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Sample records for preventive medicine residency

  1. Consensus on core competencies for preventive medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, D S; Ross, V

    1994-01-01

    Of the currently available literature on assessment of physician competency, very little applies to the needs of preventive medicine specialists. Yet the diversity of the field and the confusion among other medical specialists about the particular expertise of preventive medicine physicians suggest a need for consensus on fundamental competencies expected of graduates of preventive medicine residency training programs. We apply theoretical material on competency-based education from teacher training and instructional development to professional training in preventive medicine. We describe the process by which the Graduate Medical Education Subcommittee of the American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM), a working group of specialists, derived and refined core competencies in working sessions at professional meetings. The drafts produced at these sessions were circulated widely to residency directors and other individuals and groups in preventive medicine before being approved by the ACPM Board of Regents and included in the Residency Training Manual distributed by ACPM. This article includes this list of core competencies for preventive medicine residents. In addition, the article describes assumptions about competency development that guided the process and identifies recurrent problems in competency development. This information may be helpful to readers who wish to develop additional competencies or to tailor these competencies for their own preventive medicine residency programs.

  2. Lifestyle medicine curriculum for a preventive medicine residency program: implementation and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Haq; Petraro, Paul V.; Via, Christina; Ullah, Saif; Lim, Lionel; Wild, Dorothea; Kennedy, Mary; Phillips, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The vast majority of the healthcare problems burdening our society today are caused by disease-promoting lifestyles (e.g., physical inactivity and unhealthy eating). Physicians report poor training and lack of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes. Objective To evaluate a new curriculum and rotation in lifestyle medicine for preventive medicine residents. Methods Training included didactics (six sessions/year), distance learning, educational conferences, and newly developed lifestyle medicine rotations at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and the Integrative Medicine Center. We used a number of tools to assess residents’ progress including Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), self-assessments, and logs of personal health habits. Results A total of 20 residents participated in the lifestyle medicine training between 2010 and 2013. There was a 15% increase in residents’ discussions of lifestyle issues with their patients based on their baseline and follow-up surveys. The performance of preventive medicine residents on OSCEs increased each year they were in the program (average OSCE score: PGY1 73%, PGY2 83%, PGY3 87%, and PGY4 91%, p=0.01). Our internal medicine and preliminary residents served as a control, since they did participate in didactics but not in lifestyle medicine rotations. Internal medicine and preliminary residents who completed the same OSCEs had a slightly lower average score (76%) compared with plural for resident, preventive medicine residents (80%). However, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.11). Conclusion Incorporating the lifestyle medicine curriculum is feasible for preventive medicine training allowing residents to improve their health behavior change discussions with patients as well as their own personal health habits. PMID:27507540

  3. Knowledge of Emergency Medicine Residents in Relation to Prevention of Tetanus

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    Hojjat Derakhshanfar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Knowledge of emergency medicine residents about the management of patients suspected of having tetanus favoring wounds is very important due to their responsibility for the treatment of such patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate this knowledge and making sure of the adequacy of instructions they have received in relation to prevention of tetanus.  Methods: A reliable and reproducible questionnaire was used to evaluate knowledge of all the emergency medicine residents in Imam Hussein Hospital in Tehran, Iran, about conditions favoring tetanus (9 questions and proper interventions in such conditions (12 questions. The questionnaires were completed and scored as poor and good. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze data. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results: In the present study, 73 emergency medicine residents were evaluated (45.2% male. Knowledge of 31 (42.5% residents in relation to conditions favoring tetanus and 41 (56.2% residents in correct therapeutic interventions was in good level. The most frequent incorrect answer was related to diabetic ulcers and wounds in patients with sepsis. There was an increase in scores of conditions favoring tetanus (P<0.001 and correct therapeutic interventions (P=0.001 with an increase in educational years. However, age (P=0.64, gender (P=0.31, job experience (P=0.38 and participation in educational courses (P=0.67 had no effect on the knowledge level of emergency medicine residents. Conclusion: According to the findings of the present study, the knowledge of emergency medicine residents about correct management of patients suspected of tetanus was low, which emphasizes the necessity of providing further instructions on prevention of tetanus in wound management. 

  4. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education

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    Jani, Asim A.; Trask, Jennifer; Ali, Ather

    2016-01-01

    During 2012, the USDHHS’s Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 accredited preventive medicine residencies to incorporate an evidence-based integrative medicine curriculum into their training programs. It also funded a national coordinating center at the American College of Preventive Medicine, known as the Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education (IMPriME) Center, to provide technical assistance to the 12 grantees. To help with this task, the IMPriME Center established a multidisciplinary steering committee, versed in integrative medicine, whose primary aim was to develop integrative medicine core competencies for incorporation into preventive medicine graduate medical education training. The competency development process was informed by central integrative medicine definitions and principles, preventive medicine’s dual role in clinical and population-based prevention, and the burgeoning evidence base of integrative medicine. The steering committee considered an interdisciplinary integrative medicine contextual framework guided by several themes related to workforce development and population health. A list of nine competencies, mapped to the six general domains of competence approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education, was operationalized through an iterative exercise with the 12 grantees in a process that included mapping each site’s competency and curriculum products to the core competencies. The competencies, along with central curricular components informed by grantees’ work presented elsewhere in this supplement, are outlined as a roadmap for residency programs aiming to incorporate integrative medicine content into their curricula. This set of competencies adds to the larger efforts of the IMPriME initiative to facilitate and enhance further curriculum development and implementation by not only the current grantees but other stakeholders in graduate medical education around integrative medicine

  5. Incorporating population medicine into primary care residency training.

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    Dysinger, Wayne S; King, Valerie; Foster, Tina C; Geffken, Dominic

    2011-01-01

    Expanded competencies in population health and systems-based medicine have been identified as a need for primary care physicians. Incorporating formal training in preventive medicine is one method of accomplishing this objective. We identified three family medicine residencies that have developed formal integrated pathways for residents to also complete preventive medicine residency requirements during their training period. Although there are differences, each pathway incorporates a structured approach to dual residency training and includes formal curriculum that expands resident competencies in population health and systems-based medicine. A total of 26 graduates have completed the formally combined family and preventive medicine residencies. All are board certified in family medicine, and 22 are board certified in preventive medicine. Graduates work in a variety of academic, quality improvement, community, and international settings utilizing their clinical skills as well as their population medicine competencies. Dual training has been beneficial in job acquisition and satisfaction. Incorporation of formal preventive medicine training into family medicine education is a viable way to use a structured format to expand competencies in population medicine for primary care physicians. This type of training, or modifications of it, should be part of the debate in primary care residency redesign.

  6. Residents as teachers: survey of Canadian family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Victor K; Burke, Clarissa A; Narula, Archna

    2013-09-01

    To examine Canadian family medicine residents' perspectives surrounding teaching opportunities and mentorship in teaching. A 16-question online survey. Canadian family medicine residency programs. Between May and June 2011, all first- and second-year family medicine residents registered in 1 of the 17 Canadian residency programs as of September 2010 were invited to participate. A total of 568 of 2266 residents responded. Demographic characteristics, teaching opportunities during residency, and resident perceptions about teaching. A total of 77.7% of family medicine residents indicated that they were either interested or highly interested in teaching as part of their future careers, and 78.9% of family medicine residents had had opportunities to teach in various settings. However, only 60.1% of respondents were aware of programs within residency intended to support residents as teachers, and 33.0% of residents had been observed during teaching encounters. It appears that most Canadian family medicine residents have the opportunity to teach during their residency training. Many are interested in integrating teaching as part of their future career goals. Family medicine residencies should strongly consider programs to support and further develop resident teaching skills.

  7. Preventive medicine in 2030.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberg, Nicholas

    2012-12-01

    This invited commentary imagines two futures for preventive medicine and public health in the Year 2030. Using satire, the commentary describes one future in which large corporations control public health and another where a robust public sector plays the leading role. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Internal medicine residency training in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Hatice; Akcicek, Fehmi

    2005-12-01

    Medical school entrance depends on passing a central examination that is given annually by the National Selection and Placement Center. Undergraduate medical education takes 6 years. About 5000 students graduate from medical faculties annually. The central exam necessary for residency training is given by the National Selection and Placement Center. A Specialist Training Regulation regulates residency training. Internal medicine residency training takes 4 years and includes inpatient and outpatient care in wards and rotations. Residents prepare a dissertation that is used in the evaluation of residency competency. At the end of the residency period, residents who have been successful in previous evaluations take an oral exam followed by a written exam, which lead to their certification in internal medicine. Residents' scientific knowledge and skills are assessed by a jury consisting of five people, four from the same department and one from the equivalent department in another training institution. The title of specialist is granted after a certification exam given by training institutions and approved by the Ministry of Health. Internists are mainly employed in state hospitals, which are under the Ministry of Health. Subspecialty areas in internal medicine include gastroenterology, geriatrics, endocrinology, nephrology, hematology, rheumatology, immunology, allergology, and oncology. The training period for a subspecialty is 2 years. A substantial effort is being made all over the country to improve regulations and health care service delivery. These changes will also affect the residency training and manpower planning and employment of internists.

  9. Hospital Medicine Resident Training Tracks: Developing the Hospital Medicine Pipeline.

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    Sweigart, Joseph R; Tad-Y, Darlene; Kneeland, Patrick; Williams, Mark V; Glasheen, Jeffrey J

    2017-03-01

    Hospital medicine (HM) is rapidly evolving into new clinical and nonclinical roles. Traditional internal medicine (IM) residency training likely does not optimally prepare residents for success in HM. Hospital medicine residency training tracks may offer a preferred method for specialized HM education. Internet searches and professional networks were used to identify HM training tracks. Information was gathered from program websites and discussions with track directors. The 11 HM tracks at academic medical centers across the United States focus mostly on senior residents. Track structure and curricular content are determined largely by the structure and curricula of the IM residency programs in which they exist. Almost all tracks feature experiential quality improvement projects. Content on healthcare economics and value is common, and numerous track leaders report this content is expanding from HM tracks into entire residency programs. Tracks also provide opportunities for scholarship and professional development, such as workshops on abstract creation and job procurement skills. Almost all tracks include HM preceptorships as well as rotations within various disciplines of HM. HM residency training tracks focus largely on quality improvement, health care economics, and professional development. The structures and curricula of these tracks are tightly linked to opportunities within IM residency programs. As HM continues to evolve, these tracks likely will expand to bridge clinical and extra-clinical gaps between traditional IM training and contemporary HM practice. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2017;12:173-176. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine

  10. Teleophthalmology in preventive medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Michelson, Georg

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date overview of the clinical applications, methods, and technologies of teleophthalmology within the field of preventive medicine. The ability of novel methods to detect the initial signs of neurodegenerative diseases on the basis of alterations in the retina is reviewed, and detailed attention is paid to the role of teleophthalmology in screening for vision-threatening diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. A major part of the book is devoted to novel imaging methods and the latest information technologies, including advanced mobile communication and Web 2.0 applications in teleophthalmology. In addition, the initial projects of an interdisciplinary cooperation in preventive medicine are described. All of the authors are experienced in the scientific and practical aspects of teleophthalmology, including e-learning, and have produced a book that will meet the needs of all medical care providers interested in using teleophthalmology.

  11. Educational contracts in family medicine residency training.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahood, S.; Rojas, R.; Andres, D.; Zagozeski, C.; White, G.; Bradel, T.

    1994-01-01

    An educational contract for family medicine residency training and evaluation addresses many of the difficulties and challenges of current postgraduate medical education. This article identifies important principles for developing a contractual approach; describes the contract used in one program and its implementation; and discusses its theory, advantages, and limitations.

  12. Workplace Violence and Harassment Against Emergency Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnapp, Benjamin H; Slovis, Benjamin H; Shah, Anar D; Fant, Abra L; Gisondi, Michael A; Shah, Kaushal H; Lech, Christie A

    2016-09-01

    Several studies have shown that workplace violence in the emergency department (ED) is common. Residents may be among the most vulnerable staff, as they have the least experience with these volatile encounters. The goal for this study was to quantify and describe acts of violence against emergency medicine (EM) residents by patients and visitors and to identify perceived barriers to safety. This cross-sectional survey study queried EM residents at multiple New York City hospitals. The primary outcome was the incidence of violence experienced by residents while working in the ED. The secondary outcomes were the subtypes of violence experienced by residents, as well as the perceived barriers to safety while at work. A majority of residents (66%, 78/119) reported experiencing at least one act of physical violence during an ED shift. Nearly all residents (97%, 115/119) experienced verbal harassment, 78% (93/119) had experienced verbal threats, and 52% (62/119) reported sexual harassment. Almost a quarter of residents felt safe "Occasionally," "Seldom" or "Never" while at work. Patient-based factors most commonly cited as contributory to violence included substance use and psychiatric disease. Self-reported violence against EM residents appears to be a significant problem. Incidence of violence and patient risk factors are similar to what has been found previously for other ED staff. Understanding the prevalence of workplace violence as well as the related systems, environmental, and patient-based factors is essential for future prevention efforts.

  13. The Chief Resident Role in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

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    Hafner, John W. Jr., MD, MPH

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Study Objectives: Although other specialties have examined the role of the chief resident (CR, the role and training of the emergency medicine (EM CR has largely been undefined.Methods: A survey was mailed to all EM CRs and their respective program directors (PD in 124 EM residency programs. The survey consisted of questions defining demographics, duties of the typical CR, and opinions regarding the level of support and training received. Multiple choice, Likert scale (1 strong agreement, 5 strong disagreement and short-answer responses were used. We analyzed associations between CR and PD responses using Chi-square, Student’s T and Mann-Whitney U tests.Results: Seventy-six percent of CRs and 65% of PDs responded and were similar except for age (31 vs. 42 years; p<0.001. CR respondents were most often male, in year 3 of training and held the position for 12 months. CRs and PDs agreed that the assigned level of responsibility is appropriate (2.63 vs. 2.73, p=0.15; but CRs underestimate their influence in the residency program (1.94 vs. 2.34, p=0.002 and the emergency department (2.61 vs. 3.03, p=0.002. The majority of CRs (70% and PDs (77% report participating in an extramural training program, and those CRs who participated in training felt more prepared for their job duties (2.26 vs. 2.73; p=0.03.Conclusion: EM CRs feel they have appropriate job responsibility but believe they are less influential in program and department administration than PD respondents. Extramural training programs for incoming CRs are widely used and felt to be helpful. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:120-125.

  14. Essentials of periodontal medicine in preventive medicine

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    Minkle Gulati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of systemic disorders on periodontal diseases is well established. However, of growing interest is the effect of periodontal diseases on numerous systemic diseases or conditions like cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, pre-term low birth weight babies, preeclampsia, respiratory infections and others including osteoporosis, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, erectile dysfunction, Alzheimer′s disease, gastrointestinal disease, prostatitis, renal diseases, which has also been scientifically validated. This side of the oral-systemic link has been termed Periodontal Medicine and is potentially of great public health significance, as periodontal disease is largely preventable and in many instances readily treatable, hence, providing many new opportunities for preventing and improving prognosis of several systemic pathologic conditions. This review article highlights the importance of prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases as an essential part of preventive medicine to circumvent its deleterious effects on general health.

  15. Emergency Medicine Resident Perceptions of Medical Professionalism

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    Joshua Jauregui

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical professionalism is a core competency for emergency medicine (EM trainees; but defining professionalism remains challenging, leading to difficulties creating objectives and performing assessment. Because professionalism is dynamic, culture-specific, and often taught by modeling, an exploration of trainees’ perceptions can highlight their educational baseline and elucidate the importance they place on general conventional professionalism domains. To this end, our objective was to assess the relative value EM residents place on traditional components of professionalism. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional, multi-institutional survey of incoming and graduating EM residents at four programs. The survey was developed using the American Board of Internal Medicine’s “Project Professionalism” and the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education definition of professionalism competency. We identified 27 attributes within seven domains: clinical excellence, humanism, accountability, altruism, duty and service, honor and integrity, and respect for others. Residents were asked to rate each attribute on a 10-point scale. We analyzed data to assess variance across attributes as well as differences between residents at different training levels or different institutions. Results: Of the 114 residents eligible, 100 (88% completed the survey. The relative value assigned to different professional attributes varied considerably, with those in the altruism domain valued significantly lower and those in the “respect for others” and “honor and integrity” valued significantly higher (p<0.001. Significant differences were found between interns and seniors for five attributes primarily in the “duty and service” domain (p<0.05. Among different residencies, significant differences were found with attributes within the “altruism” and “duty and service” domains (p<0.05. Conclusion: Residents perceive differences in

  16. Workplace Violence and Harassment Against Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin H. Schnapp

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several studies have shown that workplace violence in the emergency department (ED is common. Residents may be among the most vulnerable staff, as they have the least experience with these volatile encounters. The goal for this study was to quantify and describe acts of violence against emergency medicine (EM residents by patients and visitors and to identify perceived barriers to safety. Methods: This cross-sectional survey study queried EM residents at multiple New York City hospitals. The primary outcome was the incidence of violence experienced by residents while working in the ED. The secondary outcomes were the subtypes of violence experienced by residents, as well as the perceived barriers to safety while at work. Results: A majority of residents (66%, 78/119 reported experiencing at least one act of physical violence during an ED shift. Nearly all residents (97%, 115/119 experienced verbal harassment, 78% (93/119 had experienced verbal threats, and 52% (62/119 reported sexual harassment. Almost a quarter of residents felt safe “Occasionally,” “Seldom” or “Never” while at work. Patient-based factors most commonly cited as contributory to violence included substance use and psychiatric disease. Conclusion: Self-reported violence against EM residents appears to be a significant problem. Incidence of violence and patient risk factors are similar to what has been found previously for other ED staff. Understanding the prevalence of workplace violence as well as the related systems, environmental, and patient-based factors is essential for future prevention efforts.

  17. Feasibility of an innovative third-year chief resident system: an internal medicine residency leadership study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolade, Victor O; Staton, Lisa J; Jayarajan, Ramesh; Bentley, Nanette K; Huang, Xiangke

    2014-01-01

    The role of the internal medicine chief resident includes various administrative, academic, social, and educational responsibilities, fulfillment of which prepares residents for further leadership tasks. However, the chief resident position has historically only been held by a few residents. As fourth-year chief residents are becoming less common, we considered a new model for rotating third-year residents as the chief resident. Online surveys were given to all 29 internal medicine residents in a single university-based program after implementation of a leadership curriculum and specific job description for the third-year chief resident. Chief residents evaluated themselves on various aspects of leadership. Participation was voluntary. Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS version 21. Thirteen junior (first- or second-year) resident responses reported that the chief residents elicited input from others (mean rating 6.8), were committed to the team (6.8), resolved conflict (6.7), ensured efficiency, organization and productivity of the team (6.7), participated actively (7.0), and managed resources (6.6). Responses from senior residents averaged 1 point higher for each item; this pattern repeated itself in teaching evaluations. Chief resident self-evaluators were more comfortable running a morning report (8.4) than with being chief resident (5.8). The feasibility of preparing internal medicine residents for leadership roles through a rotating PGY-3 (postgraduate year) chief residency curriculum was explored at a small internal medicine residency, and we suggest extending the study to include other programs.

  18. Preventative Medicine today

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    José Antonio Maluf de Carvalho

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The great majority of chronic diseases can be prevented byreducing risks, understood as factors that increase the probabilityof a specific disease or condition, such as hypertension,hypercholesterolemia, inadequate diet, smoking habit, obesity andsedentarism. These aspects are evaluated in this article as wellas prevention and screening methods.

  19. Common Factors Among Family Medicine Residents Who Encounter Difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binczyk, Natalia M; Babenko, Oksana; Schipper, Shirley; Ross, Shelley

    2018-04-01

    Residents in difficulty are costly to programs in both time and resources, and encountering difficulty can be emotionally harmful to residents. Approximately 10% of residents will encounter difficulty at some point in training. While there have been several studies looking at common factors among residents who encounter difficulty, some of the findings are inconsistent. The objective of this study was to determine whether there are common factors among the residents who encounter difficulty during training in a large Canadian family medicine residency program. Secondary data analysis was performed on archived resident files from a Canadian family medicine residency program. Residents who commenced an urban family medicine residency program between the years of 2006 and 2014 were included in the study. Five hundred nine family medicine residents were included in data analysis. Residents older than 30 years were 2.33 times (95% CI: 1.27-4.26) more likely to encounter difficulty than residents aged 30 years or younger. Nontransfer residents were 8.85 times (95% CI: 1.17-66.67) more likely to encounter difficulty than transfer residents. The effects of sex, training site, international medical graduate status, and rotation order on the likelihood of encountering difficulty were nonsignificant. Older and nontransfer residents may be facing unique circumstances and may benefit from additional support from the program.

  20. Resident-as-teacher in family medicine: a CERA survey.

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    Al Achkar, Morhaf; Davies, M Kelly; Busha, Michael E; Oh, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    Teaching has been increasingly recognized as a primary responsibility of residents. Residents enjoy teaching, and their majority report interest in the continuation of teaching activities after graduation. Resident-as-teacher programs have emerged nationally as a means of enhancing teaching skills. This study examined the current use of residents-as-teachers programs in family medicine residencies through a national survey of family medicine residency program directors. This survey project was part of the Council of Academic Family Medicine Education Research Alliance (CERA) 2014 survey to family medicine program directors that was conducted between February 2014 and May 2014. The response rate of the survey was 49.6% (224/451). The majority (85.8%) of residency programs offer residents formal instruction in teaching skills. The vast majority (95.6%) of programs mandated the training. The average total hours of teaching instruction residents receive while in residency training was 7.72. The residents are asked to formally evaluate the teaching instruction in 68.1% of the programs. Less than a quarter (22.6%) of residency programs offer the teaching instruction in collaboration with other programs. "Retreat, workshop, and seminars" were identified as the main form of instruction by 33.7% of programs. In 83.3% of programs not offering instruction, lack of resources was identified as the primary barrier. The majority of family medicine residency programs provide resident-as-teacher instructions, which reflects increasing recognition of importance of the teaching role of residents. Further research is needed to assess the effectiveness of such instruction on residents' teaching skills and their attitudes toward teaching.

  1. Teaching strategies used by internal medicine residents on the wards.

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    Smith, Dustin T; Kohlwes, R Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Residents serve as teachers to interns and students in most internal medicine residency programs. The purpose of our study is to explore what internal medicine residents perceive as effective teaching strategies in the inpatient setting and to formulate a guideline for preparing residents to lead their ward teams. Housestaff identified as excellent teaching residents were recruited from a large internal medicine residency program. Focus groups were formed and interviews were conducted using open-ended questions. Transcripts of the interviews were reviewed, analyzed, and compared for accuracy by two investigators. The transcripts were then coded to categorize data into similar subjects from which recurrent themes in resident teaching were identified. Twenty-two residents participated in four focus group interviews held in 2008. We identified five principal themes for effective teaching by residents: (T)aking advantage of teaching opportunities, (E)mpowering learners, (A)ssuming the role of leader, (C)reating a learning environment, and (H)abituating the practice of teaching. Strategies for effective teaching by residents exist. The TEACH mnemonic is a resident-identified method of instruction. Use of this tool could enable residency programs to create instructional curricula to prepare their residents and interns to take on the roles of team leaders and teachers.

  2. Interventional Pain Procedures in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sanjeev; Cicone, Caitlin; Chang, Philip

    2018-04-01

    Exposure to interventional pain procedures is now a required component of training in physical medicine and rehabilitation residencies as mandated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Data regarding resident exposure and competency in these procedures remain limited. Objectives were to determine the volume and type of exposure physical medicine and rehabilitation residents have to interventional pain procedures and to obtain faculty-perceived opinions regarding competency of incoming fellows as it pertains to interventional pain management. Online surveys were sent to program directors of physical medicine and rehabilitation residencies and fellowship directors of interventional spine, sports medicine, and pain medicine fellowships. Surveys inquired about educational methods, the volume of procedures in which residents actively participate, and faculty-perceived competency of trainees performing procedures. Thirty-nine residency programs and 27 fellowships responded to the surveys. Of the 39 residencies that responded, there was great variation in the exposure residents receive. Most programs reported that residents have moderate exposure to common procedures such as ultrasound-guided knee injections and lumbar epidural injections. In addition, while most residency program directors report graduates to be "fairly prepared" (33%) to "well prepared" (20.5%) with regard to spine procedures, most fellowship directors (63%) describe incoming fellows to be at the "beginner" level.

  3. Feasibility of an innovative third-year chief resident system: an internal medicine residency leadership study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O. Kolade

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of the internal medicine chief resident includes various administrative, academic, social, and educational responsibilities, fulfillment of which prepares residents for further leadership tasks. However, the chief resident position has historically only been held by a few residents. As fourth-year chief residents are becoming less common, we considered a new model for rotating third-year residents as the chief resident. Methods: Online surveys were given to all 29 internal medicine residents in a single university-based program after implementation of a leadership curriculum and specific job description for the third-year chief resident. Chief residents evaluated themselves on various aspects of leadership. Participation was voluntary. Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS version 21. Results: Thirteen junior (first- or second-year resident responses reported that the chief residents elicited input from others (mean rating 6.8, were committed to the team (6.8, resolved conflict (6.7, ensured efficiency, organization and productivity of the team (6.7, participated actively (7.0, and managed resources (6.6. Responses from senior residents averaged 1 point higher for each item; this pattern repeated itself in teaching evaluations. Chief resident self-evaluators were more comfortable running a morning report (8.4 than with being chief resident (5.8. Conclusion: The feasibility of preparing internal medicine residents for leadership roles through a rotating PGY-3 (postgraduate year chief residency curriculum was explored at a small internal medicine residency, and we suggest extending the study to include other programs.

  4. Choosing family medicine residency programs: what factors infuence residents’ decisions?

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    Lee, Joseph; Alferi, Marg; Patel, Tejal; Lee, Linda

    2011-03-01

    To describe key determinants for residents' selection of a new community-based, interprofessional site for their family medicine training, and to evaluate residents' satisfaction with their programs. Combined qualitative and quantitative methods using in-depth interviews and a survey. McMaster University, including the new site of the Centre for Family Medicine in Kitchener-Waterloo, Ont, and a long-established site in Hamilton, Ont. Eleven first-year and second-year family medicine residents from the Kitchener-Waterloo site participated in in-depth interviews. Forty-four first-year and second-year family medicine residents completed the survey, 22 in Kitchener-Waterloo and 22 in Hamilton. Kitchener-Waterloo residents participated in in-depth interviews during their residency programs in 2008 to 2009 using a semistructured format to explore their choice of site and the effect of an interprofessional environment on their education. Common themes were established using qualitative analysis techniques; based on these themes, a survey was developed and distributed to residents from both sites to further explore factors influencing site selection, satisfaction, and effects of interprofessional education. Residents identifIed several reasons for selecting a new community-based, interprofessional family medicine residency program. Reasons included preference for the location and opportunities to learn in an interprofessional teaching environment. A less hierarchical structure and greater opportunities for one-on-one teaching also influenced their choices. Perception of poor communication from the well established site was identified as a challenge. Residents at both sites indicated similarly high levels of program satisfaction. Residents selected the new community-based family medicine site for reasons of geographic location and the potential for clinical learning experiences and interprofessional education. High program satisfaction was achieved at both the new and well

  5. Hospitalist involvement in family medicine residency training: A CERA study.

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    Baldor, Robert; Savageau, Judith A; Shokar, Navkiran; Potts, Stacy; Gravel, Joseph; Eisenstock, Kimberly; Ledwith, James

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about the impact of hospitalists on family medicine residencies. We surveyed family medicine residency directors to assess attitudes about hospitalists and their involvement in residency teaching. Questions were included in the 2012 Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) survey of family medicine residency directors. Univariate statistics were used to describe programs, directors, and our questions on the use of hospitalists. Bivariate statistics were used to examine relationships between the use of hospitalists to teach and program characteristics. Forty-one percent (n=175) of residency directors completed the hospitalist section of the CERA survey. Sixty-six percent of residency programs were community based/university affiliated. The majority of directors who have, or are planning to develop, a hospitalist service currently use an internal medicine service (92.5%), followed by family medicine (39.1%), pediatrics (35.4%), OB/laborists (18.0%), and combined services (8.7%). The majority of programs with a hospitalist training track (or plans to develop one) indicated that this was for a family medicine service. Sixty percent of programs that have a hospitalist service involve hospitalists in teaching. Twenty percent of directors reported that hospitalists serve as family medicine faculty, and 63% viewed them as "good educators." However, 85% reported no reduction in inpatient teaching by family medicine faculty despite using hospitalist teaching services. Hospitalists have a significant educational role in family medicine resident training. Further research is needed to explore how hospitalists and family medicine faculty can collaborate to promote enhanced efficiency and effectiveness as residency teachers.

  6. Tailoring Morning Reports to an Internal Medicine Residency in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousa, Khalid Mohamed Ali; Muneer, Mohammed; Rahil, Ali; Al-Mohammed, Ahmed; AlMohanadi, Dabia; Elhiday, Abdelhaleem; Hamad, Abdelrahman; Albizreh, Bassim; Suliman, Noor; Muhsin, Saif

    2014-12-01

    Morning report, a case-based conference that allows learners and teachers to interact and discuss patient care, is a standard educational feature of internal residency programs, as well as some other specialties. Our intervention was aimed at enhancing the format for morning report in our internal medicine residency program in Doha, Qatar. In July 2011, we performed a needs assessment of the 115 residents in our internal medicine residency program, using a questionnaire. Resident input was analyzed and prioritized using the percentage of residents who agreed with a given recommendation for improving morning report. We translated the input into interventions that enhanced the format and content, and improved environmental factors surrounding morning report. We resurveyed residents using the questionnaire that was used for the needs assessment. Key changes to the format for morning report included improving organization, adding variety to the content, enhancing case selection and the quality of presentations, and introducing patient safety and quality improvement topics into discussions. This led to a morning report format that is resident-driven, and resident-led, and that produces resident-focused learning and quality improvement activities. Our revised morning report format is a dynamic tool, and we will continue to tailor and modify it on an ongoing basis in response to participant feedback. We recommend a process of assessing and reassessing morning report for other programs that want to enhance resident interest and participation in clinical and safety-focused discussions.

  7. Hands-On Sports Medicine Training for Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the development of a hands-on sports medicine training program for residents at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center. Education strategies include clinical teaching, on-the-field education, experiential learning, and didactic instruction. Programs focusing exclusively on sports medicine are needed because the number of…

  8. Developing a curriculum for emergency medicine residency orientation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Raymond; Choudhri, Tina; Roche, Colleen; Ranniger, Claudia; Greenberg, Larrie

    2014-05-01

    New residents enter emergency medicine (EM) residency programs with varying EM experiences, which makes residency orientation programs challenging to design. There is a paucity of literature to support best practices. We report on a curriculum development project for EM residency orientation using the Kern Model. Components of the revised curriculum include administrative inculcation into the program; delivering skills and knowledge training to ensure an entering level of competence; setting expectations for learning in the overall residency curriculum; performing an introductory performance evaluation; and socialization into the program. Post-implementation resident surveys found the new curriculum to be helpful in preparing them for the first year of training. The Kern Model was a relevant and useful method for redesigning a new-resident orientation curriculum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Global health education in emergency medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havryliuk, Tatiana; Bentley, Suzanne; Hahn, Sigrid

    2014-06-01

    Interest in global health and international electives is growing among Emergency Medicine (EM) residents in the United States (US). The majority of EM residency programs offer opportunities for international electives. The degree of participation among residents and type of support provided by the residency program, however, remains unclear. To explore the current state of global health education among EM residents who participate in international electives. A 12-question survey was e-mailed to the program directors of the 192 EM residency programs in the US. The survey included questions about the number of residents participating in international electives and the types of preparation, project requirements, supervision, and feedback participating residents receive. The response rate was 53% with 102 responses. Seventy-five of 102 (74%) programs reported that at least one resident participated in an international elective in the 2010-2011 academic year. Forty-three programs (42%) report no available funding to support any resident on an international elective. Residents receive no preparation for international work in 41 programs (40%). Only 25 programs (26%) required their residents to conduct a project while abroad. Forty-nine programs (48%) reported no formal debriefing session, and no formal feedback was collected from returning residents in 57 of 102 (59%) programs. The majority of EM residencies have residents participating in international electives. However, the programs report variable preparation, requirements, and resident supervision. These results suggest a need for an expanded and more structured approach to international electives undertaken by EM residents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Training family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcerelli, John H; Fowler, Shannon L; Murdoch, William; Markova, Tsveti; Kimbrough, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe a training curriculum for family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology (doctoral) trainees at the Wayne State University/Crittenton Family Medicine Residency program. The collaborative care curriculum involves a series of patient care and educational activities that require collaboration between family medicine residents and psychology trainees. Activities include: (1) clinic huddle, (2) shadowing, (3) pull-ins and warm handoffs, (4) co-counseling, (5) shared precepting, (6) feedback from psychology trainees to family medicine residents regarding consults, brief interventions, and psychological testing, (7) lectures, (8) video-observation and feedback, (9) home visits, and (10) research. The activities were designed to teach the participants to work together as a team and to provide a reciprocal learning experience. In a brief three-item survey of residents at the end of their academic year, 83% indicated that they had learned new information or techniques from working with the psychology trainees for assessment and intervention purposes; 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their patient care; and 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their ability to work as part of a team. Informal interviews with the psychology trainees indicated that reciprocal learning had taken place. Family medicine residents can learn to work collaboratively with psychology trainees through a series of shared patient care and educational activities within a primary care clinic where an integrated approach to care is valued.

  11. Musculoskeletal imaging in preventive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainberger, Franz; Falkowski, Anna L; Hirtler, Lena; Riegler, Georg; Schlegl, Thomas; Thaker, Siddharth; Patsch, Janina; Crevenna, Richard

    2016-02-01

    The aim is to review the modalities in musculoskeletal imaging with view on the prognostic impact for the patient's and for social outcome and with view on three major fields of preventive medicine: nutrition and metabolism, sports, and patient education. The added value provided by preventive imaging is (1) to monitor bone health and body composition with a broad spectrum of biomarkers, (2) to detect and quantify variants or abnormalities of nerves, muscles, tendons, bones, and joints with a risk of overuse, rupture, or fracture, and (3) to develop radiology reports from the widely used narrative format to structured text and multimedia datasets. The awareness problem is a term for describing the underreporting and the underdiagnosis of fragility fractures in osteoporosis.

  12. Development of a novel sports medicine rotation for emergency medicine residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waterbrook AL

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Anna L Waterbrook,1 T Gail Pritchard,2 Allison D Lane,1 Lisa R Stoneking,1 Bryna Koch,2 Robert McAtee,1 Kristi H Grall,1 Alice A Min,1 Jessica Prior,1 Isaac Farrell,1 Holly G McNulty,1 Uwe Stolz1 1Department of Emergency Medicine, 2Office of Medical Student Education, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Abstract: Musculoskeletal complaints are the most common reason for patients to visit a physician, yet competency in musculoskeletal medicine is invariably reported as a deficiency in medical education in the USA. Sports medicine clinical rotations improve both medical students' and residents' musculoskeletal knowledge. Despite the importance of this knowledge, a standardized sports medicine curriculum in emergency medicine (EM does not exist. Hence, we developed a novel sports medicine rotation for EM residents to improve their musculoskeletal educational experience and to improve their knowledge in musculoskeletal medicine by teaching the evaluation and management of many common musculoskeletal disorders and injuries that are encountered in the emergency department. The University of Arizona has two distinct EM residency programs, South Campus (SC and University Campus (UC. The UC curriculum includes a traditional 4-week orthopedic rotation, which consistently rated poorly on evaluations by residents. Therefore, with the initiation of a new EM residency at SC, we replaced the standard orthopedic rotation with a novel sports medicine rotation for EM interns. This rotation includes attendance at sports medicine clinics with primary care and orthopedic sports medicine physicians, involvement in sport event coverage, assigned reading materials, didactic experiences, and an on-call schedule to assist with reductions in the emergency department. We analyzed postrotation surveys completed by residents, postrotation evaluations of the residents completed by primary care sports medicine faculty and orthopedic chief residents, as well as the

  13. Emergency Medicine Resident Rotations Abroad: Current Status and Next Steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C. Morris, MD, MPH

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: International rotations for residents are increasingly popular, but there is a dearth of evidence to demonstrate that these rotations are safe and that residents have appropriate training and support to conduct them. Methods: A survey was sent to all U.S. emergency medicine (EM residencies with publicly available e-mail addresses. The survey documents and examines the training and support that emergency medicine residents are offered for international rotations and the frequency of adverse safety events. Results: 72.5% of program director responded that their residents are participating in rotations abroad. However, only 15.4% of programs reported offering training specific to working abroad. The results point to an increased need for specific training and insurance coverage. Conclusion: Oversight of international rotations should be improved to guarantee safety and education benefit.

  14. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  15. Residents' views about family medicine specialty education in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzuner Arzu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Residents are one of the key stakeholders of specialty training. The Turkish Board of Family Medicine wanted to pursue a realistic and structured approach in the design of the specialty training programme. This approach required the development of a needs-based core curriculum built on evidence obtained from residents about their needs for specialty training and their needs in the current infrastructure. The aim of this study was to obtain evidence on residents' opinions and views about Family Medicine specialty training. Methods This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The board prepared a questionnaire to investigate residents' views about some aspects of the education programme such as duration and content, to assess the residents' learning needs as well as their need for a training infrastructure. The questionnaire was distributed to the Family Medicine Departments (n = 27 and to the coordinators of Family Medicine residency programmes in state hospitals (n = 11 by e-mail and by personal contact. Results A total of 191 questionnaires were returned. The female/male ratio was 58.6%/41.4%. Nine state hospitals and 10 university departments participated in the study. The response rate was 29%. Forty-five percent of the participants proposed over three years for the residency duration with either extensions of the standard rotation periods in pediatrics and internal medicine or reductions in general surgery. Residents expressed the need for extra rotations (dermatology 61.8%; otolaryngology 58.6%; radiology 52.4%. Fifty-nine percent of the residents deemed a rotation in a private primary care centre necessary, 62.8% in a state primary care centre with a proposed median duration of three months. Forty-seven percent of the participants advocated subspecialties for Family Medicine, especially geriatrics. The residents were open to new educational methods such as debates, training with models, workshops and e

  16. Residents' views about family medicine specialty education in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzuner, Arzu; Topsever, Pinar; Unluoglu, Ilhami; Caylan, Ayse; Dagdeviren, Nezih; Uncu, Yesim; Mazicioğlu, Mumtaz; Ozçakir, Alis; Ozdemir, Hakan; Ersoy, Fusun

    2010-04-15

    Residents are one of the key stakeholders of specialty training. The Turkish Board of Family Medicine wanted to pursue a realistic and structured approach in the design of the specialty training programme. This approach required the development of a needs-based core curriculum built on evidence obtained from residents about their needs for specialty training and their needs in the current infrastructure. The aim of this study was to obtain evidence on residents' opinions and views about Family Medicine specialty training. This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The board prepared a questionnaire to investigate residents' views about some aspects of the education programme such as duration and content, to assess the residents' learning needs as well as their need for a training infrastructure. The questionnaire was distributed to the Family Medicine Departments (n = 27) and to the coordinators of Family Medicine residency programmes in state hospitals (n = 11) by e-mail and by personal contact. A total of 191 questionnaires were returned. The female/male ratio was 58.6%/41.4%. Nine state hospitals and 10 university departments participated in the study. The response rate was 29%. Forty-five percent of the participants proposed over three years for the residency duration with either extensions of the standard rotation periods in pediatrics and internal medicine or reductions in general surgery. Residents expressed the need for extra rotations (dermatology 61.8%; otolaryngology 58.6%; radiology 52.4%). Fifty-nine percent of the residents deemed a rotation in a private primary care centre necessary, 62.8% in a state primary care centre with a proposed median duration of three months. Forty-seven percent of the participants advocated subspecialties for Family Medicine, especially geriatrics. The residents were open to new educational methods such as debates, training with models, workshops and e-learning. Participation in courses and congresses was considered

  17. Emergency Medicine Residency Applicant Characteristics Associated with Measured Adverse Outcomes During Residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Bohrer-Clancy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Negative outcomes in emergency medicine (EM programs use a disproportionate amount of educational resources to the detriment of other residents. We sought to determine if any applicant characteristics identifiable during the selection process are associated with negative outcomes during residency. Methods Primary analysis consisted of looking at the association of each of the descriptors including resident characteristics and events during residency with a composite measure of negative outcomes. Components of the negative outcome composite were any formal remediation, failure to complete residency, or extension of residency. Results From a dataset of 260 residents who completed their residency over a 19-year period, 26 (10% were osteopaths and 33 (13% were international medical school graduates A leave of absence during medical school (p <.001, failure to send a thank-you note (p=.008, a failing score on United States Medical Licensing Examination Step I (p=.002, and a prior career in health (p=.034 were factors associated with greater likelihood of a negative outcome. All four residents with a “red flag” during their medicine clerkships experienced a negative outcome (p <.001. Conclusion “Red flags” during EM clerkships, a leave of absence during medical school for any reason and failure to send post-interview thank-you notes may be associated with negative outcomes during an EM residency.

  18. Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency Program: Relationship between Lifestyle Behaviors and Burnout and Wellbeing Measures in First-Year Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClafferty, Hilary; Brooks, Audrey J; Chen, Mei-Kuang; Brenner, Michelle; Brown, Melanie; Esparham, Anna; Gerstbacher, Dana; Golianu, Brenda; Mark, John; Weydert, Joy; Yeh, Ann Ming; Maizes, Victoria

    2018-04-23

    It is widely recognized that burnout is prevalent in medical culture and begins early in training. Studies show pediatricians and pediatric trainees experience burnout rates comparable to other specialties. Newly developed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies in professionalism and personal development recognize the unacceptably high resident burnout rates and present an important opportunity for programs to improve residents experience throughout training. These competencies encourage healthy lifestyle practices and cultivation of self-awareness, self-regulation, empathy, mindfulness, and compassion—a paradigm shift from traditional medical training underpinned by a culture of unrealistic endurance and self-sacrifice. To date, few successful and sustainable programs in resident burnout prevention and wellness promotion have been described. The University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency (PIMR) curriculum, developed in 2011, was designed in part to help pediatric programs meet new resident wellbeing requirements. The purpose of this paper is to detail levels of lifestyle behaviors, burnout, and wellbeing for the PIMR program’s first-year residents ( N = 203), and to examine the impact of lifestyle behaviors on burnout and wellbeing. The potential of the PIMR to provide interventions addressing gaps in lifestyle behaviors with recognized association to burnout is discussed.

  19. Trends in violence education in family medicine residency curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronholm, Peter F; Singh, Vijay; Fogarty, Colleen T; Ambuel, Bruce

    2014-09-01

    Violence is a significant public health issue with far-reaching implications for the health of individuals and their communities. Our objective was to describe trends in violence-related training in family medicine residency programs since the last national survey was conducted in 1997. Surveys were sent to 337 US family medicine residency programs with the program director having active Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) membership. Measures included residency setting and characteristics, violence-related curricular content, teaching techniques and personnel, timing of content, and impact of changes in Residency Review Committee (RRC) and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements. Descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses comparing measures across time were used. A total of 201 (60%) surveys were completed. The most common violence curricula was child (83%) and elder abuse (76%), and the most common teachers of violence-related content were family physicians, psychologists, and social workers. The most common teaching methods were clinical precepting (94%), lectures (90%), case vignettes (71%), and intimate partner violence (IPV) shelter experiences (67%). ACGME and RRC changes were not reflected in self-reported measures of curricular emphasis or time. Violence curricular content and number of hours has been constant in family medicine residencies over time. An increase in the reported use of active learning strategies was identified as a trend across surveys. Next steps for violence curricula involve assessment of residents' competency to identify and intervene in violence.

  20. Development of a novel sports medicine rotation for emergency medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterbrook, Anna L; Pritchard, T Gail; Lane, Allison D; Stoneking, Lisa R; Koch, Bryna; McAtee, Robert; Grall, Kristi H; Min, Alice A; Prior, Jessica; Farrell, Isaac; McNulty, Holly G; Stolz, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal complaints are the most common reason for patients to visit a physician, yet competency in musculoskeletal medicine is invariably reported as a deficiency in medical education in the USA. Sports medicine clinical rotations improve both medical students' and residents' musculoskeletal knowledge. Despite the importance of this knowledge, a standardized sports medicine curriculum in emergency medicine (EM) does not exist. Hence, we developed a novel sports medicine rotation for EM residents to improve their musculoskeletal educational experience and to improve their knowledge in musculoskeletal medicine by teaching the evaluation and management of many common musculoskeletal disorders and injuries that are encountered in the emergency department. The University of Arizona has two distinct EM residency programs, South Campus (SC) and University Campus (UC). The UC curriculum includes a traditional 4-week orthopedic rotation, which consistently rated poorly on evaluations by residents. Therefore, with the initiation of a new EM residency at SC, we replaced the standard orthopedic rotation with a novel sports medicine rotation for EM interns. This rotation includes attendance at sports medicine clinics with primary care and orthopedic sports medicine physicians, involvement in sport event coverage, assigned reading materials, didactic experiences, and an on-call schedule to assist with reductions in the emergency department. We analyzed postrotation surveys completed by residents, postrotation evaluations of the residents completed by primary care sports medicine faculty and orthopedic chief residents, as well as the total number of dislocation reductions performed by each graduating resident at both programs over the last 5 years. While all residents in both programs exceeded the ten dislocation reductions required for graduation, residents on the sports medicine rotation had a statistically significant higher rate of satisfaction of their educational

  1. Introducing a psychosomatic medicine interest group for psychiatry residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Neil V; Azzam, Pierre; Gopalan, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Having gained subspecialty certification in 2003, the field of psychosomatic medicine (PM) addresses the mental health needs of individuals who suffer from general medical conditions. The rising prevalence of chronic illness, along with trends in medical delivery toward more collaborative models of care, underscores the value of recruitment to PM specialty programs. To foster interest and education in PM, we have developed and implemented a Psychosomatic Medicine Interest Group for trainees within a psychiatry residency program. Participants have found the Psychosomatic Medicine Interest Group to be an enjoyable experience that has improved their clinical practice and interest in PM. The Psychosomatic Medicine Interest Group has also been a successful vehicle to enhance clinical knowledge and mentoring opportunities during training, while bolstering residents' desire to pursue a career in PM. Copyright © 2015 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. All rights reserved.

  2. [The medical specialist for insurance medicine--the Flemish residency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkenberg, A M; Vervoort, F

    2011-12-01

    Insurance medicine is becoming more and more important. Currently, there are few countries in Europe where insurance medicine is recognised as an independent discipline; the Netherlands is one example. Since 2007 the "Specialist in Insurance Medicine and Medico-legal Expertise" is recognised in Belgium. This article will give an overview of the residency of Flemish physicians. By enactment, this consists of a theoretical and a practical section. This way of education should open broad possibilities in private and social insurance medicine, but also in the research sector.

  3. City planning as preventive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corburn, Jason

    2015-08-01

    The health and well-being of rapidly growing urban populations is a global health issue. Cities in the global north and south are faced with rising health inequities - or avoidable differences in health determinants and outcomes based on place, social status and ethnicity. This commentary suggests that focusing only on treatment interventions in cities is likely to fail because populations will be forced to go back into the urban living and working conditions that likely made them sick in the first place. City planning as preventive medicine includes taking a relational and systems approach to urban health, requiring health assessments for all urban policy making, promoting neighborhood health centers as engines of community economic development and gathering place-based health indicator data to track progress and adapt interventions over time as conditions change. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effectiveness of resident as teacher curriculum in preparing emergency medicine residents for their teaching role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein Nejad, Hooman; Bagherabadi, Mehdi; Sistani, Alireza; Dargahi, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, recognizing the need and importance of training residents in teaching skills has resulted in several resident-as-teacher programs. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of this teaching initiative and investigate the improvement in residents' teaching skills through evaluating their satisfaction and perceived effectiveness as well as assessing medical students' perception of the residents' teaching quality. This research is a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-tests, continuing from Dec 2010 to May 2011 in Imam Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. In this survey, Emergency Medicine Residents (n=32) participated in an 8-hour workshop. The program evaluation was performed based on Kirkpatrick's model by evaluation of residents in two aspects: self-assessment and evaluation by interns who were trained by these residents. Content validity of the questionnaires was judged by experts and reliability was carried out by test re-test. The questionnaires were completed before and after the intervention. Paired sample t-test was applied to analyze the effect of RAT curriculum and workshop on the improvement of residents' teaching skills based on their self-evaluation and Mann-Whitney U test was used to identify significant differences between the two evaluator groups before and after the workshop. The results indicated that residents' attitude towards their teaching ability was improved significantly after participating in the workshop (pTeacher for emergency medicine residents resulted in favorable outcomes in the second evaluated level of Kirkpatrick's model, i.e. it showed measurable positive changes in the self-assessments of medical residents about different aspects of teaching ability and performance. However, implementing training sessions for resident physicians, although effective in improving their confidence and self-assessment of their teaching skills, seems to cause no positive change in the third

  5. Description of an ethics curriculum for a medicine residency program.

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, H J

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the attempts to develop and implement an ethics curriculum for the Internal Medicine Residency Program at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The objectives of the curriculum were to enhance moral reasoning skills and to promote humanistic attitudes and behavior among the residents. The diverse methodologies used to achieve these objectives included case discussions, literature reading, role playing, writing, and videos. These activities occurred predominantly withi...

  6. Amputee care education in physical medicine and rehabilitation residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Joseph Abraham; Morgenroth, David Crespi

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess amputee care-related educational offerings and barriers to further educational opportunities in United States physical medicine and rehabilitation residency programs. A two-part survey was distributed to all United States physical medicine and rehabilitation residency program directors. Part 1 assessed the use of educational tools in amputee education. Part 2 assessed the potential barriers to amputee care-related education. Sixty-nine percent of the program directors responded. Seventy-five percent or more of the programs that responded have didactic lectures; grand rounds; reading lists; self-assessment exam review; gait analysis training; training with prosthetists; faculty with amputee expertise; and amputee care during inpatient, outpatient, and consult rotations. Less than 25% of the programs use intranet resources. No more than 14% of the programs said any one factor was a major barrier. However, some of the most prominent major barriers were limited faculty number, finances, and patient volume. The factors many of the programs considered somewhat of a barrier included lack of national standardized resources for curriculum, resident time, and faculty time. This study identified the most commonly used amputee educational opportunities and methods in physical medicine and rehabilitation residencies as well as the barriers to furthering resident amputee education. Developing Web-based resources on amputee care and increasing awareness of physiatrists as perioperative consultants could improve resident amputee education and have important implications toward optimizing care of individuals with amputation.

  7. Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasse, Miriam; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To review the literature on teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents and to identify formats and content of these programs and their effects. DATA SOURCES Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to mid-July 2008) and the Education Resources Information Center database (pre-1966 to mid-July 2008) were searched using and combining the MeSH terms teaching, internship and residency, and family practice; and teaching, graduate medical education, and family practice. STUDY SELECTION The initial MEDLINE and Education Resources Information Center database searches identified 362 and 33 references, respectively. Titles and abstracts were reviewed and studies were included if they described the format or content of a teaching-skills program or if they were primary studies of the effects of a teaching-skills program for family medicine residents or family medicine and other specialty trainees. The bibliographies of those articles were reviewed for unidentified studies. A total of 8 articles were identified for systematic review. Selection was limited to articles published in English. SYNTHESIS Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents vary from half-day curricula to a few months of training. Their content includes leadership skills, effective clinical teaching skills, technical teaching skills, as well as feedback and evaluation skills. Evaluations mainly assessed the programs’ effects on teaching behaviour, which was generally found to improve following participation in the programs. Evaluations of learner reactions and learning outcomes also suggested that the programs have positive effects. CONCLUSION Family medicine residency training programs differ from all other residency training programs in their shorter duration, usually 2 years, and the broader scope of learning within those 2 years. Few studies on teaching-skills training, however, were designed specifically for family medicine residents. Further studies assessing the

  8. Resident Career Planning Needs in Internal Medicine: A Qualitative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rina L.; Windish, Donna M.; Rosenbaum, Julie R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Few residency programs have centralized resources for career planning. As a consequence, little is known about residents' informational needs regarding career planning. Objective To examine career preparation stressors, practical needs, and information that residents wished they were privy to when applying. Methods In 2007 and 2008, we surveyed 163 recent graduates or graduating residents from 10 Yale-based and Yale-affiliated hospitals' internal medicine programs regarding their experiences with applying for positions after residency. We included questions about demographics, mentorship, stress of finding a job or fellowship, and open-ended questions to assess barriers and frustrations. Qualitative data were coded independently and a classification scheme was negotiated by consensus. Results A total of 89 residents or recent graduates responded, and 75% of them found career planning during residency training at least somewhat stressful. Themes regarding the application process included (1) knowledge about the process, (2) knowledge about career paths and opportunities, (3) time factors, (4) importance of adequate personal guidance and mentorship, and (5) self-knowledge regarding priorities and the desired outcome. Residents identified the following advice as most important: (1) start the process as early as possible and with a clear knowledge of the process timeline, (2) be clear about personal goals and priorities, and (3) be well-informed about a prospective employer and what that employer is looking for. Most residents felt career planning should be structured into the curriculum and should occur in the first year or throughout residency. Conclusions This study highlights residents' desire for structured dissemination of information and counseling with regard to career planning during residency. Our data suggest that exposure to such resources may be beneficial as early as the first year of training. PMID:22132271

  9. Resident career planning needs in internal medicine: a qualitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rina L; Windish, Donna M; Rosenbaum, Julie R

    2010-12-01

    Few residency programs have centralized resources for career planning. As a consequence, little is known about residents' informational needs regarding career planning. To examine career preparation stressors, practical needs, and information that residents wished they were privy to when applying. In 2007 and 2008, we surveyed 163 recent graduates or graduating residents from 10 Yale-based and Yale-affiliated hospitals' internal medicine programs regarding their experiences with applying for positions after residency. We included questions about demographics, mentorship, stress of finding a job or fellowship, and open-ended questions to assess barriers and frustrations. Qualitative data were coded independently and a classification scheme was negotiated by consensus. A total of 89 residents or recent graduates responded, and 75% of them found career planning during residency training at least somewhat stressful. Themes regarding the application process included (1) knowledge about the process, (2) knowledge about career paths and opportunities, (3) time factors, (4) importance of adequate personal guidance and mentorship, and (5) self-knowledge regarding priorities and the desired outcome. Residents identified the following advice as most important: (1) start the process as early as possible and with a clear knowledge of the process timeline, (2) be clear about personal goals and priorities, and (3) be well-informed about a prospective employer and what that employer is looking for. Most residents felt career planning should be structured into the curriculum and should occur in the first year or throughout residency. This study highlights residents' desire for structured dissemination of information and counseling with regard to career planning during residency. Our data suggest that exposure to such resources may be beneficial as early as the first year of training.

  10. Comparison of Emergency Medicine Malpractice Cases Involving Residents to Non-Resident Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurley, Kiersten L; Grossman, Shamai A; Janes, Margaret; Yu-Moe, C Winnie; Song, Ellen; Tibbles, Carrie D; Shapiro, Nathan I; Rosen, Carlo L

    2018-04-17

    Data are lacking on how emergency medicine (EM) malpractice cases with resident involvement differs from cases that do not name a resident. To compare malpractice case characteristics in cases where a resident is involved (resident case) to cases that do not involve a resident (non-resident case) and to determine factors that contribute to malpractice cases utilizing EM as a model for malpractice claims across other medical specialties. We used data from the Controlled Risk Insurance Company (CRICO) Strategies' division Comparative Benchmarking System (CBS) to analyze open and closed EM cases asserted from 2009-2013. The CBS database is a national repository that contains professional liability data on > 400 hospitals and > 165,000 physicians, representing over 30% of all malpractice cases in the U.S (> 350,000 claims). We compared cases naming residents (either alone or in combination with an attending) to those that did not involve a resident (non-resident cohort). We reported the case statistics, allegation categories, severity scores, procedural data, final diagnoses and contributing factors. Fisher's exact test or t-test was used for comparisons (alpha set at 0.05). Eight hundred and forty-five EM cases were identified of which 732 (87%) did not name a resident (non-resident cases), while 113 (13%) included a resident (resident cases) (Figure 1). There were higher total incurred losses for non-resident cases (Table 1). The most frequent allegation categories in both cohorts were "Failure or Delay in Diagnosis/Misdiagnosis" and "Medical Treatment" (non-surgical procedures or treatment regimens i.e. central line placement). Allegation categories of Safety and Security, Patient Monitoring, Hospital Policy and Procedure and Breach of Confidentiality were found in the non-resident cases. Resident cases incurred lower payments on average ($51,163 vs. $156,212 per case). Sixty six percent (75) of resident vs 57% (415) of non-resident cases were high severity claims

  11. Residency Programs in Veterinary Internal Medicine. Where Are We Going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, J. E., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Data from the 6th Symposium on Veterinary Medical Education, the Arthur D. Little, Inc. report, and the survey of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine are reported as they pertain to the need for more residency programs, program quality and accreditation. Program funding is also discussed. (JMD)

  12. A Novel Approach to Medicine Training for Psychiatry Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onate, John; Hales, Robert; McCarron, Robert; Han, Jaesu; Pitman, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A unique rotation was developed to address limited outpatient internal medicine training in psychiatric residency by the University of California, Davis, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, which provides medical care to patients with mental illness. Methods: The number of patients seen by the service and the number of…

  13. Can Emergency Medicine Residents Predict Cost of Diagnostic Testing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tainter, Christopher R

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic testing represents a significant portion of healthcare spending, and cost should be considered when ordering such tests. Needless and excessive spending may occur without an appreciation of the impact on the larger healthcare system. Knowledge regarding the cost of diagnostic testing among emergency medicine (EM residents has not previously been studied. A survey was administered to 20 EM residents from a single ACGME-accredited three-year EM residency program, asking for an estimation of patient charges for 20 commonly ordered laboratory tests and seven radiological exams. We compared responses between residency classes to evaluate whether there was a difference based on level of training. The survey completion rate was 100% (20/20 residents. We noted significant discrepancies between the median resident estimates and actual charge to patient for both laboratory and radiological exams. Nearly all responses were an underestimate of the actual cost. The group median underestimation for laboratory testing was $114, for radiographs $57, and for computed tomography exams was $1,058. There was improvement in accuracy with increasing level of training. This pilot study demonstrates that EM residents have a poor understanding of the charges burdening patients and health insurance providers. In order to make balanced decisions with regard to diagnostic testing, providers must appreciate these factors. Education regarding the cost of providing emergency care is a potential area for improvement of EM residency curricula, and warrants further attention and investigation.

  14. Family medicine residents' practice intentions: Theory of planned behaviour evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, Lawrence E M; Fowler, Nancy; Kwan, Matthew Y W

    2015-11-01

    To assess residents' practice intentions since the introduction of the College of Family Physicians of Canada's Triple C curriculum, which focuses on graduating family physicians who will provide comprehensive care within traditional and newer models of family practice. A survey based on Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour was administered on 2 occasions. McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont. Residents (n = 135) who were enrolled in the Department of Family Medicine Postgraduate Residency Program at McMaster University in July 2012 and July 2013; 54 of the 60 first-year residents who completed the survey in 2012 completed it again in 2013. The survey was modeled so as to measure the respondents' intentions to practise with a comprehensive scope; determine the degree to which their attitudes, subjective norms, and perceptions of control about comprehensive practice influence those intentions; and investigate how these relationships change as residents progress through the curriculum. The survey also queried the respondents about their intentions with respect to particular medical services that underpin comprehensive practice. The responses indicate that the factors modeled by the theory of planned behaviour survey account for 60% of the variance in the residents' intentions to adopt a comprehensive scope of practice upon graduation, that there is room for curricular improvement with respect to encouraging residents to practise comprehensive care, and that targeting subjective norms about comprehensive practice might have the greatest influence on improving resident intentions. The theory of planned behaviour presents an effective approach to assessing curricular effects on resident practice intentions while also providing meaningful information for guiding further program evaluation efforts in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University.

