conservation, radical surgery and radioactive iodine treatment; To define the role of external radiation therapy and the management of complex and advanced thyroid cancer; To analyze the results of management of anaplastic thyroid cancer and make a plea for combined modality treatment; To define the current role of genetic studies in medullary thyroid cancer. At the end of this refresher course, the attendees will be able to understand the natural history, the prognostic factors and risk groups and surgical and combined modality treatment in thyroid cancer

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging detection of prostate cancer in men with previous negative prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Matthew; Frye, Thomas P

    2017-06-01

    Use of transrectal ultrasound guided systematic prostate biopsy has poor diagnostic accuracy for prostate cancer (PCa) detection. Recently multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) of the prostate and MR/US fusion biopsy has been gaining popularity for men who have previously undergone a negative biopsy. We performed PubMed ® and Web of Science ® searches to identify studies on this subject, particularly focusing on studies consisting of patients who have had at least one previously negative biopsy. Across the literature, when a suspicious lesion is found on mpMRI, MR/US fusion biopsy has consistently demonstrated higher detection rate for any PCa and clinically significant PCa (csPCa) compared to the traditional repeat systematic biopsy (SB) approach. Furthermore, anteriorly located tumors are frequently identified using MR targeted biopsy (TB), suggesting that an MR guided approach allows for increased accuracy for detecting tumors commonly missed by systematic biopsies. We conclude that men with a prior negative biopsy and continued suspicion of PCa should strongly be encouraged to get a prostate mpMRI prior to a repeat biopsy.

  5. Bevacizumab, Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-21

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Cervical Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  6. relationship between family history of breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2013-07-02

    Jul 2, 2013 ... Moreover, familial breast cancer patients present especially progesterone receptor-negative tumors (P=0.0380). CONCLUSIONS: Our initial significant findings show that familial breast cancer seems to affect young women and tends to present high Scarff-Bloom-Richardson grade tumors with lymph node.

  7. Phenomenological Characteristics of Autobiographical Memories: Responsiveness to an Induced Negative Mood State in Those With and Without a Previous History of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Andrew E P

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the relative accessibility of phenomenological characteristics in autobiographical memories of 104 students with and without a previous history of a depression. Participants recalled personal events that were elicited with cue words and then asked to rate these personal events for a number of phenomenological characteristics. The characteristics were typicality, rumination, valence, importance of others, expectancy, desirability, and personal importance. The effects of previous history of depression (without history or with previous history of depression) and self-reported mood (pre- and post-negative mood induction) on autobiographical recall was examined by employing a mixed factor design. Self-reported mood was measured as a manipulation check, before and after Mood Induction Procedure. Typicality, rumination and personal importance showed significant interaction effects in those with a history of depression. Ordinal regression supported the finding that those with a history of depression had a higher chance of typicality and personal importance than those without a history of depression. The results indicate that recall of autobiographical characteristics is in part dependent on induced negative mood state and on previous history of depression. The findings may prompt future research into targeted interventions that reduce individual tendencies for heightened cognitive reactivity in negative mood states for those with a history of depression.

  8. Natural history of breast cancers detected in the Swedish mammography screening programme: a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahl, Per-Henrik; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Mæhlen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The natural history of screen-detected breast cancers is not well understood. A previous analysis of the incidence change during the introduction of the Norwegian screening programme in the late 1990s suggested that the natural history of many screen-detected invasive breast cancers is to regress...... spontaneously but the study was possibly confounded by use of hormone replacement therapy in the population. We did a similar analysis of data collected during an earlier period when few women were exposed to hormone replacement therapy....

  9. Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in elderly patients with previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer: single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocvirk, Janja; Moltara, Maja Ebert; Mesti, Tanja; Boc, Marko; Rebersek, Martina; Volk, Neva; Benedik, Jernej; Hlebanja, Zvezdana

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is mainly a disease of elderly, however, geriatric population is underrepresented in clinical trials. Patient registries represent a tool to assess and follow treatment outcomes in this patient population. The aim of the study was with the help of the patients’ register to determine the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in elderly patients who had previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer. The registry of patients with mCRC was designed to prospectively evaluate the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy as well as selection of patients in routine clinical practice. Patient baseline clinical characteristics, pre-specified bevacizumab-related adverse events, and efficacy data were collected, evaluated and compared according to the age categories. Between January 2008 and December 2010, 210 patients with mCRC (median age 63, male 61.4%) started bevacizumab-containing therapy in the 1 st line setting. Majority of the 210 patients received irinotecan-based chemotherapy (68%) as 1 st line treatment and 105 patients (50%) received bevacizumab maintenance therapy. Elderly (≥ 70 years) patients presented 22.9% of all patients and they had worse performance status (PS 1/2, 62.4%) than patients in < 70 years group (PS 1/2, 35.8%). Difference in disease control rate was mainly due to inability to assess response in elderly group (64.6% in elderly and 77.8% in < 70 years group, p = 0.066). The median progression free survival was 10.2 (95% CI, 6.7–16.2) and 11.3 (95% CI, 10.2–12.6) months in elderly and < 70 years group, respectively (p = 0.58). The median overall survival was 18.5 (95% CI, 12.4–28.9) and 27.4 (95% CI, 22.7–31.9) months for elderly and < 70 years group, respectively (p = 0.03). Three-year survival rate was 26% and 37.6% in elderly vs. < 70 years group (p = 0.03). Overall rates of bevacizumab-related adverse events were similar in both groups: proteinuria 21

  10. Intraoperative irradiation for locally recurrent colorectal cancer in previously irradiated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddock, M.G.; Gunderson, L.L.; Nelson, H.; Cha, S.; Devine, R.M.; Dozois, R.R.; Wolff, B.G.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Little information exists in the literature on salvage treatment for patients with pelvic recurrences of colorectal cancer who have previously received high dose radiation therapy (RT). A retrospective review of such patients treated aggressively with surgical resection and intraoperative electrons (IOERT) was undertaken. Material and Methods: From 1981 through 1994, 52 previously irradiated patients with recurrent locally advanced colorectal cancer without evidence of distant metastatic disease were treated with surgical resection and intraoperative electrons (IOERT) ± additional external beam RT. Every attempt was made to achieve a gross total resection prior to IOERT if it could be safely accomplished. IOERT doses ranged from 1000-3000 cGy with a median of 2000 cGy. 37 patients received additional external beam radiotherapy either pre- or post-operatively with doses ranging from 500-5040 cGy (median 2520 cGy). 20 patients received 5FU ± leukovorin during external beam RT. Three patients received 5FU+leukovorin after completion of RT. Results: 31 males and 21 females with a median age of 55 years (range 31-73 years) were treated. 71% of patients have been followed until death or for > 2 years. The median, 2-year and 5-year actuarial overall survival is 23 months, 48% and 13%, respectively. Actuarial central disease control (IOERT field) at 2 and 4 years is 72 and 57%; pelvic control at 2 and 4 years is 60 and 34%. Pelvic control rates are better in patients who received ≥ 3000 cGy external beam RT in addition to IOERT as compared to patients who received no external beam RT or < 3000 cGy, with 2 year pelvic control rates of 81% vs. 54%. 25 patients have developed distant metastases. The actuarial rate of appearance of distant metastatic disease at 2 and 4 years is 60 and 80%. Late complications attributable to IOERT include neuropathies in 13 patients (5 mild, 5 moderate, 3 severe) and narrowing or obstruction of the ureter in four patients

  11. Intraoperative irradiation for locally recurrent colorectal cancer in previously irradiated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddock, Michael G.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Nelson, Heidi; Cha, Stephen S.; Devine, Richard M.; Dozois, Roger R.; Wolff, Bruce G.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Information in the literature regarding salvage treatment for patients with locally recurrent colorectal cancer who have previously been treated with high or moderate dose external beam irradiation (EBRT) is scarce. A retrospective review was therefore performed in our institution to determine disease control, survival, and tolerance in patients treated aggressively with surgical resection and intraoperative electron irradiation (IOERT) ± additional EBRT and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1981 through 1994, 51 previously irradiated patients with recurrent locally advanced colorectal cancer without evidence of distant metastatic disease were treated at Mayo Clinic Rochester with surgical resection and IOERT ± additional EBRT. An attempt was made to achieve a gross total resection before IOERT if it could be safely accomplished. The median IOERT dose was 20 Gy (range, 10-30 Gy). Thirty-seven patients received additional EBRT either pre- or postoperatively with doses ranging from 5 to 50.4 Gy (median 25.2 Gy). Twenty patients received 5-fluorouracil ± leucovorin during EBRT. Three patients received additional cycles of 5-fluorouracil ± leucovorin as maintenance chemotherapy. Results: Thirty males and 21 females with a median age of 55 years (range 31-73 years) were treated. Thirty-four patients have died; the median follow-up in surviving patients is 21 months. The median, 2-yr, and 5-yr actuarial overall survivals are 23 months, 48% and 12%, respectively. The 2-yr actuarial central control (within IOERT field) is 72%. Local control at 2 years has been maintained in 60% of patients. There is a trend toward improved local control in patients who received ≥30 Gy EBRT in addition to IOERT as compared to those who received no EBRT or <30 Gy with 2-yr local control rates of 81% vs. 54%. Distant metastatic disease has developed in 25 patients, and the actuarial rate of distant progression at 2 and 4 years is 56% and 76%, respectively. Peripheral

  12. Case-control study for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility in EPICOLON: previously identified variants and mucins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abulí, Anna; Morillas, Juan D; Rigau, Joaquim; Latorre, Mercedes; Fernández-Bañares, Fernando; Peña, Elena; Riestra, Sabino; Payá, Artemio; Jover, Rodrigo; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Villanueva, Cristina M; Moreno, Victor; Piqué, Josep M; Carracedo, Angel; Castells, Antoni; Andreu, Montserrat; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Alonso-Espinaco, Virginia; Muñoz, Jenifer; Gonzalo, Victoria; Bessa, Xavier; González, Dolors; Clofent, Joan; Cubiella, Joaquin

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Familial aggregation in CRC is also important outside syndromic forms and, in this case, a polygenic model with several common low-penetrance alleles contributing to CRC genetic predisposition could be hypothesized. Mucins and GALNTs (N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase) are interesting candidates for CRC genetic susceptibility and have not been previously evaluated. We present results for ten genetic variants linked to CRC risk in previous studies (previously identified category) and 18 selected variants from the mucin gene family in a case-control association study from the Spanish EPICOLON consortium. CRC cases and matched controls were from EPICOLON, a prospective, multicenter, nationwide Spanish initiative, comprised of two independent stages. Stage 1 corresponded to 515 CRC cases and 515 controls, whereas stage 2 consisted of 901 CRC cases and 909 controls. Also, an independent cohort of 549 CRC cases and 599 controls outside EPICOLON was available for additional replication. Genotyping was performed for ten previously identified SNPs in ADH1C, APC, CCDN1, IL6, IL8, IRS1, MTHFR, PPARG, VDR and ARL11, and 18 selected variants in the mucin gene family. None of the 28 SNPs analyzed in our study was found to be associated with CRC risk. Although four SNPs were significant with a P-value < 0.05 in EPICOLON stage 1 [rs698 in ADH1C (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.06-2.50, P-value = 0.02, recessive), rs1800795 in IL6 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.10-2.37, P-value = 0.01, recessive), rs3803185 in ARL11 (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.17-2.15, P-value = 0.007, codominant), and rs2102302 in GALNTL2 (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.00-1.44, P-value = 0.04, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles], only rs3803185 achieved statistical significance in EPICOLON stage 2 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.06-1.69, P-value = 0.01, recessive). In the joint analysis for both stages, results were only significant for rs3803185 (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1

  13. Case-control study for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility in EPICOLON: previously identified variants and mucins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno Victor

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Familial aggregation in CRC is also important outside syndromic forms and, in this case, a polygenic model with several common low-penetrance alleles contributing to CRC genetic predisposition could be hypothesized. Mucins and GALNTs (N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase are interesting candidates for CRC genetic susceptibility and have not been previously evaluated. We present results for ten genetic variants linked to CRC risk in previous studies (previously identified category and 18 selected variants from the mucin gene family in a case-control association study from the Spanish EPICOLON consortium. Methods CRC cases and matched controls were from EPICOLON, a prospective, multicenter, nationwide Spanish initiative, comprised of two independent stages. Stage 1 corresponded to 515 CRC cases and 515 controls, whereas stage 2 consisted of 901 CRC cases and 909 controls. Also, an independent cohort of 549 CRC cases and 599 controls outside EPICOLON was available for additional replication. Genotyping was performed for ten previously identified SNPs in ADH1C, APC, CCDN1, IL6, IL8, IRS1, MTHFR, PPARG, VDR and ARL11, and 18 selected variants in the mucin gene family. Results None of the 28 SNPs analyzed in our study was found to be associated with CRC risk. Although four SNPs were significant with a P-value ADH1C (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.06-2.50, P-value = 0.02, recessive, rs1800795 in IL6 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.10-2.37, P-value = 0.01, recessive, rs3803185 in ARL11 (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.17-2.15, P-value = 0.007, codominant, and rs2102302 in GALNTL2 (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.00-1.44, P-value = 0.04, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles], only rs3803185 achieved statistical significance in EPICOLON stage 2 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.06-1.69, P-value = 0.01, recessive. In the joint analysis for both stages, results were only significant for rs3803185 (OR = 1

  14. Aflibercept and FOLFOX6 Treatment for Previously Untreated Stage IV Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-03

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  15. Effect of fasting on 24-h blood pressure values of individuals with no previous history of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seker, Ayse; Demirci, Hakan; Ocakoglu, Gokhan; Aydin, Ufuk; Ucar, Hakan; Yildiz, Gursel; Yaman, Ozen

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to analyze the difference in 24-h blood pressure values during Ramadan of fasting and nonfasting individuals with no previous history of hypertension. This study was planned as a multicenter research study in the cities of Izmit, Zonguldak, Sivas, and Adana. The percentage changes in the blood pressure of the patients were calculated from their blood pressure measurements at 0 h while they were resting. A Food Frequency Questionnaire was filled out by all participants. Forty patients were included in the fasting group and 55 patients were included in the nonfasting group in the study. There was a difference between the two groups in percent changes of systolic measurements performed at the 4th (5% difference and P=0.020), 13th (6% difference and P=0.015), 14th (10% difference and P=0.017), 18th (9% difference and P=0.027), 19th (9% difference and P=0.020), and 20th (6% difference and P=0.014) hours with respect to the baseline measurement at the 0 h. There was a difference between the fasting and nonfasting groups in the Fasting Food Questionnaire results. Meat consumption was significantly higher in the fasting group. A systolic blood pressure increase in fasting patients was observed in measurements at 18:00, 19:00, and 20:00 h. We believe that an increase of more than 10% in blood pressure at the time of iftar is an important result of our study in terms of the meal preferences of the individuals under risk.

  16. Child-Bearing Decision Making Among Women Previously Treated for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    after breast cancer. Cancer Pract, 2, 407-413. 10. Dow KH, Harris JR, Callista Roy . (1994). Pregnancy after breast-conserving surgery and radiation...another report [Dow, Harris and Roy , 1994], 23 women who had had a pregnancy following breast cancer and 4 who subsequently adopted a child were...Cancer Practice, 2, 407-413. Dow, K.H., Harris, J.R., & Callista , R. (1994). Pregnancy after breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy for breast

  17. Space-time clusters of breast cancer using residential histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Rikke Baastrup; Meliker, Jaymie R; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

    2014-01-01

    cancer existed in space and time in Denmark, using 33 years of residential histories. METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study of 3138 female cases from the Danish Cancer Registry, diagnosed with breast cancer in 2003 and two independent control groups of 3138 women each, randomly...... selected from the Civil Registration System. Residential addresses of cases and controls from 1971 to 2003 were collected from the Civil Registration System and geo-coded. Q-statistics were used to identify space-time clusters of breast cancer. All analyses were carried out with both control groups...

  18. Towards cancer-aware life-history modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokko, Hanna; Hochberg, Michael E

    2015-07-19

    Studies of body size evolution, and life-history theory in general, are conducted without taking into account cancer as a factor that can end an organism's reproductive lifespan. This reflects a tacit assumption that predation, parasitism and starvation are of overriding importance in the wild. We argue here that even if deaths directly attributable to cancer are a rarity in studies of natural populations, it remains incorrect to infer that cancer has not been of importance in shaping observed life histories. We present first steps towards a cancer-aware life-history theory, by quantifying the decrease in the length of the expected reproductively active lifespan that follows from an attempt to grow larger than conspecific competitors. If all else is equal, a larger organism is more likely to develop cancer, but, importantly, many factors are unlikely to be equal. Variations in extrinsic mortality as well as in the pace of life--larger organisms are often near the slow end of the fast-slow life-history continuum--can make realized cancer incidences more equal across species than what would be observed in the absence of adaptive responses to cancer risk (alleviating the so-called Peto's paradox). We also discuss reasons why patterns across species can differ from within-species predictions. Even if natural selection diminishes cancer susceptibility differences between species, within-species differences can remain. In many sexually dimorphic cases, we predict males to be more cancer-prone than females, forming an understudied component of sexual conflict.

  19. Colorectal cancer presenting as tuboovarian abscess in a 40 year old patient with previous tubal occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Anderson

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Tuboovarian abscess is rare after tubal occlusion. These patients should be evaluated specifically for nongynecologic etiology, including colorectal cancer. Radiologic studies can be misleading, and surgical exploration should be strongly considered if a woman with a history of tubal occlusion presents with a presumptive tuboovarian abscess, particularly if the abscess contains air.

  20. Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... given diethylstilbestrol (DES) during pregnancy. British Journal of Cancer 2001; 84(1):126–133. [PubMed Abstract] Hoover RN, Hyer M, Pfeiffer RM, et al. Adverse health outcomes in women exposed in utero to diethylstilbestrol. New England Journal of Medicine 2011; ...

  1. History of thyroid disease and survival of ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minlikeeva, Albina N; Freudenheim, Jo L; Cannioto, Rikki A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Findings from in vitro studies suggest that increased exposure to thyroid hormones can influence progression of ovarian tumours. However, epidemiologic evidence on this topic is limited. METHODS: We pooled data from 11 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. Using......=624 cases) and mortality (HR=1.16; 95% CI=1.03-1.31). Neither duration of hypothyroidism nor use of thyroid medications was associated with survival. CONCLUSIONS: In this large study of women with ovarian cancer, we found that recent history of hyperthyroidism and overall history of hypothyroidism...

  2. PREGNANCY IN WOMEN WITH A HISTORY OF BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Parokonnaya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The study has demonstrated that medical abortion in women with a history of breast cancer is not justified as a medical intervention in further pregnancy. After 2 years of the termination of treatment, there may be procreation in a patient with early cancer, a good prognosis, and an active wish to have a baby. At the same time, the patient should undergo a complete examination, involving a geneticist's counseling.

  3. Analysis of Over 10,000 Cases Finds No Association between Previously-Reported Candidate Polymorphisms and Ovarian Cancer Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kristin L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Fogarty, Zachary C.; Charbonneau, Bridget; Block, Matthew S.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Rossing, Mary Anne; Cramer, Daniel W.; Pearce, C. Leigh; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Menon, Usha; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Levine, Douglas A.; Gronwald, Jacek; Culver, Hoda Anton; Whittemore, Alice S.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lambrechts, Diether; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bandera, Elisa V.; Hogdall, Estrid; Heitz, Florian; Kaye, Stanley B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Campbell, Ian; Goodman, Marc T.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Lurie, Galina; Eccles, Diana; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Flanagan, James; Harter, Philipp; du Bois, Andreas; Schwaab, Ira; Hogdall, Claus K.; Lundvall, Lene; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Paddock, Lisa E.; Rudolph, Anja; Eilber, Ursula; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Ziolkowska-Seta, Izabela; Brinton, Louise; Yang, Hannah; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Despierre, Evelyn; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lubiński, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Menkiszak, Janusz; Jensen, Allan; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Berchuck, Andrew; Wu, Anna H.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Terry, Kathryn L.; Vitonis, Allison F.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Johnatty, Sharon; deFazio, Anna; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan; Sellers, Thomas A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Goode, Ellen L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death among women. In an effort to understand contributors to disease outcome, we evaluated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously associated with ovarian cancer recurrence or survival, specifically in angiogenesis, inflammation, mitosis, and drug disposition genes. Methods Twenty-seven SNPs in VHL, HGF, IL18, PRKACB, ABCB1, CYP2C8, ERCC2, and ERCC1 previously associated with ovarian cancer outcome were genotyped in 10,084 invasive cases from 28 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium with over 37,000 observed person-years and 4,478 deaths. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association between candidate SNPs and ovarian cancer recurrence or survival with and without adjustment for key covariates. Results We observed no association between genotype and ovarian cancer recurrence or survival for any of the SNPs examined. Conclusions These results refute prior associations between these SNPs and ovarian cancer outcome and underscore the importance of maximally powered genetic association studies. Impact These variants should not be used in prognostic models. Alternate approaches to uncovering inherited prognostic factors, if they exist, are needed. PMID:23513043

  4. Analysis of over 10,000 Cases finds no association between previously reported candidate polymorphisms and ovarian cancer outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kristin L; Vierkant, Robert A; Fogarty, Zachary C; Charbonneau, Bridget; Block, Matthew S; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Rossing, Mary Anne; Cramer, Daniel W; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Menon, Usha; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Levine, Douglas A; Gronwald, Jacek; Culver, Hoda Anton; Whittemore, Alice S; Karlan, Beth Y; Lambrechts, Diether; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bandera, Elisa V; Hogdall, Estrid; Heitz, Florian; Kaye, Stanley B; Fasching, Peter A; Campbell, Ian; Goodman, Marc T; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Lurie, Galina; Eccles, Diana; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Flanagan, James M; Harter, Philipp; du Bois, Andreas; Schwaab, Ira; Hogdall, Claus K; Lundvall, Lene; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Paddock, Lisa E; Rudolph, Anja; Eilber, Ursula; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Ziolkowska-Seta, Izabela; Brinton, Louise; Yang, Hannah; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Despierre, Evelyn; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lubinski, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Menkiszak, Janusz; Jensen, Allan; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Berchuck, Andrew; Wu, Anna H; Pike, Malcolm C; Van Denberg, David; Terry, Kathryn L; Vitonis, Allison F; Doherty, Jennifer A; Johnatty, Sharon E; Defazio, Anna; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan; Sellers, Thomas A; Phelan, Catherine M; Kalli, Kimberly R; Cunningham, Julie M; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L

    2013-05-01

    Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death among women. In an effort to understand contributors to disease outcome, we evaluated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) previously associated with ovarian cancer recurrence or survival, specifically in angiogenesis, inflammation, mitosis, and drug disposition genes. Twenty-seven SNPs in VHL, HGF, IL18, PRKACB, ABCB1, CYP2C8, ERCC2, and ERCC1 previously associated with ovarian cancer outcome were genotyped in 10,084 invasive cases from 28 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium with over 37,000-observed person-years and 4,478 deaths. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association between candidate SNPs and ovarian cancer recurrence or survival with and without adjustment for key covariates. We observed no association between genotype and ovarian cancer recurrence or survival for any of the SNPs examined. These results refute prior associations between these SNPs and ovarian cancer outcome and underscore the importance of maximally powered genetic association studies. These variants should not be used in prognostic models. Alternate approaches to uncovering inherited prognostic factors, if they exist, are needed.

  5. History of allergy and reduced incidence of colorectal cancer, Iowa Women's Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prizment, Anna E; Folsom, Aaron R; Cerhan, James R; Flood, Andrew; Ross, Julie A; Anderson, Kristin E

    2007-11-01

    Previous epidemiologic studies have reported that a history of allergy is associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer and other malignancies. We studied the association between allergy history and incident colorectal cancer (n=410) prospectively in 21,292 Iowa women followed for 8 years. Allergy was defined from four self-reported questions about physician-diagnosed asthma (a), hay fever (b), eczema or allergy of the skin (c), and other allergic conditions (d). A history of any allergy was inversely associated with incident colorectal cancer: after multivariate adjustment, the hazard ratio (HR) was 0.74 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.59-0.94]. Compared with women with no allergy, women reporting only one of the four types of allergy and women reporting two or more types had HRs of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.56-1.01) and 0.58 (95% CI, 0.37-0.90), respectively (P trend=0.02). The inverse association persisted in analyses restricted to any type of nonasthmatic allergy (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.56-0.95). HRs were similar for rectal and colon cancers as well as for colon subsites: proximal and distal (HRs for any allergy ranged from 0.63 to 0.78 across these end points). Allergy history, which may reflect enhanced immunosurveillance, is associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer.

  6. The Natural History of Juvenile or Subacute GM2 Gangliosidosis: 21 New Cases and Literature Review of 134 Previously Reported

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maegawa, Gustavo H. B.; Stockley, Tracy; Tropak, Michael; Banwell, Brenda; Blaser, Susan; Kok, Fernando; Giugliani, Roberto; Mahuran, Don; Clarke, Joe T. R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Juvenile GM2 gangliosidosis is a group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases caused by deficiency of lysosomal β-hexosaminidase resulting in GM2 ganglioside accumulation in brain. The purpose of this study was to delineate the natural history of the condition and identify genotype-phenotype correlations that might be helpful in predicting the course of the disease in individual patients. METHODS A cohort of 21 patients with juvenile GM2 gangliosidosis, 15 with the Tay-Sachs variant and 6 with the Sandhoff variant, was studied prospectively in 2 centers. Our experience was compared with previously published reports on 134 patients. Information about clinical features, β-hexosaminidase enzyme activity, and mutation analysis was collected. RESULTS In our cohort of patients, the mean (±SD) age of onset of symptoms was 5.3 ± 4.1 years, with a mean follow-up time of 8.4 years. The most common symptoms at onset were gait disturbances (66.7%), incoordination (52.4%), speech problems (28.6%), and developmental delay (28.6%). The age of onset of gait disturbances was 7.1 ± 5.6 years. The mean time for progression to becoming wheelchair-bound was 6.2 ± 5.5 years. The mean age of onset of speech problems was 7.0 ± 5.6 years, with a mean time of progression to anarthria of 5.6 ± 5.3 years. Muscle wasting (10.6 ± 7.4 years), proximal weakness (11.1 ± 7.7 years), and incontinence of sphincters (14.6 ± 9.7 years) appeared later in the course of the disease. Psychiatric disturbances and neuropathy were more prevalent in patients with the Sandhoff variant than in those with the Tay-Sachs variant. However, dysphagia, sphincter incontinence, and sleep problems occurred earlier in those with the Tay-Sachs variant. Cerebellar atrophy was the most common finding on brain MRI (52.9%). The median survival time among the studied and reviewed patients was 14.5 years. The genotype-phenotype correlation revealed that in patients with the Tay-Sachs variant, the presence

  7. Analyzing recurrent events when the history of previous episodes is unknown or not taken into account: proceed with caution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Navarro

    2017-05-01

    Conclusions: Common-baseline hazard models cannot be recommended when we analyse recurrent events in the presence of event dependence. It is important to have access to the history of prior-episodes per subject, it can permit to obtain better estimations of the effects of the exposures

  8. Binge Drinking and Rape: A Prospective Examination of College Women with a History of Previous Sexual Victimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Jenna L.; Calhoun, Karen S.; Gidycz, Christine A.

    2010-01-01

    The current study prospectively examined the longitudinal relationships between binge drinking behavior and rape experiences among a multisite sample of college women with a history of prior attempted or completed rape (N = 228). Rates of binge drinking among this high-risk sample were high. Prospective analyses indicated that binge drinking…

  9. History of periodontal disease diagnosis and lung cancer incidence in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Xiaodan; LaMonte, Michael J; Hovey, Kathleen M; Nwizu, Ngozi; Freudenheim, Jo L; Tezal, Mine; Scannapieco, Frank; Hyland, Andrew; Andrews, Christopher A; Genco, Robert J; Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    2014-08-01

    While some evidence suggests that periodontal disease (PD) might be positively associated with lung cancer, prospective studies in women are limited. Previous findings may reflect residual confounding by smoking. The study aims to determine whether history of PD diagnosis is associated with incident lung cancer in a large cohort of postmenopausal women. Prospective analyses were conducted in a cohort of 77,485 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. History of PD (prevalence of 26.1 %) was self-reported, and 754 incident lung cancer cases occurred during an average 6.8 (SD ± 2.6) years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Overall, PD was positively associated with lung cancer risk after adjusting for detailed smoking history including smoking status and pack-years of smoking (HR 1.24, 95 % CI 1.07-1.45). There was a positive additive interaction between PD with pack-years of smoking (p = 0.02), suggesting a potential synergistic effect between PD and smoking intensity on lung cancer. The association between PD and lung cancer was stronger in former smokers. When restricted to never-smokers, PD was not associated with lung cancer (HR 1.02, 95 % CI 0.68-1.53). Periodontal disease was not independently associated with lung cancer in non-smoking postmenopausal women. However, smoking and PD jointly increased lung cancer risk beyond that expected from the sum of the each effect separately. The potential synergism between PD and smoking on lung cancer warrants further examination.

  10. Long-Term Risk for Noncervical Anogenital Cancer in Women with Previously Diagnosed High-Grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Freja Lærke; Munk, Christian; Jensen, Signe Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background: High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is essential for developing high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2 and CIN3) and has also been associated with noncervical anogenital cancers. However, limited knowledge exists about the long-term risk for anal, vulvar, and vaginal...... risks for subsequent anal, vulvar, and vaginal cancer than women with no such history. The relative risks were higher for CIN3 than CIN2.Noexcess risk was found for rectal cancer. Analyses in which time since first CIN3 was taken into account showed increased relative risks for anal [HR = 4.8; 95......% confidence interval (CI), 3.3-7.0], vulvar (HR = 3.2; 95% CI, 2.0-5.3), and vaginal (HR = 5.5; 95% CI, 2.4-12.3) cancers ≥25 years after CIN3 diagnosis. Conclusion: Women with a history of CIN2 or CIN3 have a long-term increased relative risk for developing anal, vulvar, and vaginal cancer due to an impaired...

  11. Nutrient-based dietary patterns, family history, and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turati, Federica; Edefonti, Valeria; Bravi, Francesca; Ferraroni, Monica; Franceschi, Silvia; La Vecchia, Carlo; Montella, Maurizio; Talamini, Renato; Decarli, Adriano

    2011-11-01

    The effect of dietary habits on colorectal cancer (CRC) risk may be modified by a family history of CRC. We analyzed data from an Italian case-control study, including 1953 CRC cases and 4154 controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for combined categories of family history and tertiles of two a posteriori dietary patterns were derived using multiple logistic regression models. Compared with individuals without family history and in the lowest tertile category of the 'starch-rich' pattern, the ORs of CRC were 1.38 (95% CI: 1.19-1.61) for the group without family history and in the highest tertile, 2.89 (95% CI: 2.30-3.64) for the one with family history and in the lowest tertile, and 4.00 (95% CI: 3.03-5.27) for the one with family history and in the highest tertile. Compared with individuals without family history and in the highest tertile of the 'vitamins and fiber' pattern, the ORs were 1.29 (95% CI: 1.12-1.48) for the group without family history and in the lowest tertile, 2.89 (95% CI: 2.30-3.64) for the one with family history and in the highest tertile, and 3.74 (95% CI: 2.85-4.91) for the one with family history and in the lowest tertile. Family history of CRC and 'starch-rich' or 'vitamins and fiber' patterns has an independent effect on CRC risk in our population. However, as having a family history plausibly implies shared environmental and/or genetic risk factors, our results could not exclude that dietary habits can modify genetic susceptibility to CRC.

  12. Completeness of pedigree and family cancer history for ovarian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Yedong; Lim, Myong Cheol; Seo, Sang Soo; Kang, Sokbom; Park, Sang Yoon

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the completeness of pedigree and of number of pedigree analysis to know the acceptable familial history in Korean women with ovarian cancer. Interview was conducted in 50 ovarian cancer patients for obtaining familial history three times over the 6 weeks. The completeness of pedigree is estimated in terms of familial history of disease (cancer), health status (health living, disease and death), and onset age of disease and death. The completion of pedigree was 79.3, 85.1, and 85.6% at the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd time of interview and the time for pedigree analysis was 34.3, 10.8, and 3.1 minutes, respectively. The factors limiting pedigree analysis were as follows: out of contact with their relatives (38%), no living ancestors who know the family history (34%), dispersed family member because of the Korean War (16%), unknown cause of death (12%), reluctance to ask medical history of relatives (10%), and concealing their ovarian cancer (10%). The percentage of cancers revealed in 1st (2%) and 2nd degree (8%) relatives were increasing through surveys, especially colorectal cancer related with Lynch syndrome (4%). Analysis of pedigree at least two times is acceptable in Korean woman with ovarian cancer from the first study. The completion of pedigree is increasing, while time to take family history is decreasing during three time survey.

  13. Open comparative trial of formestane versus megestrol acetate in postmenopausal patients with advanced breast cancer previously treated with tamoxifen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freue, M; Kjaer, M; Boni, C; Joliver, J; Janicke, F; Willemse, PHB; Coombes, RC; Van Belle, S; Perez-Carrion, R; Zieschang, J; de Palacios, PI; Rose, C

    The aim of the trial was to compare efficacy and safety of the aromatase inhibitor formestane (250 mg i.m. given every 2 weeks) with the progestin megestrol acetate (160 mg administered orally once daily), as second-line therapy in postmenopausal patients with advanced breast cancer previously

  14. Birth outcome in women with previously treated breast cancer--a population-based cohort study from Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Dalberg

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Data on birth outcome and offspring health after the appearance of breast cancer are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of adverse birth outcomes in women previously treated for invasive breast cancer compared with the general population of mothers.Of all 2,870,932 singleton births registered in the Swedish Medical Birth Registry during 1973-2002, 331 first births following breast cancer surgery--with a mean time to pregnancy of 37 mo (range 7-163--were identified using linkage with the Swedish Cancer Registry. Logistic regression analysis was used. The estimates were adjusted for maternal age, parity, and year of delivery. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to estimate infant health and mortality, delivery complications, the risk of preterm birth, and the rates of instrumental delivery and cesarean section. The large majority of births from women previously treated for breast cancer had no adverse events. However, births by women exposed to breast cancer were associated with an increased risk of delivery complications (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.2-1.9, cesarean section (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.7, very preterm birth (<32 wk (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.7-6.0, and low birth weight (<1500 g (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.4-5.8. A tendency towards an increased risk of malformations among the infants was seen especially in the later time period (1988-2002 (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.7.It is reassuring that births overall were without adverse events, but our findings indicate that pregnancies in previously treated breast cancer patients should possibly be regarded as higher risk pregnancies, with consequences for their surveillance and management.

  15. NATURAL HISTORY OF THERAPEUTIC MANAGEMENT IN ORAL CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    S C Mohapatra; V K Srivastava; P Mohapatra; J NP Gupta; J Tandon

    1995-01-01

    The natural history of a diseases is greatly influenced by the course of therapeutic management. Just after the tissue stage of the disease is aver. The cure rate of diseases, particularly those of cancers, could probably be modified to a greater extent, if the natural history of the therapeutic manage­ment is understood properly, so that the community education programme be organised in the proper direction, to trigger early diagnosis. Home remedy urn the first preference of 76.8% of oral ca...

  16. Are previous episodes of bacterial vaginosis a predictor for vaginal symptoms in breast cancer patients treated with aromatase inhibitors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Malene R; Goukasian, Irina; Panduro, Nathalie

    2018-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of vaginal symptoms in postmenopausal women with breast cancer exposed to aromatase inhibitors, and to investigate if the risk of vaginal symptoms is associated with previous episodes of bacterial vaginosis. Methods Patients from Rigshospitalet and Herlev...... University Hospital, Denmark, were identified through the register of Danish Breast Cancer Cooperation Group and 78 patients participated in the study. Semiquantitave questionnaires and telephone interview were used to assess the prevalence of vaginal symptoms and previous episode(s) of bacterial vaginosis....... Multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess the association between vaginal symptoms and previous episodes of bacterial vaginosis. Results Moderate to severe symptoms due to vaginal itching/irritation were experienced by 6.4% (95% CI: 2.8-14.1%), vaginal dryness by 28.4% (95% CI: 19...

  17. Screening history of cervical cancers in Emilia-Romagna, Italy: defining priorities to improve cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Paolo Giorgi; Caroli, Stefania; Mancini, Silvia; de' Bianchi, Priscilla Sassoli; Finarelli, Alba C; Naldoni, Carlo; Bucchi, Lauro; Falcini, Fabio

    2015-03-01

    Most invasive cervical cancers in industrialized countries are due to the lack of Pap test coverage, very few are due to screening failures. This study aimed at quantifying the proportion of invasive cancers occurring in nonscreened or underscreened women and that in women with a previous negative screening, that is, screening failure, during the first two screening rounds (1996-2002) and in the following rounds (2003-2008) in the Emilia-Romagna region. All cases of invasive cancers registered in the regional cancer registry between 1996 and 2008 were classified according to screening history through a record linkage with the screening programme registry. The incidence significantly decreased from 11.6/100 000 to 8.7/100 000; this decrease is due to a reduction in squamous cell cancers (annual percentage change -6.2; confidence interval: -7.8, -4.6) and advanced cancers (annual percentage change -6.6; confidence interval: -8.8, -4.3), whereas adenocarcinomas and microinvasive cancers were essentially stable. The proportion of cancers among women not yet invited and among nonresponders decreased over the two periods, from 45.5 to 33.3%. In contrast, the proportion of women with a previous negative Pap test less than 5 years and 5 years or more before cancer incidence increased from 5.7 to 13.3% and from 0.3 to 5.5%, respectively. Although nonattendance of the screening programme remains the main barrier to cervical cancer control, the introduction of a more sensitive test, such as the human papillomavirus DNA test, could significantly reduce the burden of disease.

  18. Is mammography screening history a predictor of future breast cancer risk?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sune Bangsbøll; Törnberg, Sven; Kilpeläinen, Sini

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the model by Walter and Day for risk of cervical cancer following negative screens, one might hypothesize that women in a mammography screening programme with a certain number of negative screens had a lower remaining breast cancer risk than that of women in general. We studied whether...... number of negative screens was a predictor for a low remaining breast cancer risk in women participating in the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Copenhagen and Funen. Data were collected from the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Sweden (1989-2012), Copenhagen, Denmark (1991...... was not a predictor of a low remaining breast cancer risk in women participating in the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Sweden, Copenhagen and Funen, Denmark. The history of previous negative screens is therefore not suitable for personalisation of mammography screening....

  19. Phase 1/2 Study of LOXO-195 in Patients With Previously Treated NTRK Fusion Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-27

    Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung; Thyroid Neoplasms; Sarcoma; Colorectal Neoplasms; Salivary Gland Neoplasms; Biliary Tract Neoplasms; Brain Neoplasm, Primary; Melanoma; Glioblastoma; Bile Duct Neoplasms; Astrocytoma; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Pontine Glioma; Pancreatic Neoplasms; Ovarian Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Renal Cell; Cholangiocarcinoma; Skin Carcinoma; Carcinoma, Bronchogenic; Bronchial Neoplasms; Lung Neoplasms; Respiratory Tract Neoplasms; Thoracic Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue; Nevi and Melanomas; Intestinal Neoplasms; Thyroid Cancer; GIST; Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors; Breast Secretory Carcinoma; Uterine Neoplasms; Fibrosarcoma; Infantile Fibrosarcoma; Congenital Mesoblastic Nephroma; Central Nervous System Neoplasms

  20. Endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women with and without previous estrogen replacement treatment: comparison of clinical and histopathological characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, Anette Lynge; Norup, P

    1993-01-01

    Prevalence of diabetes mellitus was higher in nonusers (P ...Clinical and histopathological features of postmenopausal endometrial cancer were studied in 63 patients who had received exogenous estrogens previously and in 76 patients who had never been exposed to estrogens. All treatments were primarily surgical. Estrogen users were younger than nonusers (P...... metaplasia and "foam" cells were not related to tumor grade or use of estrogens. The receptor content correlated inversely with grade but was not related to estrogen use. Duration of estrogen treatment was not associated with tumor stage and grade. Our findings support the theory that endometrial cancer...

  1. Testicular germ cell cancer despite previous local radiotherapy to the testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, K-P; Lauke, H; Michl, U; Winter, E; Loy, V

    2002-06-01

    Testicular intraepithelial neoplasia (TIN, also carcinoma in situ of the testis) is the uniform precursor of testicular germ cell cancer. Local radiotherapy to the testis with dosages of 18-20 Gy has been found to safely eradicate TIN and germ cells, too. Thus, the general assumption is that the development of invasive germ cell tumours can be prevented by this radiotherapy. Herein, we report two patients with one-sided testicular tumour and biopsy-proven contralateral TIN. Both of them developed germ cell neoplasms in the remaining testis although local radiotherapy with 20 Gy had been applied to the testis. One patient developed pure seminoma 7 years after completion of radiotherapy, the other developed a combined tumour consisting of embryonal carcinoma and seminoma after 5 years. Treatment consisted of orchiectomy in each of the cases. Histologically, both had TIN in the testicular tissue surrounding the new growths. Pathogenetically, a small fraction of radioresistent TIN cells overcoming irradiation and progressing to full-blown germ cell cancer in the later course may be the histogenetic clue to explain these unexpected events. Other explanations, though less probable, could be technical radiotherapeutic failure due to targeting problems and a pre-existing radioresistent germ cell tumour in the irradiated testicle.

  2. Validity of self-reported family history of cancer: A systematic literature review on selected cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiederling, Jonas; Shams, Ahmad Zia; Haug, Ulrike

    2016-10-01

    Evidence regarding validity of self-reported family history of cancer (FHC) has been reviewed only for breast, colorectal, prostate, ovarian, endometrial and uterine cancer. We aimed to systematically review studies assessing validity of self-reported family history for the remaining cancer sites. We searched the Medline database for relevant studies published by January 2016. We extracted information on the study design and the positive predictive value (PPV) of self-reported FHC, defined as the proportion of reported cancer diagnoses among relatives that was confirmed by a reference standard (as a measure of over-reporting). We also extracted information on sensitivity of self-reported FHC (as a measure of underreporting). Overall, 21 studies were included that provided information on the PPV of self-reported FHC for relevant cancers and four studies also provided information on sensitivity. The PPV was highest (mostly >70%) for pancreatic, lung, thyroid and urinary system cancers and for leukemia and lymphoma, while it was lowest for stomach and liver cancer. Sensitivity was highest (>70%) for pancreatic cancer, lung cancer, brain cancer, melanoma, leukemia and lymphoma. For several cancers, sample sizes were low and the number of studies limited, particularly regarding sensitivity of self-reported FHC. In conclusion, for some cancers (e.g., pancreatic cancer, lung cancer, leukemia, lymphoma) self-reported FHC can be considered sufficiently valid to be useful, for example, in preventive counseling. For several cancers, it is not sufficiently studied or the pattern is inconsistent. This needs to be taken into account when using self-reported information about FHC in clinical practice or epidemiological research. © 2016 UICC.

  3. 18F-FDG PET demonstrates previously unvisualised bony metastases in a lung cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, J.; Rowe, C.; Scott, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A 59-year-old male, presented to his local doctor with the trivial complaint of a persistent dry cough. On clinical examination he was found to have an enlarged right supraclavicular lymph node. He was investigated with chest X-ray, Computerised Tomography (CT) and Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) of the palpable node CT showed a right lung mass, bulky hilar, mediastinal, supraclavicular and cervical lymph nodes FNAC was inconclusive due to an insufficient tissue sample, but suggestive of non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Hence excisional node biopsy was required which revealed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Subsequent CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis for staging revealed no distant involvement. Therefore radical radiotherapy was planned to treat the locally advanced disease. Prior to treatment a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan was organised by his specialist as a baseline study to monitor therapy progress. Non-Attenuation corrected images of the chest, abdomen and pelvis were obtained 40 minutes post administration of 394 MBq 18 F-FDG, on a Siemens 951/3IR PET scanner. The images were reconstructed using both Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and Ordered Subsets-Expectation Maximization (OSEM) algorithms. The images revealed extensive metastases particularly in the spine and pelvis, besides the known locally advanced thoracic disease A 99m Tc MDP bone scan and plain film radiographs aimed at confirming bony metastases were negative, even though the bone scan noted a slight focus in the right fourth rib. The appearance suggested trauma, but a solitary bone metastasis could not be ruled out MRI of the spine confirmed the PET scan findings. Mr RD was to have curative radical radiotherapy, but after the PET results, it was decided to treat him palliatively. The value of 18 F-FDG PET in staging some cancers such as NSCLC is widely accepted, in this case it was pivotal in altering the patient's management. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New

  4. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults with cancer or a history of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costerus, Joost M; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-03-01

    To study the incidence, clinical presentation, causative bacteria, and outcome of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults with cancer. We evaluated incidence and characteristics of patients with cancer included in a nationwide prospective cohort study of adults with community-acquired meningitis performed in the Netherlands from March 1, 2006, to September 31, 2014. All patients underwent a neurologic examination at hospital discharge, and outcome was graded using the Glasgow Outcome Scale. Active cancer was identified in 68 of 1,351 episodes (5%) and a history of cancer in 87 (6%). The annual incidence of community-acquired bacterial meningitis was 2.71-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.68-4.36, p bacterial meningitis in patients with cancer compared to patients without cancer was similar. Patients with active cancer presented with lower leukocyte count in blood (12.1 × 10(9) cells/L vs 17.3 × 10(9) cells/L, p bacterial meningitis (odds ratio 1.85, 95% CI 1.09-3.13). One of 8 patients with community-bacterial meningitis was identified to have a history of cancer and cancer was considered active in half of these patients. Patients with active cancer present with lower CSF leukocyte counts, are more likely to be infected with L monocytogenes, and are at high risk of unfavorable outcome. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Safety and feasibility of laparoscopic sigmoid colon and rectal cancer surgery in patients with previous vertical abdominal laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haksal, Mustafa; Ozdenkaya, Yasar; Atici, Ali Emre; Okkabaz, Nuri; Aksakal, Nihat; Erdemir, Ayhan; Civil, Osman; Oncel, Mustafa

    2015-09-01

    Current study aims to analyze the impact of previous vertical laparotomy on safety and feasibility of laparoscopic sigmoid colon and rectal cancer operations. All consecutive patients who underwent a laparoscopic resection for sigmoid colon or rectal cancer were included. These aspects were abstracted and compared within no laparotomy and previous vertical laparotomy groups: demographics, perioperative aspects, pathological features and survival. There were 252 patients in no laparotomy group, and 25 cases with previous vertical incisions including lower (n = 12, 48%), upper (n = 7, 28%), and lower&upper (n = 2, 8%) midline and paramedian (n = 4, 16%) laparotomies. Veress insufflation and open technique were used in 19 (76%) and 6 (24%) cases, respectively, during the insertion of the first trocar in previous laparotomy group. Patients in previous laparotomy group were significantly older (59.2 ± 13.4 vs. 66.2 ± 10.1, p = 0.01), but gender, ASA scores, tumor and technique related factors were similar within the groups, including operation time (200 [70-600] vs. 200 [130-390] min, p = 0.353), blood loss (250 [100-1500] vs. 250 [0-2200] ml, p = 0.46), additional trocar insertion (10 [4%] vs. 3 [12%], p = 0.101), conversion (20 [7.9%] vs. 4 [16%], p = 0.25), postoperative complication (59 [23.4%] vs. 4 [16%], p = 0.06) and 30-day mortality (7 [2.8%] vs. 1 [4%], p = 0.536) rates. Oncological outcomes regarding pathological features and 5-year survival rates (65% vs. 73.2%, p = 0.678) were not different. The presence of a previous laparotomy does not worsen the outcomes in patients undergoing laparoscopic removal of sigmoid or rectal cancer, thus laparoscopy may be considered to be safe and feasible in these cases. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The impact of pulmonary metastasectomy in patients with previously resected colorectal cancer liver metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Wiegering

    Full Text Available 40-50% of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC will develop liver metastases (CRLM during the course of the disease. One third of these patients will additionally develop pulmonary metastases.137 consecutive patients with CRLM, were analyzed regarding survival data, clinical, histological data and treatment. Results were stratified according to the occurrence of pulmonary metastases and metastases resection.39% of all patients with liver resection due to CRLM developed additional lung metastases. 44% of these patients underwent subsequent pulmonary resection. Patients undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy showed a significantly better five-year survival compared to patients not qualified for curative resection (5-year survival 71.2% vs. 28.0%; p = 0.001. Interestingly, the 5-year survival of these patients was even superior to all patients with CRLM, who did not develop pulmonary metastases (77.5% vs. 63.5%; p = 0.015. Patients, whose pulmonary metastases were not resected, were more likely to redevelop liver metastases (50.0% vs 78.6%; p = 0.034. However, the rate of distant metastases did not differ between both groups (54.5 vs.53.6; p = 0.945.The occurrence of colorectal lung metastases after curative liver resection does not impact patient survival if pulmonary metastasectomy is feasible. Those patients clearly benefit from repeated resections of the liver and the lung metastases.

  7. Phenomenological Characteristics of Autobiographical Memories: Responsiveness to an Induced Negative Mood State in Those With and Without a Previous History of Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Andrew E. P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the relative accessibility of phenomenological characteristics in autobiographical memories of 104 students with and without a previous history of a depression. Participants recalled personal events that were elicited with cue words and then asked to rate these personal events for a number of phenomenological characteristics. The characteristics were typicality, rumination, valence, importance of others, expectancy, desirability, and personal importance. The effe...

  8. Is mammography screening history a predictor of future breast cancer risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Sune Bangsbøll; Törnberg, Sven; Kilpeläinen, Sini; Von Euler-Chelpin, My; Njor, Sisse Helle

    2015-02-01

    Inspired by the model by Walter and Day for risk of cervical cancer following negative screens, one might hypothesize that women in a mammography screening programme with a certain number of negative screens had a lower remaining breast cancer risk than that of women in general. We studied whether number of negative screens was a predictor for a low remaining breast cancer risk in women participating in the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Copenhagen and Funen. Data were collected from the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Sweden (1989-2012), Copenhagen, Denmark (1991-2009) and Funen, Denmark (1993-2009), and linked to the respective cancer registries. We calculated cumulative hazard rates for breast cancer in women in cohorts defined by age at entry and number of negative screens for the maximum follow-up period in each screening centre. For all centres and cohorts, the cumulative hazard were parallel for all number of negative screens, from after the time, when the women were scheduled to be invited for the next screen. This means that the remaining breast cancer risk is similar no matter how many negative screens a woman have had. Number of negative screens was not a predictor of a low remaining breast cancer risk in women participating in the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Sweden, Copenhagen and Funen, Denmark. The history of previous negative screens is therefore not suitable for personalisation of mammography screening.

  9. Breast-conservation therapy in early-stage breast cancer patients with a positive family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Georges; Mirza, Nadeem Q; Meric, Funda; Hunt, Kelly K; Mirza, Attiqa N; Newman, Lisa A; Ames, Frederick C; Kuerer, Henry M; Ross, Merrick I; Feig, Barry; Babiera, Gildy; Buchholz, Thomas A; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Singletary, S Eva

    2002-11-01

    Our goal was to evaluate the role of breast-conservation therapy in early-stage breast cancer patients with a family history (FH) of breast cancer. Between 1970 and 1994, 1324 female patients with breast cancer were treated with breast-conservation therapy at our institution. From these, we identified 985 patients with stage 0-II breast cancer and who had available information on FH status. FH was considered positive in any patient who had a relative who had been previously diagnosed with breast cancer. Disease-specific survival was calculated from the date of initial diagnosis using the Kaplan-Meier method. The stage distribution for the 985 patients was as follows: 0 in 65 (7%), I in 500 (51%), and II in 420 (43%). The median age was 50 years (range, 21-88), with a median follow-up time of 8.8 years (range,.25-29). The median tumor size was 1.5 cm. FH was positive in 31%. There were no significant differences in locoregional recurrence, distant recurrence, disease-specific survival, or incidence of contralateral breast cancer in patients with a positive FH versus patients with a negative FH. Breast-conservation therapy is not contraindicated in early-stage breast cancer patients with a positive FH.

  10. History of hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes and ovarian cancer patient survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minlikeeva, Albina N; Freudenheim, Jo L; Cannioto, Rikki A

    2017-01-01

    for these conditions and overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) among patients diagnosed with invasive epithelial ovarian carcinoma. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for age and stage to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) overall and within......PURPOSE: Survival following ovarian cancer diagnosis is generally low; understanding factors related to prognosis could be important to optimize treatment. The role of previously diagnosed comorbidities and use of medications for those conditions in relation to prognosis for ovarian cancer patients...... has not been studied extensively, particularly according to histological subtype. METHODS: Using pooled data from fifteen studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, we examined the associations between history of hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, and medications taken...

  11. History of Comorbidities and Survival of Ovarian Cancer Patients, Results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minlikeeva, Albina N; Freudenheim, Jo L; Eng, Kevin H

    2017-01-01

    carcinoma who participated in 23 studies included in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, we explored associations between histories of endometriosis; asthma; depression; osteoporosis; and autoimmune, gallbladder, kidney, liver, and neurological diseases and overall and progression-free survival...... with ovarian cancer outcome in the overall sample nor in strata defined by histologic subtype, weight status, age at diagnosis, or stage of disease (local/regional vs. advanced).Conclusions: Histories of endometriosis; asthma; depression; osteoporosis; and autoimmune, gallbladder, kidney, liver, or neurologic......Background: Comorbidities can affect survival of ovarian cancer patients by influencing treatment efficacy. However, little evidence exists on the association between individual concurrent comorbidities and prognosis in ovarian cancer patients.Methods: Among patients diagnosed with invasive ovarian...

  12. The role of health literacy and communication habits on previous colorectal cancer screening among low-income and uninsured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojinnaka, Chinedum O; Bolin, Jane N; McClellan, David A; Helduser, Janet W; Nash, Philip; Ory, Marcia G

    2015-01-01

    To determine the association between health literacy, communication habits and colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among low-income patients. Survey responses of patients who received financial assistance for colonoscopy between 2011 and 2014 at a family medicine residency clinic were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression (n = 456). There were two dependent variables: (1) previous CRC screening and (2) CRC screening adherence. Our independent variables of interest were health literacy and communication habits. Over two-thirds (67.13%) of respondents had not been previously screened for CRC. Multivariate analysis showed a decreased likelihood of previous CRC screening among those who had marginal (OR = 0.52; 95% CI = 0.29-0.92) or inadequate health literacy (OR = 0.49; 95% CI = 0.27-0.87) compared to those with adequate health literacy. Controlling for health literacy, the significant association between educational attainment and previous CRC screening was eliminated. Thus, health literacy mediated the relationship between educational attainment and previous CRC screening. There was no significant association between communication habits and previous CRC screening. There was no significant association between screening guideline adherence, and health literacy or communication. Limited health literacy is a potential barrier to CRC screening. Suboptimal CRC screening rates reported among those with lower educational attainment may be mediated by limited health literacy.

  13. Outcomes of Organ Transplantation from Donors with a Cancer History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shanzhou; Tang, Yunhua; Zhu, Zebin; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Zhiheng; Wang, Linhe; Sun, Chengjun; Zhang, Yixi; Zhao, Qiang; Chen, Maogen; Wu, Linwei; Wang, Dongping

    2018-01-01

    Background The inherent challenges of selecting an acceptable donor for the increasing number and acuity of recipients has forced programs to take increased risks, including accepting donors with a cancer history (DWCH). Outcomes of organ transplantation using organs from DWCH must be clarified. We assessed transplant outcomes of recipients of organs from DWCH. Material/Methods Retrospective analysis of the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients data from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2014 identified 8385 cases of transplants from DWCH. A Cox-proportional hazard regression model and log-rank test were used to compare patient survival and hazard levels of various cancer types. Results DWCH was an independent risk factor of 5-year patient survival (HR=1.089, 95% CI: 1.009–1.176, P=0.03) and graft survival (HR=1.129, 95% CI: 1.056–1.208, Ptransplantation (patient survival: HR=1.112, 95% CI: 1.057–1.170, Ptransplantation. Donors with genitourinary and gastrointestinal cancers were associated with inferior outcomes in kidney transplantation. Transplantation from donors with central nervous system cancer resulted in poorer survival in liver transplant recipients. Recipients of organs from donors with hematologic malignancy and otorhinolaryngologic cancer had poorer survival following heart transplantation. Conclusions Under the current donor selection criteria, recipients of organs from DWCH had inferior outcomes in liver and heart transplantation, whereas organs from DWCH were safely applied in kidney and lung transplantation. Specific cancer types should be cautiously evaluated before performing certain types of organ transplantation. PMID:29455213

  14. Family history of cancer and the risk of bladder cancer: A case-control study from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turati, Federica; Bosetti, Cristina; Polesel, Jerry; Serraino, Diego; Montella, Maurizio; Libra, Massimo; Facchini, Gaetano; Ferraroni, Monica; Tavani, Alessandra; La Vecchia, Carlo; Negri, Eva

    2017-06-01

    A family history of bladder cancer has been associated with the risk of bladder cancer, but quantification of the excess risk in different populations is still a relevant issue. Further, the role of a family history of other cancers on the risk of bladder cancer remains unclear. We analyzed data from an Italian case-control study, including 690 bladder cancer cases and 665 hospital controls. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated through unconditional logistic regression models, adjusted for sex, age, study center, year of interview and further for education, smoking and sibling's number. The OR for family history of bladder cancer was 2.13 (95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) 1.02-4.49) from the model with partial adjustment, and 1.99 (95%CI 0.91-4.32) after additional adjustment for smoking and siblings' number, based on 23 cases (3.3%) and 11 controls (1.7%) with a family history of bladder cancer. The fully adjusted OR was 3.77 when the relative was diagnosed at age below 65years. Smokers with a family history of bladder cancer had a four-fold increased risk compared to non-smokers without a family history. Bladder cancer risk was significantly increased among subjects with a family history of hemolymphopoietic cancers (OR=2.97, 95%CI 1.35-6.55). Family history of cancer at other sites showed no significant association with bladder cancer risk. This study confirms an approximately two-fold increased risk of bladder cancer for family history of bladder cancer, and indicates a possible familial clustering of bladder cancer with cancers of the hemolymphopoietic system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of Lymphocyte T CD4 Levels on the Neuropsychological Performance of Population A ected by HIV and with a Previous History of Substance Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Vázquez-Justo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The immunological markers help to know if there is a good recovery of the immunological system in patients infected with HIV. Among them, the lymphocyte T CD4 rate is the main indicator of the patient’s immunological state being used for staging HIV infection, evaluating the mortality or comorbidity risk and the vulnerability to certain oportunistic infections. However, its link with the presence of cognitive alterations is not clear. Therefore, the aim of this article is to study if lymphocyte T CD4 levels are connected with the neuropsychological performance of a group of people infected with HIV and with a previous history of substance use. The sample consisted of 80 seropositive males with a previous history of substance use. They were evaluated by means of a neuropsychological battery which assesses the most affected cognitive domains in HIV population. The results showed that the patients having a higher level of immunodeficiency have a poorer performance in terms of attention, visuomotor dexterity, visual memory, visual perception, auditory-verbal learning and inhibition. Therefore, our results show a realtion between the lymphocyte T CD4 rate and the neuropsychological performance in seropositive people with a previsous history of substance use.

