WorldWideScience

Sample records for previous acute migraine

  1. Safety and tolerability of frovatriptan in the acute treatment of migraine and prevention of menstrual migraine: Results of a new analysis of data from five previously published studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, E Anne; Pawsey, Stephen P; Campbell, John C; Hu, Xiaojun

    2010-04-01

    Triptans are a recommended first-line treatment for moderate to severe migraine. Using clinical trial data, we evaluated the safety and tolerability of frovatriptan as acute treatment (AT) and as short-term preventive (STP) therapy for menstrual migraine (MM). Data from 2 Phase III AT trials (AT1: randomized, placebo controlled, 1 attack; AT2: 12-months, noncomparative, open label) and 3 Phase IIIb STP trials in MM (MMP1 and MMP2: randomized, placebo controlled, double blind, 3 perimenstrual periods; MMP3: open label, noncomparative, 12 perimenstrual periods) were analyzed. In AT1, patients treated each attack with frovatriptan 2.5 mg, sumatriptan 100 mg, or placebo. In AT2, they used frovatriptan 2.5 mg. In MMP1 and MMP2, women administered frovatriptan 2.5 mg for 6 days during the perimenstrual period, taking a loading dose of 2 or 4 tablets on day 1, followed by once-daily or BID frovatriptan 2.5 mg, respectively; in MMP3, they used BID frovatriptan 2.5 mg. In AT1, which was previously published in part, group differences in adverse events (AEs) were analyzed using the Fisher exact test, and response rates were compared using logistic regression. Post hoc analyses of sustained pain-free status with no AEs (SNAE) and sustained pain response with no AEs (SPRNAE) were performed using a 2-sample test for equality of proportions without continuity correction. For AT2 and the STP studies, data were summarized using descriptive statistics. Results of individual safety analyses for the STP studies were previously reported; the present report includes new results from a pooled analysis of MMP1 and MMP2 and a new analysis of MMP3 in which AEs were coded using Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities version 8.0. AT1 included 1206 patients in the safety group; AT2 included 496. In the STP studies, safety data were collected for 1487 women. In AT1 and AT2, 85.6% and 88.3%, respectively, of enrolled patients were women. Overall, AEs were generally mild to moderate (AT

  2. Pizotifen relieves acute migraine symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S.M. Kamrul Huda

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To The Editor: Various pharmacological agents are used for the treatment of migraine. In the last five years, various drug companies in Bangladesh have been marketing pizotifen as a preventive treatment of all types of migraine. Pizotifen is a serotonin antagonist acting mainly at the 5-HT1, 5-HT2A and 5HT2C receptors. It also has some activity as an antihistamine (1. Pizotifen is a well-established preventative therapy of migraine. I would like to report my own experience in using pizotifen in treating the acute attacks of migraine. Pizotifen was prescribed as acute therapy in 11 patients, 6 females (4 had migraine without aura and 2 had migraine with aura and 5 males (all had migraine without aura. Three female and 5 male patients, who had migraine without aura, reported no beneficial effect of pizotifen as treatment for the acute attacks. Three female patients (two with migraine with aura and one with migraine without aura had their headache relieved by use of pizotifen as treatment for the acute attacks. This is an initial observation about the effectiveness of pizotifen as acute therapy in migraine. However, this could be simply a placebo affect. Nevertheless, it will be worth exploring the role of pizotifen as a therapeutic agent for acute attacks of migraine by conducting well-designed randomized, controlled studies.

  3. Acute treatment of migraine headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2010-04-01

    Optimum acute treatment of migraine requires prevention of headache as a top priority. Recognition of the multitude of migraine presentations, the frequency of total headache attacks, and number of days of headache disability are critical. Successful treatment requires excellent patient-clinician communication enhancing confidence and mutual trust based on patient needs and preferences. Optimum management of acute migraine nearly always requires pharmacologic treatment for rapid resolution. Migraine-specific triptans, dihydroergotamine, and several antiinflammatories have substantial empirical clinical efficacy. Older nonspecific drugs, particularly butalbital and opioids, contribute to medication overuse headache and are to be avoided. Clinicians should utilize evidence-based acute migraine-specific therapy stressing the imperative acute treatment goal of early intervention, but not too often with the correct drug, formulation, and dose. This therapy needs to provide cost-effective fast results, meaningful to the patient while minimizing the need for additional drugs. Migraine-ACT evaluates 2-hour pain freedom with return to normal function, comfort with treatment, and consistency of response. Employ a thoroughly educated patient, formulary, testimonials, stratification, and rational cotherapy against the race to central sensitization for optimum outcomes. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  4. Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... migraine without aura. Migraine with aura (previously called classical migraine). With a migraine with aura, a person ... take this time to read or listen to music, rather than deal with traffic. For stressors you ...

  5. Commonly Used Acute Migraine Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... migraine with aura face a higher risk of ischemic stroke — a stroke that occurs because of a clot ... with aura can take control of their elevated stroke risk. For young women with aura on birth control, Dr. Diener ...

  6. Long-term tolerability of telcagepant for acute treatment of migraine in a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connor, Kathryn M; Aurora, Sheena K; Loeys, Tom

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term tolerability of telcagepant for acute treatment of intermittent migraine attacks. Background.- Telcagepant is a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist being investigated for the acute treatment of migraine....

  7. Acute Confusional Migraine: Distinct Clinical Entity or Spectrum of Migraine Biology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashar M. Farooqi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this review is to explore the literature reports of acute confusional migraine (ACM including patient characteristics, migraine symptomatology, and proposed diagnostic criteria. A literature review was conducted using PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science using the terms “confusional migraine” and “confusional state in migraine”. All the relevant articles from 1970 to 2016 were included. A total of 120 patients were found in the literature. Most of the cases were seen in the pediatric population with a slight male predominance. Personal or family history of migraine was common. Most patients had a headache prior to the confusional state. In addition to confusion and agitation, some developed visual (32.5% and/or sensory symptoms (19% and/or speech problems (39% either prior to or during the confusional state. Data on treatment outcomes is lacking. Patients with most common forms of migraine report attention and cognitive disturbances but awareness remains intact as opposed to patients with ACM. ACM is a distinct entity and should be included as part of the appendix of International Classification of Headache Disoders-3 beta version (ICHD-3β criteria. Prospective studies are needed to further study this disorder and its association with other migraine forms.

  8. Effectiveness of Sumatriptan for Acute Treatment of Migraine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The triptans are currently the drugs of choice for acute treatment of migraine. Although there are several newer triptans, sumatriptan that was first introduced into clinical practice is still preferred to newer triptans by subjects in several clinical trials. Objective This study was conducted to determine the ...

  9. Acute migraine therapy: recent evidence from randomized comparative trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mett, A.; Tfelt-Hansen, P.

    2008-01-01

    (1) A wide array of data regarding acute migraine treatment are available, but few trials strictly adhere to International Headache Society guidelines for patient inclusion criteria. (2) Triptans appear to have similar efficacy profiles, but among newer triptans, almotriptan offers improved...

  10. Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the body Difficulty speaking Hearing noises or music Uncontrollable jerking or other movements Sometimes, a migraine ... genetics and environmental factors appear to play a role. Migraines may be caused by changes in the ...

  11. Migraines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or skipping meals may also trigger migraines. Hormone changes: Women may experience migraines related to their menstrual cycles, to menopause, or to using hormonal birth control or hormone replacement therapy. Stress: Stress ...

  12. The acute and preventative treatment of episodic migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Miller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Episodic migraine is a common debilitating condition with significant worldwide impact. An effective management plan must include acute treatment to relieve the pain and potential disability associated with the attacks and may also include preventative treatments with an aim of decreasing attack frequency and severity in the longer term. Acute treatments must be limited to a maximum of 2-3 days a week to prevent medication overuse headache and focus on simple analgesia, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and triptans. Preventative treatments are numerous and should be considered when migraine attacks are frequent and or disabling, acute medication is failing, in special circumstances such as hemiplegic migraines or if the patient requests them. All preventative medications must be given at therapeutic doses for at least 6-8 weeks before an adequate trial can be judged ineffective. The most important factor in choosing drugs is the patient and the clinical features of their attack and treatment should be tailored to these. Relative co-morbidities will influence drug choice, as will the side effect profile and the efficacy of the drug. First line preventative drugs include ß-blockers, amitriptyline and anti-epileptic drugs such as topiramate and valproate. Drugs with lower efficacy or poorer side effect profiles include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, calcium channel antagonists, gabapentin and herbal medicines.

  13. Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the hospital sometimes. Migraine headache is a risk factor for stroke. Risk is higher in people who smoke, more so ... not smoking, people with migraines should avoid other risk factors for stroke. These include: Taking birth control pills Eating unhealthy ...

  14. Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stress, anxiety, hormonal changes, bright or flashing lights, lack of food or sleep, and dietary substances. Migraine in some women may ... stress, anxiety, hormonal changes, bright or flashing lights, lack of food or sleep, and dietary substances. Migraine in some women may ...

  15. Acute Treatment Therapies for Pediatric Migraine: A Qualitative Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patniyot, Irene R; Gelfand, Amy A

    2016-01-01

    We sought to conduct a qualitative systematic review to evaluate the safety and efficacy of available treatments for pediatric patients with migraine or benign primary headache in the emergency department, in an effort to inform future practice. Scopus, Medline, and PubMed databases were searched for randomized controlled trials retrospective reviews, review articles, and case studies discussing migraine or benign primary headache management that were conducted in the emergency room or outpatient acute care setting in pediatric patients (less than 18-years old). Meeting abstracts and cited references within articles were also evaluated. Multiple variables were recorded, including type of treatment, study design, dosing, primary outcome, and side effects. Therapeutic gain was calculated in studies with a placebo arm. Treatments were subjectively assessed based on methodology and number of trials for a particular therapy. Thirty-one studies were included in the final analysis. Of these, 17 were randomized controlled trials, 9 were retrospective reviews, and 5 were prospective chart review studies. One pertained to IV fluids, 2 to nonspecific analgesic use, 5 to dopamine receptor antagonists, 2 to valproic acid, 1 to propofol, 1 to magnesium, 1 to bupivicaine, 13 to triptan medications, and 3 to dihydroergotamine (DHE). Treatments considered effective for acute migraine or benign primary headache in the analgesic category include ibuprofen, and to a lesser degree acetaminophen. Ketorolac was not compared to other NSAIDs, but was found to be less effective than prochlorperazine. Of the phenothiazines, prochlorperazine was considered most effective. Of the triptan medications, almotriptan, rizatriptan, zolmitriptan nasal spray, sumatriptan nasal spray, and combination sumatriptan/naproxen are effective agents for acute treatment. Treatments considered probably effective included IV fluids, chlorpromazine, valproate sodium, injectable sumatriptan, and IV DHE. Treatments

  16. Allodynia Is Associated With Initial and Sustained Response to Acute Migraine Treatment: Results from the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Richard B; Munjal, Sagar; Buse, Dawn C; Bennett, Alix; Fanning, Kristina M; Burstein, Rami; Reed, Michael L

    2017-07-01

    In a population sample of persons with migraine treating with a single category of acute migraine medication, to identify rates and factors associated with acute treatment outcomes, including 2-hour pain freedom (2hPF), 24-hour pain response (24hPR), and 24-hour sustained pain response (24hSPR). Key predictors include acute treatment type (triptans and other medication categories), the influence of allodynia on response to medication, and the interaction between medication category and presence of allodynia in response to treatment among people with migraine. Cutaneous allodynia was previously associated with inadequate 2hPF, 24hPR, and 24hSPR (sustained response at 24 hours among those with adequate 2hPF) among people with migraine in the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) Study. The AMPP Study obtained data from a representative US sample of persons with migraine by mailed questionnaire. The 2006 survey included 8233 people with migraine aged 18 or over who completed the Migraine Treatment Optimization Questionnaire (mTOQ). mTOQ was used to assess acute treatment outcomes including 2hPF, 24hPR, and 24hSPR. Eligible individuals used only a single category of acute prescription migraine treatments (n  =  5236, 63.6%). This sample was stratified into 5 categories of type of acute prescription headache medication used (triptans, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, barbiturate-combinations, opioids, and opioid combinations and ergot alkaloids). Separate binary logistic regression models evaluated: (1) triptans vs other medication types; (2) presence of allodynia vs no allodynia; and (3) the interaction of medication category with allodynia. Sociodemographic variables, health insurance status, over-the-counter and preventive medication use were included as covariates. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were generated for each acute treatment outcome. Among eligible participants, the mean age was 46 years, and 82.5% were women

  17. Menstrual migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Moschiano, Franca; Grazzi, Licia; D?Amico, Domenico; Schieroni, Ferdinando; Bussone, Gennaro

    2001-01-01

    An association between migraine and menstruation can be ascertained by use of a diary for a minimum of three cycles. The pathophysiological and clinical peculiarities of menstrual migraine indicate that its management should differ from that of non?menstrual migraine. NSAIDS or migraine-specific medications (e.g. triptans) are often effective for the acute management of menstrual migraine. Preventive treatment is indicated when the attacks are long?lasting, severe and disabling and do not res...

  18. Aberrant neuromagnetic activation in the motor cortex in children with acute migraine: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyao Guo

    Full Text Available Migraine attacks have been shown to interfere with normal function in the brain such as motor or sensory function. However, to date, there has been no clinical neurophysiology study focusing on the motor function in children with migraine during headache attacks. To investigate the motor function in children with migraine, twenty-six children with acute migraine, meeting International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria and age- and gender-matched healthy children were studied using a 275-channel magnetoencephalography system. A finger-tapping paradigm was designed to elicit neuromagnetic activation in the motor cortex. Children with migraine showed significantly prolonged latency of movement-evoked magnetic fields (MEF during finger movement compared with the controls. The correlation coefficient of MEF latency and age in children with migraine was significantly different from that in healthy controls. The spectral power of high gamma (65-150 Hz oscillations during finger movement in the primary motor cortex is also significantly higher in children with migraine than in controls. The alteration of responding latency and aberrant high gamma oscillations suggest that the developmental trajectory of motor function in children with migraine is impaired during migraine attacks and/or developmentally delayed. This finding indicates that childhood migraine may affect the development of brain function and result in long-term problems.

  19. Migraine Treatment: Current Acute Medications and Their Potential Mechanisms of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jonathan Jia Yuan; De Felice, Milena

    2017-12-12

    Migraine is a common and disabling primary headache disorder with a significant socioeconomic burden. The management of migraine is multifaceted and is generally dichotomized into acute and preventive strategies, with several treatment modalities. The aims of acute pharmacological treatment are to rapidly restore function with minimal recurrence, with the avoidance of side effects. The choice of pharmacological treatment is individualized, and is based on the consideration of the characteristics of the migraine attack, the patient's concomitant medical problems, and treatment preferences. Notwithstanding, a good understanding of the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of the various drug options is essential to guide therapy. The current approach and concepts relevant to the acute pharmacological treatment of migraine will be explored in this review.

  20. Caffeine discontinuation improves acute migraine treatment: a prospective clinic-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Ji; Choi, Hyun Ah; Choi, Hanna; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2016-12-01

    Caffeine has both excitatory and vasoconstrictive effects on central nervous system. Caffeine use might be associated with development and chronification of migraine. We aimed to evaluate the effect of caffeine cessation on the acute treatment of migraine. We prospectively recruited migraine patients who consumed caffeine drinks daily and instructed them to discontinue their caffeine intake. Triptans were prescribed for acute treatment. Patients were followed up after at least two weeks after screening and evaluated the efficacy of acute treatment with the migraine assessment of current therapy (Migraine-ACT) questionnaire. Excellent efficacy was defined as Migraine-ACT score of 4. Chronic migraine, body mass index, allodynia, depression, anxiety, antiemetic use, and use of prophylactic medication were included in the multivariate analysis if the univariate p caffeine intake (abstinence group). The efficacy of acute treatment was assessed at median 34.5 days (interquartile range, 28-89) after the screening. Twenty-six patients (72.2 %) in the abstinence group and 29 (40.3 %) in the non-abstinence group reported an excellent efficacy (p = 0.002). The abstinence group also showed a trend toward greater reduction of headache impact test-6 (HIT-6) scores (p = 0.085). Caffeine abstinence was independently associated with an excellent efficacy of acute treatment (multivariate odds ratio, 3.2; 95 % confidence interval, 1.2-8.4; p = 0.018) after controlling for covariates. Caffeine abstinence is associated with better efficacy of acute migraine treatment. Our uncontrolled study results encourage a further confirmatory study on this issue.

  1. Migrainous infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, K; Artto, V; Bendtsen, L

    2011-01-01

    Migrainous infarction (MI), i.e. an ischemic stroke developing during an attack of migraine with aura is rare and the knowledge of its clinical characteristics is limited. Previous case series using the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) included......Migrainous infarction (MI), i.e. an ischemic stroke developing during an attack of migraine with aura is rare and the knowledge of its clinical characteristics is limited. Previous case series using the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) included...

  2. NSAIDs in the Acute Treatment of Migraine: A Review of Clinical and Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpad Pardutz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a common disabling neurological disorder with a serious socio-economical burden. By blocking cyclooxygenase nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs decrease the synthesis of prostaglandins, which are involved in the pathophysiology of migraine headaches. Despite the introduction more than a decade ago of a new class of migraine-specific drugs with superior efficacy, the triptans, NSAIDs remain the most commonly used therapies for the migraine attack. This is in part due to their wide availability as over-the-counter drugs and their pharmaco-economic advantages, but also to a favorable efficacy/side effect profile at least in attacks of mild and moderate intensity. We summarize here both the experimental data showing that NSAIDs are able to influence several pathophysiological facets of the migraine headache and the clinical studies providing evidence for the therapeutic efficacy of various subclasses of NSAIDs in migraine therapy. Taken together these data indicate that there are several targets for NSAIDs in migraine pathophysiology and that on the spectrum of clinical potency acetaminophen is at the lower end while ibuprofen is among the most effective drugs. Acetaminophen and aspirin excluded, comparative trials between the other NSAIDs are missing. Since evidence-based criteria are scarce, the selection of an NSAID should take into account proof and degree of efficacy, rapid GI absorption, gastric ulcer risk and previous experience of each individual patient. If selected and prescribed wisely, NSAIDs are precious, safe and cost-efficient drugs for the treatment of migraine attacks.

  3. Altered Cortical Activation in Adolescents With Acute Migraine: A Magnetoencephalography Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jing; deGrauw, Xinyao; Korostenskaja, Milena; Korman, Abraham M.; O’Brien, Hope L.; Kabbouche, Marielle A.; Powers, Scott W.; Hershey, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    To quantitatively assess cortical dysfunction in pediatric migraine, 31 adolescents with acute migraine and age- and gender-matched controls were studied using a magnetoencephalography (MEG) system at a sampling rate of 6,000 Hz. Neuromagnetic brain activation was elicited by a finger-tapping task. The spectral and spatial signatures of magnetoencephalography data in 5 to 2,884 Hz were analyzed using Morlet wavelet and beamformers. Compared with controls, 31 migraine subjects during their headache attack phases (ictal) showed significantly prolonged latencies of neuromagnetic activation in 5 to 30 Hz, increased spectral power in 100 to 200 Hz, and a higher likelihood of neuromagnetic activation in the supplementary motor area, the occipital and ipsilateral sensorimotor cortices, in 2,200 to 2,800 Hz. Of the 31 migraine subjects, 16 migraine subjects during their headache-free phases (interictal) showed that there were no significant differences between interictal and control MEG data except that interictal spectral power in 100 to 200 Hz was significantly decreased. The results demonstrated that migraine subjects had significantly aberrant ictal brain activation, which can normalize interictally. The spread of abnormal ictal brain activation in both low- and high-frequency ranges triggered by movements may play a key role in the cascade of migraine attacks. Perspective This is the first study focusing on the spectral and spatial signatures of cortical dysfunction in adolescents with migraine using MEG signals in a frequency range of 5 to 2,884 Hz. This analyzing aberrant brain activation may be important for developing new therapeutic interventions for migraine in the future. PMID:23792072

  4. Diclofenac potassium powder for oral solution: a review of its use in patients with acute migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnock-Jones, Karly P

    2014-08-01

    Diclofenac potassium powder for oral solution (Voltfast(®), Catafast(®), Cambia(®); hereafter referred to as diclofenac potassium powder) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and is indicated for the acute treatment of migraine. This article reviews the pharmacological properties of diclofenac potassium powder and its efficacy and tolerability in patients with acute migraine. Diclofenac potassium powder was clinically efficacious and generally well tolerated in placebo-controlled trials in patients with this indication; it was more effective than diclofenac potassium tablets with regard to the primary endpoint of 2-h pain relief as well as in several important secondary endpoints, such as time to onset of analgesic action. The oral powder-for-solution formulation of diclofenac potassium is a useful option in the acute treatment of migraine with or without aura.

  5. Early clinical experience with subcutaneous GR43175 in acute migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, P; Brand, J; Dano, P

    1989-01-01

    In six European clinics 111 migraine patients were treated in a series of open dose-ranging studies with subcutaneous injections of 1 to 4 mg GR43175, a novel 5-HT 1-like receptor agonist. Response rates after 20-30 min were dose related and rose from 33% with 1 mg to 96% with 4 mg GR43175. Side ...

  6. Dihydroergotamine mesylate-loaded dissolving microneedle patch made of polyvinylpyrrolidone for management of acute migraine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Cetin; Joyce, Jessica C; Nguyen, Hiep X; Eangoor, Padmanabhan; Knaack, Jennifer S; Banga, Ajay K; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2017-12-28

    Migraine is a widespread neurological disease with negative effects on quality of life and productivity. Moderate to severe acute migraine attacks can be treated with dihydroergotamine mesylate (DHE), an ergot derivative that is especially effective in non-responders to triptan derivatives. To overcome limitations of current DHE formulations in subcutaneous injection and nasal spray such as pain, adverse side effects and poor bioavailability, a new approach is needed for DHE delivery enabling painless self-administration, quick onset of action, and high bioavailability. In this study, we developed a dissolving microneedle patch (MNP) made of polyvinylpyrrolidone, due to its high aqueous solubility and solubility enhancement properties, using a MNP design previously shown to be painless and simple to administer. DHE-loaded MNPs were shown to have a content uniformity of 108±9% with sufficient mechanical strength for insertion to pig skin ex vivo and dissolution within 2min. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies were carried out on hairless rats, and DHE plasma levels were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The area under curve (AUC) value after DHE delivery by MNP (1259±917ng/mL min) was not significantly different (p>0.05) as compared to subcutaneous injection, with a relative bioavailability of 97%. Also, appreciable plasma levels of DHE were seen within 5min for both delivery methods and t max value of MNPs (38±23min) showed no significant difference (p>0.05) compared to subcutaneous injection (24±13min). These results suggest that DHE-loaded MNPs have promise as an alternative DHE delivery method that can be painlessly self-administered with rapid onset and high bioavailability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Migraine aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charles, Andrew; Hansen, Jakob Møller

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The migraine aura is a dramatic spontaneous change in brain activity resulting in a variety of transient neurological symptoms. The purpose of this review is to address recent advances in the understanding of aura and its role in migraine. RECENT FINDINGS: The formal...... classification of migraine aura is becoming both broader and more detailed. Traditionally viewed as a primary event that triggers a migraine attack, studies regarding the timing of aura relative to other symptoms of migraine indicate that it may not in fact play a primary role in initiating an attack. Careful...... recording and analysis of visual aura symptoms provides new insight into the initiation and propagation of the underlying brain phenomenon, and the different regions of visual cortex that produce different visual perceptions. Migraine with aura may have different responses to acute and preventive therapies...

  8. Acute migraine in the Emergency Department: extending European principles of management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelletti, Paolo; Farinelli, Ivano; Steiner, Timothy J

    2008-10-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) placed migraine 19th among all causes of disability (12th in women) measured in years of healthy life lost to disability (YLD). The importance of headache disorders, particularly of the primary forms, is established by their distribution worldwide, their duration (the majority being life-long conditions) and their imposition of both disability and life-style restrictions among large numbers of people. For these reasons, headache disorders should represent a public-health priority. In the Emergency Department (ED), as elsewhere, migraine is often under-diagnosed-and under-treated when it is diagnosed. The result is likely to be failure of treatment. Particular attention to diagnosis is needed in ED patients with acute headache, since there is a higher probability of secondary headache due to underlying pathologies. According to European principles of management, acute migraine treatment generally is stepwise. Of the two main steps, the first relies on symptomatic medication, preferably NSAIDs with or without antiemetics. The second step uses specific therapies, usually triptans. Modifications to routine practice are appropriate in the ED. Parenteral administration of symptomatic therapies is a preferred first choice, whilst immediate resort to triptans may be appropriate, and achieve better outcomes, in patients with severe headache and diagnostic confirmation of migraine.

  9. Adding Additional Acute Medications to a Triptan Regimen for Migraine and Observed Changes in Headache-Related Disability: Results From the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Dawn C; Serrano, Daniel; Reed, Michael L; Kori, Shashi H; Cunanan, Cedric M; Adams, Aubrey Manack; Lipton, Richard B

    2015-06-01

    Though triptans are the most widely used acute treatments for migraine, response to treatment is sometimes suboptimal. Triptan therapy is often augmented by the addition of other acute treatments. The benefits of this practice have not been examined in large-scale, real-world observational studies. To assess changes in headache-related disability associated with adding additional acute treatments to a triptan regimen by category of added treatment including: a second triptan, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), opioids or barbiturates. Subjects were participants in the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention study, a longitudinal, US population-based study of individuals with "severe" headache. Respondents who met International Classification of Headache Disorders 3 beta criteria for migraine were on triptan therapy per respondent self-report, used the same triptan, and provided headache-related disability data for at least 2 consecutive years. Subjects were divided based on headache days per month into 3 groups: low-frequency episodic migraine (LFEM, 0-4), moderate-frequency episodic migraine (MFEM, 5-9), and high-frequency episodic migraine/chronic migraine (HFEM/CM, ≥ 10 headache days per month). HFEM and CM were combined into a single group for analyses because of sample size limitations. Patterns of acute treatment for migraine were monitored from one year to the next over the following couplets of years (2005-2006, 2006-2007, 2007-2008, and 2008-2009). The first eligible couplet was analyzed for each respondent. Medication regimens studied included: (1) maintaining current triptan use (consistent group); (2) adding a different triptan; (3) adding an NSAID; or (4) adding a combination analgesic containing opioids or barbiturates. We assessed change in Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) score from the first to the second year of a couplet, contrasting scores of participants with consistent use with those who added an acute treatment to

  10. Greater occipital nerve block for the acute treatment of prolonged or persistent migraine aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, María L; Aledo-Serrano, Ángel; López-Ruiz, Pedro; Gutiérrez-Viedma, Álvaro; Fernández, Cristina; Orviz, Aida; Arias, José A

    2017-07-01

    Background Presently, there is no evidence to guide the acute treatment of migraine aura. We aimed to describe the effect of greater occipital nerve (GON) anaesthetic block as a symptomatic treatment for long-lasting (prolonged or persistent) migraine aura. Methods Patients who presented with migraine aura lasting > 2 hours were consecutively recruited during one year at the Headache Unit and the Emergency Department of a tertiary hospital. All patients underwent a bilateral GON block with bupivacaine 0.5%. Patients were followed up for 24 hours. Results A total of 22 auras were treated in 18 patients. Auras consisted of visual ( n = 13), visual and sensory ( n = 4) or sensory symptoms alone ( n = 5). Eleven episodes met diagnostic criteria for persistent aura (>1 week) without infarction. The response was complete without early recurrence in 11 cases (50%), complete with recurrence in auras lasting auras (72.7% vs. 27.3%; p = 0.033). Conclusions GON block could be an effective symptomatic treatment for prolonged or persistent migraine aura. Randomised controlled trials are still required to confirm these results.

  11. Resting-state fMRI study of acute migraine treatment with kinetic oscillation stimulation in nasal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tie-Qiang Li

    2016-01-01

    The result of this study confirms the efficacy of KOS treatment for relieving acute migraine symptoms and reducing attack frequency. Resting-state fMRI measurements demonstrate that migraine is associated with aberrant intrinsic functional activity in the limbic and primary sensory systems. KOS in the nasal cavity gives rise to the adjustment of the intrinsic functional activity in the limbic and primary sensory networks and restores the physiological homeostasis in the autonomic nervous system.

  12. Acute Intravenous Calcium Antagonist for Suspected Hemiplegic Migraine – A Case Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Lützhøft Rath

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke mimics, like attacks of hemiplegic migraine, are challenging in acute stroke evaluation. We present a 28-year-old woman with a suspected hemiplegic migraine attack with left-sided hemiparalysis. Brain CT with perfusion imaging 1 h 54 min after symptom onset revealed hypoperfusion in the right hemisphere. The patient was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA with no effect. After a subsequent intravenous verapamil infusion, the patient gained full motor function within 10 min. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI performed 5 h 46 min after symptom onset revealed diffusion restriction in the same area as the hypoperfusion on CT. There were no notable changes on T2 images. The patient stayed clinically in remission, except for reduced sensation for all modalities on the extremities on the left side. Although brain CT 24 h after symptom onset revealed an edema in the same area, an MRI performed 17 days later showed no new infarctions. Young patients with a history of migraine with aura admitted with symptoms of acute ischemic stroke are at risk of insufficient treatment. Calcium antagonists might be considered if there is no effect of first-line treatment with rtPA.

  13. Acute Intravenous Calcium Antagonist for Suspected Hemiplegic Migraine - A Case Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Charlotte Lützhøft; He, Jun; Nordling, Mette Maria; Wienecke, Troels

    2017-01-01

    Stroke mimics, like attacks of hemiplegic migraine, are challenging in acute stroke evaluation. We present a 28-year-old woman with a suspected hemiplegic migraine attack with left-sided hemiparalysis. Brain CT with perfusion imaging 1 h 54 min after symptom onset revealed hypoperfusion in the right hemisphere. The patient was treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) with no effect. After a subsequent intravenous verapamil infusion, the patient gained full motor function within 10 min. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 5 h 46 min after symptom onset revealed diffusion restriction in the same area as the hypoperfusion on CT. There were no notable changes on T2 images. The patient stayed clinically in remission, except for reduced sensation for all modalities on the extremities on the left side. Although brain CT 24 h after symptom onset revealed an edema in the same area, an MRI performed 17 days later showed no new infarctions. Young patients with a history of migraine with aura admitted with symptoms of acute ischemic stroke are at risk of insufficient treatment. Calcium antagonists might be considered if there is no effect of first-line treatment with rtPA.

  14. The efficacy and tolerability of frovatriptan and dexketoprofen for the treatment of acute migraine attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allais, Gianni; Rolando, Sara; De Lorenzo, Cristina; Benedetto, Chiara

    2014-08-01

    Frovatriptan is a triptan characterized by a high affinity for 5-HT1B/1D receptors and a long half-life contributing to a more sustained and prolonged action than other triptans. Dexketoprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with a relatively short half-life and rapid onset of action, blocking the action of cyclo-oxygenase, which is involved in prostaglandins' production, thus reducing inflammation and pain. Both drugs have been successfully employed as monotherapies for the treatment of acute migraine attacks. The combination of these two drugs (frovatriptan 2.5 mg plus dexketoprofen 25 or 37.5 mg) has been tested in migraine sufferers, showing a rapid and good initial efficacy, with 2-h pain free rates of 51%, and a high persistence in the 48-h following the onset of pain: recurrence occurred in only 29% of attacks and sustained pain free rates were 43% at 24- and 33% at 48-h.

  15. Intravenous paracetamol versus dexketoprofen in acute migraine attack in the emergency department: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkcuer, Ibrahim; Serinken, Mustafa; Eken, Cenker; Yilmaz, Atakan; Akdag, Ömer; Uyan, Emrah; Kiray, Cihan; Elicabuk, Hayri

    2014-03-01

    Migraine is a common form of headache that is a major burden for patients who often seek emergency care. The goal of this study was to compare the effectiveness of intravenous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication (dexketoprofen) with paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the treatment of an acute migraine attack. This prospective, randomised, double blind, controlled study was conducted in a tertiary care emergency unit. Study patients were randomised into two groups to receive either 50 mg of dexketoprofen trometamol or 1000 mg of paracetamol intravenously by rapid infusion in 150 mL of normal saline. Pain reduction was measured at baseline, and after 15 and 30 min, using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS)) as the primary outcome. VAS is a measurement tool ranging from 0 (no pain) to 100 mm (worst pain). 200 patients were included in the final analysis. Mean (SD) age of the study subjects was 30.1 ± 11 years and 81% (n=162) were women. Median reduction in VAS score at 30 min was 56 (IQR 30-78.5) for the paracetamol group and 55 (IQR 34-75) for the dexketoprofen group, with a difference of 1 mm (95% CI -7 to 10) between the two groups. Intravenous paracetamol and dexketoprofen appear to produce equivalent pain relief for migraine in the emergency department. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV NO: NCT01730326.

  16. Diphenhydramine as adjuvant therapy for acute migraine. An ED-based randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Benjamin W; Cabral, Lisa; Adewunmi, Victoria; Solorzano, Clemencia; Esses, David; Bijur, Polly E; Gallagher, E John

    2015-01-01

    Background More than one million patients present to US emergency departments (ED) annually seeking care for acute migraine. Parenteral anti-histamines have long been used in combination with anti-dopaminergics such as metoclopramide to treat acute migraine in the ED. High quality data supporting this practice do not exist. We determined whether administration of diphenhydramine 50mg IV + metoclopramide 10mg IV resulted in greater rates of sustained headache relief than placebo+ metoclopramide 10mg IV. Methods This was a randomized, double-blind clinical trial comparing two active treatments for acute migraine in an ED. Eligible patients were adults younger than 65 years presenting with an acute moderate or severe headache meeting International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 migraine criteria. Patients were stratified based on presence or absence of allergic symptoms. The primary outcome was sustained headache relief, defined as achieving a headache level of mild or none within two hours of medication administration, and maintaining this level of relief without use of any additional headache medication for 48 hours. Secondary efficacy outcomes include mean improvement on a 0 to 10 verbal scale between baseline and one hour, the frequency with which subjects indicated they would want the same medication the next time they present to the ED with migraine, and the ED throughput time. Sample size calculation using a 2-sided alpha of 0.05, a beta of 0.20 and a 15% difference between study arms determined the need for 374 patients. An interim analysis was conducted when data were available for 200 subjects. Results 420 patients were approached for participation. 208 eligible patients consented to participate and were randomized. At the planned interim analysis, the data safety monitoring committee recommended that the study be halted for futility. Baseline characteristics were comparable between the groups. 14% (29/208) of the sample reported allergic symptoms

  17. Metoclopramide for acute migraine: a dose-finding randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Benjamin W.; Mulvey, Laura; Esses, David; Solorzano, Clemencia; Paternoster, Joseph; Lipton, Richard B.; Gallagher, E. John

    2012-01-01

    Background Intravenous metoclopramide is effective as primary therapy for acute migraine but the optimal dose of this medication is not yet known. Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, dose finding study conducted on patients who presented to our emergency department (ED) meeting International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria for migraine without aura. We randomized patients to 10mg, 20mg, or 40mg of intravenous metoclopramide. We co-administered diphenhydramine to all patients to prevent extra-pyramidal side effects. The primary outcome was improvement in pain on an 11 point Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) at one hour. Secondary outcomes included sustained pain freedom at 48 hours and adverse effects. Results In this study, 356 patients were randomized. Baseline demographics and headache features were comparable among the groups. At one hour, those who received 10mg improved by a mean of 4.7 NRS points (95%CI: 4.2, 5.2); those who received 20mg improved by 4.9 (95%CI: 4.4, 5.4), and those who received 40mg improved by 5.3(95%CI: 4.8, 5.9). Rates of 48 hour sustained pain freedom in the 10, 20, and 40mg groups were: 16% (95%CI:10,24%), 20% (95%CI:14,28%), and 21% (95%CI:15,29%), respectively. The most commonly occurring adverse event was drowsiness, which impaired function in 17% (95%CI: 13,21%) of the overall study population. Akathisia developed in 33 patients. Both drowsiness and akathisia were evenly distributed across the 3 arms of the study. One month later, no patient had developed tardive dyskinesia. Conclusions 20mg or 40mg of metoclopramide are no better for acute migraine than 10mg of metoclopramide. PMID:21227540

  18. A review of the pharmacoeconomics of eletriptan for the acute treatment of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhambri R

    2015-01-01

    market is now dominated by generics, eletriptan 40 mg is among the most clinically and cost-effective oral triptans available for the management of acute migraine. Increased effectiveness/efficacy of eletriptan may necessitate a lesser need for other migraine treatments and/or switching to other triptans.Keywords: oral triptans, cost-effectiveness, literature search

  19. Diclofenac with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Sheena; Rabbie, Roy; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers choose not to, or are unable to, seek professional help and rely on over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics. Diclofenac is an established analgesic, and new formulations using the potassium or epolamine salts, which can be dissolved in water, have been developed for rapid absorption, which may be beneficial in acute migraine. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce the nausea and vomiting commonly associated with migraine. Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of diclofenac, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine headaches in adults. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Oxford Pain Relief Database, ClinicalTrials.gov, and reference lists for studies through 27 September 2011. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- and/or active-controlled studies using self administered diclofenac to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used numbers of participants achieving each outcome to calculate relative risk (or ‘risk ratio’) and numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or a different active treatment. Main results Five studies (1356 participants) compared oral diclofenac with placebo, and one also compared it with sumatriptan; none combined diclofenac with a self administered antiemetic. Four studies treated attacks with single doses of medication, and two allowed an optional second dose for inadequate response. Only two studies, with three active treatment arms, provided data for pooled analysis of primary outcomes. For single doses of diclofenac

  20. Pharmacological migraine provocation: a human model of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Messoud; Hansen, Jakob Møller

    2010-01-01

    for migraine mechanisms. So far, however, animal models cannot predict the efficacy of new therapies for migraine. Because migraine attacks are fully reversible and can be aborted by therapy, the headache- or migraine-provoking property of naturally occurring signaling molecules can be tested in a human model....... If a naturally occurring substance can provoke migraine in human patients, then it is likely, although not certain, that blocking its effect will be effective in the treatment of acute migraine attacks. To this end, a human in vivo model of experimental headache and migraine in humans has been developed...

  1. Clinical Pharmacology of Current and Future Drugs for the Acute Treatment of Migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    Migraine is a common disorder with a female prevalence of 17% and a male prevalence of 9%. Migraine is most often disabling and the patients need treatment of the attacks. The introduction of triptans has been a revolution for many migraine patients but only a minority of patients use these speci...

  2. Drugs targeting 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors in acute treatments of migraine attacks. A review of new drugs and new administration forms of established drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Pihl, Thomas Peter Boye; Hougaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The development of sumatriptan, more than 20 years ago, added substantially to the characterization of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors and their relevance to acute migraine therapy. Recently, 5-HT1F receptor agonists, with no vascular effects, have shown efficacy in the treatme...... in a low incidence of recurrence. None of these reviewed treatments are likely to fulfill patients' expectations, and the advancement of acute migraine drugs should likely depend on different mechanisms from current 5-HT-related drugs....

  3. The role of triptans in the management of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiyanti

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is one of the most prevalent disorders seen in clinical practice today and also a major cause of disability in the workplace. The prevalence of migraine is highest during the years of peak productivity, ie, between the ages of 25 and 55 years. The triptans are a group of selective 5-hydroxtriptamine (HT1 serotonin receptor agonists that activate the 5-HT1B/1D receptor and possibly also the 5-HT1A dan 5-HT1F receptors. To date 7 subclasses of serotonin receptors have been identified, namely subclasses 5-HT1 to 5-HT7. Triptan causes cranial vasoconstriction, inhibits peripheral trigeminal activity and the trigeminal afferents. With its triple action, triptans can control acute attacks of migraine. Triptan is contraindicated in patients with previous ischemic or coronary artery disease, cerebral or peripheral vascular disease and other cardiovascular disorders. Triptans should be given immediately after an acute attack of migraine. The triptans are useful in the management of an acute migraine, but are not indicated for preventive therapy of migraine. Several new advances in migraine management have been made in regard to the recognition of the disease, the pathogenesis of migraine, and the phenomenon of central sensitization. More treatment options become available to patients and prescribers, the impact of such therapy on worker productivity will become more important in determining the value of such interventions.

  4. Pharmacological migraine provocation: a human model of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Messoud; Hansen, Jakob Møller

    2010-01-01

    . If a naturally occurring substance can provoke migraine in human patients, then it is likely, although not certain, that blocking its effect will be effective in the treatment of acute migraine attacks. To this end, a human in vivo model of experimental headache and migraine in humans has been developed...

  5. Clinical Pharmacology of Current and Future Drugs for the Acute Treatment of Migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    Migraine is a common disorder with a female prevalence of 17% and a male prevalence of 9%. Migraine is most often disabling and the patients need treatment of the attacks. The introduction of triptans has been a revolution for many migraine patients but only a minority of patients use these speci...... with no more adverse events than placebo, but only one quarter of migraine patients have been pain-free after 2 hours in phase III studies. The development of current CGRP antagonists has been stopped....

  6. Oral contraceptives, pregnancy and the risk of cerebral thromboembolism: the influence of diabetes, hypertension, migraine and previous thrombotic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, O

    1995-01-01

    -matched, randomly selected controls. RESPONSE: Of the 692 case and 1584 control questionnaires sent out, 590 (85.1%) and 1396 (88.1%), respectively, were returned. Of the 590 cases, nine had had cerebral thrombosis before 1980, 15 refused to participate, 44 had a revised diagnosis (primarily multiple sclerosis......) and 25 had an unreliable diagnosis, leaving 497 with a reliable cerebral thromboembolic diagnosis. Among the 1396 controls, 26 either refused to participate, were mentally handicapped, lived abroad or returned an uncompleted questionnaire, leaving 1370 controls included in the study. RESULTS: After...... thromboembolism whereas diabetes, hypertension, migraine and past thromboembolic events increased the risk of cerebral thromboembolism significantly. Women with these increased thrombotic risks should use oestrogen-containing oral contraceptives only after careful considerations of the risks, if at all....

  7. Menstrual migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Simić Svetlana; Slankamenac Petar; Cvijanović Milan; Banić-Horvat Sofija; Jovin Zita; Ilin Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. The prevalence of migraine in childhood and adolescence has not changed to a great extent, but it increases in adolescence, especially in female adolescents. Menstrual migraine – definition. There are two types of menstrual migraine: true menstrual migraine and menstrual related migraine. True menstrual migraine occurs predominantly around menstruation, whereas menstrual related migraine occurs during menstruation, but also at other times during the month. Causes. Exaggerated or...

  8. [Cerebrovascular accidents and migraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaigne, P; Brunet, P; Pierrot-Deseilligny, C; Roullet, E

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-three clinical cases are reported, illustrating the difficulties of diagnosing migrainous focal cerebrovascular accidents. Cases of constituted cerebral infarcts and transient cerebral ischemia occurring during the cephalalgic phase, without headache and in patients with no previous history of typical migrainous attacks are described. Migraine may be considered to be the cause on convincing clinical criteria, but the diagnosis can only be established after negative results of investigations to exclude other causes of focal cerebral ischemia.

  9. Direct and Indirect Healthcare Resource Utilization and Costs Among Migraine Patients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafede, Machaon; Sapra, Sandhya; Shah, Neel; Tepper, Stewart; Cappell, Katherine; Desai, Pooja

    2018-02-15

    The goal of this analysis was to provide a contemporary estimate of the burden of migraine, incorporating both direct and indirect costs, by comparing the costs of migraine patients to a matched group of patients without migraine in a large, nationally representative sample of commercially insured patients in the United States. Previous studies have shown that the economic burden of migraine in the United States is substantial for payers, patients, and employers. Despite the availability of multiple acute and preventive pharmacological treatment options and a relatively stable migraine prevalence in the United States, there has been a documented increase in migraine-related healthcare resource and pharmacy use. Given the frequently disabling nature of migraine and its high prevalence, especially during peak productive years, and the lack of recent estimates of the burden of migraine, there is a need to update the existing literature with more current data. This retrospective, observational cohort study identified migraine patients in the Truven Health Market Scan Research Databases between January 2008 and June 2013. Adult patients had 12 months of continuous enrollment before (baseline period) and after (follow-up period) the day they received migraine diagnoses and/or medications (index) and no diagnosis of HIV or malignancy during the study period. The patients with migraine were matched 1:1 to a group of patients without migraine on demographic variables and index date. Direct healthcare utilization and costs and indirect (absenteeism, short-term disability, and long-term disability) costs were assessed during the 12-month follow-up period and differences between patients with vs without migraine were assessed. Two additional multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted. First, an analysis was conducted comparing the odds of having a short-term disability claim between patients with and without migraine after controlling for patient demographic and

  10. [Migraine with psychiatric co-morbidity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radat, F

    2005-07-01

    Investigation of migraine co-morbidity has confirmed a strong association between depression, anxiety disorders (particularly panic and phobia) and migraine. However, research into the possible mechanisms underlying these associations remains limited. The literature also indicates that migrainers are at reduced risk of suffering from anxiety, mood disorders and substance-related disorders compared with medication overuse headache sufferers. Patients suffering from medication overuse headache sometimes exhibit addictive behavior for acute migraine drugs. Finally, migrainers show increased non-specific neurotic suffering.

  11. Sumatriptan-naproxen fixed combination for acute treatment of migraine: a critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaouki K Khoury

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chaouki K Khoury, James R CouchDepartment of Neurology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USAAbstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, including naproxen and naproxen sodium, are effective yet nonspecific analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs, which work for a variety of pain and inflammatory syndromes, including migraine. In migraine, their analgesic effect helps relieve the headache, while their anti-inflammatory effect decreases the neurogenic inflammation in the trigeminal ganglion. This is the hypothesized mechanism by which they prevent the development of central sensitization. Triptans, including sumatriptan, work early in the migraine process at the trigeminovascular unit as agonists of the serotonin receptors (5-HT receptors 1B and 1D. They block vasoconstriction and block transmission of signals to the trigeminal nucleus and thus prevent peripheral sensitization. Therefore, combining these two drugs is an attractive modality for the abortive treatment of migraine. Sumatriptan–naproxen fixed combination tablet (Treximet® [sumatriptan–naproxen] proves to be an effective and well tolerated drug that combines these two mechanisms; yet is far from being the ultimate in migraine abortive therapy, and further research remains essential.Keywords: Treximet®, sumatriptan–naproxen, migraine, treatment

  12. Animal Migraine Models for Drug Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Olesen, Jes

    2013-01-01

    responses are likely to be behavioral, allowing multiple experiments in each individual animal. Distinction is made between acute and prophylactic models and how to validate each of them. Modern insight into neurobiological mechanisms of migraine is so good that it is only a question of resources...... for headache has almost come to a standstill partly because of a lack of valid animal models. Here we review previous models with emphasis on optimal characteristics of a future model. In addition to selection of animal species, the method of induction of migraine-like changes and the method of recording...

  13. Pharmacological migraine provocation: a human model of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Messoud; Hansen, Jakob Møller

    2010-01-01

    for migraine mechanisms. So far, however, animal models cannot predict the efficacy of new therapies for migraine. Because migraine attacks are fully reversible and can be aborted by therapy, the headache- or migraine-provoking property of naturally occurring signaling molecules can be tested in a human model......In vitro studies have contributed to the characterization of receptors in cranial blood vessels and the identification of possible new antimigraine agents. Animal models enable the study of vascular responses, neurogenic inflammation, and peptide release, and thus have provided leads in the search....... If a naturally occurring substance can provoke migraine in human patients, then it is likely, although not certain, that blocking its effect will be effective in the treatment of acute migraine attacks. To this end, a human in vivo model of experimental headache and migraine in humans has been developed...

  14. SAFETY IN THE ACUTE MANAGEMENT OF MIGRAINE DURING PREGNANCY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW Seguridad en el tratamiento de la migraña aguda durante el embarazo: una revisiÓn sistemática

    OpenAIRE

    Paola Andrea Ortiz Salas; Carlos Eduardo PinzÓn FlÓrez; ángela María Gutiérrez; Fidel Ernesto Sobrino Mejía

    2009-01-01

    Background. Migraine is three times more frequent in females than males and is modulated by changes in ovarian hormones throughout different stages of a female’s life; migraine thus begins with the onset of menstruation, improves during the second and third trimester of pregnancy and a remission may sometimes be brought about during menopause. Objetive.Evaluating the safety of acute management of migraine during pregnancy. Materials and methods. A systematic review was made of the literature ...

  15. Placebo effect in the acute treatment of migraine: subcutaneous placebos are better than oral placebos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Craen, A. J.; Tijssen, J. G.; de Gans, J.; Kleijnen, J.

    2000-01-01

    We carried out a meta-analysis of 22 trials to determine the comparative placebo effect of (a) subcutaneous vs. oral and (b) in-hospital vs. at-home administration in the treatment of migraine. The headache relief rates were combined from the placebo arms of these randomised clinical trials

  16. Altered cognition-related brain activity and interactions with acute pain in migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vani A. Mathur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the effect of migraine on neural cognitive networks. However, cognitive dysfunction is increasingly being recognized as a comorbidity of chronic pain. Pain appears to affect cognitive ability and the function of cognitive networks over time, and decrements in cognitive function can exacerbate affective and sensory components of pain. We investigated differences in cognitive processing and pain–cognition interactions between 14 migraine patients and 14 matched healthy controls using an fMRI block-design with two levels of task difficulty and concurrent heat (painful and not painful stimuli. Across groups, cognitive networks were recruited in response to a difficult cognitive task, and a pain–task interaction was found in the right (contralateral to pain stimulus posterior insula (pINS, such that activity was modulated by decreasing the thermal pain stimulus or by engaging the difficult cognitive task. Migraine patients had less task-related deactivation within the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and left dorsal anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC compared to controls. These regions have been reported to have decreased cortical thickness and cognitive-related deactivation within other pain populations, and are also associated with pain regulation, suggesting that the current findings may reflect altered cognitive function and top-down regulation of pain. During pain conditions, patients had decreased task-related activity, but more widespread task-related reductions in pain-related activity, compared to controls, suggesting cognitive resources may be diverted from task-related to pain-reduction-related processes in migraine. Overall, these findings suggest that migraine is associated with altered cognitive-related neural activity, which may reflect altered pain regulatory processes as well as broader functional restructuring.

  17. Vestibular migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lempert, Thomas; Olesen, Jes; Furman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine, jointly formulated by the Committee for Classification of Vestibular Disorders of the Bárány Society and the Migraine Classification Subcommittee of the International Headache Society (IHS). The classification includes vestibular...... migraine and probable vestibular migraine. Vestibular migraine will appear in an appendix of the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) as a first step for new entities, in accordance with the usual IHS procedures. Probable vestibular migraine may be included...

  18. Auditory hallucinations associated with migraine: Case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eli E; Grosberg, Brian M; Crystal, Sara C; Robbins, Matthew S

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this review is to describe auditory hallucinations (paracusias) associated with migraine attacks to yield insights into their clinical significance and pathogenesis. Isolated observations have documented rare associations of migraine with auditory hallucinations. Unlike visual, somatosensory, language, motor, and brainstem symptoms, paracusias with acute headache attacks are not a recognized aura symptom by the International Headache Society, and no systematic review has addressed this association. We retrospectively studied patients experiencing paracusias associated with migraine at our center and in the literature. We encountered 12 patients (our center = 5, literature = 7), 58% were female, and 75% had typical migraine aura. Hallucinations most commonly featured voices (58%), 75% experienced them during headache, and the duration was most often <1 hour (67%). No patients described visual aura evolving to paracusias. Most patients (50%) had either a current or previous psychiatric disorder, most commonly depression (67%). The course of headache and paracusias were universally congruent, including improvement with headache prophylaxis (58%). Paracusias uncommonly co-occur with migraine and usually feature human voices. Their timing and high prevalence in patients with depression may suggest that paracusias are not necessarily a form of migraine aura, though could be a migraine trait symptom. Alternative mechanisms include perfusion changes in primary auditory cortex, serotonin-related ictal perceptual changes, or a release phenomenon in the setting of phonophobia with avoidance of a noisy environment. © International Headache Society 2014.

  19. Menstrual Migraine

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-01-01

    The association between migraine and menstruation was determined using diary data from 155 women of median age 44 years (range, 15 to 58 years) who were not using hormonal contraception and attended the City of London Migraine Clinic, UK.

  20. Current management: migraine headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Stephen D

    2017-12-01

    Migraine varies in its frequency, severity, and impact; treatment should consider these variations and the patient's needs and goals. Migraine pharmacologic treatment may be acute (abortive) or preventive (prophylactic), and patients often require both. New medication devices are available or in development, including an intracutaneous, microneedle system of zolmitriptan and sumatriptan, and breath-powered powder sumatriptan intranasal treatment. Lasmiditan, a 5-HT1F receptor agonist, is in development for acute treatment, as are small molecule calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists (Gepants) for acute and preventive treatment. Antibodies to CGRP and its receptor are being developed for migraine prevention. All 4 treatments are effective and have, as of yet, no safety concerns.

  1. Intranasal Lidocaine in Acute Treatment of Migraine: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avcu, Nazire; Doğan, Nurettin Özgür; Pekdemir, Murat; Yaka, Elif; Yılmaz, Serkan; Alyeşil, Cansu; Akalın, Latif Erdem

    2017-06-01

    The study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intranasal lidocaine administration for migraine treatment. This single-center, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial was conducted in a tertiary care emergency department. Included patients met the migraine criteria of the International Headache Society. Patients were randomized to intranasal lidocaine or saline solution; all participants received 10 mg of intravenous metoclopramide. Patient pain intensity was assessed with an 11-point numeric rating scale score. The primary outcome measure was the change in pain scores at 15 minutes; secondary outcomes were changes in pain intensity after pain onset and need for rescue medication. Patients (n=162) were randomized into 2 groups with similar baseline migraine characteristics and numeric rating scale scores. The median reduction in numeric rating scale score at 15 minutes was 3 (interquartile range [IQR] 2 to 5) for the lidocaine group and 2 (IQR 1 to 4) for the saline solution group (median difference=1.0; 95% confidence interval 0.1 to 2.1). The reduction in pain score at 30 minutes was 4 (IQR 3 to 7) for the lidocaine group and 5 (IQR 2 to 7) for the saline solution group (median difference=1.0; 95% confidence interval 0.1 to 2.1). Need for rescue medication did not differ between the groups, and local irritation was the most common adverse event in the lidocaine group. Although intranasal lidocaine was found no more efficacious than normal saline solution in our study, future studies should focus on patients who present earlier after headache onset. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Caffeine and Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spotlight On News Content Capsule Contact Understanding Migraine Caffeine and Migraine Doctor Q&A Managing Migraine Migraine ... of Headache Disorders Cluster Headache Post-Traumatic Headache Caffeine and Migraine January 10, 2017 Key Points Caffeine ...

  3. Stress and Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spotlight On News Content Capsule Contact Understanding Migraine Stress and Migraine Doctor Q&A Managing Migraine Migraine ... of Headache Disorders Cluster Headache Post-Traumatic Headache Stress and Migraine March 16, 2017 How to cope ...

  4. Migraine - Prophylactic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhury Debashish

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Preventive therapy in migraine constitutes an important aspect of migraine management especially in patients who are not controlled or have significant disability despite taking drugs for acute management. In spite of te recent advances in understanding of the pathophysiology of migraine, the mechanisms of action of many preventive drugs are largely unknown. Further, these provide only about 50% reduction in frequency in about 2/3rds of migraine sufferers. Hence, risk-benefit ratio must be considered while prescribing these agents. Recent efforts to undertake large-scale meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of these agents have been rewarding and consensus guidelines have evolved. Propanolol, metoprolol, amitriptyline, sodium valproate, flunarizine and lisuride have emerged as first line drugs. The role of newer anti-convulsants and botox injections in refractory cases are being investigated. Availability, co-morbidities, medical contraindications, concomitant acute therapy and costs are important determinants for choosing a particular agent. This article reviews the guidelines to be followed in choosing the prophylactic treatment options for migraine.

  5. Pharmacogenomics and migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Brøsen, Kim

    2008-01-01

    cases pharmacodynamic variability we mention possible implications for the acute and preventive treatment of migraine. Pharmacogenomics will most likely in the future be one part of our therapeutic armamentarium and will provide a stronger scientific basis for optimizing drug therapy on the basis...

  6. Migraine Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain) stop working properly and send the wrong signals. This may affect the nerve system that regulates pain. Whatever the cause, experts do agree that different things trigger (set off) migraines in people who have them. Eating particular foods can bring on a migraine in ...

  7. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  8. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  9. A Prospective, Randomized Trial of Intravenous Prochlorperazine Versus Subcutaneous Sumatriptan in Acute Migraine Therapy in the Emergency Department(Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    migraine abortive therapy.1-5 It is often given in conjunction with diphenhydramine to minimize the risk of akathisia.6 Subcutaneously injected...subcutaneous sumatriptan (Imitrex, GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) in migraine abortive therapy in ED patients. The primary outcome measure was the mean...to our knowledge Prochlorperazine was superior to sumatriptan in relieving pain, whereas adverse effects (nausea and sedation) were similar. How this

  10. Towards a reliable animal model of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Jansen-Olesen, Inger

    2012-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry shows a decreasing interest in the development of drugs for migraine. One of the reasons for this could be the lack of reliable animal models for studying the effect of acute and prophylactic migraine drugs. The infusion of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) is the best validated...... and most studied human migraine model. Several attempts have been made to transfer this model to animals. The different variants of this model are discussed as well as other recent models....