  15. Enhancing outpatient nephrology experience for internal medicine residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Kenar D.; Shah, Hitesh H.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Interest in nephrology careers continues to remain low in the USA. Educational innovations that enhance interest in nephrology among medical trainees are being actively studied. While internal medicine (IM) residency programs commonly offer the inpatient nephrology elective to the resident, outpatient nephrology experience is lacking. Understanding the provision of care in outpatient and home dialysis and management of patients with glomerular diseases, chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation are vital components of an outpatient nephrology rotation. In this review article, we share our experiences in incorporating outpatient nephrology to the IM resident’s elective time. We also present the structure of the nephrology rotations at our programs and suggest several learning opportunities in outpatient nephrology that the training community can provide to medical residents. Strategies to effectively set up an outpatient nephrology rotation are also described. While more educational research on the impact of outpatient nephrology on resident learning and career choices are needed, we encourage a collaborative effort between faculty members in nephrology and the medicine residency programs to provide this unique learning opportunity to IM residents. PMID:29479427

  16. Herbal medicine use among urban residents in Lagos, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Over three-quarter of the world's population is using herbal medicines with an increasing trend globally. Herbal medicines may be beneficial but are not completely harmless. This study aimed to assess the extent of use and the general knowledge of the benefits and safety of herbal medicines among urban residents in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods The study involved 388 participants recruited by cluster and random sampling techniques. Participants were interviewed with a structured open- and close-ended questionnaire. The information obtained comprises the demography and types of herbal medicines used by the respondents; indications for their use; the sources, benefits and adverse effects of the herbal medicines they used. Results A total of 12 herbal medicines (crude or refined) were used by the respondents, either alone or in combination with other herbal medicines. Herbal medicines were reportedly used by 259 (66.8%) respondents. 'Agbo jedi-jedi' (35%) was the most frequently used herbal medicine preparation, followed by 'agbo-iba' (27.5%) and Oroki herbal mixture® (9%). Family and friends had a marked influence on 78.4% of the respondents who used herbal medicine preparations. Herbal medicines were considered safe by half of the respondents despite 20.8% of those who experienced mild to moderate adverse effects. Conclusions Herbal medicine is popular among the respondents but they appear to be ignorant of its potential toxicities. It may be necessary to evaluate the safety, efficacy and quality of herbal medicines and their products through randomised clinical trial studies. Public enlightenment programme about safe use of herbal medicines may be necessary as a means of minimizing the potential adverse effects. PMID:22117933

  17. [TO BE A RESIDENT IN THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Matan; Abu Ghosh, Zahi; Rubin, Limor; Kharouf, Fadi; Ayalon, Oshrat; Dror, Danna; Falah, Batla; Mevorach, Dror

    2018-03-01

    Sir William Osler is considered to be one of the fathers of modern medicine who pioneered the practice of bedside teaching of clinical medicine for medical students and residents. Osler was well known as a diagnostician and outstanding therapist with a humanized approach and rare didactic capabilities. Medical training at Hadassah is built on the central tenets of Osler's approach, incorporating the tremendous advances in science and medicine. Training for residents in Internal Medicine is designed to develop a broad base of medical and, if possible, scientific knowledge, as well as skills and competencies to deliver a high standard of patient care. In the past 7 years, 28 residents have undergone specialist training in Internal Medicine B. Among them, 71% were Israeli medical school graduates; 36% were women;18% were recent immigrants to Israel; 78% were Jewish. Among Jewish residents, 32% were religiously observant. Besides the usual assignments of the internal medicine ward, the medical staff of Internal Medicine B excelled in diagnosis of hard to diagnose diseases as described in eleven cases. The diagnosis in some of those cases was a result of listening to the patient, education on clinical reasoning and the use advanced diagnostic tools. The basic unit of the residency is the clinical mission with an emphasis on exposure to novel modalities such as the use of bedside ultra sound along with dealing with end-of-life dilemmas, the management of complex situations and development of communication and interpersonal skills needed to work with close relatives and families facing critical times. The medical training in the internal ward is not just the sum of arbitrary care of the hospitalized patients, but a well-structured plan with gradually increasing demands. Over the past 7 years, residents in Internal Medicine B have achieved successful passing grades of 38/38 on the first attempt oral and written board examinations, a record that attests to the quality of

  18. The State of Communication Education in Family Medicine Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Kate L; Rosenbaum, Marcy E

    2016-06-01

    Communication skills are essential to medical training and have lasting effects on patient satisfaction and adherence rates. However, relatively little is reported in the literature identifying how communication is taught in the context of residency education. Our goal was to determine current practices in communication curricula across family medicine residency programs. Behavioral scientists and program directors in US family medicine residencies were surveyed via email and professional organization listservs. Questions included whether programs use a standardized communication model, methods used for teaching communication, hours devoted to teaching communication, as well as strengths and areas for improvement in their program. Analysis identified response frequencies and ranges complemented by analysis of narrative comments. A total of 204 programs out of 458 family medicine residency training sites responded (45%), with 48 out of 50 US states represented. The majority of respondents were behavioral scientists. Seventy-five percent of programs identified using a standard communication model; Mauksch's patient-centered observation model (34%) was most often used. Training programs generally dedicated more time to experiential teaching methods (video review, work with simulated patients, role plays, small groups, and direct observation of patient encounters) than to lectures (62% of time and 24% of time, respectively). The amount of time dedicated to communication education varied across programs (average of 25 hours per year). Respondent comments suggest that time dedicated to communication education and having a formal curriculum in place are most valued by educators. This study provides a picture of how communication skills teaching is conducted in US family medicine residency programs. These findings can provide a comparative reference and rationale for residency programs seeking to evaluate their current approaches to communication skills teaching and

  19. Internal Medicine Residents' Perceptions of Cross-Cultural Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Elyse R; Betancourt, Joseph R; Miller, Elizabeth; Nathan, Michael; MacDonald, Ellie; Ananeh-Firempong, Owusu; Stone, Valerie E

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Physicians increasingly face the challenge of managing clinical encounters with patients from a range of cultural backgrounds. Despite widespread interest in cross-cultural care, little is known about resident physicians' perceptions of what will best enable them to provide quality care to diverse patient populations. OBJECTIVES To assess medicine residents' (1) perceptions of cross-cultural care, (2) barriers to care, and (3) training experiences and recommendations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS Qualitative individual interviews were conducted with 26 third-year medicine residents at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston (response rate = 87%). Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. RESULTS Despite significant interest in cross-cultural care, almost all of the residents reported very little training during residency. Most had gained cross-cultural skills through informal learning. A few were skeptical about formal training, and some expressed concern that it is impossible to understand every culture. Challenges to the delivery of cross-cultural care included managing patients with limited English proficiency, who involve family in critical decision making, and who have beliefs about disease that vary from the biomedical model. Residents cited many implications to these barriers, ranging from negatively impacting the patient-physician relationship to compromised care. Training recommendations included making changes to the educational climate and informal and formal training mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS If cross-cultural education is to be successful, it must take into account residents' perspectives and be focused on overcoming residents' cited barriers. It is important to convey that cross-cultural education is a set of skills that can be taught and applied, in a time-efficient manner, rather than requiring an insurmountable knowledge base. PMID:16704391

  20. Skills of internal medicine residents in disclosing medical errors: a study using standardized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Lynfa; McIlroy, Jodi; Levinson, Wendy

    2009-12-01

    To determine internal medicine (IM) residents' ability to disclose a medical error using standardized patients (SPs) and to survey residents' experiences of disclosure. In 2005, 42 second-year IM residents at the University of Toronto participated in the study. Each resident disclosed one medical error (insulin overdose) to an SP. The SP and a physician observer scored performance using a rating scale (1 = not performed, 2 = performed somewhat, and 3 = performed well) that measures error disclosure on five specific component skills and that provides an overall assessment score (scored on a five-point scale, 5 = high). Residents also completed a questionnaire. The mean scores on the five components were explanation of medical facts (2.60), honesty (2.31), empathy (2.47), future error prevention (1.99), and general communication skills (2.47). The residents' mean overall disclosure score was 3.53. Although 27 of 42 residents (64%) reported previous experience in disclosing an error to a patient during their training, only 7 (27%) of these residents reported receiving any feedback about their performance. Of 41 residents, 21 (51%) had received some prior training in disclosure, and 38 (93%) thought additional training would be useful and relevant. Disclosing medical error is now a standard practice. Experience with medical error begins early in training, and preparing trainees to discuss these errors is essential. Areas exist for improvement in residents' disclosure abilities, particularly regarding the prevention of future errors. Curricula to increase residents' skills and comfort in disclosure need to be implemented. Most residents would welcome further training.

  1. Five Key Leadership Actions Needed to Redesign Family Medicine Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozakowski, Stanley M; Eiff, M Patrice; Green, Larry A; Pugno, Perry A; Waller, Elaine; Jones, Samuel M; Fetter, Gerald; Carney, Patricia A

    2015-06-01

    New skills are needed to properly prepare the next generation of physicians and health professionals to practice in medical homes. Transforming residency training to address these new skills requires strong leadership. We sought to increase the understanding of leadership skills useful in residency programs that plan to undertake meaningful change. The Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4) project (2007-2014) was a comparative case study of 14 family medicine residencies that engaged in innovative training redesign, including altering the scope, content, sequence, length, and location of training to align resident education with requirements of the patient-centered medical home. In 2012, each P4 residency team submitted a final summary report of innovations implemented, overall insights, and dissemination activities during the study. Six investigators conducted independent narrative analyses of these reports. A consensus meeting held in September 2012 was used to identify key leadership actions associated with successful educational redesign. Five leadership actions were associated with successful implementation of innovations and residency transformation: (1) manage change; (2) develop financial acumen; (3) adapt best evidence educational strategies to the local environment; (4) create and sustain a vision that engages stakeholders; and (5) demonstrate courage and resilience. Residency programs are expected to change to better prepare their graduates for a changing delivery system. Insights about effective leadership skills can provide guidance for faculty to develop the skills needed to face practical realities while guiding transformation.

  2. Program for suicidal prevention, mental disorder treatment, and mental health development for resident doctors

    OpenAIRE

    José Luis Jiménez López; Jesús Arenas Osuna

    2017-01-01

    High demand of care and the academic burden of courses of specialization in medicine affect the mental health of medical residents with events ranging from simple emotional discomfort to development of affective disorders in susceptible individuals. The suicide of physicians has produced programs for their attention in some countries. We present the first mental health clinic for residents of a high specialty hospital in Mexico, focused on the prevention of suicide and depression, treatment o...

  3. Real time curriculum map for internal medicine residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Roger Y; Roberts, J Mark

    2007-11-07

    To manage the voluminous formal curriculum content in a limited amount of structured teaching time, we describe the development and evaluation of a curriculum map for academic half days (AHD) in a core internal medicine residency program. We created a 3-year cyclical curriculum map (an educational tool combining the content, methodology and timetabling of structured teaching), comprising a matrix of topics under various specialties/themes and corresponding AHD hours. All topics were cross-matched against the ACP-ASIM in-training examination, and all hours were colour coded based on the categories of core competencies. Residents regularly updated the map on a real time basis. There were 208 topics covered in 283 AHD hours. All topics represented core competencies with minimal duplication (78% covered once in 3 years). Only 42 hours (15%) involved non-didactic teaching, which increased after implementation of the map (18-19 hours/year versus baseline 5 hours/year). Most AHD hours (78%) focused on medical expert competencies. Resident satisfaction (90% response) was high throughout (range 3.64 +/- 0.21, 3.84 +/- 0.14 out of 4), which improved after 1 year but returned to baseline after 2 years. We developed and implemented an internal medicine curriculum map based on real time resident input, with minimal topic duplication and high resident satisfaction. The map provided an opportunity to balance didactic versus non-didactic teaching, and teaching on medical versus non medical expert topics.

  4. Examining Critical Thinking Skills in Family Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David; Schipper, Shirley; Westbury, Chris; Linh Banh, Hoan; Loeffler, Kim; Allan, G Michael; Ross, Shelley

    2016-02-01

    Our objective was to determine the relationship between critical thinking skills and objective measures of academic success in a family medicine residency program. This prospective observational cohort study was set in a large Canadian family medicine residency program. Intervention was the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST), administered at three points in residency: upon entry, at mid-point, and at graduation. Results from the CCTST, Canadian Residency Matching Service file, and interview scores were compared to other measures of academic performance (Medical Colleges Admission Test [MCAT] and College of Family Physicians of Canada [CCFP] certification examination results). For participants (n=60), significant positive correlations were found between critical thinking skills and performance on tests of knowledge. For the MCAT, CCTST scores correlated positively with full scores (n=24, r=0.57) as well as with each section score (verbal reasoning: r=0.59; physical sciences: r=0.64; biological sciences: r=0.54). For CCFP examination, CCTST correlated reliably with both sections (n=49, orals: r=0.34; short answer: r=0.47). Additionally, CCTST was a better predictor of performance on the CCFP exam than was the interview score at selection into the residency program (Fisher's r-to-z test, z=2.25). Success on a critical thinking skills exam was found to predict success on family medicine certification examinations. Given that critical thinking skills appear to be stable throughout residency training, including an assessment of critical thinking in the selection process may help identify applicants more likely to be successful on final certification exam.

  5. Medicine in the 21st century: recommended essential geriatrics competencies for internal medicine and family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brent C; Warshaw, Gregg; Fabiny, Anne Rebecca; Lundebjerg Mpa, Nancy; Medina-Walpole, Annette; Sauvigne, Karen; Schwartzberg, Joanne G; Leipzig, Rosanne M

    2010-09-01

    Physician workforce projections by the Institute of Medicine require enhanced training in geriatrics for all primary care and subspecialty physicians. Defining essential geriatrics competencies for internal medicine and family medicine residents would improve training for primary care and subspecialty physicians. The objectives of this study were to (1) define essential geriatrics competencies common to internal medicine and family medicine residents that build on established national geriatrics competencies for medical students, are feasible within current residency programs, are assessable, and address the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies; and (2) involve key stakeholder organizations in their development and implementation. Initial candidate competencies were defined through small group meetings and a survey of more than 100 experts, followed by detailed item review by 26 program directors and residency clinical educators from key professional organizations. Throughout, an 8-member working group made revisions to maintain consistency and compatibility among the competencies. Support and participation by key stakeholder organizations were secured throughout the project. The process identified 26 competencies in 7 domains: Medication Management; Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health; Complex or Chronic Illness(es) in Older Adults; Palliative and End-of-Life Care; Hospital Patient Safety; Transitions of Care; and Ambulatory Care. The competencies map directly onto the medical student geriatric competencies and the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Competencies. Through a consensus-building process that included leadership and members of key stakeholder organizations, a concise set of essential geriatrics competencies for internal medicine and family medicine residencies has been developed. These competencies are well aligned with concerns for residency training raised in a recent Medicare Payment Advisory

  6. Emergency medicine resident well-being: stress and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoonpongsimanont, W; Murphy, M; Kim, C H; Nasir, D; Compton, S

    2014-01-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) residents are exposed to many work-related stressors, which affect them both physically and emotionally. It is unknown, however, how EM residents perceive the effect of these stressors on their well-being and how often they use unhealthy coping mechanisms to manage stress. To evaluate EM residents' perceptions of stressors related to their overall well-being and the prevalence of various coping mechanisms. An online survey instrument was developed to gauge resident stress, satisfaction with current lifestyle, stress coping mechanisms and demographics. A stratified random sample of EM residents from three postgraduate years (PGY-I, PGY-II and PGY-III) was obtained. Descriptive statistics and one-way analysis of variance were used to compare residents across PGY level. There were 120 potential participants in each of the three PGYs. The overall response rate was 30% (109) with mean age of 30 and 61% were male. On a 0-4 scale (0 = completely dissatisfied), respondents in PGY-I reported significantly less satisfaction with lifestyle than those in PGY-II and III (mean rating: 1.29, 1.66 and 1.70, respectively; P stress categories: work relationships (1.37), work environment (1.10) and response to patients (1.08). Residents reported exercise (94%), hobbies (89%) and use of alcohol (71%) as coping methods. Residents reported low satisfaction with current lifestyle. This dissatisfaction was unrelated to perceived work-related stress. Some undesirable coping methods were prevalent, suggesting that training programs could focus on promotion of healthy group activities.

  7. Outcomes assessment of a residency program in laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, E E; Pisciotto, P T; Hopfer, S M; Makowski, G; Ryan, R W; Aslanzadeh, J

    1997-01-01

    During a down-sizing of residency programs at a State University Medical School, hospital based residents' positions were eliminated. It was determined to find out the characteristics of the residents who graduated from the Laboratory Medicine Program, to compare women graduates with men graduates, and to compare IMGs with United States Graduates. An assessment of a 25 year program in laboratory medicine which had graduated 100 residents showed that there was no statistically significant difference by chi 2 analysis in positions (laboratory directors or staff), in certification (American Board of Pathology [and subspecialties], American Board of Medical Microbiology, American Board of Clinical Chemistry) nor in academic appointments (assistant professor to full professor) when the male graduates were compared with the female graduates or when graduates of American medical schools were compared with graduates of foreign medical schools. There were statistically significant associations by chi 2 analysis between directorship positions and board certification and between academic appointments and board certification. Of 100 graduates, there were 57 directors, 52 certified, and 41 with academic appointments. Twenty-two graduates (11 women and 11 men) attained all three.

  8. Factors Associated with Medical Knowledge Acquisition During Internal Medicine Residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeger, Scott L.; Kolars, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Knowledge acquisition is a goal of residency and is measurable by in-training exams. Little is known about factors associated with medical knowledge acquisition. OBJECTIVE To examine associations of learning habits on medical knowledge acquisition. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS Cohort study of all 195 residents who took the Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (IM-ITE) 421 times over 4 years while enrolled in the Internal Medicine Residency, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. MEASUREMENTS Score (percent questions correct) on the IM-ITE adjusted for variables known or hypothesized to be associated with score using a random effects model. RESULTS When adjusting for demographic, training, and prior achievement variables, yearly advancement within residency was associated with an IM-ITE score increase of 5.1% per year (95%CI 4.1%, 6.2%; p < .001). In the year before examination, comparable increases in IM-ITE score were associated with attendance at two curricular conferences per week, score increase of 3.9% (95%CI 2.1%, 5.7%; p < .001), or self-directed reading of an electronic knowledge resource 20 minutes each day, score increase of 4.5% (95%CI 1.2%, 7.8%; p = .008). Other factors significantly associated with IM-ITE performance included: age at start of residency, score decrease per year of increasing age, −0.2% (95%CI −0.36%, −0.042%; p = .01), and graduation from a US medical school, score decrease compared to international medical school graduation, −3.4% (95%CI −6.5%, −0.36%; p = .03). CONCLUSIONS Conference attendance and self-directed reading of an electronic knowledge resource had statistically and educationally significant independent associations with knowledge acquisition that were comparable to the benefit of a year in residency training. PMID:17468889

  9. Characteristics of Emergency Medicine Residency Programs in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño, Andrés; Alcalde, Victor; Gutierrez, Camilo; Romero, Mauricio Garcia; Carrillo, Atilio Moreno; Vargas, Luis E; Vallejo, Carlos E; Zarama, Virginia; Mora Rodriguez, José L; Bustos, Yury; Granada, Juliana; Aguiar, Leonar G; Menéndez, Salvador; Cohen, Jorge I; Saavedra, Miguel A; Rodriguez, Juan M; Roldan, Tatiana; Arbelaez, Christian

    2017-10-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) is in different stages of development around the world. Colombia has made significant strides in EM development in the last two decades and recognized it as a medical specialty in 2005. The country now has seven EM residency programs: three in the capital city of Bogotá, two in Medellin, one in Manizales, and one in Cali. The seven residency programs are in different stages of maturity, with the oldest founded 20 years ago and two founded in the last two years. The objective of this study was to characterize these seven residency programs. We conducted semi-structured interviews with faculty and residents from all the existing programs in 2013-2016. Topics included program characteristics and curricula. Colombian EM residencies are three-year programs, with the exception of one four-year program. Programs accept 3-10 applicants yearly. Only one program has free tuition and the rest charge tuition. The number of EM faculty ranges from 2-15. EM rotation requirements range from 11-33% of total clinical time. One program does not have a pediatric rotation. The other programs require 1-2 months of pediatrics or pediatric EM. Critical care requirements range from 4-7 months. Other common rotations include anesthesia, general surgery, internal medicine, obstetrics, gynecology, orthopedics, ophthalmology, radiology, toxicology, psychiatry, neurology, cardiology, pulmonology, and trauma. All programs offer 4-6 hours of protected didactic time each week. Some programs require Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Pediatric Advanced Life Support and Advanced Trauma Life Support, with some programs providing these trainings in-house or subsidizing the cost. Most programs require one research project for graduation. Resident evaluations consist of written tests and oral exams several times per year. Point-of-care ultrasound training is provided in four of the seven programs. As emergency medicine continues to develop in Colombia, more residency programs are

  10. Characteristics of Emergency Medicine Residency Programs in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Patiño

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency medicine (EM is in different stages of development around the world. Colombia has made significant strides in EM development in the last two decades and recognized it as a medical specialty in 2005. The country now has seven EM residency programs: three in the capital city of Bogotá, two in Medellin, one in Manizales, and one in Cali. The seven residency programs are in different stages of maturity, with the oldest founded 20 years ago and two founded in the last two years. The objective of this study was to characterize these seven residency programs. Methods: We conducted semi-structured interviews with faculty and residents from all the existing programs in 2013–2016. Topics included program characteristics and curricula. Results: Colombian EM residencies are three-year programs, with the exception of one four-year program. Programs accept 3–10 applicants yearly. Only one program has free tuition and the rest charge tuition. The number of EM faculty ranges from 2–15. EM rotation requirements range from 11–33% of total clinical time. One program does not have a pediatric rotation. The other programs require 1–2 months of pediatrics or pediatric EM. Critical care requirements range from 4–7 months. Other common rotations include anesthesia, general surgery, internal medicine, obstetrics, gynecology, orthopedics, ophthalmology, radiology, toxicology, psychiatry, neurology, cardiology, pulmonology, and trauma. All programs offer 4–6 hours of protected didactic time each week. Some programs require Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Pediatric Advanced Life Support and Advanced Trauma Life Support, with some programs providing these trainings in-house or subsidizing the cost. Most programs require one research project for graduation. Resident evaluations consist of written tests and oral exams several times per year. Point-of-care ultrasound training is provided in four of the seven programs. Conclusion: As

  11. Impact of a family medicine resident wellness curriculum: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Runyan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Up to 60% of practicing physicians report symptoms of burnout, which often peak during residency. Residency is also a relevant time for habits of self-care and resiliency to be emphasized. A growing literature underscores the importance of this; however, evidence about effective burnout prevention curriculum during residency remains limited. Objectives: The purpose of this project is to evaluate the impact of a new, 1-month wellness curriculum for 12 second-year family medicine residents on burnout, empathy, stress, and self-compassion. Methods: The pilot program, introduced during a new rotation emphasizing competencies around leadership, focused on teaching skills to cultivate mindfulness and self-compassion in order to enhance empathy and reduce stress. Pre-assessments and 3-month follow-up assessments on measures of burnout, empathy, self-compassion, and perceived stress were collected to evaluate the impact of the curriculum. It was hypothesized that this curriculum would enhance empathy and self-compassion as well as reduce stress and burnout among family medicine residents. Results: Descriptive statistics revealed positive trends on the mean scores of all the measures, particularly the Mindfulness Scale of the Self-Compassion Inventory and the Jefferson Empathy Scale. However, the small sample size and lack of sufficient power to detect meaningful differences limited the use of inferential statistics. Conclusions: This feasibility study demonstrates how a residency wellness curriculum can be developed, implemented, and evaluated with promising results, including high participant satisfaction.

  12. Impact of a family medicine resident wellness curriculum: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyan, Christine; Savageau, Judith A; Potts, Stacy; Weinreb, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Up to 60% of practicing physicians report symptoms of burnout, which often peak during residency. Residency is also a relevant time for habits of self-care and resiliency to be emphasized. A growing literature underscores the importance of this; however, evidence about effective burnout prevention curriculum during residency remains limited. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the impact of a new, 1-month wellness curriculum for 12 second-year family medicine residents on burnout, empathy, stress, and self-compassion. The pilot program, introduced during a new rotation emphasizing competencies around leadership, focused on teaching skills to cultivate mindfulness and self-compassion in order to enhance empathy and reduce stress. Pre-assessments and 3-month follow-up assessments on measures of burnout, empathy, self-compassion, and perceived stress were collected to evaluate the impact of the curriculum. It was hypothesized that this curriculum would enhance empathy and self-compassion as well as reduce stress and burnout among family medicine residents. Descriptive statistics revealed positive trends on the mean scores of all the measures, particularly the Mindfulness Scale of the Self-Compassion Inventory and the Jefferson Empathy Scale. However, the small sample size and lack of sufficient power to detect meaningful differences limited the use of inferential statistics. This feasibility study demonstrates how a residency wellness curriculum can be developed, implemented, and evaluated with promising results, including high participant satisfaction.

  13. An assessment of emotional intelligence in emergency medicine resident physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanagnou, Dimitrios; Linder, Kathryn; Shah, Anuj; London, Kory Scott; Chandra, Shruti; Naples, Robin

    2017-12-27

    To define the emotional intelligence (EI) profile of emergency medicine (EM) residents, and identify resident EI strengths and weaknesses. First-, second-, and third-year residents (post-graduate years [PGY] 1, 2, and 3, respectively) of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's EM Program completed the Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i 2.0), a validated instrument offered by Multi-Health Systems. Reported scores included total mean EI, 5 composite scores, and 15 subscales of EI. Scores are reported as means with 95% CIs. The unpaired, two-sample t-test was used to evaluate differences in means. Thirty-five residents completed the assessment (response rate 97.2%). Scores were normed to the general population (mean 100, SD 15). Total mean EI for the cohort was 103 (95%CI,100-108). EI was higher in female (107) than male (101) residents. PGY-2s demonstrated the lowest mean EI (95) versus PGY-1s (104) and PGY-3s (110). The difference in PGY-3 EI (110; 95%CI,103-116) and PGY-1 EI (95, 95%CI,87-104) was statistically significant (unpaired t-test, pself-actualization (107); empathy (107); interpersonal relationships (106); impulse control (106); and stress tolerance (106). Lowest subscale score was in assertiveness (98). Self-regard (89), assertiveness (88), and independence (90) were areas in which PGY-2s attained relatively lower scores (unpaired t-test, ptraining that may assist in developing EM residents, specifically in self-regard, assertiveness, and self-expression. Further study is required to ascertain if patterns in level of training are idiosyncratic or relate to the natural maturation of residents.

  14. Evaluating residents in the nuclear medicine residency training program: an educational perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascual, T.N.; San Luis, T.O.L.; Leus, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The comprehensive evaluation of medical residents in a residency-training program includes the use of educational tools to measure the attainment of competencies in the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains as prescribed in the training curriculum. Attention is almost always focused on the testing of cognitive domain of the learners with limited attention given on the psychomotor and affective parameters, which are in fact, together with the cognitive domain, integral to the students' learning behaviour. This paper aims to review the principles of test construction, including the perspectives on the roles, types and purpose of tests in the domains of learning (cognitive, psychomotor and affective) as well as the use of Non-Test materials for measuring affective learning outcomes and the construction of Performance Tests and Portfolio Assessment tools which are all essential for the effective and efficient evaluation of residents in a Nuclear Medicine Training Program. (author)

  15. Real time curriculum map for internal medicine residency

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    Roberts J Mark

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To manage the voluminous formal curriculum content in a limited amount of structured teaching time, we describe the development and evaluation of a curriculum map for academic half days (AHD in a core internal medicine residency program. Methods We created a 3-year cyclical curriculum map (an educational tool combining the content, methodology and timetabling of structured teaching, comprising a matrix of topics under various specialties/themes and corresponding AHD hours. All topics were cross-matched against the ACP-ASIM in-training examination, and all hours were colour coded based on the categories of core competencies. Residents regularly updated the map on a real time basis. Results There were 208 topics covered in 283 AHD hours. All topics represented core competencies with minimal duplication (78% covered once in 3 years. Only 42 hours (15% involved non-didactic teaching, which increased after implementation of the map (18–19 hours/year versus baseline 5 hours/year. Most AHD hours (78% focused on medical expert competencies. Resident satisfaction (90% response was high throughout (range 3.64 ± 0.21, 3.84 ± 0.14 out of 4, which improved after 1 year but returned to baseline after 2 years. Conclusion We developed and implemented an internal medicine curriculum map based on real time resident input, with minimal topic duplication and high resident satisfaction. The map provided an opportunity to balance didactic versus non-didactic teaching, and teaching on medical versus non medical expert topics.

  16. Multidimensional Attitudes of Emergency Medicine Residents Toward Older Adults

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    Teresita M. Hogan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The demands of our rapidly expanding older population strain many emergency departments (EDs, and older patients experience disproportionately high adverse health outcomes. Trainee attitude is key in improving care for older adults. There is negligible knowledge of baseline emergency medicine (EM resident attitudes regarding elder patients. Awareness of baseline attitudes can serve to better structure training for improved care of older adults. The objective of the study is to identify baseline EM resident attitudes toward older adults using a validated attitude scale and multidimensional analysis. Methods: Six EM residencies participated in a voluntary anonymous survey delivered in summer and fall 2009. We used factor analysis using the principal components method and Varimax rotation, to analyze attitude interdependence, translating the 21 survey questions into 6 independent dimensions. We adapted this survey from a validated instrument by the addition of 7 EM-specific questions to measures attitudes relevant to emergency care of elders and the training of EM residents in the geriatric competencies. Scoring was performed on a 5-point Likert scale. We compared factor scores using student t and ANOVA. Results: 173 EM residents participated showing an overall positive attitude toward older adults, with a factor score of 3.79 (3.0 being a neutral score. Attitudes trended to more negative in successive post-graduate year (PGY levels. Conclusion: EM residents demonstrate an overall positive attitude towards the care of older adults. We noted a longitudinal hardening of attitude in social values, which are more negative in successive PGY-year levels. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(4:511–517.

  17. A Model Longitudinal Observation Medicine Curriculum for an Emergency Medicine Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Matthew; Baugh, Christopher; Osborne, Anwar; Clark, Carol; Shayne, Philip; Ross, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The role of observation services for emergency department patients has increased in recent years. Driven by changing health care practices and evolving payer policies, many hospitals in the United States currently have or are developing an observation unit (OU) and emergency physicians are most often expected to manage patients in this setting. Yet, few residency programs dedicate a portion of their clinical curriculum to observation medicine. This knowledge set should be integrated into the core training curriculum of emergency physicians. Presented here is a model observation medicine longitudinal training curriculum, which can be integrated into an emergency medicine (EM) residency. It was developed by a consensus of content experts representing the observation medicine interest group and observation medicine section, respectively, from EM's two major specialty societies: the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) and the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). The curriculum consists of didactic, clinical, and self-directed elements. It is longitudinal, with learning objectives for each year of training, focusing initially on the basic principles of observation medicine and appropriate observation patient selection; moving to the management of various observation appropriate conditions; and then incorporating further concepts of OU management, billing, and administration. This curriculum is flexible and designed to be used in both academic and community EM training programs within the United States. Additionally, scholarly opportunities, such as elective rotations and fellowship training, are explored. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  18. Psychosomatic medicine and psychiatry residents: a pan-Canadian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Granich, Annette; Chan, Peter; Abbey, Susan; Galbaud du Fort, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    Psychosomatic medicine (PM) is recognized as a psychiatric subspecialty in the US, but continues to be considered a focused area of general psychiatric practice in Canada. Due to the unclear status of PM in Canada, a national survey was designed to assess the perception of and training experiences in PM among psychiatry residents. Residents enrolled at one of 13 psychiatry programs in Canada participated in the study. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the effect of PM training experiences and career interest in PM on the perception of PM, controlling for number of months already completed in PM, training level, and residency program. The response rate was 35%, n = 199. 68% of respondents identified PM as a definite subspecialty, with the majority of respondents believing that PM was as important a subspecialty as child (53%), forensic (67%) and geriatric psychiatry (75%). Eighty percent of the respondents believed a PM specialist should complete more than 3 months of additional training to be competent/qualified. There was significant heterogeneity in training experiences across programs, with a differential effect of certain training components-seminar, journal club-associated with a more favorable perception of PM as a subspecialty. The above results challenge the notion that PM represents only a focused area of general psychiatric practice in Canada. PM appears to require additional training beyond residency for trainees to feel competent and qualified. Results from this survey suggest Canada should follow the US lead on recognizing PM as a subspecialty. Copyright © 2011 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute pain management curriculum for emergency medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motov, Sergey M; Marshall, John P

    2011-10-01

    Pain is the most common reason people visit emergency departments (EDs); this implies that emergency physicians (EPs) should be experts in managing acute painful conditions. The current trend in the literature, however, demonstrates that EPs possess inadequate knowledge and lack formal training in acute pain management. The purpose of this article is to create a formal educational curriculum that would assist emergency medicine (EM) residents in proper assessment and treatment of acute pain, as well as in providing a solid theoretical and practical knowledge base for managing acute pain in the ED. The authors propose a series of lectures, case-oriented study groups, practical small group sessions, and class-specific didactics with the goal of enhancing the theoretical and practical knowledge of acute pain management in the ED. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  20. Internal Medicine residents use heuristics to estimate disease probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phang, Sen Han; Ravani, Pietro; Schaefer, Jeffrey; Wright, Bruce; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Training in Bayesian reasoning may have limited impact on accuracy of probability estimates. In this study, our goal was to explore whether residents previously exposed to Bayesian reasoning use heuristics rather than Bayesian reasoning to estimate disease probabilities. We predicted that if residents use heuristics then post-test probability estimates would be increased by non-discriminating clinical features or a high anchor for a target condition. We randomized 55 Internal Medicine residents to different versions of four clinical vignettes and asked them to estimate probabilities of target conditions. We manipulated the clinical data for each vignette to be consistent with either 1) using a representative heuristic, by adding non-discriminating prototypical clinical features of the target condition, or 2) using anchoring with adjustment heuristic, by providing a high or low anchor for the target condition. When presented with additional non-discriminating data the odds of diagnosing the target condition were increased (odds ratio (OR) 2.83, 95% confidence interval [1.30, 6.15], p = 0.009). Similarly, the odds of diagnosing the target condition were increased when a high anchor preceded the vignette (OR 2.04, [1.09, 3.81], p = 0.025). Our findings suggest that despite previous exposure to the use of Bayesian reasoning, residents use heuristics, such as the representative heuristic and anchoring with adjustment, to estimate probabilities. Potential reasons for attribute substitution include the relative cognitive ease of heuristics vs. Bayesian reasoning or perhaps residents in their clinical practice use gist traces rather than precise probability estimates when diagnosing.

  1. Impact of night shifts on emergency medicine resident resuscitation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerley, Sarah; McKaigney, Conor; Boyne, Devon; Ginsberg, Darrell; Dagnone, J Damon; Hall, Andrew K

    2018-03-12

    Emergency medicine (EM) trainees often work nightshifts. We sought to measure how this circadian disruption affects EM resident performance during simulated resuscitations. This retrospective cohort study enrolled EM residents at a single Canadian academic centre over a six-year period. Residents completed twice-annual simulation-based resuscitation-focused objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) with assessment in four domains (primary assessment, diagnostic actions, therapeutic actions and communication), and a global assessment score (GAS). Primary and secondary exposures of interest were the presence of a nightshift (late-evening shifts ending between midnight and 03h00 or overnight shifts ending after 06h00) the day before or within three days before an OSCE. A random effects linear regression model was used to quantify the association between nightshifts and OSCE scores. From 57 residents, 136 OSCE scores were collected. Working a nightshift the day before an OSCE did not affect male trainee scores but was associated with a significant absolute decrease in mean total scores (-6% [95% CI -12% to 0%]), GAS (-7% [-13% to 0%]), and communication (-9% [-16% to -2%]) scores among women. Working any nightshift within three days before an OSCE lowered absolute mean total scores by 4% [-7% to 0%] and communication scores by 5% [-5% to 0%] irrespective of gender. Our results suggest that shift work may impact EM resident resuscitation performance, particularly in the communication domain. This impact may be more significant in women than men, suggesting a need for further investigation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Residency education through the family medicine morbidity and mortality conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Curi; Fetters, Michael D; Gorenflo, Daniel W

    2006-09-01

    The value of the morbidity and mortality conference (M&MC) has received little examination in the primary care literature. We sought to understand the educational content of M&MCs by examining data from a family medicine training program. Archived morbidity and mortality conference data (July 2001-July 2003) were retrieved from two University of Michigan family medicine adult inpatient services (one community based and one university based). We used chi-square and t test to compare demographic variables and adverse events between hospital sites. We qualitatively analyzed written comments about adverse events. Both family medicine services shared similar diagnoses, patient volume, length of stay, and gender distribution of patients, but the community hospital had an older average patient age (67.9 years versus 52.9 years) and a higher outpatient complication rate. Analysis of the qualitative data revealed patterns of adverse events, such as an association between avoidable admissions and inadequate pain control, that could be improved through educational intervention. Although family medicine residents' experiences in university and community hospitals were comparable, there were differences in patient populations and case complexity. Modifying the M&MC format could enhance its effectiveness as an educational tool about adverse events.

  3. Family medicine residents' perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoako, Adae O; Amoako, Agyenim B; Pujalte, George Ga

    2015-01-01

    Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7%) compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8%) respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively). Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, sports medicine contribute to residents' knowledge and comfort level in treatment of common sports injuries.

  4. NON-MUSCULOSKELETAL SPORTS MEDICINE LEARNING IN FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualino Caputo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing popularity of primary care sports medicine fellowships, as evidenced by the more than two-fold increase in family medicine sports medicine fellowships from a total of 31 accredited programs during the 1998/1999 academic year (ACGME, 1998 to 63 during the 2003/2004 academic year (ACGME, 2006, there are few empirical studies to support the efficacy of such programs. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have been conducted to assess the impact of primary care sports medicine fellowships on family medicine residents' learning of non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics. Rigorous evaluations of the outcomes of such programs are helpful to document the value of such programs to both the lay public and interested medical residents. In order to evaluate such programs, it is helpful to apply the same objective standards to residents trained across multiple programs. Hence, we would like to know if there is a learning effect with respect to non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics identified on yearly administered American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM in-training exams (ITE to family medicine residents in family medicine residency programs in the United States with and without primary care sports medicine fellowship programs. Review and approval for the research proposal was granted by the ABFM, who also allowed access to the required data. Permission to study and report only non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics excluding musculoskeletal topics was granted at the time due to other ongoing projects at the ABFM involving musculoskeletal topics. ABFM allowed us access to examinations from 1998 to 2003. We were given copies of each exam and records of responses to each item (correct or incorrect by each examinee (examinees were anonymous for each year.For each year, each examinee was classified by the ABFM as either (a belonging to a program that contained a sports medicine fellowship, or (b not belonging to a program

  5. The Effects of Abortion Training on Family Medicine Residents' Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summit, Aleza K; Gold, Marji

    2017-01-01

    RHEDI, Reproductive Health Education in Family Medicine, offers technical assistance and funding to family medicine residency programs to support integrated opt-out abortion and reproductive health training for residents. This study assessed the impact of this enhanced training on residents' reproductive health experience. Investigator-developed pre- and post-surveys were administered online to 214 residents at 12 family medicine residency programs before and after their RHEDI training experience. Surveys addressed experience in contraception and abortion, attitudes around abortion provision, and post-residency intentions. Descriptive statistics were generated, and statistical tests were performed to assess changes after training. Surveys had a 90% response rate. After the RHEDI enhanced reproductive health rotation, residents reported increased experience in contraception provision, early pregnancy ultrasound, aspiration and medication abortion, and miscarriage management. After training, residents with experience in IUD insertion increased from 85% to 99%, and contraceptive implant insertion experience rose from 60% to 85%. Residents who had performed any abortions increased from 15% to 79%, and self-rated competency in abortion increased. Finally, almost all residents agreed that early abortion was within the scope of family medicine, and training confirmed residents' intentions to provide reproductive health services after residency. Integrated training in reproductive health, with an emphasis on abortion, increases residents' experience and underscores their understanding of the role of these services in family medicine. Increasing the number of family medicine residency programs that offer this training could help prepare family physicians to meet their patients' needs for reproductive health services.

  6. [Current problems in preventive medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheptalov, N N

    1995-01-01

    The author presents data on the incidence of diseases involving temporary invalidity among workers of the Moscow Railway. The difference in morbidity levels at various enterprises in this branch of industry is as high as 2.9 to 5.9 times, which fact is regarded as a sign of uncontrollable increase of morbidity among the workers of the predominant part of the production. A system of registration and organizational measures aimed at morbidity prevention, conditionally named Automated Monitoring System 'Morbidity' (AMSM) is presented. Results of distribution of morbidity by "days" in the final line 30 of record file 16BH in relative compatible parameters are described. Introduction of AMSM resulted in reduction of morbidity in 1993 as reflected in line 35 in "days" by 10% vs. the year 1992 and in a different rating of a test enterprise TC-18 in the total group of the Moscow Railway Depot, which moved from the 4th to 10th position. Economical estimation of the benefit due to morbidity reduction and validation of cost efficacy and self support of AMSM are presented.

  7. Discrimination and abuse in internal medicine residency. The Internal Medicine Program Directors of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanIneveld, C H; Cook, D J; Kane, S L; King, D

    1996-07-01

    To survey the extent to which internal medicine housestaff experience abuse and discrimination in their training. Through a literature review and resident focus groups, we developed a self-administered questionnaire. In this cross-sectional survey, respondents were asked to record the frequency with which they experienced and witnessed different types of abuse and discrimination during residency training, using a 7-point Likert scale. Internal medicine housestaff in Canada. Of 543 residents in 13 programs participating (84% response rate), 35% were female. Psychological abuse, as reported by attending physicians (68%), patients (79%), and nurses or other health workers (77%), was widespread. Female residents experienced gender discrimination by attending physicians (70%), patients (88%), and nurses (71%); rates for males were 23%, 38%, and 35%, respectively. Females reported being sexually harassed more often than males, by attending physicians (35% vs 4%, p discrimination and homophobic remarks in the workplace, perpetrated by all groups of health professionals. Psychological abuse, gender discrimination, sexual harassment, physical abuse, homophobia, and racial discrimination are prevalent problems during residency training. Housestaff, medical educators, allied health workers, and the public need to work together to address these problems in the training environment.

  8. Emergency Medicine Residency Boot Camp Curriculum: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ataya, Ramsey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Establishing a boot camp curriculum is pertinent for emergency medicine (EM residents in order to develop proficiency in a large scope of procedures and leadership skills.  In this article, we describe our program’s EM boot camp curriculum as well as measure the confidence levels of resident physicians through a pre- and post-boot camp survey. Methods: We designed a one-month boot camp curriculum with the intention of improving the confidence, procedural performance, leadership, communication and resource management of EM interns. Our curriculum consisted of 12 hours of initial training and culminated in a two-day boot camp. The initial day consisted of clinical skill training and the second day included code drill scenarios followed by interprofessional debriefing.   Results: Twelve EM interns entered residency with an overall confidence score of 3.2 (1-5 scale across all surveyed skills. Interns reported the highest pre-survey confidence scores in suturing (4.3 and genitourinary exams (3.9. The lowest pre-survey confidence score was in thoracostomy (2.4. Following the capstone experience, overall confidence scores increased to 4.0. Confidence increased the most in defibrillation and thoracostomy. Additionally, all interns reported post-survey confidence scores of at least 3.0 in all skills, representing an internal anchor of “moderately confident/need guidance at times to perform procedure.” Conclusion: At the completion of the boot camp curriculum, EM interns had improvement in self-reported confidence across all surveyed skills and procedures. The described EM boot camp curriculum was effective, feasible and provided a foundation to our trainees during their first month of residency. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(2:356–361.

  9. Residents as teachers: psychiatry and family medicine residents' self-assessment of teaching knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Michael W; Ekambaram, Vijayabharathi; Tucker, Phebe; Aggarwal, Ruchi

    2013-09-01

    Residents are one of the prime sources of information and education for medical students. As an initial step in supporting residents as teachers, a baseline self-assessment of residents' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values related to teaching was conducted among psychiatry and family medicine residents to compare and improve their confidence and skills as teachers. Psychiatry residents (N=12) and family medicine residents (N=23) completed self-assessments of their knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values related to teaching. Residents also were asked to list steps used in the One-Minute Preceptor process and estimate the time each spent in teaching. Descriptive summary statistics were used for four main areas related to teaching; t-test and chi-square analyses were conducted to ascertain whether there was a significant difference in resident groups. In the current study, the perceived amount of time spent for teaching patients was significantly higher among family practice residents, whereas no group differences were found for time teaching medical students, peers, community members, non-physicians, or others. However, family medicine residents rated themselves higher than psychiatry residents in their understanding of their roles in teaching medical students and teaching patients. Also, family medicine residents' self-reported teaching skills were more advanced (82.4%) than psychiatry residents' (54.2%). They most likely applied at least two different teaching methods in inpatient and outpatient settings, as compared with psychiatry residents. No significant group differences were found in the other 15 items assessing teaching knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values. Results indicate that residents' knowledge, skills, attitudes, and values regarding teaching varies across institutions and training programs. The psychiatry residents in this study do not clearly understand their role as educators with patients and medical students; they have a less clear

  10. Emergency Medicine Resident Orientation: How Training Programs Get their Residents Started

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGrath, Jillian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The first formal orientation program for incoming emergency medicine (EM residents was started in 1976. The last attempt to describe the nature of orientation programs was by Brillman in 1995. Now almost all residencies offer orientation to incoming residents, but little is known about the curricular content or structure of these programs. The purpose of this project was to describe the current composition and purpose of EM resident orientation programs in the United States. In autumn of 2014, we surveyed all U.S. EM residency program directors (n=167. We adapted our survey instrument from one used by Brillman (1995. The survey was designed to assess the orientation program’s purpose, structure, content, and teaching methods. The survey return rate was 63% (105 of 167. Most respondents (77% directed three-year residencies, and all but one program offered intern orientation. Orientations lasted an average of nine clinical (Std. Dev.=7.3 and 13 non-clinical days (Std. Dev.=9.3. The prototypical breakdown of program activities was 27% lectures, 23% clinical work, 16% skills training, 10% administrative activities, 9% socialization and 15% other activities. Most orientations included activities to promote socialization among interns (98% and with other members of the department (91%. Many programs (87% included special certification courses (ACLS, ATLS, PALS, NRP. Course content included the following: use of electronic medical records (90%, physician wellness (75%, and chief complaint-based lectures (72%. Procedural skill sessions covered ultrasound (94%, airway management (91%, vascular access (90%, wound management (77%, splinting (67%, and trauma skills (62%. Compared to Brillman (1995, we found that more programs (99% are offering formal orientation and allocating more time to them. Lectures remain the most common educational activity. We found increases in the use of skills labs and specialty certifications. We also observed increases in

  11. Virtual Alternative to the Oral Examination for Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGrath, Jillian

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The oral examination is a traditional method for assessing the developing physician’s medical knowledge, clinical reasoning and interpersonal skills. The typical oral examination is a face-to-face encounter in which examiners quiz examinees on how they would confront a patient case. The advantage of the oral exam is that the examiner can adapt questions to the examinee’s response. The disadvantage is the potential for examiner bias and intimidation. Computer-based virtual simulation technology has been widely used in the gaming industry. We wondered whether virtual simulation could serve as a practical format for delivery of an oral examination. For this project, we compared the attitudes and performance of emergency medicine (EM residents who took our traditional oral exam to those who took the exam using virtual simulation. Methods: EM residents (n=35 were randomized to a traditional oral examination format (n=17 or a simulated virtual examination format (n=18 conducted within an immersive learning environment, Second Life (SL. Proctors scored residents using the American Board of Emergency Medicine oral examination assessment instruments, which included execution of critical actions and ratings on eight competency categories (1-8 scale. Study participants were also surveyed about their oral examination experience. Results: We observed no differences between virtual and traditional groups on critical action scores or scores on eight competency categories. However, we noted moderate effect sizes favoring the Second Life group on the clinical competence score. Examinees from both groups thought that their assessment was realistic, fair, objective, and efficient. Examinees from the virtual group reported a preference for the virtual format and felt that the format was less intimidating. Conclusion: The virtual simulated oral examination was shown to be a feasible alternative to the traditional oral examination format for

  12. Public Health and Preventive Medicine Meet Integrative Health: Applications of Competency Mapping to Curriculum Education at the University of Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Eden V; Benn, Rita K; Warber, Sara L

    2015-11-01

    The University of Michigan School of Public Health Preventive Medicine Residency (UMSPH PMR) Integrative Medicine Program (IMP) was developed to incorporate integrative medicine (IM), public health, and preventive medicine principles into a comprehensive curriculum for preventive medicine residents and faculty. The objectives of this project were to (1) increase the preventive medicine workforce skill sets based in complementary and alternative medicine and IM that would address individual and population health issues; (2) address the increasing demand for evidence-based IM by training physicians to implement cost-effective primary and secondary prevention services and programs; and (3) share lessons learned, curriculum evaluations, and best practices with the larger cohort of funded IM PMR programs. The UMSPH PMR collaborated with University of Michigan IM faculty to incorporate existing IM competencies with those already established for preventive medicine and public health residency training as the first critical step for IMP curriculum integration. Essential teaching strategies incorporated didactic and practicum methods, and made use of seasoned IM faculty, along with newly minted preventive medicine integrative teaching faculty, and PMR resident learners as IM teachers. The major components of the IMP curriculum included resident participation in IMP Orientation Sessions, resident leadership in epidemiology graduate IM seminars, resident rotations in IM month-long clinical practicums, resident participation in interprofessional health system-wide IM clinical case conferences, and PMR faculty enrollment in the renowned Faculty Scholars Program in Integrative Healthcare. This paper describes the novel interdisciplinary collaborations and key curriculum components that resulted in the IMP, as well as evaluation of strengths, weaknesses, and lessons learned. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving the Quality of Postgraduate Education in Traditional Japanese Kampo Medicine for Junior Residents: An Exploratory Survey Conducted in Five Institutions in the Tohoku Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Shin; Kobayashi, Seiichi; Kaneko, Soichiro; Tabata, Masao; Sato, Shinya; Ishikawa, Keiichi; Suzuki, Saya; Arita, Ryutaro; Saito, Natsumi; Kamiya, Tetsuharu; Nishikawa, Hitoshi; Ikeno, Yuka; Tanaka, Junichi; Ohsawa, Minoru; Kikuchi, Akiko; Numata, Takehiro; Kuroda, Hitoshi; Abe, Michiaki; Ishibashi, Satoru; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Ishii, Tadashi

    2016-11-01

    Traditional Japanese (Kampo) medicine has been widely applied in general medicine in Japan. In 2001, the model core curriculum for Japanese medical education was revised to include Kampo medicine. Since 2007, all 80 Japanese medical schools have incorporated it within their programs. However, postgraduate training or instruction of Kampo medicine has not been recognized as a goal for the clinical training of junior residents by Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare; little is known about postgraduate Kampo medicine education. This exploratory study investigated attitudes about Kampo medicine among junior residents in Japanese postgraduate training programs. A questionnaire survey was administered to junior residents at five institutions in the Tohoku area of Japan. Questions evaluated residents' experiences of prescribing Kampo medicines and their expectations for postgraduate Kampo education and training. As a result, 121 residents responded (response rate = 74%). About 96% of participants had previously received Kampo medicine education at their pre-graduate medical schools and 64% had prescribed Kampo medications. Specifically, daikenchuto was prescribed to prevent ileus and constipation after abdominal surgery and yokukansan was prescribed to treat delirium in the elderly. Residents received on-the-job instruction by attending doctors. Over 70% of participants indicated that there was a need for postgraduate Kampo medicine education opportunities and expected lectures and instruction on how to use it to treat common diseases. In conclusion, we have revealed that junior residents require Kampo medicine education in Japanese postgraduate training programs. The programs for comprehensive pre-graduate and postgraduate Kampo education are expected.

  14. Disaster Education: A Survey Study to Analyze Disaster Medicine Training in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Ritu R; Cattamanchi, Srihari; Alqahtani, Abdulrahman; Aljohani, Majed; Keim, Mark; Ciottone, Gregory R

    2017-08-01

    The increase in natural and man-made disasters occurring worldwide places Emergency Medicine (EM) physicians at the forefront of responding to these crises. Despite the growing interest in Disaster Medicine, it is unclear if resident training has been able to include these educational goals. Hypothesis This study surveys EM residencies in the United States to assess the level of education in Disaster Medicine, to identify competencies least and most addressed, and to highlight effective educational models already in place. The authors distributed an online survey of multiple-choice and free-response questions to EM residency Program Directors in the United States between February 7 and September 24, 2014. Questions assessed residency background and details on specific Disaster Medicine competencies addressed during training. Out of 183 programs, 75 (41%) responded to the survey and completed all required questions. Almost all programs reported having some level of Disaster Medicine training in their residency. The most common Disaster Medicine educational competencies taught were patient triage and decontamination. The least commonly taught competencies were volunteer management, working with response teams, and special needs populations. The most commonly identified methods to teach Disaster Medicine were drills and lectures/seminars. There are a variety of educational tools used to teach Disaster Medicine in EM residencies today, with a larger focus on the use of lectures and hospital drills. There is no indication of a uniform educational approach across all residencies. The results of this survey demonstrate an opportunity for the creation of a standardized model for resident education in Disaster Medicine. Sarin RR , Cattamanchi S , Alqahtani A , Aljohani M , Keim M , Ciottone GR . Disaster education: a survey study to analyze disaster medicine training in emergency medicine residency programs in the United States. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(4):368-373.

  15. Disease Prevention and Health Promotion: How Integrative Medicine Fits

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Ather; Katz, David L.

    2015-01-01

    As a discipline, preventive medicine has traditionally been described to encompass primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention. The fields of preventive medicine and public health share the objectives of promoting general health, preventing disease, and applying epidemiologic techniques to these goals. This paper discusses a conceptual approach between the overlap and potential synergies of integrative medicine principles and practices with preventive medicine in the context of these levels o...

  16. [The vital tasks of preventive medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizh, I M

    1996-05-01

    The article discusses the actual problems of prophylaxis in common system of troops medical supply and defines the subsequent reformative ways of preventive medicine. First of all, the necessity of organized principles revision of prophylactic direction is connected with the fact of main health indices negative dynamics of Armed Forces personal, indicative of weakening of all types of prophylactic work. These are prophylactic work among recruits during their adaptation to military service conditions, prophylactic medical examination, tempering, fiscal training and prophylaxis of infectious diseases. However, we shouldn't forget about positive experience accumulated in the past, as much as possible we should use the achievements of military medical science. For further development of preventive direction of troops and fleet medical supply the priority ways of essential tasks decision of military medicine have been planned. It is necessary to connect the decision of concrete tasks with general perspective of introduction in Armed Forces of region system of servicemen medical supply.

  17. Complementary and integrative medicine attitudes and perceived knowledge in a large pediatric residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziodeen, Kamilah A; Misra, Sanghamitra M

    2018-04-01

    There is limited formal complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)/integrative medicine (IM) training in most US pediatric residency programs. Not surprisingly, the AAP Fellows survey #49 demonstrated that pediatricians in residency training and those younger than 42 years old reported less knowledge of CAM than their counterparts. The purpose of this study was to assess pediatric residents' attitudes toward CAM and IM, personal use of CAM, perceived knowledge gaps, and preferred methods of delivery for IM education in a large pediatric residency program. A 20-question anonymous, voluntary electronic survey was sent to all categorical and combined program pediatric residents at a pediatric residency program in Texas. Eighty of 177 pediatric residents completed the survey. Eighty-three percent of respondents reported that patients have asked them about complementary and integrative medicine, and 88% reported that they would like to expand their knowledge on CAM/IM. Lack of knowledge was the top barrier to residents' incorporation of complementary and integrative medicine into their practice. Preferred methods of education delivery were reported as exposure to complementary and integrative medicine providers and noon conference lectures. Residents in this large pediatric residency program recognize their knowledge gaps and wish to improve their understanding of complementary and integrative medicine. A formal IM curriculum could bridge knowledge gaps and help residents feel more comfortable discussing IM with patients and their families. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. [Interdisciplinary quality management in preventive medicine institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Robert

    2004-12-01

    Like all health care institutions, preventive medicine institutions, too, need a quality assurance structure. An integrated system consisting of "balanced score card", "finite-elements-model" and "interdisciplinary quality circles" is presented. This organisational structure allows the implementation of quality assurance in complex institutions as well, such as health care organisations. In addition, this concept guarantees broad acceptance by all team members, not least due to complexity reduction.

  19. Development of a Patient Charting System to Teach Family Practice Residents Disease Management and Preventive Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dickerman, Joel

    1997-01-01

    .... Designing notes which 'prompt' residents to gather patient information vital to optimal care can teach residents the concepts of longitudinal care, particularly chronic disease management and preventive care...

  20. Social Media in Professional Medicine: New Resident Perceptions and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background For younger generations, unconstrained online social activity is the norm. Little data are available about perceptions among young medical practitioners who enter the professional clinical arena, while the impact of existing social media policy on these perceptions is unclear. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the existing perceptions about social media and professionalism among new physicians entering in professional clinical practice; and to determine the effects of formal social media instruction and policy on young professionals’ ability to navigate case-based scenarios about online behavior in the context of professional medicine. Methods This was a prospective observational study involving the new resident physicians at a large academic medical center. Medical residents from 9 specialties were invited to participate and answer an anonymous questionnaire about social media in clinical medicine. Data were analyzed using SAS 9.4 (Cary, NC), chi-square or Fisher’s exact test was used as appropriate, and the correct responses were compared between different groups using the Kruskal–Wallis analysis of variance. Results Familiarity with current institutional policy was associated with an average of 2.2 more correct responses (P=.01). Instruction on social media use during medical school was related to correct responses for 2 additional questions (P=.03). On dividing the groups into no policy exposure, single policy exposure, or both exposures, the mean differences were found to be statistically significant (3.5, 7.5, and 9.4, respectively) (P=.03). Conclusions In this study, a number of young physicians demonstrated a casual approach to social media activity in the context of professional medical practice. Several areas of potential educational opportunity and focus were identified: (1) online privacy, (2) maintaining digital professionalism, (3) safeguarding the protected health information of patients, and (4) the impact of

  1. Social Media in Professional Medicine: New Resident Perceptions and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Cedric; Mesner, Jason; Stopyra, Jason; O'Neill, James; Husain, Iltifat; Geer, Carol; Gerancher, Karen; Atkinson, Hal; Harper, Erin; Huang, William; Cline, David M

    2016-06-09

    For younger generations, unconstrained online social activity is the norm. Little data are available about perceptions among young medical practitioners who enter the professional clinical arena, while the impact of existing social media policy on these perceptions is unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the existing perceptions about social media and professionalism among new physicians entering in professional clinical practice; and to determine the effects of formal social media instruction and policy on young professionals' ability to navigate case-based scenarios about online behavior in the context of professional medicine. This was a prospective observational study involving the new resident physicians at a large academic medical center. Medical residents from 9 specialties were invited to participate and answer an anonymous questionnaire about social media in clinical medicine. Data were analyzed using SAS 9.4 (Cary, NC), chi-square or Fisher's exact test was used as appropriate, and the correct responses were compared between different groups using the Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance. Familiarity with current institutional policy was associated with an average of 2.2 more correct responses (P=.01). Instruction on social media use during medical school was related to correct responses for 2 additional questions (P=.03). On dividing the groups into no policy exposure, single policy exposure, or both exposures, the mean differences were found to be statistically significant (3.5, 7.5, and 9.4, respectively) (P=.03). In this study, a number of young physicians demonstrated a casual approach to social media activity in the context of professional medical practice. Several areas of potential educational opportunity and focus were identified: (1) online privacy, (2) maintaining digital professionalism, (3) safeguarding the protected health information of patients, and (4) the impact of existing social media policies. Prior social media

  2. [The Computer Book of the Internal Medicine resident: validity and reliability of a questionnaire for self-assessment of competences in internal medicine residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oristrell, J; Casanovas, A; Jordana, R; Comet, R; Gil, M; Oliva, J C

    2012-12-01

    There are no simple and validated instruments for evaluating the training of specialists. To analyze the reliability and validity of a computerized self-assessment method to quantify the acquisition of medical competences during the Internal Medicine residency program. All residents of our department participated in the study during a period of 28 months. Twenty-two questionnaires specific for each rotation (the Computer-Book of the Internal Medicine Resident) were constructed with items (questions) corresponding to three competence domains: clinical skills competence, communication skills and teamwork. Reliability was analyzed by measuring the internal consistency of items in each competence domain using Cronbach's alpha index. Validation was performed by comparing mean scores in each competence domain between senior and junior residents. Cut-off levels of competence scores were established in order to identify the strengths and weaknesses of our training program. Finally, self-assessment values were correlated with the evaluations of the medical staff. There was a high internal consistency of the items of clinical skills competences, communication skills and teamwork. Higher scores of clinical skills competence and communication skills, but not in those of teamwork were observed in senior residents than in junior residents. The Computer-Book of the Internal Medicine Resident identified the strengths and weaknesses of our training program. We did not observe any correlation between the results of the self- evaluations and the evaluations made by staff physicians. The items of Computer-Book of the Internal Medicine Resident showed high internal consistency and made it possible to measure the acquisition of medical competences in a team of Internal Medicine residents. This self-assessment method should be complemented with other evaluation methods in order to assess the acquisition of medical competences by an individual resident. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Espa

  3. A Survey of Clinical Skills Evaluation Practices in Internal Medicine Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Linda L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The evaluation processes of 75 internal medicine residencies visited by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) in 1978-82 are reviewed. The methods of evaluation used by the residencies are described and compared with the findings from an earlier cycle of visits in 1972-75. (Author/MLW)

  4. Evaluation of a Substance Use Disorder Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Melissa R.; Arnsten, Julia H.; Parish, Sharon J.; Kunins, Hillary V.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching about diagnosis, treatment, and sequelae of substance use disorders (SUDs) is insufficient in most Internal Medicine residency programs. To address this, the authors developed, implemented, and evaluated a novel and comprehensive SUD curriculum for first year residents (interns) in Internal Medicine, which anchors the ensuing 3-year…

  5. Evaluating Efficiencies in Preventive Medicine: Comparing Approaches Between the Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    assigned to Marine units; and support to Navy and Marine units from hospital , clinical, and preventive medicine units.41 Also similar to the Army...biohazards, safety, respiratory protection, hazard controls, and ergonomics .113 Moreover, they are responsible for the detection, assessment, and...Preventive Medicine Technicians Preventive Medicine Technicians are unique in how they become qualified. They begin their careers as Hospital

  6. Career interest and perceptions of nephrology: A repeated cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Michael N; Maynard, Sharon; Porter, Ivan; Kincaid, Hope; Jain, Deepika; Aslam, Nabeel

    2017-01-01

    Interest in nephrology careers among internal medicine residents in the United States is declining. Our objective was to assess the impact of the presence of a nephrology fellowship training program on perceptions and career interest in nephrology among internal medicine residents. A secondary objective was to identify commonly endorsed negative perceptions of nephrology among internal medicine residents. This was a repeated cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents before (Group 1) and 3 years after (Group 2) the establishment of nephrology fellowship programs at two institutions. The primary outcome was the percentage of residents indicating nephrology as a career interest in Group 1 vs. Group 2. Secondary outcomes included the frequency that residents agreed with negative statements about nephrology. 131 (80.9%) of 162 residents completed the survey. 19 (14.8%) residents indicated interest in a nephrology career, with 8 (6.3%) indicating nephrology as their first choice. There was no difference in career interest in nephrology between residents who were exposed to nephrology fellows during residency training (Group 2) and residents who were not (Group 1). The most commonly endorsed negative perceptions of nephrology were: nephrology fellows have long hours/burdensome call (36 [28.1%] of residents agreed or strongly agreed), practicing nephrologists must take frequent/difficult call (35 [27.6%] agreed or strongly agreed), and nephrology has few opportunities for procedures (35 [27.3%] agreed or strongly agreed). More residents in Group 2 agreed that nephrology is poorly paid (8.9% in Group 1 vs. 20.8% in Group 2, P = 0.04), whereas more residents in Group 1 agreed that nephrologists must take frequent/difficult call (40.0% in Group 1 vs. 18.1% in Group 2, P = 0.02). The initiation of a nephrology fellowship program was not associated with an increase in internal medicine residents' interest in nephrology careers. Residents endorsed several negative

  7. Career prospects for graduating nuclear medicine residents: survey of nuclear medicine program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A; Guiberteau, Milton J; Metter, Darlene F; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    There has been much consternation in the nuclear medicine (NM) community in recent years regarding the difficulty many NM graduates experience in securing initial employment. A survey designed to determine the extent and root causes behind the paucity of career opportunities was sent to all 2010-2011 NM residency program directors. The results of that survey and its implications for NM trainees and the profession are presented and discussed in this article. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Leadership for All: An Internal Medicine Residency Leadership Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jared M; Wininger, David A; Martin, Bryan

    2016-10-01

    Developing effective leadership skills in physicians is critical for safe patient care. Few residency-based models of leadership training exist. We evaluated residents' readiness to engage in leadership training, feasibility of implementing training for all residents, and residents' acceptance of training. In its fourth year, the Leadership Development Program (LDP) consists of twelve 90-minute modules (eg, Team Decision Making and Bias, Leadership Styles, Authentic Leadership) targeting all categorical postgraduate year (PGY) 1 residents. Modules are taught during regularly scheduled educational time. Focus group surveys and discussions, as well as annual surveys of PGY-1s assessed residents' readiness to engage in training. LDP feasibility was assessed by considering sustainability of program structures and faculty retention, and resident acceptance of training was assessed by measuring attendance, with the attendance goal of 8 of 12 modules. Residents thought leadership training would be valuable if content remained applicable to daily work, and PGY-1 residents expressed high levels of interest in training. The LDP is part of the core educational programming for PGY-1 residents. Except for 2 modules, faculty presenters have remained consistent. During academic year 2014-2015, 45% (13 of 29) of categorical residents participated in at least 8 of 12 modules, and 72% (21 of 29) participated in at least 7 of 12. To date, 125 categorical residents have participated in training. Residents appeared ready to engage in leadership training, and the LDP was feasible to implement. The attendance goal was not met, but attendance was sufficient to justify program continuation.