  16. Frequency and clinical significance of previously undetected incidental findings detected on computed tomography simulation scans for breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Tsunoda, Hiroko; Takahashi, Osamu; Kikuchi, Mari; Honda, Satoshi; Shikama, Naoto; Akahane, Keiko; Sekiguchi, Kenji

    2012-11-01

    To determine the frequency and clinical significance of previously undetected incidental findings found on computed tomography (CT) simulation images for breast cancer patients. All CT simulation images were first interpreted prospectively by radiation oncologists and then double-checked by diagnostic radiologists. The official reports of CT simulation images for 881 consecutive postoperative breast cancer patients from 2009 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Potentially important incidental findings (PIIFs) were defined as any previously undetected benign or malignancy-related findings requiring further medical follow-up or investigation. For all patients in whom a PIIF was detected, we reviewed the clinical records to determine the clinical significance of the PIIF. If the findings from the additional studies prompted by a PIIF required a change in management, the PIIF was also recorded as a clinically important incidental finding (CIIF). There were a total of 57 (6%) PIIFs. The 57 patients in whom a PIIF was detected were followed for a median of 17 months (range, 3-26). Six cases of CIIFs (0.7% of total) were detected. Of the six CIIFs, three (50%) cases had not been noted by the radiation oncologist until the diagnostic radiologist detected the finding. On multivariate analysis, previous CT examination was an independent predictor for PIIF (p = 0.04). Patients who had not previously received chest CT examinations within 1 year had a statistically significantly higher risk of PIIF than those who had received CT examinations within 6 months (odds ratio, 3.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-9.50; p = 0.01). The rate of incidental findings prompting a change in management was low. However, radiation oncologists appear to have some difficulty in detecting incidental findings that require a change in management. Considering cost, it may be reasonable that routine interpretations are given to those who have not received previous chest CT examinations within 1 year

  17. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Deputy Director's Page Previous NCI Directors ... History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Deputy Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, ...

  18. Value and reliability of findings from previous epidemiologic studies in the assessment of radiation-related cancer risks. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frasch, G.; Martignoni, K.

    1990-01-01

    The theories put forward here are predominantly based on pooled data from previous studies in a number of cohorts made up by mostly non-average individuals. These studies were carried out by various researchers and differed in procedures and aims. Factors of major importance to the validity and reliability of the conclusions drawn from this study are pointed out. In one chapter some light is thrown on factors known to bear a relation to the incidence of radiation-induced cancer of the breast, even though at present this can only very vaguely be described on a quantitative basis. These factors include fractionated dose regimens, pregnancies and parturitions, menarche, menopause, synergisms as well as secondary cancer of the breast. The available body of evidence suggests that exposure of each of 1 million women to a dose of 10 mGy (rad) can be linked with approx. 3 additional cases of mammary cancer reported on an average per year after the latency period. The fact that there is some statistical scatter around this value is chiefly attributable to age-related causes at the beginning of exposure. Differences in ethnic and cultural characteristics between the populations investigated appeared to be less important here. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Cognitive-Behavioral Coping, Illness Perception, and Family Adaptability in Oncological Patients with a Family History of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postolica, Roxana; Iorga, Magdalena; Petrariu, Florin Dumitru; Azoicai, Doina

    2017-01-01

    Aim . The study investigated the differences between patients with and without a family history of cancer regarding coping strategies, illness perception, and family adaptability to the disease. Material and Methods . A total of 124 patients diagnosed with cancer were included in the research (55 of them with a family history of cancer). The Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire , the Strategic Approach to Coping Scale , the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale , and the Illness Perception Questionnaire were applied. The data were processed using the SPSS 21 software. Results . Patients with previous records of cancer in the family get significantly higher scores for the illness coherence factor. Family satisfaction is significantly higher for patients with a genetic risk, compared to the one reported by patients who suffer from the disease but have no genetic risk. Cognitive-behavioral coping strategies and family cohesion are factors that correlate with an adaptive perception of the illness in the case of patients with a family history of cancer. Conclusion . Results are important for the construction of strategies used for patients with a family history of cancer.

  20. History, development and future of cancer screening in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian N Olver

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of screening an asymptomatic population for cancer is to achieve better health outcomes, particularly a population survival benefit. Australia has three population screening programs: the National Cervical Screening Program (NCSP, BreastScreen Australia and the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP. Methods: We reviewed the history and development of the three programs. NCSP: Women have a Pap smear every 2 years from age 18–20, or 2 years after first becoming sexually active, until age 69. Since introduction of the NCSP, the cervical cancer incidence has halved, with an approximate 60% decrease in mortality. The screening participation rate approximates 57%, but is lower for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, women in remote areas, and women with lower socio-economic status. The National HPV (human papillomavirus Vaccination Program, introduced in 2007, is expected to reduce the incidence of cervical cancer by a further 70% and has already reduced the incidence of high-grade lesions in girls. In 2017, testing for HPV every 5 years starting at age 25 will replace the Pap smear as the principal screening test. BreastScreen Australia: This program targets women aged 50–74. Over 20 years, mortality from breast cancer has decreased by 32% in response to screening and treatment advances. The participation rate is 56%. The major adverse impact of breast screening is overdiagnosis, estimated in Australia to be as low as 8% of detected cancers, but with estimates of up to 30% from some research. Women should be made aware of both the potential benefits and harms from screening. Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in high-risk women leads to earlier screening. NBCSP: The NBCSP uses immunochemical faecal occult blood test (iFOBT kits on stool samples to detect bleeding from the bowel. When rollout is complete in 2020, test kits will be sent every 2 years to people aged 50–74. People who test positive

  1. Levels of Distress in Women With a Family History of Ovarian Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kash, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    The overall goal of this study is to determine the levels of distress in women with a family history of ovarian cancer and to identify the mediating factors between risk of developing ovarian cancer...

  2. Breast Cancer Family History and Allele-Specific DNA Methylation in the Legacy Girls Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui-Chen; Do, Catherine; Andrulis, Irene L; John, Esther M; Daly, Mary B; Buys, Saundra S; Chung, Wendy K; Knight, Julia A; Bradbury, Angela R; Keegan, Theresa H M; Schwartz, Lisa; Krupska, Izabela; Miller, Rachel L; Santella, Regina M; Tycko, Benjamin; Terry, Mary Beth

    2018-02-13

    Family history, a well-established risk factor for breast cancer, can have both genetic and environmental contributions. Shared environment in families as well as epigenetic changes that also may be influenced by shared genetics and environment may also explain familial clustering of cancers. Epigenetic regulation, such as DNA methylation, can change the activity of a DNA segment without a change in the sequence; environmental exposures experienced across the life course can induce such changes. However, genetic-epigenetic interactions, detected as methylation quantitative trait loci (mQTLs; a.k.a. meQTLs) and haplotype-dependent allele-specific methylation (hap-ASM), can also contribute to inter-individual differences in DNA methylation patterns. To identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs) associated with breast cancer susceptibility, we examined differences in white blood cell DNA methylation in 29 candidate genes in 426 girls (ages 6-13 years) from the LEGACY Girls Study, 239 with and 187 without a breast cancer family history (BCFH). We measured methylation by targeted massively parallel bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq) and observed BCFH DMRs in two genes: ESR1 (Δ 4.9%, P = 0.003) and SEC16B (Δ 3.6%, P = 0.026), each of which has been previously implicated in breast cancer susceptibility and pubertal development. These DMRs showed high inter-individual variability in methylation, suggesting the presence of mQTLs/hap-ASM. Using single nucleotide polymorphisms data in the bis-seq amplicon, we found strong hap-ASM in SEC16B (with allele specific-differences ranging from 42% to 74%). These findings suggest that differential methylation in genes relevant to breast cancer susceptibility may be present early in life, and that inherited genetic factors underlie some of these epigenetic differences.

  3. The major stressful life events and cancer: stress history and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Faruk; Karalar, Umran; Aliustaoglu, Mehmet; Keskin, Serkan; Can, Gulbeyaz; Cinar, Fatma Ebru

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the extent of stressful life events' etiology and to compare socio-demographic and medical characteristics of the presence and absence of stress in Turkish cancer patients. Patients with cancer who attended ambulatory patient care units answered the questionnaires. Medical information was reviewed from chart data. The study population comprised 465 women (60.5%) and 303 men (39.5%), in total 768 cases. The median age was 53 years, ranging between 18 and 94. Three-hundred and twenty patients (41.7%) had at least one type of stress since last year of the time of initial diagnosis. Among patients had stress, the median number of stress modalities presented was 1 (range 1-6). Death, lack of livelihood, quarrel, illness, and debt almost always consisted of stress types. History of stress within last year was found more in women (66.3% vs. 56.5%, P = 0.006) and overweight patients (57.5% vs. 47.2%, P = 0.005). Similarly, among cancer types, only patients with breast cancer (41.9% vs. 31.7%, P = 0.04) had lived more stressful situation. However, the married patients (72.2% vs. 80.6%, P = 0.03) had less stress. Patients with gastric cancer had more frequent debt (29.0%, P history (21.4%, P = 0.001). Additionally, in lung cancer patients, their rate of livelihood difficulty was highly less than average (2.4%, P = 0.003). We found that overweight patients had more illness history (68.9% vs. 51.6%, P = 0.004), patients who were not working had more death history (89.7% vs. 78%, P = 0.01), and female patients had more quarrel history (78.2% vs. 60.5%, P = 0.002). Likewise, history of debt in patients who is a member of large family (56.2% vs. 27.4%, P = 0.01) was more frequent. Additionally, the lack of livelihood was prominent in urban patients (92.8% vs. 78.6%, P = 0.002) and in patients with low income (48.5% vs. 66.7%, P = 0.004). The question of whether or not psychological factors originated from stressful life events have an

  4. The Context of the History of Mathematics as Previous Organizer O Contexto da História da Matemática como Organizador Prévio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Messildo Viana Nunes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article consists of a reflection on the possibility of using the History of the Mathematics as a pedagogical resource for introduction of mathematical concepts, allied to the David Ausubel’s theory of significant learning. This overlap can help us in the elaboration/organization of didactic sequences that can favor the construction of the mathematical knowledge by the pupil himself. In this case, we use some examples from Euclidean Geometry as a reference to present our conception on how and why we conceive the context of the history of the mathematics as a legitimate previous organizer. Keywords: History of Mathematics. Significant Learning. Previous Organizer.Este artigo consiste em uma reflexão sobre a possibilidade de uso da História da Matemática como recurso pedagógico, para introdução de conceitos matemáticos, aliada à teoria da aprendizagem significativa de David Ausubel. Tal imbricação pode nos auxiliar na elaboração/organização de sequências didáticas que possam favorecer a construção do conhecimento matemático pelo próprio aluno. Nesse caso utilizamos alguns exemplos da Geometria Euclidiana como referência para apresentar nossa concepção sobre como e por que concebemos o contexto da história da matemática como um legítimo organizador prévio. Palavras-chave: História da Matemática. Aprendizagem significativa. Organizador Prévio.

  5. Family history of prostate and colorectal cancer and risk of colorectal cancer in the Women's health initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer L; Yee, Cecilia; Paskett, Electra; Schwartz, Ann G; Lane, Dorothy; Palmer, Nynikka R A; Bock, Cathryn H; Nassir, Rami; Simon, Michael S

    2017-12-13

    Evidence suggests that risk of colorectal and prostate cancer is increased among those with a family history of the same disease, particularly among first-degree relatives. However, the aggregation of colorectal and prostate cancer within families has not been well investigated. Analyses were conducted among participants of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) observational cohort, free of cancer at the baseline examination. Subjects were followed for colorectal cancer through August 31st, 2009. A Cox-proportional hazards regression modeling approach was used to estimate risk of colorectal cancer associated with a family history of prostate cancer, colorectal cancer and both cancers among first-degree relatives of all participants and stratified by race (African American vs. White). Of 75,999 eligible participants, there were 1122 colorectal cancer cases diagnosed over the study period. A family history of prostate cancer alone was not associated with an increase in colorectal cancer risk after adjustment for confounders (aHR =0.94; 95% CI =0.76, 1.15). Separate analysis examining the joint impact, a family history of both colorectal and prostate cancer was associated with an almost 50% increase in colorectal cancer risk (aHR = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.04, 2.10), but similar to those with a family history of colorectal cancer only (95% CI = 1.31; 95% CI = 1.11, 1.54). Our findings suggest risk of colorectal cancer is increased similarly among women with colorectal cancer only and among those with both colorectal and prostate cancer diagnosed among first-degree family members. Future studies are needed to determine the relative contribution of genes and shared environment to the risk of both cancers.

  6. History of the Rare Cancer Network and past research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René-Olivier Mirimanoff

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Approximately, twenty years ago, the Rare Cancer Network (RCN was formed in Lausanne, Switzerland, to support the study of rare malignancies. The RCN has grown over the years and now includes 130 investigators from twenty-four nations on six continents. The network held its first international symposium in Nice, France, on March 21-22, 2014. The proceedings of that meeting are presented in two companion papers. This manuscript reviews the history of the growth of the RCN and contains the abstracts of fourteen oral presentations made at the meeting of prior RCN studies. From 1993 to 2014, 74 RCN studies have been initiated, of which 54 were completed, 10 are in progress or under analysis, and 9 were stopped due to poor accrual. Forty-four peer reviewed publications have been written on behalf of the RCN.

  7. Life history theory and breast cancer risk: methodological and theoretical challenges: Response to "Is estrogen receptor negative breast cancer risk associated with a fast life history strategy?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktipis, Athena

    2016-01-01

    In a meta-analysis published by myself and co-authors, we report differences in the life history risk factors for estrogen receptor negative (ER-) and estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers. Our meta-analysis did not find the association of ER- breast cancer risk with fast life history characteristics that Hidaka and Boddy suggest in their response to our article. There are a number of possible explanations for the differences between their conclusions and the conclusions we drew from our meta-analysis, including limitations of our meta-analysis and methodological challenges in measuring and categorizing estrogen receptor status. These challenges, along with the association of ER+ breast cancer with slow life history characteristics, may make it challenging to find a clear signal of ER- breast cancer with fast life history characteristics, even if that relationship does exist. The contradictory results regarding breast cancer risk and life history characteristics illustrate a more general challenge in evolutionary medicine: often different sub-theories in evolutionary biology make contradictory predictions about disease risk. In this case, life history models predict that breast cancer risk should increase with faster life history characteristics, while the evolutionary mismatch hypothesis predicts that breast cancer risk should increase with delayed reproduction. Whether life history tradeoffs contribute to ER- breast cancer is still an open question, but current models and several lines of evidence suggest that it is a possibility. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Foundation for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health.

  8. Family history and risk of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anna L V; Andersson, Therese M-L; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng; Cnattingius, Sven; Dickman, Paul W; Lambe, Mats

    2015-05-01

    The risk of breast cancer is at least two-fold increased in young women with a family history of breast cancer. Pregnancy has a dual effect on breast cancer risk; a short-term increase followed by a long-term protection. We investigated if the risk of breast cancer during and within 10 years following pregnancy is affected by a family history of breast cancer. We followed a cohort of women aged 15-44 years between 1963 and 2009 identified in Swedish population-based registers. Family history was defined as having a mother or sister with breast cancer. We estimated incidence rate ratios of breast cancer during pregnancy and time intervals up to 10 years post-delivery, with a focus on pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC), defined as breast cancer during pregnancy or within 2 years post-delivery. In 3,452,506 women, there were 15,548 cases of breast cancer (1208 were PABC). Compared to nulliparous women, the risk of breast cancer was decreased during pregnancy, similar during first year and increased during second year post-delivery. The pattern was similar in women with or without family history of breast cancer. A peak in risk was observed 5-6 years following the first birth regardless of family history. After a second birth, this peak was only present in women with a family history. Our results indicate that women with a family history of breast cancer do not have a different breast cancer risk during and within 10 years following pregnancy compared to women without a family history.

  9. The history and use of cancer registry data by public health cancer control programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary C; Babcock, Frances; Hayes, Nikki S; Mariotto, Angela B; Wong, Faye L; Kohler, Betsy A; Weir, Hannah K

    2017-12-15

    Because cancer registry data provide a census of cancer cases, registry data can be used to: 1) define and monitor cancer incidence at the local, state, and national levels; 2) investigate patterns of cancer treatment; and 3) evaluate the effectiveness of public health efforts to prevent cancer cases and improve cancer survival. The purpose of this article is to provide a broad overview of the history of cancer surveillance programs in the United States, and illustrate the expanding ways in which cancer surveillance data are being made available and contributing to cancer control programs. The article describes the building of the cancer registry infrastructure and the successful coordination of efforts among the 2 federal agencies that support cancer registry programs, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. The major US cancer control programs also are described, including the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program, the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, and the Colorectal Cancer Control Program. This overview illustrates how cancer registry data can inform public health actions to reduce disparities in cancer outcomes and may be instructional for a variety of cancer control professionals in the United States and in other countries. Cancer 2017;123:4969-76. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Younger age of onset and multiple primary lesions associated with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cases with a positive family history of the cancer suggests genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Nan; Wen, Xiaoduo; Zhang, Nan; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Liwei; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Na; Wen, Denggui

    2014-01-01

    Previous epidemiological studies have consistently found a positive family history of esophageal cancer is associated with a significantly increased risk of the cancer. However, whether the elevated risk could be attributed to common household exposure or inherited susceptibility is uncertain. This study aimed to highlight the effect of genetic predisposition by noting the significant differences in onset age and multiple primary cancers between esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cases with or without a positive family history of the cancer. Age at onset and the percentage of multiple primary cancers were compared between ESCCs with (n = 766) or without (n = 1 776) a positive family history of the cancer in a consecutive surgery cohort at the Department of Thoracic Surgery of Hebei Tumor Hospital and the Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University. Overall, ESCCs with a positive family history of the cancer featured both a significantly younger age of onset and significantly more multiple primary cancers than those with a negative family history (onset age 51.83 vs. 53.49 years old, P genetic predisposition. The results of subgroup analyses indicate a younger age of ESCC development results from the interaction of environmental and genetic risk factors, but multiple primary cancers may be related only to genetic predisposition.

  11. Obesity and Weight Loss Attempts among Subjects with a Personal History of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambria Moten

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Obesity is a risk factor for many cancers and obese cancer patients have a poorer prognosis. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of obesity and attempts to lose weight among cancer survivors. The effects of cancer treatment and time since cancer treatment were also evaluated. Methods: The 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey data were analysed between 2011 and 2013; respondents with (n = 966 and without (n = 6,093 a personal history of cancer were identified. Each respondent’s body mass index (BMI was calculated using self-reported height and weight measurements and categorised as normal (<25 kg/m2, overweight (25‒29.9 kg/m2 or obese (≥30 kg/m2. Results: Cancer survivors were older (mean age = 63.4 versus 44.7 years for those with no history of cancer. Overall, there were similar percentages of overweight (37.6% versus 34.1%; relative risk ratio [RRR] = 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.75‒1.31 and obese (31.4% versus 27.5%; RRR = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.79‒1.39 respondents among both cancer survivors and those without a history of cancer. Among overweight and obese participants, cancer survivors did not demonstrate increased weight loss attempts compared to those without a history of cancer (61.6% versus 66.3%; odds ratio = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.73‒1.20. Conclusion: A high prevalence of overweight and obese cancer survivors were identified without any association with cancer treatment. However, cancer survivors did not demonstrate increased attempts to lose weight in comparison to those without a history of cancer despite awareness of their degree of body fatness. Increased efforts to promote the maintenance of a healthy weight among cancer survivors are needed.

  12. Obesity and Weight Loss Attempts among Subjects with a Personal History of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moten, Ambria; Jeffers, Kayin; Larbi, Daniel; Smith-White, Roxanne; Taylor, Teletia; Wilson, Lori; Adenuga, Babafemi; Frederick, Wayne; Laiyemo, Adeyinka

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for many cancers and obese cancer patients have a poorer prognosis. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of obesity and attempts to lose weight among cancer survivors. The effects of cancer treatment and time since cancer treatment were also evaluated. The 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey data were analysed between 2011 and 2013; respondents with (n = 966) and without (n = 6,093) a personal history of cancer were identified. Each respondent's body mass index (BMI) was calculated using self-reported height and weight measurements and categorised as normal (<25 kg/m(2)), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m(2)) or obese (≥30 kg/m(2)). Cancer survivors were older (mean age = 63.4 versus 44.7 years for those with no history of cancer). Overall, there were similar percentages of overweight (37.6% versus 34.1%; relative risk ratio [RRR] = 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.75-1.31) and obese (31.4% versus 27.5%; RRR = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.79 1.39) respondents among both cancer survivors and those without a history of cancer. Among overweight and obese participants, cancer survivors did not demonstrate increased weight loss attempts compared to those without a history of cancer (61.6% versus 66.3%; odds ratio = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.73 1.20). A high prevalence of overweight and obese cancer survivors were identified without any association with cancer treatment. However, cancer survivors did not demonstrate increased attempts to lose weight in comparison to those without a history of cancer despite awareness of their degree of body fatness. Increased efforts to promote the maintenance of a healthy weight among cancer survivors are needed.

  13. Is prevalence of colorectal polyps higher in patients with family history of colorectal cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Murad-Regadas, Sthela Maria; Bezerra, Carla Camila Rocha; Peixoto, Ana Ligia Rocha; Regadas, Francisco Sérgio Pinheiro; Rodrigues, Lusmar Veras; Siebra, José Airton Gonçalves; da Silva Fernandes, Graziela Olivia; Vasconcelos, Rafael Aragão

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTObjectives:To assess the prevalence of polyps in patients with a family history of colorectal cancer, in comparison to asymptomatic individuals with indication for screening.Methods:A prospective study in a group of patients who underwent colonoscopy between 2012 and 2014. Patients were divided into two groups: Group I: no family history of colorectal cancer, and Group II: with a family history in first-degree relatives. Demographic characteristics, findings on colonoscopy...

  14. The relationship between family history of cancer, coping style and psychological distress

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yu; Cao, Chunmei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between family history of cancer, coping style and psychological distress. Methods: Total 80 patients with family history of cancer and 72 normal controls were analyzed using self-reporting inventory (SCL-90), coping style scale and impact of event scale-revised (IES-R). Results: 1. Between the two groups of patients, there were significant differences in anxiety, depression, cancer-specific distress and coping style. 2. Psychological distress (anxie...

  15. Family history of cancer and the risk of laryngeal cancer: a case-control study from Italy and Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavello, Werner; Turati, Federica; Bosetti, Cristina; Talamini, Renato; Levi, Fabio; Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Chiesa, Fausto; Franceschi, Silvia; La Vecchia, Carlo; Negri, Eva

    2012-02-01

    Only limited data is available on the relationship between family history of laryngeal and other neoplasms and laryngeal cancer risk. We investigated the issue using data from a multicentre case-control study conducted in Italy and Switzerland between 1992 and 2009 including 852 cases with histologically confirmed laryngeal cancer and 1970 controls admitted to hospital for acute, non neoplastic conditions. Unconditional logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, study center, education, tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking and number of siblings were used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) of laryngeal cancer. The multivariate OR was 2.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-5.3) in subjects reporting a first-degree relative with laryngeal cancer, as compared to subjects with no family history. The OR was higher when the relative was diagnosed before 60 years of age (OR = 3.5, 95% CI 1.4-8.8). As compared to subjects without family history, non-smokers, and moderate drinkers, the OR was 37.1 (95% CI 9.9-139.4) for current smokers, heavy drinkers, with family history of laryngeal cancer. Family history of colorectal (OR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.3) and kidney (OR = 3.8, 95% CI 1.2-12.1) cancer were also associated to an increased risk of laryngeal cancer, while no significant increase in risk was found for family history of cancer at all sites, excluding the larynx (OR = 1.1). Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  16. Breast and Ovarian Cancer and Family History Risk Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Triple negative cancers are a type of breast cancer that lack estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. NCCN Guidelines Version 2.2014 Genetics/Familial ...

  17. Possible consequences of applying guidelines to healthy women with a family history of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asperen, CJ; Tollenaar, RAEM; Krol-Warmerdam, EMM; Blom, Jannet; Hoogendoorn, WE; Seynaeve, CMJC; Brekelmans, CTM; Devilee, P; Cornelisse, CJ; Klijn, JGM; de Bock, GH

    Possible effects of consistently applying published guidelines on healthy women with breast cancer in their family history were analysed. We investigated 1060 unrelated breast cancer patients and calculated the numbers of first-degree relatives that would be referred to a familial cancer clinic if

  18. Increased primary healthcare utilisation among women with a history of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, Carriene; Berendsen, Annette J.; Groenhof, Feikje; van der Meer, Klaas; de Bock, Geertruida H.

    Little is known about the current role of the general practitioner (GP) in breast cancer follow-up care. This study explores primary healthcare use in the period after completion of primary breast cancer treatment. A total of 336 women with a history of early-stage breast cancer treated with

  19. The feasibility of a second lumpectomy and breast brachytherapy for localized cancer in a breast previously treated with lumpectomy and radiation therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Manjeet; Feldman, Sheldon; Boolbol, Susan; Wang, Lin; Harrison, Louis B

    2008-01-01

    With accumulating evidence supporting partial-breast irradiation, we conducted a Phase I/II study to evaluate the role of a second conservative surgery and brachytherapy for patients presenting with a local recurrence/new primary in a breast who has previously undergone a lumpectomy and external radiation therapy for breast cancer. Fifteen patients with a localized lesion in the breast have undergone a second lumpectomy and received low-dose-rate brachytherapy on protocol. The first 6 patients received a dose of 30Gy. With no unacceptable acute toxicity observed, the brachytherapy dose was increased to 45Gy. Three patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and 8 patients are on antiestrogen therapy. The median time interval between the primary breast cancer diagnosis and the second cancer event in the ipsilateral breast is 94 months (range, 28-211). With a median followup of 36 months after brachytherapy, the 3-year Kaplan-Meier overall survival, local disease-free survival and mastectomy-free survival are 100% and 89%, respectively. There was no Grade 3/4 fibrosis or necrosis observed. All patients had baseline asymmetry due to the breast volume deficit from the second lumpectomy. With breast asymmetry as a given, the cosmetic result observed in all patients has been good to excellent. Early results suggest low-complication rates, high rate of local control and freedom from mastectomy. Additional studies are needed to establish whether a second lumpectomy and breast brachytherapy are an acceptable alternative to mastectomy for patients presenting with a localized cancer in a previously irradiated breast.

  20. Clinical activity of fulvestrant in metastatic breast cancer previously treated with endocrine therapy and/or chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Mi Hwa; Kim, Hee Kyung; Lee, Hansang; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin-Seok; Im, Young-Hyuck; Park, Yeon Hee

    2018-03-16

    We conducted a retrospective analysis of the clinical activity of fulvestrant in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative metastatic breast cancer (MBC) previously treated with endocrine therapy and/or chemotherapy. We reviewed the medical records of all patients with MBC treated at Samsung Medical Center between January 2009 and August 2016. Patients received fulvestrant 250 mg intramuscularly every 28 days (from January 2009 to November 2010) or 500 mg intramuscularly every 28 days (from December 2010 to August 2016). Tumor responses were assessed every 8 weeks and at the end of treatment, as well as when disease progression was suspected. A total of 84 patients were included in this study. A median of two previous endocrine treatments had been performed; 79% of the patients had received two or more endocrine treatments. Forty-five patients (54%) had been treated with chemotherapy for MBC before the fulvestrant treatment course. Visceral metastasis was found in 49 patients (58%). The estimated median progression-free survival and overall survival were 4.4 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.4 to 5.5) and 32.5 months (95% CI, 17.6 to 47.4), respectively. The disease control rate was 40.5% (95% CI, 30.5 to 51.5); partial response was observed in 16% of the patients and stable disease was observed in 25% of the patients. The most frequently reported adverse reactions were mild-to-moderate grade myalgia (10.5% of the patients), injection site pain (7%), and fatigue (7%). Fulvestrant was generally well tolerated. Fulvestrant showed encouraging clinical activity and favorable feasibility in postmenopausal women with MBC who had been treated with multiple endocrine therapies and/or cytotoxic chemotherapies.

  1. Do people really know what makes a family history of cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jennifer N W; Hewison, Jenny

    2014-12-01

    Family history is often referred to as a family tree in casual everyday conservations, but it carries a different connotation in medicine. This study is the first to investigate people's understanding of 'family medical history' and the concept of 'family' in the context of inherited cancer. Three hundred and nine staff at the Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds completed an online web survey. Not all respondents understood or knew what makes a family history of cancer. Only 54% knew exactly the type of information required to make a family history. Apart from blood relatives, adopted and step-siblings, step parents, in-laws, spouses, friends and colleagues were also named as 'family' for family history taking. Personal experience of living with cancer and academic qualification were not significant in influencing knowledge of family history. There is misunderstanding and poor knowledge of family history of cancer and the type of information required to make a family history even in a sample of people teaching and researching medicine and health issues. Public understanding of the value of family medical history in cancer prevention and management is important if informed clinical decisions and appropriate health care are to be delivered. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Strongly enhanced colorectal cancer risk stratification by combining family history and genetic risk score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weigl K

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Korbinian Weigl,1,2 Jenny Chang-Claude,3,4 Phillip Knebel,5 Li Hsu,6 Michael Hoffmeister,1 Hermann Brenner1,2,7 1Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ, Heidelberg, 2German Cancer Consortium (DKTK, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ, Heidelberg, 3Unit of Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ, Heidelberg, 4University Cancer Center Hamburg, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, 5Department for General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; 6Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA; 7Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT, Heidelberg, Germany Background and aim: Family history (FH and genetic risk scores (GRSs are increasingly used for risk stratification for colorectal cancer (CRC screening. However, they were mostly considered alternatively rather than jointly. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of individual and joint risk stratification for CRC by FH and GRS.Patients and methods: A GRS was built based on the number of risk alleles in 53 previously identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms among 2,363 patients with a first diagnosis of CRC and 2,198 controls in DACHS [colorectal cancer: chances for prevention through screening], a population-based case-control study in Germany. Associations between GRS and FH with CRC risk were quantified by multiple logistic regression.Results: A total of 316 cases (13.4% and 214 controls (9.7% had a first-degree relative (FDR with CRC (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.86, 95% CI 1.52–2.29. A GRS in the highest decile was associated with a 3.0-fold increased risk of CRC (aOR 3.00, 95% CI 2.24–4.02 compared with the lowest decile. This association was tentatively more pronounced in older age groups. FH and GRS were essentially unrelated, and their

  3. Case report of right hamate hook fracture in a patient with previous fracture history of left hamate hook: is it hamate bipartite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norton Sandra

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hamate hook fracture is a common fracture in golfers and others who play sports that involve rackets or sticks such as tennis or hockey. This patient had a previous hamate fracture in the opposing wrist along with potential features of hamate bipartite. Case presentation A 19 year old male presented with a complaint of right wrist pain on the ulnar side of the wrist with no apparent mechanism of injury. The pain came on gradually one week before being seen in the office and he reported no prior care for the complaint. His history includes traumatic left hamate hook fracture with surgical excision. Conclusion The patient was found to have marked tenderness over the hamate and with a prior fracture to the other wrist, computed tomography of the wrist was ordered revealing a fracture to the hamate hook in the right wrist. He was referred for surgical evaluation and the hook of the hamate was excised. Post-surgically, the patient was able to return to normal activity within eight weeks. This case is indicative of fracture rather than hamate bipartite. This fracture should be considered in a case of ulnar sided wrist pain where marked tenderness is noted over the hamate, especially after participation in club or racket sports.

  4. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder with Suicide Obsessions in a First Responder without Previous Diagnosis of OCD or History of Suicide Attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachamallu, Vivekananda; Song, Michael M; Liu, Haiying; Giles, Charles L; McMahon, Terry

    2017-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a distressing and often debilitating disorder characterized by obsessions, compulsions, or both that are time-consuming and cause impairment in social, occupational, or other areas of functioning. There are many published studies reporting higher risk of suicidality in OCD patients, as well as studies describing increased risk of suicidality in OCD patients with other comorbid psychiatric conditions such as major depressive disorder (MDD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Existing case reports on OCD with suicide as the obsessive component describe patients with long standing diagnosis of OCD with suicidal ideations or previous suicide attempts. This report describes the case of a 28-year-old male, who works as a first responder, who presented with new onset symptoms characteristic of MDD and PTSD, with no past history of OCD or suicidality who developed OCD with suicidal obsessions. Differentiating between suicidal ideation in the context of other psychiatric illnesses and suicidal obsessions in OCD is critical to ensuring accurate diagnosis and timely provision of most appropriate treatment. The combination of exposure and response prevention therapy and pharmacotherapy with sertraline and olanzapine was effective in helping the patient manage the anxiety and distress stemming from the patient's OCD with suicidal obsession.

  5. Family Ties: The Role of Family Context in Family Health History Communication About Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Vivian M; Corona, Rosalie; Bodurtha, Joann N; Quillin, John M

    2016-01-01

    Family health history about cancer is an important prevention and health promotion tool. Yet few studies have identified family context factors that promote such discussions. We explored relations among family context (cohesion, flexibility, and openness), self-efficacy, and cancer communication (gathering family history, sharing cancer risk information, and frequency) in a diverse group of women enrolled in a randomized control trial. Baseline survey data for 472 women were analyzed. The women's average age was 34 years, 59% identified as Black, 31% had graduated high school, and 75% reported a family history of any cancer. Results showed that greater family cohesion and flexibility were related to higher communication frequency and sharing cancer information. Women who reported greater self-efficacy were more likely to have gathered family history, shared cancer risk information, and communicated more frequently with relatives. Openness was not associated with communication but was related to greater family cohesion and flexibility. Adjusting for demographic variables, self-efficacy, and family cohesion significantly predicted communication frequency. Women with higher self-efficacy were also more likely to have gathered family health history about cancer and shared cancer risk information. Future research may benefit from considering family organization and self-efficacy when developing psychosocial theories that in turn inform cancer prevention interventions.

  6. Population pharmacokinetics of trastuzumab emtansine in previously treated patients with HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer (AGC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shang-Chiung; Kagedal, Matts; Gao, Yuying; Wang, Bei; Harle-Yge, Marie-Laurence; Girish, Sandhya; Jin, Jin; Li, Chunze

    2017-12-01

    Ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) is an antibody-drug conjugate comprising trastuzumab conjugated via a stable thioether linker to DM1, a highly potent cytotoxic agent. A population pharmacokinetics (PK) analysis was performed to characterize T-DM1 PK and evaluate the impact of patient characteristics on T-DM1 PK in previously treated patients with HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Following T-DM1 weekly or every three weeks dosing, T-DM1 concentration measurements (n = 780) were collected from 136 patients in the GATSBY (NCT01641939) study and analyzed using nonlinear mixed effects modeling. The influence of demographic, baseline laboratory, and disease characteristics on T-DM1 PK was examined. T-DM1 PK was best described by a two-compartment model with parallel linear and nonlinear (Michaelis-Menten) elimination from the central compartment. The final population model estimated linear clearance (CL) of 0.79 L/day, volume of distribution in the central compartment (V c ) of 4.48 L, distribution clearance (Q) of 0.62 L/day, volume of distribution in the peripheral compartment (V p ) of 1.49 L, nonlinear CL of 2.06 L/day, and KM of 1.63 μg/mL. Parameter uncertainty was low to moderate for fixed effects, except KM (estimated with poor precision). Patients with high body weight and low baseline trastuzumab concentrations had significantly faster linear CL; those with higher body weight had significantly larger V c . In a HER2-positive AGC population, T-DM1 PK was best described by a two-compartment model with parallel linear and nonlinear elimination. Baseline body weight and trastuzumab concentration were identified as significant covariates for T-DM1 PK in a HER2-positive AGC population.

  7. Screening history in women with cervical cancer in a Danish population-based screening program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirschner, Benny; Poll, Susanne; Rygaard, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the screening histories of all cervical cancers in a Danish screening population. The intention was to decide suboptimal sides of the screening program and to evaluate the significance of routine screening in the development of cervical cancer.......The aim of this study was to explore the screening histories of all cervical cancers in a Danish screening population. The intention was to decide suboptimal sides of the screening program and to evaluate the significance of routine screening in the development of cervical cancer....

  8. Germline rearrangements in families with strong family history of glioma and malignant melanoma, colon, and breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Cederquist, Kristina; Aradottir, Steina; Borg, Åke; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Shete, Sanjay; Lau, Ching C.; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Lai, Rose; Il'yasova, Dora; Houlston, Richard S.; Schildkraut, Joellen; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Wrensch, Margaret; Davis, Faith G.; Merrell, Ryan; Johansen, Christoffer; Sadetzki, Siegal; Bondy, Melissa L.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Adatto, Phyllis; Morice, Fabian; Payen, Sam; McQuinn, Lacey; McGaha, Rebecca; Guerra, Sandra; Paith, Leslie; Roth, Katherine; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Yung, Alfred; Aldape, Kenneth; Gilbert, Mark; Weinberger, Jeffrey; Colman, Howard; Conrad, Charles; de Groot, John; Forman, Arthur; Groves, Morris; Levin, Victor; Loghin, Monica; Puduvalli, Vinay; Sawaya, Raymond; Heimberger, Amy; Lang, Frederick; Levine, Nicholas; Tolentino, Lori; Saunders, Kate; Thach, Thu-Trang; Iacono, Donna Dello; Sloan, Andrew; Gerson, Stanton; Selman, Warren; Bambakidis, Nicholas; Hart, David; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Alan; Cohen, Mark; Rogers, Lisa; Nock, Charles J; Wolinsky, Yingli; Devine, Karen; Fulop, Jordonna; Barrett, Wendi; Shimmel, Kristen; Ostrom, Quinn; Barnett, Gene; Rosenfeld, Steven; Vogelbaum, Michael; Weil, Robert; Ahluwalia, Manmeet; Peereboom, David; Staugaitis, Susan; Schilero, Cathy; Brewer, Cathy; Smolenski, Kathy; McGraw, Mary; Naska, Theresa; Rosenfeld, Steven; Ram, Zvi; Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix; Umansky, Felix; Zaaroor, Menashe; Cohen, Avi; Tzuk-Shina, Tzeela; Voldby, Bo; Laursen, René; Andersen, Claus; Brennum, Jannick; Henriksen, Matilde Bille; Marzouk, Maya; Davis, Mary Elizabeth; Boland, Eamon; Smith, Marcel; Eze, Ogechukwu; Way, Mahalia; Lada, Pat; Miedzianowski, Nancy; Frechette, Michelle; Paleologos, Nina; Byström, Gudrun; Svedberg, Eva; Huggert, Sara; Kimdal, Mikael; Sandström, Monica; Brännström, Nikolina; Hayat, Amina; Tihan, Tarik; Zheng, Shichun; Berger, Mitchel; Butowski, Nicholas; Chang, Susan; Clarke, Jennifer; Prados, Michael; Rice, Terri; Sison, Jeannette; Kivett, Valerie; Duo, Xiaoqin; Hansen, Helen; Hsuang, George; Lamela, Rosito; Ramos, Christian; Patoka, Joe; Wagenman, Katherine; Zhou, Mi; Klein, Adam; McGee, Nora; Pfefferle, Jon; Wilson, Callie; Morris, Pagan; Hughes, Mary; Britt-Williams, Marlin; Foft, Jessica; Madsen, Julia; Polony, Csaba; McCarthy, Bridget; Zahora, Candice; Villano, John; Engelhard, Herbert; Borg, Ake; Chanock, Stephen K; Collins, Peter; Elston, Robert; Kleihues, Paul; Kruchko, Carol; Petersen, Gloria; Plon, Sharon; Thompson, Patricia; Johansen, C.; Sadetzki, S.; Melin, B.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Lau, Ching C.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Liu, Yanhong; Shete, Sanjay; Yu, Robert K.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Houlston, Richard S.; Hosking, Fay J.; Robertson, Lindsay; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Sloan, Andrew E.; Barnett, Gene; Devine, Karen; Wolinsky, Yingli; Lai, Rose; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sadetzki, Siegal; Yechezkel, Galit Hirsh; Bruchim, Revital Bar-Sade; Aslanov, Lili; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Broholm, Helle; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Schubert, Erica; DeAngelis, Lisa; Jenkins, Robert B.; Yang, Ping; Rynearson, Amanda; Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Henriksson, Roger; Melin, Beatrice S.; Cederquist, Kristina; Aradottir, Steina; Borg, Åke; Merrell, Ryan; Lada, Patricia; Wrensch, Margaret; Wiencke, John; Wiemels, Joe; McCoy, Lucie; McCarthy, Bridget J.; Davis, Faith G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although familial susceptibility to glioma is known, the genetic basis for this susceptibility remains unidentified in the majority of glioma-specific families. An alternative approach to identifying such genes is to examine cancer pedigrees, which include glioma as one of several cancer phenotypes, to determine whether common chromosomal modifications might account for the familial aggregation of glioma and other cancers. Methods Germline rearrangements in 146 glioma families (from the Gliogene Consortium; http://www.gliogene.org/) were examined using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. These families all had at least 2 verified glioma cases and a third reported or verified glioma case in the same family or 2 glioma cases in the family with at least one family member affected with melanoma, colon, or breast cancer.The genomic areas covering TP53, CDKN2A, MLH1, and MSH2 were selected because these genes have been previously reported to be associated with cancer pedigrees known to include glioma. Results We detected a single structural rearrangement, a deletion of exons 1-6 in MSH2, in the proband of one family with 3 cases with glioma and one relative with colon cancer. Conclusions Large deletions and duplications are rare events in familial glioma cases, even in families with a strong family history of cancers that may be involved in known cancer syndromes. PMID:24723567

  9. Family History of Breast Cancer as a Determinant of the Risk of Developing Endometrial and Ovarian Cancers: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kazerouni, N. N

    2002-01-01

    Statement of the problem: Although endometrial and ovarian cancers share some of the same reproductive, hormonal, and genetic risk factors with breast cancer, it is not well established if a family history of breast cancer...

  10. One month after diagnosis : quality of life, coping and previous functioning in siblings of children with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtzager, BA; Grootenhuis, MA; Hoekstra-Weebers, JEHM; Last, BF

    Background The aim of the present study is to describe the quality of life (QoL) of siblings of children with cancer and to predict it according to their health before the diagnosis of cancer in the ill child and their ways of coping with the illness. Methods Participants were 83 siblings from 56

  11. Does risk of endometrial cancer for women without a germline mutation in a DNA mismatch repair gene depend on family history of endometrial cancer or colorectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharati, Rajani; Jenkins, Mark A.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Marchand, Loïc Le; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Hopper, John L.; Win, Aung Ko

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether risk of endometrial cancer for women without a germline mutation in a DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene depends on family history of endometrial or colorectal cancer. Methods We retrospectively followed a cohort of 79,166 women who were recruited to the Colon Cancer Family Registry, after exclusion of women who were relatives of a carrier of a MMR gene mutation. The Kaplan-Meier failure method was used to estimate the cumulative risk of endometrial cancer. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for association between family history of endometrial or colorectal cancer and risk of endometrial cancer. Results A total of 628 endometrial cancer cases were observed, with mean age at diagnosis of 54.4 (standard deviation 15.7) years. The cumulative risk of endometrial cancer to age 70 years was estimated to be 0.94% (95% CI 0.83–1.05) for women with no family history of endometrial cancer, and 3.80% (95% CI 2.75–4.98) for women with at least one first- or second-degree relative with endometrial cancer. Compared with women without family history, we found an increased risk of endometrial cancer for women with at least one first-or second-degree relative with endometrial cancer (HR 3.66, 95% CI 2.63–5.08), and for women with one first-degree relative with colorectal cancer diagnosed at age <50 years (HR 1.48, 95% CI 1.15–1.91). Conclusion An increased risk of endometrial cancer is associated with a family history of endometrial cancer or early-onset colorectal cancer for women without a MMR gene mutation; indicating for potential underlying genetic and environmental factors shared by colorectal and endometrial cancers other than caused by MMR gene mutations. PMID:24631449

  12. The Complexity of H-wave Amplitude Fluctuations and Their Bilateral Cross-Covariance Are Modified According to the Previous Fitness History of Young Subjects under Track Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Ceballos-Villegas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Hoffmann reflex (H-wave is produced by alpha-motoneuron activation in the spinal cord. A feature of this electromyography response is that it exhibits fluctuations in amplitude even during repetitive stimulation with the same intensity of current. We herein explore the hypothesis that physical training induces plastic changes in the motor system. Such changes are evaluated with the fractal dimension (FD analysis of the H-wave amplitude-fluctuations (H-wave FD and the cross-covariance (CCV between the bilateral H-wave amplitudes. The aim of this study was to compare the H-wave FD as well as the CCV before and after track training in sedentary individuals and athletes. The training modality in all subjects consisted of running three times per week (for 13 weeks in a concrete road of 5 km. Given the different physical condition of sedentary vs. athletes, the running time between sedentary and athletes was different. After training, the FD was significantly increased in sedentary individuals but significantly reduced in athletes, although there were no changes in spinal excitability in either group of subjects. Moreover, the CCV between bilateral H-waves exhibited a significant increase in athletes but not in sedentary individuals. These differential changes in the FD and CCV indicate that the plastic changes in the complexity of the H-wave amplitude fluctuations as well as the synaptic inputs to the Ia-motoneuron systems of both legs were correlated to the previous fitness history of the subjects. Furthermore, these findings demonstrate that the FD and CCV can be employed as indexes to study plastic changes in the human motor system.

  13. Staging the Axilla with selective sentinel node biopsy in patients with previous excision of non-palpable and palpable breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruano, R.; Garcia-Talavera, J.R.; Arriba, A. de; Ramos, M.; Gonzalez-Orus, J.; Iglesias, M.; Serrano, E.; Macias, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    To present our experience in the therapeutic approach of the sentinel node biopsy (SNB) in patients with previous excision of the breast cancer, divided in non-palpable and palpable lesions, in comparison with time treatment and stagement of breast cancer. In the period 2001-2006, 138 patients with prior diagnostic excisional biopsy (96 non-palpable and 42 palpable breast cancer) and 328 without previous surgery (32 non-palpable; 296 palpable cancer) were treated. The combined technique ( 99m Tc-colloidal rhenium and isosulfan blue dye) was the approach for sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection. Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was completed only when the SLN was positive for metastasis or not located. Detection rate, if there was prior surgery, was 95% for non-palpable and 98% for palpable cancer, and 99% for one-time treatment group. Metastasis rate in the SLN was 15% in non-palpable cancer (14/91), significantly smaller than in palpable breast cancer (39% if prior surgery and 37% in one-time surgery). According to tumoral size, ALND metastasis rate was similar for T1 and T2 tumors (43-44%). In the follow-up of the groups with prior diagnostic biopsy or surgery of the breast cancer we have not found any false negative in the axilla. The detection of the SLN is also feasible in patients with previous surgery of breast cancer. Because SLN metastasis rates are significantly smaller in non-palpable lesions, the effort in screening programs for early detection of breast cancer and also in improving histopathological confirmation of malignancy with ultrasound or stereotactic guided core biopsies must continue. (orig.)

  14. [Evaluation of mortality after the analysis of the screening history in women diagnosed with infiltrating cervical cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Marta; Astudillo, Aurora; Clavero, Omar; Velasco, Julio; Ibáñez, Raquel; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2018-03-01

    To assess the impact of screening history on the incidence of cervical cancer from 2000 to 2010 in Asturias. Retrospective study. All public hospitals in Asturias. From 374 women diagnosed with cervical cancer were retrieved. Clinical information, FIGO stage and all previous cytological data were extracted from clinical and histopathological records. Proportional differences were assessed using chi-square tests. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Women between 25 and 70years had no records of a previous cytology within 5.5years of cancer diagnosis in 65.6%. This proportion was related with older age, presence of symptoms and an advance tumor stage at diagnosis. Women over 70years old had no records of a previous cytology in 83.3%. An organized cervical cancer screening program and optimal quality of the system, monitored through audits, could help to reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality in Asturias. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. [Influence of nutritional status, hormones serum levels, and family history on breast cancer development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Jiménez, Emilio; García López, Pedro A; Schmidt-Río-Valle, Jacqueline; Valenza, Carmen

    2012-10-01

    Several studies have analyzed the relation between obesity and the hormonal imbalances generated by overweight and a family history of breast cancer. All of these factors are potentially implicated in the early development of breast cancer. To verify the existence of a significant relation between the nutritional status of breast cancer patients, their hormone serum levels (estrogens, prolactin, and progesterone), and the existence of a family history of breast cancer. Retrospective data was collected from clinical records of 524 women diagnosed with breast cancer in a Spanish hospital. There was a positive association between estrogen, progesterone and prolactin serum levels and body mass index. The elevations in hormone levels occurred earlier in life among women with a family history of breast cancer. A two way ANOVA found a significant association between progesterone and prolactin levels with the age at diagnosis of breast cancer. Extreme serum levels of these hormones appear to be related to the early development of breast cancer, which in turn is influenced by the existence of a family history of cancer among those women with normal or average hormone levels.

  16. Family history, body mass index and survival in Japanese patients with stomach cancer: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Yuko; Kawai, Masaaki; Fujiya, Tsuneaki; Suzuki, Masaki; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Yamanami, Hideaki; Kakugawa, Yoichiro; Nishino, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-15

    Family history and nutritional status may affect the long-term prognosis of stomach cancer, but evidence is insufficient and inconsistent. To clarify the prognostic factors of stomach cancer, we conducted a prospective study of 1,033 Japanese patients with histologically confirmed stomach cancer who were admitted to a single hospital between 1997 and 2005. Family history of stomach cancer and pretreatment body mass index (BMI) were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Clinical data were retrieved from a hospital-based cancer registry. All patients were completely followed up until December, 2008. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated according to family history in parents and siblings and BMI category. During a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 403 all-cause and 279 stomach cancer deaths were documented. Although no association with family history was observed in the patients overall, analysis according to age group found an increased risk of all-cause death associated with a history in first degree relatives (HR = 1.61, 95% CI: 0.93-2.78, p = 0.09) and with a parental history (HR = 1.86, 95% CI: 1.06-3.26) among patients aged under 60 years at diagnosis. BMI was related to all-cause and stomach cancer death among patients aged 60 and over, showing a J-shaped pattern (HR of all-cause death = 2.28 for BMI stomach cancer, especially parental history, may affect mortality among younger stomach cancer patients, whereas nutritional status may be a prognostic factor in older patients. © 2014 UICC.

  17. Gefitinib Plus Interleukin-2 in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Previously Treated with Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bersanelli, Melissa, E-mail: melissa.bersanelli@alice.it; Buti, Sebastiano; Camisa, Roberta [Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Via Gramsci, 14, 43126 Parma (Italy); Brighenti, Matteo; Lazzarelli, Silvia [Oncology Unit, Azienda Istituti Ospitalieri di Cremona, Largo Priori, 1, 26100 Cremona (Italy); Mazza, Giancarlo [Radiology Division, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili,1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Passalacqua, Rodolfo, E-mail: melissa.bersanelli@alice.it [1Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Via Gramsci, 14, 43126 Parma (Italy)

    2014-09-30

    The activation of lymphocytes by gefitinib treatment has been described. In this phase II pilot trial, we explored the possible synergism between IL-2 and gefitinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment. From September, 2003, to November, 2006, 70 consecutive patients with advanced, progressive NSCLC, previously treated with chemotherapy, received oral gefitinib 250 mg daily. The first 39 patients received gefitinib alone (G group). The other 31 also received subcutaneous IL-2 (GIL-2 group): 1 MIU/m{sup 2} (Million International Unit/m{sup 2})twice a day on Days 1 and 2, once a day on Days 3, 4, 5 every week for four consecutive weeks with a four-week rest period. Median follow-up was 25.2 months. Grade 3–4 toxicity of gefitinib was represented by skin rash (7%), asthenia/anorexia (6%) and diarrhea (7%); patients treated with IL-2 showed grade 2–3 fever (46%), fatigue (21%) and arthralgia (13%). In the GIL-2 group and G-group, we respectively observed: an overall response rate of 16.1% (6.4% complete response) and 5.1% (only partial response); a disease control rate of 41.9% and 41%; a median time to progression of 3.5 (CI 95% = 3.2–3.8) and 4.1 (CI 95% = 2.6–5.7) months; a median overall survival of 20.1 (CI 95% = 5.1–35.1) and 6.9 (CI 95% = 4.9–8.9) months (p = 0.002); and an actuarial one-year survival rate of 54% and 30%. Skin toxicity (p < 0.001; HR = 0.29; CI 95% = 0.16–0.54) and use of IL-2 (p < 0.001; HR = 0.33; CI 95% = 0.18–0.60) were independently associated with improvement of survival. In this consecutive, non-randomized, series of advanced NSCLC patients, the use of IL-2 increased the efficacy of gefitinib.

  18. Gefitinib Plus Interleukin-2 in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Previously Treated with Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bersanelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The activation of lymphocytes by gefitinib treatment has been described. In this phase II pilot trial, we explored the possible synergism between IL-2 and gefitinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treatment. From September, 2003, to November, 2006, 70 consecutive patients with advanced, progressive NSCLC, previously treated with chemotherapy, received oral gefitinib 250 mg daily. The first 39 patients received gefitinib alone (G group. The other 31 also received subcutaneous IL-2 (GIL-2 group: 1 MIU/m2 (Million International Unit/m2twice a day on Days 1 and 2, once a day on Days 3, 4, 5 every week for four consecutive weeks with a four-week rest period. Median follow-up was 25.2 months. Grade 3–4 toxicity of gefitinib was represented by skin rash (7%, asthenia/anorexia (6% and diarrhea (7%; patients treated with IL-2 showed grade 2–3 fever (46%, fatigue (21% and arthralgia (13%. In the GIL-2 group and G-group, we respectively observed: an overall response rate of 16.1% (6.4% complete response and 5.1% (only partial response; a disease control rate of 41.9% and 41%; a median time to progression of 3.5 (CI 95% = 3.2–3.8 and 4.1 (CI 95% = 2.6–5.7 months; a median overall survival of 20.1 (CI 95% = 5.1–35.1 and 6.9 (CI 95% = 4.9–8.9 months (p = 0.002; and an actuarial one-year survival rate of 54% and 30%. Skin toxicity (p < 0.001; HR = 0.29; CI 95% = 0.16–0.54 and use of IL-2 (p < 0.001; HR = 0.33; CI 95% = 0.18–0.60 were independently associated with improvement of survival. In this consecutive, non-randomized, series of advanced NSCLC patients, the use of IL-2 increased the efficacy of gefitinib.

  19. Family history of cancer in benign brain tumor subtypes versus gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn eOstrom

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Family history is associated with gliomas, but this association has not ben established for benign brain tumors. Using information from newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients, we describe patterns of family cancer histories in patients with benign brain tumors and compare those to patients with gliomas. Methods: Newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients were identified as part of the Ohio Brain Tumor Study (OBTS. Each patient was asked to participate in a telephone interview about personal medical history, family history of cancer, and other exposures. Information was available from 33 acoustic neuroma (65%, 78 meningioma (65%, 49 pituitary adenoma (73.1% and 152 glioma patients (58.2%. The association between family history of cancer and each subtype was compared with gliomas using unconditional logistic regression models generating odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Results: There was no significant difference in family history of cancer between patients with glioma and benign subtypes. Conclusions: The results suggest that benign brain tumor may have an association with family history of cancer. More studies are warranted to disentangle the potential genetic and/or environmental causes for these diseases.

  20. Family History of Cancer in Benign Brain Tumor Subtypes Versus Gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrom, Quinn T.; McCulloh, Christopher; Chen, Yanwen; Devine, Karen; Wolinsky, Yingli

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Family history is associated with gliomas, but this association has not been established for benign brain tumors. Using information from newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients, we describe patterns of family cancer histories in patients with benign brain tumors and compare those to patients with gliomas. Methods: Newly diagnosed primary brain tumor patients were identified as part of the Ohio Brain Tumor Study. Each patient was asked to participate in a telephone interview about personal medical history, family history of cancer, and other exposures. Information was available from 33 acoustic neuroma (65%), 78 meningioma (65%), 49 pituitary adenoma (73.1%), and 152 glioma patients (58.2%). The association between family history of cancer and each subtype was compared with gliomas using unconditional logistic regression models generating odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. Results: There was no significant difference in family history of cancer between patients with glioma and benign subtypes. Conclusion: The results suggest that benign brain tumor may have an association with family history of cancer. More studies are warranted to disentangle the potential genetic and/or environmental causes for these diseases.

  1. Biweekly cetuximab and irinotecan as second-line therapy in patients with gastro-esophageal cancer previously treated with platinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoennemann, Katrine R; Bjerregaard, Jon K; Hansen, Tine P

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Until recently there has been no proven second-line therapy for patients with advanced gastro-esophageal cancer (GEC). Since 2004, Denmark has had a national health program where non-proven therapy can be offered to patients with advanced cancer, after approval by an expert panel...... appointed by the National Board of Health. This program has accelerated the introduction and implementation of new therapies in Denmark. Inspired by therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer, a combination of cetuximab and irinotecan (Cetiri) was chosen for second-line therapy in GEC patients. We report our......) on day 1 every 2nd week until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Toxicity was prospectively evaluated according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE) version 3.0. RESULTS: From December 2007 to February 2009, 50 consecutive patients received Cetiri...

  2. An analysis of discrepancies between United Kingdom cancer research funding and societal burden and a comparison to previous and United States values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Ashley J R; Delarosa, Beverly; Hur, Hannah

    2015-11-02

    Ideally, the allocation of research funding for each specific type of cancer should be proportional to its societal burden. This burden can be estimated with the metric 'years of life lost' (YLL), which combines overall mortality and age at death. Using United Kingdom data from 2010, we compared research funding from the National Cancer Research Institute to this YLL burden metric for 26 types of cancers in order to identify the discrepancies between cancer research funding allocation and societal burden. We also compared these values to United States data from 2010 and United Kingdom data published in 2005. Our study revealed a number of discrepancies between cancer research funding and burden. Some cancers are funded at levels far higher than their relative burden suggests (testicular, leukaemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma, breast, cervical, ovarian, prostate) while other cancers appear under-funded (gallbladder, lung, nasopharyngeal, intestine, stomach, pancreatic, thyroid, oesophageal, liver, kidney, bladder, and brain/central nervous system). United Kingdom funding patterns over the past decade have generally moved to increase funding to previously under-funded cancers with one notable exception showing a converse trend (breast cancer). The broad relationship between United Kingdom and United States funding patterns is similar with a few exceptions (e.g. leukaemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma, prostate, testicular cancer). There are discrepancies between cancer research funding allocation and societal burden in the United Kingdom. These discrepancies are broadly similar in both the United Kingdom and the United States and, while they appear to be improving, this is not consistent across all types of cancer.

