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Sample records for prevents atmospheric erosion

  1. Toothpaste prevents debonded brackets on erosive enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Érico Luiz Damasceno; Pinto, Shelon Cristina Souza; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Ellwood, Roger Phillip; Pretty, Ian; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of high fluoride dentifrice on the bond strength of brackets after erosive challenge. Eighty-four enamel specimens were divided into seven groups (n = 12): WN (distilled water/no acid challenge), W3C (distilled water/3 cycles of acid challenge), and W6C (distilled water/6 cycles of acid challenge) were not submitted to dentifrice treatment. Groups RF3C (regular fluoride dentifrice/3 cycles of acid challenge) and RF6C (regular fluoride dentifrice/6 cycles of acid challenge) were treated with dentifrices containing 1450 μg F(-)/g and HF3C (high fluoride dentifrice/3 cycles of acid challenge) and HF6C (high fluoride dentifrice/6 cycles of acid challenge) were with 5000 μg F(-)/g. Acid challenges were performed for seven days. After bond strength test, there was no significant difference among groups submitted to 3 cycles of acid challenge (P > 0.05). Statistically significant difference was found between the regular and high fluoride dentifrices after 6 cycles of acid challenge (<0.05). Similar areas of adhesive remaining were found among control groups and among groups W6C, RF3C, RF6C, HF3C, and HF6C. The high fluoride dentifrice was able to prevent the reduction of bond strength values of brackets submitted to acid challenge. the high fluoride toothpaste prevents debonded brackets on erosive enamel.

  2. Toothpaste Prevents Debonded Brackets on Erosive Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érico Luiz Damasceno Barros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of high fluoride dentifrice on the bond strength of brackets after erosive challenge. Eighty-four enamel specimens were divided into seven groups (n=12: WN (distilled water/no acid challenge, W3C (distilled water/3 cycles of acid challenge, and W6C (distilled water/6 cycles of acid challenge were not submitted to dentifrice treatment. Groups RF3C (regular fluoride dentifrice/3 cycles of acid challenge and RF6C (regular fluoride dentifrice/6 cycles of acid challenge were treated with dentifrices containing 1450 μg F−/g and HF3C (high fluoride dentifrice/3 cycles of acid challenge and HF6C (high fluoride dentifrice/6 cycles of acid challenge were with 5000 μg F−/g. Acid challenges were performed for seven days. After bond strength test, there was no significant difference among groups submitted to 3 cycles of acid challenge (P>0.05. Statistically significant difference was found between the regular and high fluoride dentifrices after 6 cycles of acid challenge (<0.05. Similar areas of adhesive remaining were found among control groups and among groups W6C, RF3C, RF6C, HF3C, and HF6C. The high fluoride dentifrice was able to prevent the reduction of bond strength values of brackets submitted to acid challenge. Clinical relevance: the high fluoride toothpaste prevents debonded brackets on erosive enamel.

  3. Preventing erosion at pipeline crossings of watercourses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawatsky, L.; Arnold, G.

    1997-01-01

    Watercourses are naturally vulnerable to erosion but the risk is particularly acute after sub-soil and armour materials have been disturbed by trenching and backfilling during construction. Various types of erosion (river scour, river bed, river channel bed and river bank ) and the progressive removal of pipeline cover resulting from erosion were discussed. Methods of estimating the risk of progressive erosion, river avulsions and beaver dam scour, and methods of mitigating erosion at pipeline crossings such as deep burial, proper siting, conventional armouring, and a combination of bank toe protection, and upper bank vegetation cover, were described

  4. The prevention of wind erosion in agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaslavsky, D.

    1977-01-01

    The wind erosion is a problem over more than 80 000 hectares in the Netherlands. The damage in wind erodible areas is on the average at least 150 Dfl. per hectare per year. A lot of damages very probably pass unobserved or unreported.

  5. Does vegetation prevent wave erosion of salt marsh edges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feagin, R A; Lozada-Bernard, S M; Ravens, T M; Möller, I; Yeager, K M; Baird, A H

    2009-06-23

    This study challenges the paradigm that salt marsh plants prevent lateral wave-induced erosion along wetland edges by binding soil with live roots and clarifies the role of vegetation in protecting the coast. In both laboratory flume studies and controlled field experiments, we show that common salt marsh plants do not significantly mitigate the total amount of erosion along a wetland edge. We found that the soil type is the primary variable that influences the lateral erosion rate and although plants do not directly reduce wetland edge erosion, they may do so indirectly via modification of soil parameters. We conclude that coastal vegetation is best-suited to modify and control sedimentary dynamics in response to gradual phenomena like sea-level rise or tidal forces, but is less well-suited to resist punctuated disturbances at the seaward margin of salt marshes, specifically breaking waves.

  6. Dental formulations for the prevention of dental erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a therapeutic method for preventing and/or inhibiting dental erosion in a mammalian subject, and the provision of a dental care product for performing the method. The dental care product of the invention comprises a starch-degrading enzyme of E. C. 3.2.1.1, wherein said...... product comprises less than 1 wt.% ionic surfactant, and preferably is substantially free of endoprotease and/or lipase. The properties of the dental care product serve to prevent and/or inhibit dental erosion in a subject that typically results from repeated exposure of the patient's tooth surfaces...

  7. Aqueous Drainage Device Erosion: A Review of Rates, Risks, Prevention, and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Upneet; Hoguet, Ambika

    2018-01-01

    Aqueous drainage device tube erosions require prompt intervention to prevent endophthalmitis. As the use of drainage devices in glaucoma surgery continues to increase, recognizing and managing tube erosions is a pertinent issue. This review provides a comprehensive overview of tube erosions, including the rates of erosion with various types of patch grafts, the risk factors associated with erosion, and approaches to repair in order to counsel and treat our patients to prevent endophthalmitis.

  8. ISLSCP II Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Consumption by Continental Erosion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Continental Atmospheric CO2 Consumption data set represents gridded estimates for the riverine export of carbon and of sediments based on empirical models. All...

  9. ISLSCP II Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Consumption by Continental Erosion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Continental Atmospheric CO2 Consumption data set represents gridded estimates for the riverine export of carbon and of sediments based on empirical...

  10. Assessing the efficiency of Mediterranean ditch networks in preventing vineyards soil erosion within landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levavasseur, Florent; Bailly, Jean-Stéphane; Lagacherie, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Water erosion of cultivated soils is a threat to the sustainability of agriculture, especially in Mediterranean areas. For a long time, Mediterranean farmers have thus adopted some soil conservation practices. Actual ditch networks, which are generally associated with terraces, result from historical successive farmer settlements and are one of these soil conservation practices. By intercepting surface run-off, ditches decrease slope length and prevent soil erosion on downstream plots. However, since water erosion hazard and ditch network geometries are highly variable in vineyards landscape and since ditch building and maintaining are costly, the objective of this study was to identify and map the resulting efficiency of ditch networks in preventing soil erosion. For a given area, a ditch network efficiency is defined here as the balance between the network density, i.e. network cumulated length for a given area unit, and the erosion sensitivity over an area which measures the performance of the ditch network in limiting soil erosion. The erosion efficiency of ditch networks was thus identified using both i) computer generated ditch networks with various spatial configurations and ii) the stream power index as an erosion sensitivity indicator, computed from a DTM in which each ditch network was burned. The stream power index of the actual networks were compared with a set of generated networks whose density and topology were selected to maximize the performance in preventing soil erosion thanks to the use of a self-developed optimized stochastic network generator. For four 1 km² hillslopes, we showed that the performances of actual networks to prevent soil erosion was among the best that were obtained by simulated networks with even greater densities. Furthermore, we showed that the stream power index values that accounted for the actual ditch networks to prevent soil erosion hazard was both minimal and weakly variable in the whole study area (30 km²) at

  11. Preventing erosive risks after wildfire in Spain: advances and gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Filgueira, Cristina; Vega Hidalgo, José A.; Fontúrbel Lliteras, Teresa

    2017-04-01

    Galicia (NW Spain) is one of the most wildfire-affected areas in Western Europe and where the highest soil losses following fire are recorded in the Iberian Peninsula. During the last decade, mitigation of hydrological and erosive risk has been an important objective for researchers and forest managers. For this reason, research carried out has focused on three main issues: i) the development of operational tools to prioritize post-fire soil stabilization actions, based on soil burn severity indicators and remote sensed information, and testing of their ability to reflect degradation risk in relevant soil properties and subsequent soil erosion, ii) the development and testing of different soil stabilization treatments and their effectiveness for reducing erosion, following their application at broad scale, under the specific environmental conditions of Galicia and iii) the assessment of the performance of current erosion models as well as the development of empirical models to predict post-fire soil losses. On the other hand, the use of forest resources is an essential component of the regional incomes in NW Spain and consequently there is a pressing necessity for investigation on techniques suitable for reconciling soil conservation and sustainable use of those resources. In the framework of wildfire impacts this involve many and complex challenges. This scenario contrast with most of the Iberian Peninsula under Mediterranean influence where salvage logging is not a priority. As in other regions, post-fire hydrologic and erosive risk modeling, including threatened resources vulnerability evaluation is also a capital research need, particularly in a climate change context where dramatic changes in drivers such as precipitation, evapotranspiration and fire regime are expected. The study was funded by the National Institute of Agricultural Research of Spain (INIA) through project RTA2014-00011-C06-02, cofunded by FEDER and the Plan de Mejora e Innovación Forestal de

  12. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land-atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G L; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-06-14

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land-atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt C⋅y(-1) of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt C⋅y(-1), equivalent to 8-37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the "hotspots," largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g C⋅m(-2)⋅y(-1)), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty.

  13. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land−atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land−atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt C⋅y−1 of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt C⋅y−1, equivalent to 8–37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the “hotspots,” largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g C⋅m−2⋅y−1), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty. PMID:27247397

  14. Erosion behavior of composite Al-Cr cathodes in cathodic arc plasmas in inert and reactive atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, Robert; Mendez Martin, Francisca; Hawranek, Gerhard; Polcik, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Al x Cr 1−x composite cathodes with Al contents of x = 0.75, 0.5, and 0.25 were exposed to cathodic arc plasmas in Ar, N 2 , and O 2 atmospheres and their erosion behavior was studied. Cross-sectional analysis of the elemental distribution of the near-surface zone in the cathodes by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a modified layer for all cathodes and atmospheres. Due to intermixing of Al and Cr in the heat-affected zone, intermetallic Al-Cr phases formed as evidenced by x-ray diffraction analysis. Cathode poisoning effects in the reactive N 2 and O 2 atmospheres were nonuniform as a result of the applied magnetic field configuration. With the exception of oxide islands on Al-rich cathodes, reactive layers were absent in the circular erosion zone, while nitrides and oxides formed in the less eroded center region of the cathodes

  15. Atmospheric Pollution: Its Origins and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meetham, A. R.

    Although atmospheric pollution can be reduced or eliminated in many different ways, each way involves questions of economics, the time factor, availability of materials, priority over other urgent reforms, and individual and social psychology. To provide a basis for consideration of these questions, this book gives information not only about the…

  16. Sequence of stannous and sodium fluoride solutions to prevent enamel erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Saoirse; Mistry, Miten; Mutahar, Mahdi; Moazzez, Rebecca; Bartlett, David

    2015-12-01

    Investigate the timing of stannous (SnF2) and sodium fluoride (NaF) application with and without salivary pellicle to prevent enamel erosion. Human buccal molar enamel samples (n=120, REC ref 12/LO/1836) were randomly assigned to three groups testing SnF2 and NaF basic fluoride formulation and commercial mouthrinses with and without the presence of human saliva. Samples were randomly allocated to 2 subgroups: immersion in either fluoride for 1 min either before or after citric acid immersion (0.3%, pH 3.2, 10 min), and the cycle repeated 5 times. For human saliva group, samples were immersed in 80 ml of natural saliva for 24 h prior to the experiment. Analysis was done using non-contacting profilometry and microhardness change. Data were not normal and were log transformed. A linear model tested statistical differences between the groups. SnF2 application before erosion statistically reduced step height compared to application after erosion for all groups (solutions: 6.5 μm (±1.2), 7.5 μm (±0.8); p=0.01, mouthrinses: 3.2 μm (±0.6), 4.2 μm (±0.7); perosion increased step height compared to application after, but this was only statistically significant for the saliva group (before: 5.6 μm (±0.3) and after: 4.9 μm (±0.3); p=0.023). Presence of saliva increased microhardness change (perosion and when NaF was applied after erosion (SnF2: 156.6KHN (±32.8), 123KHN (±20.1); p=0.02. NaF: 119.5KHN (±33.5), 218KHN (±24.9), before, and after respectively). SnF2 reduced step height formation overall when compared to NaF, but particularly when applied before citric acid immersion. In contrast, NaF reduced step height when applied after citric acid immersion, but only in the presence of saliva. Stannous fluoride can be recommended over sodium fluoride to patients at risk of dental erosion and is optimally applied before erosion occurs. If sodium fluoride is to be used in the presence of saliva it is optimally applied after erosion has occurred. Copyright © 2015

  17. Effects of Different Concentrations and Excipients of Titanium Tetrafluoride on Dentin Erosion Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Taís; Ramos-Oliveira, Thayanne; Silva, Camila; Cersosimo, Maria; Turssi, Cecilia; Freitas, Patricia

    To evaluate the preventive effect of titanium fluoride (TiF4) gel and solution, in different concentrations, on dentin erosion. Of 140 root dentin slabs (3 x 3 x 1 mm) cut from 70 freshly extracted human third molars, 70 with intermediate Knoop microhardness and lowest surface curvature were selected and randomly divided into 7 groups (n = 10): G1: negative control (no treatment); G2: positive control (AmF/NaF/SnCl2 solution); G3: placebo gel (no fluoride); G4: 1% TiF4 solution; G5: 1% TiF4 gel; G6: 4% TiF4 solution; G7: 4% TiF4 gel. Samples were subjected to 10 days of erosive cycling, consisting of alternating exposures to citric acid (0.05 M, pH 2.3, 2 min, 6x/day) and remineralizing solution (pH 7.0, 90 min, between acid exposures). Each cycle consisted of a total of 6 immersions in acid per day. After 5 and 10 days of pH cycling, surface loss was assessed by optical profilometry (µm). One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05) showed that after 5 days, G7 revealed a significant reduction in surface loss compared to the other groups, while G4, G5 and G6 did not differ significantly from G1. After 10 days of erosive challenges, G7 did not differ significantly from G2 and there was no difference between G4, G5, G6 and G1. G3 showed the highest surface loss compared to all groups, except G1 and G5. The treatments tested were not able to prevent dentinal erosion, but the application of 4% TiF4 gel did reduce surface loss of dentin.

  18. An integrated approach to prevent the erosion of salt marshes in the lagoon of Venice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Barausse

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The loss of coastal habitats is a widespread problem in Europe. To protect the intertidal salt marshes of the lagoon of Venice from the erosion due to natural and human causes which is diffusely and intensely impacting them, the European Commission has funded the demonstrative project LIFE VIMINE. LIFE VIMINE aims to protect the most interior, hard-to-access salt marshes in the northern lagoon of Venice through an integrated approach, whose core is the prevention of erosion through numerous, small but spatially-diffuse soil-bioengineering protections works, mainly placed through semi-manual labour and with low impact on the environment and the landscape. The effectiveness of protection works in the long term is ensured through routine, temporally-continuous and spatially-diffuse actions of monitoring and maintenance. This method contrasts the common approach to managing hydraulic risk and erosion in Italy which is based on large, one-off and irreversible protection actions. The sustainability of the LIFE VIMINE approach is ensured by the participatory involvement of stakeholders and the recognition that protecting salt marshes means defending the benefits they provide to society through their ecological functions, as well as protecting the jobs linked to the existence or conservation of this habitat.

  19. Erosion of atmospherically deposited radionuclides as affected by soil disaggregation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claval, D.; Garcia-Sanchez, L.; Real, J.; Rouxel, R.; Mauger, S.; Sellier, L.

    2004-01-01

    The interactions of soil disaggregation with radionuclide erosion were studied under controlled conditions in the laboratory on samples from a loamy silty-sandy soil. The fate of 134 Cs and 85 Sr was monitored on soil aggregates and on small plots, with time resolution ranging from minutes to hours after contamination. Analytical experiments reproducing disaggregation mechanisms on aggregates showed that disaggregation controls both erosion and sorption. Compared to differential swelling, air explosion mobilized the most by producing finer particles and increasing five-fold sorption. For all the mechanisms studied, a significant part of the contamination was still unsorbed on the aggregates after an hour. Global experiments on contaminated sloping plots submitted to artificial rainfalls showed radionuclide erosion fluctuations and their origin. Wet radionuclide deposition increased short-term erosion by 50% compared to dry deposition. A developed soil crust when contaminated decreased radionuclide erosion by a factor 2 compared to other initial soil states. These erosion fluctuations were more significant for 134 Cs than 85 Sr, known to have better affinity to soil matrix. These findings confirm the role of disaggregation on radionuclide erosion. Our data support a conceptual model of radionuclide erosion at the small plot scale in two steps: (1) radionuclide non-equilibrium sorption on mobile particles, resulting from simultaneous sorption and disaggregation during wet deposition and (2) later radionuclide transport by runoff with suspended matter

  20. Legacy of human-induced C erosion and burial on soil–atmosphere C exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oost, Kristof; Verstraeten, Gert; Doetterl, Sebastian; Notebaert, Bastiaan; Wiaux, François; Broothaerts, Nils; Six, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Carbon exchange associated with accelerated erosion following land cover change is an important component of the global C cycle. In current assessments, however, this component is not accounted for. Here, we integrate the effects of accelerated C erosion across point, hillslope, and catchment scale for the 780-km2 Dijle River catchment over the period 4000 B.C. to A.D. 2000 to demonstrate that accelerated erosion results in a net C sink. We found this long-term C sink to be equivalent to 43% of the eroded C and to have offset 39% (17–66%) of the C emissions due to anthropogenic land cover change since the advent of agriculture. Nevertheless, the erosion-induced C sink strength is limited by a significant loss of buried C in terrestrial depositional stores, which lagged the burial. The time lag between burial and subsequent loss at this study site implies that the C buried in eroded terrestrial deposits during the agricultural expansion of the last 150 y cannot be assumed to be inert to further destabilization, and indeed might become a significant C source. Our analysis exemplifies that accounting for the non–steady-state C dynamics in geomorphic active systems is pertinent to understanding both past and future anthropogenic global change. PMID:23134723

  1. Best management practices to reduce and prevent water pollution with herbicides from run-off and erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehring, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The natural phenomenon of run-off and erosion lead to unpreventable pesticide water pollution in case of extreme weather conditions. In this relationship the use of herbicides involves a higher risk than other pesticides because of the specific terms of application. Directive 2009/128/EC for the sustainable use of pesticides aspires to enhanced water protection. German national action plan contains quantitative objectives which require strong reduction of water pollution by run-off and erosion of pesticides and accordingly herbicides. The European TOPPS prowadis project developed a consolidated and basic diagnosis concept for the first time to determine the field specific run-off risk. Compatible mitigation measures were linked to specific risk scenarios. Risk diagnosis and suitable mitigation measures determine best management practices for the prevention of run-off and erosion. Different new diagnosis methods and the implementation are presented. Further documents and information are available on the web [http://www.topps-life.org/].

  2. Space weather events at Mars: atmospheric erosion during solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Shannon; Luhmann, Janet; Dong, Chuanfei; Thiemann, Ed; Gruesbeck, Jacob; Lee, Christina; DiBraccio, Gina A.; Ma, Yingjuan; Brain, David; Halekas, Jasper; Espley, Jared R.; Connerney, John E. P.

    2017-10-01

    The early Sun played a major role in the evolution of terrestrial atmospheres, with extreme EUV and X-ray fluxes, as well as a more intense solar wind and higher occurrences of powerful solar transient events. The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission has been observing the upper atmosphere and magnetic topology of Mars, and has made numerous measurements of solar transient events such as Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) and Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs) since November 2014. These events are characterized by dramatic changes in dynamic pressure, magnetic field strength and substantial increases in escaping and precipitating planetary ions. We will present MAVEN observations of ICMEs and SIRs and show three of the strongest solar transient events observed during solar cycle 24. We will also present global MHD and test particle simulations of these events and discuss their influence on the magnetic topology and atmospheric escape rates at Mars. Finally, using observations of the magnitude and frequency of M and X class flares at younger, Sun-like stars, we have extrapolated the frequency of ICMEs at earlier stages of the Sun and will present simulations of the Mars-early solar wind interaction. The extreme conditions in the Sun’s early history may have had a significant influence on the evolution of the Martian atmosphere and may also have implications for exoplanets interacting with the stellar winds of younger, more active stars.

  3. Study to compare the performance of two designs to prevent river bend erosion in Arctic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Messing with Mother Nature takes knowledge and work, and she is hard to outfox, especially when it comes to redirecting rivers. To : protect infrastructure, however, sometimes river flow must be altered. This study focuses on two erosion-control proj...

  4. Integrating atmospheric deposition, soil erosion and sewer transport models to assess the transfer of traffic-related pollutants in urban areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, Yi; Bonhomme, Celine; Bout, Bastian Van den; Jetten, V.G.; Chebbo, Ghassan

    2017-01-01

    For the first time, this paper develops an integrated and spatially-distributed modelling approach, linking atmospheric deposition, soil erosion and sewer transport models, to assess the transfer of traffic-related pollutants in urban areas. The modelling system is applied to a small urban catchment

  5. Use of dentifrices to prevent erosive tooth wear: harmful or helpful?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Magalhães

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is the loss of dental hard tissues caused by non-bacterial acids. Due to acid contact, the tooth surface becomes softened and more prone to abrasion from toothbrushing. Dentifrices containing different active agents may be helpful in allowing rehardening or in increasing surface resistance to further acidic or mechanical impacts. However, dentifrices are applied together with brushing and, depending on how and when toothbrushing is performed, as well as the type of dentifrice and toothbrush used, may increase wear. This review focuses on the potential harmful and helpful effects associated with the use of dentifrices with regard to erosive wear. While active ingredients like fluorides or agents with special anti-erosive properties were shown to offer some degree of protection against erosion and combined erosion/abrasion, the abrasive effects of dentifrices may increase the surface loss of eroded teeth. However, most evidence to date comes from in vitro and in situ studies, so clinical trials are necessary for a better understanding of the complex interaction of active ingredients and abrasives and their effects on erosive tooth wear.

  6. Prevention of erosive/abrasive enamel wear due to orange juice modified with dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegehaupt, Fj; Günthart, N; Sener, B; Attin, T

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the erosive/abrasive enamel wear after contact with orange juices modified with different dietary supplements. A total of 96 bovine enamel samples were prepared and allocated to eight groups (1-8; n = 12). Samples were eroded (120 s) in 200 ml of the following eight solutions: 1: water (control), 2: orange juice, 3: water + calcium effervescent tablet, 4: orange juice + calcium effervescent tablet, 5: water + 0.75 g acid/base regulating powder (Probase), 6: water + 0.375 g Probase, 7: orange juice + 0.75 g Probase and 8: orange juice + 0.375 g Probase. After erosion, the samples were brushed with 40 brushing strokes (load 2.5 N). Enamel wear was measured using surface profilometry after 20 and 40 cycles of erosion/abrasion respectively. Highest mean enamel wear (± SD) after 20 and 40 cycles of erosion/abrasion was observed for the unmodified orange juice (group 2) (0.605 ± 0.240 μm; 1.375 ± 0.496 μm respectively). The enamel wear in all other groups (3-8) was significantly lower (P abrasive enamel wear induces by orange juice and tooth brushing could be reduced significantly by modification with free available dietary supplements. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Sonic anemometry and sediment traps to evaluate the effectiveness of windbreaks in preventing wind erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro López

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present work analyzes the effectiveness of windbreaks against wind erosion through the study of streamline patterns and turbulent flow by means of sonic anemometry and sediment traps. To this end, windbreaks composed of plastic meshes (7.5 m long and 0.7 m tall were used. Windbreaks are a good means to reduce wind erosion, as they produce a positive effect on the characteristics of air currents that are related to wind erosion processes. Due to their ease of installation and dismantling, plastic meshes are widely used in areas where they are not required permanently. In our study, the use of a mesh of 13 × 30 threads cm−2 and 39 % porosity resulted in an average reduction of 85 % in face velocity at a height of 0.4 m and a distance of 1 m from the windbreak. The turbulence intensity i increased behind the windbreak because the reduction of mean of air speed on the leeside caused by the flow of air through the windbreak. Fluctuation levels, however, remained stable. The mean values of turbulence kinetic energy k decreased by 65 % to 86 % at a distance of 1 m from the windbreak and at a height of 0.4 m. The windbreak reduces erosion and sediment transportation 2 m downwind (2.9 times the windbreak height. Nevertheless, sediment transportation was not reduced at a height of 1.0 m and the effect of the windbreak was not observed at a distance of 6 m downwind (8.6 m times the windbreak height.

  8. Research on the Structure, Quality and Measures to Prevent and Combat Soil Erosion in the Village Stejaru from Teleorman County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Popa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is part of a research project on the influence of agro-livestock activities on surface water quality inTeleorman County. The paper presents structure, quality and measures to prevent and combat soil erosion in relationto agro-livestock activities in this area. The paper presents structure, quality and measures to prevent and combat soilerosion in relation to agro-livestock activities in this area. The research has been done in the whole locality, and tooksoil samples to determine the type and soil texture and soil supply status with major nutrients (N, P, K. Based onthese results and knowing the types of main crops and livestock structure, at Stejaru level, recommendations weremade about avoiding the risks of pollution of surface water by nitrates from agricultural and livestock activities.

  9. Effect of pretreatment with an Er:YAG laser and fluoride on the prevention of dental enamel erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis Derceli, Juliana; Faraoni-Romano, Juliana Jendiroba; Azevedo, Danielle Torres; Wang, Linda; Bataglion, César; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Er:YAG laser and its association with fluoride (1.23% acidulate phosphate fluoride gel) on the prevention of enamel erosion. Sixty specimens were obtained from bovine enamel (4 × 4 mm), which were ground flat, polished, and randomly divided into five groups according to the preventive treatments: control-fluoride application; L--Er:YAG laser; L+F--laser + fluoride; F+L--fluoride + laser; L/F--laser/fluoride simultaneously. Half of the enamel surface was covered with nail varnish (control area), and the other half was pretreated with one of the preventive strategies to subsequently be submitted to erosive challenge. When the laser was applied, it was irradiated for 10 s with a focal length of 4 mm and 60 mJ/2 Hz. Fluoride gel was applied for 4 min. Each specimen was individually exposed to regular Coca-Cola® for 1 min, four times/day, for 5 days. Wear analysis was performed with a profilometer, and demineralization was assessed with an optical microscope. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (wear)/Dunn test and ANOVA/Fisher's exact tests. The group L/F was similar to control group. The other groups showed higher wear, which did not present differences among them. In the demineralization assessment, the groups F+L and L/F showed lower demineralization in relation to the other groups. It can be concluded that none preventive method was able to inhibit dental wear. The treatments L/F and F+L showed lower enamel demineralization.

  10. Application of Coal Ash to Postmine Land for Prevention of Soil Erosion in Coal Mine in Indonesia: Utilization of Fly Ash and Bottom Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Matsumoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the number of coal-fired power plants with the increase in coal production and its consumption has caused the problem of the treatment of a large amount of coal ash in Indonesia. In the past studies, coal ash was applied to postmine land with the aim of improving soil conditions for plant growth; however, heavy rain in the tropical climate may cause soil erosion with the change in soil conditions. This study presents the effects of application of coal ash to postmine land on soil erosion by performing the artificial rainfall test as well as physical testing. The results indicate that the risk of soil erosion can be reduced significantly by applying the coal ash which consists of more than 85% of sand to topsoil in the postmine land at the mixing ratio of over 30%. Additionally, they reveal that not only fine fractions but also microporous structures in coal ash enhance water retention capacity by retaining water in the structure, leading to the prevention of soil erosion. Thus, the risk of soil erosion can be reduced by applying coal ash to topsoil in consideration of soil composition and microporous structure of coal ash.

  11. 7Be in soil, deposited dust and atmospheric air and its using to infer soil erosion along Alexandria region, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, I H; Abdel-Halim, A A

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated the radioactivity behavior of 7 Be in surface soil, airborne and deposited dust along Alexandria region in Egypt. The results obtained were used to predict scavenging processes of 7 Be from surface soil to infer soil erosion and land vulnerable to accelerated sea-level rise. The areal activity concentrations of 7 Be in surface soil were investigated in 30 undisturbed sites and 7 Be inventories were determined via deposited dust in 10 locations. Results of the former were found to be ranged from 78 Bq/m 2 to 104 Bq/m 2 . High levels were observed in western sites associated with high dust deposition rate. On the other hand, low levels were found in the eastern sites, those may be attributed to scavenging processes such as land erosion toward the direction to the sea. The effective removal rates of 7 Be were calculated using the box-model, showing a broad special trend of inventories generally decreasing eastwards. The scavenging rates were ranged between 3.13 yr -1 in western sites to 5.34 yr -1 in eastern ones which denote that the east of the city suffers from rapid soil erosion. The airborne 7 Be was monthly monitored along the period from October 2014 to September 2015 through one site located at the mid of the city. The results revealed lower values in winter and autumn than in summer and spring ranged between 6.2 mBq/m 3 and 10.5 mBq/m 3 . These levels are comparable with that in other world regions and the seasonal variations are associated with the prevailing climatic conditions in Alexandria region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeting Atp6v1c1 Prevents Inflammation and Bone Erosion Caused by Periodontitis and Reveals Its Critical Function in Osteoimmunology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Li

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease (Periodontitis is a serious disease that affects a majority of adult Americans and is associated with other systemic diseases, including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and other inflammatory diseases. While great efforts have been devoted toward understanding the pathogenesis of periodontitis, there remains a pressing need for developing potent therapeutic strategies for targeting this pervasive and destructive disease. In this study, we utilized novel adeno-associated virus (AAV-mediated Atp6v1c1 knockdown gene therapy to treat bone erosion and inflammatory caused by periodontitis in mouse model. Atp6v1c1 is a subunit of the V-ATPase complex and regulator of the assembly of the V0 and V1 domains of the V-ATPase complex. We demonstrated previously that Atp6v1c1 has an essential function in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. We hypothesized that Atp6v1c1 may be an ideal target to prevent the bone erosion and inflammation caused by periodontitis. To test the hypothesis, we employed AAV RNAi knockdown of Atp6v1c1 gene expression to prevent bone erosion and gingival inflammation simultaneously. We found that lesion-specific injection of AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 into the periodontal disease lesions protected against bone erosion (>85% and gingival inflammation caused by P. gingivalis W50 infection. AAV-mediated Atp6v1c1 knockdown dramatically reduced osteoclast numbers and inhibited the infiltration of dendritic cells and macrophages in the bacteria-induced inflammatory lesions in periodontitis. Silencing of Atp6v1c1 expression also prevented the expressions of osteoclast-related genes and pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Our data suggests that AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 treatment can significantly attenuate the bone erosion and inflammation caused by periodontitis, indicating the dual function of AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 as an inhibitor of bone erosion mediated by osteoclasts, and as an inhibitor of inflammation through down-regulation of pro

  13. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  14. Saliva and dental erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  15. Comparison of proton pump inhibitor and histamine-2 receptor antagonist in the prevention of recurrent peptic ulcers/erosions in long-term low-dose aspirin users: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Chi; Li, Yun-Da; Chiang, Po-Hung; Tsay, Feng-Woei; Chan, Hoi-Hung; Tsai, Wei-Lun; Tsai, Tzung-Jiun; Wang, E-Ming; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Lai, Kwok-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitor and histamine-2 receptor antagonist can prevent aspirin-related ulcers/erosions but few studies compare the efficacy of these two agents. Aims. We evaluated the efficacy of omeprazole and famotidine in preventing recurrent ulcers/erosions in low-dose aspirin users. The 24-week clinical outcomes of the patients using low-dose aspirin for cardiovascular protection with a history of ulcers/erosions and cotherapy of omeprazole or famotidine were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms, recurrent ulcers/erosions, erosive esophagitis, gastrointestinal bleeding, and thromboembolic events was analyzed. A total of 104 patients (famotidine group, 49 patients; omeprazole group, 55 patients) were evaluated. Famotidine group had more gastrointestinal symptoms episodes than omeprazole group (46.9% versus 23.6%, P=0.01). Fifteen famotidine group patients and 5 omeprazole group patients had recurrent ulcers/erosions (30.6% versus 9.1%, P=0.005). Lanza scale was significantly lower in omeprazole group than in famotidine group (1.2±0.7 versus 1.7±1.1, P=0.008). Only 1 famotidine group patient had ulcer bleeding. The incidences of erosive esophagitis and thromboembolic events were comparable between both groups. Omeprazole was superior to famotidine with less gastrointestinal symptoms and recurrent ulcers/erosions in patients using 24-week low-dose aspirin. The risk of erosive esophagitis, gastrointestinal bleeding, and thromboembolic events was similar between both groups.

  16. Deficiency of Cathepsin K prevents inflammation and bone erosion in rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis and reveals its shared osteoimmune role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yun; Wang, Min; Jules, Joel; Zhou, Xuedong; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Using RA and periodontitis mouse models, we demonstrated that RA and periodontitis share many pathological features, such as deregulated cytokine production, increased immune-cell infiltration, increased expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), and enhanced osteoclast activity and bone erosion. We revealed that genetic deletion of Cathepsin K (Ctsk) caused a radical reduction in inflammation and bone erosion within RA joint capsules and periodontal lesions, a drastic decrease in immune-cell infiltration, and a significant reduction in osteoclasts, macrophages, dendritic and T-cells. Deficiency of Ctsk greatly decreased the expression of TLR-4, 5, and 9 and their downstream cytokines in periodontal gingival epithelial lesions and synovial RA lesions. Hence, Ctsk may be targeted to treat RA and periodontitis simultaneously due to its shared osteoimmune role. PMID:25896020

  17. A Study of Cavitation Erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiromu Isaka; Masatsugu Tsutsumi; Tadashi Shiraishi; Hiroyuki Kobayashi

    2002-01-01

    The authors performed experimental study for the purpose of the following two items from a viewpoint of cavitation erosion of a cylindrical orifice in view of a problem at the letdown orifice in PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor). 1. To get the critical cavitation parameter of the cylindrical orifice to establish the design criteria for prevention of cavitation erosion, and 2. to ascertain the erosion rate in such an eventuality that the cavitation erosion occurs with the orifice made of stainless steel with precipitation hardening (17-4-Cu hardening type stainless steel), so that we confirm the appropriateness of the design criteria. Regarding the 1. item, we carried out the cavitation tests to get the critical cavitation parameters inside and downstream of the orifice. The test results showed that the cavitation parameter at inception is independent of the length or the diameter of the orifice. Moreover, the design criteria of cavitation erosion of cylindrical orifices have been established. Regarding the 2. item, we tested the erosion rate under high-pressure conditions. The cavitation erosion actually occurred in the cylindrical orifice at the tests that was strongly resemble to the erosion occurred at the plant. It will be seldom to reproduce resemble cavitation erosion in a cylindrical orifice with the hard material used at plants. We could establish the criteria for preventing the cavitation erosion from the test results. (authors)

  18. Erosive gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, S.H.; Conrad, C.; Kjoergaad, J.

    1982-01-01

    Erosive gastritis is a well-defined radiologic and endoscopic entity. It is one of the common causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, yet it is seldom diagnosed and often confused with a number of other diseases. This communication re-emphasizes the characteristic endoscopic and radiologic features of erosive gastritis and its differential diagnosis. Two representative cases are reported. (orig.)

  19. Comparison of Proton Pump Inhibitor and Histamine-2 Receptor Antagonist in the Prevention of Recurrent Peptic Ulcers/Erosions in Long-Term Low-Dose Aspirin Users: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chi Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Proton pump inhibitor and histamine-2 receptor antagonist can prevent aspirin-related ulcers/erosions but few studies compare the efficacy of these two agents. Aims. We evaluated the efficacy of omeprazole and famotidine in preventing recurrent ulcers/erosions in low-dose aspirin users. Methods. The 24-week clinical outcomes of the patients using low-dose aspirin for cardiovascular protection with a history of ulcers/erosions and cotherapy of omeprazole or famotidine were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms, recurrent ulcers/erosions, erosive esophagitis, gastrointestinal bleeding, and thromboembolic events was analyzed. Results. A total of 104 patients (famotidine group, 49 patients; omeprazole group, 55 patients were evaluated. Famotidine group had more gastrointestinal symptoms episodes than omeprazole group (46.9% versus 23.6%, P=0.01. Fifteen famotidine group patients and 5 omeprazole group patients had recurrent ulcers/erosions (30.6% versus 9.1%, P=0.005. Lanza scale was significantly lower in omeprazole group than in famotidine group (1.2±0.7 versus 1.7±1.1, P=0.008. Only 1 famotidine group patient had ulcer bleeding. The incidences of erosive esophagitis and thromboembolic events were comparable between both groups. Conclusions. Omeprazole was superior to famotidine with less gastrointestinal symptoms and recurrent ulcers/erosions in patients using 24-week low-dose aspirin. The risk of erosive esophagitis, gastrointestinal bleeding, and thromboembolic events was similar between both groups.

  20. Macro impact of the law on prevention and control of atmospheric pollution on power industry development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z. [State Power Corporation (China). Dept. of Science, Technology and Environment

    2001-07-01

    The newly revised and enlarged main contents of China's Law of Prevention and Control of Atmospheric Pollution, which came into force on 1 September 2000, are described. The macro impacts of the law on the power industry development are analyzed mainly in respect to power demand and readjustment of power structure and layout, clean production and pollution control level, scientific management of environmental protection, in accordance with law as well as changes of construction and operation costs. Several questions worthy to be noted in course of implementation of the new law are enumerated. 1 tab.

  1. Start-up circuit upgrading to reduce the erosion of the rotor blades of the last stages of steam turbines and prevent the mass strips of stellite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhko, V. V.; Gorin, A. V.; Zaitsev, I. V.; Kovalev, I. A.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G.; Lomagin, S. N.; Chernov, V. P.

    2017-03-01

    At turbine starts with low steam flow rates in idle mode, the low-pressure rotor blades consume energy, causing the ventilation heating of the stages and creating higher depression in them than in the condenser. This leads to the return steam flows in the exhaust of the low-pressure cylinder (LPC), reducing the heat due to the moisture of starting steam damps and cooling injections. It is shown that, as a result of upgrading with the transition to fully milled shroud platforms of rotor blades, the depression in the stages decreases and their cooling efficiency is reduced due to the removal of an elastic turn of the rotor blades under the action of centrifugal forces and seal of them by periphery. Heating the rotor blades of the last stages exceeds the temperature threshold of soldering resistance of stellite plates (150°C), and their mass strips begin. The start-up circuit providing both the temperature retention of the last stages lower the soldering resistance threshold due to overwetting the steam damps up to saturation condition and the high degree of removal from the dump steam of excessive erosive-dangerous condensed moisture was proposed, applied, and tested at the operating power unit. The investment in the development and application of the new start-up circuit are compensated in the course of a year owing to guaranteed prevention of the strips of stellite plates that lengthens the service life of the rotor blades of the last stages as well as increase of the rotor blade efficiency due to the sharp decrease of erosive wear of the profiles and reduction of their surface roughness. This reduces the annual consumption of equivalent fuel by approximately 1000 t for every 100 MW of installed capacity.

  2. Thermomechanical Erosion Modelling of Baydaratskaya Bay, Russia with COSMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearson, S.G.; Lubbad, R; Le, T.M.H.; Nairn, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Rapid coastal erosion threatens Arctic coastal infrastructure, including communities and industrial installations. Erosion of permafrost depends on numerous processes, including thermal and mechanical behaviour of frozen and unfrozen soil, nearshore hydrodynamics, atmospheric forcing, and the

  3. Trends in rainfall erosivity in NE Spain at annual, seasonal and daily scales, 1955–2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Beguería

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall erosivity refers to the ability of precipitation to erode soil, and depends on characteristics such as its total volume, duration, and intensity and amount of energy released by raindrops. Despite the relevance of rainfall erosivity for soil degradation prevention, very few studies have addressed its spatial and temporal variability. In this study the time variation of rainfall erosivity in the Ebro Valley (NE Spain is assessed for the period 1955–2006. The results show a general decrease in annual and seasonal rainfall erosivity, which is explained by a decrease of very intense rainfall events whilst the frequency of moderate and low events increased. This trend is related to prevailing positive conditions of the main atmospheric teleconnection indices affecting the West Mediterranean, i.e. the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO, the Mediterranean Oscillation (MO and the Western Mediterranean Oscillation (WeMO.

  4. Identifying the Areas Benefitting from the Prevention of Wind Erosion by the Key Ecological Function Area for the Protection of Desertification in Hunshandake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xiao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on the spatial flow of ecosystem services can help to identify the spatial relationships between service-providing areas (SPAs and service-benefitting areas (SBAs. In this study, we used the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT model to stimulate the flow paths of the wind erosion prevented by ecosystems in Hunshandake, China. By interpolating these paths, the SBAs were identified, and their benefits in terms of land cover, population, and Gross Domestic Product (GDP were determined. The results indicated that the flow paths mostly extended to the eastern part of the study area, and the estimated cover of the SBAs was 39.21% of the total area of China. The grid cells through which many (≥10% of the trajectories passed were mainly located in the western part of north-eastern China and the eastern part of northern China. The benefitting population accounted for 74.51% of the total population of China, and the GDP was 67.11% of the total in 2010. Based on this research, we described a quantitative relationship between the SPAs and the SBAs and identified the actual beneficiaries. This work may provide scientific knowledge that can be used by decision makers to develop management strategies, such as ecological compensation to mitigate damage from sandstorms in the study area.

  5. Erhversbetinget erosion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Gjørup, Hans; Nyvad, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Baggrund – I forbindelse med dental erosion er en grundig udredning af patienten vigtig, således at årsagen til erosionernes opståen findes, og der kan iværksættes adækvat forebyggende indsats. En sådan udredning er ikke mindst vigtig, når arbejdsmiljøet mistænkes. Patienttilfælde – En 30-årig...... arbejdsskade, men ikke anerkendt, da erosioner ikke er optaget på Arbejdsskadestyrelsens liste over erhvervssygdomme. En systematisk registrering af lignende tilfælde kunne imidlertid på sigt ændre retspraksis for fremtidige patienter med arbejdsbetinget erosion....

  6. Quantifying the erosion effect on current carbon budget of European agricultural soils at high spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugato, Emanuele; Paustian, Keith; Panagos, Panos; Jones, Arwyn; Borrelli, Pasquale

    2016-05-01

    The idea of offsetting anthropogenic CO2 emissions by increasing global soil organic carbon (SOC), as recently proposed by French authorities ahead of COP21 in the 'four per mil' initiative, is notable. However, a high uncertainty still exits on land C balance components. In particular, the role of erosion in the global C cycle is not totally disentangled, leading to disagreement whether this process induces lands to be a source or sink of CO2. To investigate this issue, we coupled soil erosion into a biogeochemistry model, running at 1 km(2) resolution across the agricultural soils of the European Union (EU). Based on data-driven assumptions, the simulation took into account also soil deposition within grid cells and the potential C export to riverine systems, in a way to be conservative in a mass balance. We estimated that 143 of 187 Mha have C erosion rates 0.45 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1). In comparison with a baseline without erosion, the model suggested an erosion-induced sink of atmospheric C consistent with previous empirical-based studies. Integrating all C fluxes for the EU agricultural soils, we estimated a net C loss or gain of -2.28 and +0.79 Tg yr(-1) of CO2 eq, respectively, depending on the value for the short-term enhancement of soil C mineralization due to soil disruption and displacement/transport with erosion. We concluded that erosion fluxes were in the same order of current carbon gains from improved management. Even if erosion could potentially induce a sink for atmospheric CO2, strong agricultural policies are needed to prevent or reduce soil erosion, in order to maintain soil health and productivity. © 2015 The Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma and decontamination. Can it contribute to preventing hospital-acquired infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, N; Cahill, O; Daniels, S; Galvin, S; Humphreys, H

    2014-10-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) affect ∼4.5 million patients in Europe alone annually. With the ever-increasing number of 'multi-resistant' micro-organisms, alternative and more effective methods of environmental decontamination are being sought as an important component of infection prevention and control. One of these is the use of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) systems with clinical applications in healthcare facilities. CAPPs have been shown to demonstrate antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral properties and have been adopted for other uses in clinical medicine over the past decade. CAPPs vary in their physical and chemical nature depending on the plasma-generating mechanism (e.g. plasma jet, dielectric barrier discharge, etc.). CAPP systems produce a 'cocktail' of species including positive and negative ions, reactive atoms and molecules (e.g. atomic oxygen, ozone, superoxide and oxides of nitrogen), intense electric fields, and ultraviolet radiation (UV). The effects of these ions have been studied on micro-organisms, skin, blood, and DNA; thus, a range of possible applications of CAPPs has been identified, including surface decontamination, wound healing, biofilm removal, and even cancer therapy. Here we evaluate plasma devices, their applications, mode of action and their potential role specifically in combating HCAIs on clinical surfaces. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Puerto Rico Relative Erosion Potential (REP) - 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The relative erosion potential is an indicator of sediment and pollution runoff from land based on slope, soil type, land cover (circa 2000) and (maximum monthly)...

  9. Puerto Rico Relative Vulnerability to Erosion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical factors, such as the slope of the land, the texture of the soil, and the precipitation regime influence erosion in an area. Parts of Puerto Rico are very...

  10. Puerto Rico Relative Erosion Potential (REP) - 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The relative erosion potential is an indicator of sediment and pollution runoff from land based on slope, soil type, land cover (circa 1990) and (maximum monthly)...

  11. DENTAL EROSION IN PRIMARY DENTITION- A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafi Shaik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The pattern of oral diseases has been influenced by ever changing human lifestyle. Tooth wear especially dental erosion has drawn increasing attention as risk factor for tooth damage or loss in recent years. It is a common condition in primary dentition compared to permanent dentition due to thinner and less mineralised enamel. However, it is more worrying, when this condition is being found in an alarming proportion among children. The presence of dental erosion in children is likely to be associated with a number of general health and dietary factors, but it is also aggravated by the relatively more rapid progression of erosion in the deciduous teeth. An understanding of the aetiologies and risk factors for erosion is important for early recognition of dental erosion to prevent serious irreversible damage to the dentition. This paper discusses the erosion in children with regard to its epidemiology, prevalence, clinical features, measurement and prevention.

  12. EVALUATION OF RAINFALL EROSIVIT OF RAINFALL EROSIVITY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    The coefficient of Determination R ficient of Determination R2 was 0.5011. was 0.5011. During this per .... reducing its energy and preventing splash erosion. It also slows runoff, reduces sheet erosion, and anchors ... surface roughness, infiltration, interception, lower the density of the soil, and improve the structure of.

  13. Vegetated Reinforced Soil Slope Streambank Erosion Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sotir, Robbin B; Fischenich, J. C

    2003-01-01

    ...). The VRSS system is useful for the immediate repair or prevention of deeper failures providing a structurally sound system with soil reinforcement, drainage and erosion control typically on steepened...

  14. The role of fluoride and casein phosphopeptide/amorphous calcium phosphate in the prevention of erosive/abrasive wear in an in vitro model using hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegehaupt, Florian J; Attin, T

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of various fluoride compounds and casein phosphopeptide/amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on the reduction of erosive/abrasive tooth wear. Forty enamel samples were prepared from bovine lower incisors, stratified and allocated to 4 groups (1-4). Samples in group 1 remained untreated and served as negative controls. The test samples were treated for 2 min/day as follows: group 2 amine/sodium fluoride gel (pH 4.8; 12,500 ppm), group 3 sodium fluoride gel (pH 7.1; 12,500 ppm) and group 4 CPP-ACP-containing mousse. De- and remineralization cycling was performed for 20 days with 6 erosive attacks for 20 s with HCl (pH 3.0) per day. Samples were stored in artificial saliva between cycles and overnight. Toothbrushing (15 s; 60 strokes/min; load 2.5 N) with a toothpaste slurry was performed each day before the first and 1 h after the last erosive exposure. Tooth wear was measured by comparing baseline surface profiles with the corresponding posttreatment profiles. Tooth wear was significantly reduced in groups 2 and 3 compared with group 1, while the enamel loss of group 4 was not significantly lower compared to the negative control group 1. Between the fluoride groups 2 and 3, no significant difference in tooth wear was recorded. Erosive/abrasive tooth wear under the conditions used could be reduced significantly by the daily application of fluoride gels, irrespective of the fluoride compound, while the application of CPP-ACP-containing mousse was less effective. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Changes in wind erosion over a 25-year restoration chronosequence on the south edge of the Tengger Desert, China: implications for preventing desertification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Quanlin; Fehmi, Jeffrey S; Zhang, Dekui; Fan, Baoli; Chen, Fang

    2017-08-23

    Wind erosion is a primary cause of desertification as well as being a serious ecological problem in arid and semi-arid areas across the world. To determine mechanisms for restoring desertified lands, an unrestored shifting sand dune and three formerly shifting sand dunes (desertified lands) that had been enclosed and afforested for 5, 15, and 25 years were selected for evaluation on the south edge of the Tengger Desert, China. Based on sampling heights between 0.2 and 3 m, the critical threshold average wind speed was 6.5 m s -1 at 2 m where the sand transport rate was reduced from 285.9 kg m -2  h -1 on the unrestored dunes to 9.1 and 1.8 kg m -2  h -1 on the sites afforested and enclosed for 5 and 15 years, respectively. The percentage of wind eroded area was reduced from 99.9% on the unrestored dune to 94.5, 9.0, and 0.5% on the sites afforested and enclosed for 5, 15, and 25 years, respectively. Wind erosion was effectively reduced after 15 years. Although there were different driving factors for wind erosion mitigation on the different restoration stages, an increase in the vegetation cover, surface roughness, soil shear strength, soil clay content, organic matter, and reduction in the near-surface wind speed were the primary variables associated with the restoration chronosequence. We conclude that reducing the wind speed and developing a biological crust through vegetation restoration were the critical components for restoration of desertified land.

  16. Dietary assessment and counseling for dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Teresa A

    2018-02-01

    Dental erosion occurs after exposure to intrinsic or extrinsic acids. Exposure to intrinsic gastrointestinal acids is associated with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, rumination syndrome, or gastroesophageal reflux. Extrinsic dietary acids from foods or beverages also can cause erosion, particularly when exposure is prolonged by holding or swishing behaviors. Clinicians should screen patients exhibiting dental erosion for anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, rumination syndrome, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Clinicians should screen patients without a medical explanation for their erosion for exposure to acidic foods and beverages, particularly for habits that prolong exposure. Identification of intrinsic and extrinsic acid exposures and recommendations to minimize exposures are important to prevent erosion and maintain oral health. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Erosion and Errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, H.; Heeres, Glenn; Os, van Bertil; Derickx, Willem; Schoorl, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Slope soil erosion is one of the main threats to archaeological sites. Several methods were applied to establish the erosion rates at archaeological sites. Digital elevation models (DEMs) from three different dates were used. We compared the elevations from these three models to estimate erosion. We

  18. Assessing storm erosion hazards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranasinghe, Ranasinghe W M R J B; Callaghan, D.; Ciavola, Paolo; Coco, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The storm erosion hazard on coasts is usually expressed as an erosion volume and/or associated episodic coastline retreat. The accurate assessment of present-day and future storm erosion volumes is a key task for coastal zone managers, planners and engineers. There are four main approaches that can

  19. Mapping erosion from space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.

    2007-01-01

    Soil erosion by water is the most important land degradation problem worldwide. Spatial information on erosion is required for defining effective soil and water conservation strategies. Satellite remote sensing can provide relevant input to regional erosion assessment. This thesis comprises a review

  20. The role of fluoride in erosion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Young, Alix; Ganss, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The role of fluoride in erosion therapy has long been questioned. However, recent research has yielded positive results. In this chapter, an overview of the literature is provided regarding the application of fluorides in the prevention and treatment of erosion and erosive wear. The results are presented and discussed for different fluoride sources such as monovalent and polyvalent fluorides, and for different vehicles such as toothpastes, solutions and rinses, as well as varnishes and gels. It is concluded that fluoride applications are very likely to be of use in the preventive treatment of erosive wear. Most promising are high-concentration, acidic formulations and the polyvalent fluoride sources, with the best evidence available for stannous fluoride. However, the evidence base for clinical effectiveness is still small. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. The use of straw mulch as a strategy to prevent extreme soil erosion rates in citrus orchard. A Rainfall simulation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Giménez-Morera, Antonio; Jordán, Antonio; Pereira, Paulo; Novara, Agata; García-Orenes, Fuensanta

    2014-05-01

    Not only the Sahel (Haregeweyn et al., 2013), the deforested land (Borelli et al., 2013) the chinese Plateau are affected by intense soil erosion rates (Zhao et al., 2013). Soil erosion affect agriculture land (Cerdà et al., 2009), and citrus orchards are being seeing as one of the crops with the highest erosion rates due to the managements that avoid the catch crops, weeds or litter. Example of the research carried out on citrus orchards is found in the Mediterranean (Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2008; 2009; Cerdà et al., 2009a; 2009b; Cerdà et al., 2011; 2012) and in China (Wu et al., 1997; Xu et al., 2010; Wang et al., 2011; Wu et al., 2011; Liu et al., 2011; Lü et al., 2011; Xu et al., 2012), and they confirm the non sustainable soil losses measured. The land management in citrus plantations results in soil degradation too (Lu et al., 1997; Lü et al., 2012; Xu et al., 2012). The use of cover crops to reduce the soil losses (Lavigne et al., 2012; Le Bellec et al., 2012) and the use of residues such as dried citrus peel has been found successful. There is a need to find new plants or residues to protect the soils on citrus orchards. Agriculture produces a high amount of residues. The pruning can contribute with a valuable source of nutrients and a good soil protection. The leaves of the trees, and some parts of the plants, once harvest can contribute to reduce the soil losses. Due to the mechanization of the agriculture, and the reduction of the draft animals (mainly horses, mules, donkeys and oxen) the straw is being a residue instead of a resource. The Valencia region is the largest producer of citrus in Europe, and the largest exporter in the world. This citrus production region is located in the eastern cost of Spain where we can find the rice production area of the l'Albufera Lagoon paddy fields, the third largest production region in Spain. This means, a rice production region surrounded by the huge citrus production region. There, the rice straw is not used

  2. U.S.V.I. Relative Erosion Potential - 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The relative erosion potential is an indicator of sediment and pollution runoff from land based on slope, soil type, land cover (circa 2000) and (maximum monthly)...