  9. Survey of emergency medicine resident debt status and financial planning preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaspy, Jeffrey N; Ma, O John; Steele, Mark T; Hall, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    Most resident physicians accrue significant financial debt throughout their medical and graduate medical education. The objective of this study was to analyze emergency medicine resident debt status, financial planning actions, and educational experiences for financial planning and debt management. A 22-item questionnaire was sent to all 123 Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education-accredited emergency medicine residency programs in July 2001. Two follow-up mailings were made to increase the response rate. The survey addressed four areas of resident debt and financial planning: 1) accrued debt, 2) moonlighting activity, 3) financial planning/debt management education, and 4) financial planning actions. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Survey responses were obtained from 67.4% (1,707/2,532) of emergency medicine residents in 89 of 123 (72.4%) residency programs. Nearly one half (768/1,707) of respondents have accrued more than 100,000 dollars of debt. Fifty-eight percent (990/1,707) of all residents reported that moonlighting would be necessary to meet their financial needs, and more than 33% (640/1,707) presently moonlight to supplement their income. Nearly one half (832/1,707) of residents actively invested money, of which online trading was the most common method (23.3%). Most residents reported that they received no debt management education during residency (82.1%) or medical school (63.7%). Furthermore, 79.1% (1,351/1,707) of residents reported that they received no financial planning lectures during residency, although 84.2% (1,438/1,707) reported that debt management and financial planning education should be available during residency. Most emergency medicine residency programs do not provide their residents with financial planning education. Most residents have accrued significant debt and believe that more financial planning and debt management education is needed during residency.

  10. Competency-Based Medical Education: Can Both Junior Residents and Senior Residents Achieve Competence After a Sports Medicine Training Module?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Tim; Wright, Sara; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan M; Theodoropoulos, John; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Wasserstein, David; Ringsted, Charlotte; Hodges, Brian; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell

    2015-12-02

    Competency-based medical education as a resident-training format will move postgraduate training away from time-based training, to a model based on observable outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether junior residents and senior residents could demonstrate clinical skills to a similar level, after a sports medicine rotation. All residents undertaking a three-month sports medicine rotation had to pass an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. The stations tested the fundamentals of history-taking, examination, image interpretation, differential diagnosis, informed consent, and clinical decision-making. Performance at each station was assessed with a binary station-specific checklist and an overall global rating scale, in which 1 indicated novice, 2 indicated advanced beginner, 3 indicated competent, 4 indicated proficient, and 5 indicated expert. A global rating scale was also given for each domain of knowledge. Over eighteen months, thirty-nine residents (twenty-one junior residents and eighteen senior residents) and six fellows (for a total of forty-five participants) completed the examination. With regard to junior residents and senior residents, analysis using a two-tailed t test demonstrated a significant difference (p < 0.01) in both total checklist score and overall global rating scale; the mean total checklist score (and standard deviation) was 56.15% ± 10.99% for junior residents and 71.87% ± 8.94% for senior residents, and the mean global rating scale was 2.44 ± 0.55 for junior residents and 3.79 ± 0.49 for senior residents. There was a significant difference between junior residents and senior residents for each knowledge domain, with a significance of p < 0.05 for history-taking and p < 0.01 for the remainder of the domains. Despite intensive teaching within a competency-based medical education model, junior residents were not able to demonstrate knowledge as well as senior residents, suggesting that overall clinical experience

  11. [Motivation and support provided on training: a longitudinal study of a cohort of family medicine residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Dina; de Jesus, Saul Neves; Cruz, José Pestana

    2011-12-01

    Having as main goal the development of a culture of professional excellence, the Family Medicine residency currently intends to correspond to the principles of adult learning approach, in which motivation for practicing is essential. (1) To analyze the variability of Family Medicine residentes professional motivation, throughout the residency training; (2) To characterize Family Medicine residents perception about the support provided on training, during the residency; (3) To analyze the variability of Family Medicine residents perception about the support provided by the supervisor, throughout the residency. Observational, quantitative and longitudinal study (2005-2008) of Family Medicine residents who participated in a survey on professional motivation. At the beginning of the residency in 2005 (N = 109) in Portugal, they were submitted to three assessment moments (n = 69) by a postal survey using a questionnaire with 57 Likert scale items, representing motivational variables--professional project, professional commitment, initial motivation, intrinsic motivation, self-efficacy expectations, self-control expectations, assertiveness and perception of the support provided on training program. Descriptive statistics and analytic tests (ANOVA--GLM repeated measures) were used to study the variability of the cognitive dimensions (a = 0,05). Although motivated to Family Medicine practice (response rate = 47.8%, at the study entry), the physicians professional motivation variability along the residency has presented slightly positive, at the end of the study, but not statistically significant. The physicians of our cohort responded by assigning a relatively high average levels in almost all items of the scale support provided on training during the residency, and its variation showed a positive trend, at the end of the study. This study produced results of an important phenomenon on which there is no published information in Portugal. It provides substantial evidence on

  12. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Alexander B; Shea, Sandra; Czeisler, Charles A; Landrigan, Christopher P; Leape, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    Long working hours and sleep deprivation have been a facet of physician training in the US since the advent of the modern residency system. However, the scientific evidence linking fatigue with deficits in human performance, accidents and errors in industries from aeronautics to medicine, nuclear power, and transportation has mounted over the last 40 years. This evidence has also spawned regulations to help ensure public safety across safety-sensitive industries, with the notable exception of medicine. In late 2007, at the behest of the US Congress, the Institute of Medicine embarked on a year-long examination of the scientific evidence linking resident physician sleep deprivation with clinical performance deficits and medical errors. The Institute of Medicine’s report, entitled “Resident duty hours: Enhancing sleep, supervision and safety”, published in January 2009, recommended new limits on resident physician work hours and workload, increased supervision, a heightened focus on resident physician safety, training in structured handovers and quality improvement, more rigorous external oversight of work hours and other aspects of residency training, and the identification of expanded funding sources necessary to implement the recommended reforms successfully and protect the public and resident physicians themselves from preventable harm. Given that resident physicians comprise almost a quarter of all physicians who work in hospitals, and that taxpayers, through Medicare and Medicaid, fund graduate medical education, the public has a deep investment in physician training. Patients expect to receive safe, high-quality care in the nation’s teaching hospitals. Because it is their safety that is at issue, their voices should be central in policy decisions affecting patient safety. It is likewise important to integrate the perspectives of resident physicians, policy makers, and other constituencies in designing new policies. However, since its release

  13. Training in childhood obesity management in the United States: a survey of pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics and family medicine residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Margaret S; Rhodes, Erinn T; Ludwig, David S

    2010-02-17

    Information about the availability and effectiveness of childhood obesity training during residency is limited. We surveyed residency program directors from pediatric, internal medicine-pediatrics (IM-Peds), and family medicine residency programs between September 2007 and January 2008 about childhood obesity training offered in their programs. The response rate was 42.2% (299/709) and ranged by specialty from 40.1% to 45.4%. Overall, 52.5% of respondents felt that childhood obesity training in residency was extremely important, and the majority of programs offered training in aspects of childhood obesity management including prevention (N = 240, 80.3%), diagnosis (N = 282, 94.3%), diagnosis of complications (N = 249, 83.3%), and treatment (N = 242, 80.9%). However, only 18.1% (N = 54) of programs had a formal childhood obesity curriculum with variability across specialties. Specifically, 35.5% of IM-Peds programs had a formal curriculum compared to only 22.6% of pediatric and 13.9% of family medicine programs (p obesity training was competing curricular demands (58.5%). While most residents receive training in aspects of childhood obesity management, deficits may exist in training quality with a minority of programs offering a formal childhood obesity curriculum. Given the high prevalence of childhood obesity, a greater emphasis should be placed on development and use of effective training strategies suitable for all specialties training physicians to care for children.

  14. Use of Team-Based Learning Pedagogy for Internal Medicine Ambulatory Resident Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balwan, Sandy; Fornari, Alice; DiMarzio, Paola; Verbsky, Jennifer; Pekmezaris, Renee; Stein, Joanna; Chaudhry, Saima

    2015-12-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is used in undergraduate medical education to facilitate higher-order content learning, promote learner engagement and collaboration, and foster positive learner attitudes. There is a paucity of data on the use of TBL in graduate medical education. Our aim was to assess resident engagement, learning, and faculty/resident satisfaction with TBL in internal medicine residency ambulatory education. Survey and nominal group technique methodologies were used to assess learner engagement and faculty/resident satisfaction. We assessed medical learning using individual (IRAT) and group (GRAT) readiness assurance tests. Residents (N = 111) involved in TBL sessions reported contributing to group discussions and actively discussing the subject material with other residents. Faculty echoed similar responses, and residents and faculty reported a preference for future teaching sessions to be offered using the TBL pedagogy. The average GRAT score was significantly higher than the average IRAT score by 22%. Feedback from our nominal group technique rank ordered the following TBL strengths by both residents and faculty: (1) interactive format, (2) content of sessions, and (3) competitive nature of sessions. We successfully implemented TBL pedagogy in the internal medicine ambulatory residency curriculum, with learning focused on the care of patients in the ambulatory setting. TBL resulted in active resident engagement, facilitated group learning, and increased satisfaction by residents and faculty. To our knowledge this is the first study that implemented a TBL program in an internal medicine residency curriculum.

  15. First-Year Residents Outperform Third-Year Residents after Simulation-Based Education in Critical Care Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Benjamin D.; Corbridge, Thomas C.; Schroedl, Clara J.; Wilcox, Jane E.; Cohen, Elaine R.; McGaghie, William C.; Wayne, Diane B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Prior research shows that gaps exist in internal medicine residents’ critical care knowledge and skills. The purpose of this study was to compare the bedside critical care competency of first-year residents who received a simulation-based educational intervention plus clinical training to third-year residents who received clinical training alone. Methods During their first three months of residency, a group of first-year residents completed a simulation-based educational intervention. A group of traditionally-trained third-year residents who did not receive simulation-based training served as a comparison group. Both groups were evaluated using a 20-item clinical skills assessment at the bedside of a patient receiving mechanical ventilation at the end of their medical intensive care unit rotation. Scores on the skills assessment were compared between groups. Results Simulator-trained first-year residents (n=40) scored significantly higher compared to traditionally-trained third-year residents (n=27) on the bedside assessment, 91.3% (95% CI 88.2% to 94.3%) vs. 80.9% (95% CI 76.8% to 85.0%), P = simulation-based educational intervention demonstrated higher clinical competency than third-year residents who did not undergo simulation training. Critical care competency cannot be assumed after clinical ICU rotations; simulation-based curricula can help ensure residents are proficient to care for critically ill patients. PMID:23222546

  16. Problem-based learning in laboratory medicine resident education: a satisfaction survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepiller, Quentin; Solis, Morgane; Velay, Aurélie; Gantner, Pierre; Sueur, Charlotte; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Barth, Heidi; Fafi-Kremer, Samira

    2017-04-01

    Theoretical knowledge in biology and medicine plays a substantial role in laboratory medicine resident education. In this study, we assessed the contribution of problem-based learning (PBL) to improve the training of laboratory medicine residents during their internship in the department of virology, Strasbourg University Hospital, France. We compared the residents' satisfaction regarding an educational program based on PBL and a program based on lectures and presentations. PBL induced a high level of satisfaction (100%) among residents compared to lectures and presentations (53%). The main advantages of this technique were to create a situational interest regarding virological problems, to boost the residents' motivation and to help them identify the most relevant learning objectives in virology. However, it appears pertinent to educate the residents in appropriate bibliographic research techniques prior to PBL use and to monitor their learning by regular formative assessment sessions.

  17. Why Do Emergency Medicine Residents Experience Burn Out? A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefe Kamaloo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Emergency medicine residents are a high–risk group for burnout syndrome. This was a qualitative study with content analysis on emergency medical residents with 2 aims: evaluating the incidence of occupational burnout syndrome and identifying the points of view and attitudes of emergency medical residents about factors related to occupational burnout syndrome.Method: For this study, 2 sessions of focus group discussions were set up at Imam Khomeini hospital affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Each session took 90 minutes, and 20 emergency medicine residents in their first or second year of emergency medicine residency participated in the sessions. Data were coded   by MAXQDA10 software.Results: Data were categorized in 4 themes as follow: (1 the characteristics of emergency medicine; (2 ambiguity in residents’ duties; (3 educational planning; and (4 careers.Data on the proposed solutions by residents were analyzed and coded in 3 groups including (1 changes in personal life; (2 arrangement in shifts; and  (3 educational issues.Conclusion: According to findings of this qualitative study, most of emergency medicine residents have experienced exhaustion sometime during the course of their residency. Psychological supports may help the residents to cope with their career difficulties and probable burn out.

  18. Charting the Road to Competence: Developmental Milestones for Internal Medicine Residency Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael L.; Aagaard, Eva M.; Caverzagie, Kelly J.; Chick, Davoren A.; Holmboe, Eric; Kane, Gregory; Smith, Cynthia D.; Iobst, William

    2009-01-01

    Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Outcome Project requires that residency program directors objectively document that their residents achieve competence in 6 general dimensions of practice. Intervention In November 2007, the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) and the ACGME initiated the development of milestones for internal medicine residency training. ABIM and ACGME convened a 33-member milestones task force made up of program directors, experts in evaluation and quality, and representatives of internal medicine stakeholder organizations. This article reports on the development process and the resulting list of proposed milestones for each ACGME competency. Outcomes The task force adopted the Dreyfus model of skill acquisition as a framework the internal medicine milestones, and calibrated the milestones with the expectation that residents achieve, at a minimum, the “competency” level in the 5-step progression by the completion of residency. The task force also developed general recommendations for strategies to evaluate the milestones. Discussion The milestones resulting from this effort will promote competency-based resident education in internal medicine, and will allow program directors to track the progress of residents and inform decisions regarding promotion and readiness for independent practice. In addition, the milestones may guide curriculum development, suggest specific assessment strategies, provide benchmarks for resident self-directed assessment-seeking, and assist remediation by facilitating identification of specific deficits. Finally, by making explicit the profession's expectations for graduates and providing a degree of national standardization in evaluation, the milestones may improve public accountability for residency training. PMID:21975701

  19. Characteristics of Graduating Family Medicine Residents Who Intend to Practice Maternity Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Sebastian T; Hochheimer, Camille J; Barr, Wendy B; Leveroni-Calvi, Matteo; Lefevre, Nicholas M; Wallenborn, Jordyn T; Peterson, Lars E

    2018-03-08

    Prior research found that 24% of graduating family medicine residents intend to provide obstetrical deliveries, but only 9% of family physicians 1 to 10 years into practice are doing so. Our study aims to describe the individual and residency program characteristics associated with intention to provide obstetrical deliveries and prenatal care. Cross-sectional data on 2014-2016 graduating residents were obtained from the American Board of Family Medicine certification examination demographic questionnaire that asked about intended provision of specific clinical activities. A hierarchical model accounting for clustering within residency programs was used to determine associations between intended provision of maternity care with individual and residency program characteristics. Of 9,541 graduating residents, 22.7% intended to provide deliveries and 51.2% intended to provide prenatal care. Individual characteristics associated with a higher likelihood of providing deliveries included female gender, graduation from an allopathic medical school, and participation in a loan repayment program. Residency characteristics included geographic location in the Midwest or West region, training at a federally qualified health center (FQHC)-based clinic, funding as a teaching health center (THC), more months of required maternity care rotations, larger residency class size, and maternity care fellowship at residency. Our findings suggest that increasing the proportion of graduating family medicine residents who intend to provide maternity care may be associated with increased exposure to maternity care training, more family medicine training programs in FQHCs and THCs, and expanded loan repayment programs.

  20. A national survey of residents in combined Internal Medicine and Dermatology residency programs: educational experience and future plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, Arash; Wanat, Karolyn; Crotty, Bradley H; Rosenbach, Misha

    2015-10-16

    In response to a perceived erosion of medical dermatology, combined internal medicine and dermatology programs (med/derm) programs have been developed that aim to train dermatologists who take care of medically complex patients. Despite the investment in these programs, there is currently no data with regards to the potential impact of these trainees on the dermatology workforce. To determine the experiences, motivations, and future plans of residents in combined med/derm residency programs. We surveyed residents at all United States institutions with both categorical and combined training programs in spring of 2012. Respondents used visual analog scales to rate clinical interests, self-assessed competency, career plans, and challenges. The primary study outcomes were comfort in taking care of patients with complex disease, future practice plans, and experience during residency. Twenty-eight of 31 med/derm residents (87.5%) and 28 of 91 (31%) categorical residents responded (overall response rate 46%). No significant differences were seen in self-assessed dermatology competency, or comfort in performing inpatient consultations, cosmetic procedures, or prescribing systemic agents. A trend toward less comfort in general dermatology was seen among med/derm residents. Med/derm residents were more likely to indicate career preferences for performing inpatient consultation and taking care of medically complex patients. Categorical residents rated their programs and experiences more highly. Med/derm residents have stronger interests in serving medically complex patients. Categorical residents are more likely to have a positive experience during residency. Future work will be needed to ascertain career choices among graduates once data are available.

  1. Workplace Violence and Harassment Against Emergency Medicine Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Schnapp, Benjamin H.; Slovis, Benjamin H.; Shah, Anar D.; Fant, Abra L.; Gisondi, Michael A.; Shah, Kaushal H.; Lech, Christie A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies have shown that workplace violence in the emergency department (ED) iscommon. Residents may be among the most vulnerable staff, as they have the least experience with thesevolatile encounters. The goal for this study was to quantify and describe acts of violence against emergencymedicine (EM) residents by patients and visitors and to identify perceived barriers to safety. Methods: This cross-sectional survey study queried EM residents at mul...

  2. Community Health Workers and Family Medicine Resident Education: Addressing the Social Determinants of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalmont, Kate; Norris, Jeffrey; Garzon, Agustina; Cisneros, Raquel; Greene, Heather; Regino, Lidia; Sandoval, Virginia; Gomez, Roberto; Page-Reeves, Janet; Kaufman, Arthur

    2016-04-01

    Neither the health care system nor the training of medical residents focus sufficiently on social determinants of health. Community health workers (CHWs) are a growing presence in health care settings. Culturally and linguistically competent, typically they are from underserved communities and spend more time addressing social determinants of health than others on the health care team. However, CHWs are an infrequent presence in resident clinical training environments. The University of New Mexico Family Medicine Residency placed family medicine residents at a community clinic in Albuquerque managed by CHWs, recognizing that CHWs' collaboration with residents would enhance resident competency in multiple domains. Residents gained skills from CHWs in inter-professional teamwork, cultural proficiency in patient care, effective communication, provision of cost-conscious care, and advocating for both individual and community health. Our model recognizes the value of CHW skills and knowledge and creates a powerful rationale for greater recognition of CHW expertise and integration of CHWs as members of the care team.

  3. An Innovative Clinical Skills “Boot Camp” for Dental Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Castillo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available During a 1-year hospital-based residency, dental residents are required to rotate through many departments including surgery, medicine, and emergency medicine. It became apparent that there was a gap between clinical skills knowledge taught in dental school curriculum and skills required for hospital-based patient care. In response, a simulation-based intensive clinical skill “boot camp” was created. The boot camp provided an intensive, interactive 3-day session for the dental residents. During the 3 days, residents were introduced to medical knowledge and skills that were necessary for their inpatient hospital rotations but were lacking in traditional dental school curriculum. Effectiveness of the boot camp was assessed in terms of knowledge base and comfort through presession and postsession surveys. According to resident feedback, this intensive introduction for the dental residents improved their readiness for their inpatient hospital-based residency.

  4. A sedentary job? Measuring the physical activity of emergency medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Elaine B; Caputo, Nicholas D; Pedraza, Solimar; Reynolds, Toussaint; Sharifi, Rahim; Waseem, Muhammad; Kornberg, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The debate on the quality of health care provided in the United States has continued to be waged as concerns have grown over the years. Stress, sleep deprivation, poor diet, and lack of exercise may lead to inadequate work performance by physicians. This study was undertaken to determine whether Emergency Medicine (EM) residents satisfy daily recommendations for total number of steps taken per day set forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Surgeon General in a 12-h shift. An observational prospective cohort study was conducted between August 2009 and November 2009 at an urban Level I trauma center with an annual census of over 165,000 Emergency Department (ED) visits per year. The mean number of steps taken by EM residents during 12-h shifts was measured. Mean steps taken during a shift were 7333 (95% confidence interval 6901-7764). Only nine (9.9%) pedometer readings reached the target level of 10,000 (10 K) steps or above. A t-test was used to compare steps with the hypothesized 10 K steps target. Recordings of 10K steps or greater were not correlated with ED sections (p=0.60) shift (medical vs. surgical, p=0.65) or ED census (r(2)physical activity regimens may help improve the overall well-being of EM residents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Training Internal Medicine Residents in Social Medicine and Research-Based Health Advocacy: A Novel, In-Depth Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Gaurab; Pels, Richard J; Stark, Rachel L; Jain, Priyank; Bor, David H; McCormick, Danny

    2017-04-01

    Health disparities are pervasive worldwide. Physicians have a unique vantage point from which they can observe the ways social, economic, and political factors impact health outcomes and can be effective advocates for enhanced health outcomes and health equity. However, social medicine and health advocacy curricula are uncommon in postgraduate medical education. In academic year (AY) 2012, the Cambridge Health Alliance internal medicine residency program transformed an elective into a required social medicine and research-based health advocacy curriculum. The course has three major innovations: it has a yearlong longitudinal curriculum, it is required for all residents, and all residents complete a group research-based health advocacy project within the curricular year. The authors describe the structure, content, and goals of this curriculum. Over the last four years (AYs 2012-2015), residents (17/32; 53%) have rated the overall quality of the course highly (mean = 5.2, where 6 = outstanding; standard deviation = 0.64). In each year since the new course has been implemented, all scholarly work from the course has been presented at conferences by 31 resident presenters and/or coauthors. The course seems to enhance the residency program's capacity to recruit high-caliber residents and faculty members. The authors are collecting qualitative and quantitative data on the impact of the course. They will use their findings to advocate for a national health advocacy competency framework. Recommendations about how to initiate or further develop social medicine and health advocacy curricula are offered.

  6. Associations between subspecialty fellowship interest and knowledge of internal medicine: A hypothesis-generating study of internal medicine residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidet Paul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about whether and how medical knowledge relates to interest in subspecialty fellowship training. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between residents' interest in subspecialty fellowship training and their knowledge of internal medicine (IM. Methods A questionnaire was emailed to 48 categorical postgraduate-year (PGY two and three residents at a New York university-affiliated IM residency program in 2007 using the Survey Monkey online survey instrument. Overall and content area-specific percentile scores from the IM in-training examination (IM-ITE for the same year was used to determine objective knowledge. Results Forty-five of 48 residents (response rate was 93.8% completed the survey. Twenty-two (49% were PG2 residents and 23(51% were PGY3 residents. Sixty percent of respondents were male. Six (13% residents were graduates of U.S. medical schools. Eight (18% reported formal clinical training prior to starting internal medicine residency in the U.S. Of this latter group, 6 (75% had training in IM and 6 (75 % reported a training length of 3 years or less. Thirty-seven of 45 (82% residents had a subspecialty fellowship interest. Residents with a fellowship interest had a greater mean overall objective knowledge percentile score (56.44 vs. 31.67; p = 0.04 as well as greater mean percentile scores in all content areas of IM. The adjusted mean difference was statistically significant (p Conclusions More than half of surveyed residents indicated interest in pursuing a subspecialty fellowship. Fellowship interest appears positively associated with general medical knowledge in this study population. Further work is needed to explore motivation and study patterns among internal medicine residents.

  7. Lipids in psychiatric disorders and preventive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Miriam; Levant, Beth; Reichel, Martin; Gulbins, Erich; Kornhuber, Johannes; Müller, Christian P

    2017-05-01

    Psychiatric disorders like mood disorders, schizophrenia, or drug addiction affect a sizeable proportion of the human population and severely compromise quality of life. Therefore, measures to prevent the manifestation, and treatments to ameliorate the symptoms, of these disorders are in high demand. Brain lipids determine the localization and function of proteins in the cell membrane of neurons. Lipids may also act as neurotransmitters or other signalling molecules. The lipid composition of the brain can be influenced by nutrition, environmental factors, and by behavioural activity. Thus, lipids represent a target for preventive medicine of psychiatric disorders. Here we review how brain lipids contribute to normal behaviour and to major psychiatric disorders with the focus on phospholipids/fatty acids, sphingolipids, and endocannabinoids. Accumulating evidence suggests a crucial role for membrane forming and signalling lipids in the brain in the etiopathologies of depression, bipolar disorders, schizophrenia, and drug addiction. Lipids also represent potential preventive interventions for these psychiatric disorders by either targeted dietary supplementation or pharmacological manipulation of lipid regulating enzymes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Internal Medicine residents use heuristics to estimate disease probability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Phang

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Our findings suggest that despite previous exposure to the use of Bayesian reasoning, residents use heuristics, such as the representative heuristic and anchoring with adjustment, to estimate probabilities. Potential reasons for attribute substitution include the relative cognitive ease of heuristics vs. Bayesian reasoning or perhaps residents in their clinical practice use gist traces rather than precise probability estimates when diagnosing.

  9. The Computer Book of the Internal Medicine Resident: competence acquisition and achievement of learning objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oristrell, J; Oliva, J C; Casanovas, A; Comet, R; Jordana, R; Navarro, M

    2014-01-01

    The Computer Book of the Internal Medicine resident (CBIMR) is a computer program that was validated to analyze the acquisition of competences in teams of Internal Medicine residents. To analyze the characteristics of the rotations during the Internal Medicine residency and to identify the variables associated with the acquisition of clinical and communication skills, the achievement of learning objectives and resident satisfaction. All residents of our service (n=20) participated in the study during a period of 40 months. The CBIMR consisted of 22 self-assessment questionnaires specific for each rotation, with items on services (clinical workload, disease protocolization, resident responsibilities, learning environment, service organization and teamwork) and items on educational outcomes (acquisition of clinical and communication skills, achievement of learning objectives, overall satisfaction). Associations between services features and learning outcomes were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate analysis. An intense clinical workload, high resident responsibilities and disease protocolization were associated with the acquisition of clinical skills. High clinical competence and teamwork were both associated with better communication skills. Finally, an adequate learning environment was associated with increased clinical competence, the achievement of educational goals and resident satisfaction. Potentially modifiable variables related with the operation of clinical services had a significant impact on the acquisition of clinical and communication skills, the achievement of educational goals, and resident satisfaction during the specialized training in Internal Medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Internal medicine resident knowledge of transfusion medicine: results from the BEST-TEST international education needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haspel, Richard L; Lin, Yulia; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Tinmouth, Alan; Cid, Joan; Eichler, Hermann; Lozano, Miguel; van de Watering, Leo; Fisher, Patrick B; Ali, Asma; Parks, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Blood transfusion is the most common hospital procedure performed in the United States. While inadequate physician transfusion medicine knowledge may lead to inappropriate practice, such an educational deficit has not been investigated on an international scale using a validated assessment tool. Identifying specific deficiencies is critical for developing curricula to improve patient care. Rasch analysis, a method used in high-stakes testing, was used to validate an assessment tool consisting of a 23-question survey and a 20-question examination. The assessment tool was administered to internal medicine residents to determine prior training, attitudes, perceived ability, and actual knowledge related to transfusion medicine. A total of 474 residents at 23 programs in nine countries completed the examination. The overall mean score of correct responses was 45.7% (site range, 32%-56%). The mean score for Postgraduate Year (PGY)1 (43.9%) was significantly lower than for PGY3 (47.1%) and PGY4 (50.6%) residents. Although 89% of residents had participated in obtaining informed consent from a patient for transfusion, residents scored poorly (<25% correct) on questions related to transfusion reactions. The majority of residents (65%) would find additional transfusion medicine training "very" or "extremely" helpful. Internationally, internal medicine residents have poor transfusion medicine knowledge and would welcome additional training. The especially limited knowledge of transfusion reactions suggests an initial area for focused training. This study not only represents the largest international assessment of transfusion medicine knowledge, but also serves as a model for rigorous, collaborative research in medical education. © 2014 AABB.

  11. A National CERA Study of the Use of Laborists in Family Medicine Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldor, Robert A; Pecci, Christine Chang; Moreno, Gerardo; Van Duyne, Virginia; Potts, Stacy E

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about the impact of laborists (which we defined as "clinicians dedicated to providing L&D care services in the hospital environment for pregnant patients, regardless of who provided the prenatal care" for this survey) on family medicine residency training. We surveyed family medicine residency directors to assess characteristics about laborist services and their involvement in family medicine residency teaching. Questions were included in the 2015 Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) survey of family medicine residency directors. Univariate statistics were used to describe programs, directors, and our questions on the use of laborists. Chi-square tests and Student's t tests were used to evaluate bivariate relationships using a P30% of their graduates included L&D care in their first practice.. Laborists have an important role in family medicine resident obstetrics training and education. More research is needed to explore how laborists and family medicine faculty can collaborate to promote enhanced efficiency and effectiveness as residency teachers.

  12. A medical paradox: curative versus preventive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, J F

    1976-08-07

    A familiar medical contrast is presented as part of a modern medical problem. The problem it reflects is the relative importance of preventive and curative services for medical practitioners, which is already, or will shortly resolve itself into, a dilemma of whether medical men should stress preventive medicine to the possible detriment of curative medicine. It is submitted that the solution to both problem and dilemma should be sought against the background of history and philosophy, where they are seen to be expressions of an eternal paradox--that of the relative value of the individual in relation to the family, group, or community. If the submission is valid, then the answer to the problem is not a purely medical exercise, nor is the dilemma purely a 'doctor's dilemma'. The paradox, being eternal, is not soluble in our time, but the community must, on the urging of the medical profession, find a general solution to the problem--'a public consensus for out time'. This must be followed by public demand for a parliamentary solution--'decision-making ex consensus'. It is argued that although the latter programme does not come easily to democracy, it can be achieved through public consensus if action is taken by the leaders of thought in appropriate categories. Initiative must be exercised by the medical profession, but public consensus can only be achieved in consultation with the leaders of all learned professions, civil servants and legislators. It must then be presented fairly and without bias to the public. In the meantime, the medical profession must formulate its own 'medical consensus' and the doctor must resolve his personal dilemma according to formulated law, public or medical consensus or, in the last resort, according to his conviction and conscience. This method of solving a problem will almost certainly be applicable to other and more recent medical problems such as the population explosion, selective abortion and euthanasia.

  13. Getting it RITE: Impact of a Dedicated Hospital Medicine Curriculum for Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Doris; Shah, Chirayu; Campbell, Steffanie; Bates, Jeffrey T; Lescinskas, Erica

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this study was to improve resident confidence in inpatient care and knowledge in hospital medicine topics with a newly developed rotation and curriculum called the Resident Inpatient Training Experience. This study was a prospective observational study completed by postgraduate year-2 (PGY-2) internal medicine residents in two affiliated hospitals. Forty-six PGY-2 residents each rotated on the Resident Inpatient Training Experience service for 1 month and completed a pre- and postrotation confidential online survey. Primary outcomes included confidence in managing hospitalized patients, knowledge regarding hospital medicine topics, and interest in pursuing hospital medicine as a career. Thirty-three PGY-2 residents completed both the pre- and postrotation survey (72% response rate). After completing the rotation, the residents' confidence level (measured on a 5-point Likert scale, with 1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree) rose significantly in managing hospitalized patients, from 3.82 to 4.33 ( P = 0.003) and in leading a ward team, from 3.76 to 4.21 ( P = 0.020). Knowledge level (measured on a 5-point Likert scale with 1 = very poor and 5 = excellent) improved significantly in transitions of care, from 3.45 to 3.79 ( P = 0.023); cost-conscious care, from 3.00 to 3.42 ( P = 0.016); physician billing/coding, from 2.55 to 3.03 ( P = 0.007); hospital metrics, from 2.39 to 2.94 ( P = 0.002); and hospital reimbursement, from 2.48 to 3.09 ( P = 0.001). Interest in pursuing hospital medicine as a career also increased. Resident independence in managing patients and training in hospital medicine topics has not kept up with evolving need. Dedicated hospital medicine rotation and curriculum are effective ways to alleviate the deficiencies in resident education.

  14. Are All Competencies Equal in the Eyes of Residents? A Multicenter Study of Emergency Medicine Residents' Interest in Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Suzanne; Hu, Kevin; Messman, Anne; Moadel, Tiffany; Khandelwal, Sorabh; Streich, Heather; Noelker, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Feedback, particularly real-time feedback, is critical to resident education. The emergency medicine (EM) milestones were developed in 2012 to enhance resident assessment, and many programs use them to provide focused resident feedback. The purpose of this study was to evaluate EM residents' level of interest in receiving real-time feedback on each of the 23 competencies/sub-competencies. This was a multicenter cross-sectional study of EM residents. We surveyed participants on their level of interest in receiving real-time on-shift feedback on each of the 23 competencies/sub-competencies. Anonymous paper or computerized surveys were distributed to residents at three four-year training programs and three three-year training programs with a total of 223 resident respondents. Residents rated their level of interest in each milestone on a six-point Likert-type response scale. We calculated average level of interest for each of the 23 sub-competencies, for all 223 respondents and separately by postgraduate year (PGY) levels of training. One-way analyses of variance were performed to determine if there were differences in ratings by level of training. The overall survey response rate across all institutions was 82%. Emergency stabilization had the highest mean rating (5.47/6), while technology had the lowest rating (3.24/6). However, we observed no differences between levels of training on any of the 23 competencies/sub-competencies. Residents seem to ascribe much more value in receiving feedback on domains involving high-risk, challenging procedural skills as compared to low-risk technical and communication skills. Further studies are necessary to determine whether residents' perceived importance of competencies/sub-competencies needs to be considered when developing an assessment or feedback program based on these 23 EM competencies/sub-competencies.

  15. Assessing the New Competencies for Resident Education: A Model from an Emergency Medicine Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisdorff, Earl J.; Hayes, Oliver W.; Carlson, Dale J.; Walker, Gregory L.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the experience of Michigan State University's emergency medicine residency program, proposes a practical method for modifying an existing student evaluation format. The model provides a template other programs could use in assessing residents' acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes reflected in the six general competencies…

  16. The Merits of a Two-Day Evidence-Based Medicine Course for Surgical Residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubbink, Dirk T.; Legemate, Dink A.; Koelemay, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Over 10 years ago, we introduced a two-day, evidence-based surgery course for surgical residents. During the last 4 years, we evaluated its effect on the participants' evidence-based medicine (EBM) knowledge and skills. Between 2012 and 2015, six courses were organised for residents of various

  17. Impact of Pregnancy and Gender on Internal Medicine Resident Evaluations: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Megan L; Elrashidi, Muhamad Y; Halvorsen, Andrew J; McDonald, Furman S; Oxentenko, Amy S

    2017-06-01

    Pregnancy and its impact on graduate medical training are not well understood. To examine the effect of gender and pregnancy for Internal Medicine (IM) residents on evaluations by peers and faculty. This was a retrospective cohort study. All IM residents in training from July 1, 2004-June 30, 2014, were included. Female residents who experienced pregnancy and male residents whose partners experienced pregnancy during training were identified using an existing administrative database. Mean evaluation scores by faculty and peers were compared relative to pregnancy (before, during, and after), accounting for the gender of both the evaluator and resident in addition to other available demographic covariates. Potential associations were assessed using mixed linear models. Of 566 residents, 117 (20.7%) experienced pregnancy during IM residency training. Pregnancy was more common in partners of male residents (24.7%) than female residents (13.2%) (p = 0.002). In the post-partum period, female residents had lower peer evaluation scores on average than their male counterparts (p = 0.0099). A large number of residents experience pregnancy during residency. Mean peer evaluation scores were lower after pregnancy for female residents. Further study is needed to fully understand the mechanisms behind these findings, develop ways to optimize training throughout pregnancy, and explore any unconscious biases that may exist.

  18. Determinants of Malaria Prevention and Treatment Seeking Behaviours of Pregnant Undergraduates Resident in University Hostels, South-East Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinweuba, Anthonia Ukamaka; Agbapuonwu, Noreen Ebelechukwu; Onyiapat, JaneLovena Enuma; Israel, Chidimma Egbichi; Ilo, Clementine Ifeyinwa; Arinze, Joyce Chinenye

    2017-01-01

    This cross-sectional descriptive survey investigated determinants of malaria prevention and treatment seeking behaviours of pregnant undergraduates resident in university hostels, South-East Nigeria. Purposive sampling was used to enrol 121 accessible and consenting undergraduates with self-revealed and noticeable pregnancy residing in twenty-three female hostels of four university campuses in Enugu State, Nigeria. Structured interview guide developed based on reviewed literature and WHO-recommended malaria prevention and treatment measures was used to collect students' self-report data on malaria preventive health behaviours, sick role behaviours, and clinic use using mixed methods. The WHO-recommended malaria prevention measures were sparingly used. Some believed that pregnancy does not play any role in a woman's reaction to malaria infection. Only 41 (50.6%) visited a hospital for screening and treatment. Thirty-four (28.1%) used antimalaria medicine bought from chemist shop or over-the-counter medicines, while 33 (27.3%) used untreated net. The students were more likely to complete their antimalaria medicine when they were sick with malaria infection than for prevention ( p = 0.0186). Knowledge, academic schedule, cultural influence on perception and decision-making, and accessibility of health facility were key determinants of the women's preventive and treatment seeking behaviours. Health education on malaria prevention and dangers of drug abuse should form part of orientation lectures for all freshmen. University health centres should be upgraded to provide basic antenatal care services.

  19. Determinants of Malaria Prevention and Treatment Seeking Behaviours of Pregnant Undergraduates Resident in University Hostels, South-East Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthonia Ukamaka Chinweuba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional descriptive survey investigated determinants of malaria prevention and treatment seeking behaviours of pregnant undergraduates resident in university hostels, South-East Nigeria. Purposive sampling was used to enrol 121 accessible and consenting undergraduates with self-revealed and noticeable pregnancy residing in twenty-three female hostels of four university campuses in Enugu State, Nigeria. Structured interview guide developed based on reviewed literature and WHO-recommended malaria prevention and treatment measures was used to collect students’ self-report data on malaria preventive health behaviours, sick role behaviours, and clinic use using mixed methods. The WHO-recommended malaria prevention measures were sparingly used. Some believed that pregnancy does not play any role in a woman’s reaction to malaria infection. Only 41 (50.6% visited a hospital for screening and treatment. Thirty-four (28.1% used antimalaria medicine bought from chemist shop or over-the-counter medicines, while 33 (27.3% used untreated net. The students were more likely to complete their antimalaria medicine when they were sick with malaria infection than for prevention (p=0.0186. Knowledge, academic schedule, cultural influence on perception and decision-making, and accessibility of health facility were key determinants of the women’s preventive and treatment seeking behaviours. Health education on malaria prevention and dangers of drug abuse should form part of orientation lectures for all freshmen. University health centres should be upgraded to provide basic antenatal care services.

  20. Program for suicidal prevention, mental disorder treatment, and mental health development for resident doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Jiménez López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High demand of care and the academic burden of courses of specialization in medicine affect the mental health of medical residents with events ranging from simple emotional discomfort to development of affective disorders in susceptible individuals. The suicide of physicians has produced programs for their attention in some countries. We present the first mental health clinic for residents of a high specialty hospital in Mexico, focused on the prevention of suicide and depression, treatment of mental disorders and mental health promotion. Unlike the reports of other countries, we get participation of more than 95%, we provide appropriate treatment and follow-up to residents with mental disorder, and there has not been a consummate suicide. We assume that the use of different strategies (scrutiny, adapting models of prevention of suicide as a peer and gatekeeper training, informative sessions of mental health promotion and stigma, interventions targeted at individuals and groups with conflicts has been useful against barriers that do not allow doctors to identify the risk of suicide warning signs, seek help for mental disorder, and seek to improve their mental health.

  1. Teaching and evaluating multitasking ability in emergency medicine residents - what is the best practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Kenneth Wj

    2014-01-01

    Multitasking is an essential skill to develop during Emergency Medicine (EM) residency. Residents who struggle to cope in a multitasking environment risk fatigue, stress, and burnout. Improper management of interruption has been causally linked with medical errors. Formal teaching and evaluation of multitasking is often lacking in EM residency programs. This article reviewed the literature on multitasking in EM to identify best practices for teaching and evaluating multitasking amongst EM residents. With the advancement in understanding of what multitasking is, deliberate attempts should be made to teach residents pitfalls and coping strategies. This can be taught through a formal curriculum, role modeling by faculty, and simulation training. The best way to evaluate multitasking ability in residents is by direct observation. The EM Milestone Project provides a framework by which multitasking can be evaluated. EM residents should be deployed in work environments commiserate with their multitasking ability and their progress should be graduated after identified deficiencies are remediated.

  2. Maintaining a Twitter Feed to Advance an Internal Medicine Residency Program’s Educational Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Akhil; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-01-01

    Background Residency programs face many challenges in educating learners. The millennial generation’s learning preferences also force us to reconsider how to reach physicians in training. Social media is emerging as a viable tool for advancing curricula in graduate medical education. Objective The authors sought to understand how social media enhances a residency program’s educational mission. Methods While chief residents in the 2013-2014 academic year, two of the authors (PB, AN) maintained a Twitter feed for their academic internal medicine residency program. Participants included the chief residents and categorical internal medicine house staff. Results At the year’s end, the authors surveyed residents about uses and attitudes toward this initiative. Residents generally found the chief residents’ tweets informative, and most residents (42/61, 69%) agreed that Twitter enhanced their overall education in residency. Conclusions Data from this single-site intervention corroborate that Twitter can strengthen a residency program’s educational mission. The program’s robust following on Twitter outside of the home program also suggests a need for wider adoption of social media in graduate medical education. Improved use of data analytics and dissemination of these practices to other programs would lend additional insight into social media’s role in improving residents’ educational experiences. PMID:27731845

  3. What are internal medicine residents missing? A communication needs assessment of outpatient clinical encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Kristina L

    2014-09-01

    In order to guide curricular innovation, we looked at the feasibility and utility of performing a targeted needs assessment of the communication skills of PGY2 internal medicine (IM) residents in their continuity clinic, utilizing faculty direct observation with a validated instrument for communication skills evaluation. A convenience sample of PGY2 residents in the Emory University School of Medicine IM Residency Program was invited to participate. Using the SEGUE Framework, a checklist of medical communication tasks, faculty assessed residents during a clinic encounter. Thirty out of 53 (57%) PGY2 residents were assessed. SEGUE results indicate residents were most likely to "maintain patient's privacy" (100%), "greet patient appropriately" (97%) and "check/clarify information" (100%). Residents were least likely to "acknowledge waiting time" (7%), "explore psychosocial/emotional factors" (27%) and "outline agenda for visit" (33%). The SEGUE Framework is a feasible tool to evaluate the communication skills of IM residents in a clinic setting. Many PGY2 IM residents in a large, urban practice do not elicit important psychosocial information during outpatient clinic visits. More observation and evaluation of residents' communication skills are needed, with emphasis on building skills to "Understand the Patient's Perspective." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Family medicine residents' reactions to introducing a reflective exercise into training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Allen F; Duggan, Ashley P

    2013-01-01

    Teaching residents how to reflect and providing ongoing experience in reflection may aid their development into adaptable, life-long learning professionals. We introduced an ongoing reflective exercise into the curriculum of a family medicine residency program. Residents were provided 15 minutes, three times a week, to complete these reflective exercises. We termed these reflective exercises "clinical blogs" since they were entered into a web-based computer portfolio, though they were not publicly available. The aim of this study is to explore family medicine residents' responses to the introduction of an ongoing reflective exercise and examine strengths and challenges of the reflective process. We invited a cohort of family medicine residents (8 residents) who had all participated in the reflective exercises as part of their residency to participate in one of two offered focus groups to share their experience with the reflective exercise. An investigator not connected to the training program led each focus group using minimal structure in order to allow for the breadth of residents' experiences to be revealed. The focus groups were audio recorded, and the recordings were transcribed verbatim without identifying participants. We used a grounded theory approach, using open coding to analyze the focus group transcripts and to identify themes. Four residents participated in each focus group. We identified four main themes regarding family medicine residents' responses of the reflective practice exercises: (1) Residents viewed blogging (reflecting) as a method of enhanced personal and professional self-development; (2) Despite the reflective exercises being valued as self-development, residents see an inherent conflict between self-development and professional duties; (3) Residents recognize their emotional responses, but writing about emotional issues is difficult for some residents; and (4) Clinical blogging in our residency has not reached its potential due to the

  5. Lifestyle Medicine: Lifestyle Profile of Resident Doctors in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lifestyle behavours of Physicians are becoming increasingly important because of the dual benefits of safeguarding the physicians' health and promotion of good patient health outcome. Resident doctors at tertiary institutions provide the bulk of service to patients hence the need to identify their lifestyle behaviours and ...

  6. Development and Implementation of a Novel HIV Primary Care Track for Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, David A; Huang, Grace C; Potter, Jennifer; Baker, Joseph J; Libman, Howard

    2017-03-01

    Declining mortality has led to a rising number of persons living with HIV (PLWH) and concerns about a future shortage of HIV practitioners. To develop an HIV Primary Care Track for internal medicine residents. Academic hospital and community health center with a history of caring for PLWH and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients. Internal medicine residents. We enrolled four residents annually in a 3-year track with the goal of having each provide continuity care to at least 20 PLWH. The curriculum included small group learning sessions, outpatient electives, a global health opportunity, and the development of a scholarly project. All residents successfully accrued 20 or more PLWH as continuity patients. Senior residents passed the American Academy of HIV Medicine certification exam, and 75 % of graduates took positions in primary care involving PLWH. Clinical performance of residents in HIV care quality measures was comparable to those reported in published cohorts. We developed and implemented a novel track to train medical residents in the care of PLWH and LGBT patients. Our results suggest that a designated residency track can serve as a model for training the next generation of HIV practitioners.

  7. Integrative Medicine in Residency: Feasibility and Effectiveness of an Online Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebensohn, Patricia; Kligler, Benjamin; Brooks, Audrey J; Teets, Raymond; Birch, Michele; Cook, Paula; Maizes, Victoria

    2017-07-01

    Online curricular interventions in residency have been proposed to address challenges of time, cost, and curriculum consistency. This study is designed to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of a longitudinal, multisite online curriculum in integrative medicine (IMR) for residents. Residents from eight family medicine programs undertook the 200-hour online IMR curriculum. Their medical knowledge (MK) scores at completion were compared to a control group from four similar residency programs. Study and control groups were comparable in baseline demographics, and MK scores. Course completion, MK scores, and course evaluations were assessed. Of 186 IMR residents, 76.9% met completion requirements. The IMR group showed statistically significant higher MK scores at residency completion, the control group did not (IMR: 79.2% vs. 53.2% mean correct). Over three-fourths of IMR participants (range 79-92%) chose the top two rating categories for each course evaluation item. In an exit survey, ability to access the curriculum for 1 additional year and intention to utilize IM approaches after residency were the highest ranked items. The demonstrated feasibility, effectiveness, and positive evaluations of the IMR curriculum indicate that a multisite, online curricular intervention is a potentially viable approach to offering new curriculum with limited on-site faculty expertise for other family medicine residencies.

  8. Assessing the Influence of a Fitbit Physical Activity Monitor on the Exercise Practices of Emergency Medicine Residents: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Targeted interventions have improved physical activity and wellness of medical residents. However, no exercise interventions have focused on emergency medicine residents. Objective This study aimed to measure the effectiveness of a wearable device for tracking physical activity on the exercise habits and wellness of this population, while also measuring barriers to adoption and continued use. Methods This pre-post cohort study enrolled 30 emergency medicine residents. Study duration was 6 months. Statistical comparisons were conducted for the primary end point and secondary exercise end points with nonparametric tests. Descriptive statistics were provided for subjective responses. Results The physical activity tracker did not increase the overall self-reported median number of days of physical activity per week within this population: baseline 2.5 days (interquartile range, IQR, 1.9) versus 2.8 days (IQR 1.5) at 1 month (P=.36). There was a significant increase in physical activity from baseline to 1 month among residents with median weekly physical activity level below that recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at study start, that is, 1.5 days (IQR 0.9) versus 2.4 days (IQR 1.2; P=.04), to 2.0 days (IQR 2.0; P=.04) at 6 months. More than half (60%, 18/30) of participants reported a benefit to their overall wellness, and 53% (16/30) reported a benefit to their physical activity. Overall continued use of the device was 67% (20/30) at 1 month and 33% (10/30) at 6 months. Conclusions The wearable physical activity tracker did not change the overall physical activity levels among this population of emergency medicine residents. However, there was an improvement in physical activity among the residents with the lowest preintervention physical activity. Subjective improvements in overall wellness and physical activity were noted among the entire study population. PMID:28143805

  9. Effect of Educational Debt on Emergency Medicine Residents: A Qualitative Study Using Individual Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Timothy P; Brown, Madison M; Reibling, Ellen T; Ghassemzadeh, Sassan; Gordon, Dawn M; Phan, Tammy H; Thomas, Tamara L; Brown, Lance

    2016-10-01

    In 2001, less than 20% of emergency medicine residents had more than $150,000 of educational debt. Our emergency medicine residents anecdotally reported much larger debt loads. Surveys have reported that debt affects career and life choices. Qualitative approaches are well suited to explore how and why such complex phenomena occur. We aim to gain a better understanding of how our emergency medicine residents experience debt. We conducted individual semistructured interviews with emergency medicine residents. We collected self-reported data related to educational debt and asked open-ended questions about debt influence on career choices, personal life, future plans, and financial decisions. We undertook a structured thematic analysis using a qualitative approach based in the grounded theory method. Median educational debt was $212,000. Six themes emerged from our analysis: (1) debt influenced career and life decisions by altering priorities; (2) residents experienced debt as a persistent source of background stress and felt powerless to change it; (3) residents made use of various techniques to negotiate debt in order to focus on day-to-day work; (4) personal debt philosophy, based on individual values and obtained from family, shaped how debt affected each individual; (5) debt had a normative effect and was acculturated in residency; and (6) residents reported a wide range of financial knowledge, but recognized its importance to career success. Our emergency medicine residents' debt experience is complex and involves multiple dimensions. Given our current understanding, simple solutions are unlikely to be effective in adequately addressing this issue. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Research on Prevention and Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease by Translational Medicine Based Chinese Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shi-chao; Zhang, Jun-ping

    2015-05-01

    Translational medicine is inevitable in the development of modern medicine, and the uprising concept of translational medicine provides an opportunity for the development of Chinese medicine (CM). Their ideas are well communicated. There are two patterns of researching on CM based on translational medicine: 'literature to bench to bedside' and 'bench to bedside to bench'. CM has her advantages in preventing and treating cardiovascular disease. Effective methods for preventing and treating cardiovascular disease by CM should be further studied based on translational medicine concepts.

  11. Newborn well-child visits in the home setting: a pilot study in a family medicine residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Ashley; Sutter, Mary Beth; Magee, Susanna

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of our study was to pilot a home visit program targeting neonates conducted by family medicine residents. While the literature shows that home visit programs are successful at preventing adverse outcomes for young children, such as improving parenting practices and promoting breastfeeding, no data exist about newborn home visits conducted by resident physicians. Residents conducted newborn home visits precepted by a family medicine faculty member from June 2012--May 2013. Subjects were recruited from the residency continuity practice and randomized to receive two home visits (which replaced two office visits) or routine office-based newborn care. All participants were surveyed using the validated WHOQOL-BREF quality of life scale and a patient satisfaction instrument. Metrics were also obtained from the electronic medical record. Mothers and resident physicians completed an open-ended questionnaire about their experience. All patients, whether receiving office-based or home-based care, rated their care highly. Significant differences were seen in usage of acute care in the first 6 months of life, and mothers in the home visit group trended toward initiating breastfeeding at a higher rate. The home visit group ranked their quality of life higher across all domains when compared to the control group, approaching statistical significance in two domains. Residents providing home visits reported increased connectedness to patients and improved confidence in anticipatory guidance delivery. Home visits are valuable for families with newborns, in terms of minimizing acute care service usage, breastfeeding promotion, and perhaps increasing maternal perceptions of well-being. A home visit program has the potential to enhance resident education and the doctor-patient relationship.

  12. Competency-based achievement system: using formative feedback to teach and assess family medicine residents' skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Shelley; Poth, Cheryl N; Donoff, Michel; Humphries, Paul; Steiner, Ivan; Schipper, Shirley; Janke, Fred; Nichols, Darren

    2011-09-01

    Family medicine residency programs require innovative means to assess residents' competence in "soft" skills (eg, patient-centred care, communication, and professionalism) and to identify residents who are having difficulty early enough in their residency to provide remedial training. To develop a method to assess residents' competence in various skills and to identify residents who are having difficulty. The Competency-Based Achievement System (CBAS) was designed to measure competence using 3 main principles: formative feedback, guided self-assessment, and regular face-to-face meetings. The CBAS is resident driven and provides a framework for meaningful interactions between residents and advisors. Residents use the CBAS to organize and review their feedback, to guide their own assessment of their progress, and to discern their future learning needs. Advisors use the CBAS to monitor, guide, and verify residents' knowledge of and competence in important skills. By focusing on specific skills and behaviour, the CBAS enables residents and advisors to make formative assessments and to communicate their findings. Feedback indicates that the CBAS is a user-friendly and helpful system to assess competence.

  13. The use of sleep aids among Emergency Medicine residents: a web based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Ali

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleepiness is a significant problem among residents due to chronic sleep deprivation. Recent studies have highlighted medical errors due to resident sleep deprivation. We hypothesized residents routinely use pharmacologic sleep aids to manage their sleep deprivation and reduce sleepiness. Methods A web-based survey of US allopathic Emergency Medicine (EM residents was conducted during September 2004. All EM residency program directors were asked to invite their residents to participate. E-mail with reminders was used to solicit participation. Direct questions about use of alcohol and medications to facilitate sleep, and questions requesting details of sleep aids were included. Results Of 3,971 EM residents, 602 (16% replied to the survey. Respondents were 71% male, 78% white, and mean (SD age was 30 (4 years, which is similar to the entire EM resident population reported by the ACGME. There were 32% 1st year, 32% 2nd year, 28% 3rd year, and 8% 4th year residents. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS showed 38% of residents were excessively sleepy (ESS 11–16 and 7% were severely sleepy (ESS>16. 46% (95 CI 42%–50% regularly used alcohol, antihistamines, sleep adjuncts, benzodiazepines, or muscle relaxants to help them fall or stay asleep. Study limitations include low response and self-report. Conclusion Even with a low response rate, sleep aid use among EM residents may be common. How this affects performance, well-being, and health remains unknown.

  14. Creative solution for implementation of experiential, competency-based palliative care training for internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Douglas D; Shpritz, Deborah W; Wolfsthal, Susan D; Zimrin, Ann B; Keay, Timothy J; Fang, Hong-Bin; Schuetz, Carl A; Stapleton, Laura M; Weissman, David E

    2011-09-01

    To graduate internal medicine residents with basic competency in palliative care, we employ a two-pronged strategy targeted at both residents and attending physicians as learners. The first prong provides a knowledge foundation using web-based learning programs designed specifically for residents and clinical faculty members. The second prong is assessment of resident competency in key palliative care domains by faculty members using direct observation during clinical rotations. The faculty training program contains Competency Assessment Tools addressing 19 topics distributed amongst four broad palliative care domains designed to assist faculty members in making the clinical competency assessments. Residents are required to complete their web-based training by the end of their internship year; they must demonstrate competency in one skill from each of the four broad palliative care domains prior to graduation. Resident and faculty evaluation of the training programs is favorable. Outcome-based measures are planned to evaluate long-term program effectiveness.

  15. Correlation of the Emergency Medicine Resident In-service Examination with the American Osteopathic Board of Emergency Medicine Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Levy

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eligible residents during their fourth postgraduate year (PGY-4 of emergency medicine (EM residency training who seek specialty board certification in emergency medicine may take the American Osteopathic Board of Emergency Medicine (AOBEM Part 1 Board Certifying Examination (AOBEM Part 1. All residents enrolled in an osteopathic EM residency training program are required to take the EM Resident In-service Examination (RISE annually. Our aim was to correlate resident performance on the RISE with performance on the AOBEM Part 1. The study group consisted of osteopathic EM residents in their PGY-4 year of training who took both examinations during that same year. Methods: We examined data from 2009 to 2012 from the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME. The NBOME grades and performs statistical analyses on both the RISE and the AOBEM Part 1. We used the RISE exam scores, as reported by percentile rank, and compared them to both the score on the AOBEM Part 1 and the dichotomous outcome of passing or failing. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was generated to depict the relationship. Results: We studied a total of 409 residents over the 4-year period. The RISE percentile score correlated strongly with the AOBEM Part 1 score for residents who took both exams in the same year (r¼0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54 to 0.66. Pass percentage on the AOBEM Part 1 increased by resident percent decile on the RISE from 0% in the bottom decile to 100% in the top decile. ROC analysis also showed that the best cutoff for determining pass or fail on the AOBEM Part 1 was a 65th percentile score on the RISE. Conclusion: We have shown there is a strong correlation between a resident’s percentile score on the RISE during their PGY-4 year of residency training and first-time success on the AOBEM Part 1 taken during the same year. This information may be useful for osteopathic EM residents as an indicator as to how well

  16. Family medicine residency program director expectations of procedural skills of medical school graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Gretchen M; Chesser, Amy K; Woods, Nikki Keene; Krug, Nathan R; Kellerman, Rick D

    2013-06-01

    Mismatch between program directors' expectations of medical school graduates and the experience of students in medical school has important implications for patient safety and medical education. We sought to define family medicine residency program directors' expectations of medical school graduates to independently perform various procedural skills and medical school graduates' self-reported competence to perform those skills at residency outset. In July of 2011, a paper-based survey was distributed nationwide by mail to 441 family medicine residency program directors and 3,287 medical school graduates enrolled as postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) residents in family medicine residency programs. Program director expectation of independent performance and recent medical school graduate self-reported ability to independently perform each of 40 procedures was assessed. Surveys were completed and returned from 186 program directors (response rate 42%) and 681 medical school graduates (response rate 21%). At least 66% of program directors expected interns to enter residency able to independently perform 15 of 40 procedures. More than 80% of new interns reported they were able to independently perform five of the 15 procedures expected by program directors. Incongruity exists between program director expectations and intern self-reported ability to perform common procedures. Both patient safety and medical education may be jeopardized by a mismatch of expectation and experience. Assessment of medical students prior to medical school graduation or at the start of residency training may help detect procedural skill gaps and protect patient safety.

  17. Organizational environment and perceptions of teaching quality in seven South Carolina family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, J C; Baxley, E G; Schell, B J; Cleghorn, G D; Bogdewic, S P

    1998-08-01

    To explore the relationship between organizational environment and teaching quality in seven family medicine residency programs. In 1995, a questionnaire on organizational environment was administered to the faculties at all seven family medicine residency programs in South Carolina. Eighty-seven percent of the faculty members participated, as did convenience samples of residents, nurses, and administrative staff. The questionnaire measured seven variables: teaching quality, job satisfaction, organizational climate, employees' autonomy, goal attainment, organizational commitment, and job-related stress. Residents, nurses, and administrative staff who were connected to programs at which faculty expressed high levels of job satisfaction assessed teaching quality as higher than did those at other programs. The residents' perceptions of teaching quality were positively correlated with high ratings of organizational climate and job-related stress. The staffs' ratings of goal attainment were also associated with teaching quality. Faculty satisfaction was associated with their reported employee autonomy and goal attainment. The organizational characteristics of family medicine residency programs significantly influence the perceptions of teaching quality: specifically, there perceptions are correlated with the degree to which faculty are satisfied with their work environments. In addition, residents' and staffs' perceptions of teaching quality are associated with their attitudes toward their organizations' environments.

  18. A Model Curriculum for an Emergency Medical Services (EMS Rotation for Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mancera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This EMS curriculum is designed for Emergency Medicine residents at all levels of training. Introduction: Emergency Medicine (EM physicians have routine interaction with Emergency Medical Services (EMS in their clinical practice. Additionally, the American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME mandates that all Emergency Medicine resident physicians receive specific training in the area of EMS.1 Historically, EMS training for EM residents has been conducted in the absence of a standardized didactic curriculum. Despite advancements in the area of prehospital training, there remains wide inconsistency in EMS training experiences among EM residency training programs.2 To our knowledge a standardized and reproducible EMS curriculum for EM residents does not exist. Objectives: The aim of this curriculum is to provide a robust learning experience for EM residents around prehospital care and EMS that fulfills the ACGME requirements and which can be easily replicated and implemented in a variety of EM residency training programs. Method: The educational strategies used in this curriculum include didactics, asynchronous learning through online modules and a focused reading list, experiential learning through ride-alongs, structured small group discussion, supervised medical command shifts, and mentored practice in organizing and delivering didactics to EMS providers.

  19. Internal Medicine Residents' Beliefs, Attitudes, and Experiences Relating to Palliative Care: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, S; Mirza, R; Nissim, R; Ridley, J

    2017-05-01

    Internal medicine residents are frequently called upon to provide palliative care to hospitalized patients, but report feeling unprepared to do so effectively. Curricular development to enhance residents' palliative care skills and competencies requires an understanding of current beliefs, attitudes and learning priorities. We conducted a qualitative study consisting of semi-structured interviews with ten internal medicine residents to explore their understanding of and experiences with palliative care. All of the residents interviewed had a sound theoretical understanding of palliative care, but faced many challenges in being able to provide care in practice. The challenges described by residents were system-related, patient-related and provider-related. They identified several priority areas for further learning, and discussed ways in which their current education in palliative care could be enhanced. Our findings provide important insights to guide curricular development for internal medicine trainees. The top five learning priorities in palliative care that residents identified in our study were: 1) knowing how and when to initiate a palliative approach, 2) improving communication skills, 3) improving symptom management skills, 4) identifying available resources, and 5) understanding the importance of palliative care. Residents felt that their education in palliative care could be improved by having a mandatory rotation in palliative care, more frequent didactic teaching sessions, more case-based teaching from palliative care providers, opportunities to be directly observed, and increased support from palliative care providers after-hours.