  3. The influence of family history on prostate cancer risk : implications for clinical management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madersbacher, Stephan; Alcaraz, Antonio; Emberton, Mark; Hammerer, Peter; Ponholzer, Anton; Schroeder, Fritz H.; Tubaro, Andrea

    A family history of prostate cancer has long been identified as an important risk factor for developing the disease. This risk factor can be easily assessed in clinical practice and current guidelines recommend to initiate prostate cancer early detection 5 years earlier (i.e. around the age of 40

  4. Relative impact of previous disturbance history on the likelihood of additional disturbance in the Northern United States Forest Service USFS Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Landsat archive is increasingly being used to detect trends in the occurrence of forest disturbance. Beyond information about the amount of area affected, forest managers need to know if and how disturbance regimes change. The National Forest System (NFS) has developed a comprehensive plan for carbon monitoring that requires a detailed temporal mapping of forest disturbances across 75 million hectares. A long-term annual time series that shows the timing, extent, and type of disturbance beginning in 1990 and ending in 2011 has been prepared for several USFS Regions, including the Northern Region. Our mapping starts with an automated detection of annual disturbances using a time series of historical Landsat imagery. Automated detections are meticulously inspected, corrected and labeled using various USFS ancillary datasets. The resulting maps of verified disturbance show the timing and types are fires, harvests, insect activity, disease, and abiotic (wind, drought, avalanche) damage. Also, the magnitude of each change event is modeled in terms of the proportion of canopy cover lost. The sequence of disturbances for every pixel since 1990 has been consistently mapped and is available across the entirety of NFS. Our datasets contain sufficient information to describe the frequency of stand replacement, as well as how often disturbance results in only a partial loss of canopy. This information provides empirical insight into how an initial disturbance may predispose a stand to further disturbance, and it also show a climatic signal in the occurrence of processes such as fire and insect epidemics. Thus, we have the information to model the likelihood of occurrence of certain disturbances after a given event (i.e. if we have a fire in the past what does that do to the likelihood of occurrence of insects in the future). Here, we explore if previous disturbance history is a reliable predictor of additional disturbance in the future and we present results of applying

  5. Treatment with B vitamins and incidence of cancer in patients with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack: results of a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, Graeme J; Eikelboom, John W; Yi, Qilong; Lees, Kennedy R; Chen, Christopher; Xavier, Denis; Navarro, Jose C; Ranawaka, Udaya K; Uddin, Wasim; Ricci, Stefano; Gommans, John; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2012-06-01

    To determine the effect of B vitamin treatment on the incidence of cancer among patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack. A total of 8164 patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack were randomly allocated to double-blind treatment with 1 tablet daily of placebo or B vitamins (2 mg folic acid, 25 mg vitamin B(6), 500 μg vitamin B(12)) and followed for a median of 3.4 years for any cancer as an adverse event. There was no significant difference in the incidence of any cancer among participants assigned B vitamins compared with placebo (4.04% versus 4.59%; risk ratio, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.70-1.07) and no difference in cancer mortality (2.35% versus 2.09%; risk ratio, 1.09; 0.81-1.46). Among 1899 patients with diabetes, the incidence of cancer was higher among participants assigned B vitamins compared with placebo (5.35% versus 3.28%; adjusted risk ratio, 2.21; 1.31-3.73), whereas among 6168 patients without diabetes, the incidence of cancer was lower among participants assigned B vitamins compared with placebo (3.66% versus 5.03%; adjusted risk ratio, 0.67; 0.51-0.87; P for interaction=0.0001). Daily administration of folic acid, vitamin B(6), and vitamin B(12) to 8164 patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack for a median of 3.4 years had no significant effect, compared with placebo, on cancer incidence or mortality. However, a post hoc subgroup analysis raises the hypothesis that folic acid treatment may increase the incidence of cancer among diabetics and reduce the incidence of cancer among nondiabetics with a history of stroke or transient ischemic attack.

  6. Do individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer adhere to medical recommendations for the prevention of colorectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Karen; Mesters, Ilse; Weiss-Meilnik, Ahuva; Geva, Ravit; Rozner, Guy; Strul, Hana; Inbar, Moshe; Halpern, Zamir; Kariv, Revital

    2013-12-01

    Individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer (CRC), have a two-to-five-fold increased lifetime risk to develop CRC. Thus, they are particularly likely to benefit from adherence to medical recommendations for CRC prevention. Despite this increased risk, previous studies have shown an underutilization of colonoscopy for screening and a paucity of data on lifestyle habits that could enhance colonoscopy rates in this population. The primary aims were (a) to assess CRC screening patterns and lifestyle choices among siblings and children of CRC patients, (b) to ascertain discrepancies between actual behavior and medical recommendations, and (c) to identify family members with multiple unhealthy lifestyle habits. The secondary aim was to test for possible associations between utilization rates for CRC screening and other preventive health services. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 318 first-degree relatives (FDRs) of 164 CRC patients treated at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center. Interviews were conducted with a structured questionnaire. There was significant underutilization of colonoscopy for screening with only 73 FDRs (23.0%) adhering to the recommended screening schedule. This rate was slightly improved (N = 58, 31.9%) among subjects aged 40 years and above, although it was still far below the optimum. A similar result (N = 70, 21.7%) was observed for other cancer screening tests and routine medical check-ups. A significant association (P preventive health services, and adherence to CRC screening recommendations. CRC screening is significantly underutilized among FDRs of CRC patients. FDRs who do not comply with CRC screening guidelines, lead unhealthy lifestyles, and avoid other cancer screening tests are at increased risk and should be addressed specifically in future interventions.

  7. Validity of self-reported cancer history in the health examinees (HEXA) study: A comparison of self-report and cancer registry records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sooyoung; Shin, Aesun; Song, Daesub; Park, Jae Kyung; Kim, Yeonjung; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Kang, Daehee; Lee, Jong-Koo

    2017-10-01

    To assess the validity of the cohort study participants' self-reported cancer history via data linkage to a cancer registry database. We included 143,965 participants from the Health Examinees (HEXA) study recruited between 2004 and 2013 who gave informed consent for record linkage to the Korean Central Cancer Registry (KCCR). The sensitivity and the positive predictive value of self-reported histories of cancer were calculated and 95% confidence intervals were estimated. A total of 4,860 participants who had at least one record in the KCCR were included in the calculation of sensitivity. In addition, 3,671 participants who reported a cancer history at enrollment were included in the calculation of positive predictive value. The overall sensitivity of self-reported cancer history was 72.0%. Breast cancer history among women showed the highest sensitivity (81.2%), whereas the lowest sensitivity was observed for liver cancer (53.7%) and cervical cancer (52.1%). The overall positive predictive value was 81.9%. The highest positive predictive value was observed for thyroid cancer (96.1%) and prostate cancer (96.1%), and the lowest was observed for cervical cancer (43.7%). The accuracy of self-reported cancer history varied by cancer site and may not be sufficient to ascertain cancer incidence, especially for cervical and bladder cancers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Risk of thyroid cancer in euthyroid asymptomatic patients with thyroid nodules with an emphasis on family history of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JHwang, Shin Hye; Kim, Eun Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kwak, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    To determine the factors associated with thyroid cancer, focusing on first-degree family history and ultrasonography (US) features, in euthyroid asymptomatic patients with thyroid nodules. This retrospective study included 1310 thyroid nodules of 1254 euthyroid asymptomatic patients who underwent US-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy between November 2012 and August 2013. Nodule size and clinical risk factors- such as patient age, gender, first-degree family history of thyroid cancer, multiplicity on US and serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels - were considered together with US features to compare benign and malignant nodules. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the risk of thyroid malignancy according to clinical and US characteristics. Although all of the clinical factors and US findings were significantly different between patients with benign and malignant nodules, a solitary lesion on US (p = 0.041–0.043), US features and male gender (p < 0.001) were significant independent risk factors for thyroid malignancy in a multivariate analysis. Patient age, a first-degree family history of thyroid cancer and high normal serum TSH levels did not independently significantly increase the risk of thyroid cancer. However, multicollinearity existed between US assessment and patient age, first-degree family history of thyroid cancer and serum TSH values. Ultrasonography findings should be the primary criterion used to decide the management of euthyroid asymptomatic patients with thyroid nodules. The concept of first-degree family history as a risk factor for thyroid malignancy should be further studied in asymptomatic patients

  9. Risk of thyroid cancer in euthyroid asymptomatic patients with thyroid nodules with an emphasis on family history of thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JHwang, Shin Hye; Kim, Eun Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kwak, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    To determine the factors associated with thyroid cancer, focusing on first-degree family history and ultrasonography (US) features, in euthyroid asymptomatic patients with thyroid nodules. This retrospective study included 1310 thyroid nodules of 1254 euthyroid asymptomatic patients who underwent US-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy between November 2012 and August 2013. Nodule size and clinical risk factors- such as patient age, gender, first-degree family history of thyroid cancer, multiplicity on US and serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels - were considered together with US features to compare benign and malignant nodules. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the risk of thyroid malignancy according to clinical and US characteristics. Although all of the clinical factors and US findings were significantly different between patients with benign and malignant nodules, a solitary lesion on US (p = 0.041–0.043), US features and male gender (p < 0.001) were significant independent risk factors for thyroid malignancy in a multivariate analysis. Patient age, a first-degree family history of thyroid cancer and high normal serum TSH levels did not independently significantly increase the risk of thyroid cancer. However, multicollinearity existed between US assessment and patient age, first-degree family history of thyroid cancer and serum TSH values. Ultrasonography findings should be the primary criterion used to decide the management of euthyroid asymptomatic patients with thyroid nodules. The concept of first-degree family history as a risk factor for thyroid malignancy should be further studied in asymptomatic patients.

  10. The transtheoretical model, health belief model, and breast cancer screening among Iranian women with a family history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadegan, Ziba; Fathollahi-Dehkordi, Fariba; Hematti, Simin; Sirous, Reza; Tavakoli, Neda; Rouzbahani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Participation of Iranian women with a family history of breast cancer in breast cancer screening programs is low. This study evaluates the compliance of women having a family history of breast cancer with clinical breast exam (CBE) according to the stage of transtheoretical model (TTM) and health belief model (HBM). In this cross-sectional study, we used Persian version of champion's HBM scale to collect factors associated with TTM stages applied to screening from women over 20 years and older. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS, using descriptive statistics, Chi-square test, independent t -test, and analysis of covariance. Final sample size was 162 women. Thirty-three percent were in action/maintenance stage. Older women, family history of breast cancer in first-degree relatives, personal history of breast disease, insurance coverage, and a history of breast self-examination were associated with action/maintenance stage. Furthermore, women in action/maintenance stages had significantly fewer perceived barriers in terms of CBE in comparison to women in other stages ( P 0.05). The finding indicates that the rate of women in action/maintenance stage of CBE is low. Moreover, results show a strong association between perceived barriers and having a regular CBE. These clarify the necessity of promoting national target programs for breast cancer screening, which should be considered as the first preference for reducing CBE barriers.

  11. Breast cancer risk in relation to history of preeclampsia and hyperemesis gravidarum: Prospective analysis in the Generations Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Lauren B; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Jones, Michael E; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony J

    2018-03-08

    Preeclampsia and hyperemesis gravidarum are pregnancy complications associated with altered sex hormone levels. Previous studies suggest preeclampsia may be associated with a decreased risk of subsequent breast cancer and hyperemesis with an increased risk, but the evidence remains unclear. We used data from the Generations Study, a large prospective study of women in the United Kingdom, to estimate relative risks of breast cancer in relation to a history of preeclampsia and hyperemesis using Cox regression adjusting for known breast cancer risk factors. During 7.5 years average follow-up of 82,053 parous women, 1,969 were diagnosed with invasive or in situ breast cancer. Women who had experienced preeclampsia during pregnancy had a significantly decreased risk of premenopausal breast cancer (hazard ratio (HR) =0.67, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49-0.90) and of HER2-enriched tumours (HR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.12-0.91), but there was no association with overall (HR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.80-1.02) or postmenopausal (HR = 0.97, 95% CI: 0.85-1.12) breast cancer risk. Risk reductions among premenopausal women were strongest within 20 years since the last pregnancy with preeclampsia. Hyperemesis was associated with a significantly increased risk of HER2-enriched tumours (HR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.07-2.87), but not with other intrinsic subtypes or breast cancer risk overall. These results provide evidence that preeclampsia is associated with a decreased risk of premenopausal and HER2-enriched breast cancer and that hyperemesis, although not associated with breast cancer risk overall, may be associated with raised risk of HER2-enriched tumours. © 2018 The Authors International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.

  12. Risk of second breast cancer according to estrogen receptor status and family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchardy, Christine; Benhamou, Simone; Fioretta, Gérald; Verkooijen, Helena M; Chappuis, Pierre O; Neyroud-Caspar, Isabelle; Castiglione, Monica; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Vlastos, Georges; Rapiti, Elisabetta

    2011-05-01

    A recent study reported an increased risk of contralateral estrogen-negative breast cancer after a first primary estrogen-negative breast cancer. Our study aims to confirm this result and to evaluate how the risk of second breast cancer occurrence is affected by family history of breast cancer and anti-estrogen treatment. We included all 4,152 women diagnosed with breast cancer between 1995 and 2007, using data from the population-based Geneva Cancer Registry. We compared the incidence of second breast cancer among patients according to estrogen receptor (ER) status with that expected in the general population by age-period Standardized Incidence Ratios (SIRs). Among the cohort, 63 women developed second breast cancer. Patients with ER-positive first tumors had a decreased risk of second breast cancer occurrence (SIR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.48-0.90), whereas patients with ER-negative primary tumors had an increased risk (SIR: 1.98, 95% CI: 1.19-3.09) limited to ER-negative second tumors (SIR: 7.94, 95% CI: 3.81-14.60). Patients with positive family history had a tenfold (SIR: 9.74, 95% CI: 3.57-21.12) higher risk of ER-negative second tumor which increased to nearly 50-fold (SIR: 46.18, 95% CI: 12.58-118.22) when the first tumor was ER-negative. Treatment with anti-estrogen decreased the risk of second ER-positive tumors but not ER-negative tumors. The risk of second ER-negative breast cancer is very high after a first ER-negative tumor, in particular among women with strong family history. Surveillance and prevention of second cancer occurrence should consider both ER status of the first tumor and family history.

  13. Health education to improve repeat participation in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme: evaluation of a leaflet tailored to previous participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Boer, Hendrik; Seydel, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    Participation in breast cancer screening programmes often declines in the course of the programme. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether health education could diminish the amount of drop-outs between two screening rounds. The health education was tailored to women who previously

  14. Impact of family history of breast cancer on tumour characteristics, treatment, risk of second cancer and survival among men with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchardy, Christine; Rapiti, Elisabetta; Fioretta, Gerald; Schubert, Hyma; Chappuis, Pierre; Vlastos, Georges; Benhamou, Simone

    2013-11-12

    Male breast cancer patients have a higher risk of developing a second primary cancer, but whether this risk differs according to the family history of breast or ovarian cancers remains to be elucidated. We aimed to determine the effect of a positive family history among men diagnosed with breast cancer on tumour characteristics, treatment, second cancer occurrence and overall survival. We included 46 patients with known information on the family history of breast or ovarian cancer recorded at the Geneva Cancer Registry between 1970 and 2009. We compared patients with and without a family history with chi-square of heterogeneity, risk of second cancer with standardised incidence ratios (SIRs), and overall survival by Kaplan-Meier methods. Approximately 20% of men with breast cancer had a positive family history. No differences were observed between men with and without familial risk except that patients with increased risk were more likely to receive radiotherapy and hormone therapy when compared with patients without familial risk. This more complete therapy is likely to be explained by the heightened awareness of cancer treatment among breast cancer patients with affected family members. Six men developed a second cancer. SIRs for second cancer were not significantly increased among patients with or without familial risk (1.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.23-6.97 and 1.04, 95% CI 0.28-2.66, respectively). Overall survival was not significantly different between the two groups. Prognosis was similar among patients with or without familial risk. Our results are however based on small numbers and larger registry-based cohorts of males with precise data on familial risk are still warranted.

  15. The KinFact intervention - a randomized controlled trial to increase family communication about cancer history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodurtha, Joann N; McClish, Donna; Gyure, Maria; Corona, Rosalie; Krist, Alexander H; Rodríguez, Vivian M; Maibauer, Alisa M; Borzelleca, Joseph; Bowen, Deborah J; Quillin, John M

    2014-10-01

    Knowing family history is important for understanding cancer risk, yet communication within families is suboptimal. Providing strategies to enhance communication may be useful. Four hundred ninety women were recruited from urban, safety-net, hospital-based primary care women's health clinics. Participants were randomized to receive the KinFact intervention or the control handout on lowering risks for breast/colon cancer and screening recommendations. Cancer family history was reviewed with all participants. The 20-minute KinFact intervention, based in communication and behavior theory, included reviewing individualized breast/colon cancer risks and an interactive presentation about cancer and communication. Study outcomes included whether participants reported collecting family history, shared cancer risk information with relatives, and the frequency of communication with relatives. Data were collected at baseline, 1, 6, and 14 months. Overall, intervention participants were significantly more likely to gather family cancer information at follow-up (odds ratio [OR]: 2.73; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.01, 3.71) and to share familial cancer information with relatives (OR: 1.85; 95% CI: 1.37, 2.48). Communication frequency (1=not at all; 4=a lot) was significantly increased at follow-up (1.67 vs. 1.54). Differences were not modified by age, race, education, or family history. However, effects were modified by pregnancy status and genetic literacy. Intervention effects for information gathering and frequency were observed for nonpregnant women but not for pregnant women. Additionally, intervention effects were observed for information gathering in women with high genetic literacy, but not in women with low genetic literacy. The KinFact intervention successfully promoted family communication about cancer risk. Educating women to enhance their communication skills surrounding family history may allow them to partner more effectively with their families and ultimately

  16. Phase II trial of isoflavone in prostate-specific antigen recurrent prostate cancer after previous local therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Wei

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Data exist that demonstrate isoflavones' potent antiproliferative effects on prostate cancer cells. We evaluated the efficacy of isoflavone in patients with PSA recurrent prostate cancer after prior therapy. We postulated that isoflavone therapy would slow the rate of rise of serum PSA. Methods- Twenty patients with rising PSA after prior local therapy were enrolled in this open-labeled, Phase II, nonrandomized trial (Trial registration # NCT00596895. Patients were treated with soy milk containing 47 mg of isoflavonoid per 8 oz serving three times per day for 12 months. Serum PSA, testosterone, lipids, isoflavone levels (genistein, daidzein, and equol, and quality of life (QOL were measured at various time points from 0 to 12 months. PSA outcome was evaluated. Results- Within the mixed regression model, it was estimated that PSA had increased 56% per year before study entry and only increased 20% per year for the 12-month study period (p = 0.05. Specifically, the slope of PSA after study entry was significantly lower than that before study entry in 6 patients and the slope of PSA after study entry was significantly higher than before study entry in 2 patients. For the remaining 12 patients, the change in slope was statistically insignificant. Nearly two thirds of the patients were noted to have significant levels of free equol in their serum while on therapy. Conclusion- Dietary intervention with isoflavone supplementation may have biologic activity in men with biochemical recurrent prostate cancer as shown by a decline in the slope of PSA. This study may lend support to the literature that nutritional supplements have biologic activity in prostate cancer and therefore, further studies with these agents in randomized clinical trials should be encouraged.

  17. Incorporation of detailed family history from the Swedish Family Cancer Database into the PCPT risk calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Sonja; Fallah, Mahdi; Leach, Robin J; Thompson, Ian M; Freedland, Stephen; Hemminki, Kari; Ankerst, Donna P

    2015-02-01

    A detailed family history provides an inexpensive alternative to genetic profiling for individual risk assessment. We updated the PCPT Risk Calculator to include detailed family histories. The study included 55,168 prostate cancer cases and 638,218 controls from the Swedish Family Cancer Database who were 55 years old or older in 1999 and had at least 1 male first-degree relative 40 years old or older and 1 female first-degree relative 30 years old or older. Likelihood ratios, calculated as the ratio of risk of observing a specific family history pattern in a prostate cancer case compared to a control, were used to update the PCPT Risk Calculator. Having at least 1 relative with prostate cancer increased the risk of prostate cancer. The likelihood ratio was 1.63 for 1 first-degree relative 60 years old or older at diagnosis (10.1% of cancer cases vs 6.2% of controls), 2.47 if the relative was younger than 60 years (1.5% vs 0.6%), 3.46 for 2 or more relatives 60 years old or older (1.2% vs 0.3%) and 5.68 for 2 or more relatives younger than 60 years (0.05% vs 0.009%). Among men with no diagnosed first-degree relatives the likelihood ratio was 1.09 for 1 or more second-degree relatives diagnosed with prostate cancer (12.7% vs 11.7%). Additional first-degree relatives with breast cancer, or first-degree or second-degree relatives with prostate cancer compounded these risks. A detailed family history is an independent predictor of prostate cancer compared to commonly used risk factors. It should be incorporated into decision making for biopsy. Compared with other costly biomarkers it is inexpensive and universally available. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An handwritten signature, previous owners and circulation of a copy of Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo’s book ‘About the Natural History of the Indies’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio Manuel Rodrigues Costa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This research note aims to disclose a copy of Oviedo’s About the natural history of the Indies, also known as Summary of the natural history, published in Toledo in 1526 and currently under the custody of Municipal Library of Porto, Portugal. Special features of this copy are presented: author’s handwritten signature and some ownership marks that allow us to identify previous owners, the connections between them and to track book circulation.

  19. The prognostic value of family history among patients with urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbers, Lieke; Grotenhuis, Anne J; Aben, Katja K; Alfred Witjes, J; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Vermeulen, Sita H

    2015-03-01

    A history of urinary bladder cancer (UBC) in first-degree relatives increases UBC risk by twofold. The influence of positive family history on UBC prognosis is unknown. Here, we investigated association of first-degree UBC family history with clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of UBC patients. Detailed clinical data of 1,465 non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and 250 muscle-invasive or metastatic bladder cancer (MIBC) patients, diagnosed from 1995 to 2010, were collected through medical file review. Competing risk analyses were used to compare recurrence-free survival (RFS) and progression-free survival (PFS) of NMIBC patients according to self-reported UBC family history. Overall survival in MIBC patients was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. The added value of family history in prediction of NMIBC prognosis was quantified with Harrell's concordance-index. Hundred (6.8%) NMIBC and 14 (5.6%) MIBC patients reported UBC in first-degree relatives. Positive family history was statistically significantly associated with smaller tumor size and non-significantly with more favorable distribution of other tumor characteristics. In univariable analyses, positive family history correlated with longer RFS (p = 0.11) and PFS (p = 0.04). Hazard ratios for positive vs. negative family history after adjustment for clinicopathological characteristics were 0.75 (95% CI = 0.53-1.07) and 0.45 (95% CI = 0.18-1.12) for RFS and PFS, respectively. Five familial and 48 sporadic MIBC patients (Kaplan-Meier 10-year risk: 41% and 25%) died within 10 years. Family history did not improve the c-index of prediction models. This study shows that a first-degree family history of UBC is not clearly associated with NMIBC prognosis. Family history does not aid in prediction of NMIBC recurrence or progression. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  20. Family history of colorectal cancer is not associated with colorectal cancer survival regardless of microsatellite instability status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Amanda I.; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Campbell, Peter T.; Win, Aung Ko; Jenkins, Mark A.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Gryfe, Robert; Potter, John D.; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) in first-degree relatives have an elevated risk of developing CRC themselves, particularly CRC exhibiting high microsatellite instability (MSI-high). Given that MSI-high CRC is associated with a favorable prognosis, it is plausible that having a family history of CRC could, in turn, be favorably associated with CRC survival. Methods This study comprised N=4284 incident CRC cases enrolled in the Colon Cancer Family Registry via population-based cancer registries. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we evaluated the association between family history and both overall and disease-specific survival, accounting for MSI status and tumor site via stratified analyses and statistical adjustment. Results There was no evidence of association between family history and overall [hazard ratio (HR)=0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79-1.08] or disease-specific survival (HR=1.03, 95% CI: 0.85-1.24) for all cases combined, after adjustment for MSI status or tumor site. Only for rectal cancer cases was CRC family history modestly associated with more favorable overall survival (HR=0.75, 95% CI: 0.56-0.99). Conclusions Although individuals with a family history of CRC were more likely to have MSI-high tumors than those with non-familial disease, this did not translate to a survival benefit. Impact Overall, there is no evidence that family history of CRC is associated with CRC survival; however, specific mechanisms underlying family history may have prognostic impact and merit further study. PMID:24891550

  1. Personal history of rosacea and risk of incident cancer among women in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W-Q; Zhang, M; Danby, F W; Han, J; Qureshi, A A

    2015-07-28

    Rosacea is an inflammatory skin disease. We examined the association between personal history of rosacea and risk of incident cancers. A total of 75 088 whites were included from the Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2011). Information on clinician-diagnosed rosacea and diagnosis year was collected in 2005. All cancers other than basal cell carcinoma (BCC) were confirmed. During 1 447 205 person-years, we identified 5194 cases with internal malignancies and 5788 with skin cancers. We did not observe significant associations between personal history of rosacea and internal malignancies, except for thyroid cancer (hazard ratio (HR)=1.59, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.07-2.36). Among skin cancers, personal history of rosacea was associated with an elevated risk of BCC (HR=1.50, 95% CI=1.35-1.67). We suggest possible associations between personal history of rosacea and an increased risk of thyroid cancer and BCC. Further studies are warranted to replicate our findings and to explore the underlying mechanisms.

  2. Rh factor, family history and risk of breast cancer: a case-control study in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Alvaro L; Stoll, Mario; De Stéfani, Eduardo; Maisonneuve, Juan E; Mendoza, Beatriz A; Deneo-Pellegrini, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    To explore possible relationships among blood factors, family history of breast cancer (BC) and the risk of the disease, a case-control study was carried out in Montevideo, Uruguay. Eight hundred and one patients were interviewed, including 252 certified cases of BC and 549 frequency-matched controls. Blood groups (ABO, Rh) were obtained from medical records. Multivariate analyses were performed, adjusting for age, selected menstrual and reproductive factors, and family history of BC as well as of other cancers. We found that the absence of Rh factor (Rh-) was positively associated with the risk of BC (adjusted Odds Ratio [OR]=1.49, 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI] 1.05-2.11). Stratified analyses by family history of BC showed a strong association for Rh- with a positive history of first degree relatives (OR=3.17, 95% CI 1.06-9.47). Also stratified analyses by family history of other cancers showed a positive association for Rh- with a positive history of first degree relatives (OR=2.08, 95% CI 1.05-4.11). Regarding the implications of an inherited factor like Rh and its associations with the family history of BC, it might increase the probability to generate high-risk individuals if further studies confirm the present preliminary findings.

  3. Low-dose aspirin-associated upper gastric and duodenal ulcers in Japanese patients with no previous history of peptic ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamura, Naohiko; Ito, Yoshitsugu; Sasaki, Makoto; Iida, Akihito; Mizuno, Mari; Ogasawara, Naotaka; Funaki, Yasushi; Kasugai, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    Background Long-term administration of low-dose aspirin (LDA) is associated with a greater risk of adverse events, including gastroduodenal ulcers. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors for and assess the role of medication use in the development of peptic ulcer disease in Japanese patients with no history of peptic ulcers. Methods Consecutive outpatients receiving LDA (75?mg/day) who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy between January and December 2010 were enrolled. Cl...

  4. Phase II activity of belinostat (PXD-101), carboplatin, and paclitaxel in women with previously treated ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dizon, Don S; Damstrup, Lars; Finkler, Neil J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preclinical data show that belinostat (Bel) is synergistic with carboplatin and paclitaxel in ovarian cancer. To further evaluate the clinical activity of belinostat, carboplatin, and paclitaxel (BelCaP), a phase 1b/2 study was performed, with an exploratory phase 2 expansion planned...... end point was overall response rate (ORR), using a Simon 2 stage design. RESULTS: The median age was 60 years (range, 39-80 years), and patients had received a median of 3 prior regimens (range, 1-4). Fifty-four percent had received more than two prior platinum-based combinations, sixteen patients (46...

  5. Gefitinib versus docetaxel in previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (INTEREST): a randomised phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, E.S.; Hirsh, V.; Mok, T.

    2008-01-01

    in patients with high EGFR-gene-copy number (85 vs 89 patients) was not proven (72 vs 71 events; HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.78-1.51; p=0.62; median survival 8.4 vs 7.5 months). In the gefitinib group, the most common adverse events were rash or acne (360 [49%] vs 73 [10%]) and diarrhoea (255 [35%] vs 177 [25...... treatment for pretreated patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11/22...

  6. The contribution of reproductive factors and family history towards premenopausal breast cancer risk in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razif, S Mohd; Sulaiman, S; Hanie, S Soraya; Aina, E Nor; Rohaizak, M; Fuad, I; Nurismah, M I; Sharifah, N A

    2011-08-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Malaysian women. This study aimed to determine the reproductive for premenopausal breast cancer risk in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A case-control study was conducted in 216 histopathologically confirmed cases of premenopausal breast cancer and 216 community-based controls that were matched by age within a 5-year period and ethnicity. The results of this study showed that premenopausal breast cancer risks were strongly related to parity, number of live births and family history of breast cancer. Premenopausal women with these known reproductive and family history risk factors should take extra measures to undergo appropriate screening method for early detection of breast cancer.

  7. History of oral contraceptive use in breast cancer patients: impact on prognosis and endocrine treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huzell, Louise; Persson, Mia; Simonsson, Maria; Markkula, Andrea; Ingvar, Christian; Rose, Carsten; Jernström, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The purpose was to study oral contraceptive (OC) use in relation to breast cancer events and endocrine treatment response in a prospective population-based cohort, because it is unclear whether history of OC use impacts on prognosis in breast cancer patients. Between 2002 and 2011, 994 primary breast cancer patients without preoperative treatment were enrolled in Lund, Sweden and followed until December 2012. History of OC use was obtained from preoperative questionnaires. Tumor characteristics, clinical data, and date of death were obtained from pathology reports, patient charts, and population registries. Among the 948 patients with invasive cancer and no metastasis detected on the post-operative screen, 74 % had ever used OCs. Patients were followed for up to nine years (median follow-up 3 years), and 100 breast cancer events were recorded. Ever OC use was not associated with prognosis, irrespective of duration. However, any OC use before age 20 was associated with a threefold increased risk for breast cancer events in patients cancer events among patients who received aromatase inhibitors compared to patients who never used OCs (adjusted HR 0.37: 95 % CI 0.15-0.87). OC use was not associated with tamoxifen-response. If confirmed, history of OC use may yield valuable prognostic and treatment predictive information in addition to currently used criteria.

  8. Predictors associated with MRI surveillance screening in women with a personal history of unilateral breast cancer but without a genetic predisposition for future contralateral breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, John V; Wang, Xiaoyan; Attai, Deanna J; DiNome, Maggie L; Kusske, Amy; Hoyt, Anne C; Hurvitz, Sara A; Weidhaas, Joanne B; Steinberg, Michael L; McCloskey, Susan A

    2017-11-01

    For women with a personal history of breast cancer (PHBC), no validated mechanisms exist to calculate future contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk. The Manchester risk stratification guidelines were developed to evaluate CBC risk in women with a PHBC, primarily for surgical decision making. This tool may be informative for the use of MRI screening, as CBC risk is an assumed consideration for high-risk surveillance. Three hundred twenty-two women with a PHBC were treated with unilateral surgery within our multidisciplinary breast clinic. We calculated lifetime CBC risk using the Manchester tool, which incorporates age at diagnosis, family history, genetic mutation status, estrogen receptor positivity, and endocrine therapy use. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses (UVA/MVA) were performed, evaluating whether CBC risk predicted MRI surveillance. For women with invasive disease undergoing MRI surveillance, 66% had low, 23% above-average, and 11% moderate/high risk for CBC. On MVA, previous mammography-occult breast cancer [odds ratio (OR) 18.95, p breast tissue (OR 3.69, p = 0.0007), mastectomy versus lumpectomy (OR 3.12, p = 0.0041), and CBC risk (OR 3.17 for every 10% increase, p = 0.0002) were associated with MRI surveillance. No pathologic factors increasing ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence were significant on MVA. Although CBC risk predicted MRI surveillance, 89% with invasive disease undergoing MRI had breast cancer detectability (dense breasts and/or previous mammography-occult disease) predominate decision making. Pathologic factors important for determining ipsilateral recurrence risk, aside from age, were not associated with MRI surveillance.

  9. Smoking history as a predictive factor of treatment response in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Paul; Mok, Tony; Barraclough, Helen; Strizek, Alena; Lew, Rebecca; van Kooten, Maximiliano

    2012-07-01

    Recent trials in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) suggest that nonsmokers may benefit more from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy than will smokers. The aim of this systematic review was to assess smoking history as a predictive factor for treatment outcomes in patients with NSCLC. Relevant published literature was identified through systematic searches of databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library), oncology and thoracic journals, and abstracts from major oncology conferences using prespecified criteria. Articles reporting treatment outcomes (overall survival [OS], progression-free survival [PFS], and/or response rate) in smoking history subgroups from randomized controlled trials of targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy were reviewed. Data from 30 trials (32 articles, 4 abstracts) were included. Of these, 23 trials tested first-line therapy. Treatment arms included EGFR TKIs (13 trials), EGFR monoclonal antibodies (2 trials), non-EGFR targeted treatments (9 trials), chemotherapy (27 trials), and placebo or best supportive care only (3 trials). Smoking history definitions and analyses of its effect on treatment outcomes varied widely. Only 11 trials reported testing for a treatment-by-smoking history interaction. The available evidence supports but does not confirm smoking history as a predictive factor for the response to TKIs, particularly in previously treated patients. The evidence does not support smoking history as a predictor of response to non-EGFR-targeted therapies or chemotherapy. Smoking history and its effect on treatment response are inadequately reported. More rigorous collection, analysis, and reporting may clarify whether smoking history is a predictor of treatment response in advanced NSCLC. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Loop electrosurgical excision procedure in Greek patients with vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia and history of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzakis, E; Androutsopoulos, G; Zygouris, D; Grigoriadis, C; Arnogiannaki, N

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) in Greek patients with vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) and history of cervical cancer. Between January 2002 and January 2009, eight women with histologically confirmed VAIN and history of cervical cancer were included in our study. For the LEEP procedure we used a high frequency Electrosurgery Unit with at least 80 W output. Complete response rate, at 12 months of follow-up, was 75%. Recurrence rate, at 12 months of follow-up, was 25%. Complete response rate, at 24 months of follow up, was 62.5%. Recurrence rate, at 24 months of follow up, was 37.5%. LEEP may constitute a valuable excisional method for the treatment of VAIN in cases with a history of cervical cancer. It provides an interpretable specimen of the whole lesion within a few minutes. It needs a short period of training and has low cost.

  11. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  12. Cancer survivorship: history, quality-of-life issues, and the evolving multidisciplinary approach to implementation of cancer survivorship care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Mary Ann

    2009-07-01

    To discuss the history of cancer survivorship, related quality-of-life issues, and cancer survivorship care plans (CSCPs). CINAHL, PubMed, published articles, and Web sites. A cancer survivor is an individual who has been diagnosed with cancer, regardless of when that diagnosis was received, who is still living. Cancer survivorship is complex and involves many aspects of care. Major areas of concern for survivors are recurrence, secondary malignancies, and long-term treatment sequelae that affect quality of life. Four essential components of survivorship care are prevention, surveillance, intervention, and coordination. A CSCP should address the survivor's long-term care, such as type of cancer, treatments received, potential side effects, and recommendations for follow-up. It should include preventive practices, how to maintain health and well-being, information on legal protections regarding employment and health insurance, and psychosocial services in the community. Survivorship care for patients with cancer requires a multidisciplinary effort and team approach. Enhanced knowledge of long-term complications of survivorship is needed for healthcare providers. Further research on evidence-based practice for cancer survivorship care also is necessary. Nurses can review CSCPs with patients, instruct them when to seek treatment, promote recommended surveillance protocols, and encourage behaviors that lead to cancer prevention and promote well-being for cancer survivors.

  13. Developmental history of the extent of lymph node dissection in pancreatic cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GOU Shanmiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the digestive malignant tumors with the worst prognosis and has an overall 5-year survival rate as low as 5%. Even though radical resection is performed, the 5-year survival rate is only about 20%. Recurrence and metastasis are the most important influencing factors for the postoperative survival of patients with pancreatic cancer. Lymph node metastasis is an important feature of pancreatic cancer, and the extent of lymph node dissection has always been a hot topic in radical surgery for pancreatic cancer. This article summarizes the history and current status of the extent of lymph node dissection in pancreatic cancer and points out that standardized lymph node dissection is a key factor for improving patients′ prognosis after pancreatic cancer surgery.

  14. Safety and efficacy of the addition of simvastatin to panitumumab in previously treated KRAS mutant metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Jara M; Krens, Lisanne L; Bos, Monique M; Portielje, Johanneke E A; Batman, Erdogan; van Wezel, Tom; Morreau, Hans; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Gelderblom, Hans

    2015-09-01

    Panitumumab has proven efficacy in patients with metastatic or locally advanced colorectal cancer patients, provided that they have no activating KRAS mutation in their tumour. Simvastatin blocks the mevalonate pathway and thereby interferes with the post-translational modification of KRAS. We hypothesize that the activity of the RAS-induced pathway in patients with a KRAS mutation might be inhibited by simvastatin. This would theoretically result in increased sensitivity to panitumumab, potentially comparable with tumours with wild-type KRAS. A Simon two-stage design single-arm, phase II study was designed to test the safety and efficacy of the addition of simvastatin to panitumumab in colorectal cancer patients with a KRAS mutation after failing fluoropyrimidine-based, oxaliplatin-based and irinotecan-based therapy. The primary endpoint of this study was the proportion of patients alive and free from progression 11 weeks after the first administration of panitumumab, aiming for at least 40%, which is comparable with, although slightly lower than, that in KRAS wild-type patients in this setting. If this 40% was reached, then the study would continue into the second step up to 46 patients. Explorative correlative analysis for mutations in the KRAS and related pathways was carried out. One of 14 patients was free from progression at the primary endpoint time. The median progression-free survival was 8.4 weeks and the median overall survival status was 19.6 weeks. We conclude that the concept of mutant KRAS phenotype expression modulation with simvastatin was not applicable in the clinic.

  15. Phase I study of cetuximab, irinotecan, and vandetanib (ZD6474 as therapy for patients with previously treated metastastic colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Meyerhardt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD and safety, and explore efficacy and biomarkers of vandetanib with cetuximab and irinotecan in second-line metastatic colorectal cancer. METHODS: Vandetanib (an orally bioavailable VEGFR-2 and EGFR tyrosine kinases inhibitor was combined at 100 mg, 200 mg, or 300 mg daily with standard dosed cetuximab and irinotecan (3+3 dose-escalation design. Ten patients were treated at the MTD and plasma angiogenesis biomarkers (VEGF, PlGF, bFGF, sVEGFR1, sVEGFR2, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, SDF1α were measured before and after treatment. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients were enrolled at 4 dose levels and the MTD. Two dose-limiting toxicities (grade 3 QTc prolongation and diarrhea were detected at 300 mg of vandetanib with cetuximab and irinotecan resulting in 200 mg being the MTD. Seven percent of patients had a partial response, 59% stable disease and 34% progressed. Median progression-free survival was 3.6 months (95% CI, 3.2-5.6 and median overall survival was 10.5 months (95% CI, 5.1-20.7. Toxicities were fairly manageable with grade 3 or 4 diarrhea being most prominent (30%. Vandetanib and cetuximab treatment induced a sustained increase in plasma PlGF and a transient decrease in plasma sVEGFR1, but no changes in plasma VEGF and sVEGFR2. CONCLUSIONS: Vandetanib can be safely combined with cetuximab and irinotecan for metastatic colorectal cancer. Exploratory biomarker analyses suggest differential effects on certain plasma biomarkers for VEGFR inhibition when combined with EGFR blockade and a potential correlation between baseline sVEGFR1 and response. However, while the primary endpoint was safety, the observed efficacy raises concern for moving forward with this combination. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00436072.

  16. Psychological impact of genetic counseling for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: the role of cancer history, gender, age, and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenbring, Monika I; Kreddig, Nina; Deges, Gabriele; Epplen, Joerg T; Kunstmann, Erdmute; Stemmler, Susanne; Schulmann, Karsten; Willert, Joerg; Schmiegel, Wolf

    2011-04-01

    We prospectively examined the impact of an initial interdisciplinary genetic counseling (human geneticist, oncologist, and psycho-oncologist) on feelings of anxiety with a special focus on subgroups related to personal cancer history, gender, age, and education. At baseline, cancer-affected men revealed a significantly higher level of anxiety than unaffected men (pDepression Scale-A cases can be predicted by general distress (Brief Symptom Inventory) as well as by hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer-related cognitions of intrusion and avoidance (impact of event scale) with a correct classification of 86%. Although initial hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer counseling leads to an overall reduction of anxiety, differential effects of cancer history, gender, and age focus on subgroups of cancer-affected men, who may display unexpectedly high anxiety scores at baseline. Especially younger men do not seem to reduce this high anxiety level. Baseline anxiety was mainly determined by maladaptive situation-specific cognitions. Therefore, consulters should be more aware of anxiety-related cognitions in cancer-affected younger men.

  17. Long-term effects of first degree family history of breast cancer in young women: Recurrences and bilateral breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobsen, Jan J.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Brinkhuis, Mariël; Ong, Francisca; Struikmans, Henk

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of first degree relative (FDR) of young breast cancer patients. Methods. Data were used from our prospective population-based cohort study which started in 1983. The family history (FH) was registered with regard to FDR: the presence or

  18. Clinical potential of boron neutron capture therapy for locally recurrent inoperable previously irradiated head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Diana; Quah, Daniel SC; Leech, Michelle; Marignol, Laure

    2015-01-01

    This review compares the safety and efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of previously irradiated, inoperable locoregional recurrent HNC patients and compares BNCT against the standard treatment of platinum-based chemotherapy. Our analysis of published clinical trials highlights efficacy of BNCT associated with mild side effects. However, the use of BNCT should be explored in stratified randomised trials. - Highlights: • BNCT can prolong median overall survival. • BNCT can be associated with severe adverse effects. • BNCT may be comparable to chemotherapy-based regimens. • BNCT may be comparable to re-irradiation techniques regimens in patients with low performance status.

  19. Specifying exposure classification parameters for sensitivity analysis: family breast cancer history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Jurek

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Anne M Jurek,1,2 Timothy L Lash,3 George Maldonado41Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2University of Minnesota Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 3Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; 4Division of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis, MN,  USAAbstract: One of the challenges to implementing sensitivity analysis for exposure misclassification is the process of specifying the classification proportions (eg, sensitivity and specificity. The specification of these assignments is guided by three sources of information: estimates from validation studies, expert judgment, and numerical constraints given the data. The purpose of this teaching paper is to describe the process of using validation data and expert judgment to adjust a breast cancer odds ratio for misclassification of family breast cancer history. The parameterization of various point estimates and prior distributions for sensitivity and specificity were guided by external validation data and expert judgment. We used both nonprobabilistic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses to investigate the dependence of the odds ratio estimate on the classification error. With our assumptions, a wider range of odds ratios adjusted for family breast cancer history misclassification resulted than portrayed in the conventional frequentist confidence interval.Keywords: breast cancer, family cancer history, sensitivity analysis, sensitivity, specificity

  20. Self-nonself concept for cancer and diseases previously known as "autoimmune" diseases (illegitimate transferases/plasma exchange).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, P

    1978-11-01

    The illegitimate glycosphingolipid antigens of the P blood group system and of the Forssman (Fs) tissue antigen in adenocarcinoma which are foreign to the host suggest the self-nonself concept which applies also to numerous other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, gluomerulonephritis, and idiopathic acute hemolytic anemia. In the presence of the glycosphingolipid antigens such as ABO, P, and Fs, the normal serum of the homozygote recessive precursor contains antibodies for the missing antigen(s). The expected antibody to the Fs antigen was present in about 75% of normal men and women. In cancer sera, the incidence of anti-Fs was decreased to about 35-40%. On testing the normal population anti-Fs was present in 90% of the sera in the youngest group, and this value gradually diminished in the older groups; the incidence of the antibody in the 70-year age group was to about 60%. The rate of loss of anti-Fs with increasing years appears to parallel the gradual loss of anti-A and anti-B isoagglutinin titers. This phenomenon may be associated with the gradual diminution of protein synthesis with aging or the continuous accumulation of soluble immune complexes in the serum, or both. It is suggested that the self-nonself concept is also the basis for the pathogenesis of rhematoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, idiopathic acute hemolytic anemia, and numerous other conditions classified as "autoimmune" diseases. Some of these diseases are induced by viruses or drugs or both. When a virus or drug attaches itself to the membrane of a tissue cell, the self is converted to nonself which, in rheumatoid arthiritis, alters its self Ig to nonself Ig.

  1. Acculturation, Behavioral Factors, and Family History of Breast Cancer among Mexican and Mexican-American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodora, Jesse N; Cooper, Renee; Talavera, Gregory A; Gallo, Linda; Meza Montenegro, María Mercedes; Komenaka, Ian; Natarajan, Loki; Gutiérrez Millán, Luis Enrique; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Bondy, Melissa; Brewster, Abenaa; Thompson, Patricia; Martinez, María Elena

    2015-01-01

    Incidence rates for breast cancer are higher among Mexican-American (MA) women in the United States than women living in Mexico. Studies have shown higher prevalence of breast cancer risk factors in more acculturated than less acculturated Hispanic/Latinas in the United States. We compared the prevalence of behavioral risk factors and family history of breast cancer by level of acculturation and country of residence in women of Mexican descent. Data were collected from 1,201 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients living in Mexico (n = 581) and MAs in the United States (n = 620). MA participants were categorized into three acculturation groups (Spanish dominant, bilingual, and English dominant); women living in Mexico were used as the referent group. The prevalence of behavioral risk factors and family history of breast cancer were assessed according to acculturation level, adjusting for age at diagnosis and education. In the adjusted models, bilingual and English-dominant MAs were significantly more likely to have a body mass index of 30 kg/m(2) or greater, consume more than one alcoholic beverage a week, and report having a family history of breast cancer than women living in Mexico. All three U.S. acculturation groups were significantly more likely to have lower total energy expenditure (≤533 kcal/d) than women in Mexico. English-dominant women were significantly less likely to ever smoke cigarettes than the Mexican group. Our findings add to the limited scientific literature on the relationships among acculturation, health behavior, and family history of breast cancer in Mexican and MA women. Copyright © 2015 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Low-dose aspirin-associated upper gastric and duodenal ulcers in Japanese patients with no previous history of peptic ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Naohiko; Ito, Yoshitsugu; Sasaki, Makoto; Iida, Akihito; Mizuno, Mari; Ogasawara, Naotaka; Funaki, Yasushi; Kasugai, Kunio

    2013-11-12

    Long-term administration of low-dose aspirin (LDA) is associated with a greater risk of adverse events, including gastroduodenal ulcers. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors for and assess the role of medication use in the development of peptic ulcer disease in Japanese patients with no history of peptic ulcers. Consecutive outpatients receiving LDA (75 mg/day) who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy between January and December 2010 were enrolled. Clinical parameters, peptic ulcer history, concomitant drugs, the presence of Helicobacter pylori infection, reason for endoscopy, and endoscopic findings were analysed. Of 226 total patients, 14 (6.2%) were endoscopically diagnosed with peptic ulcer. Age, sex, current smoking status, current alcohol consumption, endoscopic gastric mucosal atrophy, and abdominal symptoms were not significantly associated with peptic ulcers. Diabetes mellitus was more frequent (42.9% vs. 16.5%; P = 0.024) in patients with peptic ulcers than in those without peptic ulcers. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, co-treatment with anticoagulants or proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) was significantly associated with increased and decreased risk for peptic ulcer, respectively (odds ratio [OR], 5.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19 - 28.99; P = 0.03 and OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.02 - 0.73; P = 0.02, respectively). Co-treatment with additional antiplatelet agents, H2-receptor antagonists, angiotensin II Type 1 receptor blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was not associated with peptic ulcer development. The use of PPIs reduces the risk of developing gastric or duodenal ulcers in Japanese patients taking LDA without pre-existing gastroduodenal ulcers. However, this risk is significantly increased in both patients ingesting anticoagulants and patients with diabetes. These results may help identify

  3. Association between testicular microlithiasis, testicular cancer, cryptorchidism and history of ascending testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatiou Konstantinos

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To prospectively determine the prevalence of testicular microlithiasis in symptomatic patients who were referred for scrotal ultrasound examination and to evaluate the possible association of testicular microlithiasis with testicular cancer and other conditions such as cryptorchidism or history of ascending testis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 391 men who were referred to our institutions between July 2002 and May 2005 for any type of symptoms from the testicles, underwent physical and scrotal ultrasound examination. The presence of testicular microlithiasis, the number of lesions and the involvement of both testicles in relation to the symptoms as well as the coexistence of other lesions were studied. RESULTS: Eighteen (4.6% of 391 men enrolled into the study had testicular microlithiasis. Two out of the eighteen patients (11% had concomitant testicular cancer, which was confirmed by pathological evaluation of the orchidectomy specimen. One of the patients with testicular microlithiasis presented a rising in biochemical tumor markers (LDH, and HCG and underwent orchidectomy one year later. Five of the remaining 373 (1.3% patients without microlithiasis were diagnosed with testicular cancer. Thirty six men reported having a history of ascending testis, but none of them was found with testicular cancer. Two cases of testicular torsion in a cryptorchid position had testicular microlithiasis, but the orchidectomy specimen (after surgery was negative for testicular cancer. The correlation between testicular cancer and testicular microlithiasis found in our study was statistically significant (p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: There seems to be an association between testicular microlithiasis and testicular cancer.

  4. Low glycaemic index diets improve glucose tolerance and body weight in women with previous history of gestational diabetes: a six months randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Sangeetha; Arshad, Fatimah; Abdul Ghani, Rohana; Wahab, Norasyikin A; Safii, Nik Shanita; Nisak, Mohd Yusof Barakatun; Chinna, Karuthan; Kamaruddin, Nor Azmi

    2013-05-24

    Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) increases risks for type 2 diabetes and weight management is recommended to reduce the risk. Conventional dietary recommendations (energy-restricted, low fat) have limited success in women with previous GDM. The effect of lowering Glycaemic Index (GI) in managing glycaemic variables and body weight in women post-GDM is unknown. To evaluate the effects of conventional dietary recommendations administered with and without additional low-GI education, in the management of glucose tolerance and body weight in Asian women with previous GDM. Seventy seven Asian, non-diabetic women with previous GDM, between 20- 40y were randomised into Conventional healthy dietary recommendation (CHDR) and low GI (LGI) groups. CHDR received conventional dietary recommendations only (energy restricted, low in fat and refined sugars, high-fibre). LGI group received advice on lowering GI in addition. Fasting and 2-h post-load blood glucose after 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (2HPP) were measured at baseline and 6 months after intervention. Anthropometry and dietary intake were assessed at baseline, three and six months after intervention. The study is registered at the Malaysian National Medical Research Register (NMRR) with Research ID: 5183. After 6 months, significant reductions in body weight, BMI and waist-to-hip ratio were observed only in LGI group (Pweight loss ≥5% in LGI compared to CHDR group (33% vs. 8%, P=0.01). Changes in 2HPP were significantly different between groups (LGI vs. CHDR: median (IQR): -0.2(2.8) vs. +0.8 (2.0) mmol/L, P=0.025). Subjects with baseline fasting insulin≥2 μIU/ml had greater 2HPP reductions in LGI group compared to those in the CHDR group (-1.9±0.42 vs. +1.31±1.4 mmol/L, Pweight reduction as compared to conventional low-fat diets with similar energy prescription.

  5. The impact of stratifying by family history in colorectal cancer screening programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Goede (S. Lucas); L. Rabeneck (L.); I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); A. Zauber (Ann); L.F. Paszat (Lawrence F.); J.S. Hoch (Jeffrey S.); J.H.E. Yong (Jean H.E.); F. Van Hees (Frank); J. Tinmouth (Jill); M. van Ballegooijen (Marjolein)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn the province-wide colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program in Ontario, Canada, individuals with a family history of CRC are offered colonoscopy screening and those without are offered guaiac fecal occult blood testing (gFOBT, Hemoccult II). We used microsimulation modeling to

  6. Is prostate cancer different in black men? Answers from 3 natural history models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsodikov, Alex; Gulati, Roman; de Carvalho, Tiago M; Heijnsdijk, Eveline A M; Hunter-Merrill, Rachel A; Mariotto, Angela B; de Koning, Harry J; Etzioni, Ruth

    2017-06-15

    Black men in the United States have substantially higher prostate cancer incidence rates than the general population. The extent to which this incidence disparity is because prostate cancer is more prevalent, more aggressive, and/or more frequently diagnosed in black men is unknown. The authors estimated 3 independently developed models of prostate cancer natural history in black men and in the general population using an updated reconstruction of prostate-specific antigen screening, based on the National Health Interview Survey in 2005 and on prostate cancer incidence data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program during 1975 through 2000. By using the estimated models, the natural history of prostate cancer was compared between black men and the general population. The models projected that from 30% to 43% (range across models) of black men develop preclinical prostate cancer by age 85 years, a risk that is (relatively) 28% to 56% higher than that in the general population. Among men who had preclinical disease onset, black men had a similar risk of diagnosis (range, 35%-49%) compared with the general population (32%-44%), but their risk of progression to metastatic disease by the time of diagnosis was from 44% to 75% higher than that in the general population. Prostate cancer incidence patterns implicate higher incidence of preclinical disease and higher risk of metastatic progression among black men. The findings suggest screening black men earlier than white men and support further research into the benefit-harm tradeoffs of more aggressive screening policies for black men. Cancer 2017;123:2312-2319. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  7. Tooth agenesis association with self-reported family history of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchler, E C; Lips, A; Tannure, P N; Ho, B; Costa, M C; Granjeiro, J M; Vieira, A R

    2013-02-01

    It has been proposed that tooth agenesis and cancer development share common molecular pathways. We performed a cross-sectional study to investigate the epidemiological and molecular association between tooth agenesis and self-reported family history of cancer. Eighty-two individuals with tooth agenesis and 328 individuals with no birth defect were recruited from the same institution. Tooth agenesis was assessed in permanent teeth and was defined based on the age of the participants and when initial tooth formation should be radiographically visible. We also investigated the role of genes involved in dental development that have been implicated in tumorigenesis, and 14 markers in AXIN2, FGF3, FGF10, and FGFR2 were genotyped. Individuals with tooth agenesis had an increased risk of having a family history of cancer (p = 0.00006; OR = 2.7; 95% C.I., 1.6-4.4). There were associations between AXIN2, FGF3, FGF10, and FGFR2 with tooth agenesis [i.e., individuals who carried the polymorphic allele of FGFR2 (rs1219648) presented higher risk for having premolar agenesis (p = 0.02; OR = 1.8; 95% C.I., 1.1-3.0)]. In conclusion, tooth agenesis was associated with positive self-reported family history of cancer and with variants in AXIN2, FGF3, FGF10, and FGFR2. Prospective studies are needed to confirm if tooth agenesis can be used as a risk marker for cancer.

  8. Clinical and diagnosis characteristics of breast cancers in women with a history of radiotherapy in the first 30years of life: A French multicentre cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoor-Goldschmidt, C; Supiot, S; Oberlin, O; Helfre, S; Vigneron, C; Brillaud-Meflah, V; Bernier, V; Laprie, A; Ducassou, A; Claude, L; Mahé, M A; de Vathaire, F

    2017-08-01

    Irradiation (>3Gy) to the breast or axillae before 30years of age increases the risk of secondary breast cancer (SBC). The purpose of this article is to describe the clinical characteristics of SBC and the way of diagnosis in young women (before the age of national screening) in France who had received previous radiotherapy for a childhood or a young adulthood cancer. This retrospective, multicentre study reviewed the medical records of women with SBC before the age of the national screening who had received irradiation (≥3Gy) on part or all of the breast before 30years of age, for any type of tumour except BC. A total of 121 SBC were detected in 104 women with previous radiotherapy. Twenty percent of SBC were detected during regular breast screening and 16% of the women had a regular radiological follow-up. Our results points out that the main proportion of childhood cancer survivors did not benefit from the recommended breast cancer screening. This result is comparable to other previously published studies in other countries. A national screening programme is necessary and should take into account the patient's age, family history, personal medical history and previous radiotherapy to reduce the number of SBC diagnosed at an advanced stage. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. An exploration of Papanicolaou smear history and behavior of patients with newly diagnosed cervical cancer in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hui-Hsin; Chao, Angel; Liao, Mei-Nan; Lin, Jr-Rung; Huang, Huei-Jean; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Wei-ju; Kuo, Hsiao-Ying; Lai, Chyong-Huey

    2010-01-01

    Papanicolaou (Pap) smear is an effective preventive measure in reducing cervical cancer incidence and mortality. The national health insurance made free annual cervical screening available to all Taiwanese women 30 years or older. The objective of this study was to increase knowledge about Pap smear screening history, attitudes, and behavior in Taiwanese women with newly diagnosed cervical cancer. One hundred forty-one women with newly diagnosed cervical cancer were prospectively enrolled between January 2007 and June 2008. Data were collected via a questionnaire survey, which included (1) demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, (2) reasons for receiving or not receiving a Pap smear test, and (3) knowledge of and sources of information on Pap smears. Of the 141 patients, 62 (44.0%) had never had a Pap smear before diagnosis, 10 (7.1%) did not know about the Pap smear, and only 30 (21%) reported having had more than 3 Pap smears in their lifetime. Stepwise logistic regression identified perceived potential pain, fear of embarrassment, and the number of sexual partners of the male consort as independently associated with the number of previous Pap smears (0 vs > or =1). Our results highlight the need for a better understanding of women's knowledge and experiences with Pap smear screening and developing more comfortable methods of cervical cancer screening. Education strategies should be focused on improving access to never-users. The need for a better understanding of women's experiences with Pap smear screening is highlighted.

  10. Internet-based physical activity intervention for women with a family history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Sheri J; Dunsiger, Shira I; Marinac, Catherine R; Marcus, Bess H; Rosen, Rochelle K; Gans, Kim M

    2015-12-01

    Physical inactivity is a modifiable risk factor for breast cancer. Physical activity interventions that can be delivered through the Internet have the potential to increase participant reach. The efficacy of an Internet-based physical activity intervention was tested in a sample of women at an elevated risk for breast cancer. A total of 55 women with at least 1 first-degree relative with breast cancer (but no personal history of breast cancer) were randomized to a 3-month theoretically grounded Internet-based physical activity intervention or an active control arm. Minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity, psychosocial mediators of physical activity adoption and maintenance, as well as worry and perceived risk of developing breast cancer were assessed at baseline, 3-month, and 5-month follow up. Participants were on average 46.2 (SD = 11.4) years old with a body mass index of 27.3 (SD = 4.8) kg/m2. The intervention arm significantly increased minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity compared to the active control arm at 3 months (213 vs. 129 min/week) and 5 months (208 vs. 119 min/week; both ps Internet-based physical activity intervention may substantially increase physical activity in women with a family history of breast cancer. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Safety and tolerability of combination therapy vs. standard treatment alone for patients with previously treated non-small cell lung cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. James Gulley is leading a team to test the safety and tolerability of the combination of nivolumab and CV301 to see if it can improve the survival for patientis with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.  Learn more...

