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Sample records for prevents glucose intolerance

  1. Vitamin E and Vitamin C supplementation does not prevent glucose intolerance in obese-prone rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity-induced glucose intolerance affects over 70 million Americans. Elevated oxidative stress is associated with development of glucose intolerance. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that supplementation with the anti-oxidants vitamin E (d-alpha-tocopherol acetate; 0.4 g/kg diet) and vitamin...

  2. The Root of Atractylodes macrocephala Koidzumi Prevents Obesity and Glucose Intolerance and Increases Energy Metabolism in Mice

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    Mi Young Song

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeting energy expenditure offers a strategy for treating obesity more effectively and safely. In previous studies, we found that the root of Atractylodes macrocephala Koidzumi (Atractylodis Rhizoma Alba, ARA increased energy metabolism in C2C12 cells. Here, we investigated the effects of ARA on obesity and glucose intolerance by examining energy metabolism in skeletal muscle and brown fat in high-fat diet (HFD induced obese mice. ARA decreased body weight gain, hepatic lipid levels and serum total cholesterol levels, but did not modify food intake. Fasting serum glucose, serum insulin levels and glucose intolerance were all improved in ARA treated mice. Furthermore, ARA increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1α expression, and the phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK in skeletal muscle tissues, and also prevented skeletal muscle atrophy. In addition, the numbers of brown adipocytes and the expressions of PGC1α and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1 were elevated in the brown adipose tissues of ARA treated mice. Our results show that ARA can prevent diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance in C5BL/6 mice and suggests that the mechanism responsible is related to the promotion of energy metabolism in skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissues.

  3. Indomethacin treatment prevents high fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance but not glucose intolerance in C57BL/6J Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjære, Even; Aune, Ulrike Liisberg; Røen, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    a high fat/high sucrose (HF/HS) diet or a regular diet supplemented or not with indomethacin (±INDO) for 7 weeks. Development of obesity, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance was monitored, and the effect of indomethacin on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was measured in vivo...... and in vitro using MIN6 β-cells. We found that supplementation with indomethacin prevented HF/HS-induced obesity and diet-induced changes in systemic insulin sensitivity. Thus, HF/HS+INDO-fed mice remained insulin-sensitive. However, mice fed HF/HS+INDO exhibited pronounced glucose intolerance. Hepatic glucose...

  4. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist treatment prevents glucocorticoid-induced glucose intolerance and islet-cell dysfunction in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Raalte, D.H.; van Genugten, R.E.; Linssen, M.M.L.; Ouwens, D.M.; Diamant, M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Glucocorticoids (GCs) are regarded as diabetogenic because they impair insulin sensitivity and islet-cell function. This study assessed whether treatment with the glucagon-like peptide receptor agonist (GLP-1 RA) exenatide (EXE) could prevent GC-induced glucose intolerance. RESEARCH

  5. Random plasma glucose in serendipitous screening for glucose intolerance: screening for impaired glucose tolerance study 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemer, David C; Kolm, Paul; Foster, Jovonne K; Weintraub, William S; Vaccarino, Viola; Rhee, Mary K; Varughese, Rincy M; Tsui, Circe W; Koch, David D; Twombly, Jennifer G; Narayan, K M Venkat; Phillips, Lawrence S

    2008-05-01

    With positive results from diabetes prevention studies, there is interest in convenient ways to incorporate screening for glucose intolerance into routine care and to limit the need for fasting diagnostic tests. The aim of this study is to determine whether random plasma glucose (RPG) could be used to screen for glucose intolerance. This is a cross-sectional study. The participants of this study include a voluntary sample of 990 adults not known to have diabetes. RPG was measured, and each subject had a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test several weeks later. Glucose intolerance targets included diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and impaired fasting glucose(110) (IFG(110); fasting glucose, 110-125 mg/dl, and 2 h glucose RPG to identify diabetes and 0.72 (0.68-0.75) to identify any glucose intolerance, both highly significant (p RPG values should be considered by health care providers to be an opportunistic initial screening test and used to prompt further evaluation of patients at risk of glucose intolerance. Such "serendipitous screening" could help to identify unrecognized diabetes and prediabetes.

  6. Remedies for glucose intolerance – are traditional herbal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background:Preventing or delaying the onset of diabetes in prediabetes has the potential to reduce the disease prevalence. Objective:The effectiveness of traditional herbal concoctions for diabetes in ameliorating glucose intolerance was investigated. Material and Methods:Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was carried ...

  7. Diet supplementation with green tea extract epigallocatechin gallate prevents progression to glucose intolerance in db/db mice

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    Ortsäter Henrik

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Green tea was suggested as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of diabetes more than 70 years ago, but the mechanisms behind its antidiabetic effect remains elusive. In this work, we address this issue by feeding a green tea extract (TEAVIGO™ with a high content of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG or the thiazolidinedione PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone, as positive control, to db/db mice, an animal model for diabetes. Methods Young (7 week-old db/db mice were randomized and assigned to receive diets supplemented with or without EGCG or rosiglitazone for 10 weeks. Fasting blood glucose, body weight and food intake was measured along the treatment. Glucose and insulin levels were determined during an oral glucose tolerance test after 10 weeks of treatment. Pancreata were sampled at the end of the study for blinded histomorphometric analysis. Islets were isolated and their mRNA expression analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Results The results show that, in db/db mice, EGCG improves glucose tolerance and increases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. EGCG supplementation reduces the number of pathologically changed islets of Langerhans, increases the number and the size of islets, and heightens pancreatic endocrine area. These effects occurred in parallel with a reduction in islet endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, possibly linked to the antioxidative capacity of EGCG. Conclusions This study shows that the green tea extract EGCG markedly preserves islet structure and enhances glucose tolerance in genetically diabetic mice. Dietary supplementation with EGCG could potentially contribute to nutritional strategies for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  8. Pathogenesis of glucose intolerance in uremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFronzo, R A

    1978-12-01

    The pathogenesis of glucose intolerance in uremia was examined with the glucose clamp technique. Hyperglycemic clamp (n = 8): The plasma glucose concentration is acutely raised and maintained at 125 mg/dl above basal levels. Under these steady state conditions the glucose infusion rate, M, equals the amount of glucose metabolized: Predialysis M averaged 4.23 +/- 0.36 mg/kg/min and increased to 7.71 +/- 0.43 postdialysis (p less than 0.001). The plasma insulin response predialysis was 90 +/- 20 microU/ml and decreased to 80 +/- 23 microU/ml following dialysis. Consequently the M/l ratio, a measure of tissue sensitivity to insulin, increased by 80% +/- 25% (p less than 0.001) but still remained less than controls (p less than 0.01). Euglycemic insulin clamp (n = 10): The plasma insulin concentration is acutely raised by 100 microU/ml and the plasma glucose concentration is held constant at the basal level. Predialysis both M (3.37 +/- 0.36 mg/kg/min) and M/l (3.56 +/- 0.33 mg/kg/min per microU/ml X 100) were significantly less than controls (p less than 0.01). Postdialysis both M and M/l increased significantly (p less than 0.01) to a mean that was not significantly different from controls. Basal hepatic glucose production (n = 6), 2.15 +/- 0.09 mg/kg/min, was similar to controls and fell (87% +/- 4%) normally during the insulin clamp. In five uremic subjects in wom insulin binding to monocytes was measured, there was no correlation with tissue sensitivity to insulin (M/l). Significant abnormalities in both growth hormone and glucagon physiology were present in uremic individuals, but no correlation with either the presence or degree of glucose intolerance was demonstrable. In conclusion, glucose intolerance is universally present in uremic subjects and results primarily from peripheral tissue insensitivity to insulin. Insulin secretion is usually enhanced in an attempt to compensate for this insulin resistance but in occasional subjects uremia also inhibits beta

  9. Continued glucose output after re-feeding contributes to glucose intolerance in hyperthyroidism.

    OpenAIRE

    Holness, M J; Sugden, M C

    1987-01-01

    The effects of hyperthyroidism to elicit glucose intolerance after glucose administration were decreased under conditions where hepatic glucose output was suppressed. It is concluded that continued hepatic glucose output contributes to abnormal glucose tolerance in hyperthyroidism.

  10. Glucose intolerance among apparently healthy Hausa-Fulani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Glucose intolerance has been recently reclassified by the World Health Organization (WHO) incorporating a new class known as impaired fasting glycaemia. Previous studies in this environment looked as diabetes mellitus only but not the other forms of glucose intolerance. Objectives: To study the prevalence ...

  11. Potential probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis 420 prevents weight gain and glucose intolerance in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenman, L K; Waget, A; Garret, C; Klopp, P; Burcelin, R; Lahtinen, S

    2014-12-01

    Alterations of the gut microbiota and mucosal barrier are linked with metabolic diseases. Our aim was to investigate the potential benefit of the potential probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis 420 in reducing high-fat diet-induced body weight gain and diabetes in mice. In the obesity model, C57Bl/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (60 energy %) for 12 weeks, and gavaged daily with B. lactis 420 (109 cfu) or vehicle. In the diabetes model, mice were fed a high-fat, ketogenic diet (72 energy % fat) for 4 weeks, with a 6-week subsequent treatment with B. lactis 420 (108-1010 cfu/day) or vehicle, after which they were analysed for body composition. We also analysed glucose tolerance, plasma lipopolysaccharide and target tissue inflammation using only one of the B. lactis 420 groups (109 cfu/day). Intestinal bacterial translocation and adhesion were analysed in a separate experiment using an Escherichia coli gavage. Body fat mass was increased in both obese (10.7 ± 0.8 g (mean ± standard error of mean) vs. 1.86 ± 0.21 g, Pdiabetic mice (3.01 ± 0.4 g vs. 1.14 ± 0.15 g, Pdiabetic mice (1.89 ± 0.16 g, P=0.02 for highest dose). This was reflected as reduced weight gain and improved glucose tolerance. Furthermore, B. lactis 420 decreased plasma lipopolysaccharide levels (Pdiabetic mice. Reduced intestinal mucosal adherence and plasma lipopolysaccharide suggest a mechanism related to reduced translocation of gut microbes.

  12. Fat distribution and glucose intolerance among Greenland inuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Stolk, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    circumference [WC], and percentage of body fat) and the indices of glucose metabolism (fasting and 2-h glucose levels, insulin resistance per homeostasis model assessment [HOMA-IR], and the insulin sensitivity index [ISI0,120]) among Greenland Inuit. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 3,108 adult Inuit...... associated with glucose intolerance, fasting and 2-h plasma glucose levels, HOMA-IR, and ISI0,120. VAT was more strongly associated with all outcomes than was SAT. After further adjustment for BMI or WC, VAT was associated with glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, whereas there was a trend toward...

  13. Perinatal significance of diagnosing glucose intolerance during pregnancy with portable glucose meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobi, Peter; Weissman, Amir; Egozi, Judith; Minuchin, Oscar; Geva, Adam

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the effect on perinatal outcome of replacing glucose measurements for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus in central laboratories with those obtained by portable glucose meter. Simultaneously, venous blood samples were taken at the 100-g glucose tolerance test, and finger capillary blood glucose levels were also measured with a portable glucose meter in 180 pregnant patients. Patient management was according to the venous plasma glucose results. Following deliveries, the women were reallocated to diagnostic groups by both methods of measurements and by using the same cutoff values, and the outcome data were compared. By using glucose values obtained by portable glucose meters instead of the results attained in the central laboratory, more women were diagnosed with gestational diabetes (33 vs 25) and the perinatal outcome was comparable. Obstetricians have to identify glucose intolerance during pregnancy in order to prevent macrosomia and its perinatal complications. These goals can be achieved with at least the same efficacy by performing the 100-g glucose tolerance test with a portable glucose meter as with current laboratory methods. Such an approach is time and resource saving and more convenient for both patients and health providers.

  14. Glucose effectiveness is a critical pathogenic factor leading to glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alford, F. P.; Henriksen, J. E.; Rantzau, C.

    2018-01-01

    by mass action of glucose through the skeletal muscle membrane via facilitated Glut 4 transporters. However, GE is frequently forgotten as a significant contributor to the development of glucose intolerance in "at risk" individuals. Only limited studies have examined the role of a lower GE...... in such normoglycemic subjects with preexisting mild insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction. These studies demonstrate that in "at risk" individuals, an initial low GE is a key contributor and predictor of future glucose intolerance, whereas an initial raised GE is protective against future glucose intolerance....... Conclusion: In "at risk" individuals, a low GE and genetically determined vulnerable β-cell function are more critical determinants of future glucose intolerance than their preexisting insulin-resistant state....

  15. The prevalence of glucose intolerance among antenatal clients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of and associated factors for glucose intolerance among antenatal clients at Kenyatta National Hospital at 24-36 weeks of gestation. Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital antenatal clinic. Subjects: One hundred and two (102) antenatal mothers ...

  16. Glucose intolerance in a xenotransplantation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Kirsten; Buschard, Karsten; Gram, Dorte X.

    2006-01-01

    Xenotransplantation holds the promise of replacing failing human organs with organs of animal origin. Transplantation of pancreatic islets from pigs to humans might restore glucose homeostasis and offer diabetic patients considerable improvement in their quality of life. The alpha-gal epitope......-galactosyl transferase knockout mice (alpha-GT KO) develop cataract, but no other lesions have been established in these mice. Here we report for the first time that alpha-GT KO mice have impaired glucose tolerance (p

  17. Perceived psychosocial stress and glucose intolerance among pregnant Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, M L; Whitcomb, B W; Pekow, P; Braun, B; Markenson, G; Dole, N; Manson, J E; Solomon, C G; Carbone, E T; Chasan-Taber, L

    2014-12-01

    Prior literature suggests a positive association between psychosocial stress and the risk of diabetes in non-pregnant populations, but studies during pregnancy are sparse. We evaluated the relationship between stress and glucose intolerance among 1115 Hispanic (predominantly Puerto Rican) prenatal care patients in Proyecto Buena Salud, a prospective cohort study in Western Massachusetts (2006-2011). Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-14) was administered in early (mean = 12.3 weeks gestation; range 4.1-18 weeks) and mid- (mean = 21.3 weeks gestation; range 18.1-26 weeks) pregnancy. Participants were classified as having a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, and abnormal glucose tolerance, based on the degree of abnormality on glucose tolerance testing between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, and abnormal glucose tolerance was 4.1%, 7.2%, and 14.5%, respectively. Absolute levels of early or mid-pregnancy stress were not significantly associated with glucose intolerance. However, participants with an increase in stress from early to mid-pregnancy had a 2.6-fold increased odds of gestational diabetes mellitus (95% confidence intervals: 1.0-6.9) as compared to those with no change or a decrease in stress after adjusting for age and pre-pregnancy body mass index. In addition, every one-point increase in stress scores was associated with a 5.5mg/dL increase in screening glucose level (β=5.5; standard deviation=2.8; P=0.05), after adjusting for the same variables. In this population of predominantly Puerto Rican women, stress patterns during pregnancy may influence the risk of glucose intolerance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Glucose intolerance in a xenotransplantation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Kirsten; Buschard, Karsten; Gram, Dorte X.

    2006-01-01

    Xenotransplantation holds the promise of replacing failing human organs with organs of animal origin. Transplantation of pancreatic islets from pigs to humans might restore glucose homeostasis and offer diabetic patients considerable improvement in their quality of life. The alpha-gal epitope, pr...

  19. Exenatide improves glucocorticoid-induced glucose intolerance in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiying Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ruiying Zhao1,2*, Enrique Fuentes-Mattei1,2*, Guermarie Velazquez-Torres1,3, Chun-Hui Su1,2, Jian Chen1, Mong-Hong Lee1,2, Sai-Ching Jim Yeung4,51Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 2Program in Genes and Development, 3Program in Cancer Biology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, Houston, TX, USA; 4Department of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders, 5Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA *Both authors contributed equally.Abstract: Exenatide is an incretin mimetic that is recently available in the US for the treatment of diabetes. There is a paucity of information on the effects of exenatide in glucocorticoid (GC-induced diabetes. Although the effect of continuous intravenous infusion of exenatide on GC-induced glucose intolerance has been investigated before in healthy human males receiving oral prednisolone, we investigated the efficacy of a single subcutaneous dose of exenatide (3 µg/kg in lowering blood glucose in GC-induced glucose intolerance in C57BL/6 mice. In a longitudinal experiment, the area under the curve (AUC of oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT significantly increased after dexamethasone (P = 0.004, which was subsequently decreased by exenatide (P < 0.001. A cross-sectional experiment showed that exenatide improved glucose tolerance compared with placebo in a mouse model of dexamethasone-induced glucose intolerance. AUC of OGTT in the exenatide group were significantly (P < 0.001 lower than in the placebo group. Insulin tolerance tests (ITT demonstrated that exenatide decreased the ability of the mice to tolerate insulin compared with placebo. The AUC of ITT in the exenatide group were also significantly (P = 0.006 lower than in the placebo group. In conclusion, a single dose of exenatide was able to decrease glucose intolerance and

  20. Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suez, Jotham; Korem, Tal; Zeevi, David; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Thaiss, Christoph A; Maza, Ori; Israeli, David; Zmora, Niv; Gilad, Shlomit; Weinberger, Adina; Kuperman, Yael; Harmelin, Alon; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Shapiro, Hagit; Halpern, Zamir; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2014-10-09

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are among the most widely used food additives worldwide, regularly consumed by lean and obese individuals alike. NAS consumption is considered safe and beneficial owing to their low caloric content, yet supporting scientific data remain sparse and controversial. Here we demonstrate that consumption of commonly used NAS formulations drives the development of glucose intolerance through induction of compositional and functional alterations to the intestinal microbiota. These NAS-mediated deleterious metabolic effects are abrogated by antibiotic treatment, and are fully transferrable to germ-free mice upon faecal transplantation of microbiota configurations from NAS-consuming mice, or of microbiota anaerobically incubated in the presence of NAS. We identify NAS-altered microbial metabolic pathways that are linked to host susceptibility to metabolic disease, and demonstrate similar NAS-induced dysbiosis and glucose intolerance in healthy human subjects. Collectively, our results link NAS consumption, dysbiosis and metabolic abnormalities, thereby calling for a reassessment of massive NAS usage.

  1. Muscle histidine-containing dipeptides are elevated by glucose intolerance in both rodents and men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Stegen

    Full Text Available Muscle carnosine and its methylated form anserine are histidine-containing dipeptides. Both dipeptides have the ability to quench reactive carbonyl species and previous studies have shown that endogenous tissue levels are decreased in chronic diseases, such as diabetes.Rodent study: Skeletal muscles of rats and mice were collected from 4 different diet-intervention studies, aiming to induce various degrees of glucose intolerance: 45% high-fat feeding (male rats, 60% high-fat feeding (male rats, cafeteria feeding (male rats, 70% high-fat feeding (female mice. Body weight, glucose-tolerance and muscle histidine-containing dipeptides were assessed. Human study: Muscle biopsies were taken from m. vastus lateralis in 35 males (9 lean, 8 obese, 9 prediabetic and 9 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients and muscle carnosine and gene expression of muscle fiber type markers were measured.Diet interventions in rodents (cafeteria and 70% high-fat feeding induced increases in body weight, glucose intolerance and levels of histidine-containing dipeptides in muscle. In humans, obese, prediabetic and diabetic men had increased muscle carnosine content compared to the lean (+21% (p>0.1, +30% (p<0.05 and +39% (p<0.05, respectively. The gene expression of fast-oxidative type 2A myosin heavy chain was increased in the prediabetic (1.8-fold, p<0.05 and tended to increase in the diabetic men (1.6-fold, p = 0.07, compared to healthy lean subjects.Muscle histidine-containing dipeptides increases with progressive glucose intolerance, in male individuals (cross-sectional. In addition, high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance was associated with increased muscle histidine-containing dipeptides in female mice (interventional. Increased muscle carnosine content might reflect fiber type composition and/or act as a compensatory mechanism aimed at preventing cell damage in states of impaired glucose tolerance.

  2. Frequency of diabetes, impaired fasting glucose, and glucose intolerance in high-risk groups identified by a FINDRISC survey in Puebla City, Mexico.

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    García-Alcalá, Hector; Genestier-Tamborero, Christelle Nathalie; Hirales-Tamez, Omara; Salinas-Palma, Jorge; Soto-Vega, Elena

    2012-01-01

    As a first step in the prevention of diabetes, the International Diabetes Federation recommends identification of persons at risk using the Finnish type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment (FINDRISC) survey. The frequency of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, and glucose intolerance in high-risk groups identified by FINDRISC is unknown in our country. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, and glucose intolerance in higher-risk groups using a FINDRISC survey in an urban population. We used a television program to invite interested adults to fill out a survey at a television station. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed in all persons with a FINDRISC score ≥ 15 points (high-risk and very high-risk groups). Patients were classified as normal (fasting glucose < 100 mg/dL and 2-hour glucose < 140 mg/dL), or having impaired fasting glucose (fasting glucose 100-125 mg/dL and 2-hour glucose < 140 mg/dL), glucose intolerance (fasting glucose < 126 mg/dL and 2-hour glucose 140-199 mg/dL), and diabetes mellitus (fasting glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL or 2-hour glucose ≥ 200 mg/dL). We describe the frequency of each diagnostic category in this selected population according to gender and age. A total of 186 patients had a score ≥ 15. The frequencies of diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, glucose intolerance, and normal glucose levels were 28.6%, 25.9%, 29.2%, and 16.2%, respectively. We found a higher frequency of diabetes mellitus and impaired fasting glucose in men than in women (33% versus 27% and 40% versus 21%, respectively) and more glucose intolerance in women than in men (34% versus 16%, P < 0.05). Patients with diabetes mellitus (52.55 ± 9.2 years) were older than those with impaired fasting glucose (46.19 ± 8.89 years), glucose intolerance (46.15 ± 10.9 years), and normal levels (41.9 ± 10.45 years, P < 0.05). We found a higher frequency of diabetes mellitus in those aged over 50 years

  3. Sox9-haploinsufficiency causes glucose intolerance in mice.

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    Claire L Dubois

    Full Text Available The HMG box transcription factor Sox9 plays a critical role in progenitor cell expansion during pancreas organogenesis and is required for proper endocrine cell development in the embryo. Based on in vitro studies it has been suggested that Sox9 controls expression of a network of important developmental regulators, including Tcf2/MODY5, Hnf6, and Foxa2, in pancreatic progenitor cells. Here, we sought to: 1 determine whether Sox9 regulates this transcriptional network in vivo and 2 investigate whether reduced Sox9 gene dosage leads to impaired glucose homeostasis in adult mice. Employing two genetic models of temporally-controlled Sox9 inactivation in pancreatic progenitor cells, we demonstrate that contrary to in vitro findings, Sox9 is not required for Tcf2, Hnf6, or Foxa2 expression in vivo. Moreover, our analysis revealed a novel role for Sox9 in maintaining the expression of Pdx1/MODY4, which is an important transcriptional regulator of beta-cell development. We further show that reduced beta-cell mass in Sox9-haploinsufficient mice leads to glucose intolerance during adulthood. Sox9-haploinsufficient mice displayed 50% reduced beta-cell mass at birth, which recovered partially via a compensatory increase in beta-cell proliferation early postnatally. Endocrine islets from mice with reduced Sox9 gene dosage exhibited normal glucose stimulated insulin secretion. Our findings show Sox9 plays an important role in endocrine development by maintaining Ngn3 and Pdx1 expression. Glucose intolerance in Sox9-haploinsufficient mice suggests that mutations in Sox9 could play a role in diabetes in humans.

  4. Glucan-rich polysaccharides from Pleurotus sajor-caju (Fr.) Singer prevents glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and inflammation in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet.

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    Kanagasabapathy, Gowri; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani; Abd Malek, Sri Nurestri; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Chua, Kek-Heng; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2012-12-21

    Pleurotus sajor-caju (P. sajor-caju) has been extremely useful in the prevention of diabetes mellitus due to its low fat and high soluble fiber content for thousands of years. Insulin resistance is a key component in the development of diabetes mellitus which is caused by inflammation. In this study, we aimed to investigate the in vivo efficacy of glucan-rich polysaccharide of P. sajor-caju (GE) against diabetes mellitus and inflammation in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet. Diabetes was induced in C57BL/6J mice by feeding a high-fat diet. The mice were randomly assigned to 7 groups (n=6 per group). The control groups in this study were ND (for normal diet) and HFD (for high-fat diet). The treated groups were ND240 (for normal diet) (240 mg/kg b.w) and HFD60, HFD120 and HFD240 (for high-fat), where the mice were administrated with three dosages of GE (60, 120, 240 mg GE/kg b.w respectively). Metformin (2 mg/kg b.w) served as positive control. The glucose tolerance test, glucose and insulin levels were measured at the end of 16 weeks. Expressions of genes for inflammatory markers, GLUT-4 and adiponectin in the adipose tissue of the mice were assessed. One-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range tests (DMRT) were used to determine the significant differences between groups. GE treated groups improved the glucose tolerance, attenuated hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia in the mice by up-regulating the adiponectin and GLUT-4 gene expressions. The mice in GE treated groups did not develop insulin resistance. GE also down-regulated the expression of inflammatory markers (IL-6, TNF-α, SAA2, CRP and MCP-1) via attenuation of nuclear transcription factors (NF-κB). Glucan-rich polysaccharide of P. sajor-caju can serve as a potential agent for prevention of glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and inflammation.

  5. Low-Molecular-Weight Peptides from Salmon Protein Prevent Obesity-Linked Glucose Intolerance, Inflammation, and Dyslipidemia in LDLR-/-/ApoB100/100 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrier, Geneviève; Mitchell, Patricia L; Rioux, Laurie-Eve; Hasan, Fida; Jin, Tianyi; Roblet, Cyril Roland; Doyen, Alain; Pilon, Geneviève; St-Pierre, Philippe; Lavigne, Charles; Bazinet, Laurent; Jacques, Hélène; Gill, Tom; McLeod, Roger S; Marette, André

    2015-07-01

    We previously reported that fish proteins can alleviate metabolic syndrome (MetS) in obese animals and human subjects. We tested whether a salmon peptide fraction (SPF) could improve MetS in mice and explored potential mechanisms of action. ApoB(100) only, LDL receptor knockout male mice (LDLR(-/-)/ApoB(100/100)) were fed a high-fat and -sucrose (HFS) diet (25 g/kg sucrose). Two groups were fed 10 g/kg casein hydrolysate (HFS), and 1 group was additionally fed 4.35 g/kg fish oil (FO; HFS+FO). Two other groups were fed 10 g SPF/kg (HFS+SPF), and 1 group was additionally fed 4.35 g FO/kg (HFS+SPF+FO). A fifth (reference) group was fed a standard feed pellet diet. We assessed the impact of dietary treatments on glucose tolerance, adipose tissue inflammation, lipid homeostasis, and hepatic insulin signaling. The effects of SPF on glucose uptake, hepatic glucose production, and inducible nitric oxide synthase activity were further studied in vitro with the use of L6 myocytes, FAO hepatocytes, and J774 macrophages. Mice fed HFS+SPF or HFS+SPF+FO diets had lower body weight (protein effect, P = 0.024), feed efficiency (protein effect, P = 0.018), and liver weight (protein effect, P = 0.003) as well as lower concentrations of adipose tissue cytokines and chemokines (protein effect, P ≤ 0.003) compared with HFS and HFS+FO groups. They also had greater glucose tolerance (protein effect, P < 0.001), lower activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1/S6 kinase 1/insulin receptor substrate 1 (mTORC1/S6K1/IRS1) pathway, and increased insulin signaling in liver compared with the HFS and HFS+FO groups. The HFS+FO, HFS+SPF, and HFS+SPF+FO groups had lower plasma triglycerides (protein effect, P = 0.003; lipid effect, P = 0.002) than did the HFS group. SPF increased glucose uptake and decreased HGP and iNOS activation in vitro. SPF reduces obesity-linked MetS features in LDLR(-/-)/ApoB(100/100) mice. The anti-inflammatory and glucoregulatory properties of SPF were

  6. Glucose intolerance in early postpartum in women with gestational diabetes: Who is at increased risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuridan, Liesbeth; Wens, Johan; Devlieger, Roland; Verhaeghe, Johan; Mathieu, Chantal; Benhalima, Katrien

    2015-08-01

    Women with a history of gestational diabetes (GDM) have an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes in the years after the index pregnancy. Some women with GDM already develop glucose intolerance in early postpartum. The best screening strategy for glucose intolerance in early postpartum among women with a history of GDM is still debated. We review the most important risk factors of women with GDM to develop glucose intolerance within one year postpartum. We also discuss the current recommendations for screening in early postpartum and the many challenges to organize postpartum follow up in primary care. Copyright © 2015 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Early and rapid development of insulin resistance, islet dysfunction and glucose intolerance after high-fat feeding in mice overexpressing phosphodiesterase 3B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walz, Helena A; Härndahl, Linda; Wierup, Nils

    2006-01-01

    Inadequate islet adaptation to insulin resistance leads to glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes. Here we investigate whether beta-cell cAMP is crucial for islet adaptation and prevention of glucose intolerance in mice. Mice with a beta-cell-specific, 2-fold overexpression of the c......AMP-degrading enzyme phosphodiesterase 3B (RIP-PDE3B/2 mice) were metabolically challenged with a high-fat diet. We found that RIP-PDE3B/2 mice early and rapidly develop glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, as compared with wild-type littermates, after 2 months of high-fat feeding. This was evident from....../2 mice. We conclude that accurate regulation of beta-cell cAMP is necessary for adequate islet adaptation to a perturbed metabolic environment and protective for the development of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance....

  8. Arsenate-induced maternal glucose intolerance and neural tube defects in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Denise S.; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Mitchell, Laura E.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies have linked environmental arsenic (As) exposure to increased type 2 diabetes risk. Periconceptional hyperglycemia is a significant risk factor for neural tube defects (NTDs), the second most common structural birth defect. A suspected teratogen, arsenic (As) induces NTDs in laboratory animals. Objectives: We investigated whether maternal glucose homeostasis disruption was responsible for arsenate-induced NTDs in a well-established dosing regimen used in studies of arsenic's teratogenicity in early neurodevelopment. Methods: We evaluated maternal intraperitoneal (IP) exposure to As 9.6 mg/kg (as sodium arsenate) in LM/Bc/Fnn mice for teratogenicity and disruption of maternal plasma glucose and insulin levels. Selected compounds (insulin pellet, sodium selenate (SS), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), L-methionine (L-Met), N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN)) were investigated for their potential to mitigate arsenate's effects. Results: Arsenate caused significant glucose elevation during an IP glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). Insulin levels were not different between arsenate and control dams before (arsenate, 0.55 ng/dl; control, 0.48 ng/dl) or after glucose challenge (arsenate, 1.09 ng/dl; control, 0.81 ng/dl). HOMA-IR index was higher for arsenate (3.9) vs control (2.5) dams (p = 0.0260). Arsenate caused NTDs (100%, p < 0.0001). Insulin pellet and NAC were the most successful rescue agents, reducing NTD rates to 45% and 35%. Conclusions: IPGTT, insulin assay, and HOMA-IR results suggest a modest failure of glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance characteristic of glucose intolerance. Insulin's success in preventing arsenate-induced NTDs provides evidence that these arsenate-induced NTDs are secondary to elevated maternal glucose. The NAC rescue, which did not restore maternal glucose or insulin levels, suggests oxidative disruption plays a role.

  9. Changes in hippocampal synaptic functions and protein expression in monosodium glutamate-treated obese mice during development of glucose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki-Hamada, Sachie; Hojo, Yuki; Koyama, Hajime; Otsuka, Hayuma; Oka, Jun-Ichiro

    2015-05-01

    Glucose is the sole neural fuel for the brain and is essential for cognitive function. Abnormalities in glucose tolerance may be associated with impairments in cognitive function. Experimental obese model mice can be generated by an intraperitoneal injection of monosodium glutamate (MSG; 2 mg/g) once a day for 5 days from 1 day after birth. MSG-treated mice have been shown to develop glucose intolerance and exhibit chronic neuroendocrine dysfunction associated with marked cognitive malfunctions at 28-29  weeks old. Although hippocampal synaptic plasticity is impaired in MSG-treated mice, changes in synaptic transmission remain unknown. Here, we investigated whether glucose intolerance influenced cognitive function, synaptic properties and protein expression in the hippocampus. We demonstrated that MSG-treated mice developed glucose intolerance due to an impairment in the effectiveness of insulin actions, and showed cognitive impairments in the Y-maze test. Moreover, long-term potentiation (LTP) at Schaffer collateral-CA1 pyramidal synapses in hippocampal slices was impaired, and the relationship between the slope of extracellular field excitatory postsynaptic potential and stimulus intensity of synaptic transmission was weaker in MSG-treated mice. The protein levels of vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and GluA1 glutamate receptor subunits decreased in the CA1 region of MSG-treated mice. These results suggest that deficits in glutamatergic presynapses as well as postsynapses lead to impaired synaptic plasticity in MSG-treated mice during the development of glucose intolerance, though it remains unknown whether impaired LTP is due to altered inhibitory transmission. It may be important to examine changes in glucose tolerance in order to prevent cognitive malfunctions associated with diabetes. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Blueberries’ Impact on Insulin Resistance and Glucose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April J. Stull

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Blueberries are a rich source of polyphenols, which include anthocyanin bioactive compounds. Epidemiological evidence indicates that incorporating blueberries into the diet may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM. These findings are supported by pre-clinical and clinical studies that have shown improvements in insulin resistance (i.e., increased insulin sensitivity after obese and insulin-resistant rodents or humans consumed blueberries. Insulin resistance was assessed by homeostatic model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, insulin tolerance tests, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps. Additionally, the improvements in glucose tolerance after blueberry consumption were assessed by glucose tolerance tests. However, firm conclusions regarding the anti-diabetic effect of blueberries cannot be drawn due to the small number of existing clinical studies. Although the current evidence is promising, more long-term, randomized, and placebo-controlled trials are needed to establish the role of blueberries in preventing or delaying T2DM.

  11. Glucose effectiveness is a critical pathogenic factor leading to glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes: An ignored hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, F P; Henriksen, J E; Rantzau, C; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2018-02-16

    Although the ability of glucose to mediate its own in vivo metabolism is long documented, the quantitative measurement of whole body glucose-mediated glucose disposal at basal insulin levels (glucose effectiveness [GE]), followed the introduction of the Minimal Model intravenous glucose tolerance test technique. A literature review, combined with our own studies, of the role of GE in glucose metabolism in normal and "at risk" individuals, was undertaken to determine GE's contribution to glucose homeostasis. GE accounts for ~45% to 65% of glucose disposal in man. A negative association between GE and insulin meditated glucose disposal (Si), is present in normal subjects without a family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus but is absent in normoglycaemic "at risk" relatives with a positive family history of diabetes mellitus. Intracellular GE disposal is mediated by mass action of glucose through the skeletal muscle membrane via facilitated Glut 4 transporters. However, GE is frequently forgotten as a significant contributor to the development of glucose intolerance in "at risk" individuals. Only limited studies have examined the role of a lower GE in such normoglycemic subjects with preexisting mild insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction. These studies demonstrate that in "at risk" individuals, an initial low GE is a key contributor and predictor of future glucose intolerance, whereas an initial raised GE is protective against future glucose intolerance. In "at risk" individuals, a low GE and genetically determined vulnerable β-cell function are more critical determinants of future glucose intolerance than their preexisting insulin-resistant state. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Association of Androgen Excess with Glucose Intolerance in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingjie; Wang, Jing; Shen, Shanmei; Liu, Jiayi; Sun, Jie; Ye, Xiao

    2018-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) show high prevalence of glucose intolerance. This study aimed to investigate the association of androgen excess with glucose intolerance in PCOS. A total of 378 women with PCOS participated in the study. Free androgen index (FAI) was selected as indicator of hyperandrogenism. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by 1/homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (1/HOMA-IR) and Matsuda insulin sensitivity index (ISIM); β-cell function was assessed by disposition index (DI). We found that women with glucose intolerance had higher FAI levels compared to women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) (prediabetes 6.2, T2DM 7.9 versus NGT 5.0, resp.; p intolerance (OR = 2.480, 95% CI 1.387–4.434), even after adjusting for age, BMI, waist circumference, hypertension, fasting insulin, testosterone, SHBG, and family history of diabetes. In addition, with FAI increase, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), plasma glucose concentrations, and serum insulin levels increased, while insulin sensitivity and β-cell function decreased. Our results suggested that androgen excess indicated by high FAI levels might serve as indicator of glucose intolerance, as it might promote insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction in women with PCOS.

  13. Association between whole blood mercury and glucose intolerance among adult Inuit in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Charlotte; Valera, Beatriz; Nielsen, Nina O

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Arctic diet is partly constituted by traditional food characterized by top predator animals such as whales, walrus, and seals with high mercury content. Mercury exposure has been associated with glucose intolerance in Western populations. We studied the association between whole...... blood mercury and glucose intolerance in a highly exposed non-Western population METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 2640 Inuit (18+ years) with information on ancestry, smoking, waist circumference, total energy intake, and physical activity. Mercury, fasting- and 2-h plasma glucose, insulin, and c...

  14. The effect of altered gut flora on glucose intolerance in C57BL/6NTac mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune, Ida; Hansen, Axel Jacob Kornerup; Ellekilde, Merete

    Background Recent studies have shown that long term broad spectrum antibiotic treatment improves glucose tolerance in mice. We hypothesize that it is primarily the early life altering of the gut microbiota, which will have an impact on glucose intolerance. Study setup 40 C57BL/6NTac mice were...

  15. Factors predicting early postpartum glucose intolerance in Japanese women with gestational diabetes mellitus: decision-curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, M; Nagao, Y; Mahbub, M H; Tanabe, Tsuyoshi; Tanizawa, Y

    2018-04-29

    To identify factors predicting early postpartum glucose intolerance in Japanese women with gestational diabetes mellitus, using decision-curve analysis. A retrospective cohort study was performed. The participants were 123 Japanese women with gestational diabetes who underwent 75-g oral glucose tolerance tests at 8-12 weeks after delivery. They were divided into a glucose intolerance and a normal glucose tolerance group based on postpartum oral glucose tolerance test results. Analysis of the pregnancy oral glucose tolerance test results showed predictive factors for postpartum glucose intolerance. We also evaluated the clinical usefulness of the prediction model based on decision-curve analysis. Of 123 women, 78 (63.4%) had normoglycaemia and 45 (36.6%) had glucose intolerance. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed insulinogenic index/fasting immunoreactive insulin and summation of glucose levels, assessed during pregnancy oral glucose tolerance tests (total glucose), to be independent risk factors for postpartum glucose intolerance. Evaluating the regression models, the best discrimination (area under the curve 0.725) was obtained using the basic model (i.e. age, family history of diabetes, BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 and use of insulin during pregnancy) plus insulinogenic index/fasting immunoreactive insulin intolerance. Insulinogenic index/fasting immunoreactive insulin calculated using oral glucose tolerance test results during pregnancy is potentially useful for predicting early postpartum glucose intolerance in Japanese women with gestational diabetes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Predicting glucose intolerance with normal fasting plasma glucose by the components of the metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, D.; Lin, J.; Kuo, S.; Wu, D.; Li, J.; Hsieh, C.; Wu, C.; Hung, Y.; Kuo, K.

    2007-01-01

    Surprisingly it is estimated that about half of type 2 diabetics remain undetected. The possible causes may be partly attributable to people with normal fasting plasma glucose (FPG) but abnormal postprandial hyperglycemia. We attempted to develop an effective predictive model by using the metabolic syndrome (MeS) components as parameters to identify such persons. All participants received a standard 75 gm oral glucose tolerance test which showed that 106 had normal glucose tolerance, 61 had impaired glucose tolerance and 6 had diabetes on isolated postchallenge hyperglycemia. We tested five models which included various MeS components. Model 0: FPG; Model 1 (Clinical history model): family history (FH), FPG, age and sex; Model 2 (MeS model): Model 1 plus triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, body mass index, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure; Model 3: Model 2 plus fasting plasma insulin (FPI); Model 4: Model 3 plus homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the predictive discrimination of these models. The area under the ROC curve of the Model 0 was significantly larger than the area under the diagonal reference line. All the other 4 models had a larger area under the ROC curve than Model 0. Considering the simplicity and lower cost of Model 2, it would be the best model to use. Nevertheless, Model 3 had the largest area under the ROC curve. We demonstrated that Model 2 and 3 have a significantly better predictive discrimination to identify persons with normal FPG at high risk for glucose intolerance. (author)

  17. Prevalence of glucose intolerance and associated risk factors in rural and urban populations of different ethnic groups in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, D.; Friis, H.; Mwaniki, D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of glucose intolerance in rural and urban Kenyan populations and in different ethnic groups. Further, to identify associations between lifestyle risk factors and glucose intolerance. Research design and methods: A cross-sectional study included an opportunity...... intolerance among the rural ethnic groups. High BMI, WC, AFA, abdominal visceral and subcutaneous fat thickness, low fitness and physical activity, frequent alcohol consumption, and urban residence were associated with glucose intolerance. Conclusions: The prevalence of diabetes and IGT among different Kenyan...

  18. Impact of glucose intolerance on coronary calcified lesions evaluated using multislice computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Kyoko; Ohwaki, Kazuhiro; Yano, Eiji; Yamanouchi, Toshikazu; Kim, Gwang U.

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has the unique concept that the common occurrence of individual disease components increases the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, some studies suggest that the burden of different CAD risk factors is not equal, and focusing on the whole set of risk factors might neglect the impact of individual factors that could be useful targets for prophylactic therapies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of glucose intolerance on CAD using multislice computed tomography (MSCT). Ninety-eight consecutive patients with at least one traditional CAD risk factor who visited a municipal hospital were enrolled in this study. The risk factors were impaired glucose tolerance (fasting glucose≥110 mg/dl or patients with diabetes), low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, 25 kg/m 2 for men and >23 kg/m 2 for women). CAD was determined by the presence of either stenoses, non-calcified plaques or calcified lesions. The following risk factors were significantly related in univariate logistic models: glucose intolerance and coronary calcified lesions (p=0.001), and hypertriglycemia and non-calcified plaque lesions (p=0.048). Multivariate models showed that glucose intolerance was significantly associated with calcified lesions, even after adjustment for gender, age, low HDL-C, hypertriglycemia, hypertension, and obesity (p=0.018). Our results suggest that glucose intolerance might be closely related to the presence of coronary calcified lesions among traditional CAD risk factors. (author)

  19. Dietary patterns in Greenland and their relationship with type 2 diabetes mellitus and glucose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Charlotte; Bjerregaard, Peter; Jørgensen, Marit E

    2014-02-01

    Traditional Inuit dietary patterns have been found to be beneficial for CVD but have not been investigated in relation to glucose intolerance. We examined the association between dietary patterns and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG). Cross-sectional design with a priori derived dietary patterns from an FFQ resulted in five patterns: imported meat (n 196), traditional food (n 601), balanced diet (n 126), unhealthy diet (n 652) and standard diet (n 799). Associations between dietary patterns and glucose-related outcomes were tested by linear and logistic regression analyses. Data included: dietary intake by FFQ, waist circumference, ethnicity, frequency of alcohol intake and smoking, physical activity, and oral glucose tolerance test results. Fasting participants and those without diagnosed T2DM were classified into normal glucose tolerance, IGT, IFG or T2DM. HOMA-IR (homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance index) and HOMA-β (homeostatic model assessment of β-cell function) were calculated. Data included 2374 Inuit, aged 18+ years. Participants with a traditional dietary pattern had higher fasting plasma glucose (mean 5·73 (95% CI 5·68, 5·78) mmol/l, P food was positively associated with T2DM, IFG and fasting plasma glucose, and negatively associated with β-cell function, compared with a standard diet. The imported meat diet seemed the best in relation to glucose intolerance, with lowest fasting plasma glucose and lowest odds for IFG and T2DM.

  20. Delayed ß-cell response and glucose intolerance in young women with Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerrild, Britta Eilersen; Holst, Jens Juul; Juhl, Claus

    2011-01-01

    similar. In addition we found low IGF-I, higher levels of cortisol and norepinephrine and an increased waist-hip ratio in TS. CONCLUSIONS: Young normal weight TS women show significant glucose intolerance in spite of normal insulin secretion during hyperglycaemic clamping and normal insulin sensitivity...

  1. The prevalence of glucose inTolerance among anTenaTal clienTs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-09-09

    Sep 9, 2011 ... Exclusion criteria: Clients who had pre-gestational diabetes mellitus, those already diagnosed with glucose intolerance in the current pregnancy or in previous pregnancy, clients who did not consent and clients on medications for chronic treatment. Sampling frame: This consisted of antenatal mothers.

  2. Midodrine prevents orthostatic intolerance associated with simulated spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsdell, C. D.; Mullen, T. J.; Sundby, G. H.; Rostoft, S.; Sheynberg, N.; Aljuri, N.; Maa, M.; Mukkamala, R.; Sherman, D.; Toska, K.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Many astronauts after being weightless in space become hypotensive and presyncopal when they assume an upright position. This phenomenon, known as orthostatic intolerance, may interfere with astronaut function during reentry and after spaceflight and may limit the ability of an astronaut to exit a landed spacecraft unaided during an emergency. Orthostatic intolerance is more pronounced after long-term spaceflight and is a major concern with respect to the extended flights expected aboard the International Space Station and for interplanetary exploration class missions, such as a human mission to Mars. Fully effective countermeasures to this problem have not yet been developed. To test the hypothesis that alpha-adrenergic stimulation might provide an effective countermeasure, we conducted a 16-day head-down-tilt bed-rest study (an analog of weightlessness) using normal human volunteers and administered the alpha(1)-agonist drug midodrine at the end of the bed-rest period. Midodrine was found to significantly ameliorate excessive decreases in blood pressure and presyncope during a provocative tilt test. We conclude that midodrine may be an effective countermeasure for the prevention of orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight.

  3. Acute, but not Chronic, Exposure to Arsenic Provokes Glucose Intolerance in Rats: Possible Roles for Oxidative Stress and the Adrenergic Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mohsen; Khodayar, Mohammd Javad; Seydi, Enayatollah; Soheila, Alboghobeish; Parsi, Isa Kazemzadeh

    2017-06-01

    Health problems due to heavy metals have become a worldwide concern. Along with its carcinogenicity, arsenic exposure results in impairment of glucose metabolism and insulin secretion as well as altered gene expression and signal transduction. However, the exact mechanism behind the behaviour of arsenic on glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion has not yet been fully understood. Fasting blood sugar and glucose tolerance tests were evaluated. In this study, we demonstrated that arsenic, when acutely administered, induced glucose intolerance in rats, although its chronic oral exposure did not provoke any glucose intolerance or hyperglycemia in rats. The protective activity of N-acetylcysteine, carvedilol and propranolol in male rats exposed to arsenic were also assessed, and N-acetylcysteine, particularly at 40 and 80 mg/kg, prevented the glucose intolerance induced in rats by arsenic. The present study showed that acute, but not chronic, contact with arsenic generates significant changes in the normal glucose tolerance pattern that may be due fundamentally to overproduction of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress and is preventable by using N-acetylcysteine, a thiol-containing antioxidant. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of altered gut flora on glucose intolerance in C57BL/6NTac mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune, Ida; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Hansen, Axel Jacob Kornerup

    Background Recent studies have shown that long term broad spectrum antibiotic treatment improves glucose tolerance in mice. We hypothesize that it is primarily the early life altering of the gut microbiota, which will have an impact on glucose intolerance. Study setup 40 C57BL/6NTac mice were...... no clustering was evident. Discussion Our results substantiate the theory implying an effect of gut microbiota on glucose tolerance. Furthermore, it seems evident that a window of opportunity for altering the host-microbial interaction response exists only in early life when host immunity is still developing...

  5. Dietary patterns in Greenland and their relationship with type 2 diabetes mellitus and glucose intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Charlotte; Bjerregaard, Peter; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    2013-01-01

    glucose (IFG). DESIGN: Cross-sectional design with a priori derived dietary patterns from an FFQ resulted in five patterns: imported meat (n 196), traditional food (n 601), balanced diet (n 126), unhealthy diet (n 652) and standard diet (n 799). SETTING: Associations between dietary patterns and glucose...... fasting plasma glucose (mean 5·73 (95 % CI 5·68, 5·78) mmol/l, P diet gave significantly higher odds for IFG and T2DM than the balanced diet, imported meat diet, standard diet and unhealthy diet. CONCLUSIONS: Traditional...... food was positively associated with T2DM, IFG and fasting plasma glucose, and negatively associated with β-cell function, compared with a standard diet. The imported meat diet seemed the best in relation to glucose intolerance, with lowest fasting plasma glucose and lowest odds for IFG and T2DM....

  6. Glucose intolerance associated with hypoxia in people living at high altitudes in the Tibetan highland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumiya, Kiyohito; Sakamoto, Ryota; Ishimoto, Yasuko; Kimura, Yumi; Fukutomi, Eriko; Ishikawa, Motonao; Suwa, Kuniaki; Imai, Hissei; Chen, Wenling; Kato, Emiko; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Kasahara, Yoriko; Fujisawa, Michiko; Wada, Taizo; Wang, Hongxin; Dai, Qingxiang; Xu, Huining; Qiao, Haisheng; Ge, Ri-Li; Norboo, Tsering; Tsering, Norboo; Kosaka, Yasuyuki; Nose, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Takayoshi; Tsukihara, Toshihiro; Ando, Kazuo; Inamura, Tetsuya; Takeda, Shinya; Ishine, Masayuki; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Matsubayashi, Kozo

    2016-02-23

    To clarify the association between glucose intolerance and high altitudes (2900-4800 m) in a hypoxic environment in Tibetan highlanders and to verify the hypothesis that high altitude dwelling increases vulnerability to diabetes mellitus (DM) accelerated by lifestyle change or ageing. Cross-sectional epidemiological study on Tibetan highlanders. We enrolled 1258 participants aged 40-87 years. The rural population comprised farmers in Domkhar (altitude 2900-3800 m) and nomads in Haiyan (3000-3100 m), Ryuho (4400 m) and Changthang (4300-4800 m). Urban area participants were from Leh (3300 m) and Jiegu (3700 m). Participants were classified into six glucose tolerance-based groups: DM, intermediate hyperglycaemia (IHG), normoglycaemia (NG), fasting DM, fasting IHG and fasting NG. Prevalence of glucose intolerance was compared in farmers, nomads and urban dwellers. Effects of dwelling at high altitude or hypoxia on glucose intolerance were analysed with the confounding factors of age, sex, obesity, lipids, haemoglobin, hypertension and lifestyle, using multiple logistic regression. The prevalence of DM (fasting DM)/IHG (fasting IHG) was 8.9% (6.5%)/25.1% (12.7%), respectively, in all participants. This prevalence was higher in urban dwellers (9.5% (7.1%)/28.5% (11.7%)) and in farmers (8.5% (6.1%)/28.5% (18.3%)) compared with nomads (8.2% (5.7%)/15.7% (9.7%)) (p=0.0140/0.0001). Dwelling at high altitude was significantly associated with fasting IHG+fasting DM/fasting DM (ORs for >4500 and 3500-4499 m were 3.59/4.36 and 2.07/1.76 vs intolerance. Socioeconomic factors, hypoxaemia and the effects of altitudes >3500 m play a major role in the high prevalence of glucose intolerance in highlanders. Tibetan highlanders may be vulnerable to glucose intolerance, with polycythaemia as a sign of poor hypoxic adaptation, accelerated by lifestyle change and ageing. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

  7. Long-term oral exposure to bisphenol A induces glucose intolerance and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Min Kyong; Jeong, In-Kyong; Jung Oh, Tae; Ahn, Hwa Young; Kim, Hwan Hee; Park, Young Joo; Jang, Hak Chul; Park, Kyong Soo

    2015-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used endocrine disruptor. Recent epidemiologic results have suggested an association between exposure to BPA and cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. We investigated the in vivo effects of long-term oral exposure to BPA on insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. In the present study, 4- to 6-week-old male mice on a high-fat diet (HFD) were treated with 50 μg/kg body weight per day of BPA orally for 12 weeks. Long-term oral exposure to BPA along with an HFD for 12 weeks induced glucose intolerance in growing male mice. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests showed that the mice that received an HFD and BPA exhibited a significantly larger area under the curve than did those that received an HFD only (119.9±16.8 vs. 97.9±18.2 mM/min, P=0.027). Body weight, percentage of white adipose tissue, and percentage of body fat did not differ between the two groups of mice. However, treatment with BPA reduced Akt phosphorylation at position Thr308 and GSK3β phosphorylation at position Ser9 in skeletal muscle. BPA tended to decrease serum adiponectin levels and to increase serum interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α, although these findings were not statistically significant. Treatment with BPA did not induce any detrimental changes in the islet area or morphology or the insulin content of β cells. In conclusion, long-term oral exposure to BPA induced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in growing mice. Decreased Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle by way of altered serum adipocytokine levels might be one mechanism by which BPA induces glucose intolerance. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  8. Intestinal Ralstonia pickettii augments glucose intolerance in obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanthadevi D Udayappan

    Full Text Available An altered intestinal microbiota composition has been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease including obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Low grade inflammation, potentially initiated by the intestinal microbiota, has been suggested to be a driving force in the development of insulin resistance in obesity. Here, we report that bacterial DNA is present in mesenteric adipose tissue of obese but otherwise healthy human subjects. Pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that DNA from the Gram-negative species Ralstonia was most prevalent. Interestingly, fecal abundance of Ralstonia pickettii was increased in obese subjects with pre-diabetes and T2DM. To assess if R. pickettii was causally involved in development of obesity and T2DM, we performed a proof-of-concept study in diet-induced obese (DIO mice. Compared to vehicle-treated control mice, R. pickettii-treated DIO mice had reduced glucose tolerance. In addition, circulating levels of endotoxin were increased in R. pickettii-treated mice. In conclusion, this study suggests that intestinal Ralstonia is increased in obese human subjects with T2DM and reciprocally worsens glucose tolerance in DIO mice.

  9. Gut microbial degradation of organophosphate insecticides-induces glucose intolerance via gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmurugan, Ganesan; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Swaminathan, Krishnan; Mithieux, Gilles; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash; Dhivakar, Mani; Parthasarathy, Ayothi; Babu, D D Venkatesh; Thumburaj, Leishman John; Freddy, Allen J; Dinakaran, Vasudevan; Puhari, Shanavas Syed Mohamed; Rekha, Balakrishnan; Christy, Yacob Jenifer; Anusha, Sivakumar; Divya, Ganesan; Suganya, Kannan; Meganathan, Boominathan; Kalyanaraman, Narayanan; Vasudevan, Varadaraj; Kamaraj, Raju; Karthik, Maruthan; Jeyakumar, Balakrishnan; Abhishek, Albert; Paul, Eldho; Pushpanathan, Muthuirulan; Rajmohan, Rajamani Koushick; Velayutham, Kumaravel; Lyon, Alexander R; Ramasamy, Subbiah

    2017-01-24

    Organophosphates are the most frequently and largely applied insecticide in the world due to their biodegradable nature. Gut microbes were shown to degrade organophosphates and cause intestinal dysfunction. The diabetogenic nature of organophosphates was recently reported but the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. We aimed to understand the role of gut microbiota in organophosphate-induced hyperglycemia and to unravel the molecular mechanism behind this process. Here we demonstrate a high prevalence of diabetes among people directly exposed to organophosphates in rural India (n = 3080). Correlation and linear regression analysis reveal a strong association between plasma organophosphate residues and HbA1c but no association with acetylcholine esterase was noticed. Chronic treatment of mice with organophosphate for 180 days confirms the induction of glucose intolerance with no significant change in acetylcholine esterase. Further fecal transplantation and culture transplantation experiments confirm the involvement of gut microbiota in organophosphate-induced glucose intolerance. Intestinal metatranscriptomic and host metabolomic analyses reveal that gut microbial organophosphate degradation produces short chain fatty acids like acetic acid, which induces gluconeogenesis and thereby accounts for glucose intolerance. Plasma organophosphate residues are positively correlated with fecal esterase activity and acetate level of human diabetes. Collectively, our results implicate gluconeogenesis as the key mechanism behind organophosphate-induced hyperglycemia, mediated by the organophosphate-degrading potential of gut microbiota. This study reveals the gut microbiome-mediated diabetogenic nature of organophosphates and hence that the usage of these insecticides should be reconsidered.

  10. Plasma kinetics of an LDL-like nanoemulsion and lipid transfer to HDL in subjects with glucose intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina P Bertato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Glucose intolerance is frequently associated with an altered plasma lipid profile and increased cardiovascular disease risk. Nonetheless, lipid metabolism is scarcely studied in normolipidemic glucose-intolerant patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether important lipid metabolic parameters, such as the kinetics of LDL free and esterified cholesterol and the transfer of lipids to HDL, are altered in glucose-intolerant patients with normal plasma lipids. METHODS: Fourteen glucose-intolerant patients and 15 control patients were studied; none of the patients had cardiovascular disease manifestations, and they were paired for age, sex, race and co-morbidities. A nanoemulsion resembling a LDL lipid composition (LDE labeled with 14C-cholesteryl ester and ³H-free cholesterol was intravenously injected, and blood samples were collected over a 24-h period to determine the fractional clearance rate of the labels by compartmental analysis. The transfer of free and esterified cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids from the LDE to HDL was measured by the incubation of the LDE with plasma and radioactivity counting of the supernatant after chemical precipitation of non-HDL fractions. RESULTS: The levels of LDL, non-HDL and HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, apo A1 and apo B were equal in both groups. The 14C-esterified cholesterol fractional clearance rate was not different between glucose-intolerant and control patients, but the ³H-free-cholesterol fractional clearance rate was greater in glucose-intolerant patients than in control patients. The lipid transfer to HDL was equal in both groups. CONCLUSION: In these glucose-intolerant patients with normal plasma lipids, a faster removal of LDE free cholesterol was the only lipid metabolic alteration detected in our study. This finding suggests that the dissociation of free cholesterol from lipoprotein particles occurs in normolipidemic glucose intolerance and may participate in

  11. CORRELATION BETWEEN GUT MICROBIOTA AND DEVELOPMENT OF GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE IN B6.V-Lepob/J LEPTIN DEFICIENT MICE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellekilde, Merete; Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

    -Lepob/J leptin deficient mouse, a model of severe obesity and type 2 diabetes, was correlated with development of glucose intolerance. GM composition was analyzed by means of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), a culture independent approach, separating PCR-derived DNA amplicons of bacterial 16S r......RNA. Disease development was monitored by weekly weight and blood glucose measurements supplemented with measurements of oral glucose tolerance, HbA1c%, plasma insulin and plasma cytokines. A significant correlation was demonstrated between GM composition and glucose intolerance. Also, a significant...... correlation was found between blood glucose, HbA1c% and glucose intolerance and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12, supporting the correlation found between gut and disease, as IL-12 is secreted after microbial stimulation of immunological cells – e.g. In the gut. Further investigations concerning...

  12. Continuous Blood Glucose Monitoring May Detect Carotid Occlusion Intolerance during Carotid Artery Stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Ryo; Furuse, Motomasa; Yagi, Ryokichi; Ohmura, Tomohisa; Ohnishi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Naokado; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Kawabata, Shinji; Miyachi, Shigeru; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2018-02-05

    The frequency of the occurrence of adverse events associated with carotid artery stenting (CAS) is usually low, but serious adverse events such as cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) may occur. Real-time monitoring is ideal for the early detection of adverse events during the surgical procedure. This study aimed to evaluate continuous blood glucose (BG) monitoring for the detection of adverse events during CAS. Forty patients undergoing scheduled CAS were prospectively enrolled. An artificial pancreas was used for continuous BG monitoring (once per minute), using venous blood extracted at a rate of 2 mL/hr during CAS. The primary endpoint was a correlation between BG change and adverse events. CAS was discontinued in 1 patient, and BG was not measured in 5 patients (12.5%) because of the inability to extract blood. Among 34 evaluable patients, no patient developed CHS, but 3 patients (9%) experienced carotid occlusion intolerance. During CAS, BG was significantly higher in patients with carotid occlusion intolerance (median: 5 mg/dL) than in patients without carotid occlusion intolerance (median: 0 mg/dL) (P = 0.0221). A cutoff BG value ≥4 mg/dL during CAS showed 50% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the detection of carotid occlusion intolerance. There was no significant correlation between BG change and other adverse events. BG elevation may help detect carotid occlusion intolerance although it is still unknown whether BG monitoring can detect CHS. Further studies should validate that a cutoff BG elevation value of ≥4 mg/dL during CAS indicates carotid occlusion intolerance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Glucose Intolerance after a Recent History of Gestational Diabetes Based on the 2013 WHO Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhalima, Katrien; Jegers, Katleen; Devlieger, Roland; Verhaeghe, Johan; Mathieu, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty exists on the prevalence of glucose intolerance in women with a recent diagnosis of gestational diabetes (GDM) based on a two-step screening strategy and the 2013 World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Our aim was to evaluate the uptake of postpartum screening, the prevalence and the risk factors for glucose intolerance in women with a recent history of GDM. Retrospective analysis of the medical records of women with a recent history of GDM diagnosed in a universal two-step screening strategy with the 2013 WHO criteria. All women with a history of GDM are advised to undergo a 75g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) around 12 weeks postpartum. Indices of insulin sensitivity (the Matsuda index and the reciprocal of the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, 1/HOMA-IR) and an index of beta-cell function, the Insulin Secretion-Sensitivity Index-2 (ISSI-2) were calculated based on the OGTT postpartum. Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust for confounders such as age, BMI, ethnicity and breastfeeding. Of the 191 women with GDM, 29.3% (56) did not attend the scheduled postpartum OGTT. These women had a higher BMI (28.6 ±6.8 vs. 26.2 ± 5.6, p = 0.015), were more often from an ethnic minority (EM) background (41.1% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.029) and smoked more often during pregnancy (14.3% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.001) than women who attended the OGTT postpartum. Of all women (135) who received an OGTT postpartum, 42.2% (57) had prediabetes (11.9% impaired fasting glucose, 24.4% impaired glucose tolerance and 5.9% both impaired fasting and impaired glucose tolerance) and 1.5% (2) had overt diabetes. Compared to women with a normal OGTT postpartum, women with glucose intolerance were older (32.5±4.3 vs. 30.8±4.8 years, p = 0.049), were more often obese (34.5% vs. 17.3%, p = 0.023), were more often from an EM background (33.9% vs. 18.4%, p = 0.040), less often breastfed (69.5% vs. 84.2%, p = 0.041) and had more often an abnormal fasting glycaemia

  14. Glucose Intolerance after a Recent History of Gestational Diabetes Based on the 2013 WHO Criteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrien Benhalima

    Full Text Available Uncertainty exists on the prevalence of glucose intolerance in women with a recent diagnosis of gestational diabetes (GDM based on a two-step screening strategy and the 2013 World Health Organization (WHO criteria. Our aim was to evaluate the uptake of postpartum screening, the prevalence and the risk factors for glucose intolerance in women with a recent history of GDM.Retrospective analysis of the medical records of women with a recent history of GDM diagnosed in a universal two-step screening strategy with the 2013 WHO criteria. All women with a history of GDM are advised to undergo a 75g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT around 12 weeks postpartum. Indices of insulin sensitivity (the Matsuda index and the reciprocal of the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, 1/HOMA-IR and an index of beta-cell function, the Insulin Secretion-Sensitivity Index-2 (ISSI-2 were calculated based on the OGTT postpartum. Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust for confounders such as age, BMI, ethnicity and breastfeeding.Of the 191 women with GDM, 29.3% (56 did not attend the scheduled postpartum OGTT. These women had a higher BMI (28.6 ±6.8 vs. 26.2 ± 5.6, p = 0.015, were more often from an ethnic minority (EM background (41.1% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.029 and smoked more often during pregnancy (14.3% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.001 than women who attended the OGTT postpartum. Of all women (135 who received an OGTT postpartum, 42.2% (57 had prediabetes (11.9% impaired fasting glucose, 24.4% impaired glucose tolerance and 5.9% both impaired fasting and impaired glucose tolerance and 1.5% (2 had overt diabetes. Compared to women with a normal OGTT postpartum, women with glucose intolerance were older (32.5±4.3 vs. 30.8±4.8 years, p = 0.049, were more often obese (34.5% vs. 17.3%, p = 0.023, were more often from an EM background (33.9% vs. 18.4%, p = 0.040, less often breastfed (69.5% vs. 84.2%, p = 0.041 and had more often an abnormal fasting glycaemia

  15. Association between whole blood mercury and glucose intolerance among adult Inuit in Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Charlotte; Valera, Beatriz; Nielsen, Nina O; Bjerregaard, Peter; Jørgensen, Marit E

    2015-11-01

    The Arctic diet is partly constituted by traditional food characterized by top predator animals such as whales, walrus, and seals with high mercury content. Mercury exposure has been associated with glucose intolerance in Western populations. We studied the association between whole blood mercury and glucose intolerance in a highly exposed non-Western population Cross-sectional study of 2640 Inuit (18+ years) with information on ancestry, smoking, waist circumference, total energy intake, and physical activity. Mercury, fasting- and 2-h plasma glucose, insulin, and c-peptide were measured in blood. Fasting participants without diabetes were classified into normal glucose tolerance, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glycemia, or type 2 diabetes. We calculated hepatic insulin resistance with homoeostatic model assessment - insulin resistance index, peripheral insulin sensitivity by ISI0,120., and relative beta cell function by c-peptide/insulin ratio. We conducted adjusted linear- and logistic regression analyses. For an increase in whole blood mercury of 5 µg/L we found a positive association with fasting glucose [% change=0.25 (95% CI: 0.20; 0.30); p<0.001], and 2-h glucose [% change=0.23 (95% CI: 0.05; 0.40); p=0.01]. Mercury was weakly associated with impaired fasting glycemia [OR=1.03 (95% CI: 1.02; 1.05)], and type 2 diabetes [OR=1.02 (95% CI: 1.01; 1.04)]. While the study found a weak but statistically significant association between whole blood mercury and both impaired fasting glycemia and type 2 diabetes, no associations were found with measures of underlying disturbances in glucose homoeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in cirrhosis are normalized after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, M; Leonetti, F; Riggio, O; Valeriano, V; Ribaudo, M C; Strati, F; Tisone, G; Casciani, C U; Capocaccia, L; Sprati, F

    1999-09-01

    Cirrhosis is often associated with insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. We evaluated if these alterations are restored by liver transplantation (LT). Glucose tolerance (oral glucose tolerance test [OGTT]), peripheral insulin sensitivity (euglycemic insulin clamp technique), glucose oxidation (indirect calorimetry), nonoxidative glucose disposal, and insulin secretion (hyperglycemic clamp technique) were measured in 6 patients (Group 1) before and 6 months after LT, in 12 patients (Group 2) who underwent LT 6 to 30 months previously, and in 6 healthy individuals (controls). In Group 1, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity (3.24 +/- 0.37 mg/kg/min) were normalized after LT (8.6 +/- 0.77 mg/kg/min; P <.0001; P = not significant vs. controls). The improved insulin-mediated glucose uptake was the result of a normalization of nonoxidative glucose disposal. Fasting insulin and C-peptide decreased from 24.6 +/- 3.3 microU/mL and 4.37 +/- 0.46 ng/dL, respectively, to 12.7 +/- 1.9 microU/mL and 2.46 +/- 0.5 ng/dL (controls: 10.0 +/- 3 microU/mL and 1.45 +/- 0.34 ng/dL). The glucose-induced increase of insulin concentration, which was higher before LT, showed a significant reduction, although the first phase of beta-cell secretion remained significantly higher compared with that of controls. All these findings were also confirmed in Group 2. The present data indicate that LT normalizes glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in cirrhotic patients through an improvement of both hepatic glucose clearance and the peripheral glucose disposal. The latter effect may be the result of the correction of chronic hyperinsulinemia. An increased first-phase beta-cell insulin secretion in response to high glucose levels persists, suggesting that a memory of previous insulin resistance is maintained.