  20. Training Pathology Residents to Practice 21st Century Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Stephen Black-Schaffer MA, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific advances, open information access, and evolving health-care economics are disrupting extant models of health-care delivery. Physicians increasingly practice as team members, accountable to payers and patients, with improved efficiency, value, and quality. This change along with a greater focus on population health affects how systems of care are structured and delivered. Pathologists are not immune to these disruptors and, in fact, may be one of the most affected medical specialties. In the coming decades, it is likely that the number of practicing pathologists will decline, requiring each pathologist to serve more and often sicker patients. The demand for increasingly sophisticated yet broader diagnostic skills will continue to grow. This will require pathologists to acquire appropriate professional training and interpersonal skills. Today’s pathology training programs are ill designed to prepare such practitioners. The time to practice for most pathology trainees is typically 5 to 6 years. Yet, trainees often lack sufficient experience to practice independently and effectively. Many studies have recognized these challenges suggesting that more effective training for this new century can be implemented. Building on the strengths of existing programs, we propose a redesign of pathology residency training that will meet (and encourage a continuing evolution of American Board of Pathology and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements, reduce the time to readiness for practice, and produce more effective, interactive, and adaptable pathologists. The essence of this new model is clear definition and acquisition of core knowledge and practice skills that span the anatomic and clinical pathology continuum during the first 2 years, assessed by competency-based metrics with emphasis on critical thinking and skill acquisition, followed by individualized modular training with intensively progressive responsibility

  1. Optimum number of procedures required to achieve procedural skills competency in internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Muhammad; Bhulani, Nizar; Jafferani, Asif; Naeem, Quratulain; Ahsan, Syed; Motiwala, Afaq; van Dalen, Jan; Hamid, Saeed

    2015-10-23

    Procedural skills training forms an essential, yet difficult to assess, component of an Internal Medicine Residency Program. We report the development of process of documentation and assessment of procedural skills training. An explanatory sequential mixed methods design was adopted where both quantitative and qualitative information was collected sequentially. A survey was conducted within the Department of Internal Medicine at The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan to determine the optimum number of procedures needed to be performed by residents at each year of residency. Respondents included both faculty and the residents in the Department. Thereafter, all responses were compiled and later scrutinized by a focus group comprising of a mix of faculty from various subspecialties and resident representatives. A total of 64 responses were obtained. A significant difference was found in eight procedural skills' status between residents and faculty, though none of these were significant after accounting for multiple consecutive testing. However, the results were reviewed and a consensus for the procedures needed was developed through a focus group. A finalized procedural list was generated to determine: (a) the minimum number of times each procedure needed to be performed by the resident before deemed competent; (b) the level of competency for each procedure for respective year of residency. We conclude that the opinion of both the residents and the faculty as key stakeholders is vital to determine the number of procedures to be performed during an Internal Medicine Residency. Documentation of procedural competency development during the training would make the system more objective and hence reproducible. A log book was designed consisting of minimum number of procedures to be performed before attaining competency.

  2. Effectiveness of a 2-year menopause medicine curriculum for obstetrics and gynecology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Mindy S; Washington, Chantel I; Stewart, Katherine I; Shen, Wen

    2016-03-01

    Previous work has shown American obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents are lacking in menopause training. Our objective was to assess the effectiveness of a 2-year menopause medicine curriculum in improving OB/GYN residents' knowledge and self-assessed competency in menopause topics. We developed a menopause medicine-teaching curriculum for OB/GYN residents at our academic hospital-based residency program. The 2-year curriculum was composed of year 1: four 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab with cases presentations, and year 2: three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab. Core topics included menopause physiology, hormone therapy, breast health, bone health, cardiovascular disease, and autoimmune disease. Pre- and posttests assessed resident knowledge and comfort in core topics, and a pre- and postcurriculum survey assessed utility and learning satisfaction. From July 2011 to June 2013, 34 OB/GYN residents completed the menopause curriculum annually with an average attendance at each module of 23 residents. Pre-/posttest scores improved from a mean pretest score of 57.3% to a mean posttest score of 78.7% (P menopause patients with 75.8% reporting feeling "barely comfortable" and 8.4% feeling "not at all comfortable." After the 2-year curriculum, 85.7% reported feeling "comfortable/very comfortable" taking care of menopause patients. The majority of residents (95.2%) reported the menopause curriculum was "extremely useful." A 2-year menopause medicine curriculum for OB/GYN residents utilizing lectures and a lab with case studies is an effective modality to improve resident knowledge required to manage menopause patients.

  3. Learning behaviour and preferences of family medicine residents under a flexible academic curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Alice; Wong, Eric; Boisvert, Leslie

    2014-11-01

    To determine family medicine residents' learning behaviour and preferences outside of clinical settings in order to help guide the development of an effective academic program that can maximize their learning. Retrospective descriptive analysis of academic learning logs submitted by residents as part of their academic training requirements between 2008 and 2011. London, Ont. All family medicine residents at Western University who had completed their academic program requirements (N = 72) by submitting 300 or more credits (1 credit = 1 hour). Amount of time spent on various learning modalities, location where the learning took place, resources used for self-study, and the objective of the learning activity. A total of 72 residents completed their academic requirements during the study period and logged a total of 25 068 hours of academic learning. Residents chose to spend most of their academic time engaging in self-study (44%), attending staff physicians' teaching sessions (20%),and participating in conferences, courses, or workshops (12%) and in postgraduate medical education sessions (12%). Textbooks (26%), medical journals (20%), and point-of-care resources (12%) were the 3 most common resources used for self-study. The hospital (32%), residents' homes (32%),and family medicine clinics (14%) were the most frequently cited locations where academic learning occurred. While all physicians used a variety of educational activities, most residents (67%) chose self-study as their primary method of learning. The topic for academic learning appeared to have some influence on the learning modalities used by residents. Residents used a variety of learning modalities and chose self-study over other more traditional modalities (eg, lectures) for most of their academic learning. A successful academic program must take into account residents' various learning preferences and habits while providing guidance and training in the use of more effective learning methods and

  4. Integrating addiction medicine training into medical school and residency curricula

    OpenAIRE

    Klimas, Jan; Rieb, Launette; Bury, Gerard; Muench, John; O?Toole, Thomas; Rieckman, Traci; Cullen, Walter

    2015-01-01

    peer-reviewed Background: The Affordable Care Act (2010) brings an opportunity to increase the integration of addiction treatment into the health care system. With the anticipated expansion of addiction care services in primary care, challenges, such as workforce training, can be expected. This presentation discusses challenges and opportunities for addiction medicine training of primary care professionals in Ireland, Canada and Portland, OR. Objectives: To explore ideas for integratin...

  5. Music and Medicine: Preventing Performance Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carol Anne

    2001-01-01

    Describes medical conditions that musicians may contract. Addresses what experts believe may help avoid some conditions and what to do if injury is possible. Provides a bibliography of resources on performing arts medicine, including books and periodicals, and a list of associations for performing arts medicine. (CMK)

  6. Breastfeeding Education and Support Services Provided to Family Medicine and Obstetrics-Gynecology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Lien, Elizabeth; Shattuck, Karen

    2017-11-01

    Breastfeeding education is known to be insufficient in pediatric (PEDS) training and is, in part, responsible for suboptimal rates of breastfeeding. No recent studies about the level of education provided to family medicine (FM) and obstetrics-gynecology (OB) residency trainees are available. This study was conducted to investigate breastfeeding education and support services provided to FM and OB residents in the United States. The results were compared with a 2011 study of PEDS residents. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a web-based survey emailed to program directors (PDs) of FM and OB residency programs in the United States. Eighteen percent of PDs (95 of 515) completed the survey. Of these, 88% answered questions regarding education and support services provided. A median of 23 hours of breastfeeding education is provided to OB residents (4-year program) and 8 hours provided to FM residents (3-year program). In comparison, PEDS programs reported a median of 9 hours. The most commonly used settings included lectures with faculty and lactation consultants, similar to the PEDS study. Approximately 75% of respondents cited barriers to educating residents, with limited resident time being the most common. Eighty-one percent of respondents identified breastfeeding rooms as the service most frequently provided to residents who breastfeed. FM and PEDS residents are provided similar amounts of breastfeeding education, while OB programs provide more education, but in different settings. Reported barriers to this education are similar in all specialties. Support services are more commonly provided in PEDS programs.

  7. A new model for accreditation of residency programs in internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goroll, Allan H; Sirio, Carl; Duffy, F Daniel; LeBlond, Richard F; Alguire, Patrick; Blackwell, Thomas A; Rodak, William E; Nasca, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    A renewed emphasis on clinical competence and its assessment has grown out of public concerns about the safety, efficacy, and accountability of health care in the United States. Medical schools and residency training programs are paying increased attention to teaching and evaluating basic clinical skills, stimulated in part by these concerns and the responding initiatives of accrediting, certifying, and licensing bodies. This paper, from the Residency Review Committee for Internal Medicine of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, proposes a new outcomes-based accreditation strategy for residency training programs in internal medicine. It shifts residency program accreditation from external audit of educational process to continuous assessment and improvement of trainee clinical competence.

  8. Application of preventive medicine resources in the health insurance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Karla Regina Dias de; Liberal, Márcia Mello Costa de; Zucchi, Paola

    2015-01-01

    To identify the financial resources and investments provided for preventive medicine programs by health insurance companies of all kinds. Data were collected from 30 large health insurance companies, with over 100 thousand individuals recorded, and registered at the Agência Nacional de Saúde Suplementar. It was possible to identify the percentage of participants of the programs in relation to the total number of beneficiaries of the health insurance companies, the prevention and promotion actions held in preventive medicine programs, the inclusion criteria for the programs, as well as the evaluation of human resources and organizational structure of the preventive medicine programs. Most of the respondents (46.7%) invested more than US$ 50,000.00 in preventive medicine program, while 26.7% invested more than US$ 500,000.00. The remaining, about 20%, invested less than US$ 50,000.00, and 3.3% did not report the value applied.

  9. Ten-year trends in family medicine residency productivity and staffing: impact of electronic health records, resident duty hours, and the medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesko, Sarah; Hughes, Lauren; Fitch, Wes; Pauwels, Judith

    2012-02-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs), resident duty hour restrictions, and Patient-centered Medical Home (PCMH) innovations have all impacted the clinical practices of residency programs over the past decade. The University of Washington Family Medicine Network (UWFMN) residencies have collaborated for 10 years in collecting and comparing data regarding the productivity and operations of their training programs to identify the program-level effects of such changes. Based on five survey results from 2000 to 2010, this study examines changes in faculty and resident productivity and staffing models of UWFMN residency training clinics using a standardized methodology, specifically describing the productivity impact of EHR changes and duty hour restrictions and the implementation of the PCMH by residencies. Data were systematically collected via standardized questionnaire, evaluated for quality, clarified, and then analyzed. Resident productivity decreased over the 10-year interval, with resident total yearly patient visits down 17.2%. Core family medicine faculty productivity was highly variable among programs, and nonphysician provider visits increased. Faculty part-time status increased. Front office, medical assistant, and nursing staffing grew significantly, but other administrative staff decreased, resulting in minimal change in total non-provider staffing. A majority of programs engaged in PCMH initiatives in 2010 and had implemented an EHR. Physician productivity in UWFMN residency programs decreased for all resident physicians from 2000 to 2010, likely due to a combination of decreased resident duty hours and other clinical practice changes. Productivity trends have implications for the structure and training requirements for family medicine residency programs.

  10. Integrative medicine in residency education: developing competency through online curriculum training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebensohn, Patricia; Kligler, Benjamin; Dodds, Sally; Schneider, Craig; Sroka, Selma; Benn, Rita; Cook, Paula; Guerrera, Mary; Low Dog, Tieraona; Sierpina, Victor; Teets, Raymond; Waxman, Dael; Woytowicz, John; Weil, Andrew; Maizes, Victoria

    2012-03-01

    The Integrative Medicine in Residency (IMR) program, a 200-hour Internet-based, collaborative educational initiative was implemented in 8 family medicine residency programs and has shown a potential to serve as a national model for incorporating training in integrative/complementary/alternative medicine in graduate medical education. The curriculum content was designed based on a needs assessment and a set of competencies for graduate medical education developed following the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outcome project guidelines. The content was delivered through distributed online learning and included onsite activities. A modular format allowed for a flexible implementation in different residency settings. TO ASSESS THE FEASIBILITY OF IMPLEMENTING THE CURRICULUM, A MULTIMODAL EVALUATION WAS UTILIZED, INCLUDING: (1) residents' evaluation of the curriculum; (2) residents' competencies evaluation through medical knowledge testing, self-assessment, direct observations, and reflections; and (3) residents' wellness and well-being through behavioral assessments. The class of 2011 (n  =  61) had a high rate of curriculum completion in the first and second year (98.7% and 84.2%) and course evaluations on meeting objectives, clinical utility, and functioning of the technology were highly rated. There was a statistically significant improvement in medical knowledge test scores for questions aligned with content for both the PGY-1 and PGY-2 courses. The IMR program is an advance in the national effort to make training in integrative medicine available to physicians on a broad scale and is a success in terms of online education. Evaluation suggests that this program is feasible for implementation and acceptable to residents despite the many pressures of residency.

  11. Executive Summary from the 2017 Emergency Medicine Resident Wellness Consensus Summit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Ankel

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physician wellness has recently become a popular topic of conversation and publication within the house of medicine and specifically within emergency medicine (EM. Through a joint collaboration involving Academic Life in Emergency Medicine’s (ALiEM Wellness Think Tank, Essentials of Emergency Medicine (EEM, and the Emergency Medicine Residents’ Association (EMRA, a one-day Resident Wellness Consensus Summit (RWCS was organized. Methods: The RWCS was held on May 15, 2017, as a pre-day event prior to the 2017 EEM conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. Seven months before the RWCS event, pre-work began in the ALiEM Wellness Think Tank, which was launched in October 2016. The Wellness Think Tank is a virtual community of practice involving EM residents from the U.S. and Canada, hosted on the Slack digital-messaging platform. A working group was formed for each of the four predetermined themes: wellness curriculum development; educator toolkit resources for specific wellness topics; programmatic innovations; and wellness-targeted technologies. Results: Pre-work for RWCS included 142 residents from 100 different training programs in the Wellness Think Tank. Participants in the actual RWCS event included 44 EM residents, five EM attendings who participated as facilitators, and three EM attendings who acted as participants. The four working groups ultimately reached a consensus on their specific objectives to improve resident wellness on both the individual and program level. Conclusion: The Resident Wellness Consensus Summit was a unique and novel consensus meeting, involving residents as the primary stakeholders. The summit demonstrated that it is possible to galvanize a large group of stakeholders in a relatively short time by creating robust trust, communication, and online learning networks to create resources that support resident wellness.

  12. The role of librarians in teaching evidence-based medicine to pediatric residents: a survey of pediatric residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boykan, Rachel; Jacobson, Robert M

    2017-10-01

    The research sought to identify the general use of medical librarians in pediatric residency training, to define the role of medical librarians in teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM) to pediatric residents, and to describe strategies and curricula for teaching EBM used in pediatric residency training programs. We sent a 13-question web-based survey through the Association of Pediatric Program Directors to 200 pediatric residency program directors between August and December 2015. A total of 91 (46%) pediatric residency program directors responded. Most (76%) programs had formal EBM curricula, and more than 75% of curricula addressed question formation, searching, assessment of validity, generalizability, quantitative importance, statistical significance, and applicability. The venues for teaching EBM that program directors perceived to be most effective included journal clubs (84%), conferences (44%), and morning report (36%). While 80% of programs utilized medical librarians, most of these librarians assisted with scholarly or research projects (74%), addressed clinical questions (62%), and taught on any topic not necessarily EBM (58%). Only 17% of program directors stated that librarians were involved in teaching EBM on a regular basis. The use of a librarian was not associated with having an EBM curriculum but was significantly associated with the size of the program. Smaller programs were more likely to utilize librarians (100%) than were medium (71%) or large programs (75%). While most pediatric residency programs have an EBM curriculum and engage medical librarians in various ways, librarians' expertise in teaching EBM is underutilized. Programs should work to better integrate librarians' expertise, both in the didactic and clinical teaching of EBM.

  13. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among Residents of Wayu Town, Western Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belachew, Negash; Tadesse, Tarekegne; Gube, Addisu Alemayehu

    2017-10-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine covers a wide variety of therapies and practices, which vary from country to country and region to region. The study was conducted to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of complementary and alternative medicine among the residents of Wayu town, Western Ethiopia. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on 302 residents. A systematic sampling was used to select households. Data were entered in SPSS (version 20; IBM Corp) and descriptive statistics was carried out. Of 302 participants, 51.65% have a good knowledge, 78.6% were aware of complementary and alternative medicine, and 74.22% used it in the past 2 years. A total of 23.83% believe that complementary and alternative medicine is more effective than modern medicine and 28.8% preferred complementary and alternative medicine to modern medicine. This study revealed that in Wayu town, there is relatively high public interest in complementary and alternative medicine practices and a significant number has a good knowledge but generally the attitude toward complementary and alternative medicine is relatively low.

  14. Saudi Internal Medicine Residents׳ Perceptions of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination as a Formative Assessment Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa Alaidarous

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Saudi Commission for Health Specialties first implemented the Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE as part of the final year Internal Medicine clerkship exam during the 2007–2008 academic year. This study evaluated Internal Medicine residents׳ overall perceptions of the OSCE as a formative assessment tool. It focused on residents׳ perceptions of the OSCE stations׳ attributes, determined the acceptability of the process, and provided feedback to enhance further development of the assessment tool. The main objective was to assess Internal Medicine resident test-takers׳ perceptions and acceptance of the OSCE, and to identify its strengths and weaknesses through their feedback. Sixty six residents were involved in the studied administered on November 8th 2012 at King Abdulaziz University Hospital in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Overall, resident׳s evaluation of the OSCE was favorable and encouraging. To this end, we recommend that formative assessment opportunities using the OSCE for providing feedback to students should be included in the curriculum, and continuing refinement and localized adaptation of OSCEs in use should be pursued by course directors and assessment personnel.

  15. Clinical ethics in rehabilitation medicine: core objectives and algorithm for resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, J A; McPeak, L; Gittler, M; Bodenheimer, C; King, J; Bowen, J

    2002-09-01

    Described as the balance of values on either side of a moral dilemma, ethics and ethical issues are of increasing importance in the changing practice of rehabilitation medicine. Because the substance of ethics and true ethical issues can be difficult to identify, the education of rehabilitation residents in ethics can similarly be challenging. This article discusses topics pertinent to an understanding of clinical ethics in rehabilitation medicine and provides a method of teaching residents through an algorithm of ethical issues, learning objectives, and illustrative cases.

  16. Factors associated with the subspecialty choices of internal medicine residents in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorpe Kevin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, there are more residents enrolled in cardiology training programs in Canada than in immunology, pharmacology, rheumatology, infectious diseases, geriatrics and endocrinology combined. There is no published data regarding the proportion of Canadian internal medicine residents applying to the various subspecialties, or the factors that residents consider important when deciding which subspecialty to pursue. To address the concern about physician imbalances in internal medicine subspecialties, we need to examine the factors that motivate residents when making career decisions. Methods In this two-phase study, Canadian internal medicine residents participating in the post graduate year 4 (PGY4 subspecialty match were invited to participate in a web-based survey and focus group discussions. The focus group discussions were based on issues identified from the survey results. Analysis of focus group transcripts grew on grounded theory. Results 110 PGY3 residents participating in the PGY4 subspecialty match from 10 participating Canadian universities participated in the web-based survey (54% response rate. 22 residents from 3 different training programs participated in 4 focus groups held across Canada. Our study found that residents are choosing careers that provide intellectual stimulation, are consistent with their personality, and that provide a challenge in diagnosis. From our focus group discussions it appears that lifestyle, role models, mentorship and the experience of the resident with the specialty appear to be equally important in career decisions. Males are more likely to choose procedure based specialties and are more concerned with the reputation of the specialty as well as the anticipated salary. In contrast, residents choosing non-procedure based specialties are more concerned with issues related to lifestyle, including work-related stress, work hours and time for leisure as well as the patient populations

  17. Support for and aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the US: a survey

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson Mark C; Mustafa Reem; Gunukula Sameer; Akl Elie A; Symons Andrew; Moheet Amir; Schünemann Holger J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The evidence supporting the effectiveness of educational games in graduate medical education is limited. Anecdotal reports suggest their popularity in that setting. The objective of this study was to explore the support for and the different aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We conducted a survey of family medicine and internal medicine residency program directors in the United Stat...

  18. Effecting Change in an Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum: Librarians' Role in a Pediatric Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeblisky, Kathy; Birr, Rebecca A; Sjursen Guerrero, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Librarians for the joint Phoenix Children's Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency Program were asked to assist on the Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Subcommittee for the program. Faculty was open to recommendations for revising and improving the curriculum and desired librarian assistance in completing the task. The annual program review and conference evaluations revealed a gap between the objectives of the EBM curriculum and the residents' perceived abilities to integrate knowledge into meaningful literature searches. This column demonstrates how librarians can collaborate with their residency programs to revise and improve processes to effect change in their program's EBM curriculum.

  19. Chart Smart: A Need for Documentation and Billing Education Among Emergency Medicine Residents?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Dawson, MD

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The healthcare chart is becoming ever more complex, serving clinicians, patients, third party payers, regulators, and even medicolegal parties. The purpose of this study was to identify our emergency medicine (EM resident and attending physicians’ current knowledge and attitudes about billing and documentation practices. We hypothesized that resident and attending physicians would identify billing and documentation as an area in which residents need further education.Methods: We gave a 15-question Likert survey to resident and attending physicians regarding charting practices, knowledge of billing and documentation, and opinions regarding need for further education.Results: We achieved a 100% response rate, with 47% (16/34 of resident physicians disagreeing or strongly disagreeing that they have adequate training in billing and documentation, while 91% (31/34 of residents and 95% (21/22 of attending physicians identified this skill as important to a resident’s future practice. Eighty-two percent (28/34 of resident physicians and 100% of attending physicians recommended further education for residents.Conclusion: Residents in this academic EM department identified a need for further education in billing and documentation practices. [West J Emerg Med. 2010;11(2: 116-119.

  20. The research rotation: competency-based structured and novel approach to research training of internal medicine residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrov Vihren

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United States, the Accreditation Council of graduate medical education (ACGME requires all accredited Internal medicine residency training programs to facilitate resident scholarly activities. However, clinical experience and medical education still remain the main focus of graduate medical education in many Internal Medicine (IM residency-training programs. Left to design the structure, process and outcome evaluation of the ACGME research requirement, residency-training programs are faced with numerous barriers. Many residency programs report having been cited by the ACGME residency review committee in IM for lack of scholarly activity by residents. Methods We would like to share our experience at Lincoln Hospital, an affiliate of Weill Medical College Cornell University New York, in designing and implementing a successful structured research curriculum based on ACGME competencies taught during a dedicated "research rotation". Results Since the inception of the research rotation in 2004, participation of our residents among scholarly activities has substantially increased. Our residents increasingly believe and appreciate that research is an integral component of residency training and essential for practice of medicine. Conclusion Internal medicine residents' outlook in research can be significantly improved using a research curriculum offered through a structured and dedicated research rotation. This is exemplified by the improvement noted in resident satisfaction, their participation in scholarly activities and resident research outcomes since the inception of the research rotation in our internal medicine training program.

  1. A Descriptive Analysis of the Use of Twitter by Emergency Medicine Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diller, David; Yarris, Lalena M

    2018-02-01

    Twitter is increasingly recognized as an instructional tool by the emergency medicine (EM) community. In 2012, the Council of Residency Directors in Emergency Medicine (CORD) recommended that EM residency programs' Twitter accounts be managed solely by faculty. To date, little has been published regarding the patterns of Twitter use by EM residency programs. We analyzed current patterns in Twitter use among EM residency programs with accounts and assessed conformance with CORD recommendations. In this mixed methods study, a 6-question, anonymous survey was distributed via e-mail using SurveyMonkey. In addition, a Twitter-based search was conducted, and the public profiles of EM residency programs' Twitter accounts were analyzed. We calculated descriptive statistics and performed a qualitative analysis on the data. Of 168 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited EM programs, 88 programs (52%) responded. Of those programs, 58% (51 of 88) reported having a program-level Twitter account. Residents served as content managers for those accounts in the majority of survey respondents (61%, 28 of 46). Most programs did not publicly disclose the identity or position of their Twitter content manager. We found a wide variety of applications for Twitter, with EM programs most frequently using Twitter for educational and promotional purposes. There is significant variability in the numbers of followers for EM programs' Twitter accounts. Applications and usage among EM residency programs are varied, and are frequently not consistent with current CORD recommendations.

  2. Using television shows to teach communication skills in internal medicine residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Roger Y; Saber, Sadra S; Ma, Irene; Roberts, J Mark

    2009-02-03

    To address evidence-based effective communication skills in the formal academic half day curriculum of our core internal medicine residency program, we designed and delivered an interactive session using excerpts taken from medically-themed television shows. We selected two excerpts from the television show House, and one from Gray's Anatomy and featured them in conjunction with a brief didactic presentation of the Kalamazoo consensus statement on doctor-patient communication. To assess the efficacy of this approach a set of standardized questions were given to our residents once at the beginning and once at the completion of the session. Our residents indicated that their understanding of an evidence-based model of effective communication such as the Kalamazoo model, and their comfort levels in applying such model in clinical practice increased significantly. Furthermore, residents' understanding levels of the seven essential competencies listed in the Kalamazoo model also improved significantly. Finally, the residents reported that their comfort levels in three challenging clinical scenarios presented to them improved significantly. We used popular television shows to teach residents in our core internal medicine residency program about effective communication skills with a focus on the Kalamazoo's model. The results of the subjective assessment of this approach indicated that it was successful in accomplishing our objectives.

  3. Internal Medicine Resident Engagement with a Laboratory Utilization Dashboard: Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzman, Gregory; Dine, Jessica; Epstein, Andrew; Gitelman, Yevgenly; Leri, Damien; Patel, Miltesh S; Ryskina, Kyra

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to measure internal medicine resident engagement with an electronic medical record-based dashboard providing feedback on their use of routine laboratory tests relative to service averages. From January 2016 to June 2016, residents were e-mailed a snapshot of their personalized dashboard, a link to the online dashboard, and text summarizing the resident and service utilization averages. We measured resident engagement using e-mail read-receipts and web-based tracking. We also conducted 3 hour-long focus groups with residents. Using grounded theory approach, the transcripts were analyzed for common themes focusing on barriers and facilitators of dashboard use. Among 80 residents, 74% opened the e-mail containing a link to the dashboard and 21% accessed the dashboard itself. We did not observe a statistically significant difference in routine laboratory ordering by dashboard use, although residents who opened the link to the dashboard ordered 0.26 fewer labs per doctor-patient-day than those who did not (95% confidence interval, -0.77 to 0.25; = 0 .31). While they raised several concerns, focus group participants had positive attitudes toward receiving individualized feedback delivered in real time. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  4. Characteristics of Successful Internal Medicine Resident Research Projects: Predictors of Journal Publication Versus Abstract Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Auras R; Stefan, Mihaela; Friderici, Jennifer L; Kleppel, Reva; Fitzgerald, Janice; Rothberg, Michael B

    2018-02-06

    To identify the characteristics of successful research projects at an internal medicine residency program with an established research curriculum. The authors collected data about all research projects initiated by or involving medicine residents from 2006 to 2013 at Baystate Medical Center, using departmental files and institutional review board applications. Resident and mentor characteristics were determined using personnel files and Medline searches. Using multivariable models, the authors identified predictors of successful completion of projects using adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs). The primary outcome was manuscript publication by resident and secondary outcome was either publication or regional/national presentation. Finally, residents were surveyed to identify barriers and/or factors contributing to project completion. Ninety-four research projects were identified: 52 (55.3%) projects achieved the primary outcome and 72 (76.5%) met the secondary outcome, with overlap between categories. Most study designs were cross-sectional (41, 43.6%) or retrospective cohort (30, 31.9%). After adjustment, utilization of the epidemiology/biostatistical core (PR = 2.09; 95% CI: 1.36, 3.21), established publication record of resident (PR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.14, 2.07), and resident with U.S. medical education (PR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.90) were associated with successful completion of projects. Mentor publication record (PR = 3.13) did not retain significance due to small sample size. Most respondents (65%) cited "lack of time" as a major project barrier. Programs seeking to increase resident publications should consider an institutional epidemiology/biostatistical core available to all residency research projects, and residents should choose experienced mentors with a track record of publications.

  5. Brand Name Statin Prescribing in a Resident Ambulatory Practice: Implications for Teaching Cost-Conscious Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryskina, Kira L; Pesko, Michael F; Gossey, J Travis; Caesar, Erica Phillips; Bishop, Tara F

    2014-09-01

    Several national initiatives aim to teach high-value care to residents. While there is a growing body of literature on cost impact of physicians' therapeutic decisions, few studies have assessed factors that influence residents' prescribing practices. We studied factors associated with intensive health care utilization among internal medicine residents, using brand name statin prescribing as a proxy for higher-cost care. We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of statin prescriptions by residents at an urban academic internal medicine program, using electronic health record data between July 1, 2010, and June 30, 2011. For 319 encounters by 90 residents, patients were given a brand name statin in 50% of cases. When categorized into quintiles, the bottom quintile of residents prescribed brand name statins in 2% of encounters, while the top quintile prescribed brand name statins in 98% of encounters. After adjusting for potential confounders, including patient characteristics and supervising attending, being in the primary care track was associated with lower odds (odds ratio [OR], 0.38; P  =  .02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.16-0.86), and graduating from a medical school with an above-average hospital care intensity index was associated with higher odds of prescribing brand name statins (OR, 1.70; P  =  .049; 95% CI, 1.003-2.88). We found considerable variation in brand name statin prescribing by residents. Medical school attended and residency program type were associated with resident prescribing behavior. Future interventions should raise awareness of these patterns in an effort to teach high-value, cost-conscious care to all residents.

  6. Emergency Medicine Resident Perceptions About the Need for Increased Training in Communicating Diagnostic Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, Kristin L; Papanagnou, Dimitrios; McCarthy, Danielle; Gentsch, Alexzandra; Powell, Rhea

    2018-01-19

    Introduction Diagnostic uncertainty is common in healthcare encounters. Effective communication is important to help patients and providers navigate diagnostic uncertainty, especially at transitions of care. This study sought to assess the experience and training of emergency medicine (EM) residents with communication of diagnostic uncertainty. Methods This was a survey study of a national sample of EM residents. The survey questions elicited quantitative and qualitative responses about experiences with and educational preparation for communication with patients in the setting of diagnostic uncertainty. Results A sample of 263 emergency medicine residents who had trained at over 87 medical schools and 37 residency programs responded to the survey. Nearly half of participants noted they frequently encountered challenges with these conversations;  63% reported having been "somewhat" or less trained to have these conversations during residency, and 51% expressed a strong desire for more training in how to approach these discussions. Survey respondents reported that prior educational experiences in the communication of diagnostic uncertainty were largely informal and that many residents experience frustration in clinical encounters due to inability to meet patients' expectations of reaching a diagnosis at the time of discharge. Conclusion This study found that emergency medicine residents frequently struggle in communicating with patients when there is diagnostic uncertainty upon emergency department discharge and perceived the need for training in how to communicate in these situations. The development of targeted educational strategies for improving communication in the setting of diagnostic uncertainty is consistent with emergency medicine core competencies and may improve patient and provider satisfaction with these clinical encounters.

  7. Review of Marine Corps Expeditionary Force Preventive Medicine Materiel Requirements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edwards, Nathan; Galarneau, Michael; Konoske, Paula

    2003-01-01

    A review of the preventive medicine (PM) Authorized Medical Allowance Lists (AMALs) 637/638 was conducted by the Naval Health Research Center and held at Medical Logistics Company, Camp Pendleton, 2002...

  8. Utility of the CORD ECG Database in Evaluating ECG Interpretation by Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong, Hubert E

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Electrocardiograph (ECG interpretation is a vital component of Emergency Medicine (EM resident education, but few studies have formally examined ECG teaching methods used in residency training. Recently, the Council of EM Residency Directors (CORD developed an Internet database of 395 ECGs that have been extensively peer-reviewed to incorporate all findings and abnormalities. We examined the efficacy of this database in assessing EM residents' skills in ECG interpretation. METHODS: We used the CORD ECG database to evaluate residents at our academic three-year EM residency. Thirteen residents participated, including four first-year, four second-year, and five third-year residents. Twenty ECGs were selected using 14 search criteria representing a broad range of abnormalities, including infarction, rhythm, and conduction abnormalities. Exams were scored based on all abnormalities and findings listed in the teaching points accompanying each ECG. We assigned points to each abnormal finding based on clinical relevance. RESULTS: Out of a total of 183 points in our clinically weighted scoring system, first-year residents scored an average of 99 points (54.1% [9 1- 1191, second-year residents 11 1 points (60.4% [97-1261, and third-year residents 130 points (7 1.0% [94- 1501, p = 0.12. Clinically relevant abnormalities, including anterior and inferior myocardial infarctions, were most frequently diagnosed correctly, while posterior infarction was more frequently missed. Rhythm abnormalities including ventricular and supraventricular tachycardias were most frequently diagnosed correctly, while conduction abnormalities including left bundle branch block and atrioventricular (AV block were more frequently missed. CONCLUSION: The CORD database represents a valuable resource in the assessment and teaching of ECG skills, allowing more precise identification of areas upon which instruction should be further focused or individually tailored. Our

  9. A structured women's preventive health clinic for residents: a quality improvement project designed to meet training needs and improve cervical cancer screening rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mamta K; Einstadter, Douglas; Lawrence, Renee

    2010-10-01

    Multiple resident-related factors contribute to 'missed opportunities' in providing comprehensive preventive care for female patients, including comfort level, knowledge and experience--all of which are compounded by resident turnover rates. Of particular concern among Internal Medicine (IM) residents is their knowledge and comfort level in performing pelvic exams. To evaluate the impact of a quality improvement project of implementing a Women's Preventive Health Clinic (WPHC) on addressing gaps identified by needs assessments: residents' comfort and knowledge with female preventive care and cervical cancer screening. The WPHC, a multidisciplinary weekly clinic, focused on preventive services for women with chronic conditions. The alternating didactic and clinic sessions emphasised women's preventive health topics for IM residents. Sixty-three IM residents participated in WPHC between 2002 and 2005. Pre- and post-test design was used to assess resident knowledge and comfort levels. Cervical cancer screening rates of residents' patients were assessed pre- and post-WPHC initiation. There was a significant improvement in general knowledge (64% correct at pretest vs 73% at post-test, p=0.0002), resident comfort level in discussing women's health topics and performing gynaecological exams (p<0.0002). Cervical cancer screening rates among IM residents' patients improved from 54% (pre-WPHC initiation) to 65% (post-WPHC initiation period). The results indicate that a focused resident preventive programme can meet gaps identified by education and needs assessments, and simultaneously have a positive impact on cervical cancer screening rates and thus may serve as a model for other residency programmes.

  10. Evaluation of an online program to teach microbiology to internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarner, Jeannette; Burd, Eileen M; Kraft, Colleen S; Armstrong, Wendy S; Lenorr, Kenya; Spicer, Jennifer O; Martin, Donna; del Rio, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Microbiology rounds are an integral part of infectious disease consultation service. During microbiology rounds, we highlight microbiology principles using vignettes. We created case-based, interactive, microbiology online modules similar to the vignettes presented during microbiology rounds. Since internal medicine residents rotating on our infectious disease elective have limited time to participate in rounds and learn microbiology, our objective was to evaluate the use of the microbiology online modules by internal medicine residents. We asked residents to complete 10 of 25 online modules during their infectious disease elective. We evaluated which modules they chose and the change in their knowledge level. Forty-six internal medicine residents completed assessments given before and after accessing the modules with an average of 11/20 (range, 6 to 19) and 16/20 (range, 9 to 20) correct questions, respectively (average improvement, 5 questions; P = 0.0001). The modules accessed by more than 30 residents included those related to Clostridium difficile, anaerobes, Candida spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, influenza, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Neisseria meningitidis. We demonstrated improved microbiology knowledge after completion of the online modules. This improvement may not be solely attributed to completing the online modules, as fellows and faculty may have provided additional microbiology education during the rotation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Family medicine residents' training in, knowledge about, and perceptions of digital rectal examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussières, Annick; Bouchard, Alexandre; Simonyan, David; Drolet, Sebastien

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate family medicine residents' training in, knowledge about, and perceptions of digital rectal examination (DRE). Descriptive study, using an online survey that was available in French and English. Quebec. A total of 217 residents enrolled in a family medicine program. Residents' demographic characteristics; the DRE teaching they received throughout their medical training; their reasons for omitting DRE; their recognition of DRE indications (strong vs weak) and application of DRE for 10 anorectal complaints; and their perceptions of the overall quality of the DRE training they received. Of the 879 residents contacted, 217 (25%) responded to the survey. Throughout their training, one-third of respondents did not receive any supervision for or feedback on DRE technique. Seventy-one percent of respondents expressed their inability to identify the nature of abnormal examination findings at least once during their training. The most frequently reported reasons to omit DRE were patient refusal, inadequate setting, and lack of time. Most of the residents in this study had omitted DRE at least once in their clinical work despite recognizing its importance. There was discordance between recognition of a complaint requiring DRE and execution of this technique in a clinical setting. Family medicine education programs and continuing medical education committees should consider including DRE training. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  12. Use of 360-degree assessment of residents in internal medicine in a Danish setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allerup, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the feasibility of 360 degree assessment in early specialist training in a Danish setting. Present Danish postgraduate training requires assessment of specific learning objectives. Residency in Internal Medicine was chosen for the study. It has 65 learning...

  13. Determinants of internal medicine residents' choice in the canadian R4 Fellowship Match: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassam Narmin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a discrepancy between Internal Medicine residents' decisions in the Canadian subspecialty fellowship match (known as the R4 match and societal need. Some studies have been published examining factors that influence career choices. However, these were either demographic factors or factors pre-determined by the authors' opinion as possibly being important to incorporate into a survey. Methods A qualitative study was undertaken to identify factors that determine the residents choice in the subspecialty (R4 fellowship match using focus group discussions involving third and fourth year internal medicine residents Results Based on content analysis of the discussion data, we identified five themes: 1 Practice environment including acuity of practice, ability to do procedures, lifestyle, job prospects and income 2 Exposure in rotations and to role models 3 Interest in subspecialty's patient population and common diseases 4 Prestige and respect of subspecialty 5 Fellowship training environment including fellowship program resources and length of training Conclusions There are a variety of factors that contribute to Internal Medicine residents' fellowship choice in Canada, many of which have been identified in previous survey studies. However, we found additional factors such as the resources available in a fellowship program, the prestige and respect of a subspecialty/career, and the recent trend towards a two-year General Internal Medicine fellowship in our country.

  14. Results of a Formal Mentorship Program for Internal Medicine Residents: Can We Facilitate Genuine Mentorship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohee, Brian M; Koplin, Stephen A; Shimeall, William T; Quast, Timothy M; Hartzell, Joshua D

    2015-03-01

    Mentorship programs are perceived as valuable, yet little is known about the effect of program design on mentoring effectiveness. We developed a program focused on mentoring relationship quality and evaluated how subsequent relationships compared to preexisting informal pairings. Faculty members were invited by e-mail to participate in a new mentoring program. Participants were asked to complete a biography, subsequently provided to second- and third-year internal medicine residents. Residents were instructed to contact available mentors, and ultimately designate a formal mentor. All faculty and residents were provided a half-day workshop training, written guidelines, and e-mails. Reminders were e-mailed and announced in conferences approximately monthly. Residents were surveyed at the end of the academic year. Thirty-seven faculty members completed the biography, and 70% (26 of 37) of residents responded to the survey. Of the resident respondents, 77% (20 of 26) chose a formal mentor. Of the remainder, most had a previous informal mentor. Overall, 96% (25 of 26) of the residents had identified a mentor of some kind compared to 50% (13 of 26) before the intervention (P mentors identified them as actual mentors. Similar numbers of residents described their mentors as invested in the mentorship, and there was no statistical difference in the number of times mentors and mentees met. Facilitated selection of formal mentors produced relationships similar to preexisting informal ones. This model may increase the prevalence of mentorship without decreasing quality.

  15. An instrument to characterize the environment for residents' evidence-based medicine learning and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Misa; Moseley, James L; Green, Michael L

    2012-02-01

    Many residency programs offer training in evidence-based medicine (EBM). However, these curricula often fail to achieve optimal learning outcomes, perhaps because they neglect various contextual factors in the learning environment. We developed and validated an instrument to characterize the environment for EBM learning and practice in residency programs. An EBM Environment Scale was developed following scale development principles. A survey was administered to residents across six programs in primary care specialties at four medical centers. Internal consistency reliability was analyzed with Cronbach's coefficient alpha. Validity was assessed by comparing predetermined subscales with the survey's internal structure as assessed via factor analysis. Scores were also compared for subgroups based on residency program affiliation and residency characteristics. Out of 262 eligible residents, 124 completed the survey (response rate 47%). The overall mean score was 3.89 (standard deviation=0.56). The initial reliability analysis of the 48-item scale had a high reliability coefficient (Cronbach α=.94). Factor analysis and further item analysis resulted in a shorter 36-item scale with a satisfactory reliability coefficient (Cronbach α=.86). Scores were higher for residents with prior EBM training in medical school (4.14 versus 3.62) and in residency (4.25 versus 3.69). If further testing confirms its properties, the EBM Environment Scale may be used to understand the influence of the learning environment on the effectiveness of EBM training. Additionally, it may detect changes in the EBM learning environment in response to programmatic or institutional interventions.

  16. Longitudinal Ultrasound Education Track Curriculum Implemented Within an Emergency Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulger, Creagh; Adams, Daniel Z; Hughes, Daralee; Bahner, David P; King, Andrew

    2017-06-01

    Emergency Medicine residency programs offer ultrasound-focused curricula to address Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) milestones. Although some programs offer advanced clinical tracks in ultrasound, no standard curriculum exists. We sought to establish a well-defined ultrasound track curriculum to allow interested residents to develop advanced clinical skills and scholarship within this academic niche. The curriculum involves a greater number of clinical scans, ultrasound-focused scholarly and quality improvement projects, enhanced faculty-driven ultrasound focused didactics, and participation at a national ultrasound conference to receive certification. Successful ultrasound scholarly tracks can provide residents with the potential to obtain fellowships or competency beyond ACGME requirements. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  17. Developing an integrated evidence-based medicine curriculum for family medicine residency at the University of Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, G Michael; Korownyk, Christina; Tan, Amy; Hindle, Hugh; Kung, Lina; Manca, Donna

    2008-06-01

    There is general consensus in the academic community that evidence-based medicine (EBM) teaching is essential. Unfortunately, many postgraduate programs have significant weakness in their EBM programs. The Family Medicine Residency committee at the University of Alberta felt their EBM curriculum would benefit from critical review and revision. An EBM Curriculum Committee was created to evaluate previous components and develop new strategies as needed. Input from stakeholders including faculty and residents was sought, and evidence regarding the teaching and practical application of EBM was gathered. The committee drafted goals and objectives, the primary of which were to assist residents to (1) become competent self-directed, lifelong learners with skills to effectively and efficiently keep up to date, and 2) develop EBM skills to solve problems encountered in daily practice. New curriculum components, each evidence based, were introduced in 2005 and include a family medicine EBM workshop to establish basic EBM knowledge; a Web-based Family Medicine Desktop promoting easier access to evidence-based Internet resources; a brief evidence-based assessment of the research project enhancing integration of EBM into daily practice; and a journal club to support peer learning and growth of rapid appraisal skills. Issues including time use, costs, and change management are discussed. Ongoing evaluation of the curriculum and its components is a principal factor of the design, allowing critical review and adaptation of the curriculum. The first two years of the curriculum have yielded positive feedback from faculty and statistically significant improvement in multiple areas of residents' opinions of the curriculum and comfort with evidence-based practice.

  18. CT training of nuclear medicine residents in the United States, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A; Metter, Darlene; Oates, M Elizabeth; Guiberteau, Milton J

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the ACGME Nuclear Medicine (NM) Residency Review Committee revised the NM program requirements, which increased CT training for NM residents. This article examines the effect of this revision. Requests were e-mailed to all NM program directors asking that their residents be given the opportunity to complete an online survey regarding their CT training. Subsequently, an identical online survey regarding CT training was e-mailed directly to all members of the NM Residents Organization of the American College of NM asking that they complete the survey regarding their CT training if they had not already done so. Resident responses, compared with those from a similar 2011 survey, indicate a perception that CT training and CT expertise gained in ACGME-accredited NM programs have improved. However, some NM residents are not provided with the opportunity to develop critical skills in interpreting and dictating CT scans during their time on dedicated CT services. The survey indicates that experience gained during NM residency in head and neck/neuroradiology, emergency, and musculoskeletal CT is marginal at best. A slight majority felt that CT training should be further increased. Compared with a 2011 survey of NM residents and the 2011 implementation of expanded CT training requirements, a follow-up survey seems to indicate improvement in CT training for most NM residents. Nevertheless, an opportunity clearly remains to further improve the breadth and depth of CT skills during NM residency. However, whether such an improvement will result in a reversal of multiyear downward trends in the number of NM residents and training programs in the United States is not clear. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blum AB

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Alexander B Blum1, Sandra Shea2, Charles A Czeisler3,4, Christopher P Landrigan3-5, Lucian Leape61Department of Health and Evidence Policy, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; 2Committee of Interns and Residents, SEIU Healthcare Division, Service Employees International Union, New York, NY, USA; 3Harvard Work Hours, Health and Safety Group, Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 4Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 5Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 6Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Long working hours and sleep deprivation have been a facet of physician training in the US since the advent of the modern residency system. However, the scientific evidence linking fatigue with deficits in human performance, accidents and errors in industries from aeronautics to medicine, nuclear power, and transportation has mounted over the last 40 years. This evidence has also spawned regulations to help ensure public safety across safety-sensitive industries, with the notable exception of medicine.

  20. Family medicine graduates' perceptions of intimidation, harassment, and discrimination during residency training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crutcher Rodney A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite there being considerable literature documenting learner distress and perceptions of mistreatment in medical education settings, these concerns have not been explored in-depth in Canadian family medicine residency programs. The purpose of the study was to examine intimidation, harassment and/or discrimination (IHD as reported by Alberta family medicine graduates during their two-year residency program. Methods A retrospective questionnaire survey was conducted of all (n = 377 family medicine graduates from the University of Alberta and University of Calgary who completed residency training during 2001-2005. The frequency, type, source, and perceived basis of IHD were examined by gender, age, and Canadian vs international medical graduate. Descriptive data analysis (frequency, crosstabs, Chi-square, Fisher's Exact test, analysis of variance, and logistic regression were used as appropriate. Results Of 377 graduates, 242 (64.2% responded to the survey, with 44.7% reporting they had experienced IHD while a resident. The most frequent type of IHD experienced was in the form of inappropriate verbal comments (94.3%, followed by work as punishment (27.6%. The main sources of IHD were specialist physicians (77.1%, hospital nurses (54.3%, specialty residents (45.7%, and patients (35.2%. The primary basis for IHD was perceived to be gender (26.7%, followed by ethnicity (16.2%, and culture (9.5%. A significantly greater proportion of males (38.6% than females (20.0% experienced IHD in the form of work as punishment. While a similar proportion of Canadian (46.1% and international medical graduates (IMGs (41.0% experienced IHD, a significantly greater proportion of IMGs perceived ethnicity, culture, or language to be the basis of IHD. Conclusions Perceptions of IHD are prevalent among family medicine graduates. Residency programs should explicitly recognize and robustly address all IHD concerns.

  1. Trends in research productivity of residents applying for orthopedic sports medicine fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFroda, Steven F; Shah, Kalpit N; Safdar, Omar; Mulcahey, Mary K

    2018-02-01

    Though there are no research requirements to match into an orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship, many applicants are productive in research endeavors during residency. We hypothesize that the number of publications by Orthopaedic sports medicine applicants are increasing. A list of current and recent sports medicine fellows was compiled from publicly accessible information on sports medicine fellowship websites. Articles published while the fellow was a resident were identified via publicly available search engines. The following information was collected: year of fellowship and years of residency, fellowship program, geographic location of fellowship program, total number of publications (noting specifically first and last author publications), number of publications in high impact orthopaedic journals (AJSM, JBJS Am, JSES, or Arthroscopy). Overall, 189 fellowship-matched surgeons from 2010 - 2017 were identified. There were 746 publications (average of 3.95 per fellow), with 218 (29.2%) in high impact orthopaedic journals. Surgeons who completed their fellowship during the 2016-17 academic year, published on average 5.42 publications per fellow. Fellowship applicants in the Northeast region had the highest number of total publications (359 publications, 48.1% of all publications; 6.41 publications per fellow). Applicants were listed most often as middle authors (462 publications, 61.9%). There has been an overall increase in the number of publications among sports medicine fellowship applicants in the last several academic years. Fellowship programs in the northeast United States tended to match applicants with a higher number of publications.

  2. Creating Entrustable Professional Activities to Assess Internal Medicine Residents in Training: A Mixed-Methods Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David R; Park, Yoon Soo; Smith, Christopher A; Karpinski, Jolanta; Coke, William; Tekian, Ara

    2018-04-17

    Competency-based medical education has not advanced residency training as much as many observers expected. Some medical educators now advocate reorienting competency-based approaches to focus on a resident's ability to do authentic clinical work. To develop descriptions of clinical work for which internal medicine residents must gain proficiency to deliver meaningful patient care (for example, "Admit and manage a medical inpatient with a new acute problem"). A modified Delphi process involving clinical experts followed by a conference of educational experts. The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. In phase 1 of the project, members of the Specialty Committee for Internal Medicine participated in a modified Delphi process to identify activities in internal medicine that represent the scope of the specialty. In phase 2 of the project, 5 experts who were scholars and leaders in competency-based medical education reviewed the results. Phase 1 identified important activities, revised descriptions to improve accuracy and avoid overlap, and assigned activities to stages of training. Phase 2 compared proposed activity descriptions with published guidelines for their development and application in medical education. The project identified 29 activities that qualify as entrustable professional activities. The project also produced a detailed description of each activity and guidelines for using them to assess residents. These activities reflect the practice patterns of the developers and may not fully represent internal medicine practice in Canada. Identification of these activities is expected to facilitate modification of training and assessment programs for medical residents so that programs focus less on isolated skills and more on integrated tasks. Southeastern Ontario Academic Medical Organization Endowed Scholarship and Education Fund and Queen's University Department of Medicine Innovation Fund.

  3. Compassion Fatigue is Similar in Emergency Medicine Residents Compared to other Medical and Surgical Specialties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fernanda Bellolio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Compassion fatigue (CF is the emotional and physical burden felt by those helping others in distress, leading to a reduced capacity and interest in being empathetic towards future suffering. Emergency care providers are at an increased risk of CF secondary to their first responder roles and exposure to traumatic events. We aimed to investigate the current state of compassion fatigue among emergency medicine (EM resident physicians, including an assessment of contributing factors. Methods: We distributed a validated electronic questionnaire consisting of the Professional Quality of Life Scale with subscales for the three components of CF (compassion satisfaction, burnout and secondary traumatic stress, with each category scored independently. We collected data pertaining to day- versus night-shift distribution, hourly workload and child dependents. We included residents in EM, neurology, orthopedics, family medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics, and general surgery. Results: We surveyed 255 residents, with a response rate of 75%. Of the 188 resident respondents, 18% worked a majority of their clinical shifts overnight, and 32% had child dependents. Burnout scores for residents who worked greater than 80 hours per week, or primarily worked overnight shifts, were higher than residents who worked less than 80 hours (mean score 25.0 vs 21.5; p=0.013, or did not work overnight (mean score 23.5 vs 21.3; p=0.022. EM residents had similar scores in all three components of CF when compared to other specialties. Secondary traumatic stress scores for residents who worked greater than 80 hours were higher than residents who worked less than 80 hours (mean score 22.2 vs 19.5; p=0.048, and those with child dependents had higher secondary traumatic stress than those without children (mean score 21.0 vs 19.1; p=0.012. Conclusion: CF scores in EM residents are similar to residents in other surgical and medical specialties. Residents working primarily

  4. Evaluation of Social Media Use by Emergency Medicine Residents and Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pearson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinicians and residency programs are increasing their use of social media (SM websites for educational and promotional uses, yet little is known about the use of these sites by residents and faculty. The objective of the study is to assess patterns of SM use for personal and professional purposes among emergency medicine (EM residents and faculty. Methods: In this multi-site study, an 18-question survey was sent by e-mail to the residents and faculty in 14 EM programs and to the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD listserv via the online tool SurveyMonkey™. We compiled descriptive statistics, including assessment with the chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test. StatsDirect software (v 2.8.0, StatsDirect, Cheshire, UK was used for all analyses. Results: We received 1,314 responses: 63% of respondents were male, 40% were <30 years of age, 39% were between the ages 31 and 40, and 21% were older than 40. The study group consisted of 772 residents and 542 faculty members (15% were program directors, 21% were assistant or associate PDs, 45% were core faculty, and 19% held other faculty positions. Forty-four percent of respondents completed residency more than 10 years ago. Residents used SM markedly more than faculty for social interactions with family and friends (83% vs 65% [p<0.0001], entertainment (61% vs 47% [p<0.0001], and videos (42% vs 23% [p=0.0006]. Residents used Facebook™ and YouTube™ more often than faculty (86% vs 67% [p<0.001]; 53% vs 46% [p=0.01], whereas residents used Twitter™ (19% vs 26% [p=0.005] and LinkedIn™ (15% vs 32% [p<0.0001] less than faculty. Overall, residents used SM sites more than faculty, notably in daily use (30% vs 24% [p<0.001]. For professional use, residents were most interested in its use for open positions/hiring (30% vs 18% [p<0.0001] and videos (33% vs 26% [p=0.005] and less interested than faculty with award postings (22% vs 33% [p<0.0001] or publications (30

  5. Learning behaviour and preferences of family medicine residents under a flexible academic curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Alice; Wong, Eric; Boisvert, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine family medicine residents’ learning behaviour and preferences outside of clinical settings in order to help guide the development of an effective academic program that can maximize their learning. Design Retrospective descriptive analysis of academic learning logs submitted by residents as part of their academic training requirements between 2008 and 2011. Setting London, Ont. Participants All family medicine residents at Western University who had completed their academic program requirements (N = 72) by submitting 300 or more credits (1 credit = 1 hour). Main outcome measures Amount of time spent on various learning modalities, location where the learning took place, resources used for self-study, and the objective of the learning activity. Results A total of 72 residents completed their academic requirements during the study period and logged a total of 25 068 hours of academic learning. Residents chose to spend most of their academic time engaging in self-study (44%), attending staff physicians’ teaching sessions (20%), and participating in conferences, courses, or workshops (12%) and in postgraduate medical education sessions (12%). Textbooks (26%), medical journals (20%), and point-of-care resources (12%) were the 3 most common resources used for self-study. The hospital (32%), residents’ homes (32%), and family medicine clinics (14%) were the most frequently cited locations where academic learning occurred. While all physicians used a variety of educational activities, most residents (67%) chose self-study as their primary method of learning. The topic for academic learning appeared to have some influence on the learning modalities used by residents. Conclusion Residents used a variety of learning modalities and chose self-study over other more traditional modalities (eg, lectures) for most of their academic learning. A successful academic program must take into account residents’ various learning preferences and

  6. Resident response to integration of simulation-based education into emergency medicine conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ernest E; Beaumont, Jennifer; Kharasch, Morris; Vozenilek, John A

    2008-11-01

    Utilization of simulation-based training has become increasingly prevalent in residency training. The authors compared emergency medicine (EM) resident feedback for simulation sessions to traditional lectures from an EM residency didactic program. The authors performed a retrospective review of all written EM conference evaluations over a 29-month period. Evaluation questions were scored on a 1-9 Likert scale. Lectures and simulation accounted for 77.6 and 22.4% of the conferences, respectively. Scored means (+/-standard deviations [SDs]) were as follows: overall, lecture 7.97 +/- 0.74 versus simulation 8.373 +/- 0.44 (p higher than traditional lectures. The scores over time suggest that this preference for simulation can be sustainable long term. Residents perceive simulation as more desirable teaching method compared to the traditional lecture format.

  7. Combined residency training in emergency medicine and internal medicine: an update on career outcomes and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Chad S; Stallings, Leonard A; Gonzalez, Andrew A; Templeman, Todd A

    2009-09-01

    This study was designed to provide an update on the career outcomes and experiences of graduates of combined emergency medicine-internal medicine (EM-IM) residency programs. The graduates of the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) and American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM)-accredited EM-IM residencies from 1998 to 2008 were contacted and asked to complete a survey concerning demographics, board certification, fellowships completed, practice setting, academic affiliation, and perceptions about EM-IM training and careers. There were 127 respondents of a possible 163 total graduates for a response rate of 78%. Seventy graduates (55%) practice EM only, 47 graduates (37%) practice both EM and IM, and nine graduates (7%) practice IM or an IM subspecialty only. Thirty-one graduates (24%) pursued formal fellowship training in either EM or IM. Graduates spend the majority of their time practicing clinical EM in an urban (72%) and academic (60%) environment. Eighty-seven graduates (69%) spend at least 10% of their time in an academic setting. Most graduates (64%) believe it practical to practice both EM and IM. A total of 112 graduates (88%) would complete EM-IM training again. Dual training in EM-IM affords a great deal of career opportunities, particularly in academics and clinical practice, in a number of environments. Graduates hold their training in high esteem and would do it again if given the opportunity.

  8. The Cost and Burden of the Residency Match in Emergency Medicine

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    Bush, Jeffrey S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a residency match, medical students entering emergency medicine (EM must complete away rotations, submit a number of lengthy applications, and travel to multiple programs to interview. The expenses incurred acquiring this residency position are burdensome, but there is little specialty-specific data estimating it. We sought to quantify the actual cost spent by medical students applying to EM residency programs by surveying students as they attended a residency interview. Researchers created a 16-item survey, which asked about the time and monetary costs associated with the entire EM residency application process. Applicants chosen to interview for an EM residency position at our institution were invited to complete the survey during their interview day. In total, 66 out of a possible 81 residency applicants (an 81% response rate completed our survey. The “average applicant” who interviewed at our residency program for the 2015-16 cycle completed 1.6 away, or “audition,” rotations, each costing an average of $1,065 to complete. This “average applicant” applied to 42.8 programs, and then attended 13.7 interviews. The cost of interviewing at our program averaged $342 and in total, an average of $8,312 would be spent in the pursuit of an EM residency. Due to multiple factors, the costs of securing an EM residency spot can be expensive. By understanding the components that are driving this trend, we hope that the academic EM community can explore avenues to help curtail these costs.

  9. Do emergency medicine residents and faculty have similar learning styles when assessed with the Kolb learning style assessment tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredette, Jenna; O'Brien, Corinne; Poole, Christy; Nomura, Jason

    2015-04-01

    Experiential learning theory and the Kolb Learning Style Inventory (Kolb LSI) have influenced educators worldwide for decades. Knowledge of learning styles can create efficient learning environments, increase information retention, and improve learner satisfaction. Learning styles have been examined in medicine previously, but not specifically with Emergency Medicine (EM) residents and attendings. Using the Kolb LSI, the learning styles of Emergency Medicine residents and attendings were assessed. The findings showed that the majority of EM residents and attendings shared the accommodating learning style. This result was different than prior studies that found the majority of medical professionals had a converging learning style and other studies that found attendings often have different learning styles than residents. The issue of learning styles among emergency medical residents and attendings is important because learning style knowledge may have an impact on how a residency program structures curriculum and how EM residents are successfully, efficiently, and creatively educated.

  10. Effect of Experience of Internal Medicine Residents during Infectious Disease Elective on Future Infectious Disease Fellowship Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-04

    Experience of !ntcrnal Medicine Residents during Infectious Disease Elective on Future lntCctious Di~casc Fcllo\\vship Application Sb. GRANT N_UMBER...Internal Medidne Residents during Infectious Disease Elective on Future Infectious Disease Fello\\\\/shlp Application Blyth Dl’vl, Barsournian 1\\E, Yun I-IC...Medicine Residents during Infectious Disease Elective on Fut ure Infectious Disease Fellowship Application ~ Poeter# 1440 .,...._,: OVfil"S~ ti

  11. How Many Graduating Family Medicine Residents Have Chosen Financial Support for Service Commitments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Julie; Peterson, Lars E; Fang, Bo; Kovar-Gough, Iris; Phillips, Robert L

    2017-09-01

    New family physicians have opportunities to avoid accruing educational debt or have loans repaid by making a commitment to public service. Little information is available about the numbers of early career family physicians who have made service commitments to fund their education. The purpose of this study is to describe the proportion of graduating family medicine residents who have enrolled in US military and National Health Service Corps (NHSC) scholarship and loan repayment programs, thus obligating them to future public service. The study was a secondary analysis of de-identified data from the 2014 and 2015 American Board of Family Medicine examination registration questionnaire, which is required of all residents applying for board certification. Descriptive statistics were used to indicate the numbers and proportions of respondents who indicated military or NHSC financial support. Chi square analyses were used to analyze differences between groups. Of the 6,231 residents studied, 271 (4.4%) had either obtained military support (n=191, 3.1%) or enrolled in the NHSC (n=80, 1.3%). More men had enrolled in the military than women (4.2% vs 2.2%, P<0.01), but there was no significant NHSC gender difference. Underrepresented minorities (URM) were twice as likely to have enrolled in NHSC as non-URM residents (2.5% vs 1.0%, P<0.01). Only a small fraction of graduating family medicine residents have used either military enrollment or NHSC scholarships to fund their education. Family medicine should advocate strongly for expansion of the NHSC scholarship program, which receives many more applications than it can support.

  12. Social media beliefs and usage among family medicine residents and practicing family physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, David; Covey, Carlton; Zhong, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Incorporation of social media (SM) use in medicine is gaining support. The Internet is now a popular medium for people to solicit medical information. Usage of social networks, such as Facebook and Twitter, is growing daily and provides physicians with nearly instantaneous access to large populations for both marketing and patient education. The benefits are myriad, but so are the inherent risks. We investigated the role providers' age and medical experience played in their beliefs and use of SM in medicine. Using multiple state-wide and national databases, we assessed social media use by family medicine residents, faculty, and practicing family physicians with a 24-question online survey. Descriptive data is compared by age and level of medical experience. A total of 61 family medicine residents and 192 practicing family physicians responded. There is a trend toward higher SM utilization in the younger cohort, with 90% of resident respondents reporting using SM, half of them daily. A total of 64% of family physician respondents over the age of 45 have a SM account. An equal percentage of senior physicians use SM daily or not at all. Practicing physicians, more than residents, agree that SM can be beneficial in patient care. The vast majority of residents and physicians polled believe that SM should be taught early in medical education. The high utilization of SM by younger providers, high prevalence of patient use of the Internet, and the countless beneficial opportunities SM offers should be catalysts to drive curriculum development and early implementation in medical education. This curriculum should focus around four pillars: professional standards for SM use, SM clinical practice integration, professional networking, and research.

  13. Working memory capacity is decreased in sleep-deprived internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohar, Ashraf; Adams, Alexander; Gertner, Elie; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda; Heitz, Richard; Engle, Randall; Haus, Erhard; Bijwadia, Jagdeep

    2009-06-15

    Concerns about medical errors due to sleep deprivation during residency training led the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education to mandate reductions in work schedules. Although call rotations with extended shifts continue, effects on resident sleep-wake times and working memory capacity (WMC) have not been investigated. The objective of this study was to measure effects of call rotations on sleep-wake times and WMC in internal medicine residents. During 2 months of an internal medicine training program adhering to ACGME work-hour restrictions (between April 2006 and June 2007), residents completed daily WMC tests, wore actigraphy watches, and logged their sleep hours. This observational study was conducted during a call month requiring 30-hour call rotations every fourth night, whereas the noncall month, which allowed sleep/wake cycle freedom, was used as the control. Sleep hours per night and WMC testing. Thirty-nine residents completing the study had less sleep per night during their call month (6.4 vs 7.3 h per night noncall, p errors occurred when on call (+1.07/test, p error rates were not evaluated.