  3. U.S.V.I. Relative Erosion Potential - 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The relative erosion potential is an indicator of sediment and pollution runoff from land based on slope, soil type, land cover (circa 1990) and (maximum monthly)...

  4. U.S.V.I. Relative Vulnerability to Erosion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical factors, such as the slope of the land, the texture of the soil, and the precipitation regime influence erosion in an area. Parts of Puerto Rico are very...

  5. Can enhanced weathering remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to prevent climate change? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renforth, P.; Pogge von Strandmann, P.; Henderson, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    On long timescales, silicate weathering provides the ultimate sink for CO2 released by volcanic degassing and, because the rate of such weathering is temperature dependant, this sink is thought to respond to climate change to provide a strong negative feedback stabilising Earth's climate. An increase of global weathering rates is expected in response to anthropogenic warming and this increased weathering will ultimately (on the timescale of hundreds of thousands of years) serve to remove additional CO2 and return the climate system to lower temperatures. Some have proposed that accelerating this natural process by adding ground minerals to the land surface may help to prevent climate change. However, a major challenge in assessing such a proposal is the lack of experimental kinetic data for minerals added to the environment. Here we will present results from an experiment in which a forsterite rich olivine (Mg2SiO4) was added to the top of a soil column extracted from an agricultural field. A solution was passed through the columns over a period of 5 months and the drainage waters were collected and analysed. The greater flux of Mg measured eluting from the treated soil can be used to constrain the weathering rate of the olivine. A weathering rate can be determined by normalising the rate of magnesium flux to the surface area of olivine in the soil. By combining this information with a simple shrinking core model, we can estimate that an average particle size less than 1 μm would be required in order for the olivine to completely dissolve in a year. Therefore, the energy requirements for enhanced weathering are large >2 GJ(electrical) per net tonne of CO2 sequestered, but it is at least comparable to direct air capture technologies. These preliminary results suggest limited carbon capture potential for enhanced weathering in temperate agricultural soils. However, some environments may be better suited (e.g. humid tropical agricultural soils) and additional

  6. Catalytic interface erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, H.; Cohen, E.G.D.

    1995-01-01

    We study interface erosion processes: catalytic erosions. We present two cases. (1) The erosion of a completely occupied lattice by one single moving particle starting from somewhere inside the lattice, considering deterministic as well as probabilistic erosion rules. In the latter case, the eroded regions appear to have interfaces with continuously tunable fractal dimensions. (2) The kinetic roughening of an initially flat surface, where ballistic or diffusion-limited particles, which remain intact themselves, erode the surface coming from the outside, using the same erosion rules as in (1). Many features resembling realistic interfaces, for example, islands and inlets, are generated. The dependence of the surface width on the system size is due to both the erosion mechanism and the way particles move before reaching the surface

  7. Sand transport, erosion and granular electrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    The transport of granular materials by wind has a major impact on our environment through sand/soil erosion and the generation and transport of atmospheric dust aerosols. Terrestrially the transport of dust involves billions of tons of material every year, influencing the global climate and impac......The transport of granular materials by wind has a major impact on our environment through sand/soil erosion and the generation and transport of atmospheric dust aerosols. Terrestrially the transport of dust involves billions of tons of material every year, influencing the global climate...... can affect grain transport through the generation of intense electric fields and processes of electrostatic assembly. Importantly the transport of sand is characterized by saltation, which is known to be an active process for erosion and therefore a source for dust and sand formation. Using novel...... erosion simulation techniques the link between grain transport rates and erosion rates has been quantified. Furthermore this can be linked to production rates for dust and has been associated with chemical and mineral alteration through a process of mechanical activation of fractured surfaces. This work...

  8. Protection from erosion following wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter R. Robichaud; William J. Elliot

    2006-01-01

    Erosion in the first year after a wildfire can be up to three orders of magnitude greater than the erosion from undisturbed forests. To mitigate potential postfire erosion, various erosion control treatments are applied on highly erodible areas with downstream resources in need of protection. Because postfire erosion rates generally decline by an order of magnitude for...

  9. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  10. Protection From Dental Erosion: All Fluorides are Not Equal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Robert V; Noble, Warden H

    2018-03-01

    All fluoride sources help strengthen teeth against bacterial acids that cause caries. However, excessive exposure to dietary acids, which can result in dental erosion, presents a more aggressive level of challenge compared to caries. Despite the fact that almost all toothpastes contain fluoride, both the incidence and prevalence of dental erosion appear to be on the rise. This article: (1) describes key differences between caries and dental erosion and the ability of different fluoride sources to help prevent erosion; (2) discusses the importance of the evaluation of patients for dental erosion at the earliest stages using the Basic Erosive Wear Examination scoring system to help assess and educate patients; and (3) provides evidence-based information for making specific recommendations to patients with dental erosion. The objective of this article is to assess the comparative ability of fluoride agents to protect against dental erosion. Though all fluorides are able to help strengthen teeth against cariogenic acids, not all available sources of fluoride provide the same level of erosion protection. Daily use of a stabilized stannous fluoride dentifrice has been shown to provide the most effective means of protecting teeth against the increasing risk of dental erosion and erosive tooth wear.

  11. The implementing of some plant species in erosion control on slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matić Vjačeslava

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With the need to conserve and improve the environment, it is recommended to employ plant materials in the erosion control of torrents and slopes alongside roads. Considering the well-known properties of some willow species regarding their power of vegetative reproduction, survival in poor soils and often flooded alluvium, we researched into the potentials of the following species: Salix triandra L., Salix purpurea L. and Salix incana Schrk. in the catchment of the warehouse 'Gvozdac', Experimental Estate Goč, Serbia. The research started in 2004 and has continued till the present day. The above-mentioned willow species showed significant efficiency in the bank protection of torrential watercourses and on the moist slopes of embankments and cuts of roads. Some of them can even stand a certain degree of aridity, while other species, on poor, eroded soil exposed to long and extreme drought, could not survive and did not show the expected effect, which is also the consequence of the absence of maintenance and adequate attention to such erosion-control works. In spite of the above, one of the willow species survived even in the most severe conditions, checking the erosion of the road cut slope and the road construction itself, and prevented the impacts of aggressive atmospheric waters, thus halting the erosion ridges and the removal of the asphalt road surface. The above facts prove that, with adequate measures of maintenance, plant materials can be very successfully applied for both longitudinal structures and to check dams in torrent control, as well as in erosion control on the slopes in catchments, both in civil engineering works and in forest exploitation. The research requires closer attention, extending the interests to some grass and shrub species, with the aim of ecological erosion control and reclamation of endangered watercourses, slopes and, in general, environmental protection and nature conservation. .

  12. Splash erosion. A bibliometric Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Raga, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    and Netherlands. It is interesting to analyze the evolution of research by means of splash erosion publications. Figure 6 shows the number of documents published every decade from 1961 (the first publication appears in 1967) . Various aspects need to be commented: • The decades show an exponential increase in the number of publications. • The line in the figure represents the rise in the number of publications, which have been larger in the last two decades (900s and 20000s). • The last decade included began in 2001 leads us to predict a strong boost in research in this particular field. It is also worthwhile to consider briefly the main concepts dealt with in the documents published: • There are only 3 publications with disdrometer + splash erosion as topic words. • After 1991 and 2000 we find that there are several lines of measurement of two main research lines today are already defined: the study of the splash produces with rain simulation processes or splash produces with natural rain (relationship with atmospheric variables and accuracy of the measurements). • The current decade is characterized by an increase in research using disdrometers for studying splash erosion. Summing up, the research that is being carried out using splash erosion is evolving towards an increasing number of projects, countries, and especially, papers published in prestigious scientific journals.

  13. Erosion control on logging roads in the Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    James N. Kochenderfer; James N. Kochenderfer

    1970-01-01

    In the steep terrain of the Appalachian Mountains much damage to forest streams is caused by erosion on logging roads. Muddy water that is unsuitable for fish, swimming, or human consumption often can be traced to these eroding roads. This paper has been prepared to sum up what land managers know about preventing and controlling erosion on logging roads in the...

  14. Erosion in America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-03-23

    The US loses about five billion tons of soil a year from erosion, and scientists estimate that from 20 to 50% of world cropland suffers from excessive erosion. The effect of erosion is a loss in both land and water productivity. When combined with the problems of overpopulation, overgrazing, and deforestation, the environmental impacts are very serious. There are some signs that countries are beginning to adopt conservation tilling techniques, but even cooperative government programs in the US such as the 1983 Payment-in-Kind (PIK) program have had only partial success because of expanded production on marginal farmlands. 20 reference 5 figures.

  15. Measurement of erosion: Is it possible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroosnijder, L.

    2005-01-01

    Reasons for erosion measurements are: (1) to determine the environmental impact of erosion and conservation practices, (2) scientific erosion research; (3) development and evaluation of erosion control technology; (4) development of erosion prediction technology and (5) allocation of conservation

  16. Does Canoeing Increase Streambank Erosion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward A. Hansen

    1975-01-01

    Describes research on the Pine River in Michigan to determine if large increases in canoeing accelerated streambank erosion. Most erosion was natural, but people sliding and camping on streambanks created some erosion. Heavy canoe traffic was not a cause of erosion.

  17. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... Prevention Hearing Loss Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Nutrition Osteoporosis Shingles Skin Cancer Related News Quitting Smoking, ...

  18. Erosion on logging roads in northwestern California: How much is avoidable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    John D. McCashion; Raymond M. Rice

    1983-01-01

    Abstract - A study was made on 344 miles of logging roads in northwestern California to assess sources of erosion and the extent to which road-related erosion is avoidable. At most, about 24 percent of the erosion measured on the logging roads could have been prevented by conventional engineering methods. The remaining 76 percent was caused by site conditions and...

  19. Rainfall erosivity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale; Meusburger, Katrin; Klik, Andreas; Rousseva, Svetla; Tadić, Melita Perčec; Michaelides, Silas; Hrabalíková, Michaela; Olsen, Preben; Aalto, Juha; Lakatos, Mónika; Rymszewicz, Anna; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Beguería, Santiago; Alewell, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall is one the main drivers of soil erosion. The erosive force of rainfall is expressed as rainfall erosivity. Rainfall erosivity considers the rainfall amount and intensity, and is most commonly expressed as the R-factor in the USLE model and its revised version, RUSLE. At national and continental levels, the scarce availability of data obliges soil erosion modellers to estimate this factor based on rainfall data with only low temporal resolution (daily, monthly, annual averages). The purpose of this study is to assess rainfall erosivity in Europe in the form of the RUSLE R-factor, based on the best available datasets. Data have been collected from 1541 precipitation stations in all European Union (EU) Member States and Switzerland, with temporal resolutions of 5 to 60 min. The R-factor values calculated from precipitation data of different temporal resolutions were normalised to R-factor values with temporal resolutions of 30 min using linear regression functions. Precipitation time series ranged from a minimum of 5 years to a maximum of 40 years. The average time series per precipitation station is around 17.1 years, the most datasets including the first decade of the 21st century. Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) has been used to interpolate the R-factor station values to a European rainfall erosivity map at 1 km resolution. The covariates used for the R-factor interpolation were climatic data (total precipitation, seasonal precipitation, precipitation of driest/wettest months, average temperature), elevation and latitude/longitude. The mean R-factor for the EU plus Switzerland is 722 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1) yr(-1), with the highest values (>1000 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1) yr(-1)) in the Mediterranean and alpine regions and the lowest (<500 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1) yr(-1)) in the Nordic countries. The erosivity density (erosivity normalised to annual precipitation amounts) was also the highest in Mediterranean regions which implies high risk for erosive events and floods

  20. Recognising and responding to care erosion: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jan Martinus Anne; Timmins, Fiona

    2017-08-23

    This article is the second in a two-part series discussing a gradual decline in standards of care, termed 'care erosion'. The first part of this article used cognitive dissonance theory to discuss the psychosocial mechanisms involved in care erosion and focused on the nurse's role in identifying and preventing declining standards in care. This article, part two, explores the wider involvement of individuals, organisations and nurse education in preventing care erosion, with a particular focus on reflection; mastery of nursing skills and care; supporting nursing values; and addressing denial and trivialisation of, and justifications for, substandard care.

  1. A process of thermocline erosion on the sicilian continental shelf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artale, V.; Provenzale, A.; Santoleri, R.

    1988-01-01

    A process of thermocline erosion measured in the Channel of Sicily in the period 16 November - 2 Dicember 1985 is studied. Evidence is presented that the transition from Summer to Winter stratification has been an impulsive process. It is shown that the erosion of the seasonal thermocline and the deeping of the surface mixed layer were stimulated by the action of two strong atmospheric perturbations. Possible relations between mixing events and internal wave breaking are discussed

  2. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  3. Mechanics of aeolian processes: Soil erosion and dust production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabadi, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Aeolian (wind) processes occur as a result of atmosphere/land-surface system interactions. A thorough understanding of these processes and their physical/mechanical characterization on a global scale is essential to monitoring global change and, hence, is imperative to the fundamental goal of the Earth observing system (Eos) program. Soil erosion and dust production by wind are of consequence mainly in arid and semi arid regions which cover 36 percent of the Earth's land surface. Some recent models of dust production due to wind erosion of agricultural soils and the mechanics of wind erosion in deserts are reviewed and the difficulties of modeling the aeolian transport are discussed.

  4. Erosive Lichen Planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauskar, Melissa

    2017-09-01

    Lichen planus is an inflammatory mucocutaneous condition with a myriad of clinical manifestations. There are 3 forms of lichen planus that effect the vulva: papulosquamous, hypertrophic, and erosive. Erosive lichen planus can progress to vulvar scaring, vaginal stenosis, and squamous cell carcinoma; these long-term sequelae cause sexual distress, depression, and decreased quality of life for patients. Diagnosis is often delayed because of patient embarrassment or clinician misdiagnosis. Early recognition and treatment is essential to decreasing the morbidity of this condition. Multimodal treatment, along with a multidisciplinary approach, will improve outcomes and further clinical advances in studying this condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Martin; Boergesson, Lennart; Hedstroem, Magnus; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  6. Dune erosion above revetments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In a situation with a narrow dune, the dune base can be protected with a revetment to reduce dune erosion during extreme events. To quantify the effects of a revetment on storm impact, the functionality of the numerical storm impact model XBeach (Roelvink et al., 2009) is extended to account for the

  7. Categorization of erosion control matting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    Erosion control is a critical aspect of any Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) : construction project, with the extreme negative impacts of high sediment loads in natural : waterways having been well documented. A variety of erosion control ...

  8. Soil erosion and agricultural sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Data drawn from a global compilation of studies quantitatively confirm the long-articulated contention that erosion rates from conventionally plowed agricultural fields average 1–2 orders of magnitude greater than rates of soil production, erosion under native vegetation, and long-term geological erosion. The general equivalence of the latter indicates that, considered globally, hillslope soil production and erosion evolve to balance geologic and climate forcing, whereas conventional plow-bas...

  9. Seismicity, seismology and erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovius, Niels; Meunier, Patrick; Burtin, Arnaud; Marc, Odin

    2013-04-01

    At the interface of geomorphology and seismology, patterns of erosion can be used to constrain seismic processes, and seismological instruments to determine geomorphic activity. For example, earthquakes trigger mass wasting in proportion to peak ground velocity or acceleration, modulated by local geologic and topographic conditions. This geomorphic response determines the mass balance and net topographic effect of earthquakes. It can also be used to obtain information about the distribution of seismic slip where instrumental observations are not available. Equally, seismometers can register the signals of geomorphic processes, revealing their location, type and magnitude. The high temporal resolution of such records can help determine the exact meteorological conditions that gave rise to erosion events, and the interactions between individual surface processes during such events. We will illustrate this synergy of disciplines with examples from active mountain belts around the world, including Taiwan, Japan, Papua New Guinea and the Alps.

  10. Rainfall erosivity map for Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oduro Afriyie, K.

    1995-10-01

    Monthly rainfall data, spanning over a period of more than thirty years, were used to compute rainfall erosivity indices for various stations in Ghana, using the Fournier index, c, defined as p 2 /P, where p is the rainfall amount in the wettest month and P is the annual rainfall amount. Values of the rainfall erosivity indices ranged from 24.5 mm at Sunyani in the mid-portion of Ghana to 180.9 mm at Axim in the south western coastal portion. The indices were used to construct a rainfall erosivity map for the country. The map revealed that Ghana may be broadly divided into five major erosion risk zones. The middle sector of Ghana is generally in the low erosion risk zone; the northern sector is in the moderate to severe erosion risk zone, while the coastal sector is in the severe to extreme severe erosion risk zone. (author). 11 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Actinides, accelerators and erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fifield L.K.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fallout isotopes can be used as artificial tracers of soil erosion and sediment accumulation. The most commonly used isotope to date has been 137Cs. Concentrations of 137Cs are, however, significantly lower in the Southern Hemisphere, and furthermore have now declined to 35% of original values due to radioactive decay. As a consequence the future utility of 137Cs is limited in Australia, with many erosion applications becoming untenable within the next 20 years, and there is a need to replace it with another tracer. Plutonium could fill this role, and has the advantages that there were six times as many atoms of Pu as of 137Cs in fallout, and any loss to decay has been negligible due to the long half-lives of the plutonium isotopes. Uranium-236 is another long-lived fallout isotope with significant potential for exploitation as a tracer of soil and sediment movement. Uranium is expected to be more mobile in soils than plutonium (or caesium, and hence the 236U/Pu ratio will vary with soil depth, and so could provide an independent measure of the amount of soil loss. In this paper we discuss accelerator based ultra-sensitive measurements of plutonium and 236U isotopes and their advantages over 137Cs as tracers of soil erosion and sediment movement.

  12. Atmospheric composition and micro-climate in the Alhambra monument, Granada (Spain), in the context of preventive conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horemans, B.; Schalm, O.; De Wael, K.; Cardell, C.; Van Grieken, R.

    2012-07-01

    The world famous Alhambra monument in Granada, Southern Spain, listed as UNESCO world cultural heritage since 1984, represents probably the most beautiful example of Islamic art and architecture from the Middle Ages in Europe. It is visited by ca. 2 million people annually. Granada is situated in a natural basin, surrounded by mountains with altitudes up to 3500 m. Due to this topography and the prevailing low wind speeds, pollution-derived and especially traffic-derived particulate matter often accumulates in the urban air. In order to evaluate the potential conservation risks from the surrounding air, the atmospheric composition in the Alhambra monument was evaluated. Indoor temperature and relative humidity fluctuations were evaluated for their potential degenerative effects. Furthermore, the atmospheric composition in the Alhambra was analyzed in terms of inorganic gases (NO2, SO2, O3, and NH3) and black carbon. It was found that the open architecture protected the indoor environments from developing a potentially harmful microclimate, such as the build-up of humidity resulting from the huge number of daily tourists. On the downside, the strong ventilation made the indoor air hardly different from outdoor air, as characterized by strong diurnal temperature and relative humidity gradients and high traffic-derived pollutant levels.

  13. Building Chinese wind data for Wind Erosion Prediction System using surrogate US data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion is a global problem, especially in arid and semiarid regions of the world, which leads to land degradation and atmosphere pollution. The process-based Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS), developed by the USDA, is capable of simulating the windblown soil loss with changing weather and...

  14. Soil erosion in Iran: Issues and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidreza Sadeghi, Seyed; Cerdà, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    Iran currently faces many soil erosion-related problems (see citations below). These issues are resulted from some inherent characteristic and anthropogenic triggering forces. Nowadays, the latter plays more important rule to accelerate the erosion with further emphasis on soil erosion-prone arid and semi arid regions of the country. This contribution attempts to identify and describe the existing main reasons behind accelerated soil erosion in Iran. Appropriate solutions viz. structural and non-structural approaches will be then advised to combat or minimise the problems. Iran can be used as a pilot research site to understand the soil erosion processes in semiarid, arid and mountainous terrain and our research will review the scientific literature and will give an insight of the soil erosion rates in the main factors of the soil erosion in Iran. Key words: Anthropogenic Erosion, Land Degradation; Sediment Management; Sediment Problems Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and PREVENTING AND REMEDIATING DEGRADATION OF SOILS IN EUROPE THROUGH LAND CARE (RECARE)FP7-ENV-2013- supported this research. References Aghili Nategh, N., Hemmat, A., & Sadeghi, M. (2014). Assessing confined and semi-confined compression curves of highly calcareous remolded soil amended with farmyard manure. Journal of Terramechanics, 53, 75-82. Arekhi, S., Bolourani, A. D., Shabani, A., Fathizad, H., Ahamdy-Asbchin, S. 2012. Mapping Soil Erosion and Sediment Yield Susceptibility using RUSLE, Remote Sensing and GIS (Case study: Cham Gardalan Watershed, Iran). Advances in Environmental Biology, 6(1), 109-124. Arekhi, S., Shabani, A., Rostamizad, G. 2012. Application of the modified universal soil loss equation (MUSLE) in prediction of sediment yield (Case study: Kengir Watershed, Iran). Arabian Journal of Geosciences, 5(6), 1259-1267.Sadeghi, S. H., Moosavi, V., Karami, A., Behnia, N. 2012. Soil erosion assessment and prioritization of affecting factors at plot

  15. Evolution of a steam atmosphere during Earth's accretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K J; Kasting, J F; Pollack, J B

    1988-01-01

    ) is a critical but poorly understood process. It can prevent the accumulation of a steam atmosphere if the planetesimals are sufficiently dry, or for wetter impactors if it is much more effective than we have assumed. Impact erosion of a steam atmosphere is less important; it is equivalent to a slightly drier rain of impactors. If a hypothetical Moon-forming impact took place before the collapse of the runaway greenhouse, relatively little water (approximately 30-100 bars) would have been in the atmosphere; hence little could have been lost. If the event took place later, the potential damage could have been greater.

  16. A terminological matter: paragenesis, antigravitative erosion or antigravitational erosion ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasini G.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In the speleological literature three terms are utilized to designate the “ascending erosion”: paragenesis (= paragénésis, coined in1968, antigravitative erosion (= erosione antigravitativa, coined in 1966 and antigravitational erosion (wrong English translation ofthe Italian term erosione antigravitativa, utilized later on. The term paragenesis should be abandoned because of the priority of theterm erosione antigravitativa - on the ground of the “law of priority” – and because of its ambiguous etimology. On the other hand,the term antigravitational erosion should be forsaken in favour of the term antigravitative erosion, given the meaning that the termsgravitation and gravity have in Physics. Therefore, to designate the phenomenon of the “ascending erosion” there would be nothingleft but the term antigravitative erosion.The antigravitative erosion process and its recognizability are illustrated.Examples of caves with evident antigravitative erosion phenomena, developed in different karstifiable rocks and in several partsof the world, are given.It is recalled that the antigravitative erosion is a phenomenon well-known since 1942 and widely proven and supported, and that it isrelatively easy – in many cases - to recognize the antigravitative origin of karstic passages.It is stressed that the antigravitative erosion is an important phenomenon, exclusive of the karstic caves and unique in nature.

  17. Eolian erosion of the Martian surface. I - Erosion rate similitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, J. D.; White, B. R.; Greeley, R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    A similitude parameter is derived which is based on theoretical considerations of erosion due to sand in saltation. This parameter has been used to correlate wind tunnel experiments of particle flow over model craters. The characteristics of the flow field in the vicinity and downstream of a crater are discussed and it is shown that erosion is initiated in areas lying under a pair of trailing vortices. The erosion rate parameter is used to calculate erosion rates on Mars, reported in Part 2, to be published later.

  18. Quantification Of Erosion Rates Of Agriculturally Used Soils By Artificial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Abhinand

    2010-05-01

    0.0.1 1. Introduction to soil erosion measurement by radionuclides Soil erosion by water, wind and tillage affects both agriculture and the natural environment. Studying this phenomenon would be one of the advancements in science. Soil erosion occurs worldwide and since the last two decades it has been a main topic of discussion all over the world. The use of environmental radionuclides such as 90Sr, 137Cs to study medium term soil erosion (40 yrs) started in the early 1990's. Using these new techniques better knowledge about erosion can be gained and this knowledge can be implemented for erosion risk management. The erosion and sedimentation study by using man-made and natural radioisotopes is a key technique, which has developed over the past 30 years. Fallout 137Cs and Cosmogenic 7Be are radionuclides that have been used to provide independent measurements of soil-erosion and sediment-deposition rates and patterns [1] [2] [3] [4]. Erosion measurements using radionuclides 137Cs, 7Be Caesium-137 from atmospheric nuclear-weapons tests in the 1950s and 1960s (Fig.1) is a unique tracer of erosion and sedimentation, since there are no natural sources of 137Cs. Unique events such as the Chernobyl accident in April 1986 caused regional dispersal of 137Cs that affects the total global deposition budget. This yearly pattern of fallout can be used to develop a chronology of deposition horizons in lakes, reservoirs, and floodplains. 137Cs can be easily measured by gamma spectroscopy. Using 137Cs is a fast and cheap method to study erosion-deposition processes compared to the traditional methods like silt bags. PIC Figure 1: Global 137Cs fallout (Modified from SAAS Bulletin 353, Part E, DDR, 1986) When 137Cs, 7Be reach the soil surface by wet and dry deposition, they are quickly and strongly adsorbed by ion exchange and are essentially non exchangeable in most environments. Each radionuclide is distributed differently in the soil because of differences in half-lives (30 yrs

  19. Shoulder erosions in renal osteodystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonavita, J.A.; Dalinka, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    The radiographic manifestations of renal osteodystrophy may be articular as well as osseous. The latter are well recognized, i.e. subperiosteal and subchondral bony resorption. Recently attention has been directed to the occurrence of an erosive arthritis of the hands and wrists in hyperparathyroidism. The authors present six patients with humeral head erosions, all of whom were on chronic long-term hemodialysis. These intra-articular erosions occurred at the 'bare' area of the humeral head and thus represent an erosive arthritis and therefore can be distinguished from the usual sites of subchondral and subperiosteal bony resorption seen in hyperparathyroidism. (orig.) [de

  20. Multiperspective analysis of erosion tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparovek Gerd

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Erosion tolerance is the most multidisciplinary field of soil erosion research. Scientists have shown lack in ability to adequately analyze the huge list of variables that influence soil loss tolerance definitions. For these the perspectives of erosion made by farmers, environmentalists, society and politicians have to be considered simultaneously. Partial and biased definitions of erosion tolerance may explain not only the polemic nature of the currently suggested values but also, in part, the nonadoption of the desired levels of erosion control. To move towards a solution, considerable changes would have to occur on how this topic is investigated, especially among scientists, who would have to change methods and strategies and extend the perspective of research out of the boundaries of the physical processes and the frontiers of the academy. A more effective integration and communication with the society and farmers, to learn about their perspective of erosion and a multidisciplinary approach, integrating soil, social, economic and environmental sciences are essential for improved erosion tolerance definitions. In the opinion of the authors, soil erosion research is not moving in this direction and a better understanding of erosion tolerance is not to be expected in the near future.

  1. The interaction of radio frequency electromagnetic fields with atmospheric water droplets and applications to aircraft ice prevention. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of computerized simulation of the physics of advanced microwave anti-icing systems, which preheat impinging supercooled water droplets prior to impact, was investigated. Theoretical and experimental work performed to create a physically realistic simulation is described. The behavior of the absorption cross section for melting ice particles was measured by a resonant cavity technique and found to agree with theoretical predictions. Values of the dielectric parameters of supercooled water were measured by a similar technique at lambda = 2.82 cm down to -17 C. The hydrodynamic behavior of accelerated water droplets was studied photograhically in a wind tunnel. Droplets were found to initially deform as oblate spheroids and to eventually become unstable and break up in Bessel function modes for large values of acceleration or droplet size. This confirms the theory as to the maximum stable droplet size in the atmosphere. A computer code which predicts droplet trajectories in an arbitrary flow field was written and confirmed experimentally. The results were consolidated into a simulation to study the heating by electromagnetic fields of droplets impinging onto an object such as an airfoil. It was determined that there is sufficient time to heat droplets prior to impact for typical parameter values. Design curves for such a system are presented.

  2. Plasma erosion switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Goldstein, S.A.; Miller, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    The plasma erosion switch is a device capable of initially carrying high currents, and then of opening in nanoseconds to stand off high voltages. It depends upon the erosion of a plasma which initially fills the switch. The sheath between the plasma and the cathode behaves as a diode with a rapidly increasing A-K gap. Preliminary tests of the switch on the Proto I accelerator at Sandia will be described. In these tests, the switch consisted of a cylinder of highly ionized plasma four inches in diameter and one-inch thick surrounding a one-inch cathode. The switch shorted out prepulse voltages and allowed energy to be stored in the diode inductance outside the switch until the accelerator current reached 75 kA. The switch impedance then rose rapidly to approximately 100 ω in 5 nanoseconds, whereupon the accelerator current transferred to the cathode. Current rise rates of 3.10 13 A/sec were limited by cathode turn-on. Voltage rise rates of 10 15 V/sec were achieved. The elimination of prepulse and machine turn-on transients allowed A-K gaps of 2 mm to be used with 2.5 MV pulses, yielding average E fields of 12 MV/cm. Staged versions of the device are being built and should improve rise rates. The switch shows promise for use with future, higher power, lower inductance machines

  3. Erosion in extruder flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Miron; Fodor, Petru S.

    A detailed analysis of the fluid flow in Tadmor's unwound channel model of the single screw extruder is performed by combining numerical and analytical methods. Using the analytical solution for the longitudinal velocity field (in the limit of zero Reynolds number) allows us to devote all the computational resources solely for a detailed numerical solution of the transversal velocity field. This high resolution 3D model of the fluid flow in a single-screw extruder allows us to identify the position and extent of Moffatt eddies that impede mixing. We further consider the erosion of particles (e.g. carbon-black agglomerates) advected by the polymeric flow. We assume a particle to be made of primary fragments bound together. In the erosion process a primary fragment breaks out of a given particle. Particles are advected by the laminar flow and they disperse because of the shear stresses imparted by the fluid. The time evolution of the numbers of particles of different sizes is described by the Bateman coupled differential equations used to model radioactivity. Using the particle size distribution we compute an entropic fragmentation index which varies from 0 for a monodisperse system to 1 for an extreme poly-disperse system.

  4. Global hotspots of river erosion under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plink-Bjorklund, P.; Reichler, T.

    2017-12-01

    Extreme precipitation plays a significant role for river hydrology, flood hazards and landscape response. For example, the September 2013 rainstorm in the Colorado Front Range evacuated the equivalent of hundreds to thousands of years of hillslope weathering products. Although promoted by steep topography, the Colorado event is clearly linked to rainfall intensity, since most of the 1100 debris flows occurred within the highest rainfall contour. Additional evidence for a strong link between extreme precipitation and river erosion comes from the sedimentary record, and especially from that of past greenhouse climates. The existence of such a link suggests that information about global rainfall patterns can be used to define regions of increased erosion potential. However, the question arises what rainfall criteria to use and how well the method works. A related question is how ongoing climate change and the corresponding shifts in rainfall might impact the results. Here, we use atmospheric reanalysis and output from a climate model to identify regions that are particularly susceptible to landscape change in response to extreme precipitation. In order to define the regions, we combine several hydroclimatological and geomorphological criteria into a single index of erosion potential. We show that for current climate, our criteria applied to atmospheric reanalysis or to climate model data successfully localize known areas of increased erosion potential, such as the Colorado region. We then apply our criteria to climate model data for future climate to document how the location, extent, and intensity of erosion hotspots are likely to change under global warming.

  5. Erosion mechanism and erosion products in carbon-based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, N.; Bakhtin, V.; Barsuk, V.; Kurkin, S.; Mironova, E.; Piazza, G.; Safronov, V. E-mail: vsafr@rico.ttk.ru; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Toporkov, D.; Vasenin, S.; Wuerz, H.; Zhitlukhin, A

    2002-12-01

    Plasma/material interaction was studied in disruption simulation experiments at the plasma gun facility MK-200. Graphite and carbon-fibre composites were exposed to pulsed energetic plasma under heat loads typically expected for disruptions in future tokamaks. Erosion rates, erosion mechanisms and the properties of the eroded carbon have been studied.

  6. The interactions between attrition, abrasion and erosion in tooth wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellis, R Peter; Addy, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Tooth wear is the result of three processes: abrasion (wear produced by interaction between teeth and other materials), attrition (wear through tooth-tooth contact) and erosion (dissolution of hard tissue by acidic substances). A further process (abfraction) might potentiate wear by abrasion and/or erosion. Knowledge of these tooth wear processes and their interactions is reviewed. Both clinical and experimental observations show that individual wear mechanisms rarely act alone but interact with each other. The most important interaction is the potentiation of abrasion by erosive damage to the dental hard tissues. This interaction seems to be the major factor in occlusal and cervical wear. The available evidence is insufficient to establish whether abfraction is an important contributor to tooth wear in vivo. Saliva can modulate erosive/abrasive tooth wear, especially through formation of pellicle, but cannot prevent it. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Do erosion control and snakes mesh?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher Barton; Karen Kinkead

    2005-01-01

    In the battle to curb soil erosion and sedimentation, numberous techniques and products for controlling erosion and sedimentation have been developed and are being implemented. Rolled erosion control products, such as a temporary erosion control blankets and permanent turf reinforcement mats, represent one type of erosion control product that has been used extensively...

  8. Rill erosion rates in burned forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph W. Wagenbrenner; Peter R. Robichaud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Wildfires often produce large increases in runoff and erosion rates (e.g., Moody and Martin, 2009), and land managers need to predict the frequency and magnitude of postfire erosion to determine the needs for hazard response and possible erosion mitigation to reduce the impacts of increased erosion on public safety and valued resources. The Water Erosion...

  9. Investigation of Health Risks and Their Prevention in the Rapid Climate Changes and the Rise of Pollution of the Atmosphere in the Mountain Region of the North Caucasus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babyakin, Alexander; Polozkov, Igor; Golitsyn, Georgy; Efimenko, Natalia; Zherlitsina, Liubov; Povolotskaya, Nina; Senik, Irina; Chalaya, Elena; Artamonova, Maria; Pogarski, Fedor

    2010-05-01

    atmospheric pollution making by Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics RAS. The average weighted WPI forms the basis of weather type number, synoptic weather forecast allows you to define a subtype of the weather. This classification is used in the system of MWF in the resorts of Caucasian Mineral Waters (mountainous region of Northern Caucasus), making for the purpose of timely warnings of medical personnel of medical institutions to strengthen health surveillance and, if necessary, conduct prevention of MPR. MPR to changing weather conditions are most manifest in connection with resettlement of patients from their places of permanent residence to the unusual climatic conditions of the resort. In this regard, in order to enhance the spa rehabilitation of meteosensitive patients with coronary artery disease at PSRIC a physiological method was developed for early and routine prophylaxis of maladaptive pathological and, above all, MPR using the method of transcranial electric-pulse meso-diencephalic modulation by MDMK-4 apparatus with a frontooccipital location of the electrodes. Clinical manifestation of the MPR in adverse weather conditions in patients with coronary artery disease, hypertension with dysadaptation syndrome is characterized by frequent recurrences of angina, rhythm disorders, cerebral symptoms, vascular crisis, violations in the field of psycho-emotional area and other disorders. These meteopathies are eliminated with high efficiency using the MDMK-4 apparatus in individually selected modes at the planned rate of prophylaxis for 10 procedures. In order to urgent MPR prevention the procedures can be used situationally. The high preventive and curative effects of transcranial electric-pulse meso-diencephalic modulation of the MDMK-4 apparatus is shown by positive dynamics of the clinical status of patients, including data on the MPR test survey, the Kerdem vegetative index, rheoencephalography indicators, electrocardiography, neurovascular reactivity, Holter

  10. Factors affecting the dental erosion severity of patients with eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Otsu, Mitsuhiro; Hamura, Akira; Ishikawa, Yuiko; Karibe, Hiroyuki; Ichijyo, Tomoyasu; Yoshinaga, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    Background Intraoral disease is a common occurrence in patients with eating disorders, particularly dental erosion, which frequently becomes severe and may hinder daily life. The severity varies from patient to patient. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may help prevent dental erosion in these patients. Accordingly, we investigated the relationship between the severity of erosion and the behavior of patients with eating disorders, with a focus on daily diet and vomiting behavior. Method...

  11. Estimates of saltation threshold and erosion rates on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, J. D.; White, B. R.; Greeley, R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    The Mariner 9 photographs of the Martian surface include many which show crater-associated streaks caused by atmospheric winds. Due to the low density atmosphere of Mars, the wind speeds necessary to move surface particles and thus cause the streaks are apparently very high. The atmospheric-boundary-layer wind tunnel has been used to determine threshold speeds for particles of varying density and diameter and the results for small particles have been extrapolated to estimate somewhat lower threshold speeds on Mars than previous estimates. A series of streak modeling tests is used to derive an erosion-rate correlation function, which is in turn used to estimate erosion rates to the lee of some of the craters on Mars which exhibited time-dependent streak behavior during the mission.

  12. Rainfall erosivity: An historical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainfall erosivity is the capability of rainfall to cause soil loss from hillslopes by water. Modern definitions of rainfall erosivity began with the development of the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE), where rainfall characteristics were statistically related to soil loss from thousands of plot...

  13. Topographic variability and the influence of soil erosion on the carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialynas, Yannis G.; Bastola, Satish; Bras, Rafael L.; Billings, Sharon A.; Markewitz, Daniel; Richter, Daniel deB.

    2016-05-01

    Soil erosion, particularly that caused by agriculture, is closely linked to the global carbon (C) cycle. There is a wide range of contrasting global estimates of how erosion alters soil-atmosphere C exchange. This can be partly attributed to limited understanding of how geomorphology, topography, and management practices affect erosion and oxidation of soil organic C (SOC). This work presents a physically based approach that stresses the heterogeneity at fine spatial scales of SOC erosion, SOC burial, and associated soil-atmosphere C fluxes. The Holcombe's Branch watershed, part of the Calhoun Critical Zone Observatory in South Carolina, USA, is the case study used. The site has experienced some of the most serious agricultural soil erosion in North America. We use SOC content measurements from contrasting soil profiles and estimates of SOC oxidation rates at multiple soil depths. The methodology was implemented in the tRIBS-ECO (Triangulated Irregular Network-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator-Erosion and Carbon Oxidation), a spatially and depth-explicit model of SOC dynamics built within an existing coupled physically based hydro-geomorphic model. According to observations from multiple soil profiles, about 32% of the original SOC content has been eroded in the study area. The results indicate that C erosion and its replacement exhibit significant topographic variation at relatively small scales (tens of meters). The episodic representation of SOC erosion reproduces the history of SOC erosion better than models that use an assumption of constant erosion in space and time. The net atmospheric C exchange at the study site is estimated to range from a maximum source of 14.5 g m-2 yr-1 to a maximum sink of -18.2 g m-2 yr-1. The small-scale complexity of C erosion and burial driven by topography exerts a strong control on the landscape's capacity to serve as a C source or a sink.

  14. Rainfall Erosivity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    on the best available datasets. Data have been collected from 1541 precipitation stations in all European Union (EU) Member States and Switzerland, with temporal resolutions of 5 to 60 min. The R-factor values calculated from precipitation data of different temporal resolutions were normalised to R......-factor values with temporal resolutions of 30 min using linear regression functions. Precipitation time series ranged from a minimum of 5 years to a maximum of 40 years. The average time series per precipitation station is around 17.1 years, the most datasets including the first decade of the 21st century....... Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) has been used to interpolate the R-factor station values to a European rainfall erosivity map at 1 km resolution. The covariates used for the R-factor interpolation were climatic data (total precipitation, seasonal precipitation, precipitation of driest/wettest months...

  15. Erosion on spark plug electrodes; Funkenerosion an Zuendkerzenelektroden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rager, J.

    2006-07-01

    Durability of spark plugs is mainly determined by spark gap widening, caused by electrode wear. Knowledge about the erosion mechanisms of spark plug materials is of fundamental interest for the development of materials with a high resistance against electrode erosion. It is therefore crucial to identify those parameters which significantly influence the erosion behaviour of a material. In this work, a reliable and reproducible testing method is presented which produces and characterizes electrode wear under well-defined conditions and which is capable of altering parameters specifically. Endurance tests were carried out to study the dependence of the wear behaviour of pure nickel and platinum on the electrode temperature, gas, electrode gap, electrode diameter, atmospheric pressure, and partial pressure of oxygen. It was shown that erosion under nitrogen is negligible, irrespective of the material. This disproves all common mechanism discussed in the literature explaining material loss of spark plug electrodes. Based on this observation and the variation of the mentioned parameters a new erosion model was deduced. This relies on an oxidation of the electrode material and describes the erosion of nickel and platinum separately. For nickel, electrode wear is caused by the removal of an oxide layer by the spark. In the case of platinum, material loss occurs due to the plasma-assisted formation and subsequent evaporation of volatile oxides in the cathode spot. On the basis of this mechanism a new composite material was developed whose erosion resistance is superior to pure platinum. Oxidation resistant metal oxide particles were added to a platinum matrix, thus leading to a higher erosion resistance of the composite. However, this can be decreased by a side reaction, the separation of oxygen from the metal oxides, which effectively assists the oxidation of the matrix. This reaction can be suppressed by using highly stable oxides, characterized by a large negative Gibbs

  16. Relationship between food habits and tooth erosion occurrence in Malaysian University students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaf, Zahara Abdul; Lee, Mei Tee; Ali, Nor Hazirah Muhammad; Samynathan, Selvamary; Jie, Ying Phor; Ismail, Noor Hasnani; Bibiana Hui Ying, Yong; Wei Seng, Yeo; Yahya, Nurul Asyikin

    2012-04-01

    Tooth erosion is a growing dental problem; however, the role of diet in the aetiology of tooth erosion is unclear. A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the association between tooth erosion occurrence and the consumption of acidic foods and drinks among undergraduate university students. A total of 150 undergraduate students (33 males and 117 females) aged 19 to 24 years at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia participated in this study. The Basic Erosive Wear Examination was used to assess the occurrence of tooth erosion. Information regarding dental hygiene practices, usual dietary habits, and consumption of acidic foods and drinks was obtained through a structured questionnaire. In all, 68% of subjects had tooth erosion. Subjects who reported having received information about healthy eating were less likely to have tooth erosion (χ(2) [1, N = 150] = 7.328, P = 0.007). The frequencies of milk (OR = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.13-0.67) and tea/coffee (adjusted OR = 0.42, 95% CI = 0.19-0.95) consumption were negatively associated with tooth erosion. Dental hygiene practice, the frequency and amount of acidic food and drink intake, and body mass index classification were not significantly associated with the risk of tooth erosion (P > 0.05). A high prevalence of tooth erosion was observed among this group of students. Preventive measures, such as dietary advice and increased consumption of milk at a younger age, may reduce the occurrence of tooth erosion among this age group.

  17. Predicting the temporal relationship between soil cesium-137 and erosion rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachanoski, R.G.; De Jong, E.

    1984-01-01

    A model was developed that predicts the amount of 137 Cs remaining in soil as a function of time and erosion rate. The model accounts for atmospheric deposition, radioactive decay, tillage dilution, and erosion transport of 137 Cs, as well as seasonal differences in 137 Cs deposition and erosion rates. The model was used to estimate minimum resolution of erosion estimates based on detection limits and accuracy of 137 Cs measurement by gamma spectroscopy, as a function of time and erosion rate. The analysis showed that under Saskatchewan conditions, changes in 137 Cs at a given site can be used to estimate erosion rates between 0.5 and 10 kg m -2 yr -1 with reasonable precision, provided the sampling interval is at least 15 yr. The relationship of fraction of 137 Cs lost vs. erosion as predicted by the model was compared with other methods being used. The model was used to estimate erosion from selected Saskatchewan soils where 137 Cs levels were measured in 1966 and again in 1981. Erosion rates calculated with the model varied from 1 kg m -2 yr -1 for a sandy loam soil in continuous forage to 19 kg m -2 yr -1 for a similar soil in a crop-fallow rotation. Erosion estimates using the model were higher than those calculated by assuming that soil loss was directly proportional to 137 Cs loss, especially when 137 Cs loss was high

  18. Gully erosion in Madagascar: causes and impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveloson, Andrea; Székely, Balázs; Visnovitz, Ferenc

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion has been recognized as the main cause of land degradation worldwide and gully erosion is currently considered as one of the most impressive and striking erosion type. This global environmental problem has numerous causes (both natural and anthropogenic) and inflict serious socio-economic problems all around the world. The present study aims to discuss the occurrence and environmental issues related to lavakization in Madagascar and its impact on landscape (badland formation), land use management, flora and fauna, infrastructures, soil properties and human life itself. We assembled and reviewed lavaka researches since 1953. Exact location of the field surveys, cited triggering factors and results of these scientific papers have been studied in detail and compared with our data collected using satellite imagery. Lavaka distribution was analyzed using GIS methods and the relation between their density and different factors was studied. An overview of the many contributing factors (climate, topography, geology, vegetation cover, fault systems, tectonism and land use including inappropriate cultivation and irrigation systems) is given in order to better understand lavaka formation, distribution and impacts. Synthesis of previous researches might help us define area susceptible to gully formation. This can be used to determine prevention priorities for farmers, to manage their lands sustainably. This is ILARG contribution 18.

  19. Using Cesium-137 technique to study the characteristics of different aspect of soil erosion in the Wind-water Erosion Crisscross Region on Loess Plateau of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Mian E-mail: hnli-mian@163.com; Li Zhanbin; Liu Puling; Yao Wenyi

    2005-01-01

    The most serious soil erosion on Loess Plateau exists in the Wind-water Erosion Crisscross Region. In the past 20 years, the types and intensity of soil erosion and its temporal and spatial distribution were studied, but studies on the difference of soil erosion between slope aspects and slope positions in this area have no report. However, it is very important to analyze and evaluate quantitatively the characteristics of different aspects and positions of soil loss for the prevention and treatment of soil erosion in this area. The spatial pattern of net soil loss on 4 downslope transects in four aspects (east, west, south and north) on a typical Mao (round loess mound) in Liudaogou catchment in Wind-water Erosion Crisscross Region was measured in 2000 using the resident cesium-137 deficit technique. The purposes of this investigation were undertaken to determine whether or not {sup 137}Cs measurement would give a useful indication of the extent of soil loss and their characteristics from cultivated hillsides in different slope aspect and slope position in the study area. The results showed that the difference of soil erosion in different aspect was significant and the erosion rate was in this order: north>east>south>west. Compared with other areas, the difference of erosion rate between north hillside and south hillside was on the contrary, and the possible explanations could be the effect of wind erosion. Also, the percentage of wind erosion was estimated to be at least larger than 18% of total soil loss by comparing the difference of erosion amount in south hillside and north hillside. The erosion rates on different slope positions in all aspects were also different, the highest net soil loss occurred in the lower slope position, and the upper and middle slope positions were slight. The general trend of net soil loss on sloping surface was to increase in fluctuation with increasing downslope distance.

  20. Using REE tracers to measure sheet erosion changing to rill erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Puling; Xue Yazhou; Song Wei; Wang Mingyi; Ju Tongjun

    2004-01-01

    Rare Earth Elements (REE) tracer method was used to study sheet erosion changing to rill erosion on slope land. By placing different rare earth elements of different soil depth across a slope in an indoor plot, two simulated rainfalls were applied to study the change of erosion type and the rill erosion process. The results indicate that the main erosion type is sheet erosion at the beginning of the rainfalls, and serious erosion happens after rill erosion appears. Accumulated sheet and rill erosion amounts increase with the rainfalls time. The percentage of sheet erosion amount decreases and rill erosion percentage increases with time. At the end of the rainfalls, the total rill erosion amounts are 4-5 times more than sheet erosion. In this paper, a new REE tracer method was used to quantitatively distinguish sheet and rill erosion amounts. The new REE tracer method should be useful to future studying of erosion processes on slope lands. (authors)

  1. Comparison of methods for calculating water erosion

    OpenAIRE

    SVOBODOVÁ, Pavlína

    2011-01-01

    Bachelor thesis presents a comparison of methods for calculating water erosion. The aim is to summarize available evidence concerning the problems of water erosion. There are presented some methods how to calculate average annual erosion of soils, and selected models for calculating the erosion immediately. There are also listed possible erosion control measures through which we can at least slow the effects of erosion, rather than stop completely.

  2. Multifactorial analysis of factors associated with the incidence and progression of erosive tooth wear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Aidi, H.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Truin, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    To prevent erosive tooth wear, early diagnosis and identification of causative factors are essential. The aim of the present 3-year longitudinal study was to investigate the association between a broad collection of biological and behavioural factors and the incidence and progression of erosive

  3. Erosion and deposition in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudenmaier, G.

    1985-01-01

    The flow of metal impurities from the wall and limiter to the plasma, and back towards the wall, is investigated using surface collection probes and subsequent surface analysis in order to understand impuritiy generation and impurity transport. Impurity fluxes and their scrapeoff lengths have been investigated for several years in a large number of tokamaks. The results are summarized and discussed. Erosion exceeding deposition was first observed to occur at limiterlike structures closest to the plasma edge. Recently, a new probe has been developed to measure quantitatively the erosion in ASDEX. Subsequent quantitative surface analysis is performed in situ by electron induced x-ray analysis. Erosion caused either by ions (limiter) or charge exchange neutrals (wall) can be investigated separately. The erosion at the wall is about two orders of magnitude smaller than the erosion at limiterlike structures, which is of the order of one monolayer per discharge. Simultaneous measurements of deposition and erosion have been performed to elucidate net values of deposition and erosion

  4. Gastric Mucosal Erosions - Radiologic evaluation -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hyup

    1985-01-01

    70 cases of gastric mucosal erosions were diagnosed by double contrast upper gastrointestinal examinations and endoscopic findings. Analyzing the radiologic findings of these 70 cases of gastric mucosal erosions, the following results were obtained. 1. Among the total 70 cases, 65 cases were typical varioliform erosions showing central depressions and surrounding mucosal elevations. Remaining 5 cases were erosions of acute phase having multiple irregular depressions without surrounding elevations. 2. The gastric antrum was involved alone or in part in all cases. Duodenal bulb was involved with gastric antrum in 4 cases. 3. The majority of the cases had multiple erosions. There were only 2 cases of single erosion. 4. In 65 cases of varioliform erosions; 1) The diameter of the surrounding elevations varied from 3 to 20 mm with the majority (47 cases) between 6 and 10 mm. 2) In general, the surrounding elevations with sharp margin on double contrast films were also clearly demonstrated on compression films but those with faint margin were not. 3) The size of the central barium collections varied from pinpoint to 10 mm with the majority under 5 mm. The shape of the central barium collections in majority of the cases were round with a few cases of linear, triangular or star-shape. 5. In 5 cases of acute phase erosions; 1) All the 5 cases were females. 2) On double contrast radiography, all the cases showed multiple irregular depressed lesions without surrounding elevations. 3) 1 case had the history of hematemesis. 4) In 1 case, there was marked radiological improvement on follow-up study of 2 months interval. 6. In 23 cases, there were coexistent diseases with gastric mucosal erosions. These were 13 cases of duodenal bulb ulcers,7 cases of benign gastric ulcers and 3 others

  5. Delineation of rill soil erosion from uav-borne remote sensing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinowski, Radoslaw; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    2017-01-01

    Soil erosion is a very important factor of land degradation and is especially oppressive when it occurs on productively used areas such as agricultural fields. Rill and interrill soil erosion, although less serious and smaller in size then gully erosion, might also bring serious damages. Depending...... on the time of occurrence it may prevent the field from being used, hampering soil cultivation and resulting in yields reduction. Therefore, reliable information on rill soil erosion of agricultural areas is fundamental for land managers, farmers and decision makers...

  6. Rinsing with antacid suspension reduces hydrochloric acid-induced erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Maria do Socorro Coelho; Mantilla, Taís Fonseca; Bridi, Enrico Coser; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso

    2016-01-01

    Mouthrinsing with antacids, following erosive episodes, have been suggested as a preventative strategy to minimize tooth surface loss due to their neutralizing effect. The purpose of this in situ study was to evaluate the effect of an antacid suspension containing sodium alginate, sodium bicarbonate and calcium carbonate in controlling simulated erosion of enamel of intrinsic origin. The experimental units were 48 slabs (3×3×2mm) of bovine enamel, randomly divided among 12 volunteers who wore palatal appliances with two enamel slabs. One of them was exposed extra-orally twice a day to 25mL of a hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution (0.01M, pH 2) for 2min. There were two independent phases, lasting 5 days each. In the first phase, according to a random scheme, half of the participants rinsed with 10mL of antacid suspension (Gaviscon(®), Reckitt Benckiser Healthcare Ltd.), while the remainder was rinsed with deionized water, for 1min. For the second phase, new slabs were inserted and participants switched to the treatment not received in the first stage. Therefore, the groups were as follows: (a) erosive challenge with HCl+antacid suspension; (b) erosive challenge with HCl+deionized water (DIW); (c) no erosive challenge+antacid suspension; (d) no erosive challenge+DIW. Specimens were assessed in terms of surface loss using optical profilometry and Knoop microhardness. The data were analyzed using repeated measures two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's tests. Compared to DIW rinses, surface loss of enamel was significantly lower when using an antacid rinse following erosive challenges (p=0.015). The Knoop microhardness of the enamel was significantly higher when the antacid rinse was used (p=0.026). The antacid suspension containing sodium alginate, sodium bicarbonate and calcium carbonate, rinsed after erosive challenges of intrinsic origin, reduced enamel surface loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Recognising and responding to care erosion: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jan Martinus Anne; Timmins, Fiona

    2017-08-16

    This article is the first in a two-part series discussing declining standards of care. Many healthcare organisations, particularly hospitals, are under increased pressure to maintain standards of care while experiencing funding and staff shortages, and increasing patient numbers and demand for services. One of the main risks associated with these competing demands is a gradual decline in care standards, described as 'care erosion' in this article. Understanding the psychosocial mechanisms that can lead to care erosion is important in preventing its occurrence. This article uses the theory of cognitive dissonance to explain how nurses reflect on, and maintain, quality of care. If practice is suboptimal or substandard and inconsistent with nursing values, standards or regulations, nurses are likely to experience inner conflict or 'dissonance discomfort' and will usually attempt to reduce this feeling by enhancing the quality of care they provide. Conversely, nurses may defend, deny, trivialise or ignore substandard care. The authors suggest that this is the mechanism that leads to care erosion. This article uses three scenarios to explore the nurse's role in care erosion. Part two of this article discusses the wider involvement of individuals, organisations and nurse education in preventing care erosion.