  11. Sumatriptan transdermal iontophoretic patch (NP101-Zelrix™: review of pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety in the acute treatment of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikelis M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Michail Vikelis,1 Dimos D Mitsikostas,2 Alan M Rapoport31Glyfada Headache Center, Glyfada, Greece; 2Neurology Department, Athens Naval Hospital, Athens, Greece; 3The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Migraine is a chronic, painful, and often disabling primary headache disorder, typically presenting with recurrent attacks that may be accompanied by a variety of neurological, gastrointestinal, and autonomic symptoms. Gastrointestinal symptoms in association with migraine including, nausea, vomiting, and gastroparesis, affect a large proportion of migraine sufferers. These symptoms may result in delays or inconsistencies in the absorption of oral treatments. Hence, the necessity for an innovative, non-invasive, parenteral delivery formulation for quick and effective treatment of migraine attacks is evident. Iontophoresis utilizes minimal amounts of electrical potential to support the fast transfer of ionized medication transdermally and into the general circulation. Two pharmacokinetic clinical trials have shown that iontophoretic delivery of sumatriptan through the skin produces quick and reproducible therapeutic plasma concentrations. A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, phase III study demonstrated superior efficacy versus placebo and excellent tolerability, with no triptan-related adverse events. The proportion of patients that were pain-free at 2 h post-treatment was 18% for the sumatriptan patch vs 9% for placebo (P = 0.0092; number needed to treat = 11.1. Upon approval from the Food and Drug Administration and other regulatory authorities, the iontophoretic transdermal delivery of sumatriptan will be a good choice for patients experiencing poor absorption of oral medication often associated with migraine and/or for those with intolerable triptan-related adverse events.Keywords: iontophoretic patch, migraine, migraine treatment, sumatriptan, transdermal patch

  12. Calcitonin gene-related peptide induced migraine attacks in patients with and without familial aggregation of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Christensen, Anne Francke; Liu, Marie Louise

    2017-01-01

    Background Calcitonin gene-related peptide provokes migraine attacks in 65% of patients with migraine without aura. Whether aggregation of migraine in first-degree relatives (family load) or a high number of risk-conferring single nucleotide polymorphisms contributes to migraine susceptibility...... to calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion in migraine patients is unknown. We hypothesized that genetic enrichment plays a role in triggering of migraine and, therefore, migraine without aura patients with high family load would report more migraine attacks after calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion than...... patients with low family load. Methods We allocated 40 previously genotyped migraine without aura patients to receive intravenous infusion of 1.5 μg/min calcitonin gene-related peptide and recorded migraine attacks including headache characteristics and associated symptoms. Information of familial...

  13. Migraine Variants or Episodic Syndromes That May Be Associated With Migraine and Other Unusual Pediatric Headache Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothner, A David; Parikh, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    To provide an overview of the clinical course for children and adolescents with migraine variants (M.V.), childhood periodic syndromes or the episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine using the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd Edition Beta version [ICHD-3] International Headache Society criteria for the diagnosis of each disorder. Migraine is a complex set of neurological symptoms. This review encompasses the subtypes of M.V. or episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine within the children and adolescent population. The episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine or migraine variant is multilayered neurological disorder in young children and adolescents. Within the these generally pediatric syndromes there are associated disorders described in this review, to provide a clinical overview and including the less common forms of migraine, such as acute confusional migraine, trauma-triggered migraine, and transient global amnesia. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  14. CGRP and migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Cauchi, M.; Robertson, N. P.

    2016-01-01

    Migraine has been estimated to be the seventh highest cause of disability worldwide, and the third most common disease worldwide after dental caries and tension type headache. However, the use of currently available acute and prophylactic medications to control this condition, such as 5-HT1 agonists (triptans) and beta-blockers, is limited by side effects and efficacy so that alternative and more specific treatments are required. More recently, an improved understanding of the pathophysiology...

  15. Reduced efficacy of sumatriptan in migraine with aura vs without aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Goadsby, Peter J; Charles, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether acute migraine treatment outcome is different in migraine with aura compared with migraine without aura. METHODS: We examined pooled outcome data for sumatriptan treatment of migraine with and without aura from the sumatriptan/naratriptan aggregate patient database...

  16. Prophylaxis of migraine: general principles and patient acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico D’Amico

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Domenico D’Amico1, Stewart J Tepper21Headache Center, Department of Neurological Sciences, C Besta Neurological Institute, Milan, Italy; 2Center for Headache and Pain, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Migraine is a chronic neurological condition with episodic exacerbations. Migraine is highly prevalent, and associated with significant pain, disability, and diminished quality of life. Migraine management is an important health care issue. Migraine management includes avoidance of trigger factors, lifestyle modifications, non-pharmacological therapies, and medications. Pharmacological treatment is traditionally divided into acute or symptomatic treatment, and preventive treatment or prophylaxis. Many migraine patients can be treated using only acute treatment. Patients with severe and/or frequent migraines require long-term preventive therapy. Prophylaxis requires daily administration of anti-migraine compounds with potential adverse events or contraindications, and may also interfere with other concurrent conditions and treatments. These problems may induce patients to reject the idea of a preventive treatment, leading to poor patient adherence. This paper reviews the main factors influencing patient acceptance of anti-migraine prophylaxis, providing practical suggestions to enhance patient willingness to accept pharmacological anti-migraine preventive therapy. We also provide information about the main clinical characteristics of migraine, and their negative consequences. The circumstances warranting prophylaxis in migraine patients as well as the main characteristics of the compounds currently used in migraine prophylaxis will also be briefly discussed, focusing on those aspects which can enhance patient acceptance and adherence.Keywords: migraine, prophylaxis, preventive therapy, acceptance, adherence

  17. Pearls and pitfalls in human pharmacological models of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Messoud; Hansen, Jakob Møller; Olesen, Jes

    2013-01-01

    - or migraine-provoking property of naturally occurring signaling molecules can be tested in a human model. If such an endogenous substance can provoke migraine in human patients, then it is likely, although not certain, that blocking its effect will be effective in the treatment of acute migraine attacks...... an important role in translational migraine research leading to the identification of three new principally different targets in the treatment of acute migraine attacks and has been used to examine other endogenous signaling molecules as well as genetic susceptibility factors. New additions to the model...

  18. Basilar migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, W F; Kuhn, S C; Daylida, L

    1997-03-01

    Basilar migraine is a complicated headache which the International Headache Society describes as 'migraine with aura symptoms clearly originating from the brainstem or from both occipital lobes'. For years this headache was thought to originate from a transient disturbance in the vertebrobasilar circulation, but more recent studies suggest that a central neuronal disorder may be the source of migraine. Basilar migraines may have certain symptoms which are similar to other neurologic, vascular, psychiatric and metabolic diseases, yet there are specific criteria which can help differentiate it from other diagnoses. It is characterized by a throbbing occipital headache which may be preceded by an aura. The unusual symptoms of basilar migraine, which may precede and continue throughout the duration of the headache and even after it, include bilateral visual symptoms, altered mental status, vertigo, gait ataxia, bilateral paresthesia, bilateral paralysis and dysarthria. We describe a 29-year-old black female whose husband brought her to the emergency department complaining of confusion, headache, and left-sided weakness for 2 h prior to arrival.

  19. Daunorubicin Hydrochloride, Cytarabine and Oblimersen Sodium in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Carbachol induces headache, but not migraine-like attacks, in patients with migraine without aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, H W; Wienecke, T; Olesen, J

    2009-01-01

    Schytz HW, Wienecke T, Olesen J & Ashina M. Carbachol induces headache, but not migraine-like attacks, in patients with migraine without aura. Cephalalgia 2009. London. ISSN 0333-1024Carbachol induces headache in healthy subjects, but the migraine eliciting effect of carbachol has not previously...... been studied. We hypothesized that the cholinomimetic agonist carbachol would induce headache and migraine-like attacks in migraineurs. Carbachol (3 microg/kg) or placebo was randomly infused into 18 patients with migraine without aura in a double-blind crossover study. Headache was scored on a verbal...

  1. Hemiplegic migraine aura begins with cerebral hypoperfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob M; Schytz, Henrik W; Larsen, Vibeke A

    2011-01-01

    Imaging studies of spontaneous migraine aura have proved challenging because of the episodic and unpredictable nature of migraine attacks. Two patients with signs of acute ischemic stroke were evaluated for thrombolysis and turned out to suffer from familial hemiplegic migraine. It was possible...... to record the early phase of the hemiplegic aura with computed tomography with perfusion sequences and magnetic resonance imaging. We found cerebral hypoperfusion in the relevant cortical areas within the first hour after onset of aura symptoms. This report supports the concept that migraine aura across...... the migraine spectrum is caused by similar mechanisms. In a setting with efficient cooperation between headache and stroke neurologists, thrombolysis centers provide the set-up and opportunity to record aura symptoms at an early phase. Furthermore, in the time of ready access to acute systemic thrombolysis...

  2. Sphenoid Sinusitis and Migraine-Type Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Three case histories of children (ages 10, 12, and 14 years with isolated sphenoid sinusitis who presented with acute, subacute, and chronic headache symptoms resembling migraine are reported from the University of Texas-Houston Medical School.

  3. Treatment of Menstrual-Related Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A review and meta-analysis of therapy trials for menstrual-related migraine headache (MRM and evidence-based recommendations for acute and short-term preventive treatment are reported from Toronto Western Hospital, ON, Canada.

  4. Migraine with Aura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migraine with aura Overview Migraine with aura (also called classic migraine) is a headache that strikes after or along with sensory disturbances called aura. These disturbances can include flashes ...

  5. Propionic acidemia in a previously healthy adolescent with acute onset of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laemmle, Alexander; Balmer, Christian; Doell, Carsten; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Häberle, Johannes; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2014-07-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is a rare autosomal recessive organic aciduria resulting from defects in propionyl-CoA-carboxylase (PCC), a key enzyme of intermediate energy metabolism. PA mostly manifests during the neonatal period, when affected newborns develop severe metabolic acidosis and hyperammonemia. We present a previously healthy teenager, who suffered from acute fatigue and breathlessness. The patient was tachycardic, displayed a precordial heave and a systolic murmur. Cardiac investigations revealed severe dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Biochemical work up led to the diagnosis of PA. Remarkably, this patient of consanguineous Hispanic origin was in a good general health condition before the acute onset of DCM. Diagnosis of PA was confirmed by enzymatic and molecular genetic analysis, the latter revealing a novel homozygous mutation in the PCCB gene (c.1229G > A; p.R410Q). Residual PCC enzyme activity of approximately 14 % of normal was detected in patient's lymphocytes and fibroblasts, thereby providing a possible explanation for the hitherto asymptomatic phenotype. Isolated DCM, although rare, can be the leading and/or sole symptom of late-onset PA. Therefore, patients with DCM should receive a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation including selective screening for inborn errors of metabolism.

  6. Behavioral migraine management modifies behavioral and cognitive coping in people with migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Elizabeth K; Holroyd, Kenneth A

    2014-10-01

    This is a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial which aims to examine changes in cognitive and behavioral responses to migraine with cognitive behavioral treatment for migraine, preventive medication for migraine, and their combination, and the relationship between these changes and reductions in migraine-related disability. Cognitive behavioral treatment is thought to reduce migraine-related disability through modifying maladaptive cognitive and behavioral responses to migraine. Two hundred thirty-two people with migraine who did not respond to 5 weeks of optimized acute therapy were randomized into a 2 (beta-blocker vs placebo) X 2 (behavioral migraine management [BMM] vs no BMM) treatment design. Participants received BMM and/or beta-blocker dose adjustment for 4 months, and were followed for an additional 12 months. Participants completed measures of catastrophizing, behavioral coping, and migraine-related disability throughout the study. Compared to drug therapy only, BMM demonstrated larger decreases in catastrophizing scores (19.16 to 9.89 vs 16.78 to 11.84, P cognitive and behavioral factors postulated to be mechanisms of cognitive behavioral treatments for migraine. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  7. Coexisting typical migraine in familial hemiplegic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Thomsen, Lise Lykke; Olesen, Jes

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to patients with migraine with aura (MA) and migraine without aura (MO), most patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) do not report migraine-like attacks after pharmacologic provocation with glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a donor of nitric oxide. In the present study, we examined...... patients with FHM without known gene mutations and hypothesized that 1) GTN would cause more migraine-like attacks in patients with FHM compared to controls, and 2) GTN would cause more migraine attacks in patients with FHM with coexisting MA or MO compared to the pure FHM phenotype....

  8. Intravenous lysine clonixinate for the acute treatment of severe migraine attacks: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krymchantowski, Abouch Valenty; Silva, Marcus Tulius T

    2003-01-01

    Background Several nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to be effective in the treatment of migraine. However, few commercially available NSAIDs can be administered IV. Lysine clonixinate (LC), an NSAID derived from nicotinic acid, has been proved effective in various algesic syndromes (eg, renal colic, muscular pain, nerve compression, odontalgia). The oral formulation of LC has been shown to be effective in the treatment of migraine of moderate severity. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of the IV formulation of LC in the treatment of severe migraine. Methods This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, prospective study enrolled patients with severe migraine (without aura) as defined by the criteria of the International Headache Society. When patients presented to a neurology hospital with an outpatient headache unit (Instituto de Neurologia Deolindo Couto, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) with a severe migraine attack that had lasted <4 hours, they were randomized to 1 of 2 groups (IV placebo [25 mL of 0.9% saline] or IV LC [21 mL of 0.9% saline plus 4 mL of LC 200 mg]). Headache intensity and adverse effects (AEs) were assessed before (0 minute) and 30, 60, and 90 minutes after study drug administration. Rescue medication was available 2 hours after study drug administration, and its use was compared between groups. Results Thirty-two patients (23 women, 9 men; mean [SD] age, 32 [2] years; range, 18–58 years) entered the study. Twenty-nine patients (21 women, 8 men; mean [SD] age, 32 [2] years; range, 18–56 years) completed the study. Three patients (all in the placebo group) did not complete the study (1 patient was unable to rate the pain severity after drug administration and 2 patients refused IV drug administration). Among study completers, 17 patients received LC and 12 placebo. At 30 minutes, 1 patient (8.3%) in the placebo group and 5 patients (29.4%) in the LC group were pain free

  9. [Therapeutic trials of aclarubicin in previously treated acute leukemias and hematosarcomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machover, D; Goldschmidt, E; Benavides, M; Gastiaburu, J; Vandenbulcke, J M; Delgado, M; Misset, J L; Mathe, G

    1987-01-01

    In a phase I-II trial, 38 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were given single drug induction therapy with aclarubicin (ACM) according to two dosing schedules: treatment 1: 10 to 30 mg/m2/d to a maximum total dose of 300 mg/m2 or until development of unacceptable toxicity: treatment 2: 15 mg/m2/d in ten-day courses separated by ten-day intervals. Response rates were 15% with treatment 1 and 44% with treatment 2 (overall response rate 34%). Complete remission (CR) was achieved in 6 patients who had previously failed to respond to adriamycin (ADM). Toxicity was more frequent and more severe in those patients given more than 150 mg/m2 ACM per course. The main side effects were oropharyngeal mucositis and diarrhea. Three patients exhibited T wave inversion and one had an episode of auricular flutter. In a separate trial in 16 patients with AML we used cyclic chemotherapy combining ACM (20 mg/m2/d) and ARA-C (200 mg/m2/d) for seven consecutive days. Complete remission rate was 50%. Severe ventricular rhythm disorders were seen in two patients. In a phase I-II study, 19 patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) and 8 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) were given ACM alone according to the regimen designated treatment 1 described above. Response rates were 11% (2/19) in ALL and 25% (2/8) in NHL. A review of the literature is presented in the discussion of the original trials reported herein.

  10. The migraine postdrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giffin, Nicola J.; Lipton, Richard B; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    collected on a daily basis. Visual analogue scales were used to capture the overall level of functioning and the severity of the headache. The postdrome was defined as the time from resolution of troublesome headache to return to normal.  Results: Of 120 evaluable patients, 97 (81%) reported at least one...... in the postdrome were common and may contribute to the distress and disability in the patients studied. Postdrome symptoms merit larger observational studies and careful recording in clinical trials of acute and preventive migraine treatments....

  11. The migraine postdrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giffin, Nicola J; Lipton, Richard B; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    collected on a daily basis. Visual analogue scales were used to capture the overall level of functioning and the severity of the headache. The postdrome was defined as the time from resolution of troublesome headache to return to normal. RESULTS: Of 120 evaluable patients, 97 (81%) reported at least one...... in the postdrome were common and may contribute to the distress and disability in the patients studied. Postdrome symptoms merit larger observational studies and careful recording in clinical trials of acute and preventive migraine treatments....

  12. Headaches and Migraines: Migraine 101 Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for migraine headaches. Dietary triggers for migraines include: Chocolate Cheese Food additives such as MSG Alcohol A, B, and C A, B, C, and D True/False: Migraines sometimes run in families. True/False: A bad headache is usually a sign of a brain tumor. Answer Key False. In most cases of ...

  13. Migraine and ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wammes-van der Heijden, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    An association between migraine and ischemic events, especially ischemic stroke, has been debated for many years. Whether migraine is a risk factor for ischemic events or ischemia triggers migraine, or both, is still unclear. This thesis explores different relationships between migraine and

  14. Molecular factors in migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalska, Marta; Prendecki, Micha?; Kozubski, Wojciech; Lianeri, Margarita; Dorszewska, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder that affects 11% of adults worldwide. This disease most likely has a neurovascular origin. Migraine with aura (MA) and more common form - migraine without aura (MO) ? are the two main clinical subtypes of disease. The exact pathomechanism of migraine is still unknown, but it is thought that both genetic and environmental factors are involved in this pathological process. The first genetic studies of migraine were focused on the rare subtype of MA: fa...

  15. Acupuncture Treatment in Migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jihe; Arsovska, Blagica; Kozovska, Kristina; Vasileva, Dance; Krstonijevikj, Jelena

    2017-01-01

    Introduction - Migraines are one of the most common types of headaches that occur periodically. There are two type of migraine: classical (with aura) and common migraines (without aura). Migraine occurs in women two to three times more often than in men. Material and methods - In the research are included 30 patients, 12 male and 18 female, on age from 29 to 79, treated for migraine in a period of one year. All patients had acupuncture treatment in a clinic for Traditional Chinese Medicine...

  16. Rheoencephalographic observations in migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. L. Von Almay

    1971-12-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiological concept of migraine presently held attributes the major changes to vascular factors. Therefore, it seemed appropriate to use rheoencephalography to test cerebral hemodynamics in cases of migraine. This very harmless and well suited method revealed: (1 on routine tracings during the painless intervall only 1/7 of the cases showed significant changes, while more than 2/3 could be classified with the help of an orthostatic stress test under REG-observation; (2 REG is more often correct for diagnosis than EEG and this does not surprise since REG monitors cerebral hemodynamics directly while EEG records activity for parenchyma and thus only secondarily depends on circulation; (3 similar conditions were previously seen in Meniere's disease where EEG also is less efficient than REG. According to the results of this study, it should be interesting to include REG in the work-up of migrainous patients. In these and under similar conditions, REG will be of diagnostic value.

  17. Psychotic aura symptoms in familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (ATP1A2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, José; Mendes, Alexandre; Matos, Ilda; Pereira-Monteiro, José

    2012-10-01

    Neuropsychological symptoms are rare in familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM). There are no reports of psychotic symptoms in FHM type 2 (ATP1A2). We examined a family with a FHM phenotype due to a M731T mutation in ATP1A2. A 10-year follow-up allowed us to observe complex auras, including psychotic symptoms in two siblings. Male, 48 years old, with an aura that included complex illusions with a feeling of time travelling, coincident with other aura features. The aura was regarded as mystical by the patient. Female, 38 years old, with a complex migraine aura, during which she believed she had the ability to time travel and was being followed by lobbyists who wanted to steal this ability from her. FHM type 2 must be included in the list of differential diagnoses of acute psychosis in patients with a previous history of migraine aura.

  18. [Clinical significance of nausea in migraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serousova, O V; Karpova, M I; Dolgushina, A I; Vasilenko, A F; Markova, V V; Altman, D S

    2017-01-01

    To study the prevalence and intensity of nausea in pain, prodromal and postdromal phases of migraine paroxysm, and in between the paroxysms in migraine patients, depending on the type of migraine paroxysm and frequency of pain days, and to evaluate an effect of nausea on the course of migraine. One hundred and four patients with migraine, aged from 18 to 60 years, were examined. The intensity of nausea was evaluated by a 5-point verbal analogue scale, and its intensity in between the paroxysms by the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale. All of the patients underwent a complex examination of the gastrointestinal tract. Paroxysms with accompanying nausea were found in 90% patients. Acute nausea was associated with older age, earlier onset and longer experience of migraine. In a group of patients with acute nausea, the frequency and intensity of migraine paroxysms, probability of reoccuring pain in the first day and the severity of social disability were higher. Development of nausea in between the paroxysms and its intensity was significantly higher in patients with high intensity of nausea in migraine paroxysms. Nausea in the prodrome was significantly associated with migraine without aura and chronicity of the disorder. Patients with nausea in the prodrome also had a longer painful phase and more severe social disability. No relationship between organic diseases of the digestive tract and nausea was found. Nausea can have its own pathological mechanisms not related to concomitant diseases of the digestive tract that should be taken into account in therapeutic interventions aimed at improving quality of life of the patients.

  19. A multicenter, open-label, long-term safety and tolerability study of DFN-02, an intranasal spray of sumatriptan 10 mg plus permeation enhancer DDM, for the acute treatment of episodic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munjal, Sagar; Brand-Schieber, Elimor; Allenby, Kent; Spierings, Egilius L H; Cady, Roger K; Rapoport, Alan M

    2017-12-01

    DFN-02 is a novel intranasal spray formulation composed of sumatriptan 10 mg and a permeation-enhancing excipient comprised of 0.2% 1-O-n-Dodecyl-β-D-Maltopyranoside (DDM). This composition of DFN-02 allows sumatriptan to be rapidly absorbed into the systemic circulation and exhibit pharmacokinetics comparable to subcutaneously administered sumatriptan. Rapid rate of absorption is suggested to be important for optimal efficacy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of DFN-02 (10 mg) in the acute treatment of episodic migraine with and without aura over a 6-month period based on the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events and the evaluation of results of clinical laboratory tests, vital signs, physical examination, and electrocardiograms. This was a multi-center, open-label, repeat-dose safety study in adults with episodic migraine with and without aura. Subjects diagnosed with migraine with or without aura according to the criteria set forth in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition, who experienced 2 to 6 attacks per month with fewer than 15 headache days per month and at least 48 headache-free hours between attacks, used DFN-02 to treat their migraine attacks acutely over the course of 6 months. A total of 173 subjects was enrolled, 167 (96.5%) subjects used at least 1 dose of study medication and were evaluable for safety, and 134 (77.5%) subjects completed the 6-month study. A total of 2211 migraine attacks was reported, and 3292 doses of DFN-02 were administered; mean per subject monthly use of DFN-02 was 3.6 doses. Adverse events were those expected for triptans, as well as for nasally administered compounds. No new safety signals emerged. Dysgeusia and application site pain were the most commonly reported treatment-emergent adverse events over 6 months (21% and 30.5%, respectively). Most of the treatment-emergent adverse events were mild. There were 5 serious adverse events, all

  20. Migraine vestibulaire 

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lempert, T; Olesen, J; Furman, J

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine, jointly formulated by the Committee for Classification of Vestibular Disorders of the Bárány Society and the Migraine Classification Subcommittee of the International Headache Society (IHS). The classification includes vestibular...... migraine and probable vestibular migraine. Vestibular migraine will appear in an appendix of the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) as a first step for new entities, in accordance with the usual IHS procedures. Probable vestibular migraine may be included...

  1. Migraine Headache Treated with Famciclovir and Celecoxib: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    NaPier, Bradford Lee; Morimoto, Maki; NaPier, Erin

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has been speculated to play a role in migraine headache pathophysiology. We present the first successful migraine headache treatment with therapy specifically targeting HSV infection. Case Presentation A previously healthy 21-year-old white woman presented with a severe headache and was diagnosed with severe migraine headache disorder. She initially was treated with standard migraine headache medications without symptomatic improvement. She was then given famciclovir and celecoxib. The patient fully recovered within days and continues to enjoy significant reduction in severity and frequency of symptoms. Discussion Famciclovir and celecoxib may work synergistically against HSV. The virus may play a role in the pathophysiology of migraine headaches, and this is the first case report of successful migraine headache treatment with these medications. Further studies are needed to elucidate the efficacy of these medications in treating migraine disorder. PMID:29236660

  2. Managing migraines at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foods that contain monosodium glutamate (MSG) Baked goods, chocolate, nuts, and dairy products Fruits (such as avocado, ... care Images Migraine cause CT scan of the brain Migraine headache References Garza I, Schwedt TJ, Robertson ...

  3. Alcohol and Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Meal Planning Toolkit helps you maintain a balanced diet and identify certain migraine triggers to avoid. And ... free Meal Planner for tips on maintaining a balanced, migraine-friendly diet). Since these are all behavioral factors, women with ...

  4. Migraine Related Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udagatti, Vithal D; Dinesh Kumar, Rajendran

    2017-12-01

    Migraine related vertigo (MRV) is largely accepted in the vestibular community and probably represents the second most common cause of vertigo after benign positional vertigo by far exceeding Meniere's disease. The data on vestibular migraine management is still relatively poor, despite its enormous importance in daily practice. A 55-year old male presented with history of giddiness, imbalance, sweating and sensation of nausea with severe pulsating headache of one day duration. Ear, Nose and Throat examination was normal. Neurological tests were negative. Audiogram and Electronystagmography were within normal limits. Nystagmus was positive on turning his head to left side. By reviewing the available literature on MRV, the report aims to outline a protocol for future management. The patient and caretakers were thoroughly counseled and educated, started on Flunarizine 10 mg and Dimenhydrinate 50 mg; advice healthy life style, necessary precautions, compliance to treatment. Patient was reportedly followed up and was symptom free over a period of 9 years. There is a call for proper diagnosis to address the complaint and manage of symptoms in acute attack and prophylaxis. In addition, this case highlight the ongoing need for proper systematic evaluation, therapeutic management, follow up by ensuring compliance to medication, necessary precautions and life style modification.

  5. Taking the negative view of current migraine treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Olesen, Jes

    2012-01-01

    , valproate, topiramate) a response (at least a 50% reduction in migraine frequency) is observed in 40-50%. In addition, prophylactic treatment is hampered by adverse events and withdrawals. There is a need for new acute anti-migraine drugs and targets are already available and there are more to come. It has...

  6. Ischemic strokes and migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousser, M.G.; Baron, J.C.; Chiras, J.

    1985-01-01

    Lasting neurological deficits, though most infrequent, do occur in migrainous subjects and are well documented by clinical angiographic computed tomographic (CT scan) and even pathological studies. However the mechanism of cerebral ischemia in migraine remains widely unknown and the precise role of migraine in the pathogenesis of ischemic strokes is still debated. (orig./MG)

  7. Neurovascular pharmacology of migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MaassenVanDenBrink, Antoinette; Chan, Kayi Y.

    2008-01-01

    Migraine is a paroxysmal neurovascular disorder, which affects a significant proportion of the population. Since dilation of cranial blood vessels is likely to be responsible for the headache experienced in migraine, many experimental models for the study of migraine have focussed on this feature.

  8. The stigma of migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, William B; Park, Jung E; Tian, Iris X; Kempner, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    People who have a disease often experience stigma, a socially and culturally embedded process through which individuals experience stereotyping, devaluation, and discrimination. Stigma has great impact on quality of life, behavior, and life chances. We do not know whether or not migraine is stigmatizing. We studied 123 episodic migraine patients, 123 chronic migraine patients, and 62 epilepsy patients in a clinical setting to investigate the extent to which stigma attaches to migraine, using epilepsy as a comparison. We used the stigma scale for chronic illness, a 24-item questionnaire suitable for studying chronic neurologic diseases, and various disease impact measures. Patients with chronic migraine had higher scores (54.0±20.2) on the stigma scale for chronic illness than either episodic migraine (41.7±14.8) or epilepsy patients (44.6±16.3) (pStigma correlated most strongly with the mental component score of the short form of the medical outcomes health survey (SF-12), then with ability to work and migraine disability score for chronic and episodic migraine and the Liverpool impact on epilepsy scale for epilepsy. Analysis of covariance showed adjusted scores for the stigma scale for chronic illness were similar for chronic migraine (49.3; 95% confidence interval, 46.2 to 52.4) and epilepsy (46.5; 95% confidence interval, 41.6 to 51.6), and lower for episodic migraine (43.7; 95% confidence interval, 40.9 to 46.6). Ability to work was the strongest predictor of stigma as measured by the stigma scale for chronic illness. In our model, adjusted stigma was similar for chronic migraine and epilepsy, which were greater than for episodic migraine. Stigma correlated most strongly with inability to work, and was greater for chronic migraine than epilepsy or episodic migraine because chronic migraine patients had less ability to work.

  9. Refractory chronic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martelletti, Paolo; Katsarava, Zaza; Lampl, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The debate on the clinical definition of refractory Chronic Migraine (rCM) is still far to be concluded. The importance to create a clinical framing of these rCM patients resides in the complete disability they show, in the high risk of serious adverse events from acute and preventative drugs and...... of these patients, the correct application of innovative therapeutic techniques and lastly aim to be acknowledged as clinical entity in the next definitive version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3 (ICHD-3 beta)....... and in the uncontrolled application of therapeutic techniques not yet validated.The European Headache Federation Expert Group on rCM presents hereby the updated definition criteria for this harmful subset of headache disorders. This attempt wants to be the first impulse towards the correct identification...

  10. Efficacy of enalapril in migraine prophylaxis: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Sonbolestan

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Enalapril may be effective in migraine prophylaxis according to its effect in decreasing the frequency, severity, and duration of headaches. The results support the previous suggestions on usage of ACE inhibitors in migraine prophylaxis.

  11. Molecular factors in migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Marta; Prendecki, Michał; Kozubski, Wojciech; Lianeri, Margarita; Dorszewska, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder that affects 11% of adults worldwide. This disease most likely has a neurovascular origin. Migraine with aura (MA) and more common form - migraine without aura (MO) – are the two main clinical subtypes of disease. The exact pathomechanism of migraine is still unknown, but it is thought that both genetic and environmental factors are involved in this pathological process. The first genetic studies of migraine were focused on the rare subtype of MA: familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM). The genes analysed in familial and sporadic migraine are: MTHFR, KCNK18, HCRTR1, SLC6A4, STX1A, GRIA1 and GRIA3. It is possible that migraine is a multifactorial disease with polygenic influence. Recent studies have shown that the pathomechanisms of migraine involves both factors responsible for immune response and oxidative stress such as: cytokines, tyrosine metabolism, homocysteine; and factors associated with pain transmission and emotions e.g.: serotonin, hypocretin-1, calcitonin gene-related peptide, glutamate. The correlations between genetic variants of the HCRTR1 gene, the polymorphism 5-HTTLPR and hypocretin-1, and serotonin were observed. It is known that serotonin inhibits the activity of hypocretin neurons and may affect the appearance of the aura during migraine attack. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms of migraine, including genotype-phenotype correlations, may contribute to finding markers important for the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. PMID:27191890

  12. Premonitory symptoms in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, Katarina; Artto, Ville; Bendtsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe the frequency and number of premonitory symptoms (PS) in migraine, the co-occurrence of different PS, and their association with migraine-related factors. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, a validated questionnaire was sent to Finnish migraine families between 2002 and 2013...... to obtain data on 14 predefined PS, migraine diagnoses, demographic factors, and migraine characteristics. The estimated response rate was 80%. RESULTS: Out of 2714 persons, 2223 were diagnosed with migraine. Among these, 77% reported PS, with a mean number of 3.0 symptoms compared to 30% (p ....5 symptoms (p migraine headaches. Yawning was the most commonly reported symptom (34%) among migraineurs. Females reported PS more frequently than males (81 versus 64%, p 

  13. Assessment of platelet function in acute ischemic stroke patients previously treated with aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Aida; Parkhutik, Vera; Tembl, Jose Ignacio; Vallés, Juana; Santos, Maria Teresa; Moscardó, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Platelet inhibition measured by platelet function tests could be critical to understand the reasons for early recurrence and to guide therapeutic recommendations. We assess the platelet function during the acute phase of ischemic stroke in patients pretreated with aspirin who continue their treatment with aspirin only, are started on clopidogrel only, or add clopidogrel to aspirin. Sixty-four patients were taking aspirin before the stroke. Depending on the administered antiplatelet, 3 groups were defined: ASA: patients who continued on aspirin orally or intravenous acetylsalicylate of lysine, n = 30; CLO: patients who discontinued aspirin and were started on clopidogrel, n = 16; and ASA + CLO: patients who were prescribed both aspirin and clopidogrel, n = 10. Collagen-induced thromboxane A2 (TXA2) synthesis, ADP (adenosine diphosphate)-induced aggregation, and occlusion time (PF-100) were measured. CLO group only had a marked elevation of TXA2 (17.44 ± 15.62 ng/mL, P = .000) and a shortening of the platelet function analyzer (PFA)-100 closure time (157.13 ± 88 seconds, P = .047) compared with the other 2 groups (ASA: TXA2, .62 ± 1.59 ng/mL; ASA + CLO: TXA2 1.79 ± 4.59 ng/mL). They achieved a small (13%) but significant reduction of ADP-induced aggregation (87.00 ± 23.06 mm, P = .008) compared with the ASA group (102.82 ± 22.38 seconds). Stopping aspirin intake within the first 72 hours of the acute stroke drastically increases TXA2 synthesis. During the same time window, the freshly prescribed clopidogrel manages to reduce the ADP-induced aggregation only slightly (13%). This study offers analytic proof that the common practice of replacing aspirin with clopidogrel does not leave stroke patients fully protected during the first days after an ischemic stroke. Possible solutions could be to preserve aspirin during a few days or to use loading doses of clopidogrel at hospital admission. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc

  14. Migraine treatment and placebo effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciali, José G; Peres, Mário; Bigal, Marcelo E

    2010-03-01

    Placebos are typically defined as physiologically inactive substances that elicit a therapeutic response. The antipode of the placebo effect is the nocebo effect, or the negative effects of placebo, where unpleasant symptoms (e.g., adverse events) emerge after the administration of placebo. Placebo analgesia is one of the most striking examples of the cognitive modulation of pain perception. Herein we focus on the importance of placebo in headache research. We first review the mechanisms of the placebo effect. We then focus on the importance of placebo in the acute treatment of migraine. We follow by discussing the importance of placebo on the preventive treatment of migraine and our perspectives for the 5 years to come regarding the study of the placebos.

  15. Postoperative acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with previous exposure to bleomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, Benjamin M; Efem, Richard I; Wilson, Gregory A; Kor, Daryl J; Eisenach, John H

    2014-02-01

    To determine the incidence and risk factors for postoperative acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in a large cohort of bleomycin-exposed patients undergoing surgery with general endotracheal anesthesia. From a Mayo Clinic cancer registry, we identified patients who had received systemic bleomycin and then underwent a major surgical procedure that required more than 1 hour of general anesthesia from January 1, 2000, through August 30, 2012. Heart, lung, and liver transplantations were excluded. Postoperative ARDS (within 7 days after surgery) was defined according to the Berlin criteria. We identified 316 patients who underwent 541 major surgical procedures. Only 7 patients met the criteria for postoperative ARDS; all were white men, and 6 were current or former smokers. On univariate analysis, we observed an increased risk of postoperative ARDS in patients who were current or former smokers. Furthermore, significantly greater crystalloid and colloid administration was found in patients with postoperative ARDS. We also observed a trend toward longer surgical duration and red blood cell transfusion in patients with postoperative ARDS, although this finding was not significant. Intraoperative fraction of inspired oxygen was not associated with postoperative ARDS. In bleomycin-exposed patients, the incidence of postoperative ARDS after major surgery with general anesthesia is approximately 1.3% (95% CI, 0.6%-2.6%). For first major procedures after bleomycin therapy, the incidence is 1.9% (95% CI, 0.9%-4.1%). The risk of postoperative ARDS in patients exposed to systemic bleomycin appears to be lower than expected. Smoking status may be an important factor that modifies the risk of postoperative ARDS in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sublingual piroxicam in migraine without aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, K; Tayade, Himanshu; Mandlik, Rahul

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of a single dose of sublingual piroxicam to that of a placebo during acute attacks of migraine without aura. The drug (N = 30) or a placebo (N = 30) was administered, on randomisation and double-blind basis, to 60 patients between 18 and 50 years of age suffering from migraine without aura. The patients were instructed to take a single tablet sublingually [corresponding to piroxicam 40 mg or placebo] and the severity of the painful symptomatology and associated symptoms were evaluated by this study. The patients treated with sublingual piroxicam showed a significant (P piroxicam administration. In 83.3%, the drug resulted in excellent to good response as compared to only 10% in the placebo group. No local and systemic side effects were reported with sublingual piroxicam. The present study has demonstrated that for the acute management of migraine without aura sublingual piroxicam showed significant analgesic effect with excellent tolerability.

  17. Effects of migraine disease on the vestibulocochlear system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Zaim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Migraine patients have tendency to have vestibular and auditory system problems. The aim of this study is to evaluate vestibule cochlear system of patients with migraine with Transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE video-nystagmography (VNG and caloric test. Methods:39 patients diagnosed with migraine and control group of 21 healthy volunteers were included in this study. Before they were included in the study, all of them were examined and those who has acute otitis media, chronic otitis media, tympanic membrane perforation, external otitis, ear surgery history and head trauma were excluded from the study. All patients and volunteers were tested by TEOAE, VNG and caloric tests. In evaluating the statistical data, SPSS 15.0 was utilized. Results: When TEOAE values for the migraine group and for the control group are compared, it is found statistically significant that the TEOAE values for the migraine group is lower than those for the control group. This result shows that there can be a pathology that is able to affect cochlear functions in migraine disease. As for VNG test results, a statistically significant difference cannot be determined between migraine and control groups. More over, the identification of canal paresis in caloric test indicates that peripheral vestibular problems accompany migraine disease. Conclusion:Evaluating vestibulocochlear system of migraine patients with TEOAE, VNG and caloric tests has been an important task for identifying vestibular imperfections accompanying these patients and for predicting potential auricular pathologies. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6(1: 1-4

  18. Practice Guidelines for Management of Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature (166 articles identified and reviewed on the pharmacological treatment of the child with migraine headache was classified according to acute headache and preventive medications, and the results of drug trials were evaluated by Committees of the Child Neurology Society and American Academy of Neurology.

  19. TRPM8 and Migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Dussor, Greg; Cao, Yu-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is among the most common diseases on earth and one of the most disabling, the latter due in large part to poor treatment efficacy. Development of new therapeutics is dependent on the identification of mechanisms contributing to migraine and discovery of targets for new drugs. Numerous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have implicated the transient receptor-potential M8 (TRPM8) channel in migraine. This channel is predominantly expressed on peripheral sensory neurons and is known...

  20. Human migraine models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2001-01-01

    The need for experimental models is obvious. In animal models it is possible to study vascular responses, neurogenic inflammation, c-fos expression etc. However, the pathophysiology of migraine remains unsolved, why results from animal studies not directly can be related to the migraine attack......, which is a human experience. A set-up for investigations of experimental headache and migraine in humans, has been evaluated and headache mechanisms explored by using nitroglycerin and other headache-inducing agents. Nitric oxide (NO) or other parts of the NO activated cascade seems to be responsible...... for the induced headache and migraine. Perspectives are discussed....

  1. The stigma of migraine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B Young

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: People who have a disease often experience stigma, a socially and culturally embedded process through which individuals experience stereotyping, devaluation, and discrimination. Stigma has great impact on quality of life, behavior, and life chances. We do not know whether or not migraine is stigmatizing. METHODS: We studied 123 episodic migraine patients, 123 chronic migraine patients, and 62 epilepsy patients in a clinical setting to investigate the extent to which stigma attaches to migraine, using epilepsy as a comparison. We used the stigma scale for chronic illness, a 24-item questionnaire suitable for studying chronic neurologic diseases, and various disease impact measures. RESULTS: Patients with chronic migraine had higher scores (54.0±20.2 on the stigma scale for chronic illness than either episodic migraine (41.7±14.8 or epilepsy patients (44.6±16.3 (p<0.001. Subjects with migraine reported greater inability to work than epilepsy subjects. Stigma correlated most strongly with the mental component score of the short form of the medical outcomes health survey (SF-12, then with ability to work and migraine disability score for chronic and episodic migraine and the Liverpool impact on epilepsy scale for epilepsy. Analysis of covariance showed adjusted scores for the stigma scale for chronic illness were similar for chronic migraine (49.3; 95% confidence interval, 46.2 to 52.4 and epilepsy (46.5; 95% confidence interval, 41.6 to 51.6, and lower for episodic migraine (43.7; 95% confidence interval, 40.9 to 46.6. Ability to work was the strongest predictor of stigma as measured by the stigma scale for chronic illness. CONCLUSION: In our model, adjusted stigma was similar for chronic migraine and epilepsy, which were greater than for episodic migraine. Stigma correlated most strongly with inability to work, and was greater for chronic migraine than epilepsy or episodic migraine because chronic migraine patients had less ability

  2. Shunt malfunction causing acute neurological deterioration in 2 patients with previously asymptomatic Chiari malformation Type I. Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Robert; Kalhorn, Stephen; Pacione, Donato; Weiner, Howard; Wisoff, Jeffrey; Harter, David

    2009-08-01

    Patients with symptomatic Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) typically exhibit a chronic, slowly progressive disease course with evolution of symptoms. However, some authors have reported acute neurological deterioration in the setting of CM-I and acquired Chiari malformations. Although brainstem dysfunction has been documented in patients with CM-II and hydrocephalus or shunt malfunction, to the authors' knowledge only 1 report describing ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt malfunction causing neurological deterioration in a patient with CM-I exists. The authors report on their experience with the treatment of previously asymptomatic CM-I in 2 children who experienced quite different manifestations of acute neurological deterioration secondary to VP shunt malfunction. Presumably, VP shunt malfunction created a positive rostral pressure gradient across a stenotic foramen magnum, resulting in tetraparesis from foramen magnum syndrome in 1 patient and acute ataxia and cranial nerve deficits from syringobulbia in the other. Although urgent shunt revisions yielded partial recovery of neurological function in both patients, marked improvement occurred only after posterior fossa decompression.

  3. Art and Migraine: Researching the Relationship between Artmaking and Pain Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Randy M.; Sexton-Radek, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    This research project extends a previous study (Vick & Sexton-Radek, 1999) in examining the relationship between artmaking and pain among 127 migraine sufferers. A basic overview of migraine symptoms and treatment is presented along with a discussion of concepts relating to "migraine art" in order to provide a context for this project. Surveys…

  4. An investigation of the manifest dream content associated with migraine headaches: a study of the dreams that precede nocturnal migraines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather-Greener, G Q; Comstock, D; Joyce, R

    1996-01-01

    Clinical observations of a relationship between unpleasant dreams and migraine headaches have been reported previously. Due to the anecdotal quality of these case reports, this study empirically investigated the significance of this relationship. Dream content categories were selected corresponding to emotional factors associated with stress that trigger migraine headaches. A total of 37 migraineurs recorded 10 dreams each, 5 that preceded migraines and 5 that did not. Univariate F tests revealed that 4 of the 5 variables contributed significantly to the overall effect, specifically anger, misfortune, apprehension, and aggressive interactions. Recommendations include discussing the predictive value of dreams with regard to nocturnal migraine attacks, and therapeutic implications are suggested.

  5. Not only headache: higher degree of sexual pain symptoms among migraine sufferers

    OpenAIRE

    Ifergane, Gal; Ben-Zion, Itzhak Z.; Plakht, Ygal; Regev, Keren; Wirguin, Itzhak

    2008-01-01

    Chronic illness and chronic pain can have profound negative effects on relationship and sexual satisfaction, yet the influence of migraine on sexuality has not been previously evaluated. To assess sexual functions in subjects with migraine compared to those with no migraine. We evaluated female university students using the Israeli sexual behavior inventory (ISBI). Migraine was diagnosed according to self-reported symptoms according to the IHS criteria. Several dimensions of female sexuality—...

  6. Migraine pathogenesis and state of pharmacological treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goadsby Peter J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Migraine is a largely inherited disorder of the brain characterized by a complex, but stereotypical, dysfunction of sensory processing. Often the most obvious clinical symptom is head pain, but non-headache symptoms such as photophobia, phonophobia and nausea are clearly part of the typical presentation. This review discusses the current pathophysiological concepts of migraine and migraine aura, such as a possible brainstem dysfunction and cortical spreading depression. Acute and preventive migraine treatment approaches are briefly covered with a focus on shortcomings of the currently available treatment options. A number of different receptors, such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, TRPV1 and glutamate receptors, are currently being targeted by potential novel migraine therapeutics. The prospects of this research are exciting and are likely to improve patient care.

  7. A naturalistic glyceryl trinitrate infusion migraine model in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramachandran, Roshni; Bhatt, Deepak Kumar; Ploug, Kenneth Beri

    2012-01-01

    Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) infusion is a reliable method to provoke migraine-like headaches in humans. Previous studies have simulated this human model in anaesthetized or in awake rodents using GTN doses 10,000 times higher than used in humans. The relevance of such toxicological doses to migraine...

  8. Periodontal disease as a potential factor of migraine chronification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameijeira, Pablo; Leira, Yago; Blanco, Juan; Leira, Rogelio

    2017-05-01

    Migraine is a hereditary constitutional base disorder, which is characterized by recurrent episodes of headache pulsatile characteristics associated with photophobia/phonophobia, nausea and/or vomiting. The main complication in migraine is the chronicity of the process, now recognized as a chronic migraine. Although pathogenic mechanisms that may influence the pathophysiology of migraine and its possible chronicity are not fully understood, previous studies have shown in patients with migraine molecular alterations of systemic inflammation, neurogenic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, innate immunity, dysfunction of matrix proteases and blood-brain barrier. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory lesion caused by bacteria. After the bacterial infection begins, an immune response that will be responsible for individual susceptibility appears. More advanced forms of periodontitis have demonstrated molecular alterations of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, dysfunction of matrix proteases and innate immunity, similar to those observed in migraine. Furthermore, the main molecular mediators of neurogenic inflammation related to activation of the trigeminovascular system, which are characteristic of migraine, are overexpressed in gingival crevicular fluid and mucosa in patients with periodontal disease. Hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, insulin resistance, stroke or coronary artery disease are comorbidities that periodontal disease and migraine could share. Therefore, several mechanisms and hypotheses could explain the possible association between both diseases. However, epidemiological and molecular studies will be necessary to provide a better understanding of this potential association, which could be implicated in the chronification of migraine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Migraine in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broner, Susan W; Bobker, Sarah; Klebanoff, Louise

    2017-12-01

    Migraine is one of the most common neurological disorders, affecting women disproportionally at a rate of 3:1. Prior to puberty, boys and girls are equally affected, but the female preponderance emerges after puberty. Migraine pathophysiology is not fully understood, and although the hormonal effect of estrogen is significant, other factors are at play. This article will focus on the hormonal influence on migraine in women. Here we review our most recent understanding of migraine and menstrual migraine, including epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment strategies for this challenging disorder, as well as migraine during pregnancy, postpartum period, breastfeeding, perimenopause, and menopause. We also review the risks and benefits of exogenous hormone use in this population and discuss stroke risk in women with migraine aura. By understanding these aspects of migraine in women, we hope to arm practitioners with the knowledge and tools to help guide treatment of this debilitating disorder in this large population. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Patients' preference in migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, François (Frans)

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is about migraine. Three elements are discussed. First element is preventive treatment, second element is attack treatment and the third part focuses on medication overuse headache. The preventive treatment of migraine is a valuable intervention in primary care. If preventive treatment

  11. Pathophysiology of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Goadsby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a common disabling brain disorder whose pathophysiology is now being better understood. The study of anatomy and physiology of pain producing structures in the cranium and the central nervous system modulation of the input have led to the conclusion that migraine involves alterations in the sub-cortical aminergic sensory modulatory systems that influence the brain widely.

  12. Understanding Menstrual Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Anne H

    2018-04-01

    Menstrual-related migraine is very prevalent, very disabling, yet very easy to manage given a good understanding of its cause. This article is intended to help with that understanding and to enable headache specialists to prescribe or create effective hormonal preventives of menstrual-related migraine. © 2018 American Headache Society.

  13. Comorbidity of Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuu-Jiun Wang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a common neurological disorder and can cause severely disabling during attacks. The highest prevalence occurs between the ages of 25 and 55 years, potentially the most productive period of life. Migraine leads to a burden not only to the individual, but also to the family and society. Prior studies have found migraine occurs with some illness at a greater than coincidental rate than is seen in the general population. These occurrences are called “comorbidity”, which means that these disorders are interrelated with migraine. To delineate migraine comorbidity is important because it can help improve treatment strategies and understand the possible pathophysiology of migraine. The comorbid illnesses in patients with migraine include stroke, sub-clinical vascular brain lesions, coronary heart disease, hypertension, patent foramen ovale, psychiatric diseases (depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, and suicide, restless legs syndrome, epilepsy, and asthma. In this paper, we review the existing epidemiological and hospital based studies and illustrate the connections between these illness and migraine.

  14. Glutamate receptor antagonists with the potential for migraine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Anna; Rustichelli, Cecilia; Baraldi, Carlo

    2017-12-01

    Preclinical, clinical, and other (e.g., genetic) evidence support the concept that migraine susceptibility may at least partially result from a glutamatergic system disorder. Therefore, the receptors of the glutamatergic system are considered relatively new targets for investigational drugs to treat migraine. Investigational and established glutamate receptor antagonists (GluRAs) have been shown to possess antinociceptive properties in preclinical models of trigeminovascular nociception and have been evaluated in clinical trials. This review focuses on preclinical and clinical studies of GluRAs for the treatment of migraine. Areas covered: A PubMed database search (from 1987 to December 2016) and a review of published studies on GluRAs in migraine were conducted. Expert opinion: All published clinical trials of investigational GluRAs have been unsuccessful in establishing benefit for acute migraine treatment. Clinical trial results contrast with the preclinical data, suggesting that glutamate (Glu) does not play a decisive role after the attack has already been triggered. These antagonists may instead be useful for migraine prophylaxis. Improving patient care requires further investigating and critically analyzing the role of Glu in migraine, designing experimental models to study more receptors and their corresponding antagonists, and identifying biomarkers to facilitate trials designed to target specific subgroups of migraine patients.

  15. Efficacy and safety of tonabersat, a gap-junction modulator, in the acute treatment of migraine: a double-blind, parallel-group, randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlöf, C G H; Hauge, A W; Olesen, J

    2009-01-01

    tolerated and had no effect on vital signs, electrocardiogram recordings or laboratory values. The lack of efficacy may be a function of the slow absorption of tonabersat. As a consequence of slow absorption, daily administration of tonabersat as prophylaxis for migraine attacks is under investigation...

  16. Cerebral hemodynamics in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hachinski, V C; Olesen, Jes; Norris, J W

    1977-01-01

    Clinical and angiographic findings in migraine are briefly reviewed in relation to cerebral hemodynamic changes shown by regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies. Three cases of migraine studied by the intracarotid xenon 133 method during attacks are reported. In classic migraine, with typical...... prodromal symptoms, a decrease in cerebral blood flow has been demonstrated during the aura. Occasionally, this flow decrease persists during the headache phase. In common migraine, where such prodromata are not seen, a flow decrease has not been demonstrated. During the headache phase of both types...... of migraine, rCBF has usually been found to be normal or in the high range of normal values. The high values may represent postischemic hyperemia, but are probably more frequently secondary to arousal caused by pain. Thus, during the headache phase rCBF may be subnormal, normal or high. These findings do...

  17. Treatment in chronic migraine: choice of reabilitation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana STANESCU

    2015-12-01

    started with topiramate, because the drug has the highest level of evidence in treating CM; Onabotulinumtoxin A reduced the number headache days, headache severity, headache-related disability and improved functioning and quality of life. Additionally, complementary and alternative medicine treatments are available in CM prophylaxis, such as biobehavioral techniques (relaxation training, thermal biofeedback, electromyography feedback and cognitive-behavioral therapy. Invasive and non-invasive neurostimulation techniques have been studied in the treatment and prevention of various types of headaches, including chronic migraine. New treatment options for acute attacks and for prevention include calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP antagonists and antibodies.

  18. Contact lenses, migraine, and allodynia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Bulent Timucin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical trials and electrophysiologic studies demonstrated increased perceptual sensitivity in patients suffering from migraines. At least, one triggering factor is described in 85% of migraine patients. The aim of this report was to investigate the relationship between contact lens (CL usage and migraine attacks in two cases. Two patients who were diagnosed with migraine reported that the frequency of migraine attacks increased after they switched to using CL with different base curves (BCs. These two patients, who began using CL with different BCs experienced discomfort and dryness of the eye. The ocular complaints were followed by migraine attacks. CL intolerance was also developed during migraine attack in one of the cases. The frequency of migraine attacks decreased and allodynia relieved significantly when flatter BCs were selected. CL related stimulus could have triggered the migraine attack. CLs should be well fitted in migraine patients with allodynia.

  19. Ear acupuncture in the control of migraine pain: selecting the right acupoints by the "needle-contact test".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romoli, M; Allais, G; Airola, G; Benedetto, C

    2005-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that somatic acupuncture can be helpful in migraine treatment, but substantial data on ear acupuncture (EAP) are still lacking. EAP can be useful both in the diagnosis and in the treatment of many medical conditions. As regards the control of migrainous pain, we present a case report in which a procedure called the "needle-contact test" is described in detail. During a migraine attack, the patient undergoes an accurate search for tender points of the outer ear by means of a specific pressure algometer. Once the most sensitive point has been identified, an acupuncture needle is placed in contact with it for about 10 s, without skin penetration. The expected effect is a quick and evident reduction of acute pain. If no appreciable variation in pain intensity occurs within the following 60 s, a second or third attempt is made on other previously identified tender points, until the point at which the patient notices a clear remission of pain is found. In this positive case, the same testing needle can be immediately used for therapy, completely penetrating the skin, and then extracted after about 30 min. Alternatively, a temporary needle can be implanted and left in situ for a variable period of time (1-15 days). This innovative technique allows the identification, with maximum accuracy, of the most effective ear acupoints on migraine pain during acute attacks.

  20. Recombinant EphB4-HSA Fusion Protein and Azacitidine or Decitabine for Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Previously Treated With a Hypomethylating Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Anxiety and depression in migraine.

    OpenAIRE

    Devlen, J

    1994-01-01

    The present study examined the prevalence and severity of anxiety and depression among people with migraine. To obtain a spectrum of migraine experience two potentially different samples were identified: over 600 patients attending migraine clinics and 87 migraine sufferers in the general population. International Headache Society criteria were used to establish the diagnosis of migraine. Anxiety and depression were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale and studies using th...

  2. Migraine and hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Tabeeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of a relationship between migraine and hypertension are being continued. In spite of numerous studies, the association of some types of migraine (migraine with aura and migraine without aura with hypertension has not been fully elucidated. This issue is particularly relevant since these forms differ both clinically and pathophysiologically. Of even greater importance are the analysis and prediction of associations between migraine and cardiovascular diseases (ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease. The review deals with the clinical and pathophysiological features of the relationship between hypertension and migraine. There is evidence for the anatomic and functional correlation between the antinociceptive system and blood pressure (BP regulation control. It has been speculated that the increase in pain threshold is not the result of just hypertension as a disease, but it is caused by elevated BP-related hypalgesia. The efficacy of antihypertensive drugs is the fact that supports the association between hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. Identification of groups of patients having migraine and a high cardiovascular risk will allow timely early primary prevention and therapy. Introduction of a stratification approach at diagnostic stages may cause a reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates.

  3. Behavioural management of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to recognise that migraine is a ′biological′ and not a ′psychological′ entity. However, psychological factors can be involved in migraine in 4 different ways:- 1 Migraines can be triggered by psychological stressors; 2 Severe migraine can itself be a cause of significant psychological stress which can, in turn, exacerbate the problem; 3 Even if psychological stress is not significantly involved in the genesis of the headache, pain management techniques can help people cope with their pain more effectively; 4 Longitudinal data demonstrate a complex bidirectional association between mood disorders and migraine. Treatment of a co-existing mood disorder, for example with cognitive behavioural techniques, may therefore reduce the impact of migraine. It would thus appear logical to view medical and psychological approaches as potentially synergistic rather than mutually exclusive. Functional imaging indicates that cognition, emotions, and pain experiences change the way the brain processes pain inputs. This may provide a physiological rationale for psychological interventions in pain management. As most studies of psychological management of migraine have been relatively small and the approach often varies between clinicians, the magnitude of benefit, optimum method of delivery, and the length of intervention are uncertain.

  4. Diclofenaco intramuscular no tratamento agudo da migrânea: um estudo duplo cego placebo controlado Intramuscular diclofenac in the acute treatment of migraine: a double-blind placebo controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo E. Bigal

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo é avaliar, com mascaramento duplo, o efeito do diclofenaco sobre a dor e sintomas associados em pacientes com crise de migrânea. Sessenta pacientes com migrânea com aura e sessenta pacientes com migrânea sem aura foram randomizados para receber diclofenaco intramuscular, na dose de 75 mg, associado com injeção intravenosa de solução salina, 10 ml, ou para receber solução salina isoladamente. Três parâmetros de avaliação analgésica e uma escala analógica para avaliar os sintomas associados foram usados. Aferimos ainda os percentuais de recorrência e de utilização de medicação de resgate. Pacientes que receberam diclofenaco apresentaram redução na intensidade da dor estatisticamente significativa, 60 minutos após a administração, em dois dos três parâmetros utilizados (migrânea sem aura e nos três parâmetros utilizados (migrânea com aura. Não observamos diferença, comparado com o placebo, na intensidade dos sintomas associados. Houve redução da recorrência e da utilização de medicação de resgate. A despeito de ser uma opção no tratamento das migrâneas em unidades de emergência, o diclofenaco apresenta início de ação lento e nenhum efeito nos sintomas associados.The aim of this study is to assess, in a double blind fashion, the effect of diclofenac on the pain and associated symptoms in patients with acute migraine. 60 patients with migraine with aura and 60 patients with migraine without aura were assigned at random to receiving intramuscular diclofenac, 75 mg associated to intravenous physiological saline, 10 ml, or physiological saline alone. We used 3 parameters of analgesic evaluation and an analogical scale to asses associated symptoms. We also observed the recurrence and rescue medication percentiles. Patients receiving diclofenac showed a statistically significant improvement of pain 60 minutes after the administration in two of the three parameters(migraine

  5. Migraine and Common Morbidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... migraine with aura face a higher risk of ischemic stroke — a stroke that occurs because of a clot ... with aura can take control of their elevated stroke risk. For young women with aura on birth control, Dr. Diener ...

  6. Migraine Variants in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... migraine with aura face a higher risk of ischemic stroke — a stroke that occurs because of a clot ... with aura can take control of their elevated stroke risk. For young women with aura on birth control, Dr. Diener ...