  14. How Entrustment Is Informed by Holistic Judgments Across Time in a Family Medicine Residency Program: An Ethnographic Nonparticipant Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagasser, Margaretha H; Fluit, Cornelia R M G; van Weel, Chris; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Kramer, Anneke W M

    2017-06-01

    Entrustment has mainly been conceptualized as delegating discrete professional tasks. Because residents provide most of their patient care independently, not all resident performance is visible to supervisors; the entrustment process involves more than granting discrete tasks. This study explored how supervisors made entrustment decisions based on residents' performance in a long-term family medicine training program. A qualitative nonparticipant observational study was conducted in 2014-2015 at competency-based family medicine residency programs in the Netherlands. Seven supervisor-resident pairs participated. During two days, one researcher observed first-year residents' patient encounters, debriefing sessions, and supervisor-resident educational meetings and interviewed them separately afterwards. Data were collected and analyzed using iterative, phenomenological inductive research methodology. The entrustment process developed over three phases. Supervisors based their initial entrustment on prior knowledge about the resident. In the ensuing two weeks, entrustment decisions regarding independent patient care were derived from residents' observed general competencies necessary for a range of health problems (clinical reasoning, decision making, relating to patients); medical knowledge and skills; and supervisors' intuition. Supervisors provided supervision during and after encounters. Once residents performed independently, supervisors kept reevaluating their decisions, informed by residents' overall growth in competencies rather than by adhering to a predefined set of tasks. Supervisors in family medicine residency training took a holistic approach to trust, based on general competencies, knowledge, skills, and intuition. Entrustment started before training and developed over time. Building trust is a mutual process between supervisor and resident, requiring a good working relationship.

  15. Electrocardiography teaching in Canadian family medicine residency programs: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Baldeep; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2011-04-01

    Electrocardiography (ECG) interpretation is an essential skill for a family physician. Teaching and learning electrocardiography is a difficult task, in part due to the erosion of knowledge when interpretation is not part of a daily activity. The objective of this study was to assess the current status of electrocardiography teaching in Canadian family medicine residency programs. A national survey was designed to specifically address the status of the ECG teaching curricula. This national survey was electronically sent to the family medicine program directors of all 17 Canadian accredited medical schools. Approximately 75% of the schools responded to the survey. There was a great variance among Canadian family medicine residency programs with respect to the time allotment, ECG training location, training faculty, and teaching methods utilized. The goals of each respective program are also quite wide-ranging. Family medicine residency programs across Canada are quite diverse regarding ECG training curricula and its goals. The need for a homogeneous way of teaching and evaluating has been identified.

  16. Emergency Medicine in Guyana: Lessons from Developing the Country's First Degree-conferring Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas P Forget

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Academic departments of emergency medicine are becoming increasingly involved in assisting with the development of long-term emergency medicine training programs in low and middle-income countries. This article presents our 10-year experience working with local partners to improve emergency medical care education in Guyana.Methods: The Vanderbilt Department of Emergency Medicine has collaborated with the Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation on the development of Emergency Medicine skills followed by the implementation of an emergency medicine residency training program. Residency development included a needs assessment, proposed curriculum, internal and external partnerships, University of Guyana and Ministry of Health approval, and funding.Results: In our experience, we have found that our successful program initiation was due in large part to the pre-existing interest of several local partners and followed by long-term involvement within the country. As a newer specialty without significant local expertise, resident educational needs mandated a locally present full time EM trained attending to serve as the program director. Both external and internal funding was required to achieve this goal. Local educational efforts were best supplemented by robust distance learning. The program was developed to conform to local academic standards and to train the residents to the level of consultant physicians. Despite the best preparations, future challenges remain.Conclusion: While every program has unique challenges, it is likely many of the issues we havefaced are generalizable to other settings and will be useful to other programs considering or currentlyconducting this type of collaborative project. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:477–481.

  17. Development of a New South Dakota Rural Family Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisler, Jean; Huber, Thomas; Huntington, Mark K

    2017-11-01

    The healthcare workforce is a priority in South Dakota. It has been estimated that 8,000 additional healthcare workers beyond those in practice in 2010 will be needed by 2020. In 2016, the South Dakota Department of Health included in its budget funds for the development of a new Rural Family Medicine Residency Training Program as one of the steps toward addressing the physician component of these workforce needs. This new program has just received its accreditation and is recruiting the inaugural class of resident physicians for the spring of 2018. This article provides a concise overview of the program's initial development. Copyright© South Dakota State Medical Association.

  18. Effectiveness of Residence Restrictions in Preventing Sex Offense Recidivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, Matt R.; Levenson, Jill S.; Youstin, Tasha J.

    2012-01-01

    Many municipalities have recently extended residence restrictions for sex offenders beyond the provisions of state law, although the efficacy of these measures in reducing recidivism has not been empirically established. This study used arrest histories in Jacksonville, Florida, to assess the effects of a recently expanded municipal 2,500-foot…

  19. A Formalized Three-Year Emergency Medicine Residency Ultrasound Education Curriculum

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    Andrew King

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience and type of curriculum: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Emergency Medicine Residency Program Ultrasound Education Curriculum is a three-year curriculum for PGY-1 to PGY-3 learners. Introduction/Background: Each year of the three-year The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Emergency Medicine Ultrasound Curriculum focuses on different aspects of emergency ultrasonography, thereby promoting progressive understanding and utilization of point-of-care ultrasound in medical decision-making during residency training. Ultrasound is an invaluable bedside tool for emergency physicians; this skill must be mastered by resident learners during residency training, and ultrasound competency is a required ACGME milestone.1 The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP currently recommends that 11 applications of emergency ultrasound be part of the core skills of an emergency physician.2 This curriculum acknowledges the standards developed by ACEP and the ACGME. Objectives: Learners will 1 know the indications for each the 11 ACEP point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS applications; 2 perform each of the 11 ACEP POCUS applications; 3 integrate POCUS into medical decision-making. Methods: The educational strategies used in this curriculum include: independent, self-directed learning (textbook and literature reading, brief didactic sessions describing indications and technique for each examination, hands-on ultrasound scanning under the direct supervision of ultrasound faculty with real-time feedback, and quality assurance review of ultrasound images. Residents are expected to perform a minimum of 150 ultrasound examinations with associated quality assurance during the course of their residency training. The time requirements, reading material, and ultrasound techniques taught vary depending on the year of training. Length of curriculum: The entirety of the curriculum is three years; however, each year of residency training has

  20. The Effect of Burnout on Medical Errors and Professionalism in First-Year Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwah, Jason; Weintraub, Jennifer; Fallar, Robert; Ripp, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Burnout is a common issue in internal medicine residents, and its impact on medical errors and professionalism is an important subject of investigation. To evaluate differences in medical errors and professionalism in internal medicine residents with and without burnout. A single institution observational cohort study was conducted between June 2011 and July 2012. Burnout was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory to generate subscores for the following 3 domains: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and sense of personal accomplishment. By convention, burnout was defined as a high emotional exhaustion or depersonalization subscore. Medication prescription error rate was the chosen measure of medical errors. Professionalism was measured cumulatively through examining discharge summaries completed within 48 hours, outpatient charts completed within 72 hours, and the average time to review outpatient laboratory tests. Of a total of 54 eligible first-year residents, 53 (98%) and 32 (59%) completed the initial and follow-up surveys, respectively. Residents with year-end burnout had a lower rate of medication prescription errors (0.553 versus 0.780, P  = .007). Discharge summaries completed within 48 hours of discharge (83.8% versus 84.0%, P  = .93), outpatient charts completed within 72 hours of encounter (93.7% versus 94.3%, P  = .31), and time (minutes) to review outpatient laboratory test results (72.3 versus 26.9, P  = .28) were similar between residents with and without year-end burnout. This study found a small decrease in medical errors in residents with year-end burnout compared to burnout-free residents and no difference in selected measures of professionalism.

  1. Prevention of perinatal loss: towards personalized medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Medvedev M.V.; Davydova Iu.V.

    2016-01-01

    The literature review on the prevention of preterm labor is carried out. Preterm labor is the actual problem of modern obstetrics due to the impact on maternal and child health. It is affects the level of perinatal morbidity, disability and infant mortality. Preterm labor occupies a dominant position in the structure of perinatal losses. Introduction of the prophylactic modern technologies of the preterm labor using micronized progesterone containing preparations allows clearly reduce their f...

  2. Implementation and assessment of a training course for residents in neonatology and pediatric emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossier, D; Bellot, A; Villedieu, F; Fazilleau, L; Brouard, J; Guillois, B

    2017-05-01

    Residents must balance patient care and the ongoing acquisition of medical knowledge. With increasing clinical responsibilities and patient overload, medical training is often left aside. In 2010, we designed and implemented a training course in neonatology and pediatric emergency medicine for residents in pediatrics, in order to improve their medical education. The course was made of didactic sessions and several simulation-based seminars for each year of residency. We conducted this study to assess the impact of our program on residents' satisfaction and self-assessed clinical skills. A survey was conducted at the end of each seminar. The students were asked to complete a form on a five-point rating scale to evaluate the courses and their impact on their satisfaction and self-assessed clinical skills, following the French National Health Institute's adapted Kirkpatrick model. Sixty-four (84%) of the 76 residents who attended the courses completed the form. The mean satisfaction score for the entire course was 4.78±0.42. Over 80% of the students felt that their clinical skills had improved. Medical education is an important part of residency training. Our training course responded to the perceived needs of the students with consistently satisfactory evaluations. Before the evaluation of the impact of the course on patient care, further studies are needed to assess the acquisition of knowledge and skills through objective evaluations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of Balint group training in the professional and personal development of family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Player, Marty; Freedy, John R; Diaz, Vanessa; Brock, Clive; Chessman, Alexander; Thiedke, Carolyn; Johnson, Alan

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a study based on the participation of PGY2 and PGY3 family medicine residents in Balint seminars that occurred twice monthly for 24 months. Balint groups were cofacilitated by leader pairs experienced with the Balint method. Prior to residency graduation, 18 of 19 eligible resident physicians (94.5%) completed 30- to 60-min semistructured interviews conducted by a research assistant. Resident physicians were told that these individual interviews concerned "…how we teach communication in residency." The deidentified transcripts from these interviews formed the raw data that were coded for positive (n = 9) and negative (n = 3) valence themes by four faculty coders utilizing an iterative process based on grounded theory. The consensus positive themes included several elements that have previously been discussed in published literature concerning the nature of Balint groups (e.g., being the doctor that the patient needs, reflection, empathy, blind spots, bonding, venting, acceptance, perspective taking, and developing appreciation for individual experiences). The negative themes pointed to ways of possibly improving future Balint offerings in the residency setting ( repetitive, uneasiness, uncertain impact). These findings appear to have consistency with seminal writings of both Michael and Enid Balint regarding the complex nature of intrapsychic and interpersonal skills required to effectively manage troubling doctor-patient relationships. The implications of findings for medical education (curriculum) development as well as future research efforts are discussed.

  4. Explaining the Learning Experiences of Clinical Procedures of the Internal Medicine Residents at Department of Gastroenterology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Taghavinia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the method and way of learning and teaching are effective in acquiring clinical skills, and identifying the shortcomings of learning and teaching will lead to better planning. The purpose of this study was to explain the experiences of the learning clinical procedures of the internal medicine residents in gastroenterology department. Methods: qualitative study using content thematic analysis was done. Six fourth-year residents were selected and interviewed considering purposive sampling. The data of the interviews were transcribed and analyzed after rereading. Results: the collected data are divided into three categories: learning and experience with the following four categories (learning time and experiencing, leaning and experiencing times, learning and experiencing opportunities, training and the lack of the training of some procedures. These categories are explained by using some quotes derived from the data. Conclusion: the results of this study suggest that the administrative management of internal residency is poor and should get seriously in implementation and application of intended instructions existing in the prepared program of Medical Education and Specialized Council of internal residency period. The attending physicians and residents must be aware of the content of education program at the beginning of the residency periods and the trainers must try to supervise the residents’ education.

  5. Prevention of perinatal loss: towards personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medvedev M.V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The literature review on the prevention of preterm labor is carried out. Preterm labor is the actual problem of modern obstetrics due to the impact on maternal and child health. It is affects the level of perinatal morbidity, disability and infant mortality. Preterm labor occupies a dominant position in the structure of perinatal losses. Introduction of the prophylactic modern technologies of the preterm labor using micronized progesterone containing preparations allows clearly reduce their frequency in a number of clinics that use the destination progesterone protocol for ultrasound cervical length less than 25 mm, as well as in women with preterm labor in history.

  6. Association of Group Prenatal Care in US Family Medicine Residencies With Maternity Care Practice: A CERA Secondary Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Wendy B; Tong, Sebastian T; LeFevre, Nicholas M

    2017-03-01

    Group prenatal care has been shown to improve both maternal and neonatal outcomes. With increasing adaption of group prenatal care by family medicine residencies, this model may serve as a potential method to increase exposure to and interest in maternity care among trainees. This study aims to describe the penetration, regional and program variations, and potential impacts on future maternity care practice of group prenatal care in US family medicine residencies. The CAFM Educational Research Alliance (CERA) conducted a survey of all US family medicine residency program directors in 2013 containing questions about maternity care training. A secondary data analysis was completed to examine relevant data on group prenatal care in US family medicine residencies and maternity care practice patterns. 23.1% of family medicine residency programs report provision of group prenatal care. Programs with group prenatal care reported increased number of vaginal deliveries per resident. Controlling for average number of vaginal deliveries per resident, programs with group prenatal care had a 2.35 higher odds of having more than 10% of graduates practice obstetrics and a 2.93 higher odds of having at least one graduate in the past 5 years enter an obstetrics fellowship. Residency programs with group prenatal care models report more graduates entering OB fellowships and practicing maternity care. Implementing group prenatal care in residency training can be one method in a multifaceted approach to increasing maternity care practice among US family physicians.

  7. Selection criteria for internal medicine residency applicants and professionalism ratings during internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Michael W; Reed, Darcy A; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Wittich, Christopher M; Kreuziger, Lisa M Baumann; Keddis, Mira T; McDonald, Furman S; Beckman, Thomas J

    2011-03-01

    To determine whether standardized admissions data in residents' Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) submissions were associated with multisource assessments of professionalism during internship. ERAS applications for all internal medicine interns (N=191) at Mayo Clinic entering training between July 1, 2005, and July 1, 2008, were reviewed by 6 raters. Extracted data included United States Medical Licensing Examination scores, medicine clerkship grades, class rank, Alpha Omega Alpha membership, advanced degrees, awards, volunteer activities, research experiences, first author publications, career choice, and red flags in performance evaluations. Medical school reputation was quantified using U.S. News & World Report rankings. Strength of comparative statements in recommendation letters (0 = no comparative statement, 1 = equal to peers, 2 = top 20%, 3 = top 10% or "best") were also recorded. Validated multisource professionalism scores (5-point scales) were obtained for each intern. Associations between application variables and professionalism scores were examined using linear regression. The mean ± SD (minimum-maximum) professionalism score was 4.09 ± 0.31 (2.13-4.56). In multivariate analysis, professionalism scores were positively associated with mean strength of comparative statements in recommendation letters (β = 0.13; P = .002). No other associations between ERAS application variables and professionalism scores were found. Comparative statements in recommendation letters for internal medicine residency applicants were associated with professionalism scores during internship. Other variables traditionally examined when selecting residents were not associated with professionalism. These findings suggest that faculty physicians' direct observations, as reflected in letters of recommendation, are useful indicators of what constitutes a best student. Residency selection committees should scrutinize applicants' letters for strongly favorable

  8. Objective Evaluation of Otoscopy Skills Among Family and Community Medicine, Pediatric, and Otolaryngology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyewumi, Modupe; Brandt, Michael G; Carrillo, Brian; Atkinson, Adelle; Iglar, Karl; Forte, Vito; Campisi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate and compare the perceived need for otolaryngology training and otoscopy diagnostic skills in primary care (Family and Community Medicine, Pediatric Medicine), and Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery (OTO-HNS) postgraduate trainees. Participant otoscopy skills were evaluated using the OtoSim simulator. Family and Community Medicine, Pediatric, and OTO-HNS residents were recruited. Each resident participated in 3 separate otoscopy training and assessment sessions. The ability to correctly identify middle ear pathology was objectively evaluated using OtoSim™. Pretest, posttest, and 3-month retention test results were compared among residents in a paired comparison paradigm. Survey data assessing exposure to OTO-HNS during undergraduate and postgraduate training were also collected. A total of 57 residents participated in the study. All residents reported limited exposure to OTO-HNS during undergraduate medical training. Primary care trainees performed poorly on pretest assessments (30% ± 7.8%; 95% CI). Significant improvement in diagnostic accuracy was demonstrated following a single 1-hour teaching session (30%-62%; p otology was poorly correlated to pretest performance among primary care trainees (r = 0.26) and showed a stronger positive correlation among OTO-HNS trainees (r = 0.56). A single teaching session with an otoscopy simulator significantly improved diagnostic accuracy in primary care and OTO-HNS trainees. Improved performance is susceptible to deterioration at 3 months if acquired skills are not frequently used. Self-perceived comfort with otology may not be an accurate predictor of otoscopic diagnostic skill. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The family medicine residency training initiative in miscarriage management: impact on practice in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darney, Blair G; Weaver, Marcia R; Stevens, Nancy; Kimball, Jeana; Prager, Sarah W

    2013-02-01

    Non-complicated spontaneous abortion cases should be counseled about the full range of management approaches, including uterine evacuation using manual vacuum aspiration (MVA). The Residency Training Initiative in Miscarriage Management (RTI-MM) is an intensive, multidimensional intervention designed to facilitate implementation of office-based management of spontaneous abortion using MVA in family medicine residency settings. The purpose of this study was to test the impact of the RTI-MM on self-reported use of MVA for management of spontaneous abortion. We used a pretest/posttest one group study design and a web-based, anonymous survey to collect data on knowledge, attitudes, perceived barriers, and practice of office-based management of spontaneous abortion. We used multivariable models to estimate incident relative risks and accounted for data clustering at the residency site level. Our sample included 441 residents and faculty from 10 family medicine residency sites. Our findings show a positive association between the RTI-MM and self-reported use of MVA for management of spontaneous abortion (adjusted RR=9.11 [CI=4.20--19.78]) and were robust to model specification. Male gender, doing any type of management of spontaneous abortion (eg, expectant, medication), other on-site reproductive health training interventions, and support staff knowledge scores were also significant correlates of physician practice of MVA. Our findings suggest that the RTI-MM was successful in influencing the practice of management of spontaneous abortion using MVA in this population and that support staff knowledge may impact physician practice. Integrating MVA into family medicine settings would potentially improve access to evidence-based, comprehensive care for women.

  10. A Formalized Three-Year Emergency Medicine Residency Musculoskeletal Emergencies Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew King

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Audience and type of curriculum: The Ohio State University Emergency Medicine Residency Program Musculoskeletal Emergencies Curriculum is a three-year curriculum for PGY-1 to PGY-3 learners. Introduction/Background: Musculoskeletal complaints/injuries compose a significant proportion of emergency department visits; in fact, many can result in significant morbidity. These conditions present in a vast array of acuities from minor to life/limb threatening. Emergency medicine physicians must be facile in diagnosing and managing various musculoskeletal conditions. We aim to present a three-year curriculum that incorporates clinical experience, self-directed learning, and small group-based didactics using the flipped classroom model to allow learners to master the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal emergencies. This curriculum will provide progressive training in the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal emergencies. Objectives: Resident learners will master the diagnosis and management of emergent musculoskeletal conditions including fractures/dislocations, soft tissue injuries, compartment syndrome, joint complaints, infections, and complex injuries. Methods: The educational strategies used in this curriculum include: independent, self-directed learning via textbook and medical literature reading, didactic sessions describing the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal conditions, a four-week orthopedic surgery rotation, and an optional four-week rotation at a medical center-affiliated sports medicine practice. Residents are expected to actively participate in the care of patients with musculoskeletal conditions/injuries presenting to the emergency department during the course of their residency training. The time requirements, reading material, and diagnosis/management techniques taught vary depending on the year of training. Length of curriculum: The entirety of the curriculum is three years; however, each year of residency

  11. Addressing health literacy through clear health communication: a training program for internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jamie A; Gonzaga, Alda Maria; Cohen, Elan D; Spagnoletti, Carla L

    2014-04-01

    To develop, pilot, and test the effectiveness of a clear health communication curriculum to improve resident knowledge, attitudes, and skills regarding health literacy. Thirty-one internal medicine residents participated in a small group curriculum that included didactic teaching, practice with a standardized patient, and individualized feedback on videotaped encounters with real patients. Outcomes were assessed using a pre-post survey and a communication skills checklist. Mean knowledge scores increased significantly from 60.3% to 77.6% (pcommunicating with low literacy patients (3.3 vs. 4.1) (all pcommunication improves resident knowledge, attitudes, and skills regarding health literacy. The increased use of clear health communication techniques can significantly improve the care and outcomes of vulnerable patients with limited health literacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Preparing Emergency Medicine Residents to Disclose Medical Error Using Standardized Patients

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    Carmen N. Spalding

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Emergency Medicine (EM is a unique clinical learning environment. The American College of Graduate Medical Education Clinical Learning Environment Review Pathways to Excellence calls for “hands-on training” of disclosure of medical error (DME during residency. Training and practicing key elements of DME using standardized patients (SP may enhance preparedness among EM residents in performing this crucial skill in a clinical setting. Methods This training was developed to improve resident preparedness in DME in the clinical setting. Objectives included the following: the residents will be able to define a medical error; discuss ethical and professional standards of DME; recognize common barriers to DME; describe key elements in effective DME to patients and families; and apply key elements during a SP encounter. The four-hour course included didactic and experiential learning methods, and was created collaboratively by core EM faculty and subject matter experts in conflict resolution and healthcare simulation. Educational media included lecture, video exemplars of DME communication with discussion, small group case-study discussion, and SP encounters. We administered a survey assessing for preparedness in DME pre-and post-training. A critical action checklist was administered to assess individual performance of key elements of DME during the evaluated SP case. A total of 15 postgraduate-year 1 and 2 EM residents completed the training. Results After the course, residents reported increased comfort with and preparedness in performing several key elements in DME. They were able to demonstrate these elements in a simulated setting using SP. Residents valued the training, rating the didactic, SP sessions, and overall educational experience very high. Conclusion Experiential learning using SP is effective in improving resident knowledge of and preparedness in performing medical error disclosure. This educational module can be adapted

  13. Emergency medicine residents' beliefs about contributing to an online collaborative slideshow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, Patrick M; Thanh, Jasmine; Blouin, Danielle; Gagnon, Susie; Poitras, Julien; Fountain, Renée-Marie; Fleet, Richard; Bilodeau, Andrea; van de Belt, Tom H; Légaré, France

    2015-07-01

    Collaborative writing applications (CWAs), such as the Google DocsTM platform, can improve skill acquisition, knowledge retention, and collaboration in medical education. Using CWAs to support the training of residents offers many advantages, but stimulating them to contribute remains challenging. The purpose of this study was to identify emergency medicine (EM) residents' beliefs about their intention to contribute summaries of landmark articles to a Google DocsTM slideshow while studying for their Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) certification exam. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior, the authors interviewed graduating RCPSC EM residents about contributing to a slideshow. Residents were asked about behavioral beliefs (advantages/disadvantages), normative beliefs (positive/negative referents), and control beliefs (barriers/facilitators). Two reviewers independently performed qualitative content analysis of interview transcripts to identify salient beliefs in relation to the defined behaviors. Of 150 eligible EM residents, 25 participated. The main reported advantage of contributing to the online slideshow was learning consolidation (n=15); the main reported disadvantage was information overload (n=3). The most frequently reported favorable referents were graduating EM residents writing the certification exam (n=16). Few participants (n=3) perceived any negative referents. The most frequently reported facilitator was peer-reviewed high-quality scientific information (n=9); and the most frequently reported barrier was time constraints (n=22). Salient beliefs exist regarding EM residents' intention to contribute content to an online collaborative writing project using a Google DocsTM slideshow. Overall, participants perceived more advantages than disadvantages to contributing and believed that this initiative would receive wide support. However, participants reported several barriers that need to be addressed to increase contributions. Our

  14. Preparing Emergency Medicine Residents to Disclose Medical Error Using Standardized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Carmen N; Rudinsky, Sherri L

    2018-01-01

    Emergency Medicine (EM) is a unique clinical learning environment. The American College of Graduate Medical Education Clinical Learning Environment Review Pathways to Excellence calls for "hands-on training" of disclosure of medical error (DME) during residency. Training and practicing key elements of DME using standardized patients (SP) may enhance preparedness among EM residents in performing this crucial skill in a clinical setting. This training was developed to improve resident preparedness in DME in the clinical setting. Objectives included the following: the residents will be able to define a medical error; discuss ethical and professional standards of DME; recognize common barriers to DME; describe key elements in effective DME to patients and families; and apply key elements during a SP encounter. The four-hour course included didactic and experiential learning methods, and was created collaboratively by core EM faculty and subject matter experts in conflict resolution and healthcare simulation. Educational media included lecture, video exemplars of DME communication with discussion, small group case-study discussion, and SP encounters. We administered a survey assessing for preparedness in DME pre-and post-training. A critical action checklist was administered to assess individual performance of key elements of DME during the evaluated SP case. A total of 15 postgraduate-year 1 and 2 EM residents completed the training. After the course, residents reported increased comfort with and preparedness in performing several key elements in DME. They were able to demonstrate these elements in a simulated setting using SP. Residents valued the training, rating the didactic, SP sessions, and overall educational experience very high. Experiential learning using SP is effective in improving resident knowledge of and preparedness in performing medical error disclosure. This educational module can be adapted to other clinical learning environments through creation of

  15. A Course for Teaching Patient-Centered Medicine to Family Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeheskel, Ayala; Biderman, Aya; Borkan, Jeffrey M.; Herman, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Describes a three-year course at Ben Gurion University (Israel) to develop attitudes and skills necessary for patient-centered medicine. The course uses directed reading, open discussion, case presentations, role-playing, and Balint groups to develop skills at four levels: doctor-patient communication; family systems theory; family systems…

  16. An "education for life" requirement to promote lifelong learning in an internal medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Mukta; Desbiens, Norman A

    2010-12-01

    Lifelong learning is an integral component of practice-based learning and improvement. Physicians need to be lifelong learners to provide timely, efficient, and state-of-the-art patient care in an environment where knowledge, technology, and social requirements are rapidly changing. To assess graduates' self-reported perception of the usefulness of a residency program requirement to submit a narrative report describing their planned educational modalities for their future continued medical learning ("Education for Life" requirement), and to compare the modalities residents intended to use with their reported educational activities. Data was compiled from the Education for Life reports submitted by internal medicine residents at the University of Tennessee College of Medicine Chattanooga from 1998 to 2000, and from a survey sent to the same 27 graduates 2 to 4 years later from 2000 to 2004. Twenty-four surveys (89%) were returned. Of the responding graduates, 58% (14/24) found the Education for Life requirement useful for their future continued medical learning. Graduates intended to keep up with a mean of 3.4 educational modalities, and they reported keeping up with 4.2. In a multivariable analysis, the number of modalities graduates used was significantly associated with the number they had planned to use before graduation (P  =  .04) but not with their career choice of subspecialization. The majority of residents found the Education for Life requirement useful for their future continued medical learning. Graduates, regardless of specialty, reported using more modalities for continuing their medical education than they thought they would as residents. Considering lifelong learning early in training and then requiring residents to identify ways to practice lifelong learning as a requirement for graduation may be dispositive.

  17. Functional Neuroimaging Correlates of Burnout among Internal Medicine Residents and Faculty Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durning, Steven J; Costanzo, Michelle; Artino, Anthony R; Dyrbye, Liselotte N; Beckman, Thomas J; Schuwirth, Lambert; Holmboe, Eric; Roy, Michael J; Wittich, Christopher M; Lipner, Rebecca S; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-01-01

    Burnout is prevalent in residency training and practice and is linked to medical error and suboptimal patient care. However, little is known about how burnout affects clinical reasoning, which is essential to safe and effective care. The aim of this study was to examine how burnout modulates brain activity during clinical reasoning in physicians. Using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), brain activity was assessed in internal medicine residents (n = 10) and board-certified internists (faculty, n = 17) from the Uniformed Services University (USUHS) while they answered and reflected upon United States Medical Licensing Examination and American Board of Internal Medicine multiple-choice questions. Participants also completed a validated two-item burnout scale, which includes an item assessing emotional exhaustion and an item assessing depersonalization. Whole brain covariate analysis was used to examine blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal during answering and reflecting upon clinical problems with respect to burnout scores. Higher depersonalization scores were associated with less BOLD signal in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and middle frontal gyrus during reflecting on clinical problems and less BOLD signal in the bilateral precuneus while answering clinical problems in residents. Higher emotional exhaustion scores were associated with more right posterior cingulate cortex and middle frontal gyrus BOLD signal in residents. Examination of faculty revealed no significant influence of burnout on brain activity. Residents appear to be more susceptible to burnout effects on clinical reasoning, which may indicate that residents may need both cognitive and emotional support to improve quality of life and to optimize performance and learning. These results inform our understanding of mental stress, cognitive control as well as cognitive load theory.

  18. Lack of chart reminder effectiveness on family medicine resident JNC-VI and NCEP III guideline knowledge and attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross EG

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature demonstrates that medical residents and practicing physicians have an attitudinal-behavioral discordance concerning their positive attitudes towards clinical practice guidelines (CPG, and the implementation of these guidelines into clinical practice patterns. Methods A pilot study was performed to determine if change in a previously identified CPG compliance factor (accessibility would produce a significant increase in family medicine resident knowledge and attitude toward the guidelines. The primary study intervention involved placing a summary of the Sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC VI and the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (NCEP III CPGs in all patient (>18 yr. charts for a period of three months. The JNC VI and NCEP III CPGs were also distributed to each Wayne State family medicine resident, and a copy of each CPG was placed in the preceptor's area of the involved clinics. Identical pre- and post- intervention questionnaires were administered to all residents concerning CPG knowledge and attitude. Results Post-intervention analysis failed to demonstrate a significant difference in CPG knowledge. A stastically significant post-intervention difference was found in only on attitude question. The barriers to CPG compliance were identified as 1 lack of CPG instruction; 2 lack of critical appraisal ability; 3 insufficient time; 4 lack of CPG accessibility; and 5 lack of faculty modeling. Conclusion This study demonstrated no significant post intervention changes in CPG knowledge, and only one question that reflected attitude change. Wider resident access to dedicated clinic time, increased faculty modeling, and the implementation of an electronic record/reminder system that uses a team-based approach are compliance factors that

  19. Are Self-study Procedural Teaching Methods Effective? A Pilot Study of a Family Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffenbacher, Brandy; Langner, Shannon; Khodaee, Morteza

    2017-11-01

    A family medicine residency is a unique training environment where residents are exposed to care in multiple settings, across all ages. Procedures are an integral part of family medicine practice. Family medicine residency (FMR) programs are tasked with the job of teaching these skills at a level of intensity and frequency that allows a resident to achieve competency of such skills. In an environment that is limited by work hour restrictions, self-study teaching methods are one way to ensure all residents receive the fundamental knowledge of how to perform procedures. We developed and evaluated the efficacy of a self-study procedure teaching method and procedure evaluation checklist. A self-study procedure teaching intervention was created, consisting of instructional articles and videos on three procedures. To assess the efficacy of the intervention, and the competency of the residents, pre- and postintervention procedure performance sessions were completed. These sessions were reviewed and scored using a standardized procedure performance checklist. All 24 residents participated in the study. Overall, the resident procedure knowledge increased on two of the three procedures studied, and ability to perform procedure according to expert-validated checklist improved significantly on all procedures. A self-study intervention is a simple but effective way to increase and improve procedure training in a way that fits the complex scheduling needs of a residency training program. In addition, this study demonstrates that the procedure performance checklists are a simple and reliable way to increase assessment of resident procedure performance skills in a residency setting.

  20. Classification of Prevention in Sports Medicine and Epidemiology.

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    Jacobsson, Jenny; Timpka, Toomas

    2015-11-01

    It is today recognized that a large share of manifestations of ill health associated with sports participation is preventable and that a focus should be on implementation of effective prevention programs. One hindrance for implementation of effective preventive measures in sports medicine may be that an update of preventive frameworks to the current health challenges has not been performed. We introduce classifications of prevention that are adjusted to the health challenges faced by sports participants in the present day. To enable more precise characterizations of preventive measures, we find it necessary to describe them in two dimensions. In one dimension, pathological developments in the body are used as a basis for classification of preventive measures, while the other dimension classifies prevention on the grounds of epidemiological risk indicators. We conclude that longitudinal research combining diagnostic procedures, surveillance, and targeted interventions is needed to enable the introduction of prevention programs for athletes in the beginning of their sporting career at the pre-diagnostic stage, as well as suitable prevention measures for the adult elite athletes. A more distinct classification of prevention supports a specific and cost-effective planning and translation of sports injury prevention and safety promotion adjusted to the delivery settings, various injury types, and different groups of athletes. The present classifications constitute an additional conceptual foundation for such efforts.

  1. What skills should new internal medicine interns have in july? A national survey of internal medicine residency program directors.

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    Angus, Steven; Vu, T Robert; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Aiyer, Meenakshy; McKown, Kevin; Chmielewski, Amy F; McDonald, Furman S

    2014-03-01

    The transition from medical student to intern may cause stress and burnout in new interns and the delivery of suboptimal patient care. Despite a formal set of subinternship curriculum guidelines, program directors have expressed concern regarding the skill set of new interns and the lack of standardization in that skill set among interns from different medical schools. To address these issues, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System focuses on the development of a competency-based education continuum spanning undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education. In 2010, the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine subinternship task force, in collaboration with the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine survey committee, surveyed internal medicine residency program directors to determine which competencies or skills they expected from new medical school graduates. The authors summarized the results using categories of interest. In both an item rank list and free-text responses, program directors were nearly uniform in ranking the skills they deemed most important for new interns-organization and time management and prioritization skills; effective communication skills; basic clinical skills; and knowing when to ask for assistance. Stakeholders should use the results of this survey as they develop a milestone-based curriculum for the fourth year of medical school and for the internal medicine subinternship. By doing so, they should develop a standardized set of skills that meet program directors' expectations, reduce the stress of transitions across the educational continuum, and improve the quality of patient care.

  2. Online research article discussion board to increase knowledge translation during emergency medicine residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoneking LR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lisa R Stoneking, Kristi H Grall, Alice A Min, Ashish R PanchalDepartment of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USABackground: Many clinicians have difficulties reading current best practice journal articles on a regular basis. Discussion boards are one method of online asynchronous learning that facilitates active learning and participation. We hypothesized that an online repository of best practice articles with a discussion board would increase journal article reading by emergency medicine residents.Methods: Participants answered three questions weekly on a discussion board: What question does this study address? What does this study add to our knowledge? How might this change clinical practice? A survey regarding perceived barriers to participating was then distributed.Results: Most participants completed an article summary once or twice in total (23/32, 71.9%. Only three were involved most weeks (3/32, 9.4% whereas 5/32 (15.6% participated monthly. The most common barriers were lack of time (20/32, 62.5%, difficulty logging on (7/32, 21.9%, and forgetting (6/32, 18.8%.Conclusion: Although subjects were provided weekly with an article link, email, and feedback, journal article reading frequency did not increase.Keywords: online research, discussion board, knowledge translation, emergency medicine residency

  3. Effectiveness of a Formal Mentorship Program in Family Medicine Residency: The Residents’ Perspective

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    Marie Andrades

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mentoring is a recognized form of teaching learning strategy in postgraduate medical education. This paper describes the effectiveness of a formal mentorship program from the residents’ perspective after a year of implementation. Methods. The Aga Khan University Family Medicine Residency Program is the first program in Pakistan to our knowledge to implement formal mentorship for all four years of residency. A mentorship program was developed, implemented, and evaluated a year later using a rating scale. The 10-point Likert scale consisted of questions on academics, clinical work, research, administrative issues, and personal/social issues. Results. The response rate was 95% (. Eighty percent ( were women. Satisfaction level in seeking help was the highest for academics (75%. Residents scored mentorship as low in helping to tackle their personal problems (20%. Barriers reported in rapport building with mentor were time constraints and gender difference. The most useful attributes of the mentor which helped rapport building were accessibility, active listening, support for emotional needs, and trustworthiness. Conclusion. Mentoring has a role in trainees’ personal and professional growth especially when their needs are addressed. The effectiveness of the mentorship program in residency can improve if the residents are allowed to choose their own mentors.

  4. Overcoming early barriers to PCMH practice improvement in family medicine residencies.

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    Fernald, Douglas H; Deaner, Nicole; O'Neill, Caitlin; Jortberg, Bonnie T; degruy, Frank Verloin; Dickinson, W Perry

    2011-01-01

    Residency programs face inevitable challenges as they redesign their practices for higher quality care and resident training. Identifying and addressing early barriers can help align priorities and thereby augment the capacity to change. Evaluation of the Colorado Family Medicine Residency PCMH Project included iterative qualitative analysis of field notes, interviews, and documents to identify early barriers to change and strategies to overcome them. Nine common but not universal barriers were identified: (1) a practice's history reflected some negative past experiences with quality improvement or routines incompatible with transformative change, (2) leadership gaps were evident in unprepared practice leaders or hierarchical leadership, (3) resistance and skepticism about change were expressed through cynicism aimed at change or ability to change, (4) unproductive team processes were reflected in patterns of canceled meetings, absentee leaders, or lack of accountability, (5) knowledge gaps about the Patient-centered Medical Home (PCMH) were apparent from incomplete dissemination about the project or planned changes, (6) EHR implementation distracted focus or stalled improvement activity, (7) sponsoring organizations' constraints emerged from staffing rules and differing priorities, (8) insufficient staff participation resulted from traditional role expectations and structures, and (9) communication was hampered by ineffective methods and part-time faculty and residents. Early barriers responded to varying degrees to specific interventions by practice coaches. Some barriers that interfere with practices getting started with cultural and structural transformation can be addressed with persistent attention and reflection from on-site coaches and by realigning the talents, leaders, and priorities already in these residency programs.

  5. Integrating motivational interviewing and narrative therapy to teach behavior change to family medicine resident physicians.

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    Oshman, Lauren D; Combs, Gene N

    2016-05-01

    Motivational interviewing is a useful skill to address the common problem of patient ambivalence regarding behavior change by uncovering and strengthening a person's own motivation and commitment to change. The Family Medicine Milestones underline the need for clear teaching and monitoring of skills in communication and behavior change in Family Medicine postgraduate training settings. This article reports the integration of a motivational interviewing curriculum into an existing longitudinal narrative therapy-based curriculum on patient-centered communication. Observed structured clinical examination for six participants indicate that intern physicians are able to demonstrate moderate motivational interviewing skill after a brief 2-h workshop. Participant self-evaluations for 16 participants suggest a brief 2-h curriculum was helpful at increasing importance of learning motivational interviewing by participants, and that participants desire further training opportunities. A brief motivational interviewing curriculum can be integrated into existing communication training in a Family Medicine residency training program. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Morbidity and Mortality Conference in Emergency Medicine Residencies and the Culture of Safety

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    Emily L. Aaronson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Morbidity and mortality conferences (M+M are a traditional part of residency training and mandated by the Accreditation Counsel of Graduate Medical Education. This study’s objective was to determine the goals, structure, and the prevalence of practices that foster strong safety cultures in the M+Ms of U.S. emergency medicine (EM residency programs. Methods: The authors conducted a national survey of U.S. EM residency program directors. The survey instrument evaluated five domains of M+M (Organization and Infrastructure; Case Finding; Case Selection; Presentation; and Follow up based on the validated Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality Safety Culture survey. Results: There was an 80% (151/188 response rate. The primary objectives of M+M were discussing adverse outcomes (53/151, 35%, identifying systems errors (47/151, 31% and identifying cognitive errors (26/151, 17%. Fifty-six percent (84/151 of institutions have anonymous case submission, with 10% (15/151 maintaining complete anonymity during the presentation and 21% (31/151 maintaining partial anonymity. Forty-seven percent (71/151 of programs report a formal process to follow up on systems issues identified at M+M. Forty-four percent (67/151 of programs report regular debriefing with residents who have had their cases presented. Conclusion: The structure and goals of M+Ms in EM residencies vary widely. Many programs lack features of M+M that promote a non-punitive response to error, such as anonymity. Other programs lack features that support strong safety cultures, such as following up on systems issues or reporting back to residents on improvements. Further research is warranted to determine if M+M structure is related to patient safety culture in residency programs.

  7. Are Graduating Pediatric Residents Prepared to Engage in Obesity Prevention and Treatment?

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    Frintner, Mary Pat; Liebhart, Janice L; Lindros, Jeanne; Baker, Alison; Hassink, Sandra G

    2016-01-01

    Little information is available to gauge residents' perceived receipt of comprehensive training and preparedness to manage children with obesity in practice. A national, random sample of 1000 graduating pediatric residents were surveyed in 2013 on childhood overweight/obesity and preparedness to prevent and treat obesity. A composite training measure was created by summing the number of areas (10 possible) where training on overweight/obesity was received. Multivariable logistic regression explored relationships of resident and training characteristics to residents' belief that their own counseling on prevention and treatment of overweight/obesity is very effective (vs somewhat/slightly/not effective). Of 625 survey respondents (63% response), most (68-92%) reported receipt of training in each of 10 assessed areas on overweight/obesity prevention, assessment, and treatment. Most residents did not desire more training in the assessed areas; however, 54% wanted more training in motivational interviewing. About one-fourth believed that their own counseling on the prevention of overweight/obesity (26%) and treatment of obesity (22%) was very effective. Residents who rated their ability to use motivational interviewing as very good/excellent were more likely to rate their counseling on both the prevention and treatment of overweight/obesity as very effective (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.63-7.13; and aOR 4.69, 95% CI 2.72-8.07, respectively). Residents who received training in all 10 assessed areas were also more likely to rate their counseling on both prevention and treatment as very effective (aOR 2.58, 95% CI 1.61-4.14; aOR 2.41, 95% CI 1.46-3.97, respectively). Comprehensive training on overweight/obesity and inclusion of training in motivational interviewing may help residents feel better prepared to care for children with overweight/obesity. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. Family medicine residents’ perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States

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    Amoako, Adae O; Amoako, Agyenim B; Pujalte, George GA

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Results Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7%) compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8%) respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively). Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, sports medicine contribute to residents’ knowledge and comfort level in treatment of common sports injuries. PMID:25848326

  9. Faculty Support for Self-Directed Learning in Internal Medicine Residency: A Qualitative Study Using Grounded Theory.

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    Sawatsky, Adam P; Ratelle, John T; Bonnes, Sara L; Egginton, Jason S; Beckman, Thomas J

    2017-11-28

    Self-directed learning (SDL) is part of residency training, which residents desire guidance in implementing. To characterize SDL within the clinical context, this study explored residents' perceptions of faculty members' role in promoting and supporting resident SDL. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, the authors conducted 7 focus groups with 46 internal medicine residents at the Mayo Clinic Internal Medicine Residency Program from October 2014 to January 2015. Focus group transcripts were de-identified and processed through open coding and analytic memo writing. Guided by a previously developed SDL model, data were analyzed regarding faculty member involvement in resident SDL. Themes were organized and patterns were discussed at team meetings, with constant comparison to new data. Trustworthiness was established using two member check sessions. The authors identified themes within the categories of faculty guidance for SDL, SDL versus other-directed learning (ODL), and faculty archetypes for supporting SDL. Clinical teachers play a key role in facilitating resident SDL, and can provide guidance at each step in the SDL process. Residents discussed the distinction between SDL and ODL, highlighting the integrated nature of learning and interplay between the two approaches to learning. Residents identified themes relating to three archetypal approaches faculty implement to support resident SDL in the clinical environment (directed, collaborative, and role model SDL), with benefits and challenges of each approach. This study underscores the importance of external guidance for resident SDL and expands on approaches faculty members can utilize to support SDL in the clinical context.

  10. Communication About Advance Directives and End-of-Life Care Options Among Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ramona L; Tindall, Kate; Xuan, Lei; Paulk, M Elizabeth; Halm, Ethan A

    2015-05-01

    Despite increasing awareness about the importance of discussing end-of-life (EOL) care options with terminally ill patients and families, many physicians remain uncomfortable with these discussions. The objective of the study was to examine perceptions of and comfort with EOL care discussions among a group of internal medicine residents and the extent to which comfort with these discussions has improved over time. In 2013, internal medicine residents at a large academic medical center were asked to participate in an on-line survey that assessed their attitudes and experiences with discussing EOL care with terminally-ill patients. These results were compared to data from a similar survey residents in the same program completed in 2006. Eighty-three (50%) residents completed the 2013 survey. About half (52%) felt strongly that they were able to have open, honest discussions with patients and families, while 71% felt conflicted about whether CPR was in the patient's best interest. About half (53%) felt strongly that it was okay for them to tell a patient/family member whether or not CPR was a good idea for them. Compared to 2006 respondents, the 2013 cohort felt they had more lectures about EOL communication, and had watched an attending have an EOL discussion more often. Modest improvements were made over time in trainees' exposure to EOL discussions; however, many residents remain uncomfortable and conflicted with having EOL care discussions with their patients. More effective training approaches in EOL communication are needed to train the next generation of internists. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Keeping up with the times: revising the dermatology residency curriculum in the era of molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine.

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    LaChance, Avery; Murphy, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The clinical use of molecular diagnostics, genomics, and personalized medicine is increasing and improving rapidly over time. However, medical education incorporating the practical application of these techniques is lagging behind. Although instruction in these areas should be expanded upon and improved at all levels of training, residency provides a concentrated period of time in which to hone in on skills that are practically applicable to a trainee's specialty of choice. Although residencies in some fields, such as pathology, have begun to incorporate practical molecular diagnostics training, this area remains a relative gap in dermatology residency programs. Herein, we advocate for the incorporation of training in molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine into dermatology residency programs and propose a basic curriculum template for how to begin approaching these topics. By incorporating molecular diagnostics into dermatology residency training, dermatologists have the opportunity to lead the way and actively shape the specialty's transition into the era of personalized medicine. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  12. Clinical preventive services in Guatemala: a cross-sectional survey of internal medicine physicians.

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    Juan E Corral

    Full Text Available Guatemala is currently undergoing an epidemiologic transition. Preventive services are key to reducing the burden of non-communicable diseases, and smoking counseling and cessation are among the most cost-effective and wide-reaching strategies. Internal medicine physicians are fundamental to providing such services, and their knowledge is a cornerstone of non-communicable disease control.A national cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2011 to evaluate knowledge of clinical preventive services for non-communicable diseases. Interns, residents, and attending physicians of the internal medicine departments of all teaching hospitals in Guatemala completed a self-administered questionnaire. Participants' responses were contrasted with the Guatemalan Ministry of Health (MoH prevention guidelines and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF recommendations. Analysis compared knowledge of recommendations within and between hospitals.In response to simulated patient scenarios, all services were recommended by more than half of physicians regardless of MoH or USPSTF recommendations. Prioritization was adequate according to the MoH guidelines but not including other potentially effective services (e.g. colorectal cancer and lipid disorder screenings. With the exception of colorectal and prostate cancer screening, less frequently recommended by interns, there was no difference in recommendation rates by level.Guatemalan internal medicine physicians' knowledge on preventive services recommendations for non-communicable diseases is limited, and prioritization did not reflect cost-effectiveness. Based on these data we recommend that preventive medicine training be strengthened and development of evidence-based guidelines for low-middle income countries be a priority.

  13. Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents: systematic review of formats, content, and effects of existing programs.

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    Lacasse, Miriam; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2009-09-01

    To review the literature on teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents and to identify formats and content of these programs and their effects. Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to mid-July 2008) and the Education Resources Information Center database (pre-1966 to mid-July 2008) were searched using and combining the MeSH terms teaching, internship and residency, and family practice; and teaching, graduate medical education, and family practice. The initial MEDLINE and Education Resources Information Center database searches identified 362 and 33 references, respectively. Titles and abstracts were reviewed and studies were included if they described the format or content of a teaching-skills program or if they were primary studies of the effects of a teaching-skills program for family medicine residents or family medicine and other specialty trainees. The bibliographies of those articles were reviewed for unidentified studies. A total of 8 articles were identified for systematic review. Selection was limited to articles published in English. Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents vary from half-day curricula to a few months of training. Their content includes leadership skills, effective clinical teaching skills, technical teaching skills, as well as feedback and evaluation skills. Evaluations mainly assessed the programs' effects on teaching behaviour, which was generally found to improve following participation in the programs. Evaluations of learner reactions and learning outcomes also suggested that the programs have positive effects. Family medicine residency training programs differ from all other residency training programs in their shorter duration, usually 2 years, and the broader scope of learning within those 2 years. Few studies on teaching-skills training, however, were designed specifically for family medicine residents. Further studies assessing the effects of teaching-skills training in family medicine residents are

  14. Description of a developmental criterion-referenced assessment for promoting competence in internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varney, Andrew; Todd, Christine; Hingle, Susan; Clark, Michael

    2009-09-01

    End-of- rotation global evaluations can be subjective, produce inflated grades, lack interrater reliability, and offer information that lacks value. This article outlines the generation of a unique developmental criterion-referenced assessment that applies adult learning theory and the learner, manager, teacher model, and represents an innovative application to the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) 9-point scale. We describe the process used by Southern Illinois University School of Medicine to develop rotation-specific, criterion-based evaluation anchors that evolved into an effective faculty development exercise. The intervention gave faculty a clearer understanding of the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies, each rotation's educational goals, and how rotation design affects meaningful work-based assessment. We also describe easily attainable successes in evaluation design and pitfalls that other institutions may be able to avoid. Shifting the evaluation emphasis on the residents' development of competence has made the expectations of rotation faculty more transparent, has facilitated conversations between program director and residents, and has improved the specificity of the tool for feedback. Our findings showed the new approach reduced grade inflation compared with the ABIM end-of-rotation global evaluation form. We offer the new developmental criterion-referenced assessment as a unique application of the competences to the ABIM 9-point scale as a transferable model for improving the validity and reliability of resident evaluations across graduate medical education programs.

  15. Nutritional interventions for Alzheimer's prevention: a clinical precision medicine approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelke, Matthew W; Hackett, Katherine; Chen, Jaclyn L; Shih, Chiashin; Shum, Jessica; Montgomery, Mary E; Chiang, Gloria C; Berkowitz, Cara; Seifan, Alon; Krikorian, Robert; Isaacson, Richard Scott

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a major source of morbidity and mortality, with the disease burden expected to rise as the population ages. No disease-modifying agent is currently available, but recent research suggests that nutritional and lifestyle modifications can delay or prevent the onset of AD. However, preventive nutritional interventions are not universally applicable and depend on the clinical profile of the individual patient. This article reviews existing nutritional modalities for AD prevention that act through improvement of insulin resistance, correction of dyslipidemia, and reduction of oxidative stress, and discusses how they may be modified on the basis of individual biomarkers, genetics, and behavior. In addition, we report preliminary results of clinical application of these personalized interventions at the first AD prevention clinic in the United States. The use of these personalized interventions represents an important application of precision medicine techniques for the prevention of AD that can be adopted by clinicians across disciplines. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  16. Effect of a Community-Based Service Learning Experience in Geriatrics on Internal Medicine Residents and Community Participants.

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    Miller, Rachel K; Michener, Jennifer; Yang, Phyllis; Goldstein, Karen; Groce-Martin, Jennine; True, Gala; Johnson, Jerry

    2017-09-01

    Community-based service learning (CBSL) provides an opportunity to teach internal medicine residents the social context of aging and clinical concepts. The objectives of the current study were to demonstrate the feasibility of a CBSL program targeting internal medicine residents and to assess its effect on medical residents and community participants. internal medicine residents participated in a CBSL experience for half a day during ambulatory blocks from 2011 to 2014. Residents attended a senior housing unit or center, delivered a presentation about a geriatric health topic, toured the facility, and received information about local older adult resources. Residents evaluated the experience. Postgraduate Year 3 internal medicine residents (n = 71) delivered 64 sessions. Residents felt that the experience increased their ability to communicate effectively with older adults (mean 3.91 ± 0.73 on a Likert scale with 5 = strongly agree), increased their knowledge of resources (4.09 ± 1.01), expanded their knowledge of a health topic pertinent to aging (3.48 ± 1.09), and contributed to their capacity to evaluate and care for older adults (3.84 ± 0.67). Free-text responses demonstrated that residents thought that this program would change their practice. Of 815 older adults surveyed from 36 discrete teaching sessions, 461 (56%) thought that the medical residents delivered health information clearly (4.55 ± 0.88) and that the health topics were relevant (4.26 ± 0.92). Free-text responses showed that the program helped them understand their health concerns. This CBSL program is a feasible and effective tool for teaching internal medicine residents and older adults. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. Teambuilding and leadership training in an internal medicine residency training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K; Rose, Mark; Lee, Rita; Dolgan, Colleen; Hoogwerf, Byron J

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe and evaluate the impact of a 1-day retreat focused on developing leadership skills and teambuilding among postgraduate year 1 residents in an internal medicine residency. A group of organizers, including members of the staff, the chief medical residents, administrative individuals in the residency office, and an internal organizational development consultant convened to organize an off-site retreat with activities that would provide experiential learning regarding teamwork and leadership, including a "reef survival exercise" and table discussions regarding the characteristics of ideal leaders. In addition, several energizing activities and recreational free time was provided to enhance the interaction and teamwork dimensions of the retreat. To evaluate the impact of the retreat, attendees completed baseline and follow-up questionnaires regarding their experience of the retreat. Attendees universally regarded the retreat as having value for them. Comparison of baseline to postretreat responses indicated that attendees felt that the retreat enhanced their abilities to be better physicians, resident supervisors, and leaders. Follow-up responses indicated significant increases in attendees' agreement that good leaders challenge the process, make decisions based on shared visions, allow others to act, recognize individual contributions, and serve as good role models. Results on the survival exercise indicated a high frequency with which team-based decisions surpassed individual members' decisions, highlighting the importance and value of teamwork to attendees. Our main findings were that: participants universally found this 1-day retreat beneficial in helping to develop teamwork and leadership skills and the experiential learning aspects of the retreat were more especially highly rated and highlighted the advantages of teamwork. In the context that this 1-day retreat was deemed useful by faculty and residents alike, further

  18. Educational technology improves ECG interpretation of acute myocardial infarction among medical students and emergency medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmand, Ali; Tanski, Mary; Davis, Steven; Shokoohi, Hamid; Lucas, Raymond; Zaver, Fareen

    2015-01-01

    Asynchronous online training has become an increasingly popular educational format in the new era of technology-based professional development. We sought to evaluate the impact of an online asynchronous training module on the ability of medical students and emergency medicine (EM) residents to detect electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We developed an online ECG training and testing module on AMI, with emphasis on recognizing ST elevation myocardial infarction (MI) and early activation of cardiac catheterization resources. Study participants included senior medical students and EM residents at all post-graduate levels rotating in our emergency department (ED). Participants were given a baseline set of ECGs for interpretation. This was followed by a brief interactive online training module on normal ECGs as well as abnormal ECGs representing an acute MI. Participants then underwent a post-test with a set of ECGs in which they had to interpret and decide appropriate intervention including catheterization lab activation. 148 students and 35 EM residents participated in this training in the 2012-2013 academic year. Students and EM residents showed significant improvements in recognizing ECG abnormalities after taking the asynchronous online training module. The mean score on the testing module for students improved from 5.9 (95% CI [5.7-6.1]) to 7.3 (95% CI [7.1-7.5]), with a mean difference of 1.4 (95% CI [1.12-1.68]) (p<0.0001). The mean score for residents improved significantly from 6.5 (95% CI [6.2-6.9]) to 7.8 (95% CI [7.4-8.2]) (p<0.0001). An online interactive module of training improved the ability of medical students and EM residents to correctly recognize the ECG evidence of an acute MI.

  19. How Do Emergency Medicine Residency Programs Structure Their Clinical Competency Committees? A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Christopher I; Roppolo, Lynn P; Asher, Shellie; Seamon, Jason P; Bhat, Rahul; Taft, Stephanie; Graham, Autumn; Willis, James

    2015-11-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) recently has mandated the formation of a clinical competency committee (CCC) to evaluate residents across the newly defined milestone continuum. The ACGME has been nonproscriptive of how these CCCs are to be structured in order to provide flexibility to the programs. No best practices for the formation of CCCs currently exist. We seek to determine common structures of CCCs recently formed in the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) member programs and identify unique structures that have been developed. In this descriptive study, an 18-question survey was distributed via the CORD listserv in the late fall of 2013. Each member program was asked questions about the structure of its CCC. These responses were analyzed with simple descriptive statistics. A total of 116 of the 160 programs responded, giving a 73% response rate. Of responders, most (71.6%) CCCs are chaired by the associate or assistant program director, while a small number (14.7%) are chaired by a core faculty member. Program directors (PDs) chair 12.1% of CCCs. Most CCCs are attended by the PD (85.3%) and selected core faculty members (78.5%), leaving the remaining committees attended by any core faculty. Voting members of the CCC consist of the residency leadership either with the PD (53.9%) or without the PD (36.5%) as a voting member. CCCs have an average attendance of 7.4 members with a range of three to 15 members. Of respondents, 53.1% of CCCs meet quarterly while 37% meet monthly. The majority of programs (76.4%) report a system to match residents with a faculty mentor or advisor. Of respondents, 36% include the resident's faculty mentor or advisor to discuss a particular resident. Milestone summaries (determination of level for each milestone) are the primary focus of discussion (93.8%), utilizing multiple sources of information. The substantial variability and diversity found in our CORD survey of CCC structure

  20. Female residents experiencing medical errors in general internal medicine: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankaka, Cindy Ottiger; Waeber, Gérard; Gachoud, David

    2014-07-10

    Doctors, especially doctors-in-training such as residents, make errors. They have to face the consequences even though today's approach to errors emphasizes systemic factors. Doctors' individual characteristics play a role in how medical errors are experienced and dealt with. The role of gender has previously been examined in a few quantitative studies that have yielded conflicting results. In the present study, we sought to qualitatively explore the experience of female residents with respect to medical errors. In particular, we explored the coping mechanisms displayed after an error. This study took place in the internal medicine department of a Swiss university hospital. Within a phenomenological framework, semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight female residents in general internal medicine. All interviews were audiotaped, fully transcribed, and thereafter analyzed. Seven main themes emerged from the interviews: (1) A perception that there is an insufficient culture of safety and error; (2) The perceived main causes of errors, which included fatigue, work overload, inadequate level of competences in relation to assigned tasks, and dysfunctional communication; (3) Negative feelings in response to errors, which included different forms of psychological distress; (4) Variable attitudes of the hierarchy toward residents involved in an error; (5) Talking about the error, as the core coping mechanism; (6) Defensive and constructive attitudes toward one's own errors; and (7) Gender-specific experiences in relation to errors. Such experiences consisted in (a) perceptions that male residents were more confident and therefore less affected by errors than their female counterparts and (b) perceptions that sexist attitudes among male supervisors can occur and worsen an already painful experience. This study offers an in-depth account of how female residents specifically experience and cope with medical errors. Our interviews with female residents convey the

  1. Emergency medicine resident crisis resource management ability: a simulation-based longitudinal study

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    Samuel Clarke

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Simulation has been identified as a means of assessing resident physicians’ mastery of technical skills, but there is a lack of evidence for its utility in longitudinal assessments of residents’ non-technical clinical abilities. We evaluated the growth of crisis resource management (CRM skills in the simulation setting using a validated tool, the Ottawa Crisis Resource Management Global Rating Scale (Ottawa GRS. We hypothesized that the Ottawa GRS would reflect progressive growth of CRM ability throughout residency. Methods: Forty-five emergency medicine residents were tracked with annual simulation assessments between 2006 and 2011. We used mixed-methods repeated-measures regression analyses to evaluate elements of the Ottawa GRS by level of training to predict performance growth throughout a 3-year residency. Results: Ottawa GRS scores increased over time, and the domains of leadership, problem solving, and resource utilization, in particular, were predictive of overall performance. There was a significant gain in all Ottawa GRS components between postgraduate years 1 and 2, but no significant difference in GRS performance between years 2 and 3. Conclusions: In summary, CRM skills are progressive abilities, and simulation is a useful modality for tracking their development. Modification of this tool may be needed to assess advanced learners’ gains in performance.

  2. A multimethod approach for cross-cultural training in an internal medicine residency program.

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    Staton, Lisa J; Estrada, Carlos; Panda, Mukta; Ortiz, David; Roddy, Donna

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultural competence training in residency is important to improve learners' confidence in cross-cultural encounters. Recognition of cultural diversity and avoidance of cultural stereotypes are essential for health care providers. Methods We developed a multimethod approach for cross-cultural training of Internal Medicine residents and evaluated participants' preparedness for cultural encounters. The multimethod approach included (1) a conference series, (2) a webinar with a national expert, (3) small group sessions, (4) a multicultural social gathering, (5) a Grand Rounds presentation on cross-cultural training, and (6) an interactive, online case-based program. Results The program had 35 participants, 28 of whom responded to the survey. Of those, 16 were white (62%), and residents comprised 71% of respondents (n=25). Following training, 89% of participants were more comfortable obtaining a social history. However, prior to the course only 27% were comfortable caring for patients who distrust the US system and 35% could identify religious beliefs and customs which impact care. Most (71%) believed that the training would help them give better care for patients from different cultures, and 63% felt more comfortable negotiating a treatment plan following the course. Conclusions Multimethod training may improve learners' confidence and comfort with cross-cultural encounters, as well as lay the foundation for ongoing learning. Follow-up is needed to assess whether residents' perceived comfort will translate into improved patient outcomes.

  3. Filling the Gap: Simulation-based Crisis Resource Management Training for Emergency Medicine Residents

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    Jessica R. Parsons

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In today’s team-oriented healthcare environment, high-quality patient care requires physicians to possess not only medical knowledge and technical skills but also crisis resource management (CRM skills. In emergency medicine (EM, the high acuity and dynamic environment makes CRM skills of physicians particularly critical to healthcare team success. The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medicine Education Core Competencies that guide residency program curriculums include CRM skills; however, EM residency programs are not given specific instructions as to how to teach these skills to their trainees. This article describes a simulation-based CRM course designed specifically for novice EM residents. Methods The CRM course includes an introductory didactic presentation followed by a series of simulation scenarios and structured debriefs. The course is designed to use observational learning within simulation education to decrease the time and resources required for implementation. To assess the effectiveness in improving team CRM skills, two independent raters use a validated CRM global rating scale to measure the CRM skills displayed by teams of EM interns in a pretest and posttest during the course. Results The CRM course improved leadership, problem solving, communication, situational awareness, teamwork, resource utilization and overall CRM skills displayed by teams of EM interns. While the improvement from pretest to posttest did not reach statistical significance for this pilot study, the large effect sizes suggest that statistical significance may be achieved with a larger sample size. Conclusion This course can feasibly be incorporated into existing EM residency curriculums to provide EM trainees with basic CRM skills required of successful emergency physicians. We believe integrating CRM training early into existing EM education encourages continued deliberate practice, discussion, and improvement of essential CRM skills.