  12. Breast magnetic resonance imaging significance for breast cancer diagnostic in women with genetic predisposition and a strong family history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Karpova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Screening of breast cancer with mammography recommended to women over 40 has been shown to decrease breast cancer mortality. But mam- mography has much lower accuracy in young women with BRCA1/2 mutations and women with a strong family history. Therefore new screening methods in young high-risk women are necessary to detect early-stage cancer.

  13. Reproductive history and oral contraceptive use in relation to risk of triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Amanda I; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Prentice, Ross; McTiernan, Anne; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Kuller, Lewis H; Adams-Campbell, Lucile L; Lane, Dorothy; Stefanick, Marcia L; Vitolins, Mara; Kabat, Geoffrey C; Rohan, Thomas E; Li, Christopher I

    2011-03-16

    Triple-negative (ie, estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor, and HER2 negative) breast cancer occurs disproportionately among African American women compared with white women and is associated with a worse prognosis than ER-positive (ER+) breast cancer. Hormonally mediated risk factors may be differentially related to risk of triple-negative and ER+ breast cancers. Using data from 155,723 women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative, we assessed associations between reproductive and menstrual history, breastfeeding, oral contraceptive use, and subtype-specific breast cancer risk. We used Cox regression to evaluate associations with triple-negative (N = 307) and ER+ (N = 2610) breast cancers and used partial likelihood methods to test for differences in subtype-specific hazard ratios (HRs). Reproductive history was differentially associated with risk of triple-negative and ER+ breast cancers. Nulliparity was associated with decreased risk of triple-negative breast cancer (HR = 0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.37 to 0.97) but increased risk of ER+ breast cancer (HR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.20 to 1.52). Age-adjusted absolute rates of triple-negative breast cancer were 2.71 and 1.54 per 10,000 person-years in parous and nulliparous women, respectively; by comparison, rates of ER+ breast cancer were 21.10 and 28.16 per 10,000 person-years in the same two groups. Among parous women, the number of births was positively associated with risk of triple-negative disease (HR for three births or more vs one birth = 1.46, 95% CI = 0.82 to 2.63) and inversely associated with risk of ER+ disease (HR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.74 to 1.04). Ages at menarche and menopause were modestly associated with risk of ER+ but not triple-negative breast cancer; breastfeeding and oral contraceptive use were not associated with either subtype. The association between parity and breast cancer risk differs appreciably for ER+ and triple-negative breast cancers. These findings require further

  14. Does family history of cancer modify the effects of lifestyle risk factors on esophageal cancer? a population-based case-control study in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ming, W.; Zhang, Z.F.; Kampman, E.; Zhou, Y.I.; Han, R.Q.; Yang, J.; Zhang, X.F.; Gu, X.P.; Liu, Ai-Min; Veer, van 't P.; Kok, F.J.; Zhao, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    A population-based case–control study on esophageal cancer has been conducted since 2003 in Jiangsu Province, China. The aim of this analysis is to provide further evidence on the relationship between family history of cancer in first-degree relatives (FH-FDRs) and the risk of esophageal cancer, and

  15. Does family history of cancer modify the effects of lifestyle risk factors on esophageal cancer? A population-based case-control study in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, M.; Zhang, Z.F.; Kampman, E.; Zhou, J.Y.; Han, R.Q.; Yang, J.; Zhang, X.F.; Gu, X.P.; Liu, A.M.; Veer, P. van 't; Kok, F.J.; Zhao, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    A population-based case-control study on esophageal cancer has been conducted since 2003 in Jiangsu Province, China. The aim of this analysis is to provide further evidence on the relationship between family history of cancer in first-degree relatives (FH-FDRs) and the risk of esophageal cancer, and

  16. Impact of family history of gastric cancer on colorectal neoplasias in young Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, K; Shinozaki, M; Toyoshima, O; Toyoshima, A; Matsumoto, S; Saisho, T; Tsurita, G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate risk factors for the development of colorectal neoplasia in the young population. In particular, we focused on the family history of gastric cancer. Young Japanese subjects aged 30-49 years old who underwent colonoscopy for the first time from August 2007 to August 2008 were included in this study. A total of 300 unselected consecutive patients (mean age 40.5 years) were eligible for analysis, and family history of colorectal cancer and gastric cancer, sex, age, body mass index, positivity of faecal occult blood test and the presence of symptoms were evaluated. Risk factors for developing colorectal adenoma and/or carcinoma were assessed. Colorectal neoplasias were detected in 83 (27.7%) cases. Two were found to have invasive carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that family history of gastric cancer (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.12-3.92, P = 0.02) was an independent risk factor for the development of colorectal neoplasia, as well as male sex (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.10-3.27, P = 0.02), older age (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.18-3.55, P = 0.01) and positive faecal occult blood test (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.14-3.48, P = 0.02). In the young population under 50 years of age, a family history of gastric cancer is an independent risk factor for the development of colorectal neoplasia. © 2012 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2012 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  17. Family history of esophageal cancer increases the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tiantian; Cheng, Hongwei; Chen, Xingdong; Yuan, Ziyu; Yang, Xiaorong; Zhuang, Maoqiang; Lu, Ming; Jin, Li; Ye, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    A population-based case-control was performed to explore familial aggregation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Family history of cancer was assessed by a structured questionnaire, and from which 2 cohorts of relatives of cases and controls were reconstructed. Unconditional logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression were applied for case-control design and reconstructed cohort design, respectively. We observed a close to doubled risk of ESCC associated with a positive family history of esophageal cancer among first degree relatives (odds ratio [OR] = 1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42–2.41), after adjusting age, sex, family size and other confounders. The excess risks of ESCC increased with the increasing of first-degree relatives affected by esophageal cancer (p < 0.001). In particular, those individuals whose both parents with esophageal cancer had an 8-fold excess risk of ESCC (95% CI: 1.74–36.32). The reconstructed cohort analysis showed that the cumulative risk of esophageal cancer to age 75 was 12.2% in the first-degree relatives of cases and 7.0% in those of controls (hazard ratio = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.54–2.37). Our results suggest family history of esophageal cancer significantly increases the risk for ESCC. Future studies are needed to understand how the shared genetic susceptibility and/or environmental exposures contribute to the observed excess risk. PMID:26526791

  18. Heavy smoking history interacts with chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer prognosis. A retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shitara, Kohei; Hatooka, Shunzo; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2010-01-01

    Smoking is a well-known risk factor for esophageal cancer. However, there are few reports that directly evaluate smoking as a prognostic factor for esophageal cancer. Moreover, scarce evidence is available on whether smoking interacts with major treatment modalities of esophageal cancer. In this study we retrospectively analyzed 364 patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer who were treated between 2001 and 2005 at our institution. Background characteristics, including smoking history, were analyzed as potential prognostic factors. Of the 363 patients, 76 patients (20.9%) were non-smokers or light smokers (non-heavy), whereas 287 patients (79.1%) were heavy smokers. The 5-year survival rate for non-heavy smokers and heavy smokers was 61.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 49.1-72.2) vs 44.6% (95% CI: 38.2-50.9), respectively. In a multivariate Cox model (adjusted for age, gender, performance status, alcohol consumption, histology, tumor length, International Union Against Cancer [UICC] stage, and treatment), the hazard ratio for heavy smokers in comparison with non-heavy smokers was 1.73 (95% CI: 1.12-2.68; P=0.013). When we stratified by treatment method, heavy smoking was significantly associated with poor survival only in patients treated by chemoradiotherapy (hazard ratio, 2.43; 95% CI: 1.38-4.27; P=0.002). More importantly, a statistically significant interaction between heavy smoking history and treatment modality was observed (P=0.041). Our results indicated that smoking history is strongly associated with poor prognosis in patients with esophageal cancer, especially those treated by chemoradiotherapy. Further investigation is warranted to explain this different prognosis. (author)

  19. History of the mammography and its impact in morbi-mortality due to breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, Marcia; Sartori, Eugenia; Gotta, Cesar

    2004-01-01

    On this historical article the authors offer a bibliographic revision of the evolution of breast radiological diagnosis over time, and analyze its stages and the impact on the reduction of morbidity and mortality due to breast cancer. The evolution of breast pathology diagnosis started several centuries ago but made rapid progress since the development of the X-rays (Salomon 1913). The appearance of the mammographic technique (Leborgne 1958, Gross 1966) is paramount in the history of the diagnosis and prevention of breast pathology. After the generalization and systematization of its use, it became the first method for an effective prevention and an early detection of breast cancer. (author)

  20. Reproductive history and risk of small bowel cancer by histologic type: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yunxia; Lambe, Mats; Martling, Anna; Lagergren, Jesper

    2012-12-01

    The male predominance of the two main histologic malignancies of the small bowel cancer may reflect a role of sex hormones which will be examined in this study. This was a nationwide population-based nested case-control study, based on a cohort of subjects born between 1932 and 2008, as identified in the Swedish Multi-Generation Register. For each case of small bowel cancer, 10 age- and sex-matched controls were randomly selected. Number of children and age at having the first child were analyzed in relation to the risk of small bowel cancer using conditional logistic regression, providing odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 632 female cases and 894 male cases of small bowel cancer were included. No overall increased risk of small bowel cancer was found in parous compared to non-parous women (OR = 1.02, 95 % CI 0.67-1.54). There was no association between age at first birth and small bowel cancer (>30 years of age vs bowel. No distinct risk patterns were discerned in men compared to women. Reproductive history does not seem to be associated with the risk of small bowel cancer, independent of histologic type.

  1. [Physical self-concept, anxiety, depression, and self-esteem in children with cancer and healthy children without cancer history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragado, Carmen; Hernández-Lloreda, Ma José; Sánchez-Bernardos, Ma Luisa; Urbano, Susana

    2008-08-01

    The main purpose of this study is to test if children with cancer receiving chemotherapy show a poorer physical self-concept, less self-esteem and more anxiety and depression than healthy children (with no cancer history) within the same age range (9-16 years old) and social condition. Furthermore, the capacity of self-concept and self-esteem to predict emotional distress is analyzed. The Spanish versions of PSDQ, CDI and STAIC were administered to 30 children with cancer and 90 healthy children. Except for the health and flexibility dimensions in the PSDQ, no significant differences between groups were found. Self-esteem was the best predictor of depression, whereas health and self-concept predicted anxiety.

  2. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Legislative History Committees of Interest Legislative Resources Recent Public Laws Contact Overview & Mission History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Deputy Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, Offices & Centers Advisory Boards & Review Groups Budget & ...

  3. A phase II study of VP-16-ifosfamide-cisplatin combination chemotherapy plus early concurrent thoracic irradiation for previously untreated limited small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, In Sook; Park, Young Suk; Kwon, Sung Hee [Hallym Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine] [and others

    2000-12-01

    At present the addition of thoracic irradiation to combination chemotherapy is a standard treatment for limited staged small cell ling cancer. However, there is still controversy about the optimum timing of chest irradiation. We conducted a phase II study of etoposide (VP-16)-ifosfamide-cisplatin (VIP) combination chemotherapy plus early concurrent thoracic irradiation for the patients with previously untreated limited small cell lung cancer in order to assess if the treatment modality could improve the response rate and the toxicity. Forty-four patients with limited small cell lung cancer were treated with etoposide-ifosfamide-cisplatin and concurrent thoracic irradiation. Combination chemotherapy consisted of etoposide 100 mg/m{sup 2} (on day 1-3), ifosfamide 1000 mg/m{sup 2} (on days 1 and 2) and cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} (on day 1). Concurrent thoracic irradiation consisted of a total of 4000 cGy over 4 weeks starting on the first day of the first chemotherapy. All patients who showed a complete response were given prophylactic cranial irradiation for 2.5 weeks. Forty-four of the 49 patients who entered the study from May 1994 to August 1998 were evaluable. The median age was 59 years and 40 patients had a performance status of 0 or 1. The median survival time was 22.5 months. Twenty-eight patients (62%) showed a complete response and 16 (38%) a partial response. Twenty-four patients (54%) developed grade 3 or 4 neutropenia; there was a 9% RTOG score 3 or 4 esophagitis. VIP combination chemotherapy and early concurrent thoracic irradiation for patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer revealed excellent antitumor response with tolerable toxicity. (author)

  4. Inherited mutations in 17 breast cancer susceptibility genes among a large triple-negative breast cancer cohort unselected for family history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Fergus J; Hart, Steven N; Sharma, Priyanka; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Wang, Xianshu; Miron, Penelope; Olson, Janet E; Godwin, Andrew K; Pankratz, V Shane; Olswold, Curtis; Slettedahl, Seth; Hallberg, Emily; Guidugli, Lucia; Davila, Jaime I; Beckmann, Matthias W; Janni, Wolfgang; Rack, Brigitte; Ekici, Arif B; Slamon, Dennis J; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fostira, Florentia; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fountzilas, George; Pelttari, Liisa M; Tapper, William J; Durcan, Lorraine; Cross, Simon S; Pilarski, Robert; Shapiro, Charles L; Klemp, Jennifer; Yao, Song; Garber, Judy; Cox, Angela; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ambrosone, Christine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Slager, Susan L; Vachon, Celine M; Eccles, Diana M; Fasching, Peter A

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing have led to the development of breast cancer susceptibility gene panels for germline genetic testing of patients. We assessed the frequency of mutations in 17 predisposition genes, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, in a large cohort of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) unselected for family history of breast or ovarian cancer to determine the utility of germline genetic testing for those with TNBC. Patients with TNBC (N = 1,824) unselected for family history of breast or ovarian cancer were recruited through 12 studies, and germline DNA was sequenced to identify mutations. Deleterious mutations were identified in 14.6% of all patients. Of these, 11.2% had mutations in the BRCA1 (8.5%) and BRCA2 (2.7%) genes. Deleterious mutations in 15 other predisposition genes were detected in 3.7% of patients, with the majority observed in genes involved in homologous recombination, including PALB2 (1.2%) and BARD1, RAD51D, RAD51C, and BRIP1 (0.3% to 0.5%). Patients with TNBC with mutations were diagnosed at an earlier age (P predisposition genes are present at high frequency in patients with TNBC unselected for family history of cancer. Mutation prevalence estimates suggest that patients with TNBC, regardless of age at diagnosis or family history of cancer, should be considered for germline genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Although mutations in other predisposition genes are observed among patients with TNBC, better cancer risk estimates are needed before these mutations are used for clinical risk assessment in relatives. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Non-hormonal interventions for hot flushes in women with a history of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rada

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Hot flushes are common in women with a history of breast cancer. Hormonal therapies are known to reduce these symptoms but are not recommended in women with a history of breast cancer due to their potential adverse effects. The efficacy of non-hormonal therapies is still uncertain. OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy of non-hormonal therapies in reducing hot flushes in women with a history of breast cancer. METHODS Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, Lilacs, CINAHL, PsycINFO (August 2008 and WHO ICTRP Search Portal. We handsearched reference lists of reviews and included articles, reviewed conference proceedings and contacted experts. Selection criteria: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing non-hormonal therapies with placebo or no therapy for reducing hot flushes in women with a history of breast cancer. Data collection and analysis: Two authors independently selected potentially relevant studies, decided upon their inclusion and extracted data on participant characteristics, interventions, outcomes and the risk of bias of included studies. MAIN RESULTS Sixteen RCTs met our inclusion criteria. We included six studies on selective serotonin (SSRI and serotonin-norepinephrine (SNRI reuptake inhibitors, two on clonidine, one on gabapentin, two each on relaxation therapy and homeopathy, and one each on vitamin E, magnetic devices and acupuncture. The risk of bias of most studies was rated as low or moderate. Data on continuous outcomes were presented inconsistently among studies, which precluded the possibility of pooling the results. Three pharmacological treatments (SSRIs and SNRIs, clonidine and gabapentin reduced the number and severity of hot flushes. One study assessing vitamin E did not show any beneficial effect. One of two studies on relaxation therapy showed a significant benefit. None of the other non-pharmacological therapies

  6. Non-hormonal interventions for hot flushes in women with a history of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Hot flushes are common in women with a history of breast cancer. Hormonal therapies are known to reduce these symptoms but are not recommended in women with a history of breast cancer due to their potential adverse effects. The efficacy of non-hormonal therapies is still uncertain. OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy of non-hormonal therapies in reducing hot flushes in women with a history of breast cancer. METHODS Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, Lilacs, CINAHL, PsycINFO (August 2008 and WHO ICTRP Search Portal. We handsearched reference lists of reviews and included articles, reviewed conference proceedings and contacted experts. Selection criteria: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing non-hormonal therapies with placebo or no therapy for reducing hot flushes in women with a history of breast cancer. Data collection and analysis: Two authors independently selected potentially relevant studies, decided upon their inclusion and extracted data on participant characteristics, interventions, outcomes and the risk of bias of included studies. MAIN RESULTS Sixteen RCTs met our inclusion criteria. We included six studies on selective serotonin (SSRI and serotonin-norepinephrine (SNRI reuptake inhibitors, two on clonidine, one on gabapentin, two each on relaxation therapy and homeopathy, and one each on vitamin E, magnetic devices and acupuncture. The risk of bias of most studies was rated as low or moderate. Data on continuous outcomes were presented inconsistently among studies, which precluded the possibility of pooling the results. Three pharmacological treatments (SSRIs and SNRIs, clonidine and gabapentin reduced the number and severity of hot flushes. One study assessing vitamin E did not show any beneficial effect. One of two studies on relaxation therapy showed a significant benefit. None of the other non-pharmacological therapies

  7. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2013 Media Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Deputy Director's Page Previous NCI ...

  8. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reporting & Auditing Grant Transfer Grant Closeout Contracts & Small Business Training Cancer Training at NCI (Intramural) Funding for ... NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Deputy Director's Page Previous NCI Directors ...

  9. BRCA1 status in Pakistani breast cancer patients with moderate family history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moatter, T.; Pervez, S.; Khan, S.; Azam, I.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine BRCA1 status in breast carcinoma patients of Pakistani origin. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: The Oncology Clinics of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, between May 2005 and December 2009. Methodology: Fifty three breast cancer patients based on clinical and laboratory diagnosis were recruited for this study. Moderate family history was defined as having a close relative (mother, daughter, sister) diagnosed with breast cancer under 45 years. Peripheral blood samples were collected from each patient in a 5 ml tube containing EDTA as anticoagulant. Subsequent to DNA extraction, mutational analysis of BRCA1 exons 2, 5, 6, 16, 20 and 22 was carried out using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay while protein truncation test (PTT) was used to examine mutations in exon 11. All BRCA1 sequence variants were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Results: Twenty-three patients were diagnosed with early onset breast cancer, 30 patients had moderate family history. At the time of diagnosis, the median age of enrolled patients was 39 years (range 24-65 years). Out of 53 patients, analyzed by SSCP assay, mobility shift was detected in exon 6, 16 and 20 of three patients, whereas one patient was tested positive for mutation in exon 11 by PTT assays. All patients with BRCA1 mutations were further confirmed by DNA sequencing analysis. In exon 16 c.4837A > G was confirmed, which is a common polymorphism reported in several populations including Asians. Moreover, mutations in exon 6 (c.271T > G), exon 20 (c.5231 del G) and exon 11 (c.1123 T > G) were reported first time in the Pakistani population. Several BRCA1 mutations were observed in Pakistani breast cancer patients with moderate family history. Therefore, mutation-based genetic counselling for patients with moderate family history can facilitate management, if one first or second degree relative or early onset disease is apparent. (author)

  10. The Effects of smoking status and smoking history on patients with brain metastases from lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenker, Rachel F; McTyre, Emory R; Ruiz, Jimmy; Weaver, Kathryn E; Cramer, Christina; Alphonse-Sullivan, Natalie K; Farris, Michael; Petty, William J; Bonomi, Marcelo R; Watabe, Kounosuke; Laxton, Adrian W; Tatter, Stephen B; Warren, Graham W; Chan, Michael D

    2017-05-01

    There is limited data on the effects of smoking on lung cancer patients with brain metastases. This single institution retrospective study of patients with brain metastases from lung cancer who received stereotactic radiosurgery assessed whether smoking history is associated with overall survival, local control, rate of new brain metastases (brain metastasis velocity), and likelihood of neurologic death after brain metastases. Patients were stratified by adenocarcinoma versus nonadenocarcinoma histologies. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed for survival endpoints. Competing risk analysis was performed for neurologic death analysis to account for risk of nonneurologic death. Separate linear regression and multivariate analyses were performed to estimate the brain metastasis velocity. Of 366 patients included in the analysis, the median age was 63, 54% were male and, 60% were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma. Current smoking was reported by 37% and 91% had a smoking history. Current smoking status and pack-year history of smoking had no effect on overall survival. There was a trend for an increased risk of neurologic death in nonadenocarcinoma patients who continued to smoke (14%, 35%, and 46% at 6/12/24 months) compared with patients who did not smoke (12%, 23%, and 30%, P = 0.053). Cumulative pack years smoking was associated with an increase in neurologic death for nonadenocarcinoma patients (HR = 1.01, CI: 1.00-1.02, P = 0.046). Increased pack-year history increased brain metastasis velocity in multivariate analysis for overall patients (P = 0.026). Current smokers with nonadenocarcinoma lung cancers had a trend toward greater neurologic death than nonsmokers. Cumulative pack years smoking is associated with a greater brain metastasis velocity. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. [Family history of liver cancer increases the risk of liver cancer incidence: a 20-year prospective cohort study in Qidong, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Tu, Hong; Lu, Peixin; Wang, Jinbing; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Qinan; Qian, Gengsun; Chen, Taoyang

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate whether first-degree family history of liver cancer plays a role in liver cancer incidence by prospective evaluation of a patient cohort in Qidong, China over a 20-year period. In May 1992, 708 hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carriers and 730 HBsAg-negadve controls from Qidong city were enrolled for participation in a prospective cohort study ending in November 2012.Follow-up was carried out every 6 to 12 months, and evaluations included serum assays to measure concentrations of alpha fetoprotein (AFP), HBsAg and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), as well as abdominal ultrasound to assess liver disease.The relationship between baseline (study entry) information of patients with first-degree family history of liver cancer and liver cancer incidence during the two decades of study was statistically assessed. There were 172 newly diagnosed liver cancer cases in the cohort during 25 753 person-years (py) of follow-up, representing an incidence of 667.88/100 000 py.The incidence rates of liver cancer among participants with or without liver cancer family history were 1 244.36/100 000 py and 509.70/100 000 py respectively, and the between-group difference reached the threshold for statistical significance (P less than 0.01, Relative Risk (RR):2.44, 95% Confidence Interval (CI):1.80-3.31).The incidence rates of liver cancer among participants who had a sibling with liver cancer and participants who had a parent with liver cancer were not significantly different (P > 0.05), but the liver cancer incidence among participants who had a mother with liver cancer was significantly higher than that of participants who had a father with liver cancer (P history, 56.52% (39/69) were diagnosed before 50 years old, and this rate was significantly higher than that of participants without a family history of liver cancer (40.78%, 42/103, P less than 0.05).The incidence rate of liver cancer among the participants who were family history-positive and HBsAg-positive was

  12. Diet, Lifestyles, Family History, and Prostate Cancer Incidence in an East Algerian Patient Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassed, Somia; Deus, Cláudia M.; Lourenço, Nuno; Dahdouh, Abderrezak

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the fourth most common cancer in men and the sixth leading cause of death in Algeria. To examine the relationship between lifestyle factors, including diet, and family history and PC risk, a case-control study was performed in an eastern Algerian population, comprising 90 patients with histologically confirmed PC and 190 controls. Data collection was carried out through a structured questionnaire and statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the different variables. The data showed that consumption of lamb and beef meat and high intake of animal fat and dairy products increased PC risk. Seven to thirteen vegetables servings per week and fourteen or more servings decreased PC risk by 62% and 96%, respectively. Seven to fourteen fruit servings per week decrease PC risk by 98%. Green tea consumption reduced the risk of PC but the results were statistically borderline. Increased risk was observed for individuals with family history of PC in first and in second degree. A positive strong association was also found for alcohol and smoking intake and a dose-response relationship existed for quantity and history of smoking. This study suggests that dietary habits, lifestyle factors, and family history have influence on the development of PC in Algerian population. PMID:27975054

  13. History, Pathogenesis, and Management of Familial Gastric Cancer: Original Study of John XXIII's Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Corso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is associated with the E-cadherin germline mutations, but genetic determinants have not been identified for familial intestinal gastric carcinoma. The guidelines for hereditary diffuse gastric cancer are clearly established; however, there are no defined recommendations for the management of familial intestinal gastric carcinoma. Methods. In this study we describe Pope John XXIII's pedigree that harboured gastric cancer as well as six other family members. Family history was analysed according to the International Gastric Cancer Linkage Consortium criteria, and gastric tumours were classified in accord with the last Japanese guidelines. Results. Seven out of 109 members in this pedigree harboured gastric cancer, affecting two consecutive generations. John XXIII's clinical tumour (cTN was classified as cT4bN3a (IV stage. In two other cases, gastric carcinomas were classified as intestinal histotype and staged as pT1bN0 and pT2N2, respectively. Conclusions. Pope John XXIII's family presents a strong aggregation for gastric cancer affecting almost seven members; it spreads through two consecutive generations. In absence of defined genetic causes and considering the increased risk of gastric cancer’s development in these families, as well as the high mortality rates and advanced stages, we propose an intensive surveillance protocol for asymptomatic members.

  14. Role of medical history and medication use in the aetiology of upper aerodigestive tract cancers in Europe: the ARCAGE study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Macfarlane, T V

    2012-04-01

    The study aimed to investigate the role of medical history (skin warts, Candida albicans, herpetic lesions, heartburn, regurgitation) and medication use (for heartburn; for regurgitation; aspirin) in the aetiology of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancer.

  15. Phase II study of a 3-day schedule with topotecan and cisplatin in patients with previously untreated small cell lung cancer and extensive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M.; Lassen, Ulrik Niels; Jensen, Peter Buhl

    2008-01-01

    and cisplatin are needed. The aim of this phase II study was to establish the response rate and response duration in chemo-naive patients with SCLC receiving a 3-day topotecan and cisplatin schedule. METHODS: Simons optimal two-stage design was used. Patients with previously untreated extensive disease SCLC......INTRODUCTION: Treatment with a topoisomerase I inhibitor in combination with a platinum results in superior or equal survival compared with etoposide-based treatment in extensive disease small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Five-day topotecan is inconvenient and therefore shorter schedules of topotecan......, adequate organ functions and performance status less than 3 were eligible. Topotecan (2.0 mg/m, intravenously) was administered on days 1 to 3 with cisplatin (50 mg/m, intravenously) on day 3 every 3 weeks for a total of six cycles. RESULTS: Forty-three patients received 219 cycles of chemotherapy. Median...

  16. In vitro evaluation of oestrogenic/androgenic activity of the serum organochlorine pesticide mixtures previously described in a breast cancer case–control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivero, Javier; Luzardo, Octavio P.; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A.; Machín, Rubén P.; Pestano, José; Zumbado, Manuel; Boada, Luis D.; Camacho, María; Valerón, Pilar F.

    2015-01-01

    Some organochlorine pesticides (OCs) have been individually linked to breast cancer (BC) because they exert oestrogenic effects on mammary cells. However, humans are environmentally exposed to more or less complex mixtures of these organochlorines, and the biological effects of these mixtures must be elucidated. In this work we evaluated the in vitro effects exerted on human BC cells by the OC mixtures that were most frequently detected in two groups of women who participated in a BC case–control study developed in Spain: healthy women and women diagnosed with BC. The cytotoxicity, oestrogenicity, and androgenicity of the most prevalent OC mixtures found in healthy women (H-mixture) and in BC patients (BC-mixture) were tested at concentrations that resembled those found in the serum of the evaluated women. Our results showed that both OC mixtures presented a similar oestrogenic activity and effect on cell viability, but BC-mixture showed an additional anti-androgenic effect. These results indicate that although the proliferative effect exerted by these mixtures on human breast cells seems to depend mainly on their oestrogenic action, the BC-mixture might additionally induce cell proliferation due to its anti-androgenic activity, therefore increasing the carcinogenic potential of this mixture. The findings of this study demonstrate that subtle variations in the composition of a mixture may induce relevant changes in its biological action. - Highlights: • E-screen and A-screen of two mixtures of organochlorine pesticides (OCP) • Assay concentrations based on a previous breast cancer case–control study • Only non-cytotoxic concentrations assayed • Both OCP mixtures induce proliferation mediated by oestrogen receptor. • OCP mixture of breast cancer patients exhibits additional androgenic activity.

  17. In vitro evaluation of oestrogenic/androgenic activity of the serum organochlorine pesticide mixtures previously described in a breast cancer case–control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivero, Javier; Luzardo, Octavio P., E-mail: octavio.perez@ulpgc.es; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A.; Machín, Rubén P.; Pestano, José; Zumbado, Manuel; Boada, Luis D.; Camacho, María; Valerón, Pilar F.

    2015-12-15

    Some organochlorine pesticides (OCs) have been individually linked to breast cancer (BC) because they exert oestrogenic effects on mammary cells. However, humans are environmentally exposed to more or less complex mixtures of these organochlorines, and the biological effects of these mixtures must be elucidated. In this work we evaluated the in vitro effects exerted on human BC cells by the OC mixtures that were most frequently detected in two groups of women who participated in a BC case–control study developed in Spain: healthy women and women diagnosed with BC. The cytotoxicity, oestrogenicity, and androgenicity of the most prevalent OC mixtures found in healthy women (H-mixture) and in BC patients (BC-mixture) were tested at concentrations that resembled those found in the serum of the evaluated women. Our results showed that both OC mixtures presented a similar oestrogenic activity and effect on cell viability, but BC-mixture showed an additional anti-androgenic effect. These results indicate that although the proliferative effect exerted by these mixtures on human breast cells seems to depend mainly on their oestrogenic action, the BC-mixture might additionally induce cell proliferation due to its anti-androgenic activity, therefore increasing the carcinogenic potential of this mixture. The findings of this study demonstrate that subtle variations in the composition of a mixture may induce relevant changes in its biological action. - Highlights: • E-screen and A-screen of two mixtures of organochlorine pesticides (OCP) • Assay concentrations based on a previous breast cancer case–control study • Only non-cytotoxic concentrations assayed • Both OCP mixtures induce proliferation mediated by oestrogen receptor. • OCP mixture of breast cancer patients exhibits additional androgenic activity.

  18. Freeze-Dried Black Raspberries in Preventing Oral Cancer Recurrence in High-Risk Appalachian Patients Previously Treated With Surgery For Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-04

    Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  19. A cross-sectional survey assessing factors associated with reading cancer screening information: previous screening behaviour, demographics and decision-making style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanouni, Alex; Renzi, Cristina; Waller, Jo

    2017-04-18

    There is broad agreement that cancer screening invitees should know the risks and benefits of testing before deciding whether to participate. In organised screening programmes, a primary method of relaying this information is via leaflets provided at the time of invitation. Little is known about why individuals do not engage with this information. This study assessed factors associated with reading information leaflets provided by the three cancer screening programmes in England. A cross-sectional survey asked screening-eligible members of the general population in England about the following predictor variables: uptake of previous screening invitations, demographic characteristics, and 'decision-making styles' (i.e. the extent to which participants tended to make decisions in a way that was avoidant, rational, intuitive, spontaneous, or dependent). The primary outcome measures were the amount of the leaflet that participants reported having read at their most recent invitation, for any of the three programmes for which they were eligible. Associations between these outcomes and predictor variables were assessed using binary or ordinal logistic regression. After exclusions, data from 275, 309, and 556 participants were analysed in relation to the breast, cervical, and bowel screening programmes, respectively. Notable relationships included associations between regularity of screening uptake and reading (more of) the information leaflets for all programmes (e.g. odds ratio: 0.16 for participants who never/very rarely attended breast screening vs. those who always attended previously; p = .009). Higher rational decision-making scores were associated with reading more of the cervical and bowel screening leaflets (OR: 1.13, p screening uptake may also increase subsequent engagement with information. Future research could investigate how to improve engagement at initial invitations. There may also be scope to reduce barriers to accessing non-English information and

  20. Family history of cancer other than breast or ovarian cancer in first-degree relatives is associated with poor breast cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun-Long; Chen, Chuang; Yuan, Jing-Ping; Li, Juan-Juan; Sun, Sheng-Rong

    2017-04-01

    Whether a first-degree family history of others cancers (FHOC) than breast or ovarian cancer (BOC) is associated with breast cancer prognosis remains unknown. Thus, the aim of the present study was to clarify this issue. Women who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer at the Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University from 2010 to 2013 were included in the study. The demographic and clinicopathological characteristics of these patients were extracted. FHOC was considered positive for any patient who had a relative who had been diagnosed with cancer other than BOC. Disease-free survival (DFS) was calculated based on the date of diagnosis. DFS was analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model. A total of 434 breast cancer patients were included in this study. Among these patients, 61 (14.06%) had a positive FHOC in first-degree relatives. Patients with a positive FHOC tended to have HER2-positive breast cancer (p = 0.03). In the survival analysis, FHOC was associated with poor DFS in both univariate (HR = 2.21 (1.28-3.83), 95% CI: 1.28-3.83, p breast cancer patients with FHOC, especially in patients with luminal A subtype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Recurrent mutation testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Asian breast cancer patients identify carriers in those with presumed low risk by family history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter Choon Eng; Phuah, Sze Yee; Sivanandan, Kavitta; Kang, In Nee; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Liu, Jian Jun; Hassan, Norhashimah; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Thong, Meow Keong; Hui, Miao; Hartman, Mikael; Yip, Cheng Har; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo Hwang

    2014-04-01

    Although the breast cancer predisposition genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 were discovered more than 20 years ago, there remains a gap in the availability of genetic counselling and genetic testing in Asian countries because of cost, access and inaccurate reporting of family history of cancer. In order to improve access to testing, we developed a rapid test for recurrent mutations in our Asian populations. In this study, we designed a genotyping assay with 55 BRCA1 and 44 BRCA2 mutations previously identified in Asian studies, and validated this assay in 267 individuals who had previously been tested by full sequencing. We tested the prevalence of these mutations in additional breast cancer cases. Using this genotyping approach, we analysed recurrent mutations in 533 Malaysian breast cancer cases with Malays, 3 BRCA1 and 2 BRCA2 mutations in Chinese and 1 BRCA1 mutation in Indians account for 60, 24 and 20 % of carrier families, respectively. By contrast, haplotype analyses suggest that a recurrent BRCA2 mutation (c.262_263delCT) found in 5 unrelated Malay families has at least 3 distinct haplotypes. Taken together, our data suggests that panel testing may help to identify carriers, particularly Asian BRCA2 carriers, who do not present with a priori strong family history characteristics.

  2. Personal History of Prostate Cancer and Increased Risk of Incident Melanoma in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Qing; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Ma, Jing; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Han, Jiali

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Steroid hormones, particularly androgens, play a major role in prostatic carcinogenesis. Personal history of severe acne, a surrogate for higher androgen activity, has been associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa), and one recent study indicated that severe teenage acne was a novel risk factor for melanoma. These findings suggest a possible relationship between PCa and risk of melanoma. We prospectively evaluated this association among US men. Methods A total of 42,372 participants in the Health Professionals' Follow-Up Study (HPFS; 1986 to 2010) were included. Biennially self-reported PCa diagnosis was confirmed using pathology reports. Diagnosis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) was self-reported biennially, and diagnosis of melanoma was pathologically confirmed. We sought to confirm the association in 18,603 participants from the Physicians' Health Study (PHS; 1982 to 1998). Results We identified 539 melanomas in the HPFS. Personal history of PCa was associated with an increased risk of melanoma (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.83; 95% CI, 1.32 to 2.54). Although we also detected a marginally increased risk of NMSC associated with PCa (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.995 to 1.16), the difference in the magnitude of the association between melanoma and NMSC was significant (P for heterogeneity = .002). We did not find an altered risk of melanoma associated with personal history of other cancers. The association between PCa and risk of incident melanoma was confirmed in the PHS (HR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.12 to 4.21). Conclusion Personal history of PCa is associated with an increased risk of melanoma, which may not be entirely a result of greater medical scrutiny. PMID:24190118

  3. Influence of family history of colorectal cancer on health behavior and performance of early detection procedures: the SUN Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ochoa, Eva; Gómez-Acebo, Ines; Beunza, Juan-José; Rodríguez-Cundín, Paz; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Llorca, Javier

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between family history of colorectal cancer and both health behavior and screening procedures in a population cohort. This study is a cross-sectional analysis of 15,169 participants belonging to a prospective cohort study (the SUN Project) based on two self-reported questionnaires: one of them related to lifestyle and the other a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. We explored the influence of family history of colorectal cancer in lifestyles (consumption of alcohol, weight, and diet) and medical management behaviors (screening of chronic diseases). People with family history of colorectal cancer increased their number of colorectal cancer screening tests (adjusted odds ratio for fecal occult blood test: 1.98, 95% confidence interval: 1.48-2.65; and adjusted odds ratio for colonoscopy/sigmoidoscopy: 3.42, 2.69-4.36); nevertheless, health behavior changes in diet of relatives of colorectal cancer patients were undetectable. We show that individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer increase their compliance with screening tests, although they exhibit no better health-related behaviors than people without family history of colorectal cancer. Further prospective studies are required to confirm these results and to identify tools to empower the subjects to change their risk profile. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A survey of patients with inflammatory skin recurrence corresponding to the area of previous irradiation after postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujino, Kayoko; Kashihara, Kenichi; Kotani, Shouko

    2011-01-01

    One of the unusual patterns of local recurrence in breast cancer patient is an inflammatory skin recurrence (ISR) sharply demarcating the area of previous radiation fields. To clarify the characteristics of this recurrence, we conducted a nationwide survey. We sent a survey to radiation oncologists at 200 institutions in Japan and received answers from 92. Of these, 24 institutions had some experience with patients who developed ISR affecting the previously irradiated area. The case details of 16 patients from 11 institutions were available and analyzed in this study. Eight patients experienced ISR after breast conservative therapy (groupA) and 8 patients experienced ISR after post-mastectomy radiotherapy (groupB). The postoperative pathological examination of groups A and B showed positive axillary lymph-nodes in 7/8 and 8/8 patients, positive lymphatic invasion in 4/7 and 7/8 patients, and estrogen receptor (ER) status negative in 7/8 and 6/7 patients respectively. Median survival period was 266 days in groupA and 1105 days in groupB (p=0.0001). Patients who developed the ISR tended to have several characteristics, including positive lymph-node metastases, intensive lymphatic invasion, and ER status negative. Physicians should contemplate the diagnosis of ISR next to radiation recall or radiation dermatitis, especially when the aforementioned risk factors are present. (author)

  5. A pilot study of a metronomic chemotherapy regimen with weekly low-dose docetaxel for previously treated non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoi T

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Takashi Yokoi, Takeshi Tamaki, Toshiki Shimizu, Shosaku NomuraFirst Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi City, Osaka, JapanBackground: Low-dose metronomic (LDM chemotherapy is a novel approach that involves frequent administration of a low dose of chemotherapeutic agent without a long interval.Purpose: The aim of this clinical pilot study was to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of LDM chemotherapy with weekly low-dose docetaxel for previously treated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC.Patients and methods: The enrolled patients received 15 mg/m2 of docetaxel intravenously on a weekly basis without any interval.Results: Twenty-seven patients were enrolled in the study; 20 were men, and seven were women. The median age was 62 years (range: 32–75. Eleven patients were stage IIIB, and 16 were stage IV. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 0 or 1. There was no severe hematological adverse effect; importantly, there was no neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. The objective response rate was 7.4% and the disease control rate was 51.9%. The median survival time was 16.4 months (95% CI: 5.7–36.4.Conclusion: Our preliminary results indicate that our metronomic regimen was well tolerated and active in patients with previously treated NSCLC. Thus, further investigation of this LDM regimen is warranted.Keywords: optimal biological dose, metronomic chemotherapy, docetaxel

  6. Cancer screening and history of sexual violence victimization among U.S. adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Johnson, Lisa C; Townsend, Julie S; Basile, Kathleen C; Richardson, Lisa C

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the effect a history of sexual violence (SV) victimization has on the likelihood of reporting screening tests for cancer. This study investigates the association between SV victimization and cancer screening behaviors. We analyzed data from the 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) from 11 states and 1 territory (U.S. Virgin Islands) that administered the SV module to describe demographic characteristics, quality of life, health status, cancer screening behaviors, healthcare coverage, and use of healthcare services for 58,665 women and men who reported SV victimization compared to women and men who did not. The SV victimization measure includes unwanted touching, exposure to sexual material, or ever experiencing completed or attempted unwanted sex. Statistical significance was determined using chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression models. Multivariate logistic regression results presented as adjusted proportions showed SV victimization was significantly associated with mammography screening for women (74.0 % victims vs. 77.1% nonvictims, p=0.02). SV victimization was not associated with cancer screening among men. Fewer women reporting SV victimization had healthcare insurance, a personal doctor or healthcare provider, and received regular checkups within the past 1-12 months. Fewer men reporting SV victimization had healthcare coverage. These data suggest that SV victimization may have a negative association on overall healthcare use, including breast cancer screening for women. Healthcare providers should consider SV victimization as a potential barrier for women who report not being up-to-date with mammography.

  7. Breast cancer risk perception and lifestyle behaviors among White and Black women with a family history of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Denise; Mishel, Merle; Skinner, Celette Sugg; Deroo, Lisa A; Vanriper, Marcia; Sandler, Dale P

    2009-01-01

    Although researchers have investigated the relationships between perceived risk and behavioral risk factors for breast cancer, few qualitative studies have addressed the meaning of risk and its impact on decision making regarding lifestyle behaviors. This qualitative study explored factors involved in the formulation of perceived breast cancer risk and associations between risk perception and lifestyle behaviors in white and black women with a family history of breast cancer. Eligible participants were North Carolina residents in the Sister Study, a nationwide study of risk factors for breast cancer among women who have at least 1 sister diagnosed with breast cancer. Personal interviews were conducted with 32 women. Although most had heightened perceived risk, almost 20% considered themselves below-to-average risk. Participants with moderate-to-high perceived risk were more likely to report an affected sister and mother, a first-degree relative's diagnosis within 4 years, and death of a first-degree relative from breast cancer. Many women were unaware of associations between lifestyle behaviors and breast cancer risk. Only one-third of the women reported healthy lifestyle changes because of family history; dietary change was most frequently reported. Findings may be important for cancer nurses involved in developing breast cancer education programs for women with a family history of breast cancer.

  8. Intravenous intralipid therapy is not beneficial in having a live delivery in women aged 40-42 years with a previous history of miscarriage or failure to conceive despite embryo transfer undergoing in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Check, J H; Check, D L

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of intralipid intravenous infusion in achieving a live pregnancy following IVF--embryo transfer in women of advanced reproductive age (40-42 years). A matched control was performed. Women aged 40-42 with a previous history of miscarriage or who failed to conceive despite previous embryo transfer who entered an IVF program were offered intravenous intralipid therapy (four ml of 20% liposyn II in 100 ml normal saline over one hour) during the mid-follicular phase. Clinical pregnancy rates (eight weeks with viable gestation) and live delivered pregnancy rates were then determined and compared. The results were evaluated after ten matched cycles. There were no clinical pregnancies in those receiving intralipid vs. a 40% clinical and a 30% live delivered pregnancy rate in the untreated controls (p = 0.087, Fisher's exact test). The study was terminated because of these preliminary data. In the test tube, adding intralipid to natural killer cells can inhibit their cytolytic action. However, the use of intravenous intralipid to suppress natural killer cell activity does not seem to improve the chance of a live delivery in women aged 40-42 years with a previous history of miscarriage. In fact this therapy may actually be detrimental in this age group. Since efficacy of this therapy was not found in a group of advanced reproductive age, it is not clear why this should be effective for a younger population. A controlled study for the younger group is needed. Perhaps such a study could be limited to only those with miscarriage rather than also concluding failure to conceive despite embryo transfer. Intralipid failed to improve live delivered pregnancy rates in women with prior miscarriage or previous failure with embryo transfer.

  9. Everolimus Plus Exemestane in Advanced Breast Cancer: Safety Results of the BALLET Study on Patients Previously Treated Without and with Chemotherapy in the Metastatic Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generali, Daniele; Montemurro, Filippo; Bordonaro, Roberto; Mafodda, Antonino; Romito, Sante; Michelotti, Andrea; Piovano, Pierluigi; Ionta, Maria Teresa; Bighin, Claudia; Sartori, Donata; Frassoldati, Antonio; Cazzaniga, Marina Elena; Riccardi, Ferdinando; Testore, Franco; Vici, Patrizia; Barone, Carlo Antonio; Schirone, Alessio; Piacentini, Federico; Nolè, Franco; Molino, Annamaria; Latini, Luciano; Simoncini, Edda Lucia; Roila, Fausto; Cognetti, Francesco; Nuzzo, Francesco; Foglietta, Jennifer; Minisini, Alessandro Marco; Goffredo, Francesca; Portera, Giuseppe; Ascione, Gilda; Mariani, Gabriella

    2017-06-01

    The BALLET study was an open-label, multicenter, expanded access study designed to allow treatment with everolimus plus exemestane in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer progressed following prior endocrine therapy. A post hoc analysis to evaluate if previous chemotherapy in the metastatic setting affects the safety profile of the combination regimen of everolimus and exemestane was conducted on the Italian subset, as it represented the major part of the patients enrolled (54%). One thousand one hundred and fifty-one Italian patients were included in the present post hoc analysis, which focused on two sets of patients: patients who never received chemotherapy in the metastatic setting (36.1%) and patients who received at least one chemotherapy treatment in the metastatic setting (63.9%). One thousand one hundred and sixteen patients (97.0%) prematurely discontinued the study drug, and the main reasons reported were disease progression (39.1%), local reimbursement of everolimus (31.1%), and adverse events (AEs) (16.1%). The median duration of study treatment exposure was 139.5 days for exemestane and 135.0 days for everolimus. At least one AE was experienced by 92.5% of patients. The incidence of everolimus-related AEs was higher (83.9%) when compared with those that occurred with exemestane (29.1%), and the most commonly reported everolimus-related AE was stomatitis (51.3%). However, no significant difference in terms of safety related to the combination occurred between patients without and with chemotherapy in the metastatic setting. Real-life data of the Italian patients BALLET-related cohort were an adequate setting to state that previous chemotherapy did not affect the safety profile of the combination regimen of everolimus and exemestane. With the advent of new targeted agents for advanced or metastatic breast cancer, multiple lines of therapy may be possible, and components of the combined regimens can overlap from

  10. The value of routine physical examination in the follow up of women with a history of early breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, W.; de Bock, G.H.; Schaapveld, M.; Baas, P.C.; Wiggers, T.; Jansen, L.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Routine physical examination is recommended in follow up guidelines for women with a history of breast cancer. The objective of this paper is to assess the contribution of routine physical examination in addition to mammography in the early diagnosis of breast cancer recurrences. PATIENTS

  11. History of the occupational exposure to chemical substances in workers with laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Padron, Heliodora; Jova Rodriguez, Mario Candido; Rabelo Padua, Gladys

    2010-01-01

    A case-control study was realized to 400 patients, 200 of them histologically confirmed as incident cases of larynx cancer by the National Institute for Oncology and Radiobiology of Havana, and the others 200 as controls, coming from another hospitals. A survey was applied to both groups, collecting every theirs worker histories with emphasis on occupational exposure, that were codified by an expert group taking into account the carcinogens present according to the guided code of the Epidemiological Units of Environmental Cancer and the Fields Studies and Intervention of International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). According to the results obtained, all the patients, cases and controls, presented 1 526 tasks in their labour histories, that represented an average greater than 3 tasks for each one of them. They main activities were in the agriculture, the defence and the sugar cane industry. The most predominant exposures were to the abrasive dusts, motor emissions, mists of mineral oils, gasoline/petroleum/diesel/kerosene and pesticides. In general, the valuation of the chemical risk was considered of low intensity, 1-5% of the real time to the exposure and all had the certain probability of the agent's aggressor presence.

  12. First report of the United Network for Organ Sharing Transplant Tumor Registry: donors with a history of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, H M; McBride, M A; Delmonico, F L

    2000-12-27

    Severe organ shortages have led to donor pool expansion to include older individuals, patients with hypertension, diabetes, and a past history of cancer. Transmission of cancer from cadaveric donors is a risk of transplantation and carries a high mortality rate. During a 33 month period, UNOS recorded 14,705 cadaveric donors of which 257 had a past history of cancer (PHC). A total of 650 organs (397 kidneys, 178 livers, and 75 hearts) were transplanted from these 257 donors. Type of cancer, tumor-free interval at organ procurement, and whether any PHC donor transmitted a tumor to the recipient were analyzed. Three PHC donor tumor types (skin, brain, genitourinary) were associated with 549 of the transplanted organs (85%). Twenty-eight recipients of PHC donor organs developed posttransplantation tumors (18 skin, 2 PTLD, 8 solid cancers). During a mean follow-up of 45 months (range 30-61 months), no recipients of organs from PHC donors developed a donor derived cancer. The majority (71.5%) of all non-skin and non-CNS system cancer donors had a cancer-free interval of greater than five years. Risks of cancer transmission from donors with a history of non-melanoma skin cancer and selected cancers of the CNS appear to be small. Risks of tumor transmission with certain other types of cancer may be acceptable, particularly if the donor has a long cancer-free interval prior to organ procurement while certain other cancers pose a high transmission risk. Selective use of PHC donors may permit expansion of the donor pool.

  13. Identification of Patients with Family History of Pancreatic Cancer--Investigation of an NLP System Portability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabi, Saeed; Krishnan, Anand; Roch, Alexandra M; Schmidt, Heidi; Li, DingCheng; Kesterson, Joe; Beesley, Chris; Dexter, Paul; Schmidt, Max; Palakal, Mathew; Liu, Hongfang

    2015-01-01

    In this study we have developed a rule-based natural language processing (NLP) system to identify patients with family history of pancreatic cancer. The algorithm was developed in a Unstructured Information Management Architecture (UIMA) framework and consisted of section segmentation, relation discovery, and negation detection. The system was evaluated on data from two institutions. The family history identification precision was consistent across the institutions shifting from 88.9% on Indiana University (IU) dataset to 87.8% on Mayo Clinic dataset. Customizing the algorithm on the the Mayo Clinic data, increased its precision to 88.1%. The family member relation discovery achieved precision, recall, and F-measure of 75.3%, 91.6% and 82.6% respectively. Negation detection resulted in precision of 99.1%. The results show that rule-based NLP approaches for specific information extraction tasks are portable across institutions; however customization of the algorithm on the new dataset improves its performance.

  14. A cross-sectional survey assessing factors associated with reading cancer screening information: previous screening behaviour, demographics and decision-making style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Ghanouni

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is broad agreement that cancer screening invitees should know the risks and benefits of testing before deciding whether to participate. In organised screening programmes, a primary method of relaying this information is via leaflets provided at the time of invitation. Little is known about why individuals do not engage with this information. This study assessed factors associated with reading information leaflets provided by the three cancer screening programmes in England. Methods A cross-sectional survey asked screening-eligible members of the general population in England about the following predictor variables: uptake of previous screening invitations, demographic characteristics, and ‘decision-making styles’ (i.e. the extent to which participants tended to make decisions in a way that was avoidant, rational, intuitive, spontaneous, or dependent. The primary outcome measures were the amount of the leaflet that participants reported having read at their most recent invitation, for any of the three programmes for which they were eligible. Associations between these outcomes and predictor variables were assessed using binary or ordinal logistic regression. Results After exclusions, data from 275, 309, and 556 participants were analysed in relation to the breast, cervical, and bowel screening programmes, respectively. Notable relationships included associations between regularity of screening uptake and reading (more of the information leaflets for all programmes (e.g. odds ratio: 0.16 for participants who never/very rarely attended breast screening vs. those who always attended previously; p = .009. Higher rational decision-making scores were associated with reading more of the cervical and bowel screening leaflets (OR: 1.13, p < .0005 and OR: 1.11, p = .045, respectively. Information engagement was also higher for White British participants compared with other ethnic groups for breast (OR: 3.28, p = .008

  15. MR-guided intervention in women with a family history of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viehweg, P. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Technical University Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany)]. E-mail: Petra.Viehweg@uniklinikum-dresden.de; Bernerth, T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Magdeburger Strasse 16, 06097 Halle (Germany); Kiechle, M. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Buchmann, J. [Department of Pathology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Magdeburger Strasse 14, 06097 Halle (Germany); Heinig, A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Magdeburger Strasse 16, 06097 Halle (Germany); Koelbl, H. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Magdeburger Strasse 24, 06097 Halle (Germany); Laniado, M. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Technical University Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Heywang-Koebrunner, S.H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Magdeburger Strasse 16, 06097 Halle (Germany); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Strasse 19, 81675 Munich (Germany)

    2006-01-15

    Objective: A study was undertaken to assess the clinical value of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided interventions in women with a family history, but no personal history of breast cancer. Methods and patients: Retrospective review was performed on 63 consecutive women who had a family history, but no personal history of breast cancer. A total of 97 lesions were referred for an MR-guided intervention. Standardized MR examinations (1.0 T, T1-weighted 3D FLASH, 0.15 mmol Gd-DTPA/kg body weight, prone position) were performed using a dedicated system which allows vacuum assisted breast biopsy or wire localization. Results: Histologic findings in 87 procedures revealed 9 (10%) invasive carcinomas, 12 (14%) ductal carcinomas in situ, 2 atypical ductal hyperplasias (2.5%) and 2 atypical lobular hyperplasias (2.5%). Sixty-two (71%) benign histologic results are verified by an MR-guided intervention, retrospective correlation of imaging and histology and by subsequent follow-up. In ten lesions the indication dropped since the enhancing lesion was no longer visible. Absent enhancement was confirmed by short-term re-imaging of the noncompressed breast and by follow-up. Conclusion: Malignancy was found in 24%, high-risk lesions in 5% of successfully performed MR-guided biopsy procedures. A 57% of MR-detected malignancies were ductal carcinoma in situ. In 10% of the lesions the intervention was not performed, since no enhancing lesion could be reproduced at the date of anticipated intervention. Such problems may be avoided if the initial MRI is performed in the appropriate phase of the menstrual cycle and without hormonal replacement therapy.

  16. Mammographic density and breast cancer risk by family history in women of white and Asian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Nakamura, Kaylae L; Woolcott, Christy G; Conroy, Shannon M; Byrne, Celia; Nagata, Chisato; Ursin, Giske; Vachon, Celine M

    2015-04-01

    Mammographic density, i.e., the radiographic appearance of the breast, is a strong predictor of breast cancer risk. To determine whether the association of breast density with breast cancer is modified by a first-degree family history of breast cancer (FHBC) in women of white and Asian ancestry, we analyzed data from four case-control studies conducted in the USA and Japan. The study population included 1,699 breast cancer cases and 2,422 controls, of whom 45% reported white (N = 1,849) and 40% Asian (N = 1,633) ancestry. To standardize mammographic density assessment, a single observer re-read all mammograms using one type of interactive thresholding software. Logistic regression was applied to estimate odds ratios (OR) while adjusting for confounders. Overall, 496 (12%) of participants reported a FHBC, which was significantly associated with breast cancer risk in the adjusted model (OR 1.51; 95% CI 1.23-1.84). There was a statistically significant interaction on a multiplicative scale between FHBC and continuous percent density (per 10 % density: p = 0.03). The OR per 10% increase in percent density was higher among women with a FHBC (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.13-1.49) than among those without a FHBC (OR 1.14; 1.09-1.20). This pattern was apparent in whites and Asians. The respective ORs were 1.45 (95% CI 1.17-1.80) versus 1.22 (95% CI 1.14-1.32) in whites, whereas the values in Asians were only 1.24 (95% CI 0.97-1.58) versus 1.09 (95% CI 1.00-1.19). These findings support the hypothesis that women with a FHBC appear to have a higher risk of breast cancer associated with percent mammographic density than women without a FHBC.

  17. Hereditary Susceptibility to Breast Cancer: Significance of Age of Onset in Family History and Contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S. Frank

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To correlate mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 with family history of breast cancer in a first-degree relative for women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 45 who do not have a personal or family history of ovarian cancer.

  18. Family history of skin cancer is associated with early-onset basal cell carcinoma independent of MC1R genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Nicholas L; Cartmel, Brenda; Leffell, David J; Bale, Allen E; Mayne, Susan T; Ferrucci, Leah M

    2015-12-01

    As a marker of genetic susceptibility and shared lifestyle characteristics, family history of cancer is often used to evaluate an individual's risk for developing a particular malignancy. With comprehensive data on pigment characteristics, lifestyle factors, and melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene sequence, we sought to clarify the role of family history of skin cancer in early-onset basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Early onset BCC cases (n=376) and controls with benign skin conditions (n=383) under age 40 were identified through Yale dermatopathology. Self-report data on family history of skin cancer (melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer), including age of onset in relatives, was available from a structured interview. Participants also provided saliva samples for sequencing of MC1R. A family history of skin cancer was associated with an increased risk of early-onset BCC (OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.80-3.45). In multivariate models, family history remained a strong risk factor for early-onset BCC after adjustment for pigment characteristics, UV exposure, and MC1R genotype (OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.74-3.35). Risk for BCC varied based upon the type and age of onset of skin cancer among affected relatives; individuals with a first-degree relative diagnosed with skin cancer prior to age 50 were at highest risk for BCC (OR 4.79, 95% CI 2.90-7.90). Even after taking into account potential confounding effects of MC1R genotype and various lifestyle factors that close relatives may share, family history of skin cancer remained strongly associated with early-onset BCC. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. The KinFact Intervention – A Randomized Controlled Trial to Increase Family Communication About Cancer History

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClish, Donna; Gyure, Maria; Corona, Rosalie; Krist, Alexander H.; Rodríguez, Vivian M.; Maibauer, Alisa M.; Borzelleca, Joseph; Bowen, Deborah J.; Quillin, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Knowing family history is important for understanding cancer risk, yet communication within families is suboptimal. Providing strategies to enhance communication may be useful. Methods: Four hundred ninety women were recruited from urban, safety-net, hospital-based primary care women's health clinics. Participants were randomized to receive the KinFact intervention or the control handout on lowering risks for breast/colon cancer and screening recommendations. Cancer family history was reviewed with all participants. The 20-minute KinFact intervention, based in communication and behavior theory, included reviewing individualized breast/colon cancer risks and an interactive presentation about cancer and communication. Study outcomes included whether participants reported collecting family history, shared cancer risk information with relatives, and the frequency of communication with relatives. Data were collected at baseline, 1, 6, and 14 months. Results: Overall, intervention participants were significantly more likely to gather family cancer information at follow-up (odds ratio [OR]: 2.73; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.01, 3.71) and to share familial cancer information with relatives (OR: 1.85; 95% CI: 1.37, 2.48). Communication frequency (1=not at all; 4=a lot) was significantly increased at follow-up (1.67 vs. 1.54). Differences were not modified by age, race, education, or family history. However, effects were modified by pregnancy status and genetic literacy. Intervention effects for information gathering and frequency were observed for nonpregnant women but not for pregnant women. Additionally, intervention effects were observed for information gathering in women with high genetic literacy, but not in women with low genetic literacy. Conclusions: The KinFact intervention successfully promoted family communication about cancer risk. Educating women to enhance their communication skills surrounding family history may allow them to partner

  20. Associations of parity-related reproductive histories with ER± and HER2± receptor-specific breast cancer aetiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, William F; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2017-01-01

    were estimated with Poisson regression models. Results: With nearly 31 million women-years of follow-up, 45 786 Danish women aged 20-84 years developed invasive breast cancer during 1992-2011. ER± expression was available for the entire study period and HER2± after 2006. Of the breast cancers...... before age 50. Parity and early [not later] AFLB showed a protective association with ER+/HER2- and risk association with ER-/HER2- cancers. Conclusion: Associations of reproductive history with breast cancer risk varied among Danish women by ER± and ER±/HER2± expression and age-at-diagnosis, consistent......Background: Associations of reproductive history with breast cancer risk differ by oestrogen receptor (ER±) status and possibly by the joint expression of ER and the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (ER±/HER2±). However, large sample sizes are needed to establish ER-specific risks by HER2...