  7. [Use of coronary angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction without previous use of thrombolytic agents. Analysis of 201 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, L A; Cano, M N; Maldonado, G; Feres, F; Pinto, I M; Tanajura, L F; Piegas, L S; Barbosa, M; Timerman, A; Paulista, P P

    1990-11-01

    To evaluate the experience with the use of primary PTCA in the set of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) without the previous administration of thrombolytic agents. Two hundred and one patients with AMI, aged 35 to 86 years (mean = 57.2). There were 83.5% men. Twenty patients were older than 70 years and 48.2% had an anterior AMI. PTCA was performed early in the AMI, with a delay no longer than 12 hours. In 95%, it was done solely to the infarct related artery. Seventy percent patients were in Killip class I, 21% in class II, and 8% in classes III and IV (more than 50% of this subset of patients were in cardiogenic shock). Primary success was achieved in 84.5%. In hospital mortality was 5.9%, and there were 7% reinfarctions. Among the 84 patients who underwent a late cinecoronariography study, there were 19% restenosis and 8.3% reocclusions. In the long term follow up 75% were asymptomatic. Repeat PTCA was required in 10.2% of the cases, late coronary surgery was performed on 10.8% of the patients, and post-hospital cardiac mortality was 8.8% during an average follow up of 28 months (range 2-72 months). Primary PTCA is a effective way of reperfusion in the AMI, with a high primary success, low complications rate and without any major contraindications.

  8. The migraine postdrome

    OpenAIRE

    Giffin, Nicola J.; Lipton, Richard B.; Silberstein, Stephen D.; Olesen, Jes; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report migraine postdrome symptoms in patients who report nonheadache symptoms as part of their attacks. Methods: A prospective daily electronic diary study was conducted over 3 months in 120 patients with migraine. Nonheadache symptoms before, during, and after headache were collected on a daily basis. Visual analogue scales were used to capture the overall level of functioning and the severity of the headache. The postdrome was defined as the time from resolution of troublesom...

  9. The premonitory phase: A crucial stage in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago-Veiga, A B; Vivancos, J; Sobrado, M

    2017-12-22

    The premonitory phase comprises a wide range of symptoms that precede the onset of pain in a migraine episode by up to 48hours. Premonitory symptoms are often not recognised by patients but do have a significant impact on their quality of life. As these symptoms represent the first stage of a migraine attack, they are crucial in improving our understanding of the key points of the origin of migraine. This paper uses a question-answer format to review the main clinical studies analysing premonitory symptoms, their predictive capacity, the relationship between these symptoms and the biology of migraine, and the role of neuroimaging in the premonitory phase. Finally, we discuss the relevance of these symptoms as potential therapeutic targets in the future. This study of the premonitory phase has demonstrated that the hypothalamus plays an essential role in the origin of migraine attacks. We should consider the search for new targets in acute migraine treatment in order to act before the onset of the pain. This would imply a radical change in the lives of patients with migraine. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Validity of the ID-Migraine screener in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siva, A; Zarifoglu, M; Ertas, M; Saip, S; Karli, H N; Baykan, B; Keskinaslan, A; Senocak, M

    2008-04-15

    The impact of migraine on physical, social, and emotional performance is considerable, yet it remains an underdiagnosed disorder. ID-Migraine is a validated migraine-screening tool developed to facilitate diagnosis. This study evaluated the validity and use of the Turkish version of the ID-Migraine screener (ID-Ms) in the workplace, and measured the impact of headache on disability, productivity, and quality of life among the workforce. A total of 465 employees from four companies were interviewed for screening with the ID-Ms. Subjects were included in the study if they reported two or more headaches in the past 3 months and gave a positive answer to one of the two ID-Ms prescreening questions. Eligible subjects completed the ID-Ms, the Migraine Disability Assessment Questionnaire, and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. Subjects were then evaluated for confirmation of their diagnosis according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition (ICHD-2) criteria. A total of 227 subjects (mean age 31.9 +/- 5.9 years; 65.6% women) completed the study. Migraine was diagnosed in 106 of the 227 subjects (46.7%) according to the ID-Ms and in 117 of the 227 subjects (51.5%) according to ICHD-2 criteria. The sensitivity of the ID-Ms was 70.9%, specificity was 79.1% and Cohen kappa value was 0.50. Workdays lost over the previous 3 months due to headache amounted to 8.7 +/- 9.5 days for migraine-positive and 4.9 +/- 6.6 days for migraine-negative subjects. The Turkish version of the ID-Migraine screener is a valid tool for identifying subjects with migraine in the workplace.

  11. Lysine clonixinate versus dipyrone (metamizole for the acute treatment of severe migraine attacks: a single-blind, randomized study Clonixinato de lisina versus dipirona (metamizol para o tratamento agudo de uma crise intensa de enxaqueca: estudo monocego e randomizado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abouch Valenty Krymchantowski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID are effective to treat migraine attacks. Lysine clonixinate (LC and dipyrone (metamizol have been proven effective to treat acute migraine. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of the intravenous formulations of LC and dipyrone in the treatment of severe migraine attacks. METHOD: Thirty patients (28 women, 2 men, aged 18 to 48 years with migraine according the International Headache Society (IHS (2004 were studied. The patients were randomized into 2 groups when presenting to an emergency department with a severe migraine attack. The study was single-blind. Headache intensity, nausea, photophobia and side effects were evaluated at 0, 30, 60 and 90 minutes after the drug administration. Rectal indomethacin as rescue medication (RM was available after 2 hours and its use compared between groups. RESULTS: All patients completed the study. At 30 minutes, 0% of the dipyrone group 13% of the LC group were pain free (p=0.46. At 60 and 90 minutes, 2 (13% and 5 (33% patients from the dipyrone group and 11 (73% and 13 (86.7% patients from the LC group were pain free (pCONTEXTO E OBJETIVO: Antiinflamatórios não esteroidais (AINE são eficazes no tratamento de crises de enxaqueca. O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar a eficácia e a tolerabilidade das apresentações injetáveis do clonixinato de lisina (CL e da dipirona no tratamento de crises intensas de enxaqueca. MÉTODO: Trinta pacientes (28 mulheres, 2 homens, com idades entre 18 e 48 anos e enxaqueca de acordo com a Classificação Internacional de Cefaléias (2004 foram estudados. Os pacientes foram randomizados em 2 grupos ao se apresentarem em uma unidade de emergência, com uma crise intensa de enxaqueca. O desenho do estudo foi monocego. A intensidade da cefaléia, a presença de náusea e fotofobia e os efeitos colaterais foram avaliados e comparados na administração das drogas e após 30

  12. Oral lysine clonixinate in the acute treatment of migraine: a double-blind placebo-controlled study Clonixinato de lisina oral para o tratamento agudo da migrânea: estudo duplo-cego e placebo-controlado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abouch V. Krymchantowski

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Several oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are effective to treat migraine attacks. Lysine clonixinate (LC is a NSAID derived from nicotinic acid that has proven to be effective in various pain syndromes such as renal colic and muscular pain. The aim of this double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to evaluate the efficacy of oral LC compared to placebo in the acute treatment of migraine. Sixty four patients with the diagnosis of migraine, according to the IHS criteria, were studied prospectively. Patients received LC or placebo once the headache reached moderate or severe intensity for 6 consecutive attacks. With regard to the moderate attacks, LC was superior than placebo after 1, 2 and 4 hours. The consumption of other rescue medications after 4 hours was significantly higher in the placebo group. With regard to the severe attacks, there was no difference between the active drug group and the placebo group concerning headache intensity and consumption of other rescue medications. We conclude that the NSAID lysine clonixinate is effective in treating moderately severe migraine attacks. It is not superior than placebo in treating severe migraine attacks.Alguns antinflamatórios não esteroidais (AINEs são eficazes para o tratamento de crises de migrânea. O clonixinato de lisina (CL é um AINE derivado do ácido nicotínico comprovadamente eficaz no tratamento de várias síndromes dolorosas como a cólica renal e a dor muscular. O objetivo deste estudo duplo-cego placebo-controlado foi avaliar a eficácia do CL oral comparado ao placebo no tratamento agudo da migrânea. Sessenta e quatro pacientes com o diagnóstico de migrânea, de acordo com os critérios da Sociedade Internacional de Cefaléia (IHS, foram estudados prospectivamente. Os pacientes receberam CL ou placebo quando a cefaléia atingiu a intensidade moderada ou severa em 6 crises consecutivas. Para as crises moderadas, o CL foi superior ao placebo em 1, 2 e 4

  13. [Migraine in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annequin, D

    2005-07-01

    In childhood and adolescence, migraine is the main primary headache. This diagnosis is largely underestimated and misdiagnosed in the pediatric population. Because of the lack of specific biologic markers, specific investigation tools or brain imaging techniques, these clinical entities are too often considered to be a psychological illness. Migraine is a severe headache evolving by stereotyped attacks associated with marked digestive symptoms (nausea and vomiting); throbbing pain and sensitivity to sound or light are common symptoms; the attack is sometimes preceded by a visual or sensory aura. During attacks, pain intensity is severe; most of the children have to lie down. Abdominal pain is frequently associated, rest brings relief and sleep often ends the attack. The prevalence of migraine varies between 5 percent and 10 percent in childhood. In children, the duration of the headache is quite often shorter than in adults; it is more often frontal and bilateral (2/3 of cases) than one-sided. Migraine is a disabling illness: children with migraine miss more school days in a school year than their matched controls. Migraine episodes are frequently triggered by several factors: emotional stress (school pressure, vexation, excitement: upset), hypoglycemia, lack of sleep or excess (week end migraine), sensorial stimulation (loud noise, bright light, strong odor, heat or cold...), sympathetic stimulation (sports, physical exercise). Treatment must be given early at onset of attacks; oral ibuprofen (10 mg/kg) is recommended. If the oral route in not available because of nausea or vomiting, the rectal or nasal routes can be used. Triptan can be prescribed (body weight above 30 kg) when NSAID (prescribed at right dose and time) fail to abort the attack. Non-drug treatments (relaxation training, self hypnosis, biofeedback) have shown to have good efficacy as prophylactic measures. Daily prophylactic drug treatments are prescribed in second line after failure of non

  14. The Migraine?Stroke Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Mi Ji; Lee, Chungbin; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Migraine and stroke are common neurovascular disorders which share underlying physiological processes. Increased risks of ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and subclinical ischemic lesions have been consistently found in migraineurs. Three possible associations are suggested. One is that underlying pathophysiology of migraine can lead to ischemic stroke. Second, common comorbidities between migraine and stroke can be present. Lastly, some syndromes can manifest with both migraine-like head...

  15. Association between Body Mass Index and Migraine: A Survey of Adult Population in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Both migraine and obesity are prevalent disorders in the general population, which are characterized by disability and impaired quality of life. Although so many researches had studied the association between migraine and obesity, there are still no full knowledge of the relationship between body mass index (BMI and migraine, especially chronic migraine (CM. In this study, we analyzed a previous epidemiological survey data of primary headache patients in Chongqing, which surveyed consecutive neurological outpatients through face-to-face interview with physicians using a headache questionnaire. 166 episodic migraine (EM patients and 134 chronic migraine (CM patients were included in the study out of 1327 primary headache patients. And 200 healthy adults from the physical examination center were included as a control group. Finally, we found that the patients with migraine (EM and CM were more likely to be overweight, obese, or morbidly obese compared to those in the healthy group. Significant difference was found between BMI and frequency of migraine attacks but not severity or duration of headache onset. And no significant difference was found in severity and duration of headache onset between episodic and chronic migraine among different BMI classifications. Such may update our knowledge about the clinical features of migraine and BMI, revealing that the frequency of attacks may be associated with being overweight, obese, or morbidly obese in patients with migraine and that the extent of being overweight, obese, or morbidly obese in CM patients was lower than that in EM patients.

  16. Patterns of use and health expenses associated with triptans among adults with migraines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Noxon, Virginia; Lu, Z Kevin

    2015-08-01

    To determine patterns of use, socioeconomic factors, and the impact on total health expenses associated with triptan therapy among patients with migraines. Patients with migraines were identified from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey household component files (2006 to 2011) and were restricted to those who were 18 years or older and had a migraine diagnosis. The major outcome measures were triptan use during the 2-year period and annualized average total and migraine-related health care expenses and medical utilization. Socioeconomic factors associated with triptan use were analyzed by using logistic regression. The impact of triptan use on total and migraine-related health expenses was assessed by linear regression models with log transformations. Among 1961 patients with a migraine diagnosis (representing 45.6 million individuals in the United States for years 2006 to 2011), 501 received triptans to treat acute migraines (representing 13.1 million individuals in the United States, 28.6%). Patients who were females and had higher income and education levels were more likely to receive triptans to treat migraines. Triptan expense accounted for 49.6% of total migraine-related expenses and 21.9% of total all-cause prescription drug expenses respectively. Compared with nontriptan users, the annualized total health expenses increased by 19.7% in triptan users after adjusting for demographic and health-related variables. The study suggested that socioeconomic factors were associated with triptan use in migraineurs. Higher total and migraine-related health expenses were observed in triptan users.

  17. Migraine headaches in a nutshell

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to severe pain intensity, aggravation by movement, and a pulsating feeling. ... migraine is frequently associated with the so-called medication- .... J Pain Res. 2014;. 185. doi: 10.2147/JPR.S61819. 4. Roceanu A, Antochi F, Bajenaru O. New molecules in migraine treatment. Farmacia. 2015;63(4):475-81. 5. Migraine Phases.

  18. Brain stimulation in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighina, Filippo; Cosentino, Giuseppe; Fierro, Brigida

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a very prevalent disease with great individual disability and socioeconomic burden. Despite intensive research effort in recent years, the etiopathogenesis of the disease remains to be elucidated. Recently, much importance has been given to mechanisms underlying the cortical excitability that has been suggested to be dysfunctional in migraine. In recent years, noninvasive brain stimulation techniques based on magnetic fields (transcranial magnetic stimulation, TMS) and on direct electrical currents (transcranial direct current stimulation, tDCS) have been shown to be safe and effective tools to explore the issue of cortical excitability, activation, and plasticity in migraine. Moreover, TMS, repetitive TMS (rTMS), and tDCS, thanks to their ability to interfere with and/or modulate cortical activity inducing plastic, persistent effects, have been also explored as potential therapeutic approaches, opening an interesting perspective for noninvasive neurostimulation for both symptomatic and preventive treatment of migraine and other types of headache. In this chapter we critically review evidence regarding the role of noninvasive brain stimulation in the pathophysiology and treatment of migraine, delineating the advantages and limits of these techniques together with potential development and future application. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Preventive Migraine Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article reviews the evidence base for the preventive treatment of migraine. Recent Findings: Evidence-based guidelines for the preventive treatment of migraine have recently been published by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the Canadian Headache Society (CHS), providing valuable guidance for clinicians. Strong evidence exists to support the use of metoprolol, timolol, propranolol, divalproex sodium, sodium valproate, and topiramate for migraine prevention, according to the AAN. Based on best available evidence, adverse event profile, and expert consensus, topiramate, propranolol, nadolol, metoprolol, amitriptyline, gabapentin, candesartan, Petasites (butterbur), riboflavin, coenzyme Q10, and magnesium citrate received a strong recommendation for use from the CHS. Summary: Migraine preventive drug treatments are underutilized in clinical practice. Principles of preventive treatment are important to improve compliance, minimize side effects, and improve patient outcomes. Choice of preventive treatment of migraine should be based on the presence of comorbid and coexistent illness, patient preference, reproductive potential and planning, and best available evidence. PMID:26252585

  20. Migraine, Osmophobia, and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Filho, Pedro Augusto Sampaio; Marques, Karine Sobral; Torres, Rinailda Cascia Santos; Leal, Kamila Nazare Ribas

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the association between osmophobia and the characteristics of patients and their headaches, among migraine patients. This was a cross-sectional study. Patients who consecutively sought medical attendance in a primary care unit were asked about their headaches over the last 12 months. Those who had migraine were included. A semi-structured interview, the Headache Impact Test and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used. 147 patients had migraine; 78 had osmophobia; 60 had significant anxiety symptoms; and 78 had significant depression symptoms. The mean age of these patients was 43.2 years (± 13.7); 91.2% were women. The mean length of time with complaints of headache was 13.8 years (± 12). Among the migraine patients, those with anxiety, more years of headache history, and phonophobia presented significantly more osmophobia (multivariate logistic regression). Osmophobia in migraine patients is associated with significant anxiety symptoms, length of headache history, and phonophobia. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Dipyridamole may induce migraine in patients with migraine without aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, C; Lassen, L H; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2006-01-01

    Dipyridamole inhibits phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) and adenosine re-uptake. The most prominent side-effect is headache. We examined the migraine-generating effects of dipyridamole as well as the cerebral blood velocity response in a single-blind study, including 10 patients with migraine without aura...... repeatedly. Headache was induced in all migraine patients and in eight of 10 healthy subjects (P = 0.47) with no significant difference in headache intensity (P = 0.53). However, five patients but only one healthy subject experienced the symptoms of migraine without aura, according to ICHD-2 criteria, within....... Thus, dipyridamole induces symptoms of migraine and an initial decrease in V(mca) in migraine patients, but not significantly more than in healthy subjects. This relatively low frequency of migraine induction, compared with nitric oxide donors and sildenafil, is probably due to the less specific action...

  2. Neurobiology of chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschiano, F; D'Amico, D; Schieroni, F; Bussone, G

    2003-05-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is an important problem for clinicians. It is frequent in tertiary care structures, although at present there is no clear consensus about definitions and operational criteria. In fact, CDH is a group of headache disorders that includes chronic migraine (CM). CDH usually evolves from an episodic headache form, which was migraine in most cases. Several psychopathological factors (e.g. psychiatric comorbidity, personality traits or stressful life events) and some somatic disorders (e.g. like arterial hypertension, allergic condition, sleep disturbances) are frequent in CM patients. Caffeine consumption, alcohol overuse and medication overuse (abortive drugs for migraine) could favour chronicity. The possible role of these factors remains poorly understood. Prospective studies and research about the pathophysiology of chronic pain will lead to a better understanding of CM.

  3. Neurobiology of migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goadsby, P J; Charbit, A R; Andreou, A P; Akerman, S; Holland, P R

    2009-06-30

    Migraine is a complex disorder of the brain whose mechanisms are only now being unraveled. It is common, disabling and economically costly. The pain suggests an important role of the nociceptive activation, or the perception of activation, of trigeminal cranial, particularly intracranial afferents. Moreover, the involvement of a multi-sensory disturbance that includes light, sound and smells, as well as nausea, suggests the problem may involve central modulation of afferent traffic more broadly. Brain imaging studies in migraine point to the importance of sub-cortical structures in the underlying pathophysiology of the disorder. Migraine may thus be considered an inherited dysfunction of sensory modulatory networks with the dominant disturbance affecting abnormal processing of essentially normal neural traffic.

  4. Transcranial magnetic simulation in the treatment of migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Richard B; Pearlman, Starr H

    2010-04-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a diagnostic and therapeutic modality that is being developed as both an acute and preventive treatment for migraine. TMS delivers a fluctuating magnetic field from the scalp surface to induce current in the subjacent cortex. Magnetic pulses are delivered one at a time in single-pulse TMS (sTMS) or as a train of pulses in repetitive TMS (rTMS). For most of its 30-year history, TMS has been delivered in clinical and research settings using large tabletop devices. Based on the theory that sTMS may disrupt cortical spreading depression, sTMS has been studied and shown to be effective as an acute treatment for migraine with aura. Subsequent work in animal models confirms that sTMS disrupts cortical spreading depression. To make outpatient self-treatment possible, a portable device has been developed for acute treatment of migraine with aura. Based on the theory that rTMS alters brain excitability and neurotransmitter activity, rTMS has been studied as a preventive migraine treatment. A small body of evidence suggests that rTMS may have a role, but further studies are needed. In this review, we summarize the data on TMS as a treatment of migraine, and we suggest directions for future research. Copyright 2010 The American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Intravenous valproate sodium (depacon) aborts migraine rapidly: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, N T; Kailasam, J; Meadors, L; Chernyschev, O; Gentry, P

    2000-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate the efficacy and safety of intravenous valproate in the treatment of acute migraine attacks. Numerous studies have shown oral valproate therapy to be effective in preventing migraine. To date, no published studies have explored the use of valproate in the acute treatment of migraine. After obtaining written informed consent, 61 patients presenting to a clinic with acute migraine were infused with 300 mg of intravenous valproate sodium. Sixty-six attacks were treated. The time at the beginning of infusion; the time at the end of infusion; the time to onset of relief of headache, nausea, and other associated symptoms; the time to meaningful relief; and the time to complete relief were recorded. Patient's pulse, blood pressure, and respiration were monitored. Adverse events were recorded. Mean time to onset of relief was 8 minutes, mean time to meaningful relief was 16 minutes, and mean time to complete relief was 25 minutes. A reduction in pain from severe or moderate to mild or no pain in 30 minutes was reported in 37 of 66 attacks; in 11 attacks, a reduction of more than 50% in headache severity in 30 minutes was reported. Thus, 48 (73%) of 66 attacks had significant improvement. After treatment with valproate, headache severity was significantly decreased (P<.0001); nausea, disability, and photophobia decreased; and patients became more alert. No serious adverse events were reported. Intravenous valproate appears to be safe and effective for the acute treatment of migraine. Double-blind, placebo-controlled studies to further investigate the use of this agent in acute treatment of migraine attacks are warranted.

  6. Acute hepatitis B virus infection with simultaneous high HBsAg and high anti-HBs signals in a previously HBV vaccinated HIV-1 positive patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dommelen, Laura; Verbon, Annelies; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Goossens, Valère J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a clinical manifest hepatitis B virus infection and a potentially misleading HBV serological profile in an HIV-1 positive patient despite previous HBV vaccination. The patient presented with an acute hepatitis B and there was no indication of chronic HBV infection or the

  7. Migraines and meditation: does spirituality matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachholtz, Amy B; Pargament, Kenneth I

    2008-08-01

    Migraine headaches are associated with symptoms of depression and anxiety (Waldie and Poulton Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry 72: 86-92, 2002) and feelings of low self-efficacy (French et al. Headache, 40: 647-656, 2000). Previous research suggests that spiritual meditation may ameliorate some of the negative traits associated with migraine headaches (Wachholtz and Pargament Journal of behavioral Medicine, 30: 311-318, 2005). This study examined two primary questions: (1) Is spiritual meditation more effective in enhancing pain tolerance and reducing migraine headache related symptoms than secular meditation and relaxation? and, (2) Does spiritual meditation create better mental, physical, and spiritual health outcomes than secular meditation and relaxation techniques? Eighty-three meditation naïve, frequent migraineurs were taught Spiritual Meditation, Internally Focused Secular Meditation, Externally Focused Secular Meditation, or Muscle Relaxation which participants practiced for 20 min a day for one month. Pre-post tests measured pain tolerance (with a cold pressor task), headache frequency, and mental and spiritual health variables. Compared to the other three groups, those who practiced spiritual meditation had greater decreases in the frequency of migraine headaches, anxiety, and negative affect, as well as greater increases in pain tolerance, headache-related self-efficacy, daily spiritual experiences, and existential well being.

  8. Migraine and risk of hemorrhagic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; González-Pérez, Antonio; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    to select 10,000 controls free from hemorrhagic stroke. Using unconditional logistic regression models, we calculated the risk of hemorrhagic stroke associated with migraine, adjusting for age, sex, calendar year, alcohol, body mass index, hypertension, previous cerebrovascular disease, oral contraceptive...... use, and health services utilization.The risk (odds ratio [OR]) of ICH among migraineurs was 1.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.9-1.5), and of SAH was (1.2, 95% CI 0.9-1.5). The association with ICH was stronger for migraine diagnosed ≥20 years prior to ICH (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.0-2.4), but not with SAH...... (OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.6-2.1). In analyses stratified by migraine type and gender, the OR of ICH in women with migraine with aura was 1.7 (95% CI 0.9-3.4) and the corresponding OR of SAH in women was 1.2 (95% CI 0.6-2.3). CONCLUSION: No clear increased risk of ICH or SAH was observed in migraineurs....

  9. Visual processing in migraine

    OpenAIRE

    OHare, Louise; Hibbard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common neurological condition that often involves differences in visual processing. These sensory processing differences provide important information about the underlying causes of the condition, and for the development of treatments. Review of Psychophysical Literature Psychophysical experiments have shown consistent impairments in contrast sensitivity, orientation acuity, and the perception of global form and motion. They have also established ...

  10. Migraine induced by hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Britze, Josefine

    2016-01-01

    response to hypoxia. In a randomized double-blind crossover study design, 15 migraine with aura patients were exposed to 180 min of normobaric hypoxia (capillary oxygen saturation 70-75%) or sham on two separate days and 14 healthy controls were exposed to hypoxia. Glutamate and lactate concentrations...

  11. Analysis of the MTHFR C677T variant with migraine phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haupt Larisa M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene variant C677T has been implicated as a genetic risk factor in migraine susceptibility, particularly in Migraine with Aura. Migraine, with and without aura (MA and MO have many diagnostic characteristics in common. It is postulated that migraine symptomatic characteristics might themselves be influenced by MTHFR. Here we analysed the clinical profile, migraine symptoms, triggers and treatments of 267 migraineurs previously genotyped for the MTHFR C677T variant. The chi-square test was used to analyse all potential relationships between genotype and migraine clinical variables. Regression analyses were performed to assess the association of C677T with all migraine clinical variables after adjusting for gender. Findings The homozygous TT genotype was significantly associated with MA (P P = 0.002. While the CT genotype was significantly associated with physical activity discomfort (P P = 0.002. Females with the TT genotype were significantly associated with unilateral head pain (P P P = 0.002, and the use of natural remedy for migraine treatment (P = 0.003. Conversely, male migraineurs with the TT genotype experienced higher incidences of bilateral head pain (63% vs 34% and were less likely to use a natural remedy as a migraine treatment compared to female migraineurs (5% vs 20%. Conclusions MTHFR genotype is associated with specific clinical variables of migraine including unilateral head pain, physical activity discomfort and stress.

  12. Laser-evoked potential habituation and central sensitization symptoms in childhood migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, Marina; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Ricci, Katia; Montemurno, Anna; Gentile, Francesco; Vecchio, Eleonora; Barbaro, Maria Grazia Foschino; Simeoni, Michele; Goffredo, Marvita; Livrea, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have addressed central sensitization symptoms and pain processing in childhood migraine. Our aims were to examine pain sensitivity and responses, including habituation, evoked by CO2 laser stimuli (laser-evoked potentials (LEPs)) in a cohort of children with migraine compared to non-migraine controls and to determine the correlation between LEP features and signs of central sensitization. Thirty-five patients 8-15 years of age with migraines without aura were evaluated during the inter-critical phase and were compared to 17 controls. LEPs were analyzed, and their main features were correlated with clinical symptoms including allodynia and pericranial tenderness. The laser-evoked pain threshold was lower and the N2P2 vertex complex amplitude was higher in children with migraines. Furthermore, habituation of vertex waves of LEPs clearly showed a tendency toward progressive amplitude enhancement in the migraine group. Acute allodynia and inter-critical pericranial tenderness correlated with trigeminal LEP features, particularly with the abnormal habituation pattern. Abnormalities of pain processing and symptoms of central sensitization appear to be characteristics of children with migraine. Reduced habituation and progressive amplification of cortical responses to laser stimuli indicate an overactive nociceptive system at the onset of migraine, and this hyperactivity may subtend allodynia and pericranial tenderness. Future prospective trials may aid in the early identification of clinical phenotypes that display a tendency to develop into the chronic form of migraine, warranting a timely therapeutic approach. © International Headache Society 2015.

  13. Patterns and predictors of analgesic use in pregnancy: a longitudinal drug utilization study with special focus on women with migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Gerd-Marie Eskerud; Wood, Mollie; Eberhard-Gran, Malin; Lundqvist, Christofer; Nordeng, Hedvig

    2017-07-14

    Few studies have investigated the drug utilization patterns and factors predicting drug use in pregnant women with migraine. This longitudinal drug utilization study aimed to describe patterns of analgesic use in a sample of Norwegian pregnant women according to their migraine history, and to identify predictors for analgesic use among these women. Pregnant women giving birth at Akershus University Hospital between 2008 and 2010 were recruited at ultrasound examination in gestational week 17. Data were collected by questionnaires in gestational weeks 17 and 32, and at 8 weeks postpartum, and linked to birth records. Women were grouped into four categories according to migraine history: no migraine history, previous migraine history, recent migraine history (within 1 year prior to pregnancy) and migraine in pregnancy. Patterns of use of analgesics were analyzed descriptively. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify factors predicting analgesic use. Out of 1981 women, 5.0% reported having migraine in pregnancy, 13.2% had a recent history of migraine, 11.5% had a previous history of migraine, and 68.8% reported no history of migraine. Analgesic use declined during pregnancy. Many women switched from triptans and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to paracetamol, which constituted most of the analgesic use. Factors associated with analgesic use included recent migraine history (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.2), more severe headache intensity (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.3-1.4), smoking (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.3) and multiparity (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.7). Women with migraine stop or switch medications during pregnancy. Analgesic use in pregnancy is affected by migraine characteristics and intensity, and also by socio-demographic factors. Clinicians should bear this in mind when giving advice on adequate management of migraine in pregnancy and safe analgesic use.

  14. Histamine-1 receptor blockade does not prevent nitroglycerin induced migraine. Support for the NO-hypothesis of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L H; Thomsen, L L; Kruuse, C

    1996-01-01

    . To evaluate whether GTN causes headache via liberation of histamine, we studied the effect of GTN 0.5 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 for 20 min in seven migraine sufferers, once after pretreatment with the histamine-1 (H1)-receptor blocker mepyramine (0.5 mg.kg-1) and once without pretreatment. This mepyramine dose......It has previously been shown that in migraine sufferers infusion of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) and histamine causes an immediate headache during the infusion and a genuine migraine attack one to several hours after the infusion. This identical time profile indicates a common mechanism of action...... is known to completely abolish histamine-induced headache. After pretreatment with mepyramine five patients experienced migraine, and without pretreatment six patients did so. The median peak headache score was 7 on a 0-10 scale with and without mepyramine pretreatment. The arterial responses, evaluated...

  15. Bipolar Affective Disorder and Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birk Engmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper consists of a case history and an overview of the relationship, aetiology, and treatment of comorbid bipolar disorder migraine patients. A MEDLINE literature search was used. Terms for the search were bipolar disorder bipolar depression, mania, migraine, mood stabilizer. Bipolar disorder and migraine cooccur at a relatively high rate. Bipolar II patients seem to have a higher risk of comorbid migraine than bipolar I patients have. The literature on the common roots of migraine and bipolar disorder, including both genetic and neuropathological approaches, is broadly discussed. Moreover, bipolar disorder and migraine are often combined with a variety of other affective disorders, and, furthermore, behavioural factors also play a role in the origin and course of the diseases. Approach to treatment options is also difficult. Several papers point out possible remedies, for example, valproate, topiramate, which acts on both diseases, but no first-choice treatments have been agreed upon yet.

  16. A Case of Acute Myeloid Leukemia with a Previously Unreported Translocation (14; 15 (q32; q13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Khawandanah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We hereby describe what we believe to be the first reported case of t (14; 15 (q32; q13 associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Methods. PubMed, Embase, and OVID search engines were used to review the related literature and similar published cases. Case. A47-year-old female presented in December 2011 with AML (acute myelomonocytic leukemia with normal cytogenetics; molecular testing revealed FLT-3 internal tandem duplication (ITD mutation, while no mutations involving FLT3 D385/I836, NPM1 exon 12, or KIT exons 8 and 17 were detected. She was induced with 7 + 3 (cytarabine + idarubicin and achieved complete remission after a second induction with high-dose cytarabine (HiDAC followed by uneventful consolidation. She presented 19 months after diagnosis with relapsed disease. Of note, at relapse cytogenetic analysis revealed t (14; 15 (q32; q13, while FLT-3 analysis showed a codon D835 mutation (no ITD mutation was detected. She proved refractory to the initial clofarabine-based regimen, so FLAG-idarubicin then was used. She continued to have persistent disease, and she was discharged on best supportive care. Conclusion. Based on this single case of AML with t (14; 15 (q32; q13, this newly reported translocation may be associated with refractory disease.

  17. A Case of Acute Myeloid Leukemia with a Previously Unreported Translocation (14; 15) (q32; q13).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawandanah, Mohamad; Gehrs, Bradley; Li, Shibo; Holter Chakrabarty, Jennifer; Cherry, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Background. We hereby describe what we believe to be the first reported case of t (14; 15) (q32; q13) associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Methods. PubMed, Embase, and OVID search engines were used to review the related literature and similar published cases. Case. A47-year-old female presented in December 2011 with AML (acute myelomonocytic leukemia) with normal cytogenetics; molecular testing revealed FLT-3 internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutation, while no mutations involving FLT3 D385/I836, NPM1 exon 12, or KIT exons 8 and 17 were detected. She was induced with 7 + 3 (cytarabine + idarubicin) and achieved complete remission after a second induction with high-dose cytarabine (HiDAC) followed by uneventful consolidation. She presented 19 months after diagnosis with relapsed disease. Of note, at relapse cytogenetic analysis revealed t (14; 15) (q32; q13), while FLT-3 analysis showed a codon D835 mutation (no ITD mutation was detected). She proved refractory to the initial clofarabine-based regimen, so FLAG-idarubicin then was used. She continued to have persistent disease, and she was discharged on best supportive care. Conclusion. Based on this single case of AML with t (14; 15) (q32; q13), this newly reported translocation may be associated with refractory disease.

  18. Migraine and Central Sensitization: Clinical Features, Main Comorbidities and Therapeutic Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, Marina; Sciruicchio, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a very common neurologic disorder, characterized by recurrent attacks of severe headache, autonomic nervous system dysfunction and in some patients by an aura. Migraine is a very common neurologic disorder of neuro-vascular origin, being amongst the 20 most disabling diseases. Migraine attacks are characterized by severe headache, associated to autonomic nervous system dysfunction and in some patients by aura. Pathophysiology and Role of Central Sensitization: Abnormal neuronal excitability may subtend altered processing of sensory stimuli, leading to cortical spreading depression and trigeminal activation. A dysfunction of pain modulation enhances central sensitization phenomena, contributing to acute allodynia and headache persistence. The peculiarity of migraine pain facilitates the use of analgesics, and causes an adjunctive invalidating tendency toward drug over-use. Comorbidity: Chronic migraine patients are frequently affected by diffuse pain, framed in fibromyalgia diagnosis. This comorbidity seems to be supported by common pathophysiological mechanisms. It may aggravate migraine invalidity being worth of consideration for therapeutic management. Migraine Management: Acute and preventive treatments need to be tailored to single cases. Main comorbidity and factors facilitating central sensitization should be taken into account. The management of migraine patients should include a link between headache centers and general practitioner, in order to provide for a better patient information and treatment just at the onset of the disease. Despite its high epidemiologic impact, migraine is frequently underestimated and destined to evolve into chronic form and drugs abuse. A more focused attention to factors facilitating central sensitization and invalidating comorbidities, should reduce the global burden of the disease. migraine, pathophysiology, central sensitization, fibromyalgia comorbidity, acute and preventive therapy, patients - centered approach.

  19. Low brain magnesium in migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, N.M.; Halvorson, H.; Vande-Linde, A.; Levine, S.R.; Helpern, J.A.; Welch, K.M.

    1989-01-01

    Brain magnesium was measured in migraine patients and control subjects using in vivo 31-Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. pMg and pH were calculated from the chemical shifts between Pi, PCr and ATP signals. Magnesium levels were low during a migraine attack without changes in pH. We hypothesize that low brain magnesium is an important factor in the mechanism of the migraine attack

  20. Food and migraine in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Bouhairet

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Migraine headaches are a common problem worldwide, especially in adolescents. They are usually chronic, with frequent relapses. Therefore, any dietary risk factor for headaches has important implications on migraineurs. However, the association between migraine and diet needs to be examined further. Objective To investigate the association between diet and migraine in adolescents. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in August to September 2009 on 13 - 18 year old adolescents in a senior high school in Medan, North Sumatera. We included subjects diagnosed with migraine, according to the International Headache Society (IHS criteria. Ninety participants completed the questionnaire. Foods we observed for a link to migraine included milk, chocolate, ice cream, cheese, bread, instant noodles, meatballs, chili sauce, sweetener, yoghurt, pizza, and other foods and beverages. Results Of the 90 participants with migraines, there were more females (61.1% than males. There were statistically significant associations between migraine and triggering foods (P = 0.045, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.79 as well as between migraine and family history of migraine (P = 0.043, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.66. Stress (P = 0.164, menstruation (P = 0.369, and sound or light (P= 0.577 had no significant association with migraine. A wide variety of foods and beverages were implicated as migraine precipitants. The most common were chili sauce (75.8%, ice cream (71.0%, milk (67.7%, instant noodles (67.7%, chocolate (61.3%, peanuts (59.7%, cheese (54.8% and meatballs (54.8%. Conclusion Food and family history have a significant association with the occurrence of migraine in adolescents.

  1. Newly diagnosed and previously known diabetes mellitus and 1-year outcomes of acute myocardial infarction: the VALsartan In Acute myocardial iNfarcTion (VALIANT) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguilar, David; Solomon, Scott D; Køber, Lars

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A prior diagnosis of diabetes mellitus is associated with adverse outcomes after acute myocardial infarction (MI), but the risk associated with a new diagnosis of diabetes in this setting has not been well defined. METHODS AND RESULTS: We assessed the risk of death and major cardiovas...

  2. Synesthesia and Migraine: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alstadhaug Karl B

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synesthesia is, as visual migraine aura, a common and fascinating perceptual phenomenon. Here we present a unique case with synesthesias exclusively during visual migraine auras. Case presentation A 40-year-old woman with a cyclic mood disorder had suffered from migraine with visual aura for several years. On several occasions she had experienced "mixing of senses" during the aura phase. Staring at strong bright light she could experience intense taste of lemon with flow from the salivary glands. Conclusion Acquired synesthesia, exclusively coincident with migraine aura, gives support to the idea of an anomalous cortical processing underlying the phenomenon.

  3. MIGRAINE AND STROKE: VASCULAR COMORBIDITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donata eGuidetti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Several comorbidities are associated to migraine.Recent meta-analyses have consistently demonstrated a relationship between migraine and stroke, which is well-defined for ischaemic stroke and migraine with aura, even stronger in females on oral contraceptives or smokers. However, there seems to be no clear-cut association between stroke in migraineurs and the common vascular risk factors, at least in the young adult population. Migraineurs also run an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke, while the association between migraine and cardiovascular disease remains poorly defined.Another aspect is the relationship between migraine and the presence of silent brain lesions. It has been demonstrated that there is an increased frequency of ischaemic lesions in the white matter of migraineurs, especially silent infarcts in the posterior circulation territory in patients with at least 10 attacks per month. Although there is a higher prevalence of patent foramen ovale (PFO in migraineurs, the relationship between migraine and PFO remains controversial and PFO closure is not a recommended procedure to prevent migraine. As an increased frequency of cervical artery dissections has been observed in migrainous patients, it has been hypothesized that migraine may represent a predisposing factor for cervical artery dissection. There still remains the question as to whether migraine should be considered a true vascular disease or if the comorbidity between migraine and cerebrovascular disease may have underlying shared risk factors or pathophysiological mechanisms. Although further studies are required to clarify this issue, current evidence supports a clinical management where MA patients should be screened for other concomitant vascular risk factors and treated accordingly.

  4. Spotlight on frovatriptan: a review of its efficacy in the treatment of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allais G

    2016-10-01

    -effectiveness advantages versus other triptans could drive selection of the most appropriate treatment for acute migraine attacks. Keywords: migraine, frovatriptan, menstrual, dexketoprofen, triptans, migraine with aura

  5. Migraine and risk of narcolepsy in children: A nationwide longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun-Pai; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Hsieh, Vivian Chia-Rong

    2017-01-01

    The association between migraine and narcolepsy remains controversial. We aim to investigate whether migraine is associated with an increased risk of developing narcolepsy in children. In this longitudinal study, nationwide medical-claims data of pediatric patients (0-17y) with migraine are identified using the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) between 1997 and 2010 in Taiwan. Two cohorts are selected: migraine cases (n = 8,923) and propensity score-matched non-migraine controls (n = 35,692). Children with previous history of narcolepsy or headache before the index date are excluded. Cohorts are followed until the end of 2012, their withdrawal from the NHI program, or incidence of narcolepsy (ICD-9-CM: 347). Cox proportional hazards regression models are used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals of developing narcolepsy in children with migraine compared to their non-migraine controls. A total of 13 incident cases with narcolepsy are observed during follow-up, with incidence rates of 0.1915 and 0.0278 per 1,000 person-years in migraine and non-migraine children, respectively. After a mean follow-up period of 4.68 and 5.04 years in the case and control cohort, respectively, the former exhibited a greater risk of developing narcolepsy compared to the latter (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 5.30, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.61, 17.4; p = 0.006). This finding persisted after controlling for potential confounders like baseline comorbidities and concurrent medication uptake, and in our analyses with migraine subtypes. Migraine is an independent risk factor for narcolepsy development in children. Further studies are needed to validate our findings and to explore the exact pathophysiological mechanisms linking migraine and narcolepsy.

  6. Prevalence and characteristics of migraine in medical students and its impact on their daily activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Menon

    2013-01-01

    study identified previously less-recognized triggers like head movement and accompanying symptoms like neck stiffness. Migraine-attributed burden was high in medical students.

  7. Comorbidities, medications and depressive symptoms in patients with restless legs syndrome and migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Ferreira

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The pathophysiology of migraine and restless legs syndrome (RLS seems to involve inherited mechanism and dysfunction of the dopaminergic system. Previous articles have shown that the frequency of RLS is higher in migraine patients than in controls. We conducted a study to evaluate comorbidities, medication used and depressive symptoms that can explain the relation between migraine and RLS. METHODS: A case-control study was performed in which patients with migraine (n=72 and a control group without migraine (n=72 were interviewed. Data including RLS diagnosis, depressive symptoms, comorbidities and drugs used were evaluated. RESULTS: There was a significant association between migraine and RLS (p=0.01, but comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, anemia and drugs used did not explain this association. Depression scores, as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory, were higher in migraine patients with RLS (p =0.04. CONCLUSION: No specific factors explaining the association between migraine and RLS were found. Symptoms of depression were more frequent in patients with migraine and RLS.

  8. Arterial responses during migraine headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Nielsen, T H; Olesen, J

    1990-01-01

    The superficial temporal artery has been thought to be the main focus of pain during migraine attacks, but its diameter has never been measured directly. The use of a new, high-resolution ultrasound machine to measure arterial size in 25 migraine patients with unilateral head pain showed that the...

  9. Genetics of migraine and related syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, Anine Henrike

    2014-01-01

    In this dissertation clinical genetic investigations on migraine, related syndromes and comorbid conditions are described. The first migraine syndrome studied is Familial Hemiplegic Migraine (FHM), a monogenic migraine variant. The clinical spectrum of FHM1-3 and the relation with closely related

  10. Trigger factors for familial hemiplegic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Hauge, Anne Werner; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to identify and describe migraine trigger factors in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) from a population-based sample.......The aim was to identify and describe migraine trigger factors in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) from a population-based sample....

  11. Quasi-experimental Effectiveness of Cognitive-behavioral Therapy on Reliving Migraine Headaches in Migraine Sufferers

    Science.gov (United States)

    EBRAHIMI MOGHADAM, Hosein; KARIMI, Ahoo; SEIFI, Kimia

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy on relieving migraine headaches in migraine sufferers. Materials & Methods In this quasi-experimental study with pre-test and post-test method, the samples were outpatients of public hospitals in Ilam City, southwestern Iran since May-Jul 2010. They were selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, and divided into experimental and control groups. The data were analyzed using SPSS ver. 16 and via multivariate covariance method. Results Cognitive-behavioral therapy affected on reducing the duration of symptoms of migraine in sufferers (P<0.05). Conclusion Cognitive behavioral therapy effects on reducing the time duration of symptoms of migraine headaches. Thistherapeutic method increases the level of individual, familial, social and occupational activities by reducing the time duration of symptoms and this method helps the individuals to resume their activities and regain their previous control instead of founding themselves incapable and helpless due to the pain they suffer from. PMID:29201122

  12. Perfusion-weighted MR imaging in persistent hemiplegic migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourand, Isabelle; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas; Carra-Dalliere, Clarisse; Le Bars, Emmanuelle; Bonafe, Alain; Thouvenot, Eric [Hopital Gui de Chauliac, Service de Neuroradiologie, Montpellier (France); Roubertie, Agathe [Hopital Gui de Chauliac, Service de Neuropediatrie, Montpellier (France)

    2012-03-15

    Hemiplegic migraine is a rare type of migraine that has an aura characterized by the presence of motor weakness, which may occasionally last up to several days, and then resolve without sequela. Pathogenesis of migraine remains unclear and, recently, perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) has provided a non-invasive method to study hemodynamic changes during acute attacks. Two female patients were admitted in our hospital suffering from prolonged hemiparesis. In both cases, they underwent MRI examination using a 1.5 T magnet including axial diffusion-weighted and perfusion sequences. From each perfusion MRI acquisition two regions of interest were delineated on each hemisphere and, the index of flow, cerebral blood volume, mean transit time, and time to peak were recorded and asymmetry indices from each perfusion parameter were calculated. Perfusion alterations were detected during the attacks. In one case, we observed, after 3 h of left hemiparesia, hypoperfusion of the right hemisphere. In the other case, who presented a familial hemiplegic migraine attack, on the third day of a persistent aura consisting of right hemiplegia and aphasia, PWI revealed hyperperfusion of the left hemisphere. Asymmetry indices for temporal parameters (mean transit time and time to peak) were the most sensitive. These findings resolved spontaneously after the attacks without any permanent sequel or signs of cerebral ischemia on follow-up MRI. PWI should be indicated for patients with migraine attacks accompanied by auras to assess the sequential changes in cerebral perfusion and to better understand its pathogenesis. (orig.)

  13. Perfusion-weighted MR imaging in persistent hemiplegic migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourand, Isabelle; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas; Carra-Dalliere, Clarisse; Le Bars, Emmanuelle; Bonafe, Alain; Thouvenot, Eric; Roubertie, Agathe

    2012-01-01

    Hemiplegic migraine is a rare type of migraine that has an aura characterized by the presence of motor weakness, which may occasionally last up to several days, and then resolve without sequela. Pathogenesis of migraine remains unclear and, recently, perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) has provided a non-invasive method to study hemodynamic changes during acute attacks. Two female patients were admitted in our hospital suffering from prolonged hemiparesis. In both cases, they underwent MRI examination using a 1.5 T magnet including axial diffusion-weighted and perfusion sequences. From each perfusion MRI acquisition two regions of interest were delineated on each hemisphere and, the index of flow, cerebral blood volume, mean transit time, and time to peak were recorded and asymmetry indices from each perfusion parameter were calculated. Perfusion alterations were detected during the attacks. In one case, we observed, after 3 h of left hemiparesia, hypoperfusion of the right hemisphere. In the other case, who presented a familial hemiplegic migraine attack, on the third day of a persistent aura consisting of right hemiplegia and aphasia, PWI revealed hyperperfusion of the left hemisphere. Asymmetry indices for temporal parameters (mean transit time and time to peak) were the most sensitive. These findings resolved spontaneously after the attacks without any permanent sequel or signs of cerebral ischemia on follow-up MRI. PWI should be indicated for patients with migraine attacks accompanied by auras to assess the sequential changes in cerebral perfusion and to better understand its pathogenesis. (orig.)

  14. Positron emission tomography and migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabriat, H.

    1992-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a brain imaging technique that allows in vivo studies of numerous physiological parameters. There have been few PET studies in migraine patients. Cerebral blood flow changes with no variations in brain oxygen consumption have been reported in patients with prolonged neurologic manifestations during migraine attacks. Parenteral administration of reserpine during migraine headache has been followed by a fall in the overall cerebral uptake of glucose. The small sample sizes and a number of methodologic problems complicate the interpretation of these results. Recent technical advances and the development of new PET tracers can be expected to provide further insight into the pathophysiology of migraine. Today cerebral cortex 5 HT 2 serotonin receptors can be studied in migraine patients with PET

  15. Ion channelopathies and migraine pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albury, Cassie L; Stuart, Shani; Haupt, Larisa M; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-08-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder that affects approximately 12-20% of the general adult population. Migraine pathogenesis is complex and not wholly understood. Molecular genetic investigations, imaging and biochemical studies, have unveiled a number of interconnected neurological pathways which seem to have a cause and effect component integral to its cause. Much weight of migraine attack initiation can be placed on the initial trigger and the pathways involved in its neuronal counter reaction. Ion channels play a large role in the generation, portrayal and mitigation of the brains response to external triggers. Several genetic studies have identified and implicated a number of ion channelopathy genes which may contribute to this generalised process. This review will focus on the genetics of migraine with particular emphasis placed on the potentially important role genes HEPH (responsible for iron transport and homeostasis) and KCNK18 (important for the transport and homeostasis of potassium) play in migraine cause.

  16. Future possibilities in migraine genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudkjøbing, Laura Aviaja; Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Olesen, Jes

    2012-01-01

    Migraine with and without aura (MA and MO, respectively) have a strong genetic basis. Different approaches using linkage-, candidate gene- and genome-wide association studies have been explored, yielding limited results. This may indicate that the genetic component in migraine is due to rare...... variants; capturing these will require more detailed sequencing in order to be discovered. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques such as whole exome and whole genome sequencing have been successful in finding genes in especially monogenic disorders. As the molecular genetics research progresses......, the technology will follow, rendering these approaches more applicable in the search for causative migraine genes in MO and MA. To date, no studies using NGS in migraine genetics have been published. In order to gain insight into the future possibilities of migraine genetics, we have looked at NGS studies...

  17. An analysis of 97 previously diagnosed de novo adult acute erythroid leukemia patients following the 2016 revision to World Health Organization classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shaowei; Jiang, Erlie; Wei, Hui; Lin, Dong; Zhang, Guangji; Wei, Shuning; Zhou, Chunlin; Liu, Kaiqi; Wang, Ying; Liu, Bingcheng; Liu, Yuntao; Gong, Benfa; Gong, Xiaoyuan; Feng, Sizhou; Mi, Yingchang; Han, Mingzhe; Wang, Jianxiang

    2017-08-09

    The incidence of acute erythroid leukemia subtype (AEL) is rare, accounting for 5% of cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and the outcome is dismal. However, in 2016 revision to the WHO classification, the subcategory of AEL has been removed. Myeloblasts are redefined as the percentage of total marrow cells, not non-erythroid cells. Therefore, the previously diagnosed AEL cases are currently diagnosed as AML or myelodyspalstic syndrome (MDS) according to new criteria. We respectively reviewed cases of 97 de novo previously diagnosed AEL and all the patients were diagnosed as AML or MDS according to the new classification scheme, and then the clinical characteristics of these two subtypes were compared. Statistical analyses were performed by SPSS software version 18.0. The median age was 37 years-old, the two-thirds of previous AEL cases were diagnosed as MDS, and there was no obvious difference between two subtypes except for male/female ratio and age. Cytogenetic, rather than MDS/AML subtypes, can better represent the prognostic factor of previously diagnosed AEL patients. When the cytogenetic risk of patients belonged to MRC intermediate category and age were below 40 years-old in previous AEL cases, the patients who received induction chemotherapy without transplantation had a similar survival compared with the patients who underwent transplantation (3-year OS: 67.2% vs 68.5%). Cytogenetic, rather than MDS/AML subtypes, can better represent the prognostic factor of previously diagnosed AEL patients. Transplantation was a better choice for those whose cytogenetic category was unfavorable.

  18. A Controlled Trial of Erenumab for Episodic Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goadsby, Peter J; Reuter, Uwe; Hallström, Yngve; Broessner, Gregor; Bonner, Jo H; Zhang, Feng; Sapra, Sandhya; Picard, Hernan; Mikol, Daniel D; Lenz, Robert A

    2017-11-30

    We tested erenumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, for the prevention of episodic migraine. We randomly assigned patients to receive a subcutaneous injection of either erenumab, at a dose of 70 mg or 140 mg, or placebo monthly for 6 months. The primary end point was the change from baseline to months 4 through 6 in the mean number of migraine days per month. Secondary end points were a 50% or greater reduction in mean migraine days per month, change in the number of days of use of acute migraine-specific medication, and change in scores on the physical-impairment and everyday-activities domains of the Migraine Physical Function Impact Diary (scale transformed to 0 to 100, with higher scores representing greater migraine burden on functioning). A total of 955 patients underwent randomization: 317 were assigned to the 70-mg erenumab group, 319 to the 140-mg erenumab group, and 319 to the placebo group. The mean number of migraine days per month at baseline was 8.3 in the overall population; by months 4 through 6, the number of days was reduced by 3.2 in the 70-mg erenumab group and by 3.7 in the 140-mg erenumab group, as compared with 1.8 days in the placebo group (P<0.001 for each dose vs. placebo). A 50% or greater reduction in the mean number of migraine days per month was achieved for 43.3% of patients in the 70-mg erenumab group and 50.0% of patients in the 140-mg erenumab group, as compared with 26.6% in the placebo group (P<0.001 for each dose vs. placebo), and the number of days of use of acute migraine-specific medication was reduced by 1.1 days in the 70-mg erenumab group and by 1.6 days in the 140-mg erenumab group, as compared with 0.2 days in the placebo group (P<0.001 for each dose vs. placebo). Physical-impairment scores improved by 4.2 and 4.8 points in the 70-mg and 140-mg erenumab groups, respectively, as compared with 2.4 points in the placebo group (P<0.001 for each dose vs. placebo

  19. Acute interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuervo M, Francisco; Carrillo Bayona, Jorge; Ojeda, Paulina

    2004-01-01

    The paper refers to a 71 year-old patient, to who is diagnosed acute interstitial pneumonia; with square of 20 days of evolution of cough dry emetizant, fever, general uneasiness, migraine, progressive dyspnoea and lost of weight

  20. Calcitonin gene-related peptide does not cause migraine attacks in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob M; Thomsen, Lise L; Olesen, Jes

    2011-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key molecule in migraine pathogenesis. Intravenous CGRP triggers migraine-like attacks in patients with migraine with aura and without aura. In contrast, patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) with known mutations did not report more migraine......-like attacks compared to controls. Whether CGRP triggers migraine-like attacks in FHM patients without known mutations is unknown....

  1. Sexual Dysfunction in Women With Migraine and Overweight/Obesity: Relative Frequency and Association With Migraine Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Dale S; Pavlović, Jelena M; Lipton, Richard B; Graham Thomas, J; Digre, Kathleen B; Roth, Julie; Rathier, Lucille; O'Leary, Kevin C; Evans, E Whitney; Wing, Rena R

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies suggest that migraine might be associated with female sexual dysfunction (FSD), although this association may be complicated by overweight/obesity. To disentangle relationships of migraine and obesity with FSD, we examined: (1) FSD rates in women who had migraine and obesity with a matched sample of women with obesity who were free of migraine and (2) associations between indices of migraine severity and FSD in a larger sample of participants with migraine and overweight/obesity, controlling for important confounders. Women with migraine and obesity seeking behavioral weight loss treatment to decrease headaches (n = 37) and nonmigraine controls (n = 37) with obesity seeking weight loss via bariatric surgery were matched on age (±5 years), body mass index (BMI; ±3 kg/m 2 ), and reported sexual activity during the past month. Both groups completed the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), with a validated FSFI-total cutoff score used to define FSD. In participants with migraine and overweight/obesity (n = 105), separate logistic regression models evaluated associations of migraine attack frequency, intensity, and duration with odds of having FSD, controlling for age, BMI, depression, and anxiety. On average, participants and matched controls had severe obesity (BMI = 42.4 ± 3.8 kg/m 2 ; range = 35-49.9) and were 37.3 ± 7.2 years of age (range = 22-50). FSD rate did not differ between migraine participants and controls (56.8% vs. 54.1%, P = .82). In the larger sample of participants with migraine and overweight/obesity (38.2 ± 7.8 years of age; BMI = 34.8 ± 6.4 [range = 25-50 kg/m 2 ]; 8.0 ± 4.3 migraine days/month, maximum pain intensity = 5.9 ± 1.4 on 0-10 scale; average attack duration = 18.3 ± 9.7 hours), FSD was not associated with attack frequency (P = .31), pain intensity (P = .92), or attack duration (P = .35) but was associated with more severe anxiety

  2. Calcitonin gene-related peptide triggers migraine-like attacks in patients with migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Hauge, Anne Werner; Olesen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key molecule in migraine pathogenesis. Intravenous CGRP infusion triggers delayed migraine-like attacks in patients with migraine without aura (MO). In contrast to patients with MO, in prior studies patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) did...... not report more migraine-like attacks compared to controls. Whether CGRP triggers migraine in patients with typical (non-hemiplegic) migraine with aura is (MA) unknown. In the present study we examined the migraine inducing effect of CGRP infusion in patients suffering from MA and healthy controls....

  3. Headaches and Migraines: Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Headaches and Migraines Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of Contents For ... types of headache. Each has distinct symptoms and treatments. Migraine ... and Diagnosis Migraine: The most common of vascular headaches, migraines ...

  4. Stress hormone corticosterone enhances susceptibility to cortical spreading depression in familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutant mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shyti, Reinald; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; van Heiningen, Sandra H.; Meijer, Onno C.; Ayata, Cenk; Joëls, Marian|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070219249; Ferrari, Michel D.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Tolner, Else A.

