WorldWideScience

Sample records for preventive care visit

  1. Visitation in the intensive care unit: impact on infection prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sheila; Herrera, Amando; Miller, Laura; Soto, Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based practice has shown that open visitation in the intensive care setting positively impacts patient outcomes. However, many intensive care units continue to strictly limit visitation hours. One concern for nurses is that open visitation will expose their vulnerable patients to an increased risk of infection. This fear is unfounded in professional literature as well as in the experience of a busy intensive care unit in San Antonio, Texas. Keeping our patients safe from hospital-acquired infections requires vigilant attention to infection prevention procedures. Meanwhile, what may actually be bugging our patients is a health care culture that is based on tradition and is blind to the many benefits provided by a more liberal visitation policy rooted in patient-centered care.

  2. Office-Based Tools and Primary Care Visit Communication, Length, and Preventive Service Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafata, Jennifer Elston; Shay, L Aubree; Brown, Richard; Street, Richard L

    2016-04-01

    The use of physician office-based tools such as electronic health records (EHRs), health risk appraisal (HRA) instruments, and written patient reminder lists is encouraged to support efficient, high-quality, patient-centered care. We evaluate the association of exam room use of EHRs, HRA instruments, and self-generated written patient reminder lists with patient-physician communication behaviors, recommended preventive health service delivery, and visit length. Observational study of 485 office visits with 64 primary care physicians practicing in a health system serving the Detroit metropolitan area. Study data were obtained from patient surveys, direct observation, office visit audio-recordings, and automated health system records. Outcome measures included visit length in minutes, patient use of active communication behaviors, physician use of supportive talk and partnership-building communication behaviors, and percentage of delivered guideline-recommended preventive health services for which patients are eligible and due. Simultaneous linear regression models were used to evaluate associations between tool use and outcomes. Adjusted models controlled for patient characteristics, physician characteristics, characteristics of the relationship between the patient and physician, and characteristics of the environment in which the visit took place. Prior to adjusting for other factors, visits in which the EHR was used on average were significantly (p communication behaviors facilitating patient involvement (2.1 vs. 2.6 occurrences), but more use of active patient communication behaviors (4.4 vs. 2.6). Likewise, HRA use was significantly associated with increased preventive services delivery (62.1 percent vs. 57.0 percent). All relationships remained significant (p > .05) in adjusted models with the exception of that between HRA use and preventive service delivery. Office-based tools intended to facilitate the implementation of desired primary care practice

  3. Agreement between structured checklists and Medicaid claims for preventive dental visits in primary care medical offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahel, Bhavna T; Rozier, R Gary; Stearns, Sally C

    2010-06-01

    For program evaluation purposes, the feasibility of matching Medicaid claims with physician-completed structured checklists (encounter forms, EFs) was assessed in a pediatric office-based preventive dental program. We examined agreement on visits (weighted kappa) and predictors of a match between EFs and claims (multinomial logit model with practice-level clustering). In total, 34,171 matches occurred between 41,252 EFs and 40,909 claims, representing 82.8 per cent of EFs and 83.5 per cent of claims. Agreement on visits was 56 per cent (weighted kappa = 0.66). Pediatric practices provided the majority of visits (82.4%) and matches. Increasing age of child and residence in same county as the medical practice increased the likelihood of a match. Structured checklists can be combined with claims to better assess provision of preventive dental services in pediatric primary care. However, future research should examine strategies to improve the completion of structured checklists by primary care providers if data beyond claims are to be used for program evaluation.

  4. HIV care visits and time to viral suppression, 19 U.S. jurisdictions, and implications for treatment, prevention and the national HIV/AIDS strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Irene Hall

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Early and regular care and treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection are associated with viral suppression, reductions in transmission risk and improved health outcomes for persons with HIV. We determined, on a population level, the association of care visits with time from HIV diagnosis to viral suppression. METHODS: Using data from 19 areas reporting HIV-related tests to national HIV surveillance, we determined time from diagnosis to viral suppression among 17,028 persons diagnosed with HIV during 2009, followed through December 2011, using data reported through December 2012. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we assessed factors associated with viral suppression, including linkage to care within 3 months of diagnosis, a goal set forth by the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, and number of HIV care visits as determined by CD4 and viral load test results, while controlling for demographic, clinical, and risk characteristics. RESULTS: Of 17,028 persons diagnosed with HIV during 2009 in the 19 areas, 76.6% were linked to care within 3 months of diagnosis and 57.0% had a suppressed viral load during the observation period. Median time from diagnosis to viral suppression was 19 months overall, and 8 months among persons with an initial CD4 count ≤ 350 cells/µL. During the first 12 months after diagnosis, persons linked to care within 3 months experienced shorter times to viral suppression (higher rate of viral suppression per unit time, hazard ratio [HR] = 4.84 versus not linked within 3 months; 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.27, 5.48. Persons with a higher number of time-updated care visits also experienced a shorter time to viral suppression (HR = 1.51 per additional visit, 95% CI 1.49, 1.52. CONCLUSIONS: Timely linkage to care and greater frequency of care visits were associated with faster time to viral suppression with implications for individual health outcomes and for secondary prevention.