  4. Filling the Gap: Simulation-based Crisis Resource Management Training for Emergency Medicine Residents

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    Parsons, Jessica R.; Crichlow, Amanda; Ponnuru, Srikala; Shewokis, Patricia A.; Goswami, Varsha; Griswold, Sharon

    2018-01-01

    Introduction In today’s team-oriented healthcare environment, high-quality patient care requires physicians to possess not only medical knowledge and technical skills but also crisis resource management (CRM) skills. In emergency medicine (EM), the high acuity and dynamic environment makes CRM skills of physicians particularly critical to healthcare team success. The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medicine Education Core Competencies that guide residency program curriculums include CRM skills; however, EM residency programs are not given specific instructions as to how to teach these skills to their trainees. This article describes a simulation-based CRM course designed specifically for novice EM residents. Methods The CRM course includes an introductory didactic presentation followed by a series of simulation scenarios and structured debriefs. The course is designed to use observational learning within simulation education to decrease the time and resources required for implementation. To assess the effectiveness in improving team CRM skills, two independent raters use a validated CRM global rating scale to measure the CRM skills displayed by teams of EM interns in a pretest and posttest during the course. Results The CRM course improved leadership, problem solving, communication, situational awareness, teamwork, resource utilization and overall CRM skills displayed by teams of EM interns. While the improvement from pretest to posttest did not reach statistical significance for this pilot study, the large effect sizes suggest that statistical significance may be achieved with a larger sample size. Conclusion This course can feasibly be incorporated into existing EM residency curriculums to provide EM trainees with basic CRM skills required of successful emergency physicians. We believe integrating CRM training early into existing EM education encourages continued deliberate practice, discussion, and improvement of essential CRM skills. PMID:29383082

  5. Balint groups in family medicine residency programs: a follow-up study from 1990--2010.

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    Diaz, Vanessa A; Chessman, Alexander; Johnson, Alan H; Brock, Clive D; Gavin, Jennifer K

    2015-05-01

    Balint groups have been part of residency education for decades. This study updates our understanding of the organization, purpose, and leadership of Balint groups within US family medicine residency programs. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-approved family medicine residency training programs (n=453) were contacted to complete a questionnaire, similar to ones performed in 1990 and 2000. This survey included questions regarding Balint groups, including their composition, management, and goals. More than half (54%) of respondent programs (n=159) have at least one Balint group, compared to 19% in 1990 and 60% in 2000. Of programs without Balint, 24% would like to have a Balint group, and 6% plan to initiate one within the following year. The proportion of groups meeting weekly decreased over time (80.9% in 1990 versus 40.4% in 2000 versus 11.7% in 2010). The proportion of peer only groups decreased (45.2% versus 53.6% versus 35.1%) while the proportion of groups with > 11 members increased (11.1% versus 15.8% versus 27.2%). Less than half of Balint group leaders reported going to formal training at the American Balint Society Leader's Intensive Workshop (41%). "Understanding the patient as a person" was seen as the main objective of Balint groups. Balint groups are still commonly occurring, but their implementation is changing. Groups are meeting less frequently and are more likely to be larger and heterogeneous. This trend and lack of formally trained/certified leaders may be decreasing the benefit to residents involved in Balint groups.

  6. Filling the Gap: Simulation-based Crisis Resource Management Training for Emergency Medicine Residents.

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    Parsons, Jessica R; Crichlow, Amanda; Ponnuru, Srikala; Shewokis, Patricia A; Goswami, Varsha; Griswold, Sharon

    2018-01-01

    In today's team-oriented healthcare environment, high-quality patient care requires physicians to possess not only medical knowledge and technical skills but also crisis resource management (CRM) skills. In emergency medicine (EM), the high acuity and dynamic environment makes CRM skills of physicians particularly critical to healthcare team success. The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medicine Education Core Competencies that guide residency program curriculums include CRM skills; however, EM residency programs are not given specific instructions as to how to teach these skills to their trainees. This article describes a simulation-based CRM course designed specifically for novice EM residents. The CRM course includes an introductory didactic presentation followed by a series of simulation scenarios and structured debriefs. The course is designed to use observational learning within simulation education to decrease the time and resources required for implementation. To assess the effectiveness in improving team CRM skills, two independent raters use a validated CRM global rating scale to measure the CRM skills displayed by teams of EM interns in a pretest and posttest during the course. The CRM course improved leadership, problem solving, communication, situational awareness, teamwork, resource utilization and overall CRM skills displayed by teams of EM interns. While the improvement from pretest to posttest did not reach statistical significance for this pilot study, the large effect sizes suggest that statistical significance may be achieved with a larger sample size. This course can feasibly be incorporated into existing EM residency curriculums to provide EM trainees with basic CRM skills required of successful emergency physicians. We believe integrating CRM training early into existing EM education encourages continued deliberate practice, discussion, and improvement of essential CRM skills.

  7. Assessing the Effects of the 2003 Resident Duty Hours Reform on Internal Medicine Board Scores

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    Romano, Patrick S.; Itani, Kamal M.F.; Rosen, Amy K.; Small, Dylan; Lipner, Rebecca S.; Bosk, Charles L.; Wang, Yanli; Halenar, Michael J.; Korovaichuk, Sophia; Even-Shoshan, Orit; Volpp, Kevin G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the 2003 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty hours reform affected medical knowledge as reflected by written board scores for internal medicine (IM) residents. Method The authors conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) Internal Medicine residents who started training before and after the 2003 duty hour reform using a merged data set of American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Board examination and the National Board of Medical Examiners (NMBE) United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 2 Clinical Knowledge test scores. Specifically, using four regression models, the authors compared IM residents beginning PGY-1 training in 2000 and completing training unexposed to the 2003 duty hours reform (PGY-1 2000 cohort, n = 5,475) to PGY-1 cohorts starting in 2001 through 2005 (n = 28,008), all with some exposure to the reform. Results The mean ABIM board score for the unexposed PGY-1 2000 cohort (n = 5,475) was 491, SD = 85. Adjusting for demographics, program, and USMLE Step 2 exam score, the mean differences (95% CI) in ABIM board scores between the PGY-1 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005 cohorts minus the PGY-1 2000 cohort were −5.43 (−7.63, −3.23), −3.44 (−5.65, −1.24), 2.58 (0.36, 4.79), 11.10 (8.88, 13.33) and 11.28 (8.98, 13.58) points respectively. None of these differences exceeded one-fifth of an SD in ABIM board scores. Conclusions The duty hours reforms of 2003 did not meaningfully affect medical knowledge as measured by scores on the ABIM board examinations. PMID:24556772

  8. Internal Medicine Residents' Perceptions of Team-Based Care and its Educational Value in the Continuity Clinic: A Qualitative Study.

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    Soones, Tacara N; O'Brien, Bridget C; Julian, Katherine A

    2015-09-01

    In order to teach residents how to work in interprofessional teams, educators in graduate medical education are implementing team-based care models in resident continuity clinics. However, little is known about the impact of interprofessional teams on residents' education in the ambulatory setting. To identify factors affecting residents' experience of team-based care within continuity clinics and the impact of these teams on residents' education. This was a qualitative study of focus groups with internal medicine residents. Seventy-seven internal medicine residents at the University of California San Francisco at three continuity clinic sites participated in the study. Qualitative interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. The authors used a general inductive approach with sensitizing concepts in four frames (structural, human resources, political and symbolic) to develop codes and identify themes. Residents believed that team-based care improves continuity and quality of care. Factors in four frames affected their ability to achieve these goals. Structural factors included communication through the electronic medical record, consistent schedules and regular team meetings. Human resources factors included the presence of stable teams and clear roles. Political and symbolic factors negatively impacted team-based care, and included low staffing ratios and a culture of ultimate resident responsibility, respectively. Regardless of the presence of these factors or resident perceptions of their teams, residents did not see the practice of interprofessional team-based care as intrinsically educational. Residents' experiences practicing team-based care are influenced by many principles described in the interprofessional teamwork literature, including understanding team members' roles, good communication and sufficient staffing. However, these attributes are not correlated with residents' perceptions of the educational value of team-based care. Including residents in

  9. Support for and aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the US: a survey

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    Wilson Mark C

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence supporting the effectiveness of educational games in graduate medical education is limited. Anecdotal reports suggest their popularity in that setting. The objective of this study was to explore the support for and the different aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We conducted a survey of family medicine and internal medicine residency program directors in the United States. The questionnaire asked the program directors whether they supported the use of educational games, their actual use of games, and the type of games being used and the purpose of that use. Results Of 434 responding program directors (52% response rate, 92% were in support of the use of games as an educational strategy, and 80% reported already using them in their programs. Jeopardy like games were the most frequently used games (78%. The use of games was equally popular in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs and popularity was inversely associated with more than 75% of residents in the program being International Medical Graduates. The percentage of program directors who reported using educational games as teaching tools, review tools, and evaluation tools were 62%, 47%, and 4% respectively. Conclusions Given a widespread use of educational games in the training of medical residents, in spite of limited evidence for efficacy, further evaluation of the best approaches to education games should be explored.

  10. Support for and aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the US: a survey.

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    Akl, Elie A; Gunukula, Sameer; Mustafa, Reem; Wilson, Mark C; Symons, Andrew; Moheet, Amir; Schünemann, Holger J

    2010-03-25

    The evidence supporting the effectiveness of educational games in graduate medical education is limited. Anecdotal reports suggest their popularity in that setting. The objective of this study was to explore the support for and the different aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. We conducted a survey of family medicine and internal medicine residency program directors in the United States. The questionnaire asked the program directors whether they supported the use of educational games, their actual use of games, and the type of games being used and the purpose of that use. Of 434 responding program directors (52% response rate), 92% were in support of the use of games as an educational strategy, and 80% reported already using them in their programs. Jeopardy like games were the most frequently used games (78%). The use of games was equally popular in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs and popularity was inversely associated with more than 75% of residents in the program being International Medical Graduates. The percentage of program directors who reported using educational games as teaching tools, review tools, and evaluation tools were 62%, 47%, and 4% respectively. Given a widespread use of educational games in the training of medical residents, in spite of limited evidence for efficacy, further evaluation of the best approaches to education games should be explored.

  11. Examination outcomes and work locations of international medical graduate family medicine residents in Canada.

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    Mathews, Maria; Kandar, Rima; Slade, Steve; Yi, Yanqing; Beardall, Sue; Bourgeault, Ivy

    2017-10-01

    To describe the postgraduate medical education (PGME) examination outcomes and work locations of international medical graduates (IMGs); and to identify differences between Canadians studying abroad (CSAs) and non-CSAs. Cohort study using data from the National IMG Database and Scott's Medical Database. Canada. All IMGs who had first entered a family medicine residency program between 2005 and 2009, with the exclusion of US graduates, visa trainees, and fellowship trainees. We examined 4 outcomes: passing the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part 2 (MCCQE2), obtaining Certification in Family Medicine (CCFP), working in Canada within 2 years of completing PGME training, and working in Canada in 2015. Of the 876 residents in the study, 96.1% passed the MCCQE2, 78.1% obtained a specialty designation, 37.7% worked in Canada within 2 years after their PGME, and 91.2% worked in Canada in 2015. Older graduates were more likely (odds ratio [OR] = 3.45; 95% CI 1.52 to 7.69) than recent graduates were to pass the MCCQE2, and residents who participated in a skills assessment program before their PGME training were more likely (OR = 9.60; 95% CI 1.29 to 71.63) than those who had not were to pass the MCCQE2. Women were more likely (OR = 1.67; 95% CI 1.20 to 2.33) to obtain a specialty designation than men were. Recent graduates were more likely (OR = 1.36; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.79) than older graduates were to work in Canada following training. Residents who were eligible for a full licence were more likely (OR = 3.72; 95% CI 2.30 to 5.99) to work in Canada in 2015 than those who were not eligible for a full licence were. While most IMGs who entered the family medicine PGME program passed the MCCQE2, 1 in 5 did not obtain Certification. Most IMG residents remain in Canada. Canadians studying abroad and non-CSA IMGs share similar examination success rates and retention rates. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  12. Self-Reported Emergency Medicine Residency Applicant Attitudes Towards a Procedural Cadaver Laboratory Curriculum

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    Hoffman, Lance

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Residency applicants consider a variety of factors when ranking emergency medicine (EM programs for their NRMP match list. A human cadaver emergency procedure lab curriculum is uncommon. We hypothesized that the presence this curriculum would positively impact the ranking of an EM residency program.METHODS: The EM residency at Nebraska Medical Center is an urban, university-based program with a PGY I-III format. Residency applicants during the interview for a position in the PGY I class of 2006 were surveyed by three weekly electronic mailings. The survey was distributed in March 2006 after the final NRMP match results were released. The survey explored learner preferences and methodological commonality of models of emergency procedural training, as well as the impact of a procedural cadaver lab curriculum on residency ranking. ANOVA of ranks was used to compare responses to ranking questions.RESULTS: Of the 73 potential subjects, 54 (74% completed the survey. Respondents ranked methods of procedural instruction from 1 (most preferred or most common technique to 4 (least preferred or least common technique. Response averages and 95% confidence intervals for the preferred means of learning a new procedure are as follows: textbook (3.69; 3.51-3.87, mannequin (2.83; 2.64-3.02, human cadaver (1.93; 1.72-2.14, and living patient (1.56; 1.33-1.79. Response averages for the commonality of means used to teach a new procedure are as follows: human cadaver (3.63; 3.46-3.80, mannequin (2.70; 2.50-2.90, living patient (2.09; 1.85-2.33, and textbook (1.57; 1.32-1.82. When asked if the University of Nebraska Medical Center residency ranked higher in the individual's match list because of its procedural cadaver lab, 14.8% strongly disagreed, 14.8% disagreed, 40.7% were neutral, 14.8% agreed, and 14.8% strongly agreed.CONCLUSION: We conclude that, although cadaveric procedural training is viewed by senior medical student learners as a desirable means

  13. Developing a Comprehensive Perioperative Education Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residency Training.

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    Raslau, David; Kasten, Mary Jo; Kebede, Esayas; Mohabbat, Arya; Ratrout, Basem; Mikhail, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Patients undergoing surgery are becoming increasingly complex and internists are becoming more involved in their perioperative care. Therefore, new requirements from the ACGME/ABIM necessitate education in this area. We aim to discuss how our institution adapted a perioperative curriculum to fill this need. Perioperative education is primarily given to the residents during their one month rotation through the General Internal Medicine Consult Service rotation. This is an inpatient rotation that provides perioperative expertise to surgical teams, medicine consultation to medical subspecialty teams, and outpatient preoperative evaluations. Our implementation complies with ACGME/ABIM requirements and ensures that the educational and clinical needs of our institution are met. Developing a new curriculum can be daunting. We hope that this explanation of our approach will aid others who are working to develop an effective perioperative curriculum at their institutions.

  14. The IOC Centres of Excellence bring prevention to sports medicine.

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    Engebretsen, Lars; Bahr, Roald; Cook, Jill L; Derman, Wayne; Emery, Carolyn A; Finch, Caroline F; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Schwellnus, Martin; Steffen, Kathrin

    2014-09-01

    The protection of an athlete's health and preventing injuries and illnesses in sport are top priorities for the IOC and its Medical Commission. The IOC therefore partners with selected research centres around the world and supports research in the field of sports medicine. This has enabled the IOC to develop an international network of expert scientists and clinicians in sports injury and disease prevention research. The IOC wants to promote injury and disease prevention and the improvement of physical health of the athlete by: (1) establishing long-term research programmes on injury and disease prevention (including studies on basic epidemiology, risk factors, injury mechanisms and intervention), (2) fostering collaborative relationships with individuals, institutions and organisations to improve athletes' health, (3) implementing and collaborating with applied, ongoing and novel research and development within the framework and long-term strategy of the IOC and (4) setting up knowledge translation mechanisms to share scientific research results with the field throughout the Olympic Movement and sports community and converting these results into concrete actions to protect the health of the athletes. In 2009, the IOC also identified four research centres that had an established track record in research, educational and clinical activities to achieve these ambitions: (1) the Australian Centre for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention (ACRISP), Australia; (2) the Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre (SIPRC), Canada; (3) the Clinical Sport and Exercise Medicine Research (CSEM), South Africa and (4) the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center (OSTRC), Norway. This paper highlights the work carried out by these four IOC Centres of Excellence over the past 6 years and their contribution to the world of sports medicine. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Analysis of traditional knowledge of medicinal plants from residents in Gayasan National Park (Korea).

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    Song, Mi-Jang; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Byoung-Yoon; Brian, Heldenbrand; Park, Chan-Ho; Hyun, Chang-Woo

    2014-10-21

    The purpose of this study is to investigate and analyze the traditional knowledge of medicinal plants used by residents in Gayasan National Park in order to obtain basic data regarding the sustainable conservation of its natural plant ecosystem. Data was collected using participatory observations and in-depth interviews, as the informants also become investigators themselves through attending informal meetings, open and group discussions, and overt observations with semi-structured questionnaires. Quantitative analyses were accomplished through the informant consensus factor (ICF), fidelity level, and inter-network analysis (INA). In total, 200 species of vascular plants belonging to 168 genera and 87 families were utilized traditionally in 1,682 ethnomedicianal practices. The representative families were Rosaceae (6.5%) followed by Asteraceae (5.5%), Poaceae (4.5%), and Fabaceae (4.0%). On the whole, 27 kinds of plant-parts were used and prepared in 51 various ways by the residents for medicinal purposes. The ICF values in the ailment categories were muscular-skeletal disorders (0.98), pains (0.97), respiratory system disorders (0.97), liver complaints (0.97), and cuts and wounds (0.96). In terms of fidelity levels, 57 plant species showed fidelities levels of 100%. Regarding the inter-network analysis (INA) between ailments and medicinal plants within all communities of this study, the position of ailments is distributed into four main groups. The results of the inter-network analysis will provide a suitable plan for sustainable preservation of the national park through a continued study of the data. Particular species of medicinal plants need to be protected for a balanced plant ecosystem within the park. Consequently, through further studies using these results, proper steps need to be established for preparing a wise alternative to create a sustainable natural plant ecosystem for Gayasan National Park and other national parks.

  16. Teaching and evaluation of ethics and professionalism: in Canadian family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Merril A

    2012-12-01

    To document the scope of the teaching and evaluation of ethics and professionalism in Canadian family medicine postgraduate training programs, and to identify barriers to the teaching and evaluation of ethics and professionalism. A survey was developed in collaboration with the Committee on Ethics of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. The data are reported descriptively and in aggregate. Canadian postgraduate family medicine training programs. Between June and December of 2008, all 17 Canadian postgraduate family medicine training programs were invited to participate. The first part of the survey explored the structure, resources, methods, scheduled hours, and barriers to teaching ethics and professionalism. The second section focused on end-of-rotation evaluations, other evaluation strategies, and barriers related to the evaluation of ethics and professionalism. Eighty-eight percent of programs completed the survey. Most respondents (87%) had learning objectives specifically for ethics and professionalism, and 87% had family doctors with training or interest in the area leading their efforts. Two-thirds of responding programs had less than 10 hours of scheduled instruction per year, and the most common barriers to effective teaching were the need for faculty development, competing learning needs, and lack of resident interest. Ninety-three percent of respondents assessed ethics and professionalism on their end-of-rotation evaluations, with 86% assessing specific domains. The most common barriers to evaluation were a lack of suitable tools and a lack of faculty comfort and interest. By far most Canadian family medicine postgraduate training programs had learning objectives and designated faculty leads in ethics and professionalism, yet there was little curricular time dedicated to these areas and a perceived lack of resident interest and faculty expertise. Most programs evaluated ethics and professionalism as part of their end-of-rotation evaluations, but

  17. Should we Google it? Resource use by internal medicine residents for point-of-care clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Nelson, Alisa; Gladding, Sophia; Beattie, Jim; Nixon, L James

    2013-06-01

    To determine which resources residents use at the point-of-care (POC) for decision making, the drivers for selection of these resources, and how residents use Google/Google Scholar to answer clinical questions at the POC. In January 2012, 299 residents from three internal medicine residencies were sent an electronic survey regarding resources used for POC decision making. Resource use frequency and factors influencing choice were determined using descriptive statistics. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to determine relationships between the independent variables. A total of 167 residents (56%) responded; similar numbers responded at each level of training. Residents most frequently reported using UpToDate and Google at the POC at least daily (85% and 63%, respectively), with speed and trust in the quality of information being the primary drivers of selection. Google, used by 68% of residents, was used primarily to locate Web sites and general information about diseases, whereas Google Scholar, used by 30% of residents, tended to be used for treatment and management decisions or locating a journal article. The findings suggest that internal medicine residents use UpToDate most frequently, followed by consultation with faculty and the search engines Google and Google Scholar; speed, trust, and portability are the biggest drivers for resource selection; and time and information overload appear to be the biggest barriers to resources such as Ovid MEDLINE. Residents frequently used Google and may benefit from further training in information management skills.

  18. Using simulation to instruct emergency medicine residents in cognitive forcing strategies.

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    Bond, William F; Deitrick, Lynn M; Arnold, Darryl C; Kostenbader, Marianne; Barr, Gavin C; Kimmel, Saron R; Worrilow, Charles C

    2004-05-01

    Recent literature defines certain cognitive errors that emergency physicians will likely encounter. The authors have utilized simulation and debriefing to teach the concepts of metacognition and error avoidance. The authors conducted a qualitative study of an educational intervention at Lehigh Valley Hospital during academic year 2002-03. Fifteen emergency medicine residents--eight from postgraduate year three (PGY3) and seven from postgraduate year two (PGY2)--experienced a difficult simulator lab scenario designed to lead them into a cognitive error trap. The debriefing was a PowerPoint with audio format CD-ROM with a didactic on succinylcholine (15 minutes) and cognitive forcing strategies (30 minutes). After debriefing, residents were interviewed by an ethnographer with an 11-question (15-minute) interview and completed an eight-question written survey. The residents ranked this experience second only to direct patient care for educational effectiveness. Survey results (Likert scale, 1 = disagree completely to 5 = agree completely) included "Improved my ability to use succinylcholine" (mean = 4.73), "Improved my ability to diagnose and treat hyperkalemia" (mean = 4.6), and "Cognitive forcing strategies is a useful educational effort" (mean = 4.33). The major interview themes that evolved were that the simulation lab was a positive experience; succinylcholine knowledge was gained; mistakes caused reflection/motivation; the lab was stressful; attending feedback was desired; the lab was realistic; and cognitive forcing strategies were discussed. When asked what they learned, more of the PGY3s commented on cognitive strategies or heuristic techniques (six out of eight), whereas the PGY2s commented on knowledge gained about succinylcholine (five out of seven) and only one PGY2 mentioned cognitive strategies. Pilot data suggest that metacognitive strategies can be taught to residents, though they may be better understood by upper-level residents.

  19. Developing a Communication Curriculum and Workshop for an Internal Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salib, Sherine; Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Chilek, Lindsay A; Mackert, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Learning effective communication is essential for physicians. Effective communication has been shown to affect healthcare outcomes, including patient safety, adherence rates, patient satisfaction, and enhanced teamwork. The importance of these skills has become even more apparent in recent years, with value-based purchasing programs and federal measures of patient satisfaction in the form of Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores becoming an important part of measuring the performance of a healthcare facility. We conducted a communication workshop for internal medicine residents at the University of Texas. Topics covered included the Acknowledge, Introduce, Duration, Explanation, Thank You framework; managing up; resolving conflicts; error disclosure; new medication and discharge counseling; intercultural communication; understanding Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores; and avoiding burnout. Because it would have been logistically difficult to block whole days for the workshop, the various topics were offered to residents during their regular noon conference hour for several consecutive days. After the workshop, the residents completed an anonymous questionnaire regarding their perception of the importance of various aspects of communication in patient care. The majority of the participating residents perceived the various communication skills explored during the workshop to be highly important in patient care. Concurrently, however, most residents believed that they had initially overestimated their knowledge about these various communication issues. Some demographic differences in the responses also were noted. Our findings demonstrate a needs gap and an area of potential improvement in medical education. We anticipate that with the growing understanding of the importance of communication skills in the healthcare setting, there will be an enhanced role for teaching these skills at all levels of

  20. [Prevention of soil deterioration during cultivation of medicinal plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lan-ping; Huang, Lu-qi; Jiang, You-xu; Lv, Dong-mei

    2006-05-01

    This paper summarized the aspects of the soil deterioration due to continuous growth of medicinal plants, such as nutrition insufficient, pH variation, harmful salt accumulating, harmful microbe and allelopathic substance increasing, soil physics and chemistry properties variation. And the ways to prevent and rehabilitate the deteriorated soil was indicated, which included anti-adversity species selecting, scientific management such as whorl cropping, nutrient elements supplement, usage of physical methods, nutrient liquid cultivating and VAM inoculating etc.

  1. Can we predict final outcome of internal medicine residents with in-training evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chierakul, Nitipatana; Pongprasobchai, Supot; Boonyapisit, Kanokwan; Chinthammitr, Yingyong; Pithukpakorn, Manop; Maneesai, Adisak; Srivijitkamol, Apiradee; Koomanachai, Pornpan; Koolvisoot, Ajchara; Tanwandee, Tawesak; Shayakul, Chairat; Kachintorn, Udom

    2011-02-01

    To assess the predictive value of in-training evaluation for determining future success in the internal medicine board certifying examination. Ninety-seven internal medicine residents from Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital who undertake the Thai Board examination during the academic year 2006-2008 were enrolled. Correlation between the scores during internal medicine rotation and final scores in board examination were then examined. Significant positive linear correlation was found between scores from both written and clinical parts of board certifying examination and scores from the first-year summative written and clinical examinations and also the second-year formative written examination (r = 0.43-0.68, p evaluation by attending staffs was less well correlated (r = 0.29-0.36) and the evaluation by nurses or medical students demonstrated inverse relationship (r = -0.2, p = 0.27 and r = -0.13, p = 0.48). Some methods of in-training evaluation can predict successful outcome of board certifying examination. Multisource assessments cannot well extrapolate some aspects of professional competences and qualities.

  2. What Makes a Great Resident Teacher? A Multicenter Survey of Medical Students Attending an Internal Medicine Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Lindsay; Kassam, Zain; Burke, Andrew; Wasi, Parveen; Neary, John

    2014-12-01

    Residents have a critical role in the education of medical students and have a unique teaching relationship because of their close proximity in professional development and opportunities for direct supervision. Although there is emerging literature on ways to prepare residents to be effective teachers, there is a paucity of data on what medical students believe are the attributes of successful resident teachers. We sought to define the qualities and teaching techniques that learners interested in internal medicine value in resident teachers. We created and administered a resident-as-teacher traits survey to senior medical students from 6 medical schools attending a resident-facilitated clinical conference at McMaster University. The survey collected data on student preferences of techniques employed by resident teachers and qualities of a successful resident teacher. Of 90 student participants, 80 (89%) responded. Respondents found the use of clinical examples (78%, 62 of 80) and repetition of core concepts (71%, 58 of 80) highly useful. In contrast, most respondents did not perceive giving feedback to residents, or receiving feedback from residents, was useful to their learning. With respect to resident qualities, respondents felt that a strong knowledge base (80%, 64 of 80) and tailoring teaching to the learner's level (83%, 66 of 80) was highly important. In contrast, high expectations on the part of resident supervisors were not valued. This multicenter survey provides insight into the perceptions of medical students interested in internal medicine on the techniques and qualities that characterize successful resident teachers. The findings may be useful in the future development of resident-as-teacher curricula.

  3. Video-Based Learning vs Traditional Lecture for Instructing Emergency Medicine Residents in Disaster Medicine Principles of Mass Triage, Decontamination, and Personal Protective Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Henry A; Trang, Karen; Chason, Kevin W; Biddinger, Paul D

    2018-02-01

    Introduction Great demands have been placed on disaster medicine educators. There is a need to develop innovative methods to educate Emergency Physicians in the ever-expanding body of disaster medicine knowledge. The authors sought to demonstrate that video-based learning (VBL) could be a promising alternative to traditional learning methods for teaching disaster medicine core competencies. Hypothesis/Problem The objective was to compare VBL to traditional lecture (TL) for instructing Emergency Medicine residents in the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP; Irving, Texas USA) disaster medicine core competencies of patient triage and decontamination. A randomized, controlled pilot study compared two methods of instruction for mass triage, decontamination, and personal protective equipment (PPE). Emergency Medicine resident learning was measured with a knowledge quiz, a Likert scale measuring comfort, and a practical exercise. An independent samples t-test compared the scoring of the VBL with the TL group. Twenty-six residents were randomized to VBL (n=13) or TL (n=13). Knowledge score improvement following video (14.9%) versus lecture (14.1%) did not differ significantly between the groups (P=.74). Comfort score improvement also did not differ (P=.64) between video (18.3%) and lecture groups (15.8%). In the practical skills assessment, the VBL group outperformed the TL group overall (70.4% vs 55.5%; PMedicine residents in the ACEP disaster medicine core competencies of patient triage and decontamination. Curtis HA , Trang K , Chason KW , Biddinger PD . Video-based learning vs traditional lecture for instructing emergency medicine residents in disaster medicine principles of mass triage, decontamination, and personal protective equipment. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2018;33(1):7-12.

  4. Length of residence, age and patterns of medicinal plant knowledge and use among women in the urban Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper explores patterns of women’s medicinal plant knowledge and use in an urban area of the Brazilian Amazon. Specifically, this paper examines the relationship between a woman’s age and her use and knowledge of medicinal plants. It also examines whether length of residence in three different areas of the Amazon is correlated with a woman’s use and knowledge of medicinal plants. Two of the areas where respondents may have resided, the jungle/seringal and farms/colonias, are classified as rural. The third area (which all of the respondents resided in) was urban. Methods This paper utilizes survey data collected in Rio Branco, Brazil. Researchers administered the survey to 153 households in the community of Bairro da Luz (a pseudonym). The survey collected data on phytotherapeutic knowledge, general phytotherapeutic practice, recent phytotherapeutic practice and demographic information on age and length of residence in the seringal, on a colonia, and in a city. Bivariate correlation coefficients were calculated to assess the inter-relationships among the key variables. Three dependent variables, two measuring general phytotherapeutic practice and one measuring phytotherapeutic knowledge were regressed on the demographic factors. Results The results demonstrate a relationship between a woman’s age and medicinal plant use, but not between age and plant knowledge. Additionally, length of residence in an urban area and on a colonia/farm are not related to medicinal plant knowledge or use. However, length of residence in the seringal/jungle is positively correlated with both medicinal plant knowledge and use. Conclusions The results reveal a vibrant tradition of medicinal plant use in Bairro da Luz. They also indicate that when it comes to place of residence and phytotherapy the meaningful distinction is not rural versus urban, it is seringal versus other locations. Finally, the results suggest that phytotherapeutic knowledge and use should be

  5. Length of residence, age and patterns of medicinal plant knowledge and use among women in the urban Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayland, Coral; Slattery Walker, Lisa

    2014-02-24

    This paper explores patterns of women's medicinal plant knowledge and use in an urban area of the Brazilian Amazon. Specifically, this paper examines the relationship between a woman's age and her use and knowledge of medicinal plants. It also examines whether length of residence in three different areas of the Amazon is correlated with a woman's use and knowledge of medicinal plants. Two of the areas where respondents may have resided, the jungle/seringal and farms/colonias, are classified as rural. The third area (which all of the respondents resided in) was urban. This paper utilizes survey data collected in Rio Branco, Brazil. Researchers administered the survey to 153 households in the community of Bairro da Luz (a pseudonym). The survey collected data on phytotherapeutic knowledge, general phytotherapeutic practice, recent phytotherapeutic practice and demographic information on age and length of residence in the seringal, on a colonia, and in a city. Bivariate correlation coefficients were calculated to assess the inter-relationships among the key variables. Three dependent variables, two measuring general phytotherapeutic practice and one measuring phytotherapeutic knowledge were regressed on the demographic factors. The results demonstrate a relationship between a woman's age and medicinal plant use, but not between age and plant knowledge. Additionally, length of residence in an urban area and on a colonia/farm are not related to medicinal plant knowledge or use. However, length of residence in the seringal/jungle is positively correlated with both medicinal plant knowledge and use. The results reveal a vibrant tradition of medicinal plant use in Bairro da Luz. They also indicate that when it comes to place of residence and phytotherapy the meaningful distinction is not rural versus urban, it is seringal versus other locations. Finally, the results suggest that phytotherapeutic knowledge and use should be measured separately since one may not be an

  6. [Patient safety culture in family and community medicine residents in Aragon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cogollo, R; Paredes-Alvarado, I R; Galicia-Flores, T; Barrasa-Villar, J I; Castán-Ruiz, S

    2014-01-01

    having an appropriate patient safety culture is the first recommendation to improve it. The aim of this article is to determine the safety culture in family medicine residents and then to identify improvement strategies. an online cross-sectional survey of residents in family medicine teaching units of Aragon using the translated, validated and adapted to Spanish, Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture (MOSPS) questionnaire. The results were grouped in 12-dimensional responses for analysis, and the mean value of each dimension was calculated. Perceptions were described by Percentages of Positive (PRP) and Negative Responses (PRN) to each dimension. positive results were seen in «the Patient Care Tracking/Follow-up». There were significant differences in the «Information Exchange With Other Settings», «Staff Training» and «Overall Perceptions of Patient Safety and Quality». Study participants viewed «Work Pressure and Pace» negatively. the institutions providing health services, as well as their staff, are increasingly aware of the importance of improving Patient Safety, and the results of this study allowed us to present information that helps identify weaknesses, and to design initiatives and strategies to improve care practices. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Leadership training in a family medicine residency program: Cross-sectional quantitative survey to inform curriculum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Erin; Moore, Ainsley; Schabort, Inge

    2017-03-01

    To assess the current status of leadership training as perceived by family medicine residents to inform the development of a formal leadership curriculum. Cross-sectional quantitative survey. Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, in December 2013. A total of 152 first- and second-year family medicine residents. Family medicine residents' attitudes toward leadership, perceived level of training in various leadership domains, and identified opportunities for leadership training. Overall, 80% (152 of 190) of residents completed the survey. On a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = neutral, 7 = strongly agree), residents rated the importance of physician leadership in the clinical setting as high (6.23 of 7), whereas agreement with the statement "I am a leader" received the lowest rating (5.28 of 7). At least 50% of residents desired more training in the leadership domains of personal mastery, mentorship and coaching, conflict resolution, teaching, effective teamwork, administration, ideals of a healthy workplace, coalitions, and system transformation. At least 50% of residents identified behavioural sciences seminars, a lecture and workshop series, and a retreat as opportunities to expand leadership training. The concept of family physicians as leaders resonated highly with residents. Residents desired more personal and system-level leadership training. They also identified ways that leadership training could be expanded in the current curriculum and developed in other areas. The information gained from this survey might facilitate leadership development among residents through application of its results in a formal leadership curriculum. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  8. Using tablet computers to teach evidence-based medicine to pediatrics residents: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, David B; Homme, Jason H; Jacobson, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    We sought to determine if tablet computers-supported by a laboratory experience focused upon skill-development-would improve not only evidence-based medicine (EBM) knowledge but also skills and behavior. We conducted a prospective cohort study where we provided tablet computers to our pediatric residents and then held a series of laboratory sessions focused on speed and efficiency in performing EBM at the bedside. We evaluated the intervention with pre- and postintervention tests and surveys based on a validated tool available for use on MedEdPORTAL. The attending pediatric hospitalists also completed surveys regarding their observations of the residents' behavior. All 38 pediatric residents completed the preintervention test and the pre- and postintervention surveys. All but one completed the posttest. All 7 attending pediatric hospitalists completed their surveys. The testing, targeted to assess EBM knowledge, revealed a median increase of 16 points out of a possible 60 points (P computer and laboratory sessions designed to teach the quick and efficient application of EBM at the bedside. Copyright © 2013 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quality of discharge summaries prepared by first year internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legault, Kimberly; Ostro, Jacqueline; Khalid, Zahira; Wasi, Parveen; You, John J

    2012-08-15

    Patients are particularly susceptible to medical error during transitions from inpatient to outpatient care. We evaluated discharge summaries produced by incoming postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) internal medicine residents for their completeness, accuracy, and relevance to family physicians. Consecutive discharge summaries prepared by PGY-1 residents for patients discharged from internal medicine wards were retrospectively evaluated by two independent reviewers for presence and accuracy of essential domains described by the Joint Commission for Hospital Accreditation. Family physicians rated the relevance of a separate sample of discharge summaries on domains that family physicians deemed important in previous studies. Ninety discharge summaries were assessed for completeness and accuracy. Most items were completely reported with a given item missing in 5% of summaries or fewer, with the exception of the reason for medication changes, which was missing in 15.9% of summaries. Discharge medication lists, medication changes, and the reason for medication changes--when present--were inaccurate in 35.7%, 29.5%, and 37.7% of summaries, respectively. Twenty-one family physicians reviewed 68 discharge summaries. Communication of follow-up plans for further investigations was the most frequently identified area for improvement with 27.7% of summaries rated as insufficient. This study found that medication details were frequently omitted or inaccurate, and that family physicians identified lack of clarity about follow-up plans regarding further investigations and visits to other consultants as the areas requiring the most improvement. Our findings will aid in the development of educational interventions for residents.

  10. The Most Common Feedback Themes in Communication Skills Training in an Internal Medicine Residency Program: Lessons from the Resident Audio-Recording Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heeyoung; Papireddy, Muralidhar Reddy; Hingle, Susan T; Ferguson, Jacqueline Anne; Koschmann, Timothy; Sandstrom, Steve

    2017-05-03

    Individualized structured feedback is an integral part of a resident's learning in communication skills. However, it is not clear what feedback residents receive for their communication skills development in real patient care. We will identify the most common feedback topics given to residents regarding communication skills during Internal Medicine residency training. We analyzed Resident Audio-recording Project feedback data from 2008 to 2013 by using a content analysis approach. Using open coding and an iterative categorization process, we identified 15 emerging themes for both positive and negative feedback. The most recurrent feedback topics were Patient education, Thoroughness, Organization, Questioning strategy, and Management. The residents were guided to improve their communication skills regarding Patient education, Thoroughness, Management, and Holistic exploration of patient's problem. Thoroughness and Communication intelligibility were newly identified themes that were rarely discussed in existing frameworks. Assessment rubrics serve as a lens through which we assess the adequacy of the residents' communication skills. Rather than sticking to a specific rubric, we chose to let the rubric evolve through our experience.

  11. Pediatric fractures – an educational needs assessment of Canadian pediatric emergency medicine residents

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    Dixon AC

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrew C Dixon Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Objectives: To determine the gaps in knowledge of Canadian pediatric emergency medicine residents with regards to acute fracture identification and management. Due to their predominantly medical prior training, fractures may be an area of weakness requiring a specific curriculum to meet their needs. Methods: A questionnaire was developed examining comfort level and performance on knowledge based questions of trainees in the following areas: interpreting musculoskeletal X-rays; independently managing pediatric fractures, physical examination techniques, applied knowledge of fracture management, and normal development of the bony anatomy. Using modified Dillman technique the instrument was distributed to pediatric emergency medicine residents at seven Canadian sites. Results: Out of 43 potential respondents, 22 (51% responded. Of respondents, mean comfort with X-ray interpretation was 69 (62–76 95% confidence interval [CI] while mean comfort with fracture management was only 53 (45–63 95% CI; mean comfort with physical exam of shoulder 60 (53–68 95% CI and knee 69 (62–76 95% CI was low. Less than half of respondents (47%; 95% CI 26%–69% could accurately identify normal wrist development, correctly manage a supracondylar fracture (39%; 95% CI 20%–61%, or identify a medial epicondyle fracture (44%; 95% CI 24%–66%. Comfort with neurovascular status of the upper (mean 82; 95% CI 75–89 and lower limb (mean 81; 95% CI 74–87 was high. Interpretation: There are significant gaps in knowledge of physical exam techniques, fracture identification and management among pediatric emergency medicine trainees. A change in our current teaching methods is required to meet this need. Keywords: pediatric, fractures, education, radiologic interpretation

  12. Prevention practices of family medicine clerkship preceptors in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatt, L M; Frasier, P Y; Strayhorn, G; Kowlowitz, V

    2001-07-01

    Before implementing a new prevention curriculum, the authors assessed the prevention practices and attitudes of community family physicians in North Carolina who precepted third-year family medicine clerkship students. An 18-item questionnaire was mailed to 165 preceptors during the 1995-96 academic year. The questionnaire explored the preceptors' levels of preparation to counsel patients, the types of prevention services they offered, and their levels of success in modifying patients' behaviors. The survey was re-sent to non-respondents. The response rate was 70% (n = 112); of these 75% were men and 55% had graduated after 1987. Over 60% of the preceptors "almost always" offered services in smoking cessation, exercise, diet and nutrition, and age-specific services (range 62-86%). Over 50% felt "very prepared" to counsel patients regarding smoking cessation, sexually transmitted diseases, depression, exercise, alcohol use, and age-specific services (range 53-74%). However, the preceptors in this study felt pessimistic about their success in getting patients to change their behaviors. Preceptors who had graduated more recently offered more preventive services for smoking cessation, alcohol use, and illicit drugs than did earlier graduates. Although North Carolina preceptors were pessimistic about their success in changing patients' behaviors regarding prevention, they were confident about their knowledge and skills to provide these services. This information was used to modify a prevention curriculum for third-year medical students.

  13. The Influence of Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training on Resident Assistants' Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Martin A. Swanbrow; Drum, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the mental health influence on resident assistants associated with their training in suicide prevention and their subsequent role as campus mental health gatekeepers. Despite considerable prior personal experience with their own suicidal thinking as well as with others who have thoughts of suicide, a multiple regression…

  14. The Impact of Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention on University Resident Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Deborah J.; Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Miles, Nathan; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Wachter Morris, Carrie A.; Prieto-Welch, Susan L.; Werden, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Resident assistants (RAs) can serve as important suicide prevention gatekeepers. The purpose of the study was to determine if training improved RAs' crisis communications skills and suicide-related knowledge and to determine if the knowledge elements predicted crisis communications skills. New RAs showed significant improvement in all areas from…

  15. Allocation of Internal Medicine Resident Time in a Swiss Hospital: A Time and Motion Study of Day and Evening Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Nathalie; Méan, Marie; Castioni, Julien; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Waeber, Gérard; Garnier, Antoine

    2017-04-18

    Little current evidence documents how internal medicine residents spend their time at work, particularly with regard to the proportions of time spent in direct patient care versus using computers. To describe how residents allocate their time during day and evening hospital shifts. Time and motion study. Internal medicine residency at a university hospital in Switzerland, May to July 2015. 36 internal medicine residents with an average of 29 months of postgraduate training. Trained observers recorded the residents' activities using a tablet-based application. Twenty-two activities were categorized as directly related to patients, indirectly related to patients, communication, academic, nonmedical tasks, and transition. In addition, the presence of a patient or colleague and use of a computer or telephone during each activity was recorded. Residents were observed for a total of 696.7 hours. Day shifts lasted 11.6 hours (1.6 hours more than scheduled). During these shifts, activities indirectly related to patients accounted for 52.4% of the time, and activities directly related to patients accounted for 28.0%. Residents spent an average of 1.7 hours with patients, 5.2 hours using computers, and 13 minutes doing both. Time spent using a computer was scattered throughout the day, with the heaviest use after 6:00 p.m. The study involved a small sample from 1 institution. At this Swiss teaching hospital, internal medicine residents spent more time at work than scheduled. Activities indirectly related to patients predominated, and about half the workday was spent using a computer. Information Technology Department and Department of Internal Medicine of Lausanne University Hospital.

  16. Teaching Emotional Intelligence: A Control Group Study of a Brief Educational Intervention for Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane L. Gorgas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emotional Intelligence (EI is defined as an ability to perceive another’s emotional state combined with an ability to modify one’s own. Physicians with this ability are at a distinct advantage, both in fostering teams and in making sound decisions. Studies have shown that higher physician EI’s are associated with lower incidence of burn-out, longer careers, more positive patient-physician interactions, increased empathy, and improved communication skills. We explored the potential for EI to be learned as a skill (as opposed to being an innate ability through a brief educational intervention with emergency medicine (EM residents. Methods: This study was conducted at a large urban EM residency program. Residents were randomized to either EI intervention or control groups. The intervention was a two-hour session focused on improving the skill of social perspective taking (SPT, a skill related to social awareness. Due to time limitations, we used a 10-item sample of the Hay 360 Emotional Competence Inventory to measure EI at three time points for the training group: before (pre and after (post training, and at six-months post training (follow up; and at two time points for the control group: pre- and follow up. The preliminary analysis was a four-way analysis of variance with one repeated measure: Group x Gender x Program Year over Time. We also completed post-hoc tests. Results: Thirty-three EM residents participated in the study (33 of 36, 92%, 19 in the EI intervention group and 14 in the control group. We found a significant interaction effect between Group and Time (p<0.05. Post-hoc tests revealed a significant increase in EI scores from Time 1 to 3 for the EI intervention group (62.6% to 74.2%, but no statistical change was observed for the controls (66.8% to 66.1%, p=0.77. We observed no main effects involving gender or level of training. Conclusion: Our brief EI training showed a delayed but statistically significant

  17. Seen through their eyes: residents' reflections on the cognitive and contextual components of diagnostic errors in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogdie, Alexis R; Reilly, James B; Pang, Wyki G; Keddem, Shimrit; Barg, Frances K; Von Feldt, Joan M; Myers, Jennifer S

    2012-10-01

    Diagnostic errors in medicine are common and costly. Cognitive bias causes are increasingly recognized contributors to diagnostic error but remain difficult targets for medical educators and patient safety experts. The authors explored the cognitive and contextual components of diagnostic errors described by internal medicine resident physicians through the use of an educational intervention. Forty-one internal medicine residents at University of Pennsylvania participated in an educational intervention in 2010 that comprised reflective writing and facilitated small-group discussion about experiences with diagnostic error from cognitive bias. Narratives and discussion were transcribed and analyzed iteratively to identify types of cognitive bias and contextual factors present. All residents described a personal experience with a case of diagnostic error that contained at least one cognitive bias and one contextual factor that may have influenced the outcome. The most common cognitive biases identified by the residents were anchoring bias (36; 88%), availability bias (31; 76%), and framing effect (23; 56%). Prominent contextual factors included caring for patients on a subspecialty service (31; 76%), complex illness (26; 63%), and time pressures (22; 54%). Eighty-five percent of residents described at least one strategy to avoid a similar error in the future. Residents can easily recall diagnostic errors, analyze the errors for cognitive bias, and richly describe their context. The use of reflective writing and narrative discussion is an educational strategy to teach recognition, analysis, and cognitive-bias-avoidance strategies for diagnostic error in residency education.

  18. Family medicine residents’ perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoako AO

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Adae O Amoako,1 Agyenim B Amoako,2 George GA Pujalte3 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USA; 2Department of Family Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Northwest, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 3Sports Medicine, Divisions of Primary Care, and Orthopedics, Mayo Clinic Health System, Waycross, GA, USA Background and objective: Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Results: Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7% compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8% respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively. Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, <0.0001, and 0.0001, respectively; comfort level, P=0.0016, <0.0001, 0.0897, and 0.0010, respectively. Conclusion: Medical education background, factors that affect training, and an interest in sports medicine contribute to residents' knowledge and comfort

  19. A comparative study on cancer prevention principles between Iranian traditional medicine and classic medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Zeinalian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the three main causes of mortality in most human communities whose prevalence is being increased. A significant part of health budget in all countries has been allocated to treat the cancer, which is incurable in many cases. It has led the global health attitude to cancer prevention. Many cancer-related risk factors have been identified for which preventive recommendations have been offered by international organizations such as World Health Organization. Some of the most important of these risk factors are smoking and alcohol consumption, hypercaloric and low-fiber diet, obesity, inactivity, environmental and industrial pollution, some viral infections, and hereditary factors. Exact reviewing of Iranian-Islamic traditional medicine (IITM resources determines that preventive rules, which named as six essential rules (Sitteh-e-Zarurieah are abundantly found, including all identified cancer-related risk factors. These preventive rules are: Air (Hava, body movement and repose, sleep and wakefulness, food and drink, evacuation and retention, and mental movement and repose (A′raz-e-Nafsani. The associated risk factors in classic medicine are: Smoking and air pollution, sedentary life, sleep disturbance, improper nutrition and alcohol, chronic constipation, and psychoneurotic stresses. Moreover, these rules are comprehensive enough to include many of the other harmful health-related factors whose roles have been confirmed in the occurrence of different diseases, except cancer. Apparently, cancer prevention in Iran would be more successful if the sextet necessary rules of IITM are promoted among the populations and health policy makers.

  20. Admission of nursing home residents to a hospital internal medicine department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Raquel; Zapatero, Antonio; Marco, Javier; Perez, Alejandro; Canora, Jesús; Plaza, Susana; Losa, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Hospitalization of nursing home residents is costly and potentially exposes residents to iatrogenic disease and psychological harm. In this study, we analyzed the data from the Basic Minimum Data Set of patients hospitalized from the nursing home who were discharged from all the internal medicine departments at the National Health Service hospitals in Spain between 2005 and 2008, according to the data provided by the Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs. Between January 2005 and December 2008, 2,134,363 patients were admitted to internal medicine departments in Spain, of whom 45,757 (2.1%) were nursing home residents. Overall, 7898 (17.3%) patients died during hospitalization, 2442 (30.91%) of them in the first 48 hours. The following variables were the significant predictors of in-hospital mortality in multivariate analysis: age (odds ratio [OR] 1.02, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.02-1.03), female gender (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.13-1.17), dementia (OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.03-1.16), previous feeding tube (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.09-1.79), malignant disease (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.86-2.23), acute infectious disease (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.12-1.25), pressure sores (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.62-1.95), acute respiratory failure (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.90-2.10), and nosocomial pneumonia (OR 2.5, 95% CI 2.23-2.72). Two of every 100 patients admitted to internal medicine departments came from nursing homes. The rate of mortality is very high in these patients, with almost one third of patients dying in the first 48 hours, which suggests that many of these transfers were unnecessary. The cost of these admissions for 1 year was equivalent to the annual budget of a 300- to 400-bed public hospital in Spain. The mechanism of coordination between nursing homes and public hospitals must be reviewed with the aim of containing costs and facilitating the care of patients in the last days of life. Copyright © 2012 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The challenges of implementing advanced access for residents in family medicine in Quebec. Do promising strategies exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Malham, Sabina; Touati, Nassera; Maillet, Lara; Breton, Mylaine

    2018-12-01

    The advanced access (AA) model is a highly recommended innovation to improve timely access to primary healthcare. Despite that many studies have shown positive impacts for healthcare professionals, and for patients, implementing this model in clinics with a teaching mission for family medicine residents poses specific challenges. To identify these challenges within these clinics, as well as potential strategies to address them. The authors adopted a qualitative multiple case study design, collected data in 2016 using semi-structured interviews (N = 40) with healthcare professionals and clerical staff in four family medicine units in Quebec, and performed a thematic analysis. They validated results through a discussion workshop, involving many family physicians and residents practicing in different regions Results: Five challenges emerged from the data: 1) choosing, organizing residents' patient; 2) managing and balancing residents' appointment schedules; 3) balancing timely access with relational continuity; 4) understanding the AA model; 5) establishing collaborative practices with other health professionals. Several promising strategies were suggested to address these challenges, including clearly defining residents' patient panels; adopting a team-based care approach; incorporating the model into academic curriculum and clinical training; proactive and ongoing education of health professionals, residents, and patients; involving residents in the change process and in adjustment strategies. To meet the challenges of implementing AA, decision-makers should consider exposing residents to AA during academic training and clinical internships, involving them in team work on arrival, engaging them as key actors in the implementation and in intra- and inter-professional collaborative models.

  2. Expectations of iPad Use in an Internal Medicine Residency Program: Is It Worth the “Hype”?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Nancy; Chapman, Christopher G; Patel, Bhakti K; Woodruff, James N

    2013-01-01

    Background While early reports highlight the benefits of tablet computing in hospitals, introducing any new technology can result in inflated expectations. Objective The aim of the study is to compare anticipated expectations of Apple iPad use and perceptions after deployment among residents. Methods 115 internal medicine residents received Apple iPads in October 2010. Residents completed matched surveys on anticipated usage and perceptions after distribution 1 month prior and 4 months after deployment. Results In total, 99% (114/115) of residents responded. Prior to deployment, most residents believed that the iPad would improve patient care and efficiency on the wards; however, fewer residents “strongly agreed” after deployment (34% vs 15% for patient care, PiPad for placing orders post call and during admission (71% vs 44% post call, P=.01, and 16% vs 0% admission, P=.04). Previous Apple iOS product owners were also more likely to use the iPad in key areas. Overall, 84% of residents thought the iPad was a good investment for the residency program, and over half of residents (58%) reported that patients commented on the iPad in a positive way. Conclusions While the use of tablets such as the iPad by residents is generally well received, high initial expectations highlight the danger of implementing new technologies. Education on the realistic expectations of iPad benefits may be warranted. PMID:23656727

  3. Expectations of iPad use in an internal medicine residency program: is it worth the "hype"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Nancy; Chapman, Christopher G; Patel, Bhakti K; Woodruff, James N; Arora, Vineet M

    2013-05-08

    While early reports highlight the benefits of tablet computing in hospitals, introducing any new technology can result in inflated expectations. The aim of the study is to compare anticipated expectations of Apple iPad use and perceptions after deployment among residents. 115 internal medicine residents received Apple iPads in October 2010. Residents completed matched surveys on anticipated usage and perceptions after distribution 1 month prior and 4 months after deployment. In total, 99% (114/115) of residents responded. Prior to deployment, most residents believed that the iPad would improve patient care and efficiency on the wards; however, fewer residents "strongly agreed" after deployment (34% vs 15% for patient care, PiPad for placing orders post call and during admission (71% vs 44% post call, P=.01, and 16% vs 0% admission, P=.04). Previous Apple iOS product owners were also more likely to use the iPad in key areas. Overall, 84% of residents thought the iPad was a good investment for the residency program, and over half of residents (58%) reported that patients commented on the iPad in a positive way. While the use of tablets such as the iPad by residents is generally well received, high initial expectations highlight the danger of implementing new technologies. Education on the realistic expectations of iPad benefits may be warranted.

  4. Lifestyle medicine course for family medicine residents: preliminary assessment of the impact on knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and personal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatskey, Lilach; Bar Zeev, Yael; Tzuk-Onn, Adva; Polak, Rani

    2017-09-01

    The WHO estimates that by 2020 two-thirds of the diseases worldwide will be the result of unhealthy lifestyle habits. Less than half of primary care physician graduates feel prepared to give lifestyle behaviour counselling. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of lifestyle medicine (LM) course on self-reported knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and health behaviour of family medicine residents. Based on the Israeli syllabus for the study of LM, we delivered five face to face 20 H courses. Pre/post data were collected by knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and personal health survey: RESULTS: A total of 112 family medicine residents participated in one of the five courses, of which 91 (81.3%) filled both pre and post surveys. Participates showed an improvement in self-reported knowledge and capacity to manage patients in regard to smoking, weight management and physical activity. An improvement was noted in personal health behaviour of overweight participant's in regard to self-reported physical activity. A comprehensive LM syllabus based course has a positive impact on family medicine residents LM counselling abilities. We suggest that LM course should be considered as a potential permanent addition to the family medicine residency programme. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Pharmacist-Physician Collaboration at a Family Medicine Residency Program: A Focus Group Study

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    Keri Hager

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In response to transforming healthcare and pursuit of the Triple Aim, many health systems have added team members to expand the capabilities and effectiveness of the team to facilitate these aims. The objective of this study was to explore knowledge and perceptions of pharmacist-physician collaboration among family medicine residents (FMR, family medicine faculty (FMF, and pharmacist faculty and residents in a practice where clinical pharmacy services were relatively new. Understanding the nuances of pharmacist-physician interactions will provide insight into how to improve FMR education to prepare learners for patient-centered, team-based practice. Methods: An exploratory descriptive qualitative study design was used to articulate perceptions of professional roles and team-based care in an interprofessional family medicine community-based clinical practice. Five, 60-minute focus groups were conducted in a clinical training setting that focuses on preparing family medicine physicians for collaborative rural primary care practice. Results: Twenty-one FMRs, eight FMF, and six clinical pharmacists participated. Three themes emerged from the focus groups and were consistent across the groups: 1 roles of pharmacists recognized by physicians in different settings, 2 benefits to collaboration, and 3 keys to successful pharmacist-physician collaboration which include a developing the relationship, b optimizing communication, c creating beneficial clinical workflow, d clarifying roles and responsibilities, and e increasing opportunities for meaningful interactions. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that by co-locating physicians and pharmacists in the same environment, and providing a basic structure for collaboration, a collaborative working relationship can be initiated. Practices looking to have more effective collaborative working relationships should strive to increase the frequency of interactions of the professions, help the

  6. Procedural Headache Medicine in Neurology Residency Training: A Survey of US Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Matthew S; Robertson, Carrie E; Ailani, Jessica; Levin, Morris; Friedman, Deborah I; Dodick, David W

    2016-01-01

    To survey neurology residency program directors (PDs) on trainee exposure, supervision, and credentialing in procedures widely utilized in headache medicine. Clinic-based procedures have assumed a prominent role in headache therapy. Headache fellows obtain procedural competence, but reliance on fellowship-trained neurologists cannot match the population eligible for treatments. The inclusion of educational modules and mechanisms for credentialing trainees pursuing procedural competence in residency curricula at individual programs is not known. A web-based survey of US neurology residency PDs was designed by the American Headache Society (AHS) procedural special interest section in collaboration with AHS and American Academy of Neurology's Headache and Facial Pain section leadership. The survey addressed exposure, training, and credentialing in: (1) onabotulinumtoxinA (onabotA) injections, (2) extracranial peripheral nerve blocks (PNBs), and (3) trigger point injections (TPIs). Fifty-five PDs (42.6%) completed the survey. Compared to noncompleters, survey completers were more likely to feature headache fellowships at their institutions (38.2% vs 10.8%, P=0.0002). High exposure (onabotA=90.9%, PNBs=80.0%, TPIs=70.9%) usually featured hands-on patient instruction (66.2%) and lectures (55.7%). Supervised performance rates were high (onabotA=65.5%, PNBs=60.0%, TPIs=52.7%), usually in continuity clinic (60.0%) or headache elective (50.9%). Headache specialists (69.1%) or general neurology (32.7%) faculty most commonly trained residents. Formal credentialing was uncommon (16.4-18.2%), mostly by documenting supervised procedures (25.5%). Only 27.3% of programs permitted trainees to perform procedures independently. Most PDs felt procedural exposure (80.0-90.9%) and competence (50.9-56.4%) by all trainees was important. Resident exposure to procedures for headache is high, but credentialing mechanisms, while desired by most PDs, are not generally in place. Implementation

  7. Mentoring during Medical School and Match Outcome among Emergency Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehon, Erin; Cruse, Margaret H; Dawson, Brandon; Jackson-Williams, Loretta

    2015-11-01

    Few studies have documented the value of mentoring for medical students, and research has been limited to more subjective (e.g., job satisfaction, perceived career preparation) rather than objective outcomes. This study examined whether having a mentor is associated with match outcome (where a student matched based on their rank order list [ROL]). We sent a survey link to all emergency medicine (EM) program coordinators to distribute to their residents. EM residents were surveyed about whether they had a mentor during medical school. Match outcome was assessed by asking residents where they matched on their ROL (e.g., first choice, fifth choice). They were also asked about rank in medical school, type of degree (MD vs. DO), and performance on standardized tests. Residents who indicated having a mentor completed the Mentorship Effectiveness Scale (MES), which evaluates behavioral characteristics of the mentor and yields a total score. We assessed correlations among these variables using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Post-hoc analysis using independent sample t-test was conducted to compare differences in the MES score between those who matched to their first or second choice vs. third or higher choice. Participants were a convenience sample of 297 EM residents. Of those, 199 (67%) reported having a mentor during medical school. Contrary to our hypothesis, there was no significant correlation between having a mentor and match outcome (r=0.06, p=0.29). Match outcome was associated with class rank (r=0.13, p=0.03), satisfaction with match outcome (r= -0.37, pmentors, a t-test revealed that the MES score was significantly higher among those who matched to their first or second choice (M=51.31, SD=10.13) compared to those who matched to their third or higher choice (M=43.59, SD=17.12), t(194)=3.65, pmentor during medical school does not impact match outcome, but having an effective mentor is associated with a more favorable match outcome among medical students

  8. Mentoring During Medical School and Match Outcome Among Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Dehon

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Few studies have documented the value of mentoring for medical students, and research has been limited to more subjective (e.g., job satisfaction, perceived career preparation rather than objective outcomes. This study examined whether having a mentor is associated with match outcome (where a student matched based on their rank order list [ROL]. Methods: We sent a survey link to all emergency medicine (EM program coordinators to distribute to their residents. EM residents were surveyed about whether they had a mentor during medical school. Match outcome was assessed by asking residents where they matched on their ROL (e.g., first choice, fifth choice. They were also asked about rank in medical school, type of degree (MD vs. DO, and performance on standardized tests. Residents who indicated having a mentor completed the Mentorship Effectiveness Scale (MES, which evaluates behavioral characteristics of the mentor and yields a total score. We assessed correlations among these variables using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Post-hoc analysis using independent sample t-test was conducted to compare differences in the MES score between those who matched to their first or second choice vs. third or higher choice. Results: Participants were a convenience sample of 297 EM residents. Of those, 199 (67% reported having a mentor during medical school. Contrary to our hypothesis, there was no significant correlation between having a mentor and match outcome (r=0.06, p=0.29. Match outcome was associated with class rank (r=0.13, p=0.03, satisfaction with match outcome (r= -0.37, p<0.001, and type of degree (r=0.12, p=0.04. Among those with mentors, a t-test revealed that the MES score was significantly higher among those who matched to their first or second choice (M=51.31, SD=10.13 compared to those who matched to their third or higher choice (M=43.59, SD=17.12, t(194=3.65, p<0.001, d=0.55. Conclusion: Simply having a mentor during medical

  9. The implementation of a practice management programme for family medicine residents in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mutawa, Noora; Elmahdi, Hisham; Joyce, Pauline

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the effectiveness of introducing a full five-day practice management (PM) training workshop based on selected Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies; professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI), and system-based practice. The study used pre-post study design. A total of 39 family medicine residents in Qatar were included in this study. The outcomes of interest were the level of change in the selected ACGME competencies. Pre- vs. post-workshop scores as well as change in scores of quarterly formative assessment were analysed using paired T-test. The overall improvement in post-programme scores compared to pre-programme scores was 9.8% (p-value writing objectives and time management skills (p-value performance and applicability in practice is required.