    2015-01-01

    Stress is a putative migraine trigger, but the pathogenic mechanisms involved are unknown. Stress and stress hormones increase neuronal excitability by enhancing glutamatergic neurotransmission, but inhibitory effects have also been reported. We hypothesise that an acute rise in stress hormones,

  5. Frequency of Migraine Headaches in Patients With Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Brinder; Whipple, Mary O; Tepper, Stewart J; Mohabbat, Arya B; Stillman, Mark; Vincent, Ann

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of migraine headache in a large cohort of patients with fibromyalgia using a brief migraine headache-screening tool. Several studies report a high prevalence of fibromyalgia among patients with migraine headaches, but there is a dearth of research evaluating the frequency of migraine headaches in patients with fibromyalgia, despite clinical observations suggesting that migraine headaches are common in patients with fibromyalgia. This was a cross-sectional survey study. Patients (N = 3717) with a previous diagnosis of fibromyalgia who were members of the Mayo Clinic Fibromyalgia Registry were contacted by electronic survey and asked to complete a brief demographic and medical history questionnaire and the validated ID-Migraine screener. A total of 1730 patients (46.5%) completed the electronic survey. The majority of participants were white (97.2%), female (92.5%), with a mean age of 56.2 (±13.1) years. Of the respondents, 966 (55.8%) met criteria for migraine headaches. Hypertension (309 [32.3%] vs. 294 [40.1%], P = .004), asthma (312 [32.5%] vs. 189 [25.9%], P = .011), irritable bowel syndrome (520 [54.6%] vs. 348 [47.6], P = .017), chronic fatigue syndrome (486 [50.7%] vs. 271 [37.1], P fibromyalgia. Clinicians who care for either population must be aware that these conditions commonly overlap and can significantly increase a patient's cumulative disease burden. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  6. Association of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms with migraine and headache after a natural disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcaya, Mariana C; Lowe, Sarah R; Asad, Asad L; Subramanian, S V; Waters, Mary C; Rhodes, Jean

    2017-05-01

    Previous research shows that migraine and general headache symptoms increase after traumatic events. Questions remain about whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) produces migraine/headache symptoms, or if individuals afflicted by migraine/headache are especially likely to develop PTSD. We test whether PTSD symptoms following a natural disaster are associated with higher odds of reporting frequent headaches/migraines postdisaster. We decompose PTSD into intrusion, avoidance, and hyperarousal symptom clusters to examine which, if any, are uniquely related to headache/migraine postdisaster. We use prospectively collected pre- and postdisaster data to explore whether overall PTSD symptoms and symptom clusters are associated with migraine/headache in a sample of Hurricane Katrina survivors. We account for severity of hurricane exposure and control for baseline migraine and headache problems to reduce the probability that heightened PTSD susceptibility among those who already suffered from the conditions could explain observed associations. PTSD symptoms were associated with higher odds of experiencing frequent headaches or migraines with a standard deviation change in PTSD score corresponding to over twice the odds (95% confidence interval [1.64, 2.68]) of having trouble with frequent headaches or migraines in the post-Katrina period. Each additional point on the intrusion subscale (sample M [SD] = 1.6 [1.1]) was associated with 55% higher odds of reporting frequent headache/migraine (95% confidence interval [1.03, 2.33]), but we found no association with avoidance or hyperarousal symptoms. Clinicians and disaster planners should be aware that disaster survivors might be at heightened risk of migraine/headache episodes, and those experiencing intrusive reminders may be most affected. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Acute hepatitis B virus infection with simultaneous high HBsAg and high anti-HBs signals in a previously HBV vaccinated HIV-1 positive patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dommelen, Laura; Verbon, Annelies; van Doorn, H Rogier; Goossens, Valère J

    2010-03-01

    We present a case of a clinical manifest hepatitis B virus infection and a potentially misleading HBV serological profile in an HIV-1 positive patient despite previous HBV vaccination. The patient presented with an acute hepatitis B and there was no indication of chronic HBV infection or the presence of a mutation in the 'a' determinant. Remarkably, simultaneously with high HBV surface antigen and HBV viral load, high anti-HBs antibodies were present. If, due to previous HBV vaccination only anti-HBs was tested in this patient, the result of the high anti-HBs antibodies could be very misleading and offering a false sense of security. Our findings contribute to the ongoing discussion on how to assess HBV specific immunological memory and determining the role of HBV booster vaccinations in immunocompromised individuals.

  8. [The migraine of Immanual Kant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podoll, K; Hoff, P; Sass, H

    2000-07-01

    The German philosopher Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) suffered, since his forties, from a migraine with aura which showed a significant exacerbation in his seventies, coinciding with the onset of symptoms of a senile dementia of Alzheimer's type. Recorded symptoms of Kant's migraine include recurrent scintillating scotomas, one episode of diplopia, two episodes of complete amaurosis and frequent headaches described as oppressions of the head. The said symptoms of Kant's migraine can be traced not only in his letters and in accounts of his contemporary biographers, but also in the philosopher's published work.

  9. Motion sickness in migraine sufferers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Furman, Joseph M; Balaban, Carey D

    2005-12-01

    Motion sickness commonly occurs after exposure to actual motion, such as car or amusement park rides, or virtual motion, such as panoramic movies. Motion sickness symptoms may be disabling, significantly limiting business, travel and leisure activities. Motion sickness occurs in approximately 50% of migraine sufferers. Understanding motion sickness in migraine patients may improve understanding of the physiology of both conditions. Recent literature suggests important relationships between the trigeminal system and vestibular nuclei that may have implications for both motion sickness and migraine. Studies demonstrating an important relationship between serotonin receptors and motion sickness susceptibility in both rodents and humans suggest possible new motion sickness prevention therapies.

  10. Subcutaneous delivery of sumatriptan in the treatment of migraine and primary headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore JC

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Johanna C Moore, James R MinerDepartment of Emergency Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: Subcutaneous sumatriptan is an effective treatment for pain from acute migraine headache, and can be used in patients with known migraine syndrome and in patients with primary headaches when secondary causes have been excluded. In limited comparative trials, subcutaneous sumatriptan performed in a manner comparable with oral eletriptan and intravenous metoclopramide, was superior to intravenous aspirin and intramuscular trimethobenzamide-diphenhydramine, and was inferior to intravenous prochlorperazine for pain relief. The most common side effects seen with subcutaneous sumatriptan are injection site reactions and triptan sensations. As with all triptans, there is a risk of rare cardiovascular events with subcutaneous sumatriptan and its use should be limited to those without known cerebrovascular disease and limited in those with known cardiovascular risk factors and unknown disease status. In studies of patient preference and tolerability, the subcutaneous formulation has a faster time of onset and high rate of efficacy when compared with the oral formulation, but the oral formulation appears to be better tolerated. It is important to consider the needs of the patient, their past medical history, and what aspects of migraine treatment are most important to the patient when considering treatment of acute migraine or primary headache. Subcutaneous sumatriptan is a good first-line agent for the treatment of pain from acute migraine headaches and primary headaches.Keywords: sumatriptan, subcutaneous, migraine headache, primary headache

  11. Squamous Carcinoma of the Lung Presenting as Migraine-Type Headache: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eswaran Waran

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Orthostatic hypotension has long been recognised as a paraneoplastic effect of lung cancer. Lung cancer presenting with orthostatic hypotension and migraine-type headaches has not been previously described in the literature. Case Report: A 62-year-old Caucasian male presented with headaches, typical of his migraine, after a 30-year migraine-free period. An examination revealed a significant postural drop in BP with reflex tachycardia and no other features of dysautonomia. Investigations showed a metastatic squamous cell lung cancer. Pharmacological treatment of orthostatic hypotension resolved the migraine-type headaches. Discussion: Orthostatic hypotension is associated with lung cancer. Prompt pharmacological treatment in patients not responding to non-pharmacological therapy can provide relief from disabling symptoms of orthostatic hypotension. In this patient, this included symptoms consistent with migraine-type headaches.

  12. Increased intrinsic brain connectivity between pons and somatosensory cortex during attacks of migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2017-01-01

    The neurological disturbances of migraine aura are caused by transient cortical dysfunction due to waves of spreading depolarization that disrupt neuronal signaling. The effects of these cortical events on intrinsic brain connectivity during attacks of migraine aura have not previously been...... investigated. Studies of spontaneous migraine attacks are notoriously challenging due to their unpredictable nature and patient discomfort. We investigated 16 migraine patients with visual aura during attacks and in the attack-free state using resting state fMRI. We applied a hypothesis-driven seed......-based approach focusing on cortical visual areas and areas involved in migraine pain, and a data-driven independent component analysis approach to detect changes in intrinsic brain signaling during attacks. In addition, we performed the analyses after mirroring the MRI data according to the side of perceived...

  13. Higher P-Wave Dispersion in Migraine Patients with Higher Number of Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Koçer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective and Aim. An imbalance of the sympathetic system may explain many of the clinical manifestations of the migraine. We aimed to evaluate P-waves as a reveal of sympathetic system function in migraine patients and healthy controls. Materials and Methods. Thirty-five episodic type of migraine patients (complained of migraine during 5 years or more, BMI < 30 kg/m2 and 30 controls were included in our study. We measured P-wave durations (minimum, maximum, and dispersion from 12-lead ECG recording during pain-free periods. ECGs were transferred to a personal computer via a scanner and then used for magnification of x400 by Adobe Photoshop software. Results. P-wave durations were found to be similar between migraine patients and controls. Although P WD (P-wave dispersion was similar, the mean value was higher in migraine subjects. P WD was positively correlated with P max (P<0.01. Attacks number per month and male gender were the factors related to the P WD (P<0.01. Conclusions. Many previous studies suggested that increased sympathetic activity may cause an increase in P WD. We found that P WD of migraine patients was higher than controls, and P WD was related to attacks number per month and male gender. Further studies are needed to explain the chronic effects of migraine.

  14. Cranial Autonomic Symptoms in Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Cranial autonomic symptoms (CAS in patients with migraine and cluster headaches (CH were characterized and compared in a prospective study of consecutive patients attending a headache clinic at Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan.

  15. Sphenopalatine ganglion neuromodulation in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Sabrina; Schoenen, Jean; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article is to review the prospect of treating migraine with sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) neurostimulation. BACKGROUND: Fuelled by preliminary studies showing a beneficial effect in cluster headache patients, the potential of treating migraine with neurostimulation...... has gained increasing interest within recent years, as current treatment strategies often fail to provide adequate relief from this debilitating headache. Common migraine symptoms include lacrimation, nasal congestion, and conjunctival injection, all parasympathetic manifestations. In addition......, studies have suggested that parasympathetic activity may also contribute to the pain of migraineurs. The SPG is the largest extracranial parasympathetic ganglion of the head, innervating the meninges, lacrimal gland, nasal mucosa, and conjunctiva, all structures involved in migraine with cephalic...

  16. What Is an Ocular Migraine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2014. http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com. Accessed July 5, 2017. Jogi V, et al. More clinical observations on migraine associated with monocular visual symptoms in an Indian population. ...

  17. Temporomandibular disorders and migraine headache

    OpenAIRE

    Demarin, Vida; Bašić Kes, Vanja

    2010-01-01

    Migraine headache and temporomandibular disorders show significant overlap in the area or distribution of pain, the gender prevalence and age distribution. Temporomandibular disorders may cause headaches per se, worsen existent primary headaches, and add to the burden of headache disorders. The patients with combined migraine and tension-type headaches had a higher prevelance of temporomandibular disorders. Evidence supporting a close relationship include the increased masticatory...

  18. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...... in the methodology and quality of the MRS migraine studies over time, some results were consistent and reproducible. 31P-MRS studies suggested reduced availability of neuronal energy and implied a mitochondrial dysfunction in the migraine brain. 1H-MRS studies reported interictal abnormalities in the excitatory...... and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting persistent altered excitability in migraine patients. N-Acetylaspartate levels were decreased in migraine, probably due to a mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal energy metabolism. The reported abnormalities may increase...

  19. Anger, depression and personality dimensions in patients with migraine without aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Fassino, Secondo; Lo Giudice, Rossana; Rainero, Innocenzo; Gramaglia, Carla; Marech, Lucrezia; Amianto, Federico; Gentile, Salvatore; Pinessi, Lorenzo

    2007-01-01

    Migraine without aura causes acute and chronic pain and partially compromises patients' social functioning and work performance. Over the past years, psychiatric comorbidities were frequently observed in these patients, together with coping difficulties and typical personality traits. The aim of this study was to identify whether migraine patients and controls share distinctive personality traits. 105 consecutive patients suffering from migraine without aura referred to the Headache Center of Turin University were enrolled in the study and compared to a control group of 79 healthy subjects. Patients and controls completed several psychometric questionnaires, including the Temperament and Character Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory and the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. Patients suffering from migraine show more depressive symptoms, difficult anger management with a tendency to hypercontrol, and a distinctive personality profile with high harm avoidance, high persistence and low self-directedness. When a logistic regression was performed, the only significant predictors of migraine were temperament variables. The results suggest that the personality traits and psychosomatic mechanisms of migraine patients may make them vulnerable to stress and less skilled in coping with pain. These traits correlate with dysregulated neurotransmitter systems which may also be part of the psychobiological components of personality, depressive disorders and migraine itself. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Migraine comorbidity constellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietjen, Gretchen E; Herial, Nabeel A; Hardgrove, Jacqueline; Utley, Christine; White, Leah

    2007-06-01

    To identify distinct constellations of comorbid disorders occurring in migraineurs, and to examine differences in demographics, headache profiles, and psychosocial features between the comorbidity constellations. This is a retrospective electronic chart review of consecutive new female outpatients diagnosed with migraine (n = 223) using International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD)-II criteria. Questionnaire collected information on comorbid diagnoses, current depression, somatic symptoms, psychosocial stressors, and antidepressant use, social and abuse history. Cluster analysis, based on nonheadache disorders, was performed and differences between the resulting groups were examined. We identified 3 groups. Group 1 (n = 55) was defined by hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and hypothyroidism; Group 2 (n = 83) by depression, anxiety, and fibromyalgia; Group 3 (n = 85) by the absence of defining comorbidities. Group 1 had more males (22% vs 5% vs 12%, P constellations, with differing headache and psychosocial profiles, suggesting heterogeneity of genetic and environmental factors. This may have implications for diagnosis and disease management.

  1. [Migraine with visual aura].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidot, S; Biotti, D

    2016-06-01

    Migraine with visual aura is marked by recurrent episodes of transient visual disturbance, often followed by headaches. Its pathophysiology has not been fully understood, but visual auras might be related to a self-propagating wave of cortical depolarization called "cortical spreading depression", triggering a trigemino-vascular "storm" ultimately leading to headaches. The most specific visual symptom is the "fortification spectrum" consisting of glimmering jagged lines spreading from the center to the periphery, and leaving a transient scotoma in its wake. Other visual symptoms are numerous, ranging from elementary positive or negative visual phenomena to complex and elaborate hallucinations. The diagnosis can be made according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders revised in 2013. The main goal of the treatment is to relieve the patient's pain quickly and to decrease the frequency of the episodes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Ischaemia-induced (symptomatic) migraine attacks may be more frequent than migraine-induced ischaemic insults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Friberg, L; Olsen, T S

    1993-01-01

    with or without headache. A severe internal carotid stenosis/occlusion and reduced regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was demonstrated. Borderline ischaemia may thus prime the brain for developing migrainous aura with or without migraine (symptomatic migraine). Four patients had a combination of permanent...... deficits after the very first migraine attack, severe atherosclerosis, risk factors for stroke, high age and no family history of migraine. In these cases the evidence indicates that thromboembolic ischaemia had triggered an attack of migraine with aura (likely symptomatic migraine). Three young females...... presented long-lasting typical and severe idiopathic migraine with aura. Attack-associated rCBF reduction was likely to have caused permanent, mild, visual or somatosensory deficits (migrainous infarction). In five patients the relationship between migraine and stroke remained unresolved. It seems...

  3. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome and Migraine in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Pei Lin

    2011-06-01

    Conclusion: Results of the study show that younger onset age and headache during CVS attacks may have increased risk of migraine development. Large-scale prospective studies are warranted to further clarify the relationship between CVS and migraine.

  4. Antiphospholipids antibodies and migraine | Nyandaiti | Sahel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thrombotic neurological conditions such as migraine. We set out to estimate the concentration of antiphospholipids antibody among patients with migraine and normal population. Methods: This is prospective case-control study of 158 subjects ...

  5. Impact of Migraine on School Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Karceski, MD The impact of migraine on school performance Daniel Kantor, MD e168 WHAT QUESTION DID THE ... overlooked problem: how migraine headache affects the school performance of children. 1 It is bad enough to ...

  6. Migraine Medications and Antidepressants: A Risky Mix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health risks associated with taking migraine medications and antidepressants at the same time? Answers from Jerry W. ... that combining migraine medications called triptans with certain antidepressants — including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: familial hemiplegic migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plomp JJ, Frants RR, van den Maagdenberg AM, Ferrari MD. Genetic models of migraine. Arch Neurol. 2007 ... van den Maagdenberg AM, Haan J, Terwindt GM, Ferrari MD. Migraine: gene mutations and functional consequences. Curr ...

  8. EFFICACY AND TOLERABILITY OF STOPAIN FOR A MIGRAINE ATTACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eSt. Cyr

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo determine whether topical menthol 6% gel will relieve a migraine attack.Materials and MethodsA single-center, open-label pilot trial of 25 patients with at least one year of diagnosed episodic migraine and < 15 headache days per month. Patients treated one migraine attack with STOPAIN topical menthol 6% gel to skull base within 2 hours of headache onset. Headache pain severity was assessed prior to and after gel application. ResultsThirty-two patients enrolled and 25 completed the study. Prior to treatment, seven patients had mild pain, 13 moderate pain, and five severe pain. Two hours following gel application, 7 patients had no pain, 7 mild pain, 6 moderate pain and 5 severe pain. The majority of patients had similar pain intensity (8; 32 % or improvement (13; 52%. At 24-hour, only 2 non-rescued patients still had mild headache. Of the 25 completers, two patients took rescue medication prior to the 2-hour period, and an additional 10 patients rescued between 2 and 24 hours. ConclusionStudy results showed a significant improvement in headache intensity by 2 hours after gel application. This pilot study shows STOPAIN gel may be effective in treating an acute migraine attack.

  9. Nitroglycerin provocation in normal subjects is not a useful human migraine model?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedskov, J F; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Olesen, J

    2010-01-01

    Provoking delayed migraine with nitroglycerin in migraine sufferers is a cumbersome model. Patients are difficult to recruit, migraine comes on late and variably and only 50-80% of patients develop an attack. A model using normal volunteers would be much more useful, but it should be validated...... aspirin 1000 mg, zolmitriptan 5 mg or placebo to normal healthy volunteers. The design was double-blind, placebo-controlled three-way crossover. Our hypothesis was that these drugs would be effective in the treatment of the mild constant headache induced by long-lasting GTN infusion. The headaches did...... experiment suggests that headache caused by direct nitric oxide (NO) action in the continued presence of NO is very resistance to analgesics and to specific acute migraine treatments. This suggests that NO works very deep in the cascade of events associated with vascular headache, whereas tested drugs work...

  10. [Migraine in children and adolescents-brain and muscle? : Another example of why children are not small adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf, M N; König, H; Hannibal, I; Langhagen, T; Bonfert, M V; Klose, B; Rahmsdorf, B; Giese, R M; Straube, A; von Kries, R; Albers, L; Ebinger, F; Ertl-Wagner, B; Kammer, B; Körte, I; Sollmann, N; Krieg, S; Heinen, F

    2017-12-01

    Migraine as primary headache is a life-long disease which is relevant for the quality of life and is based on complex genetics. It often starts in childhood with symptoms typical for the specific age. These show different nuances compared to the migraine symptoms in adults, for example, regarding (bilateral/unilateral) localization of the acute migraine headache. Only over the course of years-during adolescence and young adulthood-do the more specific symptoms as defined by the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD 3 beta) develop. In this article we focus on the clinical specifics of children and adolescents with migraine. We elaborately refer to the trigeminocervical complex (TCC) because it forms a conceptual bridge for the understanding of migraine, for psychoeducation, and for therapeutic options. We pragmatically discuss options and limits of treatments.

  11. Evidence for a vascular factor in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Mohammad S; Hansen, Adam E; Amin, Faisal Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that migraine is caused by neural dysfunction without involvement of vasodilatation. Because dismissal of vascular mechanisms seemed premature, we examined diameter of extra- and intracranial vessels in migraine without aura patients.......It has been suggested that migraine is caused by neural dysfunction without involvement of vasodilatation. Because dismissal of vascular mechanisms seemed premature, we examined diameter of extra- and intracranial vessels in migraine without aura patients....

  12. Spotlight on frovatriptan: a review of its efficacy in the treatment of migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allais, Gianni; Benedetto, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurovascular disorder, affecting millions of people worldwide. Current guidelines recommend triptans as first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe migraine attacks. Frovatriptan is a second-generation triptan with a longer terminal elimination half-life in blood than other triptans (~26 hours). Three double-blind, randomized crossover preference studies have been recently conducted, assessing efficacy and safety of frovatriptan versus rizatriptan, zolmitriptan, and almotriptan, respectively. Frovatriptan showed favorable tolerability and sustained effect, with a significantly lower rate of relapse over 48 hours versus the other triptans. These findings were confirmed in a series of analyses of patient subsets from the three studies, including patients with menstrually related and oral contraceptive-induced migraine, hypertension, obesity, weekend migraine, as well as patients with migraine with aura. In all patient subsets analyzed, lower headache recurrence rates were observed versus the comparator triptans, indicating a more sustained pain-relieving effect on migraine symptoms. A further randomized, double-blind study demonstrated that frovatriptan given in combination with the fast-acting cyclooxygenase inhibitor dexketoprofen provided improved migraine pain-free activity at 2 hours, and gave more sustained pain-free activity at 24 hours, versus frovatriptan alone. These benefits were observed both when the combination was administered early (1 hour after onset). Different pharmacokinetic, but synergistic, properties between frovatriptan and dexketoprofen may make the combination of these agents particularly effective in migraine treatment, with rapid onset of action and sustained effect over 48 hours. These benefits, together with potential cost-effectiveness advantages versus other triptans could drive selection of the most appropriate treatment for acute migraine attacks. PMID:27757013

  13. Treatment of migraine attacks based on the interaction with the trigemino-cerebrovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Link, A.S.; Kuris, A.; Edvinsson, L.

    2008-01-01

    with the intensity of the headache. The development of drugs of the triptan class has provided relief for the acute attacks but at the cost of, mainly cardiovascular, side effects. Thus, the intention to improve treatment led to the development of small CGRP receptor antagonists such as olcegepant (BIBN4096BS......) and MK-0974 that alleviate the acute migraine attack without acute side events. The purpose of this review is to give a short overview of the pathological background of migraine headache and to illustrate the mechanisms behind the actions of triptans and the promising CGRP receptor blockers...... disorder. It has been discovered that the trigemino-cerebrovascular system plays a key role in migraine headache pathophysiology by releasing the potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). This neuropeptide is released in parallel with the pain and its concentration correlates well...

  14. Picasso's migraine: Illusory cubist splitting or illusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haan, Joost; Ferrari, Michel D

    2011-07-01

    It is widely believed that Pablo Picasso suffered from migraine. The main cause for this is our suggestion made 10 years ago that some of Picasso's paintings resemble migraine auras. Here we critically look back at our own hypothesis. We conclude that, although the idea is still fascinating, there is no proof of Picasso suffering from migraine with aura.

  15. Migraine symptomatology and major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, Lannie; Penninx, Brenda; Nyholt, Dale R.; Distel, Marijn A.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    Introduction and objective: Migraine and major depressive disorder (MDD) frequently co-occur, but it is unclear whether depression is associated with a specific subtype of migraine. The objective of this study was to investigate whether migraine is qualitatively different in MDD patients (N = 1816)

  16. The impact of migraine on health status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essink-Bot, M. L.; van Royen, L.; Krabbe, P.; Bonsel, G. J.; Rutten, F. F.

    1995-01-01

    PROBLEMS--What is the effect of migraine on health status, defined as the patient's physical, psychological, and social functioning? And, suppose that the health status of migraine sufferers appears to be impaired, to what extent is this a consequence of migraine-associated comorbidity rather than

  17. Exploring genes and pathways involved in migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eising, E.

    2017-01-01

    The research in this thesis was aimed at identifying genes and molecular pathways involved in migraine. To this end, two gene expression analyses were performed in brain tissue obtained from transgenic mouse models for familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), a monogenic subtype of migraine with aura.

  18. The impact of migraine on health status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essink-Bot, M L; van Royen, L; Krabbe, P; Bonsel, G J; Rutten, F F

    PROBLEMS: What is the effect of migraine on health status, defined as the patient's physical, psychological, and social functioning? And, suppose that the health status of migraine sufferers appears to be impaired, to what extent is this a consequence of migraine-associated comorbidity rather than

  19. Migraine in menopausal women: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripa, Patrizia; Ornello, Raffaele; Degan, Diana; Tiseo, Cindy; Stewart, Janet; Pistoia, Francesca; Carolei, Antonio; Sacco, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that migraine activity is influenced by hormonal factors, and particularly by estrogen levels, but relatively few studies have investigated the prevalence and characteristics of migraine according to the menopausal status. Overall, population-based studies have shown an improvement of migraine after menopause, with a possible increase in perimenopause. On the contrary, the studies performed on patients referring to headache centers have shown no improvement or even worsening of migraine. Menopause etiology may play a role in migraine evolution during the menopausal period, with migraine improvement more likely occurring after spontaneous rather than after surgical menopause. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy has been found to be associated with migraine worsening in observational population-based studies. The effects of several therapeutic regimens on migraine has also been investigated, leading to nonconclusive results. To date, no specific preventive measures are recommended for menopausal women with migraine. There is a need for further research in order to clarify the relationship between migraine and hormonal changes in women, and to quantify the real burden of migraine after the menopause. Hormonal manipulation for the treatment of refractory postmenopausal migraine is still a matter of debate. PMID:26316824

  20. Effectiveness of standardized combination therapy for migraine treatment in the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Stephanie; Bulloch, Blake; Young, Christine; Yonker, Marcy; Hostetler, Mark

    2013-03-01

    To compare outcomes of pediatric migraine patients treated in an emergency department (ED) before and after implementation of a standardized combination intravenous therapy regimen aimed toward improving and standardizing abortive migraine therapy. In a pediatric ED, migraines represent 8-18% of all headache visits. Despite this large number, no standard treatment for acute migraine therapy currently exists. The study utilized a retrospective chart review of patients seeking acute migraine treatment at a tertiary care, pediatric ED from August 2006 to March 2010. Inclusion criteria were pediatric migraine patients as defined by International Headache Society guidelines. The comparison population received various migraine therapies based on attending practice preference. After October 2008, patients received standardized intravenous combination therapy involving a normal saline fluid bolus, ketorolac, prochlorperazine, and diphenhydramine. Occasionally, metoclopramide was substituted during prochlorperazine shortages. Reduction in headache pain score was the primary outcome. Secondary outcome measures included length of ED stay, hospital admission rate, and ED readmission rate within 48 hours. The study yielded 87 patients who received standardized combination therapy and 165 comparison patients. No significant difference in patient characteristics existed when evaluating patient demographics, outpatient medication use, and initial headache pain score. When compared with the non-standardized therapy population, the combination therapy patients revealed significant reductions in pain score (decrease of 5.3 vs. 6.9, difference -1.6, 95% confidence interval -2.2 to -0.8, P pediatric migraine therapy in the ED by significantly reducing headache pain scores, length of ED stay, and hospital admission rates. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  1. Comparison of the effects of dietary factors in the management and prophylaxis of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyazit Zencirci

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Beyazit Zencirci11Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Medical Faculty of Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaras, TurkeyAbstract: Migraine is defined as a disorder characterized by intermittent headache episodes, accompanied with nausea, photophobia and/or phonophobia. Pharmacological therapy is in accordance with the severity of pain and may include acute, prophylactic and most commonly both approaches. The aim of the acute therapy is stopping or alleviating the attack or progression of the pain and in case of a migraine attack that has started, lessening the pain it. Preventive therapy aims to reduce attack frequency and severity. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of dietary factors in the management and prophylaxis of migraine in cases diagnosed as having migraine disorder according to the 2003-IHS criteria. Fifty consecutive Turkish patients (13 men, 37 women with diagnosis of migraine were randomly divided into two groups for treatment protocols with the written approval of the ethics committee. The cases in the first group (K were treated with metoprolol, vitamin B2 (riboflavin, and naproxen sodium just at the aura or at the beginning of the attacks. The cases in the second group (D were also supplied with a comprehensive dietary list arranged by our algology clinics in addition to the same medication protocol. There were no demographic differences between the cases (P > 0.05. VAS scores were lower in group D than group K (P < 0.01, and also the migraine attack frequencies and monthly amounts of analgesic consumed amounts were also statistically significantly less. It was concluded that beta-blocker and riboflavin therapy supplemented with convenient diet with appropriate alternatives in patients with migraine disorder was associated with statistically significant decreases in headache frequency, intensity, duration and medication intake.Keywords: migraine, food intake, trigger

  2. Treatment of chronic migraine: a 3-month comparator study of naproxen sodium vs SumaRT/Nap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Roger; Nett, Robert; Dexter, Kent; Freitag, Fred; Beach, M E; Manley, Heather R

    2014-01-01

    To compare the use of a combination of 85 mg sumatriptan plus 500 mg naproxen sodium in a combination tablet with 500 mg naproxen sodium in an identically appearing tablet when used as a daily preventative and acute treatment for 1 month and episodic acute treatment for an additional 2 months in patients with chronic migraine. To date, there has been minimal study of acute medications for patients with chronic migraine. Consequently, there is a paucity of study methodology or evidence-based guidance on the use of acute treatment medications in patients with chronic migraine. This two-center, double-blind, randomized, parallel-group, comparator pilot trial of 28 subjects, 18 to 65 years of age, with ICHD-II defined chronic migraine, was designed to generate hypotheses about the efficacy of 2 established acute migraine medications used both as a daily preventive treatment (month 1) and episodic acute treatment (months 1, 2, and 3). Subjects were randomized 1:1 to treat daily with SumaRT/Nap (85 mg sumatriptan + 500 mg naproxen sodium) (group A) or naproxen sodium (500 mg) (group B) in a prophylactic strategy for 1 month followed by 2 months of the same medications used for episodic acute treatment. The combination of SumaRT/Nap used over a 3-month period did not appear to significantly reduce the number of migraine headache days. In the subset of subjects using naproxen sodium and completing the study per protocol, there was a marked reduction in migraine headache days (P Nap (group A) did not appear to reduce migraine headache frequency over a 3-month period. Subjects using naproxen sodium (group B) alone and completing the study per protocol had a marked statistically significant reduction in migraine headache days. Both groups completing the study per protocol had experienced clinically meaningful 2-hour headache relief. This suggests there may be a subset of patients with chronic migraine that are responsive to high doses of naproxen as an acute

  3. SumaRT/Nap vs naproxen sodium in treatment and disease modification of migraine: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Roger; O'Carroll, Phillip; Dexter, Kent; Freitag, Fred; Shade, Candace L

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study explored the potential for 2 recognized acute migraine medications, 85 mg of sumatriptan plus 500 mg of naproxen sodium in a combination tablet (SumaRT/Nap) and 500 mg of naproxen sodium, to treat and modify the disease progression of migraine. In other words, can these medications both abort an acute attack of migraine and reduce the number of future migraine attacks? Patients suffering with moderate to severe attacks of migraine desire acute treatment. As migraine frequency increases, so does the need for more frequent relief of acute attacks. This may lead to medication overuse and potentially medication overuse headache (MOH). Ideally, acute medication would have the ability to abort an attack of migraine and reduce the likelihood of future attacks. The primary endpoint of this study was a reduction in migraine headache days from baseline through month 3 of the study. Subjects were randomized 1:1 to treat 14 or fewer migraines per month with SumaRT/Nap (Group A) or naproxen sodium (Group B) for 3 months. Subjects in group A utilized SumaRT/Nap were encouraged, but not required, to treat migraine headache within 1 hour of onset of headache when the pain was mild. They could re-treat if needed after 2 hours. Subjects in group B utilized the same treatment strategy with 500 mg of naproxen sodium. Tablets of study medication were identical for both groups. Subjects recorded headache days, migraine attacks, duration of attacks, treatment, and treatment results daily on paper diaries. Subjects took the Migraine Disability Assessment Test (MIDAS) at randomization and 3 months later at the end of study. Naproxen sodium was associated with a statistically significant reduction in migraine headache days at month 3 compared to baseline (P = .0002). SumaRT/Nap was also associated with a reduction of migraine headache days, but this decrease did not reach statistical significance (P = .2). In addition, subjects in the naproxen sodium group

  4. Quality of Life and Migraine Disability among Female Migraine Patients in a Tertiary Hospital in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Munvar Miya; Hassan, Norul Badriah; Gan, Siew Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background. Disability caused by migraine may be one of the main causes of burden contributing to poor quality of life (QOL) among migraine patients. Thus, this study aimed to measure QOL among migraine sufferers in comparison with healthy controls. Methods. Female diagnosed migraine patients (n= 100) and healthy controls (n=100) completed the Malay version of the World Health Organization QOL Brief (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire. Only migraine patients completed the Malay version of the Migraine Disability Assessment questionnaire. Results. Females with migraines had significantly lower total WHOQOL-BREF scores (84.3) than did healthy controls (91.9, Pmigraine patients with lower total QOL scores had 1.2 times higher odds of having disability than patients with higher total QOL scores. Conclusions. The present study showed that migraine sufferers experienced significantly lower QOL than the control group from a similar population. Disability was severe and frequent and was associated with lower QOL among the migraine patients. PMID:25632394

  5. Vitamin supplementation as possible prophylactic treatment against migraine with aura and menstrual migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Munvar Miya; Gan, Siew Hua

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common form of headache disorder globally. The etiology of migraine is multifactorial, with genetic components and environmental interactions considered to be the main causal factors. Some researchers postulate that deficits in mitochondrial energy reserves can cause migraine or an increase in homocysteine levels can lead to migraine attacks; therefore, vitamins could play a vital role in migraine prevention. For instance, riboflavin influences mitochondrial dysfunction and prevents migraine. Genes such as flavoenzyme 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), especially the C677T variant, have been associated with elevated plasma levels of homocysteine and migraine with aura. Homocysteine catalyzation requires the presence of vitamins B6, B12, and folic acid, which can decrease the severity of migraine with aura, making these vitamins potentially useful prophylactic agents for treating migraine with aura. Menstrual migraine, on the other hand, is associated with increased prostaglandin (PG) levels in the endometrium, indicating a role for vitamin E, which is an anti-PG. Vitamin C can also be used as a scavenger of reactive oxygen species for treating neurogenic inflammation in migraine patients. This paper reviews possible therapies based on vitamin supplementation for migraine prophylaxis, focusing on migraine with aura and menstrual migraine.

  6. Prevalence of Migraine Headache in Epileptic Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayena Jabbehdari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders which a physician might come across in his career life. On the other hand, migraine is common disorders in society chronic headache such as migraine in epileptic patients give ride to difficulties in seizure treatment due to altering the sleeping pattern and calmness disarrangement. Therefore, early diagnosis and suitable treatment in epileptic patients is definitely inevitable, and it will help in a more desirable patients' treatment. So we aimed to evaluate the prevalence of migraine in epileptic patients and relation between these two disorders. Number of 150 epileptic patients attended to neurology clinic of Shohadaye Tajrish Hospital and Iranian Epilepsy Association between June 2010 to May 2011 were fulfilled the questionnaire, and the data has been assessed by SPSS software. In this study, we used MS-Q (migraine screening -questionnaire designed for early diagnosis of migraine in the general population. From all patients filling the questionnaire, the prevalence of migraine (with or without aura was as follows: 23 persons had criteria compatible with migraine with aura; 26 patients had migraine without aura. Migraine was more common in these patients: persons with academic degrees, women, patients who were used 2 antiepileptic drugs, and patients with high BMI. In this study, we showed that migraine in epileptic patients is more prevalent than the general population. Thus, early diagnosis and efficient treatment of migraine headache in these patients is mandatory. More studies are needed for evaluation of this issue.

  7. Migraine among medical students in Kuwait University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashel, Jasem Y; Ahmed, Samar Farouk; Alroughani, Raed; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-05-10

    Medical students routinely have triggers, notably stress and irregular sleep, which are typically associated with migraine. We hypothesized that they may be at higher risk to manifest migraine. We aimed to determine the prevalence of migraine among medical students in Kuwait University. This is cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study. Participants who had two or more headaches in the last 3 months were subjected to two preliminary questions and participants with at least one positive response were asked to perform the validated Identification of Migraine (ID Migraine™) test. Frequency of headache per month and its severity were also reported. Migraine headache was suggested in 27.9% subjects based on ID-Migraine™. Migraine prevalence (35.5% and 44%, versus 31.1%, 25%, 21.1%, 14.8%, 26.5%, p Kuwait University compared to other published studies. The migraine prevalence, frequency and headache severity, all increased in the final two years of education.

  8. Chronic migraine--classification, characteristics and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Dodick, David W; Goadsby, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    According to the revised 2nd Edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, primary headaches can be categorized as chronic or episodic; chronic migraine is defined as headaches in the absence of medication overuse, occurring on =15 days per month for =3 months, of which...... headaches on =8 days must fulfill the criteria for migraine without aura. Prevalence and incidence data for chronic migraine are still uncertain, owing to the heterogeneous definitions used to identify the condition in population-based studies over the past two decades. Chronic migraine is severely...... disabling and difficult to manage, as affected patients experience substantially more-frequent headaches, comorbid pain and affective disorders, and fewer pain-free intervals, than do those with episodic migraine. Data on the treatment of chronic migraine are scarce because most migraine-prevention trials...

  9. Unilateral nasal pain with migraine features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Mónica; Montojo, Teresa; de la Casa, Beatriz; Vela, Lydia; Pareja, Juan A

    2013-09-01

    Migraine attacks exclusively felt in the face are very rare, the pain involving the territories supplied by the second and third branches of the trigeminal nerve. Two patients suffering from heminasal pain attacks accompanied with typical migrainous features and responsive to oral or intranasal triptans - but not to intranasal lidocaine or oxymetazoline. In one patient, the attacks could be precipitated upon slight touching on the tip of the nose, in the other attacks were preceded by the nasal sensation typically heralding sneezing. Migraine pain mostly develops within the innervation territory of the first branch of the trigeminal nerve, which includes the nose. Therefore, episodes of unilateral nasal pain with migrainous features could be considered a migraine with unusual topography (nasal migraine). Painful nasal attacks occasionally preceded by stimulation of trigeminal afferents in the nose, could be conceived of as migraine-tic syndrome.

  10. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  11. Sex and the Migraine Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsook, D; Erpelding, N; Lebel, A; Linnman, C; Veggeberg, R; Grant, PE; Buettner, C; Becerra, L; Burstein, R

    2014-01-01

    The brain responds differently to environmental and internal signals that relates to the stage of development of neural systems. While genetic and epigenetic factors contribute to a premorbid state, hormonal fluctuations in women may alter the set point of migraine. The cyclic surges of gonadal hormones may directly alter neuronal, glial and astrocyte function throughout the brain. Estrogen is mainly excitatory and progesterone inhibitory on brain neuronal systems. These changes contribute to the allostatic load of the migraine condition that most notably starts at puberty in girls. PMID:24662368

  12. Typhi–Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Brosset Ugas MD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics.

  13. Faster Improvement in Migraine Pain Intensity and Migraine-Related Disability at Early Time Points with AVP-825 (Sumatriptan Nasal Powder Delivery System) versus Oral Sumatriptan: A Comparative Randomized Clinical Trial Across Multiple Attacks from the COMPASS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Richard B; McGinley, James S; Shulman, Kenneth J; Wirth, R J; Buse, Dawn C

    2017-11-01

    Fast relief of migraine pain, associated symptoms, and migraine-related disability are priorities in the acute treatment of migraine. Efforts to improve the pharmacokinetic profiles of acute migraine treatments with the aim of providing faster relief include the development of non-oral routes of administration. AVP-825 (ONZETRA ® Xsail ® ) is a delivery system containing 22 mg sumatriptan powder that uses a patient's own breath to deliver medication intranasally, targeting the upper posterior nasal cavity beyond the narrow nasal valve, an area lined with vascular mucosa conducive to rapid drug absorption into the systemic circulation. While most studies comparing treatments measure differences in proportions of patients achieving a dichotomous endpoint at fixed time intervals, in this study we compare trajectories of migraine pain and disability over time for AVP-825 versus 100 mg oral sumatriptan tablets. We used data from the COMPASS study (NCT01667679, clinicaltrials.gov), a double-blind, double-dummy, active-comparator, cross-over study of people with a diagnosis of migraine. Participants treated up to five qualifying migraine attacks within 1 hour of onset with either AVP-825 plus placebo tablets or 100 mg oral sumatriptan tablets plus placebo delivery system during the first of two 12-week treatment periods, and then switched treatment sequences to treat up to five more attacks in the second treatment period. Patients recorded ordinal migraine pain intensity and migraine-related disability before dosing (predose), and at 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 minutes. Three-level ordinal multilevel models accounted for unique data structure (repeated measures nested within attacks for each patient) and tested for treatment differences in migraine pain and migraine-related disability through the first 2 hours of attacks post dose. Among 259 study participants (mean age 40.0 years, 84.6% female, 78.4% white), there was significant between and within person

  14. Early (≤ 1-h) vs. late (>1-h) administration of frovatriptan plus dexketoprofen combination vs. frovatriptan monotherapy in the acute treatment of migraine attacks with or without aura: a post hoc analysis of a double-blind, randomized, parallel group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allais, Gianni; Bussone, Gennaro; Tullo, Vincenzo; Cortelli, Pietro; Valguarnera, Fabio; Barbanti, Piero; Sette, Giuliano; Frediani, Fabio; D'Arrigo, Giacomo; d'Onofrio, Florindo; Comi, Giancarlo; Curone, Marcella; Colombo, Bruno; Omboni, Stefano; Benedetto, Chiara

    2015-05-01

    The early use of triptan in combination with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug after headache onset may improve the efficacy of acute migraine treatment. In this retrospective analysis of a randomized, double-blind, parallel group study, we assessed the efficacy of early or late intake of frovatriptan 2.5 mg + dexketoprofen 25 or 37.5 mg (FroDex 25 and FroDex 37.5) vs. frovatriptan 2.5 mg alone (Frova) in the acute treatment of migraine attacks. In this double-blind, randomized parallel group study 314 subjects with acute migraine with or without aura were randomly assigned to Frova, FroDex 25, or FroDex 37.5. Pain free (PF) at 2-h (primary endpoint), PF at 4-h and pain relief (PR) at 2 and 4-h, speed of onset at 60, 90, 120 and 240-min, and sustained pain free (SPF) at 24-h were compared across study groups according to early (≤1-h; n = 220) or late (>1-h; n = 59) intake. PF rates at 2 and 4-h were significantly larger with FroDex 37.5 vs. Frova (early intake, n = 71 FroDex 37.5 and n = 75 Frova: 49 vs. 32 % and 68 vs. 52 %, p < 0.05; late intake, n = 20 Frodex 37.5, and n = 18 Frova: 55 vs. 17 %, p < 0.05 and 85 vs. 28 %, p < 0.01). Also with FroDex 25, in the early intake group (n = 74) PF episodes were significantly higher than Frova. PR at 2 and 4-h was significantly better under FroDex 37.5 than Frova (95 % vs. 50 %, p < 0.001, 100 % vs. 72 %, p < 0.05) in the late intake group (n = 21). SPF episodes at 24-h after early dosing were 25 % (Frova), 45 % (FroDex 25) and 41 % (FroDex 37.5, p < 0.05 combinations vs. monotherapy), whereas they were not significantly different with late intake. All treatments were equally well tolerated. FroDex was similarly effective regardless of intake timing from headache onset.

  15. CGRP as the target of new migraine therapies - successful translation from bench to clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvinsson, Lars; Haanes, Kristian Agmund; Warfvinge, Karin; Krause, Diana N

    2018-04-24

    Treatment of migraine is on the cusp of a new era with the development of drugs that target the trigeminal sensory neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or its receptor. Several of these drugs are expected to receive approval for use in migraine headache in 2018 and 2019. CGRP-related therapies offer considerable improvements over existing drugs as they are the first to be designed specifically to act on the trigeminal pain system, they are more specific and they seem to have few or no adverse effects. CGRP receptor antagonists such as ubrogepant are effective for acute relief of migraine headache, whereas monoclonal antibodies against CGRP (eptinezumab, fremanezumab and galcanezumab) or the CGRP receptor (erenumab) effectively prevent migraine attacks. As these drugs come into clinical use, we provide an overview of knowledge that has led to successful development of these drugs. We describe the biology of CGRP signalling, summarize key clinical evidence for the role of CGRP in migraine headache, including the efficacy of CGRP-targeted treatment, and synthesize what is known about the role of CGRP in the trigeminovascular system. Finally, we consider how the latest findings provide new insight into the central role of the trigeminal ganglion in the pathophysiology of migraine.

  16. Familial hemiplegic migraine locus on 19p13 is involved in the common forms of migraine with and without aura

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. May (Arne); R.A. Ophoff (Roel); G.M. Terwindt (Gisela); C. Urban; R. van Eijk (Ronald); J. Haan (Joost); H.C. Diener (Hans Christoph); D. Lindhout (Dick); R.R. Frants (Rune); L.A. Sandkuijl (Lodewijk); M.D. Ferrari (Michel)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractMigraine is a common neurological disease of two main types: migraine with aura and migraine without aura. Familial clustering suggests that genetic factors are involved in the etiology of migraine. Recently, a gene for familial hemiplegic migraine, a rare autosomal dominant subtype of

  17. Triptans and migraine: advances in use, administration, formulation, and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macone, Amanda E; Perloff, Michael D

    2017-03-01

    Recent triptan development has focused on new administration methods and formulations, triptan combination therapies, treatment in menstrually related migraines, and novel serotonin receptor subtype agonists (5HTf). Areas covered: Clinical triptan research related to migraine was reviewed, analyzing EMBASE and PUBMED data bases from 01/01/2011 to 06/29/2016, with a focus on clinical trials of class 1 or 2 level of evidence. There have been advances in drug combination therapies, as well as administration devices that aid in ease of use, increase efficacy, and decrease adverse reactions. Some new agents and devices have similar or less efficacy compared to previous generic triptan formulations. New agents have action at the 5HTf receptor subtype, and avoid vascular side effects of classic 5Ht1b/d agonists, however adverse reactions may limit their clinic use. Long half-life triptans, frovatriptan and naratriptan, do appear to have good benefit in menstral related migraine. Expert opinion: Recent advances in triptan development can offer some advantages to migraine therapy and patient preferences, but have a much higher cost compared to individual generic triptan agents. In the coming years, triptan advances with high efficacy, limiting ADRs and cost are welcomed, in this regard the 5HT1b/d triptans are already well established.

  18. Migraine: Does aura require investigation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijiaratnam, Nirosen; Barber, Daniel; Lim, Kai Zheong; Paul, Eldho; Jiang, Matthew; Chosich, Benjamin; Wijeratne, Tissa

    2016-09-01

    Migraine is a debilitating condition that affects approximately 15% of the general population. It represents a huge proportion of presentations to the emergency department and a significant number of neurology admissions. Patients are often investigated with imaging. This is particularly the case with migraine with aura (MA). The yield of imaging is however low. There is limited information on Australian hospital presentations and utility of imaging. We aimed to analyse the demographics of migraine presentations to our hospital and the yield of imaging in our centre to help guide future approaches to these patients. We retrospectively looked at medical records of patients presenting to the western health from January 2012 to June 2013. Patients were classified as either having migraine with aura or without. Baseline demographics, cardiovascular risk factors and imaging studies (CT brain, MRI brain and carotid Doppler studies) in each group were evaluated. Patients found to have white matter hyperintensities on MRI were further evaluated. We found patients with aura were more likely to have hypercholesterolemia (12% vs 7%, p=0.05). Patients with aura were more likely to be evaluated with imaging (CT brain (70% vs 41% paura were investigated with carotid Doppler studies. Only 1 patient had an abnormal result. Patients with white matter hyperintensities were older (51 vs 39 years; paura to be largely similar. We also found imaging in either group to be of almost no clinical value. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Herbal medicines in migraine prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeWeerdt, CJ; Bootsma, HPR; Hendriks, H

    1996-01-01

    The efficacy of feverfew capsules on migraine prophylaxis was investigated in a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study in which 50 patients, who had not used feverfew before, participated. The capsules were filled with a dried alcoholic extract of feverfew on microcristalline

  20. Migraine headaches in a nutshell

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to the International Headache Society, a migraine is a headache that lasts for 4–72 hours and presents with at least two of the following symptoms: unilateral localisation, moderate to severe pain intensity, aggravation by movement, and a pulsating feeling. The headache is also usually accompanied by nausea ...

  1. Comorbidity of Migraine with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Riise, Trond; Lund, Anders; Dilsaver, Steven C.; Hundal, Oivind; Oedegaard, Ketil J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate how often drugs used to treat migraine and ADHD are prescribed to the same patients to assess, indirectly, the comorbidity of these disorders. Method: We used data from the Norwegian prescription database for 2006, including the total Norwegian population (N = 4,640,219). Results:…

  2. Association Between Obesity and Migraine in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Jelena M; Vieira, Julio R; Lipton, Richard B; Bond, Dale S

    2017-08-25

    Migraine is a common and highly disabling condition that is particularly prevalent among women and especially women of reproductive age. The tremendous rise in adiposity in the Western world has led to an epidemic of obesity in women. The particular effects of obesity on women with migraine of various ages are the focus of this review. Conflicting findings from various studies with different approaches and populations have made challenging definitive conclusions about associations between migraine and obesity. While the association between obesity and migraine frequency has been consistently demonstrated and obesity is considered a risk factor for progression from episodic to chronic migraine, the association between obesity and migraine prevalence is still somewhat debated and appears to be dependent on gender and age, with the most consistent effects observed in women younger than 55 years of age. Association between migraine and obesity is most commonly observed in women of reproductive age. The multimodal changes associated with age and hormonal change in women likely play a role in this relationship, as obesity does not appear to be related to migraine in women over 55 years of age. Future studies focusing on the migraine-obesity relationship in women should examine the effects of age, endogenous hormonal state, and exogenous hormones on migraine and obesity.

  3. The Relationship between Migraine and Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayçıl Özturan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a kind of headache accompanied by neurologic, gastrointestinal, and autonomous variations. The roles of factors that trigger migraine, especially nutrition triggers, have become much more questionable with the increase in the rate of migraine occurrence. Some patients with migraine have stated that their headache attacks start without any reason. However, inner triggers such as hormonal changes or external triggers such as air exchange, some smells or the association of both triggers can start the headache. Each patient may not have same sensitivity to these triggers. A single factor might become prominent in some patients, but more than one factor may need to be required in other patients. Although the connection between migraine and the factors such as stress, environmental factors, chronic diseases, and nutritional and sleep status has been known, their mechanisms are still not clear. Nutritional status and the effects of nutrition play an important role being pain triggers in everybody, especially children and young people who suffer from migraine headache. Considering the migraine triggers generally, it has been suggested in studies that there is at least one nutrition-related trigger and hunger is the most frequently reported trigger in terms of diet. Moreover it is known that chocolate, tea, coffee, cheese, and alcohol may trigger migraine because of some specific elements within them. In recently conducted studies, using some functional foods have raised on the treatment of migraine. For this reason, the relationship between migraine and triggering factors as food and nutrition are examined in this study.

  4. Impact of migraine on fibromyalgia symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giamberardino, Maria Adele; Affaitati, Giannapia; Martelletti, Paolo; Tana, Claudio; Negro, Andrea; Lapenna, Domenico; Curto, Martina; Schiavone, Cosima; Stellin, Luisa; Cipollone, Francesco; Costantini, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FMS) and high frequency episodic/chronic migraine (M) very frequently co-occur, suggesting common pathophysiological mechanisms; both conditions display generalized somatic hyperalgesia. In FMS-M comorbidity we assessed if: a different level of hyperalgesia is present compared to one condition only; hyperalgesia is a function of migraine frequency; migraine attacks trigger FMS symptoms. Female patients with fibromyalgia (FMS)(n.40), high frequency episodic migraine (M1)(n.41), chronic migraine (M2)(n.40), FMS + M1 (n.42) and FMS + M2 (n.40) underwent recording of: -electrical pain thresholds in skin, subcutis and muscle and pressure pain thresholds in control sites, -pressure pain thresholds in tender points (TePs), -number of monthly migraine attacks and fibromyalgia flares (3-month diary). Migraine and FMS parameters were evaluated before and after migraine prophylaxis, or no prophylaxis, for 3 months with calcium-channel blockers, in two further FMS + H1 groups (n.49, n.39). 1-way ANOVA was applied to test trends among groups, Student's t-test for paired samples was used to compare pre and post-treatment values. The lowest electrical and pressure thresholds at all sites and tissues were found in FMS + M2, followed by FMS + H1, FMS, M2 and M1 (trend: p fibromyalgia and migraine involves heightened somatic hyperalgesia compared to one condition only. Increased migraine frequency - with shift towards chronicity - enhances both hyperalgesia and spontaneous FMS pain, which is reversed by effective migraine prophylaxis. These results suggest different levels of central sensitization in patients with migraine, fibromyalgia or both conditions and a role for migraine as a triggering factor for FMS.

  5. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome components, individually and in combination, in male patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome, without previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrazzak Gehani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mortality from cardiovascular disease in the Middle East is projected to increase substantially in the coming decades. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS in acute coronary syndrome (ACS continues to raise interest, but data from the Middle East is limited, especially in non-diabetic patients. This study was conducted to ascertain the prevalence of MS and frequency of its components, individually and in combination, in a male population presenting with ACS, but without a previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM. Methods: This is a prospective study of 467 consecutive male patients hospitalized for ACS. They were categorized according to the specific criteria stated in the latest joint statement for the global definition of MS. Results: The mean age was (49.7±10.7 years. Of the 467 patients, 324 (69.4% fulfilled the criteria for MS. ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI was identified in 178 patients (54.9%, and non-ST elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS in 146 patients (45.1%. These proportions were not significantly different from those without MS (STEMI 51.7% vs. NSTE-ACS 48.3%, respectively. However, patients with MS were older (50.6±10 vs. 47.9±11 years; p=0.012, and more than half of those with MS were above 50 years. The most common abnormal metabolic components were reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c; 94.1%, elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG; 89.8%, and elevated triglycerides (81.8%, followed by increased waist circumference (61.7% and raised blood pressure (40.4%. The majority of patients with MS had three or more metabolic components (326 patients, 69.4%, and 102 (21.8% had two components, but only 37 (8.4% had a single component. Conclusions: In ACS patients, without previous history of DM, MS is highly prevalent. Reduced HDL, elevated FBG and triglycerides were the most frequent metabolic components. The majority had multiple components. These findings raise alarm and show that drug therapy alone may

  6. A double-blind study of SB-220453 (Tonerbasat) in the glyceryltrinitrate (GTN) model of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedskov, Jesper Filtenborg; Iversen, H K; Olesen, J

    2004-01-01

    , scored 0-10, was registered for 12 h, and fulfillment of International Headache Society (IHS) criteria was recorded until 24 h. Four subjects had a hypotensive episode after SB-220453 plus GTN but none after GTN alone. The reaction was unexpected, since animal models and previous human studies had shown......The need for experimental migraine models increases as therapeutic options widen. In the present study, we investigated SB-220453 for efficacy in the glyceryltrinitrate (GTN) human experimental migraine model. SB-220453 is a novel benzopyran compound, which in animal models inhibits neurogenic...... towards reduction after SB-220453 compared with placebo (median 4 vs. 7, P = 0.15). However, no reduction was seen in the number of subjects experiencing delayed headache (8 vs. 8), number of subjects reporting migraine (6 vs. 8), migraine attacks fulfilling IHS criteria 1.1 or 1.7 (6 vs. 7) or IHS 1...

  7. Migraine-like episodic pain behavior in a dog: can dogs suffer from migraines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessas, I N; Volk, H A; Kenny, P J

    2013-01-01

    Migraines and other primary headache disorders commonly affect people. There is evidence to suggest that migraines can occur in dogs. In this review, we present a dog with paroxysmal episodes that have a striking resemblance to human migraine, and we give an overview of migraine in people. The current classification, clinical signs, and diagnosis in people are discussed, as well as the anatomy of head pain, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and treatment options. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Serotonergic mechanisms in the migraine brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Marie Deen; Christensen, Casper Emil; Hougaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Background Migraine is one of the most common and disabling of all medical conditions, affecting 16% of the general population, causing huge socioeconomic costs globally. Current available treatment options are inadequate. Serotonin is a key molecule in the neurobiology of migraine, but the exact...... role of brain serotonergic mechanisms remains a matter of controversy. Methods We systematically searched PubMed for studies investigating the serotonergic system in the migraine brain by either molecular neuroimaging or electrophysiological methods. Results The literature search resulted in 59 papers......, of which 13 were eligible for review. The reviewed papers collectively support the notion that migraine patients have alterations in serotonergic neurotransmission. Most likely, migraine patients have a low cerebral serotonin level between attacks, which elevates during a migraine attack. Conclusion...

  9. Prostaglandins and prostaglandin receptor antagonism in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonova, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Human models of headache may contribute to understanding of prostaglandins' role in migraine pathogenesis. The current thesis investigated the migraine triggering effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in migraine patients without aura, the efficacy of a novel EP4 receptor antagonist, BGC20....... The infusion of PGE2 caused the immediate migraine-like attacks and vasodilatation of the middle cerebral artery in migraine patients without aura. The highly specific and potent EP4 receptor antagonist, BGC20-1531, was not able to attenuate PGE2-induced headache and vasodilatation of both intra- and extra......-cerebral arteries. The intravenous infusion of PGF2α did not induce headache or statistically significant vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries in healthy volunteers. Novel data on PGE2-provoked immediate migraine-like attacks suggest that PGE2 may be one of the important final products in the pathogenesis...

  10. Migraine and structural abnormalities in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim is to provide an overview of recent studies of structural brain abnormalities in migraine and to discuss the potential clinical significance of their findings. RECENT FINDINGS: Brain structure continues to be a topic of extensive research in migraine. Despite advances...... in neuroimaging techniques, it is not yet clear if migraine is associated with grey matter changes. Recent large population-based studies sustain the notion of increased prevalence of white matter abnormalities in migraine, and possibly of silent infarct-like lesions. The clinical relevance of this association...... is not clear. Structural changes are not related to cognitive decline, but a link to an increased risk of stroke, especially in patients with aura, cannot be ruled out. SUMMARY: Migraine may be a risk factor for structural changes in the brain. It is not yet clear how factors such as migraine sub-type, attack...

  11. The KATP channel in migraine pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Karagholi, Mohammad Al-Mahdi; Hansen, Jakob Møller; Severinsen, Johanne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To review the distribution and function of KATP channels, describe the use of KATP channels openers in clinical trials and make the case that these channels may play a role in headache and migraine. DISCUSSION: KATP channels are widely present in the trigeminovascular system and play...... an important role in the regulation of tone in cerebral and meningeal arteries. Clinical trials using synthetic KATP channel openers report headache as a prevalent-side effect in non-migraine sufferers, indicating that KATP channel opening may cause headache, possibly due to vascular mechanisms. Whether KATP...... channel openers can provoke migraine in migraine sufferers is not known. CONCLUSION: We suggest that KATP channels may play an important role in migraine pathogenesis and could be a potential novel therapeutic anti-migraine target....

  12. Association between migraine, lifestyle and socioeconomic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, Han; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Skytthe, Axel

    2011-01-01

    or studying. The risk was increased for men compared to women in subjects with heavy physical exercise, intake of alcohol, and body mass index >25. Migraine was associated with several lifestyle and socioeconomic factors. Most associations such as low education and employment status were probably due......To investigate whether sex-specific associations exist between migraine, lifestyle or socioeconomic factors. We distinguished between the subtypes migraine with aura (MA) and migraine without aura (MO). In 2002, a questionnaire containing validated questions to diagnose migraine and questions...... on lifestyle and socioeconomic factors was sent to 46,418 twin individuals residing in Denmark. 31,865 twin individuals aged 20-71 were included. The twins are representative of the Danish population with regard to migraine and other somatic diseases and were used as such in the present study. An increased...