  8. Variability of Rainfall Erosivity and Erosivity Density in the Ganjiang River Catchment, China: Characteristics and Influences of Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianghu Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is one of the most critical environmental hazards in the world. Understanding the changes in rainfall erosivity (RE and erosivity density (ED, as well as their affecting factors, at local and catchment scales in the context of climate warming is an important prerequisite of soil erosion prevention and soil loss risk assessment. The present study identified the variability and trends of RE and ED in terms of both time and space in the Ganjiang River catchment over the period of 1960–2012, and also analyzed and discussed the impact of climate change. The results show that RE and ED in the catchment had great monthly variations and high year-to-year variability. Both presented long-term increasing trends over the entire study period. The highest RE and ED were observed in June and in the eastern and northeast parts of the catchment, which indicated that June was the most susceptible month for soil erosion in this area and the lower reaches of the Ganjiang River was the riskiest area for soil erosion. Finally, the East Asian summer monsoon and climate change were highly correlated with changes in RE and ED.

  9. On the geoethical implications of wind erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Károly, Tatárvári

    2016-04-01

    precipitation changes, this also increases the occurrence of bush-fires, and the growing extent of uncovered soil surface shall intensify wind erosion as well accelerating the negative effects described above. Who will be held responsible for this? Who should bear the larger cost of production in agriculture that is caused by the cost of research necessary to uncover the methods of prevention of irreversible damages caused in nature and environment? Because the field of research requires an interdisciplinary approach, research and innovation requires huge funds, the different approaches to the problem in every single field, and different reasoning methods represent a hurdle as well. In search for possible solutions it is necessary that political decision-makers adopt regulations which have solid scientific fundamentals, and also the cooperation of mankind active in science and economy is crucial. This is the only way of finding sustainable and long term solutions to the problem.

  10. Erosive tooth wear in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, T.S.; Lussi, A.; Jaeggi, T.; Gambon, D.L.; Lussi, A.; Ganss, C.

    2014-01-01

    Erosive tooth wear in children is a common condition. Besides the anatomical differences between deciduous and permanent teeth, additional histological differences may influence their susceptibility to dissolution. Considering laboratory studies alone, it is not clear whether deciduous teeth are

  11. Compost for steep slope erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    This study was initiated to develop guidelines for maintenance erosion control measures for steep slopes. The study focused on evaluating and monitoring KY-31 fescue germination rates using two media treatments 1) 100 percent by weight compost and 2)...

  12. Erosion-resistant composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C.B.; Tennery, V.J.; Curlee, R.M.

    A highly erosion-resistant composite material is formed of chemical vapor-deposited titanium diboride on a sintered titanium diboride-nickel substrate. This material may be suitable for use in cutting tools, coal liquefaction systems, etc.

  13. Soil Erosion and Agricultural Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, D. R.

    2009-04-01

    Data drawn from a global compilation of studies support the long articulated contention that erosion rates from conventionally plowed agricultural fields greatly exceed rates of soil production, erosion under native vegetation, and long-term geological erosion. Whereas data compiled from around the world show that soil erosion under conventional agriculture exceeds both rates of soil production and geological erosion rates by up to several orders of magnitude, similar global distributions of soil production and geological erosion rates suggest an approximate balance. Net soil erosion rates in conventionally plowed fields on the order of 1 mm/yr can erode typical hillslope soil profiles over centuries to millennia, time-scales comparable to the longevity of major civilizations. Well-documented episodes of soil loss associated with agricultural activities date back to the introduction of erosive agricultural methods in regions around the world, and stratigraphic records of accelerated anthropogenic soil erosion have been recovered from lake, fluvial, and colluvial stratigraphy, as well as truncation of soil stratigraphy (such as truncated A horizons). A broad convergence in the results from studies based on various approaches employed to study ancient soil loss and rates of downstream sedimentation implies that widespread soil loss has accompanied human agricultural intensification in examples drawn from around the world. While a broad range of factors, including climate variability and society-specific social and economic contexts — such as wars or colonial relationships — all naturally influence the longevity of human societies, the ongoing loss of topsoil inferred from studies of soil erosion rates in conventional agricultural systems has obvious long-term implications for agricultural sustainability. Consequently, modern agriculture — and therefore global society — faces a fundamental question over the upcoming centuries. Can an agricultural system

  14. Dynamics of organic carbon losses by water erosion after biocrust removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantón Yolanda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In arid and semiarid ecosystems, plant interspaces are frequently covered by communities of cyanobacteria, algae, lichens and mosses, known as biocrusts. These crusts often act as runoff sources and are involved in soil stabilization and fertility, as they prevent erosion by water and wind, fix atmospheric C and N and contribute large amounts of C to soil. Their contribution to the C balance as photosynthetically active surfaces in arid and semiarid regions is receiving growing attention. However, very few studies have explicitly evaluated their contribution to organic carbon (OC lost from runoff and erosion, which is necessary to ascertain the role of biocrusts in the ecosystem C balance. Furthermore, biocrusts are not resilient to physical disturbances, which generally cause the loss of the biocrust and thus, an increase in runoff and erosion, dust emissions, and sediment and nutrient losses. The aim of this study was to find out the influence of biocrusts and their removal on dissolved and sediment organic carbon losses. One-hour extreme rainfall simulations (50 mm h-1 were performed on small plots set up on physical soil crusts and three types of biocrusts, representing a development gradient, and also on plots where these crusts were removed from. Runoff and erosion rates, dissolved organic carbon (DOC and organic carbon bonded to sediments (SdOC were measured during the simulated rain. Our results showed different SdOC and DOC for the different biocrusts and also that the presence of biocrusts substantially decreased total organic carbon (TOC (average 1.80±1.86 g m-2 compared to physical soil crusts (7.83±3.27 g m-2. Within biocrusts, TOC losses decreased as biocrusts developed, and erosion rates were lower. Thus, erosion drove TOC losses while no significant direct relationships were found between TOC losses and runoff. In both physical crusts and biocrusts, DOC and SdOC concentrations were higher during the first minutes after runoff

  15. Wind erosion of soils burned by wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. S. Wagenbrenner; M. J. Germino; B. K. Lamb; R. B. Foltz; P. R. Robichaud

    2011-01-01

    Wind erosion and aeolian transport processes are largely unstudied in the post-wildfire environment, but recent studies have shown that wind erosion can play a major role in burned landscapes. A wind erosion monitoring system was installed immediately following a wildfire in southeastern Idaho, USA to measure wind erosion from the burned area (Figure 1). This paper...

  16. Developement and introduction of measures for protecting coal from wind erosion during transportation. Razrabotka, vnedrenie mer i sredstv zashchity uglei ot vetrovoi ehrozii pri transportirovanii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, V.M.; Radovitskii, I.V.; Sazhin, O.B.; Yakubovich, I.L.

    1985-01-01

    Ways are discussed of reducing coal losses during transportation, totalling around 10 million tons per annum (about 50% due to wind erosion). The paper reviews coal protection in USA, FRG, Japan, Czechoslovakia and German Democratic Republic, protective covers, characteristics of water-in-oil emulsions (60% water phase) and their application, results of industrial scale tests, development and principal application of devices for creating protective covering of coal in open trucks, new protective materials for prevention of coal losses (water soluble latex, waste from oil refineries, etc.). Basic physical properties of oil refinery waste are given. Tests proved that this kind of cover can reliably prevent small coal from flying away at railway speeds of 110-120 km/h. The paper describes prevention of coal losses during storage (effect of oxygen, atmospheric precipitation and wind) by special emulsion covers, devices for preparing and depositing protective covering (water saturated steam) and automation of protective covering devices. 5 references.

  17. Dental erosion in workers exposed to sulfuric acid in lead storage battery manufacturing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Yuji; Takaku, Satoru; Okawa, Yoshikazu; Matsukubo, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Dental erosion, and specifically its symptoms, has long been studied in Japan as an occupational dental disease. However, in recent years, few studies have investigated the development of this disease or labor hygiene management aimed at its prevention. As a result, interest in dental erosion is comparatively low, even among dental professionals. Our investigation at a lead storage battery factory in 1991 found that the work environmental sulfuric acid density was above the tolerable range (1.0mg/m(3)) and that longterm workers had dental erosion. Therefore, workers handling sulfuric acid were given an oral examination and rates of dental erosion by tooth type, rates of erosion by number of working years and rates of erosion by sulfuric acid density in the work environment investigated. Where dental erosion was diagnosed, degree of erosion was identified according to a diagnostic criterion. No development of dental erosion was detected in the maxillary teeth, and erosion was concentrated in the anterior mandibular teeth. Its prevalence was as high as 20%. Rates of dental erosion rose precipitously after 10 working years. The percentages of workers with dental erosion were 42.9% for 10-14 years, 57.1% for 15-19 years and 66.7% for over 20 years with 22.5% for total number of workers. The percentages of workers with dental erosion rose in proportion to work environmental sulfuric acid density: 17.9% at 0.5-1.0, 25.0% at 1.0-4.0 and 50.0% at 4.0-8.0mg/m(3). This suggests that it is necessary to evaluate not only years of exposure to sulfuric acid but also sulfuric acid density in the air in factory workers.

  18. Effect of vegetable oils applied over acquired enamel pellicle on initial erosion

    OpenAIRE

    IONTA, Franciny Querobim; de ALENCAR, Catarina Ribeiro Barros; VAL, Poliana Pacifico; BOTEON, Ana Paula; JORD?O, Maisa Camillo; HON?RIO, Heitor Marques; BUZALAF, Mar?lia Afonso Rabelo; RIOS, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective The prevalence of dental erosion has been recently increasing, requiring new preventive and therapeutic approaches. Vegetable oils have been studied in preventive dentistry because they come from a natural, edible, low-cost, and worldwide accessible source. This study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of different vegetable oils, applied in two concentrations, on initial enamel erosion. Material and Methods Initially, the acquired pellicle was formed in situ for 2...

  19. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...

  20. Plant biodiversity effects in reducing fluvial erosion are limited to low species richness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Daniel C; Cardinale, Bradley J; Wynn-Thompson, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that plant biodiversity may increase the erosion resistance of soils, yet direct evidence for any such relationship is lacking. We conducted a mesocosm experiment with eight species of riparian herbaceous plants, and found evidence that plant biodiversity significantly reduced fluvial erosion rates, with the eight-species polyculture decreasing erosion by 23% relative to monocultures. Species richness effects were largest at low levels of species richness, with little increase between four and eight species. Our results suggest that plant biodiversity reduced erosion rates indirectly through positive effects on root length and number of root tips, and that interactions between legumes and non-legumes were particularly important in producing biodiversity effects. Presumably, legumes increased root production of non-legumes by increasing soil nitrogen availability due to their ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen. Our data suggest that a restoration project using species from different functional groups might provide the best insurance to maintain long-term erosion resistance.

  1. Determination of riverbank erosion probability using Locally Weighted Logistic Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Elena; Flori, Aikaterini; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.; Giannakis, Georgios; Vozinaki, Anthi Eirini K.; Karatzas, George P.; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos

    2015-04-01

    Riverbank erosion is a natural geomorphologic process that affects the fluvial environment. The most important issue concerning riverbank erosion is the identification of the vulnerable locations. An alternative to the usual hydrodynamic models to predict vulnerable locations is to quantify the probability of erosion occurrence. This can be achieved by identifying the underlying relations between riverbank erosion and the geomorphological or hydrological variables that prevent or stimulate erosion. Thus, riverbank erosion can be determined by a regression model using independent variables that are considered to affect the erosion process. The impact of such variables may vary spatially, therefore, a non-stationary regression model is preferred instead of a stationary equivalent. Locally Weighted Regression (LWR) is proposed as a suitable choice. This method can be extended to predict the binary presence or absence of erosion based on a series of independent local variables by using the logistic regression model. It is referred to as Locally Weighted Logistic Regression (LWLR). Logistic regression is a type of regression analysis used for predicting the outcome of a categorical dependent variable (e.g. binary response) based on one or more predictor variables. The method can be combined with LWR to assign weights to local independent variables of the dependent one. LWR allows model parameters to vary over space in order to reflect spatial heterogeneity. The probabilities of the possible outcomes are modelled as a function of the independent variables using a logistic function. Logistic regression measures the relationship between a categorical dependent variable and, usually, one or several continuous independent variables by converting the dependent variable to probability scores. Then, a logistic regression is formed, which predicts success or failure of a given binary variable (e.g. erosion presence or absence) for any value of the independent variables. The

  2. Severe Ventral Erosion of Penis Caused by Indwelling Urethral Catheter and Inflation of Foley Balloon in Urethra—Need to Create List of “Never Events in Spinal Cord Injury” in order to Prevent These Complications from Happening in Paraplegic and Tetraplegic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Never Events are serious, largely preventable patient safety incidents that should not occur if the available preventative measures have been implemented. We propose that a list of “Never Events” is created for spinal cord injury patients in order to improve the quality of care. To begin with, following two preventable complications related to management of neuropathic bladder may be included in this list of “Never Events.” (i Severe ventral erosion of glans penis and penile shaft caused by indwelling urethral catheter; (ii incorrect placement of a Foley catheter leading to inflation of Foley balloon in urethra. If a Never Event occurs, health professionals should report the incident through hospital risk management system to National Patient Safety Agency's Reporting and Learning System, communicate with the patient, family, and their carer as soon as possible about the incident, undertake a comprehensive root cause analysis of what went wrong, how, and why, and implement the changes that have been identified and agreed following the root cause analysis.

  3. Seasonal variation and climate change impact in Rainfall Erosivity across Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagos, Panos; Borrelli, Pasquale; Meusburger, Katrin; Alewell, Christine; Ballabio, Cristiano

    2017-04-01

    residues, reduced tillage) in regions with high erosivity. Besides soil erosion mapping, the intra-annual analysis of rainfall erosivity is an important step towards flood prevention, hazard mitigation, ecosystem services, land use change and agricultural production. The application of REDES in combination with moderate climate change scenarios scenario (HadGEM RCP 4.5) resulted in predictions of erosivity in 2050. The overall increase of rainfall erosivity in Europe by 18% until 2050 are in line with projected increases of 17% for the U.S.A. The predicted mean rise of erosivity is also expected to increase the threat of soil erosion in Europe. The most noticeable increase of erosivity is projected for North-Central Europe, the English Channel, The Netherlands and Northern France. On the contrary, the Mediterranean basin show mixed trends. The success story with the compilation of REDES and first rainfall erosivity map of Europe was a driver to implement a Global Rainfall Erosivity Database (GloREDa). During the last 3 years, JRC was leading an effort to collect high temporal resolution rainfall data worldwide. In collaboration with 50 scientists worldwide and 100+ Meteorological and environmental Organisations, we have developed a Global Erosivity Database. In this database, we managed to include calculated erosivity values for 3,625 stations covering 63 countries worldwide.

  4. RECURRENT CORNEAL EROSION SYNDROME (a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Trufanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent corneal erosion (RCE syndrome is characterized by episodes of recurrent spontaneous epithelial defects. Main clinical symptoms (pain, redness, photophobia, lacrimation occurred at night. Corneal lesions revealed by slit lamp exam vary depending on the presence of corneal epithelium raise, epithelial microcysts or epithelial erosions, stromal infiltrates and opacities. Microtraumas, anterior corneal dystrophies, and herpesvirus give rise to RCE. Other causes or factors which increase the risk of RCE syndrome include meibomian gland dysfunction, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, diabetes, and post-LASIK conditions. Basal membrane abnormalities and instability of epithelial adhesion to stroma play a key role in RCE pathogenesis. Ultrastructural changes in RCE include abnormalities of basal epithelial cells and epithelial basal membrane, absence or deficiency of semi-desmosomes, loss of anchor fibrils. Increase in matrix metalloproteinases and collagenases which contribute to basal membrane destruction results in recurrent erosions and further development of abnormal basal membrane. The goals of RCE therapy are to reduce pain (in acute stage, to stimulate re-epithelization, and to restore «adhesion complex» of basal membrane. In most cases, RCE responds to simple conservative treatment that includes lubricants, healing agents, and eye patches. RCEs that are resistant to simple treatment, require complex approach. Non-invasive methods include long-term contact lens use, instillations of autologous serum (eye drops, injections of botulinum toxin (induces ptosis, antiviral agent use or oral intake of metalloproteinase inhibitors. Cell membrane stabilizers, i.e., antioxidants, should be included into treatment approaches as well. Antioxidant effect of Emoxipine promotes tissue reparation due to the prevention of cell membrane lipid peroxidation as well as due to its anti-hypoxic, angioprotective, and antiplatelet effects. If conservative therapy

  5. Bentonite erosion - Laboratory studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansson, Mats

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Bentonite clay is proposed as buffer material in the KBS-3 concept of storing spent nuclear fuel. Since the clay is plastic it will protect the canisters containing the spent fuel from movements in the rock. Furthermore, the clay will expand when taking up water, become very compact and hence limit the transport of solutes to and from the canister to only diffusion. The chemical stability of the bentonite barrier is of vital importance. If much material would be lost the barrier will lose its functions. As a side effect, lots of colloids will be released which may facilitate radionuclide transport in case of a breach in the canister. There are scenarios where during an ice age fresh melt water may penetrate down to repository depths with relatively high flow rates and not mix with older waters of high salinity. Under such conditions bentonite colloids will be more stable and there is a possibility that the bentonite buffer would start to disperse and bentonite colloids be carried away by the passing water. This work is a part of a larger project called Bentonite Erosion, initiated and supported by SKB. In this work several minor experiments have been performed in order to investigate the influence of for instance di-valent cations, gravity, etc. on the dispersion behaviour of bentonite and/or montmorillonite. A bigger experiment where the real situation was simulated using an artificial fracture was conducted. Two Plexiglas slabs were placed on top of each other, separated by plastic spacers. Bentonite was placed in a container in contact with a fracture. The bentonite was water saturated before deionized water was pumped through the fracture. The evolution of the bentonite profile in the fracture was followed visually. The eluate was collected in five different slots at the outlet side and analyzed for colloid concentration employing Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS) and a Single Particle Counter (SPC). Some

  6. Bentonite erosion. Laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Mats (Div. of Nuclear Chemistry, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden), School of Chemical Science and Engineering)

    2009-11-15

    This report covers the laboratory studies that have been performed at Nuclear Chemistry, KTH in the project 'Bentonite Erosion'. Many of the experiments in this report were performed to support the work of the modelling group and were often relatively simple. One of the experiment series was performed to see the impact of gravity and concentration of mono- and di-valent cations. A clay suspension was prepared in a test tube. A net was placed in contact with the suspension, the test tube was filled with solutions of different concentrations and the system was left overnight to settle. The tube was then turned upside down and the behaviour was visually observed. Either the clay suspension fell through the net or stayed on top. By using this method surprisingly sharp determinations of the Critical Coagulation (Flocculation) Concentration (CCC/CFC) could be made. The CCC/CFC of Ca2+ was for sodium montmorillonite determined to be between 1 and 2 mM. An artificial fracture was manufactured in order to simulate the real case scenario. The set-up was two Plexiglas slabs separated by 1 mm thick spacers with a bentonite container at one side of the fracture. Water was pumped with a very low flow rate perpendicular to bentonite container and the water exiting the fracture was sampled and analyzed for colloid content. The bentonite used was treated in different ways. In the first experiment a relatively montmorillonite rich clay was used while in the second bentonite where only the readily soluble minerals had been removed was used. Since Plexiglas was used it was possible to visually observe the bentonite dispersing into the fracture. After the compacted bentonite (1,000 kg/m3) had been water saturated the clay had expanded some 12 mm out into the fracture. As the experiment progressed the clay expanded more out into the fracture and seemed to fractionate in two different phases with less material in the outmost phase. A dark rim which was later analyzed to contain

  7. Human-induced erosion has offset one-third of carbon emissions from land cover change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengang; Hoffmann, Thomas; Six, Johan; Kaplan, Jed O.; Govers, Gerard; Doetterl, Sebastian; van Oost, Kristof

    2017-04-01

    Anthropogenic land cover change (ALCC) is an important carbon (C) loss mechanism, but current methods do not consider the role of accelerated soil organic C erosion and its burial in sediments in their assessments of net soil-atmosphere C exchange. Using a comprehensive global database and parsimonious modelling, we evaluate the impact of anthropogenic soil erosion on C fluxes between the Earth’s surface and atmosphere from the onset of agriculture to the present day. We find that agricultural erosion represents a very large and transient perturbation to the C cycle and has induced a cumulative net uptake of 78 +/- 22 Pg C in terrestrial ecosystems during the period 6000 BC to AD 2015. This erosion-induced soil organic C sink is estimated to have offset 37 +/- 10% of previously recognized C emissions resulting from ALCC. We estimate that rates of C burial have increased by a factor of 4.6 since AD 1850. Thus, current assessments may significantly overestimate both past and future anthropogenic emissions from the land. Given that ALCC is the most uncertain component of the global C budget and that there is a strong connection between ALCC and erosion, an explicit representation of erosion and burial processes is essential to fully understand the impact of human activities on the net soil-atmosphere C exchange.

  8. Dental erosion among South Brazilian adolescents: A 2.5-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusius, C D; Alves, L S; Susin, C; Maltz, M

    2018-02-01

    This population-based longitudinal study investigated the incidence, progression and risk factors for dental erosion among South Brazilian adolescents. Eight hundred and one schoolchildren attending 42 public and private schools were clinically examined at 12 years of age; clinical examinations were repeated after 2.5 years (SD=0.3). After tooth cleaning and drying, permanent incisors and first molars were classified using the Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) scoring criteria. Questionnaires were used to collect data on socio-demographic characteristics, dietary habits, toothbrushing frequency and general health. Poisson regression analysis was used to assess the association between dental erosion incidence and explanatory variables, with adjusted incidence risk ratios (IRR) and 95% CI estimated. Among those who did not have dental erosion at baseline, 49 of 680 schoolchildren (7.1%; 95% CI=5.2-9.1) developed erosive lesions over the follow-up period. Among schoolchildren who had dental erosion at baseline, 31 of 121 (25.4%; 95% CI=17.6-33.3) had new or more severe lesions. Boys were more likely to develop dental erosion than girls (IRR=1.88; 95% CI=1.06-3.32). A moderate incidence of dental erosion was observed among South Brazilian adolescents, with boys being at higher risk. The high progression rate of 25% observed here is very concerning, and it should be taken in consideration when designing preventive strategies for dental erosion. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Soil erosion in Slovene Istria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Mikoš

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available From the end of nineties of the 20th century, intense hydrologic and geomorphologic research is taking place in the Slovene Istria. As a part of this research also studies on soil erosion were undertaken in the period from 2005 to 2008. The field measurements were under taken onclosed 1m2 large erosion plots under three different land uses (on bare soils in an olive grove, on an overgrown meadow, in a forest, placed south of the Marezige village in the Rokava River basin.We show weekly measurements of surface erosion (interrill erosion for the period of 13 months (the end of March 2005 – the end of April 2006, as well as monthly and seasonal averages together with selected linear statistical correlations between soil erosion and weather parameters.From May 2005 to April 2006 the interrill erosion on bare soils in an olive grove with an inclination of 5.5° amounted to 9013 g/m2 (90 t/ha that corresponds to surface lowering rate of 8.5 mm/yr; on an overgrown meadow with an inclination of 9.4° it amounted to 168 g/m2 (1,68 t/ha that corresponds to surface lowering rate of 0.16 mm//yr; and in a forest with an inclination of 7.8° it amounted to 391 g/m2 (3,91 t/ha and in a forest with an inclination of 21.4° it amounted to 415 g/m2 (4,15 t/ha, respectively, that corresponds to surface lowering rate of 0.4 mm/yr.

  10. Rainfall erosivity in Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Carlos A.; Vidal, Karim L.

    2011-11-01

    SummaryOne of the most widely used indicators of potential water erosion risk is the rainfall-runoff erosivity factor ( R) of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE). R is traditionally determined by calculating a long-term average of the annual sum of the product of a storm's kinetic energy ( E) and its maximum 30-min intensity ( I30), known as the EI30. The original method used to calculate EI30 requires pluviograph records for at most 30-min time intervals. Such high resolution data is difficult to obtain in many parts of the world, and processing it is laborious and time-consuming. In Chile, even though there is a well-distributed rain gauge network, there is no systematic characterization of the territory in terms of rainfall erosivity. This study presents a rainfall erosivity map for most of the cultivated land in the country. R values were calculated by the prescribed method for 16 stations with continuous graphical record rain gauges in Central Chile. The stations were distributed along 800 km (north-south), and spanned a precipitation gradient of 140-2200 mm yr -1. More than 270 years of data were used, and 5400 storms were analyzed. Additionally, 241 spatially distributed R values were generated by using an empirical procedure based on annual rainfall. Point estimates generated by both methods were interpolated by using kriging to create a map of rainfall erosivity for Central Chile. The results show that the empirical procedure used in this study predicted the annual rainfall erosivity well (model efficiency = 0.88). Also, an increment in the rainfall erosivities was found as a result of the rainfall depths, a regional feature determined by elevation and increasing with latitude from north to south. R values in the study area range from 90 MJ mm ha -1 h -1 yr -1 in the north up to 7375 MJ mm ha -1 h -1 yr -1 in the southern area, at the foothills of the Andes Mountains. Although the map and the estimates could be improved in the future by

  11. Jovian atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, M.; Travis, L.D.

    1986-10-01

    A conference on the atmosphere of Jupiter produced papers in the areas of thermal and ortho-para hydrogen structure, clouds and chemistry, atmospheric structure, global dynamics, synoptic features and processes, atmospheric dynamics, and future spaceflight opportunities. A session on the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune was included, and the atmosphere of Saturn was discussed in several papers

  12. Erosion and lateral surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Erosion can cause serious agricultural and environmental hazards. It can generate severe damage to the landscape, lead to significant loss of agricultural land and consequently to reduction in agricultural productivity, induce surface water pollution due to the transport of sediments and suspende...

  13. Elevated temperature erosive wear of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Manish

    2006-01-01

    Solid particle erosion of metals and alloys at elevated temperature is governed by the nature of the interaction between erosion and oxidation, which, in turn, is determined by the thickness, pliability, morphology, adhesion characteristics and toughness of the oxide scale. The main objective of this paper is to critically review the present state of understanding of the elevated temperature erosion behaviour of metals and alloys. First of all, the erosion testing at elevated temperature is reviewed. This is followed by discussion of the essential features of elevated temperature erosion with special emphasis on microscopic observation, giving details of the erosion-oxidation (E-O) interaction mechanisms. The E-O interaction has been elaborated in the subsequent section. The E-O interaction includes E-O maps, analysis of transition criteria from one erosion mechanism to another mechanism and quantification of enhanced oxidation kinetics during erosion. Finally, the relevant areas for future studies are indicated. (topical review)

  14. Role of sulfites and 4-hexylresorcinol in microbial growth and melanosis prevention of deepwater pink shrimp (Parapenaeus longirostris) using a controlled atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Alvarez, O; Gómez-Guillén, M C; Montero, P

    2005-01-01

    A controlled atmosphere containing 48% CO2 and 7% O2 was used in association with refrigeration for storage of deepwater pink shrimp (Parapenaeus longirostris). Shrimp were treated with two different concentrations of sodium metabisulfite or 4-hexylresorcinol and subjected to the controlled atmosphere immediately after capture onboard ship or on arrival in port. Total volatile basic nitrogen, total viable counts, enterobacteria, lactic acid bacteria, and luminescent bacteria were determined, and black spot progression was evaluated. The combined effect of controlled atmosphere and melanosis inhibitors was used to delay black spot development as compared to the shrimp stored in ice alone. Storage under the controlled atmosphere without ice limited microbiological quality, namely, total viable counts, but enterobacterial growth was lower.

  15. Mean bedrock-to-saprolite conversion and erosion rates during mountain growth and decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretier, Sébastien; Goddéris, Yves; Delannoy, Thibault; Rouby, Delphine

    2014-05-01

    Weathering and associated atmospheric CO2 consumption are thought to increase during the erosion of uplifting mountain ranges, but the effect of enhanced erosion on weathering is still the subject of active debate. Among the recent criticisms, 1D models coupling erosion and weathering suggest that weathering first increases but then decrease when uplift increases. Moreover, it seems that for the last 12 Ma, global erosion increased while weathering and atmospheric CO2 stayed constant. Nevertheless, it is possible that erosion heterogeneity in uplifting landscapes leads to time lags between mean uplift, erosion and weathering, without contradicting the fact that erosion does enhance weathering. We explore this possibility by using a 3D land- scape evolution model applied to a synthetic surface with different uplift and climate scenarios. Although we do not strictly simulate the weathering outflux of the mountain, we analyze the weathering response through the evolution of the mountain-mean saprolite production rate and compare it to the mountain-mean erosion rate through time. The parametrical analysis shows that the temporal relationship between mean erosion and saprolite production rates depends mainly on the ratio of the maximum saprolite production rate and the uplift rate wm/U. When wm/U > 1, which corresponds to mountain ranges under hot and humid climate, mean erosion and sapro- lite production rates vary at the same rate during uplift and after, once the uplift is stopped. When the uplift is stopped, mean saprolite production rate decreases monotonically, although locally, saprolite production rates pass by maxima. These maxima occur at different times, which produces a mono- tonic decrease at large scale. When wm/U < 1, which corresponds to most of the mountain ranges at mid-latitudes, mean production rate peaks early and then remains constant, while erosion keeps on increasing and reaches a steady-state ˜10 Myrs later. When uplift is stopped, erosion and

  16. Impacts of shoreline erosion on coastal ecosystems in Songkhla Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nipaporn Chusrinuan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Songkhla Province is located on the eastern coast of the southern Thai Peninsula, bordering the Gulf of Thailand for approximately 107 km. Most of the basin’s foreshores have been extensively developed for housing, tourism and shrimp farming. The beaches are under deteriorating impacts, often causing sediment transport which leads to an unnaturally high erosion rate. This natural phenomenon is considered to be a critical problem in the coastal areas affected by the hazard of coastal infrastructure and reduced beach esthetics for recreation. In this study, shoreline changes were compared between 1975 and 2006 using aerial photographs and Landsat imageries using Geographic Information System (GIS. The results revealed that 18.5 km2 of the coastal areas were altered during the period. Of this, 17.3 km2 suffered erosion and 1.2 km2were subjected to accretion. The most significant changes occurred between 1975-2006. Shoreline erosion was found at Ban Paktrae, Ranot District, with an average erosion rate of 5.3 m/year, while accretion occurred at Laem Samila, MuangSongkhla District with an average accretion rate of 2.04 m/year. The occurrences of shoreline erosion have contributed to the degradation of coastal soil and water quality, destruction of beach and mangrove forests, loss of human settlements and livelihood.These processes have led to deterioration of the quality of life of the residents. Prevention and mitigation measures to lessen economic and social impacts due to shoreline erosion are discussed.

  17. Modeling erosion from forest roads with WEPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. McFero Grace

    2007-01-01

    Forest roads can be major sources of soil erosion from forest watersheds. Sediments from forest roads are a concern due to their potential delivery to stream systems resulting in degradation of water quality. The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) was used to predict erosion from forest road components under different management practices. WEPP estimates are...

  18. Soil Erosion. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buydos, John F., Comp.

    Soil erosion is the detachment and movement of topsoil or soil material from the upper part of the soil profile. It may occur in the form of rill, gully, sheet, or wind erosion. Agents of erosion may be water, wind, glacial ice, agricultural implements, machinery, and animals. Soil conservation measures require a thorough understanding of the…

  19. Natural and anthropogenic rates of soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regions of land that are brought into crop production from native vegetation typically undergo a period of soil erosion instability, and long term erosion rates are greater than for natural lands as long as the land continues being used for crop production. Average rates of soil erosion under natur...

  20. Soil erosion in humid regions: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Holz; Karl W.J. Williard; Pamela J. Edwards; Jon E. Schoonover

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion has significant implications for land productivity and surface water quality, as sediment is the leading water pollutant worldwide. Here, erosion processes are defined. The dominant factors influencing soil erosion in humid areas are reviewed, with an emphasis on the roles of precipitation, soil moisture, soil porosity, slope steepness and length,...

  1. Factors affecting the dental erosion severity of patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsu, Mitsuhiro; Hamura, Akira; Ishikawa, Yuiko; Karibe, Hiroyuki; Ichijyo, Tomoyasu; Yoshinaga, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    Intraoral disease is a common occurrence in patients with eating disorders, particularly dental erosion, which frequently becomes severe and may hinder daily life. The severity varies from patient to patient. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may help prevent dental erosion in these patients. Accordingly, we investigated the relationship between the severity of erosion and the behavior of patients with eating disorders, with a focus on daily diet and vomiting behavior. A total 71 female eating disorder outpatients from the Clinical Center of Psychosomatic Dentistry of Nippon Dental University Hospital and the Psychosomatic Internal Medicine Department of Kudanzaka Hospital or who were hospitalized at Hasegawa Hospital were enrolled. Dental erosion severity and location were determined by oral examination. Patients who induced vomiting were queried on their behavior during vomiting and on routine diet habits. Patients with dental erosion were further divided into mild and severe groups based on the lesion severity and the groups compared. Dental erosion was observed in 43 of 50 subjects who induced vomiting. Dental erosion was most frequent on the palatal side of the anterior maxillary teeth, occurring in 81.3% of the subjects. There were significant differences observed between the mild and severe groups according to post-vomiting oral hygiene. Significantly more subjects in the mild group consumed large amounts of water before vomiting, and significantly more subjects in the severe group routinely consumed carbonated beverages or sweetened food. While self-induced vomiting is the main cause of dental erosion in eating disorder patients, the erosion severity may be affected by behavior when inducing vomiting or by routine consumption of certain foods and beverages. Addressing these factors may help prevent severe dental erosion in patients who chronically induce vomiting.

  2. Global carbon export from the terrestrial biosphere controlled by erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, Valier; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Eglinton, Timothy

    2015-05-14

    Riverine export of particulate organic carbon (POC) to the ocean affects the atmospheric carbon inventory over a broad range of timescales. On geological timescales, the balance between sequestration of POC from the terrestrial biosphere and oxidation of rock-derived (petrogenic) organic carbon sets the magnitude of the atmospheric carbon and oxygen reservoirs. Over shorter timescales, variations in the rate of exchange between carbon reservoirs, such as soils and marine sediments, also modulate atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. The respective fluxes of biospheric and petrogenic organic carbon are poorly constrained, however, and mechanisms controlling POC export have remained elusive, limiting our ability to predict POC fluxes quantitatively as a result of climatic or tectonic changes. Here we estimate biospheric and petrogenic POC fluxes for a suite of river systems representative of the natural variability in catchment properties. We show that export yields of both biospheric and petrogenic POC are positively related to the yield of suspended sediment, revealing that POC export is mostly controlled by physical erosion. Using a global compilation of gauged suspended sediment flux, we derive separate estimates of global biospheric and petrogenic POC fluxes of 157(+74)(-50) and 43(+61)(-25) megatonnes of carbon per year, respectively. We find that biospheric POC export is primarily controlled by the capacity of rivers to mobilize and transport POC, and is largely insensitive to the magnitude of terrestrial primary production. Globally, physical erosion rates affect the rate of biospheric POC burial in marine sediments more strongly than carbon sequestration through silicate weathering. We conclude that burial of biospheric POC in marine sediments becomes the dominant long-term atmospheric carbon dioxide sink under enhanced physical erosion.

  3. Engineering Analysis of Beach Erosion at Homer Spit, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    SPIT, ALASKA Nby (V) Orson P. Smith, Jane M. Smith, Mary A. Cialone Joan Pope, Todd L. Walton Coastal Engineering Research Center CD DEPARTMENT OF THE...BEACH EROSION AT HOMER Final report SPIT, ALASKA 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(.) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(.) Orson P. Smith, Jane M...preventing offshore losses and beach profile recession as well as protecting the roadway. I Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE MWhen Data

  4. The Arctic Coastal Erosion Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, Jennifer M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thomas, Matthew Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bull, Diana L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Craig A. [Integral Consulting Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Roberts, Jesse D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Permafrost-dominated coastlines in the Arctic are rapidly disappearing. Arctic coastal erosion rates in the United States have doubled since the middle of the twentieth century and appear to be accelerating. Positive erosion trends have been observed for highly-variable geomorphic conditions across the entire Arctic, suggesting a major (human-timescale) shift in coastal landscape evolution. Unfortunately, irreversible coastal land loss in this region poses a threat to native, industrial, scientific, and military communities. The Arctic coastline is vast, spanning more than 100,000 km across eight nations, ten percent of which is overseen by the United States. Much of area is inaccessible by all-season roads. People and infrastructure, therefore, are commonly located near the coast. The impact of the Arctic coastal erosion problem is widespread. Homes are being lost. Residents are being dispersed and their villages relocated. Shoreline fuel storage and delivery systems are at greater risk. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operate research facilities along some of the most rapidly eroding sections of coast in the world. The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) is struggling to fortify coastal radar sites, operated to ensure national sovereignty in the air, against the erosion problem. Rapid alterations to the Arctic coastline are facilitated by oceanographic and geomorphic perturbations associated with climate change. Sea ice extent is declining, sea level is rising, sea water temperature is increasing, and permafrost state is changing. The polar orientation of the Arctic exacerbates the magnitude and rate of the environmental forcings that facilitate coastal land area loss. The fundamental mechanics of these processes are understood; their non-linear combination poses an extreme hazard. Tools to accurately predict Arctic coastal erosion do not exist. To obtain an accurate predictive model, a coupling of the influences of

  5. Dental erosion in 12-year-old school children living in Jakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septalita, A.; Bahar, A.; Agustanti, A.; Rahardjo, A.; Maharani, D. A.; Rosalien, R.

    2017-08-01

    This study assesses the dental erosion status of 12-year-old Indonesian children and studies the determinants of dental erosion of these children. The survey was performed in 2016 with ethics approval. A multistage cluster proportional to size random sampling method was adopted to select 12-year-old children in 24 primary schools in Jakarta. The parents were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire concerning their children’s diet and oral health habits. The children were examined by a single calibrated examiner. Detection of dental erosion followed basic erosive wear examination (BEWE) criteria. A total of 487 children participated in the survey. Most children (88%) had at least some signs of erosion (BEWE > 0), with dentin being involved in 50% of the cases (BEWE = 2). Dental erosion was significantly related to gender, the frequencies of citric tea consumption, parent’s dental knowledge, father’s education, and dental caries (OR = 3.148). The 12-year-old Indonesian school children who lived in Jakarta had signs of erosion, although severe erosion was not found. Screening programs should be provided to identify risk groups so early preventive measures can be taken.

  6. Vegetation Restoration, Soil Erosion and Sediment Yield on the Loess Plateau After "GFG" Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Juying

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion is an increasing environmental problem globally, and the Chinese Loess Plateau suffers the most severe soil erosion in the world. To control soil and water losses and improve ecosystem of the Loess Plateau, significant efforts have been made since the 1950s, especially the implementation of "Grain for Green (GFG)" policy in 1999 on a large scale. After about 15 years of "GFG" implementation, vegetation restored evidently, and soil erosion and sediment yield reduced markedly on the Loess Plateau region. However, for the lager-scale afforestation on the Loess Plateau, the relationship between afforestation and soil water carrying capacity, the sustainability of afforestation and ecosystem should be considered. Although the comprehensive practices have achieved remarkable soil erosion control, soil erosion is still likely to be very severe during heavy rainstorms, especially in gully slope. Attention should be paid in strengthening the storage and drainage measures in the inter-gully to prevent gravitational erosion by reducing the slope runoff flowing down the gully. Proper and rational control measures and management methods in different sections must be investigated further and focused on preventing soil erosion at the sources rather than intercepting sediment with potential risk to the watershed.

  7. Marine Pollution Prevention Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Pollution Prevention Act of 2008 implements the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, including related Protocols (MARPOL)...

  8. Atmospheric contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruetter, Juerg

    1997-01-01

    It is about the levels of contamination in center America, the population's perception on the problem, effects of the atmospheric contamination, effects in the environment, causes of the atmospheric contamination, possibilities to reduce the atmospheric contamination and list of Roeco Swisscontac in atmospheric contamination

  9. Using albedo to reform wind erosion modelling, mapping and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Webb, Nicholas P.

    2016-12-01

    Wind erosion and dust emission models are used to assess the impacts of dust on radiative forcing in the atmosphere, cloud formation, nutrient fertilisation and human health. The models are underpinned by a two-dimensional geometric property (lateral cover; L) used to characterise the three-dimensional aerodynamic roughness (sheltered area or wakes) of the Earth's surface and calibrate the momentum it extracts from the wind. We reveal a fundamental weakness in L and demonstrate that values are an order of magnitude too small and significant aerodynamic interactions between roughness elements and their sheltered areas have been omitted, particularly under sparse surface roughness. We describe a solution which develops published work to establish a relation between sheltered area and the proportion of shadow over a given area; the inverse of direct beam directional hemispherical reflectance (black sky albedo; BSA). We show direct relations between shadow and wind tunnel measurements and thereby provide direct calibrations of key aerodynamic properties. Estimation of the aerodynamic parameters from albedo enables wind erosion assessments over areas, across platforms from the field to airborne and readily available satellite data. Our new approach demonstrated redundancy in existing wind erosion models and thereby reduced model complexity and improved fidelity. We found that the use of albedo enabled an adequate description of aerodynamic sheltering to characterise fluid dynamics and predict sediment transport without the use of a drag partition scheme (Rt) or threshold friction velocity (u∗t). We applied the calibrations to produce global maps of aerodynamic properties which showed very similar spatial patterns to each other and confirmed the redundancy in the traditional parameters of wind erosion modelling. We evaluated temporal patterns of predicted horizontal mass flux at locations across Australia which revealed variation between land cover types that would not

  10. Soil Erosion Threatens Food Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Burgess

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since humans worldwide obtain more than 99.7% of their food (calories from the land and less than 0.3% from the oceans and aquatic ecosystems, preserving cropland and maintaining soil fertility should be of the highest importance to human welfare. Soil erosion is one of the most serious threats facing world food production. Each year about 10 million ha of cropland are lost due to soil erosion, thus reducing the cropland available for world food production. The loss of cropland is a serious problem because the World Health Organization and the Food and Agricultural Organization report that two-thirds of the world population is malnourished. Overall, soil is being lost from agricultural areas 10 to 40 times faster than the rate of soil formation imperiling humanity’s food security.

  11. On inhibition of dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rölla, Gunnar; Jonski, Grazyna; Saxegaard, Erik

    2013-11-01

    To examine the erosion-inhibiting effect of different concentrations of hydrofluoric acid. Thirty-six human molars were individually treated with 10 ml of 0.1 M citric acid for 30 min (Etch 1), acid was collected and stored until analysis. The teeth were randomly divided into six groups and then individually treated with 10 ml of one of six dilutions (from 0.1-1%) of hydrofluoric acid. The teeth were then again treated with citric acid (Etch 2). The individual acid samples from Etch 1 and 2 were analyzed for calcium by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy and difference in calcium loss was calculated. The highest erosion inhibiting effect was obtained in groups with the highest concentrations of hydrofluoric acid, where the pH was lowest, below pKa of 3.17, thus the hydrofluoric acids being mainly in an undissociated state. Diluted hydrofluoric acid is present in aqueous solution of SnF2 and TiF4 (which are known to inhibit dental erosion): SnF2 + 3H2O = Sn(OH)2 + 2HF + H2O and TiF4 + 5H2O = Ti(OH)4 + 4HF + H2O. It is also known that pure, diluted hydrofluoric acid can inhibit dental erosion. Teeth treated with hydrofluoric acid are covered by a layer of CaF2-like mineral. This mineral is acid resistant at pH acid resistant mineral, initiated by tooth enamel treatment with hydrofluoric acid. Hydrofluoric acid is different in having fluoride as a conjugated base, which provides this acid with unique properties.

  12. Sports drinks and dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Warden H; Donovan, Terence E; Geissberger, Marc

    2011-04-01

    Sports drinks were originally developed to improve hydration and performance in athletes taking part in intense or endurance sporting events. These drinks contain relatively high amounts of carbohydrates (sugars), salt, and citric acid. These ingredients create the potential for dental ramifications and overall public health consequences such as obesity and diabetes. High intake of sports drinks during exercise, coupled with xerostomia from dehydration, may lead to the possibility of erosive damage to teeth.

  13. Erosive forms in rivers systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Una Alvarez, E. de; Vidal Romani, J. R.; Rodriguez Martinez-Conde, R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to analyze the geomorphological meaning of the concepts of stability/change and to study its influence on a fluvial erosion system. Different cases of fluvial potholes in Galicia (NW of the Iberian Peninsula) are considered. The work conclusions refer to the nature of the process and its morphological evolution in order to advance towards later contributions with respect of this type of systems. (Author) 14 refs.

  14. Erosion behavior of EEDS cermet coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Guo; Xu Binshi; Wang Haidou; Yin Liang; Li Qingfen; Wei Shicheng; Cui Xiufang

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the erosion performance of electro-thermal explosion directional spraying (EEDS) cermet WC/Co coatings using an air solid particle erosion rig. The influences of the different parameters such as impact angle, impingement velocity, environment temperature, particle diameter, on the erosion property of the coatings were studied. The eroded surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and the erosion mechanisms were discussed. The structure and bond characters of the coatings were also determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and SEM. The results indicate that the EEDS WC/Co coatings are characterized by fine grain structure, good metallurgical bond and brittle erosion character. The erosion rates of the coatings decrease with temperature increasing and increase with impact angle and impingement velocity increasing. At elevated temperature, the oxidation happens on the coatings surface, which affects the erosion behavior

  15. Soil cover and wind erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryrear, D.W.

    Wind erosion on agricultural lands can be reduced if the soil surface is protected with crop residues. In evaluating the influence of residues on wind erosion, previous research has expressed residues of various crops as an equivalent of flat, small grain. This becomes difficult as the density of the residue changes with weathering, or as crops other than the major cultivated crops are grown. Soil losses due to wind erosion were determined by covering various percentages of the soil surface with simulated flat residues (wood dowels 3.1 to 25.4 mm in diameter). Covering 20% of the soil surface reduced soil losses 57%, and a 50% cover reduced soil losses 95%. The expression SLR = 1.81 e/sup x/ where x = /sup -0.072% SC/ describes the relationship between soil loss ratio (SLR) and percent soil cover (% SC) with a correlation coefficient of -0.94 (soil cover limits 8 to 80%). The cover can be any nonerodible material such as large clods, gravel, cotton gin trash, or any diameter stick between 3.1 and 25.4 mm. Percent soil cover is easily measured in the field or can be estimated with a minimum of training and experience.

  16. Application and verification of cold air velocity technique for solving tube ash erosion problem in PC boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Kisoo; Jeong, Kwon Seok

    2012-01-01

    Fly ash erosion is a leading cause of boiler tube failure in PC boilers. Therefore, shields or baffle plates are installed in specific areas to mitigate fly ash erosion and prevent boiler tube failure. However, the tube failure problems caused by fly ash erosion cannot be eliminated with this solution alone, because each PC boiler has a different flue gas flow pattern and erosion can become severe in unexpected zones. This problem is caused by an asymmetric internal flow velocity and local growth of the flue gas velocity. For these reasons, clearly defining the flow pattern in PC boilers is important for solving the problem of tube failure caused by fly ash erosion. For this purpose, the cold air velocity technique (CAVT) can be applied to the fly ash erosion problem. In this study, CAVT was carried out on the Hadong 2 PC boiler and the feasibility of application of CAVT to conventional PC boilers was validated

  17. MR imaging of erosions in interphalangeal joint osteoarthritis: is all osteoarthritis erosive?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grainger, A.J.; Farrant, J.M.; O'Connor, P.J.; Tan, A.L.; Emery, P.; Tanner, S.; McGonagle, D.

    2007-01-01

    Erosive osteoarthritis is usually considered as an inflammatory subset of osteoarthritis (OA). However, an inflammatory component is now recognised in all subsets of OA, so this subgroup of erosive or inflammatory OA is more difficult to conceptualise. The aim of this study was to compare routine CR and MRI to investigate erosion numbers and morphology to determine whether hand OA in general is a more erosive disease than previously recognised. Fifteen patients with clinical (OA) of the small joints of the hand underwent MRI of one of the affected proximal interphalangeal (PIP) or distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints. Conventional radiographs (CR) of the hand were also obtained. The MR images were reviewed by two observers for the presence of central and marginal erosions. The site and morphology of any erosions was recorded. CR images of the same hand joint were scored independently for central and marginal erosions by the same observers. There was 100% agreement between the observers for scoring erosions on CR. Agreement for the MRI scores was also excellent (kappa = 0.84). MRI detected 37 erosions, of which only 9 were seen on CR. The increase in sensitivity using MRI was much greater for marginal erosions (1 detected on CR, 19 on MRI) than for central erosions (8 on CR, 18 on MRI). Using MRI 80% of joints examined showed 1 or more erosions compared with 40% using CR. If only marginal erosions were considered 80% of joints were still considered erosive by MRI criteria, but only 1 showed evidence of erosion on CR. Morphologically central erosions appeared to represent areas of subchondral collapse and pressure atrophy. In contrast, marginal erosions resembled those seen in inflammatory arthritides. Erosions, and particularly marginal erosions typical of those seen in inflammatory arthritis, are a more common feature of small joint OA than conventional radiographs have previously indicated. (orig.)

  18. [Assessment of the impacts of soil erosion on water environment based on the integration of soil erosion process and landscape pattern].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Wu, Bing-Fang; Zeng, Yuan; Zhang, Lei

    2013-09-01

    The integration of the effects of landscape pattern to the assessment of the impacts of soil erosion on eco-environmental is of practical significance in methodological prospect, being able to provide an approach for identifying water body's sediment source area, assessing the potential risks of sediment export of on-site soil erosion to the target water body, and evaluating the capacity of regional landscape pattern in preventing soil loss. In this paper, the RUSLE model was applied to simulate the on-site soil erosion rate. With the consideration of the soil retention potential of vegetation cover and topography, a quantitative assessment was conducted on the impacts of soil erosion in the water source region of the middle route for South-to-North Water Transfer Project on rivers and reservoirs by delineating landscape pattern at point (or cell) scale and sub-watershed level. At point (or grid cell) scale, the index of soil erosion impact intensity (I) was developed as an indicator of the potential risk of sediment export to the water bodies. At sub-watershed level, the landscape leakiness index (LI) was employed to indicate the sediment retention capacity of a given landscape pattern. The results revealed that integrating the information of landscape pattern and the indices of soil erosion process could spatially effectively reflect the impact intensity of in situ soil erosion on water bodies. The LI was significantly exponentially correlated to the mean sediment retention capacity of landscape and the mean vegetation coverage of watershed, and the sediment yield at sub-watershed scale was significantly correlated to the LI in an exponential regression. It could be concluded that the approach of delineating landscape pattern based on soil erosion process and the integration of the information of landscape pattern with its soil retention potential could provide a new approach for the risk evaluation of soil erosion.

  19. Atmosphere Impact Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Hilke E.; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy

    2018-02-01

    } ρ0 (π h R)^{3/2}, r_{cap}˜25 km for the current Earth), that are able to eject all the atmosphere above the tangent plane of the impact site, where h, R and ρ0 are the atmospheric scale height, radius of the target, and its atmospheric density at the ground. 3) Small impactors (m_{min}>4 πρ0 h3, r_{min}˜ 1 km for the current Earth), that are only able to eject a fraction of the atmospheric mass above the tangent plane. We demonstrate that per unit impactor mass, small impactors with r_{min} Earth, they are more than five orders of magnitude more efficient (per unit impactor mass) than giant impacts, implying that atmospheric mass loss must have been common. The enormous atmospheric mass loss efficiency of small impactors is due to the fact that most of their impact energy and momentum is directly available for local mass loss, where as in the giant impact regime a lot of energy and momentum is 'wasted' by having to create a strong shock that can transverse the entirety of the planet such that global atmospheric loss can be achieved. In the absence of any volatile delivery and outgassing, we show that the population of late impactors inferred from the lunar cratering record containing 0.1% M_{\\oplus } is able to erode the entire current Earth's atmosphere implying that an interplay of erosion, outgassing and volatile delivery is likely responsible for determining the atmospheric mass and composition of the early Earth. Combining geochemical observations with impact models suggest an interesting synergy between small and big impacts, where giant impacts create large magma oceans and small and larger impacts drive the atmospheric loss.

  20. Coastal erosion problem, modelling and protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Nihal; Balas, Lale; İnan, Asu

    2015-09-01

    Göksu Delta, located in the south of Silifke County of Mersin on the coastal plain formed by Göksu River, is one of the Specially Protected Areas in Turkey. Along the coastal area of the Delta, coastline changes at significant rates are observed, concentrating especially at four regions; headland of İncekum, coast of Paradeniz Lagoon, river mouth of Göksu and coast of Altınkum. The coast of Paradeniz Lagoon is suffering significantly from erosion and the consequent coastal retreating problem. Therefore, the narrow barrier beach which separates Paradeniz Lagoon from the Mediterranean Sea is getting narrower, creating a risk of uniting with the sea, thus causing the disappearance of the Lagoon. The aim of this study was to understand the coastal transport processes along the coastal area of Göksu Delta to determine the coastal sediment transport rates, and accordingly, to propose solutions to prevent the loss of coastal lands in the Delta. To this end, field measurements of currents and sediment grain sizes were carried out, and wind climate, wave climate, circulation patterns and longshore sediment transport rates were numerically modeled by HYDROTAM-3D, which is a three dimensional hydrodynamic transport model. Finally, considering its special importance as an environmentally protected region, some coastal structures of gabions were proposed as solutions against the coastal erosion problems of the Delta. The effects of proposed structures on future coastline changes were also modeled, and the coastlines predicted for the year 2017 are presented and discussed in the paper.

  1. California Higher Education, the Master Plan, and the Erosion of College Opportunity. National Center Report #09-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Patrick M.

    2009-01-01

    This occasional paper describes the development of the 1960 Master Plan for Higher Education and the current statewide challenges that make the plan ineffective today in preventing the erosion of college opportunity. (Contains 29 endnotes and 8 tables.)

  2. Comparison of erosion and erosion control works in Macedonia, Serbia and Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Blinkov

    2013-12-01

    Natural conditions in the Balkan countries contribute to the appearance of various erosion forms and the intensity of the erosion processes. Over the history of these countries, people who settled this region used the available natural resources to fill their needs (tree cutting, incorrect plugging, overgrazing, which contributed to soil erosion. Organized erosion control works in the Balkans started in the beginning of the 20th century (1905 in Bulgaria. The highest intensity of erosion control works were carried out during the period 1945 – 1990. Various erosion control works were launched. Bulgaria had a large anti-erosion afforestation, almost 1 million ha. Bulgaria's ecological river restoration approach has been in use for almost 50 years. Serbia contributed significant erosion and torrent control works on hilly agricultural areas. Specific screen barrages and afforestation on extremely dry areas are characteristic in Macedonia. A common characteristic for all countries is a high decrease in erosion control works in the last 20 years.