  17. A model of type 2 diabetes in the guinea pig using sequential diet-induced glucose intolerance and streptozotocin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan K. Podell

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among noncommunicable diseases, and additional animal models that more closely replicate the pathogenesis of human type 2 diabetes are needed. The goal of this study was to develop a model of type 2 diabetes in guinea pigs, in which diet-induced glucose intolerance precedes β-cell cytotoxicity, two processes that are crucial to the development of human type 2 diabetes. Guinea pigs developed impaired glucose tolerance after 8 weeks of feeding on a high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, as determined by oral glucose challenge. Diet-induced glucose intolerance was accompanied by β-cell hyperplasia, compensatory hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia with hepatocellular steatosis. Streptozotocin (STZ treatment alone was ineffective at inducing diabetic hyperglycemia in guinea pigs, which failed to develop sustained glucose intolerance or fasting hyperglycemia and returned to euglycemia within 21 days after treatment. However, when high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet-fed guinea pigs were treated with STZ, glucose intolerance and fasting hyperglycemia persisted beyond 21 days post-STZ treatment. Guinea pigs with diet-induced glucose intolerance subsequently treated with STZ demonstrated an insulin-secretory capacity consistent with insulin-independent diabetes. This insulin-independent state was confirmed by response to oral antihyperglycemic drugs, metformin and glipizide, which resolved glucose intolerance and extended survival compared with guinea pigs with uncontrolled diabetes. In this study, we have developed a model of sequential glucose intolerance and β-cell loss, through high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet and extensive optimization of STZ treatment in the guinea pig, which closely resembles human type 2 diabetes. This model will prove useful in the study of insulin-independent diabetes pathogenesis with or without comorbidities, where the guinea pig serves as a relevant model species.

  18. Fructose Malabsorption and Intolerance: Effects of Fructose with and without Simultaneous Glucose Ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latulippe, Marie E.; Skoog, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    Concern exists that increasing fructose consumption, particularly in the form of high-fructose corn syrup, is resulting in increasing rates of fructose intolerance and aggravation of clinical symptoms in individuals with irritable bowel syndrome. Most clinical trials designed to test this hypothesis have used pure fructose, a form not commonly found in the food supply, often in quantities and concentrations that exceed typical fructose intake levels. In addition, the amount of fructose provided in tests for malabsorption, which is thought to be a key cause of intolerance, often exceeds the normal physiological absorption capacity for this sugar. To help health professionals accurately identify and treat this condition, this article reviews clinical data related to understanding fructose malabsorption and intolerance (i.e., malabsorption that manifests with symptoms) relative to usual fructose and other carbohydrate intake. Because simultaneous consumption of glucose attenuates fructose malabsorption, information on the fructose and glucose content of foods, beverages, and ingredients representing a variety of food categories is provided. PMID:21793722

  19. Fructose malabsorption and intolerance: effects of fructose with and without simultaneous glucose ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latulippe, Marie E; Skoog, Suzanne M

    2011-08-01

    Concern exists that increasing fructose consumption, particularly in the form of high-fructose corn syrup, is resulting in increasing rates of fructose intolerance and aggravation of clinical symptoms in individuals with irritable bowel syndrome. Most clinical trials designed to test this hypothesis have used pure fructose, a form not commonly found in the food supply, often in quantities and concentrations that exceed typical fructose intake levels. In addition, the amount of fructose provided in tests for malabsorption, which is thought to be a key cause of intolerance, often exceeds the normal physiological absorption capacity for this sugar. To help health professionals accurately identify and treat this condition, this article reviews clinical data related to understanding fructose malabsorption and intolerance (i.e., malabsorption that manifests with symptoms) relative to usual fructose and other carbohydrate intake. Because simultaneous consumption of glucose attenuates fructose malabsorption, information on the fructose and glucose content of foods, beverages, and ingredients representing a variety of food categories is provided.

  20. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, V. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C. [Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Cascio, W.E. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Phillips, P.M. [Toxicity Assessment Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Andrews, D. [Research Cores Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Miller, D. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Doerfler, D.L. [Research Cores Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kodavanti, U.P., E-mail: kodavanti.urmila@epa.gov [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased α{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone

  1. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, V.; Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C.; Cascio, W.E.; Phillips, P.M.; Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C.; Andrews, D.; Miller, D.; Doerfler, D.L.; Kodavanti, U.P.

    2013-01-01

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased α 2 -macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone metabolic

  2. Resolution of glucose intolerance in long-term high-fat, high-sucrose-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Greg M; Kraakman, Michael J; Mason, Shaun A; Murphy, Andrew J; Bruce, Clinton R

    2017-06-01

    The high-fat, high-sucrose diet (HFSD)-fed C57Bl/6 mouse is a widely used model of prediabetes. However, studies typically implement a relatively short dietary intervention lasting between 4 and 16 weeks; as a result, little is known about how a long-term HFSD influences the metabolic profile of these mice. Therefore, the aim of this investigation was to examine the effects of consuming a HFSD for 42 weeks on the development of hyperinsulinaemia and glucose intolerance in male C57Bl/6 mice. Two cohorts of HFSD mice were studied at independent institutes and they underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with measures of plasma insulin and free fatty acids (FFA). Age-matched chow-fed control mice were also studied. The HFSD-fed mice were hyperinsulinaemic and grossly obese, being over 25 g heavier than chow-fed mice, which was due to a marked expansion of subcutaneous adipose tissue. This was associated with a 3-fold increase in liver lipid content. Glucose tolerance, however, was either the same or better than control mice due to the preservation of glucose disposal as revealed by a dynamic stable isotope-labelled OGTT. In addition, plasma FFAs were suppressed to lower levels in HFSD mice during the OGTT. In conclusion, we have made the paradoxical observation that long-term HFSD feeding results in the resolution of glucose intolerance in the C57Bl/6 mouse. Mechanistically, we propose that the gross expansion of subcutaneous adipose tissue increases the glucose disposal capacity of the HFSD-fed mouse, which overcomes the prevailing insulin resistance to improve glucose tolerance. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. First Trimester Maternal Glycated Hemoglobin and Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Do Not Predict Third Trimester Glucose Intolerance of Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Erica K; Boggess, Kim A; Mathew, Leny; Culhane, Jennifer

    2017-04-01

    Early pregnancy prediction of third trimester glucose intolerance may identify a population of women whose trajectory toward gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is modifiable. We assessed whether first trimester glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), markers of insulin resistance, predicted third trimester glucose intolerance. Nondiabetic women with singleton pregnancies enrolled in a prospective observational study, 11 0/7 to 14 6/7 weeks. At enrollment, maternal characteristics, medical history, and blood samples were collected for HbA1c and SHBG. Two-step GDM screening was performed, 22 0/7 to 33 6/7 weeks. A 50 g oral glucose tolerance test ≥130 mg/dL defined screen positive, or glucose intolerance. Carpenter-Coustan criteria diagnosed GDM. Means HbA1c and SHBG were compared between glucose-intolerant versus normoglycemic women, and GDM versus no GDM women. We report unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (OR; 95% confidence interval [CI]) of regression analyses. Adjusted models include race, enrollment body mass index, and history of GDM. Among 250 women, 29% were glucose intolerant and 6% had GDM. Among glucose-intolerant women, HbA1c was higher (5.3 ± 0.3 vs. 5.1 ± 0.3, P = .01) and associated with glucose intolerance in unadjusted, but not adjusted, models (OR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.2-7.1; adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.0, 95% CI: 0.7-5.4). Among GDM women, HbA1c was higher (5.4 ± 0.4 vs 5.2 ± 0.3, P = .002) and SHBG was lower (228 ± 72 vs 288 ± 93 mmol/L, P = .02). The HbA1c predicted GDM in unadjusted (OR: 13.2, 95% CI: 2.6-68.0) but not adjusted (aOR: 6.7, 95% CI: 0.8-55.2) models. Although metabolic alterations may well precede third trimester glucose intolerance, neither HbA1c of SHBG remained an independent predictor of glucose intolerance or GDM in adjusted models.

  4. High fat diet-induced glucose intolerance impairs myocardial function, but not myocardial perfusion during hyperaemia: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Brom Charissa E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucose intolerance is a major health problem and is associated with increased risk of progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. However, whether glucose intolerance is related to impaired myocardial perfusion is not known. The purpose of the present study was to study the effect of diet-induced glucose intolerance on myocardial function and perfusion during baseline and pharmacological induced hyperaemia. Methods Male Wistar rats were randomly exposed to a high fat diet (HFD or control diet (CD (n = 8 per group. After 4 weeks, rats underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. Subsequently, rats underwent (contrast echocardiography to determine myocardial function and perfusion during baseline and dipyridamole-induced hyperaemia (20 mg/kg for 10 min. Results Four weeks of HFD feeding resulted in glucose intolerance compared to CD-feeding. Contractile function as represented by fractional shortening was not altered in HFD-fed rats compared to CD-fed rats under baseline conditions. However, dipyridamole increased fractional shortening in CD-fed rats, but not in HFD-fed rats. Basal myocardial perfusion, as measured by estimate of perfusion, was similar in CD- and HFD-fed rats, whereas dipyridamole increased estimate of perfusion in CD-fed rats, but not in HFD-fed rats. However, flow reserve was not different between CD- and HFD-fed rats. Conclusions Diet-induced glucose intolerance is associated with impaired myocardial function during conditions of hyperaemia, but myocardial perfusion is maintained. These findings may result in new insights into the effect of glucose intolerance on myocardial function and perfusion during hyperaemia.

  5. Microflora Disturbance during Progression of Glucose Intolerance and Effect of Sitagliptin: An Animal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinfeng Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Emerging evidences have shown a close interplay between obesity, diabetes, and intestinal flora disturbance. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, exemplified by sitagliptin, is highly efficacious in treating type 2 diabetes (T2DM, yet little is known if sitagliptin exerts beneficial effects on microbiota associated with obesity and T2DM. We evaluated changes of gut microbiota following the induction of obesity and T2DM in a streptozotocin treated high fat/high carbohydrate fed (HF/HC-STZ rat model and explored the effect of sitagliptin on gut microbiota for HF/HC-STZ rats. Methods. Sitagliptin was administered via oral gavage to diabetic rats. Fecal DNA extraction and 454 pyrosequencing based on analysis of 16S rRNA genes was utilized to determine the overall structure of microbiota in fecal DNA samples. Results. Results showed that, at the level of phylum, there was higher abundance of Firmicutes and Tenericutes and less abundance of Bacteroidetes in obese rats compared to their lean counterparts. At the level of genus, short-chain fatty acid- (SCFA- producing bacteria, Blautia, Roseburia, and Clostridium, and probiotics Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and so forth were identified significantly different from each other among conditions. Conclusion. Marked shifts of the gut microbiota structure were observed in the rats during development of glucose intolerance. Intestinal flora changed in the process of glucose intolerance, and treatment of sitagliptin moderately corrected the dysbiosis of microbiota in T2DM.

  6. High protein and cholesterol intakes associated with emergence of glucose intolerance in a low-risk Canadian Inuit population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefidbakht, Saghar; Johnson-Down, Louise; Young, T Kue; Egeland, Grace M

    2016-07-01

    The rate of type 2 diabetes mellitus among Inuit is 12·2 % in individuals over 50 years of age, similar to the Canadian prevalence. Given marked dietary transitions in the Arctic, we evaluated the dietary and other correlates of not previously diagnosed glucose intolerance, defined as type 2 diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance. Cross-sectional analyses were limited to adults with a completed 2 h oral glucose tolerance test and without pre-existing diabetes. Anthropometric assessments, health and medication usage questionnaires and a 24 h dietary recall were administered. Canadian International Polar Year Inuit Health Survey (2007-2008). Inuit adults (n 777). Glucose intolerance was associated with older age and adiposity. Percentage of energy from protein above the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range of 35 %, compared with intake within the range, was associated with increased odds of glucose intolerance (OR=1·98; 95 % CI 1·09, 3·61) in multivariable analyses. Further, cholesterol intake in the highest three quartiles combined (median exposures of 207, 416 and 778 mg/d, respectively) compared with the lowest quartile (median intake of 81 mg/d) was associated with glucose intolerance (OR=2·15; 95 % CI 1·23, 3·78) in multivariable analyses. Past-day traditional food consumption was borderline protective of glucose intolerance (P=0·054) and high fibre intake was not significantly protective (P=0·08). The results contribute to the existing literature on high protein and cholesterol intakes as they may relate to diabetes risk.

  7. Alantolactone Improves Prolonged Exposure of Interleukin-6-Induced Skeletal Muscle Inflammation Associated Glucose Intolerance and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjee Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The pro-inflammatory cytokine, Interleukin-6 (IL-6, has been proposed to be one of the mediators that link chronic inflammation to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Many studies have demonstrated the effects of IL-6 on insulin action in the skeletal muscle. However, few studies have investigated the effect of long-term treatment of IL-6, leading to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. In the present study, we observed protective effects of alantolactone, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Inula helenium against glucose intolerance and insulin resistance induced by prolonged exposure of IL-6. Alantolactone has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects through IL-6-induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 signaling pathway. The relationship between IL-6 exposure and expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, involved in inflammation in the skeletal muscle, and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. We observed maximum dysregulation of glucose uptake after 40 ng/ml IL-6 induction for 24 h in L6 myotubes. Prolonged IL-6 exposure suppressed glucose uptake regulating alpha serine/threonine-protein kinase (AKT phosphorylation; however, pretreatment with alantolactone activated AKT phosphorylation and improved glucose uptake. Alantolactone also attenuated IL-6-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation, followed by an increase in expression of negative regulator suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3. Furthermore, IL-6-induced expression of pathogen recognition receptor, TLR4, was also suppressed by alantolactone pretreatment. Post-silencing of STAT3 using siRNA approach, IL-6-stimulated siRNA-STAT3 improved glucose uptake and suppressed TLR4 gene expression. Taken together, we propose that, as a STAT3 inhibitor, alantolactone, improves glucose regulation in the skeletal muscle by inhibiting IL-6-induced STAT3-SOCS3 signaling followed by inhibition of the TLR4 gene expression. Therefore

  8. Dietary α-lactalbumin supplementation alleviates normocaloric western diet-induced glucose intolerance in Göttingen minipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blat, Sophie; Vincent, Sophie; Lefeuvre, Luz; Lemoine-Morel, Sophie; Malbert, Charles-Henri; Pichon, Lisa; Mikogami, Takashi; Gratas-Delamarche, Arlette

    2015-02-01

    The pandemic of obesity in Western countries is mainly due to the high-fat, high-energy diet prevailing there. Obesity-associated metabolic disorders are the consequence of fat mass increase leading to altered adipokine secretion, hyperlipemia, oxidant stress, low-grade inflammation, and eventually glucose intolerance. Yet not all people consuming a Western diet become obese, and the question is raised whether these people are also at risk of developing metabolic disorders. Glucose tolerance, lipid profile, and oxidant and inflammation status were investigated longitudinally in lean Göttingen minipigs receiving for 16 weeks either a normal diet (ND), a Western diet (WD), or a Western diet supplemented with a whey protein isolate (WPI) rich in α-lactalbumin known to improve glucose tolerance. ND and WD were supplied isoenergetically. Lean minipigs fed WD displayed glucose intolerance and altered lipid profile after 6 weeks of diet but no inflammation or oxidative stress. Supplementation with WPI alleviated glucose intolerance by improving insulin secretion, but not lipid profile. Western diet consumption is deleterious for glucose tolerance even in the absence of fat mass accretion, and dyslipemia is a major determinant for this metabolic dysfunction. Stimulating insulin secretion with a WPI is an effective strategy to improve glucose tolerance. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  9. Insulin receptor isoform A ameliorates long-term glucose intolerance in diabetic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Castroverde, Sabela; Gómez-Hernández, Almudena; Fernández, Silvia; García-Gómez, Gema; Di Scala, Marianna; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Fernández-Millán, Elisa; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; García-Bravo, María; Chambon, Pierre; Álvarez, Carmen; Perdomo, Liliana; Beneit, Nuria; Benito, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disease and its pathogenesis involves abnormalities in both peripheral insulin action and insulin secretion. Previous in vitro data showed that insulin receptor isoform A, but not B, favours basal glucose uptake through its specific association with endogenous GLUT1/2 in murine hepatocytes and beta cells. With this background, we hypothesized that hepatic expression of insulin receptor isoform A in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes could potentially increase the glucose uptake of these cells, decreasing the hyperglycaemia and therefore ameliorating the diabetic phenotype. To assure this hypothesis, we have developed recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors expressing insulin receptor isoform A (IRA) or isoform B (IRB) under the control of a hepatocyte­-specific promoter. Our results demonstrate that in the long term, hepatic expression of IRA in diabetic mice is more efficient than IRB in ameliorating glucose intolerance. Consequently, it impairs the induction of compensatory mechanisms through beta cell hyperplasia and/or hypertrophy that finally lead to beta cell failure, reverting the diabetic phenotype in about 8 weeks. Our data suggest that long-term hepatic expression of IRA could be a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27562101

  10. Sympathetic overactivity precedes metabolic dysfunction in a fructose model of glucose intolerance in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, Katia De; Senador, Danielle D.; Mostarda, Cristiano; Irigoyen, Maria C.

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of high levels of fructose in humans and animals leads to metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunction. There are questions as to the role of the autonomic changes in the time course of fructose-induced dysfunction. C57/BL male mice were given tap water or fructose water (100 g/l) to drink for up to 2 mo. Groups were control (C), 15-day fructose (F15), and 60-day fructose (F60). Light-dark patterns of arterial pressure (AP) and heart rate (HR), and their respective variabilities were measured. Plasma glucose, lipids, insulin, leptin, resistin, adiponectin, and glucose tolerance were quantified. Fructose increased systolic AP (SAP) at 15 and 60 days during both light (F15: 123 ± 2 and F60: 118 ± 2 mmHg) and dark periods (F15: 136 ± 4 and F60: 136 ± 5 mmHg) compared with controls (light: 111 ± 2 and dark: 117 ± 2 mmHg). SAP variance (VAR) and the low-frequency component (LF) were increased in F15 (>60% and >80%) and F60 (>170% and >140%) compared with C. Cardiac sympatho-vagal balance was enhanced, while baroreflex function was attenuated in fructose groups. Metabolic parameters were unchanged in F15. However, F60 showed significant increases in plasma glucose (26%), cholesterol (44%), triglycerides (22%), insulin (95%), and leptin (63%), as well as glucose intolerance. LF of SAP was positively correlated with SAP. Plasma leptin was correlated with triglycerides, insulin, and glucose tolerance. Results show that increased sympathetic modulation of vessels and heart preceded metabolic dysfunction in fructose-consuming mice. Data suggest that changes in autonomic modulation may be an initiating mechanism underlying the cluster of symptoms associated with cardiometabolic disease. PMID:22319048

  11. The "metabolic syndrome" is less useful than random plasma glucose to screen for glucose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bassuoni, Eman A; Ziemer, David C; Kolm, Paul; Rhee, Mary K; Vaccarino, Viola; Tsui, Circe W; Kaufman, Jack M; Osinski, G Eileen; Koch, David D; Narayan, K M Venkat; Weintraub, William S; Phillips, Lawrence S

    2008-09-01

    To compare the utility of metabolic syndrome (MetS) to random plasma glucose (RPG) in identifying people with diabetes or prediabetes. RPG was measured and an OGTT was performed in 1155 adults. Test performance was measured by area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve (AROC). Diabetes was found in 5.1% and prediabetes in 20.0%. AROC for MetS with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) was 0.80 to detect diabetes, and 0.76 for diabetes or prediabetes--similar to RPG alone (0.82 and 0.72). However, the AROC for MetS excluding fasting plasma glucose was lower: 0.69 for diabetes (pRPG and MetS with FPG), and 0.69 for diabetes or prediabetes. AROCs for MetS with FPG and RPG were comparable and higher for recognizing diabetes in blacks vs. whites, and females vs. males. MetS with FPG was superior to RPG for identifying diabetes only in subjects with age RPG--a more convenient and less expensive test.

  12. Glucose tolerance in Papua New Guinea: ethnic differences, association with environmental and behavioural factors and the possible emergence of glucose intolerance in a highland community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, H; Finch, C; Collins, A; Koki, G; King, L F; Heywood, P; Zimmet, P

    1989-08-21

    That Melanesians of non-Austronesian genetic ancestry may be relatively resistant to glucose intolerance was supported by the results of a study of two semitraditional non-Austronesian villages in the Papua New Guinean highlands in 1983, in which an absence of diabetes and a high degree of glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were observed. The second of this series of surveys was conducted in 1985 in three non-traditional communities: a periurban, non-Austronesian village in the highlands, and rural and periurban Austronesian villages in coastal locations. Although an absence of diabetes was demonstrated once again in the highlanders, these periurban subjects showed an unexpectedly high insulin response which may be a precursor of glucose intolerance. The notion that highland communities that are living in non-traditional circumstances in Papua New Guinea presently are in "metabolic transition" towards diabetes and other non-communicable diseases, if correct, is of importance to the public health of the nation. In the periurban, coastal-dwelling Austronesians, diabetes with severe hyperglycaemia was demonstrated, and there was some evidence of a secular trend towards increasing glucose intolerance. The two-hour plasma glucose concentrations were shown to be associated with obesity, modernity and Seventh-Day Adventist religious persuasion. However, important and unexplained differences in glucose tolerance remained between rural and periurban coastal dwellers after taking these factors into account.

  13. Fermented Moringa oleifera Decreases Hepatic Adiposity and Ameliorates Glucose Intolerance in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Hyunchae; Kim, Bobae; Park, Hyunjoon; Lee, Kyuyeon; Kim, Hee-Hoon; Sim, Ho-Cheol; Do, Hyun-Jin; Hyun, Chang-Kee; Do, Myoung-Sool

    2017-05-01

    Metabolic diseases, such as glucose intolerance and nonalcoholic fatty-liver disease (NAFLD), are primary risk factors for life-threatening conditions such as diabetes, heart attack, stroke, and hepatic cancer. Extracts from the tropical tree Moringa oleifera show antidiabetic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. Fermentation can further improve the safety and nutritional value of certain foods. We investigated the efficacy of fermented M. oleifera extract (FM) against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced glucose intolerance and hepatic lipid accumulation and investigated the underlying mechanisms by analyzing expression of proteins and genes involved in glucose and lipid regulation. C57BL/6 mice were fed with normal chow diet (ND) or HFD supplemented with distilled water (DW, control), nonfermented M. oleifera extract (NFM), or FM for 10 weeks. Although body weights were similar among HFD-fed treatment groups, liver weight was decreased, and glucose tolerance test (GTT) results improved in the FM group compared with DW and NFM groups. Hepatic lipid accumulation was also lower in the FM group, and expressions of genes involved in liver lipid metabolism were upregulated. In addition, HFD-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress, and lipotoxicity in quadriceps muscles were decreased by FM. Finally, proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression was decreased by FM in the liver, epididymal adipose tissue, and quadriceps of HFD-fed mice. FMs may decrease glucose intolerance and NAFLD under HFD-induced obesity by decreasing ER stress, oxidative stress, and inflammation.

  14. Catch-up growth following food restriction exacerbates adulthood glucose intolerance in pigs exposed to intrauterine undernutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Cao, Meng; Zhuo, Yong; Che, Lianqiang; Fang, Zhengfeng; Xu, Shengyu; Lin, Yan; Feng, Bin; Wu, De

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of food restriction followed by controlled refeeding on glucose tolerance in pigs exposed to intrauterine malnutrition. Pregnant sows (n = 11) were assigned to either a control (C) group or an undernutrition (U) group (75% of C) during gestation. At postnatal 68 d, the offspring (n = 16) were placed on either a cafeteria feeding (CF) group or a food-restricted (FR) group (75% of CF) for 6 wk. After that, all offspring were fed ad libitum until 189 d (dpn189). The results showed that maternal malnutrition induced offspring glucose intolerance, which was demonstrated by increased serum glucose and triacylglycerol content at dpn189, as well as increased area under the blood glucose curve (AUC) during the intravenous glucose tolerance test (i.v.GTT) (P food restriction followed by controlled refeeding further increased serum glucose content at dpn189 and AUC during i.v.GTT in pigs born from U sows (P food restriction can exacerbate glucose intolerance in offspring exposed to intrauterine malnutrition. This may be caused by increased hepatic gluconeogenesis, decreased muscle glucose transport, and impaired hepatic insulin signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hepatic rather than cardiac steatosis relates to glucose intolerance in women with prior gestational diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Winhofer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increased myocardial lipid accumulation has been described in patients with pre- and overt type 2 diabetes and could underlie the development of left-ventricular dysfunction in metabolic diseases (diabetic cardiomyopathy. Since women with prior gestational diabetes (pGDM display a generally young population at high risk of developing diabetes and associated cardiovascular complications, we aimed to assess whether myocardial lipid accumulation can be detected at early stages of glucose intolerance and relates to markers of hepatic steatosis (Fatty Liver Index, cardiac function, insulin sensitivity and secretion. METHODS: Myocardial lipid content (MYCL, left-ventricular function (1H-magnetic-resonance-spectroscopy and -imaging, insulin sensitivity/secretion (oral glucose tolerance test and the fatty liver index (FLI were assessed in 35 pGDM (45.6±7.0 years, 28.3±4.8 kg/m2 and 14 healthy control females (CON; 44.7±9.8 years, 26.1±2.5 kg/m2, matching for age and body-mass-index (each p>0.1. RESULTS: Of 35 pGDM, 9 displayed normal glucose tolerance (NGT, 6 impaired glucose regulation (IGR and 20 had been already diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2DM. MYCL and cardiac function were comparable between pGDM and CON; in addition, no evidence of left-ventricular dysfunction was observed. MYCL was inversely correlated with the ejection fraction in T2DM (R = -0.45, p<0.05, while the FLI was tightly correlated with metabolic parameters (such as HbA1C, fasting plasma glucose and HDL-cholesterol and rose along GT-groups. CONCLUSIONS: There is no evidence of cardiac steatosis in middle-aged women with prior gestational diabetes, suggesting that cardiac complications might develop later in the time-course of diabetes and may be accelerated by the co-existence of further risk factors, whereas hepatic steatosis remains a valid biomarker for metabolic diseases even in this rather young female cohort.

  16. Inhibition of the gut enzyme intestinal alkaline phosphatase may explain how aspartame promotes glucose intolerance and obesity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Sarah S.; Hamilton, A. Rebecca L.; Munoz, Alexander R.; Phupitakphol, Tanit; Liu, Wei; Hyoju, Sanjiv K.; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P.; Morrison, Sara; Hu, Dong; Zhang, Weifeng; Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Huo, Haizhong; Hamarneh, Sulaiman R.; Hodin, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Diet soda consumption has not been associated with tangible weight loss. Aspartame (ASP) commonly substitutes sugar and one of its breakdown products is phenylalanine (PHE), a known inhibitor of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), a gut enzyme shown to prevent metabolic syndrome in mice. We hypothesized that ASP consumption might contribute to the development of metabolic syndrome based on PHE’s inhibition of endogenous IAP. The design of the study was such that for the in vitro model, IAP was added to diet and regular soda, and IAP activity was measured. For the acute model, a closed bowel loop was created in mice. ASP or water was instilled into it and IAP activity was measured. For the chronic model, mice were fed chow or high-fat diet (HFD) with/without ASP in the drinking water for 18 weeks. The results were that for the in vitro study, IAP activity was lower (p water group (48.1 ± 1.6 vs 42.4 ± 3.1, p = 0.0001). Significant difference in glucose intolerance between the HFD ± ASP groups (53 913 ± 4000.58 (mg·min)/dL vs 42 003.75 ± 5331.61 (mg·min)/dL, respectively, p = 0.02). Fasting glucose and serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels were significantly higher in the HFD + ASP group (1.23- and 0.87-fold increases, respectively, p = 0.006 and p = 0.01). In conclusion, endogenous IAP’s protective effects in regard to the metabolic syndrome may be inhibited by PHE, a metabolite of ASP, perhaps explaining the lack of expected weight loss and metabolic improvements associated with diet drinks. PMID:27997218

  17. Loss of Hepatic Mitochondrial Long-Chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Confers Resistance to Diet-Induced Obesity and Glucose Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Choi, Joseph; Selen Alpergin, Ebru S; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas; Scafidi, Susanna; Riddle, Ryan C; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2017-07-18

    The liver has a large capacity for mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation, which is critical for systemic metabolic adaptations such as gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis. To understand the role of hepatic fatty acid oxidation in response to a chronic high-fat diet (HFD), we generated mice with a liver-specific deficiency of mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation (Cpt2 L-/- mice). Paradoxically, Cpt2 L-/- mice were resistant to HFD-induced obesity and glucose intolerance with an absence of liver damage, although they exhibited serum dyslipidemia, hepatic oxidative stress, and systemic carnitine deficiency. Feeding an HFD induced hepatokines in mice, with a loss of hepatic fatty acid oxidation that enhanced systemic energy expenditure and suppressed adiposity. Additionally, the suppression in hepatic gluconeogenesis was sufficient to improve HFD-induced glucose intolerance. These data show that inhibiting hepatic fatty acid oxidation results in a systemic hormetic response that protects mice from HFD-induced obesity and glucose intolerance. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Loss of Hepatic Mitochondrial Long-Chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Confers Resistance to Diet-Induced Obesity and Glucose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Lee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The liver has a large capacity for mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation, which is critical for systemic metabolic adaptations such as gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis. To understand the role of hepatic fatty acid oxidation in response to a chronic high-fat diet (HFD, we generated mice with a liver-specific deficiency of mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation (Cpt2L−/− mice. Paradoxically, Cpt2L−/− mice were resistant to HFD-induced obesity and glucose intolerance with an absence of liver damage, although they exhibited serum dyslipidemia, hepatic oxidative stress, and systemic carnitine deficiency. Feeding an HFD induced hepatokines in mice, with a loss of hepatic fatty acid oxidation that enhanced systemic energy expenditure and suppressed adiposity. Additionally, the suppression in hepatic gluconeogenesis was sufficient to improve HFD-induced glucose intolerance. These data show that inhibiting hepatic fatty acid oxidation results in a systemic hormetic response that protects mice from HFD-induced obesity and glucose intolerance.

  19. Loss of Nlrp3 Does Not Protect Mice from Western Diet-Induced Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Glucose Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringling, Rebecca E; Gastecki, Michelle L; Woodford, Makenzie L; Lum-Naihe, Kelly J; Grant, Ryan W; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J; Padilla, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that loss of Nlrp3 would protect mice from Western diet-induced adipose tissue (AT) inflammation and associated glucose intolerance and cardiovascular complications. Five-week old C57BL6J wild-type (WT) and Nlrp3 knockout (Nlrp3-/-) mice were randomized to either a control diet (10% kcal from fat) or Western diet (45% kcal from fat and 1% cholesterol) for 24 weeks (n = 8/group). Contrary to our hypothesis that obesity-mediated white AT inflammation is Nlrp3-dependent, we found that Western diet-induced expression of AT inflammatory markers (i.e., Cd68, Cd11c, Emr1, Itgam, Lgals, Il18, Mcp1, Tnf, Ccr2, Ccl5 mRNAs, and Mac-2 protein) were not accompanied by increased caspase-1 cleavage, a hallmark feature of NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Furthermore, Nlrp3 null mice were not protected from Western diet-induced white or brown AT inflammation. Although Western diet promoted glucose intolerance in both WT and Nlrp3-/- mice, Nlrp3-/- mice were protected from Western diet-induced aortic stiffening. Additionally, Nlrp3-/- mice exhibited smaller cardiomyocytes and reduced cardiac fibrosis, independent of diet. Collectively, these findings suggest that presence of the Nlrp3 gene is not required for Western diet-induced AT inflammation and/or glucose intolerance; yet Nlrp3 appears to play a role in potentiating arterial stiffening, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis.

  20. CORRELATION BETWEEN GUT MICROBIOTA AND DEVELOPMENT OF GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE IN B6.V-Lepob/J LEPTIN DEFICIENT MICE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellekilde, Merete; Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

    Life style associated diseases such as type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease originate form an adaptive immune response, which can be down regulated by a regulatory immune response and are under heavy stimulation from early life gut microbiota (GM). Today...... correlation was found between blood glucose, HbA1c% and glucose intolerance and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12, supporting the correlation found between gut and disease, as IL-12 is secreted after microbial stimulation of immunological cells – e.g. In the gut. Further investigations concerning...

  1. Gender-Specific Mechanisms Underlying the Amelioration of High-Fat Diet-Induced Glucose Intolerance in B-Cell-Activating Factor Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobae Kim

    Full Text Available It has recently been found that B cell activating factor (BAFF plays an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis. We also have previously reported that BAFF deficiency reverses high-fat (HF diet-induced glucose intolerance by potentiating adipose tissue function. In the present study, we found that BAFF deficient (BAFF-/- mice exhibit gender-specific differences in protection against diet-induced glucose intolerance, and aimed to characterize the gender-dependent molecular alterations in energy metabolism. Under HF feeding conditions, serum BAFF level of female wild-type (WT mice was considerably higher than that of male mice. Despite increased body weight gain, both male and female BAFF-/- mice showed significantly improved glucose tolerance compared to their WT counterparts. Expressions of genes involved in glucose transport, thermogenesis and lipid oxidation were up-regulated in brown adipose tissues of both male and female BAFF-/- mice. Interestingly, the expression of thermogenic genes in subcutaneous adipose tissue was significantly enhanced in female BAFF-/- compared to WT mice, but the difference was not observed between male BAFF-/- and WT mice. The enhanced thermogenic program was confirmed by higher protein levels of UCP1 and irisin in female BAFF-/- than in WT mice. Additionally, adiponectin production in white adipose tissues and AMPK phosphorylation in subcutaneous adipose tissue were also significantly elevated in female BAFF-/- compared to WT mice, but not in male BAFF-/- mice. Our findings define a comprehensive scenario for the enhancing effect of BAFF depletion on glucose tolerance wherein the underlying mechanism is, at least in part, gender-specific, and suggest that gender difference should be considered as an important factor in the use of BAFF blockade as a therapeutic approach for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  2. Boehmeria nivea Stimulates Glucose Uptake by Activating Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma in C2C12 Cells and Improves Glucose Intolerance in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hee Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the antidiabetic property of Boehmeria nivea (L. Gaud. Ethanolic extract of Boehmeria nivea (L. Gaud. (EBN increased the uptake of 2-[N-(nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-ylamino]-2-deoxy-d-glucose in C2C12 myotubes. To examine the mechanisms underlying EBN-mediated increase in glucose uptake, we examined the transcriptional activity and expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ, a pivotal target for glucose metabolism in C2C12 myotubes. We found that the EBN increased both the transcriptional activity and mRNA expression levels of PPAR-γ. In addition, we measured phosphorylation and expression levels of other targets of glucose metabolism, such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and protein kinase B (Akt/PKB. We found that EBN did not alter the phosphorylation or expression levels of these proteins in a time- or dose-dependent manner, which suggested that EBN stimulates glucose uptake through a PPAR-γ-dependent mechanism. Further, we investigated the antidiabetic property of EBN using mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD. Administration of 0.5% EBN reduced the HFD-induced increase in body weight, total cholesterol level, and fatty liver and improved the impaired fasting glucose level, blood insulin content, and glucose intolerance. These results suggest that EBN had an antidiabetic effect in cell culture and animal systems and may be useful for preventing diabetes.

  3. A low socio-economic status is an additional risk factor for glucose intolerance in high risk Hong Kong Chinese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Gary T.C.; Chan, Juliana C.N.; Yeung, Vincent T.F.; Chow, Chun-Chung; Tsang, Lynn W.W.; Cockram, Clive S.

    2001-01-01

    To examine whether a low socio-economic status (SES) is an additional risk factor for glucose intolerance in Hong Kong Chinese with known risk factors for glucose intolerance, a total of 2847 Chinese subjects (473 men and 2374 women) were recruited from the community for assessment. They had known risk factors for glucose intolerance including a previous history of gestational diabetes, positive family history of diabetes in first degree relatives and equivocal fasting plasma glucose concentrations between 7 and 8 mmol/l or random plasma glucose concentrations between 8 and 11 mmol/l. The 2847 subjects were classified according to their education levels and occupations: education group 1 = high school or university, group 2 = middle school, group 3 = illiterate or up to elementary school; occupational group 1 = professional or managerial, group 2 = non-manual, group 3 = manual, group 4 = unskilled, group 5 = housewife or unemployed. Different socio-economic groups were well represented in this selected population. The distribution of educational groups in this study was similar to that recorded in the 1991 Hong Kong Census. When analysed according to education levels and after adjustment for age, women in the lowest social class had the highest prevalence of diabetes, body mass index, blood pressure and plasma glucose concentrations. Men with the lowest education level had the highest prevalence of diabetes after age adjustment. The age-adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) of having diabetes was 2.3 (1.3, 4.3) in female subjects and 2.5 (1.2, 5.4) in male subjects with the lowest SES compared to subjects with the highest SES. When categorised according to occupation and after adjustment for age, women in the lowest social class had the highest prevalence of diabetes and glycaemic indexes. The age-adjusted odds ratio of having diabetes was 4.5 (1.9, 10.9) in female subjects with the lowest SES compared to those with the highest SES. The corresponding age

  4. [The importance of oral glucose tolerance test in diagnosis of glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus in women with polycystic ovary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Ana Gabriela; Rehme, Marta Francis Benevides; Micussi, Maria Thereza Albuquerque Barbosa Cabral; Maranhão, Técia Maria de Oliveira; Pimenta, Walkyria de Paula; Carvalho, Lídia Raquel de; Pontes, Anaglória

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the importance of the oral glucose tolerance test for the diagnosis of glucose intolerance (GI) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2) in women with PCOS. A retrospective study was conducted on 247 patients with PCOS selected at random. The diagnosis of GI was obtained from the two-hour oral glucose tolerance test with 75 g of glucose according to the criteria of the World Health Organization (WHO) (GI: 120 minutes for plasma glucose >140 mg/dL and 200 mg/dL) and fasting glucose using the criteria of the American Diabetes Association (impaired fasting glucose: fasting plasma glucose >100 and 126 mg/dL). A logistic regression model for repeated measures was applied to compare the oral glucose tolerance test with fasting plasma glucose. ANOVA followed by the Tukey test was used for the analysis of the clinical and biochemical characteristics of patients with and without GI and/or DM-2. A p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. PCOS patients had a mean age of 24.8±6.3, and body mass index (BMI) of 18.3 to 54.9 kg/m² (32.5±7.6). The percentage of obese patients was 64%, the percentage of overweight patients was 18.6% and 17.4% had healthy weight. The oral glucose tolerance test identified 14 cases of DM-2 (5.7%), while fasting glucose detected only three cases (1.2%), and the frequency of these disorders was higher with increasing age and BMI. The results of this study demonstrate the superiority of the oral glucose tolerance test in relation to fasting glucose in diagnosing DM-2 in young women with PCOS and should be performed in these patients.

  5. Ursolic acid increases skeletal muscle and brown fat and decreases diet-induced obesity, glucose intolerance and fatty liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven D Kunkel

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle Akt activity stimulates muscle growth and imparts resistance to obesity, glucose intolerance and fatty liver disease. We recently found that ursolic acid increases skeletal muscle Akt activity and stimulates muscle growth in non-obese mice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that ursolic acid might increase skeletal muscle Akt activity in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. We studied mice that consumed a high fat diet lacking or containing ursolic acid. In skeletal muscle, ursolic acid increased Akt activity, as well as downstream mRNAs that promote glucose utilization (hexokinase-II, blood vessel recruitment (Vegfa and autocrine/paracrine IGF-I signaling (Igf1. As a result, ursolic acid increased skeletal muscle mass, fast and slow muscle fiber size, grip strength and exercise capacity. Interestingly, ursolic acid also increased brown fat, a tissue that shares developmental origins with skeletal muscle. Consistent with increased skeletal muscle and brown fat, ursolic acid increased energy expenditure, leading to reduced obesity, improved glucose tolerance and decreased hepatic steatosis. These data support a model in which ursolic acid reduces obesity, glucose intolerance and fatty liver disease by increasing skeletal muscle and brown fat, and suggest ursolic acid as a potential therapeutic approach for obesity and obesity-related illness.

  6. Transgenerational Glucose Intolerance of Tumor Necrosis Factor with Epigenetic Alteration in Rat Perirenal Adipose Tissue Induced by Intrauterine Hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Rina; Yan, Jie; Yang, Huixia

    2016-01-01

    Changes in DNA methylation may play a role in the genetic mechanism underlying glucose intolerance in the offspring of mothers with diabetes. Here, we established a rat model of moderate intrauterine hyperglycemia induced by streptozotocin to detect glucose and lipid metabolism of first-generation (F1) and second-generation (F2) offspring. Moderate intrauterine hyperglycemia induced high body weight in F1 and F2 offspring of diabetic mothers. F1 offspring had impaired glucose tolerance and abnormal insulin level. Additionally, F1 and F2 offspring that were exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia had impaired insulin secretion from the islets. The tumor necrosis factor (Tnf) gene was upregulated in perirenal adipose tissue from F1 offspring and relatively increased in F2 offspring. Both F1 and F2 offspring showed similar hypomethylation level at the -1952 site of Tnf. We confirmed that DNA methylation occurs in offspring exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia and that the DNA methylation is intergenerational and inherited.

  7. A cross-sectional study of the association between persistent organic pollutants and glucose intolerance among Greenland Inuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Borch-Johnsen, K; Bjerregaard, P

    2008-01-01

    prevalence over the last 30 years. Thus the aim was to study the association between POPs and glucose intolerance and markers of insulin resistance and insulin secretion using a population-based design. METHODS: From 1999 to 2002 the Greenland population study was carried out among adult Inuit living...... in Greenland. The examination included a 75 g OGTT, anthropometric measurements, a structured interview, and blood tests. Plasma glucose and serum insulin were analysed, and three defined subclasses of POPs were analysed in a subgroup. Associations were adjusted for age, sex, waist circumference, Inuit...... heritage, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and educational level. RESULTS: Data on POPs were available on 692 individuals, 305 men (mean age 50 years) and 387 women (mean age 49 years). The prevalence of diabetes was 10.3%, and 10.5% had impaired glucose tolerance. The concentrations of several POPs...

  8. Insulin signal transduction in skeletal muscle from glucose-intolerant relatives of type 2 diabetic patients [corrected

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, H; Song, X M; Jensen, C B

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether defects in the insulin signal transduction cascade are present in skeletal muscle from prediabetic individuals, we excised biopsies from eight glucose-intolerant male first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes (IGT relatives) and nine matched control subjects...... phosphorylation in control subjects and IGT relatives, with a tendency for reduced phosphorylation in IGT relatives (P = 0.12). In conclusion, aberrant phosphorylation/activity of IRS-1, PI 3-kinase, and Akt is observed in skeletal muscle from relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes with IGT. However...... resistance in skeletal muscle from relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes....

  9. Inhibition of the gut enzyme intestinal alkaline phosphatase may explain how aspartame promotes glucose intolerance and obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Sarah S; Hamilton, A Rebecca L; Munoz, Alexander R; Phupitakphol, Tanit; Liu, Wei; Hyoju, Sanjiv K; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P; Morrison, Sara; Hu, Dong; Zhang, Weifeng; Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Huo, Haizhong; Hamarneh, Sulaiman R; Hodin, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Diet soda consumption has not been associated with tangible weight loss. Aspartame (ASP) commonly substitutes sugar and one of its breakdown products is phenylalanine (PHE), a known inhibitor of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), a gut enzyme shown to prevent metabolic syndrome in mice. We hypothesized that ASP consumption might contribute to the development of metabolic syndrome based on PHE's inhibition of endogenous IAP. The design of the study was such that for the in vitro model, IAP was added to diet and regular soda, and IAP activity was measured. For the acute model, a closed bowel loop was created in mice. ASP or water was instilled into it and IAP activity was measured. For the chronic model, mice were fed chow or high-fat diet (HFD) with/without ASP in the drinking water for 18 weeks. The results were that for the in vitro study, IAP activity was lower (p < 0.05) in solutions containing ASP compared with controls. For the acute model, endogenous IAP activity was reduced by 50% in the ASP group compared with controls (0.2 ± 0.03 vs 0.4 ± 0.24) (p = 0.02). For the chronic model, mice in the HFD + ASP group gained more weight compared with the HFD + water group (48.1 ± 1.6 vs 42.4 ± 3.1, p = 0.0001). Significant difference in glucose intolerance between the HFD ± ASP groups (53 913 ± 4000.58 (mg·min)/dL vs 42 003.75 ± 5331.61 (mg·min)/dL, respectively, p = 0.02). Fasting glucose and serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels were significantly higher in the HFD + ASP group (1.23- and 0.87-fold increases, respectively, p = 0.006 and p = 0.01). In conclusion, endogenous IAP's protective effects in regard to the metabolic syndrome may be inhibited by PHE, a metabolite of ASP, perhaps explaining the lack of expected weight loss and metabolic improvements associated with diet drinks.

  10. On the status and comparison of glucose intolerance in female breast cancer patients at initial diagnosis and during chemotherapy through an oral glucose tolerance test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-jie Lu

    Full Text Available AIMS: This study is to estimate the status and comparison of glucose intolerance in female breast cancer patients at initial diagnosis and during chemotherapy through an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, as well as to learn the effect of chemotherapy on the glucose metabolism of breast cancer patients. METHODS: All the 79 breast cancer patients at initial diagnosis, with the mean age of 53.2 years, and 96 breast cancer patients before the 5th or 6th cycle of chemotherapy, with the mean age of 51.5 years, participated in the study from December 2012 to October 2013. After an overnight fast, participants underwent OGTT test, and fasting and 2-hour glucose levels were measured to identify undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes (i.e., impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance in them. Previously diagnosed diabetes among the female breast cancer patients was determined on the self-report and the medical record. RESULTS: The overall incidences of total normal glucose tolerance, prediabetes, diabetes in female breast cancer patients at initial diagnosis and during chemotherapy were 24.1% and 38.5% (p0.05, respectively, and the differences of normal glucose tolerance and prediabetes instead of diabetes between the two groups were statistically significant. About 84% of the total diabetes and prediabetes in the female breast cancer patients at initial diagnosis and 79.7% of those during chemotherapy need to be diagnosed with OGTT. CONCLUSIONS: Breast cancer patients have high incidences of diabetes and prediabetes. After chemotherapy even with steroids, some breast cancer patients with abnormal glucose metabolism may even become normal. Isolated hyperglycemia 2 hours after glucose loading is common, and OGTT should be made for breast cancer patients at initial diagnosis and during chemotherapy.

  11. Cytosolic Pellino-1-Mediated K63-Linked Ubiquitination of IRF5 in M1 Macrophages Regulates Glucose Intolerance in Obesity

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    Donghyun Kim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available IRF5 is a signature transcription factor that induces M1 macrophage polarization. However, little is known regarding cytosolic proteins that induce IRF5 activation for M1 polarization. Here, we report the interaction between ubiquitin E3 ligase Pellino-1 and IRF5 in the cytoplasm, which increased nuclear translocation of IRF5 by K63-linked ubiquitination in human and mouse M1 macrophages. LPS and/or IFN-γ increased Pellino-1 expression, and M1 polarization was attenuated in Pellino-1-deficient macrophages in vitro and in vivo. Defective M1 polarization in Pellino-1-deficient macrophages improved glucose intolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet. Furthermore, macrophages in adipose tissues from obese humans exhibited increased Pellino-1 expression and IRF5 nuclear translocation compared with nonobese subjects, and these changes are associated with insulin resistance index. This study demonstrates that cytosolic Pellino-1-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination of IRF5 in M1 macrophages regulates glucose intolerance in obesity, suggesting a cytosolic mediator function of Pellino-1 in TLR4/IFN-γ receptor-IRF5 axis during M1 polarization.

  12. Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 is required for high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjære, Even; Andersen, Charlotte; Myrmel, Lene Secher

    2015-01-01

    -induced glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis using the Timp1 null mice. METHODS: Timp1 knockout (TKO) and wild type (TWT) mice were fed chow, high-fat diet (HFD) or intermediate fat and sucrose diet (IFSD). We determined body weight, body composition, lipid content of the liver, energy intake, energy...... and had lower energy efficiency than TWT mice when fed HFD, but not when fed chow or IFSD. Importantly, TKO mice were protected from development of HFD- as well as IFSD-induced glucose intolerance, hepatic steatosis, and altered expression of genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism and inflammation....... CONCLUSION: Collectively, our results indicate that TIMP-1 contributes to the development of diet-induced hepatic steatosis and glucose intolerance and may be a potential therapeutic target....

  13. The effect of altered gut flora on glucose intolerance in C57BL/6NTac mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune, Ida; Ellekilde, Merete; Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis

    Recent studies have shown that long term broad spectrum antibiotic treatment improves glucose tolerance in mice. We hypothesize that it is primarily in the early life that altering of the gut microbiota will have an impact on glucose intoleance.....

  14. The effect of altered gut flora on glucose intolerance in C57BL/6NTac mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune, Ida; Ellekilde, Merete; Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis

    Recent studies have shown that long term broad spectrum antibiotic treatment improves glucose tolerance in mice. We hypothesize that it is primarily in the early life that altering of the gut microbiota will have an impact on glucose intoleance........Recent studies have shown that long term broad spectrum antibiotic treatment improves glucose tolerance in mice. We hypothesize that it is primarily in the early life that altering of the gut microbiota will have an impact on glucose intoleance.....

  15. Host-microbiota interaction induces bi-phasic inflammation and glucose intolerance in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molinaro, Antonio; Caesar, Robert; Holm, Louise Mannerås

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Gut microbiota modulates adiposity and glucose metabolism in humans and mice. Here we investigated how colonization of germ-free (GF) mice affects kinetics of adiposity and glucose metabolism. METHODS: Adiposity and glucose metabolism were evaluated at different time points in ex-GF an...

  16. Chronic erythropoietin treatment improves diet-induced glucose intolerance in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caillaud, Corinne; Mechta, Mie; Ainge, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) ameliorates glucose metabolism through mechanisms not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of EPO on glucose metabolism and insulin signaling in skeletal muscle. A 2-week EPO treatment of rats fed with a high-fat diet (HFD) improved fasting glucose leve...

  17. Overexpression of Rad in muscle worsens diet-induced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance and lowers plasma triglyceride level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilany, Jacob; Bilan, Philip J.; Kapur, Sonia; Caldwell, James S.; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Marette, Andre; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2006-03-01

    Rad is a low molecular weight GTPase that is overexpressed in skeletal muscle of some patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or obesity. Overexpression of Rad in adipocytes and muscle cells in culture results in diminished insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. To further elucidate the potential role of Rad in vivo, we have generated transgenic (tg) mice that overexpress Rad in muscle using the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promoter-enhancer. Rad tg mice have a 6- to 12-fold increase in Rad expression in muscle as compared to wild-type littermates. Rad tg mice grow normally and have normal glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, but have reduced plasma triglyceride levels. On a high-fat diet, Rad tg mice develop more severe glucose intolerance than the wild-type mice; this is due to increased insulin resistance in muscle, as exemplified by a rightward shift in the dose-response curve for insulin stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake. There is also a unexpected further reduction of the plasma triglyceride levels that is associated with increased levels of lipoprotein lipase in the Rad tg mice. These results demonstrate a potential synergistic interaction between increased expression of Rad and high-fat diet in creation of insulin resistance and altered lipid metabolism present in type 2 diabetes. diabetes mellitus | glucose transport | RGK GTPase | transgenic mouse

  18. The Ways of Preventing Students’ Extremism and Intolerance in the Regional Educational Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Selivanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available  The paper reveals the inefficiency problem of preventive measures controlling students’ intolerant and extremist behavior in higher educational institutions. According to the author, such trends in students’ society, as well as the rising phenomenon of nationalistic religious identity inevitably leading to interpersonal tensions, are caused in the last decades by the degrading prestige of higher education, growing pragmatism and formality of its achievement and key value depreciation in higher educational institutions. To improve the existing situation, it is necessary to revive the main functions of higher educational establishments –the intellectual and professional elite formation, cherishing the humanity values, social responsibility and active civil position; on the other hand, it is vitally important to create the system of prevention and correction of such trends as intolerance and extremism. However, the above goals are aggravated by the number of other problems listed in the paper.The method of developing the system of complex prevention of the mentioned negative phenomena is proposed with the reference to higher educational institutions; the specific stages of the given method, the technologies and organizational forms being outlined; the practical application and outcome in Tyumen State University being discussed. The research findings can be interesting for people responsible for preventive measures in higher educational instinutionms. 

  19. Fructose Malabsorption and Intolerance: Effects of Fructose with and without Simultaneous Glucose Ingestion

    OpenAIRE

    Latulippe, Marie E.; Skoog, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    Concern exists that increasing fructose consumption, particularly in the form of high-fructose corn syrup, is resulting in increasing rates of fructose intolerance and aggravation of clinical symptoms in individuals with irritable bowel syndrome. Most clinical trials designed to test this hypothesis have used pure fructose, a form not commonly found in the food supply, often in quantities and concentrations that exceed typical fructose intake levels. In addition, the amount of fructose provid...

  20. Soy formula for prevention of allergy and food intolerance in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, D A; Sinn, J

    2006-10-18

    Allergies and food reactions in infants and children are common and may be associated with a variety of foods including adapted cow's milk formula. Soy based formulas have been used to treat infants with allergy or food intolerance. However, it is unclear whether they can help prevent allergy and food intolerance in infants without clinical evidence of allergy or food intolerance. To determine the effect of feeding adapted soy formula compared to human milk, cow's milk formula or a hydrolysed protein formula on preventing allergy or food intolerance in infants without clinical evidence of allergy or food intolerance. The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. Updated searches were performed of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2006), MEDLINE (1966-March 2006), EMBASE (1980-March 2006), CINAHL (1982-March 2006) and previous reviews including cross references. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials that compare the use of an adapted soy formula to human milk, an adapted cow's milk or a hydrolysed protein formula for feeding infants without clinical allergy or food intolerance in the first six months of life. Only trials with > 80% follow up of participants and reported in group of assignment were eligible for inclusion. Eligibility of studies for inclusion, methodological quality and data extraction were assessed independently by each review author. Primary outcomes included clinical allergy, specific allergies and food intolerance. Where no heterogeneity of treatment effect was found, the fixed effect model was used for meta-analysis. Where significant or apparent heterogeneity was found, results were reported using the random effects model and potential causes of the heterogeneity were sought. Three eligible studies enrolling high risk infants with a history of allergy in a first degree relative were included. No eligible study enrolled infants fed human milk. No study

  1. Dysregulation of the Glutamine Transporter Slc38a3 (SNAT3 and Ammoniagenic Enzymes in Obese, Glucose-Intolerant Mice

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    Stephanie M. Busque

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Uric acid nephrolithiasis is prevalent among patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome; it is correlated with an acidic urine and lower urinary ammonium excretion and is likely associated with insulin resistance. Insulin stimulates ammoniagenesis in renal cell lines via increased phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG activity and glutamine metabolism. Ammonium excretion into the proximal tubule is mediated at least in part by the Na+/H+-exchanger NHE3 and in the collecting duct involving the Rhesus protein RhCG. Here we tested, whether obesity and insulin resistance in a diet-induced mouse model could contribute to deranged ammonium excretion. Methods: Obesity was induced by diet in mice and the impact on key molecules of proximal tubular ammoniagenesis and urinary acid excretion tested. Results: Diet-induced obesity was confirmed by pathological intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT. Three groups of mice were compared: control mice; obese, glucose-intolerant with abnormal IPGTT (O-GI; or moderate weight with normal IPGTT (Non-Responders, NR. Basal urinary ammonium excretion did not differ among groups. However, acid loading increased urinary ammonium excretion in all groups, but to a lesser extent in the O-GI group. SNAT3 mRNA expression was enhanced in both obese groups. PDG expression was elevated only in acid-loaded O-GI mice, whereas PEPCK was enhanced in both O-GI and NR groups given NH4CI. NHE activity in the brush border membrane of the proximal tubule was strongly reduced in the O-GI group whereas RhCG expression was similar. Conclusion: In sum, obesity and glucose intolerance impairs renal ammonium excretion in response to NH4CI feeding most likely through reduced NHE activity. The stimulation of SNAT3 and ammoniagenic enzyme expression may be compensatory but futile.

  2. Association of genetic variants of melatonin receptor 1B with gestational plasma glucose level and risk of glucose intolerance in pregnant Chinese women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunyao Liao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aimed to explore the association of MTNR1B genetic variants with gestational plasma glucose homeostasis in pregnant Chinese women. METHODS: A total of 1,985 pregnant Han Chinese women were recruited and evaluated for gestational glucose tolerance status with a two-step approach. The four MTNR1B variants rs10830963, rs1387153, rs1447352, and rs2166706 which had been reported to associate with glucose levels in general non-pregnant populations, were genotyped in these women. Using an additive model adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI, association of these variants with gestational fasting and postprandial plasma glucose (FPG and PPG levels were analyzed by multiple linear regression; relative risk of developing gestational glucose intolerance was calculated by logistic regression. Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium was tested by Chi-square and linkage disequilibrium (LD between these variants was estimated by measures of D' and r(2. RESULTS: In the pregnant Chinese women, the MTNR1B variant rs10830963, rs1387153, rs2166706 and rs1447352 were shown to be associated with the increased 1 hour PPG level (p=8.04 × 10(-10, 5.49 × 10(-6, 1.89 × 10(-5 and 0.02, respectively. The alleles were also shown to be associated with gestational glucose intolerance with odds ratios (OR of 1.64 (p=8.03 × 10(-11, 1.43 (p=1.94 × 10(-6, 1.38 (p=1.63 × 10(-5 and 1.24 (p=0.007, respectively. MTNR1B rs1387153, rs2166706 were shown to be associated with gestational FPG levels (p=0.04. Our data also suggested that, the LD pattern of these variants in the studied women conformed to that in the general populations: rs1387153 and rs2166706 were in high LD, they linked moderately with rs10830963, but might not linked with rs1447352;rs10830963 might not link with rs1447352, either. In addition, the MTNR1B variants were not found to be associated with any other traits tested. CONCLUSIONS: The MTNR1B is likely to be involved in the regulation of glucose

  3. Glucose intolerance and General Health Questionnaire 12-item version scores of male two-shift workers stratified by precariousness of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between precariousness of work, glucose intolerance and psychological wellbeing for male workers, stratified by age. I recruited 2542 manufacturing two-shift workers, aged from 35 to 54 years. Glucose intolerance was defined as fasting plasma glucose of ≥100mg/dL or current medication of diabetes mellitus. The rating scale of General Health Questionnaire 12-item version (GHQ-12) was used for evaluating psychological well-being. There was a significant increase in the prevalence of glucose intolerance by aging in permanent workers. In addition, the prevalence of glucose intolerance except 30s and the prevalence of positive GHQ-12 scores except 50s of permanent workers were both significantly higher than that of temporary workers in each age class. Temporary workers in this study sign contracts for 3 years, and heather worker's effect, compared with permanent workers, would be reflected in this study. Copyright © 2015 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Usefulness of Homeostatic Measurement Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) for Detection of Glucose Intolerance in Thai Women of Reproductive Age with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwananuruk, Thanyarat; Rattanachaiyanont, Manee; Leerasiri, Pichai; Indhavivadhana, Suchada; Techatraisak, Kitirat; Angsuwathana, Surasak; Tanmahasamut, Prasong; Dangrat, Chongdee

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To study the cut-off point of Homeostatic Measurement Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) as a screening test for detection of glucose intolerance in Thai women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Study Design. Cross-sectional study. Setting. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital. Subject. Two hundred and fifty Thai PCOS women who attended the Gynecologic Endocrinology Unit, during May 2007 to January 2009. Materials and Methods. The paitents were interviewed and examined for weight, height, waist circumference, and blood pressure. Venous blood samples were drawn twice, one at 12-hour fasting and the other at 2 hours after glucose loading. Results. The prevalence of glucose intolerance in Thai PCOS women was 20.0%. The mean of HOMA-IR was 3.53  ±  7.7. Area under an ROC curve for HOMA-IR for detecting glucose intolerance was 0.82. Using the cut-off value of HOMA-IR >2.0, there was sensitivity at 84.0%, specificity at 61.0%, positive predictive value at 35.0%, negative predictive value at 93.8%, and accuracy at 65.6%. Conclusion. HOMA-IR >2.0 was used for screening test for glucose intolerance in Thai PCOS women. If the result was positive, a specific test should be done to prove the diagnosis.

  5. Exposure to Common Food Additive Carrageenan Alone Leads to Fasting Hyperglycemia and in Combination with High Fat Diet Exacerbates Glucose Intolerance and Hyperlipidemia without Effect on Weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Bhattacharyya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Major aims were to determine whether exposure to the commonly used food additive carrageenan could induce fasting hyperglycemia and could increase the effects of a high fat diet on glucose intolerance and dyslipidemia. Methods. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to either carrageenan, high fat diet, or the combination of high fat diet and carrageenan, or untreated, for one year. Effects on fasting blood glucose, glucose tolerance, lipid parameters, weight, glycogen stores, and inflammation were compared. Results. Exposure to carrageenan led to glucose intolerance by six days and produced elevated fasting blood glucose by 23 weeks. Effects of carrageenan on glucose tolerance were more severe than from high fat alone. Carrageenan in combination with high fat produced earlier onset of fasting hyperglycemia and higher glucose levels in glucose tolerance tests and exacerbated dyslipidemia. In contrast to high fat, carrageenan did not lead to weight gain. In hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp studies, the carrageenan-exposed mice had higher early glucose levels and lower glucose infusion rate and longer interval to achieve the steady-state. Conclusions. Carrageenan in the Western diet may contribute to the development of diabetes and the effects of high fat consumption. Carrageenan may be useful as a nonobese model of diabetes in the mouse.

  6. Exposure to common food additive carrageenan alone leads to fasting hyperglycemia and in combination with high fat diet exacerbates glucose intolerance and hyperlipidemia without effect on weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Feferman, Leo; Unterman, Terry; Tobacman, Joanne K

    2015-01-01

    Major aims were to determine whether exposure to the commonly used food additive carrageenan could induce fasting hyperglycemia and could increase the effects of a high fat diet on glucose intolerance and dyslipidemia. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to either carrageenan, high fat diet, or the combination of high fat diet and carrageenan, or untreated, for one year. Effects on fasting blood glucose, glucose tolerance, lipid parameters, weight, glycogen stores, and inflammation were compared. Exposure to carrageenan led to glucose intolerance by six days and produced elevated fasting blood glucose by 23 weeks. Effects of carrageenan on glucose tolerance were more severe than from high fat alone. Carrageenan in combination with high fat produced earlier onset of fasting hyperglycemia and higher glucose levels in glucose tolerance tests and exacerbated dyslipidemia. In contrast to high fat, carrageenan did not lead to weight gain. In hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp studies, the carrageenan-exposed mice had higher early glucose levels and lower glucose infusion rate and longer interval to achieve the steady-state. Carrageenan in the Western diet may contribute to the development of diabetes and the effects of high fat consumption. Carrageenan may be useful as a nonobese model of diabetes in the mouse.