  13. Association between migraine, lifestyle and socioeconomic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, Han; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Skytthe, Axel

    2011-01-01

    To investigate whether sex-specific associations exist between migraine, lifestyle or socioeconomic factors. We distinguished between the subtypes migraine with aura (MA) and migraine without aura (MO). In 2002, a questionnaire containing validated questions to diagnose migraine and questions...... on lifestyle and socioeconomic factors was sent to 46,418 twin individuals residing in Denmark. 31,865 twin individuals aged 20-71 were included. The twins are representative of the Danish population with regard to migraine and other somatic diseases and were used as such in the present study. An increased...... or studying. The risk was increased for men compared to women in subjects with heavy physical exercise, intake of alcohol, and body mass index >25. Migraine was associated with several lifestyle and socioeconomic factors. Most associations such as low education and employment status were probably due...

  14. One hundred years of migraine research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Koehler, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    ); oligemia in the wake of CSD in rats (1982); neurogenic inflammation theory of migraine (1987); a new headache classification (1988); the discovery of sumatriptan (1988); migraine and calcitonin gene-related peptide (1990); the brainstem "migraine generator" and PET studies (1995); migraine......Pain research, and headache research in particular, during the 20th century, has generated an enormous volume of literature promulgating theories, questions, and temporary answers. This narrative review describes the most important events in the history of migraine research between 1910 and 2010....... Based on the standard textbooks of headache: Wolff's Headache (1948 and 1963) and The Headaches (1993, 2000, and 2006) topics were selected for a historical review. Most notably these included: isolation and clinical introduction of ergotamine (1918); further establishment of vasodilation in migraine...

  15. The 5-HT(1F) receptor agonist lasmiditan as a potential treatment of migraine attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Olesen, Jes

    2012-01-01

    Lasmiditan is a novel selective 5-HT(1F) receptor agonist. It is both scientifically and clinically relevant to review whether a 5-HT(1F) receptor agonist is effective in the acute treatment of migraine. Two RCTs in the phase II development of lasmiditan was reviewed. In the intravenous placebo...

  16. CGRP receptor antagonists and antibodies against CGRP and its receptor in migraine treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Recently developed calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonistic molecules have shown promising results in clinical trials for acute treatment of migraine attacks. Drugs from the gepant class of CGRP receptor antagonists are effective and do not cause vasoconstriction, one...

  17. Recognizing the role of CGRP and CGRP receptors in migraine and its treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars; Warfvinge, Karin

    2018-01-01

    that either abort acute attacks of migraine (gepants) or are effective as prophylaxis (antibodies). However, there is still much discussion concerning the site of action of these drugs. Problem Here we describe the most recent data related to CGRP in the trigeminal ganglion and its connections to the CNS...

  18. Migraine in menopausal women: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripa P

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Patrizia Ripa,1 Raffaele Ornello,1 Diana Degan,1 Cindy Tiseo,1 Janet Stewart,2 Francesca Pistoia,1 Antonio Carolei,1 Simona Sacco1 1Department of Applied Clinical Sciences and Biotechnology, Institute of Neurology, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Italy; 2Psychology Division, School of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Scotland, UK Abstract: Evidence suggests that migraine activity is influenced by hormonal factors, and particularly by estrogen levels, but relatively few studies have investigated the prevalence and characteristics of migraine according to the menopausal status. Overall, population-based studies have shown an improvement of migraine after menopause, with a possible increase in perimenopause. On the contrary, the studies performed on patients referring to headache centers have shown no improvement or even worsening of migraine. Menopause etiology may play a role in migraine evolution during the menopausal period, with migraine improvement more likely occurring after spontaneous rather than after surgical menopause. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy has been found to be associated with migraine worsening in observational population-based studies. The effects of several therapeutic regimens on migraine has also been investigated, leading to nonconclusive results. To date, no specific preventive measures are recommended for menopausal women with migraine. There is a need for further research in order to clarify the relationship between migraine and hormonal changes in women, and to quantify the real burden of migraine after the menopause. Hormonal manipulation for the treatment of refractory postmenopausal migraine is still a matter of debate. Keywords: headache, female, menstrual cycle, sex hormones

  19. [Risk of fatal/non-fatal events in patients with previous coronary heart disease/acute myocardial infarction and treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Olmo, L; Juan Armas, J; Gomariz García, J J

    2017-09-04

    Primary Care is the fundamental axis of our health system and obliges us to be consistent with our prescriptions. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk and increased risk of all causes of death, as well as acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with a previous myocardial infarction. Pain and cardiac patient management are 2 basic pillars in our daily activity, and we must know the limitations of NSAIDs in patients with established cardiovascular risk. We present a review of the scientific literature with primary interest in the role of NSAIDs and cardiovascular risk. The objective is to determine the relationship between the consumption of different NSAIDs and the fatal and non-fatal events among patients with known coronary disease. This is a review of the scientific literature with primary interest in the role of NSAIDs and cardiovascular risk. The literature review was conducted in PubMed search engines like Tripdatabase and with certain keywords. Of the 15 original papers found, 9 did not correspond completely to the central focus, so the approach was decided from 6 original articles from the past 5 years, which address the central focus of increased cardiovascular risk found (fatal and non-fatal events) in patients with prior cardiovascular disease or AMI being prescribed NSAIDs for any reason. The risk of fatal/non-fatal events in each of the studies is expressed by the odds ratio (OR)/hazard ratio (HR), defined as the probability of an event occurring. A moderate risk was observed for ibuprofen. It increases the risk of acute coronary syndrome after 5 years of cardiovascular event, especially in the 2nd year (OR 1.63; 95% CI 1.42-1.87). It also increases the risk of stroke (HR 1.23; 95% IC 1.10-1.38). Cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors were the third risk group, after nabumetone and diclofenac. Celecoxib increases risk from the 14th day of treatment (HR 2.3; 95% CI 1.79-3.02), having an OR

  20. MIGRAINE: BASIC PRINCIPLES OF TREATMENT AND PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. R. Esin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern recommendations for the migraine attack treatment and it's prophylaxis are analyzed in this review. Established, that acetylsalicylic acid, diclofenac potassium, ibuprofen, naproxen, paracetamol, metamizol and their combination with caffeine are drugs of the first choice for migraine attack treatment. Metoclopramide and domperidone are used to reduce nausea and vomiting. Also triptans are high effective drugs for migraine attack treatment. Metoprolol, propranolol, flunarizine, valproic acid can be used for migraine prophylaxis. Drugs of the second choice are: amitriptyline, venlafaxine, naproxen and bisoprolol.

  1. Migraine, cerebrovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J Sinclair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is emerging that migraine is not solely a headache disorder. Observations that ischemic stroke could occur in the setting of a migraine attack, and that migraine headaches could be precipitated by cerebral ischemia, initially highlighted a possibly association between migraine and cerebrovascular disease. More recently, large population-based studies that have demonstrated that migraineurs are at increased risk of stroke outside the setting of a migraine attack have prompted the concept that migraine and cerebrovascular disease are comorbid conditions. Explanations for this association are numerous and widely debated, particularly as the comorbid association does not appear to be confined to the cerebral circulation as cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease also appear to be comorbid with migraine. A growing body of evidence has also suggested that migraineurs are more likely to be obese, hypertensive, hyperlipidemic and have impaired insulin sensitivity, all features of the metabolic syndrome. The comorbid association between migraine and cerebrovascular disease may consequently be explained by migraineurs having the metabolic syndrome and consequently being at increased risk of cerebrovascular disease. This review will summarise the salient evidence suggesting a comorbid association between migraine, cerebrovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome.

  2. The neurobiology of throbbing pain in migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    Virtually everyone can recall an experience, migraine or not, in which pain had a throbbing, pulsatile quality, particularly in association with intense pain. Its pulsatile character strongly reinforces the common presumption that it coincides with the heart beat. For migraine, a cerebral vascular origin of the throbbing quality is a central tenet of the prevailing scientific view of migraine pain. However recent data challenge this perspective, with implications for our understanding of throbbing pain not only for migraine but also for the pathophysiology of throbbing pain in other conditions as well. PMID:22540199

  3. Sleep in Patients with Chronic Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun-Pai; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2017-09-01

    The biological and pathophysiological interaction between sleep and chronic migraine (CM) remains to be fully elucidated. In this article, we provide a narrative review of the literature on sleep disturbance and CM, highlighting recent advances in sleep research and insights into mechanisms that could mediate a role of sleep disturbances in migraine chronification. We discuss the potential for cognitive-behavioral insomnia therapy (CBTi) as an intervention for CM with comorbid insomnia. Finally, we propose a model of the mechanisms underlying the interactions among sleep physiology, maladaptive migraine-coping behaviors, and coexisting factors which contribute to sleep disturbances in CM based on conceptual models used in sleep research. Insomnia is the most common sleep complaint among patients with CM. CM patients experience more frequent and severe insomnia symptoms than patients with episodic migraine (EM). It has been suggested that sleep disturbances may predispose individuals to migraine attacks, which may affect the pain-processing trigeminovascular system and thus play a role in migraine progression. Encouraging but limited evidence suggests that management of insomnia via behavioral sleep therapy may reverse CM to EM and possibly prevent migraine chronification. Migraine has a complex relationship with sleep. The use of objective sleep study such as polysomnographic microstructural sleep analysis and actigraphy could help connect sleep disturbances and processes related to CM. Future longitudinal studies should examine whether effective behavioral treatments such as CBTi can reverse migraine chronification.

  4. Peripheral neuromodulation in chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini, F; De Boni, A

    2012-05-01

    Patients with chronic migraines are often refractory to medical treatment. Therefore, they might need other strategies to modulate their pain, according to their level of disability. Neuromodulation can be achieved with several tools: meditation, biofeedback, physical therapy, drugs and electric neurostimulation (ENS). ENS can be applied to the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), either invasively (cortical or deep brain) or non-invasively [cranial electrotherapy stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation]. Among chronic primary headaches, cluster headaches are most often treated either through deep brain stimulation or occipital nerve stimulation because there is a high level of disability related to this condition. ENS, employed through several modalities such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, interferential currents and pulsed radiofrequency, has been applied to the peripheral nervous system at several sites. We briefly review the indications for the use of peripheral ENS at the site of the occipital nerves for the treatment of chronic migraine.

  5. Evaluating the reporting of adverse events in controlled clinical trials conducted in 2010-2015 on migraine drug treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Lindqvist, Janus Kaufmann; Do, Thien Phu

    2018-01-01

    Background In 2008, the International Headache Society published guidelines on the "evaluation and registration of adverse events in clinical drug trials on migraine". They listed seven recommendations for reporting adverse events in randomized controlled trials on migraine. The present study aimed to evaluate adherence to these recommendations, and based on the results, to recommend improvements. Methods We searched the PubMed/MEDLINE database to identify controlled trials on migraine drugs published from 2010 to 2015. For each trial, we noted whether five of the recommended parameters were presented. In addition, we noted whether adverse events were reported in abstracts. Results We identified 73 trials; 51 studied acutely administered drugs and 22 studied prophylactic drugs for migraine. The number of patients with any adverse events were reported in 74% of acute-administration and 86% of prophylactic drug trials. Only 30 (41%) of the 73 studies reported adverse events with data in the abstracts, and 27 (37%) abstracts did not mention adverse events. Conclusion Adverse events, both frequency and symptoms, should be reported to allow a fair judgement of benefit/tolerability ratio when randomized controlled trials in migraine treatment are published. Clinically significant adverse events should be included in the abstract of every randomized controlled trial in migraine treatment.

  6. Association of excessive daytime sleepiness with migraine and headache frequency in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavem, Knut; Kristiansen, Håvard Anton; Kristoffersen, Espen Saxhaug; Kværner, Kari Jorunn; Russell, Michael Bjørn

    2017-12-01

    Some previous studies have postulated an association between migraine and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). This study evaluated the association of EDS with migraine and headache frequency in a general population, after adjusting for potential confounding variables. The study was a postal survey of a random age and gender-stratified sample of 40,000 persons aged 20 to 80 years old drawn by the National Population Register in Norway. The questionnaire included questions about migraine, headache, the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) and various comorbidities. EDS was defined as ESS > 10. The association of EDS and migraine/headache were analysed by bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses. A total of 21,177 persons responded to the ESS and were included in the analyses. The odds ratio (OR) for EDS was increased for migraineurs (1.42 (95% CI 1.31─1.54), p 179 days per year compared to those without headache in multivariable analysis. In a general population, the odds for EDS increased significantly with the headache frequency, irrespective of migraine status. EDS was not associated with reported migraine in multivariable analysis.

  7. Increased RLS prevalence in children and adolescents with migraine: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Stefan; Böck, Andreas; Schlegel, Werner; Kilic, Arzu; Wagner, Gudrun; Gelbmann, Gloria; Hübenthal, Almut; Kanbur, Incifer; Natriashvili, Sofia; Karwautz, Andreas; Wöber, Christian; Wöber-Bingöl, Ciçek

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies have reported an increased frequency of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in adult migraine patients. Until now, the frequency of RLS in pediatric patients has not been investigated. We set out to assess the frequency of RLS in children and adolescents with migraine compared to headache-free controls. We investigated 111 consecutive patients with a sole diagnosis of migraine with or without aura presenting to the Headache Unit at the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and 73 headache-free controls for the presence of RLS using a semistructured interview. In addition, we assessed the level of daytime sleepiness by means of the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS). A second group of headache-free controls was screened for the presence of RLS using an online questionnaire. The frequency of RLS in migraine patients was significantly higher than in controls (22% vs. 5% (p RLS and migraine in the pediatric population. Future studies are needed to determine the extent of sleep disruption in children and adolescents with migraine and comorbid RLS.

  8. PACAP38 induces migraine-like attacks in patients with migraine without aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik Winther; Birk, Steffen; Wienecke, Troels

    2009-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that infusion of vasoactive neurotransmitters may trigger headache or migraine-like attacks in man. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide-38 (PACAP38) is a strong vasodilator found in trigeminal sensory and parasympathetic perivascular nerve fibers. We...... therefore hypothesized that infusion of PACAP38 would cause headache in healthy subjects and migraine-like attacks in migraine patients. Twelve healthy subjects and 12 migraine patients were examined in two separate studies. All subjects were allocated to receive 10 pmol/kg/min PACAP38 and placebo......) by high resolution ultrasonography were recorded during hospital phase in migraineurs. PACAP38 infusion caused headache in all healthy subjects and 11 out of 12 migraine patients. Seven migraine patients experienced migraine-like attacks after PACAP38 and none after placebo (P = 0.016). Most of attacks (6...

  9. [Acetylsalicylic acid in self-medication of migraine. A pharmacy-based observational study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, H; Gessner, U; Petersen-Braun, M; Weingärtner, U

    2007-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of acetylsalicylic acid in the treatment of acute migraine attacks by self-medication under daily life conditions when bought in a pharmacy and also the ability of patients to self-diagnose correctly. A total of 296 patients were recruited from 156 pharmacies and recorded up to 3 migraine attacks. Following an advisory discussion the pharmacists gave a questionnaire to persons who had purchased acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin Migraine) in the pharmacy to treat migraine. A total of 578 questionnaires containing 36 questions about demographic details, headache phenotype, medical history, efficacy over 2 h and tolerability of the preparation were analyzed. The IHS criteria (1988) for migraine were identified correctly by 92.7% of the patients. In 66.3% of the attacks, the intensity of the headache was reported as severe. In 60% of the documented attacks, a decrease from severe or moderate to mild or no headache was recorded after medication, and freedom from headache was achieved in 35.8%. The effect was reproducible over 3 migraine attacks. Nausea, photophobia and phonophobia were reduced by 71-86% compared to the baseline level. Side-effects were reported twice as often by the participants in response to closed questions than to open questions (16.6 vs. 8.3%). A high percentage of migraine patients are capable of diagnosing their condition themselves when they seek advice in a pharmacy. The data on efficacy confirm the results from controlled clinical studies. The same parameters as those used in controlled clinical studies can also be recorded in pharmacy-based observational studies, therefore, the safety and tolerability of the medication can be recorded under real conditions.

  10. Acupuncture for the prevention of episodic migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Klaus; Allais, Gianni; Brinkhaus, Benno; Fei, Yutong; Mehring, Michael; Vertosick, Emily A.; Vickers, Andrew; White, Adrian R

    2016-01-01

    30 to 1715) met our updated selection criteria. We excluded five previously included trials from this update because they included people who had had migraine for less than 12 months, and included five new trials. Five trials had a no-acupuncture control group (either treatment of attacks only or non-regulated routine care), 15 a sham-acupuncture control group, and five a comparator group receiving prophylactic drug treatment. In comparisons with no-acupuncture control groups and groups receiving prophylactic drug treatment, there was risk of performance and detection bias as blinding was not possible. Overall the quality of the evidence was moderate. Comparison with no acupuncture Acupuncture was associated with a moderate reduction of headache frequency over no acupuncture after treatment (four trials, 2199 participants; standardised mean difference (SMD) −0.56; 95% CI −0.65 to −0.48); findings were statistically heterogeneous (I2 = 57%; moderate quality evidence). After treatment headache frequency at least halved in 41% of participants receiving acupuncture and 17% receiving no acupuncture (pooled risk ratio (RR) 2.40; 95% CI 2.08 to 2.76; 4 studies, 2519 participants) with a corresponding number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) of 4 (95% CI 3 to 6); there was no indication of statistical heterogeneity (I2 = 7%; moderate quality evidence). The only trial with post-treatment follow-up found a small but significant benefit 12 months after randomisation (RR 2.16; 95% CI 1.35 to 3.45; NNT 7; 95% 4 to 25; 377 participants, low quality evidence). Comparison with sham acupuncture Both after treatment (12 trials, 1646 participants) and at follow-up (10 trials, 1534 participants), acupuncture was associated with a small but statistically significant frequency reduction over sham (moderate quality evidence). The SMD was −0.18 (95% CI −0.28 to −0.08; I2 = 47%) after treatment and −0.19 (95% CI −0.30 to −0.09; I2 = 59%) at follow

  11. Transcranial magnetic simulation in the treatment of migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Lipton, Richard B.; Pearlman, Starr H.

    2010-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a diagnostic and therapeutic modality that is being developed as both an acute and preventive treatment for migraine. TMS delivers a fluctuating magnetic field from the scalp surface to induce current in the subjacent cortex. Magnetic pulses are delivered one at a time in single-pulse TMS (sTMS) or as a train of pulses in repetitive TMS (rTMS). For most of its 30-year history, TMS has been delivered in clinical and research settings using large table...

  12. Antiphospholipids antibodies and migraine | Nyandaiti | Sahel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Similarly, antiphospholipid antibodies was significantly elevated in migraine patients with aura compared to those without aura, ( 2=0.037; p<0.05). The frequency of migraine attacks correlated positively with the concentration of lgG anti β2GP1; ( p<0.05). Conclusion: We demonstrated increased serum level of lgG anti ...

  13. Migraine genetics : from monogenic to complex forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanmolkot, Kaate Raymond Josepha

    2008-01-01

    Migraine has a strong genetic component, but the identification of these factors has proven difficult mainly because of the complex interaction of multiple loci and environmental factors. Unraveling its molecular basis and deciphering pathways leading to migraine attacks will help identifying novel

  14. Nurses improve migraine management in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, Petra; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; de Jong, Gosse; Baarveld, Frans; van den Berg, J. S. Peter

    Introduction Migraine is a common disorder with a high burden. Adequate treatment results in improvement of quality of life. Migraine patients are mainly treated by general practitioners (GPs), but there is still room for improvement. This study investigated whether primary care nurses could improve

  15. Migraine before rupture of intracranial aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, Elena R; Gurary, Natalia M; Sakovich, Vladimir P

    2013-01-01

    Rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) causes thunderclap headache but it remains unclear whether headache in general and migraine in particular are more prevalent in patients with unruptured SIA.......Rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) causes thunderclap headache but it remains unclear whether headache in general and migraine in particular are more prevalent in patients with unruptured SIA....

  16. Migraine & paediatric obesity: a plausible link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Ravid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and migraine are both highly prevalent disorders in the general population, influenced by genetic and environmental risk factors. In recent studies, obesity was found to be a strong risk factor for transformed migraine and, among migraineurs, obesity was associated with frequent headaches and higher disability scores. Suggested mechanisms included: (i obesity as a pro-inflammatory state may be associated with neurovascular inflammation in patients with migraine; (ii elevated levels of plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP in obese individuals may play a role as an important post-synaptic mediator of trigeminovascular inflammation in migraine; (iii dismodulation in the hypothalamic neuropeptide, orexin, in obese persons may be associated with increased susceptibility to neurogenic inflammation causing migraine attacks; and (iv leptin and adiponectin can activate proinflammatory cytokine release that is involved in the pathogenesis of migraine. In addition, both conditions are associated with psychiatric co-morbidities, such as depression and anxiety, that can further increase headache frequency and disability. Therefore, the effect of obesity on migraine outcome is important. Weight and BMI should be measured and calculated in all children presenting with migraine, and weight control should be a part of the treatment.

  17. Increased prevalence of migraine in Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, Jeroen C.; Timmermans, Janneke; Post, Martijn C.; Budts, Werner; Schepens, Marc A. A. M.; Thijs, Vincent; Schonewille, Wouter J.; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Plokker, Herbert W. M.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A high prevalence of migraine has been described in various forms of congenital heart disease, with and without shunt. In this study we investigated the prevalence of migraine in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS). METHODS: All 457 adult patients with MFS from the participating centres

  18. Increased prevalence of migraine in Marfan syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J.C.; Timmermans, J.; Post, M.C.; Budts, W.; Schepens, M.A.; Thijs, V.; Schonewille, W.J.; Bie, R.M. de; Plokker, H.W.M.; Tijssen, J.G.P.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A high prevalence of migraine has been described in various forms of congenital heart disease, with and without shunt. In this study we investigated the prevalence of migraine in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS). METHODS: All 457 adult patients with MFS from the participating centres

  19. Migraine and structural changes in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Lipton, Richard B; Ashina, Sait

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the association between migraine without aura (MO) and migraine with aura (MA) and 3 types of structural brain abnormalities detected by MRI: white matter abnormalities (WMAs), infarct-like lesions (ILLs), and volumetric changes in gray and white matter (GM, WM) regions....

  20. Interface Between Cosmetic and Migraine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfrerer, Lisa; Guyuron, Bahman

    2017-10-01

    This article describes connections between migraine surgery and cosmetic surgery including technical overlap, benefits for patients, and why every plastic surgeon may consider screening cosmetic surgery patients for migraine headache (MH). Contemporary migraine surgery began by an observation made following forehead rejuvenation, and the connection has continued. The prevalence of MH among females in the USA is 26%, and females account for 91% of cosmetic surgery procedures and 81-91% of migraine surgery procedures, which suggests substantial overlap between both patient populations. At the same time, recent reports show an overall increase in cosmetic facial procedures. Surgical techniques between some of the most commonly performed facial surgeries and migraine surgery overlap, creating opportunity for consolidation. In particular, forehead lift, blepharoplasty, septo-rhinoplasty, and rhytidectomy can easily be part of the migraine surgery, depending on the migraine trigger sites. Patients could benefit from simultaneous improvement in MH symptoms and rejuvenation of the face. Simple tools such as the Migraine Headache Index could be used to screen cosmetic surgery patients for MH. Similarity between patient populations, demand for both facial and MH procedures, and technical overlap suggest great incentive for plastic surgeons to combine both. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  1. Straight Talk about Migraines, Cindy McCain Speaks Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Migraine Headaches Straight Talk About Migraines, Cindy McCain Speaks Out Past ... www.headaches.org Read More "Migraine Headaches" Articles Straight Talk About Migraines, Cindy McCain Speaks Out / What ...

  2. Rare Complications of Migraine With Aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plato, Brian M

    2016-09-01

    To provide a review of the diagnostic criteria, pathophysiology, and potential treatments of the complications of migraine as identified by the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3β, with the exception of status migrainosus. Migraine with aura may be associated with the onset of rare, but significantly disabling neurological symptoms. This review provides an overview of the associated complications that may arise from migraine with aura. The complications of migraine that arise from migraine aura are infrequently encountered in clinical practice; however, they can be severely disabling for patients. As these conditions are encountered, thorough diagnostic evaluation is necessary. In some cases, it may be difficult to find a consistently reliable therapeutic option for these patients; however, as more cases enter the literature, a greater understanding of these conditions and how to treat them may arise. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  3. The relationship between migraine and rosacea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Casper Emil; Andersen, Frederikke Schelde; Wienholtz, Nita

    2017-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the association between migraine and rosacea. Background Migraine is a complex disorder with episodes of headache, nausea, photo- and phonophobia. Rosacea is an inflammatory skin condition with flushing, erythema, telangiectasia, papules, and pustules. Both...... PubMed and EMBASE was undertaken for studies investigating the association between all forms of migraine and rosacea published until November 2016, and meta-analysis of eligible studies. Results Nine studies on eight populations were identified. Studies differed in methodology and diagnostic process......, but all investigated co-occurrence of migraine and rosacea. Four studies were eligible for meta-analysis, resulting in a pooled odds ratio of 1.96 (95% confidence interval 1.41-2.72) for migraine in a rosacea population compared to a non-rosacea population. Conclusion Our meta-analysis confirmed...

  4. Prednisolone reduces nitric oxide-induced migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, P; Daugaard, D; Lassen, L H

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) induces delayed migraine attacks in migraine patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pre-treatment with prednisolon could decrease this effect of GTN. METHODS: In this double-blind, randomized and placebo-controlled, crossover...... study 15 migraineurs with migraine without aura were pre-treated with 150 mg of prednisolone or placebo followed by a 20-min infusion of GTN (0.5 ug/kg/min). One hour after the GTN-infusion, the participants were sent home, but continued to rate headache and possible associated symptoms by filling out...... a headache diary every hour for 12 h. There were two equal primary efficacy end-points: frequency of delayed migraine and intensity of delayed headache. RESULTS: Nine patients experienced a GTN headache fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for migraine without aura on the placebo day compared with four...

  5. Hormonal management of migraine at menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, Rossella E; Sances, Grazia; Detaddei, Silvia; Ornati, Alessandra; Chiovato, Luca; Polatti, Franco

    2009-06-01

    In this review, we underline the importance of linking migraine to reproductive stages for optimal management of such a common disease across the lifespan of women. Menopause has a variable effect on migraine depending on individual vulnerability to neuroendocrine changes induced by estrogen fluctuations and on the length of menopausal transition. Indeed, an association between estrogen 'milieu' and attacks of migraine is strongly supported by several lines of evidence. During the perimenopause, it is likely to observe a worsening of migraine, and a tailored hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) to minimize estrogen/progesterone imbalance may be effective. In the natural menopause, women experience a more favourable course of migraine in comparison with those who have surgical menopause. When severe climacteric symptoms are present, postmenopausal women may be treated with continuous HRT. Even tibolone may be useful when analgesic overuse is documented. However, the transdermal route of oestradiol administration in the lowest effective dose should be preferred to avoid potential vascular risk.

  6. Psychological Factors Associated with Chronic Migraine and Severe Migraine-Related Disability: an Observational Study in a Tertiary Headache Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Elizabeth K.; Buse, Dawn C.; Klepper, Jaclyn E.; Mayson, Sarah Jo; Grinberg, Amy S.; Grosberg, Brian M.; Pavlovic, Jelena M.; Robbins, Matthew S.; Vollbracht, Sarah E.; Lipton, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate relationships among modifiable psychological factors and chronic migraine and severe migraine-related disability in a clinic-based sample of persons with migraine. Background Evidence evaluating relationships between modifiable psychological factors and chronic migraine and severe migraine-related disability is lacking in people with migraine presenting for routine clinical care. Methods Adults with migraine completed surveys during routinely scheduled visits to a tertiary headache center. Participants completed surveys assessing chronic migraine (meeting criteria for migraine with ≥15 headache days in the past month), severe migraine disability (Migraine Disability Assessment Scale score ≥ 21), and modifiable psychological factors [depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), anxious symptoms (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), Pain Catastrophizing Scale and Headache Specific Locus of Control]. Logistic regression evaluated relationships between modifiable psychological factors and chronic migraine and severe migraine disability. Results Among 90 eligible participants the mean age was 45.0 (SD = 12.4); 84.8% were women. One-third (36.0%) met study criteria for chronic migraine; half of participants (51.5%) reported severe migraine-related disability. Higher depressive symptoms (OR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1,11, 3.55) and chance HSLC (OR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.13, 1.43) were associated with chronic migraine. Higher depressive symptoms (OR = 3.54, 95%CI = 1.49, 8.41), anxiety symptoms (OR = 3.65, 95% CI = 1.65, 8.06), and pain catastrophizing (OR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.14, 3.35), were associated with severe migraine-related disability. Conclusions Psychiatric symptoms and pain catastrophizing were strongly associated with severe migraine-related disability. Depression and chance locus of control were associated with chronic migraine. This study supports the need for longitudinal observational studies to evaluate relationships among naturalistic

  7. Genetics of Migraine: Insights into the Molecular Basis of Migraine Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Heidi G; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-04-01

    Migraine is a complex, debilitating neurovascular disorder, typically characterized by recurring, incapacitating attacks of severe headache often accompanied by nausea and neurological disturbances. It has a strong genetic basis demonstrated by rare migraine disorders caused by mutations in single genes (monogenic), as well as familial clustering of common migraine which is associated with polymorphisms in many genes (polygenic). Hemiplegic migraine is a dominantly inherited, severe form of migraine with associated motor weakness. Family studies have found that mutations in three different ion channels genes, CACNA1A, ATP1A2, and SCN1A can be causal. Functional studies of these mutations has shown that they can result in defective regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission and the excitatory/inhibitory balance in the brain, which lowers the threshold for cortical spreading depression, a wave of cortical depolarization thought to be involved in headache initiation mechanisms. Other putative genes for monogenic migraine include KCKN18, PRRT2, and CSNK1D, which can also be involved with other disorders. There are a number of primarily vascular disorders caused by mutations in single genes, which are often accompanied by migraine symptoms. Mutations in NOTCH3 causes cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a hereditary cerebrovascular disease that leads to ischemic strokes and dementia, but in which migraine is often present, sometimes long before the onset of other symptoms. Mutations in the TREX1 and COL4A1 also cause vascular disorders, but often feature migraine. With respect to common polygenic migraine, genome-wide association studies have now identified single nucleotide polymorphisms at 38 loci significantly associated with migraine risk. Functions assigned to the genes in proximity to these loci suggest that both neuronal and vascular pathways also contribute to the pathophysiology of common

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging arterial-spin-labelling perfusion alterations in childhood migraine with atypical aura: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulouis, Grégoire; Shotar, Eimad; Dangouloff-Ros, Volodia; Grévent, David; Calmon, Raphaël; Brunelle, Francis; Naggara, Olivier; Kossorotoff, Manoelle; Boddaert, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    Atypical migraine with aura can be challenging to diagnose. Arterial-spin-labelling (ASL) is able to non-invasively quantify brain perfusion. Our aim was to report cerebral blood flow (CBF) alterations using ASL, at the acute phase of atypical migraine with aura in children. Paediatric patients were retrospectively included if (1) referred for acute neurological deficit(s), (2) underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at presentation with ASL sequence, and (3) had subsequent diagnosis of migraine with aura. Neurological symptom-free controls were matched for age. Twenty-eight regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on CBF maps for each participant/control. Ten patients were included (median age 13y, range 8-16y). Eight of 10 had multiple aura symptoms during the episode. For every patient, CBF was decreased in a brain region consistent with symptoms when MRI was performed less than 14 hours after onset (n=7 patients) and increased if the MRI was performed 17 hours or more after (n=4 MRIs). MRI-ASL appears to be a promising tool for the diagnostic workup and differentials exclusion in paediatric migraine with aura. Constant and time-consistent non-territorial CBF modifications were found in our sample providing additional insight to migraine with aura pathophysiology. The authors encourage implementing this sequence at the acute phase of unexplained paediatric neurological deficits, with or without accompanying headache. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  9. Aura and Other Neurologic Dysfunction in or with Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissoon, Narayan R; Cutrer, Fred Michael

    2017-07-01

    Migraine can present with a wide range of neurological symptoms. Based on currently available data, the symptoms of typical migraine aura are most likely related to cortical spreading depression (CSD), and evidence supports that CSD can lead to trigeminovascular activation resulting in the headache phase of migraine. An alternative diagnosis to migraine aura should be considered if migrainous headaches present with transient neurological symptoms that have features inconsistent with aura. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  10. Spontaneous, late, in-the-bag intraocular lens subluxation in a patient with a previous acute angle-closure glaucoma attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei-Wen; Chang, Shirley H L

    2004-08-01

    Cataract surgery was performed in a 49-year-old woman 16 months after an acute angle-closure glaucoma attack. Zonular dialysis was observed during surgery, but the intraocular lens (IOL) was implanted in the capsular bag uneventfully. At 4 1/2 months, 1 IOL loop wrapped in the bag herniated into the anterior chamber. The patient had no history of trauma. The IOL loop remained in the anterior chamber for 9 months, until the subluxated IOL spontaneously returned to its original position. Six months later, the IOL again dislocated into the anterior chamber.

  11. Migraine disorder: workplace implications and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Peggy A

    2007-02-01

    Migraine disorder is disabling, costly, underdiagnosed, and undertreated. It affects employees' quality of life and ability to work or attend school, potentially decreasing their earning ability. Migraine disorder impacts the workplace substantially through absenteeism and presenteeism and increases health care costs. Although research on migraine disorder is expansive, no systematic research tool or design exists within population studies. This may account for the different prevalence rates seen, especially in African studies, which rely on verbal interviews instead of mail or telephone surveys. Women have a higher prevalence rate throughout the research, but they seek help more often than men. This may contribute to their higher rates, although hormones also play a role. Occupational health nurses can affect the outcome of migraine disorder for employees and employers. They can assist in identifying those employees with migraine disorder who are not diagnosed, those who have not investigated the various available medications, or the lifestyle changes that would decrease the intensity and frequency of migraine attacks. Research is needed to quantify the cost savings of workplace intervention in identifying employees with migraine disorder and its effect on absenteeism, presenteeism, and health care use. Occupational health nurses can determine the effectiveness of education by measuring motivation, lifestyle changes, and workplace modification against the intensity and frequency of migraine attacks. This, in turn, will yield measurable results in reducing absenteeism and presenteeism in the workplace. Occupational health nurses can spread this information through employees to their families. As more undiagnosed and undertreated individuals with migraine become educated and pursue diagnosis, treatment, and lifestyle changes, a measurable decrease in health care use and costs may occur. The economic impact of migraine disorder, in terms of workplace absenteeism and

  12. Tendon Length, Calf Muscle Atrophy, and Strength Deficit After Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: Long-Term Follow-up of Patients in a Previous Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Juuso; Lantto, Iikka; Piilonen, Juuso; Flinkkilä, Tapio; Ohtonen, Pasi; Siira, Pertti; Laine, Vesa; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Pajala, Ari; Leppilahti, Juhana

    2017-09-20

    In this prospective study, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess long-term Achilles tendon length, calf muscle volume, and muscle fatty degeneration after surgery for acute Achilles tendon rupture. From 1998 to 2001, 60 patients at our center underwent surgery for acute Achilles tendon rupture followed by early functional postoperative rehabilitation. Fifty-five patients were reexamined after a minimum duration of follow-up of 13 years (mean, 14 years), and 52 of them were included in the present study. Outcome measures included Achilles tendon length, calf muscle volume, and fatty degeneration measured with MRI of both the affected and the uninjured leg. The isokinetic plantar flexion strength of both calves was measured and was correlated with the structural findings. The Achilles tendon was, on average, 12 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.6 to 15.6 mm; p muscles were 63 cm (13%; p muscle atrophy. Increased Achilles tendon length is associated with smaller calf muscle volumes and persistent plantar flexion strength deficits after surgical repair of Achilles tendon rupture. Strength deficits and muscle volume deficits are partly compensated for by FHL hypertrophy, but 11% to 13% deficits in soleus and gastrocnemius muscle volumes and 12% to 18% deficits in plantar flexion strength persist even after long-term follow-up. Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  13. Paliperidone palmitate in non-acute patients with schizophrenia previously unsuccessfully treated with risperidone long-acting therapy or frequently used conventional depot antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, A; Bergmans, P; Cherubin, P; Keim, S; Llorca, P-M; Cosar, B; Petralia, A; Corrivetti, G; Hargarter, L

    2015-08-01

    PALMFlexS, a prospective multicentre, open-label, 6-month, phase IIIb interventional study, explored tolerability, safety and treatment response in adults (n = 231) with non-acute but symptomatic schizophrenia switching to flexibly dosed paliperidone palmitate (PP) after unsuccessful treatment with risperidone long-acting injectable therapy (RLAT) or conventional depot antipsychotics (APs). Treatment response was measured by change in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score from baseline (BL) to last-observation-carried-forward (LOCF) endpoint (EP). Safety and tolerability assessments included Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale (ESRS) total score and treatment-emergent adverse events. Significant reductions in mean PANSS total score were observed for all groups (-7.5 to -10.6; p ⩽ 0.01 [BL to LOCF EP]). After switching to PP, more than 50% of all patients achieved ⩾20% and one-third of RLAT-treated patients even achieved ⩾50% improvement in PANSS total score. Across groups, there were significant improvements (p < 0.05) in symptom severity as measured by Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S; trend for improvement with RLAT; p = 0.0568), subjective well-being, medication satisfaction, and patient functioning with PP. PP was generally well tolerated. Clinically relevant benefits were observed in non-acute patients with schizophrenia switched from RLAT or conventional depot APs to PP. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Migraine accompagnee: Clinical and neutroradiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    This study analyses clinical data, EEC and X-ray findings of 102 stationary examined migraine patients, 62 of whom suffered from migraine accompagnee. Sex distribution, age at onset of disease, hereditary disease disposition and EEC findings largely correspond to the data given in literature. As it had been expected, the X-ray images of the skull and the cerebral angiographies performed in 46 patients suffering from migraine accompagnee did not show any pathological findings. The X-ray images were compared with those taken of patients without migraine anamnesis in order to detect non-pathologic variations. Neither differences in the intensity of vascular and diplovenous marking could be found in the native images of the skull nor any variations of the circle of Willisi. The dependency of the posterior cerebral artery on the carotid circulation existing in 41% of the migraine accompagnee does not lead to any particular alteration of the accompanying symptoms and signs. The idea is discussed to divide the migraine syndrome into simple, focal and complicated migraine on the basis of a uniform pathogenesis. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Risk Factor and Comorbidity of Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woro Riyadina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine is a chronic daily headache which interfere a quality of life. The purpose of this research is to obtain the prevalence, risk factors, and comorbidity of migraine. Methods: A cross sectional study involving 4771 subjects in 5 villages in the district of Central Bogor, Bogor City 2011–2012. Data collection was performed using WHO STEPS (interview, measurement, physical examination, and laboratory test. Results: In this study, the migraine prevalence was 22.43%, with significant risk factors were sex, age, and stress (p < 0.05. Comorbidity of migraine was coronary heart diseases (p < 0.05. There was no significant correlation between migraine with marital status, level of education, smoking, hypertension, obesity, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, trigliseride level, and diabetes mellitus (p > 0.05. Conclusions: Risk factors which have significant association with migraine are sex, age, and stress, whereas coronary heart disease existed as a comorbidity with migraine.

  16. Neurophysiology of visual aura in migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Koichi

    2007-01-01

    Visual processing in migraine has been targeted because the visual symptoms that are commonly associated with attack, either in the form of aura or other more subtle symptoms, indicate that the visual pathways are involved in migrainous pathophysiology. The visual aura of the migraine attack has been explained by the cortical spreading depression (CSD) of Leao, neuroelectric event beginning in the occipital cortex and propagating into contiguous brain region. Clinical observations suggest that hyperexcitability occurs not only during the attack, typically in the form of photophobia, but also between attacks. Numerous human neuroimaging, neurophysiological and psychophysical studies have identified differences in cortical visual processing in migraine. The possibility of imaging the typical visual aura with BOLD functional MRI has revealed multiple neurovascular events in the occipital cortex within a single attack that closely resemble CSD. As transient synchronized neuronal excitation precedes CSD, changes in cortical excitability underlie the migraine attack. Independent evidence for altered neuronal excitability in migraineurs between attacks emerges from visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), recordings of cortical potentials and psychophysics. Recently, both TMS and psychophysical studies measuring visual performance in migraineurs have used measures which presumably measure primary visual (V1) and visual association cortex. Our VEP and blink reflex study showed that migraine patients exhibiting allodynia might show central sensitization of braistem trigeminal neuron and had contrast modulation dysfunction during the cortical visual processing of V1 and visual association cortex in-between attacks. In pathophysiology of migraine, these neurophysiological and psychophysical studies indicate that abnormal visual and trigeminal hyperexcitability might persist between migraine attacks. The influence of migraine on cortical

  17. The NRP1 migraine risk variant shows evidence of association with menstrual migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Charmaine E; Sutherland, Heidi G; Maher, Bridget H; Lea, Rodney A; Haupt, Larisa M; Frith, Alison; Anne MacGregor, E; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2018-04-18

    In 2016, a large meta-analysis brought the number of susceptibility loci for migraine to 38. While sub-type analysis for migraine without aura (MO) and migraine with aura (MA) found some loci showed specificity to MO, the study did not test the loci with respect to other subtypes of migraine. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) robustly associated with migraine are individually or collectively associated with menstrual migraine (MM). Genotyping of migraine susceptibility SNPs was conducted using the Agena MassARRAY platform on DNA samples from 235 women diagnosed with menstrual migraine as per International Classification for Headache Disorders II (ICHD-II) criteria and 140 controls. Alternative genotyping methods including restriction fragment length polymorphism, pyrosequencing and Sanger sequencing were used for validation. Statistical analysis was performed using PLINK and SPSS. Genotypes of 34 SNPs were obtained and investigated for their potential association with menstrual migraine. Of these SNPs, rs2506142 located near the neuropilin 1 gene (NRP1), was found to be significantly associated with menstrual migraine (p = 0.003). Genomic risk scores were calculated for all 34 SNPs as well as a subset of 7 SNPs that were nearing individual significance. Overall, this analysis suggested these SNPs to be weakly predictive of MM, but of no prognostic or diagnostic value. Our results suggest that NRP1 may be important in the etiology of MM. It also suggests some genetic commonality between common migraine subtypes (MA and MO) and MM. The identification of associated SNPs may be the starting point to a better understanding of how genetic factors may contribute to the menstrual migraine sub-type.

  18. No abnormalities of intrinsic brain connectivity in the interictal phase of migraine with aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougaard, A; Amin, F M; Magon, S; Sprenger, T; Rostrup, E; Ashina, M

    2015-04-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have shown hyperresponsiveness of cortical areas to visual stimuli in migraine patients with aura outside of attacks. This may be a key feature in the initiation of aura episodes and possibly also migraine headache attacks. It is unknown if cortical dysfunction is present at rest, i.e. in the absence of any external stimuli. Functional magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful technique for evaluating resting state functional connectivity, i.e. coherence of brain activity across cerebral areas. The objective of this study was to investigate resting-state functional brain connectivity in migraineurs with aura outside of attacks using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Forty patients suffering from migraine with visual aura and 40 individually age and gender matched healthy controls with no history or family history of migraine were investigated. Following advanced denoising, the data were analyzed both in a hypothesis-driven fashion, testing for abnormalities involving 27 different brain areas of potential relevance to migraine with aura including the cortical visual areas, the amygdala and peri-aqueductal grey matter, and in a data-driven exploratory fashion (dual regression) in order to reveal any possible between-group differences of resting state networks. Age, gender, attack frequency and disease duration were included as nuisance variables. No differences of functional connectivity were found between patients and controls. The previously reported increased cortical hyperresponsivity in the interictal phase of migraine with aura is unlikely to be caused by abnormalities of intrinsic brain connectivity. The interictal migraine aura brain may be abnormally functioning only during exposure to external stimuli. © 2015 EAN.

  19. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide and migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zagami, Alessandro S; Edvinsson, Lars; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) is found in human trigeminocervical complex and can trigger migraine. PACAP levels were measured using a sensitive radioimmunoassay. Stimulation of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in cat elevated PACAP levels in cranial blood. Patients...... with moderate or severe migraine headache had elevated PACAP in the external jugular vein during headache (n = 15), that was reduced 1 h after treatment with sumatriptan 6 mg (n = 11), and further reduced interictally (n = 9). The data suggest PACAP, or its receptors, are a promising target for migraine...

  20. Emerging migraine treatments and drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    Migraine has a 1-year prevalence of 10% and high socioeconomic costs. Despite recent drug developments, there is a huge unmet need for better pharmacotherapy. In this review we discuss promising anti-migraine strategies such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists and 5....... Tonabersat, a cortical spreading depression inhibitor, has shown efficacy in the prophylaxis of migraine with aura. Several new drug targets such as nitric oxide synthase, the 5-HT(1D) receptor, the prostanoid receptors EP(2) and EP(4), and the pituitary adenylate cyclase receptor PAC1 await development...

  1. Erenumab (AMG 334) in episodic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Messoud; Dodick, David; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    ) study will receive erenumab 70 mg every 4 weeks for up to 5 years. This preplanned interim analysis, conducted after all participants had completed the 1-year open-label follow-up, evaluated changes in monthly migraine days (MMD), achievement of ≥50%, ≥75%, and 100% reductions, Headache Impact Test (HIT...... improvements and favorable safety and tolerability profiles, supports further investigation of erenumab as a preventive treatment in patients with EM. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01952574. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with episodic migraine, erenumab...... reduces long-term MMD and improves headache-related disability and migraine-specific quality of life....

  2. The journey from genetic predisposition to medication overuse headache to its acquisition as sequela of chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelletti, Paolo

    2018-01-10

    Migraine remains one of the biggest clinical case to be solved among the non-communicable diseases, second to low back pain for disability caused as reported by the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. Despite this, its genetics roots are still unknown. Its evolution in chronic forms hits 2-4% of the population and causes a form so far defined Medication Overuse Headache (MOH), whose pathophysiological basis have not been explained by many dedicated studies. The Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 has not recognized MOH as independent entity, but as a sequela of Chronic Migraine. This concept, already reported in previous studies, has been confirmed by the efficacy of OnabotulinumtoxinA in Chronic Migraine independently from the presence of MOH. The consistency of the current definitions of both Medication Overuse Headache and Chronic Migraine itself might be re-read on the basis of new evidences.

  3. Migraine in the post-menopausal period is associated with higher levels of mood disorders, disability, and more menopausal symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Carturan

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To assess the prevalence of headache in post-menopausal women. Methods Women attending gynecology outpatient services in the coastal region of the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil were invited to participate in this study. Only those with non-surgical menopause and no hormone replacement therapy were included. Prevalence and characterization of headaches were assessed, as well as the burden of migraine, traits of anxiety and depression, and menopausal symptomatology. Results One hundred and three women were included in the study. Migraine affected 14.7% of them. Some previous type of headache was reported by 86.2% of the women, most of whom improved during menopause but still presented with headache attacks. There was a correlation between higher migraine disability and depressive traits. Conclusions Many women believe that their headaches, particularly migraine, will end after menopause. This is, unfortunately, not the case for many of them.

  4. Two-stage case-control association study of dopamine-related genes and migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardo Julio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported risk haplotypes for two genes related with serotonin and dopamine metabolism: MAOA in migraine without aura and DDC in migraine with aura. Herein we investigate the contribution to migraine susceptibility of eight additional genes involved in dopamine neurotransmission. Methods We performed a two-stage case-control association study of 50 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, selected according to genetic coverage parameters. The first analysis consisted of 263 patients and 274 controls and the replication study was composed by 259 cases and 287 controls. All cases were diagnosed according to ICHD-II criteria, were Spanish Caucasian, and were sex-matched with control subjects. Results Single-marker analysis of the first population identified nominal associations of five genes with migraine. After applying a false discovery rate correction of 10%, the differences remained significant only for DRD2 (rs2283265 and TH (rs2070762. Multiple-marker analysis identified a five-marker T-C-G-C-G (rs12363125-rs2283265-rs2242592-rs1554929-rs2234689 risk haplotype in DRD2 and a two-marker A-C (rs6356-rs2070762 risk haplotype in TH that remained significant after correction by permutations. These results, however, were not replicated in the second independent cohort. Conclusion The present study does not support the involvement of the DRD1, DRD2, DRD3, DRD5, DBH, COMT, SLC6A3 and TH genes in the genetic predisposition to migraine in the Spanish population.

  5. Generalized mechanical pain sensitivity over nerve tissues in patients with strictly unilateral migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Cuadrado, María Luz; Pareja, Juan A

    2009-06-01

    No study has previously analyzed pressure pain sensitivity of nerve trunks in migraine. This study aimed to examine the differences in mechanical pain sensitivity over specific nerves between patients with unilateral migraine and healthy controls. Blinded investigators assessed pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the supra-orbital nerves (V1) and peripheral nerve trunks of both upper extremities (median, radial, and ulnar nerves) in 20 patients with strictly unilateral migraine and 20 healthy matched controls. Pain intensity after palpation over both supra-orbital nerves was also assessed. A pressure algometer was used to quantify PPT, whereas a 10-point numerical pain rate scale was used to evaluate pain to palpation over the supra-orbital nerve. The analysis of covariance revealed that pain to palpation over the supra-orbital nerve was significantly higher (P0.6). In patients with unilateral migraine, we found increased mechano-sensitivity of the supra-orbital nerve on the symptomatic side of the head. Outside the head, the same patients showed increased mechano-sensitivity of the main peripheral nerves of both upper limbs, without asymmetries. Such diffuse hypersensitivity of the peripheral nerves lends further evidence to the presence of a state of hyperexcitability of the central nervous system in patients with unilateral migraine.

  6. Associations between stress and migraine and tension-type headache: results from a school-based study in adolescents from grammar schools in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milde-Busch, Astrid; Blaschek, Astrid; Heinen, Florian; Borggräfe, Ingo; Koerte, Inga; Straube, Andreas; Schankin, Christoph; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2011-05-01

    Stress is considered the major contributor to migraine and tension-type headache in adolescents. Previous studies have focused on general stressors, whereas the aim of the present study was to investigate associations between individuals' stressful experiences and different types of headache. Adolescents from 10th and 11th grades of grammar schools filled in questionnaires. Stressful experiences were measured with the Trier Inventory of Chronic Stress. Type of headache was classified according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Linear regressions, adjusted for sex and grade, were calculated to estimate differences in stress scores that can be attributed to migraine, tension-type headache or miscellaneous headache. A total of 1260 questionnaires were analysed. Tension-type headache, migraine and co-existing migraine plus tension-type headache were found in 48.7%, 10.2% and 19.8% of the participants. In subjects with migraine or co-existing migraine plus tension-type headache, high increases in stress scores were found in all investigated dimensions, whereas much weaker and inconsistent associations were found in subjects with tension-type headache only. The characteristic of migraine is more associated with stressful experiences than this is the case for tension-type headache. This suggests that adolescent migraine patients might especially benefit from behavioural interventions regarding stress.

  7. [Migrainous aura subtypes in hospitalized children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedroń, Agnieszka; Steczkowska, Małgorzata; Zajac, Anna; Stolarska, Urszula; Kroczka, Sławomir

    2009-01-01

    Migraine with aura is characterized by reversible focal neurological symptoms preceding or accompanying headache. Visual aura is the most common type of aura and its patognomic symptoms are scintillating fortification migrating across the visual field or scintillating scotoma. However, the symptoms are not always so typical and clinical doubts are greater when negative symptoms (loss of vision, numbness or paresis) are present. Differential diagnosis of migraine with aura includes in the first place transient ischemic attack (TIA) as well as epilepsy. Diagnosis of migraine in the developmental age is more difficult and associated with unprecise description of the symptoms. Thorough history taking is crucial in migraine diagnosis and following management. Knowledge of migraine with aura symptoms, clinical differences associated with developmental age and features enabling differentiation with other disorders imitating migraine is very important. Description of aura types and characteristics of migraine headache and their accompanying symptoms in children. 30 children were included, aged 8-17 years (mean 13,6 years), hospitalized at Department of Pediatric Neurology Chair of Pediatric and Adolescent Neurology, Jagiellonian University in 14 months of years 2008 and 2009. Clinical analysis was based on inquiry addressed to the patients and their parents. Migraine with visual aura was established in 9 patients, with somatosensory aura in 4, visual and somatosensory in 5, visual and dysphasic in 1, visual, somatosensory and dysphasic in 5, somatosensory and dysphasic in 2 and basilar type migraine in 4 patients. Consequently, symptoms of visual aura were present in 20/30 patients, in 9 of them it was the only type of aura and in 11 coexisted with other aura types. In more than half cases it manifested as simple visual phenomenons (spots, dots, frills, lines). Blurred vision was found in 5 patients (bilateral in 3, unilateral in 3) and hemianopia in 2 (bilateral in aura

  8. Dietary Treatment for Migraine Under Six Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical factors and response to treatment were compared in children < 6 years and older children treated for migraine by nonpharmacologic measures in a pediatric headache clinic at Schneider Children’s Medical Center, Petah Tiqwa, Israel.

  9. Emerging migraine treatments and drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    Migraine has a 1-year prevalence of 10% and high socioeconomic costs. Despite recent drug developments, there is a huge unmet need for better pharmacotherapy. In this review we discuss promising anti-migraine strategies such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists and 5......-hydroxytrypamine (5-HT)(1F) receptor agonists, which are in late-stage development. Nitric oxide antagonists are also in development. New forms of administration of sumatriptan might improve efficacy and reduce side effects. Botulinum toxin A has recently been approved for the prophylaxis of chronic migraine....... Tonabersat, a cortical spreading depression inhibitor, has shown efficacy in the prophylaxis of migraine with aura. Several new drug targets such as nitric oxide synthase, the 5-HT(1D) receptor, the prostanoid receptors EP(2) and EP(4), and the pituitary adenylate cyclase receptor PAC1 await development...

  10. Cerebral blood flow changes in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L

    1991-01-01

    A number of basically different methods have been used in studies of the cerebrovascular changes which occur in migraine and each individual set of findings seems to be dependent on which method is used. One method on its own can only disclose a part of all the pathophysiological events. This rev......A number of basically different methods have been used in studies of the cerebrovascular changes which occur in migraine and each individual set of findings seems to be dependent on which method is used. One method on its own can only disclose a part of all the pathophysiological events....... This review is an attempt to consider the capabilities of each method and to bring together the results from different studies on migraine in order to create a complete picture of the cerebrovascular changes which occur during the course of a migraine attack....

  11. Morphological Abnormalities of Thalamic Subnuclei in Migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magon, Stefano; May, Arne; Stankewitz, Anne

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The thalamus contains third-order relay neurons of the trigeminal system, and animal models as well as preliminary imaging studies in small cohorts of migraine patients have suggested a role of the thalamus in headache pathophysiology. However, larger studies using advanced imaging...... techniques in substantial patient populations are lacking. In the present study, we investigated changes of thalamic volume and shape in a large multicenter cohort of patients with migraine. High-resolution T1-weighted MRI data acquired at 3 tesla in 131 patients with migraine (38 with aura; 30.8 ± 9 years...... a fully automated multiatlas approach. Deformation-based shape analysis was performed to localize surface abnormalities. Differences between patients with migraine and healthy subjects were assessed using an ANCOVA model. After correction for multiple comparisons, performed using the false discovery rate...

  12. Visual Disturbances: Related to Migraine or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... migraine with aura face a higher risk of ischemic stroke — a stroke that occurs because of a clot ... with aura can take control of their elevated stroke risk. For young women with aura on birth control, Dr. Diener ...

  13. Dysautonomia in the pathogenesis of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gazerani, Parisa; Cairns, Brian Edwin

    2018-01-01

    , such as bright lights, hunger, poor sleep quality, menses, and special dietary components is discussed. The influence of currently employed pharmacological treatments on altered autonomic function during the migraine attack is explored. Expert Commentary: Migraine-related alterations in ANS function have......INTRODUCTION: Migraine is a common complex neurological disorder involving multiple brain areas that regulate autonomic, affective, cognitive, and sensory functions. This review explores autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction in migraine headache sufferers. Areas covered: Reference material...... that are indicative of altered autonomic function, which include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, polyuria, eyelid edema, conjunctival injection, lacrimation, nasal congestion, and ptosis, are discussed and putative mechanisms explored. In addition, alteration of ANS function by endogenous and exogenous stressors...

  14. Anxiety and Depression Symptomatology in Migraine: Retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disorders among patients with migraine attending the outpatient clinic of Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Kaduna Methods: This is a retrospective study. Case files of all patients who presented with 'headache syndrome' from January, 2000 to ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: sporadic hemiplegic migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Haan J, Pusch M, van den Maagdenberg AM, Ferrari MD, Dichgans M. Systematic analysis of three FHM ... van den Maagdenberg AM, Haan J, Terwindt GM, Ferrari MD. Migraine: gene mutations and functional consequences. Curr ...

  16. A multicenter phase I/II study of obatoclax mesylate administered as a 3- or 24-hour infusion in older patients with previously untreated acute myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D Schimmer

    Full Text Available An open-label phase I/II study of single-agent obatoclax determined a maximum tolerated dose (MTD and schedule, safety, and efficacy in older patients (≥ 70 yr with untreated acute myeloid leukemia (AML.Phase I evaluated the safety of obatoclax infused for 3 hours on 3 consecutive days (3 h × 3 d in 2-week cycles. Initial obatoclax dose was 30 mg/day (3 h × 3 d; n = 3. Obatoclax was increased to 45 mg/day (3 h × 3 d if ≤ 1 patient had a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT and decreased to 20 mg/day (3 h × 3 d if DLT occurred in ≥ 2 patients. In the phase II study, 12 patients were randomized to receive obatoclax at the dose identified during phase I (3 h × 3 d or 60 mg/day administered by continuous infusion over 24 hours for 3 days (24 h × 3 d to determine the morphologic complete response rate.In phase I, two of three patients receiving obatoclax 30 mg/day (3 h × 3 d experienced grade 3 neurologic DLTs (confusion, ataxia, and somnolence. Obatoclax was decreased to 20 mg/day (3 h × 3 d. In phase II, no clinically relevant safety differences were observed between the 20 mg/day (3 h × 3 d; n = 7 and 60 mg/day (24 h × 3 d; n = 5 arms. Neurologic and psychiatric adverse events were most common and were generally transient and reversible. Complete response was not achieved in any patient.Obatoclax 20 mg/day was the MTD (3 h × 3 d in older patients with AML. In the schedules tested, single-agent obatoclax was not associated with an objective response. Evaluation in additional subgroups or in combination with other chemotherapy modalities may be considered for future study.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00684918.