  10. Ten Tips for Engaging the Millennial Learner and Moving an Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum into the 21st Century

    OpenAIRE

    Toohey, Shannon L.; Wray, Alisa; Wiechmann, Warren; Lin, Michelle; Boysen-Osborn, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Millennial learners are changing the face of residency education because they place emphasis on technology with new styles and means of learning. While research on the most effective way to teach the millennial learner is lacking, programs should consider incorporating educational theories and multimedia design principles to update the curriculum for these new learners. The purpose of the study is to discuss strategies for updating an emergency medicine (EM) residency program’s ...

  11. Breaking bad news education for emergency medicine residents: A novel training module using simulation with the SPIKES protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Inchoel; Gupta, Amit; Mandani, Kaivon; Haubner, Laura; Peckler, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Breaking bad news (BBN) in the emergency department (ED) is a common occurrence. This is especially true for an emergency physician (EP) as there is little time to prepare for the event and likely little or no knowledge of the patients or family background information. At our institution, there is no formal training for EP residents in delivering bad news. We felt teaching emergency medicine residents these communication skills should be an important part of their educational curriculum. We d...

  12. Prevalence of orthorexia nervosa in resident medical doctors in the faculty of medicine (Ankara, Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bağci Bosi, A Tülay; Camur, Derya; Güler, Cağatay

    2007-11-01

    This study has been carried out to "identify highly sensitive behavior on healthy nutrition (orthorexia nervosa-ON)" in residence medical doctors (MD) in the Faculty of Medicine. Diagnoses of ON was based on the presence of a disorder with obsessive-compulsive personality. The study is a cross-sectional research, which reached out to the entire 318 MD. The ORTO-15 test was used to propose a diagnostic proceeding and to try verify the prevalence of ON. Those subjects who were classified below 40 from the ORTO-15 test are accepted to have ON. Chi-square test, ANOVA (univariate) analysis and logistic regression were used for analyses of the data. Mean score of the participants from the ORTO-15 test is 39.8+/-0.22, and there is no statistical difference between women and men. A total of 45.5% of the residence MD involved in the research scored below 40 in the ORTO-15 test. Those who do their food shopping themselves, skip a meal with a salad/fruit, care about the quality of the things they eat, think that eating outside is healthy, look at the content of what they eat and the content of food is important in selection of a product score lower in their average marks in ORTO-15 and the difference among the groups is statistically significant. Food selection of 20.1% of the male participants and 38.9% of the female participants among the residence MD is influenced by the programs on nutrition/health in mass-media. The difference between the groups is statistically significant (p<0.05). Female medical doctors are more careful than men of their physical appearance and weight control and consume less caloric food, which is statistically significant. Since those who exhibit "healthy fanatic" eating habits may have a risk of ON in the future, it would be useful to conduct studies that identify the prevalence of ON in the public.

  13. Emergency medicine resident physicians' perceptions of electronic documentation and workflow: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, P M; Redden, L; Poole, S; Pozner, C N; Horsky, J; Raja, A S; Poon, E; Schiff, G; Landman, A

    2015-01-01

    To understand emergency department (ED) physicians' use of electronic documentation in order to identify usability and workflow considerations for the design of future ED information system (EDIS) physician documentation modules. We invited emergency medicine resident physicians to participate in a mixed methods study using task analysis and qualitative interviews. Participants completed a simulated, standardized patient encounter in a medical simulation center while documenting in the test environment of a currently used EDIS. We recorded the time on task, type and sequence of tasks performed by the participants (including tasks performed in parallel). We then conducted semi-structured interviews with each participant. We analyzed these qualitative data using the constant comparative method to generate themes. Eight resident physicians participated. The simulation session averaged 17 minutes and participants spent 11 minutes on average on tasks that included electronic documentation. Participants performed tasks in parallel, such as history taking and electronic documentation. Five of the 8 participants performed a similar workflow sequence during the first part of the session while the remaining three used different workflows. Three themes characterize electronic documentation: (1) physicians report that location and timing of documentation varies based on patient acuity and workload, (2) physicians report a need for features that support improved efficiency; and (3) physicians like viewing available patient data but struggle with integration of the EDIS with other information sources. We confirmed that physicians spend much of their time on documentation (65%) during an ED patient visit. Further, we found that resident physicians did not all use the same workflow and approach even when presented with an identical standardized patient scenario. Future EHR design should consider these varied workflows while trying to optimize efficiency, such as improving

  14. Family Medicine Residents' Performance with Detected Versus Undetected Simulated Patients Posing as Problem Drinkers

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    Mark B. Sobell, PhD

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Simulated patients are commonly used to evaluate medical trainees. Unannounced simulated patients provide an accurate measure of physician performance. Purpose: To determine the effects of detection of SPs on physician performance, and identify factors leading to detection. Methods: Fixty-six family medicine residents were each visited by two unannounced simulated patients presenting with alcohol-induced hypertension or insomnia. Residents were then surveyed on their detection of SPs. Results: SPs were detected on 45 out of 104 visits. Inner city clinics had higher detection rates than middle class clinics. Residents’ checklist and global rating scores were substantially higher on detected than undetected visits, for both between-subject and within-subject comparisons. The most common reasons for detection concerned SP demographics and behaviour; the SP “did not act like a drinker” and was of a different social class than the typical clinic patient. Conclusions: Multi-clinic studies involving residents experienced with SPs should ensure that the SP role and behavior conform to physician expectations and the demographics of the clinic. SP station testing does not accurately reflect physicians’ actual clinical behavior and should not be relied on as the primary method of evaluation. The study also suggests that physicians’ poor performance in identifying and managing alcohol problems is not entirely due to lack of skill, as they demonstrated greater clinical skills when they became aware that they were being evaluated. Physicians’ clinical priorities, sense of responsibility and other attitudinal determinants of their behavior should be addressed when training physicians on the management of alcohol problems.

  15. Social worker assessment of bad news delivery by emergency medicine residents: a novel direct-observation milestone assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Alice Ann; Spear-Ellinwood, Karen; Berman, Melissa; Nisson, Peyton; Rhodes, Suzanne Michelle

    2016-09-01

    The skill of delivering bad news is difficult to teach and evaluate. Residents may practice in simulated settings; however, this may not translate to confidence or competence during real experiences. We investigated the acceptability and feasibility of social workers as evaluators of residents' delivery of bad news during patient encounters, and assessed the attitudes of both groups regarding this process. From August 2013 to June 2014, emergency medicine residents completed self-assessments after delivering bad news. Social workers completed evaluations after observing these conversations. The Assessment tools were designed by modifying the global Breaking Bad News Assessment Scale. Residents and social workers completed post-study surveys. 37 evaluations were received, 20 completed by social workers and 17 resident self-evaluations. Social workers reported discussing plans with residents prior to conversations 90 % of the time (18/20, 95 % CI 64.5, 97.8). Social workers who had previously observed the resident delivering bad news reported that the resident was more skilled on subsequent encounters 90 % of the time (95 % CI 42.2, 99). Both social workers and residents felt that prior training or experience was important. First-year residents valued advice from social workers less than advice from attending physicians, whereas more experienced residents perceived advice from social workers to be equivalent with that of attending physicians (40 versus 2.9 %, p = 0.002). Social worker assessment of residents' abilities to deliver bad news is feasible and acceptable to both groups. This formalized self-assessment and evaluation process highlights the importance of social workers' involvement in delivery of bad news, and the teaching of this skill. This method may also be used as direct-observation for resident milestone assessment.

  16. The forgotten educational needs of the house staff: training internal medicine residents to address end-of-life issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerai, Sara Moore; Wheeler, Margot

    2013-01-01

    An intervention was conducted, aimed at providing residents in internal medicine with communication skills to address end-of-life issues with patients. Residents participated in two 1-hour educational sessions designed to teach a communication protocol, enhance listening skills, and to provide practice in effective communication in a safe, small-group format. An anonymous on-line survey assessed the effectiveness of the intervention. Twenty-five residents completed the intervention. There was a trend toward increased comfort level in addressing end-of-life issues among residents who completed the intervention, versus a comparison group. Residents who completed the intervention reported that using the words "death" and "dying" with patients and families was an important teaching point.

  17. The disaster prevention awareness of foreign residents and disaster management of organizations for foreign employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tan Yen; Sugiki, Nao; Matsuo, Kojiro

    2017-10-01

    Japan is known to have many natural disasters occurrences, especially in recent years, the seismic hazard named "Nankai-trough Disastrous Earthquake" of magnitude 9(M) was predicted and will have caused huge damages. Therefore, disaster management should be well planned and executed to ensure minimal amount of victims and damages from disaster. However, foreign residents are mostly vulnerable and ill-equipped to face such consequences compared to Japanese residents, especially when there is limited information available for foreigners presently. As the influx of foreigner migration has been steadily increasing annually, it is vital for disaster management to be compulsively planned to cope up with the great variety of foreigners' needs from diverse backgrounds accordingly. The purpose of this study is to comprehend foreign residents' disaster prevention awareness, in order to provide a more effective information provision on disaster management, so as to help improve their disaster prevention awareness. Thus, this study is set in Toyohashi city, and the methodology used is by conducting two questionnaires. Firstly, to have an accurate understanding on the awareness of foreign residents towards disasters prevention, the questionnaire is conducted towards foreign university students, on pertinent issues such as on the degree of preparedness and their matters of concern of which is related to natural disasters. Secondly, to comprehend disaster management of organizations, the other focuses on preventive measures adopted by manufacturing industry organizations, such as types of preventive measures as a whole and on the issues and challenges encountered during foreign employee-related enforcement of disaster management. Finally, based both results of the questionnaire, the key factors on effective information provision of disaster management is considered.

  18. Intensive Care Unit Rotations and Predictors of Career Choice in Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine: A Survey of Internal Medicine Residency Directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Minter

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The United States (US is experiencing a growing shortage of critical care medicine (CCM trained physicians. Little is known about the exposures to CCM experienced by internal medicine (IM residents or factors that may influence their decision to pursue a career in pulmonary/critical care medicine (PCCM. Methods. We conducted a survey of US IM residency program directors (PDs and then used multivariable logistic regression to identify factors that were predictive of residency programs with a higher percentage of graduates pursuing careers in PCCM. Results. Of the 249 PDs contacted, 107 (43% completed our survey. University-sponsored programs more commonly had large ICUs (62.3% versus 42.2%, p=0.05, primary medical ICUs (63.9% versus 41.3%, p=0.03, and closed staffing models (88.5% versus 41.3%, p20 beds, residents serving as code leaders, and greater proportion of graduates pursuing specialization. Conclusions. While numerous differences exist between the ICU rotations at community- and university-sponsored IM residencies, the percentage of graduates specializing in PCCM was similar. Exposure to larger ICUs, serving as code leaders, and higher rates of specialization were predictive of a career choice in PCCM.

  19. The Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire: score validity among medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A; Thompson, Warren G; Thomas, Kris G

    2011-12-01

    The Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) purports to measure motivation using the expectancy-value model. Although it is widely used in other fields, this instrument has received little study in health professions education. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of MSLQ scores. We conducted a validity study evaluating the relationships of MSLQ scores to other variables and their internal structure (reliability and factor analysis). Participants included 210 internal medicine and family medicine residents participating in a web-based course on ambulatory medicine at an academic medical centre. Measurements included pre-course MSLQ scores, pre- and post-module motivation surveys, post-module knowledge test and post-module Instructional Materials Motivation Survey (IMMS) scores. Internal consistency was universally high for all MSLQ items together (Cronbach's α = 0.93) and for each domain (α ≥ 0.67). Total MSLQ scores showed statistically significant positive associations with post-test knowledge scores. For example, a 1-point rise in total MSLQ score was associated with a 4.4% increase in post-test scores (β = 4.4; p motivation and satisfaction. Scores on MSLQ domains demonstrated associations that generally aligned with our hypotheses. Self-efficacy and control of learning belief scores demonstrated the strongest domain-specific relationships with knowledge scores (β = 2.9 for both). Confirmatory factor analysis showed a borderline model fit. Follow-up exploratory factor analysis revealed the scores of five factors (self-efficacy, intrinsic interest, test anxiety, extrinsic goals, attribution) demonstrated psychometric and predictive properties similar to those of the original scales. Scores on the MSLQ are reliable and predict meaningful outcomes. However, the factor structure suggests a simplified model might better fit the empiric data. Future research might consider how assessing and responding to motivation could enhance

  20. Does Spanish instruction for emergency medicine resident physicians improve patient satisfaction in the emergency department and adherence to medical recommendations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoneking LR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available LR Stoneking,1 AL Waterbrook,1 J Garst Orozco,2 D Johnston,1 A Bellafiore,1 C Davies,3 T Nuño,1 J Fatás-Cabeza,4 O Beita,5 V Ng,1 KH Grall,6 W Adamas-Rappaport7 1Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Sinai Health System, Chicago, IL, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, 4Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 5Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 6Department of Emergency Medicine, Regions Hospital, St Paul, MN, 7Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Background: After emergency department (ED discharge, Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency are less likely than English-proficient patients to be adherent to medical recommendations and are more likely to be dissatisfied with their visit.Objectives: To determine if integrating a longitudinal medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into emergency medicine residency didactics improves patient satisfaction and adherence to medical recommendations in Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency.Methods: Our ED has two Emergency Medicine Residency Programs, University Campus (UC and South Campus (SC. SC program incorporates a medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into their didactics. Real-time Spanish surveys were collected at SC ED on patients who self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking during registration and who were treated by resident physicians from both residency programs. Surveys assessed whether the treating resident physician communicated in the patient’s native Spanish language. Follow-up phone calls assessed patient satisfaction and adherence to discharge instructions.Results: Sixty-three patients self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking from August 2014 to July 2015 and were initially included in this pilot study

  1. Expectations of clinical teachers and faculty regarding development of the CanMEDS-Family Medicine competencies: Laval developmental benchmarks scale for family medicine residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasse, Miriam; Théorêt, Johanne; Tessier, Sylvie; Arsenault, Louise

    2014-01-01

    The CanMEDS-Family Medicine (CanMEDS-FM) framework defines the expected terminal enabling competencies (EC) for family medicine (FM) residency training in Canada. However, benchmarks throughout the 2-year program are not yet defined. This study aimed to identify expected time frames for achievement of the CanMEDS-FM competencies during FM residency training and create a developmental benchmarks scale for family medicine residency training. This 2011-2012 study followed a Delphi methodology. Selected faculty and clinical teachers identified, via questionnaire, the expected time of EC achievement from beginning of residency to one year in practice (0, 6, 12, […] 36 months). The 15-85th percentile intervals became the expected competency achievement interval. Content validity of the obtained benchmarks was assessed through a second Delphi round. The 1st and 2nd rounds were completed by 33 and 27 respondents, respectively. A developmental benchmarks scale was designed after the 1st round to illustrate expectations regarding achievement of each EC. The 2nd round (content validation) led to minor adjustments (1.9±2.7 months) of intervals for 44 of the 92 competencies, the others remaining unchanged. The Laval Developmental Benchmarks Scale for Family Medicine clarifies expectations regarding achievement of competencies throughout FM training. In a competency-based education system this now allows identification and management of outlying residents, both those excelling and needing remediation. Further research should focus on assessment of the scale reliability after pilot implementation in family medicine clinical teaching units at Laval University, and corroborate the established timeline in other sites.

  2. The U.S. Army Occupational and Environmental Medicine Residency at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland: 1960-1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaydos, Joel C; Mallon, Timothy M; Rice, William A

    2016-11-01

    Reorganization of the Army and critical assessment of Army Graduate Medical Education programs prompted the Occupational and Environmental Medicine (OEM) Consultant to the Army Surgeon General to initiate a review of current Army OEM residency training. Available information indicated the Army OEM residency at Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, was the first and longest operating Army OEM residency. Describing this residency was identified as the first step in the review, with the objectives of determining why the residency was started and sustained and its relevance to the needs of the Army. Records possibly related to the residency were reviewed, starting with 1954 since certification of physicians as Occupation Medicine specialists began in 1955. Interviews were conducted with selected physicians who had strong affiliations with the Army residency and the practice of Army OEM. The Army OEM residency began in 1960 and closed in 1996 with the transfer of Army OEM residency training to the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD. Over 36 years, 47 uniformed residency graduates were identified; 44 were from the Army. Forty graduated between 1982 and 1996. The OEM residency was part of a dynamic cycle. Uniformed OEM leaders identified the knowledge and skills required of military OEM physicians and where these people should be stationed in the global Army. Rotations at military sites to acquire the needed knowledge and skills were integrated into the residency. Residency graduates were assigned to positions where they were needed. Having uniformed residents and preceptors facilitated the development of trust with military leaders and access to areas where OEM physician skills and knowledge could have a positive impact. Early reports indicated the residency was important in recruiting and retaining OEM physicians, with emphasis placed on supporting the Army industrial base. The late 1970s into the 1990s was a more dynamic period. There was

  3. An Innovative Educational and Mentorship Program for Emergency Medicine Women Residents to Enhance Academic Development and Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Kriti; Takayesu, James Kimo; Arbelaez, Christian; Peak, David; Nadel, Eric S

    2015-11-01

    Given the discrepancy between men and women's equal rates of medical school matriculation and their rates of academic promotion and leadership role acquisition, the need to provide mentorship and education to women in academic medicine is becoming increasingly recognized. Numerous large-scale programs have been developed to provide support and resources for women's enrichment and retention in academic medicine. Analyses of contributory factors to the aforementioned discrepancy commonly cite insufficient mentoring and role modeling as well as challenges with organizational navigation. Since residency training has been shown to be a critical juncture for making the decision to pursue an academic career, there is a need for innovative and tailored educational and mentorship programs targeting residents. Acknowledging residents' competing demands, we designed a program to provide easily accessible mentorship and contact with role models for our trainees at the departmental and institutional levels. We believe that this is an important step towards encouraging women's pursuit of academic careers. Our model may be useful to other emergency medicine residencies looking to provide such opportunities for their women residents.

  4. Use of 360-degree assessment of residents in internal medicine in a Danish setting: a feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allerup, P; Aspegren, K; Ejlersen, E

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to explore the feasibility of 360 degree assessment in early specialist training in a Danish setting. Present Danish postgraduate training requires assessment of specific learning objectives. Residency in Internal Medicine was chosen for the study. It has 65...

  5. Burned Out at the Bedside: Patient Perceptions of Physician Burnout in an Internal Medicine Resident Continuity Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafreniere, Justin P; Rios, Rebeca; Packer, Hillary; Ghazarian, Sharon; Wright, Scott M; Levine, Rachel B

    2016-02-01

    Burnout is high among resident physicians and may be associated with suboptimal patient care and reduced empathy. To investigate the relationship between patient perceptions of empathy and enablement and physician burnout in internal medicine residents. Cross-sectional, survey-based observational study between December 2012 and March 2013 in a resident continuity clinic located within a large urban academic primary care practice in Baltimore, Maryland. Study participants were 44 PGY1-3 residents and a convenience sample of their English-speaking adult primary care patients (N = 244). Patients rated their resident physicians using the Consultation and Relational Empathy Measure (CARE) and the Patient Enablement Instrument (PEI). Residents completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). We tested for associations between resident burnout and patients' perceptions of resident empathy (CARE) and enablement (PEI) using multilevel regression analysis. Multilevel regression analyses indicated significant positive associations between physician depersonalization scores on the MBI and patient ratings of empathy (B = 0.28, SE = 0.17, p care encounters. The relationship between physician distress and patient perceptions of care has important implications for medical education and requires further study.

  6. The effect of electronic health record software design on resident documentation and compliance with evidence-based medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaira Rodriguez Torres

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the role of electronic health record software in resident education by evaluating documentation of 30 elements extracted from the American Academy of Ophthalmology Dry Eye Syndrome Preferred Practice Pattern. The Kresge Eye Institute transitioned to using electronic health record software in June 2013. We evaluated the charts of 331 patients examined in the resident ophthalmology clinic between September 1, 2011, and March 31, 2014, for an initial evaluation for dry eye syndrome. We compared documentation rates for the 30 evidence-based elements between electronic health record chart note templates among the ophthalmology residents. Overall, significant changes in documentation occurred when transitioning to a new version of the electronic health record software with average compliance ranging from 67.4% to 73.6% (p 90% in 13 elements while Electronic Health Record B had high compliance (>90% in 11 elements. The presence of dialog boxes was responsible for significant changes in documentation of adnexa, puncta, proptosis, skin examination, contact lens wear, and smoking exposure. Significant differences in documentation were correlated with electronic health record template design rather than individual resident or residents' year in training. Our results show that electronic health record template design influences documentation across all resident years. Decreased documentation likely results from "mouse click fatigue" as residents had to access multiple dialog boxes to complete documentation. These findings highlight the importance of EHR template design to improve resident documentation and integration of evidence-based medicine into their clinical notes.

  7. Parental Involvement and Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders: Perspectives from Residents in Psychiatry, Pediatrics, and Family Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Tamara Davidson; Girz, Laura; Stillar, Amanda; Tessier, Carole; Lafrance, Adele

    2017-07-01

    Best practice guidelines encourage the involvement of parents in the assessment and treatment of child/adolescent eating disorders (ED). This study investigated medical residents' perspectives regarding parental involvement as well as their expectations for future practice in the assessment and treatment of ED. Five hundred and eighty-four medical residents from 17 Canadian residency programs specializing in family medicine, pediatrics, and psychiatry completed a web-based survey. Questions pertained to assessment and treatment practices for child/adolescent ED. Analyses included ANOVAs, paired t-tests, and, for residents who endorsed family involvement (N = 444), qualitative content analysis. Overall, residents reported that they "mostly" agreed with the involvement of family in the assessment and treatment of ED. Residents' endorsement of family involvement in both domains increased according to the extent of ED training received. Four major themes emerged from the content analysis of family involvement and included recommendations in line with evidence-based models and unspecified, passive involvement in the assessment and recovery process. Many residents endorse family involvement in both assessment and treatment; however, understanding of the nature of such involvement is often vague. Training in evidence-based protocols is necessary for residents planning to engage in multi-disciplinary assessment, referral, and/or treatment in their future practice.

  8. Internal Medicine Residency Program Directors' Views of the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency: An Opportunity to Enhance Communication of Competency Along the Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Steven V; Vu, T Robert; Willett, Lisa L; Call, Stephanie; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Chaudhry, Saima

    2017-06-01

    To examine internal medicine (IM) residency program directors' (PDs') perspectives on the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency (Core EPAs)-introduced into undergraduate medical education to further competency-based assessment-and on communicating competency-based information during transitions. A spring 2015 Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine survey asked PDs of U.S. IM residency programs for their perspectives on which Core EPAs new interns must or should possess on day 1, which are most essential, and which have the largest gap between expected and observed performance. Their views and preferences were also requested regarding communicating competency-based information at transitions from medical school to residency and residency to fellowship/employment. The response rate was 57% (204/361 programs). The majority of PDs felt new interns must/should possess 12 of the 13 Core EPAs. PDs' rankings of Core EPAs by relative importance were more varied than their rankings by the largest gaps in performance. Although preferred timing varied, most PDs (82%) considered it important for medical schools to communicate Core EPA-based information to PDs; nearly three-quarters (71%) would prefer a checklist format. Many (60%) would be willing to provide competency-based evaluations to fellowship directors/employers. Most (> 80%) agreed that there should be a bidirectional communication mechanism for programs/employers to provide feedback on competency assessments. The gaps identified in Core EPA performance may help guide medical schools' curricular and assessment tool design. Sharing competency-based information at transitions along the medical education continuum could help ensure production of competent, practice-ready physicians.

  9. Faculty staff-guided versus self-guided ultrasound training for internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, George A; Kelmenson, Daniel A; Noble, Vicki E; Murray, Alice F; Currier, Paul F

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasonography is of growing importance within internal medicine (IM), but the optimal method of training doctors to use it is uncertain. In this study, the authors provide the first objective comparison of two approaches to training IM residents in ultrasonography. In this randomised trial, a simulation-based ultrasound training curriculum was implemented during IM intern orientation at a tertiary care teaching hospital. All 72 incoming interns attended a lecture and were given access to online modules. Interns were then randomly assigned to a 4-hour faculty-guided (FG) or self-guided (SG) ultrasound training session in a simulation laboratory with both human and manikin models. Interns were asked to self-assess their competence in ultrasonography and underwent an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) to assess their competence in basic and procedurally oriented ultrasound tasks. The primary outcome was the score on the OSCE. Faculty-guided training was superior to self-guided training based on the OSCE scores. Subjects in the FG training group achieved significantly higher OSCE scores on the two subsets of task completion (0.9-point difference, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.27-1.54; p = 0.008) and ultrasound image quality (2.43-point difference, 95% CI 1.5-3.36; p training groups demonstrated an increase in self-assessed competence after their respective training sessions and there was little difference between the groups. Subjects rated the FG training group much more favourably than the SG training group. Both FG and SG ultrasound training curricula can improve the self-reported competence of IM interns in ultrasonography. However, FG training was superior to SG training in both skills acquisition and intern preference. Incorporating mandatory ultrasound training into IM residencies can address the perceived need for ultrasound training, improve confidence and procedural skills, and may enhance patient safety. However, the optimal training method

  10. Preventive medicine oversight of splash pads on military installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Lisa Raysby; Perry, Matthew; Browne, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, an increasing number of military installations have installed splash pads that provide fun, recreational water entertainment for Soldiers and their families. The addition of splash pads brings added responsibilities for medical treatment facility preventive medicine oversight and installation facilities maintenance to ensure a safe and healthy environment. Currently, there are no consistent standards or detailed guidance for military installations to follow when installing and maintaining splash pads. The central issues associated with splash pads on military installations are water quality and risk for waterborne illnesses, responsibility for safety and health oversight, and federal energy and water sustainability mandates. This article examines the importance of implementing a standard for design and oversight to ensure the health and safety of Soldiers and their families.

  11. The Effect of Emergency Department Overcrowding on Efficiency of Emergency Medicine Residents' Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzghabaei, Anita; Shojaee, Majid; Alimohammadi, Hossein; Derakhshanfar, Hojjat; Kashani, Parvin; Nassiriabrishamchi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Creating a calm and stress-free environment affects education significantly. The effects of the emergency department overcrowding (EDO) on the training of emergency medicine residents (EMR) is a highly debated subject. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of EDO on efficiency of EMR's education. In this cross-sectional study, the effects of overcrowding on EMR's education in the resuscitation room and acute care unit. Data collection was done using a questionnaire, which was filled out by the second year EMRs. The crowding level was calculated based on the national emergency department overcrowding scale (NEDOCS). The relationship between the two studied variables was evaluated using independent sample t-test and SPSS 21 statistical software. 130 questionnaires were filled out during 61 shifts. 47 (77.05%) shifts were overcrowded. The attend's ability to teach was not affected by overcrowding in the resuscitation room (p=0.008). The similar results were seen regarding the attend's training ability in the acute care unit. It seems that the emergency department overcrowding has no effect on the quality of education to the EMRs.

  12. Assigning residents of emergency medicine to screen patients before admission: a strategy to overcome overcrowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadeh, Hamid Reza; Davoudi, Amir; Davoudi, Farnoush; Mahmoodi, Sadrollah; Ghane, Mohammad Reza; Goodarzi, Hasan; Faraji, Mehrdad

    2012-01-01

    The overcrowded hospital is an unsafe one. Overcrowding the emergency department (ED) results in increased patient suffering, prolonged waiting time, deteriorating level of service, and on occasion, a worsened medical condition or even death. This study proposes a strategy to overcome ED overcrowding. The proportion of acute area admitted patients to screened patients (A/S), and the proportion of patients who were finally transferred to inpatient wards (W/A) to those admitted in ED acute area were investigated during 6 consecutive months. Emergency medicine residents were assigned to screen patients before ED admission and afterwards. The average A/S changed from 82.4% to 44.2% (P = 0.028), and the average W/A changed from 28.3% to 51.48% (P = 0.028) before and after screening patients respectively. The initiative resulted in 97 less patients in the acute area per day. Decreased number of acute area admitted patients, and increase W/A proportion showed that the initiative was successful in obviating ED overcrowding while provision of care to those most in need was not altered.

  13. Online research article discussion board to increase knowledge translation during emergency medicine residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneking, Lisa R; Grall, Kristi H; Min, Alice A; Panchal, Ashish R

    2013-01-01

    Many clinicians have difficulties reading current best practice journal articles on a regular basis. Discussion boards are one method of online asynchronous learning that facilitates active learning and participation. We hypothesized that an online repository of best practice articles with a discussion board would increase journal article reading by emergency medicine residents. PARTICIPANTS ANSWERED THREE QUESTIONS WEEKLY ON A DISCUSSION BOARD: What question does this study address? What does this study add to our knowledge? How might this change clinical practice? A survey regarding perceived barriers to participating was then distributed. Most participants completed an article summary once or twice in total (23/32, 71.9%). Only three were involved most weeks (3/32, 9.4%) whereas 5/32 (15.6%) participated monthly. The most common barriers were lack of time (20/32, 62.5%), difficulty logging on (7/32, 21.9%), and forgetting (6/32, 18.8%). Although subjects were provided weekly with an article link, email, and feedback, journal article reading frequency did not increase.

  14. How we teach ethics and communication during a Canadian neonatal perinatal medicine residency: an interactive experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daboval, Thierry; Moore, Gregory P; Ferretti, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    Ethically challenging clinical situations frequently confront health care professionals in neonatology. These situations require neonatologists to exercise professionalism by communicating effectively throughout evolving physician-parent relationships in order to arrive at shared decisions for care that are in the best interest of the neonate and grounded solidly in ethical precepts. This article describes the process by which a well-delineated, interactive program to teach ethical reasoning and skillful communication with parents was implemented at the University of Ottawa, Canada. A revised ethics program implemented in 2009 identified competencies that should be demonstrated at the end of the Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine (NPM) residency. Several seminars were refined while new workshops, problem-based learning in ethics, and a personal portfolio were added. All teaching strategies were well received based on the average level of satisfaction (5.8 out of 7, SD 0.4). We are now moving forward by formally assessing our program including the impact on knowledge acquisition and behavior. A dedicated, interactive competency-based neonatal ethics teaching program is vital to support NPM trainees in learning how to integrate ethical thinking with competencies in communication.

  15. GIS residency footprinting: analyzing the impact of family medicine graduate medical education in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hixon, Allen L; Buenconsejo-Lum, Lee E; Racsa, C Philip

    2012-04-01

    Access to care for patients in Hawai'i is compromised by a significant primary care workforce shortage. Not only are there not enough primary care providers, they are often not practicing in locations of high need such as rural areas on the neighbor islands or in the Pacific. This study used geographic information systems (GIS) spatial analysis to look at practice locations for 86 University of Hawai'i Family Medicine and Community Health graduates from 1993 to the 2010. Careful alumni records were verified and entered into the data set using the street address of major employment. Questions to be answered were (1) what percentage of program graduates remain in the state of Hawai'i and (2) what percentage of graduates practice in health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) throughout the United States. This study found that 73 percent of graduates remain and practice in Hawai'i with over 36 percent working in Health Professional Shortage Areas. Spatial analysis using GIS residency footprinting may be an important analytic tool to ensure that graduate medical education programs are meeting Hawai'i's health workforce needs.

  16. GIS Residency Footprinting: Analyzing the Impact of Family Medicine Graduate Medical Education in Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenconsejo-Lum, Lee E; Racsa, C Philip

    2012-01-01

    Background Access to care for patients in Hawai‘i is compromised by a significant primary care workforce shortage. Not only are there not enough primary care providers, they are often not practicing in locations of high need such as rural areas on the neighbor islands or in the Pacific. Methods This study used geographic information systems (GIS) spatial analysis to look at practice locations for 86 University of Hawai‘i Family Medicine and Community Health graduates from 1993 to the 2010. Careful alumni records were verified and entered into the data set using the street address of major employment. Questions to be answered were (1) what percentage of program graduates remain in the state of Hawai‘i and (2) what percentage of graduates practice in health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) throughout the United States. Results This study found that 73 percent of graduates remain and practice in Hawai‘i with over 36 percent working in Health Professional Shortage Areas. Discussion Spatial analysis using GIS residency footprinting may be an important analytic tool to ensure that graduate medical education programs are meeting Hawai‘i's health workforce needs. PMID:22737640

  17. The Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors’ (CORD Academy for Scholarship in Education in Emergency Medicine: A Five-Year Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph LaMantia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors’ (CORD Academy for Scholarship in Education in Emergency Medicine was founded in 2010 to support emergency medicine educators, advance educational methods and scholarship in Emergency Medicine, and foster collaboration among members. As one of the first academies housed in a specialty organization, the CORD Academy concept has been successfully implemented, and has now grown to thirty members in the categories of Distinguished Educator, Academy Scholar, and Academy Member in four focus areas (Teaching and Evaluation; Enduring Educational Materials, Educational Leadership, and Education Research. In this update, the Academy leadership describes the revised academy structure, evolution of the application, and reports the activities of the three Academy pillars – membership/awards/recognition; faculty development and structured programs; and education research and scholarship – in the first five years of the Academy.

  18. [Interdisciplinary training opportunities for residents in occupational medicine: the experience of the ERC Tour 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toninelli, E; Fostinelli, J; Rosen, M A; Lucchini, R; Apostoli, P

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the experience of the School of Occupational Medicine of the University of Brescia at the current edition of the New York and New Jersey Education and Research Center--Historical Perspectives Tour on Occupational Safety and Health, that involved 5 different industrial and environmental sites, appropriate for understanding the complex occupational health and safety problems. In every site, the participants have interacted with workers and professionals and discussed about the specific work processes, to better understand the risk faced by the workers, occupational pathologies that can occur, personal protective equipment used and preventive measures adopted. This experience has been successful in provide interdisciplinary educations to occupational safety and health professionals in training in order to prepare them for the collaboration and cooperation required to solve the complex occupational health and safety problems they will face in their future careers.

  19. Self-Assessment of Skills and Competencies among Residents Participating in a Pediatric Hospice and Palliative Medicine Elective Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossfeld, Zachary M; Tumin, Dmitry; Humphrey, Lisa M

    2018-02-01

    To describe our institutional experience with a four-week pediatric HPM elective rotation and its impact on residents' self-rated competencies. In the spirit of bolstering primary hospice and palliative medicine (HPM) skills of all pediatricians, it is unclear how best to teach pediatric HPM. An elective rotation during residency may serve this need. An anonymous online survey was distributed to pediatric and internal medicine/pediatrics residents at a single, tertiary academic children's hospital. Respondents were asked to rate education, experience, and comfort with five aspects of communication with families of children with terminal illnesses and six domains of managing the symptoms of terminal illnesses. Self-ratings were recorded on a 1-5 scale: none, minimal, moderate, good, or excellent. Demographic data, including details of training and prior HPM training, were collected. Respondents completed a set of six questions gauging their attitude toward palliative care in general and at the study institution specifically. All respondents desire more HPM training. Those residents who self-selected to complete a pediatric HPM elective rotation had significantly higher self-ratings in 10 of 11 competency/skill domains. Free-text comments expressed concern about reliance on the specialty HPM team. A pediatric HPM elective can significantly increase residents' self-rated competency. Such rotations are an under-realized opportunity in developing the primary HPM skills of pediatricians, but wider adoption is restricted by the limited availability of pediatric HPM rotations and limited elective time during training.

  20. Interprofessional collaboration between residents and nurses in general internal medicine: a qualitative study on behaviours enhancing teamwork quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Muller-Juge

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Effective teamwork is necessary for optimal patient care. There is insufficient understanding of interactions between physicians and nurses on internal medicine wards. OBJECTIVE: To describe resident physicians' and nurses' actual behaviours contributing to teamwork quality in the setting of a simulated internal medicine ward. METHODS: A volunteer sample of 14 pairs of residents and nurses in internal medicine was asked to manage one non-urgent and one urgent clinical case in a simulated ward, using a high-fidelity manikin. After the simulation, participants attended a stimulated-recall session during which they viewed the videotape of the simulation and explained their actions and perceptions. All simulations were transcribed, coded, and analyzed, using a qualitative method (template analysis. Quality of teamwork was assessed, based on patient management efficiency and presence of shared management goals and of team spirit. RESULTS: Most resident-nurse pairs tended to interact in a traditional way, with residents taking the leadership and nurses executing medical prescriptions and assuming their own specific role. They also demonstrated different types of interactions involving shared responsibilities and decision making, constructive suggestions, active communication and listening, and manifestations of positive team building. The presence of a leader in the pair or a truly shared leadership between resident and nurse contributed to teamwork quality only if both members of the pair demonstrated sufficient autonomy. In case of a lack of autonomy of one member, the other member could compensate for it, if his/her own autonomy was sufficiently strong and if there were demonstrations of mutual listening, information sharing, and positive team building. CONCLUSIONS: Although they often relied on traditional types of interaction, residents and nurses also demonstrated readiness for increased sharing of responsibilities. Interprofessional

  1. [What, how, and how much should a Family and Community Medicine resident do to become a good specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Rodríguez, M; Aparcero Gallardo, M; Amodeo Arahal, M C; Romero Solís, P

    2017-10-23

    To determine the ideal volume of activity to be carried out by residents in Family and Community Medicine in order to acquire the competencies of their professional activity. The consensus opinion of a group of experts in the training of residents in Family and Community Medicine was collected from 152 tutors using an online Delphi-type questionnaire. The overall medians obtained in the different activities that should be developed by residents of Family and Community Medicine were: individual diagnostic/therapeutic interventions: retinography 60, spirometry 40, anticoagulation 45, cryo/electrocoagulation 35, infiltrations 45, tele-dermatology 60, and others 45; women's health: pregnancy 45, gynaecological ultrasound/IUD 41, cytology 32.5, family planning 19.5, and maternal education 17; lifestyle and care interventions: geriatrics 30, nursing 45, individual tobacco advice 30, group advice 15, health problems 15, and dietary advice 15; community intervention: sessions with youth 15, and social risk 15; training: sessions 40, continuing education 40. This information has defined the activity volumes that should be developed by the residents in order to acquire an adequate level of competence in the areas of individual diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, women's health, interventions to change lifestyles, community intervention, and clinical and training sessions. The consensus obtained could serve as a basis for the creation of a road map in the training of residents as a complementary tool to the Resident's Book, which is obligatory in all specialties. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Time-motion studies of internal medicine residents' duty hours: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leafloor, Cameron W; Lochnan, Heather A; Code, Catherine; Keely, Erin J; Rothwell, Deanna M; Forster, Alan J; Huang, Allen R

    2015-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, medical residents' long duty hours have been under scrutiny as a factor affecting patient safety and the work environment for the residents. After several mandated changes in duty hours, it is important to understand how residents spend their time before proposing and implementing future changes. Time-motion methodology may provide reliable information on what residents do while on duty. The purpose of this study is to review all available literature pertaining to time-motion studies of internal medicine residents while on a medicine service and to understand how much of their time is apportioned to various categories of tasks, and also to determine the effects of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-mandated duty hour changes on resident workflow in North America. Electronic bibliographic databases were searched for articles in English between 1941 and April 2013 reporting time-motion studies of internal medicine residents rotating through a general medicine service. Eight articles were included. Residents spent 41.8% of time in patient care activities, 18.1% communicating, 13.8% in educational activities, 19.7% in personal/other, and 6.6% in transit. North American data showed the following changes after the implementation of the ACGME 2003 duty hours standard: patient care activities from 41.8% to 40.8%, communication activities from 19.0% to 22.3%, educational activities from 17.7% to 11.6%, and personal/other activities from 21.5% to 17.1%. There was a paucity of time-motion data. There was great variability in the operational definitions of task categories reported in the studies. Implementation of the ACGME duty hour standards did not have a significant effect on the percentage of time spent in particular tasks. There are conflicting reports on how duty hour changes have affected patient safety. A low proportion of time spent in educational activities deserves further study and may point to a review of the

  3. A model of self-directed learning in internal medicine residency: a qualitative study using grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatsky, Adam P; Ratelle, John T; Bonnes, Sara L; Egginton, Jason S; Beckman, Thomas J

    2017-02-02

    Existing theories of self-directed learning (SDL) have emphasized the importance of process, personal, and contextual factors. Previous medical education research has largely focused on the process of SDL. We explored the experience with and perception of SDL among internal medicine residents to gain understanding of the personal and contextual factors of SDL in graduate medical education. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, we conducted 7 focus group interviews with 46 internal medicine residents at an academic medical center. We processed the data by using open coding and writing analytic memos. Team members organized open codes to create axial codes, which were applied to all transcripts. Guided by a previous model of SDL, we developed a theoretical model that was revised through constant comparison with new data as they were collected, and we refined the theory until it had adequate explanatory power and was appropriately grounded in the experiences of residents. We developed a theoretical model of SDL to explain the process, personal, and contextual factors affecting SDL during residency training. The process of SDL began with a trigger that uncovered a knowledge gap. Residents progressed to formulating learning objectives, using resources, applying knowledge, and evaluating learning. Personal factors included motivations, individual characteristics, and the change in approach to SDL over time. Contextual factors included the need for external guidance, the influence of residency program structure and culture, and the presence of contextual barriers. We developed a theoretical model of SDL in medical education that can be used to promote and assess resident SDL through understanding the process, person, and context of SDL.

  4. [Counseling and preventive action in elderly population in hospitals and residences in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre-Miquel, Clara; Figueroa, Carmen; Santos, Juana; Astasio, Paloma; Gil, Pedro

    2016-10-01

    To establish the profile of elderly patients, and to assess current preventive actions in hospitals, geriatric residences, and different health-care centres in Spain. Cross-sectional descriptive study, based on a questionnaire to be answered by doctors who treat the elderly population in Spain (2013). Health-care centres from different regions of Spain. A total of 420 practitioners from hospitals, residences and other community centres, with data from 840 geriatric clinics. Main outcome variables are: dependence, reason for assistance, comorbidity, professional consultation, and life style recommendations. Association factor, type of institution where patients have been attended. Analysis of prevalence and association using Chi-squared test. Two-thirds (66.7%) of the study population were shown to be dependent, with a higher percentage among women than men: 68.9% vs. 62.4% (P=.055). It was also found that among the population aged 85 or more, 88.6% of the women and 85.2% of the men suffered comorbidity. In spite of these results, only 6.6% of the patients suffering comorbidity received additional advice concerning healthy-lifestyle. A large majority (79.6%) of the patients treated in hospitals received advice concerning healthy lifestyle, while 59.62% of those treated in nursing homes received it (P<.001). It was observed that there is a lack of preventive action related to health promotion among the elderly, with differences between hospitals and geriatric residences. This suggests that it is time to put forward new specialised programs addressed to health professionals, in order to reinforce health promotion attitudes and preventive interventions in gerontology clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. The resident-as-teacher educational challenge: a needs assessment survey at the National Autonomous University of Mexico Faculty of Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Durante-Montiel Irene; García-Durán Rocío; Graue-Wiechers Enrique L; Ruiz-Pérez Leobardo C; Sánchez-Mendiola Melchor

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The role of residents as educators is increasingly recognized, since it impacts residents, interns, medical students and other healthcare professionals. A widespread implementation of resident-as-teacher courses in developed countries' medical schools has occurred, with variable results. There is a dearth of information about this theme in developing countries. The National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) Faculty of Medicine has more than 50% of the residency progra...

  6. Veterinary Preventive Medicine Curriculum Development at Louisiana State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbert, William T.

    1976-01-01

    The program aims at training veterinarians, with interdepartmental faculty participation the rule rather than the exception. Included in the curriculum are: avian medicine, herd health management, veterinary public health, veterinary food hygiene, and regulatory veterinary medicine. (LBH)

  7. Performance of internal medicine residents in the primary interpretation of musculoskeletal radiographs in an ambulatory care setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, F.A.; Stewart, N.R.; Terrell, C.B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the characteristics of misinterpretations of musculoskeletal radiographs by internal medicine residents (IMRs) in an ambulatory care setting. Discordances between IMRs and staff radiologists were prospectively identified and retrospectively reviewed to assess type of error and patient outcome. The setting was an acute ambulatory care clinic at a large university hospital staffed by board-certified emergency medicine faculty and IMRs. Of 541 patients radiographed, 321 (59%) had adequate follow-up to establish outcome. Error characteristics examined included nature and site, type (false negative ([F-] or false positive [F+]), clinical significance, interpreter responsible, and level of interpreter training

  8. Differences in the perception of characteristics of excellence of clinical tutors among residents and consultants at an emergency medicine residency program a qualitative research

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    Muna Saleem Aljahany

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Defining exactly what characterizes a clinical tutor as excellent and another less effective, is an important task in assessing the effectiveness of clinical training and guiding faculty development. Aim: We aimed to evaluate those characteristics and measure differences in their perception among accomplished and non-accomplished consultants and residents in the Emergency Department. We also compared perceptions between the different groups of participants. Methods: The characteristics measured were extracted from an extensive search of previously published studies summarized in a review article. A qualitative study was conducted, using a 20 item questionnaire piloted from the refined characteristics (good indicator of reliability; Cronbach′s Alpha = 0.86. The questionnaire was distributed among all consultants and residents in Saudi Board of Emergency Medicine. Results: No significant difference between consultants′ and residents′ perception was found. "Sincere" was an exception 87.8% versus 55.1%, P = 0.013. Consultants′ specifications did not seem to affect perception on overall scores and its component sub-scores. Conclusion: Since results showed no relation between accomplished and non-accomplished consultants in perceiving those qualities, we excluded the lack of knowledge of those characteristics as a cause of being accomplished or non-accomplished. We suggest a greater dedication from program developers towards creating more opportunities to involve more consultants in basic Emergency Medicine training.

  9. Preventive dental care among Medicaid-enrolled senior adults: from community to nursing facility residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Mary C; Caplan, Daniel J; Bern-Klug, Mercedes; Cowen, Howard J; Cunningham-Ford, Marsha A; Marchini, Leonardo; Momany, Elizabeth T

    2018-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the utilization rate of preventive oral health care services while senior adults were community-dwelling differed from the rate after those same senior adults were admitted to nursing facilities. A secondary objective was to evaluate other significant predictors of receipt of preventive oral health procedures after nursing facility entry. Iowa Medicaid claims from 2007-2014 were accessed for adults who were 68+ years upon entry to a nursing facility and continuously enrolled in Medicaid for at least three years before and at least two years after admission (n = 874). Univariate, bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted. During the five years that subjects were followed, 52.8% never received a dental exam and 75.9% never received a dental hygiene procedure. More Medicaid-enrolled senior adults received ≥1 preventive dental procedure in the two years while residing in a nursing facility compared to the three years before entry. In multivariable analyses, the strongest predictor of preventive oral health care utilization after entry was the receipt of preventive oral health services before entry (p senior adult establishing a source of dental care while community-dwelling. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  10. Time-motion studies of internal medicine residents' duty hours: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Leafloor CW

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cameron W Leafloor,1 Heather A Lochnan,2,3,6 Catherine Code,2,4 Erin J Keely,2,3,6 Deanna M Rothwell,5,6 Alan J Forster,2,4–6 Allen R Huang2,6,7 1Faculty of Medicine, 2Department of Medicine, 3Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, 4Division of General Internal Medicine, 5Performance Measurement and Innovation, 6Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 7Division of Geriatric Medicine, The Ottawa Hospital and University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Background: Since the mid-1980s, medical residents' long duty hours have been under scrutiny as a factor affecting patient safety and the work environment for the residents. After several mandated changes in duty hours, it is important to understand how residents spend their time before proposing and implementing future changes. Time-motion methodology may provide reliable information on what residents do while on duty.Purpose: The purpose of this study is to review all available literature pertaining to time-motion studies of internal medicine residents while on a medicine service and to understand how much of their time is apportioned to various categories of tasks, and also to determine the effects of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME-mandated duty hour changes on resident workflow in North America.Methods: Electronic bibliographic databases were searched for articles in English between 1941 and April 2013 reporting time-motion studies of internal medicine residents rotating through a general medicine service.Results: Eight articles were included. Residents spent 41.8% of time in patient care activities, 18.1% communicating, 13.8% in educational activities, 19.7% in personal/other, and 6.6% in transit. North American data showed the following changes after the implementation of the ACGME 2003 duty hours standard: patient care activities from 41.8% to 40.8%, communication activities from 19.0% to 22.3%, educational activities from 17.7% to 11.6%, and personal

  11. Preventive medicines: vaccination, prophylaxis of infectious diseases, disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heininger, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Immunizations belong to the most successful interventions in medicine. Like other drugs, vaccines undergo long periods of pre-clinical development, followed by careful clinical testing through study Phases I, II, and III before they receive licensure. A successful candidate vaccine will move on to be an investigational vaccine to undergo three phases of pre-licensure clinical trials in a stepwise fashion before it can be considered for approval, followed by an optional fourth phase of post-marketing assessment. The overall risk-benefit assessment of a candidate vaccine is very critical in making the licensure decision for regulatory authorities, supported by their scientific committees. It includes analyses of immunogenicity, efficacy, reactogenicity or tolerability, and safety of the vaccine. Public trust in vaccines is a key to the success of immunization programs worldwide. Maintaining this trust requires knowledge of the benefits and scientific understanding of real or perceived risks of immunizations. Under certain circumstances, pre- or post-exposure passive immunization can be achieved by administration of immunoglobulines. In terms of prevention of infectious diseases, disinfection can be applied to reduce the risk of transmission of pathogens from patient to patient, health-care workers to patients, patients to health-care workers, and objects or medical devices to patients.

  12. Residents' and preceptors' perceptions of the use of the iPad for clinical teaching in a family medicine residency program.

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    Archibald, Douglas; Macdonald, Colla J; Plante, Judith; Hogue, Rebecca J; Fiallos, Javier

    2014-08-20

    As Family Medicine programs across Canada are transitioning into a competency-based curriculum, medical students and clinical teachers are increasingly incorporating tablet computers in their work and educational activities. The purpose of this pilot study was to identify how preceptors and residents use tablet computers to implement and adopt a new family medicine curriculum and to evaluate how they access applications (apps) through their tablet in an effort to support and enhance effective teaching and learning. Residents and preceptors (n = 25) from the Family Medicine program working at the Pembroke Regional Hospital in Ontario, Canada, were given iPads and training on how to use the device in clinical teaching and learning activities and how to access the online curriculum. Data regarding the use and perceived contribution of the iPads were collected through surveys and focus groups. This mixed methods research used analysis of survey responses to support the selection of questions for focus groups. Reported results were categorized into: curriculum and assessment; ease of use; portability; apps and resources; and perceptions about the use of the iPad in teaching/learning setting. Most participants agreed on the importance of accessing curriculum resources through the iPad but recognized that these required enhancements to facilitate use. The iPad was considered to be more useful for activities involving output of information than for input. Participants' responses regarding the ease of use of mobile technology were heterogeneous due to the diversity of computer proficiency across users. Residents had a slightly more favorable opinion regarding the iPad's contribution to teaching/learning compared to preceptors. iPad's interface should be fully enhanced to allow easy access to online curriculum and its built-in resources. The differences in computer proficiency level among users should be reduced by sharing knowledge through workshops led by more skillful i

  13. Gaps in Radiation Therapy Awareness: Results From an Educational Multi-institutional Survey of US Internal Medicine Residents.

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    Shaverdian, Narek; Yoo, Sun Mi; Cook, Ryan; Chang, Eric M; Jiang, Naomi; Yuan, Ye; Sandler, Kiri; Steinberg, Michael; Lee, Percy

    2017-08-01

    Internists and primary care providers play a growing role in cancer care. We therefore evaluated the awareness of radiation therapy in general and specifically the clinical utility of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among current US internal medicine residents. A web-based institutional review board-approved multi-institutional survey was distributed to US internal medicine residency programs. The survey evaluated trainee demographic characteristics, baseline radiation oncology awareness, knowledge of the role of SBRT for early-stage NSCLC, and whether the survey successfully improved awareness. Thirty US internal medicine programs participated, with an overall participant response rate of 46% (1177 of 2551). Of the trainees, 93% (n=1076) reported no radiation oncology education in their residency, 39% (n=452) reported confidence in knowing when to consult radiation oncology in an oncologic emergency, and 26% (n=293) reported confidence in knowing when to consult radiation oncology in the setting of a newly diagnosed cancer. Of the participants, 76% (n=850) correctly identified that surgical resection is the standard treatment in operable early-stage NSCLC, but only 50% (n=559) of participants would recommend SBRT to a medically inoperable patient, followed by 31% of participants (n=347) who were unsure of the most appropriate treatment, and 10% (n=117) who recommended waiting to offer palliative therapy. Ninety percent of participants (n=1029) agreed that they would benefit from further training on when to consult radiation oncology. Overall, 96% (n=1072) indicated that the survey increased their knowledge and awareness of the role of SBRT. The majority of participating trainees received no education in radiation oncology in their residency, reported a lack of confidence regarding when to consult radiation oncology, and overwhelmingly agreed that they would benefit from further training. These findings

  14. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN BURNOUT SYNDROME IN INTERNAL MEDICINE RESIDENTS, THEIR REPORT OF THE SUBOPTIMAL CARE PRACTICES AND PATIENTS’ REPORT

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    ISABEL CASTAÑO

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This investigation pretended to establish the association between the Burnout Syndrome in internal medicine residents,the report of their sub optimal medical practices and the report of their hospitalized patients in charge, by using amultitrait-multimethod with a concurrent design that allows the research of two objects in the same investigation withconvergent results. The translated version by Moreno (2004 of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI and the semistructured interview were used in medical residents, and a questionnaire to patients based on the scales proposed byMcKinley, Manku-Scott, Hastings, French and Baker (1997 in their research. The results showed no associationbetween the Burnout Syndrome and the report of the sub optimal practices from residents and patients. On thecontrary, it was found a significant association between the communication category and the report of patients. Finally,suggestions are formulated for improvements of these sub optimal practices and complementary studiesare proposed.

  15. Ten Tips for Engaging the Millennial Learner and Moving an Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum into the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, Shannon L.; Wray, Alisa; Wiechmann, Warren; Lin, Michelle; Boysen-Osborn, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Millennial learners are changing the face of residency education because they place emphasis on technology with new styles and means of learning. While research on the most effective way to teach the millennial learner is lacking, programs should consider incorporating educational theories and multimedia design principles to update the curriculum for these new learners. The purpose of the study is to discuss strategies for updating an emergency medicine (EM) residency program’s curriculum to accommodate the modern learner. Discussion These 10 tips provide detailed examples and approaches to incorporate technology and learning theories into an EM curriculum to potentially enhance learning and engagement by residents. Conclusion While it is unclear whether technologies actually promote or enhance learning, millennials use these technologies. Identifying best practice, grounded by theory and active learning principles, may help learners receive quality, high-yield education. Future studies will need to evaluate the efficacy of these techniques to fully delineate best practices. PMID:27330668

  16. Ten Tips for Engaging the Millennial Learner and Moving an Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum into the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon L. Toohey

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Millennial learners are changing the face of residency education because they place emphasis on technology with new styles and means of learning. While research on the most effective way to teach the millennial learner is lacking, programs should consider incorporating educational theories and multimedia design principles to update the curriculum for these new learners. The purpose of the study is to discuss strategies for updating an emergency medicine (EM residency program’s curriculum to accommodate the modern learner. Discussion: These 10 tips provide detailed examples and approaches to incorporate technology and learning theories into an EM curriculum to potentially enhance learning and engagement by residents. Conclusion: While it is unclear whether technologies actually promote or enhance learning, millennials use these technologies. Identifying best practice, grounded by theory and active learning principles, may help learners receive quality, high-yield education. Future studies will need to evaluate the efficacy of these techniques to fully delineate best practices.

  17. Ten Tips for Engaging the Millennial Learner and Moving an Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum into the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, Shannon L; Wray, Alisa; Wiechmann, Warren; Lin, Michelle; Boysen-Osborn, Megan

    2016-05-01

    Millennial learners are changing the face of residency education because they place emphasis on technology with new styles and means of learning. While research on the most effective way to teach the millennial learner is lacking, programs should consider incorporating educational theories and multimedia design principles to update the curriculum for these new learners. The purpose of the study is to discuss strategies for updating an emergency medicine (EM) residency program's curriculum to accommodate the modern learner. These 10 tips provide detailed examples and approaches to incorporate technology and learning theories into an EM curriculum to potentially enhance learning and engagement by residents. While it is unclear whether technologies actually promote or enhance learning, millennials use these technologies. Identifying best practice, grounded by theory and active learning principles, may help learners receive quality, high-yield education. Future studies will need to evaluate the efficacy of these techniques to fully delineate best practices.

  18. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum

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    Patti Pagels

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents’ health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents N=25 participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents’ ability to measure their patients’ health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge p=0.001 and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8% and a translator more effectively (77.8% three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training.

  19. [Understanding the risk factors for infectious diseases, their prevention, and control, among residents of Zhejiang Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y S; Wu, Q Q; Xu, S Y; Wang, L; Liu, H; Yao, D M; Di, Z Q; Tian, X Y

    2016-09-06

    Objective: To investigate the understanding of infectious diseases, their prevention, and control, and the factors influencing this literacy among urban and rural residents of Zhejiang Province. Methods: In November- December 2014, a multistage stratified cluster sampling questionnaire was administered at study sites in eight districts of Zhejiang province: Hangzhou city Gongshu district, Hangzhou city Chun'an county, Wenzhou city Cangnan county, Dongyang city, Jiaxing city Jiashan county, Zhoushan city Putuo district, Linhai city, Lishui city Jinyun county. The inclusion criteria were: 15-60 years old, living locally for more than six continuous months, and no mental illness. The exclusion criteria were: foreigner residing locally, resident of Hong Kong, Macau, or Taiwan, or unable to communicate through speech or writing. In this study, 4 091 questionnaires were distributed, and 4 020 valid questionnaires were returned(98.26%). Health literacy regarding infectious diseases was measured at five levels: knowledge, skills, behaviors, access to information, and understanding of the prevention of infectious diseases. A total score was calculated for each questionnaire, and a total score of ≥80 was deemed to indicate an understanding of the prevention of infectious diseases. A χ 2 test was used to compare the levels of health literacy in different populations with single-factor analyses, and a multivariate unconditional logistic regression model was used to analyze the factors affecting infectious diseases prevention and treatment literacy levels. Results: Of the 4 020 respondents(aged(43.84 ± 10.28)years), 1 964 were male(48.86%)and 2 056 were female(51.14%). In the total surveyed population, 15.17%( n =610)understood the prevention of infectious diseases, 294 were male(14.97%)and 316 were female(15.37%)(χ 2 =2.48, P =0.115). When the participants in the different age groups were analyzed, 23.11%, 20.29%, 13.27%, and 11.04% of those aged 18- 29( n =116), 30- 39

  20. STarDom study - Applying systems theory framework for Internal Medicine senior residency career development in a Singapore ACGMEI Residency Programme

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    Joanne Kua

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Career counselling is a complex process. Traditional career counselling is unidirectional in approach and ignores the impact and interactions of other factors. The Systems Theory Framework (STF is an emerging framework that illustrates the dynamic and complex nature of career development. Our study aims to i explore factors affecting senior residency (SR subspecialty choices, and ii determine the suitable utility of the STF in career counselling. Methods: A prospective observational cohort study of internal medicine residents was done. Surveys were collected at three time points. The Specialty Indecision Scale (SIS assesses the individual components and expert consensus group derived the questions for the contextual components. We measured burnout using the Mashlach Burnout Inventory. Process influences were assessed via thematic analysis of open-ended question at the 3rd survey. Results: 82 responses were collected. There was a trend towards older residents being ready to commit albeit not statistically significant. At year 1, overseas graduands (OR = 6.87, p= 0.02, lifestyle factors (t(29=2.31, p=0.03, d= 0.91, individual factors of readiness (t(29 = -2.74, p=0.01, d= 1.08, indecisiveness (t(27= -0.57, p=0.02, d= 0.99 and self- doubt (t(29= -4.02, p=0.00, d= 1.54 predicted the resident’s ability to commit to SR. These factors change and being married (OR 4.49, p= 0.03 was the only factor by the 3rd survey. Male residents are more resolute in their choice (OR= 5.17, p= 0.02. Conclusion: The resident’s choice of SR changes over time. The STF helps in understanding decision-making about subspecialty choices. Potential applications include: i initiation of career counselling at year 1 and ii reviewing unpopular SR subspecialties to increase their attractiveness.

  1. Content and conceptual frameworks of psychology and social work preceptor feedback related to the educational requests of family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Luc; Rocque, Rhéa; Audétat, Marie-Claude

    2017-06-01

    Supervision of communication competency in clinical settings in medicine is an important component of professional training. The purpose of this study was to describe the content and rationale of psychology and social work preceptor feedback to family medicine residents who express educational needs during case-based written vignettes. We conducted a qualitative study with 25 psychology and social work preceptors from family medicine departments of the three French-speaking universities in the province of Quebec, Canada. During an individual interview, preceptors were asked to respond to three short case-based written vignettes depicting resident educational issues regarding communication and to explain their responses. Authors analyzed the content of responses and the conceptual frameworks reported. The three vignettes elicited 475 responses, including 58 distinct responses and 33 distinct conceptual frameworks. Therapeutic alliance and stages of grief were the two most reported conceptual frameworks. The vignettes stimulated a wealth of responses and conceptual frameworks among psychology and social work preceptors in family medicine. The complete list of responses could be useful for faculty development activities by stimulating preceptors' reflexive practice with regard to their responses, the educational goals of these responses and the conceptual frameworks underlying their feedback. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A survey of the current utilization of asynchronous education among emergency medicine residents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallin, Mike; Schlein, Sarah; Doctor, Shaneen; Stroud, Susan; Dawson, Matthew; Fix, Megan

    2014-04-01

    Medical education is transitioning from traditional learning methods. Resident interest in easily accessible education materials is forcing educators to reevaluate teaching methodology. To determine emergency medicine residents' current methods of and preferences for obtaining medical knowledge, the authors created a survey and sent it to residents, at all levels of training throughout the United States, whose e-mail addresses were available via their residency's official Web site (June-December 2012). The eight-question voluntary survey asked respondents about demographics, their use of extracurricular time, and the materials they perceived as most beneficial. The authors used descriptive statistics to analyze results. Of the 401 residents who received the e-mailed survey, 226 (56.3%) completed it. Of these, 97.7% reported spending at least one hour per week engaging in extracurricular education, and 34.5% reported spending two to four hours per week (P journals (36.5%), and Google (33.8%; P educators must engage with current learners to guide appropriate use of these.

  3. Feasibility of Spanish-language acquisition for acute medical care providers: novel curriculum for emergency medicine residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grall, Kristi H; Panchal, Ashish R; Chuffe, Eliud; Stoneking, Lisa R

    2016-01-01

    Language and cultural barriers are detriments to quality health care. In acute medical settings, these barriers are more pronounced, which can lead to poor patient outcomes. We implemented a longitudinal Spanish-language immersion curriculum for emergency medicine (EM) resident physicians. This curriculum includes language and cultural instruction, and is integrated into the weekly EM didactic conference, longitudinal over the entire 3-year residency program. Language proficiency was assessed at baseline and annually on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale, via an oral exam conducted by the same trained examiner each time. The objective of the curriculum was improvement of resident language skills to ILR level 1+ by year 3. Significance was evaluated through repeated-measures analysis of variance. The curriculum was launched in July 2010 and followed through June 2012 (n=16). After 1 year, 38% had improved over one ILR level, with 50% achieving ILR 1+ or above. After year 2, 100% had improved over one level, with 90% achieving the objective level of ILR 1+. Mean ILR improved significantly from baseline, year 1, and year 2 (F=55, df =1; Planguage skills in EM residents. The curriculum improved EM-resident language proficiency above the goal in just 2 years. Further studies will focus on the effect of language acquisition on patient care in acute settings.