  1. The impact of stratifying by family history in colorectal cancer screening programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Simon Lucas; Rabeneck, Linda; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Zauber, Ann G; Paszat, Lawrence F; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Yong, Jean H E; van Hees, Frank; Tinmouth, Jill; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein

    2015-09-01

    In the province-wide colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program in Ontario, Canada, individuals with a family history of CRC are offered colonoscopy screening and those without are offered guaiac fecal occult blood testing (gFOBT, Hemoccult II). We used microsimulation modeling to estimate the cumulative number of CRC deaths prevented and colonoscopies performed between 2008 and 2038 with this family history-based screening program, compared to a regular gFOBT program. In both programs, we assumed screening uptake increased from 30% (participation level in 2008 before the program was launched) to 60%. We assumed that 11% of the population had a family history, defined as having at least one first-degree relative diagnosed with CRC. The programs offered screening between age 50 and 74 years, every two years for gFOBT, and every ten years for colonoscopy. Compared to opportunistic screening (2008 participation level kept constant at 30%), the gFOBT program cumulatively prevented 6,700 more CRC deaths and required 570,000 additional colonoscopies by 2038. The family history-based screening program increased these numbers to 9,300 and 1,100,000, a 40% and 93% increase, respectively. If biennial gFOBT was replaced with biennial fecal immunochemical test (FIT), annual Hemoccult Sensa or five-yearly sigmoidoscopy screening, both the added benefits and colonoscopies required would decrease. A biennial gFOBT screening program that identifies individuals with a family history of CRC and recommends them to undergo colonoscopy screening would prevent 40% (range in sensitivity analyses: 20-51%) additional deaths while requiring 93% (range: 43-116%) additional colonoscopies, compared to a regular gFOBT screening program. © 2015 UICC.

  2. Does positive family history of prostate cancer increase the risk of prostate cancer on initial prostate biopsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshafei, Ahmed; Moussa, Ayman Salah; Hatem, Asmaa; Ethan, Vargo; Panumatrassamee, Kamol; Hernandez, Adrian V; Jones, J Stephen

    2013-04-01

    To assess the role of family history (FH) in the risk of a positive prostate biopsy (PBx) in a large North American biopsy population as earlier reports showed increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa) in men with a FH, but the risk has been limited to low grade prostate cancer in smaller studies, and the REDUCE trial found no such risk in North American patients. We evaluated 4360 men undergoing initial extended biopsy (8-14 cores). Indications were elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and/or abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE). Variables including age, FH of PCa, race, PSA, and DRE results were included in our analysis to assess risk factors associated with PCa, high-grade prostate cancer (HGPCa), and low-grade prostate cancer (LGPCa). Two hundred sixty-eight patients had an FH of PCa whereas 4092 had negative FH. Positive biopsy was found in 1976 patients with HGPCa in 1149 and LGPCa in 827. Among 268 patients with an FH, overall PCa was found in 144 of 268 patients (54%); HGPCa in 79 of 144 patients (55%) and LGPCa in 65 of 144 patients (45%). FH was a significant risk factor for PCa, HGPCa, and LGPCa in univariate and multivariate analysis (P = .0001, .02, and .02, respectively). Also, FH was associated with high-risk benign pathology in the form of atypical small acinar cell proliferation (ASAP) or high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasm (HGPIN) (P = .04). Men in North America with an FH of PCa who undergo prostate biopsy are more likely to be diagnosed with both HGPCa and LGPCa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk stratification in cervical cancer screening by complete screening history: Applying bioinformatics to a general screening population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, Nicholas; Sundström, Karin; Nygård, Jan F; Dillner, Joakim; Komorowski, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Women screened for cervical cancer in Sweden are currently treated under a one-size-fits-all programme, which has been successful in reducing the incidence of cervical cancer but does not use all of the participants' available medical information. This study aimed to use women's complete cervical screening histories to identify diagnostic patterns that may indicate an increased risk of developing cervical cancer. A nationwide case-control study was performed where cervical cancer screening data from 125,476 women with a maximum follow-up of 10 years were evaluated for patterns of SNOMED diagnoses. The cancer development risk was estimated for a number of different screening history patterns and expressed as Odds Ratios (OR), with a history of 4 benign cervical tests as reference, using logistic regression. The overall performance of the model was moderate (64% accuracy, 71% area under curve) with 61-62% of the study population showing no specific patterns associated with risk. However, predictions for high-risk groups as defined by screening history patterns were highly discriminatory with ORs ranging from 8 to 36. The model for computing risk performed consistently across different screening history lengths, and several patterns predicted cancer outcomes. The results show the presence of risk-increasing and risk-decreasing factors in the screening history. Thus it is feasible to identify subgroups based on their complete screening histories. Several high-risk subgroups identified might benefit from an increased screening density. Some low-risk subgroups identified could likely have a moderately reduced screening density without additional risk. © 2017 UICC.

  4. Local cluster of germ cell cancer in a cohort of male automotive workers in Germany not explained by previous or concurrent activities and exposures in farming and forestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeisser, N; Behrens, T; Mester, B; Gottlieb, A; Langner, I; Ahrens, W

    2011-02-01

    To examine whether exposures or activities in farming, forestry and related occupations explain the excess incidence of germ cell cancer (GCC) observed among male employees in one of the six car-manufacturing plants that is located in a geographic area where farming is frequent. A cohort based case-control study was conducted among workers in six car-manufacturing plants located in areas with different industrial structure. The study involved 188 cases of germ cell cancer identified through active retrieval in 38 hospitals and 1000 controls, drawn from administrative accounting files, individually matched by year of birth (± 2 years). Information regarding tasks and exposures and potential confounding variables were obtained by face-to-face or telephone interviews. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using a conditional logistic regression model adjusted for cryptorchidism and other potential confounders. In this case-control study 5.3% of cases and 6.3% of controls ever worked in agriculture or livestock farming. No increased risks were observed for working in agriculture (OR=0.8 95% CI: 0.4-1.6), livestock farming (OR=0.8 95% CI: 0.4-1.6) or for exposure to pesticides (OR=0.7 95% CI: 0.3-1.7), for exposure to fertilizers (OR=0.8 95% CI: 0.4-1.8) and disinfectants (OR=1.0 95% CI: 0.3-2.8). There were no statistically significant increases in risk associated with ever exposure to salt based wood protection agents (OR=2.3 95% CI: 0.6-9.1), working with plywood (OR=1.4 95% CI: 0.6-3.2), coated wood (OR=1.4 95% CI: 0.5-3.9) or working in forestry (OR=1.7 95% CI: 0.5-6.4). Lagging of exposures did not alter the results. The observed excess incidence in the cohort of automotive workers can be hardly explained by previous or concurrent work in farming or forestry. Because of the small numbers of subjects ever employed in farming the statistical power in assessing associations between agricultural work and agricultural exposures was limited

  5. Previous extensive sun exposure and subsequent vitamin D production in patients with basal cell carcinoma of the skin, has no protective effect on internal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindelöf, Bernt; Krynitz, Britta; Ayoubi, Shiva; Martschin, Christoph; Wiegleb-Edström, Desiree; Wiklund, Kerstin

    2012-05-01

    It has been suggested that sunlight through production of vitamin D might have a protective effect on a number of internal cancers. Consequently, in spite of the well known skin cancer risks, some researchers advocate more exposure to ultraviolet radiation, supported by the solarium industry. We estimated the risk of internal cancer before the patient contracted a basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin, the most common cancer in white populations and strongly associated with extensive sun exposure. A nested case control study was undertaken in the whole Swedish population. 115,016 patients with BCC and 987,893 controls were linked to population based registers. The cases had an increased risk of getting another form of cancer before the BCC diagnosis: odds ratio (OR)=1.84; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.81-1.86. This risk was mainly due to skin cancer: OR=4.95; 95% CI 4.81-5.09 but also non-skin cancer risk was elevated: OR=1.37; 95% CI 1.35-1.39. We adjusted the estimates for age, level of income, occupational status in national censuses, place of living and sex, where appropriate. Of the cancers specifically suggested to be related to vitamin D status: colon, prostate, breast, and ovary cancer, all had slightly increased ORs whilst for pancreatic and gastric cancer no increased OR was found. Patients with BCC, a proxy for extensive sun exposure, run an increased risk of other forms of cancer prior to the diagnosis of BCC. The findings in this study contradict that vitamin D production through extensive sun exposure has any protective effect on internal cancer but emphasise the increased risk for skin cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Is there an association between invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast and a family history of gastric cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikman, Bar; Davidson, Tima; Kais, Hasan; Jeroukhimov, Igor; Leshno, Ari; Sandbank, Judith; Halevy, Ariel; Lavy, Ron

    2016-01-01

    CDH1 gene mutations have been found to be associated with diffuse type gastric cancer and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) of the breast. To the best of our knowledge, this is the only study relating a family history of gastric cancer to ILC of the breast. We conducted a retrospective study comparing the family history of malignancies in patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast and ILC treated in our Medical Center. The comparison was evaluated in both types of breast cancer groups, dividing the patients into two age groups, cancer was reported in 7.2 % in the ILC group as compared to 2.3 % in the IDC group, P cancer was more common in the ILC group as opposed to the IDC group, 18 versus 8.1 % respectively, P = 0.002 and persisted in both age groups. We conclude that a family history of malignancies in first degree relatives is more common in patients with ILC than IDC and that there is a significant association between a family history of gastric cancer and ILC.

  7. Risk of pancreatic cancer associated with family history of cancer and other medical conditions by accounting for smoking among relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Montes, E; Gomez-Rubio, P; Márquez, M; Rava, M; Löhr, M; Michalski, C W; Molero, X; Farré, A; Perea, J; Greenhalf, W; Ilzarbe, L; O'Rorke, M; Tardón, A; Gress, T; Barberà, V M; Crnogorac-Jurcevic, T; Domínguez-Muñoz, E; Muñoz-Bellvís, L; Balsells, J; Costello, E; Huang, J; Iglesias, M; Kleeff, J; Kong, Bo; Mora, J; Murray, L; O'Driscoll, D; Poves, I; Scarpa, A; Ye, W; Hidalgo, M; Sharp, L; Carrato, A; Real, F X; Malats, N

    2018-01-10

    Family history (FH) of pancreatic cancer (PC) has been associated with an increased risk of PC, but little is known regarding the role of inherited/environmental factors or that of FH of other comorbidities in PC risk. We aimed to address these issues using multiple methodological approaches. Case-control study including 1431 PC cases and 1090 controls and a reconstructed-cohort study (N = 16 747) made up of their first-degree relatives (FDR). Logistic regression was used to evaluate PC risk associated with FH of cancer, diabetes, allergies, asthma, cystic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis by relative type and number of affected relatives, by smoking status and other potential effect modifiers, and by tumour stage and location. Familial aggregation of cancer was assessed within the cohort using Cox proportional hazard regression. FH of PC was associated with an increased PC risk [odds ratio (OR) = 2.68; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.27-4.06] when compared with cancer-free FH, the risk being greater when ≥ 2 FDRs suffered PC (OR = 3.88; 95% CI: 2.96-9.73) and among current smokers (OR = 3.16; 95% CI: 2.56-5.78, interaction FHPC*smoking P-value = 0.04). PC cumulative risk by age 75 was 2.2% among FDRs of cases and 0.7% in those of controls [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.42; 95% CI: 2.16-2.71]. PC risk was significantly associated with FH of cancer (OR = 1.30; 95% CI: 1.13-1.54) and diabetes (OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.01-1.52), but not with FH of other diseases. The concordant findings using both approaches strengthen the notion that FH of cancer, PC or diabetes confers a higher PC risk. Smoking notably increases PC risk associated with FH of PC. Further evaluation of these associations should be undertaken to guide PC prevention strategies. © The Author(s) 2018; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association

  8. Rectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: natural history and implications for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Sheryl; Stock, Richard G.; Greenstein, Adrian J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: There exists little information concerning the natural history of rectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, the tolerance of pelvic irradiation in these patients is unknown. We analyzed the largest series of patients with IBD and rectal cancer in order to determine the natural history of the disease as well as the effect and tolerance of pelvic irradiation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 47 patients with IBD and rectal cancer treated over a 34-year period (1960-1994) was performed. Thirty-five patients had ulcerative colitis and 12 patients had Crohn's disease. There were 31 male patients and 16 female patients. The stage (AJC) distribution was as follows: stage 0 in 5 patients, stage I in 13 patients, stage II in 7 patients, stage III in 13 patients, and stage IV in 9 patients. Surgical resection was performed in 44 patients. In two of these patients, preoperative pelvic irradiation was given followed by surgery. Twenty of these patients underwent postoperative adjuvant therapy (12 were treated with chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation and 8 with chemotherapy alone). Three patients were found to have unresectable disease and were treated with chemotherapy alone (2 patients) or chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) (1 patient). Radiation complications were graded using the RTOG acute and late effects scoring criteria. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 250 months (median 24 months). Results: The 5-year actuarial results revealed an overall survival (OS) of 42%, a disease-free survival (DFS) of 43%, a pelvic control rate (PC) of 67% and a freedom from distant failure (FFDF) of 47%. DFS decreased with increasing T stage with a 5-year rate of 86% for patients with Tis-T2 disease compared to 10% for patients with T3-T4 disease (p ) were noted in three patients (20%) receiving pelvic irradiation ± chemotherapy and these included two cases of grade 3 skin reactions and one case of grade 4 gastrointestinal

  9. A case of laparoscopic surgery for endometrial cancer in a patient previously treated with a transvaginal mesh procedure for pelvic organ prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Yoshino

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Transvaginal mesh (TVM surgery is an effective treatment option for women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP. Because the TVM procedure preserves the uterus, it is possible for endometrial cancer to occur at a later date. We herein present the first report of such an endometrial cancer, diagnosed well after TVM surgery for POP, and the use of laparoscopic surgery to conduct a simple total hysterectomy to treat it. Keywords: endometrial cancer, laparoscopic surgery, pelvic organ prolapse, transvaginal mesh

  10. Role of 18F-Choline PET/CT in guiding biopsy in patients with risen PSA levels and previous negative biopsy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Londoño, G A; García Vicente, A M; Amo-Salas, M; Fúnez Mayorga, F; López Guerrero, M A; Talavera Rubio, M P; Gutierrez Martin, P; González García, B; de la Torre Pérez, J A; Soriano Castrejón, Á M

    To study 18 F-Choline PET/CT in the diagnosis and biopsy guide of prostate cancer (pCa) in patients with persistently high prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and previous negative prostate biopsy. To compare the clinical risk factors and metabolic variables as predictors of malignancy. Patients with persistently elevated PSA in serum (total PSA >4ng/mL) and at least a previous negative or inconclusive biopsy were consecutively referred for a whole body 18 F-Choline PET/CT. Patient age, PSA level, PSA doubling time (PSAdt) and PSA velocity (PSAvel) were obtained. PET images were visually (positive or negative) and semiquantitatively (SUVmax) reviewed. 18 F-Choline uptake prostate patterns were defined as focal, multifocal, homogeneous or heterogeneous. Histology on biopsy using transrectal ultrasound-guided approach was the gold standard. Sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp) and accuracy (Ac) of PET/CT for diagnosis of pCa were evaluated using per-patient and per-prostate lobe analysis. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to assess the value of SUVmax to diagnose pCa. Correlation between PET/CT and biopsy results per-prostate lobe was assessed using the Chi-square test. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were applied to compare clinical risk factors and metabolic variables as predictors of malignancy. Thirty-six out of 43 patients with histologic confirmation were included. In 11 (30.5%) patients, pCa was diagnosed (Gleason score from 4 to 9). The mean values of patient age, PSA level, PSAdt and PSAvel were: 65.5 years, 15.6ng/ml, 28.1 months and 8.5ng/mL per year, respectively. Thirty-three patients had a positive PET/CT; 18 had a focal pattern, 7 multifocal, 4 homogeneous and 4 heterogeneous. Se, Sp and Ac of PET/CT were of 100%, 12% and 38% in the patient based analysis, and 87%, 29% and 14% in the prostate lobe based analysis, respectively. The ROC curve analysis of SUVmax showed an AUC of 0.568 (p=0.52). On a lobe

  11. Phase I/II study of gefitinib (Iressa(®)) and vorinostat (IVORI) in previously treated patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji-Youn; Lee, Soo Hyun; Lee, Geon Kook; Yun, Tak; Lee, Young Joo; Hwang, Kum Hui; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Heung Tae

    2015-03-01

    Vorinostat has been shown to overcome resistance to gefitinib. We performed a phase I/II study combining gefitinib with vorinostat in previously treated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A 3 + 3 dose-escalation design was used to determine maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Three dose levels were tested: 250 mg/day gefitinib on days 1-28 and 200, 300 or 400 mg/day vorinostat on days 1-7, and 15-21 out of every 28 days. The primary endpoint was median progression-free survival (PFS). Fifty-two patients were enrolled and treated (43 in phase II). The median age was 59 years, 28 patients were male, 44 had adenocarcinoma, 29 had never smoked, and 36 had undergone one prior treatment. Twenty-two patients exhibited sensitive EGFR mutations. Planned dose escalation was completed without reaching the MTD. The RP2D was 250 mg gefitinib and 400 mg vorinostat. In 43 assessable patients in phase II, the median PFS was 3.2 months; the overall survival (OS) was 19.0 months. There were 16 partial responses and six cases of stable disease. In EGFR-mutant NSCLC, response rate was 77 %, median PFS was 9.1 months, and median OS was 24.1 months. The most common adverse events were anorexia and diarrhea. Treatment with 250 mg gefitinib daily with biweekly 400 mg/day vorinostat was feasible and well tolerated. In an unselected patient population, this combination dose did not improve PFS. However, this combination showed a potential for improving efficacy of gefitinib in EGFR-mutant NSCLC (NCT01027676).

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Vorapaxar With and Without a Thienopyridine for Secondary Prevention in Patients With Previous Myocardial Infarction and No History of Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack: Results from TRA 2°P-TIMI 50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohula, Erin A; Aylward, Philip E; Bonaca, Marc P; Corbalan, Ramon L; Kiss, Robert G; Murphy, Sabina A; Scirica, Benjamin M; White, Harvey; Braunwald, Eugene; Morrow, David A

    2015-11-17

    Vorapaxar antagonizes protease-activated receptor 1, the primary receptor for thrombin on human platelets, and reduces recurrent thrombotic events in stable patients with a previous myocardial infarction (MI). We wished to determine whether the efficacy and safety of antiplatelet therapy with vorapaxar was modified by concurrent thienopyridine use. The Thrombin Receptor Antagonist in Secondary Prevention of Atherothrombotic Ischemic Events-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 50 (TRA 2°P-TIMI 50) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of vorapaxar in 26,449 patients with previous atherothrombosis. This prespecified analysis included 16,897 patients who qualified with a MI in the preceding 2 weeks to 12 months and was restricted to patients without a history of stroke or transient ischemic attack given its contraindication in that population. Randomization was stratified on the basis of planned thienopyridine use. Thienopyridine was planned at randomization in 12,410 (73%). Vorapaxar significantly reduced the composite of cardiovascular death, MI, and stroke in comparison with placebo regardless of planned thienopyridine therapy (planned thienopyridine, hazard ratio, 0.80, 0.70-0.91, PGlobal Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries (GUSTO) moderate or severe bleeding risk was increased with vorapaxar and was not significantly altered by planned thienopyridine (planned, hazard ratio, 1.50; 1.18-1.89, Phistory of previous MI, whether treated concomitantly with a thienopyridine or not. The relative risk of moderate or severe bleeding was similarly increased irrespective of thienopyridine use. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00526474. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Family history record and hereditary cancer risk perception according to National Cancer Institute criteria in a Spanish medical oncology service: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Rodas, Iván; López-Trabada, Daniel; Rupérez Blanco, Ana Belén; Custodio Cabello, Sara; Peligros Gómez, María Isabel; Orera Clemente, María; Calvo, Felipe A; Martín, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Identification of patients at risk of hereditary cancer is an essential component of oncology practice, since it enables clinicians to offer early detection and prevention programs. However, the large number of hereditary syndromes makes it difficult to take them all into account in daily practice. Consequently, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has suggested a series of criteria to guide initial suspicion. It was the aim of this study to assess the perception of the risk of hereditary cancer according to the NCI criteria in our medical oncology service. We retrospectively analyzed the recordings of the family history in new cancer patients seen in our medical oncology service from January to November 2009, only 1 year before the implementation of our multidisciplinary hereditary cancer program. The family history was recorded in only 175/621 (28%) patients. A total of 119 (19%) patients met 1 or more NCI criteria (1 criterion, n = 91; 2 criteria, n = 23; 3 criteria, n = 4; and 4 criteria, n = 1), and only 14 (11.4%) patients were referred to genetic counseling. This study shows that few clinicians record the family history. The perception of the risk of hereditary cancer is low according to the NCI criteria in our medical oncology service. These findings can be explained by the lack of a multidisciplinary hereditary cancer program when the study was performed. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Plato, Sun Tsu, and the Art of War (on cancer). Can we learn from history?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudnak, Mark A; Hoener, Stephanie G

    2003-04-01

    Cancer, in all its guises is on the rise along with the population growth. While not the leading cause of death in the world, it may soon garner that unfortunate honor. In the US, it is second only to heart disease. The 'war on cancer' declared in the US by Richard Milhouse Nixon is not being won. At present, treatment modalities are limited to resection, immunotoxins, radiation, chemotherapy, genomeceuticals, and variations on those themes. It is anticipated that with the emerging human genome data, most of these areas will be expanded, with the possible exception of radiation. However, all these approaches have two things in common. First, they have met with limited success. Second, they all work around the similar idea of containment and eradication in situ of the disease. This paper presents an alternative and novel way of looking at the research and treatment options for cancer taking two lessons from history. First, is Plato's dialectic where 'truth' is uncovered by examining a situation from two opposite directions at once. Second, from Sun Tsu's treaty on the Art of War, where he recommends that when faced with a superior opponent, one method of dealing with the situation is to provoke them, anger them, cause them to move. The second tactic wears out the opponent and presents them in a more favorable situation for assault. It is suggested herein that perhaps cancer can be attacked by first assisting its growth, and causing metastasis to a location more favorable to attack with the common mechanisms cited above. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. Rectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: natural history and implications for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Sheryl; Stock, Richard; Greenstein, Adrian

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSES/OBJECTIVE: There exists little information concerning the natural history of rectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, the tolerance of pelvic irradiation in these patients is unknown. We analyzed the largest series of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer in order to determine the natural history of the disease as well as the effect and tolerance of pelvic irradiation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 47 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer treated over a 34 year period (1960-1994) was performed. Thirty five patients had Ulcerative Colitis and 12 patients had Crohn's Disease. There were 31 male patients and 16 female patients. The stage (AJC) distribution was as follows: stage 0 in 5 patients, stage I in 13 patients, stage II in 7 patients, stage III in 13 patients and stage IV in 9 patients. Surgical resection was performed in 44 patients. In 2 of these patients, preoperative pelvic irradiation was given followed by surgery. Twenty of these patients underwent post-operative adjuvant therapy (12 were treated with chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation and 8 with chemotherapy alone). Three patients were found to have unresectable disease and were treated with chemotherapy alone (2 patients) or chemotherapy and radiation therapy (1 patient). Radiation complications were graded using the RTOG acute and late effects scoring criteria. Follow up ranged from 4 to 250 months (median - 24 months). RESULTS: The 5 year actuarial results revealed an overall survival (OS) of 42%, a disease free survival (DFS) of 43%, a pelvic control rate (PC) of 67% and a freedom from distant failure (FFDF) of 47%. DFS decreased with increasing T stage with a 5 year rate of 86% for patients with Tis - T2 disease compared to 10% for patients with T3-T4 disease (p ) were noted in 3 patients (20%) receiving radiation therapy and these included two cases of grade 3 skin reactions and one case of grade

  16. Semicentenial history of development of radiotherapy and Treatment of Oesophageal Cancer in Azerbaijan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasirova, F.J.; Shiraliyev, O.K.; Beibutov, Sh.M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The history of Oesophageal Cancer Therapy in Azerbaijan dates back to 1953-1956 when during the Soviet era, when we published our work on radiotherapy of oesophageal cancer for the first time. During the past more than 50 years a total of 5283 patients of oesophageal cancer have been treated by radiotherapy using several devices, e.g., GUTCo- 400, GUT-Co-1200, Luch-l, Agat-R and Rockus-M. Of them were 67.7% men and 32.3% women. The age of patients ranged between 24-88 years. 80.1% patients were aged more than 50 years. The majority of patients reported to the hospital with very late stages of disease: only 2.6% belonged to stage-1, while 30.6% were stage-2, 64% stage- 3 and 2.4% stage-4. Duration of disease after the beginning of the first symptoms averaged 4-5 months. Histologically 95% of patients had squamous carcinoma and the rest had adeno-carcinoma and others kinds of tumour n macroscopical picture of tumour patients were distributed as follows: circular sclerosing cancer at 28.4%, papillary fungoid one at 7,1%, saucer-like one at 29.2%, nodular medulla ring at 35.32%. Extent of defect changed within the limits of 2-15 sm, only at 2.7% were 2-3 sm. Majority of the tumours were located in the middle (56,1%), less often in lower (29,9%) and in the upper third of esophagus (14%). The defects of adjacent organs were at 27.1% cases. In view of the age, the associated diseases and the extent of tumour the radical surgical intervention could b. offered to only 10-15% of hospitalized patients. All patients received radiation therapy after a proper topometric and dosimetric evaluation. During the past several decades, the technique of radiotherapy has improved with time and the process has been modernized in keeping with international standards. Results: Our results show that average 1,2,3 and 5 year survival of our patients have been 40-60%, 18-27%, 10-12% and 6-7% respectively. The optimum factor for good prognosis has been the early detection of disease

  17. Actively approaching women with a history of ovarian cancer for genetic counselling by GP, desirable and feasible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, L.M. van; Helpser, C.W.; Velthuizen, M.E.; Dulmen, A.M. van; Zweemer, R.P.; Witteveen, P.O.; Butter, E.S.F.A.; Luijt, R.B. van der; Gent-Wagemakers, M.P.L. van; Beijaert, R.P.H.; Wit, N.J. de; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: According to recent guidelines, genetic counselling and DNA testing is recommended to all women with ovarian cancer to optimally customize follow-up for them and their kin. Since previous guidelines did not advise referral for most of these women, the majority of ovarian cancer survivors

  18. Is prevalence of colorectal polyps higher in patients with family history of colorectal cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sthela Maria Murad-Regadas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the prevalence of polyps in patients with a family history of colorectal cancer, in comparison to asymptomatic individuals with indication for screening. Methods: A prospective study in a group of patients who underwent colonoscopy between 2012 and 2014. Patients were divided into two groups: Group I: no family history of colorectal cancer, and Group II: with a family history in first-degree relatives. Demographic characteristics, findings on colonoscopy, presence, location and histological type of polyps were evaluated, comparing the two groups. Results: 214 patients were evaluated: 162 in Group I and 52 in Group II. The distribution of patients with polyps was similar in relation to gender: polyps were evidenced in Group I in 33 (20% female patients vs. 10 (6% male patients (p = 1.00; in Group II, the presence of polyps was evidenced in 9 (17% female patients vs. 2 (4% male patients (p = 1.00. Polypoid lesions were found in 54 patients (25%, with 43 (26% in Group I and 11 (21% in Group II. The prevalence of adenomas was similar in both groups (Group I = 18/37% vs. Group II = 10/50% (p = 0.83. Conclusion: In this preliminary study, no correlation was found between prevalence of polyps and a family history of colorectal cancer. Resumo: Objetivos: Avaliar a prevalência de pólipos em pacientes com história familiar de câncer colorretal comparando com indivíduos assintomáticos com indicação para rastreamento. Métodos: Estudo prospectivo realizado em um grupo de indivíduos submetidos à colonoscopia entre 2012 e 2014. Os pacientes foram distribuídos em dois grupos: Grupo I: sem história familiar de câncer colorretal e Grupo II: com história familiar em parentes de primeiro grau. Avaliaram-se características demográficas, achados na colonoscopia, presença, localização e tipo histológico dos pólipos, comparando os dois grupos. Resultados: Foram avaliados 214 pacientes, 162 incluídas no grupo I e 52

  19. Previous radiotherapy and the clinical activity and toxicity of pembrolizumab in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer: a secondary analysis of the KEYNOTE-001 phase 1 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaverdian, Narek; Lisberg, Aaron E; Bornazyan, Krikor; Veruttipong, Darlene; Goldman, Jonathan W; Formenti, Silvia C; Garon, Edward B; Lee, Percy

    2017-07-01

    Preclinical studies have found radiotherapy enhances antitumour immune responses. We aimed to assess disease control and pulmonary toxicity in patients who previously received radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) before receiving pembrolizumab. We assessed patients with advanced NSCLC treated on the phase 1 KEYNOTE-001 trial at a single institution (University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA). Patients were aged 18 years or older, had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 1 or less, had adequate organ function, and no history of pneumonitis. Patients received pembrolizumab at a dose of either 2 mg/kg of bodyweight or 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks, or 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks, until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or other protocol-defined reasons for discontinuation. Disease response and pulmonary toxicity were prospectively assessed by Immune-related Response Criteria and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. The primary objective of the KEYNOTE-001 trial was to assess the safety, side-effect profile, and antitumour activity of pembrolizumab. For our secondary analysis, patients were divided into subgroups to compare patients who previously received radiotherapy with patients who had not. Our primary objective was to determine whether previous radiotherapy affected progression-free survival, overall survival, and pulmonary toxicity in the intention-to-treat population. The KEYNOTE-001 trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01295827. Between May 22, 2012, and July 11, 2014, 98 patients were enrolled and received their first cycle of pembrolizumab. One patient was lost to follow-up. 42 (43%) of 97 patients had previously received any radiotherapy for the treatment of NSCLC before the first cycle of pembrolizumab. 38 (39%) of 97 patients received extracranial radiotherapy and 24 (25%) of 97 patients received thoracic radiotherapy. Median follow-up for surviving patients was 32·5

  20. Effect of Administration of Single Dose GnRH Agonist in Luteal Phase on Outcome of ICSI-ET Cycles in Women with Previous History of IVF/ICSI Failure: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafardoust, Simin; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Koroush; Mokhtar, Sara; Badehnoosh, Bita; Arjmand-Teymouri, Fatemeh; Fatemi, Farnaz; Mohammadzadeh, Afsaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background GnRH agonist administration in the luteal phase has been suggested to beneficially affect the outcome of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and embryo transfer (ET) cycles. This blind randomized controlled study evaluates the effect of GnRH (Gonadotropine Releasing Hormone) agonist administration on ICSI outcome in GnRH antagonist ovarian stimulation protocol in women with 2 or more previous IVF/ICSI-ET failures. Methods One hundred IVF failure women who underwent ICSI cycles and stimulated with GnRH antagonist ovarian stimulation protocol, were included in the study. Women were randomly assigned to intervention (received a single dose injection of GnRH agonist (0.1 mg of Decapeptil) subcutaneously 6 days after oocyte retrieval) and control (did not receive GnRH agonist) groups. Implantation and clinical pregnancy rates were the primary outcome measures. Results Although the age of women, the number of embryos transferred in the current cycle and the quality of the transferred embryos were similar in the two groups, there was a significantly higher rate of implantation (Mann Whitney test, p = 0.041) and pregnancy (32.6% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.030, OR = 3.3, 95%CI, 1.08 to 10.4) in the intervention group. Conclusion Our results suggested that, in addition to routine luteal phase support using progesterone, administration of 0.1 mg of Decapeptil 6 days after oocyte retrieval in women with previous history of 2 or more IVF/ICSI failures led to a significant improvement in implantation and pregnancy rates after ICSI following ovarian stimulation with GnRH antagonist protocol. PMID:25927026

  1. Phase III trial comparing vinflunine with docetaxel in second-line advanced non-small-cell lung cancer previously treated with platinum-containing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krzakowski, Maciej; Ramlau, Rodryg; Jassem, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    To compare vinflunine (VFL) to docetaxel in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have experienced treatment failure with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy.......To compare vinflunine (VFL) to docetaxel in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have experienced treatment failure with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy....

  2. Association of history of allergies and influenza-like infections with laryngeal cancer in a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippidis, Filippos T; Schwartz, Stephen M; Becker, Nikolaus; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Kirschfink, Michael; Dietz, Andreas; Becher, Heiko; Ramroth, Heribert

    2015-08-01

    Prior studies suggest that history of allergy and infections early in life might be inversely associated with cancer. We explored the association between allergies, recent influenza infections and laryngeal cancer risk. We used data from a case-control study which included 229 cases of laryngeal cancer and 769 population controls matched for age and sex. History of a physician-diagnosed allergy, influenza-like infections in the past 5 years, smoking, alcohol consumption and occupational exposure to carcinogens were self-reported. Allergies were classified into two groups (Type I and Type IV), according to the underlying immunologic mechanism. Conditional logistic regression models were fitted using laryngeal cancer as the outcome, adjusting for smoking, alcohol consumption and occupational exposure and stratified for age and sex. Having any allergy was not associated significantly with laryngeal cancer. Although Type I and Type IV allergies were non-significantly associated with laryngeal cancer, Type IV allergies showed a strong inverse association after adjusting for smoking and alcohol (OR 0.50, 95 % CI 0.22-1.2). Participants who reported at least one influenza-like infection during the past 5 years were significantly less likely to have laryngeal cancer (OR 0.57, 95 % CI 0.39-0.81). After considering fever (≥38.5 °C) as a criterion for influenza infection, the association between influenza infection and laryngeal cancer was even stronger (OR 0.29, 95 % CI 0.13-0.63). We found no significant association between any allergy and laryngeal cancer, some indication of an inverse association between Type IV allergy and laryngeal cancer, whereas recent influenza infections were inversely associated with laryngeal cancer risk.

  3. Vitamin D receptor gene polymorphism as an important modifier of positive family history related breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpää, Pia; Hirvonen, Ari; Kataja, Vesa; Eskelinen, Matti; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Uusitupa, Matti; Vainio, Harri; Mitrunen, Katja

    2004-04-01

    The association between vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and diseases such as breast cancer, prostate cancer and osteoporosis has been extensively investigated during recent years. To date, several polymorphisms have been found in the VDR gene. In this Finnish case-control study, comprising 483 breast cancer patients and 482 healthy population controls, we investigated the association between altered breast cancer risk and two polymorphisms in the 3' end of the gene detectable with ApaI and TaqI restriction enzymes. A statistically significant difference was observed in the ApaI genotype distribution between cases and controls. Women with the VDR variant a allele containing genotypes showed a decreased risk for breast cancer [odds ratio (OR) 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.54-0.98] compared to women with the AA genotype. This association was especially strong among women with a positive family history of breast cancer (OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.03-0.76). Moreover, there was a trend (P for trend = 0.0007) for decreased risk with increasing number of variant alleles. The lowest risk of breast cancer was seen for the women with the aa genotype (OR 0.03, 95% CI 0.003-0.31) compared to women with the AA genotype. A tendency of decreased risk of breast cancer was also observed for the TaqI T allele containing genotypes (Tt and TT) (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.41-1.12), but because the distribution of Taql alleles in the controls missed the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P = 0.01), we were unable to properly assess the potential impact of the TaqI polymorphism in breast cancer susceptibility. In conclusion, our results suggest that the VDR ApaI genotype may be an important modifier of individual breast cancer risk among Finnish women, especially if they have a positive family history of breast cancer.

  4. Hip fracture history and risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer: a Danish population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamberg AL

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Anna Lei Lamberg1,2, Anne Braae Olesen1,2, Annette Østergaard Jensen11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, 2Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, DenmarkBackground: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with osteoporotic fractures, such as hip fracture. Sun exposure, the natural source of vitamin D, is the main risk factor for basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. In this study, we examined the association between a history of hip fracture and risk of BCC and SCC.Methods: We conducted a population-based case-controlled study using data on BCC and SCC cases registered in the Danish Cancer Registry from 1990–2005. For each case, we selected five population controls matched by age and gender. We used conditional logistic regression to compute odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI, while adjusting for chronic diseases and socioeconomic status.Results: A history of hip fracture was associated with a decreased risk of BCC (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.85–0.94, which was most pronounced in cases of tumors on the trunk, extremities, or at multiple sites. We found no association for SCC (OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.98–1.17.Conclusion: Our study showed an inverse association between history of hip fracture and risk of BCC, but not of SCC. Sun exposure, resulting in vitamin D synthesis, may explain the link between the two diseases.Keywords: hip fracture, vitamin D, sunlight, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma

  5. Skin cancer screening behaviours among individuals with a strong family history of malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparian, N A; McLoone, J K; Meiser, B; Butow, P N; Simpson, J M; Mann, G J

    2010-11-09

    This study examined the prevalence and correlates of skin cancer screening behaviours among individuals at high risk of developing melanoma due to strong family history. A total of 120 individuals with a known family-specific CDKN2A mutation (72% response rate) completed a self-report questionnaire assessing annual frequency of skin self-examination (SSE), clinical skin examination (CSE) and a variety of potential demographic, clinical and psychosocial correlates. In the past 12 months, 50% of participants reported engaging in SSE at least four times, and 43% of participants had undergone at least one CSE. Engagement in SSE was associated with doctor recommendation (β=1.77, P=0.001), confidence in one's ability to perform SSE (β=1.44, Pmelanoma treatment (β=0.77, P=0.002) and intention to perform SSE in the future (β=1.69, Pmelanoma engage in suboptimal levels of skin surveillance. Improved doctor-patient communication, as well as psycho-education and behavioural support, may be viable means of improving early skin cancer detection behaviours in this high-risk population.

  6. Morphological and immuno phenotypic characterization of mammary carcinomas in relation to family history of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualco, G.; Ortega, V.; Musto, M.; Delgado, L.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate histopathological and immuno phenotypic differences between breast carcinomas sporadic (CM E) and developed in the context of breast cancer (B C) Family (CM F). Methodology: The study included in the CME group (n = 34) patients (pts) with unilateral CM diagnosed after age 30 without family history of CM. In CM F group (n = 26) family members were included pts with 3 or more cases of CM (at least one diagnosed before age 50) or two cases with any of the following sub-criteria: at least one case diagnosed before age 35, paternal transmission, bilateral breast cancer, cancer ovary. Each group was subdivided into 2 subgroups according to age at diagnosis of CM: age equal to or greater than 40 years (subgroup 1) and age under 40 years (subgroup 2). It recorded the clinical characteristics and conventional anatomical and pathological parameters. By immunohistochemistry (IHC) expression of estrogen receptors was studied and progesterone (E R, P R), HER2, p3, bcl-2 and Ki67. Appropriate statistical tests were applied to Univariate and multivariate analyzes. Results: Mean age at diagnosis (45 vs 58, p <0.001) and tumor size (p <0.05) were lower in the CMF group than in the group with CME. In both groups predominant histological type was infiltrating ductal carcinoma NOS. He documented a tendency to higher histological grade and lower E R expression in CMF regarding CME. There were no differences in the expression of Pr, HER2, Ki67, bcl2 and p53. while in the CMF group no differences in tumor characteristics were observed by age diagnosis, in the CME, subgroup 2 showed a predominance of edges expansive growth, lower tubular differentiation, histological grade end stores III, minor component in situ, and low expression of RE. Discussion: Morphologic and immune phenotypic features are similar to the CMF studies documented in the United States and Europe, which agrees with the ancestral origin predominant in our population. Overall, the group presented

  7. Can GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms predict clinical outcomes of chemotherapy in gastric and colorectal cancers? A result based on the previous reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu H

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Haixia Liu,1,* Wei Shi,2,* Lianli Zhao,3 Dianlu Dai,4 Jinghua Gao,5 Xiangjun Kong6 1Department of Ultrasound, 2Office of Medical Statistics, 3Human Resource Department, 4Department of Surgical Oncology, 5Department of Medical Oncology, 6Central Laboratory, Cangzhou Central Hospital, Yunhe District, Cangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this study and should be considered cofirst authors Background: Gastric and colorectal cancers remain the major causes of cancer-related death. Although chemotherapy improves the prognosis of the patients with gastrointestinal cancers, some patients do not benefit from therapy and are exposed to the adverse effects. The polymorphisms in genes including GSTM1 and GSTT1 have been explored to predict therapeutic efficacy; however, the results were inconsistent and inconclusive. Materials and methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by searching relevant studies about the association between the GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms and chemotherapy efficacy in gastrointestinal cancers in databases such as PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang database up to January 10, 2016. Subgroup analyses were also performed according to ethnicity, cancer type, evaluation criteria, study type, chemotherapy type, and age. Results: A total of 19 articles containing 3,217 cases were finally included. Overall analysis suggested that no significance was found between overall toxicity, neurotoxicity, neutropenia, gastrointestinal toxicity, tumor response, and progression-free survival, and the polymorphisms in GSTM1 and GSTT1, while GSTM1 polymorphism associated with overall survival (OS; hazard ratio =1.213, 95% confidence interval =1.060–1.388, P=0.005. Subgroup analyses suggested that neurotoxicity was associated with GSTM1 polymorphism in the Asian population, neutropenia was associated with GSTM1 polymorphism in palliative

  8. Factors Influencing Choices for Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Previously Unscreened African and Caucasian Americans: Findings from a Triangulation Mixed Methods Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Mack T.; Creswell, John W.; Jimbo, Masahito

    2014-01-01

    We investigated factors that influence choice of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening test and assessed the most- and least-preferred options among fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, and double contrast barium enema among adults with varied race, gender, and geographic region demographics. Mixed methods data collection consisted of 10 focus group interviews and a survey of the 93 focus group participants. Participants were ≥50 years of age and reported not having been screened for colorectal cancer in the last ten years. Analyses examined differences by race, gender, and geographic location. Participants had modest knowledge about CRC and there were fewer correct answers to knowledge questions by African Americans. Participants recognized value of early detection, and identified health symptoms and their doctor's recommendation as influential for obtaining CRC screening. They chose colonoscopy and FOBT as the most preferred tests, while barium enema was least preferred. The analysis revealed intra-group variations in preference, though there were no significant differences by race, gender, or location. Openness of discussing this sensitive topic, lack of knowledge about colorectal cancer and screening costs, and diversity of preferences expressed within study groups suggest the importance of patient-physician dialogue about colorectal cancer screening options. New approaches to promoting colorectal cancer screening need to explore methods to facilitate patients establishing and expressing preferences among the screening options. PMID:19082695

  9. Radiation port cutaneous metastases: Reports of two patients whose recurrent visceral cancers presented as skin lesions at the site of previous radiation and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Spencer Hoyt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is associated with a variety of complications, including the development of primary skin cancers in the radiated region. However, it is rare for patients with visceral cancers who are treated with radiation therapy to subsequently develop cutaneous metastasis within the radiation port. We describe two patients with internal malignancies who developed cutaneous metastases within their radiation ports following radiotherapy. In addition, we used PubMed to perform an extensive literature review and identify additional reports of cutaneous metastasis within a radiation port. We excluded patients who developed melanoma or primary skin cancers in the radiation port. We also excluded patients with non-solid organ malignancies. Herein, we summarize the characteristics of 23 additional patients who experienced radiation port cutaneous metastases and explore possible mechanisms for the occurrence of radiation port cutaneous metastases.

  10. Transcriptional profiling of human breast cancer cells cultured under microgravity conditions revealed the key role of genetic gravity sensors previously detected in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Lavan, David; Diego Orihuela-Tacuri, M.; Sanabria, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    Currently, studies in Drosophila melanogaster has shown emerging evidence that microgravity stimuli can be detected at the genetic level. Analysis of the transcriptome in the pupal stage of the fruit flies under microgravity conditions versus ground controls has suggested the presence of a few candidate genes as "gravity sensors" which are experimentally validated. Additionally, several studies have shown that microgravity causes inhibitory effects in different types of cancer cells, although the genes involved and responsible for these effects are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the genes suggested as the sensors of gravitational waves in Drosophila melanogaster and their human counterpart (orthologous genes) are highly involved in carcinogenesis, proliferation, anti-apoptotic signals, invasiveness, and metastatic potential of breast cancer cell tumors. The transcriptome analyses suggested that the observed inhibitory effect in cancer cells could be due to changes in the genetic expression of these candidates. These results encourage the possibility of new therapeutic targets managed together and not in isolation.

  11. A qualitative exploration of the meaning of the term "survivor" to young women living with a history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, S

    2018-04-06

    There has been a recent increase in research considering the perceptions of the term "cancer survivor" held by individuals who have or have had cancer. This article explores the meaning of the term to young women living with a history of breast cancer. Twenty women participated in semi-structured interviews about their experience of breast cancer. The methodology was informed by social constructionist grounded theory. Three of the women interviewed said they would use the term survivor to describe themselves, but most of the women felt it did not fit with their experiences. The accounts of those who accepted and rejected the survivor identity are explored, and subthemes in the latter are "survivor as somebody else" and "cancer's ongoing presence." This article calls into question the basing of intervention strategies on the notion of the "cancer survivor," and the assumption that younger women favour the survivor identity. Participants struggled with the demand to live up to the ideal of the survivor, which implied a high degree of agency where in reality, cancer was a disempowering experience. Being labelled a survivor obscured ongoing impacts of cancer on the young women's lives. © 2018 The Author. European Journal of Cancer Care Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Reirradiation of recurrent node-positive non-small cell lung cancer after previous stereotactic radiotherapy for stage I disease. A multi-institutional treatment recommendation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieder, Carsten [Nordland Hospital, Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Bodoe (Norway); University of Tromsoe, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsoe (Norway); Ruysscher, Dirk de [MAASTRO Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Gaspar, Laurie E. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aurora, CO (United States); Guckenberger, Matthias [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Mehta, Minesh P. [Miami Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Miami, FL (United States); Cheung, Patrick; Sahgal, Arjun [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and University of Toronto, Department of Radiation Oncology, Toronto (Canada)

    2017-07-15

    Practice guidelines have been developed for early-stage and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, many common clinical scenarios still require individualized decision making. This is true for locoregional relapse after initial stereotactic radiotherapy (stereotactic body radiation therapy or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy; SBRT or SABR), an increasingly utilized curative treatment option for stage I NSCLC. A consortium of expert radiation oncologists was established with the aim of providing treatment recommendations. In this scenario, a case was distributed to six radiation oncologists who provided their institutions' treatment recommendations. In this case, a patient developed local and mediastinal relapse after SABR (45 Gy, 3 fractions), comparable to the tumor burden in de novo stage IIIA NSCLC. Treatment recommendations were tabulated and a consensus conclusion was developed. Three institutions recommended evaluation for surgery. If the patient was not a surgical candidate, and/or refused surgery, definitive chemoradiation was recommended, including retreating the primary to full dose. European participants were more in favor of a non-surgical approach. None of the participants were reluctant to prescribe reirradiation, but two institutions prescribed doses lower than 60 Gy. Platinum-based doublets together with intensity-modulated radiotherapy were preferred. The institutional recommendations reflect the questions and uncertainties discussed in current stage III guidelines. All institutions agreed that previous SABR is not a contraindication for salvage chemoradiation. In the absence of high-quality prospective trials for recurrent NSCLC, all treatment options recommended in current guidelines for stage III disease can be considered in clinical scenarios such as this. (orig.) [German] Fuer fruehe und lokal fortgeschrittene Stadien des nicht-kleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinoms (NSCLC) wurden Behandlungsleitlinien publiziert

  13. Are there differences in zonal distribution and tumor volume of prostate cancer in patients with a positive family history?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade J. Sexton

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine if there are any differences in the zonal distribution and tumor volumes of familial and sporadic prostate cancers (PC in men undergoing radical prostatectomy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 839 patients underwent a radical prostatectomy in the absence of prior neoadjuvant therapy between 1987 and 1996. Telephone interviews were conducted to obtain an updated family history. A positive family history was defined as the diagnosis of PC in at least one first degree relative. Prostatectomy specimens were examined to determine the number of tumor foci, zonal origin of the dominant tumor focus, tumor volume of the largest cancer focus, total tumor volume, Gleason score and stage, and the surgical margin status. Results were stratified according to family history and ethnicity. RESULTS: We successfully contacted 437 patients (52%. Prostatectomy specimens from 55 patients were excluded from review due to a history of prior transurethral resection of the prostate (n = 26 or uncertain pathological stage (n = 29. Of the remaining 382 patients, 76 (20% reported having a first-degree relative with PC. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences in the pathologic variables between the two groups of patients with or without a family history of PC. CONCLUSIONS: Familial and sporadic PC share similar characteristics. No histopathological differences account for the increased positive predictive value of PC screening tests among patients with a family history of PC.

  14. Space-time analysis of testicular cancer clusters using residential histories: a case-control study in Denmark.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantel D Sloan

    Full Text Available Though the etiology is largely unknown, testicular cancer incidence has seen recent significant increases in northern Europe and throughout many Western regions. The most common cancer in males under age 40, age period cohort models have posited exposures in the in utero environment or in early childhood as possible causes of increased risk of testicular cancer. Some of these factors may be tied to geography through being associated with behavioral, cultural, sociodemographic or built environment characteristics. If so, this could result in detectable geographic clusters of cases that could lead to hypotheses regarding environmental targets for intervention. Given a latency period between exposure to an environmental carcinogen and testicular cancer diagnosis, mobility histories are beneficial for spatial cluster analyses. Nearest-neighbor based Q-statistics allow for the incorporation of changes in residency in spatial disease cluster detection. Using these methods, a space-time cluster analysis was conducted on a population-wide case-control population selected from the Danish Cancer Registry with mobility histories since 1971 extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System. Cases (N=3297 were diagnosed between 1991 and 2003, and two sets of controls (N=3297 for each set matched on sex and date of birth were included in the study. We also examined spatial patterns in maternal residential history for those cases and controls born in 1971 or later (N= 589 case-control pairs. Several small clusters were detected when aligning individuals by year prior to diagnosis, age at diagnosis and calendar year of diagnosis. However, the largest of these clusters contained only 2 statistically significant individuals at their center, and were not replicated in SaTScan spatial-only analyses which are less susceptible to multiple testing bias. We found little evidence of local clusters in residential histories of testicular cancer cases in this Danish

  15. Space-time analysis of testicular cancer clusters using residential histories: a case-control study in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Chantel D; Nordsborg, Rikke B; Jacquez, Geoffrey M; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Meliker, Jaymie R

    2015-01-01

    Though the etiology is largely unknown, testicular cancer incidence has seen recent significant increases in northern Europe and throughout many Western regions. The most common cancer in males under age 40, age period cohort models have posited exposures in the in utero environment or in early childhood as possible causes of increased risk of testicular cancer. Some of these factors may be tied to geography through being associated with behavioral, cultural, sociodemographic or built environment characteristics. If so, this could result in detectable geographic clusters of cases that could lead to hypotheses regarding environmental targets for intervention. Given a latency period between exposure to an environmental carcinogen and testicular cancer diagnosis, mobility histories are beneficial for spatial cluster analyses. Nearest-neighbor based Q-statistics allow for the incorporation of changes in residency in spatial disease cluster detection. Using these methods, a space-time cluster analysis was conducted on a population-wide case-control population selected from the Danish Cancer Registry with mobility histories since 1971 extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System. Cases (N=3297) were diagnosed between 1991 and 2003, and two sets of controls (N=3297 for each set) matched on sex and date of birth were included in the study. We also examined spatial patterns in maternal residential history for those cases and controls born in 1971 or later (N= 589 case-control pairs). Several small clusters were detected when aligning individuals by year prior to diagnosis, age at diagnosis and calendar year of diagnosis. However, the largest of these clusters contained only 2 statistically significant individuals at their center, and were not replicated in SaTScan spatial-only analyses which are less susceptible to multiple testing bias. We found little evidence of local clusters in residential histories of testicular cancer cases in this Danish population.

  16. Tumor characteristics and family history in relation to mammographic density and breast cancer: The French E3N cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Dartois, Laureen; Delaloge, Suzette; Hopper, John; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Baglietto, Laura

    2017-08-01

    Mammographic density is a known heritable risk factor for breast cancer, but reports how tumor characteristics and family history may modify this association are inconsistent. Dense and total breast areas were assessed using Cumulus™ from pre-diagnostic mammograms for 820 invasive breast cancer cases and 820 matched controls nested within the French E3N cohort study. To allow comparisons across models, percent mammographic density (PMD) was standardized to the distribution of the controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of breast cancer risk for mammographic density were estimated by conditional logistic regression while adjusting for age and body mass index. Heterogeneity according to tumor characteristic and family history was assessed using stratified analyses. Overall, the OR per 1 SD for PMD was 1.50 (95% CI, 1.33-1.69). No evidence for significant heterogeneity by tumor size, lymph node status, grade, and hormone receptor status (estrogen, progesterone, and HER2) was detected. However, the association of PMD was stronger for women reporting a family history of breast cancer (OR 1SD =2.25; 95% CI, 1.67-3.04) than in women reporting none (OR 1SD =1.41; 95% CI, 1.24-1.60; p heterogeneity =0.002). Similarly, effect modification by FHBC was observed using categories of PMD (p heterogeneity =0.02) with respective ORs of 15.16 (95% CI, 4.23-54.28) vs. 3.14 (95% CI, 1.89-5.22) for ≥50% vs. breast cancer risk with a family history supports the hypothesis of shared genetic factors responsible for familial aggregation of breast cancer and the heritable component of mammographic density. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Does hyperbaric oxygen treatment have the potential to increase salivary flow rate and reduce xerostomia in previously irradiated head and neck cancer patients? A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forner, Lone; Hansen, Ole Hyldegaard; von Brockdorff, Annet Schack

    2011-01-01

    Irradiated head and neck cancer survivors treated in the Hyperbaric Oxygen (HBO) Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital, spontaneously reported improvement of radiation-induced dry mouth feeling. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate salivary flow rate and xerostomia before and after HBO...

  18. Trends in Obesity Prevalence in Adults With a History of Cancer: Results From the US National Health Interview Survey, 1997 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; Shi, Zaixing; Sardo Molmenti, Christine L; Rundle, Andrew; Tsai, Wei Yann

    2016-09-10

    Obesity after a diagnosis of specific cancers has been associated with worse prognosis. We examined the trend in obesity prevalence among cancer survivors in the United States in the past two decades and compared trends with those of adults without a history of cancer. This was a population-based nationally representative sample of 538,969 noninstitutionalized US adults 18 to 85 years old with and without a history of cancer who participated in annual cross-sectional National Health Interview Surveys from 1997 to 2014. Obesity was defined as body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2) for non-Asians and body mass index ≥ 27.5 kg/m(2) for Asians. Among 32,447 cancer survivors identified, the most common cancer diagnoses were breast (n = 6,948), prostate (n = 3,984), and colorectal (n = 2,546). From 1997 to 2014, the prevalence of obesity increased from 22.4% to 31.7% in cancer survivors and from 20.9% to 29.5% in adults without a history of cancer (P for trend obesity prevalence was higher in women and men with a history of cancer compared with those without a history of cancer (all P for interaction obesity prevalence was 3.1% in female and 3.7% in male colorectal cancer survivors, 3.0% in breast cancer survivors, and 2.1% in prostate cancer survivors (all P obesity burden were colorectal cancer survivors, breast cancer survivors, and non-Hispanic blacks. From 1997 to 2014, obesity increased more rapidly among adult cancer survivors compared with the general population. Colorectal and breast cancer survivors and non-Hispanic blacks were identified as being at the highest risk for obesity. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Risk of Colorectal Cancer for Carriers of Mutations in MUTYH, with and without a Family History of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Ko; Dowty, James G.; Cleary, Sean P.; Kim, Hyeja; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Young, Joanne P.; Clendenning, Mark; Rosty, Christophe; MacInnis, Robert J.; Giles, Graham G.; Boussioutas, Alex; Macrae, Finlay A.; Parry, Susan; Goldblatt, Jack; Baron, John A.; Burnett, Terrilea; Marchand, Loïc Le; Newcomb, Polly A.; Haile, Robert W.; Hopper, John L.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Gallinger, Steven; Lindor, Noralane M.; Tucker, Katherine M.; Winship, Ingrid M.; Jenkins, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    We studied 2332 individuals with monoallelic mutations in MUTYH among 9504 relatives of 264 colorectal cancer (CRC) cases with a MUTYH mutation. We estimated CRC risks, through 70 y of age, of 7.2% for male carriers of monoallelic mutations (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.6%–11.3%) and 5.6% for female carriers of monoallelic mutations (95% CI, 3.6%–8.8%), irrespective of family history. For monoallelic MUTYH mutation carriers with a first-degree relative with CRC, diagnosed by 50 y of age who does not have the MUTYH mutation, risks of CRC were 12.5% for men and (95% CI, 8.6%–17.7%) and 10% for women (95% CI, 6.7%–14.4%). Risks of CRC for carriers of monoallelic mutations in MUTYH with a first-degree relative with CRC are sufficiently high to warrant more intensive screening than for the general population. PMID:24444654

  20. CDC25A Protein Stability Represents a Previously Unrecognized Target of HER2 Signaling in Human Breast Cancer: Implication for a Potential Clinical Relevance in Trastuzumab Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Brunetto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The CDC25A-CDK2 pathway has been proposed as critical for the oncogenic action of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 in mammary epithelial cells. In particular, transgenic expression of CDC25A cooperates with HER2 in promoting mammary tumors, whereas CDC25A hemizygous loss attenuates the HER2-induced tumorigenesis penetrance. On the basis of this evidence of a synergism between HER2 and the cell cycle regulator CDC25A in a mouse model of mammary tumorigenesis, we investigated the role of CDC25A in human HER2-positive breast cancer and its possible implications in therapeutic response. HER2 status and CDC25A expression were assessed in 313 breast cancer patients and we found statistically significant correlation between HER2 and CDC25A (P = .007. Moreover, an HER2-positive breast cancer subgroup with high levels of CDC25A and very aggressive phenotype was identified (P = .005. Importantly, our in vitro studies on breast cancer cell lines showed that the HER2 inhibitor efficacy on cell growth and viability relied also on CDC25A expression and that such inhibition induces CDC25A down-regulation through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway and DNA damage response activation. In line with this observation, we found a statistical significant association between CDC25A overexpression and trastuzumab-combined therapy response rate in two different HER2-positive cohorts of trastuzumab-treated patients in either metastatic or neoadjuvant setting (P = .018 for the metastatic cohort and P = .021 for the neoadjuvant cohort. Our findings highlight a link between HER2 and CDC25A that positively modulates HER2- targeted therapy response, suggesting that, in HER2-positive breast cancer patients, CDC25A overexpression affects trastuzumab sensitivity.