  17. A multicenter phase I/II study of obatoclax mesylate administered as a 3- or 24-hour infusion in older patients with previously untreated acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmer, Aaron D; Raza, Azra; Carter, Thomas H; Claxton, David; Erba, Harry; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Tallman, Martin S; Goard, Carolyn; Borthakur, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    An open-label phase I/II study of single-agent obatoclax determined a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and schedule, safety, and efficacy in older patients (≥ 70 yr) with untreated acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Phase I evaluated the safety of obatoclax infused for 3 hours on 3 consecutive days (3 h × 3 d) in 2-week cycles. Initial obatoclax dose was 30 mg/day (3 h × 3 d; n = 3). Obatoclax was increased to 45 mg/day (3 h × 3 d) if ≤ 1 patient had a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and decreased to 20 mg/day (3 h × 3 d) if DLT occurred in ≥ 2 patients. In the phase II study, 12 patients were randomized to receive obatoclax at the dose identified during phase I (3 h × 3 d) or 60 mg/day administered by continuous infusion over 24 hours for 3 days (24 h × 3 d) to determine the morphologic complete response rate. In phase I, two of three patients receiving obatoclax 30 mg/day (3 h × 3 d) experienced grade 3 neurologic DLTs (confusion, ataxia, and somnolence). Obatoclax was decreased to 20 mg/day (3 h × 3 d). In phase II, no clinically relevant safety differences were observed between the 20 mg/day (3 h × 3 d; n = 7) and 60 mg/day (24 h × 3 d; n = 5) arms. Neurologic and psychiatric adverse events were most common and were generally transient and reversible. Complete response was not achieved in any patient. Obatoclax 20 mg/day was the MTD (3 h × 3 d) in older patients with AML. In the schedules tested, single-agent obatoclax was not associated with an objective response. Evaluation in additional subgroups or in combination with other chemotherapy modalities may be considered for future study. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00684918.

  18. Hemiplegic Migraine Presenting with Prolonged Somnolence: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Saleh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemiplegic migraine is a rare and complex disease, characterized by migraine with a reversible motor aura. Hemiplegic migraine can be easily misdiagnosed at its first presentation with an atypical severe form of migraine, a stroke, multiple sclerosis, metabolic disorders, conversion disorder or an epilepsy. We present the case of a young 24-year-old male patient, who since the age of 4 years had been having multiple episodes of migraine associated with hemiparesis, paraesthesia, prolonged somnolence, aphasia and confusion. We review the literature and discuss important diagnostic findings in hemiplegic migraine to help establishing a prompt diagnosis.

  19. Chiropractic spinal manipulative treatment of migraine headache of 40-year duration using Gonstead method: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaibi, Aleksander; Tuchin, Peter J

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a case study of chiropractic spinal manipulative treatment (CSMT) using the Gonstead method for a patient with migraines. The patient was a 52-year-old married woman with a long-term history of chronic migraines, which included nausea, vomiting, and photophobia. The patient had endometriosis, but did not relate the migraines to her menstrual cycles. She also reported not using medication for her migraines due to previous drug-related issues. The average frequency of episodes before treatment was 1 per month, and her migraines often included an aura. The pain was moderate, was located on the right side, was pulsating, and lasted for approximately 15 hours. The numeric pain scale for an average episode was 8 out of a possible 10. The aura involved nausea, photophobia, and visual disturbances including black dots in the visual field lasting for approximately 10 minutes. The patient reported all episodes being eliminated following CSMT. At 6-month follow-up, the patient had not had a single migraine episode in this period. The patient was certain that there had been no other lifestyle changes that could have contributed to her improvement. This case adds to previous research suggesting that some migraine patients may respond favorably to CSMT. The case also provides information on the Gonstead method. A case study does not represent significant scientific evidence in context with other studies conducted; this study suggests that a trial of CSMT using the Gonstead methods could be considered for chronic, nonresponsive migraines. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Acupoint Injection of Onabotulinumtoxin A for Migraines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Onabotulinumtoxin A (BoNTA has been reported to be effective in the therapy for migraines. Acupuncture has been used worldwide for the treatment of migraine attacks. Injection of a small amount of drug at acupuncture points is an innovation as compared to traditional acupuncture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of fixed (muscle-site and acupoint-site injections of BoNTA for migraine therapy in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial extending over four months. Subjects with both episodic and chronic migraines respectively received a placebo (n = 19 or BoNTA (2.5 U each site, 25 U per subject injection at fixed-sites (n = 41 including occipitofrontalis, corrugator supercilii, temporalis and trapeziue, or at acupoint-sites (n = 42 including Yintang (EX-HN3, Taiyang (EX-HN5, Baihui (GV20, Shuaigu (GB8, Fengchi (GB20 and Tianzhu (BL10. The variations between baseline and BoNTA post-injection for four months were calculated monthly as outcome measures. BoNTA injections at fixed-sites and acupoint-sites significantly reduced the migraine attack frequency, intensity, duration and associated symptoms for four months compared with placebo (p < 0.01. The efficacy of BoNTA for migraines in the acupoint-site group (93% improvement was more significant than that in the fixed-site group (85% improvement (p < 0.01. BoNTA administration for migraines is effective, and at acupoint-sites shows more efficacy than at fixed-sites. Further blinded studies are necessary to establish the efficacy of a low dose toxin (25 U introduced with this methodology in chronic and episodic migraines.

  1. Onabotulinumtoxin-A treatment in Greek patients with chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikelis, Michail; Argyriou, Andreas A; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil V; Spingos, Konstantinos C; Mitsikostas, Dimos D

    2016-12-01

    Chronic migraine is a disabling condition, with limited treatment options. We conducted an open label, single arm, prospective clinical trial, to assess the efficacy and safety of onabotulinumtoxin-A in Greek patients with chronic migraine. Since recent evidence suggests that a meaningful clinical response may be delayed until after a third onabotulinumtoxin-A administration, we aimed at assessing outcomes at this time point. A total of 119 patients with CM, scheduled to be treated with Onabotulinumtoxin-A (Botox ®) every 3 months, according to the approved indication and standard clinical practice, were prospectively enrolled. Data documenting changes from baseline (T0-trimester before Onabotulinumtoxin-A first administration) to the period after its third administration (T3) in (i) mean number of monthly headache days (ii) migraine severity as expressed by the mean number of days with peak headache intensity of >4/10 in a 0-10 numerical scale, and (iii) mean number of days with use of any acute headache medication, were collected from patients' headache diaries at each visit. Of the 119 patients, a total of 81 received 3 courses of onabotulinumtoxin-A and were included in the efficacy population. In those 81 patients, there was a significant decrease in mean headache days/month between T0 and T3 (21.3 ± 5.4 vs 7.7 ± 4.8; P 4/10 (11.9 ± 5.5 vs 3.7 ± 3.3; P Greek patients.

  2. Prophylatic treatment of migraine and migraine clinical variants with topiramate: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Carmona

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Sergio Carmona1, Osvaldo Bruera1,21Department of Neuro-otology and Pain and Headache, Instituto de Neurociencias de Buenos Aires INEBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 2Department of Pain and Headache, Fundación Favaloro, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaAbstract: Migraine and migraine variants are common, chronic and incapacitating neurovascular disorders with a high impact on health resources. There is an extensive evidence base provided by double-blind, placebo-controlled trials showing that topiramate is a safe, effective and well tolerated drug in the management of migraine and its variants, being especially promising in the management of migraine-vertigo syndrome. Models both in the US and the UK have also shown that it offers a cost benefit when direct and indirect costs are evaluated, by reducing work loss, improving quality of life and reducing the use of increasingly scarce health resources.Keywords: migraine, migraine prophylaxis, topiramate, quality of life, basilar migraine, cluster headache, vestibular migraine

  3. Rumination in migraine: Mediating effects of brooding and reflection between migraine and psychological distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokonyei, Gyongyi; Szabo, Edina; Kocsel, Natalia; Edes, Andrea; Eszlari, Nora; Pap, Dorottya; Magyar, Mate; Kovacs, David; Zsombok, Terezia; Elliott, Rebecca; Anderson, Ian Muir; William Deakin, John Francis; Bagdy, Gyorgy; Juhasz, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The relationship between migraine and psychological distress has been consistently reported in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. We hypothesised that a stable tendency to perseverative thoughts such as rumination would mediate the relationship between migraine and psychological distress. Design and Main Outcomes Measures: Self-report questionnaires measuring depressive rumination, current psychological distress and migraine symptoms in two independent European population cohorts, recruited from Budapest (N = 1139) and Manchester (N = 2004), were used. Structural regression analysis within structural equation modelling was applied to test the mediational role of brooding and reflection, the components of rumination, between migraine and psychological distress. Sex, age and lifetime depression were controlled for in the analysis. Results: Migraine predicted higher brooding and reflection scores, and brooding proved to be a mediator between migraine and psychological distress in both samples, while reflection mediated the relationship significantly only in the Budapest sample. Conclusions: Elevated psychological distress in migraine is partially attributed to ruminative response style. Further studies are needed to expand our findings to clinical samples and to examine how rumination links to the adjustment to migraine. PMID:27616579

  4. The association between candidate migraine susceptibility loci and severe migraine phenotype in a clinical sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Christensen, Anne Francke; Steinberg, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    -structured migraine interviews, blood sampling and genotyping were performed on 1806 unrelated migraineurs recruited from the Danish Headache Center. Genotyping was also performed on a control group of 6415 people with no history of migraine. Association analyses were carried out using logistic regression and odds...

  5. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 associated with parkinsonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Marie; Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Thomsen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    parkinsonism with rigidity, bradykinesia and a resting tremor. An MRI showed a normal substantia nigra, but a bilateral loss of substance in the basal ganglia, which is in contrast to the typically normal MRI in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging with single-photon emission...... Parkinson's disease remains unanswered.......Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) are allelic disorders caused by mutations in the CACNA1A gene on chromosome 19p13. It is well described that FHM1 can present with cerebellar signs, but parkinsonism has not previously...

  6. Association of expression of DRD2 rs1800497 polymorphism with migraine risk in Han Chinese individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Y

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Yingfeng Deng, Jianping Huang, Huijun Zhang, Xueqin Zhu, Qin Gong Department of Anesthesiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Ningbo University, Ningbo, ChinaBackground: Previous studies suggested that single-nucleotide polymorphisms in dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2 are the susceptibility loci for migraine. This study was aimed at evaluating the contribution of DRD2 rs1800497 and its expression to migraine risk in Han Chinese subjects. Methods: In total, 250 patients with migraine and 250 age- and sex-matched control subjects were included in this study. TaqMan allelic discrimination assay was used for DRD2 rs1800497 genotyping. Plasma DRD2 concentration was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Significant associations were observed for the rs1800497 genotype (χ2=6.37, p=0.041 and allele (χ2=4.69, p=0.03; odds ratio [OR]=1.33, 95% CI=1.03–1.72, power=58% frequencies between the migraine and control groups. Sex analysis indicated a positive association for rs1800497 between female patients with migraine and control individuals (genotype: χ2=7.84, p=0.019; allele: χ2=6.60, p=0.010; OR=1.61, 95% CI=1.12–2.30, power=73.4%. Furthermore, a significant association was observed only in female patients with migraine without aura (MO (genotype: χ2=6.88, p=0.032; allele: χ2=5.65, p=0.017; OR=1.59, 95% CI=1.08–2.36, power=65.1%. The mean plasma DRD2 levels in the control group (mean±SD: 24.20±2.78 were significantly lower than those in the migraine with aura (MA (30.86±3.69, p<0.0001 and MO groups (31.88±4.99, p<0.0001. Additionally, there was a sex-based difference in DRD2 expression in the MA (male vs female: 29.46±3.59 vs 32.27±3.27, p<0.01 and MO groups (male vs female: 29.18±3.50 vs 34.58±4.84, p<0.0001. Moreover, plasma DRD2 levels in patients were significantly different among the three genotypes (CC vs CT vs TT: 24.76±3.76 vs 30.93±3.85 vs 37.06±3.95, p<0.0001. Similar results were observed

  7. A case study for calculating employer costs for lost productive time in episodic migraine and chronic migraine: results of the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Walter F; Bruce, Christa; Manack, Aubrey; Buse, Dawn C; Varon, Sepideh F; Lipton, Richard B

    2011-10-01

    To model workplace lost productive time (LPT) from episodic migraine (EM) and chronic migraine (CM). We used published estimates of migraine epidemiology and related LPT to model the impact of migraine on two typical US workforce scenarios that differ by gender and age. In a simulated service sector workforce of 10,000 individuals, the migraine-related LPT was $2.9 million annually compared with $2.1 million for a manufacturing workforce. Individuals with moderate frequency EM accounted for 42% of the cost. Individuals with high frequency EM and CM comprised 10% of all migraine sufferers and accounted for 22% of the LPT. Lost productive time impact of migraine and other health problems depends on workforce demographics and the cost of labor. Employers can often estimate LPT costs to reveal priorities for optimizing use of health care.

  8. Characterization of consistent triggers of migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauge, Anne Werner; Kirchmann, Malene; Olesen, Jes

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize perceived consistent triggers of migraine with aura (MA).......The aim of the present study was to characterize perceived consistent triggers of migraine with aura (MA)....

  9. Can nitric oxide induce migraine in normal individuals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: For many years, scientists have debated the possibility that an individual "migraine threshold" determines the likelihood with which individuals may express migraine attacks. DISCUSSION: Recent discoveries provided evidence for both genetic and environmental influences on individual...

  10. Migraines: Simple Steps to Head Off the Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... same time every day. Don't skip meals. Fasting increases the risk of migraines. Keep a food ... weight through exercise and diet can provide additional benefits in managing migraines. If your doctor agrees, choose ...

  11. Utilization and safety of onabotulinumtoxinA for the prophylactic treatment of chronic migraine from an observational study in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matharu, Manjit; Pascual, Julio; Nilsson Remahl, Ingela; Straube, Andreas; Lum, Arlene; Davar, Gudarz; Odom, Dawn; Bennett, Lee; Proctor, Christina; Gutierrez, Lia; Andrews, Elizabeth; Johannes, Catherine

    2017-12-01

    Objective To examine treatment utilization patterns and safety of onabotulinumtoxinA for the prophylactic treatment of chronic migraine in routine clinical practice. Background Clinical trials support onabotulinumtoxinA for the prophylaxis of headache in patients with chronic migraine, but real-world data are limited. Design/methods A prospective, observational, post-authorization study in adult patients with chronic migraine treated with onabotulinumtoxinA. Data were collected at the first study injection and approximately every three months for ≤52 weeks for utilization and ≤64 weeks for safety data, and summarized using descriptive statistics. Results Eighty-five physicians (81% neurologists) at 58 practices in the United Kingdom, Germany, Spain, and Sweden participated and recruited 1160 patients (84.2% female, median age 46.6 years). At baseline, 85.8% of patients had physician diagnoses of chronic migraine/transformed migraine and reported an average of 11.3 (SD = 6.9) severe headache days per 28 days; 50.6% had previously used onabotulinumtoxinA for chronic migraine. A total of 4017 study treatments were observed. The median number of injection sites (n = 31) and total dose (155 U) were consistent across all treatment sessions, with a median 13.7 weeks observed between sessions. At least one treatment-related adverse event was reported by 291 patients (25.1%); the most frequently reported treatment-related adverse event was neck pain (4.4%). Most patients (74.4%) were satisfied/extremely satisfied with onabotulinumtoxinA treatment. Conclusions Patient demographics/characteristics are consistent with published data on the chronic migraine population. Utilization of onabotulinumtoxinA treatment for chronic migraine appears to be consistent with the Summary of Product Characteristics and published PREEMPT injection paradigm. No new safety signals were identified.

  12. Amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and fractional ALFF in migraine patients: a resting-state functional MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.-J.; Chen, X.; Sah, S.K.; Zeng, C.; Li, Y.-M.; Li, N.; Liu, M.-Q.; Du, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the amplitude of low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) of the brain in migraine patients using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and fractional ALFF in the interictal period, in comparison to healthy controls (HCs). Materials and methods: A total of 54 subjects, including 30 migraineurs and 24 gender- and age-matched HCs completed the fMRI. All the data and ALFF, fALFF analyses were preprocessed with the Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI (DPARSF). All of the statistical analyses were performed using the REST software to explore the differences in ALFF and fALFF between migraine patients and HCs. Results: In contrast to HCs, migraine patients showed significant ALFF increase in the left medulla and pons, the bilateral cerebellum posterior lobe and right insula. The regions showing decreased ALFF in migraine patients included the bilateral cerebellum posterior lobe, left cerebellum anterior lobe, bilateral orbital cortex, right middle frontal gyrus, bilateral occipital lobe, right fusiform gyrus, and bilateral postcentral gyrus. The fALFFs in migraine patients were significantly increased in the bilateral insular and left orbital cortex, but were decreased in the left occipital lobe and bilateral cerebellum posterior lobe. Conclusion: These ALFF and fALFF alterations in the brain regions of migraineurs are in keeping with the domains associated with pain and cognition. Such brain functional alteration may contribute to further understanding of migraine-related network imbalances demonstrated in previous studies. - Highlights: • Migraine is a common, paroxysmal, highly disabling primary headache disorder. • Resting-state fMRI offers a novel approach to measure spontaneous brain activity in migraine patients • The ALFF and fALFF alterations in migraineurs' brain regions are in keeping with the domains associated with pain and cognition.

  13. Effect of percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for the treatment of migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Xu, Qiao-rong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study aimed to assess the effectiveness and safety of percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS) in migraine treatment. Methods: Sixty-two patients with at least 2 migration attacks each month were recruited and randomly divided into a verum PENS group and a sham PENS group in a ratio of 1:1. All patients received verum or sham PENS 30 minutes daily, 5 times weekly for 12 weeks. The primary outcomes were change in monthly migraine days (MMD) and the 50% responder rate (RR). Secondary outcomes were evaluated using the monthly migraine attacks (MMA), monthly headache days (MHD), and monthly acute antimigraine drug intake (MAADI). All outcome measurements were performed at treatment initiation to establish a baseline and again after 12 weeks of treatment. Results: At the end of the 12 weeks, the group receiving verum PENS exhibited statistically significant decrease in the mean MMD compared with the group receiving sham PENS intervention (P < .05). Additionally, the 50% RR was significantly higher in the verum PENS group than that in the sham PENS group (P < .05). Furthermore, the MMA, MHD, and MAADI were also significantly lower in the verum PENS group that those in the sham PENS group (P < .05). Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrated that verum PENS is more effective and safe than Sham PENS for the treatment of migraine. PMID:28953632

  14. Should we advise patients to treat migraine attacks early: methodologic issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Michel D

    2005-01-01

    In clinical trials of triptans in acute migraine, patients have traditionally been required to take their medication only when their pain reached moderate or severe intensity. This methodology better ensured that migraine attacks rather than nonmigraine headaches were treated, minimized the placebo response and simplified comparison of improvement as all patients start from the same baseline pain level. In clinical practice, patients do not take medication in this way, and there is some theoretical evidence that early treatment might be beneficial. There are increasing numbers of reports claiming advantages of 'early' treatment, when the pain is mild, over 'late' treatment, when pain is moderate or severe, but these studies raise significant methodologic issues. Treating 'early' may equate with treating 'mild' in slowly progressing attacks only but this may not always be the case in rapidly progressing attacks; these two types of migraine attacks should be distinguished carefully and investigated separately. Trials should be placebo-controlled, blinded, assess the therapeutic gain versus placebo rather than the absolute rates, and use the sustained pain-free endpoint. Early treatment may also increase the risk of medication overuse headaches. At present, there is no scientific support to advise patient to treat early. Patients should be advised to take their medication as soon as they are sure they are developing a migraine headache, but not during the aura phase. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Cognitive, Personality, and Family Factors in Patients with Migraine Headache

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Johari-Fard; Farzad Goli; Amirreza Boroumand

    2014-01-01

    Migraine is a disorder that has debilitating pain, and affects all aspects of life, including the academic, social, and family life of patients. In addition, studies show the effects of migraine on patient's relationships with family members such as spouse, children, and other family members. In addition to physical pain, migraines are tied to significant psychological and economic costs. Migraineurs tend to have high levels of depression and anxiety, and migraine headaches have a profoundly ...

  16. High leptin levels are associated with migraine with aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanu, Claudia; Preisig, Martin; Castelao, Enrique; Glaus, Jennifer; Cunningham, Janet L; Del Zompo, Maria; Merikangas, Kathleen R; Schiöth, Helgi B; Mwinyi, Jessica

    2017-04-01

    Background Migraine is a prevalent disorder characterised by recurrent headache attacks preceded or accompanied by aura in a subgroup of patients. Migraine often occurs together with major depressive disorder (MDD). Alterations of adipokine levels have been reported both in migraine and in MDD. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to assess the associations between serum leptin and adiponectin levels and migraine or migraine subtypes. Analyses were adjusted for a lifetime history of MDD in order to investigate the association between adipokines and migraine under consideration of depression status. Methods We included 3025 participants from the CoLaus/PsyCoLaus study. The impact of leptin and adiponectin levels on a diagnosis of migraine was analysed by binary regression analyses, adjusting for variables known to influence adipokine levels. Subgroup analyses were conducted based on the presence of aura. Results Crude leptin levels were significantly higher in subjects with migraine than controls (Mann-Whitney U = 515,102, p = 6 × 10 -7 ). When performing adjusted analyses, leptin levels were found to be significantly higher in subjects with migraine (odds ratio = 1.22, p = 0.024) and migraine with aura (odds ratio = 1.34, p = 0.004). Conclusion High leptin levels might play a role in the pathogenesis of migraine and migraine with aura.

  17. Symptom dimensions of affective disorders in migraine patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louter, M. A.; Pijpers, J. A.; Wardenaar, K. J.; van Zwet, E. W.; van Hemert, A. M.; Zitman, F. G.; Ferrari, M. D.; Penninx, B. W.; Tervvindt, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A strong association has been established between migraine and depression. However, this is the first study to differentiate in a large sample of migraine patients for symptom dimensions of the affective disorder spectrum. Methods: Migraine patients (n = 3174) from the LUMINA (Leiden

  18. Migrainomics - identifying brain and genetic markers of migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholt, Dale R; Borsook, David; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-12-01

    Migraine is one of the world's most prevalent and disabling disorders and imposes an enormous socioeconomic burden. The exact causes of migraine are unknown, and no recognizable diagnostic pathological changes have been identified. Specific identifiable markers of migraine would aid diagnosis and could provide insight into the pathogenesis of the condition, with the potential to direct development of new therapeutics. In the past few years, advances in neuroimaging and genetic studies have provided the most substantial progress towards the identification of markers. A growing number of brain imaging studies have provided important insights into the brain mechanisms that underlie migraine symptoms during and between migraine attacks. Similarly, large-scale genome-wide association studies have identified genetic variants associated with the common forms of migraine - migraine with aura and migraine without aura. In total, 44 independent single-nucleotide polymorphism loci have been robustly associated with the risk of migraine and provide new evidence for the involvement of vascular mechanisms. Both imaging and genetics, therefore, have excellent potential as markers of migraine. In this Review, we provide a summary of results regarding current and potential neuroimaging and genetic markers of migraine, consider what conclusions can be drawn from these markers about migraine mechanisms and discuss the potential of combining imaging and genetics.

  19. Prescribing of drugs for the treatment of migraine with specific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Migraine affects between 5.15% of males and 13,5-31% of females in South Africa. Little is known about the prescribing patterns of anti-migraine drugs in South Africa. The aim of the study was to investigate the prescribing of drugs for the treatment of migraine (ATC Group NOZC), with specific emphasis on sumatriptan, in a ...

  20. Factors contributing to migraine headache surgery failure and success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kelsey; Lee, Michelle; Davis, Janine; Guyuron, Bahman

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that contribute to migraine headache surgery failure and success. A retrospective chart review was conducted of patients who underwent surgery for migraine headaches performed by the senior author (B.G.) and had at least 11 months of follow-up. The study population included three groups: migraine surgery success, improvement, and failure. Thirty-six unique data points were collected for each patient. A total of 169 patients met inclusion criteria. Of these, 66 patients comprised the migraine surgery success group (S, complete elimination of migraine headaches); 67 comprised the migraine surgery improvement group (I, >50 percent reduction in migraine frequency, intensity, or duration); and 36 comprised the migraine surgery failure group (F, I, p=0.02), migraine frequency (SI, p=0.003; S>F, p=0.04), history of head or neck injury (SI, p=0.02), increased intraoperative bleeding (SF, p=0.0006; I>F, p=0.0004), site II (S>F, p=0.015), single operative site (SI, p=0.05; S>F, p=0.04). Factors associated with migraine surgery failure include increased intraoperative bleeding and surgery on fewer trigger sites. Factors associated with migraine surgery success are older age of migraine onset, higher rate of visual symptoms versus improvement group, surgery at site I or II, and deactivating all four operative sites. Risk, III.

  1. Increased intrinsic brain connectivity between pons and somatosensory cortex during attacks of migraine with aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Larsson, Henrik B W; Rostrup, Egill; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-05-01

    The neurological disturbances of migraine aura are caused by transient cortical dysfunction due to waves of spreading depolarization that disrupt neuronal signaling. The effects of these cortical events on intrinsic brain connectivity during attacks of migraine aura have not previously been investigated. Studies of spontaneous migraine attacks are notoriously challenging due to their unpredictable nature and patient discomfort. We investigated 16 migraine patients with visual aura during attacks and in the attack-free state using resting state fMRI. We applied a hypothesis-driven seed-based approach focusing on cortical visual areas and areas involved in migraine pain, and a data-driven independent component analysis approach to detect changes in intrinsic brain signaling during attacks. In addition, we performed the analyses after mirroring the MRI data according to the side of perceived aura symptoms. We found a marked increase in connectivity during attacks between the left pons and the left primary somatosensory cortex including the head and face somatotopic areas (peak voxel: P = 0.0096, (x, y, z) = (-54, -32, 32), corresponding well with the majority of patients reporting right-sided pain. For aura-side normalized data, we found increased connectivity during attacks between visual area V5 and the lower middle frontal gyrus in the symptomatic hemisphere (peak voxel: P = 0.0194, (x, y, z) = (40, 40, 12). The present study provides evidence of altered intrinsic brain connectivity during attacks of migraine with aura, which may reflect consequences of cortical spreading depression, suggesting a link between aura and headache mechanisms. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2635-2642, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Anatomical alterations of the visual motion processing network in migraine with and without aura.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Granziera

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from migraine with aura (MWA and migraine without aura (MWoA show abnormalities in visual motion perception during and between attacks. Whether this represents the consequences of structural changes in motion-processing networks in migraineurs is unknown. Moreover, the diagnosis of migraine relies on patient's history, and finding differences in the brain of migraineurs might help to contribute to basic research aimed at better understanding the pathophysiology of migraine.To investigate a common potential anatomical basis for these disturbances, we used high-resolution cortical thickness measurement and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to examine the motion-processing network in 24 migraine patients (12 with MWA and 12 MWoA and 15 age-matched healthy controls (HCs. We found increased cortical thickness of motion-processing visual areas MT+ and V3A in migraineurs compared to HCs. Cortical thickness increases were accompanied by abnormalities of the subjacent white matter. In addition, DTI revealed that migraineurs have alterations in superior colliculus and the lateral geniculate nucleus, which are also involved in visual processing.A structural abnormality in the network of motion-processing areas could account for, or be the result of, the cortical hyperexcitability observed in migraineurs. The finding in patients with both MWA and MWoA of thickness abnormalities in area V3A, previously described as a source in spreading changes involved in visual aura, raises the question as to whether a "silent" cortical spreading depression develops as well in MWoA. In addition, these experimental data may provide clinicians and researchers with a noninvasively acquirable migraine biomarker.

  3. Weather and emergency room visits for migraine headaches in Ottawa, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, P J; Szyszkowicz, M; Stieb, D; Bourque, D A

    2006-01-01

    Self-reported surveys have indicated that weather can trigger migraine headaches. However, to date, we know of no previous study that has examined the relationship between weather and emergency room (ER) visits for this condition. To examine associations between ER visits for migraines and selected meteorological conditions within the 24 hours preceding the visit. A case-crossover design was used to study 4039 visits for migraines (ICD-9: 346) that occurred at an Ottawa hospital between 1993 and 2000. Meteorological conditions were defined using hourly readings from a fixed-site monitoring station. Conditional logistic regression was used to compare the occurrence of meteorological conditions during the 24 hours leading up to the time of the visit to control periods occurring 1 week before and after. Precipitation-related weather events (fog, snow, rain, thunder) were not associated with migraine visits. Similarly, no associations were observed with changes in atmospheric pressure, wind speed, and relative humidity during the 24 hours preceding presentation. No statistically significant differences in the frequency distribution of clusters defined by relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, and temperature were found between case and control intervals. Conversely, a mean wind speed in excess of 19 km per hour was associated with a reduction in ER visits 8 to 12 hours later. Our findings provide little support for the hypothesis that ER visits for migraines are related to weather conditions occurring within the 24 hours preceding presentation. These results should be interpreted cautiously as some comparisons are based on a small number of cases, and ER visits for migraine may represent a highly selective group of patients who suffer from this condition.

  4. Psychosocial factors associated with migraine and tension-type headache in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Elena R; Kobzeva, Natalia R; Gilev, Denis V; Kislyak, Nadezhda V; Olesen, Jes

    2017-11-01

    Background In our previous study of workers, blood donors and medical students, students stood out with a higher 1-year prevalence of migraine (28%) and tension-type headache (TTH) (74%). General factors associated with headache were common for all groups except low physical activity. The hypothesis of this study was therefore that a number of psychosocial factors relating to the personal sphere would better explain the high prevalence of migraine and TTH in students. Methods The study population consisted of 1042 students (719 females, 323 males, mean age 20.6, range 17-40). Headache diagnoses and associated factors were identified by direct professional semi-structured interview. We also interviewed about the following psychosocial factors: dissatisfaction with study, dissatisfaction with family life, dissatisfaction for personal reasons, bad financial situation, overwork, stress, not enough sleep, insomnia, depressed mood, anxiety, irritability, tendency towards conflicts and not being married. We report psychosocial factors associated with headache according to diagnosis and sex using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results Several factors were significantly associated with migraine and TTH in the univariate analysis. In the multivariate analysis, two psychosocial factors were statistically significantly associated with migraine in all students: irritability (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4-3.6) and overwork (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4-3.5). Insomnia (2.7, 95% CI 1.1-6.9) and depressed mood (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.2) were associated with migraine only in females. Two psychosocial factors were associated with TTH: dissatisfaction with study in males (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0-3.8) and depressed mood in females (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.0-3.5). Conclusion Psychosocial factors from the personal sphere showed significant association with migraine and TTH in students. Such factors should therefore be major targets for preventive efforts to reduce the prevalence of primary

  5. Migraine in Gulf War Illness and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Prevalence, potential mechanisms, and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakib eRayhan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prevalence of headache subtypes in Gulf War Illness and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome compared to controls. Background: Migraines are reported in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS. Approximately, 25% of the military personnel who served in the 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War have developed Gulf War Illness (GWI. Symptoms in GWI share considerable overlap with CFS, including headache complaints. The type and prevalence of headaches in GWI have not been adequately assessed.Methods: 50 GWI, 39 CFS and 45 controls were examined. Participants had structured headache evaluations based on the 2004 International Headache Society criteria. All subjects had history and physical examinations, measurements of systemic hyperalgesia (dolorimetry, assessments for exclusionary indicators, fatigue and symptom related questionnaires. Results: Migraines were detected in 64% of GWI (odds ratio, 11.6, [±95% CI, 4.1 to 32.5] and 82% of CFS subjects (odds ratio, 22.5, [±95% CI, 7.8 to 64.8] compared to only 13% of controls. There was a predominance of females in the CFS compared to GWI and controls. However, gender did not influence migraine status (x2= 2.7; P = 0.101. Measures of fatigue, pain, and other ancillary criteria were comparable between GWI and CFS subjects with and without headache. Conclusion: Results validate previous findings of migraine in CFS and confirms similar increased prevalence in GWI compared to controls. This suggests GWI and CFS subjects share pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie migraine attacks and contribute to the extensive overlap of symptom constructs and disease pathophysiology. The high migraine prevalence warrants the inclusion of a structured headache evaluation that coincides with clinical assessments of GWI and CFS diagnosis.

  6. Migraine generator network and spreading depression dynamics as neuromodulation targets in episodic migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlem, Markus A.

    2013-12-01

    Migraine is a common disabling headache disorder characterized by recurrent episodes sometimes preceded or accompanied by focal neurological symptoms called aura. The relation between two subtypes, migraine without aura (MWoA) and migraine with aura (MWA), is explored with the aim to identify targets for neuromodulation techniques. To this end, a dynamically regulated control system is schematically reduced to a network of the trigeminal nerve, which innervates the cranial circulation, an associated descending modulatory network of brainstem nuclei, and parasympathetic vasomotor efferents. This extends the idea of a migraine generator region in the brainstem to a larger network and is still simple and explicit enough to open up possibilities for mathematical modeling in the future. In this study, it is suggested that the migraine generator network (MGN) is driven and may therefore respond differently to different spatio-temporal noxious input in the migraine subtypes MWA and MWoA. The noxious input is caused by a cortical perturbation of homeostasis, known as spreading depression (SD). The MGN might even trigger SD in the first place by a failure in vasomotor control. As a consequence, migraine is considered as an inherently dynamical disease to which a linear course from upstream to downstream events would not do justice. Minimally invasive and noninvasive neuromodulation techniques are briefly reviewed and their rational is discussed in the context of the proposed mechanism.

  7. Abdominal migraine in childhood: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicchitano B

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Beatrice Scicchitano,1 Gareth Humphreys,1 Sally G Mitton,2 Thiagarajan Jaiganesh1 1Children's Emergency Department, 2Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, St Georges Hospital, St Georges Healthcare NHS Trust, Tooting, London, United Kingdom Abstract: The childhood condition of abdominal migraine has been described under many different synonyms, including "abdominal epilepsy", "recurrent abdominal pain", "cyclical vomiting syndrome", and "functional gastrointestinal disorder". In the early literature, abdominal migraine is included in the "childhood periodic syndrome", first described by Wyllie and Schlesinger in 1933. Abdominal migraine has emerged over the last century as a diagnostic entity in its own right thanks to the development of well defined diagnostic criteria and its recent inclusion in the International Headache Society's Classification of Headache disorders. Despite this progress, little is known about the pathophysiology of the condition, and the treatment options are poorly defined. Here we summarize the recent literature, with particular focus on establishing the diagnosis of abdominal migraine and its pathophysiology, and suggest an approach to management. Keywords: abdominal migraine, recurrent abdominal pain, abdominal epilepsy, cyclical vomiting

  8. Persistent High IgG Phase I Antibody Levels against Coxiella burnetii among Veterinarians Compared to Patients Previously Diagnosed with Acute Q Fever after Three Years of Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielders, Cornelia C. H.; Boerman, Anneroos W.; Schimmer, Barbara; van den Brom, René; Notermans, Daan W.; van der Hoek, Wim; Schneeberger, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the development of chronic Q fever in occupational risk groups. The aim of this study was to perform long-term follow-up of Coxiella burnetii seropositive veterinarians and investigate the course of IgG phase I and phase II antibodies against C. burnetii antigens and to compare this course with that in patients previously diagnosed with acute Q fever. Methods Veterinarians with IgG phase I ≥1:256 (immunofluorescence assay) that participated in a previous seroprevalence study were asked to provide a second blood sample three years later. IgG antibody profiles were compared to a group of acute Q fever patients who had IgG phase I ≥1:256 twelve months after diagnosis. Results IgG phase I was detected in all veterinarians (n = 76) and in 85% of Q fever patients (n = 98) after three years (pveterinarians and 12% of patients (OR 3.95, 95% CI: 1.84–8.49). Conclusions IgG phase I persists among veterinarians presumably because of continuous exposure to C. burnetii during their work. Serological and clinical follow-up of occupationally exposed risk groups should be considered. PMID:25602602

  9. Psychological Factors Associated With Chronic Migraine and Severe Migraine-Related Disability: An Observational Study in a Tertiary Headache Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Elizabeth K; Buse, Dawn C; Klepper, Jaclyn E; J Mayson, Sarah; Grinberg, Amy S; Grosberg, Brian M; Pavlovic, Jelena M; Robbins, Matthew S; Vollbracht, Sarah E; Lipton, Richard B

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the relationships among modifiable psychological factors and chronic migraine and severe migraine-related disability in a clinic-based sample of persons with migraine. Evidence evaluating relationships between modifiable psychological factors and chronic migraine and severe migraine-related disability is lacking in people with migraine presenting for routine clinical care. Adults with migraine completed surveys during routinely scheduled visits to a tertiary headache center. Participants completed surveys assessing chronic migraine (meeting criteria for migraine with ≥15 headache days in the past month), severe migraine disability (Migraine Disability Assessment Scale score ≥ 21), and modifiable psychological factors (depressive symptoms [Patient Health Questionnaire-9], anxious symptoms [Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7], Pain Catastrophizing Scale and Headache Specific Locus of Control). Logistic regression evaluated relationships between modifiable psychological factors and chronic migraine and severe migraine disability. Among 90 eligible participants the mean age was 45.0 (SD = 12.4); 84.8% were women. One-third (36.0%) met study criteria for chronic migraine; half of participants (51.5%) reported severe migraine-related disability. Higher depressive symptoms (OR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.11, 3.55) and chance HSLC (OR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.13, 1.43) were associated with chronic migraine. Higher depressive symptoms (OR = 3.54, 95%CI = 1.49, 8.41), anxiety symptoms (OR = 3.65, 95% CI = 1.65, 8.06), and pain catastrophizing (OR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.14, 3.35), were associated with severe migraine-related disability. Psychiatric symptoms and pain catastrophizing were strongly associated with severe migraine-related disability. Depression and chance locus of control were associated with chronic migraine. This study supports the need for longitudinal observational studies to evaluate the relationships among

  10. Migrainous aura as stroke-mimic: The role of perfusion-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Mariana; Granato, Antonio; Polverino, Paola; Furlanis, Giovanni; Ukmar, Maja; Zorzenon, Irene; Manganotti, Paolo

    2018-03-01

    The acute-onset of migrainuos aura (MA) can be erroneously diagnosed in Emergency Department (ED) as acute stroke (AS) and it can be classified as "stroke mimic" (SM). Perfusion computer tomography (PCT) may be useful to improve detection of infarcts. The aim of the study was to investigate the role in ED of PCT in improving diagnosis of migrainous aura. Data were compared with the well-defined perfusion patterns in patients with acute ischemic stroke. A standardized Stroke Protocol was planned. The protocol consisted in centralizing in ED all the patients with acute-onset of neurological symptoms compatible with cerebrovascular disease and in performing a general and neurological examination, hematological tests, brain non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT), CT angiography (CTA) of the supra-aortic and intracranial arteries and cerebral PCT. Patients with diagnosis of definite or probable acute stroke were hospitalized in Stroke Unit (SU). A six-months retrospective analysis of all the patients included in the Stroke Protocol and discharged from ED or from SU with a diagnosis of migraine with aura was performed. 172 patients were included in the Stroke Protocol and 6 patients were enrolled. NCCT, CTA and PCT were performed after 60-90 min from symptoms onset and revealed normal perfusion. Intravenous thrombolysis was performed only in one patient. Patients with acute-onset of neurological symptoms, who have rapid progressive improvement of symptoms, normal neuroimaging, in particular PCT, and preceding episodes of migraine with aura, may be considered as suffering from MA. In these cases, even if thrombolysis is safe, clinicians may defer a prompt aggressive treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [New physiopathological knowledge applied to migraine therapy and prophylaxis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visens, Laura S

    2014-01-01

    Migraine is a very common condition that has a significant socioeconomic impact. Based on the most recent reports from the World Health Organization, its diagnosis and treatment are far from being optimal. Specialists have made great efforts to classify headaches, including migraines, in order to have a useful diagnostic tool and to guide treatment. On the other hand, advances made in the knowledge of the pathophysiology of migraines, new treatment options were developed. These new options include onabotulinum toxin A and topiramate. The prompt detection of migraine disorders and an appropriate treatment, both symptomatic and preventive, are key to relieve the personal, familiar, and social burden with special focus on chronic migraine.

  12. Shared genetic risk between migraine and coronary artery disease: A genome-wide analysis of common variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witoelar, Aree; Anttila, Verneri; Gormley, Padhraig; Kurth, Tobias; Terwindt, Gisela M.; Freilinger, Tobias M.; Frei, Oleksander; Shadrin, Alexey; Wang, Yunpeng; Dale, Anders M.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Palotie, Aarno; Andreassen, Ole A.; Zwart, John-Anker

    2017-01-01

    Migraine is a recurrent pain condition traditionally viewed as a neurovascular disorder, but little is known of its vascular basis. In epidemiological studies migraine is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, including coronary artery disease (CAD), suggesting shared pathogenic mechanisms. This study aimed to determine the genetic overlap between migraine and CAD, and to identify shared genetic risk loci, utilizing a conditional false discovery rate approach and data from two large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of CAD (C4D, 15,420 cases, 15,062 controls; CARDIoGRAM, 22,233 cases, 64,762 controls) and one of migraine (22,120 cases, 91,284 controls). We found significant enrichment of genetic variants associated with CAD as a function of their association with migraine, which was replicated across two independent CAD GWAS studies. One shared risk locus in the PHACTR1 gene (conjunctional false discovery rate for index SNP rs9349379 < 3.90 x 10−5), which was also identified in previous studies, explained much of the enrichment. Two further loci (in KCNK5 and AS3MT) showed evidence for shared risk (conjunctional false discovery rate < 0.05). The index SNPs at two of the three loci had opposite effect directions in migraine and CAD. Our results confirm previous reports that migraine and CAD share genetic risk loci in excess of what would be expected by chance, and highlight one shared risk locus in PHACTR1. Understanding the biological mechanisms underpinning this shared risk is likely to improve our understanding of both disorders. PMID:28957430

  13. The role of sleep in migraine attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Inamorato

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available Migraine attacks may be precipitated by sleep deprivation or excessive sleep and sleep is also associated with relief of migraine attacks. In view of this variable relationship we studied the records of 159 consecutive outpatients of our Headache Unit. In 121 records there was reference to sleep involvement, in 55% by a single form and in 45% by more than one form. When only one form was related, relief was most common (70%. 30% of that group of patients had the migraine attack precipitated by sleep, 24% by deprivation and 6% by sleep excess. When the effects of sleep were multiple, these effects were as expected logically in 65%: «in accordance» group (e.g attack precipitated by sleep deprivation and relieved by sleep onset. In a second group, («conflicting» where the involvement was not logical, there were three different combinations of sleep involvement, possibly due to more than one pathophysiological mechanism.

  14. Trigger factors in migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauge, A W; Kirchmann, M; Olesen, J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify trigger factors in migraine with aura (MA). A total of 629 MA patients representative of the Danish population were sent a questionnaire listing 16 trigger factors thought to be relevant as well as space for free text. Distinction was made between...... attacks with or without aura within each patient. The questionnaire was returned by 522 patients of whom 347 had current MA attacks. In total 80% with current attacks (278/347) indicated that at least one factor triggered their migraine, and 67% (187/278) in this group indicated that they were aware...... of at least one factor often or always giving rise to an attack of MA. Forty-one per cent (113/278) had co-occurring attacks of migraine without aura (MO). Stress (following stress), bright light, intense emotional influences, stress (during stress) and sleeping too much or too little were the trigger factors...

  15. Emerging migraine treatments and drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    Migraine has a 1-year prevalence of 10% and high socioeconomic costs. Despite recent drug developments, there is a huge unmet need for better pharmacotherapy. In this review we discuss promising anti-migraine strategies such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists and 5....... Tonabersat, a cortical spreading depression inhibitor, has shown efficacy in the prophylaxis of migraine with aura. Several new drug targets such as nitric oxide synthase, the 5-HT(1D) receptor, the prostanoid receptors EP(2) and EP(4), and the pituitary adenylate cyclase receptor PAC1 await development....... The greatest need is for new prophylactic drugs, and it seems likely that such compounds will be developed in the coming decade....

  16. Neuroendocrine dysfunction in fibromyalgia and migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valença, Marcelo Moraes; Medeiros, Fabíola Lys; Martins, Hugo A; Massaud, Rodrigo Meirelles; Peres, Mario F P

    2009-10-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) and migraine are common chronic disorders that predominantly affect women. The prevalence of headache in patients with FM is high (35%-88%), with migraine being the most frequent type. A particular subgroup of patients with FM (approximately half) presents with a combined clinical form of these two painful disorders, which may exhibit a different manner of progression regarding symptomatology and impact on daily activities. This article reviews several common aspects of the pathophysiology regarding pain control mechanisms and neuroendocrine dysfunction occurring in FM and migraine, particularly in the chronic form of the latter. We also discuss the participation of hypothalamic and brainstem centers of pain control, the putative role played by neurotransmitters or neuromodulators on central sensitization, and changes in their levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. Understanding their mechanisms will help to establish new treatment strategies for treating these disabling brain disorders.

  17. Hypoxia triggers high-altitude headache with migraine features: A prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broessner, Gregor; Rohregger, Johanna; Wille, Maria; Lackner, Peter; Ndayisaba, Jean-Pierre; Burtscher, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Given the high prevalence and clinical impact of high-altitude headache (HAH), a better understanding of risk factors and headache characteristics may give new insights into the understanding of hypoxia being a trigger for HAH or even migraine attacks. In this prospective trial, we simulated high altitude (4500 m) by controlled normobaric hypoxia (FiO2 = 12.6%) to investigate acute mountain sickness (AMS) and headache characteristics. Clinical symptoms of AMS according to the Lake Louise Scoring system (LLS) were recorded before and after six and 12 hours in hypoxia. O2 saturation was measured using pulse oximetry at the respective time points. History of primary headache, especially episodic or chronic migraine, was a strict exclusion criterion. In total 77 volunteers (43 (55.8%) males, 34 (44.2%) females) were enrolled in this study. Sixty-three (81.18%) and 40 (71.4%) participants developed headache at six or 12 hours, respectively, with height and SpO2 being significantly different between headache groups at six hours (p headache development (p headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta) in n = 5 (8%) or n = 6 (15%), at six and 12 hours, respectively. Normobaric hypoxia is a trigger for HAH and migraine-like headache attacks even in healthy volunteers without any history of migraine. Our study confirms the pivotal role of hypoxia in the development of AMS and beyond that suggests hypoxia may be involved in migraine pathophysiology. © International Headache Society 2015.

  18. Migraine: A look down the nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlberger, Thomas; Wormald, Justin C R; Hachach-Haram, Nadine; Mosahebi, Afshin

    2017-07-01

    Studies have suggested that contact between opposing mucosal surfaces in the nasal wall and cavity can be a target of the surgical treatment of migraines. Unfortunately, not enough is known about the role of nasal pathology in the pathogenesis of this condition. The co-existence of further rhinological disorders can be an impediment to defining the cause and effect of anatomical variants. The authors compared the MRI scans of migraine- and non-migraine patients (MPs and NMPs, respectively) to determine the prevalence of such mucosal contact points in order to extrapolate whether there is a significant association with migraines. Coronal and axial MRI brain scans of 522 patients (412 migraineurs and 110 non-migraineurs) were analysed for the prevalence of anatomical variations of the nasal cavity, e.g. concha bullosa, septal deviations, mucosal swelling and contact points. The results showed no significant difference between MPs and NMPs patients for any of the parameters examined. Moreover, 87% MPs and 79% NMPs had at least one contact point. The most frequent contact point was between the middle turbinate and the septum, observed in 54% of MPs and 45% of NMPs. Contact points with the nasal mucosa are highly prevalent in both MPs and NMPs. Although a contact point does not cause a migraine in the absence of the disease, the concomitant presence of migraine and contact points can trigger an attack, and therefore, it is necessary to differentiate or exclude a rhinological disorder in these patients. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Association Between Migraine and Diabetes in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Migraine ranks as the eighth most disabling condition and one of the most common causes of headache in Pakistan. Objectives In this study, we aimed to determine the association between migraine and diabetes in pregnant women. Patients and Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 498 pregnant women, grouped into pregnant without diabetes (n = 300 and pregnant with diabetes (n = 198 according to the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study criteria. Seventy-five women with known migraine were also recruited as positive controls. After confirming that the study subjects had headache at least once a month, the researcher filled out a comprehensive form based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders version II. Migraine disability score was used to assess severity. Fasting blood glucose levels were measured by using the enzymatic method. Data were presented as mean ± SD and frequencies, where applicable. Chi-square test and Spearman correlation test were performed. A P value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results The headache prevalence during pregnancy was 69% in the women with diabetes and 64% in the women without diabetes. A positive unilateral distribution was observed in 51% of the cases and 36.3% of the controls (P < 0.01. However, 94.7% of the pregnant cohort reported not having experienced aura. Of the pregnant women with diabetes, 19% fell within the mild to moderate disability score as compared with the 10.3% of the pregnant women without diabetes (P < 0.01. High fasting blood glucose levels showed a significant association with headache scores (r = 0.144; P < 0.01. Conclusions Headaches, particularly migraine without aura, are a common occurrence in pregnancy in our population. Migraine severity is positively associated with high blood glucose levels.

  20. [Cervical discopathy, cervical migraine and vertebrobasilar arterial insufficiency: Clinical correlations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domzał, T; Zaleska, B; Kwasucki, J

    1978-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cervical migraine may suggest that a connection exists between it and cervical discopathy and also vertebrobasilar arterial insufficiency. This correlation was studied in a group of 103 patients subjected to clinical observations. In 83 of them cervical discopathy was found, in 69 cervical migraine and in 40 vertebrobasilar insufficiency were present. Among those with discopathy migraine was present in 63.6% of cases, and vertebrobasilar insufficiency in 31%. In patients with cervical migraine degenerative changes of the type of cervical discopathy were present in 90% of cases, although in only 56.5% of cases clinical signs were present connected with these changes. Vertebrobasilar insufficiency was present in 45% of patients with cervical migraine, that is more frequently than in discopathy. In the group with vertebrobasilar insufficiency radiological changes in the cervical spine were present in 77.5% of cases and the same proportion of patients in this group had cervical migraine. These numbers confirm the connection between cervical migraine and radiological changes and clinical manifestations of discopathy, and they indicate also that cervical migraine may be a successive stage of vascular changes leading to circulatory failure in the area supplied by vertebral arteries. This failure may have a different course and pathological mechanism. In 12.5% of patients in this group no cervical migraine or radiological changes were demonstrated. The term "cervical migraine" seems inappropriate since this type of headache has another substrate and mechanism than true migraine.

  1. The Migraine-Ischemic Stroke Relation in Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Pezzini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the strong epidemiologic evidence linking migraine and ischemic stroke in young adults, the mechanisms explaining this association remain poorly understood. The observation that stroke occurs more frequently during the interictal phase of migraine prompts to speculation that an indirect relation between the two diseases might exist. In this regard, four major issues might be considered which may be summarized as follows: (1 the migraine-ischemic stroke relation is influenced by specific risk factors such as patent foramen ovale or endothelial dysfunction and more frequent in particular conditions like spontaneous cervical artery dissection; (2 migraine is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors; (3 the link is caused by migraine-specific drugs; (4 migraine and ischemic vascular events are linked via a genetic component. In the present paper, we will review epidemiological studies, discuss potential mechanisms of migraine-induced stroke and comorbid ischemic stroke, and pose new research questions.

  2. [Mechanism of neural plasticity of acupuncture on chronic migraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobai; Liu, Lu; Zhao, Luopeng; Qu, Zhengyang; Zhu, Yupu; Zhang, Yajie; Wang, Linpeng

    2017-10-12

    Chronic migraine is one of neurological disorders with high rate of disability, but sufficient attention has not been paid in this field. A large number of clinical studies have shown traditional Chinese acupuncture is a kind of effective treatment with less side effects. Through the analysis of literature regarding acupuncture and migraine published from 1981 to 2017 in CNKI and PubMed databases, the mechanism of neural plasticity of acupuncture on chronic migraine was explored. It was believed the progress of chronic migraine involved the changes of neural plasticity in neural structure and function, and the neural plasticity related with neural sensitization during the process of chronic migraine was discussed from three aspects of electrophysiology, molecular chemistry and radiography. Acupuncture could treat and prevent chronic migraine via the mechanism of neural plasticity, but there was no related literature, hindering the further spreading and development of acupuncture for chronic migraine.

  3. Flunarizine versus metoprolol in migraine prophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P S; Larsen, B H; Rasmussen, M J

    1991-01-01

    The prophylactic effect of flunarizine and metoprolol was studied in a multi-center randomized, double-blind trial of 149 patients with migraine with or without aura. After a 4-week placebo run-in period, patients were randomly allocated to treatment with flunarizine 10 mg daily or metoprolol 200......). Depression was the most serious side-effect occurring in 8% on flunarizine and 3% on metoprolol. We conclude that both drugs are effective in the prevention of migraine attacks but a higher number of dropouts occurred on flunarizine because of depression or weight gain....

  4. Popular sweetner sucralose as a migraine trigger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajendrakumar M; Sarma, Rakesh; Grimsley, Edwin

    2006-09-01

    Sucralose (trichlorogalactosucrose, or better known as Splenda) is an artificial sweetener from native sucrose that was approved by the FDA on April 1, 1998 (April Fool's Day). This observation of a potential causal relationship between sucralose and migraines may be important for physicians to remember this can be a possible trigger during dietary history taking. Identifying further triggers for migraine headaches, in this case sucralose, may help alleviate some of the cost burden (through expensive medical therapy or missed work opportunity) as well as provide relief to migraineurs.

  5. Hypothalamus as a mediator of chronic migraine: Evidence from high-resolution fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Laura H; Allers, Angie; May, Arne

    2017-05-23

    To identify pathophysiologic mechanisms of migraine chronification using a recently standardized protocol for high-resolution brainstem imaging of trigeminal nociceptive stimulation. Eighteen episodic migraineurs (EMs), 17 chronic migraineurs (CMs), and 19 healthy controls (HCs) underwent painful ammonia stimulation of the left nostril in a 3T MRI scanner. Functional images were acquired with a brainstem-optimized protocol for high-resolution echo-planar imaging. We detected a significantly stronger activation of the anterior right hypothalamus in CMs compared to HCs. To exclude the headache as a prime mediator of the hypothalamic activations, we compared all migraineurs with headaches (EMs and CMs) with all migraineurs without headaches (EMs and CMs) and HCs in a second analysis and found a more posterior region of the hypothalamus to be more activated bilaterally during headaches. Our data corroborate the fact that the hypothalamus plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of migraine chronification and acute pain stage of migraineurs. While the more posterior part of the hypothalamus seems to be important for the acute pain stage, the more anterior part seems to play an important role in attack generation and migraine chronification. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. In-office discussions of migraine: results from the American Migraine Communication Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Richard B; Hahn, Steven R; Cady, Roger K; Brandes, Jan Lewis; Simons, Suzanne E; Bain, Philip A; Nelson, Meaghan R

    2008-08-01

    Research indicates that successful migraine assessment and treatment depends on information obtained during patient and healthcare professional (HCP) discussions. However, no studies outline how migraine is actually discussed during clinical encounters. Record naturally occurring HCP-migraineur interactions, analyzing frequency and impairment assessment, and preventive treatment discussions. HCPs seeing high volumes of migraineurs were recruited for a communication study. Patients likely to discuss migraine were recruited immediately before their normally scheduled appointment and, once consented, were audio- and video-recorded without a researcher present. Separate post-visit interviews were conducted with patients and HCPs. All interactions were transcribed. Sixty patients (83% female; mean age 41.7) were analyzed. Patients were diagnosed with migraine 14 years and experienced 5 per month, on average. Transcripts were analyzed using sociolinguistic techniques such as number and type of questions asked and post-visit alignment on migraine frequency and impairment. American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study guidelines were utilized. Ninety-one percent of HCP-initiated, migraine-specific questions were closed-ended/short answer; assessments focused on frequency and did not focus on attention on impairment. Open-ended questions in patient post-visit interviews yielded robust impairment-related information. Post-visit, 55% of HCP-patient pairs were misaligned regarding frequency; 51% on impairment. Of the 20 (33%) patients who were preventive medication candidates, 80% did not receive it and 50% of their visits lacked discussion of prevention. Sociolinguistic analysis revealed that HCPs often used narrowly focused, closed-ended questions and were often unaware of how migraine affected patients' lives as a result. It is recommended that HCPs assess impairment using open-ended questions in combination with the ask-tell-ask technique.

  7. Comparative efficacy trial of cupping and serkangabin versus conventional therapy of migraine headaches: A randomized, open-label, comparative efficacy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoozabadi, Mohammad Dehghani; Navabzadeh, Maryam; Roudsari, Mohammad Khodashenas; Zahmatkash, Mohsen

    2014-12-01

    Migraine headaches are the most common acute and recurrent headaches. Current treatment of a migraine headache consists of multiple medications for control and prevention of recurrent attacks. Global emergence of alternative medicine led us to examine the efficacy of cupping therapy plus serkangabin syrup in the treatment of migraine headaches. This study was a randomized, controlled, open-label, comparative efficacy trial. We randomly assigned patients with migraine into cupping therapy plus serkangabin group (30 patients) and conventional treatment group (30 patients). An investigator assessed the severity of headache, frequency of attacks in a week and duration of attacks per hour in 5 visits (at the end of 2 weeks, 1, 3 and 6 months). Generalized estimating equations approach was used to analyze repeated measures data to compare outcomes in both groups. Average age for cupping therapy group and conventional treatment group were 31.7 (±7.6) and 32.6 (±12.7) years, respectively (P = 0.45). After treatment for 2 weeks; and 1, 3 and 6 months, severity of headache (P = 0.80), frequency of migraine attacks (P = 0.63) and duration of attacks per hours (P = 0.48) were similar in conventional and cupping groups but these symptoms were decreased in each group during the study (P cupping plus serkangabin therapy and conventional treatment in the treatment and prophylaxis of migraine. The alternative therapy may be used in cases of drug intolerance, no medication response, and in primary care.

  8. SPET with 99mTc-HM PAO in the study of classic migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiglich, F.; Bonomo, F.; Barbonetti, C.; Di Lorenzo, I.; Bottinelli, G.; Tomaiolo, S.; Campani, R.; Bottinelli, O.