  7. Repeated intraperitoneal injections of interleukin 1 beta induce glucose intolerance in normal rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wogensen, L; Reimers, J; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    1991-01-01

    Previous in vitro findings suggest the involvement of interleukin 1 (IL-1) in the pathogenesis of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effects of single or repeated ip injections of recombinant IL-1 beta on blood glucose and glucose tolerance ...

  8. Dietary fat proportionately enhances oxidative stress and glucose intolerance followed by impaired expression of the genes associated with mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nabanita; Mandala, Ashok; Bhattacharjee, Sudarshan; Mukherjee, Debasri; Bandyopadhyay, Debasish; Roy, Sib Sankar

    2017-04-19

    Consumption of food that surpasses the metabolic necessity of the body leads to an epidemic condition termed obesity, which causes several metabolic disorders including oxidative damage. Dietary intervention can enlighten the mechanisms and therapeutics associated with these metabolic disorders. The reported studies related to diet include fat of different kinds and from different sources, however they lack dose response aspects. Our study highlighted the importance of dietary fat modification in modulating oxidative stress-induced glucose intolerance. Animals were maintained on a diet with a varied content of fat (30%/45%/60%) for 12 weeks and the 'withdrawal' group was fed a standard diet for another 10 weeks. The diet containing 60 energy% of fat displayed glucose intolerance, high ALT, low GSH levels and tissue-specific modulation of the prooxidant/antioxidant enzymatic activities in the liver/muscles. Prolonged sustenance of the 60 energy% fat containing diet-fed rats on standard diet led to the alteration of antioxidant activities, reversing the oxidative damage. Notably, the 'withdrawal' group displayed an organ-specific response towards dietary modification where the recovery of the antioxidant activities was observed to be much more pronounced in the liver as compared to the muscle. Further, we identified the differential expression of liver/muscle-specific genes associated with oxidative stress and mitochondrial biogenesis in response to the differing fat content. These genes can serve as markers for HFD-induced metabolic complications involving the liver/muscle. Altogether, our study has highlighted the novel area where obesity-induced oxidative stress linked alterations expressed diet and organ specific responses that are recovered by altering the dietary regimen. Future investigation of dietary modulation will open nascent avenues for developing therapeutic modalities addressing obesity-related metabolic complications.

  9. Long-term ketogenic diet causes glucose intolerance and reduced β- and α-cell mass but no weight loss in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellenbroek, Johanne H; van Dijck, Laura; Töns, Hendrica A; Rabelink, Ton J; Carlotti, Françoise; Ballieux, Bart E P B; de Koning, Eelco J P

    2014-01-01

    High-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets (KD) are used for weight loss and for treatment of refractory epilepsy. Recently, short-time studies in rodents have shown that, besides their beneficial effect on body weight, KD lead to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. However, the long-term

  10. High Body Adiposity Drives Glucose Intolerance and Increases Cardiovascular Risk in Normoglycemic Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pevida, Belén; Díaz-Gutiérrez, Jesús; Miras, Alexander Dimitri; Silva, Camilo; Romero, Sonia; Salvador, Javier; Escalada, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2018-03-09

    The objective of this study was to assess the utility of the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) value to discriminate between different cardiometabolic profiles and examine the role of body composition in predicting the associated increased risk for glucose impairment, beta-cell dysfunction, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Subjects with normal fasting glucose completed a 2-hour OGTT and were categorized to the carbohydrate metabolism alterations (CMAs) or the control group based on a 2-hour glucose threshold of 7.8 mmol/L. Body composition, visceral adipose tissue, OGTT-based parameters, and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, obstructive sleep apnea, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and smoking status were measured. Subjects with CMAs exhibited a significantly higher 1-hour postload glucose level and a greater decline in beta-cell function and CVRF profiles. After multivariate adjustment, an excess of total body and visceral fat was associated with an increased risk of CMAs, beta-cell dysfunction, CVRFs, and lower whole-body insulin sensitivity. These data support the etiopathogenic role of body and visceral fat in the development of glucose derangements and CVRFs early on in the metabolic dysregulation process. Thus, body composition analysis and OGTT assessment performed in individuals with normal fasting glucose enable a better identification of patients at risk of developing type 2 diabetes and CVD. © 2018 The Authors. Obesity published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Obesity Society (TOS).

  11. Glucose intolerance and the amount of visceral adipose tissue contribute to an increase in circulating triglyceride concentrations in Caucasian obese females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berings, Margot; Wehlou, Charline; Verrijken, An; Deschepper, Ellen; Mertens, Ilse; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Van Gaal, Luc F; Ouwens, D Margriet; Ruige, Johannes B

    2012-01-01

    Lipotoxicity is a risk factor for developing obesity-related metabolic complications, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, type 2 diabetes (DM2), cardiovascular disease and stroke. Yet, the mechanisms underlying the development of lipotoxicity itself remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether glucose intolerance aggravates lipotoxicity by evaluating the association between triglyceride (TG) concentrations and glucose tolerance status in a cross-sectional study on obese Caucasian women at risk for DM2. 913 obese females unknown to have diabetes were recruited (mean age: 41.2 ± SD 12.3; median BMI: 36.2, IQR 32.9-40.2). Visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue volumes were quantified with computed tomography. Glucose, insulin, and triglyceride concentrations were determined in fasting state and following a 75 gram oral glucose tolerance test. Based on fasting and 2 h post-load glucose levels, 27% of the women had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 8% had newly diagnosed DM2. Fasting TG concentrations were similar between the IGT- and DM2-groups, and increased as compared to women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Even when adjusting for age, hip circumference and VAT, fasting TG concentrations remained elevated as compared to NGT. Mixed modelling analysis of post-load responses showed that TG concentrations declined more slowly in the DM2-group as compared to IGT and NGT. However, when adjusting for VAT the difference in decline between the glucose tolerance groups disappeared. Glucose intolerance associates with elevated fasting TG concentrations in obese Caucasian women. We propose that glucose intolerance and increased VAT reduce lipid disposal mechanisms and may accelerate lipotoxicity.

  12. Glucose intolerance and the amount of visceral adipose tissue contribute to an increase in circulating triglyceride concentrations in Caucasian obese females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot Berings

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Lipotoxicity is a risk factor for developing obesity-related metabolic complications, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, type 2 diabetes (DM2, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Yet, the mechanisms underlying the development of lipotoxicity itself remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether glucose intolerance aggravates lipotoxicity by evaluating the association between triglyceride (TG concentrations and glucose tolerance status in a cross-sectional study on obese Caucasian women at risk for DM2. METHODS: 913 obese females unknown to have diabetes were recruited (mean age: 41.2 ± SD 12.3; median BMI: 36.2, IQR 32.9-40.2. Visceral (VAT and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue volumes were quantified with computed tomography. Glucose, insulin, and triglyceride concentrations were determined in fasting state and following a 75 gram oral glucose tolerance test. RESULTS: Based on fasting and 2 h post-load glucose levels, 27% of the women had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, and 8% had newly diagnosed DM2. Fasting TG concentrations were similar between the IGT- and DM2-groups, and increased as compared to women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT. Even when adjusting for age, hip circumference and VAT, fasting TG concentrations remained elevated as compared to NGT. Mixed modelling analysis of post-load responses showed that TG concentrations declined more slowly in the DM2-group as compared to IGT and NGT. However, when adjusting for VAT the difference in decline between the glucose tolerance groups disappeared. CONCLUSIONS: Glucose intolerance associates with elevated fasting TG concentrations in obese Caucasian women. We propose that glucose intolerance and increased VAT reduce lipid disposal mechanisms and may accelerate lipotoxicity.

  13. The Development of Diet-Induced Obesity and Glucose Intolerance in C57Bl/6 Mice on a High-Fat Diet Consists of Distinct Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda M.; Campbell, Fiona M.; Drew, Janice E.; Koch, Christiane; Hoggard, Nigel; Rees, William D.; Kamolrat, Torkamol; Thi Ngo, Ha; Steffensen, Inger-Lise; Gray, Stuart R.; Tups, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    High–fat (HF) diet-induced obesity and insulin insensitivity are associated with inflammation, particularly in white adipose tissue (WAT). However, insulin insensitivity is apparent within days of HF feeding when gains in adiposity and changes in markers of inflammation are relatively minor. To investigate further the effects of HF diet, C57Bl/6J mice were fed either a low (LF) or HF diet for 3 days to 16 weeks, or fed the HF-diet matched to the caloric intake of the LF diet (PF) for 3 days or 1 week, with the time course of glucose tolerance and inflammatory gene expression measured in liver, muscle and WAT. HF fed mice gained adiposity and liver lipid steadily over 16 weeks, but developed glucose intolerance, assessed by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT), in two phases. The first phase, after 3 days, resulted in a 50% increase in area under the curve (AUC) for HF and PF mice, which improved to 30% after 1 week and remained stable until 12 weeks. Between 12 and 16 weeks the difference in AUC increased to 60%, when gene markers of inflammation appeared in WAT and muscle but not in liver. Plasma proteomics were used to reveal an acute phase response at day 3. Data from PF mice reveals that glucose intolerance and the acute phase response are the result of the HF composition of the diet and increased caloric intake respectively. Thus, the initial increase in glucose intolerance due to a HF diet occurs concurrently with an acute phase response but these effects are caused by different properties of the diet. The second increase in glucose intolerance occurs between 12 - 16 weeks of HF diet and is correlated with WAT and muscle inflammation. Between these times glucose tolerance remains stable and markers of inflammation are undetectable. PMID:25170916

  14. Adverse pregnancy outcome in women with mild glucose intolerance: is there a clinically meaningful threshold value for glucose?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte; Lauridsen, Lars Korsholm; Ovesen, Per Glud

    2008-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have been based on the risk of future maternal diabetes rather than the short-term risk of mother and infant. Our aim was to illustrate the relation between various adverse pregnancy outcomes and maternal glucose levels in women...

  15. Splanchnic Compression Improves the Efficacy of Compression Stockings to Prevent Orthostatic Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts, Steven H.; Brown, A. K.; Lee, S. M.; Stenger, M. B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance (OI) is observed in 20-30% of astronauts. Previous data from our laboratory suggests that this is largely a result of decreased venous return. Currently, NASA astronauts wear an anti-gravity suit (AGS) which consists of inflatable air bladders over the calves, thighs and abdomen, typically pressurized from 26 to 78 mmHg. We recently determined that, thigh-high graded compression stockings (JOBST , 55 mmHg at ankle, 6 mmHg at top of thigh) were effective, though to a lesser degree than the AGS. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the addition of splanchnic compression to prevent orthostatic intolerance. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers (6M, 4F) participated in three 80 head-up tilts on separate days while (1) normovolemic (2) hypovolemic w/ breast-high compression stockings (BS)(JOBST(R), 55 mmHg at the ankle, 6 mmHg at top of thigh, 12 mmHg over abdomen) (3) hypovolemic w/o stockings. Hypovolemia was induced by IV infusion of furosemide (0.5 mg/kg) and 48 hrs of a low salt diet to simulate plasma volume loss following space flight. Hypovolemic testing occurred 24 and 48 hrs after furosemide. One-way repeated measures ANOVA, with Bonferroni corrections, was used to test for differences in blood pressure and heart rate responses to head-up tilt, stand times were compared using a Kaplan-Meyer survival analysis. Results: BS were effective in preventing OI and presyncope in hypovolemic test subjects ( p = 0.015). BS prevented the decrease in systolic blood pressure seen during tilt in normovolemia (p high garments. These stockings are readily available, inexpensive, and can be worn for days following landing as astronauts re-adapt to Earth gravity.

  16. Benefits of L-alanine or L-arginine supplementation against adiposity and glucose intolerance in monosodium glutamate-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Thiago R; Freitas, Israelle N; Vettorazzi, Jean F; Batista, Thiago M; Santos-Silva, Junia C; Bonfleur, Maria L; Balbo, Sandra L; Boschero, Antonio C; Carneiro, Everardo M; Ribeiro, Rosane A

    2017-09-01

    L-alanine (Ala) and L-arginine (Arg) have been reported to regulate pancreatic β-cell physiology and to prevent body fat accumulation in diet-induced obesity. Here, we assessed growth and adiposity parameters, glucose tolerance, insulin secretion and the expression of insulin and nutrient-regulated proteins in monosodium glutamate (MSG)-obese mice supplemented with either Ala or Arg. Male newborn C57Bl/6 mice received a daily subcutaneous injection of MSG or saline solution (CTL group), during the first 6 days of life. From 30 to 90 days of age, MSG and CTL mice received or not 2.55 % Ala (CAla or MArg groups) or 1.51 % Arg-HCl (CArg or MArg groups) in their drinking water. Adult MSG mice displayed higher adiposity associated with lower phosphorylation of the adipogenic enzyme, ACC, in adipose tissue. Glucose intolerance in MSG mice was linked to lower insulin secretion and to lower expression of IRβ in adipose tissue, as well as AS160 phosphorylation in skeletal muscle. Perigonadal fat depots were smaller in Ala and Arg mice, while retroperitoneal fat pads were decreased by Ala supplementation only. Both Ala and Arg improved fed-state glycemia as well as IRβ and pAS160 content, but only Ala led to improved glucose tolerance and insulin secretion. Adipostatic signals were increased in MAla mice, as indicated by enhanced AMPK phosphorylation and pACC content in fat depots. Ala supplementation led to more pronounced metabolic improvements compared to Arg, possibly due to suppression of lipogenesis through activation of the AMPK/ACC pathway.

  17. Hepatic branch vagus nerve plays a critical role in the recovery of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and mediates a neuroprotective effect by hypothalamic orexin-A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Harada

    Full Text Available Orexin-A (a neuropeptide in the hypothalamus plays an important role in many physiological functions, including the regulation of glucose metabolism. We have previously found that the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance is one of the triggers of ischemic neuronal damage, which is suppressed by hypothalamic orexin-A. Other reports have shown that the communication system between brain and peripheral tissues through the autonomic nervous system (sympathetic, parasympathetic and vagus nerve is important for maintaining glucose and energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine the involvement of the hepatic vagus nerve on hypothalamic orexin-A-mediated suppression of post-ischemic glucose intolerance development and ischemic neuronal damage. Male ddY mice were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO for 2 h. Intrahypothalamic orexin-A (5 pmol/mouse administration significantly suppressed the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and neuronal damage on day 1 and 3, respectively after MCAO. MCAO-induced decrease of hepatic insulin receptors and increase of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes on day 1 after was reversed to control levels by orexin-A. This effect was reversed by intramedullary administration of the orexin-1 receptor antagonist, SB334867, or hepatic vagotomy. In the medulla oblongata, orexin-A induced the co-localization of cholin acetyltransferase (cholinergic neuronal marker used for the vagus nerve with orexin-1 receptor and c-Fos (activated neural cells marker. These results suggest that the hepatic branch vagus nerve projecting from the medulla oblongata plays an important role in the recovery of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and mediates a neuroprotective effect by hypothalamic orexin-A.

  18. Ozone Induces Glucose Intolerance and Systemic Metabolic Effects in Young and Aged Brown Norway Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone could impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in very young and aged rats. Brown Norway (BN) rats, 1,4, 12, and 24 months ol...

  19. Glucose intolerance induced by blockade of central FGF receptors is linked to an acute stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Rojas

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: The effect of acute inhibition of central FGFR signaling to impair glucose tolerance likely involves a stress response associated with pronounced, but transient, sympathoadrenal activation and an associated reduction of insulin secretion. Whether this effect is a true consequence of FGFR blockade or involves an off-target effect of the FGFR inhibitor requires additional study.

  20. Host-microbiota interaction induces bi-phasic inflammation and glucose intolerance in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molinaro, Antonio; Caesar, Robert; Holm, Louise Mannerås

    2017-01-01

    expansion and inflammation. Importantly, re-colonization of antibiotic treated mice displays only the delayed phase of glucose impairment and adiposity, suggesting that the early phase may be unique to colonization of the immature GF mice gut. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide new insights on host...

  1. Glucose intolerance and gestational diabetes risk in relation to sleep duration and snoring during pregnancy: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Ihunnaya O

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insufficient sleep and poor sleep quality, considered endemic in modern society, are associated with obesity, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. Little, however, is known about the consequences of insufficient sleep and poor sleep quality during pregnancy on glucose tolerance and gestational diabetes. Methods A cohort of 1,290 women was interviewed during early pregnancy. We collected information about sleep duration and snoring during early pregnancy. Results from screening and diagnostic testing for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM were abstracted from medical records. Generalized linear models were fitted to derive relative risk (RR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs of GDM associated with sleep duration and snoring, respectively. Results After adjusting for maternal age and race/ethnicity, GDM risk was increased among women sleeping ≤ 4 hours compared with those sleeping 9 hours per night (RR = 5.56; 95% CI 1.31-23.69. The corresponding RR for lean women (2 was 3.23 (95% CI 0.34-30.41 and 9.83 (95% CI 1.12-86.32 for overweight women (≥ 25 kg/m2. Overall, snoring was associated with a 1.86-fold increased risk of GDM (RR = 1.86; 95% CI 0.88-3.94. The risk of GDM was particularly elevated among overweight women who snored. Compared with lean women who did not snore, those who were overweight and snored had a 6.9-fold increased risk of GDM (95% CI 2.87-16.6. Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest associations of short sleep duration and snoring with glucose intolerance and GDM. Though consistent with studies of men and non-pregnant women, larger studies that include objective measures of sleep duration, quality and apnea are needed to obtain more precise estimates of observed associations.

  2. Glucose intolerance and gestational diabetes risk in relation to sleep duration and snoring during pregnancy: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Insufficient sleep and poor sleep quality, considered endemic in modern society, are associated with obesity, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. Little, however, is known about the consequences of insufficient sleep and poor sleep quality during pregnancy on glucose tolerance and gestational diabetes. Methods A cohort of 1,290 women was interviewed during early pregnancy. We collected information about sleep duration and snoring during early pregnancy. Results from screening and diagnostic testing for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) were abstracted from medical records. Generalized linear models were fitted to derive relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of GDM associated with sleep duration and snoring, respectively. Results After adjusting for maternal age and race/ethnicity, GDM risk was increased among women sleeping ≤ 4 hours compared with those sleeping 9 hours per night (RR = 5.56; 95% CI 1.31-23.69). The corresponding RR for lean women (<25 kg/m2) was 3.23 (95% CI 0.34-30.41) and 9.83 (95% CI 1.12-86.32) for overweight women (≥ 25 kg/m2). Overall, snoring was associated with a 1.86-fold increased risk of GDM (RR = 1.86; 95% CI 0.88-3.94). The risk of GDM was particularly elevated among overweight women who snored. Compared with lean women who did not snore, those who were overweight and snored had a 6.9-fold increased risk of GDM (95% CI 2.87-16.6). Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest associations of short sleep duration and snoring with glucose intolerance and GDM. Though consistent with studies of men and non-pregnant women, larger studies that include objective measures of sleep duration, quality and apnea are needed to obtain more precise estimates of observed associations. PMID:20470416

  3. Splanchnic Compression Improves the Efficacy of Compression Stockings to Prevent Orthostatic Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts, Steven H.; Brown, A. K.; Lee, S. M.; Stenger, M. B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance (OI) is observed in 20-30% of astronauts. Previous data from our laboratory suggests that this is largely a result of decreased venous return. Currently, NASA astronauts wear an anti-gravity suit (AGS) which consists of inflatable air bladders over the calves, thighs and abdomen, typically pressurized from 26 to 78 mmHg. We recently determined that, thigh-high graded compression stockings (JOBST , 55 mmHg at ankle, 6 mmHg at top of thigh) were effective, though to a lesser degree than the AGS. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the addition of splanchnic compression to prevent orthostatic intolerance. Methods: Ten healthy volunteers (6M, 4F) participated in three 80 head-up tilts on separate days while (1) normovolemic (2) hypovolemic w/ breast-high compression stockings (BS)(JOBST(R), 55 mmHg at the ankle, 6 mmHg at top of thigh, 12 mmHg over abdomen) (3) hypovolemic w/o stockings. Hypovolemia was induced by IV infusion of furosemide (0.5 mg/kg) and 48 hrs of a low salt diet to simulate plasma volume loss following space flight. Hypovolemic testing occurred 24 and 48 hrs after furosemide. One-way repeated measures ANOVA, with Bonferroni corrections, was used to test for differences in blood pressure and heart rate responses to head-up tilt, stand times were compared using a Kaplan-Meyer survival analysis. Results: BS were effective in preventing OI and presyncope in hypovolemic test subjects ( p = 0.015). BS prevented the decrease in systolic blood pressure seen during tilt in normovolemia (p < 0.001) and hypovolemia w/o countermeasure (p = 0.005). BS also prevented the decrease in diastolic blood pressure seen during tilt in normovolemia (p = 0.006) and hypovolemia w/o countermeasure (p = 0.041). Hypovolemia w/o countermeasure showed a higher tilt-induced heart rate increase (p = 0.022) than seen in normovolemia; heart rate while wearing BS was not different than normovolemia (p = 0.353). Conclusion: BS may

  4. Formulas containing hydrolysed protein for prevention of allergy and food intolerance in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, D A; Sinn, J

    2006-10-18

    Allergies and food reactions are common and may be associated with foods including adapted cow's milk formula. Formulas containing hydrolysed proteins have been used to treat infants with allergy or food intolerance. However, it is unclear whether hydrolysed formula can be advocated for prevention of allergy and food intolerance in infants without evidence of allergy or food intolerance. To determine the effect of feeding hydrolysed formulas on allergy and food intolerance in infants and children compared to adapted cow's milk or human breast milk. If hydrolysed formulas are effective, to determine what type of hydrolysed formula is most effective including extensively and partially hydrolysed formulas. To determine which infants benefit, including infants at low or high risk of allergy and infants receiving early, short term or prolonged formula feeding. The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. The review was updated with searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2006), MEDLINE (1966-March 2006), EMBASE (1980-March 2006) and CINAHL (1982-March 2006) and previous reviews including cross references. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials that compare the use of a hydrolysed infant formula to human milk or cow's milk formula. Trials with >80% follow up of participants were eligible for inclusion. Eligibility of studies for inclusion, methodological quality and data extraction were assessed independently by each review author. Primary outcomes included clinical allergy, specific allergies and food intolerance. Meta-analysis was conducted using a fixed effects model. Two trials compared early, short term hydrolysed formula to human milk feeding. No significant difference in infant allergy or childhood cow's milk allergy (CMA) were reported. No eligible trial compared prolonged hydrolysed formula to human milk feeding. Two trials compared early, short term hydrolysed

  5. Disaccharide intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Disaccharide intolerance presents a pathogenic heterogeneous and most complex clinical entity. It usually occurs due to primary or secondary deficit of disaccharide activity, and rarely because of disorders of absorption or monomer metabolism. Symptomatology of disaccharide maldigestion and/or malabsorption depends on the severity of the basic disorder, the level of its overload and the patient’s age. In the youngest children, due to a rapid gastrointestinal transit and a low compensatory capacity of the colon, osmotic-fermentative diarrhoea forms the basis of clinical features. Diarrhoeal disorder can be occasionally so intensive that it disturbs not only water and electrolytic balance, but also the nutritive status of the child. In older children and adults, as well as in milder forms of the disorder, the symptomatology, most often without diarrhoea, is dominated by abdominal colic, loud peristaltic sounds, meteorism and increased flatulence. Metabolic disorders followed by conversion disorders of galactose and fructose into glucose are characterized by a hypoglycaemic crisis, as well as by various multisystemic damages due to the deposit of toxic metabolic products. The diagnosis of gastrointestinal forms of disaccharide intolerance is based on the pathologic clinical and laboratory response during the overload test, while that of the metabolic form is based on the confirmed presence of specific enzyme and/or genetic defect. Treatment of disaccharide intolerance is based on the elimination diet. Besides, in the secondary forms of the disorder, it is also necessary to apply the treatment of the basic disease.

  6. Loss of Foxd3 Results in Decreased β-Cell Proliferation and Glucose Intolerance During Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Jennifer L.; Frist, Audrey Y.; LeGrone, Alison W.; Magnuson, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    A complete molecular understanding of β-cell mass expansion will be useful for the improvement of therapies to treat diabetic patients. During normal periods of metabolic challenges, such as pregnancy, β-cells proliferate, or self-renew, to meet the new physiological demands. The transcription factor Forkhead box D3 (Foxd3) is required for maintenance and self-renewal of several diverse progenitor cell lineages, and Foxd3 is expressed in the pancreatic primordium beginning at 10.5 d postcoitum, becoming localized predominantly to β-cells after birth. Here, we show that mice carrying a pancreas-specific deletion of Foxd3 have impaired glucose tolerance, decreased β-cell mass, decreased β-cell proliferation, and decreased β-cell size during pregnancy. In addition, several genes known to regulate proliferation, Foxm1, Skp2, Ezh2, Akt2, and Cdkn1a, are misregulated in islets isolated from these Foxd3 mutant mice. Together, these data place Foxd3 upstream of several pathways critical for β-cell mass expansion in vivo. PMID:21952247

  7. Abnormal glucose metabolism is associated with reduced left ventricular contractile reserve and exercise intolerance in patients with chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egstrup, M; Kistorp, C N; Schou, M

    2013-01-01

    intolerance related to diabetes. CONCLUSION: Diabetes, known or newly detected by OGTT, is independently associated with reduced LV contractile reserve and exercise...... intolerance in outpatients with systolic HF. These findings may offer one explanation for the excess mortality related to diabetes in HF....

  8. Long-term ketogenic diet causes glucose intolerance and reduced β- and α-cell mass but no weight loss in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbroek, Johanne H; van Dijck, Laura; Töns, Hendrica A; Rabelink, Ton J; Carlotti, Françoise; Ballieux, Bart E P B; de Koning, Eelco J P

    2014-03-01

    High-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets (KD) are used for weight loss and for treatment of refractory epilepsy. Recently, short-time studies in rodents have shown that, besides their beneficial effect on body weight, KD lead to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. However, the long-term effects on pancreatic endocrine cells are unknown. In this study we investigate the effects of long-term KD on glucose tolerance and β- and α-cell mass in mice. Despite an initial weight loss, KD did not result in weight loss after 22 wk. Plasma markers associated with dyslipidemia and inflammation (cholesterol, triglycerides, leptin, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-1β, and IL-6) were increased, and KD-fed mice showed signs of hepatic steatosis after 22 wk of diet. Long-term KD resulted in glucose intolerance that was associated with insufficient insulin secretion from β-cells. After 22 wk, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was reduced. A reduction in β-cell mass was observed in KD-fed mice together with an increased number of smaller islets. Also α-cell mass was markedly decreased, resulting in a lower α- to β-cell ratio. Our data show that long-term KD causes dyslipidemia, a proinflammatory state, signs of hepatic steatosis, glucose intolerance, and a reduction in β- and α-cell mass, but no weight loss. This indicates that long-term high-fat, low-carbohydrate KD lead to features that are also associated with the metabolic syndrome and an increased risk for type 2 diabetes in humans.

  9. Association of leukocyte count with varying degrees of glucose intolerance in Asian Indians: the Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study (CURES-26).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokulakrishnan, Kuppan; Deepa, Raj; Sampathkumar, Rangasamy; Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2009-06-01

    This study assessed the association of leukocyte count with different grades of glucose intolerance in Asian Indian subjects. Three groups of subjects were recruited from the Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study (CURES), a population-based study, representative of Chennai (formerly Madras), a city in southern India. Group 1 represented normal glucose tolerance (NGT) (n = 840), group 2 included impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (n = 180), and group 3 included type 2 diabetes (n = 1170). Anthropometric measurements including weight, height, and waist measurements were obtained using standardized techniques. Leukocyte count was measured by an automated flow cytometry instrument (Sysmex SF-3000, Japan). Fasting insulin was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and insulin resistance was calculated using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). Subjects with diabetes (8.0 +/- 1.5 x 10(3)/microL) and IGT (7.9 +/- 1.3 x 10(3)/microL) had a significantly higher mean leukocyte count compared to the NGT group (7.4 +/- 1.5 x 10(3)/microL) (P Leukocyte count was significantly increased in NGT subjects with insulin resistance (IR) as measured by HOMA-IR (7.5 +/- 1.5 x 10(3)/microL; P leukocyte count with increasing severity of glucose intolerance, even after adjusting for age, waist circumference, and HOMA-IR. Among Asian Indians who are known to have high risk of premature coronary artery disease and diabetes, a significant association exists between leukocyte count and glucose intolerance.

  10. Carbenoxolone treatment ameliorated metabolic syndrome in WNIN/Ob obese rats, but induced severe fat loss and glucose intolerance in lean rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Sankara Vara Prasad Sakamuri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1 regulates local glucocorticoid action in tissues by catalysing conversion of inactive glucocorticoids to active glucocorticoids. 11β-HSD1 inhibition ameliorates obesity and associated co-morbidities. Here, we tested the effect of 11β-HSD inhibitor, carbenoxolone (CBX on obesity and associated comorbidities in obese rats of WNIN/Ob strain, a new animal model for genetic obesity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Subcutaneous injection of CBX (50 mg/kg body weight or volume-matched vehicle was given once daily for four weeks to three month-old WNIN/Ob lean and obese rats (n = 6 for each phenotype and for each treatment. Body composition, plasma lipids and hormones were assayed. Hepatic steatosis, adipose tissue morphology, inflammation and fibrosis were also studied. Insulin resistance and glucose intolerance were determined along with tissue glycogen content. Gene expressions were determined in liver and adipose tissue. CBX significantly inhibited 11β-HSD1 activity in liver and adipose tissue of WNIN/Ob lean and obese rats. CBX significantly decreased body fat percentage, hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, insulin resistance in obese rats. CBX ameliorated hepatic steatosis, adipocyte hypertrophy, adipose tissue inflammation and fibrosis in obese rats. Tissue glycogen content was significantly decreased by CBX in liver and adipose tissue of obese rats. Severe fat loss and glucose- intolerance were observed in lean rats after CBX treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that 11β-HSD1 inhibition by CBX decreases obesity and associated co-morbidities in WNIN/Ob obese rats. Our study supports the hypothesis that inhibition of 11β-HSD1 is a key strategy to treat metabolic syndrome. Severe fat loss and glucose -intolerance by CBX treatment in lean rats suggest that chronic 11β-HSD1 inhibition may lead to insulin resistance in normal conditions.

  11. Glucagon suppression during OGTT worsens while suppression during IVGTT sustains alongside development of glucose intolerance in patients with chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knop, F K; Vilsbøll, T; Larsen, Steen

    2010-01-01

    To examine plasma glucagon responses to oral and intravenous (iv) glucose in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) and either normal glucose tolerance (NGT), secondary impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or secondary diabetes mellitus (DM)....

  12. Age, BMI, and race are less important than random plasma glucose in identifying risk of glucose intolerance: the Screening for Impaired Glucose Tolerance Study (SIGT 5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemer, David C; Kolm, Paul; Weintraub, William S; Vaccarino, Viola; Rhee, Mary K; Caudle, Jane M; Irving, Jade M; Koch, David D; Narayan, K M Venkat; Phillips, Lawrence S

    2008-05-01

    Age, BMI, and race/ethnicity are used in National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines to prompt screening for pre-diabetes and diabetes, but cutoffs have not been evaluated rigorously. Random plasma glucose (RPG) was measured and 75-g oral glucose tolerance tests were performed in 1,139 individuals without known diabetes. Screening performance was assessed by logistic regression and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC). NIDDK/ADA indicators age >45 years and BMI >25 kg/m(2) provided significant detection of both diabetes and dysglycemia (both AROCs 0.63), but screening was better with continuous-variable models of age, BMI, and race and better still with models of age, BMI, race, sex, and family history (AROC 0.78 and 0.72). However, screening was even better with RPG alone (AROCs 0.81 and 0.72). RPG >125 mg/dl could be used to prompt further evaluation with an OGTT. Use of age, BMI, and race/ethnicity in guidelines for screening to detect diabetes and pre-diabetes may be less important than evaluation of RPG. RPG should be investigated further as a convenient, inexpensive screen with good predictive utility.

  13. High Intensity Resistive and Rowing Exercise Countermeasures Do Not Prevent Orthostatic Intolerance Following 70 Days of Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stenger, Michael B.; Laurie, Steven S.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.; Platts, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    More than 60% of US astronauts participating in Mir and early International Space Station missions (greater than 5 months) were unable to complete a 10-min 80 deg head-up tilt test on landing day. This high incidence of post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance may be related to limitations of the inflight exercise hardware that prevented high intensity training. PURPOSE: This study sought to determine if a countermeasure program that included intense lower-body resistive and rowing exercises designed to prevent cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning during 70 days of 6 deg head-down tilt bed rest (BR), a spaceflight analog, also would protect against post- BR orthostatic intolerance. METHODS: Sixteen males participated in this study and performed no exercise (Control, n=10) or performed an intense supine exercise protocol with resistive and aerobic components (Exercise, n=6). On 3 days/week, exercise subjects performed lower body resistive exercise and a 30-min continuous bout of rowing (greater than or equal to 75% max heart rate). On 3 other days/week, subjects performed only high-intensity, interval-style rowing. Orthostatic intolerance was assessed using a 15-min 80 deg head-up tilt test performed 2 days (BR-2) before and on the last day of BR (BR70). Plasma volume was measured using a carbon monoxide rebreathing technique on BR-3 and before rising on the first recovery day (BR+0). RESULTS: Following 70 days of BR, tilt tolerance time decreased significantly in both the Control (BR-2: 15.0 +/- 0.0, BR70: 9.9 +/- 4.6 min, mean +/- SD) and Exercise (BR-2: 12.2 +/- 4.7, BR70: 4.9 +/- 1.9 min) subjects, but the decreased tilt tolerance time was not different between groups (Control: -34 +/- 31, Exercise: -56 +/- 16%). Plasma volume also decreased (Control: -0.56 +/- 0.40, Exercise: -0.48 +/- 0.33 L) from pre to post-BR, with no differences between groups (Control: -18 +/- 11%, Exerciser: -15 +/-1 0%). CONCLUSIONS: These findings confirm previous reports

  14. Interaction of BDNF rs6265 variants and energy and protein intake in the risk for glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes in middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, James W; Park, Sunmin

    2017-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with the risk for Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to examine the association of BDNF variants with type 2 diabetes and the interactions of different BDNF genotypes with dietary habits and food and nutrient intakes in middle-aged adults. The study population included 8840 adults ages 40 to 65 y from the Ansan and Asung areas in the Korean Genome Epidemiology Study, a cross-sectional study of Korean adults, conducted from 2001 to 2002. Adjusted odd ratios for the prevalence of glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes according to BDNF genotypes were calculated after adjusting for age, sex, residence area, body mass index, physical activity, and smoking and stress status. Nutrient intake was calculated from usual food intake determined by semiquantitative food frequencies using the nutrient assessment software. BDNF rs6265 Val/Met and Met/Met variants were negatively associated with the risk for type 2 diabetes after adjusting for covariates. Serum glucose levels after glucose loading and hemoglobin A1c, but not serum insulin levels, also were negatively associated with BDNF Val/Met and Met/Met. In subgroup analysis, sex and stress levels had an interaction with BDNF Val/Met in the risk for type 2 diabetes. Glucose-intolerant and diabetic, but not nondiabetic, patients with BDNF Met/Met had nominally, but significantly higher intakes of energy than those with BDNF Val/Val. BDNF rs6265 had consistent gene-diet interactions with energy and protein intake. With low-energy, low-protein, and high-carbohydrate intake, BDNF Val/Met lowered the risk for type 2 diabetes after adjusting for confounding factors. BDNF Val/Met did not compensate for developing type 2 diabetes with high-energy intake. Additionally, indexes of insulin resistance and insulin secretion showed the same gene-energy interaction as type 2 diabetes. BDNF Val/Met and Met/Met variants (rs6265) decreases the risk for

  15. Selective breeding of mice for different susceptibilities to high fat diet‐induced glucose intolerance: Development of two novel mouse lines, Selectively bred Diet‐induced Glucose intolerance‐Prone and ‐Resistant

    OpenAIRE

    Nagao, Mototsugu; Asai, Akira; Kawahara, Momoyo; Nakajima, Yasushi; Sato, Yuki; Tanimura, Kyoko; Okajima, Fumitaka; Takaya, Makiyo; Sudo, Mariko; Takemitsu, Shuji; Harada, Taro; Sugihara, Hitoshi; Oikawa, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aims/Introduction:  The development of type 2 diabetes is primarily due to lifestyle and environmental factors, as well as genetics, as shown by familial clustering. To establish mouse lines for evaluating heritable factors determining susceptibility to diet‐induced diabetes, we performed selective breeding for differences in high fat diet (HFD)‐induced glucose intolerance. Materials and Methods:  Selective breeding was performed using hybrid mice of C57BL/6J, C3H/HeJ and AKR/N backg...

  16. Simulated stand tests and centrifuge training to prevent orthostatic intolerance on Earth, moon, and Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Brandon W; Sharp, M Keith

    2010-03-01

    One proposed method to overcome postflight orthostatic intolerance is for astronauts to undergo inflight centrifugation. Cardiovascular responses were compared between centrifuge and gravitational conditions using a seven-compartment cardiovascular model. Vascular resistance, heart rate, and stroke volume values were adopted from literature, while compartmental volumes and compliances were derived from impedance plethysmography of subjects (n=8) riding on a centrifuge. Three different models were developed to represent the typical male subject who completed a 10-min postflight stand test ("male finisher"), "non-finishing male" and "female" (all non-finishers). A sensitivity analysis found that both cardiac output and arterial pressure were most sensitive to total blood volume. Simulated stand tests showed that female astronauts were more susceptible to orthostatic intolerance due to lower initial blood pressure and higher pressure threshold for presyncope. Rates of blood volume loss by capillary filtration were found to be equivalent in female and male non-finishers, but four times smaller in male finishers. For equivalent times to presyncope during centrifugation as those during constant gravity, lower G forces at the level of the heart were required. Centrifuge G levels to match other cardiovascular parameters varied depending on the parameter, centrifuge arm length, and the gravity level being matched.

  17. Early and rapid development of insulin resistance, islet dysfunction and glucose intolerance after high-fat feeding in mice overexpressing phosphodiesterase 3B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walz, Helena A; Härndahl, Linda; Wierup, Nils

    2006-01-01

    advanced fasting hyperinsulinemia and early development of hyper-glycemia, in spite of hyperinsulinemia, as well as impaired capacity of insulin to suppress plasma glucose in an insulin tolerance test. In vitro analyses of insulin-stimulated lipogenesis in adipocytes and glucose uptake in skeletal muscle......AMP-degrading enzyme phosphodiesterase 3B (RIP-PDE3B/2 mice) were metabolically challenged with a high-fat diet. We found that RIP-PDE3B/2 mice early and rapidly develop glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, as compared with wild-type littermates, after 2 months of high-fat feeding. This was evident from...... perturbations, such as centrally located alpha-cells and reduced immunostaining for insulin and GLUT2 in islets from RIP-PDE3B/2 mice. Additionally, in vitro experiments revealed that the insulin secretory response to glucagon-like peptide-1 stimulation was markedly reduced in islets from high-fat-fed RIP-PDE3B...

  18. Common variants in the ATP-sensitive K channel genes KCNJ11 (Kir6.2) and ABCC8 (SUR1) in relation to glucose intolerance: population-based studies and meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van R.M.; Hoebee, B.; Seidell, J.C.; Schaap, M.M.; Bruin, de T.W.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Aims To evaluate the relation between common variants in the ATP-sensitive K(+) channel genes and glucose intolerance. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of reported association studies in Caucasian populations for common variants in the ABCC8 (exons 16 and 18) and the KCNJ11 (E23K) gene

  19. Amelioration of high fat diet-induced glucose intolerance by blockade of Smad4 in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H Y; Oh, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Lee, E-K; Jung, H S; Jun, H-S

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we investigated whether Smad4 signaling is involved in the regulation of beta-cell function using a high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity mouse model. Beta-cell-specific Smad4-knockout mice (Smad4(-/-)RIP-Cre(+); β-Smad4KO) were generated by mating Smad4 (flox/flox) mice with rat insulin promoter (RIP)-Cre mice. Mice were fed a HFD beginning at 6 weeks of age for 16 weeks. Body weight, food intake, fasting and fed glucose levels, and glucose and insulin tolerance were measured. The expression of Smad4 mRNA was significantly decreased in the islets of β-Smad4KO mice. In wild-type mice, Smad4 mRNA was significantly decreased at 18 weeks of age as compared with 8 weeks of age. On a regular chow diet, β-Smad4KO mice showed no differences in body weight, fed and fasting blood glucose levels, and glucose tolerance compared with wild-type mice. When fed a HFD, body weight gain was significantly reduced in β-Smad4KO mice as compared with wild-type mice, although the amount of food intake was not different. During the HFD, fed and fasting blood glucose levels, glucose stimulated insulin secretion, disposition index and glucose tolerance were significantly improved in β-Smad4KO mice as compared with wild-type mice. However, insulin tolerance tests showed no differences between the 2 groups. Inhibition of Smad4 in beta-cells conferred mild but significant improvements in glucose levels and glucose tolerance in HFD-induced obese mice. Therefore, regulation of Smad4 expression may be one of the mechanisms regulating physiological expansion of beta-cells during development of type 2 diabetes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. [Food intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugasti Murillo, Ana

    2009-05-01

    Adverse food reactions are common in the general population. Nevertheless, our knowledge of the structure of food allergens and of the mechanisms involved is poor. In 1995 the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology suggested a classification based on the causative pathogenic mechanism. According to this classification, non-toxic reactions can be divided into food allergies when they recognize immunological mechanisms and food intolerance when there are no immunological implications. The treatment of food intolerance is avoidance of the particular food. There are specific treatments for some food intolerance (beta-galactosidases for the management of lactose intolerance).

  1. Prevalence of insulin resistance and prediction of glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbikova, Jana; Dvorakova, Katerina; Grimmichova, Tereza; Hill, Martin; Stanicka, Sona; Cibula, David; Bendlova, Bela; Starka, Luboslav; Vondra, Karel

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) affects 10% of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of clinical and fasting biochemical parameters in screening for impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and DM2. Women with PCOS [n=244, age 27.4+/-7.5 years, body mass index (BMI) 27.5+/-6.9 kg/m(2)] and healthy women (n=57, age 26.8+/-5.8 years, BMI 21.3+/-2.1 kg/m(2)) underwent basal blood sampling and an oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT). Insulin resistance was identified in 40.2% of PCOS women. Impaired fasting glucose (5.6-6.9 mmol/L) was found in 30 subjects (12.3%), but the oGTT revealed IGT in only six of these cases and DM2 in one subject. IGT was found in 23 (9.4%) and DM2 in four (1.6%) of the women with PCOS. The conventional upper limits for total cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and fasting glucose revealed low sensitivity for the identification of impaired glucose metabolism. No single parameter nor any combination of them showed an accuracy sufficient for screening of IGT or DM2 in PCOS patients. All PCOS patients should be screened using an oGTT to identify disturbances in glucose metabolism.

  2. Mice Deficient in Proglucagon-Derived Peptides Exhibit Glucose Intolerance on a High-Fat Diet but Are Resistant to Obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Takagi

    Full Text Available Homozygous glucagon-GFP knock-in mice (Gcggfp/gfp lack proglucagon derived-peptides including glucagon and GLP-1, and are normoglycemic. We have previously shown that Gcggfp/gfp show improved glucose tolerance with enhanced insulin secretion. Here, we studied glucose and energy metabolism in Gcggfp/gfp mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD. Male Gcggfp/gfp and Gcggfp/+ mice were fed either a normal chow diet (NCD or an HFD for 15-20 weeks. Regardless of the genotype, mice on an HFD showed glucose intolerance, and Gcggfp/gfp mice on HFD exhibited impaired insulin secretion whereas Gcggfp/+ mice on HFD exhibited increased insulin secretion. A compensatory increase in β-cell mass was observed in Gcggfp/+mice on HFD, but not in Gcggfp/gfp mice on the same diet. Weight gain was significantly lower in Gcggfp/gfp mice than in Gcggfp/+mice. Oxygen consumption was enhanced in Gcggfp/gfp mice compared to Gcggfp/+ mice on an HFD. HFD feeding significantly increased uncoupling protein 1 mRNA expression in brown adipose and inguinal white adipose tissues of Gcggfp/gfp mice, but not of Gcggfp/+mice. Treatment with the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide (200 mg/kg improved glucose tolerance in Gcggfp/gfp mice and insulin content in Gcggfp/gfp and Gcggfp/+ mice was similar after liraglutide treatment. Our findings demonstrate that Gcggfp/gfp mice develop diabetes upon HFD-feeding in the absence of proglucagon-derived peptides, although they are resistant to diet-induced obesity.

  3. Prevention of diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance in mice by chemical derivatives of DHA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rossmeisl, Martin; Jílková, Zuzana; Jeleník, Tomáš; Hensler, Michal; Mohamed-Ali, V.; Bryhn, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 15, Suppl. (2007), A 185-A186 ISSN 1930-7381. [The Obesity Society 2007 Annual Scientific Meeting. 20.10.2007-24.10.2007, New Orleans] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/07/0708 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpo1 * obesity * high-fat diet * decosahexaenoic acid Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  4. Prevention and Reversal of Obesity and Glucose Intolerance in Mice by DHA Derivatives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rossmeisl, Martin; Jeleník, Tomáš; Jílková, Zuzana; Slámová, Kristýna; Kůs, Vladimír; Hensler, Michal; Medříková, Daša; Povýšil, C.; Flachs, Pavel; Mohamed-Ali, V.; Bryhn, M.; Berge, K.; Holmeide, A.K.; Kopecký, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 5 (2009), s. 1023-1031 ISSN 1930-7381 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA303/08/0664; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/07/0708 Grant - others:EC(XE) MITOFOOD COST FA0602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : DHA * obesity Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.366, year: 2009

  5. Chemical derivatives of docosahexaenoic acid prevent glucose intolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rossmeisl, Martin; Jílková, Zuzana; Jeleník, Tomáš; Hensler, Michal; Flachs, Pavel; Mohamed-Ali, V.; Bryhn, M.; Kopecký, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 31, Suppl.1 (2007), S76-S76 ISSN 0307-0565. [European congress on obesity /15./. 22.04.2007-25.04.2007, Budapest] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : obesity * insulin resistance * DHA * C57BL/6N mice Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  6. Enhanced glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) response to oral glucose in glucose-intolerant HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Haugaard, Steen B; Holst, J J

    2005-01-01

    with NGT patients (1455+/-422 vs. 409+/-254 pmol/L/180 min, respectively; Pgroups (7689+/-1097 vs. 8041+/-998 pmol/L/180 min, respectively; not significant). In pooled study groups, the GIP incrAUC correlated positively with the ISR incr......OBJECTIVES: We investigated whether the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), which are major regulators of glucose tolerance through the stimulation of insulin secretion, contribute to impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) among HIV......-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). METHODS: Eighteen HIV-infected male patients (six lipodystrophic and 12 nonlipodystrophic) with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) were compared with 10 HIV-infected male patients (eight lipodystrophic and two nonlipodystrophic) with IGT. Plasma...

  7. Intrauterine protein restriction combined with early postnatal overfeeding was not associated with adult-onset obesity but produced glucose intolerance by pancreatic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Grazielle Vitória Ponti; Coutinho, Felipe Rodrigues; Faiad, Jaline Zandonato; Taki, Marina Satie; de Lima Reis, Silvia Regina; Ignácio-Souza, Letícia Martins; Paiva, Adriene Alexandra; Latorraca, Márcia Queiroz; Gomes-da-Silva, Maria Helena Gaíva; Martins, Maria Salete Ferreira

    2013-01-10

    We investigated if whether intrauterine protein restriction in combination with overfeeding during lactation would cause adult-onset obesity and metabolic disorders. After birth, litters from dams fed with control (17% protein) and low protein (6% protein) diets were adjusted to a size of four (CO and LO groups, respectively) or eight (CC and LC groups, respectively) pups. All of the offspring were fed a diet containing 12% protein from the time of weaning until they were 90 d old. Compared to the CC and LC groups, the CO and LO groups had higher relative and absolute food intakes, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production; lower brown adipose tissue weight and lipid content and greater weight gain and absolute and relative white adipose tissue weight and absolute lipid content. Compared with the CO and CC rats, the LC and LO rats exhibited higher relative food intake, brown adipose tissue weight and lipid content, reduced oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and spontaneous activity, increased relative retroperitoneal adipose tissue weight and unaltered absolute white adipose tissue weight and lipid content. The fasting serum glucose was similar among the groups. The area under the glucose curve was higher in the LO and CO rats than in the LC and CC rats. The basal insulinemia and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were lower in the LO group than in the other groups. The total area under the insulin curve for the LO rats was similar to the CC rats, and both were lower than the CO and LC rats. Kitt was higher in the LO, LC and CO groups than in the CC group. Thus, intrauterine protein restriction followed by overfeeding during lactation did not induce obesity, but produced glucose intolerance by impairing pancreatic function in adulthood.

  8. Folate treatment partially reverses gestational low-protein diet-induced glucose intolerance and the magnitude of reversal is age and sex dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesson, Chellakkan S; Schutt, Amy; Mathew, Pretty R; Tanchico, Daren; Balakrishnan, Meena; Yallampalli, Uma; Yallampalli, Chandra

    2017-11-13

    Gestational low-protein (LP) programming causes glucose intolerance (GI) and insulin resistance (IR) in adult offspring. Folate supplementation has been shown to rescue the offspring from various programming effects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether folate supplementation during pregnancy reverses LP-induced GI and IR. Pregnant rats were fed control (20% protein), isocaloric low-protein (LP, 6%) or LP with 5 mg/kg folate (LPF) diets from gestational day 4 to delivery. The control diet was given during lactation and to pups after weaning. Glucose tolerance test was done at 1, 2, and 3 mo of age followed by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp at 4 mo. Rats were sacrificed at 4 mo and their gonadal, renal, inguinal, brown fat, and pancreas were weighed and expressed relative to their body weight. LP- and LPF-fed dams showed similar weight loss during late pregnancy after decreased feed intake. Both LP and LPF pups were smaller at birth but their weights caught up like that of controls by 3 mo. In males, folate supplementation reduced LP-induced GI at 2 mo (glucose area under the curve [AUC]: 1940 mmol/L × 180 min in LP, 1629 mmol/L × 180 min in LPF, and 1653 mmol/L × 180 min in controls; P reverses LP-induced GI and the magnitude of reversal is age and sex dependent. Furthermore, folate treatment does not reverse IR in either sex but makes it worse in males at 4 mo. The present study demonstrated that folate treatment is not sufficient to rescue the LP programming effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A dietary pattern including nopal, chia seed, soy protein, and oat reduces serum triglycerides and glucose intolerance in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Cruz, Martha; Tovar, Armando R; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Medina-Vera, Isabel; Gil-Zenteno, Lidia; Hernández-Viveros, Isaac; López-Romero, Patricia; Ordaz-Nava, Guillermo; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Guillen Pineda, Luz E; Torres, Nimbe

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a health problem throughout the world and is associated with cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Thus, the purpose of the present work was to evaluate the effects of a dietary pattern (DP; soy protein, nopal, chia seed, and oat) on the biochemical variables of MetS, the AUC for glucose and insulin, glucose intolerance (GI), the relationship of the presence of certain polymorphisms related to MetS, and the response to the DP. In this randomized trial, the participants consumed their habitual diet but reduced by 500 kcal for 2 wk. They were then assigned to the placebo (P; n = 35) or DP (n = 32) group and consumed the reduced energy diet plus the P or DP beverage (235 kcal) minus the energy provided by these for 2 mo. All participants had decreases in body weight (BW), BMI, and waist circumference during the 2-mo treatment (P < 0.0001); however, only the DP group had decreases in serum TG, C-reactive protein (CRP), and AUC for insulin and GI after a glucose tolerance test. Interestingly, participants in the DP group with MetS and the ABCA1 R230C variant had a greater decrease in BW and an increase in serum adiponectin concentration after 2 mo of dietary treatment than those with the ABCA1 R230R variant. The results from this study suggest that lifestyle interventions involving specific DP for the treatment of MetS could be more effective if local foods and genetic variations of the population are considered.

  10. [Fructose and fructose intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2016-10-01

    Although fructose was discovered in 1794, it was realised in recent decades only that its malabsorption can lead to intestinal symptoms while its excessive consumption induces metabolic disturbances. Fructose is a monosaccharide found naturally in most fruits and vegetables. Dietary intake of fructose has gradually increased in the past decades, especially because of the consumption of high fructose corn syrup. With its 16.4 kg/year consumption, Hungary ranks secondly after the United States. Fructose is absorbed in the small intestine by facilitated transport mediated by glucose transporter proteins-2 and -5, and arrives in the liver cells. Here it is transformed enzymatically into fructose-1-phosphate and then, fructose-1,5-diphosphate, which splits further into glyceraldehyde and dihydroxyacetone-phosphate, entering the process of glycolysis, triglyceride and uric acid production. The prevalence of fructose intolerance varies strongly, depending on the method used. The leading symptoms of fructose intolerance are similar, but less severe than those of lactose intolerance. Multiple secondary symptoms can also occur. A symptom-based diagnosis of fructose intolerance is possible, but the gold standard is the H 2 breath test, though this is less accurate than in lactose testing. Measuring fructosaemia is costly, cumbersome and not widely used. Fructose intolerance increases intestinal motility and sensitivity, promotes biofilm formation and contributes to the development of gastrooesophageal reflux. Long-term use of fructose fosters the development of dental caries and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Its role in carcinogenesis is presently investigated. The cornerstone of dietary management for fructose intolerance is the individual reduction of fructose intake and the FODMAP diet, led by a trained dietetician. The newly introduced xylose-isomerase is efficient in reducing the symptoms of fructose intolerance. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(43), 1708-1716.

  11. Enhanced glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) response to oral glucose in glucose-intolerant HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O; Haugaard, S B; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    concentrations of GLP-1 and GIP were determined frequently during a 3-h, 75-g glucose tolerance test. Insulin secretion rates (ISRs) were calculated by deconvolution of C-peptide concentrations. RESULTS: The incremental area under the curve (incrAUC) for GLP-1 was increased by 250% in IGT patients compared...... with NGT patients (1455+/-422 vs. 409+/-254 pmol/L/180 min, respectively; PISR incr......, which may represent a compensatory mechanism rather than explain the IGT; (2) that the GIP response may be associated with ISR independently of plasma glucose in nondiabetic HIV-infected males on HAART....

  12. Lactose Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abdominal pain Lactose intolerance Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  13. Lactose Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lactose intolerance means that you cannot digest foods with lactose in them. Lactose is the sugar found in milk and foods made with milk. After eating foods with lactose in them, you may feel sick to your ...

  14. Cold intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Causes Some causes of cold intolerance are: Anemia Anorexia nervosa Blood vessel problems, such as Raynaud phenomenon ... of being cold? Medical history: What is your diet like? How is your general health? What are ...

  15. Intestine-specific deletion of acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) 2 protects mice from diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David W; Gao, Yu; Yen, Mei-I; Yen, Chi-Liang Eric

    2014-06-20

    The absorption of dietary fat involves the re-esterification of digested triacylglycerol in the enterocytes, a process catalyzed by acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) 2. Mice without a functional gene encoding MGAT2 (Mogat2(-/-)) are protected from diet-induced obesity. Surprisingly, these mice absorb normal amounts of dietary fat but increase their energy expenditure. MGAT2 is expressed in tissues besides intestine, including adipose tissue in both mice and humans. To test the hypothesis that intestinal MGAT2 regulates systemic energy balance, we generated and characterized mice deficient in MGAT2 specifically in the small intestine (Mogat2(IKO)). We found that, like Mogat2(-/-) mice, Mogat2(IKO) mice also showed a delay in fat absorption, a decrease in food intake, and a propensity to use fatty acids as fuel when first exposed to a high fat diet. Mogat2(IKO) mice increased energy expenditure although to a lesser degree than Mogat2(-/-) mice and were protected against diet-induced weight gain and associated comorbidities, including hepatic steatosis, hypercholesterolemia, and glucose intolerance. These findings illustrate that intestinal lipid metabolism plays a crucial role in the regulation of systemic energy balance and may be a feasible intervention target. In addition, they suggest that MGAT activity in extraintestinal tissues may also modulate energy metabolism. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Untargeted mass spectrometric approach in metabolic healthy offspring of patients with type 2 diabetes reveals medium-chain acylcarnitine as potential biomarker for lipid induced glucose intolerance (LGIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knebel, Birgit; Mack, Susanne; Lehr, Stefan; Barsch, Aiko; Schiller, Martina; Haas, Jutta; Lange, Simone; Fuchser, Jens; Zurek, Gabriela; Müller-Wieland, Dirk; Kotzka, Jorg

    2016-12-01

    Offspring of type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients have increased risk to develop diabetes, due to inherited genetic susceptibility that directly interferes with the individual adaption to environmental conditions. We characterise T2D offspring (OSP) to identify metabolic risk markers for early disease prediction. Plasma of metabolically healthy OSP individuals (n = 43) was investigated after an oral lipid tolerance test (oLTT) by an untargeted mass spectrometric approach for holistic metabolome analyses. Two subgroups of OSP probands can be separated by oLTT, although not differing in general clinical parameters. Analyses of the plasma metabolome revealed mainly medium-chain acylcarnitines and very long-chain fatty acids with differential abundance in the subgroups. The study presented indicates that metabolically healthy OSP of T2D patients differ upon metabolic challenging in serum metabolite composition, especially medium-chain acylcarnitines. The difference suggest that postprandial lipid induced glucose intolerance (LGIT) may serve as a further valuable marker for early diabetes prediction.

  17. The effective fraction isolated from Radix Astragali alleviates glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia in db/db diabetic mice through its anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, Ruby Lc; Wong, Janice Yl; Qiao, Cf; Xu, A; Xu, Hx; Lam, Karen Sl

    2010-08-24

    Macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue together with the aberrant production of pro-inflammatory cytokines has been identified as the key link between obesity and its related metabolic disorders. This study aims to isolate bioactive ingredients from the traditional Chinese herb Radix Astragali (Huangqi) that alleviate obesity-induced metabolic damage through inhibiting inflammation. Active fraction (Rx) that inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokine production was identified from Radix Astragali by repeated bioactivity-guided high-throughput screening. Major constituents in Rx were identified by column chromatography followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass-spectrometry. Anti-diabetic activity of Rx was evaluated in db/db mice. Treatment with Rx, which included calycosin-7-β-D-glucoside (0.9%), ononin (1.2%), calycosin (4.53%) and formononetin (1.1%), significantly reduced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1) in human THP-1 macrophages and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of NF-κB in mouse RAW-Blue macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Chronic administration of Rx in db/db obese mice markedly decreased the levels of both fed and fasting glucose, reduced serum triglyceride, and also alleviated insulin resistance and glucose intolerance when compared to vehicle-treated controls. The mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cell markers CD68 and F4/80, and cytokines MCP-1, TNF-α and IL-6 were significantly reduced in epididymal adipose tissue while the alternatively activated macrophage marker arginase I was markedly increased in the Rx-treated mice. These findings suggest that suppression of the inflammation pathways in macrophages represents a valid strategy for high-throughput screening of lead compounds with anti-diabetic and insulin sensitizing properties, and further support the etiological role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of obesity-related metabolic disorders.

  18. The effective fraction isolated from Radix Astragali alleviates glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia in db/db diabetic mice through its anti-inflammatory activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoo Ruby LC

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue together with the aberrant production of pro-inflammatory cytokines has been identified as the key link between obesity and its related metabolic disorders. This study aims to isolate bioactive ingredients from the traditional Chinese herb Radix Astragali (Huangqi that alleviate obesity-induced metabolic damage through inhibiting inflammation. Methods Active fraction (Rx that inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokine production was identified from Radix Astragali by repeated bioactivity-guided high-throughput screening. Major constituents in Rx were identified by column chromatography followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and mass-spectrometry. Anti-diabetic activity of Rx was evaluated in db/db mice. Results Treatment with Rx, which included calycosin-7-β-D-glucoside (0.9%, ononin (1.2%, calycosin (4.53% and formononetin (1.1%, significantly reduced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1 in human THP-1 macrophages and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced activation of NF-κB in mouse RAW-Blue macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Chronic administration of Rx in db/db obese mice markedly decreased the levels of both fed and fasting glucose, reduced serum triglyceride, and also alleviated insulin resistance and glucose intolerance when compared to vehicle-treated controls. The mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cell markers CD68 and F4/80, and cytokines MCP-1, TNF-α and IL-6 were significantly reduced in epididymal adipose tissue while the alternatively activated macrophage marker arginase I was markedly increased in the Rx-treated mice. Conclusion These findings suggest that suppression of the inflammation pathways in macrophages represents a valid strategy for high-throughput screening of lead compounds with anti-diabetic and insulin sensitizing properties, and further support the etiological role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of

  19. Risk of glucose intolerance and gestational diabetes mellitus in relation to maternal habitual snoring during early pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chunfang; Lawrence, Wayne; Gelaye, Bizu; Stoner, Lee; Frederick, Ihunnaya O; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Sorensen, Tanya K; Williams, Michelle A

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) or habitual snoring is known to be associated with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes among both men and non-pregnant women. We examined the association of habitual snoring during early pregnancy with risk of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). A cohort of 1,579 women was interviewed during early pregnancy. We collected information about snoring frequency during early pregnancy. Results from screening and diagnostic tests for IGT and GDM were abstracted from medical records. Multivariate logistic regression models were fitted to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of IGT and GDM associated with snoring in early pregnancy. Overall, women who snored "most or all of the time" had a 2.1-fold increased odds of IGT (OR 2.10; 95% CI 1.31-3.35) and a 2.5-fold increased odds of GDM (OR 2.50; 95% CI 1.34-4.67) as compared with women who never snored. Compared with lean women (pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) snore, lean snorers had a 2-fold increased odds of GDM (OR = 1.99, 95% CI: 1.07-3.68). The odds of GDM risk was particularly elevated among overweight women (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) who snored (OR = 5.01; 95% CI 2.71-9.26). However, there was no evidence of an interaction between overweight and snoring with GDM risk (p-value = 0.144). These findings, if confirmed, may have important implications for tailoring prenatal care for overweight pregnant women, and /or those with a history of habitual snoring in early pregnancy.

  20. Oral salmon calcitonin protects against impaired fasting glycemia, glucose intolerance, and obesity induced by high-fat diet and ovariectomy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigh, Michael; Andreassen, Kim V; Hjuler, Sara T; Nielsen, Rasmus H; Christiansen, Claus; Henriksen, Kim; Karsdal, Morten A

    2013-07-01

    Oral salmon calcitonin (sCT) has demonstrated clinical efficacy in treating osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. The postmenopausal state is also associated with obesity-related insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of oral sCT on energy and glucose homeostasis in high-fat diet (HFD)- and ovariectomy (OVX)-induced obese rats. Furthermore, the weight-regulatory and gluco-regulatory effects of short-term oral sCT intervention on HFD-induced obese rats were explored. For prevention, female rats exposed to HFD with or without OVX were treated with oral sCT for 5 weeks. As intervention, HFD-induced obese male rats were treated with oral sCT for 4 days. Body weight, food intake, and plasma glucose, insulin, and leptin levels were measured, and the clinical homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index was calculated. In addition, oral glucose tolerance was evaluated in the systemic and portal circulations. For prevention, oral sCT reduced body weight by ∼16% to 19% (P fasting glycemia (P obesity. Furthermore, oral sCT significantly reduced the incremental area under the curve for plasma glucose and insulin by ∼40% and ∼70%, respectively, during glucose tolerance testing. As intervention in HFD-induced obese rats, oral sCT reduced body weight, fasting glycemia, and insulinemia in conjunction with HOMA-IR (P obese rats, indicating the clinical usefulness of oral sCT in postmenopausal obesity-related IR and type 2 diabetes.

  1. [Lactose intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Jorge L

    2016-09-01

    The most common problem limiting milk consumption worldwide is lactose intolerance (LI), which is defined as the experience of gastrointestinal symptoms due to the intake of lactose-containing food. When symptoms ensue the intake of milk, the condition is referred as milk intolerance, and it may or may not be due to LI. The most common cause of LI is primary lactase deficiency which occurs in 30% of Mexican adults when one glass of milk is consumed (12-18 g of lactose). LI occurs in less than 15% of adults after the intake of this dose of lactose. Another cause of lactose intolerance is due to secondary lactase deficiency, which occurs because lactase is reduced due to diseases that affect the intestinal mucosa. Lactose intolerance can be eliminated or significantly reduced by elimination or reduction of the intake of milk and milk containing products. Recent studies demonstrate that when β-casein-A1 contained in milk is hydrolyzed it produces β-casomorphine-7 which is an opioid associated with milk intolerance.