  1. A very rare case of HPV-53-related cervical cancer, in a 79-year-old woman with a previous history of negative Pap cytology [corrigendum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zappacosta R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Zappacosta R, Lattanzio G, Viola P, Ianieri MM, Gatta DMP, Rosini S. Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:683–688.On page 686, Figure 3 originally contained one panel and incorrect heading and notes. The authors have provided a new Figure 3 and a new legend.Read the original article 

  2. Dabrafenib plus trametinib in patients with previously untreated BRAF(V600E)-mutant metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer : An open-label, phase 2 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Planchard, David; Smit, Egbert F.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Mazieres, Julien; Besse, Benjamin; Helland, Aslaug; Giannone, Vanessa; D'Amelio, Anthony M.; Zhang, Pingkuan; Mookerjee, Bijoyesh; Johnson, Bruce E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: BRAF(V600E) mutation occurs in 1-2% of lung adenocarcinomas and acts as an oncogenic driver. Dabrafenib, alone or combined with trametinib, has shown substantial antitumour activity in patients with previously treated BRAF(V600E)-mutant metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We

  3. A family history of breast cancer will not predict female early onset breast cancer in a population-based setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bock, Geertruida H.; Jacobi, Catharina E.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Krol-Warmerdam, Elly M. M.; Blom, Jannet; van Asperen, Christi J.; Cornelisse, Cees J.; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Brekelmans, Cecile T. M.; van Houwelingen, Johannes C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: An increased risk of breast cancer for relatives of breast cancer patients has been demonstrated in many studies, and having a relative diagnosed with breast cancer at an early age is an indication for breast cancer screening. This indication has been derived from estimates based on data

  4. Validation of family cancer history data in high-risk families: the influence of cancer site, ethnicity, kinship degree, and multiple family reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehranifar, Parisa; Wu, Hui-Chen; Shriver, Tom; Cloud, Ann J; Terry, Mary Beth

    2015-02-01

    Information on family cancer history (FCH) is often collected for first-degree relatives, but more extensive FCH information is critical for greater accuracy in risk assessment. Using self-reported diagnosis of cancer as the gold standard, we examined differences in the sensitivity and specificity of relative-reported FCH by cancer site, race/ethnicity, language preference, and kinship degree (1,524 individuals from 557 families; average number of relatives per family = 2.7). We evaluated the impact of FCH data collected in 2007-2013 from multiple relatives by comparing mean values and proportions for the number of relatives with any cancer, breast cancer, or ovarian cancer as reported by a single relative and by multiple relatives in the same family. The sensitivity of FCH was lower in Hispanics, Spanish-speaking persons, and third-degree relatives (e.g., for all cancers, sensitivities were 80.7%, 87.4%, and 91.0% for third-, second-, and first-degree relatives, respectively). FCH reported by multiple relatives included a higher number of relatives with cancer than the number reported by a single relative (e.g., mean increase of 1.2 relatives with any cancer), with more relatives diagnosed with any cancer, breast cancer, and ovarian cancer in 52%, 36% and 12% of families, respectively. Collection of FCH data from multiple relatives may provide a more comprehensive picture of FCH and may potentially improve risk assessment and preventive care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Differences in Natural History between Breast Cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers and Effects of MRI Screening-MRISC, MARIBS, and Canadian Studies Combined

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnsdijk, E.A.; Warner, E.; Gilbert, F.J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M.M.; Evans, G.; Causer, P.A.; Eeles, R.A.; Kaas, R.; Draisma, G.; Ramsay, E.A.; Warren, R.M.; Hill, K.A.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; Wasser, M.N.; Bergers, E.; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Hooning, M.J.; Rutgers, E.J.; Klijn, J.G.; Plewes, D.B.; Leach, M.O.; de Koning, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is recommended that BRCA1/2 mutation carriers undergo breast cancer screening using MRI because of their very high cancer risk and the high sensitivity of MRI in detecting invasive cancers. Clinical observations suggest important differences in the natural history between breast

  6. Colonic production of butyrate in patients with previous colonic cancer during long-term treatment with dietary fibre (Plantago ovata seeds)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordgaard, I; Hove, H; Clausen, M R

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Butyrate has antineoplastic properties against colorectal cancer cells and is the preferred oxidative substrate for colonocytes. Like acetate and propionate (short-chain fatty acids; SCFAs), butyrate is produced by colonic fermentation of dietary fibre. METHODS: Twenty patients resected...... for colorectal cancer were treated with 20 g/day of the fibre Plantago ovata seeds for 3 months, which increased the intake of fibre by 17.9 +/- 0.8 g/day, from basal levels of 19.2 +/- 1.7 g/day; 17 patients completed the study. Faecal samples were obtained on eight occasions, twice before treatment......, and monthly three times during and three time after treatment. RESULTS: One month of fibre therapy increased faecal concentrations of butyrate by 42 +/- 12% (from 13.2 +/- 1.2 to 19.3 +/- 3.0 mmol/l; P

  7. Time since start of first-line therapy as a predictive clinical marker for nintedanib in patients with previously treated non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaschler-Markefski, Birgit; Sikken, Patricia; Heymach, John V

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: No predictive clinical or genetic markers have been identified or validated for antiangiogenic agents in lung cancer. We aimed to identify a predictive clinical marker of benefit for nintedanib, an angiokinase inhibitor, using data from two large second-line non-small cell lung cancer...... Phase III trials (LUME-Lung 1 ([LL1] and LUME-Lung 2). METHODS: Predictive marker identification was conducted in a multi-step process using data from both trials; a hypothesis was generated, confirmed and validated. Statistical analyses included a stepwise selection approach, a recursive partitioning...... method and the evaluation of HRs, including treatment-by-covariate interactions. The marker was finally validated using a prospectively defined hierarchical testing procedure and treatment-by-covariate interaction for overall survival (OS) based on LL1. RESULTS: Time since start of first-line therapy...

  8. Factors Influencing Choices for Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Previously Unscreened African and Caucasian Americans: Findings from a Triangulation Mixed Methods Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Ruffin, Mack T.; Creswell, John W.; Jimbo, Masahito; Fetters, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated factors that influence choice of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening test and assessed the most- and least-preferred options among fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, and double contrast barium enema among adults with varied race, gender, and geographic region demographics. Mixed methods data collection consisted of 10 focus group interviews and a survey of the 93 focus group participants. Participants were ≥50 years of age and reported not ha...

  9. Therapy's shadow: a short history of the study of resistance to cancer chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eKeating

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the history of research on resistance to drug therapy in oncology usingscientometric techniques and qualitative analysis. Using co-citation analysis, we generatemaps to visualize subdomains in resistance research in two time periods, 1975-1990 and1995-2010. These maps reveal two historical trends in resistance research: first, a shift infocus from generic mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy to a focus on resistance totargeted therapies and molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis; and second, a movementaway from an almost exclusive reliance on animal and cell models and towards thegeneration of knowledge about resistance through clinical trial work. A close reading ofhighly cited articles within each subdomain cluster reveals specific points of transitionfrom one regime to the other, in particular the failure of several promising theories ofresistance to be translated into clinical insights and the emergence of interest in resistanceto a new generation of targeted agents such as imatinib and trastuzumab. We argue thatthe study of resistance in the oncology field has thus become more integrated withresearch into cancer therapy—rather than constituting it as a separate domain of study, asit has done in the past, contemporary research treats resistance as the flip side totreatment, as therapy’s shadow.

  10. [Recent history: 12th International Conference on Cancer, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1978].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Hugo

    2014-04-01

    Using the approaches of history of the present, this article recovers the discussions surrounding the 12th International Conference on Cancer carried out in Buenos Aires in 1978, in reaction to which Georges Périès organized a "counter-conference" in Paris. In order to understand this discussion, the political situation of the time is described, as is the state of human rights at the time in Argentina, the role of the media - in particular the newspapers La Nación and Clarín and the magazine Gente - and the institutional position adopted by the National Academy of Medicine, as expressed in a letter sent to the presidents of the primary scientific societies of the world. The letter is reprinted in this text as a documentary source, taken from Memoria: Año 1978 (Presidencia de Dr. José E. Rivarola) [Acta: Year 1978 (Presidency of Dr. José E. Rivarola)]. The framework of the discussion makes reference to science's social policy versus science's supposed neutrality and the role of scientific societies.

  11. Pleural mesothelioma and lung cancer risks in relation to occupational history and asbestos lung burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilham, Clare; Rake, Christine; Burdett, Garry; Nicholson, Andrew G; Davison, Leslie; Franchini, Angelo; Carpenter, James; Hodgson, John; Darnton, Andrew; Peto, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Background We have conducted a population-based study of pleural mesothelioma patients with occupational histories and measured asbestos lung burdens in occupationally exposed workers and in the general population. The relationship between lung burden and risk, particularly at environmental exposure levels, will enable future mesothelioma rates in people born after 1965 who never installed asbestos to be predicted from their asbestos lung burdens. Methods Following personal interview asbestos fibres longer than 5 µm were counted by transmission electron microscopy in lung samples obtained from 133 patients with mesothelioma and 262 patients with lung cancer. ORs for mesothelioma were converted to lifetime risks. Results Lifetime mesothelioma risk is approximately 0.02% per 1000 amphibole fibres per gram of dry lung tissue over a more than 100-fold range, from 1 to 4 in the most heavily exposed building workers to less than 1 in 500 in most of the population. The asbestos fibres counted were amosite (75%), crocidolite (18%), other amphiboles (5%) and chrysotile (2%). Conclusions The approximate linearity of the dose–response together with lung burden measurements in younger people will provide reasonably reliable predictions of future mesothelioma rates in those born since 1965 whose risks cannot yet be seen in national rates. Burdens in those born more recently will indicate the continuing occupational and environmental hazards under current asbestos control regulations. Our results confirm the major contribution of amosite to UK mesothelioma incidence and the substantial contribution of non-occupational exposure, particularly in women. PMID:26715106

  12. Impact of Genetic Counseling in Women with a Family History of Breast Cancer in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godino, Lea; Razzaboni, Elisabetta; Bianconi, Margherita; Turchetti, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    As the impact of breast cancer (BC) risk assessment in asymptomatic women with a family history of BC had never been explored in Italy, we performed a study on a retrospective series of women who had undergone BC risk assessment. To this aim, a semi-structured telephone interview was administered to 82 women. Most participants considered the information received as clear (96.2 %) and helpful (76.8 %). Thirty-eight (46.3 %) stated that their perceived risk of BC had changed after the counseling: for 40.2 % it had decreased, for 6.1 % increased; however, women highly overestimating their risk at the baseline (≥ 4-fold) failed to show improvements in risk perception accuracy. Sixty-six women (80.5 %) stated they had followed the recommended surveillance, while 19.5 % had not, mainly due to difficulties in arranging examinations. Most women (89.0 %) had shared the information with their relatives, with 57.3 % reporting other family members had undertaken the recommended surveillance. BC risk assessment was associated with high rates of satisfaction and had a favorable impact on risk perception in a subgroup of women. The impact on surveillance adhesion extended to relatives. Organized programs for identification and surveillance may help identify a larger fraction of at-risk women and overcome the reported difficulties in arranging surveillance.

  13. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Overview & Mission History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Deputy Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, Offices & Centers Advisory Boards & Review Groups Budget & ...

  14. Solitary Plasmacytoma of the Sternum Mimicking Bone Metastasis in a Patient with a History of Breast Cancer Evaluated by F-18-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treglia, Giorgio; Luca, Giovanella [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Barbara, Muoio; Carmelo, Caldarella [Catholic Univ., Rome (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    A 65-year-old woman with a history of breast cancer (stage T2N0M0 treated with left breast conservative therapy 7 years previously followed by hormone therapy) underwent fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18-FDG PET/CT) for restaging due to increased serum tumour markers levels (CA15-3, 37 U/ml and CEA, 8 ng/ml). The patient presented thoracic pain before performing F-18-FDG PET/CT. PET/CT demonstrated an area of increased F-18-FDG uptake corresponding to an osteolytic lesion occupying the upper sternum suspicious for bone metastasis. No other areas of abnormal F-18-FDG uptake were detected in the rest of the body. Based on this PET/CT finding, the patient performed biopsy of the sternal lesion. Histology demonstrated the presence of a sternal plasmacytoma and the patient was addressed to radiation therapy. The role of F-18-FDG PET/CT in patients with multiple myeloma is well known, whereas only some articles evaluated the usefulness of this method in patients with solitary plasmacytomas. In particular, F-18-FDG PET/CT may be useful in demonstrating the evolution of solitary plasmacytomas in multiple myeloma. In our case F-18-FDG PET/CT was useful in detecting a solitary plasmacytoma of the sternum mimicking bone metastasis in a patient with history of breast cancer, correctly addressing to further histological evaluation.

  15. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of a gallbladder lesion in a patient with a history of renal cell and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Markus; Oehmen, Frank; Walter, Hajo; Büsing, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The gallbladder is an uncommon site of metastatic cancer. Although ultrasound can be regarded as a first line investigation for the detection of gallbladder lesions, differentiation between benign and malignant tumors usually requires resection. Real-time contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is a well-established technique for the classification of liver, pancreatic, and renal diseases (Weskott, 2008). The application of CEUS in the diagnosis of gallbladder tumors has rarely been described. We report the application of contrast enhanced ultrasound for the characterization of a gallbladder lesion in a 63-year-old patient with a history of renal cell and rectal cancer.

  16. PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PNLC

    PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION: A risk factor for third trimester uterine rupture in three ... for accurate diagnosis of uterine rupture. KEY WORDS: Induced second trimester abortion - Previous uterine surgery - Uterine rupture. ..... scarred uterus during second trimester misoprostol- induced labour for a missed ...

  17. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the urinary bladder in a patient with bladder cancer previously treated with intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numakura, Satoe; Morikawa, Teppei; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Toyoshima, Toyoaki; Fukayama, Masashi

    2014-02-01

    We report an extremely rare case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) of the urinary bladder. A 68-year-old man presented with gross hematuria. Cystoscopy showed multiple papillary tumors in the urinary bladder, and transurethral resection was performed. Pathological diagnosis was high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma with lamina propria invasion. The patient received six treatments with intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy. Seven months after surgery, follow-up cystoscopy showed three elevated lesions in the urinary bladder, two of which were identified histologically as recurrent urothelial carcinoma. Microscopic examination of the lesion at the anterior wall revealed diffuse infiltration of medium to large histiocytoid cells in the lamina propria, many of which had distorted nuclei and nuclear grooves. Dense eosinophilic infiltration was also observed. Immunohistochemically, the histiocytoid cells were diffusely positive for S-100 and CD1a, but negative for cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and melanosome-associated antigen recognized by HMB-45. Based on the histological and immunohistochemical features, we diagnosed the lesion as LCH of the urinary bladder. There was no evidence of recurrence of either bladder cancer or LCH after an 18-month follow-up. To avoid misdiagnosis, urologists and pathologists should be aware that LCH may develop in the urinary bladder after intravesical BCG therapy for bladder cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Prostate cancer in a man with a BRCA2 mutation and a personal history of bilateral breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, C F; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, C; Sopik, V; Narod, S A

    2015-08-01

    Men with a BRCA2 mutation face substantial lifetime risks for the development of both breast and prostate cancer. A male who was initially diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 32 was subsequently diagnosed at age 77 with both contralateral breast cancer and prostate cancer. He was found to be BRCA2 mutation carrier. The patient was treated with contralateral mastectomy, breast irradiation, prostate irradiation and adjuvant endocrine therapy. At age 83 he died of metastatic prostate cancer. Our case underscores the observation that BRCA2 mutation carriers are at risk for multiple cancers, including contralateral breast cancer, and illustrates the need for current practice recommendations for the early detection of breast and prostate cancer in men with BRCA2 mutations. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A análise seminal deve ser requisitada para homens com histórico de fertilidade prévia? Should semen analysis be requested for men with a history of previous fertility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Bedin Pasqualotto

    2006-11-01

    ão devem presumir que um paciente possui uma análise seminal normal, baseados no fato de este possuir história de estabelecimento de uma gravidez no passado.PURPOSE: to determine if the previous fertility history can predict current fertility status of a patient examined for couple’s infertility. METHODS: retrospective study involving semen analyses from 183 consecutive subfertile patients evaluated from September 2002 to March 2004. We excluded those patients who had undergone radio or chemotherapy, orchiectomy or vasectomy. Mean values of all analyses were used for patients with multiple semen analysis. Patients with more than 20x10(6 sperm/mL, motility higher than 50% and with normal strict sperm morphology higher than 14% were considered normal. Patients were divided into two groups, according to the fertility status: primary infertility (118 patients and secondary infertility (65 patients. Data were analyzed according to the chi2 test and the Student t-test. RESULTS: no differences were detected in the mean age between patients with primary infertility, 37.3±6.3, and secondary infertility, 38.1±5.9; p=0.08. In the group of patients with primary infertility, 51.9% (61 patients had a normal sperm concentration, 70.3% (83 patients had normal sperm motility and 26.3% (31 patients had normal sperm morphology. In the group of patients with secondary infertility, 53.8% (35 patients had normal sperm concentration, 75.4% (49 patients had normal sperm motility and 32.3% (21 patients had normal sperm morphology. No significant differences were detected in sperm concentration (21.3x10(6/mL versus 23.1x10(6/mL; p=0.07, motility (45.2 versus 48.1%; p=0.08 and morphology (6.1 versus 6.4%; p=0.09 between groups of patients with primary and secondary infertility. CONCLUSIONS: semen analysis should be requested even in cases of prior male fertility. Physicians should not presume a patient to have a normal semen analysis based on his previous history of initiating a pregnancy.

  20. Oral contraceptives, reproductive history and risk of colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Tsilidis, KK; Allen, NE; Key, TJ; Bakken, K; Lund, E; Berrino, F; Fournier, A; Olsen, A; Tjonneland, A; Overvad, K; Boutron-Ruault, M-C; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Byrnes, G; Chajes, V; Rinaldi, S

    2010-01-01

    Background: Oral contraceptive use and reproductive factors may initiate long-term changes to the hormonal milieu and thereby, possibly influence colorectal cancer risk. Methods: We examined the association of hormonal and reproductive factors with risk of colorectal cancer among 337?802 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, of whom 1878 developed colorectal cancer. Results: After stratification for center and age, and adjustment for body mass index, smoki...

  1. Family History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  2. Family History and Probability of Prostate Cancer, Differentiated by Risk Category: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, Ola; Drevin, Linda; Akre, Olof; Garmo, Hans; Stattin, Pär

    2016-10-01

    Familial prostate cancer risk estimates are inflated by clinically insignificant low-risk cancer, diagnosed after prostate-specific antigen testing. We provide age-specific probabilities of non-low- and high-risk prostate cancer. Fifty-one thousand, eight hundred ninety-seven brothers of 32 807 men with prostate cancer were identified in Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden (PCBaSe). Nelson-Aalen estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for cumulative, family history-stratified probabilities of any, non-low- (any of Gleason score ≥ 7, prostate-specific antigen [PSA] ≥ 10 ng/mL, T3-4, N1, and/or M1) and high-risk prostate cancer (Gleason score ≥ 8 and/or T3-4 and/or PSA ≥ 20 ng/mL and/or N1 and/or M1). The population probability of any prostate cancer was 4.8% (95% CI = 4.8% to 4.9%) at age 65 years and 12.9% (95% CI = 12.8% to 12.9%) at age 75 years, of non-low-risk prostate cancer 2.8% (95% CI = 2.7% to 2.8%) at age 65 years and 8.9% (95% CI = 8.8% to 8.9%) at age 75 years, and of high-risk prostate cancer 1.4% (95% CI = 1.3% to 1.4%) at age 65 years and 5.2% (95% CI = 5.1% to 5.2%) at age 75 years. For men with one affected brother, probabilities of any prostate cancer were 14.9% (95% CI = 14.1% to 15.8%) at age 65 years and 30.3% (95% CI = 29.3% to 31.3%) at age 75 years, of non-low-risk prostate cancer 7.3% (95% CI = 6.7% to 7.9%) at age 65 years and 18.8% (95% CI = 17.9% to 19.6%) at age 75 years, and of high-risk prostate cancer 3.0% (95% CI = 2.6% to 3.4%) at age 65 years and 8.9% (95% CI = 8.2% to 9.5%) at age 75 years. Probabilities were higher for men with a stronger family history. For example, men with two affected brothers had a 13.6% (95% CI = 9.9% to 17.6 %) probability of high-risk cancer at age 75 years. The age-specific probabilities of non-low- and high-risk cancer presented here are more informative than relative risks of any prostate cancer and more suitable to use

  3. Docetaxel plus nintedanib versus docetaxel plus placebo in patients with previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (LUME-Lung 1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Martin; Kaiser, Rolf; Mellemgaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The phase 3 LUME-Lung 1 study assessed the efficacy and safety of docetaxel plus nintedanib as second-line therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS: Patients from 211 centres in 27 countries with stage IIIB/IV recurrent NSCLC progressing after first-line chemotherapy...... to treat after 714 events in all patients. The key secondary endpoint was overall survival, analysed by intention to treat after 1121 events had occurred, in a prespecified stepwise order: first in patients with adenocarcinoma who progressed within 9 months after start of first-line therapy, then in all...... a median follow-up of 31·7 months (IQR 27·8-36·1), overall survival was significantly improved for patients with adenocarcinoma histology who progressed within 9 months after start of first-line treatment in the docetaxel plus nintedanib group (206 patients) compared with those in the docetaxel plus...

  4. Safety and radiation-enhancing effect of sodium glycididazole in loco regionally advanced laryngeal cancers previously treated with platinum-containing chemotherapy regimens: a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Y.C.; Wu, R.; Xu, Z.G.; Zhang, X.Y.; Wu, L.N.; Wang, Y.M.; Zheng, W.; Chen, X.D.; Chi, F.; Zhang, Z.Y.; Li, X.; Jin, X.Y.; Chen, W.; Wang, S.L.; Xiao, F.D.; Wang, E.Y.; Dong, X.Q.; Jia, M.X.; Li, Y.; Fan, G.L.; Hao, S.H.; Zhang, L.B.; Zhang, H.B.; Xia, H.H.X.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety and radiation-enhancing effect of sodium glycididazole in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (stage T3-4,N0-3,M0) with conventional radiotherapy. Patients and methods: Patients with locoregional advanced laryngeal cancer (stage T3-4,N0-3,M0) were included: group 1(control, n = 30)were not administered of sodium glycididazole; group 2 (test, n = 30) received sodium glycididazole at a dose of 700 mg/m2 intravenous infusion 30 minutes before radiotherapy three times a week. Surrogate end-points of efficacy were tumor and nodal size. Safety parameters were vomiting, nausea, mucositis, laryngeal edema, esophagus and skin reaction, dysphagia, dyspnea, neurological deficit. Patients were evaluated weekly during treatment for 7 weeks and thereafter monthly for 3 months. Results: In the test, the overall response rate was 88.89% (95% CI, 71.00-97.00%) at 7 weeks and 92.59% (95% CI, 76.00 to 99.00%) at 1 month of follow-up. In the control, the overall response rate was 62.5% (95% CI, 41.00 to 81.00%) at 7 weeks and 58.33% (95% CI, 37.00 to 78.00%) at 1 month of follow-up. The short-term locoregional response rate was better in the test group at 7 weeks (p = 0.027) and at 1 month (p = 0.005) of follow-up. The test group had significantly more nausea and vomiting in weeks 1 (p = 0.047), 2 (p = 0.007), and 3 (p = 0.01) of treatment. Conclusions: The study indicates sodium glycididazole is an effective radiation-enhancing agent that improves short-term locoregional control and is well tolerated in patients with loco regionally advanced laryngeal cancer. (authors)

  5. Clinical factors related with helicobacter pylori infection--is there an association with gastric cancer history in first-degree family members?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Busra B; Akkas, Burcu Esen; Vural, Gulin Ucmak

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess clinical factors associated with Helicobacter pylori positivity and to evaluate the incidence of gastric carcinoma in first-degree family members of infected patients. A total of 580 patients (mean age:38±17) with gastrointestinal complaints underwent C-14 urea breath test (UBT). Patients were grouped as: Group-1, untreated patients (n:384); and Group-2, patients who previously treated with eradication triple therapy (n:196). C-14 UBT was performed 1-2 months after the completion of eradication therapy. Associations of H pylori positivity with age, gender, ABO and Rhesus groups, smoking, dietary habits, and history of gastric cancer in first-degree family members were evaluated. The frequency of H pylori positivity was significantly higher in group-1 (58%) compared to group-2 (20%), p=0.001. There were no correlations between H pylori positivity and age, gender, ABO groups, Rhesus subgroups, smoking and dietary habits in both patient groups. The frequency of gastric cancer in family members was significantly higher in patients with H pylori infection among group-1, compared to infected patients among group-2 (56% vs. 28.6% respectively, p=0.03). We observed a significant association between H pylori positivity and the presence of gastric cancer in first-degree relatives of group-1 patients. Our results provide some confirmation of the presence of a link between gastric cancer development and H pylori. C-14 UBT is a sensitive, reliable and a widely recommended test for the detection of H pylori infection and recurrence. We suggest that detection and eradication of H pylori may contribute to a reduced risk of gastric cancer in the family members of infected patients.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of ceritinib in patients previously treated with crizotinib in anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurry, Manjusha; Zhou, Zheng-Yi; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Chenxue; Fan, Liangyi; Rebeira, Mayvis; Xie, Jipan

    2016-10-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of ceritinib vs alternatives in patients who discontinue treatment with crizotinib in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from a Canadian public healthcare perspective. A partitioned survival model with three health states (stable, progressive, and death) was developed. Comparators were chosen based on reported utilization from a retrospective Canadian chart study; comparators were pemetrexed, best supportive care (BSC), and historical control (HC). HC comprised of all treatment alternatives reported. Progression-free survival and overall survival for ceritinib were estimated using data reported from single-arm clinical trials (ASCEND-1 [NCT01283516] and ASCEND-2 [NCT01685060]). Survival data for comparators were obtained from published clinical trials in a NSCLC population and from a Canadian retrospective chart study. Parametric models were used to extrapolate outcomes beyond the trial period. Drug acquisition, administration, resource use, and adverse event (AE) costs were obtained from databases. Utilities for health states and disutilities for AEs based on EQ-5D were derived from literature. Incremental costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained were estimated. Univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Over 4 years, ceritinib was associated with 0.86 QALYs and total direct costs of $89,740 for the post-ALK population. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $149,117 comparing ceritinib vs BSC, $80,100 vs pemetrexed, and $104,436 vs HC. Additional scenarios included comparison to docetaxel with an ICER of $149,780 and using utility scores reported from PROFILE 1007, with a reported ICER ranging from $67,311 vs pemetrexed to $119,926 vs BSC. Due to limitations in clinical efficacy input, extensive sensitivity analyses were carried out whereby results remained consistent with the base-case findings. Based on the willingness-to-pay threshold for

  7. Results From the Phase III Randomized Trial of Onartuzumab Plus Erlotinib Versus Erlotinib in Previously Treated Stage IIIB or IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: METLung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigel, David R; Edelman, Martin J; O'Byrne, Kenneth; Paz-Ares, Luis; Mocci, Simonetta; Phan, See; Shames, David S; Smith, Dustin; Yu, Wei; Paton, Virginia E; Mok, Tony

    2017-02-01

    Purpose The phase III OAM4971g study (METLung) examined the efficacy and safety of onartuzumab plus erlotinib in patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer selected by MET immunohistochemistry whose disease had progressed after treatment with a platinum-based chemotherapy regimen. Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned at a one-to-one ratio to receive onartuzumab (15 mg/kg intravenously on day 1 of each 21-day cycle) plus daily oral erlotinib 150 mg or intravenous placebo plus daily oral erlotinib 150 mg. The primary end point was overall survival (OS) in the intent-to-treat population. Secondary end points included median progression-free survival, overall response rate, biomarker analysis, and safety. Results A total of 499 patients were enrolled (onartuzumab, n = 250; placebo, n = 249). Median OS was 6.8 versus 9.1 months for onartuzumab versus placebo (stratified hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95% CI, 0.98 to 1.65; P = .067), with a greater number of deaths in the onartuzumab arm (130 [52%] v 114 [46%]). Median progression-free survival was 2.7 versus 2.6 months (stratified HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.81 to 1.20; P = .92), and overall response rate was 8.4% and 9.6% for onartuzumab versus placebo, respectively. Exploratory analyses using MET fluorescence in situ hybridization status and gene expression showed no benefit for onartuzumab; patients with EGFR mutations showed a trend toward shorter OS with onartuzumab treatment (HR, 4.68; 95% CI, 0.97 to 22.63). Grade 3 to 5 adverse events were reported by 56.0% and 51.2% of patients, with serious AEs in 33.9% and 30.7%, for experimental versus control arms, respectively. Conclusion Onartuzumab plus erlotinib did not improve clinical outcomes, with shorter OS in the onartuzumab arm, compared with erlotinib in patients with MET-positive non-small-cell lung cancer.

  8. RapidArc, intensity modulated photon and proton techniques for recurrent prostate cancer in previously irradiated patients: a treatment planning comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Damien C; Miralbell, Raymond; Wang, Hui; Cozzi, Luca; Dipasquale, Giovanna; Khan, Haleem G; Ratib, Osman; Rouzaud, Michel; Vees, Hansjoerg; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-01-01

    A study was performed comparing volumetric modulated arcs (RA) and intensity modulation (with photons, IMRT, or protons, IMPT) radiation therapy (RT) for patients with recurrent prostate cancer after RT. Plans for RA, IMRT and IMPT were optimized for 7 patients. Prescribed dose was 56 Gy in 14 fractions. The recurrent gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined on 18 F-fluorocholine PET/CT scans. Plans aimed to cover at least 95% of the planning target volume with a dose > 50.4 Gy. A maximum dose (D Max ) of 61.6 Gy was allowed to 5% of the GTV. For the urethra, D Max was constrained to 37 Gy. Rectal D Median was < 17 Gy. Results were analyzed using Dose-Volume Histogram and conformity index (CI 90 ) parameters. Tumor coverage (GTV and PTV) was improved with RA (V 95% 92.6 ± 7.9 and 83.7 ± 3.3%), when compared to IMRT (V 95% 88.6 ± 10.8 and 77.2 ± 2.2%). The corresponding values for IMPT were intermediate for the GTV (V 95% 88.9 ± 10.5%) and better for the PTV (V 95% 85.6 ± 5.0%). The percentages of rectal and urethral volumes receiving intermediate doses (35 Gy) were significantly decreased with RA (5.1 ± 3.0 and 38.0 ± 25.3%) and IMPT (3.9 ± 2.7 and 25.1 ± 21.1%), when compared to IMRT (9.8 ± 5.3 and 60.7 ± 41.7%). CI 90 was 1.3 ± 0.1 for photons and 1.6 ± 0.2 for protons. Integral Dose was 1.1 ± 0.5 Gy*cm 3 *10 5 for IMPT and about a factor three higher for all photon's techniques. RA and IMPT showed improvements in conformal avoidance relative to fixed beam IMRT for 7 patients with recurrent prostate cancer. IMPT showed further sparing of organs at risk

  9. Application of support vector machines to breast cancer screening using mammogram and clinical history data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Walker H., Jr.; McKee, Dan; Velazquez, Roberto; Wong, Lut; Lo, Joseph Y.; Anderson, Francis R.

    2003-05-01

    The objectives of this paper are to discuss: (1) the development and testing of a new Evolutionary Programming (EP) method to optimally configure Support Vector Machine (SVM) parameters for facilitating the diagnosis of breast cancer; (2) evaluation of EP derived learning machines when the number of BI-RADS and clinical history discriminators are reduced from 16 to 7; (3) establishing system performance for several SVM kernels in addition to the EP/Adaptive Boosting (EP/AB) hybrid using the Digital Database for Screening Mammography, University of South Florida (DDSM USF) and Duke data sets; and (4) obtaining a preliminary evaluation of the measurement of SVM learning machine inter-institutional generalization capability using BI-RADS data. Measuring performance of the SVM designs and EP/AB hybrid against these objectives will provide quantative evidence that the software packages described can generalize to larger patient data sets from different institutions. Most iterative methods currently in use to optimize learning machine parameters are time consuming processes, which sometimes yield sub-optimal values resulting in performance degradation. SVMs are new machine intelligence paradigms, which use the Structural Risk Minimization (SRM) concept to develop learning machines. These learning machines can always be trained to provide global minima, given that the machine parameters are optimally computed. In addition, several system performance studies are described which include EP derived SVM performance as a function of: (a) population and generation size as well as a method for generating initial populations and (b) iteratively derived versus EP derived learning machine parameters. Finally, the authors describe a set of experiments providing preliminary evidence that both the EP/AB hybrid and SVM Computer Aided Diagnostic C++ software packages will work across a large population of patients, based on a data set of approximately 2,500 samples from five different

  10. Prospective evaluation of patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes following SBRT ± cetuximab for locally-recurrent, previously-irradiated head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargo, John A.; Heron, Dwight E.; Ferris, Robert L.; Rwigema, Jean-Claude M.; Wegner, Rodney E.; Kalash, Ronny; Ohr, James; Kubicek, Greg J.; Burton, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as a promising salvage strategy for unresectable, previously-irradiated recurrent squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (rSCCHN). Here-in, we report the first prospective evaluation of patient-reported quality-of-life (PR-QoL) following re-irradiation with SBRT ± cetuximab for rSCCHN. Materials and methods: From November 2004 to May 2011, 150 patients with unresectable, rSCCHN in a previously-irradiated field receiving >40 Gy were treated with SBRT to 40–50 Gy in 5 fractions ± concurrent cetuximab. PR-QoL was prospectively acquired using University of Washington Quality-of-Life Revised (UW-QoL-R). Results: Overall PR-QoL, health-related PR-QoL, and select domains commonly affected by re-irradiation progressively increase following an initial 1-month decline with statistically significant improvements noted in swallowing (p = 0.025), speech (p = 0.017), saliva (p = 0.041), activity (p = 0.032) and recreation (p = 0.039). Conclusions: Especially for patients surviving >1-year, improved tumor control associated with SBRT re-irradiation may ameliorate decreased PR-QoL resulting from rSCCHN. These improvements in PR-QoL transcend all measured domains in a validated PR-QoL assessment tool independent of age, use of cetuximab, tumor volume, and interval since prior irradiation.

  11. Levels of Distress in Women With a Family History of Ovarian Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kash, Kathryn

    2001-01-01

    ... (mothers, sisters, or daughters). Women will be queried about their objective and subjective risk status, their knowledge of ovarian cancer and risk factors, their uncertainty about ovarian cancer, levels of anxiety and depression...

  12. Levels of Distress in Women With a Family History of Ovarian Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kash, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    ... (mothers sisters or daughters). Women will be queried about their objective and subjective risk status their knowledge of ovarian cancer and risk factors their uncertainty about ovarian cancer levels of anxiety and depress...

  13. Anxiety and its correlates among young adults with a history of parental cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Christina A; Arch, Joanna J; Greer, Joseph A

    2017-01-01

    We assessed whether experiencing parental cancer during childhood was associated with anxiety levels during young adulthood-and whether parental survival status moderated anxiety or related psychosocial outcomes. Young adults who experienced parental cancer during their childhood (n = 68) and those who did not (n = 298) completed measures of current anxiety and family functioning. The parental cancer group completed measures of social support and life changes during the parental cancer and posttraumatic growth. Young adults who experienced parental cancer endorsed higher state and trait anxiety than matched controls. Higher anxiety correlated with less current family cohesion and lower past social support satisfaction. Parental cancer outcome moderated the relationship between current anxiety and dimensions of posttraumatic growth and predicted the number of cancer-related life changes. Experiencing parental cancer during childhood predicted higher reported anxiety during young adulthood. Anxiety levels were partially moderated by parental survival status.

  14. Oral cancer in Brazil: a secular history of Public Health Policies

    OpenAIRE

    MARTINS FILHO,Paulo Ricardo Saquete; SANTOS,Thiago de Santana; SILVA,Luiz Carlos Ferreira da; PIVA,Marta Rabello

    2014-01-01

    The oral cancer in Brazil is considered an important public health issue. Despite almost a century of combat disease, with oncological assistance programs and prevention campaigns based public policies, the incidence of oral cancer in several regions is still high. The major goal of cancer prevention and control is a reduction in both the incidence of the disease and the associated morbidity and mortality, as well as improved life for cancer patients and their families. Low-income and disadva...

  15. PATIENTS WITH END STAGE CANCER: LIFE HISTORY, PSYCHO-EMOTIONAL ASPECTS, RELATIONSHIP WITH THE NURSING STAFF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanete Ribeiro do Nascimento

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the cancers most feared by women for its high incidence and its psychological effects that affect the perception of sexuality and self-image. Objective: To identify the difficulties of nursing professionals in the treatment of patients with cancer, from the standpoint of a terminally ill patient of breast cancer. Methodology: This is a case study of a patient who is in the terminal stages of breast cancer. We carried out the survey of literature in journals indexed the databases LILACS and SciELO Open Access and English, on terminally ill cancer. Results: Feelings of loneliness and sadness were softened and smoothed by the attitude and disposition of nursing professionals. In moments of intervention needs of physical care, nursing care was provided. Conclusion: The nursing staff has always demonstrated skills in treating patients with cancer, providing quality care, humane and comprehensive, meeting all your needs biopsicoespiritual.

  16. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II trial of sorafenib and erlotinib or erlotinib alone in previously treated advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigel, David R; Burris, Howard A; Greco, F Anthony; Shipley, Dianna L; Friedman, Elke K; Waterhouse, David M; Whorf, Robert C; Mitchell, R Brian; Daniel, Davey B; Zangmeister, Jeffrey; Bass, J David; Hainsworth, John D

    2011-06-20

    Sorafenib, an oral multikinase inhibitor, has shown preliminary activity in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with advanced NSCLC were treated with erlotinib with or without sorafenib in this multicenter phase II trial. Key eligibility criteria included the following: stage IIIB or IV NSCLC; one to two prior regimens; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 to 2; and measurable disease. Patients were randomly assigned 2:1 to sorafenib (400 mg orally twice a day) plus erlotinib (150 mg orally daily) or placebo plus erlotinib and stratified by squamous/nonsquamous histology and prior bevacizumab. Treatment efficacy, measured by progression-free survival (PFS) and overall response rate (ORR), was compared. Treatment of 168 patients allowed detection of 40% improvement in the historical PFS of 2.2 months with single-agent erlotinib. One hundred sixty-eight patients enrolled from February 2008 to February 2009. Clinical characteristics of the two groups were similar. ORRs for sorafenib/erlotinib and placebo/erlotinib were 8% and 11%, respectively (P = .56); disease control rates were 54% and 38%, respectively (P = .056). Median PFS was 3.38 months for sorafenib/erlotinib versus 1.94 months for placebo/erlotinib (hazard ratio, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.22; P = .196). Seventy-two patients consented to analyses of tumor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In 67 patients with EGFR wild-type (WT) tumors, median PFS was 3.38 months for sorafenib/erlotinib versus 1.77 months for placebo/erlotinib (P = .018); median overall survival (OS) was 8 months for sorafenib/erlotinib versus 4.5 months for placebo/erlotinib (P = .019). An OS advantage for sorafenib/erlotinib was suggested among 43 patients with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) EGFR-negative tumors (P = .064). Both regimens were tolerable, with modest toxicity increase with sorafenib. Although there was little difference in ORR or PFS, subset analyses in EGFR WT and EGFR FISH

  17. History of Severe Sunburn and Risk of Skin Cancer Among Women and Men in 2 Prospective Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaowei; Cho, Eunyoung; Li, Wen-Qing; Weinstock, Martin A; Han, Jiali; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have assessed the relationship between sunburn and risk of different skin cancers (melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and basal cell carcinoma (BCC)) in prospective studies simultaneously, and little is known about the association of severe sunburns at different body sites with skin cancer risk. We used data on 87,166 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1982-2010) and 32,959 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1992-2010) to investigate skin cancer risk associated with history of severe sunburns at different body sites (face/arms, trunk, and lower limbs). After adjustment for other risk factors, overall baseline history of severe sunburn was more apparently associated with risk of melanoma than with risk of SCC and BCC in men (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios were 2.41 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32, 4.41) for melanoma, 1.48 (95% CI: 1.08, 2.03) for SCC, and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.32) for BCC) but not in women. Sunburn on the trunk appeared to be more closely associated with melanoma risk, but not risk of SCC and BCC, when compared with sunburns at other body sites (face/arms and lower limbs). These differences were more apparent in men than in women. Pending further investigation, our findings add novel insights to the existing literature on sunburn history and skin cancer risk. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Identification of Kininogen 1 as a Serum Protein Marker of Colorectal Adenoma in Patients with a Family History of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiekai; Huang, Yanqin; Lin, Chen; Li, Xiaofen; Fang, Xuefeng; Zhong, Chenhan; Yuan, Ying; Zheng, Shu

    2018-01-01

    The serum protein markers of colorectal adenoma in patients with a family history of colorectal cancer have been rarely reported. Serum samples from colorectal adenoma patients with or without a family history of colorectal cancer and healthy controls were profiled using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The model to distinguish colorectal adenoma patients with a family history of colorectal cancer from atypical hereditary colorectal families (CRA-H) and sporadic colorectal adenoma patients without a family history of colorectal cancer (CRA-S) was established with 85.0% accuracy. The model distinguishing CRA-H from healthy individuals was established with 90.0% specificity and 86.7% sensitivity. Additionally, five peaks (2202, 5821, 3260, 2480, and 2218) showing differential expression in advanced colorectal adenoma patients with a family history of colorectal cancer were selected. The protein Kininogen 1 (KNG1) was identified in colorectal adenoma patients and validated using Western Blotting. KNG1 may be a biomarker for colorectal adenoma patients with a family history of colorectal cancer.

  19. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  20. EUROGIN 2014 Roadmap: Differences in HPV infection natural history, transmission, and HPV-related cancer incidence by gender and anatomic site of infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Anna R.; Nyitray, Alan G.; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Goodman, Marc T.; Sudenga, Staci L.; Monsonego, Joseph; Franceschi, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause cancer at multiple anatomic sites in men and women, including cervical, oropharyngeal, anal, vulvar, and vaginal cancers in women and oropharyngeal, anal, and penile cancers in men. In this EUROGIN 2014 roadmap, differences in HPV-related cancer and infection burden by gender and anatomic site are reviewed. The proportion of cancers attributable to HPV varies by anatomic site, with nearly 100% of cervical, 88% of anal, and less than 50% of lower genital tract and oropharyngeal cancers attributable to HPV, depending on world region and prevalence of tobacco use. Often mirroring cancer incidence rates, HPV prevalence and infection natural history varies by gender and anatomic site of infection. Oral HPV infection is rare and significantly differs by gender; yet HPV-related cancer incidence at this site is several-fold higher than at either the anal canal or penile epithelium. HPV seroprevalence is significantly higher among women compared to men, likely explaining the differences in age-specific HPV prevalence and incidence patterns observed by gender. Correspondingly, among heterosexual partners, HPV transmission appears higher from women to men. More research is needed to characterize HPV natural history at each anatomic site where HPV causes cancer in men and women, information that is critical to inform the basic science of HPV natural history and the development of future infection and cancer prevention efforts. PMID:25043222

  1. Rastreamento anterior para câncer de colo uterino em mulheres com alterações citológicas ou histológicas Previous screening for cervical cancer among women with cytological and histological abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Rama

    2008-06-01

    do último exame citológico anterior.OBJECTIVE: To examine previous Pap smear history in women screened for cervical cancer with cytological or histological abnormalities. METHODS: Cross-sectional study in a sample of 5,485 women (15-65 years old who self-referred to cervical cancer screening in Sao Paulo and Campinas, Southeastern Brazil, between February 2002 and March 2003. A behavioral questionnaire was applied and cervical specimens were obtained for testing by Pap smears or liquid-based cytology. Women who had abnormal cytology were referred for colposcopic examination and, if abnormal, for cervical punch biopsy. To explore factors associated to cervical abnormalities Pearson's chi-was conduted square test at a 5% significance level. RESULTS: Cytological abnormalities were found in 354 women (6.4% and included 41 high-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions and 3 carcinomas; 92.7% were normal results. Colposcopy was performed in 289 women, and 145 (50.2% showed abnormal results. Punch biopsies showed 14 cervical intraepithelial neoplasias grade 3 and 4 carcinomas. Previous Pap smears were reported in all women who had cytology suspected of carcinoma, 97.6% of those with high-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions, all women with histological diagnosis of carcinoma and 92.9% of those who had cervical intraepithelial neoplasias grade 3 histologically. Previous Pap smear in the last tree years was reported by 86.5% and 92.8% of women with abnormal cytology and biopsy, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: There was no statistically significant difference regarding the number of Pap tests and time since their last test between women with histologically diagnosed carcinoma and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 compared with those with normal cytology.

  2. The value of routine physical examination in the follow up of women with a history of early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenli; de Bock, Geertruida H; Schaapveld, Michael; Baas, Peter C; Wiggers, Theo; Jansen, Liesbeth

    2011-03-01

    Routine physical examination is recommended in follow up guidelines for women with a history of breast cancer. The objective of this paper is to assess the contribution of routine physical examination in addition to mammography in the early diagnosis of breast cancer recurrences. The medical follow-up documents of 669 patients were reviewed. 127 contra-lateral breast cancers (CBCs) and 58 loco-regional recurrences (LRRs) in 163 patients were included. The additional contribution of routine physical examination over mammography was evaluated with the proportions of CBCs or LRRs detected by physical examination alone. χ(2) tests were used to compare the difference of contribution of physical examination among subgroups. Seven (6%) out of 127 CBCs and 13 (22%) out of 58 LRRs were detected by routine physical examination alone. Six LRRs (17%; 6/35) were in patients after breast conserving surgery and seven LRRs (30%; 7/23) in patients after mastectomy. There was a trend that the contribution of physical examination is higher in women under 60 years of age in the detection of CBCs (9%; 5/57) and LRRs (28%, 8/29) than in women over 60 years of age (CBCs:3%; 2/70 and LRRs:17%, 5/29; χ(2)=3.090, P=0.079). Twenty-two percent of loco regional breast cancer recurrences would have been detected later without physical examination. Routine physical examination may be most valuable for women with a history of breast cancer younger than 60 years at follow-up visit. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of the Relationship Between Family History of Breast Cancer and Risk Perception and Impacts on Repetition of Mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshravesh, Sahar; Taymoori, Parvaneh; Roshani, Daem

    2016-01-01

    Since the mean age of breast cancer in women living in developing countries, compared with those in developed countries, is lower by about 10 years, repetition of mammography can play an important role in reducing morbidity and mortality. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between family history of breast cancer and risk perception and its impact on repetition of mammography. In this cross-sectional study, 1,507 women aged 50 years and older, referred to the mammography center of Regions 1 and 6 in Tehran, Iran, were enrolled. Data were collected using a self-report questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS and LISREL. According to our findings, knowledge about the time interval of mammography was found to have the highest correlation with repetition of mammography (r =0.4). Among the demographic variables, marital status (β= -0.1) and family history of breast cancer (β=0.1) had the most direct and significant impact on repetition of mammography (P mammography (P mammography, but the results did not prove any relationship with risk perception. Further studies are needed to assess the effect of risk perception and knowledge about time interval on the initiation and continuation of mammography.

  4. Smoking History Predicts Sensitivity to PARP Inhibitor Veliparib in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Martin; Blais, Normand; Juhasz, Erzsebet; Gorbunova, Vera; Jones, C Michael; Urban, Laszlo; Orlov, Sergey; Barlesi, Fabrice; Kio, Ebenezer; Keilholz, Ulrich; Qin, Qin; Qian, Jiang; Nickner, Caroline; Dziubinski, Juliann; Xiong, Hao; Mittapalli, Rajendar K; Dunbar, Martin; Ansell, Peter; He, Lei; McKee, Mark; Giranda, Vincent; Ramalingam, Suresh S

    2017-07-01

    Tobacco-related NSCLC is associated with reduced survival and greater genomic instability. Veliparib, a potent poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, augments platinum-induced DNA damage. A phase 2 trial of untreated advanced NSCLC showed a trend for improved outcomes (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.80, 95% confidence interval: 0.54-1.18, p = 0.27 for overall survival and HR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.45-1.15, p = 0.17 for progression-free survival) when veliparib was added to carboplatin/paclitaxel. Here we report an exploratory analysis by smoking history. Patients were randomized 2:1 to receive carboplatin/paclitaxel with veliparib, 120 mg (n = 105), or placebo (n = 53). Patients were stratified by histologic subtype and smoking history (recent smokers [n = 95], former smokers [n = 42], and never-smokers [n = 21]). Plasma cotinine level was measured as a chemical index of smoking. Mutation status was assessed by whole exome sequencing (n = 38). Smoking history, histologic subtype, age, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, sex, and geographic region predicted veliparib benefit in univariate analyses. In multivariate analysis, history of recent smoking was most predictive for veliparib benefit. Recent smokers treated with veliparib derived significantly greater progression-free survival and overall survival benefits (HR = 0.38 [p Smoking history predicted for efficacy with a veliparib-chemotherapy combination; toxicity was acceptable regardless of smoking history. A prespecified analysis of recent smokers is planned for ongoing phase 3 studies of veliparib in NSCLC. Copyright © 2017 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Copy-number variants in patients with a strong family history of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucito, Robert; Suresh, Shubha; Walter, Kimberly; Pandey, Akhilesh; Lakshmi, B; Krasnitz, Alex; Sebat, Jonathan; Wigler, Michael; Klein, Alison P; Brune, Kieran; Palmisano, Emily; Maitra, Anirban; Goggins, Michael; Hruban, Ralph H

    2007-10-01

    Copy-number variants such as germ-line deletions and amplifications are associated with inherited genetic disorders including familial cancer. The gene or genes responsible for the majority of familial clustering of pancreatic cancer have not been identified. We used representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis (ROMA) to characterize germ-line copy number variants in 60 cancer patients from 57 familial pancreatic cancer kindreds. Fifty-seven of the 60 patients had pancreatic cancer and three had nonpancreatic cancers (breast, ovary, ovary). A familial pancreatic cancer kindred was defined as a kindred in which at least two first-degree relatives have been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Copy-number variants identified in 607 individuals without pancreatic cancer were excluded from further analysis. A total of 56 unique genomic regions with copy-number variants not present in controls were identified, including 31 amplifications and 25 deletions. Two deleted regions were observed in two different patients, and one in three patients. The germ-line amplifications had a mean size of 662 Kb, a median size of 379 Kb (range 8.2 Kb to 2.5 Mb) and included 425 known genes. Examples of genes included in the germ-line amplifications include the MAFK, JunD and BIRC6 genes. The germ-line deletions had a mean size of 375Kb, a median size 151 Kb (range 0.4 Kb to 2.3 Mb) and included 81 known genes. In multivariate analysis controlling for region size, deletions were 90% less likely to involve a gene than were duplications (p time PCR, including a germ-line amplification on chromosome 19. These genetic copy-number variants define potential candidate loci for the familial pancreatic cancer gene.

  6. Two different BRCA2 mutations found in a multigenerational family with a history of breast, prostate, and lung cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caporale DA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Diane A Caporale, Erica E SwensonDepartment of Biology, University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point, Stevens Point, WI, USAAbstract: Breast and lung cancer are two of the most common malignancies in the United States, causing approximately 40,000 and 160,000 deaths each year, respectively. Over 80% of hereditary breast cancer cases are due to mutations in two breast cancer predisposition genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. These are tumor-suppressor genes associated with DNA repair. Since the discovery of these two genes in the mid-1990s, several other breast cancer predisposition genes have been identified, such as the CHEK2 gene encoding a regulator of BRCA1. Recently, studies have begun investigating the roles of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene expression in lung cancer. We conducted a family-based case study that included a bloodline of Italian heritage with several cases of breast cancer and associated cancers (prostate and stomach through multiple generations and on a nonblood relative of Scottish/Irish descent who was consecutively diagnosed with breast and lung cancer. Cancer history and environmental risk factors were recorded for each family member. To investigate possible genetic risks, we screened for mutations in specific hypervariable regions of the BRCA1, BRCA2, and CHEK2 genes. DNA was extracted and isolated from the individuals' hair follicles and cheek cells. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR, allele-specific PCR, and DNA sequencing were performed to identify and verify the presence or absence of mutations in these regions. Genotypes of several family members were determined and carriers of mutations were identified. Here we report for the first time the occurrence of two different BRCA2 frameshift mutations within the same family. Specifically, three Italian family members were found to be carriers of the BRCA2-c.2808_2811delACAA (3036delACAA mutation, a 4-nucleotide deletion in exon 11, which is a truncated mutation that causes deleterious function of

  7. Individual data meta-analysis for the study of survival after pulmonary metastasectomy in colorectal cancer patients: A history of resected liver metastases worsens the prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabaleta, Jon; Iida, Tomohiko; Falcoz, Pierre E; Salah, Samer; Jarabo, José R; Correa, Arlene M; Zampino, Maria G; Matsui, Takashi; Cho, Sukki; Ardissone, Francesco; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Gonzalez, Michel; Gervaz, Pascal; Emparanza, Jose I; Abraira, Víctor

    2018-03-21

    To assess the impact of a history of liver metastases on survival in patients undergoing surgery for lung metastases from colorectal carcinoma. We reviewed recent studies identified by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE using the Ovid interface, with the following search terms: lung metastasectomy, pulmonary metastasectomy, lung metastases and lung metastasis, supplemented by manual searching. Inclusion criteria were that the research concerned patients with lung metastases from colorectal cancer undergoing surgery with curative intent, and had been published between 2007 and 2014. Exclusion criteria were that the paper was a review, concerned surgical techniques themselves (without follow-up), and included patients treated non-surgically. Using Stata 14, we performed aggregate data and individual data meta-analysis using random-effect and Cox multilevel models respectively. We collected data on 3501 patients from 17 studies. The overall median survival was 43 months. In aggregate data meta-analysis, the hazard ratio for patients with previous liver metastases was 1.19 (95% CI 0.90-1.47), with low heterogeneity (I 2 4.3%). In individual data meta-analysis, the hazard ratio for these patients was 1.37 (95% CI 1.14-1.64; p analysis identified the following factors significantly affecting survival: tumour-infiltrated pulmonary lymph nodes (p analysis protocol in PROSPERO (CRD42015017838). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  8. Re-irradiation for oligo-recurrence from esophageal cancer with radiotherapy history: a multi-institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingu, Keiichi; Niibe, Yuzuru; Yamashita, Hideomi; Katsui, Kuniaki; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Nishina, Tomohiro; Terahara, Atsuro

    2017-09-05

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy following surgery has recently become a standard therapy. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effectiveness and toxicity of re-irradiation for oligo-recurrence in lymph nodes from esophageal cancer treated by definitive radiotherapy or by surgery with additional radiotherapy. We reviewed retrospectively 248 patients treated with (chemo)radiotherapy for oligo-recurrence in lymph nodes from esophageal cancer in five Japanese high-volume centers between 2000 and 2015. Thirty-three patients in whom re-irradiation was performed were enrolled in this study, and the results for patients in whom re-irradiation was performed were compared with the results for other patients. Median maximum lymph node diameter was 22 mm. Median total radiation dose was 60 Gy. The median calculated biological effective dose using the LQ model with α/β = 10 Gy (BED10) in patients in whom re-irradiation was performed was significantly lower than the median BED10 in others. There was no different factor except for BED10, histology and irradiation field between patients with a past irradiation history and patients without a past irradiation history. The median observation period in surviving patients in whom re-irradiation was performed was 21.7 months. The 3-year overall survival rate in the 33 patients with a past irradiation history was 17.9%, with a median survival period of 16.0 months. Overall survival rate and local control rate in patients with a past irradiation history were significantly worse than those in patients without a past irradiation history (log-rank test, p = 0.016 and p = 0.0007, respectively). One patient in whom re-irradiation was performed died from treatment-related gastric hemorrhage. Results in the present study suggested that re-irradiation for oligo-recurrence in lymph nodes from esophageal cancer treated by definitive radiotherapy or by surgery with additional radiotherapy might be acceptable but

  9. Blood CD33(+)HLA-DR(-) myeloid-derived suppressor cells are increased with age and a history of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschoor, Chris P; Johnstone, Jennie; Millar, Jamie; Dorrington, Michael G; Habibagahi, Mojtaba; Lelic, Alina; Loeb, Mark; Bramson, Jonathan L; Bowdish, Dawn M E

    2013-04-01

    As we age, the composition of our peripheral leukocytes changes dramatically. Many of these alterations contribute to the general immune dysfunction that burdens the elderly, which in turn, contributes to increased susceptibility to disease. MDSCs represent a heterogeneous population of immunosuppressive leukocytes that are elevated in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. Given the relation between cancer incidence and age, this study examined the frequency of peripheral blood CD33(+)HLA-DR(-) MDSCs across three cohorts: healthy adults (19-59 years old), community-dwelling seniors (61-76 years old), and frail elderly (67-99 years old). This analysis is the first to demonstrate that MDSCs and specifically the CD11b(+)CD15(+) MDSC subset are increased with age. Proinflammatory cytokines that are required for the differentiation of MDSCs (e.g., TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β) were similarly found to be increased in the serum of the frail elderly. Furthermore, the proportion of MDSCs and the CD11b(+)CD15(+) subset were found to be elevated significantly in elderly donors with a history of cancer. This age-related elevation in the frequency of MDSCs may contribute to the increased cancer incidence that occurs with age. Further investigation into the functional consequences of elevated MDSCs will provide valuable insight into the progression of age-related pathologies.