  3. Mapping monthly rainfall erosivity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballabio, C; Meusburger, K; Klik, A

    2017-01-01

    Rainfall erosivity as a dynamic factor of soil loss by water erosion is modelled intra-annually for the first time at European scale. The development of Rainfall Erosivity Database at European Scale (REDES) and its 2015 update with the extension to monthly component allowed to develop monthly and...... events. Consequently, spatio-temporal mapping of rainfall erosivity permits to identify the months and the areas with highest risk of soil loss where conservation measures should be applied in different seasons of the year....... and seasonal R-factor maps and assess rainfall erosivity both spatially and temporally. During winter months, significant rainfall erosivity is present only in part of the Mediterranean countries. A sudden increase of erosivity occurs in major part of European Union (except Mediterranean basin, western part...... to Eastern Europe. The maps also show a clear delineation of areas with different erosivity seasonal patterns, whose spatial outline was evidenced by cluster analysis. The monthly erosivity maps can be used to develop composite indicators that map both intra-annual variability and concentration of erosive...

  4. Validating and improving interrill erosion equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-Bao; Wang, Zhan-Li; Yang, Ming-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Existing interrill erosion equations based on mini-plot experiments have largely ignored the effects of slope length and plot size on interrill erosion rate. This paper describes a series of simulated rainfall experiments which were conducted according to a randomized factorial design for five slope lengths (0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2 m) at a width of 0.4 m, five slope gradients (17%, 27%, 36%, 47%, and 58%), and five rainfall intensities (48, 62.4, 102, 149, and 170 mm h(-1)) to perform a systematic validation of existing interrill erosion equations based on mini-plots. The results indicated that the existing interrill erosion equations do not adequately describe the relationships between interrill erosion rate and its influencing factors with increasing slope length and rainfall intensity. Univariate analysis of variance showed that runoff rate, rainfall intensity, slope gradient, and slope length had significant effects on interrill erosion rate and that their interactions were significant at p = 0.01. An improved interrill erosion equation was constructed by analyzing the relationships of sediment concentration with rainfall intensity, slope length, and slope gradient. In the improved interrill erosion equation, the runoff rate and slope factor are the same as in the interrill erosion equation in the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP), with the weight of rainfall intensity adjusted by an exponent of 0.22 and a slope length term added with an exponent of -0.25. Using experimental data from WEPP cropland soil field interrill erodibility experiments, it has been shown that the improved interrill erosion equation describes the relationship between interrill erosion rate and runoff rate, rainfall intensity, slope gradient, and slope length reasonably well and better than existing interrill erosion equations.

  5. Validating and Improving Interrill Erosion Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-Bao; Wang, Zhan-Li; Yang, Ming-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Existing interrill erosion equations based on mini-plot experiments have largely ignored the effects of slope length and plot size on interrill erosion rate. This paper describes a series of simulated rainfall experiments which were conducted according to a randomized factorial design for five slope lengths (0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2 m) at a width of 0.4 m, five slope gradients (17%, 27%, 36%, 47%, and 58%), and five rainfall intensities (48, 62.4, 102, 149, and 170 mm h−1) to perform a systematic validation of existing interrill erosion equations based on mini-plots. The results indicated that the existing interrill erosion equations do not adequately describe the relationships between interrill erosion rate and its influencing factors with increasing slope length and rainfall intensity. Univariate analysis of variance showed that runoff rate, rainfall intensity, slope gradient, and slope length had significant effects on interrill erosion rate and that their interactions were significant at p = 0.01. An improved interrill erosion equation was constructed by analyzing the relationships of sediment concentration with rainfall intensity, slope length, and slope gradient. In the improved interrill erosion equation, the runoff rate and slope factor are the same as in the interrill erosion equation in the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP), with the weight of rainfall intensity adjusted by an exponent of 0.22 and a slope length term added with an exponent of −0.25. Using experimental data from WEPP cropland soil field interrill erodibility experiments, it has been shown that the improved interrill erosion equation describes the relationship between interrill erosion rate and runoff rate, rainfall intensity, slope gradient, and slope length reasonably well and better than existing interrill erosion equations. PMID:24516624

  6. Global distribution of 137Cs inputs for soil erosion and sedimentation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Agudo, E.

    1998-01-01

    A global distribution of 137 Cs deposition from the atmospheric nuclear tests, with estimates for 1996, excluding Chernobyl contribution, is presented, based on the global deposition data for 90 Sr. The data can be used to identify areas and countries, especially in the southern hemisphere, where the 137 Cs inventories are appropriate for soil erosion and sedimentation studies. (author)

  7. Surface decontamination by cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verry, P.; Lecoffre, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the study is to show the interest of using erosion by cavitation to remove a thin layer of matter from an irradiated surface during nuclear power plant dismantling. Several cavitation devices are tested on different surfaces to erode: aluminum, stainless steel, plexiglas, paints... The process is efficient enough to measure mass loss on materials as hard as stainless steels for a pressure of only 60 bars. Qualification tests using a nozzle feed under a 300 to 600 bar pressure are envisaged

  8. Physics of soil erosion at the microscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We focus here on the major and always topical issue of soil erosion by fluid flows, and more specifically on the determination of both a critical threshold for erosion occurrence and a kinetics that specifies the rate of eroded matter entrainment. A synthetic state-of-the-art is first proposed with a critical view on the most commonly used methods and erosion models. It is then discussed an alternative strategy, promoting the use of model materials that allow systematic parametric investigations with the purpose of first identifying more precisely the local mechanisms responsible for soil particle erosion and second ultimately quantifying both critical onsets and kinetics, possibly through existing or novel empirical erosion laws. Finally, we present and discuss several examples following this methodology, implemented either by means of experiments or numerical simulations, and coupling erosion tests in several particular hydrodynamical configurations with wisely selected mechanical tests.

  9. Varioliform erosions in the stomach and duodenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotz, W.; Schulz, D.; Munkel, G.

    1984-01-01

    One thousand five hundred and eighty-three patients who were x-rayed for dyspepsia showed varioliform erosions in 15.3%. Men had an incidence of 9.8%, almost twice as common as in women (5.5%). Mucosal polyps, usually of the hyperplastic type, occurred in 2.4%. 15% of patients with gastric ulcers and 16% of patients with duodenal ulcers had varioliform erosions. On the other hand, amongst patients with erosions, 11% had gastric ulcers and 8.3% duodenal ulcers. The definitions of erosion which have been given in the literature are partly contradictory, and are discussed. Varioliform erosions, also known as complete erosions, may be acute or chronic. They are the third most common cause of bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract. With modern radiological methods of examining the stomach, they are no longer a rare finding. (orig.) [de

  10. Evaluation of Mediterranean plants for controlling gully erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baets, S. de; Poesen, J.; Muys, B.

    2009-01-01

    In Mediterranean environments, gullies are responsible for large soil losses causing loss of fertile cropland soil, reservoir sedimentation and flooding. To limit soil loss and sediment export it is important to prevent the initiation or rills and to stabilise gullies. This can be done by establishing vegetation at vulnerable places in the landscape. Although in the past, the effects of vegetation on soil erosion rates were predicted using above-ground biomass characteristics only, plant roots also play an important role in protecting the soil against erosion by concentrated runoff. Especially in conditions where the above-ground biomass becomes very scarce (e.g. due to drought, harvest, overgrazing or fire) the effects of vegetation will be underestimated when only above-ground plant characteristics are taken into account. (Author) 6 refs.

  11. Reduction of surface erosion in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossing, T.D.; Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.

    1976-01-01

    Some of the major processes leading to surface erosion in fusion reactors are reviewed briefly, including blistering by implanted gas, sputtering by ions, atoms, and neutrons, and vaporization by local heating. Surface erosion affects the structural integrity and limits the lifetime of reactor components exposed to plasma radiation. In addition, some of the processes leading to surface erosion also cause the release of plasma contaminants. Methods proposed to reduce surface erosion have included control of surface temperature, selection of materials with a favorable microstructure, chemical and mechanical treatment of surfaces, and employment of protective surface coatings, wall liners, and divertors. The advantages and disadvantages of some of these methods are discussed

  12. Erosive lichen planus: a therapeutic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Williams; Giesen, Laura; Navajas-Galimany, Lucas; Gonzalez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Erosive lichen planus is an uncommon variant of lichen planus. Chronic erosions of the soles, accompanied by intense and disabling pain, are some of its most characteristic manifestations. We present the case of a woman who developed oral and plantar erosive lichen planus associated with lichen planus pigmentosus and ungueal lichen planus that were diagnosed after several years. The patient failed to respond to multiple therapies requiring longstanding medication but remained refractory. Knowledge of the treatment options for erosive lichen planus is insufficient. Further research is required to clarify their effectiveness, ideally adopting an evidence-based methodology.

  13. Erosion products in disruption simulation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronov, V.; Arkhipov, N.; Bakhtin, V.; Barsuk, V.; Kurkin, S.; Mironova, E.; Toporkov, D.; Vasenin, S.; Zhitlukhin, A. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research, Troisk, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Arkhipov, I. [Inst. of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation); Werle, H.; Wuerz, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    Erosion of divertor materials under tokamak disruption event presents a serious problem of ITER technology. Erosion restricts the divertor lifetime and leads to production of redeposited layers of the material retaining large amount of tritium, which is a major safety issue for future fusion reactor. Since ITER disruptive heatloads are not achievable in existing tokamaks, material erosion is studied in special simulation experiments. Till now the simulation experiments have focused mainly on investigation of shielding effect and measurement of erosion rate. In the present work the properties of eroded and redeposited graphite are studied under condition typical for hard ITER disruption. (author)

  14. Using the Remote Sensing and GIS Technology for Erosion Risk Mapping of Kartalkaya Dam Watershed in Kahramanmaras, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah E. Akay

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The soil erosion is the most serious environmental problem in watershed areas in Turkey. The main factors affecting the amount of soil erosion include vegetation cover, topography, soil, and climate. In order to describe the areas with high soil erosion risks and to develop adequate erosion prevention measures in the watersheds of dams, erosion risk maps should be generated considering these factors. Remote Sensing (RS and Geographic Information System (GIS technologies were used for erosion risk mapping in Kartalkaya Dam Watershed of Kahramanmaras, Turkey, based on the methodology implemented in COoRdination of INformation on the Environment (CORINE model. ASTER imagery was used to generate a land use/cover classification in ERDAS Imagine. The digital maps of the other factors (topography, soil types, and climate were generated in ArcGIS v9.2, and were then integrated as CORINE input files to produce erosion risk maps. The results indicate that 33.82%, 35.44%, and 30.74% of the study area were under low, moderate, and high actual erosion risks, respectively. The CORINE model integrated with RS and GIS technologies has great potential for producing accurate and inexpensive erosion risk maps in Turkey.

  15. Erosion rates of wood during natural weathering. Part II, Earlywood and latewood erosion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Sam Williams; Mark T. Knaebe; William C. Feist

    2001-01-01

    This is the second in a series of reports on the erosion rates of wood exposed outdoors near Madison, Wisconsin. In the work reported here, the erosion rates of earlywood and latewood were determined for smooth-planed vertical-grained lumber for an exposure period of 14 years. The specimens were oriented vertically, facing south; erosion was measured annually for the...

  16. Erosion rates of wood during natural weathering. Part III, Effect of exposure angle on erosion rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Sam Williams; Mark T. Knaebe; James W. Evans; William C. Feist

    2001-01-01

    This is the third in a series of reports on the erosion rates of wood exposed outdoors near Madison, Wisconsin. The specimens were exposed at an orientation of 90* or 45* facing south or horizontally (0*) for 10 years. Erosion was measured annually for the first 8 years and after 10 years. The erosion rates of earlywood (springwood) and latewood (summerwood) were...

  17. Graffiti for science - erosion painting reveals spatially variable erosivity of sediment-laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Alexander R.; Kirchner, James W.; Turowski, Jens M.

    2016-12-01

    Spatially distributed detection of bedrock erosion is a long-standing challenge. Here we show how the spatial distribution of surface erosion can be visualized and analysed by observing the erosion of paint from natural bedrock surfaces. If the paint is evenly applied, it creates a surface with relatively uniform erodibility, such that spatial variability in the erosion of the paint reflects variations in the erosivity of the flow and its entrained sediment. In a proof-of-concept study, this approach provided direct visual verification that sediment impacts were focused on upstream-facing surfaces in a natural bedrock gorge. Further, erosion painting demonstrated strong cross-stream variations in bedrock erosion, even in the relatively narrow (5 m wide) gorge that we studied. The left side of the gorge experienced high sediment throughput with abundant lateral erosion on the painted wall up to 80 cm above the bed, but the right side of the gorge only showed a narrow erosion band 15-40 cm above the bed, likely due to deposited sediment shielding the lower part of the wall. This erosion pattern therefore reveals spatial stream bed aggradation that occurs during flood events in this channel. The erosion painting method provides a simple technique for mapping sediment impact intensities and qualitatively observing spatially distributed erosion in bedrock stream reaches. It can potentially find wide application in both laboratory and field studies.

  18. Graffiti for science – erosion painting reveals spatially variable erosivity of sediment-laden flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Beer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatially distributed detection of bedrock erosion is a long-standing challenge. Here we show how the spatial distribution of surface erosion can be visualized and analysed by observing the erosion of paint from natural bedrock surfaces. If the paint is evenly applied, it creates a surface with relatively uniform erodibility, such that spatial variability in the erosion of the paint reflects variations in the erosivity of the flow and its entrained sediment. In a proof-of-concept study, this approach provided direct visual verification that sediment impacts were focused on upstream-facing surfaces in a natural bedrock gorge. Further, erosion painting demonstrated strong cross-stream variations in bedrock erosion, even in the relatively narrow (5 m wide gorge that we studied. The left side of the gorge experienced high sediment throughput with abundant lateral erosion on the painted wall up to 80 cm above the bed, but the right side of the gorge only showed a narrow erosion band 15–40 cm above the bed, likely due to deposited sediment shielding the lower part of the wall. This erosion pattern therefore reveals spatial stream bed aggradation that occurs during flood events in this channel. The erosion painting method provides a simple technique for mapping sediment impact intensities and qualitatively observing spatially distributed erosion in bedrock stream reaches. It can potentially find wide application in both laboratory and field studies.

  19. Farmers' identification of erosion indicators and related erosion damage in the Central Highlands of Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, G.; Okoba, B.O.

    2006-01-01

    Most soil and water conservation planning approaches rely on empirical assessment methods and hardly consider farmers' knowledge of soil erosion processes. Farmers' knowledge of on-site erosion indicators could be useful in assessing the site-specific erosion risk before planning any conservation

  20. Hydrogeological And Geotechnical Investigations Of Gully Erosion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For many years, gully erosion and landslides are posing a serious threat to human existence, agricultural land, infrastructure and socio-economic activities in Calabar and its environs. Consequently, hydrogeological and geotechnical studies of gully erosion sites were carried out in order to provide information on the ...

  1. Backward erosion piping : Initiation and progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Beek, V.M.

    2015-01-01

    Backward erosion piping is an internal erosion mechanism during which shallow pipes are formed in the direction opposite to the flow underneath water-retaining structures as a result of the gradual removal of sandy material by the action of water. It is an important failure mechanism in both dikes

  2. Interrill soil erosion processes on steep slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    To date interrill erosion processes and regimes are not fully understood. The objectives are to 1) identify the erosion regimes and limiting processes between detachment and transport on steep slopes, 2) characterize the interactive effects between rainfall intensity and flow depth on sediment trans...

  3. The erosive potential of candy sprays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gambon, D.L.; Brand, H.S.; Nieuw Amerongen, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the erosive potential of seven different commercially available candy sprays in vitro and in vivo. Material and methods The erosive potential was determined in vitro by measuring the pH and neutralisable acidity. The salivary pH and flow rate were measured in healthy

  4. Rethinking erosion on Java: a reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de J.; Wiersum, K.F.

    1992-01-01

    In a recent article (Diemont et al., 1991) about erosion on Java, it has been postulated that low inputs, not surface erosion, is the main cause of low productivity of upland food crops on this island. In this article it is argued that this hypothesis is too simple. An analysis of empirical field

  5. Reduction of soil erosion on forest roads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward R. Burroughs; John G. King

    1989-01-01

    Presents the expected reduction in surface erosion from selected treatments applied to forest road traveledways, cutslopes, fillslopes, and ditches. Estimated erosion reduction is expressed as functions of ground cover, slope gradient, and soil properties whenever possible. A procedure is provided to select rock riprap size for protection of the road ditch.

  6. Erosion-Resistant Water-Blast Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Marion L.; Rice, R. M.; Cosby, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    Design of nozzle reduces erosion of orifice by turbulent high-pressure water flowing through it. Improved performance and resistance to erosion achieved by giving interior nozzle surface long, gradual convergence before exit orifice abrupt divergence after orifice and by machining surface to smooth finish.

  7. Wind erosion modelling in a Sahelian environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faye-Visser, S.M.; Sterk, G.; Karssenberg, D.

    2005-01-01

    In the Sahel field observations of wind-blown mass transport often show considerable spatial variation related to the spatial variation of the wind erosion controlling parameters, e.g. soil crust and vegetation cover. A model, used to predict spatial variation in wind erosion and deposition is a

  8. Rainfall erosivity in Brazil: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper, we review the erosivity studies conducted in Brazil to verify the quality and representativeness of the results generated and to provide a greater understanding of the rainfall erosivity (R-factor) in Brazil. We searched the ISI Web of Science, Scopus, SciELO, and Google Scholar datab...

  9. Soil erosion dynamics response to landscape pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, W.; Skidmore, A.K.; Hao, F.; Wang, T.

    2010-01-01

    Simulating soil erosion variation with a temporal land use database reveals long-term fluctuations in landscape patterns, as well as priority needs for soil erosion conservation. The application of a multi-year land use database in support of a Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) led to an accurate

  10. EPro Non-contact erosion profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinert, Palle

    EPro is a profiler controlled by software, which is constructed to measure the same surface or work piece multiple times and track changes due to erosion.......EPro is a profiler controlled by software, which is constructed to measure the same surface or work piece multiple times and track changes due to erosion....

  11. Soil erosion processes on sloping land using REE tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zhenzhou; Liu Puling; Yang Mingyi; Lian Zhenlong; Ju Tongjun; Yao Wenyi; Li Mian

    2007-01-01

    Sheet erosion is the main performance in the slope soil erosion process at the primary stage of natural rainfall. For three times of rainfall during experiment, the ratios of sheet erosion to total erosion account for 71%, 48% and 49% respectively, which showed that the sloping erosion was still at the primary stage from sheet erosion to rill erosion. With the rainfall going, the rill erosion amount increase. It showed that soil erosion was changing from sheet erosion to rill erosion. The sources of sediment from different sections of the plot were analyzed, and the results indicated that whatever the sheet erosion changed, the ratio erosion of upper part of surface soil was always lower than 10%. Sheet erosion came mainly from the lower section of surface soil. With the ratios to the amount of total rill erosion changes, the rill erosion amount of each section regularly changes too. The general conclusion is that when the rainfall ends, relative erosion of different slope element to the foot of slope is: 1 meter away accounts for 16%, 2-4 meters away is 6% and 5-9 meters away is 3%. The ratio of rill erosion amount of these three slope element is 5:2:1, which shows the rill erosion amount are mainly from the slope element of 4 meters from the foot of slope. (authors)

  12. Erosion testing of hard materials and coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2005-04-29

    Erosion is the process by which unconstrained particles, usually hard, impact a surface, creating damage that leads to material removal and component failure. These particles are usually very small and entrained in fluid of some type, typically air. The damage that occurs as a result of erosion depends on the size of the particles, their physical characteristics, the velocity of the particle/fluid stream, and their angle of impact on the surface of interest. This talk will discuss the basics of jet erosion testing of hard materials, composites and coatings. The standard test methods will be discussed as well as alternative approaches to determining the erosion rate of materials. The damage that occurs will be characterized in genera1 terms, and examples will be presented for the erosion behavior of hard materials and coatings (both thick and thin).

  13. Erosion Pressure on the Danish Coasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo Sass; Sørensen, Per; Kroon, Aart

    Coastlines around the world are receding due to coastal erosion.With rising sea levels and a potential climatic deterioration due to climate change, erosion rates are likely to increase at many locations in the future.Together with the current preference of people to settle near or directly...... by the ocean, coastal erosion issues become increasingly more important to the human values at risk. Along many Danish coastlines, hard structures already act as coastal protection in the form of groins, breakwaters, revetments etc. These eroding coasts however still lack sand and where the public, in general......, neglects the need for sand replenishment i.e. in the form of repeated sand nourishments. Here we present a conceptual model and method for dividing coastal erosion into acute and chronic erosion pressure, respectively. We focus on the model use for management and climate change adaptation purposes...

  14. Atmospheric electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, J Alan

    1957-01-01

    Atmospheric Electricity brings together numerous studies on various aspects of atmospheric electricity. This book is composed of 13 chapters that cover the main problems in the field, including the maintenance of the negative charge on the earth and the origin of the charges in thunderstorms. After a brief overview of the historical developments of atmospheric electricity, this book goes on dealing with the general principles, results, methods, and the MKS system of the field. The succeeding chapters are devoted to some aspects of electricity in the atmosphere, such as the occurrence and d

  15. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Kajita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses atmospheric neutrino experiments and the neutrino oscillation studies with these neutrinos.

  16. Isoerosivity and erosion risk maps in studying water erosion in Sicily

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, V.; Giordano, G.; Iovino, M.; Palermo Univ.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the authors review simplified methods for evaluating the rainfall erosivity index and propose two relationships for estimating the annual value of Wischmeier's rainfall erosivity index at sites equipped with recording and non-recording rain-gauges. For the Sicilian region of Italy the FAO index is also found to represent the erosion risk. A regional relationship to estimate the standard deviation of the annual erosivity index is proposed. The isoerosivity map is plotted by using 41 values of the rainfall erosivity index, calculated by the Wischmeier procedure, and 128 values estimated according to a relationship proposed by the authors. Finally, for each of the 169 sites, an erosion risk is calculated and an erosion risk map plotted too

  17. Dynamic Analysis of Soil Erosion in Songhua River Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujuan; Li, Xiuhai; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Jiang; Liang, Xin; Li, Dan; Ni, Chundi; Liu, Yan

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, based on RS and GIS technology and Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE), the soil erosion dynamic changes during the two periods of 1990 and 2010 in Bin County was analyzed by using the Landsat TM data of the two periods, so as to reveal the soil erosion spatial distribution pattern and spatial and temporal dynamic evolution rule in the region. The results showed that: the overall patterns of soil erosion were basically the same in both periods, mainly featuring slight erosion and mild erosion, with the area proportions of 80.68% and 74.71% respectively. The slight and extremely intensive erosion changing rates showed a narrowing trend; mild, moderate and intensive erosion was increasing, with a trend of increased soil erosion; mild and intensive erosion were developing towards moderate erosion and moderate and extremely intensive erosion were progressing towards intensive erosion.

  18. Erosion resistance comparison of alternative surface treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Česánek, Z.; Schubert, J.; Houdková, Š.

    2017-05-01

    Erosion is a process characterized by the particle separation and the damage of component functional surfaces. Thermal spraying technology HP/HVOF (High Pressure / High Velocity Oxygen Fuel) is commonly used for protection of component surfaces against erosive wear. Alloy as well as cermet based coatings meet the requirements for high erosion resistance. Wear resistance is in many cases the determining property of required component functioning. The application suitability of coating materials is particularly influenced by different hardness. This paper therefore presents an erosion resistance comparison of alloy and cermet based coatings. The coatings were applied on steel substrates and were subjected to the erosive test using the device for evaluation of material erosion resistance working on the principle of centrifugal erodent flow. Abrasive sand Al2O3 with grain size 212-250 μm was selected as an erosive material. For this purpose, the specimens were prepared by thermal spraying technology HP/HVOF using commercially available powders Stellite 6, NiCrBSi, Cr3C2-25%NiCr, Cr3C2-25%CoNiCrAlY, Hastelloy C-276 and experimental coating TiMoCN-29% Ni. Erosion resistance of evaluated coatings was compared with erosive resistance of 1.4923 high alloyed steel without nitridation and in nitrided state and further with surface treatment using technology PVD. According to the evaluation, the resulting erosive resistance depends not only on the selected erodent and surface protection, but also on the erodent impact angle.

  19. Comparison of two occurrence risk assessment methods for collapse gully erosion ——A case study in Guangdong province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, K.; Cheng, D. B.; He, J. J.; Zhao, Y. L.

    2018-02-01

    Collapse gully erosion is a specific type of soil erosion in the red soil region of southern China, and early warning and prevention of the occurrence of collapse gully erosion is very important. Based on the idea of risk assessment, this research, taking Guangdong province as an example, adopt the information acquisition analysis and the logistic regression analysis, to discuss the feasibility for collapse gully erosion risk assessment in regional scale, and compare the applicability of the different risk assessment methods. The results show that in the Guangdong province, the risk degree of collapse gully erosion occurrence is high in northeastern and western area, and relatively low in southwestern and central part. The comparing analysis of the different risk assessment methods on collapse gully also indicated that the risk distribution patterns from the different methods were basically consistent. However, the accuracy of risk map from the information acquisition analysis method was slightly better than that from the logistic regression analysis method.

  20. Mapping monthly rainfall erosivity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale; Spinoni, Jonathan; Meusburger, Katrin; Michaelides, Silas; Beguería, Santiago; Klik, Andreas; Petan, Sašo; Janeček, Miloslav; Olsen, Preben; Aalto, Juha; Lakatos, Mónika; Rymszewicz, Anna; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Tadić, Melita Perčec; Diodato, Nazzareno; Kostalova, Julia; Rousseva, Svetla; Banasik, Kazimierz; Alewell, Christine; Panagos, Panos

    2017-02-01

    Rainfall erosivity as a dynamic factor of soil loss by water erosion is modelled intra-annually for the first time at European scale. The development of Rainfall Erosivity Database at European Scale (REDES) and its 2015 update with the extension to monthly component allowed to develop monthly and seasonal R-factor maps and assess rainfall erosivity both spatially and temporally. During winter months, significant rainfall erosivity is present only in part of the Mediterranean countries. A sudden increase of erosivity occurs in major part of European Union (except Mediterranean basin, western part of Britain and Ireland) in May and the highest values are registered during summer months. Starting from September, R-factor has a decreasing trend. The mean rainfall erosivity in summer is almost 4 times higher (315MJmmha -1 h -1 ) compared to winter (87MJmmha -1 h -1 ). The Cubist model has been selected among various statistical models to perform the spatial interpolation due to its excellent performance, ability to model non-linearity and interpretability. The monthly prediction is an order more difficult than the annual one as it is limited by the number of covariates and, for consistency, the sum of all months has to be close to annual erosivity. The performance of the Cubist models proved to be generally high, resulting in R 2 values between 0.40 and 0.64 in cross-validation. The obtained months show an increasing trend of erosivity occurring from winter to summer starting from western to Eastern Europe. The maps also show a clear delineation of areas with different erosivity seasonal patterns, whose spatial outline was evidenced by cluster analysis. The monthly erosivity maps can be used to develop composite indicators that map both intra-annual variability and concentration of erosive events. Consequently, spatio-temporal mapping of rainfall erosivity permits to identify the months and the areas with highest risk of soil loss where conservation measures should be

  1. Soil Erosion and the Carbon Cycle: Perspectives From the Mississippi River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleezer, R. O.; Smith, S. V.; Renwick, W. H.; Buddemeier, R. W.

    2006-12-01

    Soil erosion, particularly accelerated erosion associated with agriculture and other human modification of land cover, has traditionally been viewed as a source of CO2 release to the atmosphere. The two primary lines of evidence for this interpretation have been the removal of soil organic carbon (SOC) at erosional sites and the low proportional transport of eroded SOC in rivers to the ocean. The imbalance between eroded SOC and the SOC in river sediments is explained via deposition as colluvium, floodplain sediments, or in natural and artificial water bodies and subsequent oxidation. In this context floodplains have been viewed as major sediment sinks in agricultural regions and erosion is a net source of CO2. Both model studies and regional budgetary analyses in the Mississippi River Basin lead to an alternative interpretation. Erosion at a site displaces SOC-rich topsoil. SOC displacement does not necessarily establish accelerated oxidation rates for this SOC. Rivers transport a small proportion of bulk erosion products (~10%) to the ocean; and most bulk erosion products are re-deposited after erosion. Important sites for re-deposition include geomorphic features such as natural lakes, both large and small artificial water bodies (reservoirs and ponds), and alluvial depositional sites. In recent decades the locus of the dominant sediment sinks has shifted to ponds and reservoirs as artificial impoundments have proliferated. Thus an increasing proportion of eroded soil is being deposited in subaqueous rather than subaerial environments. Regional examination of the SOC in depositional sites indicates that these sites have about the same SOC concentrations as their upland counterparts. Depositional areas occupy ~10% of the upland (erosional) area and have deposition rates of a magnitude capable of balancing the erosional loss. Various lines of evidence suggest that the oxidation rates per unit area in the depositional sites are about the same as or lower than the

  2. Wind erosion reduces soil organic carbon sequestration falsely indicating ineffective management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Baldock, Jeffrey A.

    2016-09-01

    Improved management of agricultural land has the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to reduce atmospheric CO2 via soil carbon sequestration. However, SOC stocks are reduced by soil erosion which is commonly omitted from calculations of crop production, C cycling, C sequestration and C accounting. We used fields from the wind eroded dryland cropping region of Western Australia to demonstrate the global implications for C sequestration and C accounting of omitting soil erosion. For the fields we previously estimated mean net (1950s-1990) soil erosion of 1.2 ± 1.0 t ha-1 y-1. The mean net (1990-2013) soil erosion increased by nearly four times to 4.4 ± 2.1 t ha-1 y-1. Conservation agriculture has evidently not reduced wind erosion in this region. The mean net (1990-2013) SOC erosion was up to 0.2 t C ha-1 y-1 across all sampled fields and similar to measured sequestration rates in the region (up to 0.5 t C ha-1 y-1; 10 years) for many management practices recommended for building SOC stocks. The minimum detectable change (MDC; 10 years) of SOC without erosion was up to 0.2 t C ha-1 y-1 whilst the MDC of SOC with erosion was up to 0.4 t C ha-1 y-1. These results illustrate the generally applicable outcome: (i) if SOC erosion is equal to (or greater than) the increase in SOC due to management practices, the change will not be detectable (or a loss will be evident); (ii) without including soil erosion in SOC sequestration calculations, the monitoring of SOC stocks will lead to, at best the inability to detect change and, at worst the false impression that management practices have failed to store SOC. Furthermore, continued omission of soil erosion in crop production, C accounting and C sequestration will most likely undermine confidence in policy designed to encourage adoption of C farming and the attendant benefits for soil stewardship and food security.

  3. Atmospheric electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volland, H.

    1984-01-01

    The book Atmospheric Electrodynamics, by Hans Voland is reviewed. The book describes a wide variety of electrical phenomena occurring in the upper and lower atmosphere and develops the mathematical models which simulate these processes. The reviewer finds that the book is of interest to researchers with a background in electromagnetic theory but is of only limited use as a reference work

  4. Atmospheric Dispositifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    , the conceptual foundations and protocols for the production of atmosphere in architecture might be found beneath the surface of contemporary debates. In this context, the notion of atmospheric dispositif – illustrated through an oeuvre of the German architect Werner Ruhnau and its theoretical and historical...

  5. Urban atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandy, Matthew

    2017-07-01

    What is an urban atmosphere? How can we differentiate an 'atmosphere' from other facets of urban consciousness and experience? This essay explores some of the wider cultural, political, and philosophical connotations of atmospheres as a focal point for critical reflections on space and subjectivity. The idea of an 'affective atmosphere' as a distinctive kind of mood or shared corporeal phenomenon is considered in relation to recent developments in phenomenology, extended conceptions of agency, and new understandings of materialism. The essay draws in particular on the changing characteristics of air and light to reflect on different forms of sensory experience and their wider cultural and political connotations. The argument highlights some of the tensions and anomalies that permeate contemporary understandings of urban atmospheres.

  6. Erosion and stability of a mine soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.H.; Stadler, A.T.; Low, C.

    1996-01-01

    Mine soils developed from mine spoils commonly have a wide range of particle size. The slopes of old spoil piles usually are marked by gullies due to years of uncontrolled erosion. These characteristics raise questions about applicability of available theories and models for estimating runoff and erosion. An investigation was made to determine whether available erosion models can work for mine soils and can account for gully erosion. The investigation at an abandoned surface mine consisted of measurement of soil and sediment properties, measurement of runoff and erosion, observations of armor by rock fragments on gully floor, and calculations with available theories of sediment transport and slope stability. The results at this site suggest that (1) predictions with the ANSWERS model have about the same accuracy as those made for agricultural lands; (2) armor provided by rock fragments are temporary as they are periodically removed by debris flows; (3) detachment by rainfall impact is the primary cause of erosion on short steep slopes; and (4) a simplified method can be used for estimating erosion on such slopes

  7. Soft drinks and in vitro dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravelle, Brent L; Hagen Ii, Ted W; Mayhew, Susan L; Crumpton, Brooks; Sanders, Tyler; Horne, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine to what extent the in vitro exposure of healthy teeth to various commonly consumed carbonated soft drinks may precipitate dental erosion. Forty-two healthy, extracted, previously unerupted human molars were weighed prior to, during, and after suspension in various sugared and diet or zero-calorie carbonated beverages for 20 days; the specimens were stored at room temperature while being stirred at 275 rpm. The percentage decrease in tooth weight from before to after exposure represented the weight loss due to enamel erosion; values in the experimental groups varied from 3.22% to 44.52% after 20 days' exposure. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and post hoc Scheffe testing at a level of α = 0.05. Nonsugared drinks (diet and zero-calorie) as a whole were more erosive than sugared beverages. A significant positive correlation was found between the amount of titratable acid and percentage of tooth erosion, while a significant negative correlation was revealed between the beverage pH and percentage of tooth erosion. No significant correlations were found between calcium or phosphate ion concentrations and the amount of erosion. It appears that enamel erosion is dependent on not only the beverage flow rate, pH, and amount of titratable acid, but also whether the soft drink is of the diet or zero-calorie variety, which reflects the type of artificial sweetener present.

  8. Lithosphere erosion atop mantle plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrusta, R.; Arcay, D.; Tommasi, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mantle plumes are traditionally proposed to play an important role in lithosphere erosion. Seismic images beneath Hawaii and Cape Verde show a lithosphere-asthenosphere-boundary (LAB) up to 50 km shallower than the surroundings. However, numerical models show that unless the plate is stationary the thermo-mechanical erosion of the lithosphere does not exceed 30 km. We use 2D petrological-thermo-mechanical numerical models based on a finite-difference method on a staggered grid and marker in cell method to study the role of partial melting on the plume-lithosphere interaction. A homogeneous peridotite composition with a Newtonian temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity is used to simulate both the plate and the convective mantle. A constant velocity, ranging from 5 to 12.5 cm/yr, is imposed at the top of the plate. Plumes are created by imposing a thermal anomaly of 150 to 350 K on a 50 km wide domain at the base of the model (700 km depth); the plate right above the thermal anomaly is 40 Myr old. Partial melting is modeled using batch-melting solidus and liquidus in anhydrous conditions. We model the progressive depletion of peridotite and its effect on partial melting by assuming that the melting degree only strictly increases through time. Melt is accumulated until a porosity threshold is reached and the melt in excess is then extracted. The rheology of the partially molten peridotite is determined using viscous constitutive relationship based on a contiguity model, which enables to take into account the effects of grain-scale melt distribution. Above a threshold of 1%, melt is instantaneously extracted. The density varies as a function of partial melting degree and extraction. Besides, we analyze the kinematics of the plume as it impacts a moving plate, the dynamics of time-dependent small-scale convection (SSC) instabilities developing in the low-viscosity layer formed by spreading of hot plume material at the lithosphere base, and the resulting thermal

  9. Estimating soil erosion response to land use/cover change in a catchment of the Loess Plateau, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Yan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The vegetation restoration project, named the Grain to Green Program, has been operating for more than ten years in the upper reaches of the Beiluo River basin, located in the Loess Plateau of China. It is significant to be able to estimate the success of preventing soil erosion. In this study, the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE and the Sediment Distributed Delivery (SEDD model were used to assess the annual soil loss derived from water erosion. The results showed that the study area suffered from primary land use changes, with increasing grassland and forest and decreasing farmland from 1990 to 2010. Based on that, the average soil erosion modulus decreased from 18,189.72 t/(km2 a in 1990–7408.93 t/(km2 a in 2000 and 2857.76 t/(km2 a in 2010. Compared with 1990, the average soil erosion modulus decreased by 59.0% and 84.3% for 2000 and 2010, respectively. Benefiting from the increased vegetation coverage and improved ecological environment, the soil erosion in this study area clearly declined. This research also found that the distribution of the three years of soil erosion was similarly based on topographic factors. The soil erosion modulus varied with different land use types and decreased in the order of residential area>farmland>grassland>forest. The average soil erosion modulus gradually increased with the increase of the slope gradient, and 76.08% of the total soil erosion was concentrated in the region with a gradient more than 15 degrees. The soil erosion modulus also varied with slope aspects in the order of sunny slope>half-sunny slope>half-shady slope>shady slope. This research provides useful reference for soil and water conservation and utilization in this area and offers a technical basis for using the RUSLE to estimate soil erosion in the Loess Plateau of China.

  10. Estimating surface soil erosion losses and mapping erosion risk for Yusufeli micro-catchment (Artvin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Tüfekçioğlu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sheet erosion, one of the most important types of water erosion, takes place on the top soil as tiny soil layer movement that affects lake and stream ecosystem. This type of erosion is very important because the productive soil layer on the top soil can be lost in a very short period of time. The goal of this study was to quantify the amount of surface (sheet and rill soil erosion, and to identify areas under high erosion risk within the study area at Yusufeli province in Artvin by using RUSLE erosion methodology. As a result of the study it was found that the average annual potential soil loss by surface erosion was 3.6 ton ha-1yr-1. Additionally, the maps produced and conclusions reached by the study revealed that the areas of high erosion risk were identified spatially and measures to control erosion on some of these high risk areas can be possible with appropriate erosion control techniques.

  11. Interrill soil erosion processes on steep slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. C. (John); Wang, Z. L.

    2017-05-01

    To date interrill erosion processes are not fully understood under different rainfall and soil conditions. The objectives are to 1) identify the interrill erosion regime and limiting process under the study condition, 2) characterize the interactive effects of rainfall intensity and flow depth on sediment transport competency and mode, and 3) develop a lumped interrill erosion model. A loess loam soil with 39% sand and 45% silt was packed to flumes and exposed to simulated rainfall. A complete factorial design with three factors was used, which included rainfall intensity (48, 62, 102, 149, and 170 mm h-1), slope gradient (17.6, 26.8, 36.4, 46.6, and 57.7%), and slope length (0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2 m). Rain splash, sediment discharge in runoff, and flow velocity were measured. Results showed that rainfall intensity played a dual role not only in detaching soil materials but also in enhancing sediment transport. Sediment transport was the process limiting interrill erosion rate under the study condition. Two major sediment transport modes were identified: rainfall-driven rolling/creeping and flow-driven rolling/sliding. The relative importance of each mode was largely determined by flow depth. The competence of the flow in transporting sediment decreased downslope as flow depth increased due to increased dissipation of raindrop energy. The optimal mean flow depth for the maximal interrill erosion rates was erosion rate. The negative correlation seemed stronger for heavier rains, indicating the cushioning effects of flow depth. Lumped interrill erosion models, developed from short slopes, are likely to overestimate erosion rates. Given transport as the limiting process, the so called erodibility value, estimated with those models, is indeed sediment transportability under the study condition. The effects of slope length on interrill erosion regimes need to be studied further under a wider range of conditions.

  12. Divertor erosion in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whyte, D.G. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Bastasz, R.; Wampler, W.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brooks, J.N. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); West, W.P.; Wong, C.P.C.; Buzhinskij, O.I. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Opimach, I.V. [TRINITI Lab. (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Net erosion rates of carbon target plates have been measured in situ for the DIII-D lower divertor. The principal method of obtaining this data is the DiMES sample probe. Recent experiments have focused on erosion at the outer strike-point (OSP) of two divertor plasma conditions: attached (T{sub e} > 40 eV) ELMing plasmas, and detached (T{sub e} < 2 eV) ELMing plasmas. For the attached cases, the erosion rates exceed 10 cm/exposure-year, even with incident heat flux < 1 MW/m{sup 2}. In this case, measurements and modeling agree for both gross and net carbon erosion, showing the near-surface transport and redeposition of the carbon is well understood. In the attached cases, physical sputtering (with enhancement from self-sputtering and oblique incidence) is dominant, and the effective sputtering yield, Y, is greater than 10%. In ELM-free discharges, the total OSP net erosion rate is equal to the rate of carbon accumulation in the core plasma. For the detached divertor cases, the cold incident plasma eliminates physical sputtering. Attempts to measure chemically eroded hydrocarbon molecules spectroscopically indicate an upper limit of Y {le} 0.1% for the chemical sputtering yield. Net erosion is suppressed at the outer strike-point, which becomes a region of net redeposition ({approximately} 4 cm/exposure-year). The private flux wall is measured to be a region of net redeposition with dense, high neutral pressure, attached divertor plasmas. Leading edges intercepting parallel heat flux ({approximately} 50 MW/m{sup 2}) have very high net erosion rates at the OSP of an attached plasma ({approximately} 10 {micro}m/s > 1,000x erosion rate of aligned surfaces). Leading edge erosion, and subsequent carbon redeposition, caused by tile gaps can account for half of the deuterium codeposition in the DIII-D divertor.

  13. Dental Erosion and its Associated Factors In 11-16-Year Old School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirthiga, M; Poornima, P; Praveen, R; Sakeena, B; Disha, P

    2015-01-01

    Dental erosion currently stands as a great challenge for the clinician, regarding the diagnosis, identification of the etiological factors, prevention and execution of an adequate treatment. To evaluate the prevalence, severity, and associated factors on dental erosion in 11-16-years old. A cross sectional study was conducted among 2000 school children who were randomly selected. A questionnaire was given to the children that included personal demographic details and habit of consuming acidic foods and drinks. An index specific for dental erosion given by O Sullivan was used to assess every affected tooth. The values were subjected to chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of dental erosion was found to be 1.4%. Females (1.6%) were slightly more affected than males (1.3%). Public school children (2.1%) were found to be affected a little more than private children (0.7%). Chi square test showed significant association between type of school and erosion prevalence (p = 0.015). Most commonly affected teeth were lateral incisor (59.72%). The prevalence of dental erosion was found to be low when compared to various studies done all over the world.

  14. Sputtering erosion of fusion reactor cavity walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohachevsky, I.O.; Hafer, J.F.

    1976-12-01

    Devised are functions that describe the empirically and theoretically determined behavior of sputtering coefficients. These functions are used in a computer program that calculates erosion rates and total erosion of surfaces bombarded by ion beams of specified intensity. Presented here are analytic expressions that describe the effects of ion energy and angle of incidence, computational procedures, and results. Results, computed for alpha, triton, deuteron, and heavy-metal ions bombarding niobium, carbon, and iron surfaces indicate that for pellets with heavy metal shell structures sputtering erosion should be carefully considered and properly designed for

  15. Effect of titanium tetrafluoride, amine fluoride and fluoride varnish on enamel erosion in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A; Ruben, JL; Huysmans, MCDNJM

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of 1 and 4% titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4) gels, amine fluoride (AmF) 1 and 0.25% and a fluoride varnish (FP) on the prevention of dental erosion. Two experimental groups served as controls, one with no pretreatment and another one pre-treated with a

  16. Grass seeding and soil erosion in a steep, logged area in northeastern Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.D. Helvey; W.B. Fowler

    1979-01-01

    This case study tested the common belief that grass seeding is needed to prevent erosion after areas are clearcut in the Blue Mountains. Changes in the soil surface height at about 500 points each in a seedbed and an unseeded area were measured on four dates covering a 20-month period. Average vertical displacement was not consistently related to seeding nor to degree...

  17. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Klopfer, D.C.

    1990-08-01

    Protective barriers have been identified as integral components of plans to isolate defense waste on the Hanford Site. The use of natural materials to construct protective barriers over waste site is being considered. Design requirements for protective barriers include preventing exposure of buried waste, and restricting penetration or percolation of surface waters through the waste zone. Studies were initiated to evaluate the effects of wind erosion on candidate protective barrier surfaces. A wind tunnel was used to provide controlled erosive stresses and to investigate the erosive effects of wind forces on proposed surface layers for protective barriers. Mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared and tested for resistance to wind erosion at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Aerosol Wind Tunnel Research Facility. These tests were performed to investigate surface deflation caused by suspension of soil from various surface layer configurations and to provide a comparison of the relative resistance of the different surfaces to wind erosion. Planning, testing, and analyzing phases of this wind erosion project were coordinated with other tasks supporting the development of protective barriers. These tasks include climate-change predictions, field studies and modeling efforts. This report provides results of measurements of deflation caused by wind forces over level surfaces. Section 2.0 reviews surface layer characteristics and previous relevant studies on wind erosion, describes effects of erosion, and discusses wind tunnel modeling. Materials and methods of the wind tunnel tests are discussed in Section 3.0. Results and discussion are presented in Section 4.0, and conclusions and recommendations Section 5.0. 53 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. [Gastric band erosion: Alternative management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echaverry-Navarrete, Denis José; Maldonado-Vázquez, Angélica; Cortes-Romano, Pablo; Cabrera-Jardines, Ricardo; Mondragón-Pinzón, Erwin Eduardo; Castillo-González, Federico Armando

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem, for which the prevalence has increased worldwide at an alarming rate, affecting 1.7 billion people in the world. To describe the technique employed in incomplete penetration of gastric band where endoscopic management and/or primary closure is not feasible. Laparoscopic removal of gastric band was performed in five patients with incomplete penetrance using Foley catheterization in the perforation site that could lead to the development of a gastro-cutaneous fistula. The cases presented include a leak that required surgical lavage with satisfactory outcome, and one patient developed stenosis 3 years after surgical management, which was resolved endoscopically. In all cases, the penetration site closed spontaneously. Gastric band erosion has been reported in 3.4% of cases. The reason for inserting a catheter is to create a controlled gastro-cutaneous fistula, allowing spontaneous closure. Various techniques have been described: the totally endoscopic, hybrid techniques (endoscopic/laparoscopic) and completely laparoscopic. A technique is described here that is useful and successful in cases where the above-described treatments are not viable. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  19. Dental Erosion and Dentinal Sensitivity amongst Professional Wine Tasters in South East Queensland, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy George

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Professional wine tasters face a hidden occupational hazard due to the high acid content in wine. This study evaluates the self-perceived dentinal sensitivity and erosive effects of wine on the professional wine tasters of the Granite Belt and the Scenic Rim regions of South East Queensland, Australia. Methods. Seventy wineries were contacted and participants were surveyed about their professional wine tasting experience and oral health. Participants were also required to rate their tooth sensitivity prior to being examined for erosion using a modified Smith & Knight tooth wear index. The data were analysed using Mann Whitney U test and Spearman’s correlation test. Results. The results showed that most participants (25 males, 22–66 yrs, brushed twice a day; however, the majority did not floss daily and had limited knowledge of the erosive effect of wine. There was a direct correlation between years of wine tasting, age of participants, and the erosion index. Correlation was not observed between the participant’s sensitivity index and erosion index. Conclusion. The lack of significant experience of dentinal hypersensitivity amongst professional wine tasters should not prevent oral health practitioners from providing necessary counselling and undertaking preventive measures, as tooth wear can have serious long-term effect on oral health of an individual.

  20. Compressor Impeller Erosion Resistant Surface Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riley, Michael

    2000-01-01

    ...). Coatings based on tungsten carbide tantalum carbide. titanium carbide all with a cobalt matrix were evaluated for high velocity particle erosion in conventional wear test studies as well as wind tunnel testing...

  1. The erosive potential of candy sprays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambon, D L; Brand, H S; Nieuw Amerongen, A V

    2009-05-23

    To determine the erosive potential of seven different commercially available candy sprays in vitro and in vivo. The erosive potential was determined in vitro by measuring the pH and neutralisable acidity. The salivary pH and flow rate were measured in healthy volunteers after administration of a single dose of candy spray. Candy sprays have an extremely low pH (1.9-2.3) and a neutralisable acidity varying between 0.8-1.6 ml of 0.25M NaOH. In vivo, candy sprays induced a short-term 3.0 to 5.8-fold increase in salivary flow rate with a concomitant drop in salivary pH to values between 4.4 and 5.8. All candy sprays tested have an erosive potential. This information is of use for clinicians counselling juvenile patients with dental erosion.

  2. Rain Erosion/Measurement Impact Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The FARM Rain Erosion/Impact Measurement Lab develops solutions for deficiencies in the ability of materials, coatings and designs to withstand a severe operational...

  3. Emission Facilities - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  4. Understanding and Predicting Gun Barrel Erosion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnston, Ian A

    2005-01-01

    The Australian Defence Force will soon have to contend with gun barrel erosion issues arising from the use of new low-vulnerability gun propellants, the acquisition of new ammunition and gun systems...

  5. Regulated Environmental Activity Sites - CriticalErosion

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Created based on the Critical Erosion Report for 2005. Indicates the condition of shoreline, determined by our staff of Coastal Engineers, for the year 2005. This...

  6. Evaluation of erosion and siltation control fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    New proprietary products in three areas of siltation and erosion control were evaluated. Hold/Gro and Griffnet materials were evaluated for use as slope stabilizers and were compared with the Department's present method of straw tacked with an asphal...

  7. Paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, P; Bardin, T; Laredo, J D; Ziza, J M; D'Anglejan, G; Lansaman, J; Bucki, B; Forest, M; Kuntz, D

    1994-05-01

    To determine the clinical, radiologic, and histologic features of calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion. The records of 6 patients with paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis and adjacent bone cortex erosion were reviewed. Calcific tendinitis involved the linea aspera in 4 patients, the bicipital groove in 1 patient, and the deltoid insertion in another. Calcium deposits were associated with cortical bone erosions, revealed on plain radiographs in 4 patients and computed tomography scans in 2. Bone scans were performed in 2 patients and showed local hyperfixation of the isotope. In 4 patients, suspicion of a neoplasm led to a biopsy. Calcium deposits appeared to be surrounded by a foreign body reaction with numerous giant cells. Apatite crystals were identified by transmission electron microscopy and elemental analysis in 1 surgical sample. Paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion is an uncommon presentation of apatite deposition disease.

  8. Soil erosion - a local and national problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.G. Bates; O.R. Zeasman

    1930-01-01

    The erosion of soils through the action of rain water and that from melting snow is almost universal in its occurrence. The gradual erosion and levelling of any country is inevitable, being a process which has gone on as long as there has been free water on the face of the earth. Nevertheless, this process is an extremely slow one where the landscape is naturally well...

  9. Natural and anthropogenic rates of soil erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Nearing

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Regions of land that are brought into crop production from native vegetation typically undergo a period of soil erosion instability, and long term erosion rates are greater than for natural lands as long as the land continues being used for crop production. Average rates of soil erosion under natural, non-cropped conditions have been documented to be less than 2 Mg ha−1 yr−1. On-site rates of erosion of lands under cultivation over large cropland areas, such as in the United States, have been documented to be on the order of 6 Mg ha−1 yr−1 or more. In northeastern China, lands that were brought into production during the last century are thought to have average rates of erosion over this large area of as much as 15 Mg ha−1 yr−1 or more. Broadly applied soil conservation practices, and in particular conservation tillage and no-till cropping, have been found to be effective in reducing rates of erosion, as was seen in the United States when the average rates of erosion on cropped lands decreased from on the order of 9 Mg ha−1 yr−1 to 6 or 7 Mg ha−1 yr−1 between 1982 and 2002, coincident with the widespread adoption of new conservation tillage and residue management practices. Taking cropped lands out of production and restoring them to perennial plant cover, as was done in areas of the United States under the Conservation Reserve Program, is thought to reduce average erosion rates to approximately 1 Mg ha−1 yr−1 or less on those lands.

  10. Divertor erosion in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, D.G.; Bastasz, R.; Wampler, W.R.; Brooks, J.N.; West, W.P.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1998-05-01

    Net erosion rates of carbon target plates have been measured in situ for the DIII-D lower divertor. The principal method of obtaining this data is the DiMES sample probe. Recent experiments have focused on erosion at the outer strike-point of two divertor plasma conditions: (1) attached (Te > 40 eV) ELMing plasmas and (2) detached (Te 10 cm/year, even with incident heat flux 2 . In this case, measurements and modeling agree for both gross and net carbon erosion, showing the near-surface transport and redeposition of the carbon is well understood and that effective sputtering yields are > 10%. In ELM-free discharges, this erosion rate can account for the rate of carbon accumulation in the core plasma. Divertor plasma detachment eliminates physical sputtering, while spectroscopically measured chemical erosion yields are also found to be low (Y(C/D + ) ≤ 2.0 x 10 -3 ). This leads to suppression of net erosion at the outer strike-point, which becomes a region of net redeposition (∼ 4 cm/year). The private flux wall is measured to be a region of net redeposition with dense, high neutral pressure, attached divertor plasmas. Leading edges intercepting parallel heat flux (∼ 50 MW/m 2 ) have very high net erosion rates (∼ 10 microm/s) at the OSP of an attached plasma. Leading edge erosion, and subsequent carbon redeposition, caused by tile gaps can account for half of the deuterium codeposition in the DIII-D divertor

  11. Divertor erosion in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, D.G.; Bastasz, R.; Wampler, W.R.; Brooks, J.N.; West, W.P.; Wong, C.P.C.; Buzhinskij, O.I.; Opimach, I.V.