  2. Secreted factors from dental pulp stem cells improve glucose intolerance in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice by increasing pancreatic β-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumoto-Akita, Takako; Tsunekawa, Shin; Yamamoto, Akihito; Uenishi, Eita; Ishikawa, Kota; Ogata, Hidetada; Iida, Atsushi; Ikeniwa, Makoto; Hosokawa, Kaori; Niwa, Yasuhiro; Maekawa, Ryuya; Yamauchi, Yuichiro; Seino, Yusuke; Hamada, Yoji; Hibi, Hideharu; Arima, Hiroshi; Ueda, Minoru; Oiso, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have reported that stem cell transplantation promotes propagation and protection of pancreatic β-cells in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice without the differentiation of transplanted cells into pancreatic β-cells, suggesting that the improvement is due to a paracrine effect of the transplanted cells. We investigated the effects of factors secreted by dental pulp stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) on β-cell function and survival. Conditioned medium from SHED (SHED-CM) was collected 48 h after culturing in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM). The insulin levels in SHED-CM and serum-free conditioned media from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-CM) were undetectable. STZ-induced diabetic male C57B/6J mice were injected with DMEM as a control, SHED-CM, exendin-4 (Ex-4), or BM-CM for 14 days. Mouse pancreatic β-cell line MIN6 cells were incubated with different concentrations of STZ with SHED-CM, DMEM, Ex-4, or BM-CM for 6 h. Administration of 1 mL of SHED-CM twice a day improved glucose intolerance in STZ-induced diabetic mice and the effect continued for 20 days after the end of treatment. SHED-CM treatment increased pancreatic insulin content and β-cell mass through proliferation and an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test revealed enhanced insulin secretion. Incubation of MIN6 cells (a mouse pancreatic β-cell line) with SHED-CM enhanced insulin secretion in a glucose concentration-dependent manner and reduced STZ-induced cell death, indicating that the amelioration of hyperglycemia was caused by the direct effects of SHED-CM on β-cell function and survival. These effects were more pronounced than with the use of Ex-4, a conventional incretin-based drug, and BM-CM, which is a medium derived from other stem cells. These findings suggest that SHED-CM provides direct protection and encourages the propagation of β-cells, and has potential as a novel strategy for treatment

  3. FoxO1 gain of function in the pancreas causes glucose intolerance, polycystic pancreas, and islet hypervascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Kikuchi

    Full Text Available Genetic studies revealed that the ablation of insulin/IGF-1 signaling in the pancreas causes diabetes. FoxO1 is a downstream transcription factor of insulin/IGF-1 signaling. We previously reported that FoxO1 haploinsufficiency restored β cell mass and rescued diabetes in IRS2 knockout mice. However, it is still unclear whether FoxO1 dysregulation in the pancreas could be the cause of diabetes. To test this hypothesis, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing constitutively active FoxO1 specifically in the pancreas (TG. TG mice had impaired glucose tolerance and some of them indeed developed diabetes due to the reduction of β cell mass, which is associated with decreased Pdx1 and MafA in β cells. We also observed increased proliferation of pancreatic duct epithelial cells in TG mice and some mice developed a polycystic pancreas as they aged. Furthermore, TG mice exhibited islet hypervascularities due to increased VEGF-A expression in β cells. We found FoxO1 binds to the VEGF-A promoter and regulates VEGF-A transcription in β cells. We propose that dysregulation of FoxO1 activity in the pancreas could account for the development of diabetes and pancreatic cysts.

  4. Lactose Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A health care provider will tell the patient what foods or medications to avoid before the test. • Stool ... and www.nccam.nih.gov. 7  Lactose Intolerance What products contain lactose? Lactose is present in many food products and in some medications. Food Products Lactose ...

  5. Intolerant tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushf, G

    1994-04-01

    The Hyde Amendment and Roman Catholic attempts to put restrictions on Title X funding have been criticized for being intolerant. However, such criticism fails to appreciate that there are two competing notions of tolerance, one focusing on the limits of state force and accepting pluralism as unavoidable, and the other focusing on the limits of knowledge and advancing pluralism as a good. These two types of tolerance, illustrated in the writings of John Locke and J.S. Mill, each involve an intolerance. In a pluralistic context where the free exercise of religion is respected, John Locke's account of tolerance is preferable. However, it (in a reconstructed form) leads to a minimal state. Positive entitlements to benefits like artificial contraception or nontherapeutic abortions can legitimately be resisted, because an intolerance has already been shown with respect to those that consider the benefit immoral, since their resources have been coopted by taxation to advance an end that is contrary to their own. There is a sliding scale from tolerance (viewed as forbearance) to the affirmation of communal integrity, and this scale maps on to the continuum from negative to positive rights.

  6. Chemical intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz; Andersson, Linus; Nordin, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Chemical intolerance (CI) is a term used to describe a condition in which the sufferer experiences a complex array of recurrent unspecific symptoms attributed to low-level chemical exposure that most people regard as unproblematic. Severe CI constitutes the distinguishing feature of multiple...... chemical sensitivity (MCS). The symptoms reported by CI subjects are manifold, involving symptoms from multiple organs systems. In severe cases of CI, the condition can cause considerable life-style limitations with severe social, occupational and economic consequences. As no diagnostic tools for CI...

  7. Potentiation of insulin secretion and improvement of glucose intolerance by combining a novel G protein-coupled receptor 40 agonist DS-1558 with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Ryutaro; Yano, Tatsuya; Ogawa, Junko; Tanaka, Naomi; Toda, Narihiro; Yoshida, Masao; Takano, Rieko; Inoue, Masahiro; Honda, Takeshi; Kume, Shoen; Matsumoto, Koji

    2014-08-15

    G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) is a Gq-coupled receptor for free fatty acids predominantly expressed in pancreatic β-cells. In recent years, GPR40 agonists have been investigated for use as novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. We discovered a novel small molecule GPR40 agonist, (3S)-3-ethoxy-3-(4-{[(1R)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl]oxy}phenyl)propanoic acid (DS-1558). The GPR40-mediated effects of DS-1558 on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were evaluated in isolated islets from GPR40 knock-out and wild-type (littermate) mice. The GPR40-mediated effects on glucose tolerance and insulin secretion were also confirmed by an oral glucose tolerance test in these mice. Furthermore, oral administration of DS-1558 (0.03, 0.1 and 0.3mg/kg) significantly and dose-dependently improved hyperglycemia and increased insulin secretion during the oral glucose tolerance test in Zucker fatty rats, the model of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Next, we examined the combination effects of DS-1558 with glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1). DS-1558 not only increased the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by GLP-1 but also potentiated the maximum insulinogenic effects of GLP-1 after an intravenous glucose injection in normal Sprague Dawley rats. Furthermore, the glucose lowering effects of exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, were markedly potentiated by the DS-1558 (3mg/kg) add-on in diabetic db/db mice during an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. In conclusion, our results indicate that add-on GPR40 agonists to GLP-1 related agents might be a potential treatment compared to single administration of these compounds. Therefore the combinations of these agents are a novel therapeutic option for type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Feeding Intolerance in Children with Severe Impairment of the Central Nervous System: Strategies for Treatment and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Julie

    2017-12-22

    Children with severe impairment of the central nervous system (CNS) experience gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms at a high rate and severity, including retching, vomiting, GI tract pain, and feeding intolerance. Commonly recognized sources of symptoms include constipation and gastroesophageal reflux disease. There is growing awareness of sources due to the impaired nervous system, including visceral hyperalgesia due to sensitization of sensory neurons in the enteric nervous system and central neuropathic pain due to alterations in the thalamus. Challenging the management of these symptoms is the lack of tests to confirm alterations in the nervous system as a cause of symptom generation, requiring empirical trials directed at such sources. It is also common to have multiple reasons for the observed symptoms, further challenging management. Recurrent emesis and GI tract pain can often be improved, though in some not completely eliminated. In some, this can progress to intractable feeding intolerance. This comprehensive review provides an evidence-based approach to care, a framework for recurrent symptoms, and language strategies when symptoms remain intractable to available interventions. This summary is intended to balance optimal management with a sensitive palliative care approach to persistent GI symptoms in children with severe impairment of the CNS.

  9. Suspension Trauma / Orthostatic Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Technology Assessment Printer Friendly Version Suspension Trauma/Orthostatic Intolerance Safety and Health Information Bulletin SHIB 03-24- ... with important information about the hazards of orthostatic intolerance and suspension trauma when using fall arrest systems. ...

  10. Hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fructosemia; Fructose intolerance; Fructose aldolase B-deficiency; Fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase deficiency ... substances build up in the liver. Hereditary fructose intolerance is inherited, which means it can be passed ...

  11. Lactose Intolerance (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Lactose Intolerance KidsHealth / For Parents / Lactose Intolerance What's in ... Print en español Intolerancia a la lactosa About Lactose Intolerance For many kids, an ice cream sundae ...

  12. Growth hormone receptor antagonist transgenic mice are protected from hyperinsulinemia and glucose intolerance despite obesity when placed on a HF diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianxu; Householder, Lara A; Lubbers, Ellen R; List, Edward O; Troike, Katie; Vesel, Clare; Duran-Ortiz, Silvana; Kopchick, John J; Berryman, Darlene E

    2015-02-01

    Reduced GH levels have been associated with improved glucose metabolism and increased longevity despite obesity in multiple mouse lines. However, one mouse line, the GH receptor antagonist (GHA) transgenic mouse, defies this trend because it has reduced GH action and increased adiposity, but glucose metabolism and life span are similar to controls. Slight differences in glucose metabolism and adiposity profiles can become exaggerated on a high-fat (HF) diet. Thus, in this study, male and female GHA and wild-type (WT) mice in a C57BL/6 background were placed on HF and low-fat (LF) diets for 11 weeks, starting at 10 weeks of age, to assess how GHA mice respond to additional metabolic stress of HF feeding. On a HF diet, all mice showed significant weight gain, although GHA gained weight more dramatically than WT mice, with males gaining more than females. Most of this weight gain was due to an increase in fat mass with WT mice increasing primarily in the white adipose tissue perigonadal depots, whereas GHA mice gained in both the sc and perigonadal white adipose tissue regions. Notably, GHA mice were somewhat protected from detrimental glucose metabolism changes on a HF diet because they had only modest increases in serum glucose levels, remained glucose tolerant, and did not develop hyperinsulinemia. Sex differences were observed in many measures with males reacting more dramatically to both a reduction in GH action and HF diet. In conclusion, our findings show that GHA mice, which are already obese, are susceptible to further adipose tissue expansion with HF feeding while remaining resilient to alterations in glucose homeostasis.

  13. Consumption of Honey, Sucrose, and High-Fructose Corn Syrup Produces Similar Metabolic Effects in Glucose-Tolerant and -Intolerant Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raatz, Susan K; Johnson, LuAnn K; Picklo, Matthew J

    2015-10-01

    Public health recommendations call for a reduction in added sugars; however, controversy exists over whether all nutritive sweeteners produce similar metabolic effects. The objective was to compare the effects of the chronic consumption of 3 nutritive sweeteners [honey, sucrose, and high-fructose corn syrup containing 55% fructose (HFCS55)] on circulating glucose, insulin, lipids, and inflammatory markers; body weight; and blood pressure in individuals with normal glucose tolerance (GT) and those with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). In a crossover design, participants consumed daily, in random order, 50 g carbohydrate from assigned sweeteners for 2 wk with a 2- to 4-wk washout period between treatments. Participants included 28 GT and 27 IGT volunteers with a mean age of 38.9 ± 3.6 y and 52.1 ± 2.7 y, respectively, and a body mass index (in kg/m(2)) of 26 ± 0.8 and 31.5 ± 1.0, respectively. Body weight, blood pressure (BP), serum inflammatory markers, lipids, fasting glucose and insulin, and oral-glucose-tolerance tests (OGTTs) were completed pre- and post-treatment. The OGTT incremental areas under the curve (iAUCs) for glucose and insulin were determined and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) scores were calculated. Body weight and serum glucose, insulin, inflammatory markers, and total and LDL-cholesterol concentrations were significantly higher in the IGT group than in the GT group at baseline. Glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, and the OGTT iAUC for glucose or insulin did not differ by treatment, but all responses were significantly higher in the IGT group compared with the GT group. Body weight was unchanged by treatment. Systolic BP was unchanged, whereas diastolic BP was significantly lower in response to sugar intake across all treatments. An increase in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) was observed in the IGT group in response to all sugars. No treatment effect was observed for interleukin 6. HDL cholesterol did not

  14. Long-term effects of fluoxetine on glycemic control in obese patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or glucose intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Leif; Bjerre, U; Bak, J F

    1995-01-01

    Fluoxetine (F) is a specific serotonin-reuptake inhibitor that has been shown to promote weight loss and improve glycemic control in obese diabetic patients. To study its long-term metabolic effect, 40 obese patients with non-insulin -dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or impaired glucose tolera...

  15. Long-term effects of fluoxetine on glycemic control in obese patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or glucose intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Leif; Bjerre, U; Bak, J F

    1995-01-01

    Fluoxetine (F) is a specific serotonin-reuptake inhibitor that has been shown to promote weight loss and improve glycemic control in obese diabetic patients. To study its long-term metabolic effect, 40 obese patients with non-insulin -dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or impaired glucose...

  16. Rationale, design, and method of the Diabetes & Women's Health study – a study of long-term health implications of glucose intolerance in pregnancy and their determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Cuilin; Hu, Frank B; Olsen, Sjurdur F

    2014-01-01

    Women who develop gestational diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance during pregnancy are at substantially increased risk for type 2 diabetes and comorbidities after pregnancy. Little is known about the role of genetic factors and their interactions with environmental factors...... diabetes mellitus in two existing prospective cohorts, the Nurses' Health Study II and the Danish National Birth Cohort. Women who had a medical history of gestational diabetes mellitus in one or more of their pregnancies are eligible for the present study. After enrollment, we follow study participants...... for an additional 2 years to collect updated information on major clinical and environmental factors that may predict type 2 diabetes mellitus risk as well as with biospecimens to measure genetic and biochemical markers implicated in glucose metabolism. Newly collected data will be appended to the relevant existing...

  17. Aldolase B knockdown prevents high glucose-induced methylglyoxal overproduction and cellular dysfunction in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghai Liu

    Full Text Available We used cultured endothelial cells as a model to examine whether up-regulation of aldolase B and enhanced methylglyoxal (MG formation play an important role in high glucose-induced overproduction of advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGEs, oxidative stress and cellular dysfunction. High glucose (25 mM incubation up-regulated mRNA levels of aldose reductase (an enzyme converting glucose to fructose and aldolase B (a key enzyme that catalyzes MG formation from fructose and enhanced MG formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and HUVEC-derived EA. hy926 cells. High glucose-increased MG production in EA. hy926 cells was completely prevented by siRNA knockdown of aldolase B, but unaffected by siRNA knockdown of aldolase A, an enzyme responsible for MG formation during glycolysis. In addition, inhibition of cytochrome P450 2E1 or semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase which produces MG during the metabolism of lipid and proteins, respectively, did not alter MG production. Both high glucose (25 mM and MG (30, 100 µM increased the formation of N(ε-carboxyethyl-lysine (CEL, a MG-induced AGE, oxidative stress (determined by the generation of oxidized DCF, H(2O(2, protein carbonyls and 8-oxo-dG, O-GlcNAc modification (product of the hexosamine pathway, membrane protein kinase C activity and nuclear translocation of NF-κB in EA. hy926 cells. However, the above metabolic and signaling alterations induced by high glucose were completely prevented by knockdown of aldolase B and partially by application of aminoguanidine (a MG scavenger or alagebrium (an AGEs breaker. In conclusion, efficient inhibition of aldolase B can prevent high glucose-induced overproduction of MG and related cellular dysfunction in endothelial cells.

  18. Estudo da freqüência de diabetes mellitus e intolerância à glicose em pacientes com fibrose cística Study of the frequency of diabetes mellitus and glucose intolerance in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia A.A. de Castro

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a freqüência de diabetes mellitus (DM e de intolerância à glicose nos pacientes com fibrose cística seguidos no Serviço de Gastropediatria do HC-FMRP-USP. MÉTODOS: foi realizado estudo analítico transversal de um grupo de 25 pacientes mucoviscidóticos do HC-FMRP-USP. Foram realizados testes orais de tolerância à glicose (OGTT com determinação concomitante da glicemia e da insulinemia. Foram obtidas áreas sob as curvas da glicemia (G e da insulinemia (I e calculada a relação I/G, correlacionando-as com o tempo de doença clinicamente manifesta e função exócrina pancreática. RESULTADOS: cinco pacientes apresentaram alterações: um é diabético e quatro são intolerantes à glicose e/ou hiperinsulinêmicos. Há correlação direta entre a área sob a curva de insulinemia e o tempo de mucoviscidose. Verificou-se também relação inversa estatisticamente significativa entre a área sob a curva de insulinemia e o índice I/G com o número de cápsulas de enzima/kg/dia. CONCLUSÕES: a freqüência de alterações na homeostase glicêmica nos mucoviscidóticos estudados é maior que na população em geral (20% da amostra total e 33% do grupo de pacientes com glicemia e insulinemia no OGTT. Assim, é importante a realização sistemática de testes de tolerância à glicose em mucoviscidóticos, visando à detecção precoce de anormalidades metabólicas para adequado tratamento.ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of diabetes mellitus and glucose intolerance in patients with cystic fibrosis treated at the Pediatric Gastroenterology Service of HC-FMRP-USP. METHODS: A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted on a group of 25 patients with mucoviscidosis who were followed up at HC-FMRP-USP. Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT were performed, with simultaneous determination of glycemia and insulinemia. Areas under the curve were obtained for glycemia (G and insulinemia (I and the I/G ratio was

  19. Clinical utility of clodronate in the prevention and management of osteoporosis in patients intolerant of oral bisphosphonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Grimaldi, Antonella; Calcagnile, Fabio; Quarta, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Bisphosphonates have a long history in the treatment of osteoporosis and bone-related disease. This review focuses on the use of a specific nonaminobisphosphonate, clodronate, which appears to be much better tolerated than other bisphosphonates and free of high-risk contraindications. Specifically, this paper reviews its use in the prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, taking into account its tolerability profile and recent safety issues arising regarding the use of bisphosphonates.

  20. Clinical utility of clodronate in the prevention and management of osteoporosis in patients intolerant of oral bisphosphonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Grimaldi, Antonella; Calcagnile, Fabio; Quarta, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Bisphosphonates have a long history in the treatment of osteoporosis and bone-related disease. This review focuses on the use of a specific nonaminobisphosphonate, clodronate, which appears to be much better tolerated than other bisphosphonates and free of high-risk contraindications. Specifically, this paper reviews its use in the prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, taking into account its tolerability profile and recent safety issues arising regarding the use of bisphosphonates. PMID:22087064

  1. [Progress on the research of lactose intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Sai, X Y

    2016-02-01

    Our group generalized the research development of lactose intolerance, both internationally and nationally. We systematically reviewed the pathogenesis, genetic polymorphisms of lactase deficiency, relevant progress of diagnostic methods and treatment. Through this systematic review, we undedrstood that there were insufficient research efforts made on understanding the epidemiological feature of lactose intolerance in this country. Relevant genetic mutations of people were also not clear, neither the development of simple and effective diagnosis method made. We should continue to extensively and deeply carry out the study regarding methods for early prevention and intervention on lactose intolerance.

  2. Clinical utility of clodronate in the prevention and management of osteoporosis in patients intolerant of oral bisphosphonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muratore M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Muratore, Eugenio Quarta, Antonella Grimaldi, Fabio Calcagnile, Laura Quarta Department of Rheumatology, Hospital Galateo, San Cesario di Lecce, Italy Abstract: Bisphosphonates have a long history in the treatment of osteoporosis and bone-related disease. This review focuses on the use of a specific nonaminobisphosphonate, clodronate, which appears to be much better tolerated than other bisphosphonates and free of high-risk contraindications. Specifically, this paper reviews its use in the prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, taking into account its tolerability profile and recent safety issues arising regarding the use of bisphosphonates. Keywords: clodronate, bisphosphonates, osteoporosis, bone turnover, menopause, tolerability

  3. Disassembly of the actin network inhibits insulin-dependent stimulation of glucose transport and prevents recruitment of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakiridis, T; Vranic, M; Klip, A

    1994-11-25

    In muscle and fat tissues, insulin stimulates glucose transport through the translocation of glucose transporter proteins from an intracellular storage pool to the plasma membrane. The mechanism of this translocation is unknown. We have examined the possible role of the actin microfilament network in the stimulation of glucose transport by insulin and on the distribution of glucose transporters, in differentiated L6 rat skeletal muscle cells. Insulin (10(-7) M for 30 min) caused a major reorganization of the actin network of differentiated L6 myotubes. Cytochalasin D, a widely used inhibitor of actin filament formation, caused a dose- and time-dependent disassembly of the actin network, which was associated with an 80% inhibition of the insulin stimulation of glucose transport, without affecting the basal rate of glucose uptake. L6 myotubes express three glucose transporter isoforms, named GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4. Disassembly of the actin network by cytochalasin D did not affect the number of basal glucose transporters in the plasma membrane but reduced the content of all three glucose transporters in intracellular membranes and prevented their appearance at the plasma membrane response to insulin. The inhibitory effect of cytochalasin D treatment on the insulin stimulation of glucose transport occurred downstream of tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor substrate-1 and of binding of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase to the insulin receptor substrate-1. Using immunoprecipitation of intact membranes, we detected specific association of the actin-binding protein spectrin with GLUT4 glucose transporter-containing vesicles. We conclude that an intact actin network is required for the correct intracellular localization of glucose transporters, as well as for their incorporation into the plasma membrane in response to insulin. A direct interaction may exist between the actin network and the glucose transporter vesicles which may be mediated through a spectrin

  4. Pharmacokinetics of metformin in patients with gastrointestinal intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mccreight, Laura J.; Stage, Tore B.; Connelly, Paul

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Metformin intolerance symptoms are gastrointestinal in nature, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess potential causes of metformin intolerance including: altered metformin uptake from the intestine; increased anaerobic glucose utilisation...... and subsequent lactate production; altered serotonin uptake; and altered bile acid pool. METHODS: This pharmacokinetic study recruited ten severely intolerant and ten tolerant individuals matched for age, sex and BMI. A single 500mg dose of metformin was administered, with blood sampling at eleven time points...... over 24 hours. Blood samples were analysed for metformin, lactate, serotonin, and bile acid concentrations and compared across the phenotypes. RESULTS: The intolerant individuals were severely intolerant to 500mg metformin. No significant difference was identified between tolerant and intolerant...

  5. NN2211: a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 derivative with anti-diabetic effects in glucose-intolerant pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribel, Ulla; Larsen, Marianne O; Rolin, Bidda

    2002-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an effective anti-diabetic agent, but its metabolic instability makes it therapeutically unsuitable. This study investigated the pharmacodynamics of a long-acting GLP-1 derivative (NN2211: (Arg(34)Lys(26)-(N- epsilon -(gamma-Glu(N-alpha-hexadecanoyl)))-GLP-1...... a hyperglycaemic glucose clamp and chronic treatment results in better daily metabolic control. Therefore, NN2211, a GLP-1 derivative that can be administered once daily, holds promise as a new anti-diabetic drug with a minimal risk of hypoglycaemia....

  6. Proanthocyanidins Prevent High Glucose-Induced Eye Malformation by Restoring Pax6 Expression in Chick Embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Rong Tan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is one of the leading causes of offspring malformations, in which eye malformation is an important disease. It has raised demand for therapy to improve fetal outcomes. In this study, we used chick embryo to establish a GDM model to study the protective effects of proanthocyanidins on eye development. Chick embryos were exposed to high glucose (0.2 mmol/egg on embryo development day (EDD 1. Proanthocyanidins (1 and 10 nmol/egg were injected into the air sac on EDD 0. Results showed that both dosages of proanthocyanidins could prevent the eye malformation and rescue the high glucose-induced oxidative stress significantly, which the similar effects were showed in edaravone. However, proanthocyanidins could not decrease the glucose concentration of embryo eye. Moreover, the key genes regulating eye development, Pax6, was down-regulated by high glucose. Proanthocyanidins could restore the suppressed expression of Pax6. These results indicated proanthocyanidins might be a promising natural agent to prevent high glucose-induced eye malformation by restoring Pax6 expression.

  7. Statin intolerance - a question of definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algharably, Engi Abdel-Hady; Filler, Iris; Rosenfeld, Stephanie; Grabowski, Katja; Kreutz, Reinhold

    2017-01-01

    Statin therapy is the backbone of pharmacologic therapy for low-density lipoproteins cholesterol lowering and plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular disease prevention. Statin intolerance is understood as the inability to continue using a statin to reduce individual cardiovascular risk sufficiently, due to the development of symptoms or laboratory abnormalities attributable to the initiation or dose escalation of a statin. Muscle symptoms are the most common side effects observed. Areas covered: The main aim of this article is to present a review on published definitions of statin intolerance. In addition, a brief review on clinical aspects and risk factors of statin intolerance is provided and features for a common definition for statin intolerance are suggested. Expert opinion: A definition of statin intolerance by major drug regulatory agencies is not available. In clinical studies, different definitions are chosen and results are not comparable; different medical associations do not agree on one common definition. There is an unmet need to establish a common definition of statin intolerance to ensure an appropriate clinical use of this important drug class. Further work is required to develop a consensus definition on statin intolerance that could have significant positive impact on both research and clinical management.

  8. T-lymphocyte responses to intestinally absorbed antigens can contribute to adipose tissue inflammation and glucose intolerance during high fat feeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehui Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with inflammation of visceral adipose tissues, which increases the risk for insulin resistance. Animal models suggest that T-lymphocyte infiltration is an important early step, although it is unclear why these cells are attracted. We have recently demonstrated that dietary triglycerides, major components of high fat diets, promote intestinal absorption of a protein antigen (ovalbumin, "OVA". The antigen was partly transported on chylomicrons, which are prominently cleared in adipose tissues. We hypothesized that intestinally absorbed gut antigens may cause T-lymphocyte associated inflammation in adipose tissue. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Triglyceride absorption promoted intestinal absorption of OVA into adipose tissue, in a chylomicron-dependent manner. Absorption tended to be higher in mesenteric than subcutaneous adipose tissue, and was lowest in gonadal tissue. OVA immunoreactivity was detected in stromal vascular cells, including endothelial cells. In OVA-sensitized mice, OVA feeding caused marked accumulation of CD3+ and osteopontin+ cells in mesenteric adipose tissue. The accumulating T-lymphocytes were mainly CD4+. As expected, high-fat (60% kCal diets promoted mesenteric adipose tissue inflammation compared to low-fat diets (10% Kcal, as reflected by increased expression of osteopontin and interferon-gamma. Immune responses to dietary OVA further increased diet-induced osteopontin and interferon-gamma expression in mesenteric adipose. Inflammatory gene expression in subcutaneous tissue did not respond significantly to OVA or dietary fat content. Lastly, whereas OVA responses did not significantly affect bodyweight or adiposity, they significantly impaired glucose tolerance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that loss or lack of immunological tolerance to intestinally absorbed T-lymphocyte antigens can contribute to mesenteric adipose tissue inflammation and defective glucose metabolism

  9. Dietary fructose intolerance, fructan intolerance and FODMAPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedewa, Amy; Rao, Satish S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary intolerances to fructose, fructans and FODMAPs (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols) are common, yet poorly recognized and managed. Over the last decade, they have come to the forefront because of new knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Patients with these problems often present with unexplained bloating, belching, distension, gas, abdominal pain or diarrhea. Here, we have examined the most up-to-date research on these food-related intolerances, discussed controversies, and have provided some guidelines for the dietary management of these conditions. Breath testing for carbohydrate intolerance appears to be standardized and essential for the diagnosis and management of these conditions, especially in the Western population. While current research shows that the FODMAP diet may be effective in treating irritable bowel syndrome, additional research is needed to identify more foods items that are high in FODMAPs, and to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of dietary interventions. PMID:24357350

  10. Dietary fructose intolerance, fructan intolerance and FODMAPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedewa, Amy; Rao, Satish S C

    2014-01-01

    Dietary intolerances to fructose, fructans and FODMAPs (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols) are common, yet poorly recognized and managed. Over the last decade, they have come to the forefront because of new knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Patients with these problems often present with unexplained bloating, belching, distension, gas, abdominal pain, or diarrhea. Here, we have examined the most up-to-date research on these food-related intolerances, discussed controversies, and have provided some guidelines for the dietary management of these conditions. Breath testing for carbohydrate intolerance appears to be standardized and essential for the diagnosis and management of these conditions, especially in the Western population. While current research shows that the FODMAP diet may be effective in treating some patients with irritable bowel syndrome, additional research is needed to identify more foods items that are high in FODMAPs, and to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of dietary interventions.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: lactose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Lactose intolerance Lactose intolerance Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Lactose intolerance is an impaired ability to digest lactose, ...

  12. Spirulina platensis prevents high glucose-induced oxidative stress mitochondrial damage mediated apoptosis in cardiomyoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadaun, Pratiksha; Yadav, Dhananjay; Bisen, Prakash Singh

    2018-04-01

    The current study was undertaken to study the effect of Spirulina platensis (Spirulina) extract on enhanced oxidative stress during high glucose induced cell death in H9c2 cells. H9c2 cultured under high glucose (33 mM) conditions resulted in a noteworthy increase in oxidative stress (free radical species) accompanied by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c, increase in caspase activity and pro-apoptotic protein (Bax). Spirulina extract (1 μg/mL), considerably inhibited increased ROS and RNS levels, reduction in cytochrome c release, raise in mitochondrial membrane potential, decreased the over expression of proapoptotic protein Bax and suppressed the Bax/Bcl2 ratio with induced apoptosis without affecting cell viability. Overall results suggest that Spirulina extract plays preventing role against enhanced oxidative stress during high glucose induced apoptosis in cardiomyoblasts as well as related dysfunction in H9c2 cells.

  13. Ateistiske begravelsespladser og intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2011-01-01

    Kronikken diskuterer Charlotte Dyremoses kritik af planerne om begravelsespladser fri for religiøse symboler for at være udtryk for intolerance.......Kronikken diskuterer Charlotte Dyremoses kritik af planerne om begravelsespladser fri for religiøse symboler for at være udtryk for intolerance....

  14. Religious intolerance and Euroscepticism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobolt, S.B.; van der Brug, W.; de Vreese, C.H.; Boomgaarden, H.G.; Hinrichsen, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    Research on Euroscepticism focuses increasingly on the role of group identities: national identities and attitudes towards multiculturalism. Yet hardly any attention has been paid to the way in which religious intolerance shapes Euroscepticism. We argue that religious intolerance influences not only

  15. Adult-onset deficiency of acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 protects mice from diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banh, Taylor; Nelson, David W; Gao, Yu; Huang, Ting-Ni; Yen, Mei-I; Yen, Chi-Liang E

    2015-02-01

    Acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) 2 catalyzes triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis, required in intestinal fat absorption. We previously demonstrated that mice without a functional MGAT2-coding gene (Mogat2(-/-)) exhibit increased energy expenditure and resistance to obesity induced by excess calories. One critical question raised is whether lacking MGAT2 during early development is required for the metabolic phenotypes in adult mice. In this study, we found that Mogat2(-/-) pups grew slower than wild-type littermates during the suckling period. To determine whether inactivating MGAT2 in adult mice is sufficient to confer resistance to diet-induced obesity, we generated mice with an inducible Mogat2-inactivating mutation. Mice with adult-onset MGAT2 deficiency (Mogat2(AKO)) exhibited a transient decrease in food intake like Mogat2(-/-) mice when fed a high-fat diet and a moderate increase in energy expenditure after acclimatization. They gained less weight than littermate controls, but the difference was smaller than that between wild-type and Mogat2(-/-) mice. The moderate reduction in weight gain was associated with reduced hepatic TAG and improved glucose tolerance. Similar protective effects were also observed in mice that had gained weight on a high-fat diet before inactivating MGAT2. These findings suggest that adult-onset MGAT2 deficiency mitigates metabolic disorders induced by high-fat feeding and that MGAT2 modulates early postnatal nutrition and may program metabolism later in life. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. The molecular basis of lactose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Anthony K; Waud, Jonathan P; Matthews, Stephanie B

    2009-01-01

    A staggering 4000 million people cannot digest lactose, the sugar in milk, properly. All mammals, apart from white Northern Europeans and few tribes in Africa and Asia, lose most of their lactase, the enzyme that cleaves lactose into galactose and glucose, after weaning. Lactose intolerance causes gut and a range of systemic symptoms, though the threshold to lactose varies considerably between ethnic groups and individuals within a group. The molecular basis of inherited hypolactasia has yet to be identified, though two polymorphisms in the introns of a helicase upstream from the lactase gene correlate closely with hypolactasia, and thus lactose intolerance. The symptoms of lactose intolerance are caused by gases and toxins produced by anaerobic bacteria in the large intestine. Bacterial toxins may play a key role in several other diseases, such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and some cancers. The problem of lactose intolerance has been exacerbated because of the addition of products containing lactose to various foods and drinks without being on the label. Lactose intolerance fits exactly the illness that Charles Darwin suffered from for over 40 years, and yet was never diagnosed. Darwin missed something else--the key to our own evolution--the Rubicon some 300 million years ago that produced lactose and lactase in sufficient amounts to be susceptible to natural selection.

  17. Lactose Intolerance and Symptom Pattern of Lactose Intolerance among Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Madhusudan; Parveen, Irin; Shil, Bimal Chandra; Saha, Shasanka Kumar; Banik, Ranjit Kumar; Majumder, Monojit; Salam, Mahjuba Umme; Islam, Asm Nazmul

    2016-01-01

    To see the prevalence of lactose intolerance (LI) and related symptoms following oral lactose challenge in healthy volunteers. Symptoms of abdominal pain, nausea, borborygmi, flatulence, and diarrhea were noted for 24 hours and blood glucose was estimated at 0 hour and 30 minutes after 25 gm oral lactose load to healthy volunteers. Failure to rise blood glucose level ≥ 1.1 mmol/l at 30 minutes after lactose intake from fasting level was taken as lactose malabsorption (LM), i.e., LI. A total of 166 volunteers (123 males, 43 females) with a mean age 34.78 ± 11.45 years participated in this study. Lactose intolerance was found among 85.54% (n = 142, M = 104, F = 38). The main symptoms of LI were diarrhea (n = 83, 58.4.0%), borborygmi (n = 81, 57.04%), abdominal pain (n = 35, 24.65%), and flatulence (n = 27, 19.0%). Lactose intolerance among healthy adults may be common in Bangladesh. Diarrhea and borborygmi were mostly associated symptoms of LI. Saha M, Parveen I, Shil BC, Saha SK, Banik RK, Majumder M, Salam MU, Nazmul Islam ASM. Lactose Intolerance and Symptom Pattern of Lactose Intolerance among Healthy Volunteers. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2016;6(1):5-7.

  18. Lactose Intolerance (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... groups of people — about 90% or more of Asian Americans and Native Americans are lactose intolerant, and ... aged cheeses, including cheddar. Yogurt that contains live cultures is more easily digested because it contains healthy ...

  19. Lactose Intolerance (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intolerant for different reasons: Ethnic background. People of Asian, African, Native American, and Hispanic backgrounds are more ... are lower in lactose. Yogurts that contain active cultures are easier to digest and much less likely ...

  20. Glucose intolerance in the West African Diaspora

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannie; Christensen, Dirk Lund

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, Black Americans are largely descendants of West African slaves; they have a higher relative proportion of obesity and experience a higher prevalence of diabetes than White Americans. However, obesity rates alone cannot explain the higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Type 2...

  1. Efeito do tratamento com etanol sobre a gliconeogênese em ratos intolerantes à glicose - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v31i2.4653 Effect of ethanol treatment on gluconeogenesis in glucose-intolerant rats- DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v31i2.4653

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Pereira Silva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a influência do tratamento com etanol (Et sobre a gliconeogênese em ratos intolerantes à glicose. A intolerância à glicose foi induzida pela injeção de dexametasona (DEXA (0,1 mg kg-1; s.c., quatro dias. O teste de tolerância à glicose (GTT e os experimentos de perfusão de fígado in situ (avaliação da gliconeogênese foram realizados em ratos submetidos a jejum de 15h dos grupos experimentais: Controle (salina 0,9%, s.c., quatro dias; DEX (DEXA 0,1 mg kg-1; s.c., quatro dias; DEX+Et 3% (per os, 14 dias; DEX+Et 20% (per os, 14 dias; DEX+Met (Mettformina 300 mg kg-1, per os, quatro dias. Os animais tratados com DEX apresentaram elevada concentração de glicose sanguínea e também no perfusato coletado. O tratamento com metformina promoveu redução significativa na concentração de glicose no perfusato obtido de animais intolerantes à glicose. Entretanto, somente o tratamento com Et 3% promoveu redução na intolerância à glicose, mas não na produção da glicose hepática observada em animais DEX. Os dados obtidos demonstram que a administração de Et 3% melhora a intolerância à glicose induzida pela DEX sem influenciar na gliconeogênese, diferentemente do observado pelo tratamento com a metformina.In this work, the influence of ethanol (Et treatment on gluconeogenesis in glucose-intolerance rats was evaluated. Glucose intolerance in rats was induced by dexamethasone (DEXA injection (0.1 mg kg-1; s.c., 4 days. The glucose tolerance test (GTT and liver perfusion in situ experiments (gluconeogenesis evaluation were performed with 15-hour fasted rats in the following experimental groups: Control (saline 0.9%, s.c., 4 days; DEX (DEXA 0.1 mg kg-1; s.c., 4 days; DEX+Et 3% (per os, 14 days; DEX+Et 20% (per os, 14 days; DEX+Met (Metformin 300 mg kg-1, per os, 4 days. DEX-treated animals showed high glucose concentration in blood and also in the perfusate collected. Metformin treatment resulted

  2. Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Patients with Abnormal Glucose Tolerance during Pregnancy: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mie Tonoike

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal glucose tolerance during pregnancy is associated with perinatal complications. We used continuous glucose monitoring (CGM in pregnant women with glucose intolerance to achieve better glycemic control and to evaluate the maternal glucose fluctuations. We also used CGM in women without glucose intolerance (the control cases. Furthermore, the standard deviation (SD and mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE were calculated for each case. For the control cases, the glucose levels were tightly controlled within a very narrow range; however, the SD and MAGE values in pregnant women with glucose intolerance were relativity high, suggesting postprandial hyperglycemia. Our results demonstrate that pregnant women with glucose intolerance exhibited greater glucose fluctuations compared with the control cases. The use of CGM may help to improve our understanding of glycemic patterns and may have beneficial effects on perinatal glycemic control, such as the detection of postprandial hyperglycemia in pregnant women.

  3. Intolerance and Violence Against Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meharban

    2017-10-01

    Intolerance and grouse against doctors is a global phenomenon but India seems to lead the world in violence against doctors. According to World Health Organization, about 8-38% healthcare workers suffer physical violence at some point in their careers. Many more are verbally abused or threatened. Public is almost behaving like health sector terrorists. The spate of increasing attacks on doctors by damaging their property and causing physical injury is not acceptable by any civilized society. The public is becoming increasingly intolerant to a large number of social issues because of poor governance and vote bank politics. There is a need to arrest the development of further distrust between doctors and their patients/relatives, otherwise it will compromise all achievements of medical science and adversely affect healing capabilities of doctors. Rude and aggressive behavior of the patients or their family members, and arrogant and lackadaisical approach of the doctor, adversely affects the doctor-patient relationship and the outcome of the patient. The doctors, hospital administration and government must exercise "zero tolerance" with respect to acts of violence against healthcare professionals. It is possible to reduce the incidence of intolerance against doctors but difficult to eliminate it completely. The healthcare providers should demonstrate greater compassion and empathy with improved communication skills. The hospitals must have adequate infrastructure, facilities and staff to handle emergencies without delay and with due confidence and skills. The security of healthcare providers, especially in sensitive areas, should be improved by having adequate number of security guards, frisking facilities, extensive CCTV network and availability of "Quick response team" to handle unruly mob. In case of any grievances for alleged mismanagement, the public should handle the situation in a civilized manner and seek redressal through Medical Protection Act and legal

  4. Wheat and gluten intolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busink-van den Broeck, Hetty; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Brouns, F.

    2016-01-01

    With this White Paper, the current state of scientific knowledge on human disorders related to gluten and wheat is presented, with reference to other grains such as spelt, barley, rye, and oats. Backgrounds are described of coeliac disease (gluten intolerance), wheat allergies and any kind of wheat

  5. Management of statin intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma B Raju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins are the revolutionary drugs in the cardiovascular pharmacotherapy. But they also possess several adverse effects like myopathy with elevation of hepatic transaminases (>3 times the upper limit of normal or creatine kinase (>10 times the upper limit of normal and some rare side-effects, including peripheral neuropathy, memory loss, sleep disturbances, and erectile dysfunction. Due to these adverse effects, patients abruptly withdrew statins without consulting physicians. This abrupt discontinuation of statins is termed as statin intolerance. Statin-induced myopathy constitutes two third of all side-effects from statins and is the primary reason for statin intolerance. Though statin intolerance has considerably impacted cardiovascular outcomes in the high-risk patients, it has been well effectively managed by prescribing statins either as alternate-day or once weekly dosage regimen, as combination therapy with a non-statin therapy or and by dietary intervention. The present article reviews the causes, clinical implications of statin withdrawal and management of statin intolerance.

  6. Evolution and Collective Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhoite, Fred H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Examines behavioral and intellectual conformity as major attitudes in shaping political behavior. Manifestations of coercion within human and animal social units are presented, including religious intolerance, prohibition of artistic activity and literary expression, and rejection of outsiders. Available from: Managing Editor, Department of…

  7. Impact of the Bienestar School-Based Diabetes Mellitus Prevention Program on Fasting Capillary Glucose Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Roberto P.; Yin, Zenong; Hernandez, Arthur; Hale, Daniel E.; Garcia, Oralia A.; Mobley, Connie

    2005-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of a school-based diabetes mellitus prevention program on low-income fourth-grade Mexican American children. Design A randomized controlled trial with 13 intervention and 14 control schools. Setting Elementary schools in inner-city neighborhoods in San Antonio, Tex. Participants Eighty percent of participants were Mexican American and 94% were from economically disadvantaged households. Baseline and follow-up measures were collected from 1419 (713 intervention and 706 control) and 1221 (619 intervention and 602 control) fourth-grade children, respectively. Intervention The Bienestar Health Program consists of a health class and physical education curriculum, a family program, a school cafeteria program, and an after-school health club. The objectives are to decrease dietary saturated fat intake, increase dietary fiber intake, and increase physical activity. Main Outcome Measures The primary end point was fasting capillary glucose level, and the secondary end points were percentage of body fat, physical fitness level, dietary fiber intake, and dietary saturated fat intake. Fasting capillary glucose level, bioelectric impedance, modified Harvard step test, three 24-hour dietary recalls, weight, and height were collected at baseline and 8 months later. Results Children in the intervention arm attended an average of 32 Bienestar sessions. Mean fasting capillary glucose levels decreased in intervention schools and increased in control schools after adjusting for covariates (−2.24 mg/dL [0.12 mmol/L]; 95% confidence interval, −6.53 to 2.05 [−0.36 to 0.11 mmol/L]; P = .03). Fitness scores (P = .04) and dietary fiber intake (P = .009) significantly increased in intervention children and decreased in control children. Percentage of body fat (P = .56) and dietary saturated fat intake (P = .52) did not differ significantly between intervention and control children. Conclusion This intervention showed some positive results, but additional

  8. Ethanol extract of Moringa oliefera prevents in vitro glucose induced cataract on isolated goat eye lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghvendra Kurmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of Study: The aim of current work was to evaluate in vitro anticataract potential of Moringa oliefera extract. Materials and Methods: Goat eye lenses were divided into 4 groups; Group served as control, Group II as toxic control, Group III and Group IV were incubated in extract (250 μg/ml and 500 μg/ml of extract of M. oliefera Group II, III and IV were incubated in 55 mM glucose in artificial aqueous humor to induce lens opacification. Estimation of total, water soluble protein, catalase, glutathione and malondialdehyde along with photographic evaluation of lens was done. Results: Group II (toxic control lenses showed high amount of MDA (Malondialdehyde, soluble, insoluble protein, decreased catalase and glutathione levels, while lenses treated with Moringa oliefera extract (Group III and Group IV showed significant (FNx01 P < 0.05 reduction in MDA and increased level of catalase, glutathione, total and soluble protein. Conclusion: Results of present findings suggest protective effect of Moringa oliefera in prevention of in vitro glucose induced cataract.

  9. Gcg-XTEN: an improved glucagon capable of preventing hypoglycemia without increasing baseline blood glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Geething

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available While the majority of current diabetes treatments focus on reducing blood glucose levels, hypoglycemia represents a significant risk associated with insulin treatment. Glucagon plays a major regulatory role in controlling hypoglycemia in vivo, but its short half-life and hyperglycemic effects prevent its therapeutic use for non-acute applications. The goal of this study was to identify a modified form of glucagon suitable for prophylactic treatment of hypoglycemia without increasing baseline blood glucose levels.Through application of the XTEN technology, we report the construction of a glucagon fusion protein with an extended exposure profile (Gcg-XTEN. The in vivo half-life of the construct was tuned to support nightly dosing through design and testing in cynomolgus monkeys. Efficacy of the construct was assessed in beagle dogs using an insulin challenge to induce hypoglycemia. Dose ranging of Gcg-XTEN in fasted beagle dogs demonstrated that the compound was biologically active with a pharmacodynamic profile consistent with the designed half-life. Prophylactic administration of 0.6 nmol/kg Gcg-XTEN to dogs conferred resistance to a hypoglycemic challenge at 6 hours post-dose without affecting baseline blood glucose levels. Consistent with the designed pharmacokinetic profile, hypoglycemia resistance was not observed at 12 hours post-dose. Importantly, the solubility and stability of the glucagon peptide were also significantly improved by fusion to XTEN.The data show that Gcg-XTEN is effective in preventing hypoglycemia without the associated hyperglycemia expected for unmodified glucagon. While the plasma clearance of this Gcg-XTEN has been optimized for overnight dosing, specifically for the treatment of nocturnal hypoglycemia, constructs with significantly longer exposure profiles are feasible. Such constructs may have multiple applications such as allowing for more aggressive insulin treatment regimens, treating hypoglycemia due to insulin

  10. Does a reduced glucose intake prevent hyperglycemia in children early after cardiac surgery? a randomized controlled crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Betue, Carlijn T. I.; Verbruggen, Sascha C. A. T.; Schierbeek, Henk; Chacko, Shaji K.; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Joosten, Koen F. M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Hyperglycemia in children after cardiac surgery can be treated with intensive insulin therapy, but hypoglycemia is a potential serious side effect. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of reducing glucose intake below standard intakes to prevent hyperglycemia, on blood

  11. Does a reduced glucose intake prevent hyperglycemia in children early after cardiac surgery? A randomized controlled crossover study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.T. de Betue (Carlijn); S.C.A.T. Verbruggen (Sascha); H. Schierbeek (Henk); S. Chacko (Shaji); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); J.B. van Goudoever (Hans); K.F.M. Joosten (Koen)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Hyperglycemia in children after cardiac surgery can be treated with intensive insulin therapy, but hypoglycemia is a potential serious side effect. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of reducing glucose intake below standard intakes to prevent

  12. Delphinidin prevents high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis by inhibition of NOX-1 and mitochondrial superoxide in mesangial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Eun Song

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of delphinidin on high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis in mesangial cells. Glucose dose-dependently (5.6–25 mM increased cell proliferation and collagen I and IV mRNA levels, whereas pretreatment with delphinidin (50 μM prevented cell proliferation and the increased collagen mRNA levels induced by high glucose (25 mM. High glucose increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, and this was suppressed by pretreating delphinidin or the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine. NADPH oxidase (NOX 1 was upregulated by high glucose, but pretreatment with delphinidin abrogated this upregulation. Increased mitochondrial superoxide by 25 mM glucose was also suppressed by delphinidin. The NOX inhibitor apocynin and mitochondria-targeted antioxidant Mito TEMPO inhibited ROS generation and cell proliferation induced by high glucose. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2 was increased by high glucose, which was suppressed by delphinidin, apocynin or Mito TEMPO. Furthermore, PD98059 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor prevented the high glucose-induced cell proliferation and increased collagen mRNA levels. Transforming growth factor (TGF-β protein levels were elevated by high glucose, and pretreatment with delphinidin or PD98059 prevented this augmentation. These results suggest that delphinidin prevents high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis by inhibition of NOX-1 and mitochondrial superoxide in mesangial cells.

  13. Intolerance toward immigrants in Switzerland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freitag, Markus; Rapp, Carolin

    2013-01-01

    Intolerance toward immigrants has recently reached noticeable highs in Switzerland. Referring to the conflict theory, the perception of a specific group as a threat tends to lead to intolerance toward that group. The expectation of a negative relationship between threat and tolerance is neverthel......Intolerance toward immigrants has recently reached noticeable highs in Switzerland. Referring to the conflict theory, the perception of a specific group as a threat tends to lead to intolerance toward that group. The expectation of a negative relationship between threat and tolerance...

  14. [The discussion on relationship between adenoids hypertrophy and food intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqiong; Sun, Jie; Zhang, Hua

    2013-06-01

    To explore the relationship between food intolerance and adenoidal hypertrophy and accordingly to provide evidence for intolerance and adenoidal hypertrophy. Adenoidal hypertrophy in patients with a total of 111 cases as the experiment group, 30 cases of children with no history of allergies and allergy-related diseases and adenoidal hypertrophy symptoms as the control group, and compared the result of food intolerance between two groups. 1) Food intolerance detected positive rate of adenoidal hypertrophy group was higher than the control group. 2) The distribution of the two groups of children in the extent of food intolerance is different. 3) Adenoid hypertrophy and how many types of the food, which is high, moderate intolerance, are unrelated. 4) The daily consumption of 14 kinds of food, the top three foods of adenoidal hypertrophy group and control group are eggs, milk, cod. Food intolerance is the possible cause of adenoidal hypertrophy. The detection of specific IgG antibodies of food have positive significance in the prevention of adenoidal hypertrophy.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: lysinuric protein intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Lysinuric protein intolerance Lysinuric protein intolerance Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Lysinuric protein intolerance is a disorder caused by the body's inability ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Hereditary fructose intolerance Hereditary fructose intolerance Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary fructose intolerance is a condition that affects a person's ability ...

  17. Indomethacin treatment prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, but not glucose intolerance in C57BL/6J mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE: We performed experiments to examine the metabolic consequences of inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity in obesity-prone C57BL/6J mice fed a high fat/high sucrose (HF/HS) diet. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: C57BL/6J mice were fed a HF/HS diet for 7 weeks under thermoneutral conditio...

  18. Targeted disruption of the IA-2beta gene causes glucose intolerance and impairs insulin secretion but does not prevent the development of diabetes in NOD mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kubosaki, A.; Gross, S.; Miura, J.; Saeki, K.; Zhu, M.; Nakamura, S.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Notkins, A.L.

    2004-01-01

    Insulinoma-associated protein (IA)-2beta, also known as phogrin, is an enzymatically inactive member of the transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase family and is located in dense-core secretory vesicles. In patients with type 1 diabetes, autoantibodies to IA-2beta appear years before the

  19. Muscle-specific Knock-out of NUAK Family SNF1-like Kinase 1 (NUAK1) Prevents High Fat Diet-induced Glucose Intolerance*

    OpenAIRE

    Inazuka, Fumika; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Tomita, Masaru; Abe, Takaya; Shioi, Go; Esumi, Hiroyasu

    2012-01-01

    NUAK1 is a member of the AMP-activated protein kinase-related kinase family. Recent studies have shown that NUAK1 is involved in cellular senescence and motility in epithelial cells and fibroblasts. However, the physiological roles of NUAK1 are poorly understood because of embryonic lethality in NUAK1 null mice. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the roles of NUAK1 in adult tissues. We determined the tissue distribution of NUAK1 and generated muscle-specific NUAK1 knock-out (MNUAK1KO)...

  20. Strict blood glucose control by an artificial endocrine pancreas during hepatectomy may prevent postoperative acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Naoji; Kawahito, Shinji; Soga, Tomohiro; Takaishi, Kazumi; Kitahata, Hiroshi; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Shimada, Mitsuo; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M; Tanaka, Katsuya

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of a closed-loop system (STG-55; Nikkiso, Tokyo, Japan), a type of artificial endocrine pancreas for the continuous monitoring and control of intraoperative blood glucose, for preventing postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Thirty-eight patients were enrolled in this study. Glucose concentrations were controlled with either a manual injection of insulin based on a commonly used sliding scale (manual insulin group, n = 19) or the programmed infusion of insulin determined by the control algorithm of the artificial endocrine pancreas (programmed insulin group, n = 19). After the induction of anesthesia, a 20-G intravenous catheter was inserted into the peripheral forearm vein of patients in the programmed insulin group and connected to an artificial endocrine pancreas (STG-55). The target range for glucose concentrations was set to 100-150 mg/dL. The mean serum creatinine concentrations of preoperative, postoperative 24 and 48 h were 0.72, 0.78, and 0.79 mg/dL in the programmed insulin group, and 0.81, 0.95, and 1.03 mg/dL in the manual insulin group, respectively. Elevations in serum creatinine concentrations postoperative 48 h were significantly suppressed in the programmed insulin group. The STG-55 closed-loop system was effective for maintaining strict blood glucose control during hepatectomy with minimal variability in blood glucose concentrations and for suppressing elevations in serum creatinine concentrations. Strict blood glucose control by an artificial endocrine pancreas during hepatectomy may prevent postoperative AKI.

  1. Hypothyroidism as a risk factor for statin intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Craig D; Bair, Tami L; Horne, Benjamin D; McCubrey, Ray O; Lappe, Donald L; Muhlestein, Joseph B; Anderson, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    Three-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of medications because of their proven cardiovascular benefits. However, statin intolerance occurs in 5% to 20% of patients. Understanding the basis for statin intolerance remains a key issue in preventive medicine. To evaluate the association of statin intolerance with hypothyroidism in a large integrated health care system, including its sex-specific relationship and subsequent statin rechallenge and prescription history. The Intermountain Healthcare electronic medical record database identified patients (n = 2686; males = 1276, females = 1410) with a documentation of intolerance ("allergy") to at least 1 statin. Age and sex similar controls (n = 8103; males = 3892, females = 4211) were identified among patients prescribed statins without documented intolerance. Patients were evaluated for a history of hypothyroidism, development of hypothyroidism, and statin prescription history up to 5 years of follow-up. A total of 30.2% patients (210 males, 16.5%; 602 females, 42.7%) with statin intolerance had a history of hypothyroidism compared with 21.5% of statin-tolerant patients (475 males, 12.2%; 1266 females, 30.1%), for an odds ratio (OR) in the total population of 1.49 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.34-1.65; P intolerance and hypothyroidism were less likely to be on a statin than their statin-intolerant counterparts without hypothyroidism (hazard ratio 0.84; 95% CI 0.75-0.94; P = .002). Hypothyroidism is more prevalent in those with statin intolerance, both in males and, especially, in females. People with hypothyroidism are less likely to have a prescription for a statin at follow-up than those without hypothyroidism. Copyright © 2014 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Eicosapentaenoic acid prevents high fat diet-induced metabolic disorders: Genomic and metabolomic analyses of underlying mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously our lab demonstrated eicosapenaenoic acid (EPA)'s ability to prevent high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity by decreasing insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and inflammation. In the current study, we used genomic and metabolomic approaches to further investigate the molecular basis for t...

  3. Neuronal LRP1 regulates glucose metabolism and insulin signaling in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Chen; Hu, Jin; Tsai, Chih-Wei; Yue, Mei; Melrose, Heather L; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Bu, Guojun

    2015-04-08

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurological disorder characterized by profound memory loss and progressive dementia. Accumulating evidence suggests that Type 2 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder characterized by insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, significantly increases the risk for developing AD. Whereas amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and neurofibrillary tangles are major histological hallmarks of AD, impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism precedes these pathological changes during the early stage of AD and likely triggers or exacerbates AD pathology. However, the mechanisms linking disturbed insulin signaling/glucose metabolism and AD pathogenesis remain unclear. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), a major apolipoprotein E receptor, plays critical roles in lipoprotein metabolism, synaptic maintenance, and clearance of Aβ in the brain. Here, we demonstrate that LRP1 interacts with the insulin receptor β in the brain and regulates insulin signaling and glucose uptake. LRP1 deficiency in neurons leads to impaired insulin signaling as well as reduced levels of glucose transporters GLUT3 and GLUT4. Consequently, glucose uptake is reduced. By using an in vivo microdialysis technique sampling brain glucose concentration in freely moving mice, we further show that LRP1 deficiency in conditional knock-out mice resulted in glucose intolerance in the brain. We also found that hyperglycemia suppresses LRP1 expression, which further exacerbates insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and AD pathology. As loss of LRP1 expression is seen in AD brains, our study provides novel insights into insulin resistance in AD. Our work also establishes new targets that can be explored for AD prevention or therapy. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/355851-09$15.00/0.

  4. Religious Intolerance in the Cortes of Cadiz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Domínguez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been no shortage of studies on religious intolerance in the Cadiz Cortes, but many of them are burdened by two critical errors. The first one is to focus the arguments on article 12 of the Constitution, without paying attention to other parliamentary debates in which the intolerant policy of the Cortes was more clearly expounded. The second common mistake is to ignore the circumstances which prevented some deputies from freely speaking their minds on religious matters. Through a detailed analysis of the proceedings of the Cortes, as well as other sources of the period, this article is intended to remedy both shortcomings, and thus to question certain common assumptions in current historiography. This approach leads to the conclusion that, while some deputies may had hidden his penchant for freedom of conscience, the decrees and speeches of the Cortes were more intolerant than many suppose. Not only they ordered to punish all dissenters from the Church's doctrines, but they decreed death penalty for anyone who dared to suggest the introduction of religious freedom in Spain.

  5. Prevalence of Food Additive Intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    1994-01-01

    1 The existing prevalence estimates of food additive intolerance(1-4) are being reviewed. 2 In the EEC report the estimated frequency of food additive intolerance is 0.03% to 0.15% based on data from patient groups. 3 The British population study results in a prevalence estimate of 0...... The prevalence estimates vary with a factor 100. As the results vary so do the study populations. 6 If the different study populations are accounted for, a common conclusion can be drawn: Food additive intolerance is found in adults with atopic symptoms from the respiratory tract and skin. The prevalence...... estimates are questionable but may be less than 0.15%. In adults and children with reproducible, and with more subjective symptoms, such as headache and behavioural/mood change the prevalence is even lower (0.026%). Food additive intolerance is primarily found in atopic children with cutaneous symptoms...

  6. Delphinidin prevents high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis by inhibition of NOX-1 and mitochondrial superoxide in mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Seung Eun; Jo, Hye Jun; Kim, Yong-Woon; Cho, Young-Je; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Park, So-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the effect of delphinidin on high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis in mesangial cells. Glucose dose-dependently (5.6-25 mM) increased cell proliferation and collagen I and IV mRNA levels, whereas pretreatment with delphinidin (50 μM) prevented cell proliferation and the increased collagen mRNA levels induced by high glucose (25 mM). High glucose increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and this was suppressed by pretreating delphinidin or the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine. NADPH oxidase (NOX) 1 was upregulated by high glucose, but pretreatment with delphinidin abrogated this upregulation. Increased mitochondrial superoxide by 25 mM glucose was also suppressed by delphinidin. The NOX inhibitor apocynin and mitochondria-targeted antioxidant Mito TEMPO inhibited ROS generation and cell proliferation induced by high glucose. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 was increased by high glucose, which was suppressed by delphinidin, apocynin or Mito TEMPO. Furthermore, PD98059 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) prevented the high glucose-induced cell proliferation and increased collagen mRNA levels. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β protein levels were elevated by high glucose, and pretreatment with delphinidin or PD98059 prevented this augmentation. These results suggest that delphinidin prevents high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis by inhibition of NOX-1 and mitochondrial superoxide in mesangial cells. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence and Characteristics of Chemical Intolerance: A Japanese Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Kenichi; Uchiyama, Iwao; Katoh, Takahiko; Ogata, Hiromitsu; Arashidani, Keiichi; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Population-based cross-sectional study was performed to estimate the prevalence of chemical intolerance and to examine the characteristics of the sample. A Web-based survey was conducted that included 7,245 adults in Japan. The criteria for chemical intolerance proposed by Skovbjerg yielded a prevalence of 7.5% that was approximately consistent with that reported from a Danish population-based survey. Female gender, older age, and renovation in the house during the past 7 years were positively associated with chemical intolerance. Improvements in the condition were observed with daily ventilation habits. Medical history of atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, food allergy, multiple chemical sensitivity, and depression were associated with chemical intolerance. Fatigue, depressed mood, and somatic symptoms were also positively correlated with chemical intolerance. Better elucidation of the causes, comorbidities, concomitants, and consequences of chemical intolerance has the potential to provide effective solutions for its prevention and treatment.

  8. Exposure to the common food additive carrageenan leads to glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and inhibition of insulin signalling in HepG2 cells and C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S; O-Sullivan, I; Katyal, S; Unterman, T; Tobacman, J K

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of the common food additive carrageenan (E407) on glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and insulin signalling in a mouse model and human hepatic cells, since carrageenan is known to cause inflammation through interaction with toll-like receptor (TLR)4, which is associated with inflammation in diabetes. Male C57BL/6J mice were given carrageenan (10 mg/l) in their drinking water, and underwent a glucose tolerance test (GTT), an insulin tolerance test (ITT) and an ante-mortem intraperitoneal insulin injection. HepG2 cells were exposed to carrageenan (1 mg/l × 24 h) and insulin. Levels of phospho(Ser473)-protein kinase B (Akt), phospho(Ser307)-IRS1, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity and phospho(Ser32)-inhibitor of κB (IκBα) were determined by western blotting and ELISA. Glucose tolerance was significantly impaired in carrageenan-treated 12-week-old mice compared with untreated controls at all time points (n = 12; p < 0.0001). Baseline insulin and insulin levels at 30 min after taking glucose during the GTT were significantly higher following carrageenan treatment. During the ITT, glucose levels declined by more than 80% in controls, but not in carrageenan-treated mice. Carrageenan exposure completely inhibited insulin-induced increases in phospho-(Ser473)-Akt and PI3K activity in vivo in mouse liver and in human HepG2 cells. Carrageenan increased phospho(Ser307)-IRS1 levels, and this was blocked when carrageenan-induced inflammation was inhibited. This is the first report of the impact of carrageenan on glucose tolerance and indicates that carrageenan impairs glucose tolerance, increases insulin resistance and inhibits insulin signalling in vivo in mouse liver and human HepG2 cells. These effects may result from carrageenan-induced inflammation. The results demonstrate extra-colonic manifestations of ingested carrageenan and suggest that carrageenan in the human diet may contribute to the

  9. B cell depletion reduces the number of autoreactive T helper cells and prevents glucose-6-phosphate isomerase-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Frey

    Full Text Available The therapeutic benefit of B cell depletion in patients with rheumatoid arthritis has provided proof of concept that B cells are relevant for the pathogenesis of arthritis. It remains unknown which B cell effector functions contribute to the induction or chronification of arthritis. We studied the clinical and immunological effects of B cell depletion in glucose-6-phosphate isomerase-induced arthritis. We targeted CD22 to deplete B cells. Mice were depleted of B cells before or after immunization with glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI. The clinical and histological effects were studied. G6PI-specific antibody responses were measured by ELISA. G6PI-specific T helper (Th cell responses were assayed by polychromatic flow cytometry. B cell depletion prior to G6PI-immunization prevented arthritis. B cell depletion after immunization ameliorated arthritis, whereas B cell depletion in arthritic mice was ineffective. Transfer of antibodies from arthritic mice into B cell depleted recipients did not reconstitute arthritis. B cell depleted mice harbored much fewer G6PI-specific Th cells than control animals. B cell depletion prevents but does not cure G6PI-induced arthritis. Arthritis prevention upon B cell depletion is associated with a drastic reduction in the number of G6PI-specific effector Th cells.

  10. Chow fed UC Davis strain female Lepr fatty Zucker rats exhibit mild glucose intolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, and increased urine volume, all reduced by a Brown Norway strain chromosome 1 congenic donor region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig H Warden

    Full Text Available Our objective is to identify genes that influence the development of any phenotypes of type 2 diabetes (T2D or kidney disease in obese animals. We use the reproductively isolated UC Davis fatty Zucker strain rat model in which the defective chromosome 4 leptin receptor (LeprfaSte/faSte results in fatty obesity. We previously produced a congenic strain with the distal half of chromosome 1 from the Brown Norway strain (BN on a Zucker (ZUC background (BN.ZUC-D1Rat183-D1Rat90. Previously published studies in males showed that the BN congenic donor region protects from some phenotypes of renal dysfunction and T2D. We now expand our studies to include females and expand phenotyping to gene expression. We performed diabetes and kidney disease phenotyping in chow-fed females of the BN.ZUC-D1Rat183-D1Rat90 congenic strain to determine the specific characteristics of the UC Davis model. Fatty LeprfaSte/faSte animals of both BN and ZUC genotype in the congenic donor region had prediabetic levels of fasting blood glucose and blood glucose 2 hours after a glucose tolerance test. We observed significant congenic strain chromosome 1 genotype effects of the BN donor region in fatty females that resulted in decreased food intake, urine volume, glucose area under the curve during glucose tolerance test, plasma triglyceride levels, and urine glucose excretion per day. In fatty females, there were significant congenic strain BN genotype effects on non-fasted plasma urea nitrogen, triglyceride, and creatinine. Congenic region genotype effects were observed by quantitative PCR of mRNA from the kidney for six genes, all located in the chromosome 1 BN donor region, with potential effects on T2D or kidney function. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the BN genotype chromosome 1 congenic region influences traits of both type 2 diabetes and kidney function in fatty UC Davis ZUC females and that there are many positional candidate genes.