  10. The activity of serum beta-galactosidase in colon cancer patients with a history of alcohol and nicotine dependence: preliminary data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napoleon Waszkiewicz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Beta-galactosidase (GAL is a lysosomal exoglycosidase involved in the catabolism of glycoconjugates through the sequential release of beta-linked terminal galactosyl residues. The stimulation of activity of exoglycosidases and other degradative enzymes has been noted in cancers as well as in alcohol and nicotine addiction separately. This is the first study to evaluate the activity of the serum senescence marker GAL in colon cancer patients with a history of alcohol and nicotine dependence, as a potential factor of worse cancer prognosis.Material and Methods: The material was serum of 18 colon cancer patients and 10 healthy volunteers. Ten colon cancer patients met alcohol and nicotine dependence criteria. The activity of beta-galactosidase (pkat/ml was determined by the colorimetric method. Comparisons between groups were made using the Kruskal-Wallis analysis and differences evaluated using the Mann-Whitney U test. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was used to measure the statistical dependence between two variables.Results: The activity of serum GAL was significantly higher in colon cancer patients with a history of alcohol and nicotine dependence, in comparison to colon cancer patients without a history of drinking/smoking (p=0.015; 46�0increase, and the controls (p=0.0002; 81�0increase. The activity of serum GAL in colon cancer patients without a history of alcohol/nicotine dependence was higher than the activity in the controls (p = 0.043; 24�0increase.Discussion/Conclusion: Higher activity of beta-galactosidase may potentially reflect the accelerated growth of the cancer, invasion, metastases, and maturation, when alcohol and nicotine dependence coincide with colon cancer. For a better prognosis of colon cancer, alcohol and nicotine withdrawal seems to be required.

  11. G1738R is a BRCA1 founder mutation in Greek breast/ovarian cancer patients: evaluation of its pathogenicity and inferences on its genealogical history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulos, Theodore; Pertesi, Maroulio; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Armaou, Sofia; Kamakari, Smaragda; Nasioulas, George; Athanasiou, Athanassios; Dobrovic, Alex; Young, Mary-Anne; Goldgar, David; Fountzilas, George; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis

    2008-07-01

    We have performed screening in 287 breast/ovarian cancer families in Greece which has revealed that approximately 12% (8/65) of all index patients-carriers of a deleterious mutation in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, contain the base substitution G to A at position 5331 of BRCA1 gene. This generates the amino acid change G1738R for which based on a combination of genetic, in silico and histopathological analysis there are strong suggestions that it is a causative mutation. In this paper, we present further evidence suggesting the pathogenicity of this variant. Forty breast/ovarian cancer patients were reported in 11 Greek families: the above eight living in Greece, two living in Australia and one in USA, all containing G1738R. Twenty of these patients were screened and were all found to be carriers of the same base substitution. In addition, we have detected the same base change in five breast/ovarian cancer patients after screening 475 unselected patient samples with no apparent family history. The mean age of onset for all the above patients was 39.4 and 53.6 years for breast and ovarian cancer cases, respectively. A multi-factorial likelihood model for classification of unclassified variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 developed previously was applied on G1738R and the odds of it being a deleterious mutation was estimated to be 11470:1. In order to explain the prevalence of this mutation mainly in the Greek population, its genealogical history was examined. DNA samples were collected from 11 carrier families living in Greece, Australia and USA. Screening of eight intragenic SNPs, three intragenic and seven extragenic microsatellite markers and comparison with control individuals, suggested a common origin for the mutation while the time to its most recent common ancestor was estimated to be 11 generations (about 275 years assuming a generational interval of 25 years) with a 1-lod support interval of 4-24 generations (100-600 years). Considering the large degree of genetic

  12. Assisted reproductive technology use and outcomes among women with a history of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Barbara; Brown, Morton B; Missmer, Stacey A; Spector, Logan G; Leach, Richard E; Williams, Melanie; Koch, Lori; Smith, Yolanda R; Stern, Judy E; Ball, G David; Schymura, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    How do the assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcomes of women presenting for ART after cancer diagnosis compare to women without cancer? The likelihood of a live birth after ART among women with prior cancer using autologous oocytes is reduced and varies by cancer diagnosis but is similar to women without cancer when donor oocytes are used. Premenopausal patients faced with a cancer diagnosis frequently present for fertility preservation. Population-based cohort study of women treated with ART in NY, TX and IL, USA. Women with their first ART treatment between 2004 and 2009 were identified from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System database and linked to their respective State Cancer Registries based on name, date of birth and social security number. Years were rounded, i.e. year 1 = 6-18 months before treatment. This study used reports of cancer from 5 years, 6 months prior to treatment until 6 months after first ART treatment. Women who only presented for embryo banking were omitted from the analysis. The likelihood of pregnancy and of live birth with ART using autologous oocytes was modeled using logistic regression, with women without prior cancer as the reference group, adjusted for woman's age, parity, cumulative FSH dosage, infertility diagnosis, number of diagnoses, number of ART cycles, State of residency and year of ART treatment. Results of the modeling are reported as adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and (95% confidence intervals). The study population included 53 426 women; 441 women were diagnosed with cancer within 5 years prior to ART cycle start. Mean (±SD) age at cancer diagnosis was 33.4 ± 5.7 years; age at start of ART treatment was 34.9 ± 5.8 for women with cancer compared with 35.3 ± 5.3 years for women without cancer (P = 0.03). Live birth rates among women using autologous oocytes differed substantially by cancer status (47.7% without cancer versus 24.7% with cancer, P information on

  13. Ketogenic diets as an adjuvant cancer therapy: History and potential mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Bryan G.; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Anderson, Carryn M.; Eichenberger-Gilmore, Julie M.; Sibenaller, Zita A.; Mapuskar, Kranti A.; Schoenfeld, Joshua D.; Buatti, John M.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Fath, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells, relative to normal cells, demonstrate significant alterations in metabolism that are proposed to result in increased steady-state levels of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O2•−and H2O2. It has also been proposed that cancer cells increase glucose and hydroperoxide metabolism to compensate for increased levels of ROS. Given this theoretical construct, it is reasonable to propose that forcing cancer cells to use mitochondrial oxidative metabolism by feeding ketogenic diets that are high in fats and low in glucose and other carbohydrates, would selectively cause metabolic oxidative stress in cancer versus normal cells. Increased metabolic oxidative stress in cancer cells would in turn be predicted to selectively sensitize cancer cells to conventional radiation and chemotherapies. This review summarizes the evidence supporting the hypothesis that ketogenic diets may be safely used as an adjuvant therapy to conventional radiation and chemotherapies and discusses the proposed mechanisms by which ketogenic diets may enhance cancer cell therapeutic responses. PMID:25460731

  14. Ketogenic diets as an adjuvant cancer therapy: History and potential mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Bryan G; Bhatia, Sudershan K; Anderson, Carryn M; Eichenberger-Gilmore, Julie M; Sibenaller, Zita A; Mapuskar, Kranti A; Schoenfeld, Joshua D; Buatti, John M; Spitz, Douglas R; Fath, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells, relative to normal cells, demonstrate significant alterations in metabolism that are proposed to result in increased steady-state levels of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O2(•-)and H2O2. It has also been proposed that cancer cells increase glucose and hydroperoxide metabolism to compensate for increased levels of ROS. Given this theoretical construct, it is reasonable to propose that forcing cancer cells to use mitochondrial oxidative metabolism by feeding ketogenic diets that are high in fats and low in glucose and other carbohydrates, would selectively cause metabolic oxidative stress in cancer versus normal cells. Increased metabolic oxidative stress in cancer cells would in turn be predicted to selectively sensitize cancer cells to conventional radiation and chemotherapies. This review summarizes the evidence supporting the hypothesis that ketogenic diets may be safely used as an adjuvant therapy to conventional radiation and chemotherapies and discusses the proposed mechanisms by which ketogenic diets may enhance cancer cell therapeutic responses. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Ketogenic diets as an adjuvant cancer therapy: History and potential mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan G. Allen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells, relative to normal cells, demonstrate significant alterations in metabolism that are proposed to result in increased steady-state levels of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS such as O2•−and H2O2. It has also been proposed that cancer cells increase glucose and hydroperoxide metabolism to compensate for increased levels of ROS. Given this theoretical construct, it is reasonable to propose that forcing cancer cells to use mitochondrial oxidative metabolism by feeding ketogenic diets that are high in fats and low in glucose and other carbohydrates, would selectively cause metabolic oxidative stress in cancer versus normal cells. Increased metabolic oxidative stress in cancer cells would in turn be predicted to selectively sensitize cancer cells to conventional radiation and chemotherapies. This review summarizes the evidence supporting the hypothesis that ketogenic diets may be safely used as an adjuvant therapy to conventional radiation and chemotherapies and discusses the proposed mechanisms by which ketogenic diets may enhance cancer cell therapeutic responses.

  16. [History and development trend of minimally invasive techniques for gastric cancer in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peiwu; Hao, Yingxue

    2016-08-25

    Laparoscopic gastrectomy is one of the main directions of minimally invasive surgery for gastric cancer. Since 1999, the first laparoscopic gastrectomy was reported, minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer in China has undergone three stages: initial exploration period, rapid development period and gradual maturation period. The hospitals which performed laparoscopic gastrectomy and the reported cases have been increasing, at the same time the clinical efficacy is satisfied. However, there is still lack of standard and insufficient evidence in the treatment of gastric cancer by laparoscopic gastrectomy. The 3D laparoscopic and robotic gastrectomies still can not be performed in the most hospitals in China. So we should strengthen the standardization training of laparoscopic gastrectomy, develop the evidence-based medical research, promote the 3D laparoscopic and robotic gastrectomies to enhance the level of minimally invasive surgery for gastric cancer.

  17. HERMIONE: a randomized Phase 2 trial of MM-302 plus trastuzumab versus chemotherapy of physician’s choice plus trastuzumab in patients with previously treated, anthracycline-naïve, HER2-positive, locally advanced/metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Kathy; Cortes, Javier; Hurvitz, Sara A.; Krop, Ian E.; Tripathy, Debu; Verma, Sunil; Riahi, Kaveh; Reynolds, Joseph G.; Wickham, Thomas J.; Molnar, Istvan; Yardley, Denise A.

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer is a particularly aggressive form of the disease, and ultimately progresses in patients with metastases on standard therapies. Anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin, are an effective treatment for HER2-positive breast cancer, particularly when administered in combination with trastuzumab – however, doxorubicin-related cardiotoxicity has limited its use. Many patients are therefore never treated with anthracyclines, even upon disease progression, despite the potential for benefit. MM-302 is a novel, HER2-targeted antibody–liposomal doxorubicin conjugate that specifically targets HER2-overexpressing cells. Preclinical and Phase 1 data suggest that MM-302, as a monotherapy or in combination with trastuzumab, could be effective for managing previously treated, anthracycline-naïve, HER2-positive breast cancer, without the cardiotoxicity observed with free doxorubicin formulations. HERMIONE is an open-label, multicenter, randomized (1:1) Phase 2 trial of MM-302 plus trastuzumab versus chemotherapy of physician’s choice (gemcitabine, capecitabine, or vinorelbine) plus trastuzumab planned to enroll 250 anthracycline-naïve patients with locally advanced/metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. Key inclusion criteria are: previous treatment with trastuzumab (with or without pertuzumab) in any setting; refractory or intolerant to pertuzumab (refractory to pertuzumab defined as progression in the locally advanced or metastatic setting, or disease recurrence during or within 12 months of completing pertuzumab-containing neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant therapy); and disease progression on, or intolerant to, ado-trastuzumab emtansine for locally advanced or metastatic disease. The trial is currently being conducted at sites in the USA, Canada, and Western Europe. Treatment will be administered in 21-day cycles, and will be continued until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint is

  18. Risk-benefit assessment of the combined oral contraceptive pill in women with a family history of female cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Brittany Anne; Moorman, Patricia G

    2014-10-01

    Oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) are the most frequently used form of effective, reversible contraception among women of childbearing potential. In the average risk population, OCPs may offer a protective benefit against ovarian, endometrial and colorectal malignancies. In women at high risk for breast, ovarian, endometrial or colorectal malignancies, the risk-benefit profile is less well studied. In this article, we review pertinent literature on the use of OCPs in patients with genetic susceptibilities due to mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 or mismatch repair genes implicated in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer as well as those with a strong family history of malignancies associated with these syndromes. For women at high risk for ovarian, endometrial and/or colorectal malignancies due to genetic susceptibilities or a strong family history, the possibility of chemoprevention with OCPs may be an attractive option; however, the potential increase in breast cancer, although small, must be considered in clinical decision-making. The ultimate decision to use OCPs in a high-risk woman should be based on a consideration of her specific genetic risk, her age, her reproductive plans and her willingness to consider surgical prophylaxis options.

  19. Conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer - Longer duration of acute genitourinary toxicity in patients with prior history of invasive urological procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odrazka, Karel; Vanasek, Jaroslav; Vaculikova, Miloslava; Petera, Jiri; Zouhar, Milan; Zoul, Zdenk; Stejskal, Jan; Skrabkova, Zuzana; Kadeka, David [Charles Univ. Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology

    2001-11-01

    The incidence and predictors of acute toxicity were evaluated in patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for localized prostate cancer. Between December 1997 and November 1999, 116 patients with T1-T3 prostatic carcinoma were enrolled in the study. Ninety patients were treated with 70 Gy and 26 patients with T3 tumors received 74 Gy. Of the 116 patients 42 (36.2%) had a prior history of invasive urological procedure (IUP) (transurethral resection of the prostate or transvesical prostatectomy for benign prostatic hyperplasia). Acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) symptoms were graded according to the EORTC/RTOG scoring system. Toxicity duration after the completion of 3D-CRT was recorded. The majority of patients experienced only mild or no (Grade 1) acute toxicities. Medications for GI and GU symptoms (Grade 2) were required by 28.4% and 12.9% of patients, respectively. Only one case of Grade 3 GI toxicity (0.9%) was observed. Seven patients (6.1%) experienced severe GU toxicity (Grade 3 or 4). No correlation was found between acute toxicity and age, stage, dose (70 Gy vs. 74 Gy), IUP and pelvic lymphadenectomy. A significant relationship was observed between the duration of acute GU toxicity and prior IUP. Symptoms persisted for more than 4 weeks in 51.9% and 26.0% of patients with and without a prior history of IUP, respectively (p = 0.02). The incidence of acute complications, associated with 3D-CRT for prostate cancer, was acceptable in our cohort of patients. A prior history of IUP resulted in a significantly longer duration of acute GU toxicity.

  20. Screening history of women with cervical cancer: a 6-year study in Aarhus, Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingemann-Hansen, O; Lidang, M; Niemann, I; Dinesen, J; Baandrup, U; Svanholm, H; Petersen, Lk

    2008-04-08

    To identify possible weaknesses in cervical screening in Aarhus County, 10 years after the programme was introduced, screening histories were examined. A major problem for the screening programme was that 31% of women were never screened and 61% under-screened, the latter group being significantly dominated by older women and high-stage tumours.

  1. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy With Bi-Weekly Docetaxel and Carboplatin for Stage III Unresectable, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Clinical Application of a Protocol Used in a Previous Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Jun-Ichi; Saito, Yoshihiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Kudo, Shigehiro; Yoshida, Daisaku; Ichikawa, Akihiro; Sakai, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Futoshi; Kato, Shingo; Shibuya, Kei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical applicability of a protocol evaluated in a previously reported phase II study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with bi-weekly docetaxel and carboplatin in patients with stage III, unresectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and March 2006, 116 previously untreated patients with histologically proven, stage III NSCLC were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 60 Gy in combination with docetaxel, 30 mg/m 2 , and carboplatin at an area under the curve value of 3 every 2 weeks during and after radiation therapy. Results: The median survival time for the entire group was 25.5 months. The actuarial 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 53% and 31%, respectively. The 3-year cause-specific survival rate was 60% in patients with stage IIIA disease, whereas it was 35% in patients with stage IIIB disease (p = 0.007). The actuarial 2-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 55%, respectively. Acute hematologic toxicities of Grade ≥3 severity were observed in 20.7% of patients, while radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade ≥3 severity were observed in 2.6% and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The feasibility of the protocol used in the previous phase II study was reconfirmed in this series, and excellent treatment results were achieved.

  2. Treatment Rationale and Design for J-AXEL: A Randomized Phase 3 Study Comparing Nab-Paclitaxel With Docetaxel in Patients With Previously Treated Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneshima, Yasuto; Morita, Satoshi; Ando, Masahiko; Miura, Satoru; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Abe, Tetsuya; Kato, Terufumi; Kondo, Masashi; Hosomi, Yukio; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Kishimoto, Junji; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Okamoto, Isamu

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticle albumin-bound (nab) paclitaxel is a promising new therapeutic agent for all histologic types of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We recently performed a phase 2 study of weekly nab-paclitaxel in patients with previously treated advanced NSCLC, finding promising activity and acceptable toxicity for this regimen. We have now designed a randomized phase 3 intergroup study (J-AXEL, UMIN000017487) to examine the clinical benefit and safety of nab-paclitaxel compared to docetaxel in patients with previously treated advanced NSCLC. Patients are randomized to receive either docetaxel (60 mg/m 2 on day 1 every 3 weeks, control arm) or nab-paclitaxel (100 mg/m 2 on days 1, 8, and 15 every 3 weeks, experimental arm), with each drug being administered until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The study will evaluate the noninferiority of nab-paclitaxel relative to docetaxel for the primary end point of overall survival. If the primary objective is achieved, this study will provide evidence for a new alternative treatment option for patients with previously treated advanced NSCLC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy With Bi-Weekly Docetaxel and Carboplatin for Stage III Unresectable, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Clinical Application of a Protocol Used in a Previous Phase II Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Jun-Ichi, E-mail: junsaito@sannet.ne.jp [Division of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Saito, Yoshihiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Kudo, Shigehiro; Yoshida, Daisaku; Ichikawa, Akihiro [Division of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Sakai, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Futoshi [Division of Respiratory Disease, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shibuya, Kei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical applicability of a protocol evaluated in a previously reported phase II study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with bi-weekly docetaxel and carboplatin in patients with stage III, unresectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and March 2006, 116 previously untreated patients with histologically proven, stage III NSCLC were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 60 Gy in combination with docetaxel, 30 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin at an area under the curve value of 3 every 2 weeks during and after radiation therapy. Results: The median survival time for the entire group was 25.5 months. The actuarial 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 53% and 31%, respectively. The 3-year cause-specific survival rate was 60% in patients with stage IIIA disease, whereas it was 35% in patients with stage IIIB disease (p = 0.007). The actuarial 2-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 55%, respectively. Acute hematologic toxicities of Grade {>=}3 severity were observed in 20.7% of patients, while radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade {>=}3 severity were observed in 2.6% and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The feasibility of the protocol used in the previous phase II study was reconfirmed in this series, and excellent treatment results were achieved.

  4. A history of breast cancer and older age allow risk stratification of mammographic BI-RADS 3 ratings in the diagnostic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benndorf, Matthias; Wu, Yirong; Burnside, Elizabeth S

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to investigate whether risk stratification of mammographic Breast Imaging: Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 3 can be accomplished in the diagnostic setting. We analyzed 4941 BI-RADS-3-rated patients (23 malignant outcomes) and built logistic-regression models with age, personal and family history of breast cancer, fibroglandular density, and additional mammographic findings as predictive variables. A personal history of breast cancer (odds ratio: 5.53) and older age (odds ratio: 12.44/10.93 for age 50-64/>64) are independent risk factors. Patients with both risk factors have a risk >2%. Biopsy may be warranted in older patients with a history of breast cancer who would be otherwise assigned BI-RADS 3. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic Characterization of a Novel HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF74_01B) Identified among Intravenous Drug Users in Malaysia: Recombination History and Phylogenetic Linkage with Previously Defined Recombinant Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Hui Ting; Chow, Wei Zhen; Takebe, Yutaka; Chook, Jack Bee; Chan, Kok Gan; Al-Darraji, Haider Abdulrazzaq Abed; Koh, Clayton; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2015-01-01

    In many parts of Southeast Asia, the HIV-1 epidemic has been driven by the sharing of needles and equipment among intravenous drug users (IDUs). Over the last few decades, many studies have proven time and again that the diversity of HIV-1 epidemics can often be linked to the route of infection transmission. That said, the diversity and complexity of HIV-1 molecular epidemics in the region have been increasing at an alarming rate, due in part to the high tendency of the viral RNA to recombine. This scenario was exemplified by the discovery of numerous circulating recombinant forms (CRFs), especially in Thailand and Malaysia. In this study, we characterized a novel CRF designated CRF74_01B, which was identified in six epidemiologically unlinked IDUs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The near-full length genomes were composed of CRF01_AE and subtype B', with eight breakpoints dispersed in the gag-pol and nef regions. Remarkably, this CRF shared four and two recombination hotspots with the previously described CRF33_01B and the less prevalent CRF53_01B, respectively. Genealogy-based Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of CRF74_01B genomic regions showed that it is closely related to both CRF33_01B and CRF53_01B. This observation suggests that CRF74_01B was probably a direct descendent from specific lineages of CRF33_01B, CRF53_01B and subtype B' that could have emerged in the mid-1990s. Additionally, it illustrated the active recombination processes between prevalent HIV-1 subtypes and recombinants in Malaysia. In summary, we report a novel HIV-1 genotype designated CRF74_01B among IDUs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The characterization of the novel CRF74_01B is of considerable significance towards the understanding of the genetic diversity and population dynamics of HIV-1 circulating in the region.

  6. Attitudes and compliance of clinical management after genetic testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer among high-risk Southern Chinese females with breast cancer history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Ava; Chu, Annie Tsz-Wai; Wu, Christine Teen-Sum; Tse, Desiree Man-Sik

    2014-09-01

    Western studies have shown that the uptake rates of surveillance and prophylaxis may vary among BRCA mutation carriers between ethnicities. The present study is the first to investigate the behavioural impact and subjective attitudes in Southern Chinese high-risk families who had undergone BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic testing up to 2.5 years post-testing. Individuals who had such genetic testing and have consented to participate in the prospective database of Hong Kong Hereditary Breast Cancer Family Registry were recruited and surveyed by a face-to-face or telephone interview. Sociodemographic information, genetic test results, pre- and post-testing surveillance, medical regimes, and attitudes towards the choice of clinical management were obtained by interviews and retrieval of medical records using this prospective database. 69 females with breast cancer history were recruited into the study. Twenty-nine female carriers (15 BRCA1 mutated gene-carriers and 14 BRCA2 mutated gene-carriers) and 40 non-carriers of a BRCA 1/2 mutations were interviewed. The uptake rate of high risk breast screening i.e. clinical breast examination, mammography, and breast MRI is significantly higher among female carriers (48.3 %) after knowing genetic testing results than before (p resort and would use traditional Chinese medicine in cancer risk management.

  7. Current adjuvant treatment modalities for gastric cancer: From history to the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Leyla; Ordu, Cetin; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Sen, Fatma; Keskin, Serkan; Ciftci, Rumeysa; Pilanci, Kezban Nur

    2016-01-01

    The discrepancy between the surgical technique and the type of adjuvant chemotherapy used in clinical trials and patient outcomes in terms of overall survival rates has led to the generation of different adjuvant treatment protocols in distinct parts of the world. The adjuvant treatment recommendation is generally chemoradiotherapy in the United States, perioperative chemotherapy in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, and chemotherapy in Asia. These options mainly rely on the United States Intergroup-0116, United Kingdom British Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy, and the Asian Adjuvant Chemotherapy Trial of S-1 for Gastric Cancer and Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin Adjuvant Study in Stomach Cancer trials. However, the benefits were evident for only certain patients, which were not very homogeneous regarding the type of surgery, chemotherapy regimens, and stage of disease. Whether the dissimilarities in survival are attributable to surgical technique or intrinsic biological differences is a subject of debate. Regardless of the extent of surgery, multimodal therapy may offer modest survival advantage at least for diseases with lymph node involvement. Moreover, in the era of individualized treatment for most of the other cancer types, identification of special subgroups comprising those who will derive more or no benefit from adjuvant therapy merits further investigation. The aim of this review is to reveal the historical evolution and future reflections of adjuvant treatment modalities for resected gastric cancer patients. PMID:27190583

  8. Levels of Distress in Women With a Family History of Ovarian Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kash, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    ...%on their personality traits of mastery tolerance for ambiguity,. and optimism and their interest in genetic testing. With the results generated by this study specific interventions may be designed and tested to improve adjustment of women at high risk for ovarian cancer.

  9. 35Year Research History of Cytotoxicity and Cancer: a Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farghadani, Reyhaneh; Haerian, Batoul Sadat; Ebrahim, Nader Ale; Muniandy, Sekaran

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, characterized by irregular cell growth. Cytotoxicity or killing tumor cells that divide rapidly is the basic function of chemotherapeutic drugs. However, these agents can damage normal dividing cells, leading to adverse effects in the body. In view of great advances in cancer therapy, which are increasingly reported each year, we quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the papers published between 1981 and December 2015, with a closer look at the highly cited papers (HCPs), for a better understanding of literature related to cytotoxicity in cancer therapy. Online documents in the Web of Science (WOS) database were analyzed based on the publication year, the number of times they were cited, research area, source, language, document type, countries, organizationenhanced and funding agencies. A total of 3,473 publications relevant to the target key words were found in the WOS database over 35 years and 86% of them (n=2,993) were published between 20002015. These papers had been cited 54,330 times without self citation from 1981 to 2015. Of the 3,473 publications, 17 (3,557citations) were the most frequently cited ones between 2005 and 2015. The topmost HCP was about generating a comprehensive preclinical database (CCLE) with 825 (23.2%) citations. One third of the remaining HCPs had focused on drug discovery through improving conventional therapeutic agents such as metformin and ginseng. Another 33% of the HCPs concerned engineered nanoparticles (NPs) such as polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendritic polymers, PTX/SPIOloaded PLGAs and cell derived NPs to increase drug effectiveness and decrease drug toxicity in cancer therapy. The remaining HCPs reported novel factors such as miR205, Nrf2 and p27 suggesting their interference with development of cancer in targeted cancer therapy. In conclusion, analysis of 35year publications and HCPs on cytotoxicity in cancer in the present report provides opportunities for

  10. Comparative analysis of 5 lung cancer natural history and screening models that reproduce outcomes of the NLST and PLCO trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Rafael; ten Haaf, Kevin; Kong, Chung Yin; Erdogan, Ayca; Black, William C; Tammemagi, Martin C; Choi, Sung Eun; Jeon, Jihyoun; Han, Summer S; Munshi, Vidit; van Rosmalen, Joost; Pinsky, Paul; McMahon, Pamela M; de Koning, Harry J; Feuer, Eric J; Hazelton, William D; Plevritis, Sylvia K

    2014-06-01

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated that low-dose computed tomography screening is an effective way of reducing lung cancer (LC) mortality. However, optimal screening strategies have not been determined to date and it is uncertain whether lighter smokers than those examined in the NLST may also benefit from screening. To address these questions, it is necessary to first develop LC natural history models that can reproduce NLST outcomes and simulate screening programs at the population level. Five independent LC screening models were developed using common inputs and calibration targets derived from the NLST and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO). Imputation of missing information regarding smoking, histology, and stage of disease for a small percentage of individuals and diagnosed LCs in both trials was performed. Models were calibrated to LC incidence, mortality, or both outcomes simultaneously. Initially, all models were calibrated to the NLST and validated against PLCO. Models were found to validate well against individuals in PLCO who would have been eligible for the NLST. However, all models required further calibration to PLCO to adequately capture LC outcomes in PLCO never-smokers and light smokers. Final versions of all models produced incidence and mortality outcomes in the presence and absence of screening that were consistent with both trials. The authors developed 5 distinct LC screening simulation models based on the evidence in the NLST and PLCO. The results of their analyses demonstrated that the NLST and PLCO have produced consistent results. The resulting models can be important tools to generate additional evidence to determine the effectiveness of lung cancer screening strategies using low-dose computed tomography. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  11. Does a parental history of cancer moderate the associations between impaired health status in parents and psychosocial problems in teenagers: a HUNT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Elisabeth; Bjelland, Ingvar; Fosså, Sophie D; Loge, Jon H; Sørebø, Oystein; Dahl, Alv A

    2014-08-01

    Severe disease in a parent is associated with increased psychosocial problems in their children. However, moderating factors of such associations are less studied. In this cross-sectional population-based controlled study we examined the moderating effects of a history of parental cancer on the association between impaired health status in parents and psychosocial problems among their teenagers. Among families with both parents responding to the adult Health Survey of Nord-Trøndelag County of Norway (the HUNT-2 study) 71 couples were identified with primary invasive cancer in one parent. Their 81 teenage children took part in the Young-HUNT study. These families were compared to 322 cancer-free families with 328 teenagers. Based on self-report data the relations between three variables of parental impaired health and six psychosocial problems in teenagers were analyzed family wise by structural equation modeling. Significant associations between parental and teenagers' variables were observed in eight of 18 models. A history of parental cancer was a significant moderator which decreased four of eight significant associations. Such a history significantly weakened the associations between parental poor self-rated health and teenagers' anxiety/depression and school problems. A similar association of a history of parental cancer was found between psychological distress in parents and teenagers' feelings of loneliness and poor self-rated health. This study confirmed strong associations between impaired parental health and psychosocial problems in their teenagers. A history of parental cancer weakened several of the significant associations between parental impaired health variables and psychosocial problems in their teenagers. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Apixaban Versus Warfarin in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and a History of Cancer: Insights from the ARISTOTLE Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melloni, Chiara; Dunning, Allison; Granger, Christopher B; Thomas, Laine; Khouri, Michel G; Garcia, David A; Hylek, Elaine M; Hanna, Michael; Wallentin, Lars; Gersh, Bernard J; Douglas, Pamela S; Alexander, John H; Lopes, Renato D

    2017-12-01

    Cancer is associated with a prothrombotic state and increases the risk of thrombotic events in patients with atrial fibrillation. We described the clinical characteristics and outcomes and assessed the safety and efficacy of apixaban versus warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation and cancer in the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial. The association between cancer and clinical outcomes was assessed using Cox regression models. At baseline, 1236 patients (6.8%) had a history of cancer; 12.7% had active cancer, and 87.3% had remote cancer. There were no significant associations between history of cancer and stroke/systemic embolism, major bleeding, or death. The effect of apixaban versus warfarin for the prevention of stroke/systemic embolism was consistent among patients with a history of cancer (event/100 patient-years = 1.4 vs 1.2; hazard ratio [HR], 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.53-2.26) and no cancer (1.3 vs 1.6; HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.64-0.93) (P interaction = .37). The safety and efficacy of apixaban versus warfarin were preserved among patients with and without active cancer. Apixaban was associated with a greater benefit for the composite of stroke/systemic embolism, myocardial infarction, and death in active cancer (HR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.11-0.83) versus without cancer (HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.78-0.95), but not in remote cancer (HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.01-2.10) (interaction P = .0028). Cancer was not associated with a higher risk of stroke. The superior efficacy and safety of apixaban versus warfarin were consistent in patients with and without cancer. Our positive findings regarding apixaban use in patients with atrial fibrillation and cancer are exploratory and promising, but warrant further evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Proteins in Soy Might Have a Higher Role in Cancer Prevention than Previously Expected: Soybean Protein Fractions Are More Effective MMP-9 Inhibitors Than Non-Protein Fractions, Even in Cooked Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lima

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The search for anticancer MMP-9 inhibitors (MMPIs in food products has become a major goal for research. MMPIs in soy have been related only to saponins and isoflavones, but recently, low specific protein fractions in soybeans were shown to reduce MMP-9 activity as well. The present work aimed at comparing the MMPI potential of protein fractions (P and non-protein fractions (NP isolated from soybean seeds, before and after soaking and cooking, mimicking dietary exposures. Reverse and substrate zymography, as well as a fluoregenic DQ gelatin assay were used to evaluate MMP-9 activities. Colon cancer cell migration and proliferation was also tested in HT29 cells. Regarding MMP-9 inhibition, proteins in soy presented IC50 values 100 times lower than non-protein extracts, and remained active after cooking, suggesting that proteins may be more effective MMP-9 inhibitors than non-protein compounds. Using the determined IC50 concentrations, NP fractions were able to induce higher inhibitions of HT29 cell migration and proliferation, but not through MMP-9 inhibition, whilst protein fractions were shown to specifically inhibit MMP-9 activity. Overall, our results show that protein fractions in soybeans might have a higher role in soy-related cancer prevention as MMPIs than previously expected. Being nontoxic and active at lower concentrations, the discovery of these heat-resistant specific MMPI proteins in soy can be of significant importance for cancer preventive diets, particularly considering the increasing use of soy proteins in food products and the controversy around isoflavones amongst consumers.

  14. [Selective biopsy of the sentinel lymph node in patients with breast cancer and previous excisional biopsy: is there a change in the reliability of the technique according to time from surgery?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaté-Llobera, A; Notta, P C; Benítez-Segura, A; López-Ojeda, A; Pernas-Simon, S; Boya-Román, M P; Bajén, M T

    2015-01-01

    To assess the influence of time on the reliability of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in breast cancer patients with previous excisional biopsy (EB), analyzing both the sentinel lymph node detection and the lymph node recurrence rate. Thirty-six patients with cT1/T2 N0 breast cancer and previous EB of the lesion underwent a lymphoscintigraphy after subdermal periareolar administration of radiocolloid, the day before SLNB. Patients were classified into two groups, one including 12 patients with up to 29 days elapsed between EB and SLNB (group A), and another with the remaining 24 in which time between both procedures was of 30 days or more (group B). Scintigraphic and surgical detection of the sentinel lymph node, histological status of the sentinel lymph node and of the axillary lymph node dissection, if performed, and lymphatic recurrences during follow-up, were analyzed. Sentinel lymph node visualization at the lymphoscintigraphy and surgical detection were 100% in both groups. Histologically, three patients showed macrometastasis in the sentinel lymph node, one from group A and two from group B. None of the patients, not even those with malignancy of the sentinel lymph node, relapsed after a medium follow-up of 49.5 months (24-75). Time elapsed between EB and SLNB does not influence the reliability of this latter technique as long as a superficial injection of the radiopharmaceutical is performed, proving a very high detection rate of the sentinel lymph node without evidence of lymphatic relapse during follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  15. Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Progression-Free Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-14

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer AJCC V6 and v7; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer AJCC v7; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  16. Usual dietary intake among female breast cancer survivors is not significantly different from women with no cancer history: results of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliron, Brandy-Joe; Vitolins, Mara Z; Tooze, Janet A

    2014-06-01

    Dietary intake is a modifiable behavior that may reduce the risk of recurrence and death among breast cancer survivors. Cancer survivors are encouraged to consume a diet rich in fruit, vegetables, and whole grains and limit red meat, processed meat, and alcohol intake. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2003-2006), this study examined whether breast cancer survivors and women with no history of cancer differed in the distribution of usual intake of foods included in the dietary recommendations for preventing cancer and recurrences. Participants completed one or two 24-hour dietary recalls. The food groups included in this analysis were whole fruit; total vegetables; dark green and orange vegetables; whole grains; red meat; processed meat; alcohol; and calories from solid fat, alcohol, and added sugar. The National Cancer Institute Method was used to estimate the distribution of usual intake and to compare breast cancer survivors (n=102) to noncancer respondents (n=2,684). Using age and cancer survivor as covariates, subgroup estimates of usual intake were constructed. No significant group differences were found, except that survivors reported a greater intake of whole grains. More than 90% of both groups did not meet recommendations for fruits, vegetables, and whole grains; 75.4% and 70.2%, respectively, consumed less than the red meat recommendation; and breast cancer survivors was not significantly different from women with no history of cancer. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Phase 2 study of treatment selection based on tumor thymidylate synthase expression in previously untreated patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: A trial of the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group (E4203).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meropol, Neal J; Feng, Yang; Grem, Jean L; Mulcahy, Mary F; Catalano, Paul J; Kauh, John S; Hall, Michael J; Saltzman, Joel N; George, Thomas J; Zangmeister, Jeffrey; Chiorean, Elena G; Cheema, Puneet S; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Benson, Al B

    2018-02-15

    The authors hypothesized that patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who had tumors with low thymidylate synthase (TS-L) expression would have a higher response rate to combined 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) plus bevacizumab (FOLFOX/Bev) than those with high TS (TS-H) expression and that combined irinotecan and oxaliplatin (IROX) plus bevacizumab (IROX/Bev) would be more effective than FOLFOX/Bev in those with TS-H tumors. TS protein expression was determined in mCRC tissue. Patients who had TS-L tumors received FOLFOX/Bev, and those who had TS-H tumors were randomly assigned to receive either FOLFOX/Bev or IROX/Bev. The primary endpoint was the response rate (complete plus partial responses). In total, 211 of 247 patients (70% TS-H) were registered to the treatment phase. Efficacy analyses included eligible patients who had started treatment (N = 186). The response rates for patients who received IROX/Bev (TS-H), FOLFOX/Bev (TS-H), and FOLFOX/Bev (TS-L) were 33%, 38%, and 49%, respectively (P = nonsignificant). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 10 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 9-12 months; 10 months in the IROX/Bev TS-H group, 9 months in the FOLFOX/Bev TS-H group, and 13 months in the FOLFOX/Bev TS-L group). The TS-L group had improved PFS compared with the TS-H group that received FOLFOX/Bev (hazard ratio, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.0%-2.4%; P = .04; Cox regression). The median overall survival (OS) was 22 months (95% CI, 20 29 months; 18 months in the IROX/Bev TS-H group, 21 months in the FOLFOX/Bev TS-H group, and 32 months in the TS-L group). OS comparisons for the 2 TS-H arms and for the FOLFOX/Bev TS-H versus TS-L arms were not significantly different. TS expression was prognostic: Patients with TS-L tumors who received FOLFOX/Bev had a longer PFS than those with TS-H tumors, along with a trend toward longer OS. Patients with TS-H tumors did not benefit more from IROX/Bev than from FOLFOX/Bev. Cancer 2018

  18. [The clinical significance of GastroPanel in diagnostics of Helicobacter pylori eradication efficiency in patients with dyspepsia with correlation of family history of gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Marcin; Peczek, Łukasz; Rudnicki, Cezary; Nawrot, Barbara; Stec-Michalska, Krystyna

    2013-09-01

    Gastric cancer remains a significant medical and social problem. Familial, hereditary, social, and demographic factors increase the susceptibility of subjects to cancer development, especially those infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Apart from genetic studies, there are ongoing biochemical studies of possible practical value in assessment of the risk of gastric cancer development. The GastroPanelBiohit test, that include determination of the levels of gastrin (G-17), pepsinogen I (PGI), pepsinogen II (PGII) and antibodies IgG/IgA against H. pylori in serum, allowed us to determine whether there are any abnormal changes in the gastric mucosa. The aim of the study was to determine whether GastroPanel parameters, identified in patients with dyspeptic symptoms (with or without history of gastric cancer in first degree relatives) before and after successful eradication of H. pylori, have any clinical value, especially in gastric cancer development. The study comprised 61 patients aged 18-56 years with symptoms of dyspepsia. In all patients, the preliminary urea breath test (UBT) for the presence of H. pylori was performed and the positive result qualified for further study. For final analysis, 42 patients were approved, who were divided into two groups: group I (a control group) - 22 patients with negative family history of gastric cancer among the relatives of first degree, group II - 20 patients with positive history of gastric cancer among the relatives of first degree. All the patients had the gastroscopy with the biopsy of gastric mucosa for the histopathological evaluation. Additionally, the GastroPanel test was performed. In the blood serum of the patients with H. pylori infection, the concentrations of gastrin (G-17), pepsinogen I (PGI) and pepsinogen II (PGII) did not depend on family history of gastric cancer (p > 0.05). Successful eradication of H. pylori decreases the levels of G-17, PGI and PGII (statistical significance p history of gastric

  19. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician’s believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for “surgical disease” or for “Sippy” diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori

  20. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David Y

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician's believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for "surgical disease" or for "Sippy" diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori-related diseases.

  1. Symptom lead time distribution in lung cancer: natural history and prospects for early diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ades, Anthony E; Biswas, Mousumi; Welton, Nicky J; Hamilton, William

    2014-12-01

    Before their diagnosis, patients with cancer present in primary care more frequently than do matched controls. This has raised hopes that earlier investigation in primary care could lead to earlier stage at diagnosis. We re-analysed primary care symptom data collected from 247 lung cancer cases and 1235 matched controls in Devon, UK. We identified the most sensitive and specific definition of symptoms, and estimated its incidence in cases and controls prior to diagnosis. We estimated the symptom lead time (SLT) distribution (the time between symptoms attributable to cancer and diagnosis), taking account of the investigations already carried out in primary care. The impact of route of diagnosis on stage at diagnosis was also examined. Symptom incidence in cases was higher than in controls 2 years before diagnosis, accelerating markedly in the last 6 months. The median SLT was under 3 months, with mean 5.3 months [95% credible interval (CrI) 4.5-6.1] and did not differ by stage at diagnosis. An earlier stage at diagnosis was observed in patients identified through chest X-ray originated in primary care. Most symptoms preceded clinical diagnosis by only a few months. Symptom-based investigation would lengthen lead times and result in earlier stage at diagnosis in a small proportion of cases, but would be far less effective than standard screening targeted at smokers. © The Author 2014; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  2. Comparison of anamnestic history, alcohol intake and smoking, nutritional status, and liver dysfunction between thorotrast patients who developed primary liver cancer and those who did not

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyosawa, K.; Imai, H.; Sodeyama, T.; Franca, S.T.; Yousuf, M.; Furuta, S.; Fujisawa, K.; Kido, C.

    1989-01-01

    In order to clarify the differences in past history, nutritional condition and, consumption of alcohol and tobacco, and liver dysfunction between the thorotrast patients who developed primary liver cancer and those who did not, 103 persons who had no primary liver cancer in January 1980 were studied. All subjects were military men who had undergone angiography with thorotrast between 1943 and 1946. Twenty persons developed hepatocellular carcinoma and 16 developed intrahepatic bile duct carcinoma by April 1987, whereas 67 are still alive without any cancer. There was no difference in age or period after thorotrast infusion between those two groups of patients in January 1980. A difference in history of hepatitis and/or jaundice and presence of hepatic dysfunction was found between the subjects who developed primary liver cancers and those who did not. These findings suggest that an anamnestic history of hepatitis and liver dysfunction are risks for development of thorotrast-induced liver cancer. On the basis of the above findings, early detection of liver dysfunction offers a possibility of early diagnosis of primary liver cancer

  3. Braquiterapia intersticial de alta tasa de rescate en cáncer cabeza cuello previamente radiado High-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy in previously irradiated recurrent head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Gutiérrez-Bayard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A pesar de los avances en el tratamiento de cáncer de cabeza y cuello (CCC, el 15-50% de los pacientes presentan recurrencia locorregional. Para los pacientes que presentan enfermedad localmente recurrente o un segundo tumor primario en un campo previamente irradiado, las opciones terapéuticas de rescate son limitadas, siendo la resección quirúrgica con intención curativa la opción de elección para los pacientes con enfermedad limitada. Reirradiación con o sin la adición de quimioterapia puede ser una buena opción, obteniendo en pacientes seleccionados supervivencia a largo plazo. La braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis (HDRBT puede jugar un papel importante en el tratamiento de rescate en tumores de cabeza y cuello recurrentes. Presentamos un paciente de 56 años diagnosticado de cáncer de lengua sometido a cirugía y radioterapia externa adyuvante, y recurrencia metastásica ganglionar cervical contralateral a los 18 meses. Recibió tratamiento multidisciplinar con quimioterapia, cirugía y braquiterapia intersticial.Despite advances in the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC, 15-50% of patients present locoregional disease recurrence. The therapeutic options are limited for patients who present locally recurrent disease or a second primary tumor in a previously irradiated field. Surgical salvage with curative intent is the preferred option for patients with limited-volume disease. Re-irradiation with or without the addition of chemotherapy may hold promise for long-term survival for selected patients. High-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy can play an important role in the salvage treatment of previously irradiated recurrent head and neck cancer. The case reported was a 56-year old man diagnosed of tongue cancer who presented recurrent metastatic contralateral cervical node 1.5 years after radical treatment with surgery and adjuvant external radiotherapy. He received multidisciplinary treatment with chemotherapy, surgery and HDR

  4. Tirapazamine plus cisplatin versus cisplatin in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: A report of the international CATAPULT I study group. Cisplatin and Tirapazamine in Subjects with Advanced Previously Untreated Non-Small-Cell Lung Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Pawel, J; von Roemeling, R; Gatzemeier, U; Boyer, M; Elisson, L O; Clark, P; Talbot, D; Rey, A; Butler, T W; Hirsh, V; Olver, I; Bergman, B; Ayoub, J; Richardson, G; Dunlop, D; Arcenas, A; Vescio, R; Viallet, J; Treat, J

    2000-03-01

    A phase III trial, Cisplatin and Tirapazamine in Subjects with Advanced Previously Untreated Non-Small-Cell Lung Tumors (CATAPULT I), was designed to determine the efficacy and safety of tirapazamine plus cisplatin for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with previously untreated NSCLC were randomized to receive either tirapazamine (390 mg/m(2) infused over 2 hours) followed 1 hour later by cisplatin (75 mg/m(2) over 1 hour) or 75 mg/m(2) of cisplatin alone, every 3 weeks for a maximum of eight cycles. A total of 446 patients with NSCLC (17% with stage IIIB disease and pleural effusions; 83% with stage IV disease) were entered onto the study. Karnofsky performance status (KPS) was >/= 60 for all patients (for 10%, KPS = 60; for 90%, KPS = 70 to 100). Sixty patients (14%) had clinically stable brain metastases. The median survival was significantly longer (34.6 v 27. 7 weeks; P =.0078) and the response rate was significantly greater (27.5% v 13.7%; P CATAPULT I study shows that tirapazamine enhances the activity of cisplatin in patients with advanced NSCLC and confirms that hypoxia is an exploitable therapeutic target in human malignancies.

  5. [Effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on the expression level of SATB1 and c-Myc genes in gastric mucosa of patients with family history of gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracz, Adam F; Peczek, Łukasz; Zuk, Karolina; Stec-Michalska, Krystyna; Nawrot, Barbara

    2013-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a class 1 gastric carcinogen with the proved influence on gastric cancer development. The products of SATB1 and c-Myc genes play important role in cancer development and their levels are elevated in gastric cancer tissues. The aim of the study was to analyze an effect of H. pylori eradication on the expression of the SATB1 and c-Myc genes in the gastric mucosa of dyspeptic patients with family history of gastric cancer. Twenty patients enrolled to the studies were divided into two groups: nine patients (group I) without the family history of gastric cancer, and eleven patients with the family history of gastric cancer (group II). Endoscopic biopsies of gastric mucosa were taken from the antrum and corpus of H. pylori-infected subjects before and after bacteria eradication. The corresponding levels of expression were determined by analysis of the respective mRNA levels with the use of the real-time RT-PCR method. The level of each mRNA was normalized to the levels of mRNA of two reference genes, RPL29 and GAPDH. Independently of stomach topography, the antrum versus corpus, in the group I patients the levels of mRNA of SATB1 and c-Myc after eradication were higher in the following cases: SATB1/ GAPDH p = 0.017914 (antrum); SATB1/RPL29 p = 0.046400 (corpus); SATB1/GAPDH p = 0.027709 (corpus). For group II patients no statistically significant increase of the level of the c-Myc and SATB1 genes was observed. Patients with the family history of gastric cancer and H. pylori infection, with reversible histopathological changes of the gastric mucosa, have significantly higher levels of SATB1 and c-Myc genes expression as compared to the patients without family history of gastric cancer, regardless of the topography of the stomach. After successful eradication, the SATB1 mRNA level in samples of patients with the family history of gastric cancer did not increase, in contrast to the control group of patients. Presumably, the observed effect

  6. Changing Natural History of HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Metastatic to the Brain in the Era of New Targeted Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounsey, Louisa A; Deal, Allison M; Keith, Kevin C; Benbow, Julia M; Shachar, Shlomit S; Zagar, Timothy; Dees, E Claire; Carey, Lisa A; Ewend, Matthew G; Anders, Carey K

    2018-02-01

    Given the wide adoption of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted therapies for advanced HER2-positive breast cancer, we studied the natural history of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) over time. Patients with HER2-positive BCBM identified from a prospectively maintained database at the University of North Carolina were divided into 3 cohorts by year of BCBM diagnosis. Cohorts were selected by year of HER2-targeted therapy US Food and Drug Administration approval. Overall survival (OS), time to first metastasis, time to BCBM, and BCBM survival were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Associations between OS after BCBM and clinical variables were assessed by Cox proportional hazards regression models. One hundred twenty-three patients were identified. Median age was 51 years, and 58% were white and 31% African American. OS from initial breast cancer diagnosis improved over time: 3.6 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8-6.1) in the 1998-2007 cohort, 6.6 years (95% CI, 4.5-8.6) in the 2008-2012 cohort, and 7.6 years (95% CI, 4.4-9.6) in the 2013-2015 cohort (P = .05). While time from initial diagnosis to first metastasis did not differ (P = .12), time to BCBM increased over time (2.6 years [95% CI, 1.3-3.5] for 1998-2007; 2.6 years [95% CI, 2.1-4.3] for 2008-2012, and 3.3 years [95% CI, 2.2-6] for 2013-2015; P = .05). Although OS from BCBM did not significantly differ by cohort, patients who received HER2-targeted therapy after BCBM had a prolonged OS (2.1 years [95% CI, 1.6-2.6] vs. 0.65 years [95% CI, 0.4-1.3]; P = .001). OS from initial breast cancer diagnosis significantly improved over time for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer who develop BCBM, now exceeding 7 years; survival from BCBM diagnosis may now exceed 2 years. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. HABP2 p.G534E variant in patients with family history of thyroid and breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinheiro, Maísa; Drigo, Sandra Aparecida; Tonhosolo, Renata

    2017-01-01

    familial PTC cases. Genes potentially associated with deregulation of the extracellular matrix organization pathway (CTSB, TNXB, COL4A3, COL16A1, COL24A1, COL5A2, NID1, LOXL2, MMP11, TRIM24 and MUSK) and DNA repair function (NBN and MSH2) were detected by WES, suggesting that other cancer-associated genes......Familial Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC) has been described as a hereditary predisposition cancer syndrome associated with mutations in candidate genes including HABP2. Two of 20 probands from families with history of PTC and breast carcinoma (BC) were evaluated by whole exome sequencing (WES......) revealing HABP2 p.G534E. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the involvement of this variant in three families (F1: 7 relatives; F2: 3 and F3: 3). The proband and his sister (with no malignant tumor so far) from F1 were homozygous for the variant whereas one relative with PTC from F2 was negative...

  8. The Efficacy and Safety of Icotinib in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated with Chemotherapy: A Single-Arm, Multi-Center, Prospective Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingsheng Hu

    Full Text Available Icotinib is a small molecule targeting epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, which shows non-inferior efficacy and better safety comparing to gefitinib in previous phase III trial. The present study was designed to further evaluate the efficacy and safety of icotinib in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy.Patients with NSCLC progressing after one or two lines of chemotherapy were enrolled to receive oral icotinib (125 mg tablet, three times per day. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. The secondary endpoints included overall survival, objective response rate, time to progression, quality of life and safety.From March 16, 2010 to October 9, 2011, 128 patients from 15 centers nationwide were enrolled, in which 124 patients were available for efficacy evaluation and 127 patients were evaluable for safety. The median progression-free survival and time to progression were 5.0 months (95%CI 2.9-6.6 m and 5.4 months (95%CI 3.1-7.9 m, respectively. The objective response rate and disease control rate were 25.8% and 67.7% respectively. Median overall survival exceeded 17.6 months (95%CI 14.2 m-NA according to censored data. Further follow-up of overall survival is ongoing. The most frequent treatment-related adverse events were rash (26%, 33/127, diarrhea (12.6%, 16/127 and elevation of transaminase (15.7%, 20/127.In general, this study showed similar efficacy and numerically better safety when compared with that in ICOGEN trial, further confirming the efficacy and safety of icotinib in treating patients with advanced NSCLC previously treated with chemotherapy.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02486354.

  9. Natural History of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer with Bone Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Santini; Sandro, Barni; Salvatore, Intagliata; Alfredo, Falcone; Francesco, Ferraù; Domenico, Galetta; Luca, Moscetti; Nicla, La Verde; Toni, Ibrahim; Fausto, Petrelli; Enrico, Vasile; Laura, Ginocchi; Davide, Ottaviani; Flavia, Longo; Cinzia, Ortega; Antonio, Russo; Giuseppe, Badalamenti; Elena, Collovà; Gaetano, Lanzetta; Giovanni, Mansueto; Vincenzo, Adamo; Filippo, De Marinis; Satolli, Maria Antonietta; Flavia, Cantile; Andrea, Mancuso; Tanca, Francesca Maria; Raffaele, Addeo; Marco, Russano; Sterpi, M; Francesco, Pantano; Bruno, Vincenzi; Giuseppe, Tonini

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a large, multicenter, retrospective survey aimed to explore the impact of tumor bone involvement in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.Data on clinical-pathology, skeletal outcomes and bone-directed therapies for 661 deceased patients with evidence of bone metastasis were collected and statistically analyzed. Bone metastases were evident at diagnosis in 57.5% of patients. In the remaining cases median time to bone metastases appearance was 9 months. Biphosphonates were administered in 59.6% of patients. Skeletal-related events were experienced by 57.7% of patients; the most common was the need for radiotherapy. Median time to first skeletal-related event was 6 months. Median survival after bone metastases diagnosis was 9.5 months and after the first skeletal-related event was 7 months. We created a score based on four factors used to predict the overall survival from the diagnosis of bone metastases: age >65 years, non-adenocarcinoma histology, ECOG Performance Status >2, concomitant presence of visceral metastases at the bone metastases diagnosis. The presence of more than two of these factors is associated with a worse prognosis.This study demonstrates that patients affected by Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with bone metastases represent a heterogeneous population in terms of risk of skeletal events and survival. PMID:26690845

  10. Natural History of Untreated Prostate Specific Antigen Radiorecurrent Prostate Cancer in Men with Favorable Prognostic Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil E. Martin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Life expectancy data could identify men with favorable post-radiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA failure kinetics unlikely to require androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. Materials and Methods. Of 206 men with unfavorable-risk prostate cancer in a randomized trial of radiation versus radiation and ADT, 53 experienced a PSA failure and were followed without salvage ADT. Comorbidity, age and established prognostic factors were assessed for relationship to death using Cox regression analyses. Results. The median age at failure, interval to PSA failure, and PSA doubling time were 76.6 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 71.8–79.3, 49.1 months (IQR: 37.7–87.4, and 25 months (IQR: 13.1–42.8, respectively. After a median follow up of 4.0 years following PSA failure, 45% of men had died, none from prostate cancer and no one had developed metastases. Both increasing age at PSA failure (HR: 1.14; 95% CI: 1.03–1.25; P=0.008 and the presence of moderate to severe comorbidity (HR: 12.5; 95% CI: 3.81–41.0; P2 years following post-radiation PSA failure appear to be good candidates for observation without ADT intervention.

  11. Natural History of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer with Bone Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Daniele; Daniele, Santini; Barni, Sandro; Sandro, Barni; Intagliata, Salvatore; Salvatore, Intagliata; Falcone, Alfredo; Alfredo, Falcone; Ferraù, Francesco; Francesco, Ferraù; Galetta, Domenico; Domenico, Galetta; Moscetti, Luca; Luca, Moscetti; La Verde, Nicla; Nicla, La Verde; Ibrahim, Toni; Toni, Ibrahim; Petrelli, Fausto; Fausto, Petrelli; Vasile, Enrico; Enrico, Vasile; Ginocchi, Laura; Laura, Ginocchi; Ottaviani, Davide; Davide, Ottaviani; Longo, Flavia; Flavia, Longo; Ortega, Cinzia; Cinzia, Ortega; Russo, Antonio; Antonio, Russo; Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Badalamenti; Collovà, Elena; Elena, Collovà; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Gaetano, Lanzetta; Mansueto, Giovanni; Giovanni, Mansueto; Adamo, Vincenzo; Vincenzo, Adamo; De Marinis, Filippo; Filippo, De Marinis; Satolli, Maria Antonietta; Cantile, Flavia; Flavia, Cantile; Mancuso, Andrea; Andrea, Mancuso; Tanca, Francesca Maria; Addeo, Raffaele; Raffaele, Addeo; Russano, Marco; Marco, Russano; Sterpi, Michelle; Sterpi, M; Pantano, Francesco; Francesco, Pantano; Vincenzi, Bruno; Bruno, Vincenzi; Tonini, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Tonini

    2015-12-22

    We conducted a large, multicenter, retrospective survey aimed to explore the impact of tumor bone involvement in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.Data on clinical-pathology, skeletal outcomes and bone-directed therapies for 661 deceased patients with evidence of bone metastasis were collected and statistically analyzed. Bone metastases were evident at diagnosis in 57.5% of patients. In the remaining cases median time to bone metastases appearance was 9 months. Biphosphonates were administered in 59.6% of patients. Skeletal-related events were experienced by 57.7% of patients; the most common was the need for radiotherapy. Median time to first skeletal-related event was 6 months. Median survival after bone metastases diagnosis was 9.5 months and after the first skeletal-related event was 7 months. We created a score based on four factors used to predict the overall survival from the diagnosis of bone metastases: age >65 years, non-adenocarcinoma histology, ECOG Performance Status >2, concomitant presence of visceral metastases at the bone metastases diagnosis. The presence of more than two of these factors is associated with a worse prognosis.This study demonstrates that patients affected by Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with bone metastases represent a heterogeneous population in terms of risk of skeletal events and survival.