    1998-08-01

    Net erosion rates of carbon target plates have been measured in situ for the DIII-D lower divertor. The principal method of obtaining this data is the DiMES sample probe. Recent experiments have focused on erosion at the outer strike-point (OSP) of two divertor plasma conditions: attached (T e > 40 eV) ELMing plasmas, and detached (T e 2 . In this case, measurements and modeling agree for both gross and net carbon erosion, showing the near-surface transport and redeposition of the carbon is well understood. In the attached cases, physical sputtering (with enhancement from self-sputtering and oblique incidence) is dominant, and the effective sputtering yield, Y, is greater than 10%. In ELM-free discharges, the total OSP net erosion rate is equal to the rate of carbon accumulation in the core plasma. For the detached divertor cases, the cold incident plasma eliminates physical sputtering. Attempts to measure chemically eroded hydrocarbon molecules spectroscopically indicate an upper limit of Y ≤ 0.1% for the chemical sputtering yield. Net erosion is suppressed at the outer strike-point, which becomes a region of net redeposition (∼ 4 cm/exposure-year). The private flux wall is measured to be a region of net redeposition with dense, high neutral pressure, attached divertor plasmas. Leading edges intercepting parallel heat flux (∼ 50 MW/m 2 ) have very high net erosion rates at the OSP of an attached plasma (∼ 10 microm/s > 1,000x erosion rate of aligned surfaces). Leading edge erosion, and subsequent carbon redeposition, caused by tile gaps can account for half of the deuterium codeposition in the DIII-D divertor

  12. The Methods of Locating Areas Exposed to Wind Erosion in the South Moravia Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Podhrázská

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The conditions for the development of wind erosion are determined by the soil and climatic conditions as well as by the presence or absence of wind barriers. It is because of its climatic and soil conditions that the territory of the South Moravia Region has been affected by erosion for centuries. Combined with the atmospheric conditions, the dry and warm climate enables the development of aeolian processes both in light, drying soils and – under certain climatic conditions – in heavy, clay-loam soils. Soil erosion exposure maps have been prepared in order to identify the territories which are potentially exposed to wind erosion in terms of the soil and climatic conditions. Six exposure categories have been applied to the soils. However, the impact of permanent vegetation barriers – line elements – must be considered in order to identify the most exposed areas. Protective forest belts were planted in the 1950s to counter the effects of wind erosion and they are included in the database of the Institute for Economic Forest Management. The network of these wind barriers and the heath condition of the individual elements are often unsatisfactory because of poor maintenance. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the spatial function of the network of protective forest belts using the map of the potential exposure of soil in the Region of South Moravia. The method used to evaluate the spatial function of the windbreaks presented in the study using GIS instruments.

  13. Susceptibility of bovine dental enamel with initial erosion lesion to new erosive challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Cristina de Oliveira

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the impact of initial erosion on the susceptibility of enamel to further erosive challenge. Thirty bovine enamel blocks were selected by surface hardness and randomized into two groups (n = 15: GC- group composed by enamel blocks without erosion lesion and GT- group composed by enamel blocks with initial erosion lesion. The baseline profile of each block was determined using the profilometer. The initial erosion was produced by immersing the blocks into HCl 0.01 M, pH 2.3 for 30 seconds, under stirring. The erosive cycling consisted of blocks immersion in hydrochloric acid (0.01 M, pH 2.3 for 2 minutes, followed by immersion in artificial saliva for 120 minutes. This procedure was repeated 4 times a day for 5 days, and the blocks were kept in artificial saliva overnight. After erosive cycling, final profile measurement was performed. Profilometry measured the enamel loss by the superposition of initial and final profiles. Data were analyzed by t-test (p<0.05. The result showed no statistically significant difference between groups (GS = 14.60±2.86 and GE = .14.69±2.21 μm. The presence of initial erosion on bovine dental enamel does not enhance its susceptibility to new erosive challenges.

  14. Visualizing Coastal Erosion, Overwash and Coastal Flooding in New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Morse, R.; Shyka, T.

    2017-12-01

    Powerful East Coast storms and their associated storm tides and large, battering waves can lead to severe coastal change through erosion and re-deposition of beach sediment. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) has modeled such potential for geological response using a storm-impact scale that compares predicted elevations of hurricane-induced water levels and associated wave action to known elevations of coastal topography. The resulting storm surge and wave run-up hindcasts calculate dynamic surf zone collisions with dune structures using discrete regime categories of; "collision" (dune erosion), "overwash" and "inundation". The National Weather Service (NWS) recently began prototyping this empirical technique under the auspices of the North Atlantic Regional Team (NART). Real-time erosion and inundation forecasts were expanded to include both tropical and extra-tropical cyclones along vulnerable beaches (hotspots) on the New England coast. Preliminary results showed successful predictions of impact during hurricane Sandy and several intense Nor'easters. The forecasts were verified using observational datasets, including "ground truth" reports from Emergency Managers and storm-based, dune profile measurements organized through a Maine Sea Grant partnership. In an effort to produce real-time visualizations of this forecast output, the Northeastern Regional Association of Coastal Ocean Observing Systems (NERACOOS) and the Gulf of Maine Research Institute (GMRI) partnered with NART to create graphical products of wave run-up levels for each New England "hotspot". The resulting prototype system updates the forecasts twice daily and allows users the ability to adjust atmospheric and sea state input into the calculations to account for model errors and forecast uncertainty. This talk will provide an overview of the empirical wave run-up calculations, the system used to produce forecast output and a demonstration of the new web based tool.

  15. An Evaluation of the Wind Erosion Module in DUSTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, William J.; Allwine, K Jerry; Fritz, Brad G.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Chapman, Elaine G.

    2008-03-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a dust transport model (DUSTRAN), which calculates atmospheric dust concentrations that result from both natural and human activity. DUSTRAN is a comprehensive dispersion modeling system, consisting of a dust-emissions module, a diagnostic meteorological model, and dispersion models that are integrated seamlessly into GIS software. DUSTRAN functions as a console application and allows the user to interactively create a release scenario and run the underlying models. We have recently had the opportunity to compare dust concentrations calculated by DUSTRAN with observations of wind erosion made on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. In this paper we describe both DUSTRAN’s algorithm for predicting the source strength of windblown dust and the comparison of simulated dust concentrations with data. The comparisons use observations of PM10 concentrations for three separate dust events on the Hanford Site in 2001. The dust measurements were made as part of an effort to monitor site recovery following a large range fire that occurred on the Hanford Site in 2000. The comparisons have provided both encouragement as to the practical value of the wind erosion module in DUSTRAN and examples of occasions when the simulations and observations diverge. In general, the maximum dust concentrations from the simulations and the observations for each dust event agreed closely. Because of the lack of soil moisture information, the model was run in a “dry” mode. However, some discrepancies between the observations and the model suggest that accounting for soil moisture should be done where possible. For low dust concentrations, DUSTRAN tends to overestimate PM10 levels. This may be a weakness in the simple form of the dust flux parameterization. It could also be a reflection of deviations of the threshold friction velocity from our nominal value of 20 cm s-1. Overall, however, we have

  16. Dental erosion in children: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnett, V; Seow, W K

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that the prevalence of dental erosion in children varies widely between 2 and 57%. Changes seen in dental erosion range from removal of surface characteristics to extensive loss of tooth tissue with pulp exposure and abscess formation. Symptoms of dental erosion range from sensitivity to severe pain associated with pulp exposure. The etiology of dental erosion is dependent on the presence of extrinsic or intrinsic acid in the oral environment. Extrinsic sources of acids in children include frequent consumption of acidic foods and drinks, and acidic medications. Regurgitation of gastric contents into the mouth, as occurs in gastroesophageal reflux, is the most common source of intrinsic acid in children. A multitude of factors may modify the erosion process, such as saliva, oral hygiene practices, and presence or absence of fluoride. When dental erosion is diagnosed, it is important to investigate and identify the acid source, and to determine if the process is ongoing. The aim of treatment is to eliminate the cause of acid exposure, and to minimize the effects of acid exposure where it is not possible to remove the acid source. Restoration of the dentition involves stainless steel crowns to restore lost vertical dimension, and composite resin for esthetics.

  17. Dental erosion: causes, diagnostics and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Sosa-Puente

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite being a commonly studied topic, it is difficult to find studies which explain the problem of dental erosion. For this article, literature was analyzed to find information on the agents which trigger dental erosion, the main diagnosis methods, the most common treatments used nowadays and the interrelationship with dental materials. The etiology of dental erosion is multifactorial, including acids, eating disorders and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, biological factors such as saliva or habits also play a part in the establishment of this condition. In order to establish a reliable diagnosis, clinical appearance becomes decisive. The Basic Index Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE, created in 2008, is an auxiliary diagnosis tool for assessing the status and progress of the erosion. Treatment should be linked to the eradication of the causative agent and it can range from simple observational monitoring of slightly affected teeth to the placement of total crowns in the most severe cases, but this will depend entirely on the extent, severity, symptoms and type of dentition. Regarding dental materials used in the treatment of eroded parts, there are glass ionomer and composite; the latter presents the greatest resistance to biodegradation when interacting with acids. Glass ionomers are the most vulnerable material while resin is seen as the most resistant. In conclusion, dental erosion has become an issue of great importance in the dental practice because of its serious impact on dental structures. Consequently, it is ranked among the most important dental disorders in the present day.

  18. Erosion of Earthen Levees by Wave Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeren, Y.; Wren, D. G.; Reba, M. L.

    2016-02-01

    Earthen levees of aquaculture and irrigation reservoirs in the United States often experience significant erosion due to wind-generated waves. Typically constructed using local soils, unprotected levees are subjected to rapid erosion and retreat due to wind generated waves and surface runoff. Only a limited amount of published work addresses the erosion rates for unprotected levees, and producers who rely on irrigation reservoirs need an economic basis for selecting a protection method for vulnerable levees. This, in turn, means that a relationship between wave energy and erosion of cohesive soils is needed. In this study, laboratory experiments were carried out in order to quantify wave induced levee erosion and retreat. A model erodible bank was packed using a soil consisting of approximately 14% sand, 73% silt, and 13% clay in a 20.6 m long 0.7 m wide and 1.2 m deep wave tank at the USDA-ARS, National Sedimentation Laboratory in Oxford MS. The geometry of the levee face was monitored by digital camera and the waves were measured by means of 6 capacitance wave staffs. Relationships were established between levee erosion, edge and retreat rates, and incident wave energy.

  19. Elevated Temperature Solid Particle Erosion Performance of Plasma-Sprayed Co-based Composite Coatings with Additions of Al2O3 and CeO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithin, H. S.; Desai, Vijay; Ramesh, M. R.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, investigation into solid particle erosion behavior of atmospheric plasma-sprayed composite coating of CoCrAlY reinforced with Al2O3 and CeO2 oxides on Superni 76 at elevated temperature of 600 °C is presented. Alumina particles are used as erodent at two impact angles of 30° and 90°. The microstructure, porosity, hardness, toughness and adhesion properties of the as-sprayed coatings are studied. The effects of temperature and phase transformation in the coatings during erosion process are analyzed using XRD and EDS techniques. Optical profilometer is used for accurate elucidation of erosion volume loss. CoCrAlY/CeO2 coating showed better erosion resistance with a volume loss of about 50% of what was observed in case of CoCrAlY/Al2O3/YSZ coating. Lower erosion loss is observed at 90° as compared to 30° impact angle. The erosion mechanism evaluated using SEM micrograph revealed that the coatings experienced ductile fracture exhibiting severe deformation with unusual oxide cracks. Reinforced metal oxides provide shielding effect for erodent impact, enabling better erosion resistance. The oxidation of the coating due to high-temperature exposure reforms erosion process into oxidation-modified erosion process.

  20. "Keynote address, Theme 4, Management of steepland erosion: an overview"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1981-01-01

    Abstract - Steepland erosion is a composite of surface, channel, and mass erosion. The relative importance of each process is determined by an interaction between climate, soil, geology, topography, and vegetation. A change in any of these components can increase or decrease the rate of erosion. The key to successful management of erosion is the ability to 1)...

  1. Surface Erosion Control Techniques on Newly Constructed Forest Roads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnny M. Grace; John Wilhoit; Robert Rummer; Bryce Stokes

    1999-01-01

    A newly constructed forest road was treated with three erosion control treatments: wood excelsior erosion mat, native grass species, and exotic grass species. The study evaluates treatment methods on the basis of sediment reduction and runoff volume reduction compared to no treatment. The erosion mat treatment was most effective in mitigating erosion losses with a 98...

  2. Soil erosion as a driver of land-use change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.M.; Govers, G.; Kosmas, C.; VanAcker, H.; Oost, van K.; Rounsevell, M.

    2005-01-01

    Although much research has been carried out on the crop productivity response to soil erosion, little is known about the role of soil erosion as a driver of land-use change. Given, however, the some-times large erosion-induced reductions in crop yields, it appears likely that erosion has a strong

  3. Satellite-based estimation of rainfall erosivity for Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Sterk, G.; Jong, S.M. de

    2010-01-01

    Rainfall erosivity is a measure for the erosive force of rainfall. Rainfall kinetic energy determines the erosivity and is in turn greatly dependent on rainfall intensity. Attempts for its large-scale mapping are rare. Most are based on interpolation of erosivity values derived from rain gauge

  4. Rill erosion in natural and disturbed forests: 1. Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. R. Robichaud; J. W. Wagenbrenner; R. E. Brown

    2010-01-01

    Rill erosion can be a large portion of the total erosion in disturbed forests, but measurements of the runoff and erosion at the rill scale are uncommon. Simulated rill erosion experiments were conducted in two forested areas in the northwestern United States on slopes ranging from 18 to 79%. We compared runoff rates, runoff velocities, and sediment flux rates from...

  5. Erosivity, surface runoff, and soil erosion estimation using GIS-coupled runoff-erosion model in the Mamuaba catchment, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques da Silva, Richarde; Guimarães Santos, Celso Augusto; Carneiro de Lima Silva, Valeriano; Pereira e Silva, Leonardo

    2013-11-01

    This study evaluates erosivity, surface runoff generation, and soil erosion rates for Mamuaba catchment, sub-catchment of Gramame River basin (Brazil) by using the ArcView Soil and Water Assessment Tool (AvSWAT) model. Calibration and validation of the model was performed on monthly basis, and it could simulate surface runoff and soil erosion to a good level of accuracy. Daily rainfall data between 1969 and 1989 from six rain gauges were used, and the monthly rainfall erosivity of each station was computed for all the studied years. In order to evaluate the calibration and validation of the model, monthly runoff data between January 1978 and April 1982 from one runoff gauge were used as well. The estimated soil loss rates were also realistic when compared to what can be observed in the field and to results from previous studies around of catchment. The long-term average soil loss was estimated at 9.4 t ha(-1) year(-1); most of the area of the catchment (60%) was predicted to suffer from a low- to moderate-erosion risk (soil erosion was estimated to exceed > 12 t ha(-1) year(-1). Expectedly, estimated soil loss was significantly correlated with measured rainfall and simulated surface runoff. Based on the estimated soil loss rates, the catchment was divided into four priority categories (low, moderate, high and very high) for conservation intervention. The study demonstrates that the AvSWAT model provides a useful tool for soil erosion assessment from catchments and facilitates the planning for a sustainable land management in northeastern Brazil.

  6. Metrology to enable high temperature erosion testing - A new european initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fry, A.T.; Gee, M.G.; Clausen, Sønnik

    2014-01-01

    an additional emission of 250,000 tonnes of CO2 over the lifetime of the plant [1]. The cause and type of solid particle erosion varies across different industries and locations in plant, for instance the particles could be volcanic ash in aero-engines, fly ash in boilers, exfoliated scale in steam turbines...... is required. However, limitations in current measurement capability within this form of test prevent the advancement. A new European initiative, METROSION, on the development of high temperature solid particle erosion testing has a primary aim to develop this metrological framework. Several key parameters...

  7. Soil erosion and sediment yield and their relationships with vegetation cover in upper stream of the Yellow River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wei; Hao, Fanghua; Skidmore, Andrew K; Toxopeus, A G

    2010-12-15

    Soil erosion is a significant concern when considering regional environmental protection, especially in the Yellow River Basin in China. This study evaluated the temporal-spatial interaction of land cover status with soil erosion characteristics in the Longliu Catchment of China, using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. SWAT is a physical hydrological model which uses the RUSLE equation as a sediment algorithm. Considering the spatial and temporal scale of the relationship between soil erosion and sediment yield, simulations were undertaken at monthly and annual temporal scales and basin and sub-basin spatial scales. The corresponding temporal and spatial Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) information was summarized from MODIS data, which can integrate regional land cover and climatic features. The SWAT simulation revealed that the annual soil erosion and sediment yield showed similar spatial distribution patterns, but the monthly variation fluctuated significantly. The monthly basin soil erosion varied from almost no erosion load to 3.92 t/ha and the maximum monthly sediment yield was 47,540 tones. The inter-annual simulation focused on the spatial difference and relationship with the corresponding vegetation NDVI value for every sub-basin. It is concluded that, for this continental monsoon climate basin, the higher NDVI vegetation zones prevented sediment transport, but at the same time they also contributed considerable soil erosion. The monthly basin soil erosion and sediment yield both correlated with NDVI, and the determination coefficients of their exponential correlation model were 0.446 and 0.426, respectively. The relationships between soil erosion and sediment yield with vegetation NDVI indicated that the vegetation status has a significant impact on sediment formation and transport. The findings can be used to develop soil erosion conservation programs for the study area. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Participatory assessment of soil erosion severity and performance of mitigation measures using stakeholder workshops in Koga catchment, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemberu, Walle; Baartman, Jantiene E M; Fleskens, Luuk; Ritsema, Coen J

    2018-02-01

    Farmers possess a wealth of knowledge regarding soil erosion and soil and water conservation (SWC), and there is a great demand to access it. However, there has been little effort to systematically document farmers' experiences and perceptions of SWC measures. Sustainable Land Management (SLM) has largely evolved through local traditional practices rather than adoption based on scientific evidence. This research aimed to assess soil erosion and performance of different SWC measures from the farmers' perspective by documenting their perceptions and experiences in Koga catchment, Ethiopia. To this aim, workshops were organised in three sub-catchments differing in slopes and SWC measures. Workshops included group discussions and field monitoring of erosion indicators and systematically describing the status of soil erosion, soil fertility and yield to assess the performance of SWC measures. Results show that farmers are aware of the harmful effects of ongoing soil erosion and of the impacts of mitigation measures on their farms. Sheet erosion was found to be the most widespread form of erosion while rill damage was critical on plots cultivated to cereals on steep slopes. The average rill erosion rates were 24.2 and 47.3 t/ha/y in treated and untreated farmlands, respectively. SWC reduced rill erosion on average by more than 48%. However, the impacts of SWC measures varied significantly between sub-watersheds, and farmers believed that SWC measures did not prevent erosion completely. Comparatively, graded stone-faced soil bunds revealed maximum desired impacts and were most appreciated by farmers, whereas level bunds caused water logging. Most traditional ditches were highly graded and begun incising and affected production of cereals. Despite the semi-quantitative nature of the methodology, using farmers' perceptions and experiences to document land degradation and the impacts of SWC measures is crucial as they are the daily users of the land and therefore directly

  9. Helicobacter Pylori Eradication Therapy in both Erosive and Non-erosive Gastritis — A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Quamrul Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a recognized cause of peptic ulcer and gastritis. Persistence of infection is a definite risk factor for gastric malignancy. Healing of gastritis after eradication of H. pylori reduces the risks of peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancy. Objectives: To find out the relationship of H. pylori with erosive and nonerosive gastritis, the effect of anti-H. pylori therapy and to compare the effects of anti-H. pylori therapy between two types of gastritis. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was done in the Gastroenterology department of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka from June 2008 to May 2009. One hundred eighty dyspeptic patients were enrolled for the study. Patients with gastritis diagnosed by endoscopy underwent rapid urease test (RUT. RUT positive patients were considered to have H. pylori infection and were treated with triple therapy (omeprazole, amoxycillin and metronidiazole for 14 days. Treatment responses were assessed by clinical history and also by endoscopic biopsy and RUT. Results of endoscopic findings and RUT after treatment were compared with pretreatment status. Results: Seventy patients completed the treatment and finally could be assessed. Endoscopic findings of 70 patients revealed that 56 (80% patients had erosive gastritis and 14 (20% patients had nonerosive gastritis. After treatment, 47 (67.1% lesions became normal, 16 (22.9% remained erosive and 7 (10% non-erosive as before. Out of 14 non-erosive diseases, 7 became normal, while out of 56 erosive diseases 40 became normal. The erosive group responded significantly better than the non-erosive group (c2=32.766, p<0.001. Fifty nine (84.3% patients with gastritis showed negative urease test after treatment. Conclusion: Strong relation between H. pylori infection and gastritis was found. Majority were antral erosive gastritis. Erosive group responded better than non-erosive group.

  10. Annotated bibliography on soil erosion and erosion control in subarctic and high-latitude regions of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.W. Slaughter; J.W. Aldrich

    1989-01-01

    This annotated bibliography emphasizes the physical processes of upland soil erosion, prediction of soil erosion and sediment yield, and erosion control. The bibliography is divided into two sections: (1) references specific to Alaska, the Arctic and subarctic, and similar high-latitude settings; and (2) references relevant to understanding erosion, sediment production...

  11. Erosion associated with cable and tractor logging in northwestern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. M. Rice; P. A. Datzman

    1981-01-01

    Abstract - Erosion and site conditions were measured at 102 logged plots in northwestern California. Erosion averaged 26.8 m 3 /ha. A log-normal distribution was a better fit to the data. The antilog of the mean of the logarithms of erosion was 3.2 m 3 /ha. The Coast District Erosion Hazard Rating was a poor predictor of erosion related to logging. In a new equation...

  12. Effects of surface slope on erosion rates of quartz particles

    OpenAIRE

    Lodge, Phillip.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling sediment erosion is important in a wide range of environmental problems. The effects of various environmental factors on erosion rates have been studied, but the effects of surface slope on erosion rates of a wide range of sediments have not been quantified. The effects of surface slope, both in the direction of flow (pitch) and perpendicular to the flow (roll), on erosion rates of quartz particles were investigated using the Sediment Erosion at Depth Flume (Sedflume). US Navy (US...

  13. A large source of dust missing in particulate matter emission inventories? Wind erosion of post-fire landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. S. Wagenbrenner; S. H. Chung; B. K. Lamb

    2017-01-01

    Wind erosion of soils burned by wildfire contributes substantial particulate matter (PM) in the form of dust to the atmosphere, but the magnitude of this dust source is largely unknown. It is important to accurately quantify dust emissions because they can impact human health, degrade visibility, exacerbate dust-on-snow issues (including snowmelt timing, snow chemistry...

  14. Atmospheric Photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Harrie; Potter, A. E.

    1961-01-01

    The upper atmosphere offers a vast photochemical laboratory free from solid surfaces, so all reactions take place in the gaseous phase. At 30 km altitude the pressure has fallen to about one-hundredth of that at ground level, and we shall, rather arbitrarily, regard the upper atmosphere as beginning at that height. By a little less than 100 km the pressure has fallen to 10(exp -3) mm Hg and is decreasing by a power of ten for every 15 km increase in altitude. Essentially we are concerned then with the photochemistry of a nitrogen-oxygen mixture under low-pressure conditions in which photo-ionization, as well as photodissociation, plays an important part. Account must also be taken of the presence of rare constituents, such as water vapour and its decomposition products, including particularly hydroxyl, oxides of carbon, methane and, strangely enough, sodium, lithium and calcium. Many curious and unfamiliar reactions occur in the upper atmosphere. Some of them are luminescent, causing the atmosphere to emit a dim light called the airglow. Others, between gaseous ions and neutral molecules, are almost a complete mystery at this time. Similar interesting phenomena must occur in other planetary atmospheres, and they might be predicted if sufficient chemical information were available.

  15. Suitability of 239+240Pu and 137Cs as tracers for soil erosion assessment in mountain grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alewell, Christine; Meusburger, Katrin; Juretzko, Gregor; Mabit, Lionel; Ketterer, Michael E

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclides have been distributed globally due to nuclear weapons testing, nuclear accidents, nuclear weapons fabrication, and nuclear fuel reprocessing. While the negative consequences of this radioactive contamination are self-evident, the ubiquitous fallout radionuclides (FRNs) distribution form the basis for the use as tracers in ecological studies, namely for soil erosion assessment. Soil erosion is a major threat to mountain ecosystems worldwide. We compare the suitability of the anthropogenic FRNs, 137Cs and 239+240Pu as soil erosion tracers in two alpine valleys of Switzerland (Urseren Valley, Canton Uri, Central Swiss Alps and Val Piora, Ticino, Southern Alps). We sampled reference and potentially erosive sites in transects along both valleys. 137Cs measurements of soil samples were performed with a Li-drifted Germanium detector and 239+240Pu with ICP-MS. Our data indicates a heterogeneous deposition of the 137Cs, since most of the fallout origins from the Chernobyl April/May 1986 accident, when large parts of the European Alps were still snow-covered. In contrast, 239+240Pu fallout originated mainly from 1950s to 1960s atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, resulting in a more homogenous distribution and thus seems to be a more suitable tracer in mountainous grasslands. Soil erosion assessment using 239+240Pu as a tracer pointed to a huge dynamic and high heterogeneity of erosive processes (between sedimentation of 1.9 and 7 t ha(-1) yr(-1) and erosion of 0.2-16.4 t ha(-1) yr(-1) in the Urseren Valley and sedimentation of 0.4-20.3 t ha(-1) yr(-1) and erosion of 0.1-16.4 t ha(-1) yr(-1) at Val Piora). Our study represents a novel and successful application of 239+240Pu as a tracer of soil erosion in a mountain environment. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. IN SITU MEASUREMENT OF BEDROCK EROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Rieke-Zapp

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available While long term erosion rates of bedrock material may be estimated by dating methods, current day erosion rates are – if at all available – based on rough estimates or on point measurements. Precise quantification of short term erosion rates are required to improve our understanding of short term processes, for input in landscape evolution models, as well as for studying the mechanics and efficiency of different erosion processes in varying geomorphological settings. Typical current day erosion rates in the European Alps range from sub-millimetre to several millimetres per year depending on the dominant erosion processes. The level of surveying accuracy required for recurring sub-millimetre to millimetre measurements in the field is demanding. A novel surveying setup for in-situ measurement of bedrock erosion was tested recently in three different locations in Switzerland. Natural bedrock was investigated in the Gornera gorge close to Zermatt. Further on, bedrock samples were installed in exposed locations in the Erlenbach research watershed close to Einsiedeln, and in the Illgraben debris flow channel, located in the Canton Schwyz and Valais, respectively. A twofold measurement approach was chosen for all locations. For the first setup control points providing an absolute reference frame for recurrent measurements were embedded close to the area of interest. Close range photogrammetry was applied to measure surface changes on the bedrock samples. The precision for surface measurements in the field was 0.1 mm (1 σ and thus suitable for the application. The equipment needed for the surveys can easily be carried to the field. At one field site a structured light scanner was used along with the photogrammetric setup. Although the current generation of structured light scanners appeared less suitable for field application, data acquisition was much faster and checking the data for completeness in the field was straight forward. The latest

  17. In Situ Measurement of Bedrock Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke-Zapp, D. H.; Beer, A.; Turowski, J. M.; Campana, L.

    2012-07-01

    While long term erosion rates of bedrock material may be estimated by dating methods, current day erosion rates are - if at all available - based on rough estimates or on point measurements. Precise quantification of short term erosion rates are required to improve our understanding of short term processes, for input in landscape evolution models, as well as for studying the mechanics and efficiency of different erosion processes in varying geomorphological settings. Typical current day erosion rates in the European Alps range from sub-millimetre to several millimetres per year depending on the dominant erosion processes. The level of surveying accuracy required for recurring sub-millimetre to millimetre measurements in the field is demanding. A novel surveying setup for in-situ measurement of bedrock erosion was tested recently in three different locations in Switzerland. Natural bedrock was investigated in the Gornera gorge close to Zermatt. Further on, bedrock samples were installed in exposed locations in the Erlenbach research watershed close to Einsiedeln, and in the Illgraben debris flow channel, located in the Canton Schwyz and Valais, respectively. A twofold measurement approach was chosen for all locations. For the first setup control points providing an absolute reference frame for recurrent measurements were embedded close to the area of interest. Close range photogrammetry was applied to measure surface changes on the bedrock samples. The precision for surface measurements in the field was 0.1 mm (1 σ) and thus suitable for the application. The equipment needed for the surveys can easily be carried to the field. At one field site a structured light scanner was used along with the photogrammetric setup. Although the current generation of structured light scanners appeared less suitable for field application, data acquisition was much faster and checking the data for completeness in the field was straight forward. The latest generation of compact

  18. Atmospheric thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Iribarne, J V

    1973-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the atmosphere is the subject of several chapters in most textbooks on dynamic meteorology, but there is no work in English to give the subject a specific and more extensive treatment. In writing the present textbook, we have tried to fill this rather remarkable gap in the literature related to atmospheric sciences. Our aim has been to provide students of meteorology with a book that can playa role similar to the textbooks on chemical thermodynamics for the chemists. This implies a previous knowledge of general thermodynamics, such as students acquire in general physics courses; therefore, although the basic principles are reviewed (in the first four chapters), they are only briefly discussed, and emphasis is laid on those topics that will be useful in later chapters, through their application to atmospheric problems. No attempt has been made to introduce the thermodynamics of irreversible processes; on the other hand, consideration of heterogeneous and open homogeneous systems permits a...

  19. Predicting of soil erosion with regarding to rainfall erosivity and soil erodibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suif, Zuliziana; Razak, Mohd Amirun Anis Ab; Ahmad, Nordila

    2018-02-01

    The soil along the hill and slope are wearing away due to erosion and it can take place due to occurrence of weak and heavy rainfall. The aim of this study is to predict the soil erosion degree in Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia (UPNM) area focused on two major factor which is soil erodibility and rainfall erosivity. Soil erodibility is the possibilities of soil to detach and carried away during rainfall and runoff. The "ROM" scale was used in this study to determine the degree of soil erodibility, namely low, moderate, high, and very high. As for rainfall erosivity, the erosive power caused by rainfall that cause soil loss. A daily rainfall data collected from January to April was analyzed by using ROSE index classification to identify the potential risk of soil erosion. The result shows that the soil erodibilty are moderate at MTD`s hill, high at behind of block Lestari and Landslide MTD hill, and critical at behind the mess cadet. While, the highest rainfall erosivity was recorded in March and April. Overall, this study would benefit the organization greatly in saving cost in landslide protection as relevant authorities can take early measures repairing the most affected area of soil erosion.

  20. Probabilistic soil erosion modeling using the Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMIT) after wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. R. Robichaud; W. J. Elliot; J. W. Wagenbrenner

    2011-01-01

    The decision of whether or not to apply post-fire hillslope erosion mitigation treatments, and if so, where these treatments are most needed, is a multi-step process. Land managers must assess the risk of damaging runoff and sediment delivery events occurring on the unrecovered burned hillslope. We developed the Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) to address this need...

  1. Does a more sophisticated storm erosion model improve probabilistic erosion estimates?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranasinghe, R.W.M.R.J.B.; Callaghan, D.; Roelvink, D.

    2013-01-01

    The dependency between the accuracy/uncertainty of storm erosion exceedance estimates obtained via a probabilistic model and the level of sophistication of the structural function (storm erosion model) embedded in the probabilistic model is assessed via the application of Callaghan et al.'s (2008)

  2. Soil carbon and nitrogen erosion in forested catchments: implications for erosion-induced terrestrial carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. M. Stacy; S. C. Hart; C. T. Hunsaker; D. W. Johnson; A. A. Berhe

    2015-01-01

    Lateral movement of organic matter (OM) due to erosion is now considered an important flux term in terrestrial carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) budgets, yet most published studies on the role of erosion focus on agricultural or grassland ecosystems. To date, little information is available on the rate and nature of OM eroded from forest ecosystems. We present annual...

  3. 50 Years of coastal erosion analysis: A new methodological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto Campos, Antonio; Diaz Cuevas, Pilar; Ojeda zujar, Jose; Guisado-Pintado, Emilia

    2017-04-01

    that transect). While the proxy, the most recommended in the research literature, defined as the upper limit of the beach active profile (backshore/foredune, cliff or infrastructure limit if exists) guarantees the exclusion of uncertainties linked to either, tides regime (very important in the Atlantic sector) and any seasonal variations of the beach profile. Spatially, results show a predominance of sectors under erosion (52% -312km - for global period 1956-2011 and 42% -249 km- for most recent period of time 1977-2011), corresponding to mean retreats of 28 m and 20 m for each period respectively. Paradoxically, when incorporating the accumulative rates (positive and negative) for each period, accretional areas appear to be greater than erosional ones, as the methodology simplifies calculations and thus consider coastal erosion as two-dimensional (distances between proxies) whereas it is a three-dimensional process. Greater erosion occurs along the Mediterranean coast as well as progressive reduction of eroded and accreted sectors on behalf of an induced increment of stable sectors driven by the presence of coastal infrastructures (promenades, seawalls, and breakwater) which prevent the shoreline from migrating inland. The usability of the methodology and its integration on a web-based viewer undoubtedly offers a new opportunity of data exploitation, as combines natural and anthropogenic factors involved in coastal erosion/accretion in a simple but effective way.

  4. Advances in Predicting Soil Erosion After Fire Using the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, Osama Z.; Pierson, Frederick B.; Nearing, Mark A.; Williams, C. Jason; Hernandez, Mariano; Boll, Jan; Nouwakpo, Sayjro; Weltz, Mark A.; Spaeth, Kenneth E.

    2017-04-01

    The magnitude of erosion from a hillslope is governed by the availability of sediment and connectivity of overland flow and erosion processes. For undisturbed conditions, sediment is mainly detached and transported by rainsplash and sheetflow (splash-sheet) processes in bare batches, but sediment generally only travels a short distance before deposition. On recently disturbed sites (e.g., after fire), bare ground is more extensive and runoff and erosion rates are higher relative to undisturbed conditions. Increased erosion following disturbance occurs largely due to a shift from splash-sheet to concentrated-flow-dominated processes. On long-disturbed sites (e.g., after woody plant encroachment), years of soil loss can limit sediment availability and soil erosion. In contrast, recently burned landscapes typically have ample sediment available and generate high erosion rates. This presentation highlights recent advancements in hillslope erosion prediction by the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM) that accommodate recently burned conditions. The RHEM tool is a process-based model that was developed specifically for predicting hillslope runoff and erosion on rangeland ecosystems. The advancements presented here include development of empirical equations to predict erodibility parameters for conditions in which erosion by concentrated flow processes is limited (by runoff or sediment availability) and an erodibility parameter for conditions in which erosion by concentrated flow processes is the dominant erosion mechanism and sediment is amply available (burned conditions). The data used for developing and evaluating the erodibility parameter equations were obtained from rainfall simulation databases maintained by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service. The data span undisturbed, long-disturbed, and recently burned conditions. For undisturbed and long-disturbed conditions, a regression analysis was applied to derive the relationship between splash

  5. Numerical simulation of cavitation erosion on a NACA0015 hydrofoil based on bubble collapse strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, V.; Luo, X.; Escaler, X.; Huang, R.; Valencia, E.

    2015-12-01

    The prediction of erosion under unsteady cavitation is crucial to prevent damage in hydraulic machinery. The present investigation deals with the numerical simulation of erosive partial cavitation around a NACA0015 hydrofoil. The study presents the calculation of the bubble collapse strength, Sb, based on the bubble potential energy to identify the surface areas with highest risk of damage. The results are obtained with a numerical scheme assuming homogeneous mixture flow, implicit LES and Zwart cavitation model. The 3D unsteady flow simulation has been solved using OpenFOAM. Python language and OpenFOAM calculator (foamCalcEx) have been used to obtain and represent Sb. The obtained results clearly show the instants of erosive bubble collapse and the affected surface areas.

  6. Potential for monitoring soil erosion features and soil erosion modeling components from remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langran, K. J.

    1983-01-01

    Accurate estimates of soil erosion and its effects on soil productivity are essential in agricultural decision making and planning from the field scale to the national level. Erosion models have been primarily developed for designing erosion control systems, predicting sediment yield for reservoir design, predicting sediment transport, and simulating water quality. New models proposed are more comprehensive in that the necessary components (hydrology, erosion-sedimentation, nutrient cycling, tillage, etc.) are linked in a model appropriate for studying the erosion-productivity problem. Recent developments in remote sensing systems, such as Landsat Thematic Mapper, Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B), etc., can contribute significantly to the future development and operational use of these models.

  7. Study on the standard of soil erosion gradation based on erosive daily rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Ye, Suigao; Shen, Zhaowei; Lu, Fangchun; Zhang, Jinjuan

    2017-11-01

    This paper took Yuyao city as the research area. the daily rainfall data of 30-year was collected from the typical rainfall station. And the daily rainfall power function model was used to calculate the rainfall erosivity. The weight that the rainfall erosivity of the rainfall less than 30mm accounted for the total annual rainfall erosivity was calculated and analyzed. A method for soil erosion intensity gradation based on daily rainfall was proposed. At the same time, according to People’s Republic of China water conservancy industry standard “the standards for classification and gradation of soil erosion”, the weight value was used to establish the gradation standard of soil erosion intensity. The daily soil loss tolerance was 7 t/km2 calculated by this method.

  8. A Study on Cavitation Erosion Behaviors of Corrosion-resistance Thermal Spray Coating Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hee Seok

    2003-02-01

    it. 6. SUS316 is the appropriate thermal spray coating material to prevent cavitation erosion and at the same time to cut down the cost

  9. Forecast of muddy floods using high-resolution radar precipitation forcasting data and erosion modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänsel, Phoebe; Schindewolf, Marcus; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    In the federal province of Saxony, Eastern Germany, almost 60 % of the agricultural land is endangered by erosion processes, mainly caused by heavy rainfall events. Beside the primary impact of soil loss and decreasing soil fertility, erosion can cause significant effects if transported sediments are entering downslope settlements, infrastructure or traffic routes. Available radar precipitation data are closing the gap between the conventional rainfall point measurements and enable the nationwide rainfall distribution with high spatial and temporal resolution. By means of the radar precipitation data of the German Weather Service (DWD), high-resolution radar-based rainfall data totals up to 5 minute time steps are possible. The radar data are visualised in a grid-based hourly precipitation map. In particular, the daily and hourly precipitation maps help to identify regions with heavy rainfall and possible erosion events. In case of an erosion event on agricultural land, these areas are mapped with an unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV). The camera-equipped UAV delivers high-resolution images of the erosion event, that allow the generation of high-resolution orthophotos. By the application of the high-resolution radar precipitation data as an input for the process-based soil loss and deposition model EROSION 3D, these images are for validation purposes. Future research is focused on large scale soil erosion modelling with the help of the radar forecasting product and an automatic identification of sediment pass over points. The study will end up with an user friendly muddy flood warning tool, which allows the local authorities to initiate immediate measures in order to prevent severe damages in settlements, infrastructure or traffic routes.

  10. Real-time monitoring of controllable cavitation erosion in a vessel phantom with passive acoustic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shukuan; Shi, Aiwei; Jing, Bowen; Du, Xuan; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-11-01

    Cavitation erosion in blood vessel plays an important role in ultrasound thrombolysis, drug delivery, and other clinical applications. The controllable superficial vessel erosion based on ultrasonic standing wave (USW) has been used to effectively prevent vessel ruptures and haemorrhages, and optical method is used to observe the experiments. But optical method can only work in transparent media. Compared with standard B-mode imaging, passive acoustic mapping (PAM) can monitor erosion in real time and has better sensitivity of cavitation detection. However, the conventionally used PAM has limitations in imaging resolution and artifacts. In this study, a unique PAM method that combined the robust Capon beamformer (RCB) with the sign coherence factor (SCF) was proposed to monitor the superficial vessel erosion in real time. The performance of the proposed method was validated by simulations. In vitro experiments showed that the lateral (axial) resolution of the proposed PAM was 2.31±0.51 (3.19±0.38) times higher than time exposure acoustics (TEA)-based PAM and 1.73±0.38 (1.76±0.48) times higher than RCB-based PAM, and the cavitation-to-artifact ratio (CAR) of the proposed PAM could be improved by 22.5±3.2dB and 7.1±1.2dB compared with TEA and RCB-based PAM. These results showed that the proposed PAM can precisely monitor the superficial vessel erosion and the erosion shift after USW modulation. This work may have the potential of developing a useful tool for precise spatial control and real-time monitoring of the superficial vessel erosion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the serum zinc level in erosive and non-erosive oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, N; Mehdipour, M; Najafi, Sh; Bahramian, A; Garjani, Sh; Khoeini Poorfar, H

    2014-06-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory immunologic-based disease involving skin and mucosa. This disease is generally divided into two categories: erosive and non-erosive. Many etiologic factors are deliberated regarding the disease; however, the disorders of immune system and the role of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and monocytes are more highlighted. Zinc is an imperative element for the growth of epithelium and its deficiency induces the cytotoxic activity of T-helper2 cells, which seems to be associated with lichen planus. This study was aimed to evaluate the levels of serum zinc in erosive and non-erosive oral lichen planus (OLP) and to compare it with the healthy control group to find out any feasible inference. A total of 22 patients with erosive oral lichen planus, 22 patients with non erosive OLP and 44 healthy individuals as the control group were recruited in this descriptive-comparative study. All the participants were selected from the referees to the department of oral medicine, school of dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Serum zinc level was examined for all the individuals with liquid-stat kit (Beckman Instruments Inc.; Carlsbad, CA). Data were analyzed by adopting the ANOVA and Tukey tests, using SPSS 16 statistical software. The mean age of patients with erosive and non-erosive LP was 41.7 and 41.3 years, respectively. The mean age of the healthy control group was 34.4 years .The mean serum zinc levels in the erosive and non erosive lichen planus groups and control groups were 8.3 (1.15), 11.15 (0.92) and 15.74 (1.75) μg/dl respectively. The difference was statistically significant (plichen planus. This finding may probably indicate the promising role of zinc in development of oral lichen planus.

  12. Sediment storage dam: A structural gully erosion control and sediment trapping measure, northern Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Mulatie; Keesstra, Saskia; Baartman, Jantiene; Ritsema, Coen

    2014-05-01

    Gully erosion is a prime problem in Ethiopia. This study assessed the severity of gully erosion and the role of sediment storage dams (SSD) in restoring gullies and preventing further gully development, its sediment trapping efficacy (STE) and its capacity in converting degraded gully lands to productive land. On average 2.5 m deep, 6.6 m wide and 28.3 m long gullies were formed in Minizr watershed, northwest Ethiopia, in 2013. Concentrated surface runoff, traditional ditches, graded terraces without suitable water ways and road construction are the main causes of such serious gully erosion. Over grazing, tunnel flow and lack of proper immediate gully treatment actions after gully initiation are found to be additional causes of the problem. Gully erosion was also found as the major source of sediment for downstream rivers and water reservoirs. The annual volume of soil eroded from only four gullies was 1941.3 m3. To control gully erosion, SSDs were found to be important physical structures, which can trap significant amount of sediment within gullies and they can convert unproductive gully land to productive agricultural land for fruit and crop production. Eight SSDs trapped about 44*103 m3 of sediment within 2 to 8 years. Two representative SSDs constructed using gabion and stone were tested for their STE. Results showed that their efficacy was 74.1% and 66.4% for the gabion and stone SSDs, respectively. Six of the older SSDs were already full of sediment and created 0.75 ha of productive land within 2 to 8 years. SSDs best fits to treat large size and deep gullies where other gully control measures, check dams, could not function well. To prevent gully formation, controlling its causes that is avoiding traditional ditches, practicing grassed water ways to safely remove runoff water from graded terraces, integrated watershed and road side management practices are important solutions. KEY WORDS: Sediment storage dam, gully erosion, sediment trapping efficacy

  13. Coastal Vulnerability to Erosion Processes: Study Cases from Different Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anfuso, Giorgio; Martinez Del Pozo, Jose Angel; Rangel-Buitrago, Nelson

    2010-05-01

    When natural processes affect or threaten human activities or infrastructures they become a natural hazard. In order to prevent the natural hazards impact and the associated economic and human losses, coastal managers need to know the intrinsic vulnerability of the littoral, using information on the physical and ecological coastal features, human occupation and present and future shoreline trends. The prediction of future coastline positions can be based on the study of coastal changes which have occurred over recent decades. Vertical aerial photographs, satellite imagery and maps are very useful data sources for the reconstruction of coast line changes at long (>60 years) and medium (between 60 and 10 years) temporal and spatial scales. Vulnerability maps have been obtained for several coastal sectors around the world through the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS), computer-assisted multivariate analysis and numerical models. In the USA, "Flood Insurance Rate Maps" have been created by the government and "Coastal Zone Hazard Maps" have been prepared for coastal stretches affected by hurricane Hugo. In Spain, the vulnerability of the Ebro and an Andalusia coastal sector were investigated over different time scales. McLaughlin et al., (2002) developed a GIS based coastal vulnerability index for the Northern Ireland littoral that took into account socio-economic activities and coastal resistance to erosion and energetic characteristics. Lizárraga et al., (2001) combined beach reduction at Rosario (Mexico) with the probability of damage to landward structures, obtaining a vulnerability matrix. In this work several coastal vulnerability maps have also been created by comparing data on coastal erosion/accretion and land use along different coastal sectors in Italy, Morocco and Colombia. Keywords: Hazard, Vulnerability, Coastal Erosion, Italy, Morocco, Colombia.

  14. Land Husbandry: Biochar application to reduce land degradation and erosion on cassava production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuniwati, E. D.

    2017-12-01

    This field experiment was carried out to examine the effect of increasing crop yield on land degradation and erosion in cassava-based cropping systems. The experiment was also aimed at showing that with proper crop management, the planting of cassava does not result in land degradation, and therefore, a sustainable production system can be obtained. The experiment was done in a farmer's fields in Batu, about 15 km south east of Malang, East Java, Indonesia. The soils are Alfisols with a surface slope of about 8%. There were 8 experimental treatments with two replications. The experiment results show that biochar applications reduce of soil erosion rate of the cassava field were not necessarily higher than those of maize in terms of crop yield and crop management. At low-to-medium yield, also observed the nutrient uptake of cassava was lower than that of maize. At high yield, only the K uptake of cassava was higher than that of maize, whereas the N and P uptake was more or less similar. Soil erosion on the cassava field was significantly higher than that on the maize field; however, this only occurred when there was no suitable crop management. Simple crop managements, such as ridging, biochar application, or manure application could significantly reduce soil erosion. The results also revealed that proper management could prevent land degradation and increase crop yield. In turn, the increase in crop yield could decrease soil erosion and plant nutrient depletion.

  15. In situ effect of CPP-ACP chewing gum upon erosive enamel loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Ribeiro Barros de ALENCAR

    Full Text Available Abstract Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP is able to increase salivary calcium and phosphate levels at an acidic pH. Previous studies demonstrated that a CPP-ACP chewing gum was able to enhance the re-hardening of erosion lesions, but could not diminish enamel hardness loss. Therefore, there is no consensus regarding the effectiveness of CPP-ACP on dental erosion. Objective This in situ study investigated the ability of a CPP-ACP chewing gum in preventing erosive enamel loss. Material and Methods: During three experimental crossover phases (one phase per group of seven days each, eight volunteers wore palatal devices with human enamel blocks. The groups were: GI – Sugar free chewing gum with CPP-ACP; GII – Conventional sugar free chewing gum; and GIII – No chewing gum (control. Erosive challenge was extraorally performed by immersion of the enamel blocks in cola drink (5 min, 4x/day. After each challenge, in groups CPP and No CPP, volunteers chewed one unit of the corresponding chewing gum for 30 minutes. Quantitative analysis of enamel loss was performed by profilometry (µm. Data were analyzed by Repeated-Measures ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p0.05. Conclusion The CPP-ACP chewing gum was not able to enhance the anti-erosive effect of conventional chewing gum against enamel loss.

  16. METHODS OF DUST PREVENTION FROM LANDFILLS OF RAW MATERIALS AND WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan J. Hycnar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an overview of ways of solving the problem of dusting of raw materials and fine-grained waste collected on landfills. The specific physicochemical properties of loose materials and unfavorable atmospheric conditions are responsible of heavy pollution of the environment by dust, posing a threat to human health. The types of materials that are potential sources of dust pollution are presented. The methods of eliminating and limiting dusty of loose powders, often used in industry, engineering, communal and emergency situations, are discussed. Examples of domestic and foreign solutions to prevent dusting and to protect the waste deposit from erosion are shown. In conclusion, existing safety techniques have been found to be effective in preventing dusting of raw materials and waste.

  17. An Experimental Simulation Method of Erosion Process on Gully Erosion in Loess Plateau in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianen; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2017-04-01

    In view of simulation difficultment of the field gully erosion process because of complex of rainfall runoff erosion mechanism and gully geometry a design means and experimentation technology and its verification test were given based on similarity theory and hydrodynamic principles. The basic ideas was that the erosion process of the field erosion gully was forecast by constructing similar model. The model and antetype should be in obedience to the same physical equations of rainfall, runoff, erosion, sediment transport, bed deformation and Soil water transport. The geometric, kinematical and dynamic similarity must be obeyed for these models. The primary similarity scale relation expressions were the ones of the geometric, rainfall, flow, erosion sediment transport and soil water movement similarity etc. The similarity of the hydraulic boundary was the necessary and sufficient condition between the model and the prototype. The gully prototype is one of Majiagou of Ansai county of Yanan City of Shaanxi Province in China. Its location is 36°53'55.75"N and 109°13'39.08"E. The model experiment wan carried out in State Key Laboratory of Soil Erosion and Dry land Farming On the Loess Plateau in Institute of Soil and Water Conservation of Northwest A&F University. First soil was selected by starting velocity similar. Second, the normal and scale 10 experiment model was built under complying with the similarities of geometric, rainfall, flow, erosion production sediment transport and bed deformation etc. The model hydraulic boundary from the prototype was the factor of the test process of rainfall. The experiment results indicated that the extreme rainstorm gully erosion process of the prototype could be reappeared. The equivalent rainfall process of gully prototype were that the rainfall intensity was 1.25 mm/min and the lasting time was 508 min and precipitation was 636mmn. Both the erosion amount and the erosion gully topography of the scale model were successfully

  18. Erosion rates for polymers measured on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The summary and viewgraphs of work presented at the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) materials workshop are given. Experimental data for erosion depths and rates for polymers measured on LDEF are given. In general, agreement is reasonably good between erosion rates from the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) LDEF experiment and prior data obtained at much lower mission fluences. Agreement is particularly satisfying in the case of Kapton where the prior data base is large. In spite of the known presence of silicaceous contamination on LDEF surfaces, the erosion rates of the highly erodible materials are hardly affected, if at all. Graphs showing changes in optical properties (reflectance and transmittance) of metal films are included.

  19. Erosion of buffer caused by groundwater leakages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autio, J.; Hanana, K.; Punkkinen, O.; Koskinen, K.; Olin, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the Finnish HLW disposal concept the most important properties of the bentonite clay being considered for these isolation purposes are its thermal behaviour, low hydraulic conductivity, diffusion limited transport, rheology, plasticity, sufficient swelling potential, and exchange capacity. All of these properties depend critically on bentonite density; therefore, any potential mass loss or redistribution events must be well characterized. One such event or process is the erosion of bentonite by flowing groundwater and the groundwater flowing in newly formed channels, in special. Mechanical erosion during the operational phase, due to high groundwater pressure gradients in open excavations, has been identified as a critical issue in TKS-2006 and SR-Can. This work addresses the mechanical erosion of bentonite by fluid shear. In order for buffer erosion to occur three processes must take place: detachment, entrainment, and transport. These processes are followed by the settling of the material and redistribution of buffer mass. Erosion begins with the detachment of a particle from surrounding material, which requires the application of shear forces greater than the attractive force between the particle and parent structure. Entrainment is the process by which the eroding medium lifts the detached particle into the flow. The most important aspect in entrainment is transfer of fluid's inertial forces via surface friction to particles' inertial forces, which, in turn, must overcome the frictional resistance between the particle and its surroundings. Factors influencing frictional resistance include gravity, particle mass, saturation degree of parent structure, composition of water present in parent structure, particle size, and surface roughness. Recent erosion tests, whereby water flow was directed over compacted bentonite blocks or through a system of bentonite pellets, have indicated that bentonite erodes

  20. EPro Non-contact erosion profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinert, Palle

    Pro is a profiling program build to measure the same surface or work piece multiple times and track changes due to erosion. It was developed during 2001 - 2002 at Aalborg University and was part of a Master of Science project dealing with stability of rubble mound breakwaters. The goal was to aut......Pro is a profiling program build to measure the same surface or work piece multiple times and track changes due to erosion. It was developed during 2001 - 2002 at Aalborg University and was part of a Master of Science project dealing with stability of rubble mound breakwaters. The goal...

  1. Wind and water erosion control on semiarid lands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddoway, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    Commercial crop production on semiarid lands is difficult because insufficient water is often present to manage the system effectively. Erosion control presents the major management problem. The factors contributing to wind erosion and their interaction have been quantified into a wind erosion equation. The control of wind erosion through agronomic alteration of the various factors is discussed. The quantification and control of water erosion is also discussed with respect to the Universal Soil Loss Equation. Radioisotopes tracers have been used in conjunction with these erosion equations to measure soil losses. (author)

  2. Impact of tillage erosion on water erosion in a hilly landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Zhang, J H; Zhang, Z H; Jia, L Z

    2016-05-01

    Little has been known of the interaction between tillage erosion and water erosion, while the two erosion processes was independently studied. Can tillage-induced soil redistribution lead to exaggerated (or retarded) runoff flow and sediment concentrations in steeply sloping fields? A series of simulated tillage and artificial rainfall events were applied to rectangular runoff plots (2m×8m) with a slope of 15° to examine the impacts of tillage erosion intensities on water erosion in the Yangtze Three Gorges Reservoir Area, China. Mean flow velocity, effective/critical shear stress, and soil erodibility factor K were calculated to analyze the differences in hydrodynamic characteristics induced by tillage. Our experimental results suggest that mean runoff rates were 2.26, 1.19, and 0.65Lmin(-1) and that mean soil detachment rates were 1.53, 1.01, and 0.61gm(-2)min(-1) during the 70-min simulated rainfall events for 52-, 31-, and 10-year tillage, respectively. A significant difference (Pwater losses tended to increase with increasing tillage intensity. A significant difference in mean flow velocity occurred near the upper and lower slope boundaries of the field, while significant differences (Perosion increases soil erodibility and delivers the soil for water erosion in sloping fields, accelerating water erosion. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Atmospheric monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Radioactivity in air was measured by a network of continuously operating air samplers at nineteen locations near the Site perimeter and five locations somewhat distant from the Site. The Site perimeter samplers provided for general coverage in all directions but with emphasis in the prevalent downwind directions to the south and east of the Site including the communities of Benton City, Richland, Pasco, Connell, and Othello. The distant air sample locations provided background airborne radioactivity data for comparison. These samplers were located at Sunnyside, Moses Lake, Washtucna, Walla Walla, and at McNary Dam. Airborne radionuclide concentrations during 1982 were lower than those observed in 1981 because of the gradual decline of atmospheric fallout associated with a foreign atmospheric nuclear test that occurred in the fall of 1980. Airborne radioactivity data collected during 1982 did not indicate the presence of detectable levels of Hanford origin radionuclides in the offsite environs

  4. Atmospheric materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    A disjunction between the material and the immaterial has been at the heart of the architectural debate for decades. In this dialectic tension, the notion of atmosphere which increasingly claims attention in architectural discourse seems to be parallactic, leading to the re-evaluation of perceptual...... experience and, consequently, to the conceptual and methodological shifts in the production of space, and hence in the way we think about materiality. In this context, architectural space is understood as a contingent construction – a space of engagement that appears to us as a result of continuous...... and complex interferences revealed through our perception; ‘the atmospheric’ is explored as a spatial and affective quality as well as a sensory background, and materiality as a powerful and almost magical agency in shaping of atmosphere. Challenging existing dichotomies and unraveling intrinsic...