  4. TRACER: an 'eye-opener' to the patient experience across the transition of care in an internal medicine resident program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Lauren B; Hall, Susana L; Kleppel, Reva W; Hinchey, Kevin T

    2015-01-01

    A safe patient transition requires a complex set of physician skills within the interprofessional practice. To evaluate a rotation which applies self-reflection and workplace learning in a TRAnsition of CarE Rotation (TRACER) for internal medicine (IM) residents. TRACER is a 2-week required IM resident rotation where trainees join a ward team as a quality officer and follow patients into postacute care. In 2010, residents participated in semistructured, one-on-one interviews as part of ongoing program evaluation. They were asked what they had learned on TRACER, the year prior, and how they used those skills in their practice. Using transcripts, the authors reviewed and coded each transcript to develop themes. Five themes emerged from a qualitative, grounded theory analysis: seeing things from the other side, the 'ah ha' moment of fragmented care, team collaboration including understanding nursing scope of practice in different settings, patient understanding, and passing the learning on. TRACER gives residents a moment to breathe and open their eyes to the interprofessional practice setting and the patient's experience of care in transition. Residents learn about transitions of care through self-reflection. This learning is sustained over time and is valued enough to teach to their junior colleagues.

  5. Improving quality in an internal medicine residency program through a peer medical record audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Keiko; Mansi, Ishak A; Banks, Daniel

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a quality improvement project of a limited didactic session, a medical record audit by peers, and casual feedback within a residency program. Residents audited their peers' medical records from the clinic of a university hospital in March, April, August, and September 2007. A 24-item quality-of-care score was developed for five common diagnoses, expressed from 0 to 100, with 100 as complete compliance. Audit scores were compared by month and experience of the resident as an auditor. A total of 469 medical records, audited by 12 residents, for 80 clinic residents, were included. The mean quality-of-care score was 89 (95% CI = 88-91); the scores in March, April, August, and September were 88 (95% CI = 85-91), 94 (95% CI = 90-96), 87 (95% CI = 85-89), and 91 (95% CI = 89-93), respectively. The mean score of 58 records of residents who had experience as auditors was 94 (95% CI = 89-96) compared with 89 (95% CI = 87-90) for those who did not. The score significantly varied (P = .0009) from March to April and from April to August, but it was not significantly associated with experience as an auditor with multivariate analysis. Residents' compliance with the standards of care was generally high. Residents responded to the project well, but their performance dropped after a break in the intervention. Continuation of the audit process may be necessary for a sustained effect on quality.

  6. Adherence to vector preventive measures decrease cases of acute Dengue among Abuja residents, Nigeria

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    Idris Abdullahi Nasir

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nigeria is one of the dengue hyper-endemic nations. This study investigated the level of knowledge about dengue and vector preventive practices and their impacts on acute dengue among febrile patients at Abuja, Nigeria. Materials and methods: This cross-sectional survey was conducted on febrile patients attending University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria. Blood samples were individually collected from 171 febrile patients residing at Gwagwalada suburb. Interviewer administered questionnaires were used to assess subjects’ knowledge about preventive measures against vector breeding and bites. Blood samples were tested for dengue virus Nonstructural glycoprotein-1antigen using enzyme linked Immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results: Fifteen out of 171 febrile persons (8.8% were Dengue NS1 positive. Sixty percent of the subjects do not know about dengue, while 33% knew about dengue virus infection through television/ radio programs, 5% through healthcare professionals and 2% from friends/families. Those who persistently use indoor residual spraying and long sleeves/trousers during daytime had less cases of DENV NS1 than those who do not. There was statistical association between DENV NS1 and residence in proximity to waste dumpsites (P<0.0001 and frequent use of long sleeve clothing and trousers (P=0.005. However, there was no statistical association between DENV NS1 antigenemia and persistent use of indoor residual spraying and presence of in-door water containers (P>0.05. Conclusions: Findings from this study imply that proper education and adherence to preventive measures minimize people from being susceptible to Dengue virus infections.

  7. Process-oriented dynamic group psychotherapy for depression as a teaching modality in a family medicine residency program- A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Eric P; McClaflin, Richard; Zonca, Rachel; Mikuni, Karen; Chung, Willard; Etnyre, Ethan; Faucette, Lindsey; Oates, David; Merrill, Chuck

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives This pilot study provides a description and evaluation of process-oriented dynamic group psychotherapy for depression as a teaching modality for family medicine residents. The main purpose of using this modality was to teach family medicine residents a variety of psychological clinical skills. A secondary benefit of this modality was to provide in-house, primary care treatment to depressed patients, although the efficacy of this was not evaluated in the present study. Methods A 10-item, self-report, Likert-type questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of family medicine residents who had participated in the program. Results Completed questionnaires were received from 100% of the family medicine resident participants. Responses to the questionnaires indicate that the residents felt they acquired a variety of clinical skills from the training modality, to include developing active listening and interviewing skills; methods to improve the doctor-patient relationship; increased skills in empathy, intuitive processes, and emotional support; a depth understanding of how intra-psychic conflicts and interpersonal problems contribute to depression; how to give effective feedback that promotes behavioral change; and how to place interventions at the appropriate level of change. Eighty-eight percent of residents indicated they would recommend this learning modality to a family medicine physician colleague. Conclusions The family medicine residents' responses to the questionnaires indicate that they perceived process-oriented dynamic group psychotherapy for depression as a constructive and beneficial modality for both patient care and learning a variety of clinical skills.

  8. A National Implementation Project to Prevent Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection in Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Greene, M Todd; Meddings, Jennifer; Krein, Sarah L; McNamara, Sara E; Trautner, Barbara W; Ratz, David; Stone, Nimalie D; Min, Lillian; Schweon, Steven J; Rolle, Andrew J; Olmsted, Russell N; Burwen, Dale R; Battles, James; Edson, Barbara; Saint, Sanjay

    2017-08-01

    utilization remained unchanged (4.50 at baseline, 4.45 at conclusion of project; IRR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.88-1.03; P = .26) in adjusted analyses. The number of urine cultures ordered for all residents decreased from 3.49 per 1000 resident-days to 3.08 per 1000 resident-days. Similarly, after adjustment, the rates were shown to decrease from 3.52 to 3.09 (IRR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.77-0.94; P = .001). In a large-scale, national implementation project involving community-based nursing homes, combined technical and socioadaptive catheter-associated UTI prevention interventions successfully reduced the incidence of catheter-associated UTIs.

  9. Family Medicine in a Consumer Age — Part 4: Preventive Medicine, Professional Satisfaction, and the Rise of Consumerism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Morton M.

    1977-01-01

    In an attempt to find out if the physician perceives the same strengths and weaknesses in today's practice of family medicine as does the consumer, the Lay Advisory Committee of the College's B.C. Chapter initiated a survey of physicians' and consumers' attitudes. This article, the fourth and last in a series, presents some of the results of the survey as they relate to preventive-medicine, professional satisfaction and the rise of consumerism.

  10. Approved Instructional Resources Series: A National Initiative to Identify Quality Emergency Medicine Blog and Podcast Content for Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Michelle; Joshi, Nikita; Grock, Andrew; Swaminathan, Anand; Morley, Eric J; Branzetti, Jeremy; Taira, Taku; Ankel, Felix; Yarris, Lalena M

    2016-05-01

    Background Emergency medicine (EM) residency programs can provide up to 20% of their planned didactic experiences asynchronously through the Individualized Interactive Instruction (III) initiative. Although blogs and podcasts provide potential material for III content, programs often struggle with identifying quality online content. Objective To develop and implement a process to curate quality EM content on blogs and podcasts for resident education and III credit. Methods We developed the Approved Instructional Resources (AIR) Series on the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine website. Monthly, an editorial board identifies, peer reviews, and writes assessment questions for high-quality blog/podcast content. Eight educators rate each post using a standardized scoring instrument. Posts scoring ≥ 30 of 35 points are awarded an AIR badge and featured in the series. Enrolled residents can complete an assessment quiz for III credit. After 12 months of implementation, we report on program feasibility, enrollment rate, web analytics, and resident satisfaction scores. Results As of June 2015, 65 EM residency programs are enrolled in the AIR Series, and 2140 AIR quizzes have been completed. A total of 96% (2064 of 2140) of participants agree or strongly agree that the activity would improve their clinical competency, 98% (2098 of 2140) plan to use the AIR Series for III credit, and 97% (2077 of 2140) plan to use it again in the future. Conclusions The AIR Series is a national asynchronous EM curriculum featuring quality blogs and podcasts. It uses a national expert panel and novel scoring instrument to peer review web-based educational resources.

  11. Frequency of use and acceptability of clinical prediction rules for pulmonary embolism among Swiss general internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, N; Stalder, O; Limacher, A; Bassetti, S; Beer, J H; Genné, D; Battegay, E; Hayoz, D; Leuppi, J; Mueller, B; Perrier, A; Waeber, G; Rodondi, N; Aujesky, D

    2017-12-01

    Whether clinical prediction rules for pulmonary embolism are accepted and used among general internal medicine residents remains uncertain. We therefore evaluated the frequency of use and acceptability of the Revised Geneva Score (RGS) and the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI), and explored which factors were associated with rule use. In an online survey among general internal medicine residents from 10 Swiss hospitals, we assessed rule acceptability using the Ottawa Acceptability of Decision Rules Instrument (OADRI) and explored the association between physician and training-related factors and rule use using mixed logistic regression models. The response rate was 50.4% (433/859). Overall, 61% and 36% of the residents reported that they always or regularly use the RGS and the PESI, respectively. The mean overall OADRI score was 4.3 (scale 0-6) for the RGS and 4.1 for the PESI, indicating a good acceptability. Rule acceptability (odds ratio [OR] 6.19 per point, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.64-10.51), prior training in emergency medicine (OR 5.14, CI 2.20-12.01), and availability of internal guidelines recommending RGS use (OR 4.25, CI 2.15-8.43) were associated with RGS use. Rule acceptability (OR 6.43 per point, CI 4.17-9.92) and rule taught at medical school (OR 2.06, CI 1.24-3.43) were associated with PESI use. The RGS was more frequently used than the PESI. Both rules were considered acceptable. Rule acceptability, prior training in emergency medicine, availability of internal guidelines, and rule taught at medical school were associated with rule use and represent potential targets for quality improvement interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Female residents experiencing medical errors in general internal medicine: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Mankaka, Cindy Ottiger; Waeber, Gérard; Gachoud, David

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Doctors, especially doctors-in-training such as residents, make errors. They have to face the consequences even though today's approach to errors emphasizes systemic factors. Doctors' individual characteristics play a role in how medical errors are experienced and dealt with. The role of gender has previously been examined in a few quantitative studies that have yielded conflicting results. In the present study, we sought to qualitatively explore the experience of female residents...

  13. Adoption of a wiki within a large internal medicine residency program: a 3-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotty, Bradley H; Mostaghimi, Arash; Reynolds, Eileen E

    2012-01-01

    To describe the creation and evaluate the use of a wiki by medical residents, and to determine if a wiki would be a useful tool for improving the experience, efficiency, and education of housestaff. In 2008, a team of medical residents built a wiki containing institutional knowledge and reference information using Microsoft SharePoint. We tracked visit data for 3 years, and performed an audit of page views and updates in the second year. We evaluated the attitudes of medical residents toward the wiki using a survey. Users accessed the wiki 23,218, 35,094, and 40,545 times in each of three successive academic years from 2008 to 2011. In the year two audit, 85 users made a total of 1082 updates to 176 pages and of these, 91 were new page creations by 17 users. Forty-eight percent of residents edited a page. All housestaff felt the wiki improved their ability to complete tasks, and 90%, 89%, and 57% reported that the wiki improved their experience, efficiency, and education, respectively, when surveyed in academic year 2009-2010. A wiki is a useful and popular tool for organizing administrative and educational content for residents. Housestaff felt strongly that the wiki improved their workflow, but a smaller educational impact was observed. Nearly half of the housestaff edited the wiki, suggesting broad buy-in among the residents. A wiki is a feasible and useful tool for improving information retrieval for house officers.

  14. Addressing the leadership gap in medicine: residents' need for systematic leadership development training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Daniel M; Bernard, Ken; Bohnen, Jordan; Bohmer, Richard

    2012-04-01

    All clinicians take on leadership responsibilities when delivering care. Evidence suggests that effective clinical leadership yields superior clinical outcomes. However, few residency programs systematically teach all residents how to lead, and many clinicians are inadequately prepared to meet their day-to-day clinical leadership responsibilities. The purpose of this article is twofold: first, to make the case for the need to refocus residency education around the development of outstanding "frontline" clinical leaders and, second, to provide an evidence-based framework for designing formal leadership development programs for residents. The authors first present a definition of clinical leadership and highlight evidence that effective frontline clinical leadership improves both clinical outcomes and satisfaction for patients and providers. The authors then discuss the health care "leadership gap" and describe barriers to implementing leadership development training in health care. Next, they present evidence that leaders are not just "born" but, rather, can be "made," and offer a set of best practices to facilitate the design of leadership development programs. Finally, the authors suggest approaches to mitigating barriers to implementing leadership development programs and highlight the major reasons why health care delivery organizations, residency programs, and national accreditation bodies must make comprehensive leadership education an explicit goal of residency training.

  15. Japanese Resident Physicians' Attitudes, knowledge, and Perceived Barriers on the Practice of Evidence Based Medicine: a Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emura Sei SE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence based medicine plays a crucial role as a tool that helps integrate research evidence into clinical practice. However, few reports have yet to examine its application in daily practice among resident physicians in Japan. The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes towards and knowledge of EBM among resident physicians in Japanese and determine perceived barriers to its use. Findings A cross-sectional, self-administered anonymous questionnaire was distributed to 60 resident staffs at Saga University Hospital in Japan. Forty residents completed and returned the questionnaire. Fifty four percent of respondents understood the basic terminology of EBM, 3% could explain this to others, and 41% indicated they would like to understand the terminology more. Thirteen percent admitted having a good understanding of EBM basic skills. Fifty respondents indicated having read EBM sources, but only 3% indicated that they use these sources in clinical decision making. The most prominent barriers of EBM application revealed in this study were insufficient time to access the sources, a lack of native language references, and insufficient basic EBM skills, but not scepticism about the EBM concept. Conclusions In general, respondents positively welcomed EBM, and moderately understood and knew basic EBM skill; however, barriers in its application were shown to exist.

  16. Breaking bad news education for emergency medicine residents: A novel training module using simulation with the SPIKES protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Inchoel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Breaking bad news (BBN in the emergency department (ED is a common occurrence. This is especially true for an emergency physician (EP as there is little time to prepare for the event and likely little or no knowledge of the patients or family background information. At our institution, there is no formal training for EP residents in delivering bad news. We felt teaching emergency medicine residents these communication skills should be an important part of their educational curriculum. We describe our experience with a defined educational program designed to educate and improve physician′s confidence and competence in bad news and death notification. A regularly scheduled 5-h grand rounds conference time frame was dedicated to the education of EM residents about BBN. A multidisciplinary approach was taken to broaden the prospective of the participants. The course included lectures from different specialties, role playing for three short scenarios in different capacities, and hi-fidelity simulation cases with volatile psychosocial issues and stressors. Participants were asked to fill out a self-efficacy form and evaluation sheets. Fourteen emergency residents participated and all thought that this education is necessary. The mean score of usefulness is 4.73 on a Likert Scale from 1 to 5. The simulation part was thought to be the most useful (43%, with role play 14%, and lecture 7%. We believe that teaching physicians to BBN in a controlled environment is a good use of educational time and an important procedure that EP must learn.

  17. Limitations of Condensed Teaching Strategies to Develop Hand-Held Cardiac Ultrasonography Skills in Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jeffrey S; Barake, Walid; Smith, Chris; Thakrar, Amar; Johri, Amer M

    2016-08-01

    Advances in ultrasonographic technology have allowed for hand-held cardiac ultrasonography (HHCU) units that fit into a physician's laboratory coat. Recently, studies to educate internal medicine residents have shown promise. The optimal duration and methodology for teaching HHCU skills has not been established. Over a 1-year period, internal medicine residents were recruited during their cardiology ward rotation into a single-centre nonblinded randomized trial. The 2 condensed teaching strategies were (1) a conventional ward-based program and (2) a technology-driven simulation-based strategy. Outcomes were evaluated by (1) an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) to evaluate interpretation ability (assessing both type I and type II error rates) and (2) demonstration of HHCU skills graded by 2 level III echocardiographers. Twenty-four internal medicine residents were randomized. After teaching, the conventional teaching group had a significant absolute increase in the ability to make a singular correct diagnosis (20%; P skill was not significantly different between groups. The false-positive rate increased by an absolute 14% and 17% in the conventional and technology groups, respectively (P = 0.079 and P = 0.008). Our findings suggest that HHCU interpretation skills improve after either a conventional ward-based or a technology-driven approach. However, our study emphasizes the important limitations of both teaching programs, because we detected a trend toward an increase in the false-positive rate after both approaches. This suggests that a short duration of training may not be sufficient for HHCU to be performed in a safe manner. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effectiveness of preventive medicine education and its determinants among medical students in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil, Shirin; Zawahir, Mohamed Shukry; Al-Naggar, Redhwan Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Preventive medicine has been incorporated in the medical school curriculum, but its effectiveness and the factors that affect it are yet to be widely looked into in the context of Malaysia. We aimed to measure the familiarity with, perception about the importance to learn, and the ability to practice preventive medicine as well as its determinants among the medical students in Malaysia. Thus, a cross sectional study was conducted through an anonymous online survey among 387 randomly selected final year medical students of four large public medical schools in Malaysia from March to September 2014. Of the total sample, 340 (response rate 87.8%) gave a written informed consent and took part in the survey. The familiarity of the sample with preventive medicine was measured in 19 preventive medicine areas, and their perception about the importance of preventive medicine and their ability to practice it were gauged on a Likert scale (low score indicates disagreement and high indicates agreement). Descriptive statistical analysis was performed, followed by logistic regression. The mean age of the respondents was 23.7 (SD 0.77) years, and 61.2% (n = 208) of them were females. Results showed that 22.9% of the sample (n = 78) had a low familiarity with preventive medicine, whereas 76.8% (n = 261) had a high familiarity. The study sample specified that among all the preventive medicine subjects, screening and control as well as smoking cessation and immunization are "extremely important to learn." In univariable analysis, being a female, medical school, family size, and perception about the importance to learn preventive medicine were associated with the ability to practice it. In multivariable analysis, the perception towards the importance to learn preventive medicine was the only significant determinant: aOR (adjusted odds ratio) for those who "agreed" 17.28 (95% CI aOR 4.44-67.26, P < 0.001) and for "strongly agreed" 35.87 (95% CI aOR 8.04-159.87, P < 0.001). Considering

  19. Social media responses to the Annals of Emergency Medicine residents' perspective article on multiple mini-interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nikita K; Yarris, Lalena M; Doty, Christopher I; Lin, Michelle

    2014-09-01

    In May 2014, Annals of Emergency Medicine continued a successful collaboration with an academic Web site, Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM) to host an online discussion session featuring the 2014 Annals Residents' Perspective article "Does the Multiple Mini-Interview Address Stakeholder Needs? An Applicant's Perspective" by Phillips and Garmel. This dialogue included Twitter conversations, a live videocast with the authors and other experts, and detailed discussions on the ALiEM Web site's comment section. This summary article serves the dual purpose of reporting the qualitative thematic analysis from a global online discussion and the Web analytics for our novel multimodal approach. Social media technologies provide a unique opportunity to engage with a diverse audience to detect existing and new emerging themes. Such technologies allow rapid hypothesis generation for future research and enable more accelerated knowledge translation. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. THE EFFECT OF COMMUNICATION SKILLS TRAINING PROGRAMME ON THE ATTITUDE AND PERCEPTIONS OF THE RESIDENTS OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeba Mary Mani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Communication skills are essential for all practicing doctors, which can be taught and assessed by a structured programme. Hence, a specialty-based communication skills training programme was conducted among the residents of the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PMR Department. The aim of the study is to assess the change in attitude and perception among the residents of PMR by a communication skills training programme. MATERIALS AND METHODS It comprised of a data collection procedure. Here, a semi-structured questionnaire was administered to the subjects. It was given as a pre-intervention, post-intervention and as a second phase post-intervention questionnaire. The communication skills training programme (n=16 was conducted after a pre-test evaluation using the validated questionnaire tool. A half-day training programme using composite Teaching-Learning methods (lectures/role play/videos/check list were included. The post-test-1 (n=16 was conducted after the training programme and the post-test-2 (n=16 was conducted after 6 weeks. All the tests used the same validated questionnaire tool with scores allocated to each item. Settings- Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PMR Department among the residents. Study Design- Educational Intervention- A communication skills training programme using composite teaching learning methods. Statistical Analysis- Analysed using SPSS-16 package software. RESULTS The median pre-test score of the sixteen PMR residents was noted to be 33. The median post-test-1 score of the group was noted to be 37. A significant difference was noted between the pre- and post-test-1 score, which was statistically significant Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test z=-3.249 and p value <0.0001. The post-test-2, which was done after 6 weeks of the programme yielded a score of 36, a similar value of post-test-1. The comparison of pre-test score with post-test-1 and post-test-2 scores showed a highly significant improvement in the

  1. History and Guideline of Emergency Medicine Residency Discipline in Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran; Review of 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Shojaee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since many years ago several problems have been felt in emergency departments (ED of hospitals. In fact, none of physicians in the hospital have accepted the direct responsibility of patients’ management in the EDs and emergency wards of University centers have been managed by residents of various disciplines. Thus, the first line of therapy does not have guardian and several consultants with various specialists have been performed regarding patient’s management. The necessity of physician training was noticed for the first time in 1950 and after 24 years in 1974, the academic emergency medicine was established in United States of America (USA in response to people expectations for overnight accessibility to specialized and quality medical cares. It was performed with foundation of the first period of resident’s training in emergency medicine discipline at University of Cincinnati, Ohio. At beginning, specialists of different fields such as internal medicine, surgery, anesthesia, orthopedics, and neurosurgery initiated the training of emergency medicine residents together which could be responsible to most of referees. Finally, with formal accepting the specialty board in 1978, this field has been officially identified as the 23th discipline in USA. Today the EDs of most hospitals in European and American countries has been managing by emergency medicine specialists which leads to improve the quality of education and treatment, significantly. Also in Iran the request of establishing this major has been presented in the secretariat of the council for graduate medical education for the first time in 1996. This request was approved and principles of its initiating recognized officially by the ministry of health. But, considering to lack of an appropriate infrastructure, it postponed until 2000 that again this discipline was missioned for initiating to the council for graduate medical education by the minister and its outcome was

  2. Salt and its Role in Health and Disease Prevention from the Perspectives of Iranian Medicine and Modern Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Masoud; Vahid, Hamide

    2016-05-01

    Salt in Iranian medical sources is mentioned as Malh and has a special place in people's nutrition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of correct use of salt on health and disease prevention in the context of Iranian medicine and its comparison with modern medicine. This article reviews Iranian medicine references on the usage of salt and its benefits. Additionally, modern medicine references were searched to identify the dos and don'ts of salt consumption. Then the results from both approaches were compared and analyzed. The main application salt in Iranian medical resources includes usage in latif supplier, solvent, dryer, laxative of phlegm and melancholy, slimy moisture body repellent, opening obstruction of liver and spleen, aid in digestion, beneficial for seeds and corruption of foods, appetizing, cold foods reformer and improving the flavor of foods. On the other hand, the major benefits of salt according to modern medicine resources are; aiding the balance of electrolytes and fluids, carry nutrients into cells, regulation of acid-base balance, support transfer of nerve impulses, regulate blood pressure, and secretion of gastric acid. According to the Iranian medicine, the amount and type of salt to maintain health and prevent diseases is determined based on factors such as temperament, age, health and disease, season, and location. While a unique approach is not prescribed for every individual, in modern medicine resources, a fixed set of guidelines is recommended for all healthy individuals. Consequently, the modern medicine pays less attention to physiological, structural, and genetic issues. Considering the importance of salt and its undeniable impact on human health, it is apparent that additional research is required to determine factors affecting the actual amount of salt per person.

  3. Does Research Training During Residency Promote Scholarship and Influence Career Choice? A Cross-Sectional Analysis of a 10-Year Cohort of the UCSF-PRIME Internal Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlwes, Jeffrey; O'Brien, Bridget; Stanley, Marion; Grant, Ross; Shunk, Rebecca; Connor, Denise; Cornett, Patricia; Hollander, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine, and the Carnegie Foundation report on medical education recommend creating individualized learning pathways during medical training so that learners can experience broader professional roles beyond patient care. Little data exist to support the success of these specialized pathways in graduate medical education. We present the 10-year experience of the Primary Care Medicine Education (PRIME) track, a clinical-outcomes research pathway for internal medicine residents at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). We hypothesized that participation in an individualized learning track, PRIME, would lead to a greater likelihood of publishing research from residency and accessing adequate career mentorship and would be influential on subsequent alumni careers. We performed a cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residency alumni from UCSF who graduated in 2001 through 2010. We compared responses of PRIME and non-PRIME categorical alumni. We used Pearson's chi-square and Student's t test to compare PRIME and non-PRIME alumni on categorical and continuous variables. Sixty-six percent (211/319) of alumni responded to the survey. A higher percentage of PRIME alumni published residency research projects compared to non-PRIME alumni (64% vs. 40%; p = .002). The number of PRIME alumni identifying research as their primary career role was not significantly different from non-PRIME internal medicine residency graduates (35% of PRIME vs. 29% non-PRIME). Process measures that could explain these findings include adequate access to mentors (M 4.4 for PRIME vs. 3.6 for non-PRIME alumni, p < .001, on a 5-point Likert scale) and agreeing that mentoring relationships affected career choice (M 4.2 for PRIME vs. 3.7 for categorical alumni, p = .001). Finally, 63% of PRIME alumni agreed that their research experience

  4. Trends in the Medical Knowledge and Clinical Competence of Graduates of Internal Medicine Residency Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcini, John J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study assessed the effectiveness of medical resident training programs during 1983-88 by evaluating students' certification scores and comparing them to the program's evaluation of students' clinical competence. Results are reported and analyzed for top-rated, university-affiliated, and non-university-affiliated programs, focusing on trends over…

  5. Emergency medicine residents' beliefs about contributing to an online collaborative slideshow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archambault, P.M.; Thanh, J.; Blouin, D.; Gagnon, S.; Poitras, J.; Fountain, R.M.; Fleet, R.; Bilodeau, A.; Belt, T.H. van de; Legare, F.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Collaborative writing applications (CWAs), such as the Google DocsTM platform, can improve skill acquisition, knowledge retention, and collaboration in medical education. Using CWAs to support the training of residents offers many advantages, but stimulating them to contribute remains

  6. A National Survey on the Current Status of Family Practice Residency Education in Geriatric Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ina; Arenson, Christine; Warshaw, Gregg; Bragg, Elizabeth; Shaull, Ruth; Counsell, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of family practice residency directors found that 92 percent have a required geriatrics curriculum; nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home care are the predominant training sites; the mean number of geriatrics faculty is 2.6 per program; and conflicting time demands with other curricula was ranked as the most significant…

  7. Functional Neuroimaging Correlates of Burnout among Internal Medicine Residents and Faculty Members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durning, S.J.; Costanzo, M.; Artino, A.R.; Dyrbye, L.N.; Beckman, T.J.; Schuwirth, L.; Holmboe, E.; Roy, M.J.; Wittich, C.M.; Lipner, R.S.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Burnout is prevalent in residency training and practice and is linked to medical error and suboptimal patient care. However, little is known about how burnout affects clinical reasoning, which is essential to safe and effective care. The aim of this study was to examine how burnout modulates brain

  8. The relationship between communication scores from the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Skills examination and communication ratings for first-year internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winward, Marcia L; Lipner, Rebecca S; Johnston, Mary M; Cuddy, Monica M; Clauser, Brian E

    2013-05-01

    This study extends available evidence about the relationship between scores on the Step 2 Clinical Skills (CS) component of the United States Medical Licensing Examination and subsequent performance in residency. It focuses on the relationship between Step 2 CS communication and interpersonal skills scores and communication skills ratings that residency directors assign to residents in their first postgraduate year of internal medicine training. It represents the first large-scale evaluation of the extent to which Step 2 CS communication and interpersonal skills scores can be extrapolated to examinee performance in supervised practice. Hierarchical linear modeling techniques were used to examine the relationships among examinee characteristics, residency program characteristics, and residency-director-provided ratings. The sample comprised 6,306 examinees from 238 internal medicine residency programs who completed Step 2 CS for the first time in 2005 and received ratings during their first year of internal medicine residency training. Although the relationship is modest, Step 2 CS communication and interpersonal skills scores predict communication skills ratings for first-year internal medicine residents after accounting for other factors. The results of this study make a reasonable case that Step 2 CS communication and interpersonal skills scores provide useful information for predicting the level of communication skill that examinees will display in their first year of internal medicine residency training. This finding demonstrates some level of extrapolation from the testing context to behavior in supervised practice, thus providing validity-related evidence for using Step 2 CS communication and interpersonal skills scores in high-stakes decisions.

  9. A comparison of simulation-based education versus lecture-based instruction for toxicology training in emergency medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddry, Joseph K; Varney, Shawn M; Sessions, Daniel; Heard, Kennon; Thaxton, Robert E; Ganem, Victoria J; Zarzabal, Lee A; Bebarta, Vikhyat S

    2014-12-01

    Simulation-based teaching (SIM) is a common method for medical education. SIM exposes residents to uncommon scenarios that require critical, timely actions. SIM may be a valuable training method for critically ill poisoned patients whose diagnosis and treatment depend on key clinical findings. Our objective was to compare medical simulation (SIM) to traditional lecture-based instruction (LEC) for training emergency medicine (EM) residents in the acute management of critically ill poisoned patients. EM residents completed two pre-intervention questionnaires: (1) a 24-item multiple-choice test of four toxicological emergencies and (2) a questionnaire using a five-point Likert scale to rate the residents' comfort level in diagnosing and treating patients with specific toxicological emergencies. After completing the pre-intervention questionnaires, residents were randomized to SIM or LEC instruction. Two toxicologists and three EM physicians presented four toxicology topics to both groups in four 20-min sessions. One group was in the simulation center, and the other in a lecture hall. Each group then repeated the multiple-choice test and questionnaire immediately after instruction and again at 3 months after training. Answers were not discussed. The primary outcome was comparison of immediate mean post-intervention test scores and final scores 3 months later between SIM and LEC groups. Test score outcomes between groups were compared at each time point (pre-test, post-instruction, 3-month follow-up) using Wilcoxon rank sum test. Data were summarized by descriptive statistics. Continuous variables were characterized by means (SD) and tested using t tests or Wilcoxon rank sum. Categorical variables were summarized by frequencies (%) and compared between training groups with chi-square or Fisher's exact test. Thirty-two EM residents completed pre- and post-intervention tests and comfort questionnaires on the study day. Both groups had higher post-intervention mean test

  10. A comparison of risk and protective factors related to suicide ideation among residents and specialists in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eneroth, Mari; Gustafsson Sendén, Marie; Løvseth, Lise T; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin; Fridner, Ann

    2014-03-22

    Physicians have an elevated risk of experiencing suicidal thoughts, which might be due to work-related factors. However, the hierarchical work positions as well as work-related health differ among resident and specialist physicians. As such, the correlates of suicide ideation may also vary between these two groups. In the present study, work- and health-related factors and their association with suicidal thoughts among residents (n=234) and specialists (n=813) working at a university hospital were examined using cross-sectional data. Logistic regression analysis showed that having supportive meetings was associated with a lower level of suicide ideation among specialists (OR=0.68, 95% CI: 0.50-0.94), while an empowering leadership was related to a lower level of suicide ideation among residents (OR=0.55, 95% CI: 0.32-0.94). Having been harassed at work was associated with suicidal ideation among specialists (OR=2.26, 95% CI: 1.31-3.91). In addition, sickness presenteeism and work disengagement were associated with suicide ideation in both groups of physicians. These findings suggest that different workplace interventions are needed to prevent suicide ideation in residents and specialists.

  11. Managed care, consumerism, preventive medicine: does a causal connection exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, John A; Xie, Yang

    2006-07-01

    Managed care plans, and HMOs in particular, have long touted that their emphasis is on preventive care, to avoid expensive illness later in life. However, few articles in the contemporary literature adequately address this claim. The available evidence seems to support that HMOs do, in fact, provide greater access to preventive services, but the limitations of this research are substantial. This article discusses the scientific evidence on the relationships between managed care arrangements and the implications for preventive care in the current era, emphasizing consumer choices and less-restrictive plan structures.

  12. Benefits and Challenges of Developing a Customized Rubric for Curricular Review of a Residency Program in Laboratory Animal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, Tiffany L; Wilson, Ronald P

    Rigorous curricular review of post-graduate veterinary medical residency programs is in the best interest of program directors in light of the requirements and needs of specialty colleges, graduate school administrations, and other stakeholders including prospective students and employers. Although minimum standards for training are typically provided by specialty colleges, mechanisms for evaluation are left to the discretion of program directors. The paucity of information available describing best practices for curricular assessment of veterinary medical specialty training programs makes resources from other medical fields essential to informing the assessment process. Here we describe the development of a rubric used to evaluate courses in a 3-year American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ACLAM)-recognized residency training program culminating in a Master of Science degree. This rubric, based on examples from medical education and other fields of graduate study, provided transparent criteria for evaluation that were consistent with stakeholder needs and institutional initiatives. However, its use caused delays in the curricular review process as two significant obstacles to refinement were brought to light: variation in formal education in curriculum design and significant differences in teaching philosophies among faculty. The evaluation process was able to move forward after institutional resources were used to provide faculty development in curriculum design. The use of a customized rubric is recommended as a best practice for curricular refinement for residency programs because it results in transparency of the review process and can reveal obstacles to change that would otherwise remain unaddressed.

  13. Sleep behaviors and attitudes among internal medicine housestaff in a U.S. university-based residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Ilene M; Bellini, Lisa M; Shea, Judy A

    2004-05-01

    Physicians-in-training are susceptible to fatigue given their prolonged duty hours. Sleep deprivation has been shown to alter perceptions of sleepiness and performance. This study examined the state of sleepiness and attitudes about sleep and performance of work- and non-work-related tasks among incoming and current housestaff; and how rotation, call cycle, and call status are related to acute and chronic sleep deprivation and perceptions of sleepiness. A survey instrument was administered in June 2001 to 53 incoming interns and 79 current housestaff at the University Pennsylvania School of Medicine, a university-based internal medicine residency program. All 132 participants (100%) completed the instrument. Acute sleep deprivation was experienced by 34% of the current housestaff and 64% of current housestaff were chronically sleep deprived. Current housestaff admitted to the possibility of dozing while performing various work-related tasks such as writing notes in charts (69%), reviewing medication lists (61%), interpreting labs (51%), and writing orders (46%). At least half of all respondents felt their patients received good care despite residents' sleepiness and as many believed sleep deprivation was a necessary part of training. Nearly half (48%) of current housestaff rotating on a ward service reported acute sleep deprivation, as did 81% of those who were postcall. Over two-thirds of the housestaff on wards and in the ICU reported chronic sleep deprivation. Subjective sleepiness did not vary much across rotations, call cycle, and call status. Chronic and acute sleep deprivation contribute to residents' fatigue. Education could be targeted at attitudes. Further investigation of factors contributing to chronic sleep deprivation in this population is warranted.

  14. Understanding the challenges to facilitating active learning in the resident conferences: a qualitative study of internal medicine faculty and resident perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatsky, Adam P; Zickmund, Susan L; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2015-01-01

    In the Next Accreditation System, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlines milestones for medical knowledge and requires regular didactic sessions in residency training. There are many challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, and we need to better understand resident learning preferences and faculty perspectives on facilitating active learning. The goal of this study was to identify challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, both through identifying specific implementation barriers and identifying differences in perspective between faculty and residents on effective teaching and learning strategies. The investigators invited core residency faculty to participate in focus groups. The investigators used a semistructured guide to facilitate discussion about learning preferences and teaching perspectives in the conference setting and used an 'editing approach' within a grounded theory framework to qualitative analysis to code the transcripts and analyze the results. Data were compared to previously collected data from seven resident focus groups. Three focus groups with 20 core faculty were conducted. We identified three domains pertaining to facilitating active learning in resident conferences: barriers to facilitating active learning formats, similarities and differences in faculty and resident learning preferences, and divergence between faculty and resident opinions about effective teaching strategies. Faculty identified several setting, faculty, and resident barriers to facilitating active learning in resident conferences. When compared to residents, faculty expressed similar learning preferences; the main differences were in motivations for conference attendance and type of content. Resident preferences and faculty perspectives differed on the amount of information appropriate for lecture and the role of active participation in resident conferences. This study highlights several

  15. Understanding the challenges to facilitating active learning in the resident conferences: a qualitative study of internal medicine faculty and resident perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatsky, Adam P.; Zickmund, Susan L.; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2015-01-01

    Background In the Next Accreditation System, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlines milestones for medical knowledge and requires regular didactic sessions in residency training. There are many challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, and we need to better understand resident learning preferences and faculty perspectives on facilitating active learning. The goal of this study was to identify challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, both through identifying specific implementation barriers and identifying differences in perspective between faculty and residents on effective teaching and learning strategies. Methods The investigators invited core residency faculty to participate in focus groups. The investigators used a semistructured guide to facilitate discussion about learning preferences and teaching perspectives in the conference setting and used an ‘editing approach’ within a grounded theory framework to qualitative analysis to code the transcripts and analyze the results. Data were compared to previously collected data from seven resident focus groups. Results Three focus groups with 20 core faculty were conducted. We identified three domains pertaining to facilitating active learning in resident conferences: barriers to facilitating active learning formats, similarities and differences in faculty and resident learning preferences, and divergence between faculty and resident opinions about effective teaching strategies. Faculty identified several setting, faculty, and resident barriers to facilitating active learning in resident conferences. When compared to residents, faculty expressed similar learning preferences; the main differences were in motivations for conference attendance and type of content. Resident preferences and faculty perspectives differed on the amount of information appropriate for lecture and the role of active participation in resident conferences

  16. Emergency department patient characteristics: Potential impact on emergency medicine residency programs in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshove-Bolk, J.; Mencl, F.; Rijswijck, B.T. van; Weiss, I.M.; Simons, M.P.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We set out to study emergency department patient characteristics at a busy level-2 trauma center, to gain insight into the practise of emergency medicine, which is not yet recognized as a specialty in the Netherlands. METHODS: From May 27 to July 4 2001, the following data were recorded

  17. [Prevention in general practice between evidence- and narrative-based medicine: squaring the circle?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    In the German healthcare system, general practitioners (GPs) play an important role with regard to individualised prevention, as they are often the first contact for patients seeking advice. Additionally, there is a great need for preventive counselling from the patient's perspective. However, there is no clear evidence for the effectiveness of the prevention programmes established in Germany. Future prevention models need to be developed according to evidence-based criteria. Narrative-based medicine is seen as a promising complementary approach to strengthen individualised prevention in primary care. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  18. A bibliometric analysis in the fields of preventive medicine, occupational and environmental medicine, epidemiology, and public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soteriades Elpidoforos S

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research in the fields of Preventive Medicine, Occupational/Environmental Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health play an important role in the advancement of knowledge. In order to map the research production around the world we performed a bibliometric analysis in the above fields. Methods All articles published by different world regions in the above mentioned scientific fields and cited in the Journal Citation Reports (JCR database of the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI during the period 1995 and 2003, were evaluated. The research production of different world regions was adjusted for: a the gross domestic product in 1995 US dollars, and b the population size of each region. Results A total of 48,861 articles were retrieved and categorized. The USA led the research production in all three subcategories. The percentage of articles published by USA researchers was 43%, 44% and 61% in the Preventive Medicine, Epidemiology, and Public Health subcategories, respectively. Canada and Western Europe shared the second position in the first two subcategories, while Oceania researchers ranked second in the field of Public Health. Conclusion USA researchers maintain a leadership position in the production of scientific articles in the fields of Preventive Medicine, Occupational/Environmental Medicine and Epidemiology, at a level similar to other scientific disciplines, while USA contribution to science in the field of Public Health is by all means outstanding. Less developed regions would need to support their researchers in the above fields in order to improve scientific production and advancement of knowledge in their countries.

  19. Internal Medicine Residents' Training in Substance Use Disorders: A Survey of the Quality of Instruction and Residents' Self-Perceived Preparedness to Diagnose and Treat Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeman, Sarah E.; Baggett, Meridale V.; Pham-Kanter, Genevieve; Campbell, Eric G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Resident physicians are the direct care providers for many patients with addiction. This study assesses residents' self-perceived preparedness to diagnose and treat addiction, measures residents' perceptions of the quality of addictions instruction, and evaluates basic knowledge of addictions. Methods: A survey was e-mailed to 184…

  20. Tea as a functional food in preventive medicine from traditional Persian medicine point of view (a narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: In recent years, phytomedicine has a main role to support immune system and in preventive medicine to decrease cancer incidence. Traditional medicine has a basic role to introduce herbal drugs to investigate in preventive medicine. Camellia Sinensis has two popular preparations, green (unfermented and black (fully fermented tea that among societies is beside water to drink. Methods: In this narrative review study, tea preparation as herbal infusions from traditional Persian available and reliable references beside classic herbal drugs references were studied to show benefits and risks of tea consumption in health. Results: Tea consumption is famous as antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticarcinogenic, antihypertensive, neuroprotective. In traditional Persian medicine point of view its temperament is hot and dry so it can protect brain and stomach. It is sudatory and diuretic and can also increase mood. It is better to drink sweet or with milk to reduce its dryness. Conclusion: Tea preparations have a main role as a protective functional food in the human’s lives.

  1. Preventive Dental Checkups and Their Association With Access to Usual Source of Care Among Rural and Urban Adult Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aishah; Thapa, Janani R; Zhang, Donglan

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationship between rural or urban residence and having a usual source of care (USC), and the utilization of preventive dental checkups among adults. Cross-sectional analysis was conducted using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2012. We performed a logit regression on the relationship between rural and urban residence, having a USC, and having at least 1 dental checkup in the past year, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and health status. After controlling for covariates, rural adult residents had significantly lower odds of having at least 1 dental checkup per year compared to their urban counterparts (odds ratio [OR] = 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.62-0.86, P rural and urban residents, having a USC was significantly associated with an 11% (95% CI = 9%-13%) increase in the probability of having a preventive dental checkup within a year. Individuals with a USC were more likely to obtain a preventive dental visit, with similar effects in rural and urban settings. We attributed the lower odds of having a checkup in rural regions to the lower density of oral health care providers in these areas. Integration of rural oral health care into primary care may help mitigate the challenges due to a shortage of oral health care providers in rural areas. © 2017 National Rural Health Association.

  2. Dignitary medicine: adapting prehospital, preventive, tactical and travel medicine to new populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, Roger A; Callaway, David W; Connor, Bradley A; Haughton, Brian P; Mechem, C Crawford

    2012-09-01

    Dignitary Protection Medicine (DPM) is a new area of medical expertise that incorporates elements of virtually all medical and surgical specialties, drawing heavily from travel, tactical and expedition medicine. The fundamentals of DPM stem from the experiences of White House, State Department and other physicians who have traveled extensively with dignitaries. Furthermore, increased international travel of business executives and political dignitaries has mandated a need for proficiency in this realm. We sought to define the requisite knowledge base and skill sets that form the foundation of this new area of specialization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Cost-effectiveness research in elderly residents in long-term care: prevention is better than cure, but not always cheaper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Wilco P; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; van den Hout, Wilbert B

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness research in elderly residents in long-term care facilities is based on general principals of cost-effectiveness research; these have been developed primarily from the perspective of relatively healthy adults in curative medicine. These principals are, however, inadequate when evaluating interventions for the fragile elderly in long-term care, both in terms of the value attached to the health of patients and to the specific decision-making context of the institution. Here we discuss the pitfalls of cost-effectiveness research in long-term care facilities, illustrated by two prevention interventions for prevalent conditions in nursing homes: pressure ulcers and urinary tract infections. These turned out to be effective, but not cost-effective.

  4. Narrative medicine as a means of training medical students toward residency competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntfield, Shannon L; Slesar, Kristen; Dickson, Jennifer; Charon, Rita

    2013-06-01

    This study sought to explore the perceived influence of narrative medicine training on clinical skill development of fourth-year medical students, focusing on competencies mandated by ACGME and the RCPSC in areas of communication, collaboration, and professionalism. Using grounded-theory, three methods of data collection were used to query twelve medical students participating in a one-month narrative medicine elective regarding the process of training and the influence on clinical skills. Iterative thematic analysis and data triangulation occurred. Response rate was 91% (survey), 50% (focus group) and 25% (follow-up). Five major findings emerged. Students perceive that they: develop and improve specific communication skills; enhance their capacity to collaborate, empathize, and be patient-centered; develop personally and professionally through reflection. They report that the pedagogical approach used in narrative training is critical to its dividends but misunderstood and perceived as counter-culture. CONCLUSION/PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Participating medical students reported that they perceived narrative medicine to be an important, effective, but counter-culture means of enhancing communication, collaboration, and professional development. The authors contend that these skills are integral to medical practice, consistent with core competencies mandated by the ACGME/RCPSC, and difficult to teach. Future research must explore sequelae of training on actual clinical performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Patient safety principles in family medicine residency accreditation standards and curriculum objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam, Aliya; Sharma, Nishan; Harvie, Margot; O’Beirne, Maeve; Topps, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To conduct a thematic analysis of the College of Family Physicians of Canada’s (CFPC’s) Red Book accreditation standards and the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum objectives with respect to patient safety principles. Design Thematic content analysis of the CFPC’s Red Book accreditation standards and the Triple C curriculum. Setting Canada. Main outcome measures Coding frequency of the patient safety principles (ie, patient engagement; respectful, transparent relationships; complex systems; a just and trusting culture; responsibility and accountability for actions; and continuous learning and improvement) found in the analyzed CFPC documents. Results Within the analyzed CFPC documents, the most commonly found patient safety principle was patient engagement (n = 51 coding references); the least commonly found patient safety principles were a just and trusting culture (n = 5 coding references) and complex systems (n = 5 coding references). Other patient safety principles that were uncommon included responsibility and accountability for actions (n = 7 coding references) and continuous learning and improvement (n = 12 coding references). Conclusion Explicit inclusion of patient safety content such as the use of patient safety principles is needed for residency training programs across Canada to ensure the full spectrum of care is addressed, from community-based care to acute hospital-based care. This will ensure a patient safety culture can be cultivated from residency and sustained into primary care practice. PMID:27965349

  6. History of “health risk” and its place in the development of preventive medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е.Е. Shigan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The main stages of the introduction and development of preventive medicine and the term HEALTH RISK are described. The “risk” definition is related to the works by Max Fasmer and Frank Knight. The development of preventive medicine was also influenced by the works of scientists and physicians of the ancient world and the Middle Ages. Particular attention is paid to the appearance, formation and development of the medical school of Salerno, and the impact of its work and the activities of scientists and teachers on further development of prevention and treatment. The relationship of these two concepts and their history is shown. The author dwells on the prevention development in Russia, paying particular attention to domestic researchers, especially after the victory of the Great October Revolution. Works by N.A. Semashko, Z.P. Soloviev, G.V. Khlopin, A.N. Sysin and F.G. Krotkov played a huge role in the development of preventive medicine in Russia and in the world. The article also represents the prevention medicine development facts in the post-war years – the creation of large schools of medicine, aimed at the prevention of diseases and epidemiological studies of the risk incurred. The article also pays attention to the foundation of International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA, some areas of its work, especially in relation to research on the health risks. The itegration at mathematical modeling and forecasting with medicine in general and health in particular, as well as the study of the health concepts of risks at individual nosological examples are written.

  7. Results of chart reviews conducted to evaluate primary care patients seen by second and third year family medicine residents for potential adverse polypharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    F, Linda; Lutfiyya, May N; Cha, Isaac; El-Khabiry, Ehab

    2007-01-01

    To determine the prescribing patterns of family medicine residents for patients aged more than 60 years with 2 or more chronic diseases and seen at least twice in a 12 month timeframe. This is a descriptive analysis which was based on chart reviews. The setting was the University of Illinois-Rockford Family Practice Residency. Patients aged 60 years with 2 or more chronic diseases who were seen at least twice by second and third year residents. FINDINGS FROM THIS CHART REVIEW INCLUDE: 28.8% of the prescribed medications were not effective for the documented condition, 26.3% of the prescribed doses were incorrect, and 44.5% of the drugs prescribed were not the least expensive alternative. This preliminary study suggests a need for a focused intervention with family medicine residents regarding inappropriate polypharmacy issues with older patients.

  8. Results of chart reviews conducted to evaluate primary care patients seen by second and third year family medicine residents for potential adverse polypharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang LF

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prescribing patterns of family medicine residents for patients aged more than 60 years with 2 or more chronic diseases and seen at least twice in a 12 month timeframe.Methods: This is a descriptive analysis which was based on chart reviews. The setting was the University of Illinois-Rockford Family Practice Residency. Patients aged 60 years with 2 or more chronic diseases who were seen at least twice by second and third year residents.Results: Findings from this chart review include: 28.8% of the prescribed medications were not effective for the documented condition, 26.3% of the prescribed doses were incorrect, and 44.5% of the drugs prescribed were not the least expensive alternative.Discussion: This preliminary study suggests a need for a focused intervention with family medicine residents regarding inappropriate polypharmacy issues with older patients.

  9. Obesity prevention in pediatrics: A pilot pediatric resident curriculum intervention on nutrition and obesity education and counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jose L; Gilmer, Loise

    2006-09-01

    Obesity is a highly burdensome public health issue associated with premature death, multiple comorbid disabilities and staggering healthcare costs. Between 1980-2000, the prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents nearly tripled. Obesity subjects youth to social stigmatization and discrimination. These economic and personal burdens mandate targeted prevention and detection educational programs for all individuals at risk. The most cost-effective method of approaching this obesity epidemic is through education of health professionals. As part of an "Obesity Prevention in Pediatrics" curriculum, postgraduate-year (PGY)-2 residents first observed and then participated in the dietary evaluation and counseling of pediatric patients and their families. Attitudinal questionnaires, multiple-choice knowledge examinations and a pre-established checklist of desired skills and behaviors provided evaluation of the curriculum's effect on the participants' ability and willingness to manage actually obese or at-risk pediatric patients and their families. Attitudinal survey and knowledge test scores from control PGY-3 residents generally confirmed that their knowledge and counseling skills on obesity prevention and management were well below expectation. Following participation in the curriculum, study residents' knowledge tended to improve, as did their level of comfort in counseling obese and at-risk children, adolescents and their parents. Implementation of an "Obesity Prevention in Pediatrics" curriculum appears to improve participants' knowledge base as well as their skills and level of personal comfort in the recognition, evaluation and management, including counseling, of both obese and at-risk pediatric patients and their families.

  10. Dysphagia Rehabilitation and Prevention of Aspiration Pneumonia : The trial of Integrative Medicine -

    OpenAIRE

    植田, 耕一郎; Ueda, Koichiro

    2003-01-01

    Dysphagia rehabilitation has made rapid progress for ten years. It has been come into wide use across fields of medical care, health and welfare. Contacting with rehabilitation medicine, it was thought that training was possible for a mouth obstacle. However we have come to the time to reflect about dysphagia rehabilitation. Chronic diseases are increasing in aging society. And integrative medicine is new possibility of dysphagia rehabilitation and prevention of aspiration pneumonia in the si...

  11. The art of medicine: arts-based training in observation and mindfulness for fostering the empathic response in medical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazulak, Joyce; Sanaee, May; Frolic, Andrea; Knibb, Nicole; Tesluk, Eve; Hughes, Edward; Grierson, Lawrence E M

    2017-09-01

    Empathy is an essential attribute for medical professionals. Yet, evidence indicates that medical learners' empathy levels decline dramatically during medical school. Training in evidence-based observation and mindfulness has the potential to bolster the acquisition and demonstration of empathic behaviours for medical learners. In this prospective cohort study, we explore the impact of a course in arts-based visual literacy and mindfulness practice ( Art of Seeing ) on the empathic response of medical residents engaged in obstetrics and gynaecology and family medicine training. Following this multifaceted arts-based programme that integrates the facilitated viewing of art and dance, art-making, and mindfulness-based practices into a practitioner-patient context, 15 resident trainees completed the previously validated Interpersonal Reactivity Index, Compassion, and Mindfulness Scales. Fourteen participants also participated in semistructured interviews that probed their perceived impacts of the programme on their empathic clinical practice. The results indicated that programme participants improved in the Mindfulness Scale domains related to self-confidence and communication relative to a group of control participants following the arts-based programme. However, the majority of the psychometric measures did not reveal differences between groups over the duration of the programme. Importantly, thematic qualitative analysis of the interview data revealed that the programme had a positive impact on the participants' perceived empathy towards colleagues and patients and on the perception of personal and professional well-being. The study concludes that a multifaceted arts-based curriculum focusing on evidence-based observation and mindfulness is a useful tool in bolstering the empathic response, improving communication, and fostering professional well-being among medical residents. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  12. Prevention and Treatment of Flatulence From a Traditional Persian Medicine Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larijani, Bagher; Esfahani, Mohammad Medhi; Moghimi, Maryam; Shams Ardakani, Mohammad Reza; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Kordafshari, Gholamreza; Nazem, Esmaiel; Hasani Ranjbar, Shirin; Mohammadi Kenari, Hoorieh; Zargaran, Arman

    2016-04-01

    The feeling of abdominal fullness, bloating, and movement of gas in the abdomen is a very uncomfortable sensation termed flatulence. Since flatulence is one of the most common gastrointestinal symptoms that is bothersome to patients, it is important to identify effective methods to resolve this issue. In modern medicine, management of flatulence is often not satisfactory. On the other hand, traditional systems of medicine can be considered good potential sources to find new approaches for preventing and treating flatulence. The aim of this study is to review flatulence treatments from a traditional Persian medicine (TPM) viewpoint. In this study, the reasons for flatulence and methods for its prevention and treatment are reviewed in traditional Persian medicine (TPM) texts and then related with evidence from modern medicine by searching in databases, including PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, and IranMedex. From a traditional Persian scholar viewpoint, one of the most important causes of flatulence is an incorrect manner of eating; valuable advice to correct bad eating habits will be illustrated. In addition, traditional practitioners describe some herbs and vegetables as well as herbal compounds that are effective food additives to relieve flatulence. The anti-flatulent effect of most of these herbs has been experimentally verified using modern medicine. Attention to TPM can lead to the identification of new preventive and curative approaches to avoid and treat flatulence. In addition, Persian viewpoints from the medieval era regarding flatulence are historically important.

  13. Emergency department patient characteristics: Potential impact on emergency medicine residency programs in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshove-Bolk, Jolande; Mencl, Francis; van Rijswijck, Bas T F; Weiss, Ilanit M; Simons, Maarten P; van Vugt, Arie B

    2006-12-01

    We set out to study emergency department patient characteristics at a busy level-2 trauma center, to gain insight into the practise of emergency medicine, which is not yet recognized as a specialty in the Netherlands. From May 27 to July 4 2001, the following data were recorded from the charts of all patients presenting to the emergency department: age, time and form of presentation, diagnostics, treatment, disposition and the single best diagnosis (International Classification of Disease-10 classification). The majority (84%) of the 5234 patients (134/day) patients seen were self-referred and treated by the emergency department physician. The remaining 16% were referred, usually by their general practitioner, directly to a specialty service, which saw them in the emergency department. Self-referred patients tended to be younger (average 33 years), with minor trauma, and infrequently required diagnostics (37%), treatment (49%) or admission (4%). The referred patients were older (average 50 years), with 41% needing admission. Only 16% of all patients were under 16 years of age. In all, there were five deaths (referred patients), 12 resuscitations, seven intubations, seven chest tube insertions and no lumbar punctures performed during the study period. The acuity of self-referred patients seen by the emergency physicians is low, with little diagnostic testing and few interventions and resuscitations, even in a busy center. This has both training and practise implications and it may be inappropriate to take an emergency medicine practise model or curriculum from another country based on its emergency department population.

  14. Mustard Group Chemical War Agents from Preventive Medicine Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharrem Ucar

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Although many preventive efforts and treaties, chemical warfare agents have still been a severe assault form against both military and civilian individuals. The most important chemical warfare agents sulphur mustard and others are easy to handle and cheap those the important reasons to accept sulphur mustard as a chemical warfare agent. Many individuals attacked by sulphur mustard have severe health problems such as respiratory system diseases. After ten years of sulphur mustard exposure, several health problems such as respiratory tract problems (%42.5, eye problems (%40 and other systemic diseases have been observed to insist on induviduals when examined. Exposure of even single sulphur mustard exposure has been seen to result high level of disability and early deaths. In spite of the fact that there is no available antidote and/or remedy against sulphur mustard exposure, our country has an incremental chemical assault threat for both military personels and civilians because of its jeopolitics position. Experimental studies regarding sulphur mustard toxicity will be helpful for novel preventive strategies and antidot devolepment. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000: 209-214

  15. A Military Doctor Pioneer of the Preventive Medicine in Turkey: Colonel Dr. Huseyin Remzi Bey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogan Ceyhan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important turning points in Turkish History of Medicine is the transfer of Western / European medical knowledge to Ottoman medicine in 19th century. This knowledge is mostly transferred by government employed Ottoman citizens and aimed at improving the health status of the Ottoman State’s elites, troops and people. Most important contributions of transferring and popularizing the concepts of microbe and vaccination to Ottoman medicine, concerning both disease and preventive medicine, were made by a military doctor, “Colonel Dr. Huseyin Remzi Bey”. He served in a large spectrum of military and civilian health services from field medicine to professorship in higher educational institutes and made important contributions for education of modern medicine in Turkish language. He was a part of the Ottoman team visiting Pasteur to learn the rabies vaccine and given credit to be one of the first users of microbiological knowledge and applications in Ottoman Country. He also tried to disseminate the knowledge about health amongst people and wrote more than 50 manuscripts, most of them published as books or newspaper periodicals. He is a figure who made important contributions of the accumulation and distribution of modern medical knowledge, including preventive medicine, in Turkey. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(4.000: 347-350

  16. Results of chart reviews conducted to evaluate primary care patients seen by second and third year family medicine residents for potential adverse polypharmacy

    OpenAIRE

    Chang LF; Lutfiyya MN; Cha I; El-Khabiry E

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prescribing patterns of family medicine residents for patients aged more than 60 years with 2 or more chronic diseases and seen at least twice in a 12 month timeframe.Methods: This is a descriptive analysis which was based on chart reviews. The setting was the University of Illinois-Rockford Family Practice Residency. Patients aged 60 years with 2 or more chronic diseases who were seen at least twice by second and third year residents.Results: Findings from thi...

  17. Use of a registry-generated audit, feedback, and patient reminder intervention in an internal medicine resident clinic--a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kris G; Thomas, Matthew R; Stroebel, Robert J; McDonald, Furman S; Hanson, Gregory J; Naessens, James M; Huschka, Todd R; Kolars, Joseph C

    2007-12-01

    Disease registries, audit and feedback, and clinical reminders have been reported to improve care processes. To assess the effects of a registry-generated audit, feedback, and patient reminder intervention on diabetes care. Randomized controlled trial conducted in a resident continuity clinic during the 2003-2004 academic year. Seventy-eight categorical Internal Medicine residents caring for 483 diabetic patients participated. Residents randomized to the intervention (n = 39) received instruction on diabetes registry use; quarterly performance audit, feedback, and written reports identifying patients needing care; and had letters sent quarterly to patients needing hemoglobin A1c or cholesterol testing. Residents randomized to the control group (n = 39) received usual clinic education. Hemoglobin A1c and lipid monitoring, and the achievement of intermediate clinical outcomes (hemoglobin A1c audit, feedback, and patient reminder intervention in a resident continuity clinic modestly improved diabetes care processes, but did not influence intermediate clinical outcomes.

  18. Internet availability and interest in patients at a family medicine residency clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fashner, Julia; Drye, Stephen T

    2011-02-01

    The Internet has affected the day-to-day lives of physicians, hospitals, and patients. The medical information for each is available at a moment's notice. We surveyed patients to see how many have access to the Internet and whether they are interested in using the Internet to communicate about their medical care. An anonymous one-page survey was given to patients over the age of 18 who had an office visit at the Family Medicine Center. A total of 258 of 300 surveys were returned. A majority of these patients have access to the Internet (80.6%). Patients were most interested in being able to receive appointment reminders by e-mail (44.6%), get answers to medical questions (41.9%), and schedule appointments online (41.5%). Patients would like to be active participants in their medical care electronically. We encourage other physicians to investigate what patients in their practice would consider a service to provide electronically.

  19. Focus on transitions of care: description and evaluation of an educational intervention for internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboumatar, Hanan; Allison, Robert D; Feldman, Leonard; Woods, Kevin; Thomas, Patricia; Wiener, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Transitions of care between physicians and from inpatient to outpatient settings leave patients vulnerable to medical errors and adverse events. A transitions of care workshop consisting of 2 sessions, Sign-Out Success (SOS) and Transition To Home (TTH), taught sign-out and discharge skills to incoming internal medicine interns during orientation. The workshop used role-playing exercises, didactics, demonstrations, and peer and self-evaluations. Interns completed a survey at 3 months post workshop. Using pre-post workshop measures, SOS increased the quality of intern-rated sign-outs (P = .004). Interns reported more confidence in their ability to effectively sign out (P = .016) and a greater understanding of problems that might arise while on call (P = .012). TTH increased intern-reported confidence in their ability to communicate discharge instructions (P institutions. © 2013 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  20. What Do Clinical Supervisors Require to Teach Residents in Family Medicine How to Care for Seniors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguere, Anik M C; Lebel, Paule; Morin, Michèle; Proust, Françoise; Rodríguez, Charo; Carnovale, Valerie; Champagne, Louise; Légaré, France; Carmichael, Pierre-Hugues; Martineau, Bernard; Karazivan, Philippe; Durand, Pierre J

    2018-03-01

    We assessed clinicians' continuing professional development (CPD) needs at family practice teaching clinics in the province of Quebec. Our mixed methodology design comprised an environmental scan of training programs at four family medicine departments, an expert panel to determine priority clinical situations for senior care, a supervisors survey to assess their perceived CPD needs, and interviews to help understand the rationale behind their needs. From the environmental scan, the expert panel selected 13 priority situations. Key needs expressed by the 352 survey respondents (36% response rate) included behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, polypharmacy, depression, and cognitive disorders. Supervisors explained that these situations were sometimes complex to diagnose and manage because of psychosocial aspects, challenges of communicating with patients and families, and coordination of interprofessional teams. Supervisors also reported more CPD needs in long-term and home care, given the presence of caregivers and complexity of senior care in these settings.