  12. Race-specific impact of natural history, mammography screening, and adjuvant treatment on breast cancer mortality rates in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.T. van Ravesteyn (Nicolien); C.B. Schechter (Clyde); A.M. Near (Aimee); E.A.M. Heijnsdijk (Eveline); M.A. Stoto (Michael); G. Draisma (Gerrit); H.J. de Koning (Harry); J.S. Mandelblatt (Jeanne)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: U.S. Black women have higher breast cancer mortality rates than White women despite lower incidence. The aim of this study is to investigate how much of the mortality disparity can be attributed to racial differences in natural history, uptake of mammography screening, and

  13. Study protocol of a phase II clinical trial (KSCC1501A) examining oxaliplatin + S-1 for treatment of HER2-negative advanced/recurrent gastric cancer previously untreated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Hiroshi; Emi, Yasunori; Oki, Eiji; Tokunaga, Shoji; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Akagi, Yoshito; Baba, Hideo; Baba, Eishi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2018-01-08

    Oxaliplatin + S-1 is a recognized treatment regimen in Japan, but there are no Japanese clinical data on an oxaliplatin dose of 130 mg/m 2 . The current research involves a single-arm, prospective, phase II clinical trial to examine the efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin + S-1 with an oxaliplatin dose of 130 mg/m 2 to treat HER2-negative advanced/recurrent gastric cancer previously untreated with chemotherapy in Japan. The primary endpoint of this trial will be the response rate, and the secondary endpoints will be the safety profile of oxaliplatin + S-1, progression-free survival, the response rate in subjects under the age of 75, overall survival, time to treatment failure, duration of treatment, time to failure of strategy, and dose intensity. The threshold response rate is 45% and the expected response rate is 60%. Assuming that a one-tailed score test will be performed with an α of 0.05, 68 patients are needed to ensure a statistical power of 80%. Planned enrollment is 70 subjects and the total duration of this trial is expected to be 3 years. Since replacing cisplatin with oxaliplatin should provide the same level of therapeutic efficacy while limiting adverse events and simplifying treatment, oxaliplatin + S-1 may be increasingly used to treat gastric cancer in Japan. Verifying the efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin + S-1 with an oxaliplatin dose of 130 mg is an important task that the current trial has set out to achieve. The protocol was registered at the website of the University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN), Japan (protocol ID UMIN000017550) on May 29, 2015. The details are available at the following web address: http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/ .

  14. Novel de novo BRCA2 mutation in a patient with a family history of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Bisgaard, Marie Luise; Jønson, Lars

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BRCA2 germ-line mutations predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Mutations are widespread and unclassified splice variants are frequently encountered. We describe the parental origin and functional characterization of a novel de novo BRCA2 splice site mutation found in a patient...... exhibiting a ductal carcinoma at the age of 40. METHODS: Variations were identified by denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) and sequencing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The effect of the mutation on splicing was examined by exon trapping in COS-7 cells and by RT-PCR on RNA isolated from...... leucocytes and carcinoma tissue. RESULTS: A novel BRCA2 variant in the splice donor site of exon 21 (nucleotide 8982+1 G-->A/c.8754+1 G-->A) was identified. Exon trapping showed that the mutation activates a cryptic splice site 46 base pairs 3' of exon 21, resulting in the inclusion of a premature stop codon...

  15. A Personal Reflection on the History of Radiation Oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Florence C.H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a historical and personal narrative of the development of radiation oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), from its founding more than 100 years ago to the present day. Methods and Materials: Historical sources include the Archives of MSKCC, publications by members of MSKCC, the author's personal records and recollections, and her communications with former colleagues, particularly Dr. Basil Hilaris, Dr. Zvi Fuks, and Dr. Beryl McCormick. Conclusions: The author, who spent 38 years at MSKCC, presents the challenges and triumphs of MSKCC's Radiation Oncology Department and details MSKCC's breakthroughs in radiation oncology. She also describes MSKCC's involvement in the founding of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.

  16. History of lung disease and risk of lung cancer in a population with high household fuel combustion exposures in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosgoodiii, H Dean; Chapman, Robert S; He, Xingzhou; Hu, Wei; Tian, Linwei; Liu, Larry Z; Lai, Hong; Chen, Wei; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2013-09-01

    History of chronic lung diseases and household coal use for heating and cooking are established risk factors of lung cancer; however, few studies have been able to explore these risk factors simultaneously. Xuanwei, China, has some of the highest rates of lung cancer in China and most residents experience substantial in-home coal smoke exposures. Using a population-based case-control study of 498 lung cancer cases and 498 age-matched controls, we evaluated the risk of lung cancer in relation to coal smoke exposure and history of chronic lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, tuberculosis (TB), chronic bronchitis, and emphysema. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by conditional logistic regression adjusting for potential confounders. We observed an increased risk of lung cancer with history of any chronic lung disease among males (OR = 14.2; 95%CI = 4.3-46.9), females (OR = 2.6; 95%CI = 1.1-6.3), smokers (OR = 12.7; 95%CI = 3.5-45.8), and nonsmokers (OR = 2.6; 95%CI = 1.1-6.4). Specifically, TB (OR = 83.7; 95%CI = 11.0-634.7), COPD (OR = 3.2; 95%CI = 1.7-6.0), and emphysema and chronic bronchitis (OR = 3.3; 95%CI = 1.7-6.4) were associated with increased risks. These findings suggest that history of chronic lung diseases may also increase risk of lung cancer in populations with indoor coal smoke exposures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nivolumab Versus Docetaxel in Previously Treated Patients With Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Two-Year Outcomes From Two Randomized, Open-Label, Phase III Trials (CheckMate 017 and CheckMate 057).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Leora; Spigel, David R; Vokes, Everett E; Holgado, Esther; Ready, Neal; Steins, Martin; Poddubskaya, Elena; Borghaei, Hossein; Felip, Enriqueta; Paz-Ares, Luis; Pluzanski, Adam; Reckamp, Karen L; Burgio, Marco A; Kohlhäeufl, Martin; Waterhouse, David; Barlesi, Fabrice; Antonia, Scott; Arrieta, Oscar; Fayette, Jérôme; Crinò, Lucio; Rizvi, Naiyer; Reck, Martin; Hellmann, Matthew D; Geese, William J; Li, Ang; Blackwood-Chirchir, Anne; Healey, Diane; Brahmer, Julie; Eberhardt, Wilfried E E

    2017-12-10

    Purpose Nivolumab, a programmed death-1 inhibitor, prolonged overall survival compared with docetaxel in two independent phase III studies in previously treated patients with advanced squamous (CheckMate 017; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01642004) or nonsquamous (CheckMate 057; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01673867) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We report updated results, including a pooled analysis of the two studies. Methods Patients with stage IIIB/IV squamous (N = 272) or nonsquamous (N = 582) NSCLC and disease progression during or after prior platinum-based chemotherapy were randomly assigned 1:1 to nivolumab (3 mg/kg every 2 weeks) or docetaxel (75 mg/m 2 every 3 weeks). Minimum follow-up for survival was 24.2 months. Results Two-year overall survival rates with nivolumab versus docetaxel were 23% (95% CI, 16% to 30%) versus 8% (95% CI, 4% to 13%) in squamous NSCLC and 29% (95% CI, 24% to 34%) versus 16% (95% CI, 12% to 20%) in nonsquamous NSCLC; relative reductions in the risk of death with nivolumab versus docetaxel remained similar to those reported in the primary analyses. Durable responses were observed with nivolumab; 10 (37%) of 27 confirmed responders with squamous NSCLC and 19 (34%) of 56 with nonsquamous NSCLC had ongoing responses after 2 years' minimum follow-up. No patient in either docetaxel group had an ongoing response. In the pooled analysis, the relative reduction in the risk of death with nivolumab versus docetaxel was 28% (hazard ratio, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.62 to 0.84), and rates of treatment-related adverse events were lower with nivolumab than with docetaxel (any grade, 68% v 88%; grade 3 to 4, 10% v 55%). Conclusion Nivolumab provides long-term clinical benefit and a favorable tolerability profile compared with docetaxel in previously treated patients with advanced NSCLC.

  18. Pain in cancer survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mladosievicova, B.

    2017-01-01

    Pain is a common problem among cancer survivors, especially in the first few years after treatment. In the longer term, approximately 5% to 10% of survivors have chronic severe pain. Overall prevalence of all types pain is about 40% in some cancer survivors with previous specific diagnosis. Until recently, impact of pain in cancer survivors have largely been unexamined. This complication can be predicted by type of malignancy, its therapy, time elapsed from completion of anticancer treatment and effectivity of previous pain interventions. As the purpose of this article is to update readers on more recent data about prevalence of pain in cancer survivors and common treatment-related chronic pain etiologies in patients with a history of cancer who are beyond the acute diagnosis and treatment phase, previously known information about acute pain, pain in terminally ill patients. Some new studies in certain subpopulations of cancer survivors will be explored in more detail. (author)

  19. Clinical impact of abnormal FDG uptake in pulmonary nodules detected by CT in patients with only history of non-lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.O.; Nunez, R.; Welsh, R.J.; Chmielewski, G.W.; Hill, E.A.; Hill, J.C.; Ravikrishnan, K.P.; Darlene Fink-Bennett; Dworkin, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The aim is to assess the clinical impact of positive FDG uptake in single (SPN) or multiple (MPN) pulmonary nodules detected by CT in patients with known past history of non-lung cancers (but no known lung cancers). Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight sequential patients with non-lung cancers (15 breast, 8 colon, 5 prostate) referred for evaluation of SPN or MPN by PET over a period of two years were included. F-18 FDG PET images, covering chest and upper abdomen, were interpreted blindly and then correlated with CT findings for the precise location of abnormal FDG uptake in the chest. Results: There was a significant number of abnormal FDG uptake in both SPN or MPN. Positive abnormal uptake suggestive of malignancy was found in 25% of patients in the form of SPN and 39% of patients in the form of MPN (p<0.03). Positive cases in the pattern of multiple foci of pulmonary uptake were attributed to metastatic disease. Otherwise positive cases were followed by tissue diagnosis and/or surgical attention. The negative cases were followed clinically. Of the 11 positive cases of MPN, 2 patients (18%) showed only abnormal FDG uptake in just one of the nodules, which was later confirmed at surgery to be a primary cancer of lung in both patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that PET scan would be just as useful in patients with SPN and known non-lung cancers as other patients with no history of any cancers. Not all patients with non-lung cancer and MPN have pulmonary metastasis by PET criteria. PET may single out a primary lung malignancy in patients with non-lung cancer and MPN. PET has thus great clinical impact in these patients with pulmonary nodules and known non-lung cancers as the management would otherwise be completely different in situations revealed by the study

  20. Influência da terapêutica hormonal prévia sobre os indicadores de prognóstico do câncer de mama em mulheres na pós-menopausa Influence of previous hormonal therapy on breast cancer prognostic markers in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Aguiar Petri Nahas

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a influência da terapêutica hormonal (TH prévia sobre alguns indicadores de prognóstico do câncer de mama, em pacientes na pós-menopausa. MÉTODOS: estudo transversal por meio da aplicação de questionários e levantamento de prontuários. Foram entrevistadas 157 pacientes com diagnóstico de câncer de mama na pós-menopausa, registrando-se dados clínicos, antecedentes pessoais e familiares, uso de TH e mamografias. Nos prontuários foram obtidas informações sobre o câncer de mama quanto ao diâmetro do tumor, tipo de cirurgia e estudo imuno-histoquímico. Para a estatística empregou-se ANOVA e teste do chi2. RESULTADOS: 38,2% das pacientes eram ex-usuárias de TH e 61,8% não usuárias. O tempo médio de uso da TH foi de 3,7±3,6 anos. As ex-usuárias eram de menor faixa etária e com menor tempo de menopausa quando comparadas às não usuárias (pPURPOSE: to evaluate the influence of previous hormonal therapy (HT on breast cancer prognostic markers in postmenopausal women. Methods: a cross-sectional study was carried out, applying questionnaires and medical record surveys of 157 postmenopausal patients with breast cancer diagnosis. Clinical data, personal and familiar history, HT use, and mammograms were investigated. The medical record surveys yielded information about tumor size, imunohistochemical data, and type of surgery. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and the chi2 test. RESULTS: 38.2% of the patients were HT ex-users and 61.8% were non-users. Mean time of HT use was 3.7±3.6 years. HT ex-users were younger and with a shorter menopause time than non-users (p<0.05. 26.8% of the patients reported previous cases of breast cancer in their families, with no difference between the groups. Of the HT ex-users, 43.3% had previous mammograms, while of the non-users, only 11.3% (p<0.001. Mean tumor size was smaller in HT ex-users (2.3±1.1 cm than in non-users (3.3±1.5cm (p<0.001. The conservative

  1. Treatment rationale and study design for a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study evaluating onartuzumab (MetMAb) in combination with bevacizumab plus mFOLFOX-6 in patients with previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendell, Johanna C; Ervin, Thomas J; Gallinson, David; Singh, Jaswinder; Wallace, James A; Saleh, Mansoor N; Vallone, Marcy; Phan, See-Chun; Hack, Stephen P

    2013-09-01

    Dysregulation of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/MET pathway is associated with poor prognosis, more aggressive biological characteristics of the tumor, and shortened survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Onartuzumab (MetMAb) is a recombinant humanized monovalent monoclonal antibody directed against MET. We present the treatment rationale and protocol for an ongoing randomized multicenter placebo-controlled phase II study designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of MetMAb combined with bevacizumab and mFOLFOX-6 (5-fluoruracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin). Eligible patients with previously untreated mCRC are randomized 1:1 to either mFOLFOX-6 combined with bevacizumab and placebo followed by 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin plus bevacizumab and placebo or mFOLFOX6, bevacizumab plus MetMAb followed by 5 FU/LV, bevacizumab, and MetMAb. The primary end point of this study is progression-free survival (PFS) in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population. Secondary end points include overall survival (OS), objective response rate, and safety. Subanalyses will be performed to evaluate the effect of MET receptor expression on study primary and secondary end points. Correlative studies will be performed on tissue- and blood-derived biomarkers related to both HGF/MET signaling and other associated pathway markers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lung cancer risk in welders and foundry workers with a history of heavy smoking in the USA: The National Lung Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jason Y Y; Bassig, Bryan A; Seow, Wei Jie; Hu, Wei; Ji, Bu-Tian; Blair, Aaron; Silverman, Debra T; Lan, Qing

    2017-06-01

    Foundry work is a risk factor for lung cancer; however, the association with welding is unclear, as smoking is common among metalworkers and may mask the relationship. We evaluated whether history of welding and foundry work, independently and jointly, and employment duration were associated with lung cancer risk in heavy smokers. We analysed data from the National Lung Screening Trial, a prospective randomised trial of 53 454 heavy smokers (>30 pack-years) in the USA. Cox regression models were used to estimate the HRs and 95% CIs of medically/histologically confirmed incident lung cancer during the follow-up period (2002-2009) in relation to history and duration of welding and foundry work assessed via questionnaires, adjusted for screening arm, component study, sex, age, race/ethnicity, education, smoking status and pack-years, body mass index and personal/family medical history. There were 2034 incident lung cancer cases throughout the follow-up. Increasing years of employment in welding (p-trend =0.039) and foundry work (p-trend =0.005) were related to increased lung cancer risk among heavy smokers. Having ever been employed (≥1 yr) as either a welder or foundry worker alone was associated with non-significant increased risks of lung cancer (HR=1.12 (95% CI 0.91 to 1.37) and HR=1.09 (95% CI 0.85 to 1.39), respectively). Further, there was a joint-effect in that those who were ever employed in both occupations had significantly increased risks (HR=1.48 (95% CI 1.08 to 2.04)). Our findings provide further evidence that exposure to welding/metal fumes may be associated with elevated lung cancer risk. NCT00047385. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Application of support vector machines to breast cancer screening using mammogram and history data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Walker H., Jr.; Akanda, Anab; Lo, Joseph Y.; Anderson, Francis; Bryden, Margaret

    2002-05-01

    Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are a new and radically different type of classifiers and learning machines that use a hypothesis space of linear functions in a high dimensional feature space. This relatively new paradigm, based on Statistical Learning Theory (SLT) and Structural Risk Minimization (SRM), has many advantages when compared to traditional neural networks, which are based on Empirical Risk Minimization (ERM). Unlike neural networks, SVM training always finds a global minimum. Furthermore, SVMs have inherent ability to solve pattern classification without incorporating any problem-domain knowledge. In this study, the SVM was employed as a pattern classifier, operating on mammography data used for breast cancer detection. The main focus was to formulate the best learning machine configurations for optimum specificity and positive predictive value at very high sensitivities. Using a mammogram database of 500 biopsy-proven samples, the best performing SVM, on average, was able to achieve (under statistical 5-fold cross-validation) a specificity of 45.0% and a positive predictive value (PPV) of 50.1% at 100% sensitivity. At 97% sensitivity, a specificity of 55.8% and a PPV of 55.2% were obtained.

  4. Regorafenib plus best supportive care versus placebo plus best supportive care in Asian patients with previously treated metastatic colorectal cancer (CONCUR): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Qin, Shukui; Xu, Ruihua; Yau, Thomas C C; Ma, Brigette; Pan, Hongming; Xu, Jianming; Bai, Yuxian; Chi, Yihebali; Wang, Liwei; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Bi, Feng; Cheng, Ying; Le, Anh Tuan; Lin, Jen-Kou; Liu, Tianshu; Ma, Dong; Kappeler, Christian; Kalmus, Joachim; Kim, Tae Won

    2015-06-01

    In the international randomised phase 3 CORRECT trial (NCT01103323), regorafenib significantly improved overall survival versus placebo in patients with treatment-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer. Of the 760 patients in CORRECT, 111 were Asian (mostly Japanese). This phase 3 trial was done to assess regorafenib in a broader population of Asian patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer than was studied in CORRECT. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, phase 3 trial done in 25 hospitals in mainland China, Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan, and Vietnam, we recruited Asian patients aged 18 years or older with progressive metastatic colorectal cancer who had received at least two previous treatment lines or were unable to tolerate standard treatments. Patients had to have an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1, life expectancy of at least 3 months, and adequate bone marrow, liver, and renal function, without other uncontrolled medical disorders. We randomly allocated patients (2:1; with a computer-generated unicentric randomisation list [prepared by the study funder] and interactive voice response system; block size of six; stratified by metastatic site [single vs multiple organs] and time from diagnosis of metastatic disease [regorafenib 160 mg once daily or placebo on days 1-21 of each 28 day cycle; patients in both groups were also to receive best supportive care. Participants, investigators, and the study funder were masked to treatment assignment. The primary endpoint was overall survival, and we analysed data on an intention-to-treat basis. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01584830. Between April 29, 2012, and Feb 6, 2013, we screened 243 patients and randomly assigned 204 patients to receive either regorafenib (136 [67%]) or placebo (68 [33%]). After a median follow-up of 7·4 months (IQR 4·3-12·2), overall survival was significantly better with regorafenib

  5. The sexuality and social performance of androgen-deprived (castrated) men throughout history: implications for modern day cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucoin, Michael William; Wassersug, Richard Joel

    2006-12-01

    Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) via either surgical or chemical castration is the standard treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). In North America, it is estimated that more than 40,000 men start ADT each year. The side effects of this treatment are extensive and include gynecomastia, erectile dysfunction, and reduced libido. These changes strongly challenge patients' self-identity and sexuality. The historical term for a man who has been castrated is 'eunuch', now a pejorative term implying overall social and sexual impotence. In this paper, we review key historical features of eunuch social performance and sexuality from a variety of cultures in order to assess the validity of contemporary stereotypes of the androgen-deprived male. Data were taken from secondary sources on the history of Byzantium, Roman Antiquity, Early Islamic societies, the Ottoman Empire, Chinese Dynasties, and the Italian Castrati period. This cross-cultural survey shows that castrated men consistently held powerful social positions that yielded great political influence. Many eunuchs were recognized for their loyalty, managerial style, wisdom, and pedagogical skills. Furthermore, rather than being consistently asexual and celibate, they were often sexually active. In certain cultures, they were objects of sexual desire for males, or females, or both. Collectively, the historical accounts suggest that, given the right cultural setting and individual motivation, androgen deprivation may actually enhance rather than hinder both social and sexual performance. We conclude that eunuch history contradicts the presumption that androgen deprivation necessarily leads to social and sexual impotence. The capabilities and accomplishments of eunuchs in the past gives patients on ADT grounds for viewing themselves in a positive light, where they are neither socially impotent nor sexually chaste.

  6. Family History of Breast Cancer as a Determinant of the Risk of Developing Endometrial and Ovarian Cancers: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Prophylactic surgery in women with a hereditary predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer . J Clin Oncol 2000;18:1980-95. Eerola H, Blomqvist C...to represent clinical clues to the presence of a hereditary cancer predisposition . C) Genetic studies: The hereditary breast /ovarian cancer ...harbingers of a genetic predisposition to breast cancer , we analyzed the risk of endometrial cancer taking this

  7. Cervical cancer screening in Latvia: a brief history and recent improvements (2009-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vīberga, Ilze; Poljak, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Screening for cervical cancer (CC) has been an important part of prevention strategies in Latvia since the early 1960s, reducing its incidence from 31.7/100,000 women in 1963 to 8.9/100,000 in 1989. Political and socioeconomic changes after 1991 greatly affected the entire healthcare system, including CC screening, which was temporarily suspended. In 2005, CC screening targeting all women 25 to 69 years old was officially reintroduced in Latvia, with revision in 2007. However, the nature of the screening program remained opportunistic. The inactivity of women, lack of availability of the required services, overloaded general practitioners, and lack of involvement of gynecologists and obstetricians resulted in low coverage of the target population (10% in 2005-2006). Organized screening was finally implemented in Latvia in 2009. Currently, the national Health Payment Center is responsible for inviting women for screening. Cytological smears, principally performed in a 3-year interval, are read by cytopathologists and cytotechnologists at 25 government-based and private laboratories. Cytological testing outside the program is still very frequent and performed on an ongoing basis in parallel with the organized screening. The results of the first round of screening (2009-2011) show encouraging trends, with a stepwise increase in positive responses to the invitation letter, an increase in coverage inside the program, and increasing detection of cervical high-grade lesions and carcinoma in situ. Unfortunately there is still no cytology quality control monitoring in place, and there are no clear recommendations for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing. Because HPV testing is not reimbursed, it is rarely performed.

  8. Epithelial ovarian cancer relapsing as isolated lymph node disease: natural history and clinical outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisconti Salvatore

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several evidences suggested that ovarian cancer (OC patients showing isolated lymph node recurrence (ILNR have an indolent evolution. The aim of the study was to retrospectively review ILNR observed in our Institution over the past 11 years in order to investigate: the pattern of disease progression after the first diagnosis of ILNR, and their clinical outcome. Methods Between September 1995 and September 2006, 523 epithelial OC were diagnosed in our centers, and 301 of these relapsed. Cases with a diagnosis of ILNR, and at least 12 months of follow up after the diagnosis of ILNR were included. Post-relapse survival (PRS was recorded from the date of the diagnosis of ILNR to the date of death or date last seen. Survival probabilities were estimated according to the method of Kaplan and Meier and compared by the log rank test. Cox's regression model with stepwise variable selection was used to analyse the role of clinico-pathological parameters as prognostic factors for PRS. Results Thirty-two cases were identified as ILNR (10.6% of the recurrences, and 6.1% of the OC population. Most of the patients continued to exhibit the same pattern of progression during follow up, with 75% of the patients free from peritoneal disease after 2 years from the diagnosis of ILNR. Median Post-Relapse Survival (PRS was 37 months, and median Overall Survival (OS was 109 months, with all patients surviving more than 2 years after the initial diagnosis. In multivariate analysis only Platinum-Free Interval (PFI retained a prognostic role for PRS (p value = 0.033. Conclusion ILNR represents a less aggressive pattern of OC relapse which keeps progressing in the lymph nodes in a relatively high percentage of cases. On the other hand, the occurrence of peritoneal spreading after ILNR is associated with a rapidly fatal outcome.

  9. Classification and Regression Tree Analysis of Clinical Patterns that Predict Survival in 127 Chinese Patients with Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated by Gefitinib Who Failed to Previous Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziping WANG

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that gefitinib produces only 10%-20% tumor regression in heavily pretreated, unselected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients as the second- and third-line setting. Asian, female, nonsmokers and adenocarcinoma are favorable factors; however, it is difficult to find a patient satisfying all the above clinical characteristics. The aim of this study is to identify novel predicting factors, and to explore the interactions between clinical variables and their impact on the survival of Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC who were heavily treated with gefitinib in the second- or third-line setting. Methods The clinical and follow-up data of 127 advanced NSCLC patients referred to the Cancer Hospital & Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences from March 2005 to March 2010 were analyzed. Multivariate analysis of progression-free survival (PFS was performed using recursive partitioning, which is referred to as the classification and regression tree (CART analysis. Results The median PFS of 127 eligible consecutive advanced NSCLC patients was 8.0 months (95%CI: 5.8-10.2. CART was performed with an initial split on first-line chemotherapy outcomes and a second split on patients’ age. Three terminal subgroups were formed. The median PFS of the three subsets ranged from 1.0 month (95%CI: 0.8-1.2 for those with progressive disease outcome after the first-line chemotherapy subgroup, 10 months (95%CI: 7.0-13.0 in patients with a partial response or stable disease in first-line chemotherapy and age <70, and 22.0 months for patients obtaining a partial response or stable disease in first-line chemotherapy at age 70-81 (95%CI: 3.8-40.1. Conclusion Partial response, stable disease in first-line chemotherapy and age ≥ 70 are closely correlated with long-term survival treated by gefitinib as a second- or third-line setting in advanced NSCLC. CART can be used to identify previously unappreciated patient

  10. A multicentre year-long randomised controlled trial of exercise training targeting physical functioning in men with prostate cancer previously treated with androgen suppression and radiation from TROG 03.04 RADAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, Daniel A; Spry, Nigel; Denham, James; Taaffe, Dennis R; Cormie, Prue; Joseph, David; Lamb, David S; Chambers, Suzanne K; Newton, Robert U

    2014-05-01

    Long-term prostate cancer (PCa) survivors are at increased risk for comorbidities and physical deconditioning. To determine the effectiveness of a year-long randomised controlled trial of exercise training in PCa survivors >5 yr postdiagnosis on physical functioning. Between 2010 and 2011, 100 long-term PCa survivors from Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 03.04 Randomised Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy previously treated with androgen-deprivation therapy and radiation therapy were randomly assigned to 6 mo of supervised exercise followed by 6 mo of a home-based maintenance programme (n=50) or printed educational material about physical activity (n=50) for 12 mo across 13 university-affiliated exercise clinics in Australia and New Zealand. Supervised resistance and aerobic exercise or printed educational material about physical activity. The primary end point was a 400-m walk as a measure of cardiovascular fitness. Secondary end points were physical function, patient-reported outcomes, muscle strength, body composition, and biomarkers. Analysis of covariance was used to compare outcomes for groups at 6 and 12 mo adjusted for baseline values. Participants undergoing supervised exercise showed improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness performance at 6 mo (-19 s [p=0.029]) and 12 mo (-13 s [p=0.028]) and better lower-body physical function across the 12-mo period (pphysical functioning at 6 (p=.006) and 12 mo (p=0.002), appendicular skeletal muscle at 6 mo (p=0.019), and objective measures of muscle strength at 6 and 12 mo (pphysical functioning measures, and inclusion of well-functioning individuals. Supervised exercise training in long-term PCa survivors is more effective than physical activity educational material for increasing cardiorespiratory fitness, physical function, muscle strength, and self-reported physical functioning at 6 mo. Importantly, these benefits were maintained in the long term with a home-based programme with follow-up at 12 mo. The

  11. The natural history of cervical cancer in chinese women: results from an 11-year follow-up study in china using a multistate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Kai; Kang, Le-Ni; Chang, Irene J; Zhao, Fang-Hui; Hu, Shang-Ying; Chen, Wen; Shi, Ju-Fang; Zhang, Xun; Pan, Qin-Jing; Li, Shu-Min; Qiao, You-Lin

    2014-07-01

    It is important to understand the natural history of cervical cancer, which has implications for cancer prevention and management. However, a dearth of studies on the long-term development of cervical cancer exists in China. We investigated the natural history of cervical cancer in Chinese women by creating a multistate model using 11 years of follow-up data from the Shanxi Province Cervical Cancer Screening Study I conducted from 1999 to 2010. In 1999, a total of 1,997 eligible women, ages 35 to 45 years, were enrolled in Xiangyuan County, Shanxi Province. Participants were followed up in 2005 and 2010, respectively. The average time a subject spent in CIN1 before transiting into another state was 1.4693 years [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1215-1.9251] and the average time a subject spent in CIN2 was 2.9822 years (95% CI: 1.9790-4.4938). A subject's transition probability from CIN1 to normal increased with time. However, the transition probability from CIN1 to CIN2 was relatively lower, with 3-, 5-, and 10-year transition probabilities of 0.1415, 0.1066, and 0.0437. Comparison of 5-year transition probabilities between CIN2 to normal/CIN1 and CIN2 to CIN3(+) yielded a ratio of 2.74. Women with CIN1 had a substantial tendency for regression. Similarly, women with CIN2 had a higher probability of regression to normal/CIN1 than progression to CIN3(+). Findings in this study may have significant implications for the development and evaluation of formal cervical cancer preventive strategies in China. This study may serve as a valuable reference to future research on other multistate cancer processes. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Worse Prognosis for Stage IA Lung Cancer Patients with Smoking History and More Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yukihiro; Kage, Hidenori; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Sato, Yasunori; Ota, Satoshi; Fukayama, Masashi; Nakajima, Jun

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study examined whether the severity of chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) affects surgical outcomes. The subjects were 243 consecutive patients who underwent lobectomy for clinical stage IA lung cancer from 1999 to 2008 in our hospital. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) grading system was used to classify the severity of COPD in smokers. Among the 149 smokers, 62 were diagnosed with COPD (25 as GOLD 1, 33 as GOLD 2, and 4 as GOLD 3). In univariate analysis, postoperative pulmonary complications were associated with male sex and more severe COPD. The frequencies were 17.1% in non-COPD, 24.0% in GOLD 1-COPD, and 46.0% in GOLD 2/3-COPD smokers (p = 0.0006). In univariate analysis, older age, smoking history, higher smoking pack-years and more severe COPD were associated with poor relapse-free survival. Relapse-free survival at five years was 80.7%, 66.9%, and 61.3% in non-COPD, GOLD 1-COPD, and GOLD 2/3-COPD smokers, respectively (p = 0.0005). Multivariate analyses showed that only GOLD 2/3-COPD was associated with postoperative pulmonary complications and relapse-free survival. Inhaled bronchodilators were prescribed preoperatively to 24.3% of the GOLD 2/3-COPD group. Smokers with GOLD 2/3-COPD are at high risk for pulmonary complications and have an unfavorable long-term prognosis.

  13. Safety and Palliative Efficacy of Single-Dose 8-Gy Reirradiation for Painful Local Failure in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Radical Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topkan, Erkan, E-mail: docdretopkan@gmail.com [Baskent Department of Radiation Oncology, University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Yildirim, Berna Akkus; Guler, Ozan Cem; Parlak, Cem [Baskent Department of Radiation Oncology, University Adana Medical Faculty, Adana (Turkey); Pehlivan, Berrin [Koc University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul, and American Hospital, University of Texas MD Anderson Radiation Treatment Center, Istanbul (Turkey); Selek, Ugur [Medstar Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Antalya (Turkey)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of single-dose 8-Gy palliative chest reirradiation (CRI) in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (M-NSCLC) patients with painful thoracic failures (TF) within the previous radiation portal. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 78 M-NSCLC patients who received single-dose 8-Gy CRI for painful TF after concurrent chemoradiation therapy to a total radiation dose of 52 to 66 Gy between 2007 and 2012. Primary endpoints included significant pain relief (SPR) defined as a ≥2 point decrement in the Visual Analogue Scale for Pain inventory (VAS-P), time to pain relief, and duration of pain control. Secondary objectives were survival and prognostic factors. Results: Treatment was well tolerated, with only 5.1% grade 3 pneumonitis and 1.3% grade 2 esophagitis. Pre-CRI median and post-CRI minimum VAS-P were 7 and 3 (P<.001), respectively. SPR was noted in 67 (85.9%) patients, and only 3 (3.9%) scored progressive pain. Median time to lowest VAS-P and duration of pain control were 27 days and 6.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 7.7 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 26.5%. On multivariate analyses, lower Eastern Cooperative Oncology group score (1-2; P<.001), absence of anemia (P=.001), and fewer metastatic sites (1-2; P<.001) were found to be associated with longer OS. Conclusions: Single-dose 8-Gy CRI provides safe, effective, and durable pain palliation for TF in radically irradiated M-NSCLC patients. Because of its convenience, lower cost, and higher comfort, the present protocol can be considered an appropriate option for patients with limited life spans.

  14. Genetic evaluation based on family history and Her2 status correctly identifies TP53 mutations in very early onset breast cancer cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fostira, F; Konstantopoulou, I; Mavroudis, D; Tryfonopoulos, D; Yannoukakos, D; Voutsinas, G E

    2015-04-01

    Currently, hereditary breast cancer is being attributed to more than 20 genes of differing penetrance. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 are still the genes of reference for breast cancer susceptibility, extreme breast cancer phenotypes may be the result of deleterious alleles of other genes. Here, we report three families with early-onset breast cancer that were initially referred for BRCA1/BRCA2 genetic testing. They were diagnosed with breast cancer at an extraordinarily early age. On the basis of their extensive family history, which included multiple cancer types, and their Her2 status, they were suspected for Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Indeed, all three probands were found to harbor TP53 tumor suppressor gene mutations. These included p.C275X, described here for the first time, as well as p.R213X and p.Y220C, which have been described in the past. Our conclusion is that decisions on genetic analysis for inherited early onset breast cancer should always be based on detailed pedigree information, combined with Her2 status. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Natural history of metastatic biliary tract cancer (BTC) patients with good performance status (PS) who were treated with only best supportive care (BSC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jun Ho; Song, Haa-Na; Kim, Rock Bum; Oh, Sung Yong; Lim, Ho Yeong; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Se Hoon; Kim, Moon Jin; Lee, Soon Il; Ryou, Sung Hyeok; Hwang, In Gyu; Jang, Joung-Soon; Kim, Hong Jun; Choi, Jun Young; Kang, Jung-Hun

    2015-03-01

    Although chemotherapy is widely recommended for patients with metastatic biliary tract cancer, the natural course of these patients, especially those with good performance status who are indicated for chemotherapy, is not known. We retrospectively reviewed patients with metastatic or locally advanced biliary cancer who were diagnosed at six cancer centers. Patients were eligible if they had good performance (ECOG 0-2) and no history of any treatment for cancer. The primary objective was to evaluate the survival time of patients with advanced biliary cancer with good performance who were untreated. Of the 1677 patients, 204 met the inclusion criteria. The median age and overall survival were 72.0 years and 7.1 months. Overall survival (months) by location was 4.7 for intrahepatic, 9.7 for extrahepatic, 4.4 for gallbladder and 11.2 for ampulla of vater cancer. In subgroup analysis, overall survival of locally advanced biliary cancer was 13.8 months and that of patients with normal carcinoembryonic antigen/carbohydrate antigen 19-9 was 10.6 months. In multivariate analysis, variables that were associated with poor prognosis were metastatic biliary cancer [hazard ratio 2.19 (P = 0.001)], high baseline carcinoembryonic antigen level (defined as >4.0 ng/ml) [hazard ratio 1.51 (P = 0.024)] and high baseline carbohydrate antigen 19-9 level (defined as >100 U/ml) [hazard ratio 1.93 (P = 0.001)]. Advanced biliary tract cancer with good performance status showed modest survival without any treatment. Furthermore, subgroup analysis showed that patients with normal carbohydrate antigen 19-9 or carcinoembryonic antigen level or locally advanced status had favorable survival. Further studies comparing the outcome of chemotherapy with that of best supportive care in patients with unresectable biliary tract cancer are warranted. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Preoperative screening: value of previous tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, D S; Snow, R; Lofgren, R P

    1990-12-15

    To determine the frequency of tests done in the year before elective surgery that might substitute for preoperative screening tests and to determine the frequency of test results that change from a normal value to a value likely to alter perioperative management. Retrospective cohort analysis of computerized laboratory data (complete blood count, sodium, potassium, and creatinine levels, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time). Urban tertiary care Veterans Affairs Hospital. Consecutive sample of 1109 patients who had elective surgery in 1988. At admission, 7549 preoperative tests were done, 47% of which duplicated tests performed in the previous year. Of 3096 previous results that were normal as defined by hospital reference range and done closest to the time of but before admission (median interval, 2 months), 13 (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.2% to 0.7%), repeat values were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery. Most of the abnormalities were predictable from the patient's history, and most were not noted in the medical record. Of 461 previous tests that were abnormal, 78 (17%; CI, 13% to 20%) repeat values at admission were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery (P less than 0.001, frequency of clinically important abnormalities of patients with normal previous results with those with abnormal previous results). Physicians evaluating patients preoperatively could safely substitute the previous test results analyzed in this study for preoperative screening tests if the previous tests are normal and no obvious indication for retesting is present.

  17. Cerebral Metastasis from a Previously Undiagnosed Appendiceal Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Biroli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastases arise in 10%–40% of all cancer patients. Up to one third of the patients do not have previous cancer history. We report a case of a 67-years-old male patient who presented with confusion, tremor, and apraxia. A brain MRI revealed an isolated right temporal lobe lesion. A thorax-abdomen-pelvis CT scan showed no primary lesion. The patient underwent a craniotomy with gross-total resection. Histopathology revealed an intestinal-type adenocarcinoma. A colonoscopy found no primary lesion, but a PET-CT scan showed elevated FDG uptake in the appendiceal nodule. A right hemicolectomy was performed, and the specimen showed a moderately differentiated mucinous appendiceal adenocarcinoma. Whole brain radiotherapy was administrated. A subsequent thorax-abdomen CT scan revealed multiple lung and hepatic metastasis. Seven months later, the patient died of disease progression. In cases of undiagnosed primary lesions, patients present in better general condition, but overall survival does not change. Eventual identification of the primary tumor does not affect survival. PET/CT might be a helpful tool in detecting lesions of the appendiceal region. To the best of our knowledge, such a case was never reported in the literature, and an appendiceal malignancy should be suspected in patients with brain metastasis from an undiagnosed primary tumor.

  18. [A systematic review of international simulation models on the natural history of breast cancer: current understanding and challenges for Chinese-population-specific model development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H M; Wang, L; Shi, J F; Ying, J M; Zhu, J; Chen, L L; Yue, X P; Gong, J Y; Li, X; Wang, J L; Dai, M

    2017-10-10

    Objective: To systematically review the worldwide simulation model studies on the natural history of breast cancer and to summarize related parameters. Methods: A structured literature search was conducted in PubMed and the Cochrane Library to identify articles during 1980-2015. Articles were screened independently by two researchers. Health states in the natural history and relevant parameters were extracted. Results: A total of 36 studies were included for analysis, within the earliest one was published in 1990. Most studies were from Europe and America countries, and 2 studies from China. Markov model was mostly applied to evaluating breast cancer screening programs ( n =32). Reported health status included "healthy" ( n =36), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS, n =17), invasive breast cancer (IBC, n =36), and death ( n =27). There were two definite classifications for IBC, tumor size ( n =9) and TNM staging ( n =9, 3 studies reported transition rates). The median (range) of annual transition rates from DCIS to stage-Ⅰ IBC, Ⅰ to Ⅱ, Ⅱ to Ⅲ, Ⅲ to Ⅳ were 0.279 (0.259-0.299), 0.150 (0.069-0.430), 0.100 (0.060-0.128) and 0.210 (0.010-0.625), respectively. A total of 15 studies reported the mean duration from predinical to clinical stage for IBC was 1.95-4.70 years, which gradually increased with age, and 7 studies reported that for DCIS. Conclusions: Despite closer attention was paid to breast cancer natural history models, in recent years atypical hyperplasia has been neglected. Data on the mean duration of DCIS requires reasonable conversion. Various classifications for IBC exist whereas transition rates are limited. Current findings would be valuable references but challenging for the Chinese-population specific natural history model, development.

  19. Does a parental history of cancer moderate the associations between impaired health status in parents and psychosocial problems in teenagers: a HUNT study.

    OpenAIRE

    Jeppesen, Elisabeth; Bjelland, Ingvar; Fosså, Sophie Dorothea; Loge, Jon Håvard; Sørebø, Øystein; Dahl, Alv A.

    2014-01-01

    Severe disease in a parent is associated with increased psychosocial problems in their children. However, moderating factors of such associations are less studied. In this cross-sectional population-based controlled study we examined the moderating effects of a history of parental cancer on the association between impaired health status in parents and psychosocial problems among their teenagers. Among families with both parents responding to the adult Health Survey of Nord-Trøndelag County of...

  20. [Placental complications after a previous cesarean section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosević, Jelena; Lilić, Vekoslav; Tasić, Marija; Radović-Janosević, Dragana; Stefanović, Milan; Antić, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complication development. The research was conducted at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Nis covering 10-year-period (from 1995 to 2005) with 32358 deliveries, 1280 deliveries after a previous cesarean section, 131 cases of placenta previa and 118 cases of placental abruption. The experimental groups was presented by the cases of placenta previa or placental abruption with prior cesarean section in obstetrics history, opposite to the control group having the same conditions but without a cesarean section in medical history. The incidence of placenta previa in the control group was 0.33%, opposite to the 1.86% incidence after one cesarean section (pcesarean sections and as high as 14.28% after three cesarean sections in obstetric history. Placental abruption was recorded as placental complication in 0.33% pregnancies in the control group, while its incidence was 1.02% after one cesarean section (pcesarean sections. The difference in the incidence of intrapartal hysterectomy between the group with prior cesarean section (0.86%) and without it (0.006%) shows a high statistical significance (pcesarean section is an important risk factor for the development of placental complications.

  1. History of Breast Cancer Increases 90-Day Pulmonary Embolism Rates and Reimbursements After Total Hip Arthroplasty: A National Matched-Pair Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Samuel; Marquez-Lara, Alejandro; Bracey, Daniel N; Kurowicki, Jennifer; Roche, Martin W; Emory, Cynthia L

    2018-03-01

    Rates of total hip arthroplasty (THA) are projected to increase in the coming decades. Multiple studies have focused on identifying risk factors for adverse events after joint arthroplasty, and recent attention has been directed toward cancer. Very limited data have been published examining the effects of history of malignancy on outcomes after THA. With a concomitant increase in breast cancer diagnosis and treatments in recent years, it is expected that orthopedic surgeons will likely see more breast cancer survivors in clinic. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a personal history of breast cancer on 90-day outcomes after THA. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of the entire Medicare records. The endpoints of this study included length of stay, medical complications, surgical complications, and costs (examined here as reimbursements). Patients were matched by age and gender in order to decrease confounding. A 1:1 matching was performed. After age and demographics matching, our findings demonstrated that patients with a history of breast cancer have increased rates of pulmonary embolism (0.59% vs 0.45%, P = .003), increased use of chest computed tomography (1.72% vs 1.18%, P < .001), and higher mean 90-day reimbursements (mean $15,432 vs mean $14,701, P = .011) in the 90 days following surgery. Other medical and surgical complications were equally distributed in both cohorts. Surgeons should be aware of the increased rate of pulmonary embolism and have a more aggressive thromboprophylaxis protocol in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical testing with a panel of 25 genes associated with increased cancer risk results in a significant increase in clinically significant findings across a broad range of cancer histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Eric T; Bernhisel, Ryan; Brown, Krystal; Kidd, John; Manley, Susan

    2017-12-01

    Genetic testing for inherited cancer risk is now widely used to target individuals for screening and prevention. However, there is limited evidence available to evaluate the clinical utility of various testing strategies, such as single-syndrome, single-cancer, or pan-cancer gene panels. Here we report on the outcomes of testing with a 25-gene pan-cancer panel in a consecutive series of 252,223 individuals between September 2013 and July 2016. The majority of individuals (92.8%) met testing criteria for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) and/or Lynch syndrome (LS). Overall, 17,340 PVs were identified in 17,000 (6.7%) of the tested individuals. The PV positive rate was 9.8% among individuals with a personal cancer history, compared to 4.7% in unaffected individuals. PVs were most common in BRCA1/2 (42.2%), other breast cancer (BR) genes (32.9%), and the LS genes (13.2%). Half the PVs identified among individuals who met only HBOC testing criteria were in genes other than BRCA1/2. Similarly, half of PVs identified in individuals who met only LS testing criteria were in non-LS genes. These findings suggest that genetic testing with a pan-cancer panel in this cohort provides improved clinical utility over traditional single-gene or single-syndrome testing. Copyright © 2017 Myriad Genetics, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An investigation of the biological basis of an interaction of abdominal fat distribution and family history of breast cancer. A nested study of sisters in the Iowa Women's Health Study (United States).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olso, J E; Anderson, K E; Cerhan, J R; Follsom, A R; Sellers, T A

    2000-12-01

    The present study examined whether levels of testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), or insulin levels might underlie an increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in women with both high waist-to-hip ratio and a family history of breast cancer disease that was noted earlier in the Iowa Women's Health Study. Participants for the current study were selected from 1922 sister groups (3978 women) in the Iowa Women's Health Study cohort. Two groups were included: (1) those with no family history of breast cancer and at least one sister with a high waist-to-hip ratio; or (2) those with a positive family history of breast cancer and at least one sister with a high waist-to-hip ratio. Testosterone, SHBG and insulin were measured by radioimmunoassay from 245 fasting blood samples. Familial correlations among members of 66 families were estimated at 0.32, 0.28 and 0.25 for serum insulin, free testosterone and SHBG; respectively. Fasting serum insulin was significantly higher in breast cancer family history negative women than in family history positive women, in direct opposition to our a priori hypothesis. No significant differences were observed in serum SHBG or free testosterone across family history categories. This study corroborates a genetic component to fasting serum insulin, free testosterone and SHBG levels. It seems unlikely that insulin, SHBG, or testosterone explain the interaction between waist-to-hip ratio and family history of breast cancer among participants in the Iowa Women's Health Study.

  4. GWAS follow-up study of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma identifies potential genetic loci associated with family history of upper gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xin; Li, Wen-Qing; Hu, Nan; Zhao, Xue Ke; Wang, Zhaoming; Hyland, Paula L; Jiang, Tao; Kong, Guo Qiang; Su, Hua; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Lemin; Sun, Li; Fan, Zong Min; Meng, Hui; Zhang, Tang Juan; Ji, Ling Fen; Hu, Shou Jia; Han, Wei Li; Wu, Min Jie; Zheng, Peng Yuan; Lv, Shuang; Li, Xue Min; Zhou, Fu You; Burdett, Laurie; Ding, Ti; Qiao, You-Lin; Fan, Jin-Hu; Han, Xiao-You; Giffen, Carol; Tucker, Margaret A; Dawsey, Sanford M; Freedman, Neal D; Chanock, Stephen J; Abnet, Christian C; Taylor, Philip R; Wang, Li-Dong; Goldstein, Alisa M

    2017-07-05

    Based on our initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) on esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in Han Chinese, we conducted a follow-up study to examine the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with family history (FH) of upper gastrointestinal cancer (UGI) cancer in cases with ESCC. We evaluated the association between SNPs and FH of UGI cancer among ESCC cases in a stage-1 case-only analysis of the National Cancer Institute (NCI, 541 cases with FH and 1399 without FH) and Henan GWAS (493 cases with FH and 869 without FH) data (discovery phase). The top SNPs (or their surrogates) from discovery were advanced to a stage-2 evaluation in additional Henan subjects (2801 cases with FH and 3136 without FH, replication phase). A total of 19 SNPs were associated with FH of UGI cancer in ESCC cases with P provide important insights into new low-penetrance susceptibility regions involved in the susceptibility of families with multiple UGI cancer cases.

  5. Adaptation and evaluation of the National Cancer Institute's Diet History Questionnaire and nutrient database for Canadian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csizmadi, Ilona; Kahle, Lisa; Ullman, Ruth; Dawe, Ursula; Zimmerman, Thea Palmer; Friedenreich, Christine M; Bryant, Heather; Subar, Amy F

    2007-01-01

    Despite assumed similarities in Canadian and US dietary habits, some differences in food availability and nutrient fortification exist. Food-frequency questionnaires designed for the USA may therefore not provide the most accurate estimates of dietary intake in Canadian populations. Hence, we undertook to evaluate and modify the National Cancer Institute's Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) and nutrient database. Of the foods queried on the DHQ, those most likely to differ in nutrient composition were identified. Where possible these foods were matched to comparable foods in the Canadian Nutrient File. Nutrient values were examined and modified to reflect the Canadian content of minerals (calcium, iron, zinc) and vitamins (A, C, D, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, B6, folate and B12). DHQs completed by 13 181 Alberta Cohort Study participants aged 35-69 years were analysed to estimate nutrient intakes using the original US and modified versions of the DHQ databases. Misclassification of intake for meeting the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) was determined following analysis with the US nutrient database. Twenty-five per cent of 2411 foods deemed most likely to differ in nutrient profile were subsequently modified for folate, 11% for vitamin D, 10% for calcium and riboflavin, and between 7 and 10% for the remaining nutrients of interest. Misclassification with respect to meeting the DRI varied but was highest for folate (7%) and vitamin A (7%) among men, and for vitamin D (7%) among women over 50 years of age. Errors in nutrient intake estimates owing to differences in food fortification between the USA and Canada can be reduced in Canadian populations by using nutrient databases that reflect Canadian fortification practices.

  6. Segregation, Jim Crow, Racism, Embodied History & the People’s Health: Implications for Cancer Registries, Research & Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Nancy Krieger is Professor of Social Epidemiology, in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Director of the HSPH Interdisciplinary Concentration on Women, Gender, and Health.  She is an internationally recognized social epidemiologist, with a background in biochemistry, philosophy of science, and the history of public health, combined with over 30 years of activism linking issues involving social justice, science, and health.  In 2004, she became an ISI highly cited scientist (reaffirmed: 2015 ISI update), a group comprising “less than one-half of one percent of all publishing researchers,” and in 2013 was the recipient of the Wade Hampton Frost Award from the Epidemiology Section of the American Public Health Association; in 2015, she was awarded the American Cancer Society Clinical Research Professorship. Dr. Krieger’s work addresses three topics: (1) conceptual frameworks to understand, analyze, and improve the people’s health, including the ecosocial theory of disease distribution she has been developing since 1994 and its focus on embodiment and equity; (2) etiologic research on societal determinants of population health and health inequities; and (3) methodologic research on improving monitoring of health inequities.  She is author of Epidemiology and The People’s Health: Theory and Context (Oxford University Press, 2011), editor of Embodying Inequality: Epidemiologic Perspectives (Baywood Press, 2004) and co-editor, with Glen Margo, of AIDS: The Politics of Survival (Baywood Publishers, 1994), and, with Elizabeth Fee, of Women’s Health, Politics, and Power:  Essays on Sex/Gender, Medicine, and Public Health (Baywood Publishers, 1994).  In 1994, she co-founded, and still chairs, the Spirit of 1848 Caucus of the American Public Health Association, which is concerned with the links between social justice and public health.  Dr. Krieger received her PhD in Epidemiology from the

  7. Investigation of single-strand conformational polymorphism of the TP53 gene in women with a family history of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Burbano

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer in families with germ line mutations in the TP53 gene has been described in the medical literature. Mutation screening for susceptibility genes should allow effective prophylactic and preventive measures. Using single-strand conformational polymorphism, we screened for mutations in exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 of gene TP53 in the peripheral blood of 8 young non-affected members (17 to 36 years old of families with a history of breast cancer. Studies of this type on young patients (mean age, 25 years are very rare in the literature. The identification of these mutations would contribute to genetic counseling of members of families with predisposition to breast cancer. The results obtained did not show any polymorphism indicating mutation. In our sample, the familial tumorigenesis is probably related to other gene etiologies.

  8. The value of surveillance mammography of the contralateral breast in patients with a history of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, W.L.; Schaapveld, M.; Jansen, L.; Bagherzadegan, E.; Sahinovic, M.M.; Baas, P.C.; Hanssen, L.M.H.C.; van der Mijle, H.C.J.; Brandenburg, J.D.; Wiggers, T.; de Bock, G.H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the contribution of surveillance mammography to the early detection of metachronous contralateral. breast cancer (MCBC) and to assess its impact on the survival of breast cancer patients with relation to compliance. Method: Breast cancer patients (5589) were identified using

  9. Stomach Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with stomach acid and helps digest protein. Stomach cancer mostly affects older people - two-thirds of people ... Smoke cigarettes Have a family history of stomach cancer It is hard to diagnose stomach cancer in ...

  10. Characterization of BRCA1/2 mutations in patients with family history of breast cancer in Armenia [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofi Atshemyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The germline mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are the most significant and well characterized genetic risk factors for hereditary breast cancer. Intensive research in the last decades has demonstrated that the incidence of mutations varies widely among different populations. In this study we attempted to perform a pilot study for identification and characterization of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes among Armenian patients with family history of breast cancer and their healthy relatives. Methods. We performed targeted exome sequencing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 6 patients and their healthy relatives. After alignment of short reads to the reference genome, germline single nucleotide variation and indel discovery was performed using GATK software. Functional implications of identified variants were assessed using ENSEMBL Variant Effect Predictor tool. Results. In total, 39 single nucleotide variations and 4 indels were identified, from which 15 SNPs and 3 indels were novel. No known pathogenic mutations were identified, but 2 SNPs causing missense amino acid mutations had significantly increased frequencies in the study group compared to the 1000 Genome populations. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate the importance of screening of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene variants in the Armenian population in order to identity specifics of mutation spectrum and frequencies and enable accurate risk assessment of hereditary breast cancers.

  11. Genome-Wide Somatic Copy Number Alterations in Low-Grade PanINs and IPMNs from Individuals with a Family History of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung-Mo; Vincent, Audrey; Kanda, Mitsuro; Leclerc, Julie; Omura, Noriyuki; Borges, Michael; Klein, Alison P.; Canto, Marcia Irene; Hruban, Ralph H.; Goggins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Characterizing the earliest chromosomal alterations of pancreatic precursor neoplasms from individuals with a familial aggregation of pancreatic cancer may provide clues as to the loci of pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes. Experimental Design We used Illumina 370/660K SNP arrays to conduct genome-wide copy number analysis in 60 benign neoplasms [58 mostly low-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanIN) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) and two pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET)] and matched normal tissues from 16 individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer. PanINs and IPMNs were analyzed for KRAS codon 12/13 mutations. Results Of 40 benign neoplasms with adequate SNP calls and allele ratios, somatic chromosomal copy number changes were identifiable in only nine lesions, including eight of the 38 PanIN/IPMNs (two of which had identical alterations) and one of the two PNETs. Only two precursor lesions had more than one somatic copy number alteration. In contrast, the overwhelming majority (~95%) of PanINs harbored KRAS mutations. The chromosomal alterations identified included nine chromosomal arms affected by chromosomal loss and two by chromosomal gain. Copy number loss spanning 9p21.3 was identified in three precursor lesions; two precursors had chromosomal losses affecting 6q and 17p. Conclusions Low- and intermediate-grade PanINs and IPMNs from patients with a family history of pancreatic cancer harbor few if any somatic chromosomal alterations. The absence of a locus of recurrent chromosomal loss in most low-grade pancreatic cancer precursor lesions supports the hypothesis that there is no one tumor suppressor gene locus consistently involved in initiating familial pancreatic neoplasia. PMID:22723370

  12. Cancer survivorship and opioid prescribing rates: A population-based matched cohort study among individuals with and without a history of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Rinku; Lokku, Armend; Barbera, Lisa

    2017-11-01

    Little is known about opioid prescribing among individuals who have survived cancer. Our aim is to examine a predominantly socio-economically disadvantaged population for differences in opioid prescribing rates among cancer survivors compared with matched controls without a prior diagnosis of cancer. This was a retrospective population-wide matched cohort study. Starting in 2010, individuals residing in Ontario, Canada, who were 18 to 64 years of age and at least 5 years past their cancer diagnosis were matched to controls without a prior cancer diagnosis based on sex and calendar year of birth. Follow-up was terminated at any indication of cancer recurrence, second malignancy, or new cancer diagnosis. To examine the association between survivorship and the rate of opioid prescriptions, an Andersen-Gill recurrent event regression model was implemented, adjusting for numerous individual-level characteristics and also accounting for the matched design. The rate of opioid prescribing was 1.22 times higher among survivors than among their corresponding matched controls (adjusted relative rate, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.11-1.34). Individuals from lower income quintiles who were younger, were from rural neighborhoods, and had more comorbidities had significantly higher prescribing rates. Sex was not associated with prescribing rates. This increased rate of opioid prescribing was also seen among survivors who were 10 or more years past their cancer diagnosis (compared with their controls). This study demonstrates substantially higher opioid prescribing rates among cancer survivors, even long after attaining survivorship. This raises concerns about the diagnosis and management of chronic pain problems among survivors stemming from their cancer diagnosis or treatment. Cancer 2017;123:4286-4293. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  13. Family history suggestive of an inherited susceptibility to breast cancer and treatment outcome in young women after breast-conserving therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabner, E.; Nixon, A.J.; Garber, J.; Gelman, R.; Bornstein, B.; Connolly, J.; Hetelekidis, S.; Recht, A.; Schnitt, S.; Silver, B.; Harris, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether outcome after conservative surgery and radiation therapy for young women is affected by having a family history (FH) suggestive of an inherited susceptibility to breast cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 1968 and 1986, 205 patients 36 years of age or younger at diagnosis were treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy for clinical stage I or II invasive breast cancer. Three patients were not evaluable for FH; the remainder constitute the study population. At the time of diagnosis, 34 patients (17%; 95% CI 12-29%) had a mother or sister who had breast cancer diagnosed before age 50 years or who had ovarian cancer (2 cases) and were recorded as having a positive FH. This definition was chosen for clinical utility and to maximize the probability of inherited breast cancer within this sub-group (average 40-50%). Without genetic testing, the possibility of misclassification exists in both groups. The median age at diagnosis of the 34 patients with a positive FH was 33 years and was the same as the median age of the 168 patients in whom the FH was negative. All but 2 patients (99%) had a potential follow-up time of at least 5 years; 173 patients (86%) had a potential follow-up time of at least 10 years. RESULTS: Distributions of tumor size, pathologic nodal involvement, histologic type, histologic grade, the presence of an extensive intraductal component or lymphatic vascular invasion, volume of tissue excised, and use of adjuvant chemotherapy did not differ significantly by FH. The distribution of the sites of first failure within the first 5 years of follow-up is shown. The overall pattern of failure was significantly different (p=0.03) between patients with a positive FH and those with a negative FH; however, there was no statistically significant difference (Fisher Exact Test) in percentage of patients with no evidence of disease or local failure. At 5 years follow-up, the development of an opposite breast cancer

  14. Diet History Questionnaire: Database Revision History

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following details all additions and revisions made to the DHQ nutrient and food database. This revision history is provided as a reference for investigators who may have performed analyses with a previous release of the database.

  15. Association between parent and child distress and the moderating effects of life events in families with and without a history of pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okado, Yuko; Long, Alanna M; Phipps, Sean

    2014-10-01

    Examined the associations between parental and child distress, and moderating effects of child exposure to life events, in families with and without a history of pediatric cancer.  Children with cancer and their parents (N = 255) and healthy comparison dyads (N = 142) completed self-report measures of depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress symptoms. Children reported on the total number of stressful life events they had experienced. Correlations between parental and child symptoms were examined. Moderating effects of child exposure to life events were tested using multiple regression.  Parent and child symptoms were significantly related only in the cancer group. Child exposure to life events attenuated this relationship. Moderation effects were significant at or below average levels of life stress.  The experience of childhood cancer may strengthen the link between parent and child psychological functioning. However, child exposure to other life events may weaken this link. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.