  5. Effect of vegetable oils applied over acquired enamel pellicle on initial erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    IONTA, Franciny Querobim; de ALENCAR, Catarina Ribeiro Barros; VAL, Poliana Pacifico; BOTEON, Ana Paula; JORDÃO, Maisa Camillo; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; RIOS, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective The prevalence of dental erosion has been recently increasing, requiring new preventive and therapeutic approaches. Vegetable oils have been studied in preventive dentistry because they come from a natural, edible, low-cost, and worldwide accessible source. This study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of different vegetable oils, applied in two concentrations, on initial enamel erosion. Material and Methods Initially, the acquired pellicle was formed in situ for 2 hours. Subsequently, the enamel blocks were treated in vitro according to the study group (n=12/per group): GP5 and GP100 – 5% and pure palm oil, respectively; GC5 and GC100 – 5% and pure coconut oil; GSa5 and GSa100 – 5% and pure safflower oil; GSu5 and GSu100 – 5% and pure sunflower oil; GO5 and GO100 – 5% and pure olive oil; CON− – Deionized Water (negative control) and CON+ – Commercial Mouthwash (Elmex® Erosion Protection Dental Rinse, GABA/positive control). Then, the enamel blocks were immersed in artificial saliva for 2 minutes and subjected to short-term acid exposure in 0.5% citric acid, pH 2.4, for 30 seconds, to promote enamel surface softening. The response variable was the percentage of surface hardness loss [((SHi - SHf) / SHf )×100]. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p0.05) and less than the other groups (p<0.05). There was no difference between GP5, GC5, GC100, GSa5, GSu100, GSa100, GSu5, GO5, GO100, CON− and CON+. Conclusion Palm oil seems to be a promising alternative for preventing enamel erosion. However, further studies are necessary to evaluate a long-term erosive cycling. PMID:28877281

  6. Effect of vegetable oils applied over acquired enamel pellicle on initial erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciny Querobim IONTA

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The prevalence of dental erosion has been recently increasing, requiring new preventive and therapeutic approaches. Vegetable oils have been studied in preventive dentistry because they come from a natural, edible, low-cost, and worldwide accessible source. This study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of different vegetable oils, applied in two concentrations, on initial enamel erosion. Material and Methods Initially, the acquired pellicle was formed in situ for 2 hours. Subsequently, the enamel blocks were treated in vitro according to the study group (n=12/per group: GP5 and GP100 – 5% and pure palm oil, respectively; GC5 and GC100 – 5% and pure coconut oil; GSa5 and GSa100 – 5% and pure safflower oil; GSu5 and GSu100 – 5% and pure sunflower oil; GO5 and GO100 – 5% and pure olive oil; CON− – Deionized Water (negative control and CON+ – Commercial Mouthwash (Elmex® Erosion Protection Dental Rinse, GABA/positive control. Then, the enamel blocks were immersed in artificial saliva for 2 minutes and subjected to short-term acid exposure in 0.5% citric acid, pH 2.4, for 30 seconds, to promote enamel surface softening. The response variable was the percentage of surface hardness loss [((SHi - SHf / SHf ×100]. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p0.05 and less than the other groups (p<0.05. There was no difference between GP5, GC5, GC100, GSa5, GSu100, GSa100, GSu5, GO5, GO100, CON− and CON+. Conclusion Palm oil seems to be a promising alternative for preventing enamel erosion. However, further studies are necessary to evaluate a long-term erosive cycling.

  7. Effect of vegetable oils applied over acquired enamel pellicle on initial erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionta, Franciny Querobim; Alencar, Catarina Ribeiro Barros de; Val, Poliana Pacifico; Boteon, Ana Paula; Jordão, Maisa Camillo; Honório, Heitor Marques; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Rios, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of dental erosion has been recently increasing, requiring new preventive and therapeutic approaches. Vegetable oils have been studied in preventive dentistry because they come from a natural, edible, low-cost, and worldwide accessible source. This study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of different vegetable oils, applied in two concentrations, on initial enamel erosion. Initially, the acquired pellicle was formed in situ for 2 hours. Subsequently, the enamel blocks were treated in vitro according to the study group (n=12/per group): GP5 and GP100 - 5% and pure palm oil, respectively; GC5 and GC100 - 5% and pure coconut oil; GSa5 and GSa100 - 5% and pure safflower oil; GSu5 and GSu100 - 5% and pure sunflower oil; GO5 and GO100 - 5% and pure olive oil; CON- - Deionized Water (negative control) and CON+ - Commercial Mouthwash (Elmex® Erosion Protection Dental Rinse, GABA/positive control). Then, the enamel blocks were immersed in artificial saliva for 2 minutes and subjected to short-term acid exposure in 0.5% citric acid, pH 2.4, for 30 seconds, to promote enamel surface softening. The response variable was the percentage of surface hardness loss [((SHi - SHf) / SHf )×100]. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (pEnamel blocks of GP100 presented similar hardness loss to GSu100 (p>0.05) and less than the other groups (poil seems to be a promising alternative for preventing enamel erosion. However, further studies are necessary to evaluate a long-term erosive cycling.

  8. Cathode erosion in high-current high-pressure arc

    CERN Document Server

    Nemchinsky, V A

    2003-01-01

    Cathode erosion rate was experimentally investigated for two types of arcs: one with tungsten cathode in nitrogen atmosphere and one with hafnium cathode in oxygen atmosphere. Conditions were typical for plasma arc cutting systems: gas pressure from 2 to 5 atm, arc current from 200 to 400 A, gas flow rate from 50 to 130 litre min sup - sup 1. It was found that the actual cathode evaporation rate G is much lower than G sub 0 , the evaporation rate that follows from the Hertz-Knudsen formula: G = nu G sub 0. The difference is because some of the evaporated particles return back to the cathode. For conditions of our experiments, the factor nu could be as low as 0.01. It was shown experimentally that nu depends strongly on the gas flow pattern close to the cathode. In particular, swirling the gas increases nu many times. To explain the influence of gas swirling, model calculations of gas flows were performed. These calculations revealed difference between swirling and non-swirling flows: swirling the gas enhances...

  9. Occurrence of risk factors for dental erosion in the population of young adults in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmyhr, Øyvind; Grytten, Jostein; Holst, Dorthe

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the occurrence of risk factors for dental erosion for a group of young adults who are particularly susceptible to erosion. Another aim was to describe the awareness of erosion and distribution of risk factors according to the educational background of the parents. The sample (n = 2004 individuals) was randomly drawn from the population of 19-20-year-old Norwegians. The data were collected using telephone interviews. We measured awareness about erosion using the following question: 'Have you ever heard about dental erosion?' We obtained information about the frequency of intake of the following risk factors: soft drinks with and without sugar, and juice. Soft drinks with sugar included lemonade (Coca-Cola, Solo, Pepsi, Mozell and ice tea) and sport drinks (XL1, Maxim). Soft drinks without sugar included Cola light, Zero, PepsiMax, Solo light and ice tea light. Juice included orange, grapefruit, apple and kiwi juice. The parents' level of education was based on the Norwegian school system, which has three levels: compulsory schooling (10 years), upper secondary school education (up to 13 years) and university/college education. The data were analysed using logistic regressions analyses. Awareness of erosion was high - 93.5% of respondents were aware of the problem. The majority of respondents believed that erosion can be prevented - altogether 84.9%. They also believed that soft drinks with and without sugar are equally important for the development of erosion. 17.5% of respondents drank soft drinks with sugar daily or several times a day. The corresponding figures for soft drinks without sugar and juice were 4.9% and 34.1%, respectively. Young adults with mothers with high education drank soft drinks both with and without sugar less frequently than those who had mothers with low education. This pattern was the opposite for juice. Consumption of soft drinks and juice is high, even though awareness and knowledge about the causes

  10. Is 239+240Pu the new tracer for soil erosion assessment in mountain grasslands?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alewell, Christine; Meusburger, Katrin; Juretzko, Gregor; Mabit, Lionel; Ketterer, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion is a major threat to mountain ecosystems worldwide. However, there has been limited scientific interest in this significant environmental problem. Minimal attention has been given towards its mitigation by policy makers. Limited information in this area is partly due to the difficulty of quantifying soil erosion in mountain environments having un-ploughed soils, steep, complex topography, and harsh climates. In many environments, fallout radionuclides (FRNs) have been widely used to quantify soil particle movement and net erosion rates. A wide variety of artificial radionuclides have been deposited globally via nuclear weapons testing, nuclear accidents, nuclear weapons fabrication, and nuclear fuel reprocessing. Large-scale atmospheric tests of thermonuclear weapons resulted in the injection of debris into the stratosphere; following which isotopes such as 137 Cs, 239 Pu and 240 Pu deposited relatively uniformly on a local scale. While it is unfortunate that these isotopes were released into the environment, it is at the same time fortuitous that these FRNs can serve as valuable tracers of recent earth surface processes, including assessing soil erosion

  11. The effect of enamel proteins on erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, T.; Carvalho, T. S.; Lussi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Enamel proteins form a scaffold for growing hydroxyapatite crystals during enamel formation. They are then almost completely degraded during enamel maturation, resulting in a protein content of only 1% (w/v) in mature enamel. Nevertheless, this small amount of remaining proteins has important effects on the mechanical and structural properties of enamel and on the electrostatic properties of its surface. To analyze how enamel proteins affect tooth erosion, human enamel specimens were deproteinated. Surface microhardness (SMH), surface reflection intensity (SRI) and calcium release of both deproteinated and control specimens were monitored while continuously eroding them. The deproteination itself already reduced the initial SMH and SRI of the enamel significantly (p deproteinated enamel lost its SMH and SRI faster, and released more calcium than the control group, but these differences were only significant at later stages of erosion, where not only surface softening but surface loss can be observed. We conclude that enamel proteins have a significant effect on erosion, protecting the enamel and slowing down the progression of erosion when irreversible surface loss starts to occur. PMID:26468660

  12. Waterline Erosion Control Essential To Streambank Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean H. Urie

    1967-01-01

    Tests of streambank erosion control measures on three Michigan streams have shown the key role of waterline stabilization. After undercutting was stopped, the upper banks were revegetated in 1 to 5 years depending on treatment. Without waterline control, all revegetation efforts were ineffective.

  13. Ash Leachate Can Reduce Surface Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    George J. Holcomb; Philip B. Durgin

    1979-01-01

    In laboratory analyses of the Larabee soil from north-western California, ash leachate flocculated the clay fractions. As a result, the soil quickly settled out of suspension. To test the hypothesis that field plots on disturbed areas treated with ash leachate would be more resistant to erosion than nontreated plots, a study was done in July and August 1978, on two...

  14. Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter R. Robichaud

    2008-01-01

    Federal land management agencies have spent tens of millions of dollars on post-fire emergency watershed stabilization measures intended to minimize flood runoff, peakflows, onsite erosion, offsite sedimentation, and other hydrologic damage to natural habitats, roads, bridges, reservoirs, and irrigation systems (General Accounting Office 2003). The decision to apply...

  15. Hydrodynamic erosion process of undisturbed clay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, G.; Visser, P.J.; Vrijling, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the hydrodynamic erosion process of undisturbed clay due to the turbulent flow, based on theoretical analysis and experimental results. The undisturbed clay has the unique and complicated characteristics of cohesive force among clay particles, which are highly different from

  16. Modeling Edge Effects of Tillage Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillage erosion has been recognized as an important factor in redistribution of soil over time and in the development of morphological changes within agricultural fields. Field borders, fences, and vegetated strips that interrupt soil fluxes lead to the creation topographic discontinuities or lynche...

  17. Magnetite Nanoparticles Prepared By Spark Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiorov M.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, we study a possibility of using the electric spark erosion method as an alternative to the method of chemical co-precipitation for preparation of magnetic nanoparticles. Initiation of high frequency electric discharge between coarse iron particles under a layer of distilled water allows obtaining pure magnetite nanoparticles.

  18. Magnetite Nanoparticles Prepared By Spark Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorov, M.; Blums, E.; Kronkalns, G.; Krumina, A.; Lubane, M.

    2016-08-01

    In the present research, we study a possibility of using the electric spark erosion method as an alternative to the method of chemical co-precipitation for preparation of magnetic nanoparticles. Initiation of high frequency electric discharge between coarse iron particles under a layer of distilled water allows obtaining pure magnetite nanoparticles.

  19. Magnetite Nanoparticles Prepared By Spark Erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Maiorov M.; Blums E.; Kronkalns G.; Krumina A.; Lubane M.

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, we study a possibility of using the electric spark erosion method as an alternative to the method of chemical co-precipitation for preparation of magnetic nanoparticles. Initiation of high frequency electric discharge between coarse iron particles under a layer of distilled water allows obtaining pure magnetite nanoparticles.

  20. Erosion behaviour of hydro turbine steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    resist erosion, attention must be given to providing a micro- structure that ... Fully martensitic steels are air hardening and susceptible to hydrogen em- brittlement. Austenitic stainless steel, on the other hand, has been widely preferred by industry due to its good ... been gaining much attention; because N is a strong solid.

  1. Natural Erosion of Sandstone as Shape Optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostanin, Igor; Safonov, Alexander; Oseledets, Ivan

    2017-12-11

    Natural arches, pillars and other exotic sandstone formations have always been attracting attention for their unusual shapes and amazing mechanical balance that leave a strong impression of intelligent design rather than the result of a stochastic process. It has been recently demonstrated that these shapes could have been the result of the negative feedback between stress and erosion that originates in fundamental laws of friction between the rock's constituent particles. Here we present a deeper analysis of this idea and bridge it with the approaches utilized in shape and topology optimisation. It appears that the processes of natural erosion, driven by stochastic surface forces and Mohr-Coulomb law of dry friction, can be viewed within the framework of local optimisation for minimum elastic strain energy. Our hypothesis is confirmed by numerical simulations of the erosion using the topological-shape optimisation model. Our work contributes to a better understanding of stochastic erosion and feasible landscape formations that could be found on Earth and beyond.

  2. Hydrogeological And Geotechnical Investigations Of Gully Erosion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Consequently, hydrogeological and geotechnical studies of gully erosion sites were carried out in order to provide information on the genesis and continual expansion of gullies in the area. The results indicate that gullies are located in the upper aquifer of the Benin Formation (Coastal Plain Sands). The estimated hydraulic ...

  3. Is dental erosion really a problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlueter, N; Jaeggi, T; Lussi, A

    2012-09-01

    Dental erosion is the non-carious dental substance loss induced by direct impact of exogenous or endogenous acids. It results in a loss of dental hard tissue, which can be serious in some groups, such as those with eating disorders, in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, and also in persons consuming high amounts of acidic drinks and foodstuffs. For these persons, erosion can impair their well-being, due to changes in appearance and/or loss of function of the teeth, e.g., the occurrence of hypersensitivity of teeth if the dentin is exposed. If erosion reaches an advanced stage, time- and money-consuming therapies may be necessary. The therapy, in turn, poses a challenge for the dentist, particularly if the defects are diagnosed at an advanced stage. While initial and moderate defects can mostly be treated non- or minimally invasively, severe defects often require complex therapeutic strategies, which often entail extensive loss of dental hard tissue due to preparatory measures. A major goal should therefore be to diagnose dental erosion at an early stage, to avoid functional and esthetic impairments as well as pain sensations and to ensure longevity of the dentition.

  4. Impacts of decentralization - erosion or renewal?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna; Madsen, Jørgen Steen; Due, Jesper Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    to observe erosive tendencies in these hitherto sturdy fortresses of “organised decentralisation”. It is the main thesis of this article that the dualistic German system makes it more difficult for the German parties to adapt the bargaining system so that their overall coordination can be preserved even...

  5. Use of gabions and vegetation in erosion-control works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matić Vjačeslava

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy winter and spring rainfall during the years 2005, -06, -07, and -08 brought about numerous torrential floods and landslides throughout the world and in Serbia. They endangered people, animals, settlements, fields, and roads. This reminded us of a readily available, cheap, and efficient material: stone in wire baskets of doubly galvanized wire of various sizes and forms - gabions - which are also long-lasting, flexible, and ecological. If made according to prescribed standards, they offer a permanent solution for many erosion-control problems. In addition, they can be used in urgent interventions to protect the lives of humans, animals, and plants and prevent of immense material losses. This paper calls attention to an unjustifiably neglected but important material, easily manipulated and with significant advantages compared to other structural materials, as well as to the possibility of its successful combination with vegetation, viz., willow (Salix sp. cuttings and grasses.

  6. Experiments for understanding soil erosion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion processes are usually quantified by observation and measurement of their related forms. Rill, and gullies, moulds or sediment sinks are often used to estimate the soil loss. These forms are generally related directly to different types of processes, thus are also used to identify the dominant processes on a certain type of land-use. Nevertheless, the direct observation of erosion processes is constrained by their temporal and spatial erratic occurrence. As a consequence, the process understanding is generally deduced by analogies. Another possibility is to reproduce processes in experiments in both, the lab and in the field. Laboratory experiments are implemented when we want to have full control over all parameters we think are relevant for the process in our focus. So are very useful for identification of parameters influencing processes and their intensities, but also as physical models of the processes and process interactions in our focus. Therefore, we can use them to verify our concepts, and to define relevant parameters. Field experiments generally only simulate with controlled driving forces, this is the rain or the runoff, but dealing with the uncertainty of our study object, the soil. This enables two things: 1) similar as with lab experiments, we are able to identify processes and process interactions and so, to get a deeper understanding of soil erosion; 2) experiments are suitable for providing data about singular processes in the field and thus, to provide data suitable for model parametrisation and calibration. These may be quantitative data about erodibility or soil resistance, sediment detachment or transport. The Physical Geography Group at Trier University has a long lasting experience in the application of experiments in soil erosion research in the field, and has become lead in the further development conception and of devices and procedures to investigate splash detachment and initial transport of soil particles by wind and water

  7. 15 CFR 923.25 - Shoreline erosion/mitigation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... effects of, and studying and evaluating ways to control, or lessen the impact of, shoreline erosion... techniques and other techniques that will be used to manage the effects of erosion, including potential...

  8. Categorization of erosion control matting for slope applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-25

    Erosion control is an important aspect of any Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) construction project, with the extreme negative impacts of high sediment loads in natural waterways having been well documented. Selection of a proper erosion c...

  9. Automated Erosion System to Protect Highway Bridge Crossings at Abutments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    A new instrument (Photo-Electronic Erosion Pin, or PEEP) was examined in collecting field data and remotely monitoring bank erosion near bridge abutments during floods. The performance of PEEPs was evaluated through a detailed field study to determin...

  10. Erosion in radial inflow turbines. Volume 4: Erosion rates on internal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, W. B., Jr.; Tabakoff, W.

    1975-01-01

    An analytic study of the rate at which material is removed by ingested dust impinging on the internal surfaces of a typical radial inflow turbine is presented. Results show that there are several regions which experience very severe erosion loss, and other regions that experience moderate levels of erosion loss: (1) the greatest amount of material loss occurs on the trailing edges of the nozzle blades where very high velocity, moderate angle impacts occur. The tip regions of ductile materials are also subjected to serious levels of erosion loss; (2) moderate amounts of erosion occur near the end of the scroll and on a few of the nozzle blades near this location. Results are presented in the form of surface contours that exist on the scroll and blade surfaces after continuous particulate ingestion with time.

  11. Investigation of erosion rates of field samples using FDOT's enhanced sediment erosion rate flume (SERF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The first part of this project was to enhance and improve the Florida Department of Transportations : Sediment Erosion Rate Flume (SERF) device. Notable improvements include a pump repair, laser : system enhancement, installation of a digital vide...

  12. Water erosion of dystrophic Red Latosols (Oxisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Ernesto Bernardes Ayer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In their natural state, Latosols (Oxisols present great stability and resistance to erosion, being the most abundant and used soils for farming and cattle raising activities in southern Minas Gerais State, Brazil. However, along the last one hundred years, they have been submitted to intensive cultivation and managements which favor water erosion. This study aimed to estimate the water erosion rates of dystrophic Red Latosols from the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation, compared with the soil loss tolerance limits, and assess the impact on water erosion of the managements more common in the region, by alternative conservation management simulation. Soil loss tolerance limits ranged from 8.94 Mg ha-1 year-1 to 9.99 Mg ha-1 year-1, with the study area presenting a susceptibility of soil loss of 23.86 Mg year-1, with an average rate of 8.40 Mg ha-1 year-1, corresponding to 34.80 % of the area with values above the soil loss tolerance limit. The biggest annual losses occur in areas with use and management of eucalyptus grown downhill (30.67 Mg ha-1 year-1 and pasture under continuous occupancy (11.10 Mg ha-1 year-1. However, when the average loss per type of use is considered, the areas more susceptible to water erosion are those with potato and eucalyptus crops, grown downhill, and those in bare soil. Nevertheless, in the simulated conservation management scenario, the average losses would be drastically reduced (8.40 Mg ha-1 year-1 to 2.84 Mg ha-1 year-1 and only 4.00 % of the area with soil loss would remain above the tolerance limits.

  13. Erosion and corrosion of nuclear power plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This conference is composed of 23 papers, grouped in 3 sessions which main themes are: analysis of corrosion and erosion damages of nuclear power plant equipment and influence of water chemistry, temperature, irradiations, metallurgical and electrochemical factors, flow assisted cracking, stress cracking; monitoring and control of erosion and corrosion in nuclear power plants; susceptibility of structural materials to erosion and corrosion and ways to improve the resistance of materials, steels, coatings, etc. to erosion, corrosion and cracking

  14. Tectonic controls of Holocene erosion in a glaciated orogen

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Byron A.; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2018-01-01

    Recent work has highlighted a strong, worldwide, glacial impact of orogen erosion rates over the last 2 Ma. While it may be assumed that glaciers increased erosion rates when active, the degree to which past glaciations influence Holocene erosion rates through the adjustment of topography is not known. In this study, we investigate the influence of long-term tectonic and post-glacial topographic controls on erosion in a glaciated orogen, the Olympic Mountains, USA. We present 14 new 10Be and ...

  15. Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Debris Research, Prevention, and Reduction Act legally establishes the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Marine Debris Program. The...

  16. Shrublands and Soil Erosion. An State-of-the-Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Estríngana, Pablo; Dunkerley, David; Cerdà, Artemi

    2014-05-01

    loss and implications for landscape function: the case of Pteronia incana invasion in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Land Degradation & Development, 23: 548- 556. DOI 10.1002/ldr.2175 Kargar Chigani, H., Khajeddin, S. J. and Karimzadeh, H. R. 2012. Soil relationships of three arid land plant species and their use in rehabilitating degraded sites. Land Degradation & Development, 23: 92- 101. DOI 10.1002/ldr.1057 Kummerrow, J. 1989. Structural aspects of shrubs in Mediterranean type plant communities. In: Bellot, J. (Ed.), Jornadas Sobre las Bases Ecológicas para la Gestión de Ecosistemas Terrestres. Options Méditerranéens. Série Séminaires. CIHEAM IAMZ, Zaragoza, Vol. 3, pp. 5-11. Marques, M.J., Jiménez, L., Pérez-Rodríguez, R., García-Ormaechea, S., Bienes, R. 2005. Reducing water erosion in a gypsic soil by combined use of organic amendment and shrub revegetation. Land Degradation and Development 16, 339-350. Miao, C. Y., Yang, L., Chen, X. H., Gao, Y. 2012. The vegetation cover dynamics (1982-2006) in different erosion regions of the Yellow River Basin, China. Land Degradation & Development, 23: 62- 71. DOI 10.1002/ldr.1050 Poyatos R, Llorens P, Piñol J, Rubio C. 2008. Response of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) to soil and atmospheric water deficits under Mediterranean mountain climate. Annals of Forest Science 65: 306/301-306/313. DOI: 10.1051/forest:2008003 Prokop, P., Poręba, G. J. 2012. Soil erosion associated with an upland farming system under population pressure in Northeast India. Land Degradation & Development, 23: 310- 321. DOI 10.1002/ldr.2147 Puigdefábregas, J., Mendizábal, T. 1998. Perspectives on desertification: western Mediterranean. Journal of Arid Environments 39, 209-224. Reynolds, J.F., Maestre, F.T., Kemp, P.R., Stafford-Smith, D.M., Lambin, E. 2007. Natural and human dimensions of land degradation in drylands: causes and consequences. In: Canadell, J.G., Pataki, D.E., Pitelka

  17. The determination of risk areas for muddy floods based on a worst-case erosion modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saathoff, Ulfert; Schindewolf, Marcus; Annika Arévalo, Sarah

    2013-04-01

    Soil erosion and muddy floods are a frequently occurring hazard in the German state of Saxony, because of the topography and the high relief energy together with the high proportion of arable land. Still, the events are rather heterogeneously distributed and we do not know where damage is likely to occur. The goal of this study is to locate hot spots for the risk of muddy floods, with the objective to prevent high economic damage in future. We applied a soil erosion and deposition map of Saxony, calculated with the process based soil erosion model EROSION 3D. This map shows the potential soil erosion and transported sediment for worst case soil conditions and a 10 year rain storm event. Furthermore, a map of the current landuse in the state is used. From the landuse map, we extracted those areas that are especially vulnerable to muddy floods, like residential and industrial areas, infrastructural facilities (e.g. power plants, hospitals) and highways. In combination with the output of the soil erosion model, the amount of sediment, that enters each single landuse entity, is calculated. Based on this data, a state-wide map with classified risks is created. The results are furthermore used to identify the risk of muddy floods for each single municipality in Saxony. The results are evaluated with data of real occurred muddy flood events with documented locations during the period between 2000 and 2010. Additionally, plausibility tests are performed for selected areas (examination of landuse, topography and soil). The results prove to be plausible and most of the documented events can be explained by the modelled risk map. The created map can be used by different institutions like city and traffic planners, to estimate the risk of muddy flood occurrence at specific locations. Furthermore, the risk map can serve insurance companies to evaluate the insurance risk of a building. To make them easily accessible, the risk map will be published online via a web GIS

  18. Influence of bioadhesive polymers on the protective effect of fluoride against erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Daniele Mara da Silva; Zanatta, Rayssa Ferreira; Scaramucci, Tais; Aoki, Idalina Vieira; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated if the incorporation of the bioadhesive polymers Carbopol 980, Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), and Aristoflex AVC in a fluoridated solution (NaF-900ppm) would increase the solution's protective effect against enamel erosion. Enamel specimens were submitted to a 5-day de-remineralization cycling model, consisting of 2min immersions in 0.3% citric acid (6x/day), 1min treatments with the polymers (associated or not with fluoride), and 60min storage in artificial saliva. Ultrapure water was used as the negative control and a 900ppm fluoride solution as positive control. The initial Knoop microhardness (KHN1) was used to randomize the samples into groups. Another two microhardness assessments were performed after the first (KHN2) and second (KHN3) acid immersions, to determine initial erosion in the first day. The formula: %KHN alt =[(KHN3-KHN2)/KHN2]*100 was used to define the protective effect of the treatments. After the 5-day cycling, surface loss (SL, in μm) was evaluated with profilometry. Data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (p<0.05). For %KHN alt , the polymers alone did not reduce enamel demineralization when compared to the negative control, but Carbopol associated with NaF significantly improved its protective effect. The profilometric analysis showed that Carbopol, associated or not with NaF, exhibited the lowest SL, while CMC and Aristoflex did not exhibit a protective effect, nor were they able to improve the protection of NaF. It is concluded that Carbopol enhanced NaF's protection against initial erosion. Carbopol alone or associated with NaF was able to reduce SL after several erosive challenges. Carbopol by itself was able to reduce the erosive wear magnitude to the same extent as the sodium fluoride, therefore, is a promising agent to prevent or control enamel erosion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigation of the impact of stone bunds on water erosion in northern Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Jakob; Strohmeier, Stefan; Demelash, Nigus; Ziadat, Feras; Klik, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Soil degradation in northern Ethiopia results from intensive land-use, massive deforestation in the past and missing conservation measures. Every year huge amounts of fertile soil are flushed away irreversibly into the rivers. In order to prevent soil erosion, conservation methods are necessary, because otherwise erosion may cause severe problems in the future, especially in the cases of nutrition supply and agricultural land-use. In this study, the effectiveness of stone bonds as a soil conservation method was evaluated. The assessments took part during the raining season from June to September 2013 in the Gumara - Maksegnit watershed in the Amhara region in northern Ethiopia. On farmland two erosion plots were constructed at a representative hillslope. The plots were 20m long, 3m wide and bordered with metal sheets. In order to compare the effectiveness of stone bunds on soil erosion, one plot was constructed with a stone bund on his toe slope the other plot was constructed without a stone bund. The investigated slope was selected that all characteristics like slope, crop cover, stone cover, soil aggregate size, etc... could be considered as similar. To evaluate the impact of stone bunds on soil erosion, the lateral and the longitudinal runoff from the plot with the stone bund were collected separately. Surface runoff and eroded sediment were collected at the downward end of the plot using a trough leading to a divider sampling 10% of the total runoff. The sample was then collected in a pond (1,8m long, 1m wide and 0,5m deep). During the investigated period soil loss from the untreated plot amounted to 23.0 t.ha-1, whereas only 13.5 t.ha-1 were measured spilling over the stone bunds. This corresponds to a decrease by 41%. Beside the erosion monitoring, stone and crop cover were analyzed regularly as well as surface roughness and soil texture.

  20. Genetic erosion in crops: concept, research results and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouw, van de M.J.; Kik, C.; Hintum, van T.J.L.; Treuren, van R.; Visser, L.

    2010-01-01

    The loss of variation in crops clue to the modernization of agriculture has been described as genetic erosion The current paper discusses the different views that exist on the concept of genetic erosion in crops Genetic erosion of cultivated diversity is reflected in a modernization bottleneck in

  1. Erosion resistance of bionic functional surfaces inspired from desert scorpions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiwu, Han; Junqiu, Zhang; Chao, Ge; Li, Wen; Ren, Luquan

    2012-02-07

    In this paper, a bionic method is presented to improve the erosion resistance of machine components. Desert scorpion (Androctonus australis) is a typical animal living in sandy deserts, and may face erosive action of blowing sand at a high speed. Based on the idea of bionics and biologic experimental techniques, the mechanisms of the sand erosion resistance of desert scorpion were investigated. Results showed that the desert scorpions used special microtextures such as bumps and grooves to construct the functional surfaces to achieve the erosion resistance. In order to understand the erosion resistance mechanisms of such functional surfaces, the combination of computational and experimental research were carried out in this paper. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method was applied to predict the erosion performance of the bionic functional surfaces. The result demonstrated that the microtextured surfaces exhibited better erosion resistance than the smooth surfaces. The further erosion tests indicated that the groove surfaces exhibited better erosion performance at 30° injection angle. In order to determine the effect of the groove dimensions on the erosion resistance, regression analysis of orthogonal multinomials was also performed under a certain erosion condition, and the regression equation between the erosion rate and groove distance, width, and height was established.

  2. Process identification of soil erosion in steep mountain regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Konz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mountainous soil erosion processes were investigated in the Urseren Valley (Central Switzerland by means of measurements and simulations. The quantification of soil erosion was performed on hill slope scale (2·20 m for three different land use types: hayfields, pastures with dwarf shrubs and pastures without dwarf shrubs with three replicates each. Erosion rates during growing season were measured with sediment traps between June 2006 and November 2007. Long-term soil erosion rates were estimated based on Cs- 137 redistribution. In addition, soil moisture and surface flow were recorded during the growing season in the field and compared to model output. We chose the WEPP model (Water Erosion Prediction Project to simulate soil erosion during the growing season. Model parameters were determined in the field (slope, plant species, fractional vegetation cover, initial saturation level, by laboratory analyses (grain size, organic matter and by literature study. The WEPP model simulates sheet erosion processes (interrill and splash erosion processes, please note that no rill erosion occurs at our sites. Model output resulted in considerable smaller values than the measured erosion rates with sediment traps for the same period. We attribute the differences to observed random gravity driven erosion of soil conglomerates. The Cs-137 measurements deliver substantially higher mean annual erosion rates, which are most likely connected to snow cover related processes such as snow gliding and avalanche activities.

  3. The limits on the usefulness of erosion hazard ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. M. Rice; P. D. Gradek

    1984-01-01

    Although erosion-hazard ratings are often used to guide forest practices, those used in California from 1974 to 1982 have been inadequate for estimating erosion potential. To improve the erosion-hazard rating procedure, separate estimating equations were used for different situations. The ratings were partitioned according to yarding method, erosional process, and...

  4. Regional scaled mapping of gully erosion sensitivity in Western Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Pixels highlighted in this mapping can be considered as indicators of sediment erosion potential and runoff sensitivity of igneous rocks. The precision of the model for gully erosion sensitivity may be improved by including soil properties and topographic information. Key words: Gully erosion, East African Rift, Kavirondo Rift, ...

  5. Evaluation of Rainfall Erosivity Index for Abuja, Nigeria Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rainfall erosivity index is one of the important factors influencing soil erosion. Erosivity index for Abuja, Nigeria was evaluated using the Lombadi method. Twelve (12) years rainfall data (2001 – 2012) used was obtained from Nigerian Meteorological Agency (NIMET) Abuja. Daily kinetic energy – intensity interaction was ...

  6. Validation of a probabilistic post-fire erosion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pete Robichaud; William J. Elliot; Sarah A. Lewis; Mary Ellen Miller

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire increases of runoff and erosion often occur and land managers need tools to be able to project the increased risk. The Erosion Risk Management Tool (ERMiT) uses the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model as the underlying processor. ERMiT predicts the probability of a given amount of hillslope sediment delivery from a single rainfall or...

  7. Assessing soil erosion risk in the Tillabery landscape, Niger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results show that soil erosion output scenarios predict greater soil erosion in the study area from 2070 onwards. They suggest that human disturbance and topographic factors are the main impact factors in the affected areas. Key words: Tillabéry landscape (Niger), sheet and rill erosion modelling, data mining.

  8. Development Of Rainfall Erosivity Map For Nigeria | Ogedengbe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The indices were used to develop a rainfall erosivity map or Nigeria. The map reveals that Nigeria may be broadly divided into five major erosion risk zones. The south-western part is generally in the low erosion zone, with the exception of the coastal portion of Lagos, Ondo, Edo and Delta states. The south-east and central ...

  9. Measuring low rates of erosion from forest fuel reduction operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Elliot; Ina Sue Miller

    2004-01-01

    A study was carried out to evaluate three methods for measuring low levels of hillside soil erosion associated with forest fuel management activities, and to measure erosion from cable logging and skid trails. The tipping bucket device with a sediment basin appears to be a better tool for this application than silt fences or rillmeter analysis. The greatest erosion...

  10. A longitudinal study of tooth erosion in adolescents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aidi, H El; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Truin, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Incidence studies on tooth erosion among adolescents are scarce. This longitudinal study aimed at estimating the prevalence, incidence, progression, and distribution of erosion in young adolescents over a 1.5-year period. Erosion at baseline was present in 32.2% of the 622 children (mean age, 11.9

  11. statistical prediction of gully erosion development on the coastal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    Today, in our country Nigeria, erosion menace has become all object of discussion and a major ecological problem facing the nation. In Imo. State alone, over 350 gully erosion sites have been identified [4]. Every local government area has its own share of escalating gully and sheet erosion. For the purpose of this study, ...

  12. Multivariate erosion risk assessment of lateritic badlands of Birbhum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (i) The severity of erosion can be understood by the appearances of numerous rills and gullies, exposure of tree roots, pedestal erosion, pin- nacle erosion, bare ..... a fashion that first PC accounts for the largest amount of total variation in the data (table 4). The importance of each component is expressed by its eigen values ...

  13. Experiments on Erosion of Mud from the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, C.; Larsen, Torben; Petersen, O.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments on erosion and consolidation of natural cohesive sediments from the harbour of Esbjerg located in the Danish Watten Sea were conducted using a rotating annular flume. The objective of the paper is to describe the erosion rate of deposited beds and relate the erosion rate...

  14. WinDAM C earthen embankment internal erosion analysis software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two primary causes of dam failure are overtopping and internal erosion. For the purpose of evaluating dam safety for existing earthen embankment dams and proposed earthen embankment dams, Windows Dam Analysis Modules C (WinDAM C) software will simulate either internal erosion or erosion resulting f...

  15. The effect of liquid film on liquid droplet impingement erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Nobuyuki; Yamagata, Takayuki; Saito, Kengo; Hayashi, Kanto

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Liquid droplet impingement erosion is studied experimentally using high-speed conical spray. • Erosion rate is increased with decreasing the liquid film thickness. • Erosion model is proposed considering the influence of liquid film thickness. -- Abstract: In the present paper, the pipe-wall thinning due to liquid droplet impingement erosion is studied experimentally by using a high-speed conical spray under the influences of liquid film on the target specimen. The size of the droplets considered is an order of tens of micrometers in diameter, which is the same order as those expected in the pipeline of nuclear/fossil power plants. In order to evaluate the erosion rate by the liquid droplet impingement under the influence of liquid film, the experiments are conducted by various combinations of the specimen diameters and the standoff distances of the spray from the nozzle. The experimental results show that the erosion depth increases linearly with the local flow volume, indicating the presence of terminal stage of erosion. The present results indicate that the erosion rate increases with decreasing the specimen diameter and increases slightly with increasing the standoff distance. This result combined with the theoretical consideration of the liquid film on the specimen leads to the conclusion that the erosion rate increases with decreasing the liquid film thickness, which supports the numerical result of liquid droplet impingement erosion in literature. Then, the erosion model for predicting the erosion rate by the liquid droplet impingement is proposed considering the influence of the liquid film

  16. Ash formation, deposition, corrosion, and erosion in conventional boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, S.A.; Jones, M.L. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The inorganic components (ash-forming species) associated with coals significantly affect boiler design, efficiency of operation, and lifetimes of boiler parts. During combustion in conventional pulverized fuel boilers, the inorganic components are transformed into inorganic gases, liquids, and solids. This partitioning depends upon the association of the inorganic components in the coal and combustion conditions. The inorganic components are associated as mineral grains and as organically associated elements, and these associations of inorganic components in the fuel directly influence their fate upon combustion. Combustion conditions, such as temperature and atmosphere, influence the volatility and the interaction of inorganic components during combustion and gas cooling, which influences the state and size composition distribution of the particulate and condensed ash species. The intermediate species are transported with the bulk gas flow through the combustion systems, during which time the gases and entrained ash are cooled. Deposition, corrosion, and erosion occur when the ash intermediate species are transported to the heat-transfer surface, react with the surface, accumulate, sinter, and develop strength. Research over the past decade has significantly advanced understanding of ash formation, deposition, corrosion, and erosion mechanisms. Many of the advances in understanding and predicting ash-related issues can be attributed to advanced analytical methods to determine the inorganic composition of fuels and the resulting ash materials. These new analytical techniques have been the key to elucidation of the mechanisms of ash formation and deposition. This information has been used to develop algorithms and computer models to predict the effects of ash on combustion system performance.

  17. The erosion and erosion products of tungsten and carbon based materials bombarded by high energy pulse electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiang; Zhang Fu; Xu Zengyu; Liu Yong; Yoshida, N.; Noda, N.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the erosion behaviors and erosion products of tungsten and some carbon based materials, such as graphite, C/C composite and B 4 C/Cu functionally graded material, were investigated by using a pulse electron beam to simulate the vertical displacement events (VDE) process. The authors will focus on the forms and differences of erosion products among these testing materials, and make clear to their erosion mechanisms

  18. Determination of prevalence of dental erosion in 12-14 years school children and its relationship with dietary habits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahbaz, U.; Hosein, T.; Fauzia, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of dental erosion in 12-14 years school children and its association with dietary habits. Study Design: Observational cross-sectional analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Fatima Jinnah Dental College, Karachi, from January to June 2010. Methodology: School children aged between 12 - 14 years were included in this study. Dental erosion was detected by visual examination. Aself-developed questionnaire was used to assess the dietary habits of children. Acidic diet was considered a diet that has an acidic pH. The amount of consumption of acidic drinks and food per week was categorized into low consumption (1 - 7 times / week) and medium consumption (8 - 21 times / week). Chi-square test was applied to see any statistical difference between diet and tooth erosion at 95 percent CI. Results: The Results showed a high frequency of (46 percent) dental erosion in children, which was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in children with more acidic diet. Conclusion: This study highlights the impact of dietary habits on the prevalence of dental erosion in children. Acidic diets need to be controlled in frequency to prevent dental erosion. (author)

  19. A clinical index for evaluating and monitoring dental erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, I B; Westergaard, J; Stoltze, K

    2000-01-01

    This study describes a new fine-scaled system for classifying initial and advanced dental erosions. The system includes the use of study casts of the teeth in an epoxy resin with an accurate surface reproduction. The severity of erosion on each tooth surface is scored according to six grades...... of severity. In addition, the presence of a Class V restoration and dental erosion on the same surface increases the erosion score, as it is assumed that the need for restorative treatment can be caused by the erosion. A high inter-examiner agreement was found when the present scoring system was used by two...

  20. Application of NAA in study of rill erosion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Mian; Li Zhanbin; Ding Wenfeng

    2003-01-01

    Based on the principle and method of rare earth elements (REE) tracer and NAA for the study of soil erosion, the changeable process of rill erosion on loess sloping surface was researched in runoff scouring experiments. The results showed that the REE tracer and NAA method can be used not only quantitatively to determine soil erosion amounts on different slope sections, but also to reveal the changeable trend of relative erosion amounts. The relative errors are mostly less than ±20% for the tracing elements, which is considered satisfactory in the soil erosion studies

  1. Dynamics of agricultural soil erosion in European Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvin, L. F.; Kiryukhina, Z. P.; Krasnov, S. F.; Dobrovol'skaya, N. G.

    2017-11-01

    Socioeconomic transformation together with climate change in recent decades significantly affected the geography of agricultural erosion in European Russia. Calculations of erosion rate and soil loss from slopes using logical-mathematical erosion models within different landscape zones and administrative regions revealed spatial-temporal regularities in the dynamics of these parameters and made it possible to assess the role of changes in the main natural and anthropogenic factors of erosion. A universal significant reduction in the mass of soil material washed from tilled slopes is revealed on the background of multidirectional changes in erosion rate.

  2. Social, technological, and research responses to potential erosion and sediment disasters in the western United States, with examples from California

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. M. Rice

    1985-01-01

    Examples from California are used to illustrate typical responses to erosion and debris flow disasters in the United States. Political institutions leave virtually all responsibility for disaster prevention to the lowest levels of government or to individuals. Three circumstances in which disasters occur are discussed: urbanized debris cones, urbanized unstable...

  3. "Social, technological, and research responses to potential erosion and sediment disasters in the western United States, with examples from California"

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. M. Rice

    1985-01-01

    Synopsis - Examples from California are used to illustrate typical responses to erosion and debris flow disasters the United States. Political institutions leave virtually all responsibility for disaster prevention to the lowest levels of government or to individuals. Three circumstances in which disasters occur are discussed: urbanized debris cones, urbanized unstable...

  4. Atmospheric Smell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenslund, Anette

    revealed how a museum-staged hospital atmosphere of an art installation was directly addressed owing to its smell. Curiously, this observation speaks against prevailing literature portraying smell as the ‘mute sense’, and what is more, the museum display did not alter smell curatorially. Rather, smell......, hospital-based and museum-staged. Prompted by the ambition to acknowledge the museum’s need to have its activities rooted in thorough investigation of the given culture on show, the dual analytical disposition is a sine qua non spanning varied fields and disciplines. The conceptual discussion offered...... in the thesis is spurred on by philosophical phenomenology predominantly paired with sociological and anthropological theory. It finds support in empirical work from both a hospital and a museum setting. Thus, it draws on a three-month ethnographic fieldwork conducted in 2012 in a Danish hospital, including...

  5. Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Energy Delivery: Pulse and Power Effects on Enamel Surface and Erosive Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Renan Mota; de Souza, Vinicius Matsuzaki; Esteves, Camila Machado; de Oliveira Lima-Arsati, Ynara Bosco; Cassoni, Alessandra; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Brugnera Junior, Aldo

    2017-11-01

    High power lasers have been suggested as a useful tool for dental caries and erosion prevention due to the increase of enamel acid resistance. to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG (erbium,chromium:yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser irradiation pulse frequency and power on enamel surface and acid erosion resistance. By combining pulse frequency (5-75 Hz) and power settings (0.10-1.00 W), 20 irradiated groups and one nonirradiated control group were tested. A total of 63 bovine enamel blocks (n = 3/group) were prepared for surface hardness and roughness evaluation, performed in three phases: baseline, after irradiation, and after erosive challenge. Enamel blocks were irradiated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser with MZ8 tip (iPlus; Waterlase, Biolase, CA) for 30 sec according to experimental group and submitted. Erosive challenge consisted of four cycles alternating immersion in 0.01 M HCl (5 mL/mm 2 ; 2 min; at 37°C) and immersion in artificial saliva for 3 h. Analysis of variance (three-way ANOVA), Tukey's test, and Pearson correlation were performed for the statistical analysis (p hardness. After erosive challenge, 5 and 75 W groups showed increase in surface hardness; 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 W groups showed minor alterations in surface roughness. the irradiation of Er,Cr:YSGG laser with different parameters of power and pulse frequency settings may alter enamel surface and erosive resistance differently. Pulse frequency of 30 Hz and power of 0.50 W was considered the best parameter to prevent enamel acid erosion.

  6. Comparative rates of wind versus water erosion from a small semiarid watershed in southern Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both wind erosion and water erosion can be serious land degradation processes in semi-arid dry-lands. However, the relative erosion rates of wind and water erosion have rarely been studied simultaneously and are poorly quantified. In this study, wind erosion and water erosion rates were simultaneous...

  7. Model and mechanism of erosion fracture of refractories at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrajtis, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    A calculational technique to evaluate the refractory erosion resistance is proposed. It is shown that under erosion fracture due to breaking off flow erosion plasters are formed which cover all the fractured surface. The proposed model and mechanism of erosion fracture and erosion plaster stability allow one to perform evaluation calculations of erosion characteristics of refractiories based on zirconium dioxide

  8. Long-term stability of global erosion rates and weathering during late-Cenozoic cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenbring, Jane K; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2010-05-13

    Over geologic timescales, CO(2) is emitted from the Earth's interior and is removed from the atmosphere by silicate rock weathering and organic carbon burial. This balance is thought to have stabilized greenhouse conditions within a range that ensured habitable conditions. Changes in this balance have been attributed to changes in topographic relief, where varying rates of continental rock weathering and erosion are superimposed on fluctuations in organic carbon burial. Geological strata provide an indirect yet imperfectly preserved record of this change through changing rates of sedimentation. Widespread observations of a recent (0-5-Myr) fourfold increase in global sedimentation rates require a global mechanism to explain them. Accelerated uplift and global cooling have been given as possible causes, but because of the links between rates of erosion and the correlated rate of weathering, an increase in the drawdown of CO(2) that is predicted to follow may be the cause of global climate change instead. However, globally, rates of uplift cannot increase everywhere in the way that apparent sedimentation rates do. Moreover, proxy records of past atmospheric CO(2) provide no evidence for this large reduction in recent CO(2) concentrations. Here we question whether this increase in global weathering and erosion actually occurred and whether the apparent increase in the sedimentation rate is due to observational biases in the sedimentary record. As evidence, we recast the ocean dissolved (10)Be/(9)Be isotope system as a weathering proxy spanning the past approximately 12 Myr (ref. 14). This proxy indicates stable weathering fluxes during the late-Cenozoic era. The sum of these observations shows neither clear evidence for increased erosion nor clear evidence for a pulse in weathered material to the ocean. We conclude that processes different from an increase in denudation caused Cenozoic global cooling, and that global cooling had no profound effect on spatially and

  9. Adjustable shear stress erosion and transport flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Jepsen, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the total erosion rate and downstream transport of suspended and bedload sediments using an adjustable shear stress erosion and transport (ASSET) flume with a variable-depth sediment core sample. Water is forced past a variable-depth sediment core sample in a closed channel, eroding sediments, and introducing suspended and bedload sediments into the flow stream. The core sample is continuously pushed into the flow stream, while keeping the surface level with the bottom of the channel. Eroded bedload sediments are transported downstream and then gravitationally separated from the flow stream into one or more quiescent traps. The captured bedload sediments (particles and aggregates) are weighed and compared to the total mass of sediment eroded, and also to the concentration of sediments suspended in the flow stream.

  10. In situ erosion of cohesive sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, H.J.; Ockenden, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in tidal power schemes and the effect of a tidal energy barrage on the environment. A large man-made environmental change, such as a barrage, would be expected to have significant effects on the sediment distribution and stability of an estuary and these effects need to be assessed when considering a tidal barrage project. This report describes the development of apparatus for in-situ measurements of cohesive sediment erosion on inter-tidal mudflats. Development of the prototype field erosion bell and field testing was commissioned on behalf of the Department of Trade and Industry by the Energy Technology Support Unit (ETSU). This later work commenced in August 1991 and was completed in September 1992. (Author)

  11. Glaucoma Drainage Device Erosion Following Ptosis Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Steven S; Campbell, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    To highlight the potential risk of glaucoma drainage device erosion following ptosis surgery. Case report. A 71-year-old man underwent uncomplicated superotemporal Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation in the left eye in 2008. Approximately 8 years later, the patient underwent bilateral ptosis repair, which successfully raised the upper eyelid position. Three months postoperatively, the patient's glaucoma drainage implant tube eroded through the corneal graft tissue and overlying conjunctiva to become exposed. A graft revision surgery was successfully performed with no further complications. Caution and conservative lid elevation may be warranted when performing ptosis repair in patients with a glaucoma drainage implant, and patients with a glaucoma implant undergoing ptosis surgery should be followed closely for signs of tube erosion.

  12. Visualization of particulates distribution from electrode erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, ZHONG; Ao, XU; Yunlong, LIU; Lei, CHEN

    2018-02-01

    Particulates generated from electrode erosion in gas spark gap is inevitable and may initiate self-breakdown behavior with high risk. Traditionally, this problem is addressed by empirical method qualitatively. To push this old problem forward, this paper conducts laser confocal microscopy measurement of eroded surface and a statistical method is introduced to obtain visualization of particulates distribution from electrode erosion after different shots. This method allows dense particulates to be classified with their heights in z direction and scattered figures of particulates within certain height range are obtained. Results indicate that the higher-than-10 μm particulates start to emerge after 200 discharge shots and particulates number has a waved radial distribution with a 0.5 mm wide deposition zone. Based on these quantitative results, the risk of reignition and field-distortion failure that are triggered by particulates can be assessed.

  13. Noninvasiv behandling af slid og erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; Dijken, Jan van

    2012-01-01

    Slid og erosion af tænder synes i dag at være et voksende problem for mange patienter. I de fleste tilfælde kan tandlægens tidlige diagnostik føre til, at forebyggende tiltag iværksættes i tide, så fortsatte skader ophører, eller progressionen begrænses. Desværre er det ikke altid muligt, og hvis...... restaureret med fuldkroner på alle tænder. Hvis behandlingen udføres med direkte plast, kan det også betyde, at omkostningerne bliver mindre, så flere får mulighed for at få udført en nødvendig rekonstruktion af tandsættet. I det følgende vil forskellige faktorer i forbindelse med tandslid og erosion blive...

  14. Effectiveness of resin-based materials against erosive and abrasive enamel wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyi; Pan, Jie; Zhang, Songmei; Malmstrom, Hans S; Ren, Yan-Fang

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of resin-based materials against erosive enamel wear under erosive and abrasive challenges by orange juice and tooth brushing. Fifty enamel specimens from third molars were assigned to five groups: ICON resin infiltration with no etching (ICON-NE), ICON resin infiltration with 15 % HCl etching (ICON-AE), Seal & Protect sealant (S&P), Tetric EvoFlow (TEF), and control. Erosive lesions were first created on enamel, then treated with resin-based materials. Erosive and abrasive challenges by orange juice and tooth brushing were repeated after treatments. Erosive wear of the treated areas was measured with 3D scanning microscopy, and data were analyzed using ANOVA and paired t tests. Treatments with ICON, S&P, and TEF created a protective material coating of 4.5 ± 1.9 μm, 44.3 ± 8.1 μm, and 84.6 ± 15.7 μm in thickness on the lesion surfaces, respectively. After 15 cycles of erosive and abrasive challenges, enamel or material losses were 21.9 ± 2.3 μm for control, 24.5 ± 4.0 μm for ICON-NE, 24.6 ± 7.4 μm for ICON-AE, 11.2 ± 4.1 μm for S&P, and 3.9 ± 1.9 μm for TEF, respectively. The protective coatings were completely lost in the ICON infiltration groups but remained intact in both the S&P and TEF groups after erosive and abrasive challenges. In contrast to a resin sealant and a flowable composite, ICON infiltration resin was not effective in protecting enamel surfaces from erosive and abrasive wear. Sealant and flowable composite resin may create protective coatings on eroded enamel surfaces and prevent further tissue loss.

  15. Base Erosion, Profit Shifting and Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto Crivelli; Ruud A. de Mooij; Michael Keen

    2015-01-01

    International corporate tax issues are prominent in public debate, notably with the G20-OECD project addressing Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (‘BEPS’). But while there is considerable empirical evidence for advanced countries on the cross-country fiscal externalities at the heart of these issues, there is almost none for developing countries. This paper uses panel data for 173 countries over 33 years to explore their magnitude and nature, focusing particularly on developing countries and a...

  16. Erosion of metals by pulsating water jet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Foldyna, Josef; Klich, Jiří; Hlaváček, Petr; Zeleňák, M.; Ščučka, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 19 (2012), s. 381-386 ISSN 1330-3651 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : erosion effects * pulsating water jet * surface characteristics Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 0.601, year: 2012 http://hrcak.srce.hr/index.php?show=clanak&id_clanak_jezik=124846

  17. Transfer equations for modeling interrill erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Nouhou bako, Amina; Darboux, Frédéric; James, François; Lucas, Carine

    2016-01-01

    Numerous models are available for matter transfer along an hillslope. They are usually process-specific, requiring to use several models to simulate transfers along an hillslope. To overcome this issue, we develop a new model valid for chemical (nutrients, pollutants, dissolved carbon) and particle transfers by water. It is able to simulate both interrill and rill erosion. This new equation encompasses the previous models of Gao et al. (2004), Hairsine and Rose (1992, 1991) and Lajeunesse et ...