    1991-01-01

    Five patients presenting with migraine attacks underwent Electroencephalography (EEC), Computed Tomography (CT) and Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPET) with 99m Tc-HM PAO. EEG qand SPET were subsequently repeated in the intercritical period. We observed that two patients only showed non-specific abnormalities in EEG; scans were in all patients; all subjects exhibited diffuse cortical hypoperfusion. A strong correlation was always found between clinical presentation and hemispheric impairment. One patient exhibited asymmetrical perfusion between cerebellum hemispheres; intercritical SPET showed homogeneous distrubution of the radio-tracer in 4 patients. In the last one minimal residual hypoperfusion was observed, although less marked than in the acute phase. Therefore SPET with 99m Tc-HM PAO can be reasonably employed as the examination of choice when a migrain attack is clinically suspected, because of its reproducibility and reliability. It can be easily performed in every nuclear medical center supplied with modern tomographic cameras

  9. Reduced motor cortical inhibition in migraine: A blinded transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neverdahl, J P; Omland, P M; Uglem, M; Engstrøm, M; Sand, T

    2017-12-01

    To investigate motor cortical excitability, inhibition, and facilitation with navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in migraine in a blinded cross-sectional study. Resting motor threshold (RMT), cortical silent period (CSP), short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), and intracortical facilitation (ICF) were compared in 27 interictal migraineurs and 33 controls. 24 female interictal migraineurs and 27 female controls were compared in subgroup analyses. Seven preictal migraineurs were also compared to the interictal group in a hypothesis-generating analysis. Investigators were blinded for diagnosis during recording and analysis of data. SICI was decreased in interictal migraineurs when compared to healthy controls (p=0.013), CSP was shortened in female interictal migraineurs (p=0.041). ICF was decreased in preictal compared to interictal migraineurs (p=0.023). RMT and ICF were not different between interictal migraineurs and controls. Cortical inhibition was decreased in migraineurs between attacks, primarily in a female subgroup, indicating an importance of altered cortical inhibition in migraine. Previous studies on motor cortical excitability in migraineurs have yielded varying results. This relatively large and blinded study provides support for altered cortical inhibition in migraine. Measuring intracortical facilitation in the period preceding migraine attacks may be of interest for future studies. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Personality traits in patients with cluster headache: a comparison with migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, I; Hernández, M S; Santos, S; Jurado, C; Ruiz, L; Toribio, E; Sotelo, E M; Guerrero, A L; Molina, V; Uribe, F; Cuadrado, M L

    2016-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH) has been associated with certain personality traits and lifestyle features, but there are few studies assessing personality profiles in CH. We aimed to analyze personality traits in patients with CH, and to compare them with those found in migraine. We included all consecutive patients with CH attending 5 outpatient offices between January and December 2013. Personality traits were evaluated using the Salamanca screening test, a validated inventory assessing 11 personality traits grouped in 3 clusters. We analyzed the test results in this population, and compared them with those of a migraine population previously assessed with the same test. Eighty patients with CH (75 men, 5 women; mean age, 43.2 ± 9.9 years) were recruited. The reference population consisted of 164 migraine patients (30 men, 134 women; mean age 36.4 ± 12.7 years). In CH patients, the most frequent personality traits were anancastic (52.5 %), anxious (47.5 %), histrionic (45 %), schizoid (42.5 %), impulsive (32.5 %) and paranoid (30 %). When compared to migraine patients, paranoid (p personality traits included in cluster A (odd or eccentric disorders) are more prevalent in CH patients than in a population of migraineurs. Larger studies are needed to determine whether certain personality traits are related to CH.

  11. The relation of sexual function to migraine-related disability, depression and anxiety in patients with migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraslan, Defne; Yalınay Dikmen, Pınar; Ilgaz Aydınlar, Elif; Incesu, Cem

    2014-05-27

    Depression and anxiety are two phenomena that affect quality of life as well as sexual function. Depression and anxiety levels are reported to be high in migraine sufferers. We aimed to understand whether sexual function in women with migraine was associated to migraine-related disability and frequency of migraine attacks, and whether this relationship was modulated by depressive and anxiety symptoms. As migraine is more commonly seen in females, a total of 50 women with migraine were included. The diagnosis of migraine with or without aura was confirmed by two specialists in Neurology, according to the second edition of International Headache Society (IHS) International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-II) in 2004. Migraine disability assessment scale score, female sexual function index scores, Beck depression inventory score and Beck anxiety inventory scores. Mean MIDAS score was 19.3 ± 12.8, and mean number of migraine attacks per month were 4.3 ± 2.7. Mean Female Sexual Function Index score was 20.9 ± 5.9 and 90% of patients had sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunction was not related to MIDAS score or frequency and severity of attacks. No relationship between sexual function and anxiety was found, whereas severity of depressive symptoms was closely related to sexual function. Depressive symptoms affected all dimensions of sexual function, except for pain. Sexual dysfunction seemed to be very common in our patients with migraine, while not related to migraine related disability, frequency of attacks and migraine severity or anxiety. The most important factor that predicted sexual function was depression, which was also independent of disease severity and migraine related disability. While future larger scale studies are needed to clarify the exact relationship, depressive and sexual problems should be properly addressed in all patients with migraine, regardless of disease severity or disability.

  12. Migraine with prolonged aura: phenotype and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Michele; Afridi, Shazia

    2018-01-01

    We review the published literature on migraine with prolonged aura (PA), specifically with regards to the phenotype and treatment options. PA is not uncommon. A recent study found that about 17% of migraine auras are prolonged and that 26% of patients with migraine with aura have experienced at least one PA. The characteristics of PA are similar to most typical auras with the exception of a higher number of aura symptoms (in particular sensory and/or dysphasic). There are no well-established treatments at present which target the aura component of migraine. Other than case reports, there have been open-label studies of lamotrigine and greater occipital nerve blocks. The only randomised, blinded, controlled trial to date has been of nasal ketamine showing some reduction in aura severity but not duration. A small open-labelled pilot study of amiloride was also promising. Larger randomised, controlled trials are needed to establish whether any of the existing or novel compounds mentioned are significantly effective and safe.

  13. Cranial computed tomography in pediatric migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Cermeno, J.C.; Gobernado, J.M.; Freije, R.; Zaragoza, E.; Gimeno, A.; Centro Ramon y Cajal, Madrid

    1984-01-01

    Two migraine children showed low-density areas with irregular enhancement patterns on CT scans of the head after contrast infusion. Angiography was normal in both patients. These abnormalities probably were due to transient blood-brain barrier damage. This knowledge is important when excluding other disorders like vascular malformations. (orig.)

  14. Trigger factors and mechanisms in migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonman, Geurt Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Migraine is a severe headache syndrome, affecting approximately 33% of females and 13% of males. Patients suffer from recurring headache episodes in combination with nausea, vomiting, phono and photophobia. It is a paroxysmal disorder for which several several trigger factors have been identified by

  15. Epidemiology of migraine among students in Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssoufa Maiga

    2017-06-01

    In conclusion, migraine is common among students of Gao, it is more important in female. It has a negative impact on academic performance. It is therefore necessary to control its management to reduce the extent of the disease in this environment.

  16. Brain atrophy following hemiplegic migraine attacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelzer, Nadine; Hoogeveen, Evelien S.; Ferrari, Michel D.; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Kruit, Mark C.; Terwindt, Gisela M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with hemiplegic migraine (HM) may sometimes develop progressive neurological deterioration of which the pathophysiology is unknown. Patient We report a 16-year clinical and neuroradiological follow-up of a patient carrying a de novo p.Ser218Leu CACNA1A HM mutation who had nine

  17. Cerebral blood flow changes in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L

    1991-01-01

    A number of basically different methods have been used in studies of the cerebrovascular changes which occur in migraine and each individual set of findings seems to be dependent on which method is used. One method on its own can only disclose a part of all the pathophysiological events. This rev...

  18. Depression and Anxiety in Migraine Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have. Todd A. Smitherman, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychology, University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS; and Steven M. ... among children is 4 percent while the mean age of onset is 7 years old. ... shared with the group that migraine looks different for everyone and that “ ...

  19. Virchow-Robin spaces in childhood migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, S; Gahleitner, A; Wöber-Bingöl, C; Wöber, C; Ba-Ssalamah, A; Schoder, M; Schindler, E; Prayer, D

    1999-04-01

    Virchow-Robin spaces (VRS) are pia-lined extensions of the subarachnoid space which surround penetrating arteries as they enter the brain on its surface. Using high-resolution MRI, which shows small penetrating arteries, we studied a possible association of accentuated VRS in children with tension-type headache (TTH) or migraine. We studied 58 children aged 3-14 years (mean 10.8 years) with a clinical diagnosis of migraine (31) or TTH (27), who underwent cerebral MRI, and 30 headache-free patients of the same age (mean 10.2 years) and 30 adult migraineurs with postpubertal onset of symptoms, who served as controls. The images were reviewed for structural abnormalities in the regions of the small penetrating arteries. Accentuated VRS were found in 61% of the children with migrainous headaches and in 22% of children of those with TTH. Prominent VRS were seen in 27% of the control children and in only 13% of the adults. Small infarcts and gliosis were rare in children with or without headache, but were seen in 30% of the adult migraineurs. Our findings show that accentuated VRS are significantly more common in children with migraine than in those with TTH or headache-free controls. Detection of accentuated VRS may therefore enhance differential diagnosis of primary headaches in children, contributing to an improvement in management.

  20. Functioning of Women with Migraine Headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Talarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Migraines are one of the most commonly occurring ailments affecting the nervous system. The aim of this research paper was to evaluate the effect migraines have on the everyday functioning of women. Method. The study involved women with diagnosed migraine headaches (IHS-2004 undergoing treatment at a neurological clinic. In order to evaluate the influence of headaches on the everyday functioning of women, a MSQ v.2 questionnaire was used, whereas pain severity was assessed on a linear VAS scale. Results. Among the clinical factors, the most influential was the frequency of headaches. Headache duration was particularly significant for women below the age of 40. Pain severity cited at 8–10 pts on the VAS significantly disrupted and limited everyday functioning. On the emotional function subscale, the most influential factors were age, education, and the frequency of headaches. Conclusions. On account of headache frequency emerging as the most significant influencing factor, it is of the utmost importance to inform patients of the value of taking prophylactic measures. Central to this is the identification of factors that trigger the onset of migraines. This approach would greatly aid the individual in choosing the appropriate treatment, either pharmacological or others.

  1. Is stress a trigger factor for migraine?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonman, G.G.; Evers, D.J.; Ballieux, B.E.; de Geus, E.J.C.; de Kloet, E.R.; Terwindt, G.M.; van Dijk, J.G.; Ferrari, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Although mental stress is commonly considered to be an important trigger factor for migraine, experimental evidence for this belief is yet lacking. Objective: To study the temporal relationship between changes in stress-related parameters (both subjective and objective) and the onset of

  2. Symptom dimensions of affective disorders in migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louter, M A; Pijpers, J A; Wardenaar, K J; van Zwet, E W; van Hemert, A M; Zitman, F G; Ferrari, M D; Penninx, B W; Terwindt, G M

    2015-11-01

    A strong association has been established between migraine and depression. However, this is the first study to differentiate in a large sample of migraine patients for symptom dimensions of the affective disorder spectrum. Migraine patients (n=3174) from the LUMINA (Leiden University Medical Centre Migraine Neuro-analysis Program) study and patients with current psychopathology (n=1129), past psychopathology (n=477), and healthy controls (n=561) from the NESDA (Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety) study, were compared for three symptom dimensions of depression and anxiety. The dimensions -lack of positive affect (depression specific); negative affect (nonspecific); and somatic arousal (anxiety specific)- were assessed by a shortened adaptation of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (MASQ-D30). Within the migraine group, the association with migraine specific determinants was established. Multivariate regression analyses were conducted. Migraine patients differed significantly (pmigraine patients were predominantly similar to the past psychopathology group. For the somatic arousal dimension, migraine patients scores were more comparable with the current psychopathology group. Migraine specific determinants for high scores on all dimensions were high frequency of attacks and cutaneous allodynia during attacks. This study shows that affective symptoms in migraine patients are especially associated with the somatic arousal component. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Relationship between primary restless legs syndrome and migraine with aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Bilgehan Atılgan; Acar, Türkan; Alagöz, Aybala Neslihan; Karacan, Alper; Varım, Ceyhun; Uyanık, Mehmet Şevki; Kaya, Tezcan; Akdemir, Ramazan

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the prevalence and characteristics of definite migraine in primary restless legs syndrome (pRLS) patients and matched control patients (CPs) were investigated. We evaluated 63 consecutive adult pRLS patients and 141 age- and sex-matched controls in this case-control study. The diagnosis of migraine and its subtypes were defined based on The International Classification of Headache Disorders-II. Only those with "definite" migraine were included in the study. The mean age of 63 adult pRLS patients (15 men and 48 women) who participated in the study was 49.4 years. A total of 27 patients (42.9%) had definite migraine. Of these migraineurs, seven (11.1%) were without aura and 20 (31.8%) were with aura. The mean age of the 141 matched CPs was 48.7 years. A total of 32 CPs (22.7%) experienced migraine. Among these 32 migraineurs, 28 (19.9%) were without aura and four (2.8%) were with aura. Migraine and migraine with aura were significantly more common in pRLS patients than in CPs. pRLS patients with migraine were more anxious and experienced a shorter duration of RLS symptoms than pRLS patients without migraine. Migraineurs in the pRLS group tended to have high scores for severity of migraine headache by Visual Analog Scale score and high levels of disability by Migraine Disability Assessment grading than those in the control group. pRLS patients showed a positive association with definite migraine headaches. In contrast to results highlighted in recent studies, we found a strong link between migraine with aura and pRLS. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  4. Relationship between primary restless legs syndrome and migraine with aura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilgehan Atılgan Acar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the prevalence and characteristics of definite migraine in primary restless legs syndrome (pRLS patients and matched control patients (CPs were investigated. We evaluated 63 consecutive adult pRLS patients and 141 age- and sex-matched controls in this case–control study. The diagnosis of migraine and its subtypes were defined based on The International Classification of Headache Disorders-II. Only those with “definite” migraine were included in the study. The mean age of 63 adult pRLS patients (15 men and 48 women who participated in the study was 49.4 years. A total of 27 patients (42.9% had definite migraine. Of these migraineurs, seven (11.1% were without aura and 20 (31.8% were with aura. The mean age of the 141 matched CPs was 48.7 years. A total of 32 CPs (22.7% experienced migraine. Among these 32 migraineurs, 28 (19.9% were without aura and four (2.8% were with aura. Migraine and migraine with aura were significantly more common in pRLS patients than in CPs. pRLS patients with migraine were more anxious and experienced a shorter duration of RLS symptoms than pRLS patients without migraine. Migraineurs in the pRLS group tended to have high scores for severity of migraine headache by Visual Analog Scale score and high levels of disability by Migraine Disability Assessment grading than those in the control group. pRLS patients showed a positive association with definite migraine headaches. In contrast to results highlighted in recent studies, we found a strong link between migraine with aura and pRLS.

  5. Examination of fluctuations in atmospheric pressure related to migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuma, Hirohisa; Okuma, Yumiko; Kitagawa, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Japan has four seasons and many chances of low atmospheric pressure or approaches of typhoon, therefore it has been empirically known that the fluctuation of weather induces migraine in people. Generally, its mechanism has been interpreted as follows: physical loading, attributed by atmospheric pressure to human bodies, compresses or dilates human blood vessels, which leads to abnormality in blood flow and induces migraine. We report our examination of the stage in which migraine tends to be induced focusing on the variation of atmospheric pressure. Subjects were 34 patients with migraine, who were treated in our hospital. The patients included 31 females and three males, whose mean age was 32 ± 6.7. 22 patients had migraine with aura and 12 patients had migraine without aura. All of patients with migraine maintained a headache diary to record atmospheric pressures when they developed a migraine. The standard atmospheric pressure was defined as 1013 hPa, and with this value as the criterion, we investigated slight fluctuations in the atmospheric pressure when they developed a migraine. It was found that the atmospheric pressure when the patients developed a migraine was within 1003-1007 hPa in the approach of low atmospheric pressure and that the patients developed a migraine when the atmospheric pressure decreased by 6-10 hPa, slightly less than the standard atmospheric pressure. Small decreases of 6-10 hPa relative to the standard atmospheric pressure of 1013 hPa induced migraine attacks most frequently in patients with migraine.

  6. [The importance of chronic migraine in a general neurology service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia-Naya, M; Alarcia-Alejos, R; Modrego-Pardo, P J

    Chronic migraine is a primary headache that is difficult to treat and has an important impact on the patient's quality of life. The international headache classification recently modified the criteria for chronic migraine and therefore few studies have been conducted that analyse groups according to these new criteria. AIM. To analyse a group of patients with chronic migraine who were referred to a general neurology service. The first 100 patients with migraine were selected. Researchers established and analysed a number of subgroups of patients with episodic, chronic or chronic migraine with probable headache due to medication abuse, in accordance with the International Headache Society (IHS) headache classification and its revised version from 2006. Of the total sample of 738 new patients, 100 (13.5%) suffered from migraines and of these 100 new patients with migraine 42 (5.6% of the total series) satisfied criteria for chronic migraine and 15 patients with chronic migraine met the criteria for probable headache due to medication abuse. Before visiting the neurology service, only 41% had been diagnosed as suffering from migraine, 38% had received no information about this condition, only 17% took triptans for symptomatic relief and 23% had followed some kind of preventive treatment. One notable finding was the importance of episodic and chronic migraine in a general neurology service, on applying the recent IHS criteria. A high percentage of patients with chronic migraine who were referred to the neurology service have not been diagnosed or given any information or proper treatment; an elevated degree of self-medication and medication abuse also exists. Preventive treatment and triptans in cases of intense migraines are still not commonly used in primary care.

  7. Suicide risk in patients with migraine and comorbid fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hung-Yu; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Lin, Yung-Yang; Chen, Wei-Ta; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2015-09-22

    To identify the frequency, clinical effects, and suicide risk in comorbid fibromyalgia(FM) among patients with migraine. We surveyed patients with migraine who attended a headache clinic. All patients completed questionnaires containing demographics, headache profiles based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition, FM questionnaires based on the modified 2010 American College of Rheumatology preliminary diagnostic criteria, Migraine Disability Assessment, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Suicide risk was evaluated by self-report of lifetime suicidal ideation and attempts. Of the 1,318 recruited patients with migraine (aged 42.6 ± 12.7 years; female/male = 4.5), 10.1% (aged 44.3 ± 12.6 years; female/male = 7.9) had comorbidity of FM. Patients with migraine and comorbid FM had higher headache frequency and headache-related disability, poor sleep quality, and were more depressed/anxious than those with migraine only (p < 0.001). Suicidal ideation and attempts were reported in 27.3% and 6.9% of patients with migraine, respectively, and were higher in patients with comorbid FM than in those without (ideation: 58.3% vs 24%; attempt: 17.6% vs 5.7%; p < 0.001). In addition, comorbidity of FM was associated with a higher suicide risk in 3 different migraine subgroups, i.e., migraine without aura, migraine with aura, and chronic migraine. After controlling for covariates, comorbidity of FM remained as a predictor of suicidal ideation and attempts (odds ratio 2.61 and 1.99, respectively, p < 0.05)in patients with migraine. Comorbidity with FM is associated with a high suicide risk in patients with migraine.

  8. Lower inhibitory control interacts with greater pain catastrophizing to predict greater pain intensity in women with migraine and overweight/obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galioto, Rachel; O'Leary, Kevin C; Thomas, J Graham; Demos, Kathryn; Lipton, Richard B; Gunstad, John; Pavlović, Jelena M; Roth, Julie; Rathier, Lucille; Bond, Dale S

    2017-12-01

    Pain catastrophizing (PC) is associated with more severe and disabling migraine attacks. However, factors that moderate this relationship are unknown. Failure of inhibitory control (IC), or the ability to suppress automatic or inappropriate responses, may be one such factor given previous research showing a relationship between higher PC and lower IC in non-migraine samples, and research showing reduced IC in migraine. Therefore, we examined whether lower IC interacts with increased PC to predict greater migraine severity as measured by pain intensity, attack frequency, and duration. Women (n = 105) aged 18-50 years old (M = 38.0 ± 1.2) with overweight/obesity and migraine who were seeking behavioral treatment for weight loss and migraine reduction completed a 28-day smartphone-based headache diary assessing migraine headache severity. Participants then completed a modified computerized Stroop task as a measure of IC and self-report measures of PC (Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS]), anxiety, and depression. Linear regression was used to examine independent and joint associations of PC and IC with indices of migraine severity after controlling for age, body mass index (BMI) depression, and anxiety. Participants on average had BMI of 35.1 ± 6.5 kg/m 2 and reported 5.3 ± 2.6 migraine attacks (8.3 ± 4.4 migraine days) over 28 days that produced moderate pain intensity (5.9 ± 1.4 out of 10) with duration of 20.0 ± 14.2 h. After adjusting for covariates, higher PCS total (β = .241, SE = .14, p = .03) and magnification subscale (β = .311, SE = .51, p < .01) scores were significant independent correlates of longer attack duration. IC interacted with total PCS (β = 1.106, SE = .001, p = .03) rumination (β = 1.098, SE = .001, p = .04), and helplessness (β = 1.026, SE = .001, p = .04) subscale scores to predict headache pain intensity, such that the association between PC

  9. Sex differences in the prevalence, symptoms, and associated features of migraine, probable migraine and other severe headache: results of the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Dawn C; Loder, Elizabeth W; Gorman, Jennifer A; Stewart, Walter F; Reed, Michael L; Fanning, Kristina M; Serrano, Daniel; Lipton, Richard B

    2013-09-01

    The strikingly higher prevalence of migraine in females compared with males is one of the hallmarks of migraine. A large global body of evidence exists on the sex differences in the prevalence of migraine with female to male ratios ranging from 2:1 to 3:1 and peaking in midlife. Some data are available on sex differences in associated symptoms, headache-related disability and impairment, and healthcare resource utilization in migraine. Few data are available on corresponding sex differences in probable migraine (PM) and other severe headache (ie, nonmigraine-spectrum severe headache). Gaining a clear understanding of sex differences in a range of severe headache disorders may help differentiate the range of headache types. Herein, we compare sexes on prevalence and a range of clinical variables for migraine, PM, and other severe headache in a large sample from the US population. This study analyzed data from the 2004 American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study. Total and demographic-stratified sex-specific, prevalence estimates of headache subtypes (migraine, PM, and other severe headache) are reported. Log-binomial models are used to calculate sex-specific adjusted prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for each across demographic strata. A smoothed sex prevalence ratio (female to male) figure is presented for migraine and PM. One hundred sixty-two thousand seven hundred fifty-six individuals aged 12 and older responded to the 2004 American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study survey (64.9% response rate). Twenty-eight thousand two hundred sixty-one (17.4%) reported "severe headache" in the preceding year (23.5% of females and 10.6% of males), 11.8% met International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 criteria for migraine (17.3% of females and 5.7% of males), 4.6% met criteria for PM (5.3% of females and 3.9% of males), and 1.0% were categorized with other severe headache (0.9% of females and 1.0% of males). Sex differences were observed in

  10. Rorschach Evaluation of Personality and Emotional Characteristics in Adolescents With Migraine Versus Epilepsy and Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Balottin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The literature examining primary headache, including migraine, in adolescents, has pointed out the key role played by a wide range of psychiatric disorders in reducing the patients’ quality of life. Moreover, pioneering studies showed that preexisting personality characteristics, specific emotion regulation styles and psychological-psychiatric difficulties are likely to increase the risk of the onset, maintenance, and outcome of headache. Still personality issues in migraine have been poorly studied, in particular in children and adolescents. This study aims, therefore, to investigate the specific characteristics of personality, and in particular emotion regulation and coping strategies, in adolescent with migraine, comparing them with age-matched patients with idiopathic epilepsy and healthy adolescents. 52 adolescents (age: 11–17 were assessed using a multi-method test battery, which included a self-report questionnaire (the youth self-report, a proxy-report (child behavior checklist along with a projective personality test, the Rorschach Test, administered and scored according to the Exner comprehensive system. The results showed specific personality characteristics in adolescents with migraine, revealing a marked difficulty in modulating and regulating affections through thoughts and reflections, resorting instead to impulsive acts and maladaptive coping strategies, thus revealing a vague and immature perception of reality. Differently from adolescents belonging to the general population, but similarly to patients with epilepsy, adolescents with migraine perceive a high situational stress, probably related to the condition of suffering from chronic disease. They have, therefore, a lower self-consideration and self-esteem along with a poorer insight regarding themselves as well as the relations with others. In line with previous findings, these preliminary results suggest the need for further research on ample samples, using also

  11. An X chromosome association scan of the Norfolk Island genetic isolate provides evidence for a novel migraine susceptibility locus at Xq12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget H Maher

    Full Text Available Migraine is a common and debilitating neurovascular disorder with a complex envirogenomic aetiology. Numerous studies have demonstrated a preponderance of women affected with migraine and previous pedigree linkage studies in our laboratory have identified susceptibility loci on chromosome Xq24-Xq28. In this study we have used the genetic isolate of Norfolk Island to further analyse the X chromosome for migraine susceptibility loci.An association approach was employed to analyse 14,124 SNPs spanning the entire X chromosome. Genotype data from 288 individuals comprising a large core-pedigree, of which 76 were affected with migraine, were analysed. Although no SNP reached chromosome-wide significance (empirical α = 1 × 10(-5 ranking by P-value revealed two primary clusters of SNPs in the top 25. A 10 SNP cluster represents a novel migraine susceptibility locus at Xq12 whilst a 11 SNP cluster represents a previously identified migraine susceptibility locus at Xq27. The strongest association at Xq12 was seen for rs599958 (OR = 1.75, P = 8.92 × 10(-4, whilst at Xq27 the strongest association was for rs6525667 (OR = 1.53, P = 1.65 × 10(-4. Further analysis of SNPs at these loci was performed in 5,122 migraineurs from the Women's Genome Health Study and provided additional evidence for association at the novel Xq12 locus (P<0.05.Overall, this study provides evidence for a novel migraine susceptibility locus on Xq12. The strongest effect SNP (rs102834, joint P = 1.63 × 10(-5 is located within the 5'UTR of the HEPH gene, which is involved in iron homeostasis in the brain and may represent a novel pathway for involvement in migraine pathogenesis.

  12. Magnetic resonance image abnormality in migraine with aura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, D.K.; Batnitzky, S.; Barter, R.; McMillan, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 18 patients with migraine characterized by aura consisting of both visual symtoms and parasthesias. 15 headache-free individuals of the same age range were used as controls. Records were radomized and read in blind fashion by two neuroradiologists. Small subcortical white matter lesions were seen in three migraine cases and two controls. In one migraine case cortical infarctions were seen. In two controls, small areas of increased density similar to those in migraine were seen. No consistent correlation of migraine or its duration with cerebral atrophy was found. It is concluded that identification of both these MRI findings (small subcortical white lesions and cerebral atrophy) as significantly associated with migraine is doubtful. 21 refs., 2 figs

  13. Sleep terrors antecedent is common in adolescents with migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialho, Libânia Melo Nunes; Pinho, Ricardo Silva; Lin, Jaime; Minett, Thais Soares Cianciarullo; Vitalle, Maria Sylvia de Souza; Fisberg, Mauro; Peres, Mario Fernando Prieto; Vilanova, Luiz Celso Pereira; Masruha, Marcelo Rodrigues

    2013-02-01

    Migraines and sleep terrors (STs) are highly prevalent disorders with striking similarities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the antecedent of STs by comparing adolescents suffering from migraines with healthy controls in a large consecutive series. All patients were subjected to a detailed headache questionnaire and were instructed to keep a headache diary during a two-month period. The age range was 10 to 19 years. The diagnosis of STs was defined according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders. A total of 158 participants were evaluated. Of these participants, 50 suffered from episodic migraines (EMs), 57 had chronic migraines (CMs) and 51 were control subjects (CG). Participants who had a history of STs had significantly more migraines than participants who did not. Migraine is strongly associated with a history of STs in the adolescent population independent of demographics and pain intensity.

  14. Sleep terrors antecedent is common in adolescents with migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libânia Melo Nunes Fialho

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Migraines and sleep terrors (STs are highly prevalent disorders with striking similarities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the antecedent of STs by comparing adolescents suffering from migraines with healthy controls in a large consecutive series. METHODS: All patients were subjected to a detailed headache questionnaire and were instructed to keep a headache diary during a two-month period. The age range was 10 to 19 years. The diagnosis of STs was defined according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders. RESULTS: A total of 158 participants were evaluated. Of these participants, 50 suffered from episodic migraines (EMs, 57 had chronic migraines (CMs and 51 were control subjects (CG. Participants who had a history of STs had significantly more migraines than participants who did not. CONCLUSIONS: Migraine is strongly associated with a history of STs in the adolescent population independent of demographics and pain intensity.

  15. Bortezomib Added to Daunorubicin and Cytarabine During Induction Therapy and to Intermediate-Dose Cytarabine for Consolidation in Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia Age 60 to 75 Years: CALGB (Alliance) Study 10502

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Eyal C.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Amrein, Philip C.; Lozanski, Gerard; Wadleigh, Martha; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Powell, Bayard L.; Voorhees, Peter; Wang, Eunice S.; Blum, William; Stone, Richard M.; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Moser, Barry; Larson, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine remission induction frequency when bortezomib was combined with daunorubicin and cytarabine in previously untreated older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and safety of bortezomib in combination with consolidation chemotherapy consisting of intermediate-dose cytarabine (Int-DAC). Patients and Methods Ninety-five adults (age 60 to 75 years; median, 67 years) with previously untreated AML (including therapy-related and previous myelodysplastic syndrome) received bortezomib 1.3 mg/m2 intravenously (IV) on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 with daunorubicin 60 mg/m2 on days 1 through 3 and cytarabine 100 mg/m2 by continuous IV infusion on days 1 through 7. Patients who achieved complete remission (CR) received up to two courses of consolidation chemotherapy with cytarabine 2 gm/m2 on days 1 through 5 with bortezomib. Three cohorts with escalating dose levels of bortezomib were tested (0.7, 1.0, and 1.3 mg/m2). Dose-limiting toxicities were assessed during the first cycle of consolidation. The relationship between cell surface expression of CD74 and clinical outcome was assessed. Results Frequency of CR was 65% (62 of 95), and 4% of patients (four of 95) achieved CR with incomplete platelet recovery (CRp). Eleven patients developed grade 3 sensory neuropathy. Bortezomib plus Int-DAC proved tolerable at the highest dose tested. Lower CD74 expression was associated with CR/CRp (P = .04) but not with disease-free or overall survival. Conclusion The addition of bortezomib to standard 3 + 7 daunorubicin and cytarabine induction chemotherapy for AML resulted in an encouraging remission rate. The maximum tested dose of bortezomib administered in combination with Int-DAC for remission consolidation was 1.3 mg/m2 and proved tolerable. Further testing of this regimen is planned. PMID:23129738

  16. Female-targeted drug therapies may propel migraine DM efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-01

    Julius Caesar, Thomas Jefferson, and even Sigmund Freud had this ailment, and Alice is thought to have described it in Wonderland. But make no mistake, migraine headaches are not the stuff of fairy tales for the 45 million migraine sufferers of the disabling and costly disorder. Here are the disease management guidelines you need to reduce migraine-related expense and minimize your patient's pain.

  17. The Migraine-Ischemic Stroke Relation in Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Pezzini, Alessandro; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Dalla Volta, Giorgio; Padovani, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    In spite of the strong epidemiologic evidence linking migraine and ischemic stroke in young adults, the mechanisms explaining this association remain poorly understood. The observation that stroke occurs more frequently during the interictal phase of migraine prompts to speculation that an indirect relation between the two diseases might exist. In this regard, four major issues might be considered which may be summarized as follows: (1) the migraine-ischemic stroke relation is influenced by s...

  18. [Migraine and other primary headaches in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Hugo A

    2007-01-01

    Migraine diagnosis only relies on clinical characteristics of the episodes and therefore on the doctor's skill and experience. It is recognized that migraine inclusively in the pediatric group is underdiagnosed and inadequately treated. The International Headache Society recently reviewed the international headache classification and incorporated some clinical criteria according to the different age groups. Pediatricians and pediatric neurologists now have a new document and should become familiar with it. This paper discusses these new criteria for migraine and other primary headaches.

  19. Migraine predicts physical and pain symptoms among psychiatric outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background No study has been performed to compare the impacts of migraine and major depressive episode (MDE) on depression, anxiety and somatic symptoms, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among psychiatric outpatients. The aim of this study was to investigate the above issue. Methods This study enrolled consecutive psychiatric outpatients with mood and/or anxiety disorders who undertook a first visit to a medical center. Migraine was diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition. Three psychometric scales and the Short-Form 36 were administered. General linear models were used to estimate the difference in scores contributed by either migraine or MDE. Multiple linear regressions were employed to compare the variance of these scores explained by migraine or MDE. Results Among 214 enrolled participants, 35.0% had migraine. Bipolar II disorder patients (70.0%) had the highest percentage of migraine, followed by major depressive disorder (49.1%) and only anxiety disorder (24.5%). Patients with migraine had worse depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms and lower SF-36 scores than those without. The estimated differences in the scores of physical functioning, bodily pain, and somatic symptoms contributed by migraine were not lower than those contributed by MDE. The regression model demonstrated the variance explained by migraine was significantly greater than that explained by MDE in physical and pain symptoms. Conclusions Migraine was common and the impact of migraine on physical and pain symptoms was greater than MDE among psychiatric outpatients. Integration of treatment strategies for migraine into psychiatric treatment plans should be considered. PMID:23565902

  20. Using Search Engines to Investigate Shared Migraine Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Sara M; Turner, Dana P; Sexton, Katherine E; Deng, Hao; Houle, Timothy T

    2017-09-01

    To investigate migraine patterns in the United States using Google search data and utilize this information to better understand societal-level trends. Additionally, we aimed to evaluate time-series relationships between migraines and social factors. Extensive research has been done on clinical factors associated with migraines, yet population-level social factors have not been widely explored. Migraine internet search data may provide insight into migraine trends beyond information that can be gleaned from other sources. In this longitudinal analysis of open access data, we performed a time-series analysis in which about 12 years of Google Trends data (January 1, 2004 to August 15, 2016) were assessed. Data points were captured at a daily level and Google's 0-100 adjusted scale was used as the primary outcome to enable the comparison of relative popularity in the migraine search term. We hypothesized that the volume of relative migraine Google searches would be affected by societal aspects such as day of the week, holidays, and novel social events. Several recurrent social factors that drive migraine searches were identified. Of these, day of the week had the most significant impact on the volume of Google migraine searches. On average, Mondays accumulated 13.31 higher relative search volume than Fridays (95% CI: 11.12-15.51, P ≤ .001). Surprisingly, holidays were associated with lower relative migraine search volumes. Christmas Day had 13.84 lower relative search volumes (95% CI: 6.26-21.43, P ≤ .001) and Thanks giving had 20.18 lower relative search volumes (95% CI: 12.55-27.82, P ≤ .001) than days that were not holidays. Certain novel social events and extreme weather also appear to be associated with relative migraine Google search volume. Social factors play a crucial role in explaining population level migraine patterns, and thus, warrant further exploration. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  1. Human factors validation study of 3 mg sumatriptan autoinjector, for migraine patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brand-Schieber E

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Elimor Brand-Schieber,1 Sagar Munjal,1 Rajesh Kumar,1 Anthony D Andre,2 Will Valladao,2 Margarita Ramirez2 1Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories Inc., Princeton, NJ, 2Interface Analysis Associates, Saratoga, CA, USA Background: Migraine pain relief is reported by more than 50% of patients who receive low dose (3 mg of sumatriptan. Currently, there is no two-step autoinjector of low-dose sumatriptan available on the market for acute migraine treatment. To fulfill this need, a fully assembled, single-dose, subcutaneous autoinjector (sumatriptan 3 mg; product-code DFN-11 was developed. The device allows for injection with a simple two-step, push-to-inject process and provides feedback of the injection activation, progress, and completion.Objective: To determine if DFN-11 autoinjector can be used correctly and safely by migraine patients.Methods and participants: A human factors validation study was conducted with 45 migraine patients (30 oral-only medications users; 15 injectable sumatriptan users who performed one unaided simulated injection. Two days prior, half the oral participants were briefly trained. All others were only given the device to inspect and written instructions to review. No injections were performed during the initial session. All participants received written instructions at the injection session.Results: All participants (45/45; 100% performed the injection without any errors. Objective measures included device removal from packaging, cap removal, expiration date check, ­inspection of fluid in window, identification of allowable injection site, proper device positioning, dose confirmation, and device disposal. All participants (45/45; 100% reported no difficulty administering the injection and no concerns about using the autoinjector during a severe migraine onset.Conclusion: The results showed that the DFN-11 autoinjector can be used with safe handling without patterns of confusion, failures, high-risk errors, wet injections, or

  2. Provocation of migraine with aura using natural trigger factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal; Hauge, Anne Werner

    2013-01-01

    It is well-known that migraine attacks can be precipitated by various stimuli. More than 50% of patients with migraine with aura (MA) know of at least one stimulus that always or often triggers their MA attacks. The objective of this study was to expose patients with MA to their self-reported tri......It is well-known that migraine attacks can be precipitated by various stimuli. More than 50% of patients with migraine with aura (MA) know of at least one stimulus that always or often triggers their MA attacks. The objective of this study was to expose patients with MA to their self...

  3. Migraine headache in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sina, Farzad; Razmeh, Saeed; Habibzadeh, Neda; Zavari, Arefeh; Nabovvati, Mona

    2017-01-01

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that afflicts many people in the world and can cause severe disability during the attacks. The pathophysiology of migraine is complex and not fully understood. It seems that migraine is common in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). However, the association between migraine headache and IIH is still unclear. The present study was conducted to assess the prevalence of migraine headache and associated factors in IIH patients. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 68 patients diagnosed with IIH underwent a medical history interview and a neurological examination. The diagnosis of migraine was based on the four diagnostic criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition. Forty-five patients (63.2%) met the diagnostic criteria of migraine headache. There was no significant difference between patients with and without migraine headache in respect of their age, gender, body mass. This study revealed high prevalence of migraine headache in IIH patients; appropriate treatment can reduce their headache and prevent unnecessary treatments for IIH. PMID:29071043

  4. Treatment of Chronic Migraine with Focus on Botulinum Neurotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Schaefer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is the most common neurological disorder, and contributes to disability and large healthcare costs in the United States and the world. The treatment of migraine until recently has focused on medications, both abortive and prophylactic, but treatment of chronic migraine has been revolutionized with the introduction of botulinum toxin injection therapy. In this review, we explore the current understanding of migraine pathophysiology, and the evolution of the use of botulinum toxin therapy including proposed pathophysiological mechanisms through animal data. We also discuss the similarities and differences between three injection techniques.

  5. Studies on the Pathophysiology and Genetic Basis of Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Claudia F; Sutherland, Heidi G.; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that affects the central nervous system causing painful attacks of headache. A genetic vulnerability and exposure to environmental triggers can influence the migraine phenotype. Migraine interferes in many facets of people’s daily life including employment commitments and their ability to look after their families resulting in a reduced quality of life. Identification of the biological processes that underlie this relatively common affliction has been difficult because migraine does not have any clearly identifiable pathology or structural lesion detectable by current medical technology. Theories to explain the symptoms of migraine have focused on the physiological mechanisms involved in the various phases of headache and include the vascular and neurogenic theories. In relation to migraine pathophysiology the trigeminovascular system and cortical spreading depression have also been implicated with supporting evidence from imaging studies and animal models. The objective of current research is to better understand the pathways and mechanisms involved in causing pain and headache to be able to target interventions. The genetic component of migraine has been teased apart using linkage studies and both candidate gene and genome-wide association studies, in family and case-control cohorts. Genomic regions that increase individual risk to migraine have been identified in neurological, vascular and hormonal pathways. This review discusses knowledge of the pathophysiology and genetic basis of migraine with the latest scientific evidence from genetic studies. PMID:24403849

  6. Transcranial Doppler sonography in familial hemiplegic migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierelli, F.; Pauri, F.; Cupini, L.M.; Fiermonte, G.; Rizzo, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    A patient affected by familial hemiplegic migraine underwent transcranial Doppler sonography twice: the first during a spontaneous attack with right hemiparesis and aphasia, the second during a headachefree period. During the attack the following haemodynamic changes were seen: (a) bilateral increase in the middle cerebral artery and anterior cerebral artery blood flow velocities (this increase was more pronounced on the left side), (b) decreased systo-diastolic ratio and pulsatility index on the right side, (c) increased systo-diastolic ratio and pulsatility index on the left side. The results indicate that during the attack in this familial hemiplegic migraine patient, a diffuse vasoconstriction of the basal cerebral arteries developed. Moreover, transcranial Doppler sonography data suggest that a prolonged vasoconstriction of the peripheral arterioles could play a role in determining the neurological symptoms in this syndrome. 13 refs., 1 figs., 1 tab

  7. Transcranial Doppler sonography in familial hemiplegic migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierelli, F.; Pauri, F.; Cupini, L.M.; Fiermonte, G.; Rizzo, P.A. (Universita la Sapienza, Roma (Italy))

    1991-02-01

    A patient affected by familial hemiplegic migraine underwent transcranial Doppler sonography twice: the first during a spontaneous attack with right hemiparesis and aphasia, the second during a headachefree period. During the attack the following haemodynamic changes were seen: (a) bilateral increase in the middle cerebral artery and anterior cerebral artery blood flow velocities (this increase was more pronounced on the left side), (b) decreased systo-diastolic ratio and pulsatility index on the right side, (c) increased systo-diastolic ratio and pulsatility index on the left side. The results indicate that during the attack in this familial hemiplegic migraine patient, a diffuse vasoconstriction of the basal cerebral arteries developed. Moreover, transcranial Doppler sonography data suggest that a prolonged vasoconstriction of the peripheral arterioles could play a role in determining the neurological symptoms in this syndrome. 13 refs., 1 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Cerebral angiography in patients with complicated migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeiler, K.; Wessely, P.; Holzner, F.

    1985-01-01

    38 patients (mean age: 29 years) were investigated by means of complete 4-vessel angiography: all of them were suffering from complicated migraine without detectable vascular malformation. Stenoses of the great craniocervical vessels were found in 11 patients (28.9%), but there was not a single case of vascular occlusion. A correlation between the localization of the stenosis, the localization of the headache and the presumed region of the transient cerebral function disturbance was found only in a few patients. Concerning the morphological changes of the small intracranial arterial branches, there was hardly an difference between clinically affected and non-affected territories of the middle cerebral artery. The angiograms of the 38 cases of complicated migraine were compared with the angiograms of 40 patients suffering from strokes in the young and those of 49 patients with transient ischaemic attacks. There were remarkably fewer stenoses or occlusions in the great craniocervical arteries of patients suffering from complicated migraine (28.9%) than in the vessels of cases of stroke in the young (52.5%). However, the incidence was comparable with the results in patients with transient ischaemic attacks (34.7%). The degree of morphological changes in the small intracranial arterial branches is likely to depend primarily on the patient's age and less on the diagnosis. The results suggest that in almost 30% of patients with complicated migraine - even at juvenile age-stenoses of the great craniocervical vessels might be found. However, considering the fact that most of the stenoses are without haemodynamic significance and their localization is not in agreement with the clinical data, the pathogenetic value of these vessel wall changes is highly questionable. (Author)

  9. Clinical significance of previously cryptic copy number alterations and loss of heterozygosity in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome determined using combined array comparative genomic hybridization plus single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kyung-Nam; Lee, Jin Ok; Seo, Eul Ju; Lee, Seong Wook; Suh, Jin Kyung; Im, Ho Joon; Seo, Jong Jin

    2014-07-01

    The combined array comparative genomic hybridization plus single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray (CGH+SNP microarray) platform can simultaneously detect copy number alterations (CNA) and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Eighteen children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n=15) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n=3) were studied using CGH+SNP microarray to evaluate the clinical significance of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations. CGH+SNP microarray revealed CNAs at 14 regions in 9 patients, while metaphase cytogenetic (MC) analysis detected CNAs in 11 regions in 8 patients. Using CGH+SNP microarray, LOHs>10 Mb involving terminal regions or the whole chromosome were detected in 3 of 18 patients (17%). CGH+SNP microarray revealed cryptic LOHs with or without CNAs in 3 of 5 patients with normal karyotypes. CGH+SNP microarray detected additional cryptic CNAs (n=2) and LOHs (n=5) in 6 of 13 patients with abnormal MC. In total, 9 patients demonstrated additional aberrations, including CNAs (n=3) and/or LOHs (n=8). Three of 15 patients with AML and terminal LOH>10 Mb demonstrated a significantly inferior relapse-free survival rate (P=0.041). This study demonstrates that CGH+SNP microarray can simultaneously detect previously cryptic CNAs and LOH, which may demonstrate prognostic implications.

  10. Multicenter prevalence of opioid medication use as abortive therapy in the ED treatment of migraine headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Neil; Silverman, Daniel; Bradford, Heather; Finkelstein, Jeffrey

    2017-12-01

    Despite a range of therapeutic options for treating acute migraine headaches, the use of opioids is still reported to be common practice. This study describes treatment practices in regards to migraines in the ED. It characterizes the prevalence of opioid orders during visits in three different settings, an academic medical center, a non-academic urban ED, and a community ED. Fourteen months of consecutive migraine visits were identified. All medications ordered were separated into first-line and rescue medications. Number of visits, length of stay, door to provider time, and total provider time were compared. A total of 1222 visits were identified. Opioids were ordered in 35.8% of these visits. By facility, opioids were ordered in 12.3% of academic medical center visits, 40.9% of urban ED visits, and 68.6% of community ED visits. This ranged from 6.9% of first-line therapies in the academic center to 69.9% of rescue therapies in the community ED. Of those who received opioids, 36.0% versus 25.1% required rescue medications. Patients who received opioids had more repeat visits, 1.79 versus 1.30. The academic center and urban ED both found greater than 30% decrease in length of stay in visits where opioids were not given. In the face of evidence against opioids for migraines, over one third of patients received them. There was a higher prevalence in the community setting. There were no significant benefits in overall throughput time, however, opioid visits required more rescue medications, increased length of stay, and resulted in more repeat visits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Selectivity in Genetic Association with Sub-classified Migraine in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasman, Daniel I.; Anttila, Verneri; Buring, Julie E.; Ridker, Paul M.; Schürks, Markus; Kurth, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Migraine can be sub-classified not only according to presence of migraine aura (MA) or absence of migraine aura (MO), but also by additional features accompanying migraine attacks, e.g. photophobia, phonophobia, nausea, etc. all of which are formally recognized by the International Classification of Headache Disorders. It remains unclear how aura status and the other migraine features may be related to underlying migraine pathophysiology. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 12 independent loci at which single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with migraine. Using a likelihood framework, we explored the selective association of these SNPs with migraine, sub-classified according to aura status and the other features in a large population-based cohort of women including 3,003 active migraineurs and 18,108 free of migraine. Five loci met stringent significance for association with migraine, among which four were selective for sub-classified migraine, including rs11172113 (LRP1) for MO. The number of loci associated with migraine increased to 11 at suggestive significance thresholds, including five additional selective associations for MO but none for MA. No two SNPs showed similar patterns of selective association with migraine characteristics. At one extreme, SNPs rs6790925 (near TGFBR2) and rs2274316 (MEF2D) were not associated with migraine overall, MA, or MO but were selective for migraine sub-classified by the presence of one or more of the additional migraine features. In contrast, SNP rs7577262 (TRPM8) was associated with migraine overall and showed little or no selectivity for any of the migraine characteristics. The results emphasize the multivalent nature of migraine pathophysiology and suggest that a complete understanding of the genetic influence on migraine may benefit from analyses that stratify migraine according to both aura status and the additional diagnostic features used for clinical characterization of

  12. Acid-sensing ion channels and migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-qi KANG

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs are ligand-gated ion channels that are activated by extracellular protons (H+, which belong to epithelial sodium channels/degenerin (ENaC/DEG superfamily. ASICs are widely distributed in central nervous system, peripheral nervous system, digestive system and some tumor tissues. Different ASIC subunits play important roles in various pathophysiological processes such as touch, sour taste, learning and memory, including inflammation, ischemic stroke, pain, learning and memory decline, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis (MS, migraine, irritable bowel syndrome and tumor. Research over the last 2 decades has achieved substantial advances in migraine pathophysiology. It is now largely accepted that inflammatory pathways play a key role and three main events seem to take place: cortical spreading depression (CSD, activation of the trigeminovascular system (i.e. dural nociceptors, peripheral and central sensitization of this pain pathway. However, the exact mechanisms that link these three events to each other and to inflammation have so far remained to be studied. This article takes an overview of newly research advances in structure, distribution and the relationship with migraine of ASICs.  DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.09.013

  13. Management of Pediatric Migraine Headache in the Emergency Room and Infusion Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbouche, Marielle

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a common disorder that starts at an early age and takes a variable pattern from intermittent to chronic headache with several exacerbations throughout a lifetime. Children and adolescents are significantly affected. If an acute headache is not aborted by outpatient migraine therapy, it often causes severe disability, preventing the child from attending school and social events. Treating the acute severe headache aggressively helps prevent prolonged disability as well as possible chronification. Multiple medications are available, mostly for the outpatient management of an attack and include the use of over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications as well as prescribed medications in the triptan group. These therapies do sometime fail and the exacerbation can last from days to weeks. If the headache lasts 72 hours or longer it will fall in the category of status migrainosus. Status migrainosus is described as a severe disabling headache lasting 72 hours or more by the ICHD3 criteria. Disability is a major issue in children and adolescents and aggressive acute measures are to be taken to control it as soon as possible. Early aggressive intravenous therapy can be very effective in breaking the attack and allowing the child to be quickly back to normal functioning. This article reviews what is available for the treatment of pediatric primary headaches in the emergency room. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  14. Carbon monoxide may be an important molecule in migraine and other headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik W; Hauge, Mette K

    2014-01-01

    of cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathways. Here, we review the literature about carbon monoxide-induced headache and its possible mechanisms. CONCLUSION: We suggest, for the first time, that carbon monoxide may play an important role in the mechanisms of migraine and other headaches.......INTRODUCTION: Carbon monoxide was previously considered to just be a toxic gas. A wealth of recent information has, however, shown that it is also an important endogenously produced signalling molecule involved in multiple biological processes. Endogenously produced carbon monoxide may thus play...... an important role in nociceptive processing and in regulation of cerebral arterial tone. DISCUSSION: Carbon monoxide-induced headache shares many characteristics with migraine and other headaches. The mechanisms whereby carbon monoxide causes headache may include hypoxia, nitric oxide signalling and activation...

  15. Migraine aura symptoms: Duration, succession and temporal relationship to headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Michele; Linde, Mattias; Sances, Grazia; Ghiotto, Natascia; Guaschino, Elena; Allena, Marta; Terrazzino, Salvatore; Nappi, Giuseppe; Goadsby, Peter J; Tassorelli, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    As there are no biological markers, a detailed description of symptoms, particularly temporal characteristics, is crucial when diagnosing migraine aura. Hitherto these temporal aspects have not been studied in detail. We conducted a prospective diary-aided study of the duration and the succession of aura symptoms and their temporal relationship with headache. Fifty-four patients completed the study recording in a diary the characteristics of three consecutive auras ( ITALIC! n = 162 auras). The median duration of visual, sensory and dysphasic symptoms were 30, 20 and 20 minutes, respectively. Visual symptoms lasted for more than one hour in 14% of auras ( ITALIC! n = 158), sensory symptoms in 21% of auras ( ITALIC! n = 52), and dysphasic symptoms in 17% of auras ( ITALIC! n = 18). Twenty-six percent of patients had at least one aura out of three with one symptom lasting for more than one hour. In aura with multiple symptoms the subsequent symptom, second versus first one or third versus second, might either start simultaneously (34 and 18%), during (37 and 55%), with the end (5 and 9%), or after (24 and 18%) the previous aura symptom. The headache phase started before the aura (9%), simultaneously with the onset of aura (14%), during the aura (26%), simultaneously with the end of aura (15%) or after the end of aura (36%). We provide data to suggest that symptoms may last longer than one hour in a relevant proportion of auras or migraine with aura patients, and that there is a high variability of scenarios in terms of time relationship among aura symptoms and between aura and headache. © International Headache Society 2015.

  16. Pure menstrual migraine with sensory aura: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiann-Jy; Hsu, Yung-Chu; Chen, Dem-Lion

    2012-07-01

    Hormonal changes related to the menstrual cycle have a great impact on migraines in women. Menstrual migraine attacks are almost invariably without aura. Categorizing migraines into menstrual or non-menstrual types is one way to stratify migraines without aura according to the appendix criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. We report a peri-menopausal woman whose sensory aura exclusively heralded menstrual migraine. A 51-year-old woman had suffered from monthly episodic headaches since the age of 46. Before a headache, and within 1 h on the first day of her menstruation, she always experienced numbness in her entire left upper limb. After the sensory aura, migrainous headaches occurred with nausea and photophobia. In the postmenopausal period, she no longer had sensory aura, and her headache pattern changed and became less severe. Her physical and neurologic exams as well as electroencephalography, brain magnetic resonance imaging, and conventional angiography were all normal. She fulfilled the diagnosis of pure menstrual migraine with typical sensory aura. To our knowledge, this is the first formal case report of pure menstrual migraine with aura.

  17. Societal perspective on the burden of migraine in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roijen, L.; Essink-Bot, M. L.; Koopmanschap, M. A.; Michel, B. C.; Rutten, F. F.

    1995-01-01

    This study presents a comprehensive overview of the societal burden of migraine in The Netherlands. We assessed the direct and indirect costs of this disease, and the health status of patients with migraine. We developed the 'illness and labour' (I&L) questionnaire to collect data on the effect of

  18. Randomized, controlled trial of telcagepant over four migraine attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, Andrew P; Dahlöf, Carl Gh; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist telcagepant (tablet formulation) for treatment of a migraine attack and across four attacks. Adults with migraine were randomized, double-blind, to telcagepant 140 mg, telcagepant 280 mg, or control treatment sequ...

  19. Restless legs syndrome in migraine patients : prevalence and severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosterhout, W P J; van Someren, E J W; Louter, M A; Schoonman, G G; Lammers, G J; Rijsman, R M; Ferrari, M D; Terwindt, G M

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Our aim was to study not only the prevalence but more importantly the severity and the correlation between sleep quality and restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a large population of well-defined migraine patients as poor sleep presumably triggers migraine attacks. METHODS: In a

  20. The importance of lactic acid in migraines and fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Ribeiro, Guido Assis Cachuba; Scola, Rosana Hermínia; Piovesan, Elcio Juliato; Wollmann Junior, Darley Rugeri; Paiva, Eduardo Dos Santos; da Cunha, Claudio Leinig Pereira; Werneck, Lineu Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid is a byproduct of both muscle metabolism and the central nervous system. Changes in metabolism are related to various physiological and pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between migraine and fibromyalgia with the levels of lactic acid in the blood. We study of 93 patients was divided into five groups: 1) patients with fibromyalgia (n=20); 2) episodic migraine (n=20); 3) chronic migraine (n=20); 4) fibromyalgia and episodic migraine (n= 13); and 5) fibromyalgia and chronic migraine (n=20), and 20 healthy subjects (control group). Blood levels of lactic acid were measured at four different time points: at rest, during aerobic exercise, during anaerobic physical activity and while resting after anaerobic exercise. Lactic acid increased in all groups during anaerobic physical activity without predominance for either group. During aerobic physical activity, all groups increased lactic acid levels, but the increase was more expressive in the chronic migraine group and the chronic migraine with fibromyalgia group without statistical significance. We did not found abnormalities involving the metabolism of lactic acid in episodic and chronic migraine with or without fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Migraine headaches in a nutshell | Schellack | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article aims to provide a concise, high-level overview of the classification, management and treatment of migraine. Migraine is a common, debilitating neurological disorder that is characterised by the presence of severe headaches, which may last anything from a few hours to a few days (4–72 hours). Thus, the ...

  2. On the methodology of drug trials in migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauge, Anne Werner; Hougaard, Anders; Olesen, Jes

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Specific problems occur in clinical treatment trials for migraine with aura that differ from those encountered in treatment trials for migraine without aura. DISCUSSION: Based on our experience with four such trials, we point to a number of possible solutions and outline areas...

  3. The Effect of Migraine Headache on Educational Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Daniel I.; Sabia, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that migraine headaches are common and debilitating, little is known about their effect on educational attainment. Using data drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we estimate the relationship between migraine headache and three outcomes: high school grade point average, the probability of graduating…

  4. The clinical manifestations of vestibular migraine: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell Ferster, Ashley P; Priesol, Adrian J; Isildak, Huseyin

    2017-06-01

    To provide an overview of vestibular migraines presentation, pathology, and diagnosis, as well as an update on current diagnostic criteria. A review of the most recent literature on vestibular migraines was performed. Vestibular migraine is a process with significant impact on the quality of life for those afflicted with the disease, with attacks of spontaneous or positional vertigo and migraine symptoms lasting several minutes to 72h. Inner ear disease can co-exist with migraine and the vestibular symptoms occurring with vestibular migraine can mimic inner ear disorders providing a challenge for clinicians in establishing diagnosis. Recent diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine proposed by a joint committee of the Bárány Society and the International Headache Society provide an important standard for clinical diagnosis and research endeavor. Vestibular migraine is a challenging disease process to both diagnose and treat. Proper diagnosis and treatment requires a thorough understanding of the current literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Migraine pain associated with middle cerebral artery dilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L; Olesen, J; Iversen, H K

    1991-01-01

    The combination of measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and blood velocity in the middle cerebral arteries (MCA) by transcranial doppler sonography was used to investigate cerebrovascular involvement in migraine. Ten migraine patients with unilateral headache were studied during an...

  6. Chocolate and migraine: the history of an ambiguous association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Mattiuzzi, Camilla; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2014-12-17

    Migraine is a highly prevalent condition and an important cause of disability. Although the pathogenesis of this condition is complex and multifaceted, several environmental factors have been associated with development and aggravation of headache attacks. Among the various foods that have been implicated in migraine, chocolate has been regarded as detrimental on the basis of old and mostly anecdotal evidence. Therefore, this article is aimed to provide an overview on the current scientific evidence about the relationship between chocolate and migraine. Taken together, the information gathered from epidemiological and provocative studies attests that the potential causal association between chocolate and migraine remains largely enigmatic. The analysis of epidemiological surveys reveals a highly heterogeneous picture, with frequency of migraine episodes attributable to chocolate ranging from 0 to 22.5%. Even in those studies reporting a more convincing association, the risk of migraine after chocolate ingestion was found to be 2- to 3-fold lower than that reported for exposure to other conventional triggers such as stress, fasting, lack of sleep and alcohol beverages. The results of the double-blind studies are instead unequivocal, and clearly demonstrate that the risk of developing a headache attack after ingestion of chocolate is as likely as administering placebo in patients with migraine. It can hence be concluded that the widespread belief that chocolate and cocoacontaining foods should be absolutely avoided by migraine patients lacks of a reliable scientific basis.