  11. Fibre supplementation for the prevention of type 2 diabetes and improvement of glucose metabolism: the randomised controlled Optimal Fibre Trial (OptiFiT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honsek, Caroline; Kabisch, Stefan; Kemper, Margrit; Gerbracht, Christiana; Arafat, Ayman M; Birkenfeld, Andreas L; Dambeck, Ulrike; Osterhoff, Martin A; Weickert, Martin O; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H

    2018-02-28

    Insoluble cereal fibres have been shown in large prospective cohort studies to be highly effective in preventing type 2 diabetes, but there is a lack of interventional data. Our 2 year randomised double-blind prospective intervention study compared the effect of an insoluble oat fibre extract with that of placebo on glucose metabolism and incidence of diabetes. A total of 180 participants with impaired glucose tolerance underwent a modified version of the 1 year lifestyle training programme PREvention of DIAbetes Self-management (PREDIAS) and were randomised to receive a fibre supplement (n = 89; 7.5 g of insoluble fibre per serving) or placebo (n = 91; 0.8 g of insoluble fibre per serving) twice daily for 2 years. Eligible participants were men and women, were at least 18 years old and did not report corticosteroid or other intensive anti-inflammatory treatment, fibre intolerance or any of the following disorders: overt diabetes, chronic or malignant disease, or severe cardiopulmonary, endocrine, psychiatric, gastrointestinal, autoimmune or eating disorder. Participants were recruited at two clinical wards in Berlin and Nuthetal. The allocation was blinded to participants and study caregivers (physicians, dietitians, study nurses). Randomisation was conducted by non-clinical staff, providing neutrally numbered supplement tins. Both supplements were similar in their visual, olfactory and gustatory appearance. Intention-to-treat analysis was applied to all individuals. After 1 year, 2 h OGTT levels decreased significantly in both groups but without a significant difference between the groups (fibre -0.78 ± 1.88 mmol/l [p ≤ 0.001] vs placebo -0.46 ± 1.80 mmol/l [p = 0.020]; total difference 0.32 ± 0.29 mmol/l; not significant). The 2 year incidence of diabetes was 9/89 (fibre group) compared with 16/91 (placebo group; difference not significant). As secondary outcomes, the change in HbA 1c level was significantly different

  12. Astaxanthin prevents loss of insulin signaling and improves glucose metabolism in liver of insulin resistant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvaneswari, Saravanan; Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2012-11-01

    This study investigates the effects of astaxanthin (ASX) on insulin signaling and glucose metabolism in the liver of mice fed a high fat and high fructose diet (HFFD). Adult male Mus musculus mice of body mass 25-30 g were fed either normal chow or the HFFD. After 15 days, mice in each group were subdivided among 2 smaller groups and treated with ASX (2 mg·(kg body mass)⁻¹) in olive oil for 45 days. At the end of 60 days, HFFD-fed mice displayed insulin resistance while ASX-treated HFFD animals showed marked improvement in insulin sensitivity parameters. ASX treatment normalized the activities of hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, glycogen phosphorylase, and increased glycogen reserves in the liver. Liver tissue from ASX-treated HFFD-fed animals showed increased tyrosine phosphorylation and decreased serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrates (IRS)-1 and -2. ASX increased IRS 1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) association and serine phosphorylation of Akt. In addition, ASX decreased HFFD-induced serine kinases (c-jun N-terminal kinase-1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1). The results suggest that ASX treatment promotes the IRS-PI3K-Akt pathway of insulin signaling by decreasing serine phosphorylation of IRS proteins, and improves glucose metabolism by modulating metabolic enzymes.

  13. Glucose effectiveness in nondiabetic relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egede, M B; Henriksen, J-E; Durck, T T

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Reduced glucose effectiveness is a predictor of future glucose tolerance in individuals with a family history of type 2 diabetes. We examined retrospectively at 10 years in normoglycemic relatives of diabetic subjects (RELs) the pathophysiological role of glucose effectiveness...... in the development of isolated impaired fasting glucose, glucose intolerance, and acute insulin release. METHODS: At 0 years, 19 RELs and 18 matched control subjects had glucose effectiveness (GE), insulin sensitivity, acute insulin release (AIR)IVGTT, and disposition index measured during an iv glucose tolerance...... test (IVGTT), using the minimal model analysis. At 0 and 10 years, oral glucose tolerance (OGTT) and AIROGTT were determined. RESULTS: At 0 years, fasting glucose (FG) and GE were raised in RELs, but insulin sensitivity and AIROGTT were reduced (P ≤ .05) compared with controls. At 10 years, RELs...

  14. Lactobacillus sakei OK67 ameliorates high-fat diet-induced blood glucose intolerance and obesity in mice by inhibiting gut microbiota lipopolysaccharide production and inducing colon tight junction protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Su-Min; Jeong, Jin-Ju; Woo, Kyung Hee; Han, Myung Joo; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    A high-fat diet (HFD) induces obesity and the associated increases in blood glucose and inflammation through changes in gut microbiota, endotoxemia, and increased gut permeability. To counteract this, researchers have suggested that the use of probiotics that suppress production of proinflammatory lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we tested whether Lactobacillus sakei OK67, which inhibits gut microbiota LPS production selected from among the lactic acid bacteria isolated from kimchi, exerted antihypoglycemic or anti-inflammatory effects in HFD-fed mice. Mice were randomly divided into 2 groups and fed an HFD or a low-fat diet for 4 weeks. These groups were further subdivided; 1 subgroup was treated with L sakei OK67 and fed the experimental diet for 4.5 weeks, whereas the other subgroup was fed the experimental diet alone. L sakei OK67 treatment lowered HFD-elevated LPS levels in blood and colonic fluid and significantly decreased HFD-elevated fasting blood glucose levels and the area under the curve in an oral glucose tolerance test. L sakei OK67 treatment inhibited HFD-induced body and epididymal fat weight gains, suppressed HFD-induced tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β expression and nuclear factor-κB activation in the colon, and significantly increased HFD-suppressed interleukin-10 and tight junction protein expression in the colon. Oral administration of L sakei OK67 significantly downregulated HFD-induced expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, fatty acid synthase, and tumor necrosis factor-α in adipose tissue. In addition, L sakei OK67 treatment strongly inhibited nuclear factor-κB activation in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages. We report that L sakei OK67 ameliorates HFD-induced hyperglycemia and obesity by reducing inflammation and increasing the expression of colon tight junction proteins in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevalence of Food Additive Intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    1994-01-01

    estimates are questionable but may be less than 0.15%. In adults and children with reproducible, and with more subjective symptoms, such as headache and behavioural/mood change the prevalence is even lower (0.026%). Food additive intolerance is primarily found in atopic children with cutaneous symptoms......1 The existing prevalence estimates of food additive intolerance(1-4) are being reviewed. 2 In the EEC report the estimated frequency of food additive intolerance is 0.03% to 0.15% based on data from patient groups. 3 The British population study results in a prevalence estimate of 0.......026%. The challenged population is 81 children and adults with a history of reproducible clinical symptoms after ingestion of food additives. 4 In the Danish population study a prevalence of 1-2% is found in children age 5-16. In this study a total of 606 children mainly with atopic disease have been challenged. 5...

  16. [Abdominal spasms, meteorism, diarrhea: fructose intolerance, lactose intolerance or IBS?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litschauer-Poursadrollah, Margaritha; El-Sayad, Sabine; Wantke, Felix; Fellinger, Christina; Jarisch, Reinhart

    2012-12-01

    Meteorism, abdominal spasms, diarrhea, casually obstipation, flatulence and nausea are symptoms of fructose malabsorption (FIT) and/or lactose intolerance (LIT), but are also symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Therefore these diseases should be considered primarily in patients with digestive complaints. For diagnosis an H(2)-breath test is used.In 1,935 patients (526 m, 1,409 f) a fructose intolerance test and in 1,739 patients (518 m,1,221 f) a lactose intolerance test was done.FIT is found more frequently than LIT (57 versus 52 % in adults (p intolerance (HIT). Headache (ca. 10 %), fatigue (ca. 5 %) and dizziness (ca. 3 %) may occur after the test, irrespective whether the test was positive or negative.In more than 2/3 of patients a diet reduced in fructose or lactose may lead to improvement or remission of these metabolic disorders. IBS, which is often correlated with FIT (183/221 patients = 83 %), can be improved by relevant but also not relevant diets indicating that irritable bowel disease seems to be caused primarily by psychological disorders.

  17. Development of a lifestyle intervention using the MRC framework for diabetes prevention in people with impaired glucose regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troughton, Jacqui; Chatterjee, Sudesna; Hill, Siân E; Daly, Heather; Martin Stacey, Lorraine; Stone, Margaret A; Patel, Naina; Khunti, Kamlesh; Yates, Thomas; Gray, Laura J; Davies, Melanie J

    2016-09-01

    We report development of a group-based lifestyle intervention, Let's Prevent, using the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) framework, and delivered by structured education to prevent type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in people with impaired glucose regulation (IGR) in a UK multi-ethnic population. Diabetes Education and Self-Management for Ongoing and Newly Diagnosed (DESMOND) is the first national T2DM programme that meets National Institute for Health and Care Excellence criteria and formed the basis for Let's Prevent. An iterative cycle of initial development, piloting, collecting and collating qualitative and quantitative data, and reflection and modification, was used to inform and refine lifestyle intervention until it was fit for evaluation in a definitive randomized controlled trial (RCT). The programme encouraged IGR self-management using simple, non-technical language and visual aids. Qualitative and quantitative data suggested that intervention resulted in beneficial short-term behaviour change such as healthier eating patterns, improved health beliefs and greater participant motivation and empowerment. We also demonstrated that recruitment strategy and data collection methods were feasible for RCT implementation. Let's Prevent was developed following successful application of MRC framework criteria and the subsequent RCT will determine whether it is feasible, reliable and transferable from research into a real-world NHS primary healthcare setting. ISRCTN80605705. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health.

  18. Hiperlipidemia e intolerancia a la glucosa en un grupo de pacientes infectados con VIH que reciben terapia antirretrovírica hiperactiva Hyperlipidemia and glucose intolerance in patients with HIV infection receiving antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos José Castro-Sansores

    2006-06-01

    .OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of secondary effects on lipid metabolism as a result of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, as well as the impact of different types of antiretroviral regimens on lipids and glucose in a group of patients in Yucatan, Mexico MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted. A questionnaire created for this study was administered to each patient and total cholesterol, triglycerides and fasting glucose values were determined. The presence of hyperlipidemia and alterations in glucose were determined as well as their relation to the epidemiological variables obtained from the questionnaire RESULTS: A total of 211 subjects were studied [36 (17% of which were women and 175 (83% men]. Ninety-two patients (44% were found to have hyperlipidemia. Of these, 43 (20% had hypercholesterolemia (HC and 82 (39% hypertriglyceridaemia (HT. The presence of combined HC and HT was observed in 30 (14% patients. Nineteen (9% patients had alterations in glucose, six (3% diabetes mellitus and 13 (6% impaired glucose tolerance. The variables associated with the presence of hyperlipidemia were: levels of lymphocytes CD4>350 cells/µl (OR= 2.79 1.08-7.27, p= 0.03, male gender (OR= 3.6 1.4-9.12, p= 0.006 and the use of nucleoside-reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI (OR= 3.1 1.2-8.1, p=0.01 CONCLUSIONS: Patients with HIV infection who receive HAART have an increased risk of presenting hyperlipidemia. In this group of patients the presence of hyperlipidemia and impaired glucose tolerance was significant. Unlike what has been indicated in most published reports, the alterations of lipids were associated more frequently with INTR use, for which it is concluded that the pathogeny of these alterations is not unique, that it is probable that concurrent effects exist between different antiretroviral drug families and that other host factors are involved in the pathogenic mechanism of these alterations.

  19. Impaired glucose tolerance in rats fed low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielohuby, Maximilian; Sisley, Stephanie; Sandoval, Darleen; Herbach, Nadja; Zengin, Ayse; Fischereder, Michael; Menhofer, Dominik; Stoehr, Barbara J M; Stemmer, Kerstin; Wanke, Rüdiger; Tschöp, Matthias H; Seeley, Randy J; Bidlingmaier, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Moderate low-carbohydrate/high-fat (LC-HF) diets are widely used to induce weight loss in overweight subjects, whereas extreme ketogenic LC-HF diets are used to treat neurological disorders like pediatric epilepsy. Usage of LC-HF diets for improvement of glucose metabolism is highly controversial; some studies suggest that LC-HF diets ameliorate glucose tolerance, whereas other investigations could not identify positive effects of these diets or reported impaired insulin sensitivity. Here, we investigate the effects of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism in a well-characterized animal model. Male rats were fed isoenergetic or hypocaloric amounts of standard control diet, a high-protein "Atkins-style" LC-HF diet, or a low-protein, ketogenic, LC-HF diet. Both LC-HF diets induced lower fasting glucose and insulin levels associated with lower pancreatic β-cell volumes. However, dynamic challenge tests (oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests, insulin-tolerance tests, and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps) revealed that LC-HF pair-fed rats exhibited impaired glucose tolerance and impaired hepatic and peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity, the latter potentially being mediated by elevated intramyocellular lipids. Adjusting visceral fat mass in LC-HF groups to that of controls by reducing the intake of LC-HF diets to 80% of the pair-fed groups did not prevent glucose intolerance. Taken together, these data show that lack of dietary carbohydrates leads to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in rats despite causing a reduction in fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Our results argue against a beneficial effect of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism, at least under physiological conditions. Therefore, use of LC-HF diets for weight loss or other therapeutic purposes should be balanced against potentially harmful metabolic side effects.

  20. Genetic determinants of statin intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollex Rebecca L

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statin-related skeletal muscle disorders range from benign myalgias – such as non-specific muscle aches or joint pains without elevated serum creatinine kinase (CK concentration – to true myositis with >10-fold elevation of serum CK, to rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria. The genetic basis of statin-related muscle disorders is largely unknown. Because mutations in the COQ2 gene are associated with severe inherited myopathy, we hypothesized that common, mild genetic variation in COQ2 would be associated with inter-individual variation in statin intolerance. We studied 133 subjects who developed myopathy on statin monotherapy and 158 matched controls who tolerated statins without incident or complaint. Results COQ2 genotypes, based on two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP1 and SNP2 and a 2-SNP haplotype, all showed significant associations with statin intolerance. Specifically, the odds ratios (with 95% confidence intervals for increased risk of statin intolerance among homozygotes for the rare alleles were 2.42 (0.99 to 5.89, 2.33 (1.13 to 4.81 and 2.58 (1.26 to 5.28 for SNP1 and SNP2 genotypes, and the 2-SNP haplotype, respectively. Conclusion These preliminary pharmacogenetic results, if confirmed, are consistent with the idea that statin intolerance which is manifested primarily through muscle symptoms is associated with genomic variation in COQ2 and thus perhaps with the CoQ10 pathway.

  1. Statin Intolerance: the Clinician's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulc, Tomáš; Ceška, Richard; Gotto, Antonio M

    2015-12-01

    Muscle problems and other adverse symptoms associated with statin use are frequent reasons for non-adherence and discontinuation of statin therapy, which results in inadequate control of hyperlipidemia and increased cardiovascular risk. However, most patients who experience adverse symptoms during statin use are able to tolerate at least some degree of statin therapy. Given the profound cardiovascular benefits derived from statins, an adequate practical approach to statin intolerance is, therefore, of great clinical importance. Statin intolerance can be defined as the occurrence of myalgia or other adverse symptoms that are attributed to statin therapy and that lead to its discontinuation. In reality, these symptoms are actually unrelated to statin use in many patients, especially in those with atypical presentations following long periods of treatment. Thus, the first step in approaching patients with adverse symptoms during the course of statin therapy is identification of those patients for whom true statin intolerance is unlikely, since most of these patients would probably be capable of tolerating adequate statin therapy. In patients with statin intolerance, an altered dosing regimen of very low doses of statins should be attempted and, if tolerated, should gradually be increased to achieve the highest tolerable doses. In addition, other lipid-lowering drugs may be needed, either in combination with statins, or alone, if statins are not tolerated at all. Stringent control of other risk factors can aid in reducing cardiovascular risk if attaining lipid treatment goals proves difficult.

  2. Is it just lactose intolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Celso Eduardo; Lorena, Sônia Letícia Silva; Pavan, Célia Regina; dos Santos, Raquel Acácia Pereira Gonçalves; dos Santos Lima, Regiane Patussi; Pinto, Daiana Guedes; da Silva, Mariana Dias; de Lima Zollner, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Acquired delayed-onset hypolactasia is a common autosomal recessive condition. Cow's milk allergies, conversely, are less common conditions that may manifest with equivalent symptoms and are able to simulate and/or aggravate lactose intolerance. This study was designed to evaluate the contribution of IgE-mediated cow's milk sensitization to the symptomatology of adult patients with lactose-free diet refractory lactose intolerance. Forty-six adult patients with lactose intolerance and persistent symptoms despite a lactose-free diet underwent skin-prick test to investigate cow's milk, goat's milk, and soy protein-specific-IgE. SDS-PAGE immunoblotting was used to investigate the presence of cow's milk protein-specific IgE. The percentage of patients who had skin reactions to whole cow's milk, alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, caseins, goat's milk, and soy was 69.5, 36.9, 56.5, 56.5%, 54.3, and 50%, respectively. The percentage of patients with immunoblot-detected IgE specific for alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, caseins, and bovine serum albumin was 21.7, 63, 67.3, and 2.1%, respectively. IgE-mediated sensitization to cow's milk is a frequent comorbidity in subjects with lactose-free diet refractory lactose intolerance and is worth consideration in patients with this condition.

  3. Hypoglycemia Prevention and User Acceptance of an Insulin Pump System with Predictive Low Glucose Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Pratik; Olsen, Birthe S; Conget, Ignacio; Welsh, John B; Vorrink, Linda; Shin, John J

    2016-05-01

    The MiniMed 640G sensor-augmented insulin pump system (Medtronic, Inc., Northridge, CA) can automatically suspend insulin delivery in advance of predicted hypoglycemia and restart it upon recovery. The aims of this analysis were to determine the rate at which predicted hypoglycemia was avoided with this strategy, as well as to assess user acceptance of the system and its insulin management features. Forty subjects with type 1 diabetes used the system for 4 weeks. We retrospectively evaluated performance of the system, using downloaded pump and sensor data, and evaluated user acceptance via questionnaires. There were 2,322 suspend before low events (2.1 per subject-day). The mean (± SD) duration of pump suspension events was 56.4 ± 9.6 min, and the mean subsequent sensor glucose (SG) nadir was 71.8 ± 5.2 mg/dL. SG values following 1,930 (83.1%) of the predictive suspensions did not reach the preset low limit. Nadir SG values of ≤50 and ≤60 mg/dL were seen in 207 (8.9%) and 356 (15.3%) of the predictive suspensions, respectively. Blood glucose (BG) and SG values before and during the study were comparable (P > 0.05). The mean absolute relative difference between paired SG and BG values was 10.9 ± 13.8%. Subjects felt confident using the system, agreed that it helped protect them from hypoglycemia, and wished to continue using it. Automatic insulin pump suspension as implemented in the MiniMed 640G system can help patients avoid hypoglycemia, without significantly increasing hyperglycemia.

  4. Impact of the Bienestar school-based diabetes mellitus prevention program on fasting capillary glucose levels: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Roberto P; Yin, Zenong; Hernandez, Arthur; Hale, Daniel E; Garcia, Oralia A; Mobley, Connie

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of a school-based diabetes mellitus prevention program on low-income fourth-grade Mexican American children. A randomized controlled trial with 13 intervention and 14 control schools. Elementary schools in inner-city neighborhoods in San Antonio, Tex. Eighty percent of participants were Mexican American and 94% were from economically disadvantaged households. Baseline and follow-up measures were collected from 1419 (713 intervention and 706 control) and 1221 (619 intervention and 602 control) fourth-grade children, respectively. The Bienestar Health Program consists of a health class and physical education curriculum, a family program, a school cafeteria program, and an after-school health club. The objectives are to decrease dietary saturated fat intake, increase dietary fiber intake, and increase physical activity. The primary end point was fasting capillary glucose level, and the secondary end points were percentage of body fat, physical fitness level, dietary fiber intake, and dietary saturated fat intake. Fasting capillary glucose level, bioelectric impedance, modified Harvard step test, three 24-hour dietary recalls, weight, and height were collected at baseline and 8 months later. Children in the intervention arm attended an average of 32 Bienestar sessions. Mean fasting capillary glucose levels decreased in intervention schools and increased in control schools after adjusting for covariates (-2.24 mg/dL [0.12 mmol/L]; 95% confidence interval, -6.53 to 2.05 [-0.36 to 0.11 mmol/L]; P =.03). Fitness scores (P =.04) and dietary fiber intake (P =.009) significantly increased in intervention children and decreased in control children. Percentage of body fat (P =.56) and dietary saturated fat intake (P =.52) did not differ significantly between intervention and control children. This intervention showed some positive results, but additional research is needed to examine long-term benefits, translation, and cost-effectiveness.

  5. HEREDITARY FRUCTOSE INTOLERANCE – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Brecelj

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism that presents with hypoglicemia, metabolic acidosis and liver decompensation when the patient is exposed to fructose. Diagnosis was established by fructose tolerance test in the past and nowadays mostly by determination of deficient enzyme fructose-1phosphate aldolase (aldolase B activity in hepatic tissue or by molecular genetic means if the mutation is known. Treatment involves elimination (in infants or reduction of fructose and sucrose from the diet and results in improvement in the patient’s clinical status and liver disease.Results. This article presents a patient with hereditary fructose intolerance who was diagnosed 18 years ago on the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Ljubljana Children’s Hospital. At that time oral fructose tolerance test was used to diagnose the disorder. When she was 17 we performed liver biopsy. The enzyme determination showed the absence of aldolase B activity.Conclusions. Only cooperation of different experts enables recognition of rare metabolic disorders which must be prompt to prevent further damage.

  6. Screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency can prevent severe neonatal jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallouh, A A; Imseeh, G; Abu-Osba, Y K; Hamdan, J A

    1992-01-01

    Infants with the severe variant of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may develop hyperbilirubinaemia sufficiently severe to cause kernicterus and death, acute haemolysis on exposure to oxidant stress, congenital non-spherocytic haemolytic anaemia and, rarely, increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. In spite of these potential problems, G6PD deficiency is often not included among screening programmes for inherited disorders. In a comprehensive screening and educational programme, we tested around 34,000 infants for G6PD deficiency. Of the total group, 18.4% (24.5% boys and 11.8% girls) were deficient. Forty-two of the 6246 (0.67%) G6PD-deficient infants required exchange transfusion. None of them developed kernicterus. By contrast, of 4755 infants who had not been screened because they were born at home, three developed kernicterus. In addition, four G6PD-deficient infants had developed kernicterus in the 20-month period prior to the screening programme. None of the hyperbilirubinaemic infants had blood group incompatibility or any other identifiable cause of hyperbilirubinaemia. To avoid this disastrous result, we believe that neonatal screening for G6PD deficiency, together with a comprehensive education programme, is advisable in those parts of the world where the severe variant of G6PD deficiency is prevalent.

  7. Food intolerance and mucosal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Most infants are immunologically active and are able to develop a tolerance to oligoclonal antigens by producing IgA, along with activation of regulatory T cells, in early infancy. Cytokines and their signaling molecules are important mediators in the intestine, regulating both oral tolerance and mucosal inflammation. This system works efficiently in most individuals, but for an as yet undefined reason, some people react to food and other proteins as though they were pathogens, with induction of chronic inflammation in the mucosa. The adverse reaction caused by ingested foods is defined as food intolerance. The clinical features of food intolerance include vomiting, diarrhea, bloody stool, eczema, failure to thrive, and a protean range of other symptoms. Intolerance can be divided into two categories depending on whether or not they are immunologically mediated. Food intolerance and mucosal inflammation are deeply related because tolerance cannot be established when there is an inflammation in the intestinal mucosa. Mast cells, eosinophils, mucosal lymphocytes, and epithelial cells are deeply involved and related to each other in the development of mucosal inflammation. Meanwhile, rectal bleeding in infancy is related to lymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophil infiltration into the colonic mucosa facilitated by C-C motif ligand 11 (CCL11, known as eotaxin-1) and C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 13 (CXCL13). Rectal bleeding in infancy may not be simply caused by allergic reactions against specific antigens, but may be due to migrated lymphocytes developing immunological tolerance; including IgA synthesizing, in the intestinal mucosa. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  8. Treating statin-intolerant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pigna G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Marcello Arca, Giovanni PignaAtherosclerosis Unit, Department of Internal Medicine and Allied Medical Specialities, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Statins are effective in reducing cardiovascular events and are safe for almost all patients. Nevertheless, intolerance to statins is frequently faced in clinical practice. This is mostly due to muscular symptoms (myalgia with or without increase of plasma creatinine kinase and/or elevation of hepatic aminotransferases, which overall constitutes approximately two-thirds of reported adverse events during statin therapy. These side effects raise concerns in patients as well as in doctors and are likely to reduce patients' adherence and, as a consequence, the cardiovascular benefit. Therefore, it is mandatory that clinicians improve their knowledge on the clinical aspects of muscular and hepatic side effects of statin therapy as well as their ability to manage patients with statin intolerance. Besides briefly examining the clinical aspects and the mechanisms that are proposed to be responsible for the most common statin-associated side effects, the main purpose of this article is to review the available approaches to manage statin-intolerant patients. The first step is to determine whether the adverse events are indeed related to statin therapy. If so, lowering the dosage or changing statin, alternate dosing options, or the use of nonstatin compounds may be practical strategies. The cholesterol-lowering potency as well as the usefulness of these different approaches in treating statin-intolerant patients will be examined based on currently available data. However, the cardiovascular benefit of these strategies has not been well established, so their use has to be guided by a careful clinical assessment of each patient.Keywords: statin therapy, atorvastatin, rosuvastatin, aminotransferase levels, myopathy

  9. Increasing palmitic acid intake enhances milk production and prevents glucose-stimulated fatty acid disappearance without modifying systemic glucose tolerance in mid-lactation dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, A T; Rico, J E; Sprenkle, N T; Lock, A L; McFadden, J W

    2016-11-01

    Feeding saturated fatty acids may enhance milk yield in part by decreasing insulin sensitivity and shifting glucose utilization toward the mammary gland. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of palmitic acid (C16:0) on milk production and insulin sensitivity in cows. Twenty multiparous mid-lactation Holstein cows were enrolled in a study consisting of a 5-d covariate, 49-d treatment, and 14-d posttreatment period. All cows received a common sorghum silage-based diet and were randomly assigned to a diet containing no supplemental fat (control; n=10; 138±45d in milk) or C16:0 at 4% of ration DM (PALM; 98% C16:0; n=10; 136±44d in milk). Blood and milk were collected at routine intervals. Intravenous glucose tolerance tests (300mg/kg of body weight) were performed at d -1, 24, and 49 relative to start of treatment. Data were analyzed as repeated measures using a mixed model with fixed effects of treatment and time, and milk yield served as a covariate. The PALM treatment increased milk yield by wk 7. Furthermore, PALM increased milk fat yield and energy-corrected milk at wk 3 and 7. Changes in milk production occurred in parallel with enhanced energy intake. Increased milk fat yield during PALM treatment was due to increased C16:0 and C16:1 incorporation; PALM had no effect on concentration of milk components, BW, or body condition score. Two weeks posttreatment, energy-corrected milk and milk fat yield remained elevated in PALM-fed cows whereas yields of milk were similar between treatments. Increased milk fat yield after PALM treatment was due to increased de novo lipogenesis and uptake of preformed fatty acids. The basal concentration of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) in plasma increased by d 4, 6, and 8 of PALM treatment, a response not observed thereafter. Although PALM supplementation did not modify insulin, glucose, or triacylglycerol levels in plasma, total cholesterol in plasma was elevated by wk 3. Estimated insulin sensitivity was lower during the

  10. Effects of Alcohol on Plasma Glucose and Prevention of Alcohol-induced Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes - A Systematic Review with GRADE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetzschner, R; Nørgaard, K; Ranjan, A

    2018-01-01

    on their suggested prevention strategies. RESULTS: We included 13 studies. Eight studies reported that ethanol, regardless of administration intravenously or orally, were associated with an increased risk of hypoglycemia due to decrease in plasma glucose, impaired counter-regulatory response, awareness...... of hypoglycemia and cognitive function. Five studies did not report an increased risk of hypoglycemia. None of the studies investigated prevention strategies for ethanol-induced hypoglycemia. Recommendations from 13 diabetes associations were included. All associations recommend combining ethanol with food intake...

  11. A cluster-randomized controlled trial to study the effectiveness of a protocol-based lifestyle program to prevent type 2 diabetes in people with impaired fasting glucose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, Arlette E.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Jonkers, Ruud; Martens, Marloes; de Weerdt, Inge; Rutten, Guy E. H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Effective diabetes prevention strategies that can be implemented in daily practice, without huge amounts of money and a lot of personnel are needed. The Dutch Diabetes Federation developed a protocol for coaching people with impaired fasting glucose (IFG; according to WHO criteria: 6.1

  12. Naringin prevents HIV-1 protease inhibitors-induced metabolic complications in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanelisiwe Nzuza

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and overt diabetes are known metabolic complications associated with chronic use of HIV-Protease Inhibitors. Naringin is a grapefruit-derived flavonoid with anti-diabetic, anti-dyslipidemia, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities.The study investigated the protective effects of naringin on glucose intolerance and impaired insulin secretion and signaling in vivo.Male Wistar rats were divided into six groups (n = 6 and were daily orally treated with distilled water {3.0 ml/kg body weight (BW}, atazanavir (133 mg/kg BW, saquinavir (333 mg/kg BW with or without naringin (50 mg/kg BW, respectively for 56 days. Body weights and water consumption were recorded daily. Glucose tolerance tests were carried out on day 55 of the treatment and thereafter, the rats were sacrificed by halothane overdose.Atazanavir (ATV- or saquinavir (SQV-treated rats exhibited significant weight loss, polydipsia, elevated Fasting blood glucose (FBG, reduced Fasting Plasma Insulin (FPI and expression of phosphorylated, Insulin Receptor Substrate-1 (IRS-1 and Akt proteins, hepatic and pancreatic glucokinase levels, and also increasing pancreatic caspase-3 and -9 as well as UCP2 protein expressions compared to controls, respectively. These effects were completely reversed by naringin treatment.Naringin prevents PI-induced glucose intolerance and impairment of insulin signaling and as nutritional supplement it could therefore alleviate metabolic complications associated with antiretroviral therapy.

  13. Lactose intolerance and other disaccharidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Balvir S

    2014-09-01

    Intolerance to foods which contain lactose can cause a range of intestinal and systemic symptoms. These symptoms are caused by Lactase deficiency which is encoded by a single gene (LCT) of ≈ 50 kb located on chromosome 2q21. In some food items, lactose has been missed because of "hidden" lactose due to inadequately labeled, confusing diagnosis of lactose intolerance based on dietary restriction of dairy foods. Two polymorphisms, C/T13910 and G/A22018, linked to hypolactasia, correlate with breath hydrogen and symptoms after lactose. The key in the management of lactose intolerance is the dietary removal of lactose. Patients diagnosed as lactose intolerant must be advised of "risk" foods, inadequately labeled, including processed meats, bread, cake mixes, soft drinks, and lagers. This review highlights the types, symptoms and management of lactose intolerance and also highlights differences from milk allergy which closely mimics the symptoms of lactose intolerance.

  14. Pre-germinated brown rice prevents high-fat diet induced hyperglycemia through elevated insulin secretion and glucose metabolism pathway in C57BL/6J strain mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kuo-Ping; Hao, Chi-Long; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Chen, Chun-Yen; Wu, Bin-Nan; Lin, Hui-Li

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect and mechanism of pre-germinated brown rice (PGBR) prevented hyperglycemia in C57BL/6J mice fed high-fat-diet (HFD). Normal six-week-old mice were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 was fed standard-regular-diet (SRD) and group 2 was fed HFD for 16 weeks. In group 3, the mice were fed a HFD with its carbohydrate replaced with PGBR for 16 weeks. Comparing the SRD and HFD groups, we found the HFD group had higher blood pressure, higher concentrations of blood glucose and HbA1c. The HFD group had less protein expression of insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4) and glucokinase (GCK) and greater expression of glucogen synthase kinase (GSK) in skeletal muscle. The HFD group also had less expression of IR, serine/threonine kinase PI3K-linked protein kinase B (Akt/PKB), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), GCK and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in liver. In the HFD + PGBR group, the PGBR could reverse the disorders of blood pressure, blood glucose, HbA1c and increase insulin concentration. PGBR increased the IR, IRS-1, PI3K, Akt, GLUT-1 and GLUT-4 proteins, and ameliorated AMPK, GCK, GSK and PPARγ proteins. Together, PGBR prevented HFD-induced hyperglycemia through improving insulin levels, insulin receptor, glucose transporters and enhancing glucose metabolism.

  15. Ingestion of glucose or sucrose prevents liver but not muscle glycogen depletion during prolonged endurance-type exercise in trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Javier T; Fuchs, Cas J; Smith, Fiona E; Thelwall, Pete E; Taylor, Roy; Stevenson, Emma J; Trenell, Michael I; Cermak, Naomi M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to define the effect of glucose ingestion compared with sucrose ingestion on liver and muscle glycogen depletion during prolonged endurance-type exercise. Fourteen cyclists completed two 3-h bouts of cycling at 50% of peak power output while ingesting either glucose or sucrose at a rate of 1.7 g/min (102 g/h). Four cyclists performed an additional third test for reference in which only water was consumed. We employed (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine liver and muscle glycogen concentrations before and after exercise. Expired breath was sampled during exercise to estimate whole body substrate use. After glucose and sucrose ingestion, liver glycogen levels did not show a significant decline after exercise (from 325 ± 168 to 345 ± 205 and 321 ± 177 to 348 ± 170 mmol/l, respectively; P > 0.05), with no differences between treatments. Muscle glycogen concentrations declined (from 101 ± 49 to 60 ± 34 and 114 ± 48 to 67 ± 34 mmol/l, respectively; P glycogen concentrations declined during exercise when only water was ingested. Both glucose and sucrose ingestion prevent liver glycogen depletion during prolonged endurance-type exercise. Sucrose ingestion does not preserve liver glycogen concentrations more than glucose ingestion. However, sucrose ingestion does increase whole body carbohydrate utilization compared with glucose ingestion. This trial was registered at https://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02110836. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Liberal intolerance in European education debates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tore Vincents

    2017-01-01

    by subdividing it into four categories of liberal intolerance and demonstrates this by analysing six national debates on the accommodation of cultural and religious diversity in education. The analysis indicates that the nature of liberal intolerance understood as the combination of the four categories...... of liberal intolerance varies with the state tradition regarding religious neutrality of public institutions and the type of welfare state, but also that many liberal arguments for and against accommodation repeat themselves across national contexts....

  17. Statin intolerance: more questions than answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, John R; Campbell, Kristen B; Lakey, Wanda C

    2014-01-01

    The dramatic effectiveness of statins in improving the course of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease tends to overshadow questions of statin intolerance. Thus after more than 25 years of clinical statin use, intolerance remains a poorly understood, frustrating issue for patients and providers. It has been extraordinarily difficult to define statin intolerance and its implications for clinical practice. Here, we briefly summarize current knowledge and raise questions that need to be addressed.

  18. Discrimination And Intolerance in the Art

    OpenAIRE

    Vitor Correia

    2014-01-01

    When the people speak about discrimination and intolerance, it is usually in reference to the racial, religious, political, sexual, age, problems, etc., and does not refer, or refers less, the discrimination and the intolerance determined by artistic reasons, or with these related : the age differences in art, the sexism in art, and the rejection of works of art. In this text we intend to show the existence of these forms of discrimination and intolerance, explain what they mean, its causes, ...

  19. Discrimination And Intolerance in the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Correia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available When the people speak about discrimination and intolerance, it is usually in reference to the racial, religious, political, sexual, age, problems, etc., and does not refer, or refers less, the discrimination and the intolerance determined by artistic reasons, or with these related : the age differences in art, the sexism in art, and the rejection of works of art. In this text we intend to show the existence of these forms of discrimination and intolerance, explain what they mean, its causes, and its aftermath. We analyze the specificity of each of the discrimination and intolerance in the artistic field,  and the social weight they have in the world today.

  20. Discrimination And Intolerance in the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Correia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available When the people speak about discrimination and intolerance, it is usually in reference to the racial, religious, political, sexual, age, problems, etc., and does not refer, or refers less, the discrimination and the intolerance determined by artistic reasons, or with these related : the age differences in art, the sexism in art, and the rejection of works of art. In this text we intend to show the existence of these forms of discrimination and intolerance, explain what they mean, its causes, and its aftermath. We analyze the specificity of each of the discrimination and intolerance in the artistic field,  and the social weight they have in the world today.

  1. Choline prevents fetal overgrowth and normalizes placental fatty acid and glucose metabolism in a mouse model of maternal obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Juha; Greenwald, Esther; Jack-Roberts, Chauntelle; Ajeeb, Tamara T; Malysheva, Olga V; Caudill, Marie A; Axen, Kathleen; Saxena, Anjana; Semernina, Ekaterina; Nanobashvili, Khatia; Jiang, Xinyin

    2017-11-01

    Maternal obesity increases placental transport of macronutrients, resulting in fetal overgrowth and obesity later in life. Choline participates in fatty acid metabolism, serves as a methyl donor and influences growth signaling, which may modify placental macronutrient homeostasis and affect fetal growth. Using a mouse model of maternal obesity, we assessed the effect of maternal choline supplementation on preventing fetal overgrowth and restoring placental macronutrient homeostasis. C57BL/6J mice were fed either a high-fat (HF, 60% kcal from fat) diet or a normal (NF, 10% kcal from fat) diet with a drinking supply of either 25 mM choline chloride or control purified water, respectively, beginning 4 weeks prior to mating until gestational day 12.5. Fetal and placental weight, metabolites and gene expression were measured. HF feeding significantly (P<.05) increased placental and fetal weight in the HF-control (HFCO) versus NF-control (NFCO) animals, whereas the HF choline-supplemented (HFCS) group effectively normalized placental and fetal weight to the levels of the NFCO group. Compared to HFCO, the HFCS group had lower (P<.05) glucose transporter 1 and fatty acid transport protein 1 expression as well as lower accumulation of glycogen in the placenta. The HFCS group also had lower (P<.05) placental 4E-binding protein 1 and ribosomal protein s6 phosphorylation, which are indicators of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 activation favoring macronutrient anabolism. In summary, our results suggest that maternal choline supplementation prevented fetal overgrowth in obese mice at midgestation and improved biomarkers of placental macronutrient homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute stimulation of brain mu opioid receptors inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion via sympathetic innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudurí, Eva; Beiroa, Daniel; Stegbauer, Johannes; Fernø, Johan; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic insulin-secreting β-cells express opioid receptors, whose activation by opioid peptides modulates hormone secretion. Opioid receptors are also expressed in multiple brain regions including the hypothalamus, where they play a role in feeding behavior and energy homeostasis, but their potential role in central regulation of glucose metabolism is unknown. Here, we investigate whether central opioid receptors participate in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis in vivo. C57BL/6J mice were acutely treated by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection with specific agonists for the three main opioid receptors, kappa (KOR), delta (DOR) and mu (MOR) opioid receptors: activation of KOR and DOR did not alter glucose tolerance, whereas activation of brain MOR with the specific agonist DAMGO blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), reduced insulin sensitivity, increased the expression of gluconeogenic genes in the liver and, consequently, impaired glucose tolerance. Pharmacological blockade of α2A-adrenergic receptors prevented DAMGO-induced glucose intolerance and gluconeogenesis. Accordingly, DAMGO failed to inhibit GSIS and to impair glucose tolerance in α2A-adrenoceptor knockout mice, indicating that the effects of central MOR activation on β-cells are mediated via sympathetic innervation. Our results show for the first time a new role of the central opioid system, specifically the MOR, in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Food allergy or food intolerance?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maître, S; Maniu, C-M; Buss, G; Maillard, M H; Spertini, F; Ribi, C

    2014-04-16

    Adverse food reactions can be classified into two main categories depending on wether an immune mechanism is involved or not. The first category includes immune mediated reactions like IgE mediated food allergy, eosinophilic oesophagitis, food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome and celiac disease. The second category implies non-immune mediated adverse food reactions, also called food intolerances. Intoxications, pharmacologic reactions, metabolic reactions, physiologic, psychologic or reactions with an unknown mechanism belong to this category. We present a classification of adverse food reactions based on the pathophysiologic mechanism that can be useful for both diagnostic approach and management.

  4. estigma tolerable al estigma intolerable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Arteaga Botello

    2006-01-01

    cristalización pasa por dos referentes de interacción y relación social al interior del espacio escolar. El primero está constituido por parámetros de normalidad y anormalidad a partir de la localización de estigmas. El segundo se encuentra, a contrapelo de la tendencia anterior, tratando de diluir los efectos de los estigmas al señalarlos como una práctica de tipificación social intolerable o inaceptable.

  5. Current treatment of dyslipidaemia: PCSK9 inhibitors and statin intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinas, Konstantinos; Wilhelm, Matthias; Windecker, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Statins are the cornerstone of the management of dyslipidaemias and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Although statins are, overall, safe and well tolerated, adverse events can occur and constitute an important barrier to maintaining long-term adherence to statin treatment. In patients who cannot tolerate statins, alternative treatments include switch to another statin, intermittent-dosage regimens and non-statin lipid-lowering medications. Nonetheless, a high proportion of statin-intolerant patients are unable to achieve recommended low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol goals, thereby resulting in substantial residual cardiovascular risk. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a protease implicated in LDL receptor degradation and plays a central role in cholesterol metabolism. In recent studies, PCSK9 inhibition by means of monoclonal antibodies achieved LDL cholesterol reductions of 50% to 70% across various patient populations and background lipid-lowering therapies, while maintaining a favourable safety profile. The efficacy and safety of the monoclonal antibodies alirocumab and evolocumab were confirmed in statin-intolerant patients, indicating that PCSK9 inhibitors represent an attractive treatment option in this challenging clinical setting. PCSK9 inhibitors recently received regulatory approval for clinical use and may be considered in properly selected patients according to current consensus documents, including patients with statin intolerance. In this review we summarise current evidence regarding diagnostic evaluation of statin-related adverse events, particularly statin-associated muscle symptoms, and we discuss current recommendations on the management of statin-intolerant patients. In view of emerging evidence of the efficacy and safety of PCSK9 inhibitors, we further discuss the role of monoclonal PCSK9 antibodies in the management of statin-intolerant hypercholesterolaemic patients.

  6. Limited OXPHOS capacity in white adipocytes is a hallmark of obesity in laboratory mice irrespective of the glucose tolerance status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Schöttl

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity in white adipocytes is a hallmark of murine obesity irrespective of the glucose tolerance status. Impaired respiratory capacity in white adipocytes solely is not sufficient for the development of systemic glucose intolerance.

  7. Food Intolerance vs. Food Allergy: What's the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the difference? What's the difference between a food intolerance and a food allergy? Answers from James T C Li, ... common, but most are caused by a food intolerance rather than a food allergy. A food intolerance ...

  8. What People with Lactose Intolerance Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People With Lactose Intolerance Need to Know About Osteoporosis What Is Lactose Intolerance? Lactose intolerance is a ... Health Strategies Resources For Your Information What Is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which bones become ...

  9. Intestinal Ralstonia pickettii augments glucose intolerance in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udayappan, Shanthadevi D; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Bakker, Guido J

    2017-01-01

    An altered intestinal microbiota composition has been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease including obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Low grade inflammation, potentially initiated by the intestinal microbiota, has been suggested to be a driving force in the development ...

  10. Prevalence and determinants of glucose intolerance among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ±SD age of 38±15 years were HAARTtreated; while 200 (61 males and 139 females) with mean±SD age of 33±17 years were HAART-naive. Overall, the prevalence of GI was 40.4% (IFG) 19.5%, IGT 11.5% and DM 9.4%. The prevalence of ...

  11. Blueberries? Impact on Insulin Resistance and Glucose Intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Stull, April J.

    2016-01-01

    Blueberries are a rich source of polyphenols, which include anthocyanin bioactive compounds. Epidemiological evidence indicates that incorporating blueberries into the diet may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM). These findings are supported by pre-clinical and clinical studies that have shown improvements in insulin resistance (i.e., increased insulin sensitivity) after obese and insulin-resistant rodents or humans consumed blueberries. Insulin resistance was assessed by hom...

  12. Natural history and physiological determinants of changes in glucose tolerance in a non-diabetic population: the RISC Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrannini, E; Natali, A; Muscelli, E

    2011-01-01

    The natural history and physiological determinants of glucose intolerance in subjects living in Europe have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to increase our understanding of this area.......The natural history and physiological determinants of glucose intolerance in subjects living in Europe have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to increase our understanding of this area....

  13. Worry, Intolerance of Uncertainty, and Statistics Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda S.

    2013-01-01

    Statistics anxiety is a problem for most graduate students. This study investigates the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty, worry, and statistics anxiety. Intolerance of uncertainty was significantly related to worry, and worry was significantly related to three types of statistics anxiety. Six types of statistics anxiety were…

  14. Prediction of methotrexate intolerance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a prospective, observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijkhuizen, Evert Hendrik Pieter; Bulatović Ćalasan, Maja; Pluijm, Saskia M F; de Rotte, Maurits C F J; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Kamphuis, Sylvia; de Jonge, Robert; Wulffraat, Nico M

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an effective and safe drug in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Despite its safety, MTX-related gastrointestinal adverse effects before and after MTX administration, termed MTX intolerance, occur frequently, leading to non-compliance and potentially premature MTX termination. The aim of this study was to construct a risk model to predict MTX intolerance. In a prospective JIA cohort, clinical variables and single nucleotide polymorphisms were determined at MTX start. The Methotrexate Intolerance Severity Score was employed to measure MTX intolerance in the first year of treatment. MTX intolerance was most prevalent at 6 or 12 months after MTX start, which was defined as the outcome for the prediction model. The model was developed in 152 patients using multivariable logistic regression analysis and subsequently internally validated using bootstrapping. The prediction model included the following predictors: JIA category, antinuclear antibody, parent/patient assessment of pain, Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score-27, thrombocytes, alanine aminotransferase and creatinine. The model classified 77.5% of patients correctly, and 66.7% of patients after internal validation by bootstrapping. The lowest predicted risk of MTX intolerance was 18.9% and the highest predicted risk was 85.9%. The prediction model was transformed into a risk score (range 0-17). At a cut-off of ≥6, sensitivity was 82.0%, specificity 56.1%, positive predictive value was 58.7% and negative predictive value 80.4%. This clinical prediction model showed moderate predictive power to detect MTX intolerance. To develop into a clinically usable tool, it should be validated in an independent cohort and updated with new predictors. Such an easy-to-use tool could then assist clinicians in identifying patients at risk to develop MTX intolerance, and in turn to monitor them closely and intervene timely in order to prevent the development of MTX intolerance

  15. The differential diagnosis of food intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopf, Yurdagül; Baenkler, Hanns-Wolf; Silbermann, Andrea; Hahn, Eckhart G; Raithel, Martin

    2009-05-01

    More than 20% of the population in industrialized countries suffer from food intolerance or food allergy. Selective literature search for relevant publications in PubMed and the Cochrane Library combined with further data from the interdisciplinary database on chronic inflammatory and allergic diseases of the Erlangen University Hospital. The majority of cases of food intolerance (15% to 20%) are due to non-immunological causes. These causes range from pseudoallergic reactions to enzymopathies, chronic infections, and psychosomatic reactions that are associated with food intolerance. The prevalence of true food allergy, i.e., immunologically mediated intolerance reactions, is only 2% to 5%. The differential diagnosis of food intolerance is broad. Therefore, a structured diagnostic algorithm with input from multiple clinical disciplines should be applied. The treatment consists of eliminating the offending substance from the diet as well as medications and psychosomatic support, when indicated.

  16. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: a systematic review on the diagnostic value of gastrointestinal symptoms and self-reported milk intolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, P.; Schellevis, F. G.; van der Windt, D. A. W. M.; Kneepkens, C. M. F.; van der Horst, H. E.

    2010-01-01

    When lactose malabsorption gives rise to symptoms, the result is called 'lactose intolerance'. Although lactose intolerance is often bothersome for patients, once recognized it may be managed by simple dietary adjustments. However, diagnosing lactose intolerance is not straightforward, especially in

  17. High prevalence of methotrexate intolerance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis : development and validation of a methotrexate intolerance severity score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulatović, Maja; Heijstek, Marloes W; Verkaaik, Marleen; van Dijkhuizen, E H Pieter; Armbrust, Wineke; Hoppenreijs, Esther P A; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Kuis, Wietse; Egberts, Toine C G; Sinnema, Gerben; Rademaker, Carin M A; Wulffraat, Nico M

    OBJECTIVE: To design and validate a new questionnaire for identifying patients with methotrexate (MTX) intolerance, and to determine the prevalence of MTX intolerance in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) using this questionnaire. METHODS: The MTX Intolerance Severity Score (MISS)

  18. High prevalence of methotrexate intolerance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: development and validation of a methotrexate intolerance severity score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulatovic, M.; Heijstek, M.W.; Verkaaik, M.; Dijkhuizen, E.H. van; Armbrust, W.; Hoppenreijs, E.P.A.H.; Kamphuis, S.; Kuis, W.; Egberts, T.C.; Sinnema, G.; Rademaker, C.M.A.; Wulffraat, N.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To design and validate a new questionnaire for identifying patients with methotrexate (MTX) intolerance, and to determine the prevalence of MTX intolerance in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) using this questionnaire. METHODS: The MTX Intolerance Severity Score (MISS)

  19. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: a systematic review on the diagnostic value of gastrointestinal symptoms and self-reported milk intolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, A.P.; Schellevis, F.G.; van der Windt, D.A.W.M.; Kneepkens, C.M.F.; van der Horst, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: When lactose malabsorption gives rise to symptoms, the result is called 'lactose intolerance'. Although lactose intolerance is often bothersome for patients, once recognized it may be managed by simple dietary adjustments. However, diagnosing lactose intolerance is not straightforward,

  20. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: a systematic review on the diagnostic value of gastrointestinal symptoms and self-reported milk intolerance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, P.; Schellevis, F.G.; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Kneepkens, C.M.F.; Horst, H.E. van der

    2010-01-01

    Background: When lactose malabsorption gives rise to symptoms, the result is called 'lactose intolerance'. Although lactose intolerance is often bothersome for patients, once recognized it may be managed by simple dietary adjustments. However, diagnosing lactose intolerance is not straightforward,

  1. Prostatic cancer: intolerance and morbidity of external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douchez, J.; Fregevu, Y.; Allain, Y.M.; Cellier, P.; Fenton, J.; Hay, M.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.; Vincent, F.

    1985-01-01

    The pertherapeutic intolerance and morbidity are analyzed in a groupe of 597 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy between 1975 and 1982. Minimum follow-up is 2 years, median is 46 months. The results are compared to following parameters: associated diseases, associated surgical treatments, doses and irradiated target volumes. Pertherapeutic intolerance manifestations were found in 73% of patients and lead to complications. Urinary incontinence and chronic cystitis were more frequent after transurethral resection or prostatic target volume and by split course irradiation. Chronic diarrhea was more frequent when using large target volume. Leg edema was closely associated with pelvic lymphadenectomy. The control of pertherapeutic manifestations and the prevention of complications should improve survival in patients treated by external radiotherapy [fr

  2. Noninvasive Ventilation Intolerance: Characteristics, Predictors, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinhua; Duan, Jun; Bai, Linfu; Zhou, Lintong

    2016-03-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) intolerance is one reason for NIV failure. However, the characteristics, predictors, and outcomes of NIV intolerance are unclear. A prospective observational study was performed in the respiratory intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. Subjects with acute respiratory failure who used NIV were enrolled. Initially, continuous use of NIV was encouraged. However, if the subject could not tolerate NIV, it was used intermittently. NIV intolerance was defined as termination of NIV due to subject refusal to receive it because of discomfort, even after intermittent use was attempted. A total of 961 subjects were enrolled in the study. Of these, 50 subjects (5.2%) experienced NIV intolerance after a median 2.4 h of NIV support. Age (OR = 0.98, 95% CI 0.963-0.996) and heart rate (OR = 1.02, 95% CI 1.006-1.030) measured before NIV were 2 independent risk factors of NIV intolerance. After 1-2 h of NIV, independent risk factors of NIV intolerance were heart rate (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.016-1.044) and breathing frequency (OR = 1.06, 95% CI 1.027-1.099). Intolerant subjects had no improvement in mean arterial pressure, heart rate, or breathing frequency after the NIV intervention. Moreover, intolerant subjects had a higher intubation rate (44.0% vs 25.8%, P = .008) and higher mortality (34.0% vs 22.4%, P = .08). The three most common complaints were that NIV worsened subjects' distress (46%), that NIV resulted in dyspnea (26%), and that the flow or pressure of NIV was too strong to bear (16%). NIV intolerance worsened subjects' outcomes. Younger subjects with a high heart rate and breathing frequency may be more likely to experience NIV intolerance. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  3. Nervous glucose sensing regulates postnatal β cell proliferation and glucose homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Tarussio, David; Metref, Salima; Seyer, Pascal; Mounien, Lourdes; Vallois, David; Magnan, Christophe; Foretz, Marc; Thorens, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    How glucose sensing by the nervous system impacts the regulation of β cell mass and function during postnatal development and throughout adulthood is incompletely understood. Here, we studied mice with inactivation of glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) in the nervous system (NG2KO mice). These mice displayed normal energy homeostasis but developed late-onset glucose intolerance due to reduced insulin secretion, which was precipitated by high-fat diet feeding. The β cell mass of adult NG2KO mice wa...

  4. Nervous glucose sensing regulates postnatal beta cell proliferation and glucose homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Tarussio, David; Metref, Salima; Seyer, Pascal; Mounien, Lourdes; Vallois, David; Magnan, Christophe; Foretz, Marc; Thorens, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    How glucose sensing by the nervous system impacts the regulation of â cell mass and function during postnatal development and throughout adulthood is incompletely understood. Here we studied mice with inactivation of glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) in the nervous system (NG2KO mice). These mice displayed normal energy homeostasis but developed late onset glucose intolerance due to reduced insulin secretion which was precipitated by high fat diet feeding. The â cell mass of adult NG2KO mice was ...

  5. A Study on the Glucose and Immunoreactive Insulin Response during Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Kang Won; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mu Ho

    1973-01-01

    The blood glucose and plasma immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels were measured during aral glucose tolerance test in 7 healthy subjects and 6 patients with chronic liver diseases. The glucose tolerance was impaired in 5 of the 6 patients and normal in I. Plasma IRI responses were markedly increased and delayed in all patients, suggesting endogenous insulin resistance. Patients with more glucose intolerance showed less increase in plasma IRI than the group with less intolerance. lt is suggested that some insulin antagonists may decrease the peripheral insulin sensitivity and stimulate compensatory hyperactivity of pancreatic islets. If the compensatory hyperactivity is inadequate due to gemetic predisposition to diabetes mellitus or exhaustion of β-cells of pancreatic islets, the glucose intolerance and overt diabetes mellitus may ensue.

  6. Medicines, excipients and dietary intolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Medicinal products contain not only active drugs but also other ingredients included for a variety of purposes and collectively known as excipients.(1) People who wish to avoid a specific substance because of an allergy or intolerance may ask a healthcare professional about the constituents of a medicine and whether an alternative is available. In a previous article we discussed the issues facing people who wish to avoid certain substances for religious or cultural reasons.(2) Here, we provide an overview of several dietary conditions and the pharmaceutical issues that need to be considered by healthcare professionals advising on the suitability of a medicine. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Space Flight Orthostatic Intolerance Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luty, Wei

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes investigations conducted on different orthostatic intolerance protection garments. This paper emphasizes on the engineering and operational aspects of the project. The current Shuttle pneumatic Anti-G Suit or AGS at 25 mmHg (0.5 psi) and customized medical mechanical compressive garments (20-30 mmHg) were tested on human subjects. The test process is presented. The preliminary results conclude that mechanical compressive garments can ameliorate orthostatic hypotension in hypovolemic subjects. A mechanical compressive garment is light, small and works without external pressure gas source; however the current garment design does not provide an adjustment to compensate for the loss of mass and size in the lower torso during long term space missions. It is also difficult to don. Compression garments that do not include an abdominal component are less effective countermeasures than garments which do. An early investigation conducted by the Human Adaptation and Countermeasures Division at Johnson Space Center (JSC) has shown there is no significant difference between the protection function of the AGS (at 77 mmHg or 1.5 psi) and the Russian anti-g suit, Kentavr (at 25 mmHg or 0.5 psi). Although both garments successfully countered hypovolemia-induced orthostatic intolerance, the Kentavr provided protection by using lower levels of compression pressure. This more recent study with a lower AGS pressure shows that pressures at 20-30 mmHg is acceptable but protection function is not as effective as higher pressure. In addition, a questionnaire survey with flight crewmembers who used both AGS and Kentavr during different missions was also performed.

  8. Metabolomics reveals that vine tea (Ampelopsis grossedentata) prevents high-fat-diet-induced metabolism disorder by improving glucose homeostasis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Wenting; Jiang, Baoping; Sun, Le; Xu, Lijia; Xiao, Peigen

    2017-01-01

    Vine tea (VT), derived from Ampelopsis grossedentata (Hand.-Mazz.) W.T. Wang, is an alternative tea that has been consumed widely in south China for hundreds of years. It has been shown that drinking VT on a daily basis improves hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia. However, little is known about the preventive functions of VT for metabolic dysregulation and the potential pathological mechanisms involved. This paper elucidates the preventive effects of VT on the dysregulation of lipid and glucose metabolism using rats maintained on a high-fat-diet (HFD) in an attempt to explain the potential mechanisms involved. Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were divided into five groups: a group given normal rat chow and water (control group); a group given an HFD and water (HFD group); a group given an HFD and Pioglitazone (PIO group), 5 mg /kg; and groups given an HFD and one of two doses of VT: 500 mg/L or 2000 mg/L. After 8 weeks, changes in food intake, tea consumption, body weight, serum and hepatic biochemical parameters were determined. Moreover, liver samples were isolated for pathology histology and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based metabolomic research. VT reduced the serum levels of glucose and total cholesterol, decreased glucose area under the curve in the insulin tolerance test and visibly impaired hepatic lipid accumulation. Metabolomics showed that VT treatment modulated the contents of metabolic intermediates linked to glucose metabolism (including gluconeogenesis and glycolysis), the TCA cycle, purine metabolism and amino acid metabolism. The current results demonstrate that VT may prevent metabolic impairments induced by the consumption of an HFD. These effects may be caused by improved energy-related metabolism (including gluconeogenesis, glycolysis and TCA cycle), purine metabolism and amino acid metabolism, and reduced lipid levels in the HFD-fed rats.

  9. Metabolomics reveals that vine tea (Ampelopsis grossedentata prevents high-fat-diet-induced metabolism disorder by improving glucose homeostasis in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenting Wan

    Full Text Available Vine tea (VT, derived from Ampelopsis grossedentata (Hand.-Mazz. W.T. Wang, is an alternative tea that has been consumed widely in south China for hundreds of years. It has been shown that drinking VT on a daily basis improves hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia. However, little is known about the preventive functions of VT for metabolic dysregulation and the potential pathological mechanisms involved. This paper elucidates the preventive effects of VT on the dysregulation of lipid and glucose metabolism using rats maintained on a high-fat-diet (HFD in an attempt to explain the potential mechanisms involved.Sprague Dawley (SD rats were divided into five groups: a group given normal rat chow and water (control group; a group given an HFD and water (HFD group; a group given an HFD and Pioglitazone (PIO group, 5 mg /kg; and groups given an HFD and one of two doses of VT: 500 mg/L or 2000 mg/L. After 8 weeks, changes in food intake, tea consumption, body weight, serum and hepatic biochemical parameters were determined. Moreover, liver samples were isolated for pathology histology and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS-based metabolomic research.VT reduced the serum levels of glucose and total cholesterol, decreased glucose area under the curve in the insulin tolerance test and visibly impaired hepatic lipid accumulation. Metabolomics showed that VT treatment modulated the contents of metabolic intermediates linked to glucose metabolism (including gluconeogenesis and glycolysis, the TCA cycle, purine metabolism and amino acid metabolism.The current results demonstrate that VT may prevent metabolic impairments induced by the consumption of an HFD. These effects may be caused by improved energy-related metabolism (including gluconeogenesis, glycolysis and TCA cycle, purine metabolism and amino acid metabolism, and reduced lipid levels in the HFD-fed rats.

  10. The nocebo effect in the context of statin intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobert, Jonathan A; Newman, Connie B

    2016-01-01

    The nocebo effect, the inverse of the placebo effect, is a well-established phenomenon that is under-appreciated in cardiovascular medicine. It refers to adverse events, usually purely subjective, that result from expectations of harm from a drug, placebo, other therapeutic intervention or a nonmedical situation. These expectations can be driven by many factors including the informed consent form in a clinical trial, warnings about adverse effects communicated by clinicians when prescribing a drug, and information in the media about the dangers of certain treatments. The nocebo effect is the best explanation for the high rate of muscle and other symptoms attributed to statins in observational studies and clinical practice, but not in randomized controlled trials, where muscle symptoms, and rates of discontinuation due to any adverse event, are generally similar in the statin and placebo groups. Statin-intolerant patients usually tolerate statins under double-blind conditions, indicating that the intolerance has little if any pharmacological basis. Known techniques for minimizing the nocebo effect can be applied to the prevention and management of statin intolerance. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impaired glucose tolerance in healthy men with low body weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmoller André

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT and high body mass index (BMI are recognized risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. However, data suggest that also underweight predisposes people to develop T2DM. Here, we experimentally tested if already moderate underweight is associated with impaired glucose tolerance as compared to normal weight controls. Obese subjects were included as additional reference group. Method We included three groups of low weight, normal weight, and obese subjects comprising 15 healthy male participants each. All participants underwent a standardized hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic glucose clamp intervention to determine glucose tolerance. In addition, insulin sensitivity index (ISI was calculated by established equation. Results ISI values were higher in low and normal weight than in obese subjects (P P = 0.303. Comparable to obese participants (P = 0.178, glucose tolerance was found decreased in low weight as compared with normal weight subjects (P = 0.007. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed a positive relationship between glucose tolerance and BMI in low (P = 0.043 and normal weight subjects (P = 0.021, an effect that was found inverse in obese participants (P = 0.028. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that not only obese but also healthy people with moderate underweight display glucose intolerance. It is therefore suggested that all deviations from normal BMI may be accompanied by an increased risk of developing T2DM in later life indicating that the maintenance of body weight within the normal range has first priority in the prevention of this disease.

  12. Fructose and/or Sorbitol Intolerance in a Subgroup of Lactose Intolerant Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SR Mishkin

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis and treatment of lactose intolerance often does not resolve all the symptoms of postcibal bloating and flatulence. Included in this study were 104 lactose intolerant patients (71 female, 33 male who complained of residual postcibal discomfort in spite of adherence to and benefit from appropriate measures for their documented lactose intolerance (at least 20 ppm H2 after 25 g lactose as well as appropriate symptomatic discomfort. Clinical characteristics common to this group included: symptomatic diarrhea (12.5%, history of foreign travel (5.8%, endoscopic and pathological evidence of gastritis and helicobacter infection (19.2 and 8.7%, respectively, nonspecific abnormalities of small bowel follow-through (15.4%, Crohn’s disease (8.7% and colonic cliverticulosis (14.4%. Intolerance co fructose (at least 10 ppm H2 after 25 g fructose plus appropriate symptoms or sorbitol (at least 10 ppm H2 after 5 g sorbitol plus appropriate symptoms was documented in 17.3 and 18.3%, respectively. Intolerance to both fructose and sorbicol (administered as separate challenges, more than twice as common as intolerance to either one alone, occurred in 41.4% and was independent of sex. In conclusion, additional carbohydrate intolerances contribute to postcibal discomfort in more than 75% of lactose intolerant patients who remain symptomatic in spite of adherence to appropriate measures for this condition. While 62% of all patients had benefited significantly (greater than 50% from appropriate dietary measures and enzyme replacement for lactose intolerance, only 40% of those who were also fructose intolerant and 47% who were sorbitol intolerant benefited (greater than 50% from appropriate dietary measures (no enzyme replacement yet available for intolerance to these sugars.

  13. Arrhythmia and exercise intolerance in Fontan patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, L; Juul, K; Jensen, A S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term survival after the Fontan procedure shows excellent results but is associated with a persistent risk of arrhythmias and exercise intolerance. We aimed to analyze the current burden of clinically relevant arrhythmia and severe exercise intolerance in Danish Fontan patients...... and estimated to 99.1% per year. Prevalence of clinically relevant arrhythmia and severe exercise intolerance increased significantly with age and was found in 32% and 85% of patients ≥20years, respectively. Thus, from survival data and logistic regression models the future prevalence of patients, clinically...... relevant arrhythmia and severe exercise intolerance were estimated, revealing a considerable augmentation. Furthermore, resting and maximum cardiac index, resting stroke volume index and pulmonary diffusing capacity decreased significantly with age while diastolic and systolic ventricular function...

  14. Lactose intolerance: from diagnosis to correct management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo, T; D'Angelo, G; D'Aversa, F; Campanale, M C; Cesario, V; Montalto, M; Gasbarrini, A; Ojetti, V

    2013-01-01

    This review discusses one of the most relevant problems in gastrointestinal clinical practice: lactose intolerance. The role of lactase-persistence alleles the diagnosis of lactose malabsorption the development of lactose intolerance symptoms and its management. Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately, 75% of the world's population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. Symptoms of lactose intolerance include abdominal pain, bloating, flatulence and diarrhea with a considerable intraindividual and interindividual variability in the severity. Diagnosis is most commonly performed by the non invasive lactose hydrogen breath test. Management of lactose intolerance consists of two possible clinical choice not mutually exclusive: alimentary restriction and drug therapy.