  18. Erosion of soil organic carbon: implications for carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oost, Kristof; Van Hemelryck, Hendrik; Harden, Jennifer W.; McPherson, B.J.; Sundquist, E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural activities have substantially increased rates of soil erosion and deposition, and these processes have a significant impact on carbon (C) mineralization and burial. Here, we present a synthesis of erosion effects on carbon dynamics and discuss the implications of soil erosion for carbon sequestration strategies. We demonstrate that for a range of data-based parameters from the literature, soil erosion results in increased C storage onto land, an effect that is heterogeneous on the landscape and is variable on various timescales. We argue that the magnitude of the erosion term and soil carbon residence time, both strongly influenced by soil management, largely control the strength of the erosion-induced sink. In order to evaluate fully the effects of soil management strategies that promote carbon sequestration, a full carbon account must be made that considers the impact of erosion-enhanced disequilibrium between carbon inputs and decomposition, including effects on net primary productivity and decomposition rates.

  19. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShahrani, Mohammed Thamer; Alqarni, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clinical report describes an adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux induced dental erosion involving the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth. The extensive involvement of the palatal surfaces compromised the esthetics, incisal guidance, and functional occlusal efficiency. Indirect all-ceramic restorations were utilized to restore the esthetics and occlusal reconstruction. In conclusion, patients affected by severe dental erosion require prosthetic rehabilitation besides the management of the associated medical condition. PMID:28828189

  20. Numerical study of impact erosion of multiple solid particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chao; Liu, Yonghong; Chen, Cheng; Qin, Jie; Ji, Renjie; Cai, Baoping

    2017-11-01

    Material erosion caused by continuous particle impingement during hydraulic fracturing results in significant economic loss and increased production risks. The erosion process is complex and has not been clearly explained through physical experiments. To address this problem, a multiple particle model in a 3D configuration was proposed to investigate the dynamic erosion process. This approach can significantly reduce experiment costs. The numerical model considered material damping and elastic-plastic material behavior of target material. The effects of impact parameters on erosion characteristics, such as plastic deformation, contact time, and energy loss rate, were investigated. Based on comprehensive studies, the dynamic erosion mechanism and geometry evolution of eroded crater was obtained. These findings can provide a detailed erosion process of target material and insights into the material erosion caused by multiple particle impingement.

  1. Ceramic corrosion/erosion project description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaishi, C.V.; Carpenter, L.K.

    1981-02-01

    As a part of the United States Department of Energy's High Temperature Turbine Technology Program, the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is participating in a Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Materials Study. Objective is to create a technology base for ceramic materials which could be used by stationary gas power turbines operating with a high-temperature, coal-derived, low-Btu gas products of combustion environment. Two facilities are designed and installed to burn a varying low-Btu coal-derived gas in a controlled manner. This report contains the objectives and testing philosophy as well as the operating, specimen handling, and emergency procedures for the facilities. The facilities were checked out in August/September 1980. Testing is scheduled to begin in late 1980 with completion of 1000 hours of ceramic materials exposure to be completed by early 1981. Most of the enclosed is an update of two METC Information Releases (IR), i.e., IR 442 (1979) Test Plan for Ceramic Corrosion/Erosion Project, and IR 817 (1980) Ceramic Corrosion/Erosion Project Description.

  2. Soil Erosion in Britain: Updating the Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Boardman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Concern about soil erosion on arable land in Britain dates back at least 40 years. Monitoring schemes and case studies have subsequently identified the areas at risk, the rates and frequencies and the major factors responsible for erosion. Initial concern focused on impacts on the farm and therefore on food production. Latterly the emphasis has shifted to off-farm impacts particularly reservoir sedimentation, muddy flooding of properties and the ecological damage to watercourses due to nutrient enrichment, pesticides and damage to fish spawning grounds from fine-sediment inputs. The shift has therefore been to concerns about a healthy and sustainable environment which includes soils. Government agencies, the water companies and the farming industry have lagged behind scientific studies in recognising and addressing erosion problems. Attempts at mitigation are now largely driven by the need to comply with the EU Water Framework Directive whereby watercourses must reach “good status” by 2015. Future changes in land use and climate will offer further challenges in terms of effective monitoring and compliance.

  3. Erosion yields of deposited beryllium layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, D.; Doerner, R.P.; Baldwin, M.J.; De Temmerman, G.

    2009-01-01

    Erosion yields of various Be surfaces exposed to deuterium plasma, including polycrystalline Be (PC-Be), magnetron and thermionic vacuum arc deposited surfaces, and in situ plasma-deposited Be layers on Be (DP-Be/Be) and on graphite (DP-Be/C) targets, are measured in the linear divertor plasma simulator PISCES-B. It is observed that the enhanced erosion (∼3 times higher than PC-Be) of DP-Be/Be occurs at sample temperature T s ∼ 310 K, while DP-Be/Be possesses the same yield as PC-Be at a higher T s ∼ 570 K. The erosion yield of DP-Be/C is found to be slightly decreased at T s ∼ 850 K. This is consistent with the more effective formation of Be 2 C at higher T s , which has a higher surface binding energy than Be. It has been identified from spectroscopic measurements that Be is also eroded as BeD.

  4. Assessing susceptibility to erosion related to land cover changes induced by mining in Anori, Antioquia, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceballos Espinosa, Darney de J; Toro R, Luis Jairo

    2012-01-01

    A model for assessing the susceptibility to erosion in the municipality of Anori, through the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), was implemented, allowing the spatial assessment of different variables of a model based on the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE). Model takes into account possible changes in vegetation cover because of future development of mining projects. The model includes the major hydrological variables such as rain and runoff, as well as slopes, geology and vegetation cover. Anori is located in the north-northeast of Antioquia and presents a valuable mineral potential for the region which has increased thanks to the high prices of gold in the world and the so called mining locomotive driven by the national government. According to the results of this model, the vegetation cover change caused by open pit mining projects directly increases the susceptibility to erosion in Anori. Consequently, environmental management in the erosion susceptibility model is based on the handling of vegetation cover, through the implementation of prevention, mitigation and compensation mechanisms, to avoid increased erosion.

  5. Dental Erosion and Its Growing Importance in Clinical Practice: From Past to Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Ann-Katrin; Omar, Ridwaan; Carlsson, Gunnar E.; Johansson, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, the focus of studies on tooth wear has steadily shifted from the general condition towards the more specific area of dental erosion; equally, a shift has occurred from studies in adults to those in children and adolescents. During this time, understanding of the condition has increased greatly. This paper attempts to provide a critical overview of the development of this body of knowledge, from earlier perceptions to the present. It is accepted that dental erosion has a multifactorial background, in which individual and lifestyle factors have great significance. Notwithstanding methodological differences across studies, data from many countries confirm that dental erosion is common in children and young people, and that, when present, it progresses rapidly. That the condition, and its ramifications, warrants serious consideration in clinical dentistry, is clear. It is important for the oral healthcare team to be able to recognize its early signs and symptoms and to understand its pathogenesis. Preventive strategies are essential ingredients in the management of patients with dental erosion. When necessary, treatment aimed at correcting or improving its effects might best be of a minimally invasive nature. Still, there remains a need for further research to forge better understanding of the subject. PMID:22505907

  6. Atmospheric Models/Global Atmospheric Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-30

    Atmospheric Models /Global Atmospheric Modeling Timothy F. Hogan Naval Research Laboratory Monterey, CA 93943-5502 phone: (831) 656-4705 fax: (831...to 00-00-1998 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Atmospheric Models /Global Atmospheric Modeling 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...initialization of increments, improved cloud prediction, and improved surface fluxes) have been transition to 6.4 (Global Atmospheric Models , PE 0603207N, X-0513

  7. Auto consolidated cohesive sediments erosion; Erosion des sediments cohesifs en autoconsolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternat, F

    2007-02-15

    Pollutants and suspended matters of a river can accumulate into the sedimentary column. Once deposited, they are submitted to self-weight consolidation processes, ageing and burying, leading to an increase of their erosion resistance. Pollutant fluxes can be related to sedimentary fluxes, determined by threshold laws. In this work, an erosion threshold model is suggested by introducing a cohesion force into the usual force balance. A model of cohesion is developed on the basis of interactions between argillaceous cohesive particles (clays), particularly the Van der Waals force, whose parameterization is ensured by means of granulometry and porosity. Artificial erosion experiments were performed in a recirculating erosion flume with natural cored sediments where critical shear stress measurements were performed. Other analyses provided granulometry and porosity. The results obtained constitute a good database for the literature. The model is then applied to the experimental conditions and gives good agreement with measurements. An example of the accounting for self-weight consolidation processes is finally suggested, before finishing on a Mohr like diagram dedicated to soft cohesive sediment erosion. (author)

  8. Ecological site-based assessments of wind and water erosion: informing accelerated soil erosion management in rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Duniway, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated soil erosion occurs when anthropogenic processes modify soil, vegetation or climatic conditions causing erosion rates at a location to exceed their natural variability. Identifying where and when accelerated erosion occurs is a critical first step toward its effective management. Here we explore how erosion assessments structured in the context of ecological sites (a land classification based on soils, landscape setting and ecological potential) and their vegetation states (plant assemblages that may change due to management) can inform systems for reducing accelerated soil erosion in rangelands. We evaluated aeolian horizontal sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion rates for five ecological sites in southern New Mexico, USA, using monitoring data and rangeland-specific wind and water erosion models. Across the ecological sites, plots in shrub-encroached and shrub-dominated vegetation states were consistently susceptible to aeolian sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion. Both processes were found to be highly variable for grassland and grass-succulent states across the ecological sites at the plot scale (0.25 Ha). We identify vegetation thresholds that define cover levels below which rapid (exponential) increases in aeolian sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion occur across the ecological sites and vegetation states. Aeolian sediment flux and fluvial erosion in the study area can be effectively controlled when bare ground cover is 100 cm in length is less than ~35%. Land use and management activities that alter cover levels such that they cross thresholds, and/or drive vegetation state changes, may increase the susceptibility of areas to erosion. Land use impacts that are constrained within the range of natural variability should not result in accelerated soil erosion. Evaluating land condition against the erosion thresholds identified here will enable identification of areas susceptible to accelerated soil erosion and the development of

  9. Ecological site‐based assessments of wind and water erosion: informing accelerated soil erosion management in rangelands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas P; Herrick, Jeffrey E; Duniway, Michael C

    Accelerated soil erosion occurs when anthropogenic processes modify soil, vegetation, or climatic conditions causing erosion rates at a location to exceed their natural variability. Identifying where and when accelerated erosion occurs is a critical first step toward its effective management. Here we explored how erosion assessments structured in the context of ecological sites (a land classification based on soils, landscape setting, and ecological potential) and their vegetation states (plant assemblages that may change due to management) can inform systems for reducing accelerated soil erosion in rangelands. We evaluated aeolian horizontal sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion rates for five ecological sites in southern New Mexico, USA, using monitoring data and rangeland-specific wind and water erosion models. Across the ecological sites, plots in shrub-encroached and shrub-dominated vegetation states were consistently susceptible to aeolian sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion. Both processes were found to be highly variable for grassland and grass–succulent states across the ecological sites at the plot scale (0.25 ha). We identified vegetation thresholds that define cover levels below which rapid (exponential) increases in aeolian sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion occur across the ecological sites and vegetation states. Aeolian sediment flux and fluvial erosion in the study area could be effectively controlled when bare ground cover was 100 cm in length was less than ∼35%. Land use and management activities that alter cover levels such that they cross thresholds, and/or drive vegetation state changes, may increase the susceptibility of areas to erosion. Land use impacts that are constrained within the range of natural variability should not result in accelerated soil erosion. Evaluating land condition against the erosion thresholds identified here will enable identification of areas susceptible to accelerated soil erosion and the

  10. Material erosion and erosion products under plasma heat loads typical for ITER hard disruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronov, V. E-mail: vsafr@rico.ttk.ru; Arkhipov, N.; Bakhtin, V.; Kurkin, S.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Toporkov, D.; Vasenin, S.; Wuerz, H.; Zhitlukhin, A

    2001-03-01

    Plasma/material interaction has been studied in disruption simulation experiments. Candidate divertor materials were exposed to heat loads expected for tokamak-reactor disruptions. It is shown that sudden evaporation of a thin material layer produces a cloud of vapor plasma, which acts as a thermal shield protecting the surface from further excessive evaporation. In terms of evaporation reduction a shielding factor is above 100. Formation and physical properties of the shielding layer are analyzed. Target plasma converts the incoming energy flux into photon radiation. Radiation from target plasma is so intensive that it may cause erosion of nearby components. Surface damages result not solely from atomic vaporization but also from melt layer splashing for metals and brittle destruction for carbon-based materials. Erosion products are emitted as droplets (metal) and grains (carbon-based material). Melt layer splashing results in greater surface damages than vaporization. A contribution of brittle destruction to net erosion is under investigation now.

  11. Tolerable versus actual soil erosion rates in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijen, F. G. A.; Jones, R. J. A.; Rickson, R. J.; Smith, C. J.

    2009-05-01

    Erosion is a major threat to soil resources in Europe, and may impair their ability to deliver a range of ecosystem goods and services. This is reflected by the European Commission's Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection, which recommends an indicator-based approach for monitoring soil erosion. Defined baseline and threshold values are essential for the evaluation of soil monitoring data. Therefore, accurate spatial data on both soil loss and soil genesis are required, especially in the light of predicted changes in climate patterns, notably frequency, seasonal distribution and intensity of precipitation. Rates of soil loss are reported that have been measured, modelled or inferred for most types of soil erosion in a variety of landscapes, by studies across the spectrum of the Earth sciences. Natural rates of soil formation can be used as a basis for setting tolerable soil erosion rates, with soil formation consisting of mineral weathering as well as dust deposition. This paper reviews the concept of tolerable soil erosion and summarises current knowledge on rates of soil formation, which are then compared to rates of soil erosion by known erosion types, for assessment of soil erosion monitoring at the European scale. A modified definition of tolerable soil erosion is proposed as 'any actual soil erosion rate at which a deterioration or loss of one or more soil functions does not occur,' actual soil erosion being 'the total amount of soil lost by all recognised erosion types.' Even when including dust deposition in soil formation rates, the upper limit of tolerable soil erosion, as equal to soil formation, is ca. 1.4 t ha - 1 yr - 1 while the lower limit is ca. 0.3 t ha - 1 yr - 1 , for conditions prevalent in Europe. Scope for spatio-temporal differentiation of tolerable soil erosion rates below this upper limit is suggested by considering (components of) relevant soil functions. Reported rates of actual soil erosion vary much more than those for soil formation

  12. Conceptual considerations of evaluate internal erosion phenomenon via no-erosion filter test and continuing erosion filter test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos-Rivera Johnatan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Some widely-graded soils may exhibit, under the influence of steady seepage flow, a behaviour in which grains of the finer fraction migrate through the interstices of the matrix formed by the coarser fraction. The migrating fines may accumulate at a downstream location within the soil. Alternatively, and where there is no capacity for retention at the downstream or exit boundary, the behaviour may lead to a washing out and consequent loss of the finer fraction. The phenomenon of erosion is termed internal instability, and the soils are considered internally unstable. Taking into consideration (i the specimen reconstitution by method of compaction, (ii the application of a vertical stress to the specimen, and (iii the use of multi-stage seepage flow with head-control, to measure the origin of a conduit through the coarser fraction, some test devices were conducted by different authors to evaluate this phenomenon, the purpose of this paper is to present some considerations and key aspects about internal erosion in dams and filter compatibility with core material (specimen reconstitution, test procedure, consolidation, seepage flow, test program and its relevance to the reality. The main reason to present this investigation is due to the absence of any specified regulatory or standard test method. Given the importance of filter compatibility of the zoned earth core dam and filter materials, as well the grading stability of each zone in the presence of seepage flow, additional consideration will be given to performing Continuing Erosion Filter (CEF tests on the core-filter interface, using the laboratory permeameter device.

  13. Rainfall erosivity index for the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essel, Paul; Glover, Eric T; Yeboah, Serwaa; Adjei-Kyereme, Yaw; Yawo, Israel Nutifafa Doyi; Nyarku, Mawutoli; Asumadu-Sakyi, Godfred S; Gbeddy, Gustav Kudjoe; Agyiri, Yvette Agyiriba; Ameho, Evans Mawuli; Aberikae, Emmanuel Atule

    2016-01-01

    Rainfall erosivity is the potential ability for rainfall to cause soil loss. The purpose of this study was to estimate the rainfall erosivity index for the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission site in order to compute the surface erosion rate. Monthly rainfall data, for the period 2003-2012 were used to compute annual rainfall erosivity indices for the site, using the Modified Fournier index. Values of the annual rainfall erosivity indices ranged from 73.5 mm for 2004 to 200.4 mm for the year 2003 with a mean annual erosivity index of 129.8 mm for the period. The Pearson's Coefficient of Correlation was used to establish the relationship between annual rainfall and annual rainfall erosivity. This showed a high degree of positive relationship (r = 0.7) for the study area. The computed mean annual erosivity index revealed that the site is in the high erosion risk zone. Therefore, it is necessary to develop soil protection and management strategies to protect the soil from erosion.

  14. Gastroesophageal Reflux is Not Associated with Dental Erosion in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Yvette K.; Heyman, Melvin B.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Dalal, Deepal H.; Wojcicki, Janet M.; Clark, Ann L.; Rechmann, Beate; Rechmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Dental erosion is a complication of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in adults; in children, it is not clear if GER has a role in dental pathologic conditions. Dietary intake, oral hygiene, high bacterial load, and decreased salivary flow might contribute independently to GER development or dental erosion, but their potential involvement in dental erosion from GER is not understood. We investigated the prevalence of dental erosion among children with and without GER symptoms, and whether salivary flow rate or bacterial load contribute to location-specific dental erosion. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 59 children (ages 9–17 y) with symptoms of GER and 20 asymptomatic children (controls); all completed a questionnaire on dietary exposure. Permanent teeth were examined for erosion into dentin, erosion locations, and affected surfaces. The dentist was not aware of GER status, nor was the gastroenterologist aware of dental status. Stimulated salivary flow was measured and salivary bacterial load was calculated for total bacteria, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Results Controlling for age, dietary intake, and oral hygiene, there was no association between GER symptoms and dental erosion, by tooth location or affected surface. Salivary flow did not correlate with GER symptoms or erosion. Erosion location and surface were independent of total bacteria and levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Conclusions Location-specific dental erosion is not associated with GER, salivary flow, or bacterial load. Prospective studies are required to determine the pathogenesis of GER-associated dental erosion and the relationship between dental caries to GER and dental erosion. PMID:21820389

  15. Applying a process based erosion model to assess off-site effects of soil erosion from the regional scale to the measure level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindewolf, Marcus; Arevalo, Annika; Saathoff, Ulfert; Käpermann, Philipp; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    Since soil erosion is one of the most important issues of global soil degradation, great effort was put into the application of erosion models for the assessment and prevention of on-site damages. Beside the primary impact of soil loss in decreasing soil fertility, erosion can cause significant impacts if transported sediments are entering downslope ecosystems, settlements, infrastructure or traffic routes. These off-site damages can be very costly, affect a lot of people and contaminate water-resources. The analysis of these problems is intensified by the requirements of new legislation, such as the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD), providing new challenges for planning authorities in order to combat off-site damage. Hence there is strong public and scientific interest in understanding the processes of sediment as well as particle attached nutrient and pollutant transport. Predicting the frequency, magnitude and extent of off-site impacts of water erosion is a necessary precondition for adequate risk assessments and mitigation measures. Process based models are increasingly used for the simulation of soil erosion. Regarding the requirements of the WFD, these models need to deliver comparable estimates from the regional scale to the level of mitigation measures. This study aims on the application of the process based model EROSION 3D for off-site risk assessment on different scales for the German federal state of Saxony using available geo data, data base applications and GIS-routines. Following issues were investigated: - Where are the expected sediment deposition areas? - Which settlements, infrastructures and traffic routes are affected by sediment fluxes? - Which river sections are affected by sediment inputs? - Which river sections are affected by nutrient and heavy metal inputs? The model results identify the Saxon loess belt as highly endangered by off-site damages although hotspots can be found in the northern flatlands and the southern mountain range as

  16. Lipids in preventive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensche, A; Reich, M; Kümmerer, K; Hannig, M; Hannig, C

    2013-04-01

    There is still a great demand for the improvement of oral prophylaxis methods. One repeatedly described approach is rinsing with edible oils. The aim of the present review paper was to analyze the role of lipids in bioadhesion and preventive dentistry. Despite limited sound scientific data, extensive literature search was performed to illustrate possible effects of lipids in the oral cavity. It is to be assumed that lipophilic components modulate the process of bioadhesion to the oral hard tissues as well as the composition and ultrastructure of the initial oral biofilm or the pellicle, respectively. Thereby, lipids could add hydrophobic characteristics to the tooth surface hampering bacterial colonization and eventually decreasing caries susceptibility. Also, a lipid-enriched pellicle might be more resistant in case of acid exposure and could therefore reduce the erosive mineral loss. Furthermore, anti-inflammatory effects on the oral soft tissues were described. However, there is only limited evidence for these beneficial impacts. Neither the lipid composition of saliva and pellicle nor the interactions of lipids with the initial oral biofilm and the pellicle layer have been investigated adequately until now. Edible oils might qualify as mild supplements to conventional strategies for the prevention of caries, erosion, and periodontal diseases but further research is necessary. Against the background of current scientific and empirical knowledge, edible oils might be used as oral hygiene supplements but a decisive benefit for the oral health status is questionable.

  17. Combined impacts of land use and soil property changes on soil erosion in a mollisol area under long-term agricultural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wei; Wu, Yuyang; Hao, Zengchao; Zhang, Qi; Bu, Qingwei; Gao, Xiang

    2018-02-01

    Soil erosion exhibits special characteristics in the process of agricultural development. Understanding the combined impacts of land use and soil property changes on soil erosion, especially in the area under long-term agricultural cultivations, is vital to watershed agricultural and soil management. This study investigated the temporal-spatial patterns of the soil erosion based on a modified version of Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and conducted a soil erosion contribution analysis. The land use data were interpreted from Landsat series images, and soil properties were obtained from field sampling, laboratory tests and SPAW (Soil-Plant-Atmosphere-Water) model calculations. Over a long period of agricultural development, the average erosion modulus decreased from 187.7tkm -2 a -1 in 1979 to 158.4tkm -2 a -1 in 2014. The land use types were transformed mainly in the reclamation of paddy fields and the shrinking of wetlands on a large scale. Most of the soils were converted to loam from silty or clay loam and the saturated hydraulic conductivity (K s ) of most soil types decreased by 1.11% to 43.6%. The rapidly increasing area of 49.8km 2 of paddy fields together with the moderate decrease of 14.0km 2 of forests, as well as K s values explained 87.4% of the total variance in soil erosion. Although changes in soil physical and water characteristics indicated that soil erosion loads should have become higher, the upsurge in paddy fields played an important role in mitigating soil erosion in this study area. These results demonstrated that land use changes had more significant impacts than soil property changes on soil erosion. This study suggested that rational measures should be taken to extend paddy fields and control the dry land farming. These findings will benefit watershed agricultural targeting and management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Consensus Report of the European Federation of Conservative Dentistry: Erosive tooth wear – diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Thiago S; Colon, Pierre; Ganss, Carolina; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Lussi, Adrian; Schlueter, Nadine; Schmalz, Gottfried; Shellis, Peter R; Björg Tveit, Anne; Wiegand, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Due to an increased focus on erosive tooth wear (ETW), the European Federation of Conservative Dentistry (EFCD) considered ETW as a relevant topic for generating this consensus report. This report is based on a compilation of the scientific literature, an expert conference, and the approval by the General Assembly of EFCD. ETW is a chemical-mechanical process resulting in a cumulative loss of hard dental tissue not caused by bacteria, and it is characterized by loss of the natural surface morphology and contour of the teeth. A suitable index for classification of ETW is the basic erosive wear examination (BEWE). Regarding the etiology, patient-related factors include the predisposition to erosion, reflux, vomiting, drinking and eating habits, as well as medications and dietary supplements. Nutritional factors relate to the composition of foods and beverages, e.g., with low pH and high buffer capacity (major risk factors), and calcium concentration (major protective factor). Occupational factors are exposition of workers to acidic liquids or vapors. Preventive management of ETWaims at reducing or stopping the progression of the lesions. Restorative management aims at reducing symptoms of pain and dentine hypersensitivity, or to restore esthetic and function, but it should only be used in conjunction with preventive strategies. Effective management of ETW includes screening for early signs of ETW and evaluating all etiological factors. ETW is a clinical condition, which calls for the increased attention of the dental community and is a challenge for the cooperation with other medical specialities.

  19. Study on the facilities and procedures for meltwater erosion of thawed soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunyun Ban

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available High erosion rate of seasonal thawed soils by snow- and ice-melting runoff in the high altitude and latitude cold regions has great impacts on ecological systems, industries, agriculture and various manmade infrastructures as well as people's lives. The facilities and procedures are of great importance for the studies on simulating erosion processes of melt-frozen soil. This study focuses on the method and facility for simulating the thawing process of frozen soil. The facility includes soil freezing system, melt-water supply system and experimental flume system for thawed soil erosion. The soil freezing system provides enough space to freeze soil columns in flumes. The water supply system deliveries snow- or ice-melting water flow of constant-rate at 0 °C. The soil flumes of 200 or 300 cm long, 10 cm wide and 12 cm high are designed to be assemble and convenient for soil freezing before they are thawed in one-dimensional manner from top to bottom. The one-dimensional thawing process is realized as follows. The frozen soil flume is put on ice boxes and thermally insulated with heat-insulating materials all around to prevent frozen soil from being thawed from sidewalls and bottom. The soil thaws with this system shows that it can meet the requirements of simulating the process of soil thawing from top to bottom. The thawed soil flumes are connected from end to end to form rills of 6–8 m long to run the erosion experiments under different designed hydraulic condition. The equipment provides facility, method and operation process for simulating one-dimensional soil thawing to serve research on the effect of thawed soil depth on erosion process.

  20. Prevalence of erosive tooth wear and associated factors in a group of Mexican adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Aragón Pineda, Álvaro Edgar; Borges-Yáñez, Socorro Aída; Lussi, Adrian; Irigoyen-Camacho, María Esther; Angeles Medina, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    Erosive tooth wear is the irreversible loss of dental hard tissue as a result of chemical processes. When the surface of a tooth is attacked by acids, the resulting loss of structural integrity leaves a softened layer on the tooth's surface, which renders it vulnerable to abrasive forces. The authors' objective was to estimate the prevalence of erosive tooth wear and to identify associated factors in a sample of 14- to 19-year-old adolescents in Mexico. The authors performed a cross-sectional study on a convenience sample (N = 417) of adolescents in a school in Mexico City, Mexico. The authors used a questionnaire and an oral examination performed according to the Lussi index. The prevalence of erosive tooth wear was 31.7% (10.8% with exposed dentin). The final logistic regression model included age (P < .01; odds ratio [OR], 1.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26-2.13), high intake of sweet carbonated drinks (P = .03; OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.06-3.07), and xerostomia (P = .04; OR, 2.31; 95% CI, 1.05-5.09). Erosive tooth wear, mainly on the mandibular first molars, was associated with age, high intake of sweet carbonated drinks, and xerostomia. Knowledge regarding erosive tooth wear in adolescents with relatively few years of exposure to causal factors will increase the focus on effective preventive measures, the identification of people at high risk, and early treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Reduction Effect Analysis of Erosion Control Facilities Using Debris Flow Numerical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Kyewon; Kim, Younghwan; Oh, Chaeyeon; Lee, Hojin; Kim, SoungDoug

    2017-04-01

    With the increase in frequency of typhoons and heavy rains following the climate change, the scale of damage from the calamities in the mountainous areas has been growing larger and larger, which is different from the past. For the case of Korea where 64% of land is consisted of the mountainous areas, establishment of the check dams has been drastically increased after 2000 in order to reduce the damages from the debris flow. However, due to the lack of data on scale, location and kind of check dams established for reducing the damages in debris flow, the measures to prevent damages based on experience and subjective basis have to be relied on. This study, the high-precision DEM data was structured by using the terrestrial LiDAR in the Jecheon area where the debris flow damage occurred in July 2009. And, from the numerical models of the debris flow, Kanako-2D that is available to reflect the erosion and deposition action was applied to install the erosion control facilities (water channel, check dam) and analyzed the effect of reducing the debris flow shown in the downstream. After installing the erosion control facilities, most of debris flow moves along the water channel to reduce the area to expand the debris flow, and after installing the check dam, the flow depth and flux of the debris flow were reduced along with the erosion. However, even after constructing the erosion control facilities, damages were still inflicted on private residences or agricultural sites located on the upper regions where the deposition was made. Acknowledgments This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education(NRF-2016R1D1A3B03933362)

  2. Illuminating wildfire erosion and deposition patterns with repeat terrestrial lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengers, Francis K.; Tucker, G.E.; Moody, J.A.; Ebel, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Erosion following a wildfire is much greater than background erosion in forests because of wildfire-induced changes to soil erodibility and water infiltration. While many previous studies have documented post-wildfire erosion with point and small plot-scale measurements, the spatial distribution of post-fire erosion patterns at the watershed scale remains largely unexplored. In this study lidar surveys were collected periodically in a small, first-order drainage basin over a period of 2 years following a wildfire. The study site was relatively steep with slopes ranging from 17° to > 30°. During the study period, several different types of rain storms occurred on the site including low-intensity frontal storms (2.4 mm h−1) and high-intensity convective thunderstorms (79 mm h−1). These storms were the dominant drivers of erosion. Erosion resulting from dry ravel and debris flows was notably absent at the site. Successive lidar surveys were subtracted from one another to obtain digital maps of topographic change between surveys. The results show an evolution in geomorphic response, such that the erosional response after rain storms was strongly influenced by the previous erosional events and pre-fire site morphology. Hillslope and channel roughness increased over time, and the watershed armored as coarse cobbles and boulders were exposed. The erosional response was spatially nonuniform; shallow erosion from hillslopes (87% of the study area) contributed 3 times more sediment volume than erosion from convergent areas (13% of the study area). However, the total normalized erosion depth (volume/area) was highest in convergent areas. From a detailed understanding of the spatial locations of erosion, we made inferences regarding the processes driving erosion. It appears that hillslope erosion is controlled by rain splash (for detachment) and overland flow (for transport and quasi-channelized erosion), with the sites of highest erosion corresponding to locations

  3. Three Gorges Reservoir Area: soil erosion under natural condition vs. soil erosion under current land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönbrodt, Sarah; Behrens, Thorsten; Scholten, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Apparently, the current most prominent human-induced example for large scale environmental impact is the Three Gorges Dam in China. The flooding alongside the Yangtze River, and its tributaries results in a vast loss of settlement and farmland area with productive, fertile valley soils. Due to the associated high land use dynamic on uphill-sites, the soil resources are underlying high land use pressure. Within our study, the soil erosion under natural conditions is compared to the soil erosion under current land use after the impoundment. Both were modeled using the empirical Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) which is able to predict long-term annual soil loss with limited data. The database consists of digital terrain data (45 m resolution DEM, erosive slope length based on Monte-Carlo-Aggregation according to Behrens et al. (2008)), field investigations of recent erosion forms, and literature studies. The natural disposition to soil erosion was calculated considering the USLE factors R, S, and K. The soil erosion under current land use was calculated taking into account all USLE factors. The study area is the catchment of the Xiangxi River in the Three Gorges Reservoir area. Within the Xiangxi Catchment (3,200 km²) the highly dynamic backwater area (580 km²), and two micro-scale study sites (Xiangjiaba with 2.8 km², and Quyuan with 88 km²) are considered more detailed as they are directly affected by the river impoundment. Central features of the Xiangxi Catchment are the subtropical monsoon climate, an extremely steep sloping relief (mean slope angle 39°, SD 22.8°) artificially fractured by farmland terraces, and a high soil erodibility (mean K factor 0.37, SD 0.13). On the catchment scale the natural disposition to soil erosion makes up to mean 518.0 t ha-1 a-1. The maximum potential soil loss of 1,730.1 t ha-1 a-1 under natural conditions is reached in the Quyuan site (mean 635.8 t ha-1 a-1) within the backwater area (mean 582.9 t ha-1 a-1). In the

  4. Towards numerical prediction of cavitation erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fivel, Marc; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Chandra Roy, Samir

    2015-10-06

    This paper is intended to provide a potential basis for a numerical prediction of cavitation erosion damage. The proposed method can be divided into two steps. The first step consists in determining the loading conditions due to cavitation bubble collapses. It is shown that individual pits observed on highly polished metallic samples exposed to cavitation for a relatively small time can be considered as the signature of bubble collapse. By combining pitting tests with an inverse finite-element modelling (FEM) of the material response to a representative impact load, loading conditions can be derived for each individual bubble collapse in terms of stress amplitude (in gigapascals) and radial extent (in micrometres). This step requires characterizing as accurately as possible the properties of the material exposed to cavitation. This characterization should include the effect of strain rate, which is known to be high in cavitation erosion (typically of the order of several thousands s(-1)). Nanoindentation techniques as well as compressive tests at high strain rate using, for example, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test system may be used. The second step consists in developing an FEM approach to simulate the material response to the repetitive impact loads determined in step 1. This includes a detailed analysis of the hardening process (isotropic versus kinematic) in order to properly account for fatigue as well as the development of a suitable model of material damage and failure to account for mass loss. Although the whole method is not yet fully operational, promising results are presented that show that such a numerical method might be, in the long term, an alternative to correlative techniques used so far for cavitation erosion prediction.

  5. Dynamics of soil organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon in relation to water erosion and tillage erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaojun, Nie; Jianhui, Zhang; Zhengan, Su

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) are associated with soil erosion, yet there is a shortage of research concerning the relationship between soil erosion, SOC, and especially microbial biomass carbon (MBC). In this paper, we selected two typical slope landscapes including gentle and steep slopes from the Sichuan Basin, China, and used the (137)Cs technique to determine the effects of water erosion and tillage erosion on the dynamics of SOC and MBC. Soil samples for the determination of (137)Cs, SOC, MBC and soil particle-size fractions were collected on two types of contrasting hillslopes. (137)Cs data revealed that soil loss occurred at upper slope positions of the two landscapes and soil accumulation at the lower slope positions. Soil erosion rates as well as distribution patterns of the erosion is the major process of soil redistribution in the gentle slope landscape, while tillage erosion acts as the dominant process of soil redistribution in the steep slope landscape. In gentle slope landscapes, both SOC and MBC contents increased downslope and these distribution patterns were closely linked to soil redistribution rates. In steep slope landscapes, only SOC contents increased downslope, dependent on soil redistribution. It is noticeable that MBC/SOC ratios were significantly lower in gentle slope landscapes than in steep slope landscapes, implying that water erosion has a negative effect on the microbial biomass compared with tillage erosion. It is suggested that MBC dynamics are closely associated with soil redistribution by water erosion but independent of that by tillage erosion, while SOC dynamics are influenced by soil redistribution by both water erosion and tillage erosion.

  6. Dynamics of Soil Organic Carbon and Microbial Biomass Carbon in Relation to Water Erosion and Tillage Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaojun, Nie; Jianhui, Zhang; Zhengan, Su

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) are associated with soil erosion, yet there is a shortage of research concerning the relationship between soil erosion, SOC, and especially microbial biomass carbon (MBC). In this paper, we selected two typical slope landscapes including gentle and steep slopes from the Sichuan Basin, China, and used the 137Cs technique to determine the effects of water erosion and tillage erosion on the dynamics of SOC and MBC. Soil samples for the determination of 137Cs, SOC, MBC and soil particle-size fractions were collected on two types of contrasting hillslopes. 137Cs data revealed that soil loss occurred at upper slope positions of the two landscapes and soil accumulation at the lower slope positions. Soil erosion rates as well as distribution patterns of the erosion is the major process of soil redistribution in the gentle slope landscape, while tillage erosion acts as the dominant process of soil redistribution in the steep slope landscape. In gentle slope landscapes, both SOC and MBC contents increased downslope and these distribution patterns were closely linked to soil redistribution rates. In steep slope landscapes, only SOC contents increased downslope, dependent on soil redistribution. It is noticeable that MBC/SOC ratios were significantly lower in gentle slope landscapes than in steep slope landscapes, implying that water erosion has a negative effect on the microbial biomass compared with tillage erosion. It is suggested that MBC dynamics are closely associated with soil redistribution by water erosion but independent of that by tillage erosion, while SOC dynamics are influenced by soil redistribution by both water erosion and tillage erosion. PMID:23717530

  7. DISPERSION OF GLYPHOSATE IN SOILS UNDERGOING EROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorana Todorovic Rampazzo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Different physical, chemical and biological processes influence the behaviour of organic contaminants in soils. A better understanding of the organic pollutant behaviour in soils would improve the environmental protection. One possible way for better attenuation of the risk of pollution in agriculture can be achieved through ta better-specified pesticide management based on the adaptation of the pesticide type and application rates to the specific environmental characteristics of the area of application. Nowadays, one of the actually most applied herbicide world wide is glyphosate. Glyphosate is highly water soluble and traces have been found in surface and groundwater systems. For a better understanding of the natural influence of erosion processes on glyphosate behaviour and dispersion under heavy rain conditions after application in the field, two erosion simulation experiments were conducted on two different locations in Austria with completely different soil types in September 2008. The results of the experiments showed that under normal practical conditions (e.g. no rainfall is expected immediatly after application, the potential adsorption capacity of the Kirchberg soil (Stagnic Cambisol, with about 16.000 ppm Fe-oxides is confirmed compared to the low adsorption Chernosem soil (about 8.000 ppm pedogenic Fe-oxides.  Considering the enormous difference in the run-off amounts between the two sites Pixendorf and Kirchberg soils it can be concluded how important the soil structural conditions and vegetation type and cover are for the risks of erosion and, as a consequence, pollution of neighbouring waters. In the rainfall experiments under comparable simulation conditions, the amount of run-off was about 10 times higher at Kirchberg, owing to its better infiltration rate, than at the Pixendorf site. Moreover, the total loss of glyphosate (NT+CT through run-off at the Kirchberg site was more than double that at Pixendorf, which confirms the

  8. Alkaline erosion of CR 39 polymer surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faiman, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism of erosion of CR 39 polymer in alkaline environments. We observed the kinetics of absorption of water and methanol into both unirradiated and γ-irradiated samples. We use a capillary model to interpret our results. We etched our samples in both KOH solutions, and KOH solutions doped with methanol. Etch rate was desensitizing to γ-irradiation when KOH concentration approached saturation, but KOH solutions doped with methanol were not desensitizing, unlike with nuclear tracks. We account for this difference

  9. Simulation of plasma erosion opening switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.J.; Jones, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the modeling of Plasma Erosion Opening Switches is reviewed, and new results from both fluid and particle simulation compared. Three-fluid simulations with the ANTHEM code for switches on the NRL GAMBLE I machine and SNL PBFA II machine have shown strong dependence of the opening dynamics on the anode structure, the threshold for electron emission, on the possible presence of anomalous resistivity, and on advection of the magnetic field with cathode emitted electrons. Simulations with the implicit particle-in-cell code ISIS confirm these observations, but manifest broader current channels---in better agreement with GAMBLE I experimental results. 7 refs., 3 figs

  10. Atypical calcific tendinitis with cortical erosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, E.J. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); El-Khoury, G.Y. [Dept. of Radiology and Orthopaedics, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Objective. To present and discuss six cases of calcific tendinitis in atypical locations (one at the insertion of the pectoralis major and five at the insertion of the gluteus maximus).Patients and results. All cases were associated with cortical erosions, and five had soft tissue calcifications. The initial presentation was confusing and the patients were suspected of having infection or neoplastic disease.Conclusion. Calcific tendinitis is a self-limiting condition. It is important to recognize the imaging features of this condition to avoid unnecessary investigation and surgery. (orig.)

  11. Erosion resistant elbow for solids conveyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    An elvow and process for fabrication for use in particulate material conveying comprising a curved outer pipe, a curved inner pipe having the same radius of curvature as the outer pipe, concentric with and internal to the outer pipe, comprising an outer layer comprised of a first material and an inner layer comprised of a second material wherein said first material is characterized by high erosion resistance when impinged by particulate material and wherein said second material is characterized by high tensile strength and flexibility, and an inner pipe supporting means for providing support to said inner pipe, disposed between said inner pipe and said outer pipe. 4 figures.

  12. An empirical approach to estimate soil erosion risk in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, Luis; Martínez-Núñez, Margarita

    2011-08-01

    Soil erosion is one of the most important factors in land degradation and influences desertification worldwide. In 2001, the Spanish Ministry of the Environment launched the 'National Inventory of Soil Erosion (INES) 2002-2012' to study the process of soil erosion in Spain. The aim of the current article is to assess the usefulness of this National Inventory as an instrument of control, measurement and monitoring of soil erosion in Spain. The methodology and main features of this National Inventory are described in detail. The results achieved as of the end of May 2010 are presented, together with an explanation of the utility of the Inventory as a tool for planning forest hydrologic restoration, soil protection, erosion control, and protection against desertification. Finally, the authors make a comparative analysis of similar initiatives for assessing soil erosion in other countries at the national and European levels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Solution of internal erosion equations by asymptotic expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubujet P.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available One dimensional coupled soil internal erosion and consolidation equations are considered in this work for the special case of well determined sand and clay mixtures with a small proportion of clay phase. An enhanced modelling of the effect of erosion on elastic soil behavior was introduced through damage mechanics concepts. A modified erosion law was proposed. The erosion phenomenon taking place inside the soil was shown to act like a perturbation affecting the classical soil consolidation equation. This interpretation has enabled considering an asymptotic expansion of the coupled erosion consolidation equations in terms of a perturbation parameter linked to the maximum expected internal erosion. A robust analytical solution was obtained via direct integration of equations at order zero and an adequate finite difference scheme that was applied at order one.

  14. Development of a statistical model for the determination of the probability of riverbank erosion in a Meditteranean river basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varouchakis, Emmanouil; Kourgialas, Nektarios; Karatzas, George; Giannakis, Georgios; Lilli, Maria; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos

    2014-05-01

    Riverbank erosion affects the river morphology and the local habitat and results in riparian land loss, damage to property and infrastructures, ultimately weakening flood defences. An important issue concerning riverbank erosion is the identification of the areas vulnerable to erosion, as it allows for predicting changes and assists with stream management and restoration. One way to predict the vulnerable to erosion areas is to determine the erosion probability by identifying the underlying relations between riverbank erosion and the geomorphological and/or hydrological variables that prevent or stimulate erosion. A statistical model for evaluating the probability of erosion based on a series of independent local variables and by using logistic regression is developed in this work. The main variables affecting erosion are vegetation index (stability), the presence or absence of meanders, bank material (classification), stream power, bank height, river bank slope, riverbed slope, cross section width and water velocities (Luppi et al. 2009). In statistics, logistic regression is a type of regression analysis used for predicting the outcome of a categorical dependent variable, e.g. binary response, based on one or more predictor variables (continuous or categorical). The probabilities of the possible outcomes are modelled as a function of independent variables using a logistic function. Logistic regression measures the relationship between a categorical dependent variable and, usually, one or several continuous independent variables by converting the dependent variable to probability scores. Then, a logistic regression is formed, which predicts success or failure of a given binary variable (e.g. 1 = "presence of erosion" and 0 = "no erosion") for any value of the independent variables. The regression coefficients are estimated by using maximum likelihood estimation. The erosion occurrence probability can be calculated in conjunction with the model deviance regarding

  15. Prevalence and factors associated with dental erosion in individuals aged 12–30 years in a northeastern Brazilian city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano LC

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Luanda Cristina O Luciano,1 Meire Coelho Ferreira,2 Marco Aurelio Paschoal2 1Dentistry Program, Facimp Devry, Imperatriz, 2Post Graduate Program in Dentistry, CEUMA University, São Luís, Brazil Background/Purpose: Dental erosion in young individuals has increased significantly in recent years, due to changes in lifestyle. Thus, the present study investigated the prevalence and factors associated with dental erosion in individuals aged 12–30 years in the city of Imperatriz of Maranhão, Brazil.Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 335 individuals who answered a questionnaire consisting of variables related to dental erosion. Afterwards, the individuals were subjected to clinical examinations and the basic erosive wear examination index was used to classify their teeth according to the presence and severity of dental erosion.Results: Descriptive statistics, the chi-square test, Poisson univariate and multivariate regression were performed at 5% level of significance. The sample was characterized by 204 females (60.9%, the majority of whom were from 12 to 19 years of age (78.5%, among whom 28.7% ­presented dental erosion. Their monthly family income was from 1 to 3 minimum wages (56.4%. The variables that were significantly associated with the outcome were family income, chewing gum, and consumption of soft-drinks/juices before going to sleep (p=0.03, p=0.001, and p=0.04, respectively. Individuals who chewed chewing gum were 2.27 times (95% CI =1.43–3.60 more likely to present dental erosion than those who did not chew gum. Individuals who ingested soft drinks or juices were 2.30 times (95% CI =1.30–4.10 more likely to present dental erosion.Conclusion: The prevalence of erosion reflected the need for programs of prevention and guidance for patients about the etiological factors of the disease. Keywords: young adults, dental erosion, prevalence, factors, tooth wear, life style

  16. Resistance of Silicon-Containing Carbonized Lignin to Atomic Oxygen Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajimoto, Takeshi; Hata, Toshimitsu; Tagawa, Masahito; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Hayakawa, Hajime

    Spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) are exposed to atomic oxygen (AO). It is thus important to develop an environmentally friendly material that can be applied to the outer surfaces of spacecraft in LEO to protect them against AO. Carbonized material containing electroconductive graphitic microlayers is promising for this purpose. We produced carbonized lignin (CW) by separating wood in L-lactic acid and we investigated the AO erosion resistances of CW and CW containing Si. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the O/C ratio increased on AO exposure. The CW sample without Si and CW samples containing 20% and 40% Si exhibited less erosion than CW samples containing 5% and 10% Si. XPS revealed that the presence of Si resulted in the formation of SiO2 on the sample surface. For CW with Si contents of 20% and 40%, the SiO2 coverage may be sufficiently large to prevent attack by AO.

  17. Modelling of environmental and climatic problems: Wind and water erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslan, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Magnitude of wind and water erosion mainly depend on wind velocity, rainfall rate, slope and soil characteristics. The main purpose of this lecture is to define the role of small, meso and large scale phenomena (local and synoptic fluctuations) on water and wind erosion. These lecture notes present some results on wind speed simulation and seasonal fluctuations of water deficit for the selected station in different erosion risque and transition regions of Turkey. (author)

  18. Severe erosive arthritis of large joints in chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, C.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Two cases of chronic renal failure are presented in which a large joint severe erosive arthritis was the prominent radiologic feature of their renal osteodystrophy. In one both knees were involved, and in the other both knees and one wrist. Distal clavicular erosions were present in both, but hands were not radiographically involved. The literature is reviewed in regards other reports of erosive arthritis complicating renal failure. (orig.)

  19. Erosion of surface and near surface disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    A literature search was undertaken to identify existing data and analytical procedures regarding the processes of gully erosion. The applicability of the available information to the problems of gully erosion potential at surface and near surface disposal sites is evaluated. It is concluded that the existing knowledge regarding gully erosion is insufficient to develop procedures to ensure the long-term stability of disposal sites. Recommendations for further research are presented. 46 refs

  20. Can control of soil erosion mitigate water pollution by sediments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickson, R J

    2014-01-15

    The detrimental impact of sediment and associated pollutants on water quality is widely acknowledged, with many watercourses in the UK failing to meet the standard of 'good ecological status'. Catchment sediment budgets show that hill slope erosion processes can be significant sources of waterborne sediment, with rates of erosion likely to increase given predicted future weather patterns. However, linking on-site erosion rates with off-site impacts is complicated because of the limited data on soil erosion rates in the UK and the dynamic nature of the source-pathway-receptor continuum over space and time. Even so, soil erosion control measures are designed to reduce sediment production (source) and mobilisation/transport (pathway) on hill slopes, with consequent mitigation of pollution incidents in watercourses (receptors). The purpose of this paper is to review the scientific evidence of the effectiveness of erosion control measures used in the UK to reduce sediment loads of hill slope origin in watercourses. Although over 73 soil erosion mitigation measures have been identified from the literature, empirical data on erosion control effectiveness are limited. Baseline comparisons for the 18 measures where data do exist reveal erosion control effectiveness is highly variable over time and between study locations. Given the limitations of the evidence base in terms of geographical coverage and duration of monitoring, performance of the different measures cannot be extrapolated to other areas. This uncertainty in effectiveness has implications for implementing erosion/sediment risk reduction policies, where quantified targets are stipulated, as is the case in the EU Freshwater Fish and draft Soil Framework Directives. Also, demonstrating technical effectiveness of erosion control measures alone will not encourage uptake by land managers: quantifying the costs and benefits of adopting erosion mitigation is equally important, but these are uncertain and difficult to

  1. Erosion of nanostructured tungsten by laser ablation, sputtering and arcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogyun Hwangbo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mass loss of nanostructured tungsten, which was formed by helium plasma irradiation, due to laser ablation, sputtering, and arcing was investigated. Below the helium sputtering energy threshold (200eV. Reduction in sputtering on nanostructured surface was observed. Arcing was initiated using laser pulses, and the erosion rate by arcing was measured. The erosion rate increased with arc current, while the erosion per Coulomb was not affected by arc current.

  2. A clinical index for evaluating and monitoring dental erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, I B; Westergaard, J; Stoltze, K

    2000-01-01

    This study describes a new fine-scaled system for classifying initial and advanced dental erosions. The system includes the use of study casts of the teeth in an epoxy resin with an accurate surface reproduction. The severity of erosion on each tooth surface is scored according to six grades of s...... of the oral cavity and are furthermore suitable for data analysis. The system is thereby well-suited for determining etiologic factors and monitoring the progression of erosion over time....

  3. Density Development During Erosion Experiments of Cohesive Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Claus; Larsen, Torben

    1998-01-01

    The density development during erosion experiments was investigated. The calculation of the erosion rate requires the knowledge of the density profile with respect to the consolidation time(Parchure, 1984). At present, the basic assumption in the calculations is that the density profile is achieved...... from consolidation experiments conducted with the same consolidation period (Malta, 1986; Metha and Partheniades, 1979). Furthermore, the density is assumed constant throughout the erosion experiment. Therefore, experiments were conducted in order to investigate this assumption. Kaolinite was used...

  4. Erosion - corrosion mechanisms of stainless steel UNS S31603

    OpenAIRE

    Rajahram, Shiva Suthan

    2010-01-01

    Solid particle erosion-corrosion is the wear caused by the combined action of the mechanical process of solid particle erosion and the electrochemical process of corrosion. This joint action leads to a synergistic interaction that enhances the wear rate of the material, causing severe problems to engineering components exposed to these aggressive conditions. This poses a problem to designers and engineers, as there are currently no robust models available to predict erosion-corrosion rates du...

  5. Choking Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & Prevention Safety and Prevention Immunizations At Home ...

  6. Dust emission and soil loss due to anthropogenic activities by wind erosion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katra, Itzhak; Swet, Nitzan; Tanner, Smadar

    2017-04-01

    Wind erosion is major process of soil loss and air pollution by dust emission of clays, nutrients, and microorganisms. Many soils throughout the world are currently or potentially associated with dust emissions, especially in dryland zones. The research focuses on wind erosion in semi-arid soils (Northern Negev, Israel) that are subjected to increased human activities of urban development and agriculture. A boundary-layer wind tunnel has been used to study dust emission and soil loss by simulation and quantification of high-resolution wind processes. Field experiments were conducted in various surface types of dry loess soils. The experimental plots represent soils with long-term and short term influences of land uses such as agriculture (conventional and organic practices), grazing, and natural preserves. The wind tunnel was operated under various wind velocities that are above the threshold velocity of aeolian erosion. Total soil sediment and particulate matter (PM) fluxes were calculated. Topsoil samples from the experimental plots were analysed in the laboratory for physical and chemical characteristics including aggregation, organic matter, and high-resolution particle size distribution. The results showed variations in dust emission in response to surface types and winds to provide quantitative estimates of soil loss over time. Substantial loss of particulate matter that is management strategies as well as for PM loading to the atmosphere and air pollution.

  7. Materials erosion and redeposition studies at the PISCES-facility: net erosion under redeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Goebel, D.M.; Conn, R.W.; Leung, W.K.; Campbell, G.A.

    1986-05-01

    Simultaneous erosion and redeposition of copper and 304 stainless steel under controlled and continuous plasma (D,He,Ar) bombardment has been investigated in the PISCES-facility, which generates typical edge-plasma conditions of magnetic fusion devices. The plasma bombardment conditions are: incident ion flux in the range from 10 17 to 10 18 ions/sec/cm 2 , ion bombarding energy of 100 eV, electron temperature in the range from 5 to 15 eV, plasma density in the range from 10 11 to 10 13 cm -3 , target temperature in the range from 300 to 900K, and the total ion fluence in the range from 10 20 to 10 22 ions/cm 2 . The net erosion yield under redeposition is found to be significantly smaller than the classical sputtering yield data. A first-order modeling is attempted to interpret the erosion and redeposition behavior of materials under plasma bombardment. It is pointed out both theoretically and experimentally that the mean free path for electron impact ionization of the sputtered material is the key parameter to control the overall mechanism of erosion and redeposition. Strongly modified surface morphologies of bombarded targets are observed and indicate a retrapping effect

  8. Targeting Erosion Control: Adoption of Erosion Control Practices. A Report from a National Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Peter; And Others

    Research analyzed adoption of erosion control practices by farm operators in two counties in each of four states: Alabama, Missouri, Tennessee, and Washington. Analysis was based on farm survey data and technical and financial assistance information from county Soil Conservation Service (SCS) and Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service…

  9. Material erosion and erosion products in disruption simulation experiments at the MK-200 UG facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, N.I.; Bakhtin, V.P.; Kurkin, S.M.; Safronov, V.M.; Toporkov, D.A.; Vasenin, S.G.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.; Wuerz, H. E-mail: hermann.wurz@ihm.fzk.de

    2000-11-01

    Plasma/material interaction was studied in disruption simulation experiments at the plasma gun facility MK-200 UG. Graphite, tungsten and aluminium targets (beryllium-like material) were irradiated by intense plasma streams under heat fluxes typical for international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) hard disruption. Materials were also exposed to radiation emitted by target plasma shields. Surface damage and erosion products were analysed.