  7. PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PNLC

    PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION: A risk factor for third trimester uterine rupture in three ... for accurate diagnosis of uterine rupture. KEY WORDS: Induced second trimester abortion - Previous uterine surgery - Uterine rupture. ..... scarred uterus during second trimester misoprostol- induced labour for a missed ...

  8. Diagnosis and Development of Screening Items for Migraine in Neurological Practice in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuu-Jiun Wang

    2008-06-01

    Conclusion: Migraine was the most common headache diagnosis in the neurologists’ clinics. Probable migraine was not completely adopted as a migraine spectrum among neurologists. In contrast to ID™, moderate or severe headache intensity replaced headache-related disability as one screening item for migraine in Taiwan.

  9. Functional Assessment and Treatment of Migraine Reports and School Absences in an Adolescent with Asperger's Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvans, Rebecca K.; LeBlanc, Linda A.

    2009-01-01

    Psychological interventions for migraines typically include biofeedback training, stress-management training, or relaxation training and are implemented without consideration of environmental variables that might maintain migraines or complaints of migraines. An adolescent with daily reports of migraines that negatively impacted school attendance…

  10. Migraine and its relation with lifestyle in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, F; Safavi, M; Mahmudi, M

    2010-01-01

    Migraine is a very common primary headache disorder with no underlying identifiable pathological cause. It has a profound effect on the well-being and general functioning of its victims. Migraine is best understood as a chronic disorder with episodic manifestations, progressive in some individuals, having dramatic social and economic costs. Migraine causes stress in patients and their families, changes the roles and lifestyles and disturbs the social interactions between family members. Being more common in women, migraine is a significant women's health concern. The low rate of headaches with identifiable organic causes suggests that individual and environmental factors are determinants of migraine. Therefore, studying lifestyle and its relation with migraine is very important. This study examines the relation between migraine headaches and lifestyle in women refereed to university clinics in Iran. This is a case-control study of 170 patients selected randomly using Poisson sampling. The study population included female patients suffering from headache referred to the neurology clinics and health centers in Iran (with neurologist-diagnosed migraine according to the criteria of the International Society of Headache). The study population for the control group included women without migraine headache whose life conditions were similar to the migraine group and who were living in the same area. Data were collected by interview and a questionnaire which was tested for reliability and validity using content validity and retest methodologies. Findings showed a significant relation between some dimensions of lifestyle, such as diet eating habits (P = 0.001), resting and sleeping habits (P = 0.012), and drug usage patterns (P = 0.001) with migraine headaches. But there were no significant relationships noted between smoking, exercise or stress levels with migraine headaches. Lifestyle habits, including rest and sleep, diet and drug usage, are important factors in migraine

  11. Remission of migraine after clipping of saccular intracranial aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, E R; Busygina, A V; Kolotvinov, V S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Unruptured saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) is associated with an increased prevalence of migraine, but it is unclear whether this is altered by clipping of the aneurysm. The aim of our study was to determine whether remission rate of migraine and other recurrent headaches...... was greater in patients with SIA after clipping than in controls. METHODS: We prospectively studied 87 SIA patients with migraine or other recurrent headaches. They were interviewed about headaches in the preceding year before and 1 year after clipping using a validated semi-structured neurologist conducted...... interview. The remission rates of migraine and tension-type headache (TTH) in these patients were compared to 92 patients from a headache center. Diagnoses were made according to the ICHD-2. RESULTS: During 1 year preceding rupture 51 patients with SIA had migraine. During the year after clipping...

  12. The prophylactic effect of valproate on glyceryltrinitrate induced migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedskov, Jesper Filtenborg; Thomsen, L L; Iversen, H K

    2004-01-01

    In this study the human glyceryltrinitrate (GTN) model of migraine was for the first time used to test the effect of a prophylactic drug. We chose to test valproate due to its well documented effect as a migraine prophylactic drug. Efficacy of this compound would support the usefulness of the model...... in prophylactic antimigraine drug development. Twelve patients with migraine without aura were included in a randomized double blind crossover study. Valproate 1000 mg or placebo was given daily, each for a minimum of 13 days. On the last treatment day of each arm a 20 min intravenous infusion of GTN (0.25 microg...... were measured with high frequency ultrasound. GTN evoked migraine fulfilling IHS criteria 1.1 in 6 patients after placebo and in 2 patients after valproate (P = 0.125). Including additionally 3 patients on placebo and 1 patient on valproate who felt they had suffered a migraine attack, but who had...

  13. Auditory Processing in Children with Migraine: A Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agessi, Larissa Mendonça; Villa, Thaís Rodrigues; Carvalho, Deusvenir de Souza; Pereira, Liliane Desgualdo

    2017-04-01

    Background  This study aimed to investigate central auditory processing performance in children with migraine and compared with controls without headache. Methods  Twenty-eight children of both sexes, aged between 8 and 12 years, diagnosed with migraine with and without aura, and a control group of the same age range and with no headache history, were included. Gaps-in-noise (GIN), duration pattern test (DPT), synthetic sentence identification (SSI) test, and nonverbal dichotic test (NVDT) were used to assess central auditory processing performance. Results  Children with migraine performed significantly worse in DPT, SSI test, and NVDT when compared with controls without headache; however, no significant differences were found in the GIN test. Conclusions  Children with migraine demonstrate impairment in the physiologic mechanism of temporal processing and selective auditory attention. In our short communication, migraine could be related to impaired central auditory processing in children. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. The influence of genetic constitution on migraine drug responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Francke; Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Werge, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    and genotyping were performed on 1806 unrelated migraine cases recruited from the Danish Headache Center. Association analyses were carried out using logistic regression, assuming an additive model for the genetic effect. The effect on drug responses was tested for a combined genetic score and for each of the 12...... SNPs. Significant findings were subsequently tested in an independent replication sample of 392 unrelated Danish migraine cases. RESULTS: A single risk variant, rs2651899 in PRDM16, was significantly associated with efficacy of triptans with an odds ratio (OR) of treatment success of 1.3, and a higher......." Personalized treatment is therefore much needed. The objective of this study was to test the effect of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with migraine on migraine drug responses. METHODS: Semi-structured migraine interviews including questions on drug responses, blood samples...

  15. Matrix metalloproteinases during and outside of migraine attacks without aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, M.; Tvedskov, J.F.; Thiesen, Kerstin Lipka

    2010-01-01

    Ashina M, Tvedskov JF, Lipka K, Bilello J, Penkowa M & Olesen J. Matrix metalloproteinases during and outside of migraine attacks without aura. Cephalalgia 2009. London. ISSN 0333-1024To test the hypothesis that permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is altered during migraine attack due...... to enhanced activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), we investigated MMP-3, MMP-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases (TIMP)-1 in the external jugular vein during and outside of migraine attacks in 21 patients with migraine without aura. In addition, we measured plasma levels of several other...... of MMP-3 in the external jugular (P = 0.002) and cubital (P = 0.008) vein during attacks compared with outside of attacks. We found no correlation of ictal or interictal MMP-3, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 to migraine duration and frequency analysed in 21 patients (P > 0.05). There was no difference between ictal...

  16. Family studies to find rare high risk variants in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Dyhr; Christensen, Anne Francke; Olesen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    issues from Nature Genetics and PLOS genetics 2014, 2015 and 2016 (UTAI June) were screened for relevant papers. Reference lists from included and other relevant papers were also searched. For the description of the family-based study design using NGS an in-house protocol was used. RESULTS: Thirty...... genetic variants with bigger effect size may be involved in the disease. Since migraine has a tendency to cluster in families, a family approach might be the way to find these variants. This is also indicated by identification of migraine-associated loci in classical linkage-analyses in migraine families....... A single migraine study using a candidate-gene approach was performed in 2010 identifying a rare mutation in the TRESK potassium channel segregating in a large family with migraine with aura, but this finding has later become questioned. The technologies of next-generation sequencing (NGS) now provides...

  17. Prevalence and risk of migraine in patients with rosacea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Ashina, Messoud; Gaist, David

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rosacea features increased neurovascular reactivity; migraine is a complex neurologic disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of headache associated with nausea and increased sensitivity to light and sound. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the prevalence and risk of new-onset migraine...... in patients with rosacea. METHODS: All Danish individuals 18 years of age or older were linked in nationwide registers. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated by Cox regression. RESULTS: In the total cohort (n = 4,361,688), there were 49,475 patients with rosacea. Baseline prevalence of migraine was 7.......3% and 12.1% in the reference population and in patients with rosacea, respectively. The fully adjusted HR of migraine was 1.31 (95% confidence interval 1.23-1.39) for patients with rosacea. Patients with phymatous rosacea (n = 594) had no increased risk of migraine (adjusted HR 0.45; 95% confidence...

  18. Migraine with visual aura associated with thicker visual cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Hougaard, Anders; Garde, Ellen

    2018-01-01

    Until recent years it was believed that migraine with aura was a disorder causing intermittent neurological symptoms, with no impact on brain structure. However, recent MRI studies have reported increased cortical thickness of visual and somatosensory areas in patients with migraine with aura...... number of subjects. In this cross-sectional study, we recruited females aged 30-60 years from the nationwide Danish Twin Registry. Brain MRI of females with migraine with aura (patients), their co-twins, and unrelated migraine-free twins (controls) were performed at a single centre and assessed...... for cortical thickness in predefined cortical areas (V1, V2, V3A, MT, somatosensory cortex), blinded to headache diagnoses. The difference in cortical thickness between patients and controls adjusted for age, and other potential confounders was assessed. Comparisons of twin pairs discordant for migraine...

  19. Calcitonin gene-related peptide does not cause the familial hemiplegic migraine phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.M.; Thomsen, L.L.; Olesen, J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a migraine trigger that plays a crucial role in migraine pathophysiology, and CGRP antagonism is efficient in the treatment of migraine attacks. Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a dominantly inherited subtype of migraine w...... without aura. This indicates that the pathophysiologic pathways underlying migraine headache in FHM may be different from the common types of migraine and questions whether CGRP antagonists would be effective in the treatment of FHM patients Udgivelsesdato: 2008/9/9...

  20. CT-guided Irreversible Electroporation in an Acute Porcine Liver Model: Effect of Previous Transarterial Iodized Oil Tissue Marking on Technical Parameters, 3D Computed Tomographic Rendering of the Electroporation Zone, and Histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Fritz, S., E-mail: stefan.fritz@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of General Visceral and Transplantation Surgery (Germany); Vollherbst, D., E-mail: dominikvollherbst@web.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Zelzer, S., E-mail: s.zelzer@dkfz-heidelberg.de [German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Medical and Biological Informatics (Germany); Wachter, M. F., E-mail: fredericwachter@googlemail.com; Bellemann, N., E-mail: nadine.bellemann@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Gockner, T., E-mail: theresa.gockner@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Mokry, T., E-mail: theresa.mokry@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Schmitz, A., E-mail: anne.schmitz@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Aulmann, S., E-mail: sebastian.aulmann@mail.com [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of General Pathology (Germany); Stampfl, U., E-mail: ulrike.stampfl@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pereira, P., E-mail: philippe.pereira@slk-kliniken.de [SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology, Minimally-invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Kauczor, H. U., E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Werner, J., E-mail: jens.werner@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of General Visceral and Transplantation Surgery (Germany); Radeleff, B. A., E-mail: boris.radeleff@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the effect of previous transarterial iodized oil tissue marking (ITM) on technical parameters, three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology after CT-guided irreversible electroporation (IRE) in an acute porcine liver model as a potential strategy to improve IRE performance.MethodsAfter Ethics Committee approval was obtained, in five landrace pigs, two IREs of the right and left liver (RL and LL) were performed under CT guidance with identical electroporation parameters. Before IRE, transarterial marking of the LL was performed with iodized oil. Nonenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT examinations followed. One hour after IRE, animals were killed and livers collected. Mean resulting voltage and amperage during IRE were assessed. For 3D CT rendering of the electroporation zone, parameters for size and shape were analyzed. Quantitative data were compared by the Mann–Whitney test. Histopathological differences were assessed.ResultsMean resulting voltage and amperage were 2,545.3 ± 66.0 V and 26.1 ± 1.8 A for RL, and 2,537.3 ± 69.0 V and 27.7 ± 1.8 A for LL without significant differences. Short axis, volume, and sphericity index were 16.5 ± 4.4 mm, 8.6 ± 3.2 cm{sup 3}, and 1.7 ± 0.3 for RL, and 18.2 ± 3.4 mm, 9.8 ± 3.8 cm{sup 3}, and 1.7 ± 0.3 for LL without significant differences. For RL and LL, the electroporation zone consisted of severely widened hepatic sinusoids containing erythrocytes and showed homogeneous apoptosis. For LL, iodized oil could be detected in the center and at the rim of the electroporation zone.ConclusionThere is no adverse effect of previous ITM on technical parameters, 3D CT rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology after CT-guided IRE of the liver.

  1. CT-guided Irreversible Electroporation in an Acute Porcine Liver Model: Effect of Previous Transarterial Iodized Oil Tissue Marking on Technical Parameters, 3D Computed Tomographic Rendering of the Electroporation Zone, and Histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, C. M.; Fritz, S.; Vollherbst, D.; Zelzer, S.; Wachter, M. F.; Bellemann, N.; Gockner, T.; Mokry, T.; Schmitz, A.; Aulmann, S.; Stampfl, U.; Pereira, P.; Kauczor, H. U.; Werner, J.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the effect of previous transarterial iodized oil tissue marking (ITM) on technical parameters, three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology after CT-guided irreversible electroporation (IRE) in an acute porcine liver model as a potential strategy to improve IRE performance.MethodsAfter Ethics Committee approval was obtained, in five landrace pigs, two IREs of the right and left liver (RL and LL) were performed under CT guidance with identical electroporation parameters. Before IRE, transarterial marking of the LL was performed with iodized oil. Nonenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT examinations followed. One hour after IRE, animals were killed and livers collected. Mean resulting voltage and amperage during IRE were assessed. For 3D CT rendering of the electroporation zone, parameters for size and shape were analyzed. Quantitative data were compared by the Mann–Whitney test. Histopathological differences were assessed.ResultsMean resulting voltage and amperage were 2,545.3 ± 66.0 V and 26.1 ± 1.8 A for RL, and 2,537.3 ± 69.0 V and 27.7 ± 1.8 A for LL without significant differences. Short axis, volume, and sphericity index were 16.5 ± 4.4 mm, 8.6 ± 3.2 cm 3 , and 1.7 ± 0.3 for RL, and 18.2 ± 3.4 mm, 9.8 ± 3.8 cm 3 , and 1.7 ± 0.3 for LL without significant differences. For RL and LL, the electroporation zone consisted of severely widened hepatic sinusoids containing erythrocytes and showed homogeneous apoptosis. For LL, iodized oil could be detected in the center and at the rim of the electroporation zone.ConclusionThere is no adverse effect of previous ITM on technical parameters, 3D CT rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology after CT-guided IRE of the liver

  2. Migraine Trainers as Models: the effectiveness of Lay trainerswith migraine for behavioural attack prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.Y.M. Mérelle (Saskia)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractMigraine is a chronic brain disorder, characterized by attacks of severe headache accompanied by nausea, vomiting and sensitivity to light, sound and smell. Attacks can be preceded by premonitory symptoms such as fatigue, muscular stiff ness or negative aff ect. It has been shown that

  3. Negative affectivity, emotion regulation, and coping in migraine and probable migraine: a New Zealand case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jade K Y; Consedine, Nathan S

    2014-01-01

    Migraine is a prevalent and disabling health condition. While there have been some suggestions that personality may be linked to migraine incidence, dose-response links to disability or impact are yet to be conducted and multivariate analyses are uncommon. The purposes of this study are to evaluate the personality characteristics differentiating migraine and probable migraine sufferers from matched controls in multivariate models and assess the possibility of a dose-response relationship. Fifty migraine sufferers and 50 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched controls in New Zealand completed personality measures including negative affectivity, coping, and monitoring-blunting. Logistic regressions indicated that migraine status was concurrently predicted by Type D negative affectivity, more frequent venting and planning coping, and lower monitoring. There was little evidence to suggest a consistent dose-response type effect of personality on migraine; lower impact and disability were associated with greater openness to experiences, acceptance, and behavioural disengagement. A personality profile characterised by moderate levels of negative emotion and irritability together with failures in inhibitory self-regulation may be associated with an increased risk of strict and probable migraine.

  4. Reduced breath holding index in patients with chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgün, Hakan; Taşdemir, Serdar; Ulaş, Ümit Hıdır; Alay, Semih; Çetiz, Ahmet; Yücel, Mehmet; Öz, Oğuzhan; Odabaşı, Zeki; Demirkaya, Şeref

    2015-09-01

    Migraine is a neurovascular disorder characterized by autonomic nervous system dysfunction and severe headache attacks. Studies have shown that changes in the intracranial vessels during migraine have an important role in the pathophysiology. Many studies have been conducted on the increased risk of stroke in patients with migraine, but insufficient data are available on the mechanism underlying the increase. This study aimed to evaluate basal cerebral blood flow velocity and vasomotor reactivity in patients with chronic migraine. We evaluated 38 patients with chronic migraine. Three of them were excluded because they had auras and four of them were excluded because of their use of medication that can affect cerebral blood flow velocity and breath holding index (beta or calcium channel blockers). Our study population consisted of 31 patients with chronic migraine without aura and 29 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals who were not taking any medication. The mean blood flow velocity and breath holding index were measured on both sides from the middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery, with temporal window insonation. The breath holding index for middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery was significantly lower in the migraine group compared to that of the control group (p < 0.05).The vasomotor reactivity indicates the dilatation potential of a vessel, and it is closely related to autoregulation. According to our results, the vasodilator response of cerebral arterioles to hypercapnia was lower in patients with chronic migraine. These findings showed the existence of impairments in the harmonic cerebral hemodynamic mechanisms in patients with chronic migraine. This finding also supports the existing idea of an increased risk of stroke in patients with chronic migraine due to impaired vasomotor reactivity.

  5. Patent foramen ovale and migraine attacks: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Philomena Z Y; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2014-05-01

    Migraine headache and the presence of a patent foramen ovale have been associated with each other, although the precise pathophysiological mechanism(s) are uncertain. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify the extent of patent foramen ovale prevalence in migraineurs and to determine whether closure of a patent foramen ovale would improve migraine headache. An electronic literature search was performed to select studies between January 1980 and February 2013 that were relevant to the prevalence of patent foramen ovale and migraine, and the effects of intervention(s) on migraine attacks. Of the initial 368 articles presented by the initial search, 20 satisfied the inclusion criteria assessing patent foramen ovale prevalence in migraineurs and 21 presented data on patent foramen ovale closure. In case series and cohort studies, patent foramen ovale prevalence in migraineurs ranged from 14.6% to 66.5%. Case-control studies reported a prevalence ranging from 16.0% to 25.7% in controls, compared with 26.8% to 96.0% for migraine with aura. The extent of improvement or resolution of migraine headache attack symptoms was variable. In case series, intervention ameliorated migraine headache attack in 13.6% to 92.3% of cases. One single randomized trial did not show any benefit from patent foramen ovale closure. The data overall do not exclude the possibility of a placebo effect for resolving migraine following patent foramen ovale closure. This systematic review demonstrates firstly that migraine headache attack is associated with a higher prevalence of patent foramen ovale than among the general population. Observational data suggest that some improvement of migraine would be observed if the patent foramen ovale were to be closed. A proper assessment of any interventions for patent foramen ovale closure would require further large randomized trials to be conducted given uncertainties from existing trial data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Excitability of the motor cortex in patients with migraine changes with the time elapsed from the last attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Francesca; Coppola, Gianluca; Di Lenola, Davide; Serrao, Mariano; Di Lorenzo, Cherubino; Parisi, Vincenzo; Pierelli, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) produced by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex can be an objective measure of cortical excitability. Previously, MEP thresholds were found to be normal, increased, or even reduced in patients with migraine. In the present study, we determined whether the level of cortical excitability changes with the time interval from the last migraine attack, thereby accounting for the inconsistencies in previous reports. Twenty-six patients with untreated migraine without aura (MO) underwent a MEP study between attacks. Their data were then compared to the MEP data collected from a group of 24 healthy volunteers (HVs). During the experiment, the TMS figure-of-eight coil was positioned over the left motor area. After identifying the resting motor threshold (RMT), we delivered 10 single TMS pulses (rate: 0.1 Hz, intensity: 120% of the RMT) and averaged the resulting MEP amplitudes. The mean RMTs and MEP amplitudes were not significantly different between the MO and HV groups. In patients with MO, the RMTs were negatively correlated with the number of days elapsed since the last migraine attack (rho = -0.404, p = 0.04). Our results suggest that the threshold for evoking MEPs is influenced by the proximity of an attack; specifically, the threshold is lower when a long time interval has passed after an attack, and is higher (within the range of normative values) when measured close to an attack. These dynamic RMT variations resemble those we reported previously for visual and somatosensory evoked potentials and may represent time-dependent plastic changes in brain excitability in relation to the migraine cycle.

  7. Beta-endorphin and ACTH in plasma during attacks of common and classic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, F W; Jensen, K; Blegvad, N

    1985-01-01

    Plasma levels of beta-endorphin and ACTH were measured during and outside migraine attacks in 17 patients with common migraine and 11 patients with classic migraine. Specific radioimmunoassays for beta-endorphin and ACTH were used. The beta-endorphin assay did not cross-react with beta-lipotropin...... migraine. Accordingly, we could not add evidence to the theory of a dysfunction of the endogenous opioid system in migraine....

  8. Tetra-ataxiometric Posturography in Patients with Migrainous Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongun, Nedim; Atalay, Nilgun S; Degirmenci, Eylem; Sahin, Fusun; Bir, Levent Sinan

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common disorder characterized by headache attacks frequently accompanied by vestibular symptoms like dizziness, vertigo, and balance disorders. Clinical studies support a strong link between migraine and vertigo rather than between other headache types and vertigo or nonvertiginous dizziness. There is a lack of consensus regarding the pathophysiology of migrainous vertigo. Activation of central vestibular processing during migraine attacks and vasospasm-induced ischemia of the labyrinth are reported as the probable responsible mechanisms. Because vestibular examination alone does not provide enough information for diagnosis of migrainous vertigo, posturography systems which provide objective assessment of somatosensory, vestibular, and visual information would be very helpful to show concomitant involvement of the vestibular and somato-sensorial systems. There are few posturographic studies on patients with migraine but it seems that how balance is affected in patients with migraine and/or migrainous vertigo is still not clear. We want to investigate balance function in migraineurs with and without vertigo with a tetra-ataxiometric posturography system and our study is the first study in which tetra-ataxiometric static posturography was used to evaluate postural abnormalities in a well-defined population of patients with migrainous vertigo. To investigate balance functions in migraineurs with and without vertigo with a tetra-ataxiometric posturography system. Prospective, nonrandomized, controlled study. Pamukkale University Hospital, Neurology and Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation outpatient clinics. Sixteen patients with migrainous vertigo, 16 patients with migraine without aura and no vestibular symptoms, and 16 controls were included in the study. Computerized static posturography system was performed and statistical analyses of fall, Fourier, Stability, and Weight distribution indexes were performed. The tetra-ataxiometric posturography device

  9. CADASIL: Migraine, Encephalopathy, Stroke and Their Inter-Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Rhea Yan Ying; Markus, Hugh Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is common in Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) but its treatment responses are not well described, and its relationship to stroke risk unknown. Encephalopathy is a less common presentation; it has been suggested it is related to migraine. We characterised migraine patterns and treatment responses in CADASIL, and examined associations between migraine and both stroke risk and encephalopathy. 300 symptomatic CADASIL patients were prospectively recruited from a national referral clinic over a nineteen year period, from 1996 to 2015. Data was collected using a standardised questionnaire. Migraine was classified according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (beta version). A cross-sectional analysis was carried out on the data collected. Migraine was present in 226 (75.3%), and the presenting feature in 203 (67.7%). It was usually accompanied by aura (89.8%). Patients showed variable responses to a variety of drugs for migraine. Of 24 given triptans, 45.5% had consistent or partial responses. None had complications following triptans. Thirty-three (11.0%) patients experienced encephalopathy lasting on average 8.1 ± 3.4 days. Patients with migraine with aura had higher odds of encephalopathy (OR = 5.4; 95%CI 1.6-28.4; p = 0.002). Patients with confusional aura had higher odds of encephalopathy than those with other aura types (OR = 2.5, 95%CI = 1.0-5.8, p = 0.04). There was also no increase in risk of encephalopathy with sex or age at onset of migraine. Migraineurs had a lower stroke risk than non-migraineurs (HR = 0.46, 95%CI 0.3-0.6, p = 2.1x10-6). Migraine with aura is a prominent feature of CADASIL. Treatment responses are similar to those seen in the general migraine population and no complications were observed with triptans. Migraine with aura was associated with increased risk of encephalopathy suggesting they may share pathophysiological mechanisms

  10. Accurate Classification of Chronic Migraine via Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedt, Todd J.; Chong, Catherine D.; Wu, Teresa; Gaw, Nathan; Fu, Yinlin; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Background The International Classification of Headache Disorders provides criteria for the diagnosis and subclassification of migraine. Since there is no objective gold standard by which to test these diagnostic criteria, the criteria are based on the consensus opinion of content experts. Accurate migraine classifiers consisting of brain structural measures could serve as an objective gold standard by which to test and revise diagnostic criteria. The objectives of this study were to utilize magnetic resonance imaging measures of brain structure for constructing classifiers: 1) that accurately identify individuals as having chronic vs. episodic migraine vs. being a healthy control; and 2) that test the currently used threshold of 15 headache days/month for differentiating chronic migraine from episodic migraine. Methods Study participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging for determination of regional cortical thickness, cortical surface area, and volume. Principal components analysis combined structural measurements into principal components accounting for 85% of variability in brain structure. Models consisting of these principal components were developed to achieve the classification objectives. Ten-fold cross validation assessed classification accuracy within each of the ten runs, with data from 90% of participants randomly selected for classifier development and data from the remaining 10% of participants used to test classification performance. Headache frequency thresholds ranging from 5–15 headache days/month were evaluated to determine the threshold allowing for the most accurate subclassification of individuals into lower and higher frequency subgroups. Results Participants were 66 migraineurs and 54 healthy controls, 75.8% female, with an average age of 36 +/− 11 years. Average classifier accuracies were: a) 68% for migraine (episodic + chronic) vs. healthy controls; b) 67.2% for episodic migraine vs. healthy controls; c) 86.3% for chronic

  11. Reduced functional connectivity between salience and visual networks in migraine with aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niddam, David M; Lai, Kuan-Lin; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Chuang, Chih-Ying Naomi; Chen, Wei-Ta; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    Migraine with visual aura (MA) is associated with distinct visual disturbances preceding migraine attacks, but shares other visual deficits in between attacks with migraine without aura (MO). Here, we seek to determine if abnormalities specific to interictal MA patients exist in functional brain connectivity of intrinsic cognitive networks. In particular, these networks are involved in top-down modulation of visual processing. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, whole-brain functional connectivity maps were derived from seeds placed in the anterior insula and the middle frontal gyrus, key nodes of the salience and dorsal attention networks, respectively. Twenty-six interictal MA patients were compared with 26 matched MO patients and 26 healthy matched controls. The major findings were: connectivity between the anterior insula and occipital areas, including area V3A, was reduced in MA but not in MO. Connectivity changes between the anterior insula and occipital areas further correlated with the headache severity in MA only. The unique pattern of connectivity changes found in interictal MA patients involved area V3A, an area previously implicated in aura generation. Hypoconnectivity to this and other occipital regions may either represent a compensatory response to occipital dysfunctions or predispose MA patients to the development of aura. © International Headache Society 2015.

  12. Linking a genetic defect in migraine to spreading depression in a computational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus A. Dahlem

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM is a rare subtype of migraine with aura. A mutation causing FHM type 3 (FHM3 has been identified in SCN1A encoding the Nav1.1 Na+ channel. This genetic defect affects the inactivation gate. While the Na+ tail currents following voltage steps are consistent with both hyperexcitability and hypoexcitability, in this computational study, we investigate functional consequences beyond these isolated events. Our extended Hodgkin–Huxley framework establishes a connection between genotype and cellular phenotype, i.e., the pathophysiological dynamics that spans over multiple time scales and is relevant to migraine with aura. In particular, we investigate the dynamical repertoire from normal spiking (milliseconds to spreading depression and anoxic depolarization (tens of seconds and show that FHM3 mutations render gray matter tissue more vulnerable to spreading depression despite opposing effects associated with action potential generation. We conclude that the classification in terms of hypoexcitability vs. hyperexcitability is too simple a scheme. Our mathematical analysis provides further basic insight into also previously discussed criticisms against this scheme based on psychophysical and clinical data.

  13. Sensory migraine aura is not associated with structural grey matter abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Arngrim, Nanna; Vlachou, Maria; Larsen, Vibeke Andrée; Larsson, Henrik B W; Ashina, Messoud

    2016-01-01

    Migraine with aura (MA) is characterized by cortical dysfunction. Frequent aura attacks may alter cerebral cortical structure in patients, or structural grey matter abnormalities may predispose MA patients to aura attacks. In the present study we aimed to investigate cerebral grey matter structure in a large group of MA patients with and without sensory aura (i.e. gradually developing, transient unilateral sensory disturbances). We included 60 patients suffering from migraine with typical visual aura and 60 individually age and sex-matched controls. Twenty-nine of the patients additionally experienced sensory aura regularly. We analysed high-resolution structural MR images using two complimentary approaches and compared patients with and without sensory aura. Patients were also compared to controls. We found no differences of grey matter density or cortical thickness between patients with and without sensory aura and no differences for the cortical visual areas between patients and controls. The somatosensory cortex was thinner in patients (1.92 mm vs. 1.96 mm, P = 0.043) and the anterior cingulate cortex of patients had a decreased grey matter density (P = 0.039) compared to controls. These differences were not correlated to the clinical characteristics. Our results suggest that sensory migraine aura is not associated with altered grey matter structure and that patients with visual aura have normal cortical structure of areas involved in visual processing. The observed decreased grey matter volume of the cingulate gyrus in patients compared to controls have previously been reported in migraine with and without aura, but also in a wide range of other neurologic and psychiatric disorders. Most likely, this finding reflects general bias between patients and healthy controls.

  14. Migraine in Thai children: prevalence in junior high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visudtibhan, Anannit; Siripornpanich, Vorasith; Khongkhatithum, Chaiyos; Chiemchanya, Surang; Sirijunpen, Suthatip; Ruangkanchanasetr, Suwanna; Visudhiphan, Pongsakdi

    2007-09-01

    A cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of migraine in seventh grade Thai students in 4 junior high schools in Bangkok, Thailand, according to the diagnostic criteria of the second edition of the Classification of Headache of the International Headache Society was conducted in July 2004. The study included a screening self-administered questionnaire and face-to-face interview with physical examination. The diagnosis of migraine was made and confirmed by 2 pediatric neurologists. All of 1789 students in participating schools completed the questionnaire. After 2 interviews, 248 students (13.8%) were diagnosed with migraine. The prevalence in girls was higher than that in boys (16.2% vs 11.7%). Migraine as having aura was diagnosed in 34 students (13.7%). One student had sporadic hemiplegic migraine. Among 248 children, 176 (71%) reported the duration of headache between 1 and 2 hours. The leading precipitating factor of migraine was the stress related to daily school activities (17.7%). There were 32 students (12.9%) with frequent and intense headache who were referred to their primary physicians for further management. This study had disclosed a high prevalence of migraine in seventh grade Thai students in Bangkok City and reflected the existing burden of this illness in Thai students.

  15. Thickening of the somatosensory cortex in migraine without aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jung Bin; Suh, Sang-il; Seo, Woo-Keun; Oh, Kyungmi; Koh, Seong-Beom

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to explore cortical thickness abnormalities in a homogeneous group of patients with migraine without aura and to delineate possible relationships between cortical thickness changes and clinical variables. Fifty-six female migraine patients without aura and T2-visible white matter hyperintensities and 34 female controls were scanned on a 3T magnetic resonance imager. Cortical thickness was estimated and compared between patients and controls using a whole-brain vertex-by-vertex analysis. Correlation analysis was conducted between cortical thickness of significant clusters and clinical variables. Compared to controls, migraine patients had cortical thickening in left rostral middle frontal gyrus and bilateral post-central gyri. Region-of-interest analysis revealed cortical thickening of bilateral post-central gyri in migraine patients relative to controls. The average thickness of bilateral post-central gyri positively correlated with disease duration as well as estimated lifetime headache frequency. We have provided evidence for interictal cortical abnormalities of thickened prefrontal cortex and somatosensory cortex in female migraine patients without aura. Our findings of greater thickening of the somatosensory cortex in relation to increasing disease duration and increasing headache frequency suggest that repeated migraine attacks over time may lead to structural changes of the somatosensory cortex through increased noxious afferent input within the trigemino-thalamo-cortical pathway in migraine. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  16. Odors as triggering and worsening factors for migraine in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M Lima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of odors in triggering or worsening migraine in men. METHOD: Ninety-eight male migraineurs from the general population were assessed individually through questionnaires. Environmental factors relating to their migraine were reported, with special focus on the role of odors. RESULTS: Odors were the second most frequent triggering factor for migraine attacks (48%, behind stressful situations (59%. Likewise, odors were the second most frequent worsening factor (73%, just behind excessive light (74%. Thirty-three individuals (33.4% stated that odors were both triggering and worsening factors for their migraine attacks. Perfume, cigarette smoke and cleaning products were the most frequent migraine-related odors reported by these male migraineurs. CONCLUSION: This was the first study to assess the role of odors in migraine exclusively in men. There was a high degree of odor-related migraine among these men, thus suggesting that patient education could alert such individuals to gender-related factors, since different triggering and worsening factors have been reported by males and females.

  17. Prospective memory is dysfunctional in migraine without aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Gabriella; Russo, Antonio; Tessitore, Alessandro; Garramone, Federica; Silvestro, Marcello; Della Mura, Maria Rosaria; Marcuccio, Laura; Fornaro, Ilaria; Trojano, Luigi; Tedeschi, Gioacchino

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Prospective memory is the ability to carry out a delayed intended action, so to maintain and retrieve future plans, goals and activities. Deficits of prospective memory negatively impact on patients and caregivers' everyday living and determine poor adherence to treatment. Since frontal regions are involved in both event- and time-based prospective memory tasks and are impaired in migraine without aura, defects of prospective memory might occur in migraine without aura patients; until now this issue has not been investigated. The aim of the current study was to explore time- versus event-based prospective memory in migraine without aura. Patients and methods Ninty-one consecutive migraine without aura patients and 84 healthy subjects were enrolled in the study. They underwent a standardized measure of prospective memory evaluating both time-based and event-based prospective memory, and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment assessing global cognitive status. Moreover, all participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II and a self-administered version of the Apathy Evaluation Scale, to assess severity of depressive symptoms and apathy, respectively. Results Migraine without aura and healthy subjects did not differ on demographic aspects (i.e. age, education and gender). However, individuals with migraine without aura demonstrated impaired prospective memory performance compared to healthy subjects, with a greater impairment demonstrated for the time-based tasks. Within the migraine without aura group, no significant association was found between prospective memory performance and clinical scores, apathy, and depression. Conclusions Individuals with migraine without aura experience particular difficulty executing a future intention; therefore, migraine without aura is associated with dysfunction of prospective memory.

  18. The Etiological Relationship Between Migraine and Sudden Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Yildiz; Arslan, İlker Burak; Aydin, Huriye; Yağiz, Özlem; Tokuçoğlu, Figen; Çukurova, İbrahim

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) and migraine, assess the prevalence of migraine in patients with idiopathic SSNHL, and determine a possible common vascular etiopathogenesis for migraine and SSNHL. Prospective cohort study. Tertiary referral center. This study initially assessed 178 SSNHL cases obtained from the Head and Neck Surgery Clinic patient database at a tertiary hospital in Turkey between January 2011 and March 2016. Ultimately, a total of 61 idiopathic SSNHL patients participated in the present study. İNTERVENTIONS:: Diagnostic. Cases with inflammation in the middle or inner ear; a retro cochlear tumor; autoimmune, infectious, functional, metabolic, neoplastic, traumatic, toxic, or vascular causes; Meniere's disease; otosclerosis; multiple sclerosis; and/or cerebrovascular diseases were excluded. Of the 61 idiopathic SSHNL patients, 34 were women (55.74%); and 24 (39.34%) had migraine, according to the criteria of the International Headache Society (IHS). The mean age of the migraine patients (Group 1) was 43.83 ± 13.16 years, and that of those without migraine (Group 2) was 51.05 ± 16.49 years. The groups did not significantly differ in terms of age, sex, or SSNHL recovery rates according to the Siegel criteria (p > 0.05). Ten of the migraine patients experienced visual aura, and the recovery rates of this group were higher. Additionally, the rate of total hearing loss was lower in Group 1 (n = 3, 12.5%) than in Group 2 (n = 10, 27%). SSNHL patients had a higher prevalence of migraine. Although those with migraine had higher recovery rates, the differences were not statistically significant.

  19. Prophylaxis of migraine headaches with riboflavin: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D F; Saluja, H S

    2017-08-01

    Migraine headache is a relatively common, debilitating condition that costs our healthcare system over 78 billion dollars per year. Riboflavin has been advocated as a safe, effective prophylactic therapy for the prevention of migraines. The purpose of this study was to provide a systematic review of the current role of riboflavin in the prophylaxis of migraine headache. A MEDLINE literature search inclusive of the dates 1966-2016 was performed using the search terms: riboflavin and migraine disorders. Excerpta Medica was searched from 1980 to 2016 using the search terms: riboflavin and migraine. Additionally, Web of Science was searched using the terms riboflavin and migraine inclusive of 1945-2016. Bibliographies of all relevant papers were reviewed for additional citations. We utilized the PRISMA guidelines to select English language, human, clinical trials of riboflavin as a single entity or in combination, review articles, and supporting pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenomic data assessing the efficacy and mechanism of riboflavin therapy in the prophylactic treatment of migraine headache. A total of 11 clinical trials reveal a mixed effect of riboflavin in the prophylaxis of migraine headache. Five clinical trials show a consistent positive therapeutic effect in adults; four clinical trials show a mixed effect in paediatric and adolescent patients, and two clinical trials of combination therapy have not shown benefit. Adverse reactions with riboflavin have generally been mild. Riboflavin is well tolerated, inexpensive and has demonstrated efficacy in the reduction of adult patient's migraine headache frequency. Additional data are needed, however, to resolve questions involving pharmacokinetic issues and pharmacogenomic implications of therapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Alcohol consumption and hangover patterns among migraine sufferers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Zlotnik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Alcohol hangover is a poorly understood cluster of symptoms occurring following a heavy consumption of alcohol. The term "delayed alcohol-induced headache" is often used synonymously. Our objective was to compare alcohol hangover symptoms in migraine sufferers and nonsufferers. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, university students were asked to fill structured questionnaires assessing headache history, alcoholic consumption, and hangover symptoms (using the Hangover Symptom Scale (HSS. Subjects were classified as suffering from migraine with or without aura and nonsufferers according the International Classification of Headache Disorders 2 nd Edition (ICHD-II. The 13 hangover symptoms were divided by the researches into migraine-like and other nonmigraine-like symptoms. Results: Hangover symptoms among 95 migraine sufferers and 597 nonsufferers were compared. Migraine sufferers consumed less alcohol compared with the nonsufferers (mean drinks/week 2.34 ± 4.11 vs. 2.92 ± 3.58, P = 0.038 and suffered from higher tendency to migraine-like symptoms after drinking (mean 2.91 ± 3.43 vs. 1.85 ± 2.35, P = 0.002 but not to other hangover symptoms (mean 5.39 ± 6.31 vs. 4.34 ± 4.56, P = 0.1. Conclusions: Migraine sufferers consume less alcohol, especially beer and liquors, and are more vulnerable to migraine-like hangover symptoms than nonsufferers. The finding that the tendency to develop migraine attacks affects the hangover symptomatology may suggest a similarity in pathophysiology, and possibly in treatment options.

  1. The relationship between migraine headache and asthma features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirican, Nigar; Demirci, Seden; Cakir, Munire

    2017-06-01

    Migraine and asthma are comorbid chronic disorders with episodic attacks thought to involve inflammatory and neurological mechanisms. The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationship of asthma features between the asthma patients with migraine and those without migraine headache. A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2015 to June 2016. Physician-diagnosed asthma patients aged 18 years and above were included. Demographic data, pulmonary function test and treatment of asthma were recorded. Asthma control was assessed using the asthma control test (ACT) and asthma control questionnaire (ACQ). The diagnosis of migraine was made by the neurologist with face-to face examinations based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition beta (ICHD-III-beta) criteria. Data about the age at onset, frequency of headache attacks, duration of headache attack, the presence of aura, and severity of headache were recorded. The severity of headache was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS). Overall 121 asthma patients were included in this study. Migraine was found to be present in 32 (26.4%) of patients. No statistically significant difference was found between asthma group and asthma with migraine groups in terms of pulmonary function test parameters. The mean ACT score in asthma with migraine patients group was significantly lower than the asthma groups. Morever, in the group asthma with migraine, a negative significant correlations were found between ACT scores with VAS scores. This study demonstrates that migraine headache may be associated with poor asthma control. On the other hand, it should not be forgotten that ACT is a subjective test and can be affected from by many clinical parameters.

  2. Headache Characteristics and Clinical Features of Elderly Migraine Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rijk, Pablo; Resseguier, Noémie; Donnet, Anne

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the headache characteristics and clinical features of elderly migraine patients at a tertiary headache center. We retrospectively reviewed 239 records of migraine patients, over the age of 64 at the first visit, who had migraine as defined by the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition (beta version) from 2006 to 2015 based on the Marseille registry at Timone Hospital. 13.8% (33/239) patients had migraine with aura only, 13.0% (31/239) had both diagnoses. Of the patients who presented with migraine with aura, 13.4% (32/239) presented with aura without headache. Unilateral pain location was reported by 58.6% (140/239) of patients and the throbbing type of pain was present in 50.2% (120/239) of our study group. Photo- and phonophobia were observed in 77.4% (185/239) and 79.5% (190/239) of patients. Seventy-nine out of 239 (30.1%) patients were found to have probable medication overuse. Within this group, 31.65% (25/79) overused triptan and 70.9% (56/79) overused combination analgesics. We found higher frequencies of migraine for patients whose age at onset of migraine was younger than 18 years, and low frequency migraine was reported more frequently in the later onset group (P = .0357). We assess the headache characteristics of elderly migraine patients who were seen at our tertiary headache center and report the high frequency of probable medication overuse headache in this study group. Finally, we suggest that age of onset is an important factor in the clinical profile of these patients. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  3. Cognitive, Personality, and Family Factors in Patients with Migraine Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Johari-Fard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a disorder that has debilitating pain, and affects all aspects of life, including the academic, social, and family life of patients. In addition, studies show the effects of migraine on patient's relationships with family members such as spouse, children, and other family members. In addition to physical pain, migraines are tied to significant psychological and economic costs. Migraineurs tend to have high levels of depression and anxiety, and migraine headaches have a profoundly negative impact on sufferers’ quality of life. In the present research, we investigated the correlations and regressions of cognitive, personality, and family factors with migraine headache, to find predictor factors of migraine. In this study, the following questionnaires were used: For migraine: six-item Headache Impact Test (HIT-6, and Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire Version 2.1.; for cognitive factors: Irrational Beliefs Test and Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale; for personality factors: NEO Personality Inventory; and for family factors: Family Assessment Device. This project was on 58 women with migraine headaches, diagnosed by neurologist. The findings show that, there is a significant regression between cognitive, personality, and family factors and HIT-6. In cognitive factors, frustration reactivity and anxious overconcern, in personality factors, extraversion trait, and in family factors, affective involvement are significant. Moreover, there is a significant regression between cognitive, personality, and family factors and MSQ. In cognitive factors, frustration reactivity, anxious overconcern, and helplessness, in personality factors, agreeableness and consciousness, and in family factors, affective involvement and general functioning are significant. This project showed that cognitive, personality, and family factors have a correlation with migraine headache.

  4. Vestibular migraine: clinical and epidemiological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Oliveira Gonçalves Morganti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Vestibular migraine (VM is one of the most often common diagnoses in neurotology, but only recently has been recognized as a disease. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical and epidemiological profile of patients with VM. METHODS: This was a retrospective, observational, and descriptive study, with analysis of patients' records from an outpatient VM clinic. RESULTS: 94.1% of patients were females and 5.9% were males. The mean age was 46.1 years; 65.6% of patients had had headache for a longer period than dizziness. A correlation was detected between VM symptoms and the menstrual period. 61.53% of patients had auditory symptoms, with tinnitus the most common, although tonal audiometry was normal in 68.51%. Vectoelectronystagmography was normal in 67.34%, 10.20% had hyporeflexia, and 22.44% had vestibular hyperreflexia. Electrophysiological assessment showed no abnormalities in most patients. Fasting plasma glucose and glycemic curve were normal in most patients, while the insulin curve was abnormal in 75%. 82% of individuals with MV showed abnormalities on the metabolism of carbohydrates. CONCLUSION: VM affects predominantly middle-aged women, with migraine headache representing the first symptom, several years before vertigo. Physical, auditory, and vestibular evaluations are usually normal. The most frequent vestibular abnormality was hyperreflexia. Most individuals showed abnormality related to carbohydrate metabolism.

  5. Pediatric hemiplegic migraine: susceptibility weighted and MR perfusion imaging abnormality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altinok, Deniz; Agarwal, Ajay; Ascadi, Gyula; Luat, Aimee; Tapos, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    We report on an 11-year-old girl suffering from a typical attack of hemiplegic migraine with characteristic abnormalities in perfusion MR and susceptibility-weighted MR imaging findings. The imaging abnormalities were resolved 48 h after the attack. Susceptibility-weighted MR imaging findings correlated well with the MR perfusion, thus it can be used along with conventional MRI for evaluation of children with complex migraine attacks. Susceptibility-weighted MR imaging might have a diagnostic role in assessing the vascular events in hemiplegic migraine. (orig.)

  6. Abnormal Changes of Synaptic Excitability in Migraine with Aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siniatchkin, Michael; Sendacki, Mascha; Moeller, Friederike

    2012-01-01

    Migraine patients are characterized by altered cortical excitability and information processing between attacks. The relationship between these abnormalities is still poorly understood. In this study, visual evoked potentials (VEP) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy were recorded simultan......Migraine patients are characterized by altered cortical excitability and information processing between attacks. The relationship between these abnormalities is still poorly understood. In this study, visual evoked potentials (VEP) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy were recorded...... in migraineurs. The results demonstrate a reduced responsiveness of the occipital cortex to interventions that change cortical excitability in migraine. Moreover, altered glutamatergic neurotransmission seems to mediate the relation between abnormal cortical information processing and excitability in migraineurs....

  7. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  8. Headache impact of chronic and episodic migraine: results from the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Dawn; Manack, Aubrey; Serrano, Daniel; Reed, Michael; Varon, Sepideh; Turkel, Catherine; Lipton, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6) has been demonstrated to be a reliable and valid measure that assesses the impact of headaches on the lives of persons with migraine. Originally used in studies of episodic migraine (EM), HIT-6 is finding increasing applications in chronic migraine (CM) research. (1) To examine the headache-impact on persons with migraine (EM and CM) using HIT-6 in a large population sample; (2) to identify predictors of headache-impact in this sample; (3) to assess the magnitude of effect for significant predictors of headache-impact in this sample. The American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention study is a longitudinal, population-based study that collected data from persons with severe headache from 2004 to 2009 through annual, mailed surveys. Respondents to the 2009 survey who met International Classification of Headache Disorders 2 criteria for migraine reported at least 1 headache in the preceding year, and completed the HIT-6 questionnaire were included in the present analysis. Persons with migraine were categorized as EM (average headache days per month) or CM (average ≥15 headache days per month). Predictors of headache-impact examined include: sociodemographics; headache days per month; a composite migraine symptom severity score (MSS); an average pain severity rating during the most recent long-duration headache; depression; and anxiety. HIT-6 scores were analyzed both as continuous sum scores and using the standard, validated categories: no impact; some impact; substantial impact; and severe impact. Group contrasts were based on descriptive statistics along with linear regression models. Multiple imputation techniques were used to manage missing data. There were 7169 eligible respondents (CM = 373, EM = 6554). HIT-6 scores were normally distributed. After converting sum HIT-6 scores to the standard categories, those with CM were significantly more likely to experience "severe" headache impact (72.9% vs 42.3%) and had higher odds of

  9. Comparative efficacy trial of cupping and serkangabin versus conventional therapy of migraine headaches: A randomized, open-label, comparative efficacy trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Dehghani Firoozabadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine headaches are the most common acute and recurrent headaches. Current treatment of a migraine headache consists of multiple medications for control and prevention of recurrent attacks. Global emergence of alternative medicine led us to examine the efficacy of cupping therapy plus serkangabin syrup in the treatment of migraine headaches. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized, controlled, open-label, comparative efficacy trial. We randomly assigned patients with migraine into cupping therapy plus serkangabin group (30 patients and conventional treatment group (30 patients. An investigator assessed the severity of headache, frequency of attacks in a week and duration of attacks per hour in 5 visits (at the end of 2 weeks, 1, 3 and 6 months. Generalized estimating equations approach was used to analyze repeated measures data to compare outcomes in both groups. Results: Average age for cupping therapy group and conventional treatment group were 31.7 (±7.6 and 32.6 (±12.7 years, respectively (P = 0.45. After treatment for 2 weeks; and 1, 3 and 6 months, severity of headache (P = 0.80, frequency of migraine attacks (P = 0.63 and duration of attacks per hours (P = 0.48 were similar in conventional and cupping groups but these symptoms were decreased in each group during the study (P < 0.001. Conclusion: There was no significant difference between cupping plus serkangabin therapy and conventional treatment in the treatment and prophylaxis of migraine. The alternative therapy may be used in cases of drug intolerance, no medication response, and in primary care.

  10. The value of the MDR1 reversal agent PSC-833 in addition to daunorubicin and cytarabine in the treatment of elderly patients with previously untreated acute myeloid leukemia (AML), in relation to MDR1 status at diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van der Holt (Bronno); B. Löwenberg (Bob); A.K. Burnett (Alan); W.U. Knauf; J. Shepherd (John); P.P. Piccaluga; G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert); G.E.G. Verhoef (Gregor); A. Ferrant (Augustin); M. Crump; D. Selleslag; M. Theobald (Matthias); M. Fey (Martin); E. Vellenga (Edo); M. Dugan; P. Sonneveld (Pieter)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractTo determine whether MDR1 reversal by the addition of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor PSC-833 to standard induction chemotherapy would improve event-free survival (EFS), 419 untreated patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) aged 60 years and older were randomized to receive 2

  11. Migraine and the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder among a cohort of pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lauren E; Aponte, Christina; Perez Hernandez, Rigoberto; Velez, Juan Carlos; Gelaye, Bizu; Sánchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A; Peterlin, B Lee

    2017-12-01

    Individually both migraine and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) prevalence estimates are higher among women. However, there is limited data on the association of migraine and PTSD in women during pregnancy. We examined the association between migraine and PTSD among women attending prenatal clinics in Peru. Migraine was characterized using the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD)-III beta criteria. PTSD was assessed using the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C). Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) after adjusting for confounders. Of the 2922 pregnant women included, 33.5% fulfilled criteria for any migraine (migraine 12.5%; probable migraine 21.0%) and 37.4% fulfilled PTSD criteria. Even when controlling for depression, women with any migraine had almost a 2-fold increased odds of PTSD (OR: 1.97; 95% CI: 1.64-2.37) as compared to women without migraine. Specifically, women with migraine alone (i.e. excluding probable migraine) had a 2.85-fold increased odds of PTSD (95% CI: 2.18-3.74), and women with probable migraine alone had a 1.61-fold increased odds of PTSD (95% CI: 1.30-1.99) as compared to those without migraine, even after controlling for depression. In those women with both migraine and comorbid depression, the odds of PTSD in all migraine categories were even further increased as compared to those women without migraine. In a cohort of pregnant women, irrespective of the presence or absence of depression, the odds of PTSD is increased in those with migraine. Our findings suggest the importance of screening for PTSD, specifically in pregnant women with migraine.

  12. Comparison of Audiological Findings in Patients with Vestibular Migraine and Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kırkım, Günay; Mutlu, Başak; Olgun, Yüksel; Tanriverdizade, Tural; Keskinoğlu, Pembe; Güneri, Enis Alpin; Akdal, Gülden

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the auditory findings in vestibular migraine (VM) and migraine patients without a history of vertigo. This study was conducted on 44 patients diagnosed with definite VM and 31 patients diagnosed with migraine who were followed and treated between January 2011 and February 2015. Also, 52 healthy subjects were included in this study as a control group. All participants underwent a detailed otorhinolaryngological examination followed by audiological evaluation, including pure tone audiometry, speech reception threshold, speech recognition score, and acoustic immitancemetry. In the VM group, there were 16 patients (36.4%) with tinnitus, while in the other groups we did not observe any patients with tinnitus. The rate of tinnitus in the VM group was significantly higher in comparison to other groups (p<0.05). None of the groups had any patients with permanent or fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss. We conclude that patients with VM should be closely and longitudinally followed up for the early detection of other otological symptoms and possible occurrence of sensorineural hearing loss in the long term.

  13. Aura-like features and photophobia in sightless migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Greice Cardoso de Carvalho; Góes, Cristiana Pessoa de Queiroz Faria; Vincent, Maurice Borges

    2014-12-01

    Migraine is a central nervous system disorder frequently expressed with paroxysmal visual dysfunctions. To test the hypothesis that normal visual input is vital for the migrainous aura and photophobia. We studied the migraine-related visual disturbances in 8 sightless migraineurs identified among 200 visually impaired subjects. The main findings were the visual aura and photophobia disappearance along with blindness development, the oddness of aura - too short, colourful (e.g. blue or fire-like), auditory in nature or different in shape (round forms) - and the lack of photophobia. We propose that the aura duration should be accepted as shorter in visually impaired subjects. The changes in aura phenotype observed in our patients may be the result of both cerebral plasticity induced by the visual impairment and/or the lack of visual input per se. Integrity of visual pathways plays a key role in migraine visual aura and photophobia.

  14. The blood-brain barrier in migraine treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, L; Tfelt-Hansen, P

    2008-01-01

    Salient aspects of the anatomy and function of the blood-barrier barrier (BBB) are reviewed in relation to migraine pathophysiology and treatment. The main function of the BBB is to limit the access of circulating substances to the neuropile. Smaller lipophilic substances have some access...... to the central nervous system by diffusion, whereas other substances can cross the BBB by carrier-mediated influx transport, receptor-mediated transcytosis and absorptive-mediated transcytosis. Studies of drugs relevant to migraine pathophysiology and treatment have been examined with the pressurized...... vascular beds also. We discuss how this can be related to genuine migraine attacks. Our view is that there exists no clear proof of breakdown or leakage of the BBB during migraine attacks, and that antimigraine drugs need to pass the BBB for efficacy....

  15. What is Migraine? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stress," she says. "As I have entered perimenopause/menopause, I feel like the migraines are more often triggered by hormonal shifts in addition to stress and weather changes." Duvick says diet is also a factor, as ...

  16. Migraine's House of Headaches…and Visiting the Neighbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... migraine with aura face a higher risk of ischemic stroke — a stroke that occurs because of a clot ... with aura can take control of their elevated stroke risk. For young women with aura on birth control, Dr. Diener ...

  17. Tips for Starting Yoga in Adults with Migraines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... migraine with aura face a higher risk of ischemic stroke — a stroke that occurs because of a clot ... with aura can take control of their elevated stroke risk. For young women with aura on birth control, Dr. Diener ...

  18. Unique Migraine Subtypes, Rare Headache Disorders, and Other Disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goadsby, Peter J

    2015-08-01

    The medical aphorism that common things happen commonly makes unique (and less common) migraine subtypes especially appropriate to review for the general neurologist. This article also identifies some rare headache disorders and other disturbances, and offers strategies to manage them. This article discusses migraine with brainstem aura, which is troublesome clinically and has had a change in terminology in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, Third Edition, beta version (ICHD-3 beta), and hemiplegic migraine, which is also troublesome in practice. The rare headache disorder hypnic headache and the exploding head syndrome are also discussed. When hypnic headache is recognized, it is eminently treatable, while exploding head syndrome is a benign condition with no reported consequences. Unique migraine subtypes, rare headache disorders, and other disturbances present to neurologists. When recognized, they can often be managed very well, which offers significant benefits to patients and practice satisfaction to neurologists.

  19. The blood-brain barrier in migraine treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, L.; Tfelt-Hansen, P.

    2008-01-01

    Salient aspects of the anatomy and function of the blood-barrier barrier (BBB) are reviewed in relation to migraine pathophysiology and treatment. The main function of the BBB is to limit the access of circulating substances to the neuropile. Smaller lipophilic substances have some access...... to the central nervous system by diffusion, whereas other substances can cross the BBB by carrier-mediated influx transport, receptor-mediated transcytosis and absorptive-mediated transcytosis. Studies of drugs relevant to migraine pathophysiology and treatment have been examined with the pressurized...... vascular beds also. We discuss how this can be related to genuine migraine attacks. Our view is that there exists no clear proof of breakdown or leakage of the BBB during migraine attacks, and that antimigraine drugs need to pass the BBB for efficacy Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12...

  20. Migraine strikes as neuronal excitability reaches a tipping point.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marten Scheffer

    Full Text Available Self-propagating waves of cerebral neuronal firing, known as spreading depolarisations, are believed to be at the roots of migraine attacks. We propose that the start of spreading depolarisations corresponds to a critical transition that occurs when dynamic brain networks approach a tipping point. We show that this hypothesis is consistent with current pathogenetic insights and observed dynamics. Our view implies that migraine strikes when modulating factors further raise the neuronal excitability in genetically predisposed subjects to a level where even minor perturbations can trigger spreading depolarisations. A corollary is that recently discovered generic early warning indicators for critical transitions may be used to predict the onset of migraine attacks even before patients are clinically aware. This opens up new avenues for dissecting the mechanisms for the onset of migraine attacks and for identifying novel prophylactic treatment targets for the prevention of attacks.