  15. Coffee Consumption Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Glucose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coffee Consumption Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Glucose Intolerance in Rats fed on High-Sucrose Diet. ... Summary: Several epidemiological evidences indicate that consumption of coffee is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) however; there is dearth of experimental data to support these ...

  16. Coffee Consumption Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Glucose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    J. Physiol. Sci. 28(December 2013) 179–185 www.njps.com.ng. Coffee Consumption Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Glucose. Intolerance in Rats fed on High-Sucrose Diet. Morakinyo AO*, Adekunbi DA, Dada KA and Adegoke OA. Department of Physiology, College of Medicine of the University of Lagos, Lagos. Nigeria.

  17. Laktosemalabsorption og intolerance - Hvem, hvad og hvorfor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mikkel Malham; Olin, Anne Bille; Pærregaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    During the last decade, lactose-free diets have become increasingly popular in the general population, either isolated or as a part of a cow's milk-free diet. However, health-related benefits from a lactose-free diet are only documented for individuals with clinical lactose intolerance due...... to decreased intestinal lactase activity and subsequent lactose malabsorption. In this paper we summarize the current knowledge of lactose intolerance regarding diagnostic procedures and treatment....

  18. Galactose intolerance and the risk of cataract.

    OpenAIRE

    Winder, A. F.; Fells, P.; Jones, R. B.; Kissun, R. D.; Menzies, I. S.; Mount, J. N.

    1982-01-01

    Cataracts may arise in association with various major and minor disorders restricting galactose metabolism, and the risk is broadly associated with the degree of galactose intolerance. A family is described in which a girl presented at the age of 7 3/4 years with cataracts, galactosuria, and partial deficiencies of the enzymes galactokinase and galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase. Galactose intolerance as determined by an oral test was impaired and fluctuated with variation in activity o...

  19. MODERN METHODS OF FOOD INTOLERANCE TESTING

    OpenAIRE

    M. Yu. Rosensteyn; A. Z. Rosensteyn; S. E. Kondakov; N. A. Cherevko

    2016-01-01

    Аn analytical review of modern methods of food intolerance diagnostics based on interpretation of markers used in the various tests is рresented. It is shown that tests based on observation of the reaction of specific antibodies of the immune system to food antigens tested, are the most accurate, reliable and representative for the diagnosis of food intolerance.

  20. Does Googling lead to statin intolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sarah; Holbrook, Anne; Shah, Baiju R

    2018-07-01

    The nocebo effect, where patients with expectations of adverse effects are more likely to experience them, may contribute to the high rate of statin intolerance found in observational studies. Information that patients read on the internet may be a precipitant of this effect. The objective of the study was to establish whether the number of websites about statin side effects found using Google is associated with the prevalence of statin intolerance. The prevalence of statin intolerance in 13 countries across 5 continents was established in a recent study via a web-based survey of primary care physicians and specialists. Using the Google search engine for each country, the number of websites about statin side effects was determined, and standardized to the number of websites about statins overall. Searches were restricted to pages in the native language, and were conducted after connecting to each country using a virtual private network (VPN). English-speaking countries (Australia, Canada, UK, USA) had the highest prevalence of statin intolerance and also had the largest standardized number of websites about statin side effects. The sample Pearson correlation coefficient between these two variables was 0.868. Countries where patients using Google are more likely to find websites about statin side effects have greater levels of statin intolerance. The nocebo effect driven by online information may be contributing to statin intolerance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Frequency of methotrexate intolerance in rheumatoid arthritis patients using methotrexate intolerance severity score (MISS questionnaire).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah, Nibah; Salim, Babur; Nasim, Amjad; Hussain, Kamran; Gul, Harris; Niazi, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of methotrexate intolerance in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients by applying the methotrexate intolerance severity score (MISS) questionnaire and to see the effect of dose and concomitant use of other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDS) on methotrexate (MTX) intolerance. For the descriptive study, non-probability sampling was carried out in the Female Rheumatology Department of Fauji Foundation Hospital (FFH), Rawalpindi, Pakistan. One hundred and fifty diagnosed cases of RA using oral MTX were selected. The MISS questionnaire embodies five elements: abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, fatigue and behavioural symptoms. The amplitude of each element was ranked from 0 to 3 being no complaint (0 points), mild (1 point), moderate (2 points) and severe (3 points). A cut-off score of 6 and above ascertained intolerance by the physicians. A total of 33.3 % of the subjects exhibited MTX intolerance according to the MISS questionnaire. Out of which, the most recurring symptom of all was behavioural with a value of 44 % whereas vomiting was least noticeable with a figure of 11 %. About 6.6 % of the women with intolerance were consuming DMARDs in conjunction with MTX. Those using the highest weekly dose of MTX (20 mg) had supreme intolerance with prevalence in 46.2 % of the patients. The frequency of intolerance decreased with a decrease in weekly dose to a minimum of 20 % with 7.5 mg of MTX. MTX intolerance has moderate prevalence in RA patients and if left undetected, the compliance to use of MTX as a first-line therapy will decrease. Methotrexate intolerance is directly proportional to the dose of MTX taken. Also, there is no upstroke seen in intolerance with the use of other disease-modifying agents.

  2. Regulation of glucose dynamics by noninvasive peripheral electrical stimulation in normal and insulin-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalogna, Merav; Fishman, Sigal; Halpern, Zamir; Ben-Shlomo, Shani; Nevo, Uri; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2016-06-01

    The epidemic nature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), along with the downsides of current treatments, has raised the need for therapeutic alternatives. We studied normo-glycemic and high-fat diet (HFD), induced insulin-resistant Wistar Han rats for 2 to 3weeks. Rats received peripheral electrical stimulation (PES) treatment (2Hz/16Hz bursts, 10mA) in their hind limbs for 3min, 3 times per week. Glucose tolerance was evaluated by using a glucose tolerance test at the beginning and again at the end of the study. The effect of an acute PES treatment on metabolic rates of glucose appearance and turnover was measured by using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (HEGC) test. Repeated PES treatment significantly inhibited the progression of glucose intolerance in normal and insulin-resistant rats and prevented HFD-induced gains in body weight and fat mass. Acute treatment induced a prolonged effect on glucose turnover, as evaluated by the HEGC test. Increased hepatic glucose output was observed during the basal state (Pinsulin (41.1%, Pinsulin sensitivity in rats. Repeated PES treatment may have a beneficial effect on HFD-induced adiposity and control of body weight. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lactose intolerance in Indonesian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegar, Badriul; Widodo, Ariani

    2015-01-01

    "Lactose intolerance (LI)" is considered a common problem in Asians, and in many parts of the world. Its prevalence and age of manifestation varies between by Asian country, for possible genetic or cultural reasons. Studies in Indonesian children 3-15 years old (y) are available within the past two decades, using a pure lactose tolerance test. The prevalences of lactose malabsorption (LM) in pre-elementary (3-5 y), elementary (6-11 y), and junior high (12-14 y) school-children were 21.3%, 57.8%, and 73%, respectively. An increasing trend for LM prevalence was seen within the pre-elementary group, from 9.1% at 3 y to 28.6% at 5 y. The most frequent symptoms of LI in junior high school (JHS) group were abdominal pain (64.1%), abdominal distention (22.6%), nausea (15.1%), flatulence (5.7%), and diarrhea (1.9%), mostly within one hour of lactose ingestion. In children with regular and irregular milk drinking, LM occurred in 81.2% and 69.6%; LI was found in 56.2% and 52.1%, respectively. Most JHS children with dairy-associated recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) symptoms proved to be malabsorbers. Dairy products most related to RAP were milk and yogurt. LI was found in 81% of RAP children with abdominal pain most frequently, followed by nausea, bloating, diarrhea, borborygmi, and flatulence. Symp-tom onset occurred 30 minutes after lactose ingestion, especially nausea, bloating, and abdominal pain. In RAP children LI symptoms mostly found in breath hydrogen concentration>20 ppm. More LI symptoms were found in lactose malabsorbers, but symptoms were mild and generally disappeared in 7 hours, and in most by 15 hours.

  4. Probiotic Supplementation in Preterm: Feeding Intolerance and Hospital Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Indrio

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that giving the probiotic strain Lactobacillus reuteri (L. reuteri DSM 17938 to preterm, formula-fed infants would prevent an early traumatic intestinal inflammatory insult modulating intestinal cytokine profile and reducing the onset of feeding intolerance. Newborn were randomly allocated during the first 48 h of life to receive either daily probiotic (108 colony forming units (CFUs of L. reuteri DSM 17938 or placebo for one month. All the newborns underwent to gastric ultrasound for the measurement of gastric emptying time. Fecal samples were collected for the evaluation of fecal cytokines. Clinical data on feeding intolerance and weight gain were collected. The costs of hospital stays were calculated. The results showed that the newborns receiving L. reuteri DSM 17938 had a significant decrease in the number of days needed to reach full enteral feeding (p < 0.01, days of hospital stay (p < 0.01, and days of antibiotic treatment (p < 0.01. Statistically significant differences were observed in pattern of fecal cytokine profiles. The anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL-10, was increased in newborns receiving L. reuteri DSM 17938. Pro-inflammatory cytokines: IL-17, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha levels were increased in newborns given placebo. Differences in the gastric emptying and fasting antral area (FAA were also observed. Our study demonstrates an effective role for L. reuteri DSM 17938 supplementation in preventing feeding intolerance and improving gut motor and immune function development in bottle-fed stable preterm newborns. Another benefit from the use of probiotics is the reducing cost for the Health Care service.

  5. Statin intolerance in a referral lipid clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Wanda C; Greyshock, Nicole G; Kelley, Carly E; Siddiqui, Mohammad A; Ahmad, Umar; Lokhnygina, Yuliya V; Guyton, John R

    2016-01-01

    Statins effectively prevent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, but rates of statin discontinuation after adverse events are high. Describe the range and relative frequencies of adverse events potentially attributable to statins in lipid referral practice and assess statin rechallenge outcomes. Retrospective cohort study of 642 patients with statin-associated adverse events evaluated in a referral lipid clinic between January 1, 2004 and January 27, 2011. Patients experiencing adverse events by organ system included 92% with musculoskeletal, 8% central nervous system, 10% liver, 8% gastrointestinal, 5% peripheral nervous system, 5% skin, and 3% other events. Overlap of organ system involvement occurred in 22.5%. At least 1 follow-up visit was made by 557 patients, among whom overall median follow-up was 25 months. Among patients treated with a statin in the clinic, 71% remained on a statin at the last follow-up visit. Patients with hepatic transaminase increases by history were numerically more likely than the overall group to resume or remain on statin treatment, whereas those reporting central nervous system or gastrointestinal symptoms trended lower for statin maintenance. Among patients who experienced an adverse event after statin rechallenge, the majority (64%) were being treated with intermittent, nondaily dosing at the time of the adverse event. Although musculoskeletal symptoms are reported by 90% of patients with statin intolerance, symptoms involving other organ systems may be more frequent than previously supposed. Understanding the range of symptoms, time course, and impact on daily activities informs counseling in patient-centered practice, but assessment of causation by statins remains challenging. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Use of real time continuous glucose monitoring and intravenous insulin in type 1 diabetic mothers to prevent respiratory distress and hypoglycaemia in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iafusco, Dario; Stoppoloni, Fabrizio; Salvia, Gennaro; Vernetti, Gilberto; Passaro, Patrizia; Petrovski, Goran; Prisco, Francesco

    2008-07-01

    Pregnancy in Type 1 diabetic patients is a precarious condition, both for mother and fetus with increased the risk of prematurity and, immediately after delivery with risk of respiratory distress syndrome and hypoglycaemia in newborns. A strict control and monitoring of diabetes throughout pregnancy is important in reducing the impact of the disease on the fetus and newborn. In recent years many new technologies have been introduced to ameliorate diabetes monitoring, where the last is the Real-time Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (RT-CGMS). In the last three years, 72 h continuous glucose monitoring system (RT-CGMS) (Medtronic, CA) was performed in 18 pregnant women with Type 1 diabetes in two moments of pregnancy: during treatment with betamethasone to prevent respiratory distress and during delivery. In both cases insulin was administered intravenous and the dose was changed on the basis of glycaemia. The results present the use of this new technique during two topics moments of pregnancy of type 1 diabetes patients when is very important intensively to monitor diabetes and to obtain the well being of the fetus. No infant experimented hypoglycaemia or respiratory distress syndrome at the moment and in the first hours after the birth. We wish to stress the importance reducing glycaemia during administration of betamethasone and during labor. It is conceivable that the scarce attention paid to monitoring glucose levels in diabetic mothers during labor in gynaecological world may be due to the difficulty in glucose monitoring with the devices until now available. Hopefully, our anecdotal account may prompt improvements with RT-CGMS, and may lead to a better approach to the problem, thereby changing the prognosis of infants born to diabetic mothers.

  7. Use of real time continuous glucose monitoring and intravenous insulin in type 1 diabetic mothers to prevent respiratory distress and hypoglycaemia in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passaro Patrizia

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pregnancy in Type 1 diabetic patients is a precarious condition, both for mother and fetus with increased the risk of prematurity and, immediately after delivery with risk of respiratory distress syndrome and hypoglycaemia in newborns. A strict control and monitoring of diabetes throughout pregnancy is important in reducing the impact of the disease on the fetus and newborn. In recent years many new technologies have been introduced to ameliorate diabetes monitoring, where the last is the Real-time Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (RT-CGMS. Methods In the last three years, 72 h continuous glucose monitoring system (RT-CGMS (Medtronic, CA was performed in 18 pregnant women with Type 1 diabetes in two moments of pregnancy: during treatment with betamethasone to prevent respiratory distress and during delivery. In both cases insulin was administered intravenous and the dose was changed on the basis of glycaemia. Results The results present the use of this new technique during two topics moments of pregnancy of type 1 diabetes patients when is very important intensively to monitor diabetes and to obtain the well being of the fetus. No infant experimented hypoglycaemia or respiratory distress syndrome at the moment and in the first hours after the birth. Conclusion We wish to stress the importance reducing glycaemia during administration of betamethasone and during labor. It is conceivable that the scarce attention paid to monitoring glucose levels in diabetic mothers during labor in gynaecological world may be due to the difficulty in glucose monitoring with the devices until now available. Hopefully, our anecdotal account may prompt improvements with RT-CGMS, and may lead to a better approach to the problem, thereby changing the prognosis of infants born to diabetic mothers.

  8. [Lactose intolerance: past and present. Part 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-09-20

    Lactose intolerance is the most prevalent intestinal malabsorption disorder. After presentation of its history, the author describes the emergence of lactose intolerance during the evolution of species, and the biochemistry of lactose as well as features of human and bacterial lactase enzymes are then described. The unequal distribution of lactose intolerance in different continents and population is discussed, followed by presentation of past and present prevalence data in Hungary. Adult-type hypolactasia is caused by a polymorphism of the MCM6 gene located upstream from the lactase gene on the long arm of the chromosome 2. It can be determined with the polymerase chain reaction. The intestinal symptoms of lactose intolerance are well known, but its extra-intestinal manifestations are less recognised. Invasive diagnostic methods (determination of lactase activity from small intestinal biopsies, lactose tolerance test), are accurate, but have been replaced by the non-invasive methods; their gold standard is the H2 breath test. Genetic testing is being used more and more frequently in Hungary too, and, presumably, the methane breath test will be also available in the near future. Lactose intolerance can be accompanied by inflammatory bowel diseases, coeliac disease and irritable bowel syndrome; it could be established whether this association is causal or not in order to start a correct diet and therapy.

  9. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Give Close Are You at Risk? Home Prevention Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose ...

  10. High liver glycogen in hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, A. R. R.; Ryman, Brenda E.

    1971-01-01

    A case of hereditary fructose intolerance is reported in a girl aged 2 years at the time of her death. She had apparently progressed normally until the age of 14 months. At 19 months she was admitted to hospital with failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, and superficial infections. Investigations revealed hypoglycaemia, persistent acidosis, aminoaciduria, and a high liver glycogen level which suggested that she had glycogen storage disease. There was also some evidence of malabsorption. At necropsy the liver enzyme estimations showed that fructose 1-phosphate aldolase activity was absent and that fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase activity was reduced. Hereditary fructose intolerance and glycogen storage disease have been confused in the past on clinical grounds, but a high liver glycogen level has not previously been reported in hereditary fructose intolerance. PMID:5289293

  11. Red peppers with moderate and severe pungency prevent the memory deficit and hepatic insulin resistance in diabetic rats with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Min Jung; Kang, Suna; Moon, Na Rang; Daily, James W; Park, Sunmin

    2015-01-01

    Dementia induced by β-amyloid accumulation impairs peripheral glucose homeostasis, but red pepper extract improves glucose homeostasis. We therefore evaluated whether long-term oral consumption of different red pepper extracts improves cognitive dysfunction and glucose homeostasis in type 2 diabetic rats with β-amyloid-induced dementia. Male diabetic rats received hippocampal CA1 infusions of β-amyloid (25-35) (AD) or β-amyloid (35-25, non-plaque forming), at a rate of 3.6 nmol/day for 14 days (Non-AD). AD rats were divided into four dietary groups receiving either 1% lyophilized 70% ethanol extracts of either low, moderate and severe pungency red peppers (AD-LP, AD-MP, and AD-SP) or 1% dextrin (AD-CON) in Western diets (43% energy as fat). The ascending order of control memory deficit measured by passive avoidance test and water maze test. Furthermore, the accumulation of β-amyloid induced glucose intolerance, although serum insulin levels were elevated during the late phase of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). All of the red pepper extracts prevented the glucose intolerance in AD rats. Consistent with OGTT results, during euglycemic hyperinulinemic clamp glucose infusion rates were lower in AD-CON than Non-AD-CON with no difference in whole body glucose uptake. Hepatic glucose output at the hyperinsulinemic state was increased in AD-CON. β-amyloid accumulation exacerbated hepatic insulin resistance, but all red pepper extract treatments reversed the insulin resistance in AD rats. The extracts of moderate and severe red peppers were found to prevent the memory deficit and exacerbation of insulin resistance by blocking tau phosphorylation and β-amyloid accumulation in diabetic rats with experimentally induced Alzheimer's-like dementia. These results suggest that red pepper consumption might be an effective intervention for preventing age-related memory deficit.

  12. Adipocyte LDL receptor–related protein–1 expression modulates postprandial lipid transport and glucose homeostasis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Susanna M.; Zhou, Li; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Greer, Todd; Grant, Erin; Wancata, Lauren; Thomas, Andrew; Pfluger, Paul T.; Basford, Joshua E.; Gilham, Dean; Herz, Joachim; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Hui, David Y.

    2007-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity and its serious consequences such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer are rapidly becoming a major global health threat. Therefore, understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which dietary fat causes obesity and diabetes is of paramount importance in order to identify preventive and therapeutic strategies. Increased dietary fat intake results in high plasma levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TGRL). Tissue uptake of TGRL has been shown to promote glucose intolerance. We generated mice with an adipocyte-specific inactivation of the multifunctional receptor LDL receptor–related protein–1 (LRP1) to determine its role in mediating the effects of TGRL on diet-induced obesity and diabetes. Knockout mice displayed delayed postprandial lipid clearance, reduced body weight, smaller fat stores, lipid-depleted brown adipocytes, improved glucose tolerance, and elevated energy expenditure due to enhanced muscle thermogenesis. We further demonstrated that inactivation of adipocyte LRP1 resulted in resistance to dietary fat–induced obesity and glucose intolerance. These findings identify LRP1 as a critical regulator of adipocyte energy homeostasis, where functional disruption leads to reduced lipid transport, increased insulin sensitivity, and muscular energy expenditure. PMID:17948131

  13. [An epidemiological study of food intolerance in 2434 children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Juan; Zhu, Ting-Ting; Zeng, Rong; Chang, Li; Li, Feng-Yi; Li, Wen-Sheng; Jiang, Yong-Mei

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of intolerance to 14 foods in children and the relationship between food intolerance and disease of various systems. Serum samples of 2434 children with diseases were collected for food intolerance testing between January 2009 and October 2012. Allergen-specific IgG antibodies to 14 foods were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The children's intolerance to different foods and its relationship with age, sex and disease of various systems were analyzed. Among these children, positive rates of intolerance to milk and eggs were as high as 74.16% and 66.47% respectively, while positive rates of intolerance to chicken and pork were relatively low (0.29% and 0.21% respectively). The overall positive rates of food intolerance were 12.579% and 12.470% in males and females respectively. For infants, the highest intolerance rate was to milk; for preschool and school-age children, the highest intolerance rates were to milk and eggs respectively; for children in adolescence, the highest intolerance rate was to eggs. Among children with food intolerance involving single system, those with developmental abnormality or immune system disease had the highest overall positive rate of food intolerance. Children with double-system diseases had an overall positive rate of food intolerance as high as 13.393%. Among the children involving various systems, the positive rate of intolerance to milk and eggs were higher than other food. Factors influencing food intolerance in children include food categories and age. There may be a relationship between food intolerance and disease of various systems, and this is significant to the growth and development of children.

  14. Debates in allergy medicine: food intolerance does not exist

    OpenAIRE

    Dreborg, Sten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The term "intolerance" is not mentioned in the World Allergy Organization (WAO) document on allergy nomenclature. "Intolerance" has been used to describe some non-immunological diseases. However, pediatric gastroenterologists mix allergy and intolerance, e.g. by using the term "cow's milk protein allergy/intolerance (CMPA/I)", lumping together all types of mechanisms for not tolerating cow's milk. The basis for this mix is the fact that double-blind oral food challenges are time-c...

  15. Lactase persistence versus lactose intolerance: Is there an intermediate phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzialanski, Zbigniew; Barany, Michael; Engfeldt, Peter; Magnuson, Anders; Olsson, Lovisa A; Nilsson, Torbjörn K

    2016-02-01

    According to the prevailing theory about the genetic background to lactose intolerance, there are three genotypes but only two adult physiological phenotypes: lactase persistence in individuals with the CT and TT genotypes and lactase non-persistence in individuals with the CC genotype. However, analysis of lactase activity from intestinal biopsies has revealed three distinct levels of activity, suggesting that an intermediate physiological phenotype may exist. To assess possible disparities between different genotypes with regard to biomarkers of lactase activity and physical symptoms during an oral lactose load test. A retrospective study using an oral lactose load test (n=487). Concentrations of hydrogen in exhaled air and blood glucose were measured. Afterwards, subjects were asked to provide oral mucosa samples for genotyping and answer a questionnaire (participation rate 56%, n=274). Mean hydrogen levels in exhaled air at 120min were significantly higher in the CT genotype than in the TT genotype. There was no significant difference in blood glucose levels between the two groups. Reported symptoms, with the possible exception of abdominal pain, were equally prevalent in both groups. Subjects with the CT and TT genotypes, hitherto classified as lactase-persistent, differ in their physiological response to lactose intake, indicating differences in phenotype which could have clinical significance. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Lifelong Physical Activity Prevents Aging-Associated Insulin Resistance in Human Skeletal Muscle Myotubes via Increased Glucose Transporter Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunprajun, Tipwadee; Henriksen, Tora Ida; Scheele, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Both aging and physical inactivity are associated with increased development of insulin resistance whereas physical activity has been shown to promote increased insulin sensitivity. Here we investigated the effects of physical activity level on aging-associated insulin resistance in myotubes......, and significantly higher GLUT4 protein. It is likely that physical activity induces a number of stable adaptations, including increased GLUT4 expression that are retained in cells ex vivo and protect, or delay the onset of middle-aged-associated insulin resistance. Additionally, a sedentary lifestyle has an impact...... chain protein expression. Interestingly MHCIIa was increased only in myotubes from middle-aged active individuals. Middle-aged sedentary cells had intact insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation however, the same cell showed ablated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the plasma...

  17. Lifelong Physical Activity Prevents Aging-Associated Insulin Resistance in Human Skeletal Muscle Myotubes via Increased Glucose Transporter Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunprajun, Tipwadee; Henriksen, Tora Ida; Scheele, Camilla; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Green, Charlotte Jane

    2013-01-01

    Both aging and physical inactivity are associated with increased development of insulin resistance whereas physical activity has been shown to promote increased insulin sensitivity. Here we investigated the effects of physical activity level on aging-associated insulin resistance in myotubes derived from human skeletal muscle satellite cells. Satellite cells were obtained from young (22 yrs) normally active or middle-aged (56.6 yrs) individuals who were either lifelong sedentary or lifelong active. Both middle-aged sedentary and middle-aged active myotubes had increased p21 and myosin heavy chain protein expression. Interestingly MHCIIa was increased only in myotubes from middle-aged active individuals. Middle-aged sedentary cells had intact insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation however, the same cell showed ablated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. On the other hand, middle-aged active cells retained both insulin-stimulated increases in glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. Middle-aged active cells also had significantly higher mRNA expression of GLUT1 and GLUT4 compared to middle-aged sedentary cells, and significantly higher GLUT4 protein. It is likely that physical activity induces a number of stable adaptations, including increased GLUT4 expression that are retained in cells ex vivo and protect, or delay the onset of middle-aged-associated insulin resistance. Additionally, a sedentary lifestyle has an impact on the metabolism of human myotubes during aging and may contribute to aging-associated insulin resistance through impaired GLUT4 localization.

  18. PTEN dephosphorylates AKT to prevent the expression of GLUT1 on plasmamembrane and to limit glucose consumption in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraresi, Alessandra; Morani, Federica; Follo, Carlo; Isidoro, Ciro

    2016-01-01

    GLUT1 is the facilitative transporter playing the major role in the internalization of glucose. Basally, GLUT1 resides on vesicles located in a para-golgian area, and is translocated onto the plasmamembrane upon activation of the PI3KC1-AKT pathway. In proliferating cancer cells, which demand a high quantity of glucose for their metabolism, GLUT1 is permanently expressed on the plasmamembrane. This is associated with the abnormal activation of the PI3KC1-AKT pathway, consequent to the mutational activation of PI3KC1 and/or the loss of PTEN. The latter, in fact, could antagonize the phosphorylation of AKT by limiting the availability of Phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate. Here, we asked whether PTEN could control the plasmamembrane expression of GLUT1 also through its protein-phosphatase activity on AKT. Experiments of co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro de-phosphorylation assay with homogenates of cells transgenically expressing the wild type or knocked-down mutants (lipid-phosphatase, protein-phosphatase, or both) isoforms demonstrated that indeed PTEN physically interacts with AKT and drives its dephosphorylation, and so limiting the expression of GLUT1 at the plasmamembrane. We also show that growth factors limit the ability of PTEN to dephosphorylate AKT. Our data emphasize the fact that PTEN acts in two distinct steps of the PI3k/AKT pathway to control the expression of GLUT1 at the plasmamembrane and, further, add AKT to the list of the protein substrates of PTEN. PMID:27829222

  19. Sodium Orthovanadate and Trigonella Foenum Graecum Prevents Neuronal Parameters Decline and Impaired Glucose Homeostasis in Alloxan Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardeep Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia is the most important contributor in the onset and progress of diabetic complications mainly by producing oxidative stress. The present study was carried out to observe, the antihyperglycemic effect of sodium orthovanadate (SOV and Trigonella foenum graecum seed powder (TSP administration on blood glucose and insulin levels, membrane linked enzymes (monoamine oxidase, acetylcholinesterase, Ca2+ATPase, intracellular calcium (Ca2+ levels, lipid peroxidation, membrane fluidity and neurolipofuscin accumulation in brain of the alloxan induced diabetic rats and to see whether the treatment with SOV and TSP was capable of reversing the diabetic effects. Diabetes was induced by administration of alloxan monohydrate (15 mg/100 g body weight and rats were treated with 2 IU insulin, 0.6 mg/ml SOV, 5% TSP in the diet and a combination of 0.2 mg/ml SOV and 5% TSP separately for three weeks. Diabetic rats showed hyperglycemia with almost four fold high blood glucose levels. Activities of acetylcholinesterase and Ca2+ATPase decreased in diabetic rat brain. Diabetic rats exhibited an increased level of intracellular Ca2+ levels, lipid peroxidation, neurolipofuscin accumulations and monoamine oxidase activity. Treatment of diabetic rats with insulin, TSP, SOV and a combined therapy of lower dose of SOV with TSP revived normoglycemia and restored the altered level of membrane bound enzymes, lipid peroxidation and neurolipofuscin accumulation. Our results showed that lower doses of SOV (0.2 mg/ml could be used in combination with TSP in normalization of altered metabolic parameters and membrane linked enzymes without any harmful side effect.

  20. Comparison of different definitions of feeding intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reintam Blaser, Annika; Starkopf, Liis; Deane, Adam M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: While feeding intolerance (FI) is clinically important in the critically ill it is inconsistently defined. By evaluating definitions of FI based on relationships between symptoms and signs of gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction and mortality the objective was to define FI using...

  1. Milk Intolerance, Beta-Casein and Lactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sebely; Woodford, Keith; Kukuljan, Sonja; Ho, Suleen

    2015-08-31

    True lactose intolerance (symptoms stemming from lactose malabsorption) is less common than is widely perceived, and should be viewed as just one potential cause of cows' milk intolerance. There is increasing evidence that A1 beta-casein, a protein produced by a major proportion of European-origin cattle but not purebred Asian or African cattle, is also associated with cows' milk intolerance. In humans, digestion of bovine A1 beta-casein, but not the alternative A2 beta-casein, releases beta-casomorphin-7, which activates μ-opioid receptors expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and body. Studies in rodents show that milk containing A1 beta-casein significantly increases gastrointestinal transit time, production of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and the inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase compared with milk containing A2 beta-casein. Co-administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocks the myeloperoxidase and gastrointestinal motility effects, indicating opioid signaling pathway involvement. In humans, a double-blind, randomized cross-over study showed that participants consuming A1 beta-casein type cows' milk experienced statistically significantly higher Bristol stool values compared with those receiving A2 beta-casein milk. Additionally, a statistically significant positive association between abdominal pain and stool consistency was observed when participants consumed the A1 but not the A2 diet. Further studies of the role of A1 beta-casein in milk intolerance are needed.

  2. Chemical Intolerance among Hairdressers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Marie Thi Dao; Elberling, Jesper; Skovbjerg, Sine

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and the severity of fragrance-related symptoms among hairdressers in Denmark compared with the Danish general population. Further, to characterize former hairdressers who are severely chemically intolerant to fragranced products in relation to sex, age and health...

  3. Intolerance of Uncertainty and Adult Separation Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelen, Paul A.; Reijntjes, Albert; Carleton, R. Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU)—the tendency to react negatively to situations that are uncertain—is involved in different anxiety disorders and depression. No studies have yet examined the association between IU and symptoms of adult separation anxiety disorder. However, it is possible that greater

  4. Intolerance to dietary biogenic amines : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, SC; van Dusseldorp, M; Bottema, KC; Dubois, AEJ

    Objective: To evaluate the scientific evidence for purported intolerance to dietary biogenic amines. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched for articles in the English language published between January 1966 and August 2001. The keyword biogenic amin* was combined with hypersens*, allergen intoler*, and

  5. [Food allergy, food intolerance or functional disorder?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, B

    2009-04-01

    The term "food allergy" is widely misused for all sorts of symptoms and diseases caused by food. Food allergy (FA) is an adverse reaction to food (food hypersensitivity) occurring in susceptible individuals, which is mediated by a classical immune mechanism specific for the food itself. The best established mechanism in FA is due to the presence of IgE antibodies against the offending food. Food intolerance (FI) are all non-immune-mediated adverse reactions to food. The subgroups of FI are enzymatic (e.g. lactose intolerance due to lactase deficiency), pharmacological (reactions against biogenic amines, histamine intolerance), and undefined food intolerance (e.g. against some food additives). The diagnosis of an IgE-mediated FA is made by a carefully taken case history, supported by the demonstration of an IgE sensitization either by skin prick tests or by in vitro tests, and confirmed by positive oral provocation. For scientific purposes the only accepted test for the confirmation of FA/FI is a properly performed double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC). A panel of recombinant allergens, produced as single allergenic molecules, may in future improve the diagnosis of IgE-mediated FA. Due to a lack of causal treatment possibilities, the elimination of the culprit "food allergen" from the diet is the only therapeutic option for patients with real food allergy.

  6. Lactose intolerance and cow's milk protein allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Henrique do Nascimento RANGEL

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adverse reactions to food intake have very diverse etiology and symptomatology. Regarding milk, its food allergy is presented as lactose intolerance, the sugar in milk, or allergy to milk protein. Despite having different symptomatology, confusions among allergic conditions to dairy and its mediators are common. Milk protein allergy originates from protein components present in milk, causing reactions to either the protein fractions in emulsion (caseins or in whey (milk albumin. The allergic reaction is type IV mediated by T lymphocytes. The allergic reaction produces severe cellular damage and it triggers physical, mental and emotional symptomatology that may vary in time, intensity and severity. Lactose intolerance is originated by total or partial absence of the enzyme that digests this disaccharide. Lactose intolerance can be primary or congenital and secondary; the former being more rare and severe, the latter being more common. Lactase deficiency can be diagnosed by symptoms associated with cramping and diarrhea. Thus, the objective of this study was to conduct a review of available literature on cow’s milk protein allergy and lactose intolerance.

  7. [Lactose intolerance: past and present. Part II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-10-25

    The author summarises the interrelations between lactose intolerance, calcium and vitamin D metabolism and osteoporosis. Lactose intolerance enhances the risk of forearm and hip fractures in some patients. Lactase gene genotype and fracture risk are related in some populations. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation increase bone mineral content and they are justified in children, during pregnancy and lactation, and in postmenopausal women. The intake of milk and milk products could increase the risk of ovarian carcinoma. CC genotype of the lactase gene increased the risk of colorectal carcinoma in Finns; no such effect was observed in British, Spanish and Italian patients. Even small quantities of lactose in drugs (10-750 mg) could elicit intolerance symptoms due to individual susceptibility. In spite of public knowledge and advertising, controlled studies did not prove the beneficial effect of either a lactose-free diet, enzyme supplementation or probiotics in an evidence-based manner. While accepted guidelines are lacking, a personalised therapy is mandatory. In spite of increasing public interest in lactose intolerance, many unknown factors must still be studied.

  8. Lactose intolerance : the role of colonic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Tao

    2006-01-01

    Dairy products provide us with calcium and other valuable nutrients. However, they also contain lactose which is maldigested by a large part of the world adult population. The mechanisms by which lactose maldigestion causes symptoms of lactose intolerance are not fully understood. Studies on the

  9. Intolerance to dietary biogenic amines: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.C.; Dusseldorp, M. van; Bottema, K.C.; Dubois, A.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the scientific evidence for purported intolerance to dietary biogenic amines. Data Sources: MEDLINE was searched for articles in the English language published between January 1966 and August 2001. The keyword biogenic amin* was combined with hypersens*, allerg*, intoler*, and

  10. Fear of heights and visual height intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Thomas; Huppert, Doreen

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this review is, first, to cover the different aspects of visual height intolerance such as historical descriptions, definition of terms, phenomenology of the condition, neurophysiological control of gaze, stance and locomotion, and therapy, and, second, to identify warranted epidemiological and experimental studies. Vivid descriptions of fear of heights can be found in ancient texts from the Greek, Roman, and Chinese classics. The life-time prevalence of visual height intolerance is as high as 28% in the general population, and about 50% of those who are susceptible report an impact on quality of life. When exposed to heights, visual exploration by eye and head movements is restricted, and the velocity of locomotion is reduced. Therapy for fear of heights is dominated by the behavioral techniques applied during real or virtual reality exposure. Their efficacy might be facilitated by the administration of D-cycloserine or glucocorticoids. Visual height intolerance has a considerable impact on daily life and interpersonal interactions. It is much more frequent than fear of heights, which is defined as an environmental subtype of a specific phobia. There is certainly a continuum stretching from acrophobia to a less-pronounced visual height intolerance, to which the categorical distinction of a specific phobia does not apply.

  11. Lactose intolerance : analysis of underlying factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, RJ; Priebe, MG; Koetse, HA; Stellaard, F; Lenoir-Wijnkoop, [No Value; Antoine, JM; Zhong, Y; Huang, CY

    Background We studied the degree of lactose digestion and orocecal transit time (OCTT) as possible causes for the variability of symptoms of lactose intolerance (LI) in a sample of a population with genetically determined low lactase activity. Methods Lactose digestion index (LDI) was measured by

  12. Severe lactose intolerance with lactosuria and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosková, A; Sabacký, J; Mrskos, A; Pospísil, R

    1980-01-01

    An infant with lactose intolerance is described. A breast-fed infant developed vomiting at 3 weeks, and became dehydrated. Lactosuria, aminoaciduria, and liver damage were preesent. A milk-free diet led to rapid recovery. At 6 months a normal diet was well tolerated. PMID:7416780

  13. Milk Intolerance, Beta-Casein and Lactose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebely Pal

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available True lactose intolerance (symptoms stemming from lactose malabsorption is less common than is widely perceived, and should be viewed as just one potential cause of cows’ milk intolerance. There is increasing evidence that A1 beta-casein, a protein produced by a major proportion of European-origin cattle but not purebred Asian or African cattle, is also associated with cows’ milk intolerance. In humans, digestion of bovine A1 beta-casein, but not the alternative A2 beta-casein, releases beta-casomorphin-7, which activates μ-opioid receptors expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and body. Studies in rodents show that milk containing A1 beta-casein significantly increases gastrointestinal transit time, production of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and the inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase compared with milk containing A2 beta-casein. Co-administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocks the myeloperoxidase and gastrointestinal motility effects, indicating opioid signaling pathway involvement. In humans, a double-blind, randomized cross-over study showed that participants consuming A1 beta-casein type cows’ milk experienced statistically significantly higher Bristol stool values compared with those receiving A2 beta-casein milk. Additionally, a statistically significant positive association between abdominal pain and stool consistency was observed when participants consumed the A1 but not the A2 diet. Further studies of the role of A1 beta-casein in milk intolerance are needed.

  14. Identifying Foods causing Allergies/ Intolerances among Diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was designed to identify the foods that caused allergies / intolerances and symptoms of reaction experienced by diabetic patients attending State Specialist Hospital, Akure. Materials and Methods: Ninety-eight diabetics aged 30-80 years (30 males and 68 females) were included in the study.

  15. Dermatitis herpetiformis intolerant to dapsone in Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna K

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old man with AIDS and pulmonary tuberculosis presented with lesions suggestive of dermatitis herpetiformis and intolerance to dapsone. He was managed successfully with a combination of nicotinamide 200 mg/day and indomethacin 75 mg/day, topical steroids and gluten free diet.

  16. Dietary Protein in the Prevention of Diet-Induced Obesity and Co-Morbidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tastesen, Hanne Sørup

    mice were fed obesity‐promoting diets with protein from different sources, in different forms and at different levels to evaluate the affect on development of obesity, glucose intolerance and dyslipidemia. Results: In the present study the dietary level of protein, 16 versus 32 percent energy from...... protein, was found to be negligible in development of obesity and co‐morbidities in mice. Seafood protein with high endogenous taurine and glycine contents was found to prevent diet‐induced adiposity and dyslipidemia, both in ad libitum and pair‐fed settings. The ability of seafood proteins to prevent...... that the source and form of protein has great impact on development and prevention of diet‐induced adiposity, dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia and impairment of glucose tolerance through modulations of voluntary locomotor activity, energy expenditure and energy substrate metabolism in mice...

  17. Relative contributions of energy expenditure on physical activity, body composition and weight gain to the evolution of impaired glucose tolerance to Frank diabetes. Highlights and achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeyemo, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of obesity on glucose intolerance is a mixture of the impact of body composition on glucose-insulin relationships as well as the modulation of this metabolism by physical activity. Populations of the African diaspora in the Caribbean and the United States have higher levels of obesity, glucose intolerance and diabetes than the ancestral population in West Africa. This is most likely a consequence of lifestyle changes, including an apparent decline in physical activity and dietary changes

  18. Kinetics of Glycoxidation of Bovine Serum Albumin by Glucose, Fructose and Ribose and Its Prevention by Food Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Sadowska-Bartosz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the kinetics of the glycoxidation of bovine serum albumin (BSA as a model protein by three sugars: glucose, fructose and ribose, using fluorometric measurements of the content of advanced glycation end products (AGEs, protein-bound fructosamine, dityrosine, N'-formylkynurenine, kynurenine, tryptophan, the content of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP, protein carbonyl groups, as well as thiol groups. Moreover, the levels of glycoalbumin and AGEs were determined by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Based on the kinetic results, the optimal incubation time for studies of the modification of the glycoxidation rate by additives was chosen, and the effects of 25 compounds of natural origin on the glycoxidation of BSA induced by various sugars were examined. The same compounds were found to have different effects on glycoxidation induced by various sugars, which suggests caution in extrapolation from experiments based on one sugar to other sugars. From among the compounds tested, the most effective inhibitors of glycoxidation were: polyphenols, pyridoxine and 1-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid.

  19. Prevalence and Symptom Correlation of Lactose Intolerance in the North East Part of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, M; Shil, B C; Saha, S K; Chowdhury, M; Perveen, I; Banik, R; Rahman, M H

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to see the prevalence of lactose intolerance and symptom correlation following oral lactose challenge in healthy volunteers in the north east part of Bangladesh. Symptoms of abdominal pain, nausea, borborygmi, flatulence, diarrhea and others were noted for 24 hours and blood glucose was estimated at 0 hour and 30 minutes after 50 gm oral lactose load to healthy volunteers. Failure to rise blood glucose level ≥1.1 mmol/l at 30 minutes after lactose intake from fasting level was taken as lactose malabsorption (LM) i.e., lactose intolerance. Sensitivity and specificity of different symptoms were then found out. A total of 171 volunteers (male 123, female 48) with a mean age 34.08 years participated in this study. Lactose intolerance was found among 82.5% (n=141, M=100, F=41) subjects. Symptoms mostly experience by the lactose malabsorbers were diarrhea 93(66.0%), borborygmi 80(56.7%), abdominal pain 31(22.0%) and flatulence 32(22.7%). LM prevalence was found to increase with increasing number of symptoms up to 3 symptoms. A week positive correlation (r=0.205, P=0.007) was found between the number of symptoms and proportion of subjects having positive lactose tolerance test. Lactose intolerance among healthy adults of North East part of our country is as common as in other Asian countries including China and Malaysia. But LM is higher than that of Europeans and south Indians. Diarrhea and borborygmi were mostly associated with LM.

  20. Clinical evaluation, biochemistry and genetic polymorphism analysis for the diagnosis of lactose intolerance in a population from northeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, Paulo Roberto Lins; de Medeiros, Pedro Henrique Quintela Soares; Havt, Alexandre; Caetano, Joselany Afio; Cid, David A C; de Moura Gondim Prata, Mara; Soares, Alberto Melo; Guerrant, Richard L; Mychaleckyj, Josyf; Lima, Aldo Ângelo Moreira

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This work aimed to evaluate and correlate symptoms, biochemical blood test results and single nucleotide polymorphisms for lactose intolerance diagnosis. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil, with a total of 119 patients, 54 of whom were lactose intolerant. Clinical evaluation and biochemical blood tests were conducted after lactose ingestion and blood samples were collected for genotyping evaluation. In particular, the single nucleotide polymorphisms C>T-13910 and G>A-22018 were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism/polymerase chain reaction and validated by DNA sequencing. RESULTS: Lactose-intolerant patients presented with more symptoms of flatulence (81.4%), bloating (68.5%), borborygmus (59.3%) and diarrhea (46.3%) compared with non-lactose-intolerant patients (plactose-tolerant phenotype (plactose, we found that the most effective cutoff for glucose levels obtained for lactose malabsorbers was T-13910 and G>A-22018) with lactose tolerance in this population and suggest clinical management for patients with lactose intolerance that considers single nucleotide polymorphism detection and a change in the biochemical blood test cutoff from <25 mg/dL to <15 mg/dL. PMID:26934237

  1. Clinical evaluation, biochemistry and genetic polymorphism analysis for the diagnosis of lactose intolerance in a population from northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, Paulo Roberto Lins; de Medeiros, Pedro Henrique Quintela Soares; Havt, Alexandre; Caetano, Joselany Afio; Cid, David A C; Prata, Mara de Moura Gondim; Soares, Alberto Melo; Guerrant, Richard L; Mychaleckyj, Josyf; Lima, Aldo Ângelo Moreira

    2016-02-01

    This work aimed to evaluate and correlate symptoms, biochemical blood test results and single nucleotide polymorphisms for lactose intolerance diagnosis. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil, with a total of 119 patients, 54 of whom were lactose intolerant. Clinical evaluation and biochemical blood tests were conducted after lactose ingestion and blood samples were collected for genotyping evaluation. In particular, the single nucleotide polymorphisms C>T-13910 and G>A-22018 were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism/polymerase chain reaction and validated by DNA sequencing. Lactose-intolerant patients presented with more symptoms of flatulence (81.4%), bloating (68.5%), borborygmus (59.3%) and diarrhea (46.3%) compared with non-lactose-intolerant patients (plactose-tolerant phenotype (plactose, we found that the most effective cutoff for glucose levels obtained for lactose malabsorbers was T-13910 and G>A-22018) with lactose tolerance in this population and suggest clinical management for patients with lactose intolerance that considers single nucleotide polymorphism detection and a change in the biochemical blood test cutoff from <25 mg/dL to <15 mg/dL.

  2. Distress intolerance and clinical functioning in persons with schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Katie L.; Chiappelli, Joshua; Rowland, Laura M.; Daughters, Stacey B.; Hong, L. Elliot

    2014-01-01

    Impaired tolerance to distress may help explain part of the cognitive and functional impairments in schizophrenia. This project investigated distress intolerance in schizophrenia patients (SZ) as compared to controls, and whether distress intolerance represented an independent domain in relationship to symptoms, cognition, and functional capacity. Healthy controls (n=43) and SZ (n=65) completed a psychological distress challenge experiment and their levels of intolerance to distress were estimated. SZ showed increased distress intolerance such that they were significantly more likely to terminate the distress challenge session early compared to controls. Greater distress intolerance was associated with reduced functional capacity and worse cognitive performance in SZ. Mediation analyses suggested that distress intolerance had an independent effect on functional capacity, while some of this effect was mediated by cognitive performance. Our results suggest that distress intolerance is a promising domain for treatment research, and functional capacity may be improved by targeting treatments towards SZ patient’s ability to tolerate distress. PMID:25107316

  3. The consequences of social intolerance on non-violent protest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapp, Carolin; Ackermann, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    This paper scrutinizes the impact of intolerance toward diverse ethnic, religious, and cultural groups on an individual's willingness to actively engage in non-violent protest. Following new insights, we examine the individual as well as the ecological effect of social intolerance on protest...... behavior. Drawing from insights of social psychology and communication science, we expect that the prevalence of intolerance reinforces the positive effect of individual-level intolerance on protest participation. From a rational choice perspective, however, a negative moderating effect is expected......, as the expression of opinions becomes redundant for intolerant individuals in an intolerant society. We base our multilevel analyses on data from the World Values Surveys covering 32 established democracies. Our results reveal that intolerance leads to more non-violent protest participation. This relationship...

  4. The Negative Influence of High-Glucose Ambience on Neurogenesis in Developing Quail Embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yao; Fan, Jian-xia; Zhang, Zhao-long; Wang, Guang; Cheng, Xin; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Yang, Xuesong

    2013-01-01

    Gestational diabetes is defined as glucose intolerance during pregnancy and it is presented as high blood glucose levels during the onset pregnancy. This condition has an adverse impact on fetal development but the mechanism involved is still not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of high glucose on the developing quail embryo, especially its impact on the development of the nervous system. We established that high glucose altered the central nervous system mophologi...

  5. The role of distress intolerance in the relationship between childhood sexual abuse and problematic alcohol use among Latin American MSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Katie; White Hughto, Jaclyn M; Biello, Katie B; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Mayer, Kenneth H; Rosenberger, Joshua G; Novak, David S; Mimiaga, Matthew J

    2017-06-01

    Despite the high prevalence of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) among men who have sex with men (MSM) and its well-documented association with substance use in adulthood, little research has examined the psychological mechanisms underlying this association. The current study utilized a large, multinational sample of MSM in Latin America to examine the role of distress intolerance (i.e., decreased capacity to withstand negative psychological states) in the relationship between childhood sexual abuse history and problematic alcohol use. As part of an online survey conducted among members of the largest social/sexual networking website for MSM in Latin America, participants (n=19,451) completed measures of childhood sexual abuse history, distress intolerance, and problematic alcohol use (CAGE score>=2). Participants who reported a history of childhood sexual abuse indicated higher levels of distress intolerance, which was in turn associated with greater odds of engaging in problematic alcohol use. A mediation analysis further showed that distress intolerance partially accounted for the significant association between childhood sexual abuse history and problematic alcohol use. These findings provide initial evidence for the role of distress intolerance as a process through which early trauma shapes MSM health later in life. These findings also underscore the potential utility of addressing distress intolerance in alcohol use prevention and intervention efforts that target MSM with a history of childhood sexual abuse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Glucose Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Glucose Sensing is the eleventh volume in the popular series Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, edited by Drs. Chris D. Geddes and Joseph R. Lakowicz. This volume incorporates authoritative analytical fluorescence-based glucose sensing reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. Glucose Sensing is an essential reference for any lab working in the analytical fluorescence glucose sensing field. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of glucose sensing, and diabetes care & management, will find this volume an invaluable resource. Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy Volume 11, Glucose Sensing Chapters include: Implantable Sensors for Interstitial Fluid Smart Tattoo Glucose Sensors Optical Enzyme-based Glucose Biosensors Plasmonic Glucose Sens...

  7. Intolerance to food additives - does it exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Paul J; Kemp, Andrew S

    2012-02-01

    'Food intolerance' is often confused with a range of adverse symptoms which may be coincidental to ingestion of food. 'Food intolerance' is defined as a reaction in which symptoms must be objectively reproducible and not known to involve an immunological mechanism. A more precise term is non-allergic food hypersensitivity, which contrasts with food allergies which are due to an immunological mechanism. Some children will experience food reactions to food additives. Reported symptoms range from urticaria/angioedema to hyperactive behaviours. While parents/carers report that over one fifth of children experience of food reaction, only 1 in 20 of these are confirmed to have a non-allergic food hypersensitivity on testing. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2010 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  8. Orthostatic intolerance: a disorder of young women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Y. S.; Daamen, N.; Jacob, G.; Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, D.

    2000-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance (OI) is a cause of significant disability in otherwise healthy women seen by gynecologists. Orthostatic tachycardia is often the most obvious hemodynamic abnormality found in OI patients, but symptoms may include dizziness, visual changes, discomfort in the head or neck, poor concentration, fatigue, palpitations, tremulousness, anxiety, and, in some cases, fainting (syncope). It is the most common disorder of blood pressure regulation after essential hypertension, and patients with OI are traditionally women of childbearing age. Estimates suggest that at least 500,000 Americans suffer from some form of OI, and such patients comprise the largest group referred to centers specialized in autonomic disorders. This article reviews recent advances made in the understanding of this condition, potential pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to orthostatic intolerance, and therapeutic alternatives currently available for the management of these patients.

  9. Heat intolerance: predisposing factor or residual injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Y

    1990-02-01

    Great individual variability exists in the ability to sustain heat stress. Some individuals are more susceptible to heat than others. Those individuals, among the young active population (athletes, military recruits, laborers), are at risk to contract exertional heat stroke. Low tolerance to heat results from either functional factors, or from congenital or acquired disturbances. In most cases heat intolerance can be foreseen. Cases of dehydration, overweight, low physical fitness, lack of acclimatization, febrile or infectious diseases, and skin disorders should be regarded a priori as predisposing factors for heat intolerance. Special attention should be paid to subjects with previous heat stroke episodes since it might reflect an underlying cause for heat susceptibility. The heat tolerance of these subjects should be tested 8-12 wk postepisode to detect a possible residual injury in the ability to thermoregulate adequately in the heat.

  10. Lactose intolerance: diagnosis, genetic, and clinical factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Rejane; de Campos Mazo, Daniel Ferraz; Carrilho, Flair José

    2012-01-01

    Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately 75% of the world’s population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. This review discusses the lactase-persistence alleles that have arisen in different populations around the world, diagnosis of lactose intolerance, and its symptomatology and management. PMID:22826639

  11. Religious diversity, intolerance and civil conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Joseph Flavian

    2013-01-01

    We compute new measures of religious diversity and intolerance and study their effects on civil conflict. Using a religion tree that describes the relationship between different religions, we compute measures of religious diversity at three different levels of aggregation. We find that religious diversity is a significant and robust correlate of civil conflict. While religious fractionalization significantly reduces conflict, religious polarization increases it. This is most robust at the sec...

  12. Gadd45b prevents autophagy and apoptosis against rat cerebral neuron oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guoqian; Xu, Wenming; Tong, Linyan; Li, Shuaishuai; Su, Shiceng; Tan, Xiaodan; Li, Changqing

    2016-04-01

    Autophagic (type II) cell death has been suggested to play pathogenetic roles in cerebral ischemia. Growth arrest and DNA damage response 45b (Gadd45b) has been shown to protect against rat brain ischemia injury through inhibiting apoptosis. However, the relationship between Gadd45b and autophagy in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury remains uncertain. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Gadd45b on autophagy. We adopt the oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R) model of rat primary cortex neurons, and lentivirus interference used to silence Gadd45b expression. Cell viability and injury assay were performed using CCK-8 and LDH kit. Autophagy activation was monitored by expression of ATG5, LC3, Beclin-1, ATG7 and ATG3. Neuron apoptosis was monitored by expression of Bcl-2, Bax, cleaved caspase3, p53 and TUNEL assay. Neuron neurites were assayed by double immunofluorescent labeling with Tuj1 and LC3B. Here, we demonstrated that the expression of Gadd45b was strongly up-regulated at 24 h after 3 h OGD treatment. ShRNA-Gadd45b increased the expression of autophagy related proteins, aggravated OGD/R-induced neuron cell apoptosis and neurites injury. ShRNA-Gadd45b co-treatment with autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or Wortmannin partly inhibited the ratio of LC3II/LC3I, and slightly ameliorated neuron cell apoptosis under OGD/R. Furthermore, shRNA-Gadd45b inhibited the p-p38 level involved in autophagy, but increased the p-JNK level involved in apoptosis. ShRNA-Gadd45b co-treatment with p38 inhibitor obviously induced autophagy. ShRNA-Gadd45b co-treatment with JNK inhibitor alleviated neuron cell apoptosis. In conclusion, our data suggested that Gadd45b inhibited autophagy and apoptosis under OGD/R. Gadd45b may be a common regulatory protein to control autophagy and apoptosis.

  13. Seafood Allergy, Toxicity, and Intolerance: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prester, Ljerka

    2016-01-01

    Seafood allergies have been increasing their presence in the last 2 decades. Allergic reactions to seafood can range from mild urticarial and oral allergy syndrome to life-threatening anaphylactic reactions. Ingestion of seafood infested with Anisakis larvae can cause a disease known as anisakiasis with symptoms similar to true seafood allergy. Furthermore, some adverse reactions to seafood including histamine fish poisoning (HFP), and intolerance to histamine can trigger clinical symptoms, which, although nonallergic in origin, are similar to true immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergic reactions. Because seafood allergy usually remains a lifelong food allergy, this review focuses on the current knowledge on fish and shellfish allergens and emphasizes the importance of differentiating seafood allergy from other allergy-like reactions (anisakiasis, HFP, and intolerance to histamine). Key teaching points: • Fish and shellfish are potent allergens that can provoke serious IgE antibody-mediated adverse reactions in sensitive individuals. • Sensitization to seafood allergens can be achieved by ingestion, inhalation, or skin contact. • Shellfish major allergen, tropomyosin, shares significant homology to arthropods (dust mites and cockroaches). • Accidental exposures to seafood products cross-contaminated with fish or shellfish allergens (hidden allergens) during processing may present a health risk for sensitive individuals. • Allergens of fish parasite A. simplex present common hidden allergens in seafood, particularly in raw and undercooked home-made fish dishes. • Symptoms caused by HFP, histamine intolerance, and anisakiasis are similar to true seafood allergy.

  14. Lactase Non-persistence and Lactose Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, Theodore M; Brown, Elizabeth; Paige, David M

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical and nutritional significance of genetically determined lactase non-persistence and potential lactose and milk intolerance in 65-70% of the world's adult population. Milk consumption is decreasing in the USA and is the lowest in countries with a high prevalence of lactase non-persistence. The dairy industry and Minnesota investigators have made efforts to minimize the influence of lactose intolerance on milk consumption. Some lactose intolerant individuals, without co-existent irritable bowel syndrome, are able to consume a glass of milk with a meal with no or minor symptoms. The high frequency of lactase persistence in offspring of Northern European countries and in some nomadic African tribes is due to mutations in the promoter of the lactase gene in association with survival advantage of milk drinking. Educational and commercial efforts to improve calcium and Vitamin D intake have focused on urging consumption of tolerable amounts of milk with a meal, use of lowered lactose-content foods including hard cheeses, yogurt, and lactose-hydrolyzed milk products.

  15. Twelve weeks treatment with the DPP-4 inhibitor, sitagliptin, prevents degradation of peptide YY and improves glucose and non-glucose induced insulin secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaboe, K; Knop, F K; Vilsbøll, T

    2010-01-01

    To examine the effects of 12 weeks of treatment with the DPP-4 inhibitor, sitagliptin, on gastrointestinal hormone responses to a standardized mixed meal and beta cell secretory capacity, measured as glucose and non-glucose induced insulin secretion during a hyperglycaemic clamp, in patients...

  16. Acute systemic insulin intolerance does not alter the response of the Akt/GSK-3 pathway to environmental hypoxia in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Hulst, Gommaar; Sylow, Lykke; Hespel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate how acute environmental hypoxia regulates blood glucose and downstream intramuscular insulin signaling after a meal in healthy humans. METHODS: Fifteen subjects were exposed for 4 h to normoxia (NOR) or to normobaric hypoxia (HYP, FiO2 = 0.11) in a randomized order 40 min ...... insulin intolerance developed independently of defects in conventional insulin signaling in skeletal muscle....

  17. Cost-effectiveness of alternative thresholds of the fasting plasma glucose test to identify the target population for type 2 diabetes prevention in adults aged ≥45 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ping; Kahn, Henry S; Gregg, Edward W

    2013-12-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of alternative fasting plasma glucose (FPG) thresholds to identify adults at high risk for type 2 diabetes for diabetes preventive intervention. We used a validated simulation model to examine the change in lifetime quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and medical costs when the FPG threshold was progressively lowered in 5-mg/dL decrements from 120 to 90 mg/dL. The study sample includes nondiabetic adults aged ≥45 years in the United States using 2006-2010 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. High-risk individuals were assumed to receive a lifestyle intervention, as that used in the Diabetes Prevention Program. We calculated cost per QALY by dividing the incremental cost by incremental QALY when lowering the threshold to the next consecutive level. Medical costs were assessed from a health care system perspective. We conducted univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses to assess the robustness of the results using different simulation scenarios and parameters. Progressively lowering the FPG threshold would monotonically increase QALYs, cost, and cost per QALY. Reducing (in 5-mg/dL decrements) the threshold from 120 to 90 mg/dL cost $30,100, $32,900, $42,300, $60,700, $81,800, and $115,800 per QALY gained, respectively. The costs per QALY gained were lower for all thresholds under a lower-cost and less-effective intervention scenario. Lowering the FPG threshold leads to a greater health benefit of diabetes prevention but reduces the cost-effectiveness. Using the conventional benchmark of $50,000 per QALY, a threshold of 105 mg/dL or higher would be cost effective. A lower threshold could be selected if the intervention cost could be lowered.

  18. A cluster-randomized controlled trial to study the effectiveness of a protocol-based lifestyle program to prevent type 2 diabetes in people with impaired fasting glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselink, Arlette E; Bilo, Henk J G; Jonkers, Ruud; Martens, Marloes; de Weerdt, Inge; Rutten, Guy E H

    2013-12-02

    Effective diabetes prevention strategies that can be implemented in daily practice, without huge amounts of money and a lot of personnel are needed. The Dutch Diabetes Federation developed a protocol for coaching people with impaired fasting glucose (IFG; according to WHO criteria: 6.1 to 6.9 mmol/l) to a sustainable healthy lifestyle change: 'the road map towards diabetes prevention' (abbreviated: Road Map: RM). This protocol is applied within a primary health care setting by a general practitioner and a practice nurse. The feasibility and (cost-) effectiveness of care provided according to the RM protocol will be evaluated. A cluster randomised clinical trial is performed, with randomisation at the level of the general practices. Both opportunistic screening and active case finding took place among clients with high risk factors for diabetes. After IFG is diagnosed, motivated people in the intervention practices receive 3-4 consultations by the practice nurse within one year. During these consultations they are coached to increase the level of physical activity and healthy dietary habits. If necessary, participants are referred to a dietician, physiotherapist, lifestyle programs and/or local sports activities. The control group receives care as usual. The primary outcome measure in this study is change in Body Mass Index (BMI). Secondary outcome measures are waist circumference, physical activity, total and saturated fat intake, systolic blood pressure, blood glucose, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides and behaviour determinants like risk perception, perceived knowledge and motivation. Based on a sample size calculation 120 people in each group are needed. Measurements are performed at baseline, and after one (post-intervention) and two years follow up. Anthropometrics and biochemical parameters are assessed in the practices and physical activity, food intake and their determinants by a validated questionnaire. The cost-effectiveness is estimated

  19. Frequency of Gestational diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3.9 ± 2.1 respectively , p<0.001]. Conclusion: The frequency of GDM and IGT in Sudanese pregnant women is within the universal estimates and parity is an important risk factor that affects impaired glucose tolerance incidence in pregnancy. Keywords: microvascular, chemical diabetes, carbohydrate intolerance.

  20. (Euphorbiaceae) Leaf Extract on Sucrose-induced Glucose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the hypoglycaemic effect of the methanol extract of Bridelia ferruginea leaves (MEBF) on sucrose-induced glucose intolerance in rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats, aged 6 - 7 weeks and weighing 140 - 160 g, were used. The animals were fed standard rat chow supplemented with 35%, 50% or 65% ...

  1. Chlorophytum borivilianum root extract maintains near normal blood glucose, insulin and lipid profile levels and prevents oxidative stress in the pancreas of streptozotocin-induced adult male diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giribabu, Nelli; Kumar, Kilari Eswar; Rekha, Somesula Swapna; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2014-01-01

    The effect of C. borivilianum root on blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbAIc), insulin and lipid profile levels in diabetes mellitus are not fully understood. This study therefore investigated the effect of C. borivilianum root on the above parameters and oxidative stress of the pancreas in diabetes. C. borivilianum root aqueous extract (250 and 500 mg/kg/day) was administered to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced male diabetic rats for 28 days. Body weight, blood glucose, HbA1c, insulin, lipid profile levels and glucose homeostasis indices were determined. Histopathological changes and oxidative stress parameters i.e. lipid peroxidation (LPO) and antioxidant enzymes activity levels of the pancreas were investigated. C. borivilianum root extract treatment to diabetic rats maintained near normal body weight, blood glucose, HbA1c, lipid profile and insulin levels with higher HOMA-β cell functioning index, number of Islets/pancreas, number of β-cells/Islets however with lower HOMA-insulin resistance (IR) index as compared to non-treated diabetic rats. Negative correlations between serum insulin and blood glucose, HbA1c, triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) levels were observed. C. borivilianum root extract administration prevented the increase in lipid peroxidation and the decrease in activity levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) with mild histopathological changes in the pancreas of diabetic rats. C. borivilianum root maintains near normal levels of these metabolites and prevented oxidative stress-induced damage to the pancreas in diabetes.

  2. The effect of long-term taurine supplementation and fructose feeding on glucose and lipid homeostasis in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Lea Hüche; Orstrup, Laura Kofoed Hvidsten; Hansen, Svend Høime; Grunnet, Niels; Quistorff, Bjørn; Mortensen, Ole Hartvig

    2013-01-01

    The nonprotein amino acid taurine has been shown to counteract the negative effects of a high-fructose diet in rats with regard to insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Here we examined the long-term (26 weeks) effects of oral taurine supplementation (2% in the drinking water) in fructose-fed Wistar rats.The combination of fructose and taurine caused a significant increase in fasting glucose compared to the control diet without changing hepatic phosphoenol pyruvate carboxykinase mRNA levels. The combination of fructose and taurine also improved glucose tolerance compared to control. Neither a high-fructose diet nor taurine supplementation induced significant changes in body weight, body fat or total calorie intake, fasting insulin levels, HOMA-IR, or insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle.Fructose alone caused a decrease in liver triglyceride content, with taurine supplementation preventing this. There was no effect of long-term fructose diet and/or taurine supplementation on plasma triglycerides, plasma nonesterified fatty acids, as well as plasma HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol.In conclusion, the study suggests that long-term taurine supplementation improves glucose tolerance and normalize hepatic triglyceride content following long-term fructose feeding. However, as the combination of taurine and fructose also increased fasting glucose levels, the beneficial effect of taurine supplementation towards amelioration of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance may be questionable.