  10. Phytoremediation of Atmospheric Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    greenhouse gases produced by human activity are  carbon   dioxide , methane and  nitrous oxide.  Much attention has been directed toward CO2 mitigation...surface  ocean .   Acidification  and ultimately warming due to CO2 alone must be  addressed by removing CO2 from the atmosphere and prevention of further...as a  carbon  and energy source. One soluble MMO (sMMO)  system is expressed by some methanotrophs under conditions of low copper concentration and

  11. Studying groundwater resources and erosion with environmental isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airey, P.L.; Hardy, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    The paper considers environmental radioisotope techniques used to study the dynamics of groundwater resources, the processes of salination, soil erosion and redistribution, and systematic climate changes

  12. A 137Cs erosion model with moving boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Chuan; Ji, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    A novel quantitative model of the relationship between diffused concentration changes and erosion rates using assessment of soil losses was developed. It derived from the analysis of surface soil 137 Cs flux variation under persistent erosion effect and based on the principle of geochemistry kinetics moving boundary. The new moving boundary model improves the basic simplified transport model (Zhang et al., 2008), and mainly applies to uniform rainfall areas which show a long-time soil erosion. The simulation results for this kind of erosion show under a long-time soil erosion, the influence of 137 Cs concentration will decrease exponentially with increasing depth. Using the new model fit to the measured 137 Cs depth distribution data in Zunyi site, Guizhou Province, China which has typical uniform rainfall provided a good fit with R 2  = 0.92. To compare the soil erosion rates calculated by the simple transport model and the new model, we take the Kaixian reference profile as example. The soil losses estimated by the previous simplified transport model are greater than those estimated by the new moving boundary model, which is consistent with our expectations. - Highlights: • The diffused moving boundary principle analysing 137 Cs flux variation. • The new erosion model applies to uniform rainfall areas. • The erosion effect on 137 Cs will decrease exponentially with increasing depth. • The new model provides two methods of calculating erosion rate.

  13. A Spatial Model of Erosion and Sedimentation on Continental Margins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pratson, Lincoln

    1999-01-01

    .... A computer model that simulates the evolution of continental slope morphology under the interaction of sedimentation, slope failure, and sediment flow erosion has been constructed and validated...

  14. The amount of glacial erosion of the bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paasse, Tore

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate an upper bound for the average erosion of fresh bedrock that can reasonably be expected during a glacial period or a single glaciation. The study is based on the assumption that classic sediments, formed by Scandinavian ice erosion during the Quaternary period, still exist within the formerly glaciated area or its periphery. The volume of these sediments thus constitutes the maximum average glacial erosion of bedrock within this area. This volume is calculated by estimating the thickness of the minerogenic Quaternary from well data in Sweden and Denmark and from seismic measurements in adjacent sea areas. The average thickness of the Quaternary deposits and other reogolith in the investigated area was estimated to 16 m. Assuming that the whole volume is the result of glacial erosion of fresh bedrock this corresponds to 12 m depth. However, a great part of the sediments may consist of glacially redistributed Tertiary regolith. As the amount of Tertiary regolith is uncertain the estimated maximum average glacial erosion rate in fresh bedrock is uncertain, and assuming that the total sediment volume is the result of glacial erosion leads to an overestimation of the glacial erosion depth. Considering this, the average glacial erosion during a full glacial period has been estimated to between 0.2 m and 4 m. If the extremes in the made assumptions are excluded the glacial erosion during a glacial cycle can be estimated to about 1 m

  15. The amount of glacial erosion of the bedrock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paasse, Tore [Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate an upper bound for the average erosion of fresh bedrock that can reasonably be expected during a glacial period or a single glaciation. The study is based on the assumption that classic sediments, formed by Scandinavian ice erosion during the Quaternary period, still exist within the formerly glaciated area or its periphery. The volume of these sediments thus constitutes the maximum average glacial erosion of bedrock within this area. This volume is calculated by estimating the thickness of the minerogenic Quaternary from well data in Sweden and Denmark and from seismic measurements in adjacent sea areas. The average thickness of the Quaternary deposits and other reogolith in the investigated area was estimated to 16 m. Assuming that the whole volume is the result of glacial erosion of fresh bedrock this corresponds to 12 m depth. However, a great part of the sediments may consist of glacially redistributed Tertiary regolith. As the amount of Tertiary regolith is uncertain the estimated maximum average glacial erosion rate in fresh bedrock is uncertain, and assuming that the total sediment volume is the result of glacial erosion leads to an overestimation of the glacial erosion depth. Considering this, the average glacial erosion during a full glacial period has been estimated to between 0.2 m and 4 m. If the extremes in the made assumptions are excluded the glacial erosion during a glacial cycle can be estimated to about 1 m.

  16. Distribution of erosion and deposition on the JET belt limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, G.M.; Goodall, D.H.J.; Behrisch, R.; Roth, J.; Coad, J.P.; Harbour, P.; Kock, L. de; Pick, M.A.; Stangeby, P.C.

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of erosion and deposition of limiter material is of importance both for extrapolating to the next generation of fusion machines and for understanding impurity transport in the boundary layers of present day tokamaks. Erosion patterns have previously been reported for the JET discrete graphite limiters used up to 1986. We have now made measurements on the belt limiters used in 1987-88. These measurements show that although the pattern of net erosion is qualitatively similar to the earlier results the new maximum erosion (∼40μm) is reduced by about a factor 5, consistent with the larger limiter surface area. (author) 7 refs., 2 figs

  17. Sediment and Cavitation Erosion Studies through Dam Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of sediment and cavitation erosion through Tunnel 2 and Tunnel 3 of Tarbela Dam in Pakistan. Main bend and main branch of Tunnel 2 and outlet 1 and outlet 3 of Tunnel 3 are concluded to be critical for cavitation and sediment erosion. Studies are also performed for increased sediments flow rate, concluding 5 kg/sec as the critical value for sudden increase in erosion rate density. Erosion rate is concluded to be the function of sediment flow rate and head condition. Particulate mass presently observed is reasonably low, hence presently not affecting the velocity and the flow field.

  18. Solid particle erosion and viscoelastic properties of thermoplastic polyurethanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Arena

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The wear resistance of several thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPUs having different chemical nature and micronscale arrangement of the hard and soft segments has been investigated by means of erosion and abrasion tests. The goal was correlating the erosion performances of the materials to their macroscopic mechanical properties. Unlike conventional tests, such as hardness and tensile measurements, viscoelastic analysis proved to be a valuable tool to study the erosion resistance of TPUs. In particular, a strict correlation was found between the erosion rate and the high-frequency (~107 Hz loss modulus. The latter reflects the actual ability of TPU to dissipate the impact energy of the erodent particles.

  19. An appraisal of river erosion mitigation in the Niger Delta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aban, T. K. S.; Omuso, W. O.

    1999-01-01

    River erosion processes in the Niger Delta and the effectiveness of locally applied remedial measures is appraised, using information on channel geometry, flow velocity distribution, soil type, stratification, bank height and steepness, state of compaction, together with pool level variation in river channels. High flow velocity and bank height were identified as the major erosion causative factors. Local responses towards erosion mitigation have involved structural methods to varying degree of success. River training has been recommended as a long - term regional approach to mitigate river bank erosion. However, in the short -term revetments, concrete and sheets piles may be applied cautiously

  20. A combined CFD-experimental method for developing an erosion equation for both gas-sand and liquid-sand flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Amir

    The surface degradation of equipment due to consecutive impacts of abrasive particles carried by fluid flow is called solid particle erosion. Solid particle erosion occurs in many industries including oil and gas. In order to prevent abrupt failures and costly repairs, it is essential to predict the erosion rate and identify the locations of the equipment that are mostly at risk. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a powerful tool for predicting the erosion rate. Erosion prediction using CFD analysis includes three steps: (1) obtaining flow solution, (2) particle tracking and calculating the particle impact speed and angle, and (3) relating the particle impact information to mass loss of material through an erosion equation. Erosion equations are commonly generated using dry impingement jet tests (sand-air), since the particle impact speed and angle are assumed not to deviate from conditions in the jet. However, in slurry flows, a wide range of particle impact speeds and angles are produced in a single slurry jet test with liquid and sand particles. In this study, a novel and combined CFD/experimental method for developing an erosion equation in slurry flows is presented. In this method, a CFD analysis is used to characterize the particle impact speed, angle, and impact rate at specific locations on the test sample. Then, the particle impact data are related to the measured erosion depth to achieve an erosion equation from submerged testing. Traditionally, it was assumed that the erosion equation developed based on gas testing can be used for both gas-sand and liquid-sand flows. The erosion equations developed in this work were implemented in a CFD code, and CFD predictions were validated for various test conditions. It was shown that the erosion equation developed based on slurry tests can significantly improve the local thickness loss prediction in slurry flows. Finally, a generalized erosion equation is proposed which can be used to predict the erosion rate in

  1. Soil deflation analyses from wind erosion events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Lackóová

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There are various methods to assess soil erodibility for wind erosion. This paper focuses on aggregate analysis by a laser particle sizer ANALYSETTE 22 (FRITSCH GmbH, made to determine the size distribution of soil particles detached by wind (deflated particles. Ten soil samples, trapped along the same length of the erosion surface (150–155 m but at different wind speeds, were analysed. The soil was sampled from a flat, smooth area without vegetation cover or soil crust, not affected by the impact of windbreaks or other barriers, from a depth of maximum 2.5 cm. Prior to analysis the samples were prepared according to the relevant specifications. An experiment was also conducted using a device that enables characterisation of the vertical movement of the deflated material. The trapped samples showed no differences in particle size and the proportions of size fractions at different hourly average wind speeds. It was observed that most of particles travelling in saltation mode (size 50–500 μm – 58–70% – moved vertically up to 26 cm above the soil surface. At greater heights, particles moving in suspension mode (floating in the air; size < 100 μm accounted for up to 90% of the samples. This result suggests that the boundary between the two modes of the vertical movement of deflated soil particles lies at about 25 cm above the soil surface.

  2. EROSIVE PROCESSES AT BACANGA STATE PARK AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francicléia Vieira Ribeiro

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The conservation measures of the areas reached by irrational way of exploration were adopted in the attempt to preserve the Brazilian ecosystems. There are many Conservation Units, where (theorically the nature has larger possibilities to resist the human aggressions.In Maranhão there are 10 Conservation Units, two Federal ones and 8 State ones. The state park of Bacanga, which is the object of this work, is a State Conservation Unit located in Maranhão Island founded in 1980 and its objective is to preserve the flora, the fauna and the local springs.Despite the importance of the local ecosystem and the supervision of the responsible institutions, the real predatory actions in the area reflect the lack of ecologic conscience from who attacks the Nature extracting in a criminal way its natural resources.The environment degradation is evident when the erosive processes intensified by the human activities are observed in the local like: removal of the vegetation, the use of the agricultural practice, the urbanism, among others. Those acellerated erosive processes have reached specially the geomorphology of the Park. The silting of the river, the gullies and ravines have standed out in this sceneny of degradation of the soils.This work deals with enviromental problems caused by the human interference that influence directly in the equilibrium of local ecosystem.

  3. Study on the evaluation of erosion damage by using laser ultrasonic integrated with a wavelet analysis technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, T.; Naoe, T.; Wakui, T.; Futakawa, M.; Obayashi, H.; Sasa, T.

    2017-05-01

    Spallation targets are the key components of accelerator driven systems (ADSs) that are being developed in the world. Erosion damages on the target vessels are anticipated. To prevent accidents occurrence due to erosion of spallation target vessel, the damage evaluation technique is desirable. The excited vibration of LBE target vessel will be monitored remotely to establish the technique. In this study, the basic researches were carried out through experiments and numerical simulations to investigate the interaction between ultrasonic waves and damage to understand the correlation between structural vibration and damage degree. Specimens with distributed erosion damage was irradiated by laser shots, and the vibration was detected by a laser vibrometer subsequently. A technique, Wavelet Differential Analysis (WDA), was developed to quantitatively and clearly indicate the differences caused by damage in the vibration signals. The results illustrated that the developed technique is sensitive to erosion damage with small size and is capable of quantitatively evaluating erosion damage. It is expected that the developed techniques can be applied to monitor the real spallation targets in the future.

  4. The Effect of pH on Slurry Erosion-Corrosion of Tungsten Carbide Overlays Alloyed with Ru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelwalani, Ndivhuwo B.; van der Merwe, Josias W.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of Ru additions to WC-Fe overlays when exposed to low pH slurry erosion conditions. These overlays were applied through Plasma Transferred Arc, and the original bulk Ru powder concentrations varied from 0.5 to 5 wt.%. A slurry jet impingement erosion-corrosion test rig was used to evaluate wear, and electrochemical measurements were performed to characterize the corrosion properties. The slurry mixtures contained silica sand and synthetic mine water. The pH was varied between 3 and 6.5 for the slurry erosion tests and lowered further for the corrosion characterization. Samples were examined optically and with a scanning electron microscope using energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the phases present. For the slurry erosion-corrosion results at the pH of 6.5, addition of Ru did not show a decrease in erosion-corrosion rates. However, when the pH was decreased to 3, by the addition of HCl, Ru improved the resistance. From the electrochemistry, it was also clear that Ru additions improved the corrosion resistance, but more than 1 wt.% Ru was required. At very low pH levels, the presence of Ru was not able to prevent corrosion.

  5. The Effect of pH on Slurry Erosion-Corrosion of Tungsten Carbide Overlays Alloyed with Ru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelwalani, Ndivhuwo B.; van der Merwe, Josias W.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of Ru additions to WC-Fe overlays when exposed to low pH slurry erosion conditions. These overlays were applied through Plasma Transferred Arc, and the original bulk Ru powder concentrations varied from 0.5 to 5 wt.%. A slurry jet impingement erosion-corrosion test rig was used to evaluate wear, and electrochemical measurements were performed to characterize the corrosion properties. The slurry mixtures contained silica sand and synthetic mine water. The pH was varied between 3 and 6.5 for the slurry erosion tests and lowered further for the corrosion characterization. Samples were examined optically and with a scanning electron microscope using energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the phases present. For the slurry erosion-corrosion results at the pH of 6.5, addition of Ru did not show a decrease in erosion-corrosion rates. However, when the pH was decreased to 3, by the addition of HCl, Ru improved the resistance. From the electrochemistry, it was also clear that Ru additions improved the corrosion resistance, but more than 1 wt.% Ru was required. At very low pH levels, the presence of Ru was not able to prevent corrosion.

  6. Atmosphere: Power, Critique, Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    This paper hans three interrelated parts. First, atmosphere is approached through the concept of power. Atmospheres 'grip' us directly or mediate power indirectly by manipulating moods and evoking emotions. How does atmosphere relate to different conceptions of power? Second, atmospheric powers may...... be critiqued. Which conception of critique can be involved? Third, critiquing atmospheric powers can generate political conflict. How does atmospheric disputes relate to conceptions of politics and the political?...

  7. Land rehabilitation, erosion and C sequestration in soils of the Chinese Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Van Oost, Kristof; Quine, Tim; Govers, Gerard

    2013-04-01

    Once the cradle of Chinese civilization, the Chinese loess plateau is now one of the most degraded ecosystems in the world and a wide range of ecological rehabilitation programs have been implemented since the 1950s that aim at facilitating synergies between soil conservation, food production and socio-economic welfare. More recently, the scope of vegetation restoration programs has been extended to include sequestration of C by soils and the reconversion of 4.8 million ha of cropland to forest and grassland has re-sequestered a substantial amount of C in soils between 2000 and 2008. Although this appears to represent a significant win-win, these estimates are associated with considerable uncertainty both due to the extrapolation and, significantly, because of the assumptions made about the pre-restoration state. Here, we argue that a full assessment of the C sequestration benefit of land rehabilitation programs requires quantification not only of the C uptake in vegetation and plants under the new land use regime (as has been undertaken), but also of the soil atmosphere C exchange associated with the elevated erosion rates that typify the pre-restoration state. We present the results of an intensive measurement campaign to characterize the erosional control on vertical carbon fluxes from degraded land, typical of the pre-restoration state. We report year-round soil respiration (in the absence of vegetation) measurements with high temporal resolution along an erosion gradient on cultivated sloping land in the Chinese Loess Plateau. At 14 sites along an eroding cultivated slope, we quantified the temporal dynamics of soil CO2 fluxes using an Automated Soil CO2 Flux System. This resulted in 13296 respiration measurements between April 2007 and September 2008. We investigate the factors controlling in-situ soil respiration, including soil temperature, moisture, soil erosion and SOC stock and quality. Soil and, by inference, C erosion and deposition since 1954 were

  8. NASA Glenn/AADC Collaboration Optimized Erosion Coatings for Inlet Guide Vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, James K.; Leissler, George; Horan, Richard

    2002-01-01

    There is a need for lightweight, durable materials and structures to reduce the weight of propulsion systems. Polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are promising materials for aerospace applications because of their high strength-to-weight ratio relative to metals. Unfortunately, they are limited to applications where they are not exposed to hightemperature oxidizing atmospheres and/or particulates from ingested air. This is because oxidation and erosion occur on the surface, leading to weight loss, nodulation, and/or cracking on the surface, and a consequent decline of mechanical properties over time. Although prior research has shown that oxidation can be slowed when metallic or ceramic coatings are applied onto PMC's, there remains a need for erosion-resistant coatings that protect PMC's from high-velocity particulates in the engine flow path. These erosionresistant coatings could extend the life of polymer composites. Polymer composites are heavily damaged without an erosion-resistant coating because they are not as hard as metallic engine structures. The effectiveness and life of the coatings depends on their inherent properties as well as on the interaction between the coating and the PMC. Since polymers, in general, have high thermal expansion coefficients in comparison to metals and ceramics, failure of the coatings often occurs at this interface. The objective of this research is to develop strategies to improve this interface and tailor overlays for erosion resistance. The bondcoat, which was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, is composed of zinc blended with polyimides to improve the compatibility between the PMC and the overlay material. Initial coating trials at AADC produced vanes that had poor bonding between the overlay and bondcoats. Subsequently, Glenn successfully demonstrated that high-quality plasma-sprayed erosion coating systems could be applied to these guide vanes. Inlet guide vanes from AE 3007 engines fiber composites were coated

  9. Pucker up: the effects of sour candy on your patients' oral health. A review of the dental erosion literature and pH values for popular candies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robyn, R Loewen; Robert, J Marolt; John, D Ruby

    2008-01-01

    Although the harmful effects of acidic beverages on teeth have been well established and communicated through a variety of clinical articles and public education pieces, the Minnesota Dental Association's Public Relations Committee has determined that the new and emerging concern of the erosive effects of sour candy on the dentition should be brought to the attention of dental professionals and the public alike. Furthermore, since the serious irreversible damage caused by erosion is difficult and costly to treat, early detection and the initiation of preventive strategies are paramount to minimizing long-term consequences. The following article should serve as a review of the general topic of erosion, and should provide additional information about the increasing prevalence of erosion and the specific risks of sour candy consumption.

  10. An investigation of bergmounds as analogs to erosion control factors on protective barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamness, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    Included in several of the final disposal strategies proposed in the Interim Hanford Waste Management Plan (DOE-RL 1986a) is design of a protective barrier to isolate the underlying waste sites from the environment. The conceptual protective barrier design requires a fine-grained sediment to retain precipitation near the top of the barrier where evapotranspiration can recycle the moisture back into the atmosphere. The design incorporates gravel into the topsoil as one way to reduce its erosion. Information is needed to determine the optimal ratio of gravel to topsoil needed to reduce erosion without significantly reducing evapotranspiration, and its effect on erosion. Bergmounds are mounds with a gravelly surface that were formed about 13,000 years ago and represent natural analogs to the topsoil portion of the protective barrier. The primary goal of this study was to identify characteristics of bergmounds and the effects of these characteristics, especially the gravelly surface, on the amount and rate of erosion. A secondary goal was to apply a technique normally used to estimate vegetation cover to measure percent gravel cover, and to compare this technique with particle size distribution based on weight percent. Four bergmounds were investigated for this study, two in a windy site and two in a more sheltered site. Each bergmound was sampled in eight locations. Two methods were used to estimate the amount of surface gravel: the ocular point-intercept method which estimates the percent gravel cover, and sieved samples of the surface sediments which measure the percent gravel by weight. Holes were dug at each bergmound's eight sampling sites to examine and sample the subsurface sediments

  11. New GEOPHYSICAL MAPPING of the CHUKCHI MARGIN reveals widespread GLACIAL EROSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, D.; Polyak, L. V.; Coakley, B.

    2012-12-01

    Multibeam bathymetry, multi-channel, and chirp seismic data were acquired in a broad grid from R/V Marcus G. Langseth in September, 2011 over the outer Chukchi shelf, Chukchi Rise, Northwind Basin, and Northwind Ridge at water depths between 40 to 4,000 m. In the bathymetric data, iceberg scouring is dominant at depths less than 350 m, and multiple glacigenic bedforms are observed on the top and slopes (350-900 m) of Chukchi Rise and Borderland. The distribution mega-scale glacial lineations and ice-marginal moraines reveal a complex erosional history. The glacial lineations record two patterns of erosion which are likely formed by local and Laurentide sourced ice streams, recurrent over several glacial episodes. In the areas affected by glacial erosion, the chirp sub-bottom data reveal multiple sedimentary units including: well stratified post and inter-glacial deposits, transparent units interpreted as deformable tills, lenticular and fan shaped units interpreted as ice-marginal features and re-deposited sediments, and pre-glacial strata. A broadly observed buried erosional surface(s) exhibits high-frequency scouring and broad channelling also reveals multiple episodes of glacial erosion. A deeper erosional channel observed in the multi-channel seismic data is tunnel-valley like in form, and may be genetically linked to the large, buried erosional/drainage channels recently observed in the Bering Sea. The data obtained suggest that a Pleistocene ice sheet(s) existed on the northern Chukchi Shelf, and supports earlier conclusions of multiple erosions of the Borderland by SE-NW trending ice flows. The data greatly expand our knowledge on the Quaternary history of the Chukchi-Beringian region, and raise further questions about: the interaction of ice masses from the Laurentide, and potentially Chukchi and East-Siberian Shelf ice sheets, the glacio-isostatic history in the Bering region, and the implications for oceanic and atmospheric circulation, especially the

  12. Surface erosion and sedimentation caused by ejecta from the lunar crater Tycho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkuratov, Y.; Basilevsky, A.; Kaydash, V.; Ivanov, B.; Korokhin, V.; Videen, G.

    2018-02-01

    We use Kaguya MI images acquired at wavelengths 415, 750, and 950 nm to map TiO2 and FeO content and the parameter of optical maturity OMAT in lunar regions Lubiniezky E and Taurus-Littrow with a spatial resolution of 20 m using the Lucey method [Lucey et al., JGR 2000, 105. 20,297]. We show that some ejecta from large craters, such as Tycho and Copernicus may cause lunar surface erosion, transportation of the eroded material and its sedimentation. The traces of the erosion resemble wind tails observed on Earth, Mars, and Venus, although the Moon has no atmosphere. The highland material of the local topographic prominences could be mobilized by Tycho's granolometrically fine ejecta and caused by its transportation along the ejecta way to adjacent mare areas and subsequent deposition. The tails of mobilized material reveal lower abundances of Ti and Fe than the surrounding mare surface. We have concluded that high-Ti streaks also seen in the Lubiniezky E site, which show unusual combinations of the TiO2 and FeO content on the correlation diagram, could be the result of erosion by Tycho's ejecta too. In these locations, Tycho's material did not form a consolidated deposit, but resulted in erosion of the mare surface material that became intermixed, consequently, diluting the ejecta. The Taurus-Littrow did provide evidence of the mechanical effect of Tycho's ejecta on the local landforms (landslide, secondary craters) and do not show the compositional signature of Tycho's ejecta probably due to intermixing with local materials and dilution.

  13. A closer look at the ductile-brittle transition in solid particle erosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensink, H.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2002-01-01

    Two types of solid particle erosion are often distinguished: brittle erosion and ductile erosion. In the first case, material is removed by crack formation (maximum erosion at 90° impact angle), in the latter case by cutting and ploughing (maximum erosion around 30° impact angle). When very low

  14. Development of an Integrated Water and Wind Erosion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, D. C.; Ascough, J. C.; Wagner, L. E.; Geter, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Prediction technologies for soil erosion by the forces of wind or water have largely been developed independently from one another, especially within the United States. Much of this has been due to the initial creation of equations and models which were empirical in nature (i.e., Universal Soil Loss Equation, Wind Erosion Equation) and based upon separate water erosion or wind erosion plot and field measurements. Additionally, institutional organizations in place typically divided research efforts and funding to unique wind or water erosion research and modeling projects. However, during the past 20 years computer technologies and erosion modeling have progressed to the point where it is now possible to merge physical process-based computer simulation models into an integrated water and wind erosion prediction system. In a physically- based model, many of the processes which must be simulated for wind and water erosion computations are the same, e.g., climate, water balance, runoff, plant growth, etc. Model components which specifically deal with the wind or water detachment, transport and deposition processes are those that must differ, as well as any necessary parameterization of input variables (e.g., adjusted soil erodibilities, critical shear stresses, etc.) for those components. This presentation describes current efforts towards development of a combined wind and water erosion model, based in part upon technologies present in the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) and the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) models. Initial efforts during the past two years have resulted in modular modeling components that allow for prediction of infiltration, surface runoff, and water erosion at a hillslope scale within an Object Modeling System. Additional components currently in development include wind detachment at a single field point, continuous water balance, and unified plant growth. Challenges in this project are many, and include adequate field

  15. Spatial bedrock erosion distribution in a natural gorge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, A. R.; Turowski, J. M.; Kirchner, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of morphological evolution both in terrestrial and planetary landscapes is of increasing interest in the geosciences. In mountainous regions, bedrock channel formation as a consequence of the interaction of uplift and erosion processes is fundamental for the entire surface evolution. Hence, the accurate description of bedrock channel development is important for landscape modelling. To verify existing concepts developed in the lab and to analyse how in situ channel erosion rates depend on the interrelations of discharge, sediment transport and topography, there is a need of highly resolved topographic field data. We analyse bedrock erosion over two years in a bedrock gorge downstream of the Gorner glacier above the town of Zermatt, Switzerland. At the study site, the Gornera stream cuts through a roche moutonnée in serpentine rock of 25m length, 5m width and 8m depth. We surveyed bedrock erosion rates using repeat terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) with an average point spacing of 5mm. Bedrock erosion rates in direction of the individual surface normals were studied directly on the scanned point clouds applying the M3C2 algorithm (Lague et al., 2013, ISPRS). The surveyed erosion patterns were compared to a simple stream erosivity visualisation obtained from painted bedrock sections at the study location. Spatially distributed erosion rates on bedrock surfaces based on millions of scan points allow deduction of millimeter-scale mean annual values of lateral erosion, incision and downstream erosion on protruding streambed surfaces. The erosion rate on a specific surface point is shown to depend on the position of this surface point in the channel's cross section, its height above the streambed and its spatial orientation to the streamflow. Abrasion by impacting bedload was likely the spatially dominant erosion process, as confirmed by the observed patterns along the painted bedrock sections. However, a single plucking event accounted for the half

  16. Rainfall erosivity factor estimation in Republic of Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castraveš, Tudor; Kuhn, Nikolaus

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall erosivity represents a measure of the erosive force of rainfall. Typically, it is expressed as variable such as the R factor in the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) (Wischmeier and Smith, 1965, 1978) or its derivates. The rainfall erosivity index for a rainfall event (EI30) is calculated from the total kinetic energy and maximum 30 minutes intensity of individual events. However, these data are often unavailable for wide regions and countries. Usually, there are three issues regarding precipitation data: low temporal resolution, low spatial density and limited access to the data. This is especially true for some of postsoviet countries from Eastern Europe, such as Republic of Moldova, where soil erosion is a real and persistent problem (Summer, 2003) and where soils represents the main natural resource of the country. Consequently, researching and managing soil erosion is particularly important. The purpose of this study is to develop a model based on commonly available rainfall data, such as event, daily or monthly amounts, to calculate rainfall erosivity for the territory of Republic of Moldova. Rainfall data collected during 1994-2015 period at 15 meteorological stations in the Republic of Moldova, with 10 minutes temporal resolution, were used to develop and calibrate a model to generate an erosivity map of Moldova. References 1. Summer, W., (2003). Soil erosion in the Republic of Moldova — the importance of institutional arrangements. Erosion Prediction in Ungauged Basins: Integrating Methods and Techniques (Proceedings of symposium HS01 held during IUGG2003 at Sapporo. July 2003). IAHS Publ. no. 279. 2. Wischmeier, W.H., and Smith, D.D. (1965). Predicting rainfall-erosion losses from cropland east of the Rocky Mountains. Agr. Handbook No. 282, U.S. Dept. Agr., Washington, DC 3. Wischmeier, W.H., and Smith, D.D. (1978). Predicting rainfall erosion losses. Agr. handbook No. 537, U.S. Dept. of Agr., Science and Education Administration.

  17. Effects of Bedrock Landsliding on Cosmogenically Determined Erosion Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Nathan; Oskin, Mike; Burbank, Douglas; Heimsath, Arjun

    2005-01-01

    The successful quantification of long-term erosion rates underpins our understanding of landscape. formation, the topographic evolution of mountain ranges, and the mass balance within active orogens. The measurement of in situ-produced cosmogenic radionuclides (CRNs) in fluvial and alluvial sediments is perhaps the method with the greatest ability to provide such long-term erosion rates. In active orogens, however, deep-seated bedrock landsliding is an important erosional process, the effect of which on CRN-derived erosion rates is largely unquantified. We present a numerical simulation of cosmogenic nuclide production and distribution in landslide-dominated catchments to address the effect of bedrock landsliding on cosmogenic erosion rates in actively eroding landscapes. Results of the simulation indicate that the temporal stability of erosion rates determined from CRN concentrations in sediment decreases with increased ratios of landsliding to sediment detachment rates within a given catchment area, and that larger catchment areas must be sampled with increased frequency of landsliding in order to accurately evaluate long-term erosion rates. In addition, results of this simulation suggest that sediment sampling for CRNs is the appropriate method for determining long-term erosion rates in regions dominated by mass-wasting processes, while bedrock surface sampling for CRNs is generally an ineffective means of determining long-term erosion rates. Response times of CRN concentrations to changes in erosion rate indicate that climatically driven cycles of erosion may be detected relatively quickly after such changes occur, but that complete equilibration of CRN concentrations to new erosional conditions may take tens of thousands of years. Simulation results of CRN erosion rates are compared with a new, rich dataset of CRN concentrations from the Nepalese Himalaya, supporting conclusions drawn from the simulation.

  18. Integrated universal soil loss equation (USLE and Geographical Information System (GIS for soil erosion estimation in A Sap basin: Central Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung Gia Pham

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Central Vietnam is very susceptible to soil erosion due to its complicated terrain and heavy rainfall. The objective of this study was to quantify soil erosion in the A Sap river basin, A Luoi district, Thua Thien Hue Province, Vietnam, using the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE and Geographical Information System (GIS. The results showed that 34% of land area lost accumulated to 10 t ha−1 year−1 while 47% of the total area lost less than 1 t ha−1 year−1. Natural forest land lost the most with an average of about 19 t ha−1 year−1, followed by plantation forest with approximately 7 t ha−1 year−1 and other agricultural lands at 3.70 and 1.45 t ha−1 year−1 for yearly crops and paddy rice, respectively. Soil erosion was most sensitive to the topographic factor (LS, followed by the practice support factor (P, soil erodibility factor (K, cropping management (C, and the rainfall erosivity factor (R. Implications are that changes to the cultivated calendar and implementing intercropping are effective ways to prevent soil erosion in cultivated lands. Furthermore, introducing broad leaves trees for mountainous areas in A Sap basin was the most effective practice in reducing soil erosion. The study also pointed out that the combination of available data sources used with the USLE and GIS technology is a viable option to calculate soil erosion in Central Vietnam, which would allow targeted attention toward a solution is to reduce future soil erosion. Keywords: Central Vietnam, GIS, Soil erosion, USLE

  19. Mercury erosion experiments for spallation target system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Kaminaga, Masanori; Haga, Katsuhiro; Hino, Ryutaro

    2003-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) are promoting a plan to construct the spallation neutron source at the Tokai Research Establishment, JAERI, under the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC). A mercury circulation system has been designed so as to supply mercury to the target stably under the rated flow rate of 41 m 3 /hr. Then, it was necessary to confirm a mercury pump performance from the viewpoint of making the mercury circulation system feasible, and more, to investigate erosion rate under the mercury flow as well as an amount of mercury remained on the surface after drain from the viewpoints of mechanical strength relating to the lifetime and remote handling of mercury components. The mercury pump performance was tested under the mercury flow conditions by using an experimental gear pump, which had almost the same structure as a practical mercury pump to be expected in the mercury circulation system, and the erosion rates in a mercury pipeline as well as the amount of mercury remained on the surface were also investigated. The discharged flow rates of the experimental gear pump increased linearly with the rotation speed, so that the gear pump would work as the flow meter. Erosion rates obtained under the mercury velocity less than 1.6 m/s was found to be so small that decrease of pipeline wall thickness would be 390 μm after 30-year operation under the rated mercury velocity of 0.7 m/s. For the amount of remaining mercury on the pipeline, remaining rates of weight and volume were estimated at 50.7 g/m 2 and 3.74 Hg-cm 3 /m 2 , respectively. Applying these remaining rates of weight and volume to the mercury target, the remaining mercury was estimated at about 106.5 g and 7.9 cm 3 . Radioactivity of this remaining mercury volume was found to be three-order lower than that of the target casing. (author)

  20. Numerical simulation of backward erosion piping in heterogeneous fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yue; Yeh, Tian-Chyi Jim; Wang, Yu-Li; Liu, Mingwei; Wang, Junjie; Hao, Yonghong

    2017-04-01

    Backward erosion piping (BEP) is one of the major causes of seepage failures in levees. Seepage fields dictate the BEP behaviors and are influenced by the heterogeneity of soil properties. To investigate the effects of the heterogeneity on the seepage failures, we develop a numerical algorithm and conduct simulations to study BEP progressions in geologic media with spatially stochastic parameters. Specifically, the void ratio e, the hydraulic conductivity k, and the ratio of the particle contents r of the media are represented as the stochastic variables. They are characterized by means and variances, the spatial correlation structures, and the cross correlation between variables. Results of the simulations reveal that the heterogeneity accelerates the development of preferential flow paths, which profoundly increase the likelihood of seepage failures. To account for unknown heterogeneity, we define the probability of the seepage instability (PI) to evaluate the failure potential of a given site. Using Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS), we demonstrate that the PI value is significantly influenced by the mean and the variance of ln k and its spatial correlation scales. But the other parameters, such as means and variances of e and r, and their cross correlation, have minor impacts. Based on PI analyses, we introduce a risk rating system to classify the field into different regions according to risk levels. This rating system is useful for seepage failures prevention and assists decision making when BEP occurs.

  1. Toothbrushing after an erosive attack: will waiting avoid tooth wear?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussi, Adrian; Lussi, Jonas; Carvalho, Thiago S; Cvikl, Barbara

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if storage for up to 4 h in human saliva results in a decrease of erosive tooth wear (ETW) and in an increase of surface microhardness (SMH) of enamel samples after an erosive attack with subsequent abrasion. Furthermore, we determined the impact of individual salivary parameters on ETW and SMH. Enamel samples were distributed into five groups: group 1 had neither erosion nor saliva treatment; groups 2-5 were treated with erosion, then group 2 was placed in a humid chamber and groups 3-5 were incubated in saliva for 30 min, 2 h, and 4 h, respectively. After erosion and saliva treatments, all groups were treated with abrasion. Surface microhardness and ETW were measured before and after erosion, incubation in saliva, and abrasion. Surface microhardness and ETW showed significant changes throughout the experiment: SMH decreased and ETW increased in groups 2-5, regardless of the length of incubation in saliva. The results of groups 3-5 (exposed to saliva) were not significantly different from those of group 2 (not exposed to saliva). Exposure of eroded enamel to saliva for up to 4 h was not able to increase SMH or reduce ETW. However, additional experiments with artificial saliva without proteins showed protection from erosive tooth wear. The recommendation to postpone toothbrushing of enamel after an erosive attack should be reconsidered. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  2. Challenges in soil erosion research and prediction model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantification of soil erosion has been traditionally considered as a surface hydrologic process with equations for soil detachment and sediment transport derived from the mechanics and hydraulics of the rainfall and surface flow. Under the current erosion modeling framework, the soil has a constant...

  3. Simulating climate change impact on soil erosion using RUSLE ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Climate change, particularly due to the changed precipitation trend, can have a severe impact on soil erosion. The effect is more pronounced on the higher slopes of the Himalayan region. The goal of this study was to estimate the impact of climate change on soil erosion in a watershed of the Himalayan region using ...

  4. Geospatial application of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. C. Flanagan; J. R. Frankenberger; T. A. Cochrane; C. S. Renschler; W. J. Elliot

    2011-01-01

    The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model is a process-based technology for prediction of soil erosion by water at hillslope profile, field, and small watershed scales. In particular, WEPP utilizes observed or generated daily climate inputs to drive the surface hydrology processes (infiltration, runoff, ET) component, which subsequently impacts the rest of the...

  5. Erosion, sedimentation, and cumulative effects in the Northern Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter F. Megahan; John G. King

    2004-01-01

    Erosion and sedimentation are natural geomorphic processes characterized by large temporal and spatial variability. Recent radionuclide studies suggest that rare episodic events, such as large wildfires, produce massive sediment yields over time scales of thousands of years, thereby causing long-term average sediment production to exceed present-day average erosion...

  6. Grass seeding as a control for roadbank erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.G. Wollum

    1962-01-01

    Grass, seeded on a steep roadcut in western Oregon, reduced erosion but caused increased surface runoff during a 3-year period of observation. These results were obtained at H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest from a study designed to measure effectiveness of grass in controlling soil erosion from exposed roadbanks. Additional measurements for varying soil types will be...

  7. Using rainfall simulators to test wood shreddings for erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Gronier; Randy Foltz; Charlie Showers

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service is considering alternative methods of erosion control when constructing roads, decommissioning roads, protecting lands burned by wildland fires, and reclaiming lands disturbed by other activities. This article is the second in a series of tech tips that discuss the use of wood shreddings for erosion control. The first...

  8. Dental approach to erosive tooth wear in gastroesophageal reflux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-02

    Jun 2, 2014 ... Abstract. Background: The duration of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), the frequency of reflux, the pH and type of acid, and the quality and quantity of saliva affect the severity of dental erosion due to GERD. Objective: To ... Some medications cause salivary hypofunction and dental erosion; drugs ...

  9. Simulating Climate Change Impact on Soil Erosion using RUSLE ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    30

    station). This projected rainfall data was used to compute projected rainfall erosivity and further estimate the soil erosion employing RUSLE model over the three periods: 2020 (2011-2040),. 2050 (2041-2070), 2080 (2071-2099). The study will provide a preliminary evaluation of the potential impact of future climate change ...

  10. Silt fences: An economical technique for measuring hillslope soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter R. Robichaud; Robert E. Brown

    2002-01-01

    Measuring hillslope erosion has historically been a costly, time-consuming practice. An easy to install low-cost technique using silt fences (geotextile fabric) and tipping bucket rain gauges to measure onsite hillslope erosion was developed and tested. Equipment requirements, installation procedures, statistical design, and analysis methods for measuring hillslope...

  11. Erosion over time on severely disturbed granitic soils: a model

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. F. Megahan

    1974-01-01

    A negative exponential equation containing three parameters was derived to describe time trends in surface erosion on severely disturbed soils. Data from four different studies of surface erosion on roads constructed from the granitic materials found in the Idaho Batholith were used to develop equation parameters. The evidence suggests that surface "armoring...

  12. Soil erosion and management activities on forested slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1986-01-01

    Some of the most productive forests in the Western United States grow on marginally stable mountainous slopes, where disturbance increases the likelihood of erosion. Much of the public's concern about, and, consequently, most of the research on, erosion from these forested areas is related more to the degradation of stream resources by eroded material than to the...

  13. Evaluation of erosion control techniques on forest roads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnny M. Grace; Bob Rummer; Bryce J. Stokes; J. Wilhoit

    1998-01-01

    The cutslope and fillslope on a newly constructed forest road on the Talladega National Forest near Heflin, AL were treated with three erosion control techniques: wood excelsior erosion mat, native grass species, and exotic grass species. Bare soil plots were used as the experimental controls. Total sediment yield was measured during the period 21 September 1995 to 18...

  14. Erosive wear of selected materials for fossil energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, Thomas A.; Rawers, James C.; Tylczak, Joseph H.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    A number of materials have been evaluated to determine their erosion resistance for fossil energy applications. This is part of a larger program to study wear and corrosion at Albany Research Center. This paper will present the results for some of these materials, including FeAl, FeAl cermets, WC-Co cemented carbides, Si3N4-MoSi2, Si3N4, Stellite 6B, white cast irons and 440C steel. Trends in erosion rates due to material properties and erosive conditions will be presented. FeAl cermets performed well compared to the WC-Co cemented carbides. The interparticle spacing of the WC-Co cemented carbides correlated with the erosion rate. The erosion rate of the WC-Co cemented carbides decreased as the interparticle spacing decreased. It is important to realize that erosion resistance is not an intrinsic material property, but is a system response. A change in the wear environment can significantly alter the relative rankings of materials with respect to their wear rate. For example, at relatively low velocities, the carbides in the white cast irons are more erosion resistant than the matrix, while at higher velocities the matrix is more erosion resistant.

  15. Modeling soil erosion and transport on forest landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge Sun; Steven G McNulty

    1998-01-01

    Century-long studies on the impacts of forest management in North America suggest sediment can cause major reduction on stream water quality. Soil erosion patterns in forest watersheds are patchy and heterogeneous. Therefore, patterns of soil erosion are difficult to model and predict. The objective of this study is to develop a user friendly management tool for land...

  16. Learning Style Responses to an Online Soil Erosion Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Martha; Kettler, Timothy; Hussman, Dann

    2005-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate responses from students with different learning styles to the use of computer technology as a supplemental tool in teaching soil erosion concepts. The online lesson utilized photographs, illustrations, animations, and an interactive model that allowed students to manipulate factors influencing soil erosion. Students…

  17. Advances in modeling soil erosion after disturbance on rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research has been undertaken to develop process based models that predict soil erosion rate after disturbance on rangelands. In these models soil detachment is predicted as a combination of multiple erosion processes, rain splash and thin sheet flow (splash and sheet) detachment and concentrated flo...

  18. The development of U. S. soil erosion prediction and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Laflen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion prediction technology began over 70 years ago when Austin Zingg published a relationship between soil erosion (by water and land slope and length, followed shortly by a relationship by Dwight Smith that expanded this equation to include conservation practices. But, it was nearly 20 years before this work's expansion resulted in the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE, perhaps the foremost achievement in soil erosion prediction in the last century. The USLE has increased in application and complexity, and its usefulness and limitations have led to the development of additional technologies and new science in soil erosion research and prediction. Main among these new technologies is the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP model, which has helped to overcome many of the shortcomings of the USLE, and increased the scale over which erosion by water can be predicted. Areas of application of erosion prediction include almost all land types: urban, rural, cropland, forests, rangeland, and construction sites. Specialty applications of WEPP include prediction of radioactive material movement with soils at a superfund cleanup site, and near real-time daily estimation of soil erosion for the entire state of Iowa.

  19. Monitoring Riverbank Erosion in Mountain Catchments Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Longoni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sediment yield is a key factor in river basins management due to the various and adverse consequences that erosion and sediment transport in rivers may have on the environment. Although various contributions can be found in the literature about sediment yield modeling and bank erosion monitoring, the link between weather conditions, river flow rate and bank erosion remains scarcely known. Thus, a basin scale assessment of sediment yield due to riverbank erosion is an objective hard to be reached. In order to enhance the current knowledge in this field, a monitoring method based on high resolution 3D model reconstruction of riverbanks, surveyed by multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning, was applied to four banks in Val Tartano, Northern Italy. Six data acquisitions over one year were taken, with the aim to better understand the erosion processes and their triggering factors by means of more frequent observations compared to usual annual campaigns. The objective of the research is to address three key questions concerning bank erosion: “how” erosion happens, “when” during the year and “how much” sediment is eroded. The method proved to be effective and able to measure both eroded and deposited volume in the surveyed area. Finally an attempt to extrapolate basin scale volume for bank erosion is presented.

  20. Partnership building and stakeholder participation in soil erosion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    Partnership building and stakeholder participation in soil erosion management: A case study of Kasitu ... interventions in other areas of the district for the sustainable management of soils and curbing of erosion, which is a major problem facing this ... black clay soils, the rainfall is bimodal type and the climate is conducive for.

  1. Parameterization of erodibility in the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The magnitude of erosion from a hillslope is governed by the availability of sediment and connectivity of runoff and erosion processes. For undisturbed rangelands, sediment is primarily detached and transported by rainsplash and sheetflow (splash-sheet) processes in isolated bare batches, but sedime...

  2. Satellite remote sensing for water erosion assessment: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.

    2006-01-01

    Water erosion creates negative impacts on agricultural production, infrastructure, and water quality across the world. Regional-scale water erosion assessment is important, but limited by data availability and quality. Satellite remote sensing can contribute through providing spatial data to such

  3. Pedological perspective of gully erosion sites within Kendu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    Gully erosion in this region is caused by water. Gully erosion is a common feature in the Kendu escarpment and on the slope of Sondu-Miriu range; rendering large expanses of otherwise arable land uncultivable and uninhabitable in western Kenya (Figure. 1). Gullies occur sporadically covering over 100 ha of land in some ...

  4. Erosion of metals by multiple impacts with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy, S. L.; Thiruvengadam, A.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation determines - relation between impact velocity and minimum number of impacts producing visible erosion, relation between high frequency fatigue stresses and number of cycles to failure, water-hammer stresses relation to high frequency endurance limit, erosion rate as exposure time function, and correlates experimental data with recent theory.

  5. The Effect of Soil Erosion on Europe's Crop Yields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.M.; Govers, G.; Jones, R.A.; Rounsevell, M.D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Soil erosion negatively affects crop yields and may have contributed to the collapse of ancient civilizations. Whether erosion may have such an impact on modern societies as well, is subject to debate. In this paper we quantify the relationship between crop yields and soil water available to plants,

  6. Synergism in materials erosion due to multispecies impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auciello, O.; Haasz, A.A.; Stangeby, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    Microelectronic fabrication often involves the use of relatively low-pressure/low-temperature plasma discharges for etching micron-size features in integrated circuits: here erosion is a desired effect. Fusion plasmas, by contrast, cause erosion of the fusion device inner walls, which is generally not desirable. In both cases surfaces are bombarded simultaneously by plasma species which include ions, neutral atoms, electrons and photons, which might lead to enhanced erosion due to synergistic effects. Work performed to date suggests that similar chemistry may be involved in the erosion process associated with some semiconductor and fusion related materials: SiF 4 , SiCl 4 and CH 4 , are, for example,some of the principal species evolving from Si and C surfaces, when exposed to F, Cl and H atoms respectively, causing the observed erosion. Considerable effort has been expended on studies involving synergistic effects for semiconductor fabrication. Research on synergism related to the erosion of fusion materials (C and carbon compounds) commenced comparatively recently; however, its importance has been increasingly recognized and evidence of possible synergistic erosion of graphite has recently been obtained in the PLT fusion device. Experimental and theoretical work on synergistic effects in erosion of both semiconductors and fusion materials will be critically reviewed. (author)

  7. Erosivity of rainfall in Lages, Santa Catarina, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Schick

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The erosive capacity of rainfall can be expressed by an index and knowing it allows recommendation of soil management and conservation practices to reduce water erosion. The objective of this study was to calculate various indices of rainfall erosivity in Lages, Santa Catarina, Brazil, identify the best one, and discover its temporal distribution. The study was conducted at the Center of Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences, Lages, Santa Catarina, using daily rainfall charts from 1989 to 2012. Using the computer program Chuveros , 107 erosivity indices were obtained, which were based on maximum intensity in 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 135, 150, 165, 180, 210, and 240 min of duration and on the combination of these intensities with the kinetic energy obtained by the equations of Brown & Foster, Wagner & Massambani, and Wischmeier & Smith. The indices of the time period from 1993 to 2012 were correlated with the respective soil losses from the standard plot of the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE in order to select the erosivity index for the region. Erosive rainfall accounted for 83 % of the mean annual total volume of 1,533 mm. The erosivity index (R factor of rainfall recommended for Lages is the EI30, whose mean annual value is 5,033 MJ mm ha-1 h-1, and of this value, 66 % occurs from September to February. Mean annual erosivity has a return period estimated at two years with a 50 % probability of occurrence.

  8. Impact of erosion in the taluses of subtropical orchard terraces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duran Zuazo, V.H.; Ruiz, J.A.; Raya, A.M.; Tarifa, D.F.

    2005-01-01

    The coast of the provinces of Granada and Malaga (SE Spain) are economically important areas for the subtropical fruit cultivation. The climate is characterized by heavy periodic rainfall, which is one of the main factors responsible for soil erosion in this agroecosystem. However, the erosion

  9. Erosive wear of a surface coated hydroturbine steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Gun on a hot rolled 21Cr–4Ni–N steel meant for fabrication of hydro turbine underwater parts. The coatings have been characterized for microstructure, porosity, microhardness and crystalline nature. The erosion experiments were carried out using an air jet erosion test rig at a velocity of 120 ms. –1 and impingement angles.

  10. Modelling topographic potential for erosion and deposition using GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helena Mitasova; Louis R. Iverson

    1996-01-01

    Modelling of erosion and deposition in complex terrain within a geographical information system (GIS) requires a high resolution digital elevation model (DEM), reliable estimation of topographic parameters, and formulation of erosion models adequate for digital representation of spatially distributed parameters. Regularized spline with tension was integrated within a...

  11. Time scale bias in erosion rates of glaciated landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganti, Vamsi; von Hagke, Christoph; Scherler, Dirk; Lamb, Michael P; Fischer, Woodward W; Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Deciphering erosion rates over geologic time is fundamental for understanding the interplay between climate, tectonic, and erosional processes. Existing techniques integrate erosion over different time scales, and direct comparison of such rates is routinely done in earth science. On the basis of a global compilation, we show that erosion rate estimates in glaciated landscapes may be affected by a systematic averaging bias that produces higher estimated erosion rates toward the present, which do not reflect straightforward changes in erosion rates through time. This trend can result from a heavy-tailed distribution of erosional hiatuses (that is, time periods where no or relatively slow erosion occurs). We argue that such a distribution can result from the intermittency of erosional processes in glaciated landscapes that are tightly coupled to climate variability from decadal to millennial time scales. In contrast, we find no evidence for a time scale bias in spatially averaged erosion rates of landscapes dominated by river incision. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the proposed coupling between climate and tectonics, and interpreting erosion rate estimates with different averaging time scales through geologic time.

  12. Updated measurements in vineyards improves accuracy of soil erosion rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigo-Comino, Jesús; Davis, Jason; Keesstra, Saskia D.; Cerdà, Artemi

    2018-01-01

    All rights reserved. Vineyards have proven to be one of the most degraded agricultural ecosystems due to very high erosion rates, which are typically measured at fine temporal and spatial scales. Long-term soil erosion measures are rare, but this information may be indispensable for a proper

  13. The significance of human induced and natural erosion features ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael S. Zavada, Yeqiao Wang, Gérard Rambolamanana, Andriamiranto Raveloson, Hélène Razanatsoa

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... International aid and development agencies have designated. Madagascar's erosion rate the highest in the world (e.g.,. World Bank/USAID/Cooperation Suisse/UNESCO/UNDP/WWF 1986,. United States Agency International Development (USAID) 1998). Annual erosion rates are estimated at 200 - 400 ...

  14. Erosion rates from forests and rangelands following fuel management

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Elliot; Peter R. Robichaud; I. Sue Miller

    2007-01-01

    In both forest and rangelands, fuel reduction operations are now common practices. Mechanical thinning followed by prescribed fire is common in forests, while fire is frequently applied to rangelands. Studies at different scales (50 sq m to 389 ha) measure the erosion from fuel management. This presentation compares runoff and erosion from these studies. Plot size has...

  15. understanding the mechanism of soil erosion from outdoor model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    Finally by distorted scale laws, data for the natural slopes were synthesised to produce the hydrologic quantities; slope erosion and average infiltration rates for the soils. INTRODUCTION. In most parts of the world subject to heavy rain, erosion by overland flow is of common occurrence. This is particularly true of three belts ...

  16. The influence of wave action on coastal erosion along Monwabisi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The coastline to the east of the Monwabisi Beach tidal pool has been subject to substantial visible coastal erosion. Monwabisi is located near the City of Cape Town and is situated along the northern coastline of False Bay. The erosion that has occurred has raised concern as it is damaging local infrastructure. The coastline ...

  17. Soil erosion and sediment yield from the degraded Mzinga River ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil erosion measurements and sediment yield modelling were done to monitor land use practices that contribute to catchment degradation. The results showed very high soil erosion losses on agricultural lands (33 tons/ha) and low soil losses from fallow (4.8 tons/ha) and degraded miombo woodlands (2.4 tons/ha).

  18. Thresholds of gully erosion in the coastal plains sands of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concept of geomorphic threshold as applied in gully erosion studies assumes that water erosion occurs when the combined power of the rainfall energy and overland flow exceeds the resistance of surface materials to detachment and entrainment. This line of reasoning presupposes that certain environmental factors ...

  19. Simulating climate change impact on soil erosion using RUSLE model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Climate change, particularly due to the changed precipitation trend, can have a severe impact on soil erosion. The effect is more pronounced on the higher slopes of the Himalayan region. The goal of this study was to estimate the impact of climate change on soil erosion in a watershed of the Himalayan region using ...

  20. Erosive effects of common beverages on extracted premolar teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, W K; Thong, K M

    2005-09-01

    Dental erosion is highly prevalent today, and acidic drinks are thought to be an important cause. The aim of the present investigation was to determine the erosive potential of a range of common beverages on extracted human teeth. The beverages were tested for their individual pHs using a pH meter. The clinical effects of the most erosive beverages were determined by the degree of etching and Vickers microhardness of enamel. The results showed that many common beverages have pHs sufficiently low to cause enamel erosion. Lime juice concentrate (pH 2.1) had the lowest pH, followed by Coca-cola and Pepsi (both with pH 2.3) and Lucozade (pH 2.5). The erosive potential of these beverages was demonstrated by the deep etching of the enamel after five minutes. The Vickers Hardness of enamel was reduced by about 50 per cent in the case of lime juice (p Coca-cola (p Coca-cola completely reversed the erosive effects on the enamel. Although only a few of the beverages with the lowest pHs were tested, the present study showed that the most acidic drinks had the greatest erosive effects on enamel. While saliva was protective against erosion, relatively large volumes were required to neutralize the acidity.