  3. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  4. Prevalence of food allergy/intolerance in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    1997-01-01

    on pollen and latex cross-reactivity, systemic reactions to contact allergens and coeliac disease point to a prevalence of food allergy/intolerance in the adult European population of approximately 5%. A mild itch in the mouth and lactose intolerance are not included in this estimate which is a qualified......Discussed in this paper is the prevalence of allergy and intolerance to foods in Europe. Prevalence of allergy to food additives is not included. A fully reliable estimate of the prevalence of food allergy/intolerance does not exist. Prevalence changes with age, as does the relative importance...... of the most common food allergens. The cumulative prevalence of allergy and intolerance to cow's milk during the first year of life is approximately 2%. The total prevalence of food allergy/intolerance in children is not as well documented. In 18-month-old infants the Danish estimate is 6.5%. The high...

  5. Prevalence of food allergy/intolerance in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    1997-01-01

    Discussed in this paper is the prevalence of allergy and intolerance to foods in Europe. Prevalence of allergy to food additives is not included. A fully reliable estimate of the prevalence of food allergy/intolerance does not exist. Prevalence changes with age, as does the relative importance...... of the most common food allergens. The cumulative prevalence of allergy and intolerance to cow's milk during the first year of life is approximately 2%. The total prevalence of food allergy/intolerance in children is not as well documented. In 18-month-old infants the Danish estimate is 6.5%. The high...... on pollen and latex cross-reactivity, systemic reactions to contact allergens and coeliac disease point to a prevalence of food allergy/intolerance in the adult European population of approximately 5%. A mild itch in the mouth and lactose intolerance are not included in this estimate which is a qualified...

  6. Effectiveness of a 12-week school-based educational preventive programme on weight and fasting blood glucose in "at-risk" adolescents of type 2 diabetes mellitus: Randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani Salameh, Ayman; Al-Sheyab, Nihaya; El-Hneiti, Mamdouh; Shaheen, Abeer; Williams, Leonie M; Gallagher, Robyn

    2017-06-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a 12-week school-based educational preventive programme for type 2 diabetes by change in weight and fasting blood glucose level in Jordanian adolescents. Sixteen percent of Jordanian adults have obesity-related type 2 diabetes and 5.6% of obese adolescents examined, however one-third unexamined. Rates in Arabic countries will double in 20 years, but this can be prevented and reversed by controlling obesity. A single-blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted in 2 unisex high schools in Irbid, Jordan, in 2012. Intervention and control participants, aged 12 to 18 years, were visibly overweight/obese. They were randomly allocated to the intervention (n = 205) or control (n = 196) groups. At-risk students were assessed before and after the 12-week intervention, for change in weight and fasting blood glucose level following preventive instruction and parent-supported changes. Mean age of participants was 15.3 years with equal percentages of both males (49.4%) and females. Post intervention, the intervention group, demonstrated statistically significant reductions: mean difference of 3.3 kg in weight (P blood glucose (P blood glucose in Jordanian at-risk adolescents. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. FORMATION OF INTOLERANCE AMONG TO BAD HABITS THE STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Kulish

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article explains the importance of intolerance in relation to addictive behavior. Intolerance against bad habits is considered as the ability of man to be free and responsible for their actions. The results of studies that show the effectiveness of preventive work on formation of skills of a healthy lifestyle, use of the potential of the training program «the Step to conscious sobriety,» the lessons of prevention «Stay on the line of life!» and other preventive practices for the formation of persistent intolerance towards destroying human health. As a result of the experiment, the students increased responsibility for their actions, for their health, developed strong-willed qualities, aspiration to preservation and augmentation of moral, cultural and universal values, and develop decision-making skills, there is a sense of its paramount role in the construction of their own destiny, develop self-esteem and confidence, reduced anxiety, lack of confidence, sold the need of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, produced values for active life position. The obtained results show the effectiveness of the proposed methods of implementation of this process.

  8. Prevention of cell death by the zinc ion chelating agent TPEN in cultured PC12 cells exposed to Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation (OGD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao; Huang, Yue-yang; Wang, Yu-xiang; Wang, Hong-gang; Deng, Fei; Heng, Bin; Xie, Lai-hua; Liu, Yan-qiang

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the role of Zn(2+)-associated glutamate signaling pathway and voltage-dependent outward potassium ion currents in neuronal death induced by hypoxia-ischemia, PC12 cells were exposed to Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation (OGD) solution mimicking the hypoxic-ischemic condition in neuron, and the effect of N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), a specific Zn(2+) chelating agent on OGD-induced neuronal death was assessed in the present study. The cell survival rate, apoptosis status, potassium channel currents, intracellular free glutamate concentration and GluR2 expression in PC12 cells exposed to OGD in the absence or presence of TPEN for different time were investigated. The results showed that OGD exposure increased apoptosis, reduced the cell viability (P PC12 cells. TPEN partially reversed the influence resulted from OGD. These results suggest that OGD-induced cell apoptosis and/or death is mediated by the alteration in glutamate signaling pathway and the voltage-dependent outward potassium ion currents, while TPEN effectively prevent cell apoptosis and/or death under hypoxic-ischemic condition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Abuse, exclusion and intolerance to being female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Bertha Velázquez Rodríguez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The problem of abuse, exclusion and intolerance to women is a consequence of practices of domination pervasive in contemporary societies. This problem is manifested in the systematic harassment to women's bodies, to her thoughts and personal lifestyles, which constrains her personal dignity and violates her basic human rights. The approach to this analysis is based on the documentary method and is part of an investigation of health and gender issues in the collegiate body Gender and Sustainable Development in the Autonomous University of Mexico State.

  10. [Evolution of type 2 diabetes and carbohydrate intolerance following bariatric surgery in a Mexican mestizo population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Avilés, Eva; Espinosa-González, Omar; Amado-Galván, Mónica; Maydón-González, Hernán; Sepúlveda-Guerrero, Elisa; Zerrweck-López, Carlos

    Bariatric surgery continues to be the best treatment for weight loss and control of obesity related comorbidities. Gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy have demonstrated to be the most effective surgeries, but this has not been established in a Mexican (non-American) population. To analyse the improvement in type 2 diabetes mellitus and carbohydrate intolerance in obese patients after bariatric surgery. A retrospective analysis was performed on the data collected prospectively between 2013 and 2015 on every obese patient with diabetes and carbohydrate intolerance submitted for bariatric surgery. Analysis was performed at baseline, and at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months, and included metabolic, clinical, lipid, and anthropometrical parameters. A peri-operative and morbidity and mortality analysis was also performed. Remission rates for patients with diabetes were also established. The analysis included 73 patients, 46 with diabetes and 27 with carbohydrate intolerance. Sixty-two patients were female with a mean age of 42 years. Baseline glucose and glycosylated haemoglobin were 123±34mg/dl and 6.8±1.6%, and at 12 months they were 90.1±8mg/dl and 5.4±0.3%, respectively. Diabetes remission was observed in 68.7% of patients, including 9.3% with partial remission and 21.8% with an improvement. There was also a significant improvement in all metabolic and non-metabolic parameters. Bariatric surgery safely improves the metabolic status of patients with diabetes mellitus or carbohydrate intolerance during the first year, inducing high rates of complete remission. It has also shown a significant improvement on blood pressure, lipid, and anthropometric parameters during the first year of follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Debates in allergy medicine: food intolerance does not exist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreborg, Sten

    2015-01-01

    The term "intolerance" is not mentioned in the World Allergy Organization (WAO) document on allergy nomenclature. "Intolerance" has been used to describe some non-immunological diseases. However, pediatric gastroenterologists mix allergy and intolerance, e.g. by using the term "cow's milk protein allergy/intolerance (CMPA/I)", lumping together all types of mechanisms for not tolerating cow's milk. The basis for this mix is the fact that double-blind oral food challenges are time-consuming and expensive. Therefore, cow's milk exclusion and reintroduction is proposed to be used in primary care for the diagnosis of CMPA in children with common gastrointestinal (GI) problems such as colic and constipation. This may lead to a widespread use of hypoallergenic formulas in children without proven CMPA. In lay language, intolerance describes "not tolerating". To discuss the reasons why the term "intolerance" should not be used in the area of allergy. Presently, intolerance is not part of the allergy nomenclature. It is used by lay persons to describe "not tolerating". Pediatricians use intolerance to describe non-immunological hypersensitivity such as lactose intolerance which is acceptable. However, using the mixed term CMPA/I describing a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms in children, should be avoided. The WAO Nomenclature does not clearly distinguish between non-IgE-mediated allergy and non-allergic hypersensitivity. The term "intolerance" should not be used within the area of allergy. Intolerance should be better defined and the term restricted to some non-immunological/non-allergic diseases and not mixed with allergy, e.g. by using the term CMPA/I. A revision of the WAO nomenclature is proposed.

  12. Chemical Intolerance in Primary Care Settings: Prevalence, Comorbidity, and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katerndahl, David A.; Bell, Iris R.; Palmer, Raymond F.; Miller, Claudia S.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE This study extends previous community-based studies on the prevalence and clinical characteristics of chemical intolerance in a sample of primary care clinic patients. We evaluated comorbid medical and psychiatric disorders, functional status, and rates of health care use. METHODS A total of 400 patients were recruited from 2 family medicine clinic waiting rooms in San Antonio, Texas. Patients completed the validated Quick Environmental Exposure and Sensitivity Inventory (QEESI) to assess chemical intolerance; the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD) screen for possible psychiatric disorders; the Dartmouth–Northern New England Primary Care Cooperative Information Project (Dartmouth COOP) charts for functional status; and the Healthcare Utilization Questionnaire. RESULTS Overall, 20.3% of the sample met criteria for chemical intolerance. The chemically intolerant group reported significantly higher rates of comorbid allergies and more often met screening criteria for possible major depressive disorder, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and alcohol abuse disorder, as well as somatization disorder. The total number of possible mental disorders was correlated with chemical intolerance scores (P intolerance were significantly more likely to have poorer functional status, with trends toward increased medical service use when compared with non–chemically intolerant patients. After controlling for comorbid psychiatric conditions, the groups differed significantly only regarding limitations of social activities. CONCLUSIONS Chemical intolerance occurs in 1 of 5 primary care patients yet is rarely diagnosed by busy practitioners. Psychiatric comorbidities contribute to functional limitations and increased health care use. Chemical intolerance offers an etiologic explanation. Symptoms may resolve or improve with the avoidance of salient chemical, dietary (including caffeine and alcohol), and drug triggers. Given greater medication

  13. [Breath tests in children with suspected lactose intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, P Ángela; Furió, C Simone; Arancibia, A Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Up to 70% of the world population is lactose intolerance. However, there are no epidemiological studies among Chilean pediatric population affected by this condition. Clinical characterization of a series of children who underwent the lactose intolerance breath test for lactose intolerance study, establishing intolerance and malabsorption frequencies, the most frequent symptoms, and test performance depending on the origin. Patients under 18 years old who took the lactose intolerance breath test in the Gastroenterology Laboratory of the Catholic University of Chile, and who were admitted due to clinically suspected lactose intolerance. Malabsorption was considered when there was as an increase of ≥20ppm above the baseline (H2) or ≥34ppm of H2 and methane (CH4) combined. Intolerance was considered when the above was associated with a symptom intensity score ≥7 during registration. The analysis included194 patients aged 1 to17 years of age. Of these, 102 (53%) presented with malabsorption, and 53 (27%) were intolerant. The frequency of lactose intolerance varied from 7.1 to 45.4%, and it occurred more frequently at older ages. The most common reported symptoms were abdominal pain, bloating and rumbling. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance can be investigated from the first years of life using the lactose breath test plus a symptom questionnaire. An increase in the frequency of intolerance with age, and a greater number of positive tests, if they were requested by a gastroenterologist, were observed. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. [Intolerance to food additives: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, F; Mangini, F; Berardi, M; Sterpeta Loffredo, M; Chinellato, I; Dellino, A; Cristofori, F; Di Domenico, F; Mastrototaro, M F; Cappiello, A; Centoducati, T; Carella, F; Armenio, L

    2008-12-01

    Contrary to common believing, the prevalence of the intolerance to food additives in the general population is rather low. Nowadays many doubts persist with regard both to the pathogenetic mechanisms and to the clinical and diagnostic aspects in this field. Symptoms due to, or exacerbated from, food additives usually involve non-IgE-mediate mechanisms (pseudo-allergic reactions, PAR) and are usually less severe of those induced by food allergy. The most frequent clinical feature of the intolerance to food additives still remains the urticaria-angioedema syndrome, although these substances are really involved only in a minority of patients. Other possible clinical features include anaphylaxis, atopic eczema, behaviour disturbances, asthma and non-allergic rhinitis. The diagnostic approach consists in diary cards, reporting symptoms and food habits, elimination diet and double blinded placebo-controlled oral challenge with suspected additives. However, such procedure still remains poorly standardized and numerous uncertainties persist with regard to optimal conditions for performing and interpret the challenge results. The therapeutic approach consists in the exclusion of foods and products containing the additive involved, and, in patients not compliant to the diet, in treatment with symptomatic drugs.

  15. Lactose intolerance in systemic nickel allergy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzato, I A; Vadrucci, E; Cammarota, G; Minelli, M; Gasbarrini, A

    2011-01-01

    Some patients affected by nickel-contact allergy present digestive symptoms in addition to systemic cutaneous manifestations, falling under the condition known as systemic nickel allergy syndrome (SNAS). A nickel-related pro-inflammatory status has been documented at intestinal mucosal level. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence of lactose intolerance in patients affected by SNAS compared to a healthy population. Consecutive patients affected by SNAS referring to our departments were enrolled. The control population consisted of healthy subjects without gastrointestinal symptoms. All subjects enrolled underwent lactose breath test under standard conditions. One hundred and seventy-eight SNAS patients and 60 healthy controls were enrolled. Positivity of lactose breath test occurred in 74.7% of the SNAS group compared to 6.6% of the control group. Lactose intolerance is highly prevalent in our series of patients affected by SNAS. Based on our preliminary results, we can hypothesize that in SNAS patients, the nickel-induced pro-inflammatory status could temporarily impair the brush border enzymatic functions, resulting in hypolactasia. Further trials evaluating the effect of a nickel-low diet regimen on lactase activity, histological features and immunological pattern are needed.

  16. Twelve weeks treatment with the DPP-4 inhibitor, sitagliptin, prevents degradation of peptide YY and improves glucose- and non-glucose-induced insulin secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaboe, Kasper; Knop, Filip Krag; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2010-01-01

    with type 2 diabetes. METHOD: A double-blinded, placebo-controlled study over 12 weeks in which 24 patients with T2DM were randomized to receive either sitagliptin (Januvia) 100 mg qd or placebo as an add-on therapy to metformin. In week 0, 1 and 12 patients underwent a meal test and a 90-min 20 m......AIM: To examine the effects of 12 weeks of treatment with the DPP-4 inhibitor, sitagliptin, on gastrointestinal hormone responses to a standardized mixed meal and beta cell secretory capacity, measured as glucose and non-glucose induced insulin secretion during a hyperglycaemic clamp, in patients......M hyperglycaemic clamp with 5 g of l-arginine infusion. Main outcome measure was postprandial total glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) concentration. Additional measures were insulin and C-peptide, glycaemic control, intact and total peptide YY (PYY) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and intact...

  17. The role of colonic metabolism in lactose intolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, T.; Venema, K.; Priebe, M. G.; Welling, G. W.; Brummer, R. -J. M.; Vonk, R. J.

    Lactose maldigestion and intolerance affect a large part of the world population. The underlying factors of lactose intolerance are not fully understood. In this review, the role of colonic metabolism is discussed, i.e. fermentation of lactose by the colonic microbiota, colonic processing of the

  18. Intolerance of Uncertainty, Fear of Anxiety, and Adolescent Worry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Michel J.; Laugesen, Nina; Bukowski, William M.

    2012-01-01

    A 5 year, ten wave longitudinal study of 338 adolescents assessed the association between two forms of cognitive vulnerability (intolerance of uncertainty and fear of anxiety) and worry. Multilevel mediational analyses revealed a bidirectional and reciprocal relation between intolerance of uncertainty and worry in which change in one variable…

  19. The role of colonic metabolism in lactose intolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, T.; Venema, K.; Priebe, M.G.; Welling, G.W.; Brummer, R.J.M.; Vonk, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Lactose maldigestion and intolerance affect a large part of the world population. The underlying factors of lactose intolerance are not fully understood. In this review, the role of colonic metabolism is discussed, i.e. fermentation of lactose by the colonic microbiota, colonic processing of the

  20. 5-Aminosalicylate intolerance causing exacerbation in pediatric ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hirotaka; Arai, Katsuhiro; Tang, Julian; Hosoi, Kenji; Funayama, Rie

    2017-05-01

    5-Aminosalicylate (5-ASA) is widely used as the first-line drug for ulcerative colitis (UC). 5-ASA is mostly a safe and effective drug, but it can bring about exacerbation due to 5-ASA intolerance. 5-ASA intolerance can be confusing and it can mislead physicians into considering unnecessary treatment escalation, including corticosteroid (CS), biologics, or even surgery. In spite of the clinical importance of 5-ASA intolerance, there have been few studies on its incidence, clinical features, and diagnosis. In order to evaluate the incidence, characteristic symptoms, disease course, and laboratory data of children with 5-ASA intolerance, we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 80 children with UC. Eleven of 80 children (13.8%) with UC were diagnosed with 5-ASA intolerance. The median time between the initiation of 5-ASA and the onset of 5-ASA intolerance was 10 days (range, 4-20 days) in patients not receiving CS. Drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test (DLST) was performed in 10 patients, and was positive in eight. C-reactive protein (CRP) increased significantly when exacerbation of colitis symptoms occurred. The incidence of 5-ASA intolerance was relatively high. Besides the challenge test, elevation of CRP and positive DLST appeared to support the diagnosis of 5-ASA intolerance. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  1. Reduced muscle strength, exercise intolerance and disabling symptoms in sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcellis, R.G.; Lenssen, A.F.; de Vries, J.; Drent, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review: This review focuses on innovations in the field of assessment and treatment of muscle weakness and exercise intolerance in sarcoidosis and the association between these and fatigue, dyspnea and quality of life (QoL). Recent findings: Muscle strength and exercise intolerance are

  2. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale for Children: A Psychometric Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Roy, Amy K.; Furr, Jami M.; Gotimer, Kristin; Beidas, Rinad S.; Dugas, Michel J.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) has contributed to our understanding of excessive worry and adult anxiety disorders, but there is a paucity of research on IU in child samples. This gap is due to the absence of a psychometrically sound measure of IU in youth. The present study adapted parallel child- and parent-report forms of the Intolerance of…

  3. Systematic review: effective management strategies for lactose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaukat, Aasma; Levitt, Michael D; Taylor, Brent C; MacDonald, Roderick; Shamliyan, Tatyana A; Kane, Robert L; Wilt, Timothy J

    2010-06-15

    Lactose intolerance resulting in gastrointestinal symptoms is a common health concern. Diagnosis and management of this condition remain unclear. To assess the maximum tolerable dose of lactose and interventions for reducing symptoms of lactose intolerance among persons with lactose intolerance and malabsorption. Multiple electronic databases, including MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library, for trials published in English from 1967 through November 2009. Randomized, controlled trials of individuals with lactose intolerance or malabsorption. Three investigators independently reviewed articles, extracted data, and assessed study quality. 36 unique randomized studies (26 on lactase- or lactose-hydrolyzed milk supplements, lactose-reduced milk, or tolerable doses of lactose; 7 on probiotics; 2 on incremental lactose administration for colonic adaptation; and 1 on another agent) met inclusion criteria. Moderate-quality evidence indicated that 12 to 15 g of lactose (approximately 1 cup of milk) is well tolerated by most adults. Evidence was insufficient that lactose-reduced solution or milk with a lactose content of 0 to 2 g, compared with greater than 12 g, is effective in reducing symptoms of lactose intolerance. Evidence for probiotics, colonic adaptation, and other agents was also insufficient. Most studies evaluated persons with lactose malabsorption rather than lactose intolerance. Variation in enrollment criteria, outcome reporting, and the composition and dosing of studied agents precluded pooling of results and limited interpretation. Most individuals with presumed lactose intolerance or malabsorption can tolerate 12 to 15 g of lactose. Additional studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of lactose intolerance treatment.

  4. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research & Practice Ways to Give Close Are You at Risk? Home Prevention Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose ...

  5. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You at Risk? Home Prevention Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day Diabetes Basics ...

  6. Nrf2 deficiency improves glucose tolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu-Kun Jennifer; Wu, Kai Connie; Liu, Jie; Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: cklaasse@kumc.edu

    2012-11-01

    Nrf2, a master regulator of intracellular redox homeostasis, is indicated to participate in fatty acid metabolism in liver. However, its role in diet-induced obesity remains controversial. In the current study, genetically engineered Nrf2-null, wild-type (WT), and Nrf2-activated, Keap1-knockdown (K1-KD) mice were fed either a control or a high-fat Western diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. The results indicate that the absence or enhancement of Nrf2 activity did not prevent diet-induced obesity, had limited effects on lipid metabolism, but affected blood glucose homeostasis. Whereas the Nrf2-null mice were resistant to HFD-induced glucose intolerance, the Nrf2-activated K1-KD mice exhibited prolonged elevation of circulating glucose during a glucose tolerance test even on the control diet. Feeding a HFD did not activate the Nrf2 signaling pathway in mouse livers. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (Fgf21) is a liver-derived anti-diabetic hormone that exerts glucose- and lipid-lowering effects. Fgf21 mRNA and protein were both elevated in livers of Nrf2-null mice, and Fgf21 protein was lower in K1-KD mice than WT mice. The inverse correlation between Nrf2 activity and hepatic expression of Fgf21 might explain the improved glucose tolerance in Nrf2-null mice. Furthermore, a more oxidative cellular environment in Nrf2-null mice could affect insulin signaling in liver. For example, mRNA of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1, a gene repressed by insulin in hepatocytes, was markedly elevated in livers of Nrf2-null mice. In conclusion, genetic alteration of Nrf2 does not prevent diet-induced obesity in mice, but deficiency of Nrf2 improves glucose homeostasis, possibly through its effects on Fgf21 and/or insulin signaling. -- Highlights: ► Nrf2 deficiency improves glucose tolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet. ► The anti-diabetic hormone, Fgf21, is highly expressed in livers of Nrf2-null mice. ► The absence of Nrf2 increases the insulin-regulated Igfbp-1 mRNA in liver.

  7. Nrf2 deficiency improves glucose tolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yu-Kun Jennifer; Wu, Kai Connie; Liu, Jie; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    Nrf2, a master regulator of intracellular redox homeostasis, is indicated to participate in fatty acid metabolism in liver. However, its role in diet-induced obesity remains controversial. In the current study, genetically engineered Nrf2-null, wild-type (WT), and Nrf2-activated, Keap1-knockdown (K1-KD) mice were fed either a control or a high-fat Western diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. The results indicate that the absence or enhancement of Nrf2 activity did not prevent diet-induced obesity, had limited effects on lipid metabolism, but affected blood glucose homeostasis. Whereas the Nrf2-null mice were resistant to HFD-induced glucose intolerance, the Nrf2-activated K1-KD mice exhibited prolonged elevation of circulating glucose during a glucose tolerance test even on the control diet. Feeding a HFD did not activate the Nrf2 signaling pathway in mouse livers. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (Fgf21) is a liver-derived anti-diabetic hormone that exerts glucose- and lipid-lowering effects. Fgf21 mRNA and protein were both elevated in livers of Nrf2-null mice, and Fgf21 protein was lower in K1-KD mice than WT mice. The inverse correlation between Nrf2 activity and hepatic expression of Fgf21 might explain the improved glucose tolerance in Nrf2-null mice. Furthermore, a more oxidative cellular environment in Nrf2-null mice could affect insulin signaling in liver. For example, mRNA of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1, a gene repressed by insulin in hepatocytes, was markedly elevated in livers of Nrf2-null mice. In conclusion, genetic alteration of Nrf2 does not prevent diet-induced obesity in mice, but deficiency of Nrf2 improves glucose homeostasis, possibly through its effects on Fgf21 and/or insulin signaling. -- Highlights: ► Nrf2 deficiency improves glucose tolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet. ► The anti-diabetic hormone, Fgf21, is highly expressed in livers of Nrf2-null mice. ► The absence of Nrf2 increases the insulin-regulated Igfbp-1 mRNA in liver.

  8. Glycolysis Controls Plasma Membrane Glucose Sensors To Promote Glucose Signaling in Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairey-Remonnay, Amélie; Deffaud, Julien; Wésolowski-Louvel, Micheline; Lemaire, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Sensing of extracellular glucose is necessary for cells to adapt to glucose variation in their environment. In the respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, extracellular glucose controls the expression of major glucose permease gene RAG1 through a cascade similar to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Snf3/Rgt2/Rgt1 glucose signaling pathway. This regulation depends also on intracellular glucose metabolism since we previously showed that glucose induction of the RAG1 gene is abolished in glycolytic mutants. Here we show that glycolysis regulates RAG1 expression through the K. lactis Rgt1 (KlRgt1) glucose signaling pathway by targeting the localization and probably the stability of Rag4, the single Snf3/Rgt2-type glucose sensor of K. lactis. Additionally, the control exerted by glycolysis on glucose signaling seems to be conserved in S. cerevisiae. This retrocontrol might prevent yeasts from unnecessary glucose transport and intracellular glucose accumulation. PMID:25512610

  9. [Fasting insulinemie levels and after overload with oral glucose in overweight children (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, M J; Colomer, J; Borrajo, E; Alpera, R

    1978-02-01

    Fasting insulinemie levels and after overload with oral glucose are studied in a group of 30 overweight children aged between 2--12 years. The results are: An increase in insulin secretion according to the age only in the overload test. The insulin and glucose areas in the overweight child is statistically bigger than in the healthy child. We conclude that hyperinsulinism in obesity, may be related with a insuline-resistance and with some kind of glucose intolerance.

  10. Orthostatic intolerance and the cardiovascular response to early postoperative mobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, M; Jørgensen, Christoffer Calov; Jørgensen, T B

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A key element in enhanced postoperative recovery is early mobilization which, however, may be hindered by orthostatic intolerance, that is, an inability to sit or stand because of symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion as intolerable dizziness, nausea and vomiting, feeling of heat...... of orthostatic intolerance. In contrast, 8 (50%) and 2 (12%) patients were orthostatic intolerant at 6 and approximately 22 h after surgery, respectively. Before surgery, SAP, DAP, and TPR increased (P0.05) and Scv(O2) decreased (P... the preoperative evaluation (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The early postoperative postural cardiovascular response is impaired after radical prostatectomy with a risk of orthostatic intolerance, limiting early postoperative mobilization. The pathogenic mechanisms include both impaired TPR and CO responses....

  11. Prevalence of food allergy/intolerance in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    1997-01-01

    Discussed in this paper is the prevalence of allergy and intolerance to foods in Europe. Prevalence of allergy to food additives is not included. A fully reliable estimate of the prevalence of food allergy/intolerance does not exist. Prevalence changes with age, as does the relative importance...... of the most common food allergens. The cumulative prevalence of allergy and intolerance to cow's milk during the first year of life is approximately 2%. The total prevalence of food allergy/intolerance in children is not as well documented. In 18-month-old infants the Danish estimate is 6.5%. The high...... prevalence of peanut allergy (0.5%) in British children is not reflected in the results from other European countries. Milk, egg, fish and oranges seem to be the most common causes of allergy and intolerance in European infants and children. Results from epidemiological studies combined with the knowledge...

  12. [Calcium supplementation uncovering lactose intolerance - a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifina, Eva; Geissler, Dietmar; Zwettler, Elisabeth; Klaushofer, Klaus; Mikosch, Peter

    2012-03-01

    A 44 yr-old female with osteoporosis had no relevant gastrointestinal symptoms and did not avoid any specific food. However, after prescription of a lactose-rich calcium supplementation, clinical symptoms suspicious for lactose intolerance occurred, which were thereafter confirmed by a lactose tolerance test. Lactose intolerance may present with only slight or subtle symptoms. Drugs containing lactose may induce or increase gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with lactose intolerance. In case of gastrointestinal symptoms occurring after the initiation of drugs containing lactose, the possibility of lactose intolerance should be considered and tested by lactose tolerance test or genetic testing for the LCT (-13910) polymorphism. Due to the prevalence of about 15-25% lactose intolerance in the Austrian population, lactose free drugs should be prescribed as widely as possible.

  13. Competing Claims: Religious Affiliation and African Americans' Intolerance of Homosexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledet, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Literature on religion and political intolerance indicates competing expectations about how Black Protestant church affiliation affects African Americans' attitudes about civil liberties. On the one hand, Black Protestant theology emphasizes personal freedom and social justice, factors generally linked to more tolerant attitudes. On the other hand, Black Protestants tend to be conservative on family and social issues, factors often linked to intolerance of gays and lesbians. Data from the General Social Survey are used to examine the influence of religious group identification, as well as other relevant aspects of religiosity, on political intolerance among African Americans. Results indicate that although other aspects of religion (beliefs and behaviors) help explain variation in political intolerance, Black Protestant church affiliation has no relationship with attitudes about the civil liberties of homosexuals. However, additional tests show that Black Protestant church affiliation significantly predicts intolerance of other target groups (atheists and racists).

  14. [Clinico-immunological study of 16 cases of benzoate intolerance in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pétrus, M; Bonaz, S; Causse, E; Micheau, P; Rhabbour, M; Netter, J C; Bildstein, G

    1997-02-01

    The authors report a sery of 16 cases of intolerance to the benzoates in children. Sixteen children (9 boys and 7 girls) were directed to the Hospital of Tarbes from June 1995 to July 1995, for recurring urticaria (7/16) combined with asthma (1/16), atopic eczema (2/16), dermorespiratory syndrome (2/16) and asthma (1/16). All were subject to an immunological examination comprising alimentation inquiry, prick test, IgE determination, RAST, oral provocation test to benzoates, which establishes the diagnosis, whose confirmation is certified by the benefit of the food eviction. To conclusion, the authors underline several points: the presumable underestimation of the intolerance, the often mentioned atopic familial context, the observed pathology (urticaria, asthma, eczema), the importance of the provocation test. Finally, besides food such as grey shrimps, sodas and antibiotic syrups, one finds benzoates in the antiallergic syrups initially prescribed as a preventive measure.

  15. Glucose allostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stumvoll, Michael; Tataranni, P Antonio; Stefan, Norbert

    2003-01-01

    In many organisms, normoglycemia is achieved by a tight coupling of nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion in the pancreatic beta-cell (acute insulin response [AIR]) and the metabolic action of insulin to stimulate glucose disposal (insulin action [M]). It is widely accepted that in healthy...... individuals with normal glucose tolerance, normoglycemia can always be maintained by compensatorily increasing AIR in response to decreasing M (and vice versa). This has been mathematically described by the hyperbolic relationship between AIR and M and referred to as glucose homeostasis, with glucose...... concentration assumed to remain constant along the hyperbola. Conceivably, glucose is one of the signals stimulating AIR in response to decreasing M. Hypothetically, as with any normally functioning feed-forward system, AIR should not fully compensate for worsening M, since this would remove the stimulus...

  16. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... Prevention Hearing Loss Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Nutrition Osteoporosis Shingles Skin Cancer Related News Quitting Smoking, ...

  17. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki J Hendrick

    Full Text Available The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura, the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus, showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa. With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally

  18. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, Vicki J; Hutchison, Zoë L; Last, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura), the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris) and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus), showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa). With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally, and perhaps

  19. Glucose tolerance, insulin release, and insulin binding to monocytes in kidney transplant recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, W.A.; Wielechowski, K.S.; Mahajan, S.K.; Migdal, S.D.; McDonald, F.D.

    1982-01-01

    In order to evaluate glucose tolerance following renal transplantation, intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTT), with evaluation of hormonal responses to the intravenous glucose load and percent specific 125 I-insulin binding to peripheral blood monocytes, were studied in eight clinically stable kidney transplant recipients. For comparison purposes, identical studies were done in eight control subjects and seven clinically stable hemodialysis patients. One transplant recipient was glucose intolerant, with fasting hyperglycemia, elevated HbA1C, and abnormal glucose decay constant. Impaired pancreatic insulin release appeared to be the major factor accounting for his glucose intolerance. The seven glucose-tolerant transplant recipients had significantly increased insulin release during IVGTT compared to control subjects, and significant correlations were found among insulin release, glucose decay constant, and fasting blood sugar in those patients. Insulin binding to monocytes was significantly greater in transplant recipients than control subjects due to an increase in insulin binding capacity per cell. A significant correlation was found between percent specific 125 I-insulin binding and steroid dose, expressed as mg/kg body weight/day, in those patients. Thus, chronic steroid administration does not cause glucose intolerance in transplant recipients who manifest steroid-associated increases in pancreatic insulin release and cellular insulin binding capacity

  20. Lactose intolerance: diagnosis, genetic, and clinical factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattar R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Rejane Mattar, Daniel Ferraz de Campos Mazo, Flair José CarrilhoDepartment of Gastroenterology, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Most people are born with the ability to digest lactose, the major carbohydrate in milk and the main source of nutrition until weaning. Approximately 75% of the world's population loses this ability at some point, while others can digest lactose into adulthood. This review discusses the lactase-persistence alleles that have arisen in different populations around the world, diagnosis of lactose intolerance, and its symptomatology and management.Keywords: hypolactasia, lactase persistence, lactase non-persistence, lactose, LCT gene, MCM6 gene

  1. Towards understanding (religious (intolerance in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand J. Potgieter

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, schools and education authorities world wide have been paying increasing attention to issues surrounding diversity and religious (intolerance. The term ‘tolerance’ is, however, clouded by considerable confusion and vagueness. This article seeks to contribute to recent scholarly attempts at understanding (religious tolerance and the term that denotes it. After a brief semantic analysis of the term ‘tolerance’, arguments concerning the onticity of tolerance as phenomenon or entity are discussed. By examining its onticity we explore and explain some of the essential features of tolerance. The article ends with a brief discussion of some of the implications of our examination that we foresee for (religion education.

  2. Hypocapnia and cerebral hypoperfusion in orthostatic intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, V.; Spies, J. M.; Novak, P.; McPhee, B. R.; Rummans, T. A.; Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Orthostatic and other stresses trigger tachycardia associated with symptoms of tremulousness, shortness of breath, dizziness, blurred vision, and, often, syncope. It has been suggested that paradoxical cerebral vasoconstriction during head-up tilt might be present in patients with orthostatic intolerance. We chose to study middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity (BFV) and cerebral vasoregulation during tilt in patients with orthostatic intolerance (OI). METHODS: Beat-to-beat BFV from the MCA, heart rate, CO2, blood pressure (BP), and respiration were measured in 30 patients with OI (25 women and 5 men; age range, 21 to 44 years; mean age, 31.3+/-1.2 years) and 17 control subjects (13 women and 4 men; age range, 20 to 41 years; mean age, 30+/-1.6 years); ages were not statistically different. These indices were monitored during supine rest and head-up tilt (HUT). We compared spontaneous breathing and hyperventilation and evaluated the effect of CO2 rebreathing in these 2 positions. RESULTS: The OI group had higher supine heart rates (Pfailed to show an increment. Among the cerebrovascular indices, all BFVs (systolic, diastolic, and mean) decreased significantly more, and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) was increased in OI patients (Pindices were improved within 2 minutes of CO2 rebreathing. The relationships between CO2 and BFV and heart rate were well described by linear regressions, and the slope was not different between control subjects and patients with OI. CONCLUSIONS: Cerebral vasoconstriction occurs in OI during orthostasis, which is primarily due to hyperventilation, causing significant hypocapnia. Hypocapnia and symptoms of orthostatic hypertension are reversible by CO2 rebreathing.

  3. High incidence of intolerance to tuberculosis chemoprophylaxis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2012-02-01

    The outlook of inflammatory joint diseases has changed significantly with the advent of TNF blockers. However, these advances come with a trade off-risk of infections, especially tuberculosis. The Irish society of rheumatology has proposed guidelines to investigate and treat latent TB infection (LTBI), which is in accordance with majority of international recommendations. This protocol requires that every patient with LTBI should have chemoprophylaxis. INH and different anti-rheumatic drugs are known to cause hepatic and gastrointestinal complications. We sought to investigate the toxicity of adding prophylactic anti-TB medications to different DMARDs and anti-TNF agents. We prospectively documented the course of all patients who were prescribed chemoprophylaxis for LTBI, from August 2007 to August 2008. Arrangements were made for central re-issuing of prescription of INH or rifampicin, after reviewing monthly liver function tests and following telephone interview seeking presence of adverse events. Out of 132 patients who were commenced on different TNF blockers, only 23 patients (17%) were diagnosed with LTBI and were given prophylaxis as per recommended guidelines. Thirty-nine percent (9 out of 23) of patients discontinued INH because of adverse events. Primary reason for discontinuation in these 9 patients was as follows: 3 patients got marked transaminitis (transaminases >5 times the normal limit), 5 patients had non-resolving gastrointestinal intolerance (mainly nausea), and one patient developed non-resolving rash. We have found a significant number of our patients (39%) who could not continue anti-TB prophylaxis due to either gastrointestinal intolerance or hypertransaminesemia.

  4. From 'lactose intolerance' to 'lactose nutrition'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukito, Widjaja; Malik, Safarina G; Surono, Ingrid S; Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The concept of lactose intolerance has become embedded in Western medicine and developing economy medicine. It is based on evidence that intestinal lactase activity persists into later childhood and throughout life in only a minority of the world's population, notably northern European-derived populations. These people have the T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the rs49882359 allele (C/T), also known as C/T-13910, the MCM6 gene which positively influences the lactase LCT gene. Other lactase persistent (LP) populations are found in Africa and the Middle East with different genetic variants. These SNPs represent co-evolution with dairying since the agricultural revolution and nutrient-dependent ecological adaptation. That said, gastrointestinal symptoms considered due to small intestinal lactose malabsorption are poorly correlated with lactase non-persistence (LNP), the situation for most people. With LNP, colonic microbiome lactase enables lactose fermentation to occur so that none is found in faeces. Whether the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and gases (hydrogen, carbon dioxide and methane) produced cause symptoms is dose-dependent. Up to 25 g of lactose at any one time can usually be consumed by a LNP person, but its food and meal pattern context, the microbiomic characteristics, age and other factors may alter tolerance. Thus, the notion that lactose intolerance is a disorder or disease of LNP people is misplaced and has been one of cultural perspective. What actually matters is whether a particular dairy product as normally consumed give rise to symptoms. It is, therefore, proposed that lactose tolerance tests be replaced with dairy food tolerance tests.

  5. [Food intolerances caused by enzyme defects and carbohydrate malassimiliations : Lactose intolerance and Co].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Christiane

    2016-06-01

    Apart from allergic conditions, carbohydrate malassimiliations (sugar metabolism disorders) are classified within the group of food intolerances. These dose-dependent, yet non-immunological reactions require gastroenterological or internal diagnosis following nutritional therapy. Intolerances to carbohydrates such as lactose (milk sugar) and fructose (fruit sugar) in addition to sugar alcohols (sorbitol, mannitol, lactitol etc.) have been gaining increasing attention in recent decades as they are the cause of a wide range of gastrointestinal symptoms. There are currently various options for both diagnosis and therapy that differ notably in terms of effort, costs, and efficiency. Nutritional change and patient education are the bases of therapy. Non-observance of the trigger will result in increasing complaints and possibly even more infections, e.g., diverticula, rectal disorders, bacterial miscolonization, bile acid malabsorption). For an optimal therapy, the following sugar metabolism disorders have to be differentiated: hypolactasia versus lactose maldigestion, fructose malabsorption versus fructose overload, combined lactose and fructose intolerance, and isolated adverse reactions against sorbitol.For the medical conditions listed above, a three- or four-stage treatment regimen is recommended. Extensive dietary restrictions with regard to the relevant sugar, except for lactose, should not be maintained over a longer period of time.

  6. Real-time continuous glucose monitoring as a tool to prevent severe hypoglycaemia in selected pregnant women with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, A L; Stage, E; Ringholm, Lene

    2014-01-01

    history were informed about their additional high risk of severe hypoglycaemia, their treatment was focused on restricted insulin doses during the first 16 gestational weeks, and they were offered real-time continuous glucose monitoring on top of self-monitored plasma glucose measurements. RESULTS: Among......AIMS: Among women with Type 1 diabetes who have had severe hypoglycaemia the year before pregnancy, 70% also experience this complication in pregnancy, and particularly in the first half of pregnancy. We evaluated whether routine use of real-time continuous glucose monitoring from early pregnancy...... 28 women with a recent history of severe hypoglycaemia, 12 (43%) used real-time continuous glucose monitoring from a median (range) of 10 (7-13) gestational weeks for 10 (1-32) weeks. Among these 12 women, eight had experienced a total of 34 (range 1-11) severe hypoglycaemic events in the year before...

  7. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  8. Food intolerance prevalence in active ulcerative colitis in southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinling; Chen, Yuke; Huang, Fangyan; Luo, Qianying; Lv, Hui; Long, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Food intolerance is believed to be a source of frequent medical problems in ulcerative colitis (UC), which closely correlate with patients' dietary pattern. Living in an underdeveloped area of China, residents in southwestern region have diverse dietary habits. The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of food intolerance in the UC patients in this area and to discuss some of the possible risk factors leading to the condition. Food antibodies in serum of 80 patients with active UC were determined by standard enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). This study examined the risk factors contributing to high titers of food antibodies and the dietary patterns correlating with food intolerance in these demographics. 83.8% of patients (67/80) were found to be seropositive for food intolerance. Patients of female, aged between 20 to 40 and the one who tended to have a high fat diet were tested to be highly seropositive (pintolerance (p>0.05). Active UC patients in southwestern region of China have showed to be high seropositive in food intolerance, particularly in female and young patients. Dietary patterns with high in fat intake seem to have caused high prevalence of seropositivity in food intolerance. Although rice has been taken as staple food and the spicy food has been popular among citizen in this region, these foods have indicated to no effect on food intolerance in this study.

  9. Effect of Social Intolerance on Psychological Distress in Cardiac Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zonash, R.; Arouj, K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The patients with diverse cardiac issues and physical illness experience different levels of social intolerance, depression, anxiety and stress. Objectives: To explore the relationship between social intolerance and psychological distress among cardiac patients and investigate the effect of different type of cardiac illness, its duration and physical symptoms on social intolerance and psychological distress. Study design, settings and duration: Cross-sectional study, conducted at Benazir Bhutto Hospital (BBH), Rawalpindi Institute of Cardiology (RIC), Hearts International Hospital (HIH) and Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS) from September-December, 2014. Patients and Methods: The sample size of 180 adult cardiac patients was collected. These patients were selected from the cardiac units of 4 hospitals of Rawalpindi using purposive sampling. Social intolerance was assessed using Frustration Discomfort Scale (FDS), distress was assessed using depression anxiety and stress scale (DASS) Results: Out of 180 patients, 53.3 percent were males and 46.7 percent females. Their ages ranged from 20 to 60 years. Results revealed significant discomfort intolerance, (p < 0.01) entitlement (p < 0.05) and emotional intolerance (p < 0.01) in these patients. There was 45 percent variance in depression, while discomfort intolerance (p < 0.01) and achievement frustration (p< 0.01) showed 35 percent variance in anxiety. Conclusion: Cardiac patients suffer from major emotional distress.(author)

  10. Mothers After Gestational Diabetes in Australia Diabetes Prevention Program (MAGDA-DPP) post-natal intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shih, Sophy T.F.; Davis-Lameloise, Nathalie; Janus, Edward D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance with its onset or first recognition during pregnancy. Post-GDM women have a life-time risk exceeding 70% of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Lifestyle modifications reduce the incidence of T2DM by up to 58......% for high-risk individuals. Methods/Design: The Mothers After Gestational Diabetes in Australia Diabetes Prevention Program (MAGDA-DPP) is a randomized controlled trial aiming to assess the effectiveness of a structured diabetes prevention intervention for post-GDM women. This trial has an intervention...... group participating in a diabetes prevention program (DPP), and a control group receiving usual care from their general practitioners during the same time period. The 12-month intervention comprises an individual session followed by five group sessions at two-week intervals, and two follow-up telephone...

  11. Diagnosing and Treating Intolerance to Carbohydrates in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Pezzella, Vincenza; Amoroso, Antonio; Cozzolino, Tommaso; Di Scala, Carmen; Passariello, Annalisa

    2016-03-10

    Intolerance to carbohydrates is relatively common in childhood, but still poorly recognized and managed. Over recent years it has come to the forefront because of progresses in our knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Children with intolerance to carbohydrates often present with unexplained signs and symptoms. Here, we examine the most up-to-date research on these intolerances, discuss controversies relating to the diagnostic approach, including the role of molecular analysis, and provide new insights into modern management in the pediatric age, including the most recent evidence for correct dietary treatment.

  12. Diagnosing and Treating Intolerance to Carbohydrates in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Pezzella, Vincenza; Amoroso, Antonio; Cozzolino, Tommaso; Di Scala, Carmen; Passariello, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Intolerance to carbohydrates is relatively common in childhood, but still poorly recognized and managed. Over recent years it has come to the forefront because of progresses in our knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Children with intolerance to carbohydrates often present with unexplained signs and symptoms. Here, we examine the most up-to-date research on these intolerances, discuss controversies relating to the diagnostic approach, including the role of molecular analysis, and provide new insights into modern management in the pediatric age, including the most recent evidence for correct dietary treatment. PMID:26978392

  13. Neural Correlates of Intolerance of Uncertainty in Clinical Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever, Mirjam; Smeets, Paul; Sternheim, Lot

    2015-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty is a key contributor to anxiety-related disorders. Recent studies highlight its importance in other clinical disorders. The link between its clinical presentation and the underlying neural correlates remains unclear. This review summarizes the emerging literature on the neural correlates of intolerance of uncertainty. In conclusion, studies focusing on the neural correlates of this construct are sparse, and findings are inconsistent across disorders. Future research should identify neural correlates of intolerance of uncertainty in more detail. This may unravel the neurobiology of a wide variety of clinical disorders and pave the way for novel therapeutic targets.

  14. Diagnosing and Treating Intolerance to Carbohydrates in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Berni Canani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Intolerance to carbohydrates is relatively common in childhood, but still poorly recognized and managed. Over recent years it has come to the forefront because of progresses in our knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Children with intolerance to carbohydrates often present with unexplained signs and symptoms. Here, we examine the most up-to-date research on these intolerances, discuss controversies relating to the diagnostic approach, including the role of molecular analysis, and provide new insights into modern management in the pediatric age, including the most recent evidence for correct dietary treatment.

  15. [Prevalence of postpartum impaired glucose tolerance after gestational diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Gutiérrez, Gustavo; Macias Rocha, Ana Laura; Puente Alvarez, Erika Isela

    2012-10-01

    gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects 2 to 10% of pregnancies and it has been postulated as a variant of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) because they share a similar pathophysioiogy. Approximately in 90% the carbohydrate intolerance resolves after pregnancy, however after 5 to 16 years after delivery women will have a risk of 17 to 63% to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. to determine the frequency of postpartum impaired glucose tolerance in women with previous GDM. 125 patients with diagnosis of GMD were included, general data were captured, type of control during pregnancy and complications occurred. The women were instructed to undergo a postpartum oral glucose tolerance test of 75 g and 2 h, 6 weeks after their delivery date and they were classified into five groups: normal patients, type 2 diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose and combined both. after follow up 13 women (10.4%) were diagnosed as DM2; 14 patients (11.2%) were classified as glucose intolerance; 16 (12.8%) were catalogued with impaired fasting glucose; 6 (4.8%) had both disorders; and 76 (60.8%) were diagnosed as healthy women. the detection with a postpartum oral glucose tolerance test is necessary for the identification of the various types of disorders of the carbohydrate metabolism including DM2.

  16. Inhibition of kidney proximal tubular glucose reabsorption does not prevent against diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetic eNOS knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralikrishna Gangadharan Komala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 is the main luminal glucose transporter in the kidney. SGLT2 inhibition results in glycosuria and improved glycaemic control. Drugs inhibiting this transporter have recently been approved for clinical use and have been suggested to have potential renoprotective benefits by limiting glycotoxicity in the proximal tubule. We aimed to determine the renoprotective benefits of empagliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor, independent of its glucose lowering effect. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We induced diabetes using a low dose streptozotocin protocol in 7-8 week old endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS synthase knockout mice. We measured fasting blood glucose on a monthly basis, terminal urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Renal histology was assessed for inflammatory and fibrotic changes. Renal cortical mRNA transcription of inflammatory and profibrotic cytokines, glucose transporters and protein expression of SGLT2 and GLUT1 were determined. Outcomes were compared to diabetic animals receiving the angiotensin receptor blocker telmisartan (current best practice. RESULTS: Diabetic mice had high matched blood glucose levels. Empagliflozin did not attenuate diabetes-induced albuminuria, unlike telmisartan. Empagliflozin did not improve glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy, tubulointerstitial inflammation or fibrosis, while telmisartan attenuated these. Empagliflozin did not modify tubular toll-like receptor-2 expression in diabetic mice. Empagliflozin did not reduce the upregulation of macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, transforming growth factor β1 and fibronectin mRNA observed in the diabetic animals, while telmisartan decreased transcription of MCP-1 and fibronectin. Empagliflozin increased GLUT1 mRNA expression and telmisartan increased SGLT2 mRNA expression in comparison to untreated diabetic mice. However no significant difference was found in protein expression of GLUT1 or SGLT2 among the

  17. Menopause and risk of diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Catherine; Edelstein, Sharon L; Crandall, Jill P; Dabelea, Dana; Kitabchi, Abbas E; Hamman, Richard F; Montez, Maria G; Perreault, Leigh; Foulkes, Mary A; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2011-08-01

    The study objectives were to examine the association between menopause status and diabetes risk among women with glucose intolerance and to determine if menopause status modifies response to diabetes prevention interventions. The study population included women in premenopause (n = 708), women in natural postmenopause (n = 328), and women with bilateral oophorectomy (n = 201) in the Diabetes Prevention Program, a randomized placebo-controlled trial of lifestyle intervention and metformin among glucose-intolerant adults. Associations between menopause and diabetes risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazard models that adjusted for demographic variables (age, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes mellitus), waist circumference, insulin resistance, and corrected insulin response. Similar models were constructed after stratification by menopause type and hormone therapy use. After adjustment for age, there was no association between natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy and diabetes risk. Differences by study arm were observed in women who reported bilateral oophorectomy. In the lifestyle arm, women with bilateral oophorectomy had a lower adjusted hazard for diabetes (hazard ratio [HR], 0.19; 95% CI, 0.04-0.94), although observations were too few to determine if this was independent of hormone therapy use. No significant differences were seen in the metformin (HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.63-2.64) or placebo arms (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 0.74-2.55). Among women at high risk for diabetes, natural menopause was not associated with diabetes risk and did not affect response to diabetes prevention interventions. In the lifestyle intervention, bilateral oophorectomy was associated with a decreased diabetes risk.

  18. Menopause and risk of diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Catherine; Edelstein, Sharon L.; Crandall, Jill P.; Dabelea, Dana; Kitabchi, Abbas E.; Hamman, Richard F.; Montez, Maria G.; Perreault, Leigh; Foulkes, Mary A.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objective The study objective was to examine the association between menopause status and diabetes risk among women with glucose intolerance and to determine if menopausal status modifies response to diabetes prevention interventions. Methods The study population included women in premenopause (n=708), natural postmenopause (n=328), and bilateral oophorectomy (n=201) in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a randomized placebo-controlled trial of lifestyle intervention and metformin among glucose intolerant adults. Associations between menopause and diabetes risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazard models that adjusted for demographic variables (age, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes mellitus), waist circumference, insulin resistance and corrected insulin response. Similar models were constructed after stratification by menopause type and hormone therapy (HT) use. Results After adjustment for age, there was no association between natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy and diabetes risk. Differences by study arm were observed in women who reported bilateral oophorectomy. In the lifestyle arm, women with bilateral oophorectomy had a lower adjusted hazard for diabetes (HR 0.19, 95% CI 0.04, 0.94), although observations were too few to determine if this was independent of HT use. No significant differences were seen in the metformin (HR 1.29, 95% CI 0.63, 2.64) or placebo arms (HR 1.37, 95% CI 0.74, 2.55). Conclusions Among women at high-risk for diabetes, natural menopause was not associated with diabetes risk and did not affect response to diabetes prevention interventions. In the lifestyle intervention, bilateral oophorectomy was associated with decreased diabetes risk. PMID:21709591

  19. Clinical symptoms of food allergy/intolerance in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S

    1997-01-01

    Food allergy is principally a problem in infancy and early childhood. Food allergy/intolerance may cause a broad spectrum of symptoms and signs in children, including generalized reactions, such as anaphylactic shock. Reactions are localized mainly in the gastrointestinal tract, but food allergy/intolerance...... may also cause local symptoms in other organs such as the skin and the respiratory tract. About 50-70% demonstrate cutaneous symptoms, 50-60% gastrointestinal symptoms, and 20-30% respiratory symptoms. Among young children with food allergy/intolerance the majority have two or more symptoms...... with symptoms occurring in two or more organ systems. The symptoms occur primarily within a few minutes after food exposure (immediate reactions), however delayed reactions in the skin, gastrointestinal tract and lungs may also occur. Among children with symptoms suggestive of food allergy/intolerance...

  20. [Food intolerance: reliability and characteristics of different diagnostic alternative tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, B; Esposito, A; Capone, S; Fistetto, G; Iannitti, T

    2011-03-01

    The expression "food intolerance" dates back to the ancient Greece and can be generally defined as a sum of unpleasant symptoms of varying etiology that can onset in some patients after the ingestion of various food products. Adverse reactions to food can be divided into toxic and non-toxic. The last ones are classified as immunologically mediated, called "allergies", and non-immunologically mediated, commonly defined as "intolerances". The gut wall is directly involved in these adverse reactions to some foods, since it plays a key role in food absorption and in the regulation of the immunitary system. In this paper we discuss food intolerances and allergies, evaluating the available diagnostic methods and their scientific reliability and focusing on IgG analysis based immunoenzymatic test which is the most relevant test for intolerance diagnosis.

  1. Predicting intolerance of uncertainty in individuals with eating disorder symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sternheim, Lot C; Fisher, Martin; Harrison, Amy; Watling, Rosamond

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intolerance of Uncertainty (IU) is recognized for its contribution to various psychopathologies, in particular anxiety and depression. Studies highlight the relevance of IU for Eating Disorders (EDs) however, potential factors contributing to IU in EDs remain unstudied. METHODS: Three

  2. Antroduodenal motility in neurologically handicapped children with feeding intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werlin Steven L

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysphagia and feeding intolerance are common in neurologically handicapped children. The aim is to determine the etiologies of feeding intolerance in neurologically handicapped children who are intolerant of tube feedings. Methods Eighteen neurologically handicapped children, followed in the Tube Feeding Clinic at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin who were intolerant of gastrostomy feedings. The charts of these 18 patients were reviewed. Past medical history, diagnoses, history of fundoplication and results of various tests of gastrointestinal function including barium contrast radiography, endoscopy and antroduodenal manometry were documented. Results Five of 11 children had abnormal barium upper gastrointestinal series. Seven of 14 had abnormal liquid phase gastric emptying tests. Two of 16 had esophagitis on endoscopy. All 18 children had abnormal antroduodenal motility. Conclusions In neurologically handicapped children foregut dysmotility may be more common than is generally recognized and can explain many of the upper gastrointestinal symptoms in neurologically handicapped children.

  3. Renal Fanconi syndrome with ultrastructural defects in lysinuric protein intolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benninga, M. A.; Lilien, M.; de Koning, T. J.; Duran, M.; Versteegh, F. G. A.; Goldschmeding, R.; Poll-The, B. T.

    2007-01-01

    Renal Fanconi syndrome developed rapidly in a 3-year-old Moroccan girl with established lysinuric protein intolerance. She was hospitalized because of lowered consciousness, uncoordinated movements and hepatosplenomegaly after a febrile period. Laboratory investigations revealed plasma ammonia 270

  4. Reducing the incidence of allergy and intolerance to cereals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Meer, van der I.M.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    During recent decades, allergies and certain food intolerances have shown a worldwide gradual increase in prevalence, concomitantly with economic growth, urbanization, and changes in lifestyle and dietary patterns. They are triggered in humans with an unbalanced immune system and intestinal

  5. The role of colonic metabolism in lactose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, T; Venema, K; Priebe, M G; Welling, G W; Brummer, R-J M; Vonk, R J

    2008-08-01

    Lactose maldigestion and intolerance affect a large part of the world population. The underlying factors of lactose intolerance are not fully understood. In this review, the role of colonic metabolism is discussed, i.e. fermentation of lactose by the colonic microbiota, colonic processing of the fermentation metabolites and how these processes would play a role in the pathophysiology of lactose intolerance. We suggest that the balance between the removal and production rate of osmotic-active components (lactose, and intermediate metabolites, e.g. lactate, succinate, etc.) in the colon is a key factor in the development of symptoms. The involvement of the colon may provide the basis for designing new targeted strategies for dietary and clinical management of lactose intolerance.

  6. Repressive coping and alexithymia in idiopathic environmental intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice

    2010-01-01

    To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI).......To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI)....

  7. Quadriceps exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gifford, Jayson R; Trinity, Joel D; Layec, Gwenael

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to determine if qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration, associated with decreased mitochondrial efficiency, contribute to exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using permeabilized muscle fibers from.......05). Overall, this study indicates that COPD is associated with qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondria that affect the contribution of CI and CII-driven respiration, which potentially contributes to the exercise intolerance associated with this disease....

  8. Intolerance reaction after application of glucagon during double contrast studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainberger, F.; Fruehwald, F.; Schwaighofer, B.; Lindemayr, H.

    1986-01-01

    Whereas intolerance reactions against contrast media are a well-known hazard during radiologic procedures, intolerance reactions to other preparations used in radiology are rare. Glucagon, frequently used to induce gastrointestinal hypotonia, is said to have almost no side-effects. A case of anaphylactic reaction during double-contrast upper gastrointestinal examination is reported. Pseudoallergic reaction to propylparaben, a preservative agent in glucagon, is suspected. IgE-antibodies to glucagon could not be detected by RAST. (orig.) [de

  9. Prevalence of intolerance to food additives among Danish school children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, G.; Madsen, C.; Saval, P.

    1993-01-01

    The prevalence of intolerance to food additives was assessed in a group of unselected school children aged 5-16 years. A study group of 271 children was selected on the basis of the results of a questionnaire on atopic disease answered by 4,274 (86%) school children in the municipality of Viborg...... clinics, the prevalence of intolerance to food additives in school children is estimated to be 1-2%....

  10. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary Management

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Yanyong; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Dai, Ning; Fox, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Lactose intolerance related to primary or secondary lactase deficiency is characterized by abdominal pain and distension, borborygmi, flatus, and diarrhea induced by lactose in dairy products. The biological mechanism and lactose malabsorption is established and several investigations are available, including genetic, endoscopic and physiological tests. Lactose intolerance depends not only on the expression of lactase but also on the dose of lactose, intestinal flora, gastrointestinal motilit...

  11. [Current prospects for diagnosis and treatment of food intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynchuk, A A; Gubskaia, E Iu

    2014-11-01

    In the study we found most frequent symptoms and pathological conditions associated with food intolerance and their changes when using dietary recommendations established on the results of test-FED (FED). We were determined the frequency of responses by type of food intolerance for the most common foods. We have investigated the possibility of the normalization of body weight in patients with high body mass index.

  12. 'Food allergy / intolerance testing' in dermatology : science or hype?

    OpenAIRE

    Mercieca, Liam; Scerri, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Food allergies are becoming an increasingly recognized clinical problem and patients frequently ask if their health complaints are related to their diet. There has been a recent phenomenon of food allergy or intolerance testing leading to dietary alterations and restrictions. This article gives a brief overview of the latest evidence and current guidelines for proper diagnosis and management. A distinction between food allergies and food intolerance or sensitivity should be made. It focuses o...

  13. Perceived lactose intolerance in adult Canadians: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Susan I

    2013-08-01

    Although double-blind studies show that lactose-intolerant individuals can consume moderate quantities of milk products without perceptible symptoms, many who perceive that they are lactose intolerant limit or avoid milk products, potentially compromising calcium and vitamin D intakes. Adult Canadians are at risk of inadequate intakes of these nutrients, but no data exist on the prevalence, correlates, and potential impact of perceived lactose intolerance among Canadians. To address this, a Web-based survey of a population-representative sample of 2251 Canadians aged ≥19 years was conducted. Overall, 16% self-reported lactose intolerance. This was more common in women (odds ratio (OR), 1.84; 95% CI, 1.46-2.33) and in nonwhites (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.24-2.58) and less common in those >50 years of age (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.56-0.90) and in those completing the survey in French (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.56-0.99). Those with self-reported lactose intolerance had lower covariate-adjusted milk product and alternative intakes (mean ± SE; 1.40 ± 0.08 servings·day(-1) vs. 2.33 ± 0.03 servings·day(-1), p lactose intolerance by sex, age, and language preference was unexpected and suggests that some groups may be more vulnerable to the perception that they are lactose intolerant. Regardless of whether lactose intolerance is physiologically based or perceptual, education is required to ensure that calcium intakes are not compromised.

  14. Lysinuric protein intolerance presenting with multiple fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Posey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI is a rare autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in SLC7A7, which encodes a component of the dibasic amino acid transporter found in intestinal and renal tubular cells. Patients typically present with vomiting, diarrhea, irritability, failure to thrive, and symptomatic hyperammonemia after protein-rich meals. Long-term complications may include pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, renal disease, and osteoporosis. We present a 5-year-old male who was followed in our skeletal dysplasia clinic for 3 years for multiple fractures, idiopathic osteoporosis, and short stature in the absence of typical features of LPI. Whole exome sequencing performed to determine the etiology of the osteoporosis and speech delay identified a nonsense mutation in SLC7A7. Chromosome microarray analysis identified a deletion involving the second allele of the same gene, and biochemical analysis supported the diagnosis of LPI. Our patient's atypical presentation underscores the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for LPI in patients with unexplained fractures and idiopathic osteoporosis, even in the absence of clinical symptoms of hyperammonemia after protein rich meals or other systemic features of classical LPI. This case further demonstrates the utility of whole exome sequencing in diagnosis of unusual presentations of rare disorders for which early intervention may modify the clinical course.

  15. Milk consumption and lactose intolerance in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Rong; Huang, ChengYu; Du, HuiZhang; Zeng, Guo; Li, Ling; Ye, Sheng

    2011-10-01

    To investigate relations between milk consumption and lactose intolerance (LI) in adults and to explore the effect of milk consumption on lactase activity. Total of 182 subjects aged 20-70 years were recruited and interviewed by questionnaires, and their accumulative cow's milk intake (AMI) was calculated. LI was evaluated by hydrogen breath test (HBT). A negative correlation was found between AMI and severity of observed LI symptom (r=-0.2884; P<0.05). Binary logistic regression analysis showed a negative correlation between LI and duration and frequency of milk consumption (OR, 0.317 and 0.465, respectively; both P<0.05) and a positive correlation between LI and amount of milk consumed per sitting (OR, 6.337; P<0.05). LI is related to various milk consumption behaviors. Most Chinese adults with LI may tolerate moderate milk consumption <160 mL. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Differentiating food allergies from food intolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guandalini, Stefano; Newland, Catherine

    2011-10-01

    Adverse reactions to foods are extremely common, and generally they are attributed to allergy. However, clinical manifestations of various degrees of severity related to ingestion of foods can arise as a result of a number of disorders, only some of which can be defined as allergic, implying an immune mechanism. Recent epidemiological data in North America showed that the prevalence of food allergy in children has increased. The most common food allergens in the United States include egg, milk, peanut, tree nuts, wheat, crustacean shellfish, and soy. This review examines the various forms of food intolerances (immunoglobulin E [IgE] and non-IgE mediated), including celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. Immune mediated reactions can be either IgE mediated or non-IgE mediated. Among the first group, Immediate GI hypersensitivity and oral allergy syndrome are the best described. Often, but not always, IgE-mediated food allergies are entities such as eosinophilic esophagitis and eosinophilic gastroenteropathy. Non IgE-mediated immune mediated food reactions include celiac disease and gluten sensitivity, two increasingly recognized disorders. Finally, non-immune mediated reactions encompass different categories such as disorders of digestion and absorption, inborn errors of metabolism, as well as pharmacological and toxic reactions.

  17. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Daniel; Frühauf, Heiko; Fried, Michael; Vavricka, Stephan R; Fox, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Lactose malabsorption is a common condition caused by reduced expression or activity of lactase in the small intestine. In such patients, lactose intolerance is characterized by abdominal symptoms (e.g. nausea, bloating, and pain) after ingestion of dairy products. The genetic basis of lactose malabsorption is established and several tests for this condition are available, including genetic, endoscopic, and H2-breath tests. In contrast, lactose intolerance is less well understood. Recent studies show that the risk of symptoms after lactose ingestion depends on the dose of lactose, lactase expression, intestinal flora, and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract. Lactose intolerance has recently been defined as symptoms developing after ingestion of lactose which do not develop after placebo challenge in a person with lactose maldigestion. Such blinded testing might be especially important in those with functional gastrointestinal diseases in whom self-reported lactose intolerance is common. However, placebo-controlled testing is not part of current clinical practice. Updated protocols and high-quality outcome studies are needed. Treatment options of lactose intolerance include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. Documenting the response to multiple doses can guide rational dietary management; however, the clinical utility of this strategy has not been tested. This review summarizes the genetic basis, diagnosis, and treatment of lactose malabsorption and intolerance. PMID:24917953

  18. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yanyong; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Dai, Ning; Fox, Mark

    2015-09-18

    Lactose intolerance related to primary or secondary lactase deficiency is characterized by abdominal pain and distension, borborygmi, flatus, and diarrhea induced by lactose in dairy products. The biological mechanism and lactose malabsorption is established and several investigations are available, including genetic, endoscopic and physiological tests. Lactose intolerance depends not only on the expression of lactase but also on the dose of lactose, intestinal flora, gastrointestinal motility, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract to the generation of gas and other fermentation products of lactose digestion. Treatment of lactose intolerance can include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. This is effective if symptoms are only related to dairy products; however, lactose intolerance can be part of a wider intolerance to variably absorbed, fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs). This is present in at least half of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and this group requires not only restriction of lactose intake but also a low FODMAP diet to improve gastrointestinal complaints. The long-term effects of a dairy-free, low FODMAPs diet on nutritional health and the fecal microbiome are not well defined. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis, biological mechanism, diagnosis and dietary management of lactose intolerance.

  19. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyong Deng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lactose intolerance related to primary or secondary lactase deficiency is characterized by abdominal pain and distension, borborygmi, flatus, and diarrhea induced by lactose in dairy products. The biological mechanism and lactose malabsorption is established and several investigations are available, including genetic, endoscopic and physiological tests. Lactose intolerance depends not only on the expression of lactase but also on the dose of lactose, intestinal flora, gastrointestinal motility, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract to the generation of gas and other fermentation products of lactose digestion. Treatment of lactose intolerance can include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. This is effective if symptoms are only related to dairy products; however, lactose intolerance can be part of a wider intolerance to variably absorbed, fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs. This is present in at least half of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and this group requires not only restriction of lactose intake but also a low FODMAP diet to improve gastrointestinal complaints. The long-term effects of a dairy-free, low FODMAPs diet on nutritional health and the fecal microbiome are not well defined. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis, biological mechanism, diagnosis and dietary management of lactose intolerance.

  20. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misselwitz, Benjamin; Pohl, Daniel; Frühauf, Heiko; Fried, Michael; Vavricka, Stephan R; Fox, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Lactose malabsorption is a common condition caused by reduced expression or activity of lactase in the small intestine. In such patients, lactose intolerance is characterized by abdominal symptoms (e.g. nausea, bloating, and pain) after ingestion of dairy products. The genetic basis of lactose malabsorption is established and several tests for this condition are available, including genetic, endoscopic, and H2-breath tests. In contrast, lactose intolerance is less well understood. Recent studies show that the risk of symptoms after lactose ingestion depends on the dose of lactose, lactase expression, intestinal flora, and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract. Lactose intolerance has recently been defined as symptoms developing after ingestion of lactose which do not develop after placebo challenge in a person with lactose maldigestion. Such blinded testing might be especially important in those with functional gastrointestinal diseases in whom self-reported lactose intolerance is common. However, placebo-controlled testing is not part of current clinical practice. Updated protocols and high-quality outcome studies are needed. Treatment options of lactose intolerance include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. Documenting the response to multiple doses can guide rational dietary management; however, the clinical utility of this strategy has not been tested. This review summarizes the genetic basis, diagnosis, and treatment of lactose malabsorption and intolerance.

  1. Glucose allostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stumvoll, Michael; Tataranni, P Antonio; Stefan, Norbert

    2003-01-01

    (insulin resistance), we propose to use the term "glucose allostasis." Allostasis (stability through change) ensures the continued homeostatic response (stability through staying the same) to acute stress at some cumulative costs to the system. With increasing severity and over time, the allostatic load......In many organisms, normoglycemia is achieved by a tight coupling of nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion in the pancreatic beta-cell (acute insulin response [AIR]) and the metabolic action of insulin to stimulate glucose disposal (insulin action [M]). It is widely accepted that in healthy...

  2. Diagnosis of genetic predisposition for lactose intolerance by high resolution melting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacour, Hervé; Leduc, Amandine; Louçano-Perdriat, Andréa; Plantamura, Julie; Ceppa, Franck

    2017-02-01

    Lactose, the principle sugar in milk, is a disaccharide hydrolyzed by intestinal lactase into glucose and galactose, which are absorbed directly by diffusion in the intestine. The decline of lactase expression (or hypolactasia) in intestinal microvilli after weaning is a normal phenomenon in mammals known as lactase deficiency. It is observed in nearly 75% of the world population and is an inherited autosomal recessive trait with incomplete penetrance. It is caused by SNPs in a regulatory element for lactase gene. In Indo-European, lactase deficiency is associated with rs4982235 SNP (or -13910C>T). The aim of this study is to describe a method based on high resolution melting for rapidly detecting genetic predisposition to lactose intolerance. Analytical performance of the assay was assessed by evaluating within and betwwen-run precision and by comparing the results (n = 50 patients) obtained with the HRM assay to those obtained with the gold standard (Sanger sequencing of the region of interest). In silico prediction of HRM curves was performed to evaluate the potential impact of the other SNPs described within the PCR product on the HRM analytical performances. The assay has good performance (CV lactose intolerance.

  3. Mini review on role of β-galactosidase in lactose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Nivetha; V, Mohanasrinivasan

    2017-11-01

    This review mainly focuses on the role and properties of β-galactosidase in lactose intolerance and its industrial application. β-Galactosidase, hydrolyses the lactose into glucose and galactose and it is most commonly used in food based technology, particularly in the dairy manufacturing industry. This catalyst mainly focus for the improvement of new and novel products with hydrolyzed lactose, which can be appropriate for the lactose-intolerant persons, to improve the technological, texture and scientific properties of non-fermented dairy products. β-Galactosidase derived from the group of saccharides which is a converting enzymes in the family of hydrolases. They are broadly distributed in the several biological living systems. The enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose is also preferred in food based technology due to the low soluble range of lactose. The concentration lactose was found to be high in fermented dairy products such as ice cream, butter, cheese curd, yogurt, etc., can prompt extreme lactose crystallization bringing about items through a coarse, abrasive surface. Lactose hydrolysis in dairy products enhances adaptability also, richness altogether. These products are extra edible. Also for this purpose, the utilization of β-galactosidase enzyme prior to the condensing operation can reduce the lactose content to a point where lactose was no longer a problem industrial application of β-galactosidase. In Industries, due to the positive and constructive effect on intestinal bacterial microflora, different types of applications are possible in β-galactosidase enzyme.

  4. Tolerance of food intolerance: a socio-cultural study of parents who have investigated food intolerance with their families

    OpenAIRE

    Golemac, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on parent perceptions about food, behaviour and the learning of their young children in a sociocultural context. It aims to provide further information to educators, parents, teachers and care providers of children, particularly in the pre-school years, about families who have investigated food intolerance and its possible role in early childhood learning. The four participants of this study are members of the Food Intolerance Network (FIN), an online discussion forum f...

  5. Minimal hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase-α activity required to sustain survival and prevent hepatocellular adenoma formation in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Mok; Kim, Goo-Young; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Mansfield, Brian C.; Chou, Janice Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia), characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis and chronic risk of hepatocellular adenoma (HCA), is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC) activity. In a previous 70–90 week-study, we showed that a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-mediated gene transfer that restores more than 3% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity in G6pc−/− mice corrects hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency with no evidence of HCA. We now examine the minimal hepatic G6Pase-α activity required to confer therapeutic efficacy. We show that rAAV-treated G6pc−/− mice expressing 0.2% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity suffered from frequent hypoglycemic seizures at age 63–65 weeks but mice expressing 0.5–1.3% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity (AAV-LL mice) sustain 4–6 h of fast and grow normally to age 75–90 weeks. Despite marked increases in hepatic glycogen accumulation, the AAV-LL mice display no evidence of hepatic abnormalities, hepatic steatosis, or HCA. Interprandial glucose homeostasis is maintained by the G6Pase-α/glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) complex, and G6PT-mediated microsomal G6P uptake is the rate-limiting step in endogenous glucose production. We show that hepatic G6PT activity is increased in AAV-LL mice. These findings are encouraging for clinical studies of G6Pase-α gene-based therapy for GSD-Ia. PMID:26937391

  6. Minimal hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase-α activity required to sustain survival and prevent hepatocellular adenoma formation in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Mok Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia, characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis and chronic risk of hepatocellular adenoma (HCA, is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC activity. In a previous 70–90 week-study, we showed that a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV vector-mediated gene transfer that restores more than 3% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity in G6pc−/− mice corrects hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency with no evidence of HCA. We now examine the minimal hepatic G6Pase-α activity required to confer therapeutic efficacy. We show that rAAV-treated G6pc−/− mice expressing 0.2% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity suffered from frequent hypoglycemic seizures at age 63–65 weeks but mice expressing 0.5–1.3% of wild-type hepatic G6Pase-α activity (AAV-LL mice sustain 4–6 h of fast and grow normally to age 75–90 weeks. Despite marked increases in hepatic glycogen accumulation, the AAV-LL mice display no evidence of hepatic abnormalities, hepatic steatosis, or HCA. Interprandial glucose homeostasis is maintained by the G6Pase-α/glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT complex, and G6PT-mediated microsomal G6P uptake is the rate-limiting step in endogenous glucose production. We show that hepatic G6PT activity is increased in AAV-LL mice. These findings are encouraging for clinical studies of G6Pase-α gene-based therapy for GSD-Ia.

  7. Statin intolerance – an attempt at a unified definition. Position paper from an International Lipid Expert Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Manfredi; Toth, Peter P.; Farnier, Michel; Davidson, Michael H.; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Athyros, Vasilis; Djuric, Dragan M.; Ezhov, Marat V.; Greenfield, Robert S.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Kostner, Karam; Serban, Corina; Lighezan, Daniel; Fras, Zlatko; Moriarty, Patrick M.; Muntner, Paul; Goudev, Assen; Ceska, Richard; Nicholls, Stephen J.; Broncel, Marlena; Nikolic, Dragana; Pella, Daniel; Puri, Raman; Rysz, Jacek; Wong, Nathan D.; Bajnok, Laszlo; Jones, Steven R.; Ray, Kausik K.; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.

    2015-01-01

    Statins are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical practice. They are usually well tolerated and effectively prevent cardiovascular events. Most adverse effects associated with statin therapy are muscle-related. The recent statement of the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) has focused on statin associated muscle symptoms (SAMS), and avoided the use of the term ‘statin intolerance’. Although muscle syndromes are the most common adverse effects observed after statin therapy, excluding other side effects might underestimate the number of patients with statin intolerance, which might be observed in 10–15% of patients. In clinical practice, statin intolerance limits effective treatment of patients at risk of, or with, cardiovascular disease. Knowledge of the most common adverse effects of statin therapy that might cause statin intolerance and the clear definition of this phenomenon is crucial to effectively treat patients with lipid disorders. Therefore, the aim of this position paper was to suggest a unified definition of statin intolerance, and to complement the recent EAS statement on SAMS, where the pathophysiology, diagnosis and the management were comprehensively presented. PMID:25861286

  8. Perception of lactose intolerance in irritable bowel syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainese, Raffaella; Casellas, Francesc; Mariné-Barjoan, Eugènia; Vivinus-Nébot, Mylène; Schneider, Stéphane M; Hébuterne, Xavier; Piche, Thierry

    2014-10-01

    The importance of lactose malabsorption in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is not well defined and these patients often complain of lactose intolerance. To objectively measure lactose malabsorption, a hydrogen breath test (HBT) can be performed, but a discrepancy emerges between the results of the HBT and the symptomatic response during the HBT. To determine in a group of IBS patients whether self-perceived lactose intolerance and the symptomatic response to lactose HBT were conditioned by other factors besides the presence of lactose malabsorption. Oral challenge to lactose (50 g) was tested in 51 IBS patients to assess HBT malabsorption and the symptomatic response to lactose intolerance was scored on a validated questionnaire. Allergological screening for common inhalants and food allergens (including cow's milk) was performed. The presence of psychological factors (e.g. anxiety, depression, fatigue) was evaluated using validated questionnaires. A total of 21 out of 51 patients (41.1%) were self-perceived to be lactose intolerant, 24/51 (47%) had a positive HBT, and 14/51 (27.4%) presented with symptoms of lactose intolerance during HBT. The serological screening for inhalant and food allergens was positive in 6/21 (28.6%) and 4/21 (19%) of patients who self-perceived lactose intolerance and in 5/14 (37.5%) and 3/14 (21.4%) in intolerant patients symptomatic during HBT. Only 1/51 (1.9%) presented evidence of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to cow's milk. Patients who experienced symptoms of lactose intolerance during HBT presented more severe IBS symptoms [326 (296-398) vs. 215 (126-295) P=0.05] and a higher score of anxiety, depression, and fatigue. Factors influencing the symptoms of lactose intolerance during HBT resulted in an increase in hydrogen produced and in the severity of IBS. In a cohort of 51 IBS patients, the symptoms of lactose intolerance during HBT were influenced by the capacity to absorb lactose and the severity of IBS. Other factors, such as

  9. Effects of Reductions of Body Fat and Regional Adipose Tissue on Glucose and Lipid Metabolism Among Eldery Japanese

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeto, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Hiroshi; Takemoto, Tai-Ichiro

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate effects of improvement of obesity on glucose and lipid metabolism, changes of body weight, skinfolds and biochemical parameters in glucose and lipid metabolism were examined through a six month health education on excercise and diet. Subjects were 20 men and 36 women aged from 48 to 87, who had overweight and/or glucose intolerance. Weight, relative weight and fat mass were significantly reduced after the program in both sexes. Circumference ratios were reduced only in women. The ...

  10. Changes in Visceral Adiposity, Subcutaneous Adiposity, and Sex Hormones in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Catherine; Dabelea, Dana; Kalyani, Rita R; Christophi, Costas A; Bray, George A; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Darwin, Christine H; Yalamanchi, Swaytha; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Golden, Sherita Hill; Boyko, Edward J

    2017-09-01

    The degree to which changes in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) relate to corresponding changes in plasma sex steroids is not known. We examined whether changes in VAT and SAT areas assessed by computed tomography were associated with changes in sex hormones [dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), testosterone, estradiol, estrone, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG)] among Diabetes Prevention Program participants. Secondary analysis of a randomized trial. Overweight and glucose-intolerant men (n = 246) and women (n = 309). Intensive lifestyle change with goals of weight reduction and 150 min/wk of moderate intensity exercise or metformin administered 850 mg twice a day or placebo. Associations between changes in VAT, SAT, and sex hormone changes over 1 year. Among men, reductions in VAT and SAT were both independently associated with significant increases in total testosterone and SHBG in fully adjusted models. Among women, reductions in VAT and SAT were both independently associated with increases in SHBG and associations with estrone differed by menopausal status. Associations were similar by race/ethnicity and by randomization arm. No significant associations were observed between change in fat depot with change in estradiol or DHEAS. Among overweight adults with impaired glucose intolerance, reductions in either VAT and SAT were associated with increased total testosterone in men and higher SHBG in men and women. Weight loss may affect sex hormone profiles via reductions in visceral and subcutaneous fat. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  11. Serum diamine oxidase activity in patients with histamine intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzotti, G; Breda, D; Di Gioacchino, M; Burastero, S E

    2016-03-01

    Intolerance to various foods, excluding bona fide coeliac disease and lactose intolerance, represents a growing cause of patient visits to allergy clinics.Histamine intolerance is a long-known, multifaceted clinical condition triggered by histamine-rich foods and alcohol and/or by drugs that liberate histamine or block diamine oxidase (DAO), the main enzyme involved in the metabolism of ingested histamine. Histamine limitation diets impose complex, non-standardized restrictions that may severely impact the quality of life of patients. We retrospectively evaluated 14 patients who visited allergy outpatient facilities in northern Italy with a negative diagnosis for IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity, coeliac disease, conditions related to gastric hypersecretion, and systemic nickel hypersensitivity, and who previously underwent a histamine limitation diet with benefits for their main symptoms. Serum diamine oxidase levels and the clinical response to diamine oxidase supplementation were investigated. We found that 10 out of 14 patients had serum DAO activityintolerance. Moreover, 13 out of 14 patients subjectively reported a benefit in at least one of the disturbances related to food intolerances following diamine oxidase supplementation. The mean value (±SD) of diamine oxidase activity in the cohort of patients with histamine intolerance symptoms was 7.04±6.90 U/mL compared to 39.50±18.16 U/mL in 34 healthy controls (P=0.0031). In patients with symptoms triggered by histamine-rich food, measuring the serum diamine oxidase activity can help identify subjects who can benefit from a histamine limitation diet and/or diamine oxidase supplementation.Properly designed, controlled studies investigating histamine intolerance that include histamine provocation are indispensable for providing insights into the area of food intolerances, which are currently primarily managed with non-scientific approaches in Italy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. SLC9B1 methylation predicts fetal intolerance of labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Anna K; Conneely, Karen N; Kilaru, Varun; Cobb, Dawayland; Payne, Jennifer L; Meilman, Samantha; Corwin, Elizabeth J; Kaminsky, Zachary A; Dunlop, Anne L; Smith, Alicia K

    2018-01-01

    Fetal intolerance of labor is a common indication for delivery by Caesarean section. Diagnosis is based on the presence of category III fetal heart rate tracing, which is an abnormal heart tracing associated with increased likelihood of fetal hypoxia and metabolic acidemia. This study analyzed data from 177 unique women who, during their prenatal visits (7-15 weeks and/or 24-32 weeks) to Atlanta area prenatal care clinics, consented to provide blood samples for DNA methylation (HumanMethylation450 BeadChip) and gene expression (Human HT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip) analyses. We focused on 57 women aged 18-36 (mean 25.4), who had DNA methylation data available from their second prenatal visit. DNA methylation patterns at CpG sites across the genome were interrogated for associations with fetal intolerance of labor. Four CpG sites (P value intolerance of labor. DNA methylation and gene expression were negatively associated when examined longitudinally during pregnancy using a linear mixed-effects model. Positive predictive values of methylation of these four sites ranged from 0.80 to 0.89, while negative predictive values ranged from 0.91 to 0.92. The four CpG sites were also associated with fetal intolerance of labor in an independent cohort (the Johns Hopkins Prospective PPD cohort). Therefore, fetal intolerance of labor could be accurately predicted from maternal blood samples obtained between 24-32 weeks gestation. Fetal intolerance of labor may be accurately predicted from maternal blood samples obtained between 24-32 weeks gestation by assessing DNA methylation patterns of SLC9B1. The identification of pregnant women at elevated risk for fetal intolerance of labor may allow for the development of targeted treatments or management plans.

  13. Extra digestive manifestations of irritable bowel syndrome: intolerance to drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poitras, Pierre; Gougeon, Alexandre; Binn, Muriel; Bouin, Mickael

    2008-08-01

    Patients with IBS frequently complain of medication side effects. The goals of this study were to assess the prevalence of drug intolerance as an extra GI manifestation in patients with IBS and to verify the association between drug intolerance and psychological comorbidity. Female patients followed in a tertiary care center completed questionnaires assessing the presence of drug intolerance as well as somatic and psychological extra GI conditions. IBS patients (Rome II criteria; n = 71) were compared to inflammatory bowel disease patients (IBD; n = 96) or to healthy controls (HC; n = 67). The relationship to psychological comorbidity was verified in two different paradigms: (1) by looking at the statistical correlation between drug intolerance and the psychological extra GI symptoms in our IBS patients, and (2) by comparing in a meta-analysis the side effects to placebo (the nocebo effect is presumably increased due to hypervigilance or amplification in psychological disorders) in IBS patients or in patients with comparable medical conditions included in various drug trials approved by Health Canada. Our results show that prevalence of drug intolerance was significantly more elevated in IBS (41% patients) than in HC (7%) or in IBD (27%); somatic and psychological extra GI symptoms were also markedly increased in IBS. In addition, drug intolerance in our IBS patients was significantly associated with somatic comorbidities such as fatigue or multiple symptoms (P mood instability, or sleep disorder. A meta-analysis revealed that the nocebo effect was not different in patients with IBS than in control patients. In conclusion, drug intolerance is a frequent extra GI manifestation of IBS that is not associated with psychological comorbidity; thus, a somatic origin must be explored.

  14. [Determination of lactose intolerance frequency in children with food allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutyra, Tomasz; Iwańczak, Barbara

    2008-10-01

    Lactose malabsorption and lactose intolerance symptoms are the most common alimentary tract disorders in children. Lactose intolerance is a result of lactase deficiency or lack of lactase and lactose malabsorption. Hypersensitivity in food allergy is connected with the presence of specific IgE (specific antibodies against some allergens) or lymphocytes. Lactose intolerance and food allergy may coexist in the same patient. The aim of this study was determination of lactose intolerance frequency in children with food allergy who were below and above 5 years of age. The number of 87 children with food allergy aged from 0.7 to 18 years were included in the study (48 boys and 39 girls). 51 patients above 5 years of age and 36 patients below 5 years of age were studied. Lactose intolerance symptoms, hydrogen breath test, activity of lactase and villous atrophy were investigated. Decreased absorption of lactose in hydrogen breath test was observed in 28% of children above 5 years of age and in 5% in younger children. Positive result of biological trial in hydrogen breath test was observed in 10% of patients who were below 5 years of age and in 26% patients above 5 years. There was no statistically significant difference in lactose intolerance frequency and in decreased activity of lactase in intestinal mucosa between these two groups. Frequent partial villous atrophy was observed in younger patients (41,38%) than in children above 5 years of age (17.86%). Lactose intolerance was observed in 10% patients who were below 5 years of age and in 26% patients above 5 years of age with food allergy. There was no statistically significant difference between these two groups.

  15. A novel botanical formula prevents diabetes by improving insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Juntao; Velliquette, Rodney A; Grann, Kerry; Burns, Charlie R; Scholten, Jeff; Tian, Feng; Zhang, Qi; Gui, Min

    2017-07-05

    extracts of mulberry leaf, fenugreek seed and American ginseng at a ratio of 1:1.3:3.4 prevented the development of insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance and T2DM. Given the rising need for effective non-drug targeting of insulin resistance and progression to T2DM, complementary and alternative nutritional strategies without intolerable side effects could have meaningful impact on metabolic health and diabetes risks.

  16. Momordica charantia maintains normal glucose levels and lipid profiles and prevents oxidative stress in diabetic rats subjected to chronic sucrose load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Padmaja; George, Saramma

    2010-06-01

    Momordica charantia L., commonly known as bitter gourd, is used as a vegetable by the Asian community in Africa. It is frequently used as an antidiabetic herb for the management of the disease in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of M. charantia on glucose level, lipid profiles, and oxidative stress in diabetic rats subjected to a sucrose load. Five normal rats and 20 diabetic rats (diabetes induced by injecting alloxan monohydrate) were used for the experiment. Diabetic rats were divided into four groups: three experimental groups that received sucrose (4 g/kg of body weight) plus graded doses of M. charantia extract and a diabetic control group that received only sucrose (4 g/kg of body weight). Normal rats were used as the normal control group and received only sucrose (4 kg/kg of body weight). The experiment was run for 30 days, after which rats were bled to assay blood glucose, lipid profiles, and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and reduced glutathione. After this, all treatments were terminated. Rats in the normal control group, diabetic control group, and experimental group 3 were subjected to observation for 30 days and were bled on day 31 to assay parameters as stated above. Results indicated that M. charantia maintained the normal glucose levels in all experimental groups, reduced triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein levels, and increased high-density lipoprotein levels. It also improved the antioxidant status, indicated by low levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and normal levels of reduced glutathione. Rats reverted to diabetic conditions and were found to be under oxidative stress after termination of treatment. This study concludes that M. charantia maintains the normal glucose level, lipid profiles, and antioxidant condition in diabetic rats against the sucrose load.

  17. Pancreatic alpha-cell dysfunction contributes to the disruption of glucose homeostasis and compensatory insulin hypersecretion in glucocorticoid-treated rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Rafacho

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid (GC-based therapies can cause insulin resistance (IR, glucose intolerance, hyperglycemia and, occasionally, overt diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms behind these metabolic disorders could improve the management of glucose homeostasis in patients undergoing GC treatment. For this purpose, adult rats were treated with a daily injection of dexamethasone (1 mg/kg b.w., i.p. (DEX or saline as a control for 5 consecutive days. The DEX rats developed IR, augmented glycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hyperglucagonemia. Treatment of the DEX rats with a glucagon receptor antagonist normalized their blood glucose level. The characteristic inhibitory effect of glucose on glucagon secretion was impaired in the islets of the DEX rats, while no direct effects were found on α-cells in islets that were incubated with DEX in vitro. A higher proportion of docked secretory granules was found in the DEX α-cells as well as a trend towards increased α-cell mass. Additionally, insulin secretion in the presence of glucagon was augmented in the islets of the DEX rats, which was most likely due to their higher glucagon receptor content. We also found that the enzyme 11βHSD-1, which participates in GC metabolism, contributed to the insulin hypersecretion in the DEX rats under basal glucose conditions. Altogether, we showed that GC treatment induces hyperglucagonemia, which contributes to an imbalance in glucose homeostasis and compensatory β-cell hypersecretion. This hyperglucagonemia may result from altered α-cell function and, likely, α-cell mass. Additionally, blockage of the glucagon receptor seems to be effective in preventing the elevation in blood glucose levels induced by GC administration.

  18. Environmental Intolerance, Symptoms and Disability Among Fertile-Aged Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuokko, Aki; Karvala, Kirsi; Lampi, Jussi; Keski-Nisula, Leea; Pasanen, Markku; Voutilainen, Raimo; Pekkanen, Juha; Sainio, Markku

    2018-02-08

    The purpose was to study the prevalence of environmental intolerance (EI) and its different manifestations, including behavioral changes and disability. Fertile-aged women ( n = 680) of the Kuopio Birth Cohort Study were asked about annoyance to 12 environmental factors, symptoms and behavioral changes. We asked how much the intolerance had disrupted their work, household responsibilities or social life. We chose intolerance attributed to chemicals, indoor molds, and electromagnetic fields to represent typical intolerance entities. Of the respondents, 46% reported annoyance to chemicals, molds, or electromagnetic fields. Thirty-three percent reported symptoms relating to at least one of these three EIs, 18% reported symptoms that included central nervous system symptoms, and 15% reported behavioral changes. Indicating disability, 8.4% reported their experience relating to any of the three EIs as at least "somewhat difficult", 2.2% "very difficult" or "extremely difficult", and 0.9% "extremely difficult". Of the latter 2.2%, all attributed their intolerance to indoor molds, and two thirds also to chemicals. As the number of difficulties increased, the number of organ systems, behavioral changes and overlaps of the three EIs also grew. EI is a heterogeneous phenomenon and its prevalence depends on its definition. The manifestations of EI form a continuum, ranging from annoyance to severe disability.

  19. [Prevalence of intolerance to salicylates in patients with nasal polyposis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Rodríguez, Jaisel Luz; Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Rodríguez-Briceño, Rodrigo Alberto; Galicia-Tapia, Jorge; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Salicylates intolerance is related to alteration in the metabolism of arachidonic acid leading to increased leukotrienes. The condition may be manifested with respiratory, skin or systemic symptoms or associated with sinonasal polyposis. Salicylates are present in anti-inflammatory drugs, cosmetics products and food. To determine the prevalence of salicylates intolerance in patients with sinonasal polyposis presenting to Clinical Immunology and Allergy and Otolaryngology Service, CMN 20 Noviembre, Mexico City. An observational, descriptive, cross sectional study included patients with sinonasal polyposis. The sample size was 49 patients, and variables were compared using STATISTICA 8.0. The prevalence of sinonasal polyposis was 4% of the study group, predominantly in females; only 24% of the population had an ideal weight, the salicylates intolerance prevalence was 53%, and the Samter triad was 31%. Sinonasal polyposis has an inflammatory disease pattern. Its pathophysiology is not yet fully established and in this study was related to obesity and persistent sinusitis. The most feared complication recurrence is associated with salicylates intolerance. The study found a slight increase of recurrence in the group of intolerance, with no statistically significant difference, possibly related to the sample size.

  20. Rapid resolution of milk protein intolerance in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazare, Farrah B; Brand, Donald A; Marciano, Tuvia A; Daum, Fredric

    2014-08-01

    Infants with milk protein intolerance are usually switched to a casein hydrolysate or amino acid-based formula, which they continue to receive until 1 year of age, when they are rechallenged with a cow's-milk or soy protein formula. To investigate whether some of these infants actually become tolerant sooner, this study gathered preliminary data for establishing an empirical timetable for the resolution of milk protein intolerance. This prospective, longitudinal cohort study enrolled infants food challenge and data collection protocol. Negative stool guaiac tests following rechallenge indicated resolution of milk protein intolerance by the time subjects reached an average age of 6.7 ± 1.0 months (mean ± standard deviation). By the age of 7 months, milk protein intolerance was resolved in 12 of the 16 infants, the remainder having resolved by 10 months. It may be reasonable to treat infants with milk protein intolerance for 2 to 3 months with a hypoallergenic formula, then rechallenge them at 6 months of age, usually without causing recurrence of the hematochezia. Rechallenging before 12 months old could result in cost savings to families and insurers.

  1. Salicylate Food Intolerance and Aspirin Hypersensitivity in Nasal Polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzedeh, Hossein; Esmaeilzadeh, Elmira; Faramarzi, Mohammad; Nabavi, Mohammad; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    A clear association between allergy and nasal polyposis (NP) is not determined and the role of food intolerance in patients with NP is not investigated by oral food challenge (OFC). To investigate the relation of salicylate food intolerance and atopy in patients with NP according to recurrence and aspirin sensitivity. A cross sectional multicenter study was done in two tertiary centers for allergy in Iran. Adult patients with NP were selected for the study that had been referred to allergy clinics. The oral aspirin challenge (OAC) test was performed to identify aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) and the OFC test was used to investigate food intolerance. Atopic evaluation was performed by skin-prick tests, nasal smear and blood eosinophil count as well as serum total IgE. One hundred and nineteen Iranian patients (female to male ratio 1.05) with NP were enrolled (mean age, 38 ± 11 years). Recurrence of nasal polyposis was 64.7%. OAC was performed in all cases; 43.79% cases had aspirin hypersensitivity. In addition, OFC tests determined that 69.9% of patients had salicylate food allergy. Salicylate food intolerance was significantly higher in NP cases with AERD than in aspirin tolerant patients (pfood intolerance was associated with AERD in nasal polyposis.

  2. Acquired intolerance to organic solvents and results of vestibular testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyntelberg, F.; Vesterhauge, S.; Fog, P.; Isager, H.; Zillstorff, K.

    1986-01-01

    Among 160 consecutive patients referred to the Clinic of Occupational Medicine, Rigshospitalet, for symptoms connected with exposure to organic solvents, 20 exhibited symptoms of acquired intolerance to minor amounts of organic solvents. Later, an additional 30 consecutive patients with symptoms of acquired intolerance were included, yielding a total of 43 men and 7 women. The characteristics of the clinical syndrome described are complaints of dizziness, nausea, and weakness after exposure to minimal solvent vapor concentrations. After having tolerated long-term occupational exposure to moderate or high air concentrations of various organic solvents, the patients became intolerant within a short period of time. Since dizziness was a frequent complaint, we tried to obtain a measure of the patients' complaints using vestibular tests. As a diagnostic test the combined vestibular tests had a sensitivity of 0.55 and a specificity of 0.87. No differences between patients with and without intolerance could be detected by the vestibular tests used. We conclude that acquired intolerance to organic solvents is a new but characteristic and easily recognizable syndrome, often with severe consequences for the patient's working ability.

  3. Expert opinion: the therapeutic challenges faced by statin intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jaideep; Martin, Seth S; Banach, Maciej

    2016-08-01

    Statin intolerance is largely defined by muscle related symptoms, leading to intolerability and cessation. The nocebo effect coupled with the challenges of diagnosing statin myopathy undermines drug adherence that is critical for achieving the benefits of lipid-lowering and cardiovascular risk reduction. A temporal relationship should be made between the initiation of therapy and development of symptoms to aid in diagnosis. The mainstay of treatment is statin cessation or statin dose reduction and evaluation of alternative causes for muscle related symptoms. Most symptoms usually resolve within 2 weeks of discontinuing therapy. The patient can be re-challenged with the same statin at a lower dose or an alternative statin. Non-statin lipid lowering therapies offer an alternative to patients who cannot tolerate statins. We discuss current guideline-focused management of patients with statin intolerance. When initiating statin therapy, attention to risk factors for statin intolerance is strongly recommended. Most patients will tolerate some degree of statin therapy; thus statin re-challenge is advisable. If alternative dosing regimens are not tolerated, non-statin medications are acceptable alternatives. To limit errors in the diagnosis of statin intolerance, improvements in clinician-patient communication about the side effects and benefits of statins should be attempted.

  4. Manipulation of the gut microbiota in C57BL/6 mice changes glucose tolerancewithout affecting weight development and gut mucosal immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Gunilla Veslemöy; Hansen, Camilla Hartmann Friis; Hufeldt, Majbritt Ravn

    2012-01-01

    glucose intolerance reminiscent of human T2D. We hypothesized that antibiotic treatment in C57BL/6 mice would have an impact on glucose tolerance without affecting weight and gut immunology. When compared to mice treated with erythromycin or the controls, treatment for five weeks with ampicillin improved...

  5. A study of the effect of aging on insulin and glucagon release during intravenous glucose tolerance tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafiez, A.A.; El-Kirdassy, Z.; Abdel-Hafez, M.A.; Megahed, G.; Ashmawy, K.R.; Ziada, A.; Sheba, E.

    1985-01-01

    Glucose intolerance in aged persons had been reported by many investigators. In this study intravenous glucose tolerance tests have been performed of 63 subjects classified into three groups (20 - 40 years, 40 - 60 years and above 60 years). With increasing age, significant increases of plasma glucose and insulin and decreases in glucose assimilation, insulin stimulating activity and insulin index were observed. No significant differences have been found in plasma glucagon levels of glucagon suppression areas so that it may be concluded that glucagon is of no importance to the reduction of glucose tolerance with aging. (author)

  6. Food allergy and food intolerance: towards a sociological agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettleton, Sarah; Woods, Brian; Burrows, Roger; Kerr, Anne

    2009-11-01

    This article asks what sociological insights an analysis of food allergy and food intolerance might afford. We outline the parameters of debates around food allergy and food intolerance in the immunological, clinical and epidemiological literatures in order to identify analytic strands which might illuminate our sociological understanding of the supposed increase in both. Food allergy and food intolerance are contested and contingent terms and it is salient that the term true food allergy is replete throughout medico-scientific, epidemiological and popular discourses in order to rebuff spurious or 'nonallergic' claims of food-related symptoms. Complexity theory is introduced as a means of gaining analytic purchase on the food allergy debate. The article concludes that the use of this perspective provides a contemporary example of the 'double hermeneutic', in that the meanings and interpretations of contemporary explanations of food allergy are both permeated by, and can be made sense of, through recourse to complexity thinking.

  7. Clinical symptoms of food allergy/intolerance in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S

    1997-01-01

    Food allergy is principally a problem in infancy and early childhood. Food allergy/intolerance may cause a broad spectrum of symptoms and signs in children, including generalized reactions, such as anaphylactic shock. Reactions are localized mainly in the gastrointestinal tract, but food allergy....../intolerance may also cause local symptoms in other organs such as the skin and the respiratory tract. About 50-70% demonstrate cutaneous symptoms, 50-60% gastrointestinal symptoms, and 20-30% respiratory symptoms. Among young children with food allergy/intolerance the majority have two or more symptoms...... with symptoms occurring in two or more organ systems. The symptoms occur primarily within a few minutes after food exposure (immediate reactions), however delayed reactions in the skin, gastrointestinal tract and lungs may also occur. Among children with symptoms suggestive of food allergy...

  8. Pulsatile insulin secretion, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satin, Leslie S; Butler, Peter C; Ha, Joon; Sherman, Arthur S

    2015-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) results when increases in beta cell function and/or mass cannot compensate for rising insulin resistance. Numerous studies have documented the longitudinal changes in metabolism that occur during the development of glucose intolerance and lead to T2DM. However, the role of changes in insulin secretion, both amount and temporal pattern, has been understudied. Most of the insulin secreted from pancreatic beta cells of the pancreas is released in a pulsatile pattern, which is disrupted in T2DM. Here we review the evidence that changes in beta cell pulsatility occur during the progression from glucose intolerance to T2DM in humans, and contribute significantly to the etiology of the disease. We review the evidence that insulin pulsatility improves the efficacy of secreted insulin on its targets, particularly hepatic glucose production, but also examine evidence that pulsatility alters or is altered by changes in peripheral glucose uptake. Finally, we summarize our current understanding of the biophysical mechanisms responsible for oscillatory insulin secretion. Understanding how insulin pulsatility contributes to normal glucose homeostasis and is altered in metabolic disease states may help improve the treatment of T2DM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pulsatile insulin secretion, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satin, Leslie S.; Butler, Peter C.; Ha, Joon; Sherman, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) results when increases in beta cell function and/or mass cannot compensate for rising insulin resistance. Numerous studies have documented the longitudinal changes in metabolism that occur during the development of glucose intolerance and lead to T2DM. However, the role of changes in insulin secretion, both amount and temporal pattern has been understudied. Most of the insulin secreted from pancreatic beta cells of the pancreas is released in a pulsatile pattern, which is disrupted in T2DM. Here we review the evidence that changes in beta cell pulsatility occur during the progression from glucose intolerance to T2DM in humans, and contribute significantly to the etiology of the disease. We review the evidence that insulin pulsatility improves the efficacy of secreted insulin on its targets, particularly hepatic glucose production, but also examine evidence that pulsatility alters or is altered by changes in peripheral glucose uptake. Finally, we summarize our current understanding of the biophysical mechanisms responsible for oscillatory insulin secretion. Understanding how insulin pulsatility contributes to normal glucose homeostasis and is altered in metabolic disease states may help improve the treatment of T2DM. PMID:25637831

  10. Pathophysiology and aetiology of impaired fasting glycaemia and impaired glucose tolerance: does it matter for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faerch, K; Borch-Johnsen, K; Holst, Jens Juul

    2009-01-01

    the transition from the prediabetic states to overt type 2 diabetes is characterised by a non-reversible vicious cycle that includes severe deleterious effects on glucose metabolism, there are good reasons to use the well-established aetiological and pathophysiological differences in i-IFG, i-IGT and IFG...... sensitivity as well as a progressive loss of beta cell function. The aetiologies of i-IFG and i-IGT also seem to differ, with i-IFG being predominantly related to genetic factors, smoking and male sex, while i-IGT is predominantly related to physical inactivity, unhealthy diet and short stature. Since...

  11. Neuroscience of glucose homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    La Fleur, S E; Fliers, E; Kalsbeek, A

    2014-01-01

    Plasma glucose concentrations are homeostatically regulated and maintained within strict boundaries. Several mechanisms are in place to increase glucose output when glucose levels in the circulation drop as a result of glucose utilization, or to decrease glucose output and increase tissue glucose

  12. [Lactose intolerance in neonates with non-infectious diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hui-Min; Jiang, Yi; Hu, Yu-Lian; Yang, Hui; Dong, Tian-Jin

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the development of lactose intolerance in neonates with non-infectious diarrhea and its association with diarrhea, and to evaluate the diagnostic values of fecal pH value and urine galactose determination for neonatal lactase deficiency. Seventy hospitalized neonates who developed non-infectious diarrhea between October 2012 and June 2015 were enrolled as the diarrhea group, and 162 hospitalized neonates without non-infectious diarrhea were enrolled as the non-diarrhea group. Test paper was used to determine fecal pH value. The galactose oxidase method was used to detect urine galactose. The neonates with positive galactose oxidase were diagnosed with lactase deficiency, and those with lactase deficiency and diarrhea were diagnosed with lactose intolerance. According to the results of urine galactose detection, 69 neonates in the diarrhea group who underwent urine galactose detection were classified into lactose intolerance group (45 neonates) and lactose tolerance group (24 neonates), and their conditions after treatment were compared between the two groups. The follow-up visits were performed for neonates with diarrhea at 3 months after discharge. Fecal pH value and positive rate of urine galactose (65% vs 54%) showed no significant differences between the diarrhea and non-diarrhea groups (P>0.05). Fecal pH value showed no significant difference between the lactose intolerance and lactose tolerance groups (P>0.05), while the neonates in the lactose intolerance group had a significantly longer time to recovery of defecation than those in the lactose tolerance group (Pintolerance tends to occur. Determination of fecal pH value has no significance in the diagnosis of lactose intolerance in neonates with diarrhea.

  13. Multiple drug intolerance syndrome: prevalence, clinical characteristics, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Eric; Ho, Ngoc J

    2012-02-01

    Population-based data on the demographics and clinical characteristics of patients with multiple unrelated drug class intolerances noted in their medical records are lacking. To provide population-based drug "allergy" incidence rates and prevalence, and to identify individuals with multiple drug intolerance syndrome (MDIS) defined by 3 or more unrelated drug class "allergies," and to provide demographic and clinical information on MDIS cases. Electronic medical record data from 2,375,424 Kaiser Permanente Southern California health plan members who had a health care visit and at least 11 months of health care coverage during 2009 were reviewed. Population-based drug "allergy" incidence rates and prevalence were determined for 23 unrelated medication classes. On January 1, 2009, 478,283 (20.1%) health plan members had at least one reported "allergy." Individuals with a history of at least 1 "allergy" and females, in general, reported higher population-based new "allergy" incidence rates. Multiple drug intolerance syndrome was present in 49,582 (2.1%). The MDIS cases were significantly older, 62.4 ± 16.1 years; heavier, body mass index 29.3 ± 7.1; and likely to be female, 84.9%, compared with average health plan members. They had high rates of health care utilization, medication usage, and new drug "allergy" incidence. They sought medical attention for common nonmorbid conditions. Multiple drug intolerance syndrome is in part iatrogenic. It is associated with overweight elderly women who have high rates of health care and medication usage. Urticarial syndromes only explain a small fraction of MDIS cases. Multiple drug intolerance syndrome is associated with anxiety, but not predominately with immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergy or life-threatening illness. Multiple drug intolerance syndrome can be managed by medication avoidance and judicious rechallenge. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  14. Coping strategies, social support and responsibility in chemical intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Maria; Andersson, Linus; Nordin, Steven

    2010-08-01

    To study coping strategies, social support and responsibility for improvement in chemical intolerance (CI). Limited knowledge of CI among health professionals and lay persons places demands on the chemically intolerant individual's coping strategies and perception of social support and ability to take responsibility for improvement. However, there is sparse literature on these issues in CI. A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based, quasi-experimental study. Fifty-nine persons with mild, 92 with moderate and 31 with severe CI participated by rating (i) usage and effectiveness of six problem- and six emotion-focused coping strategies, (ii) emotional, instrumental and informative support provided by various sources and (iii) society's and the inflicted individual's responsibility for improvement. The participants reported that the most commonly used and effective coping strategies were avoiding odorous/pungent environments and asking persons to limit their use of odorous/pungent substances (problem-focused strategies) as well as accepting the situation and reprioritising (emotion-focused strategies). High intolerance severity was associated with problem-focused coping strategies and relatively low intolerance with emotion-focused strategies. More emotional than instrumental and informative support was perceived, predominantly from the partner and other family members. Responsibility attributed to society was also found to increase from mild to moderate/severe intolerance. Certain coping strategies are more commonly used and perceived as more effective than others in CI. However, intolerance severity plays a role regarding both coping strategies and responsibility. Emotional support appears to be the most available type of support. For improved care, certain coping strategies may be suggested by nurses, the healthcare system needs to provide better social support to these patients and the issue of responsibility for improvement may be discussed with the patient.

  15. Chlorella Protein Hydrolysate Attenuates Glucose Metabolic Disorder and Fatty Liver in High-fat Diet-induced Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Naoto; Yanagita, Teruyoshi; Rahman, Shaikh Mizanoor; Ando, Yotaro

    2016-07-01

    Chlorella (Parachlorella beijerinckii) powder is reported to show a preventive effect against metabolic syndromes such as arteriosclerosis, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Approximately 60% of the chlorella content is protein. In order to understand the role of chlorella protein, we prepared a chlorella protein hydrolysate (CPH) by protease treatment. Male C57BL/6 mice were divided into three groups: a normal diet group, high-fat diet (HFD) group, and high-fat diet supplemented with CPH (HFD+CPH) group. The CPH administration improved glucose intolerance, insulin sensitivity, and adipose tissue hypertrophy in the high-fat diet-fed mice. In addition, the HFD+CPH group had significantly decreased liver total cholesterol and triglyceride levels compared with those in the HFD group. Furthermore, the HFD+CPH group had a decreased level of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in serum and a lower MCP-1 mRNA expression level in adipose tissue compared with the HFD group. The present study suggests that chlorella protein hydrolysate can prevent a high-fat diet-induced glucose disorder and fatty liver by inhibiting adipocyte hypertrophy and reducing the MCP-1 protein and gene expression.

  16. Exogenous glucose administration impairs glucose tolerance and pancreatic insulin secretion during acute sepsis in non-diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Watanabe

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The development of hyperglycemia and the use of early parenteral feeding are associated with poor outcomes in critically ill patients. We therefore examined the impact of exogenous glucose administration on the integrated metabolic function of endotoxemic mice using our recently developed frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT. We next extended our findings using a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP sepsis model administered early parenteral glucose support. METHODS: Male C57BL/6J mice, 8-12 weeks, were instrumented with chronic indwelling arterial and venous catheters. Endotoxemia was initiated with intra-arterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 mg/kg in the presence of saline or glucose infusion (100 µL/hr, and an FSIVGTT was performed after five hours. In a second experiment, catheterized mice underwent CLP and the impact of early parenteral glucose administration on glucose homeostasis and mortality was assessed over 24 hrs. MEASUREMENTS: AND MAIN RESULTS: Administration of LPS alone did not impair metabolic function, whereas glucose administration alone induced an insulin sensitive state. In contrast, LPS and glucose combined caused marked glucose intolerance and insulin resistance and significantly impaired pancreatic insulin secretion. Similarly, CLP mice receiving parenteral glucose developed fulminant hyperglycemia within 18 hrs (all > 600 mg/dl associated with increased systemic cytokine release and 40% mortality, whereas CLP alone (85 ± 2 mg/dL or sham mice receiving parenteral glucose (113 ± 3 mg/dL all survived and were not hyperglycemic. Despite profound hyperglycemia, plasma insulin in the CLP glucose-infused mice (3.7 ± 1.2 ng/ml was not higher than sham glucose infused mice (2.1 ± 0.3 ng/ml. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of parenteral glucose support and the systemic inflammatory response in the acute phase of sepsis induces profound insulin resistance and impairs compensatory pancreatic insulin

  17. Exercise intolerance in Glycogen Storage Disease Type III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Pradel, Agnès; Husu, Edith

    2013-01-01

    experience exercise intolerance due to insufficient carbohydrate oxidation in skeletal muscle. Six patients aged 17-36-years were studied. We determined VO 2peak (peak oxygen consumption), the response to forearm exercise, and the metabolic and cardiovascular responses to cycle exercise at 70% of VO 2peak...... caused exercise intolerance with dynamic skeletal muscle symptoms (excessive fatigue and muscle pain), and hypoglycemia in 4 subjects. In this study we combined anaerobic and aerobic exercise to systematically study skeletal muscle metabolism and exercise tolerance in patients with GSD IIIa. Exercise...

  18. Lysinuric protein intolerance in a 5-month-old girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viplav Narayan Deogaonkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysinuric protein intolerance (LPI, also known as cationic aminoaciduria, hyperdibasic aminoaciduria type 2, or familial protein intolerance, is an autosomal recessive defect of diamino acid transport. LPI is characterized by the inability of the body to digest and utilize certain amino acids, namely lysine, arginine, and ornithine. As a result, there is an increased excretion of these amino acids, which in turn affects the liver, the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, immune system, spleen, and organs producing blood. We report a 5-month-old girl born of third degree consanguineous marriage who presented with hepatosplenomegaly with sepsis and worsening jaundice due to LPI.

  19. Feeding Intolerance and Gastric Acid Levels of the Neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Kışlalı, Fatih Mehmet; Havan, Merve; Sarıcı, Dilek; Kılıç, Mustafa; Razi, Cem Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between feeding intolerance, a common problem at neonatal intensive care units, and gastric pH levels. The gastric fluid pH levels of the preterm and term infants with feeding intolerance has been measured and compared with those of a control group. Material and Methods: A total of forty-one preterm and term infants were included in the study (17 females, 24 males). There were 12 newborns (six preterms and six terms) in the stu...

  20. Repressive coping and alexithymia in ideopathic environmental intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI). Methods The study included participants who had previously...... participated in a general population-based study and reported symptoms of environmental intolerance (n = 787) and patients with IEI (n = 237). The participants completed questionnaires assessing IEI, namely, a measure of repressive coping combining scores on the Marlowe–Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS...

  1. Dairy Intake, Dietary Adequacy, and Lactose Intolerance12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Despite repeated emphasis in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans on the importance of calcium in the adult American diet and the recommendation to consume 3 dairy servings a day, dairy intake remains well below recommendations. Insufficient health professional awareness of the benefits of calcium and concern for lactose intolerance are among several possible reasons, This mini-review highlights both the role of calcium (and of dairy, its principal source in modern diets) in health maintenance and reviews the means for overcoming lactose intolerance (real or perceived). PMID:23493531

  2. Consumption of honey, sucrose, and high fructose corn syrup produce similar metabolic effects in glucose tolerant and glucose intolerant individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Current public health recommendations call for reduction of added sugars; however, controversy exits over whether all nutritive sweeteners produce similar metabolic effects. Objective: To compare effects of chronic consumption of three nutritive sweeteners (honey, sucrose and high fructo...

  3. On a problem of religious intolerance manifestations against neopagan organiozations in Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Smoulsky Ie.

    2013-01-01

    Author describes some aspects of religious intolerance against neopagan organizations in modern Ukraine. The phenomenon of intolerance is taken both in dimensions of confession-confession and state-confession relationships. The article discovers rich factual evidence towards mentioned problem.

  4. Aspects of western cultural, Intolerance: on the hermeneutical approach to the Mah–abh–arata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Dragonetti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are frequent manifestations of Western cultural intolerance that prevent a scientific neutral approach to the intellectual achievements of other cultures, and also to appreciate them in their actual value. The authors of this article first refer to examples of this kind of intolerance in the field of Philosophy (which has been the principal object of their last investigations, Religion (Buddhist Atheism, and Linguistics (the «discovery» of Sanskrit language by Western scholars. In the present paper they specifically deal with the hermeneutical approach by Western scholars to the Mah–abh–arata that the authors consider the most important work in World Literature: Intolerance in this matter makes scholars find in the Mah–abh–arata a real «chaos» or conduces them to the obsessive search for the «Ur-Text», giving rise to theories that eliminate large portions of the epic poem considering them interpolations, or negating it all creativity, originality, and even its Indian essence. The last part of the article is dedicated to Krsna, an avatara, i.e. a reincarnation or manifestation, of the Supreme God Visnu. Krsna is seen as «a bizarre figure», «a cynic», «an opportunist», «a charlatan, who declares himself to be the God of Gods». These Western scholars leave completely aside the Indian tradition of almost three thousand centuries that proclaims that Krsna is not a God, but the God of the Hindu people, being adored by many devoted hearts. A simple but important hermeneutical norm has been forgotten: To accept the cultural products created by another culture as they are conceived by it, and without interpreting them according to one’s one cultural criteria based on the own values and beliefs.

  5. Relative contributions of energy expenditure on physical activity, body composition and weight gain to the evolution of impaired glucose tolerance to Frank diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, T.; Wilks, R.; Jahoor, F.; Adeyemo, A.

    1999-01-01

    In modem technological societies the requirement for physical work is diminished and access to food is unrestricted. Under these circumstances a large proportion of the population will gain weight and develop obesity and diabetes. At the individual level, genetic and behavioural factors must combine to lead to an imbalance between energy intake and its expenditure. Weight gain, especially rapid weight gain in a population appears to increase the risk of diabetes sharply. Thus understanding the route to weight gain and obesity, and the modulatory effects of physical activity on development of glucose intolerance is critical to credible intervention strategies to reverse or prevent diabetes in populations especially those in transitional societies. In this proposal we will examine the quantitative importance of non-resting energy expenditure (EE) in populations with rising levels of obesity and high prevalence of diabetes. (author)

  6. Minimal cross-intolerance with nilotinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic or accelerated phase who are intolerant to imatinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhaus, Andreas; le Coutre, Philipp D.; Rosti, Gianantonio; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Jabbour, Elias; Gillis, Kathryn; Woodman, Richard C.; Blakesley, Rick E.; Giles, Francis J.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Baccarani, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Nilotinib has significant efficacy in patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP) and in patients with CML-CP or CML in accelerated phase (CML-AP) after imatinib failure. We investigated the occurrence of cross-intolerance to nilotinib in imatinib-intolerant patients with CML. Only 1/75 (1%) patients with nonhematologic imatinib intolerance experienced a similar grade 3/4 adverse event (AE), and 3/75 (4%) experienced a similar persistent grade 2 nonhematologic AE on nilotinib. Only 7/40 (18%) patients with hematologic imatinib intolerance discontinued nilotinib, all because of grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia. Ninety percent of imatinib-intolerant patients with CML-CP who did not have complete hematologic response (CHR) at baseline (n = 52) achieved CHR on nilotinib. Nilotinib induced a major cytogenetic response in 66% and 41% of patients with imatinib-intolerant CML-CP and CML-AP (complete cytogenetic response in 51% and 30%), respectively. Minimal cross-intolerance was confirmed in patients with imatinib-intolerant CML. The favorable tolerability of nilotinib in patients with imatinib intolerance leads to alleviation of AE-related symptoms and significant and durable responses. In addition to its established clinical benefit in patients with newly diagnosed CML and those resistant to imatinib, nilotinib is effective and well-tolerated for long-term use in patients with imatinib intolerance. This study is registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00471497 PMID:21467546

  7. Orthostatic intolerance and postural tachycardia syndrome as suspected adverse effects of vaccination against human papilloma virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise S; Pors, Kirsten; Theibel, Ann C

    2015-01-01

    intolerance, headache, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, and neuropathic pain starting in close relation to HPV vaccination. METHODS: Patients were referred for orthostatic intolerance following HPV vaccination. Symptoms of autonomic dysfunction were quantified by standardised questionnaire. The diagnosis...... intolerance, 94% nausea, 82% chronic headache, 82% fatigue, 77% cognitive dysfunction, 72% segmental dystonia, 68% neuropathic pain. CONCLUSIONS: In a population referred for symptoms of orthostatic intolerance and other symptoms consistent with autonomic dysfunction that began in close temporal association...

  8. [The clinical and immunological manifestations of food intolerance in obese patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentsova, T B; Gapparova, K M; Grigor'ian, O N; Vorozhko, I V; Kirillova, O O; Chekhonina, Iu G

    2012-01-01

    The clinical and immunological manifestations of food intolerance in obese patients were studied. Food intolerance was diagnosed in 32.6 and 33.4% in obese patients stage 2 and stage 3 respectively, and was basically determined by 13 proteinaceous food products. The changes in immune status in obese patients created conditions for development of food intolerance. The timely diagnose food intolerance allows to personalize the diet therapy.

  9. Food intolerance and intestinal microbiota. Whether there is a relationship between them?

    OpenAIRE

    Gubskaya, O. Yu.

    2017-01-01

    In the article the modern view on the problem of food intolerance, food intolerance relationships, and food allergy with the state of the intestinal microbiota are shown. Special attention is focused on the new therapeutic possibilities and approaches for correction of food intolerance manifestations, including the appointment of probiotics among which the Bacillus subtillis and Bacillus licheniformis is justified, effective and safe measure. Key words: food intolerance, food allergy, hypers...

  10. Effects of sugar-sweetened beverage intake on the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: the Mihama diabetes prevention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshima, Nobuko; Shimo, Miho; Miyazawa, Kae; Konegawa, Sachi; Matsumoto, Aki; Onishi, Yuki; Sasaki, Ryoma; Suzuki, Toshinari; Yano, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Kazutaka; Yamada, Tomomi; Gabazza, Esteban Cesar; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Sumida, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    In Japan, the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing for several reasons, including increased consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). However, whether SSBs cause T2DM by excess of energy production resulting in obesity remains unclear. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the effects of SSB intake on the development of T2DM in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Ninety-three subjects (30 males and 63 females) with IGT aged 40-69 y and residing in the Mihama district (southern Mie Prefecture, Japan) were included in the study. The mean observational period was 3.6 y. All subjects underwent the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and completed a lifestyle questionnaire survey related to SSB intake. OGTT results and SSB intake were evaluated before and after the observational period. In addition, the correlation between SSB intake and development of T2DM was investigated. Of the 93 subjects, 20 (21.5%) developed T2DM (T2DM group) and demonstrated a significantly high SSB intake compared with the group that did not develop the disease (non-T2DM group). The odds ratio for the incidence of T2DM based on SSB intake was 3.26 (95% confidence interval, 1.17-9.06). The body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2)) and the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-R) values was significantly higher in the T2DM group than in the non-T2DM group, while the insulinogenic indices were significantly lower in the former than in the latter group. The sum of insulin secretion levels during OGTT was not significantly different between groups. SSB intake correlated with the predisposition for developing T2DM, possibly by influencing body weight, insulin resistance, and the ability of the pancreatic beta cells to effectively compensate for the insulin resistance.

  11. A1C predicts type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in a population at risk: the community diabetes prevention project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite Silmara AO

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims In a population at risk for type 2 diabetes (T2DM, we assessed early physical and metabolic markers that predict progression from normal to impaired glucose tolerance (IGT and T2DM. Methods A total of 388 individuals (22% male, age 46 + 11 years at risk for T2DM were randomized to Standard (n = 182 or Intervention (n = 206 care and evaluated at baseline and 5 annual follow-up visits, including blood pressure, BMI, A1C, lipids, urine albumin/creatinine ratio, VO2max, fasting glucose, insulin and C-peptide. The Standard group received results of annual lab tests and quarterly newsletters, while the Intervention group received quarterly newsletters and detailed discussions of lab results, routine self-directed activities, semi-annual group meetings and monthly telephone calls for ongoing support. Results Overall, 359 (93% returned for at least one follow-up visit and 272 (70% completed the final 5-year assessment. Return rates, changes in measures and incidence of IGT/T2DM were similar between groups. Low cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max was the most prevalent baseline abnormality. A1C and BMI were significant predictors of IGT/T2DM after controlling for other factors. The risk of IGT/T2DM within 5 years was 17.16 (95% CL: 6.169, 47.736 times greater for those with baseline A1C>=5.8% as compared to those Conclusion Baseline A1C>=5.8% was a significant predictor of IGT/T2DM within 5 years in a population at high risk for T2DM. A1C is routinely performed among patients with diabetes, however these data and other evidence suggest that it may also be a useful tool for risk assessment and screening.

  12. ChREBP-Knockout Mice Show Sucrose Intolerance and Fructose Malabsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takehiro; Iizuka, Katsumi; Takao, Ken; Horikawa, Yukio; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Takeda, Jun

    2018-03-12

    We have previously reported that 60% sucrose diet-fed ChREBP knockout mice (KO) showed body weight loss resulting in lethality. We aimed to elucidate whether sucrose and fructose metabolism are impaired in KO. Wild-type mice (WT) and KO were fed a diet containing 30% sucrose with/without 0.08% miglitol, an α-glucosidase inhibitor, and these effects on phenotypes were tested. Furthermore, we compared metabolic changes of oral and peritoneal fructose injection. A thirty percent sucrose diet feeding did not affect phenotypes in KO. However, miglitol induced lethality in 30% sucrose-fed KO. Thirty percent sucrose plus miglitol diet-fed KO showed increased cecal contents, increased fecal lactate contents, increased growth of lactobacillales and Bifidobacterium and decreased growth of clostridium cluster XIVa. ChREBP gene deletion suppressed the mRNA levels of sucrose and fructose related genes. Next, oral fructose injection did not affect plasma glucose levels and liver fructose contents; however, intestinal sucrose and fructose related mRNA levels were increased only in WT. In contrast, peritoneal fructose injection increased plasma glucose levels in both mice; however, the hepatic fructose content in KO was much higher owing to decreased hepatic Khk mRNA expression. Taken together, KO showed sucrose intolerance and fructose malabsorption owing to decreased gene expression.

  13. ChREBP-Knockout Mice Show Sucrose Intolerance and Fructose Malabsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Kato

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that 60% sucrose diet-fed ChREBP knockout mice (KO showed body weight loss resulting in lethality. We aimed to elucidate whether sucrose and fructose metabolism are impaired in KO. Wild-type mice (WT and KO were fed a diet containing 30% sucrose with/without 0.08% miglitol, an α-glucosidase inhibitor, and these effects on phenotypes were tested. Furthermore, we compared metabolic changes of oral and peritoneal fructose injection. A thirty percent sucrose diet feeding did not affect phenotypes in KO. However, miglitol induced lethality in 30% sucrose-fed KO. Thirty percent sucrose plus miglitol diet-fed KO showed increased cecal contents, increased fecal lactate contents, increased growth of lactobacillales and Bifidobacterium and decreased growth of clostridium cluster XIVa. ChREBP gene deletion suppressed the mRNA levels of sucrose and fructose related genes. Next, oral fructose injection did not affect plasma glucose levels and liver fructose contents; however, intestinal sucrose and fructose related mRNA levels were increased only in WT. In contrast, peritoneal fructose injection increased plasma glucose levels in both mice; however, the hepatic fructose content in KO was much higher owing to decreased hepatic Khk mRNA expression. Taken together, KO showed sucrose intolerance and fructose malabsorption owing to decreased gene expression.

  14. Inappropriate suppression of glucagon during OGTT but not during isoglycaemic i.v. glucose infusion contributes to the reduced incretin effect in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knop, F K; Vilsbøll, T; Madsbad, S

    2007-01-01

    significant glucagon suppression only occurred following isoglycaemic i.v. glucose infusion (-63 +/- 21 vs 10 +/- 16 mmol/l x 45 min; p = 0.002). The incretin effect was significantly reduced in patients with type 2 diabetes compared with control subjects, but no significant differences in the secretion...... ingestion of glucose, while isoglycaemic i.v. administration of glucose results in normal suppression of glucagon. We suggest that this phenomenon contributes both to the glucose intolerance and to the reduced incretin effect observed in patients with type 2 diabetes.......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We investigated glucagon responses during OGTT and isoglycaemic i.v. glucose infusion, respectively, to further elucidate the mechanisms behind the glucose intolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients (eight men) with type 2 diabetes (age: 64...

  15. Prevalence, risk factors, clinical consequences, and treatment of enteral feed intolerance during critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungabissoon, Usha; Hacquoil, Kimberley; Bains, Chanchal; Irizarry, Michael; Dukes, George; Williamson, Russell; Deane, Adam M; Heyland, Daren K

    2015-05-01

    We aimed to determine the incidence of enteral feed intolerance and factors associated with intolerance and to assess the influence of intolerance on nutrition and clinical outcomes. We conducted a retrospective analysis of data from an international observational cohort study of nutrition practices among 167 intensive care units (ICUs). Data were collected on nutrition adequacy, ventilator-free days (VFDs), ICU stay, and 60-day mortality. Intolerance was defined as interruption of enteral nutrition (EN) due to gastrointestinal (GI) reasons (large gastric residuals, abdominal distension, emesis, diarrhea, or subjective discomfort). Logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for intolerance and their clinical significance. A sensitivity analysis restricted to sites specifying a gastric residual volume ≥200 mL to identify intolerance was also conducted. Data from 1,888 ICU patients were included. The incidence of intolerance was 30.5% and occurred after a median 3 days from EN initiation. Patients remained intolerant for a mean (±SD) duration of 1.9 ± 1.3 days . Intolerance was associated with worse nutrition adequacy vs the tolerant (56% vs 64%, P intolerance remained associated with negative outcomes. Although mortality was greater among the intolerant patients, this was not statistically significant. Intolerance occurs frequently during EN in critically ill patients and is associated with poorer nutrition and clinical outcomes. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  16. 75 FR 2551 - NIH Consensus Development Conference: Lactose Intolerance and Health; Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... Conference: Lactose Intolerance and Health; Notice Notice is hereby given by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the ``NIH Consensus Development Conference: Lactose Intolerance and Health'' to be held... the public. Lactose intolerance is the inability to digest significant amounts of lactose, a sugar...

  17. Cold Intolerance of the hand measured by the CISS questionnaire in a normative study population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, A.C.J; Jaquet, J-B.; Daanen, H. A M; Hovius, S.E.R.

    2006-01-01

    Cold intolerance has been recognized as one of the most disabling sequelae of upper extremity trauma, especially when neurovascular structures are involved. In this study, we aimed to describe cold intolerance in a normative study population, validate the Cold Intolerance Symptom Severity (CISS)

  18. Factors predicting walking intolerance in patients with peripheral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine which physiological variables conduce to walking intolerance in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Design. The physiological response to a graded treadmill exercise test (GTT) in patients with PAD was characterised. Setting. Patients were recruited from the Department of. Vascular ...

  19. Hemodynamic causes of exercise intolerance in Fontan patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebert, Anders; Jensen, Annette S; Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise intolerance is frequent among Fontan patients and an important determinant for quality of life. This study investigated the hemodynamic causes of impaired exercise capacity in Fontan patients with particular focus on the influence of stroke volume index (SVI) and heart rate (HR...

  20. The clinical impact of mild carbohydrate intolerance in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte Møller; Damm, P; Sørensen, B

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to study the clinical impact of mild carbohydrate intolerance in pregnant women with risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. STUDY DESIGN: This was a historical cohort study of 2904 pregnant women examined for gestational diabetes on the basis of risk factors...