  5. [Effect of Visiting and a Smartphone Application Based Infection Prevention Education Program for Child Care Teachers: A Non-Randomized Controlled Trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun Jeong; Kwon, In Soo

    2017-12-01

    This study was performed to develop an infection prevention education program for child care teachers and to verify its effects. The study was conducted using a nonequivalent control group with a pretest-posttest design. Four private daycare centers (2 centers per city) that were alike in terms of the number of children by age, number of child care teachers, and child care environment were chosen. Participants were assigned to the experimental group (n=20) or control group (n=20). As a part of the program, visiting education (90 min) was provided in the 1st week, and smartphone application education (10 min) was provided thrice a week, in the 2nd and 3rd weeks. Child care teachers' self-efficacy for infection prevention revealed a significant interaction effect between the group and time of measurement (F=21.62, pteachers. Thus, this program may be effective in enhancing their infection control. © 2017 Korean Society of Nursing Science

  6. Physician visits and preventive care among Asian American and Pacific Islander long-term survivors of colorectal cancer, USA, 1996-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, C Brooke; Townsend, Julie S; Tai, Eric; Thomas, Cheryll C

    2014-03-01

    Published literature on receipt of preventive healthcare services among Asian American and Pacific Islander (API) cancer survivors is scarce. We describe patterns in receipt of preventive services among API long-term colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry-Medicare data were used to identify 9,737 API and white patients who were diagnosed with CRC during 1996-2000 and who survived 5 or more years beyond their diagnoses. We examined receipt of vaccines, mammography (females), bone densitometry (females), and cholesterol screening among the survivors and how the physician specialties they visited for follow-up care correlated to services received. APIs were less likely than whites to receive mammography (52.0 vs. 69.3 %, respectively; P < 0.0001) but more likely to receive influenza vaccine, cholesterol screening, and bone densitometry. These findings remained significant in our multivariable model, except for receipt of bone densitometry. APIs visited PCPs only and both PCPs and oncologists more frequently than whites (P < 0.0001). Women who visited both PCPs and oncologists compared with PCPs only were more likely to receive mammography (odds ratio = 1.40; 95 % confidence interval, 1.05-1.86). Visits to both PCPs and oncologists were associated with increased use of mammography. Although API survivors visited these specialties more frequently than white survivors, API women may need culturally appropriate outreach to increase their use of this test. Long-term cancer survivors need to be aware of recommended preventive healthcare services, as well as who will manage their primary care and cancer surveillance follow-up.

  7. Prenatal Care: Second Trimester Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy week by week During the second trimester, prenatal care includes routine lab tests and measurements of your ... too. By Mayo Clinic Staff The goal of prenatal care is to ensure that you and your baby ...

  8. Prenatal Care: Third Trimester Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy week by week During the third trimester, prenatal care might include vaginal exams to check the baby's position. By Mayo Clinic Staff Prenatal care is an important part of a healthy pregnancy, ...

  9. Prenatal Care: First Trimester Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... issues Your health care provider will discuss the importance of proper nutrition and prenatal vitamins. Your first ... Delivery, and Postpartum Care. Washington, D.C.: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; 2014:1. Lockwood CJ, ...

  10. Digital screen visits in home care services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarakit, Mohamad; Nors Hansen, Louise; Evron, Lotte Orr

    2017-01-01

    The use of digital technology is increasing in home care services in Denmark. In the municipality of Copenhagen digital screens visits are being used as an alternative version of the traditional (physical) home visit to a selected population to increase quality and efficiency in the home care...... services. The aim of this pilot study is to investigate how the intercultural communication is used during digital home visits in a Copenhagen community when caring for older patients with a minority ethnic background. Methods: document analysis teaching material including two video cases combined...... with participant observation of three selected screen visits with older patients with a minority ethnic background. Analysis: thematic analysis based on a hermeneutic approach. Primarily results indicate that older patients with a minority ethnic background are screened out during the recruitment phase for digital...

  11. Do freequent Antenatal Care Visits ensure access and adherence to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Do freequent Antenatal Care Visits ensure access and adherence to Intermittent preventive treatment of Malaria in pregnancy in an Urban Hospital in South West Nigeria? ... Respondents were enrolled over a period of three months in a secondary healthcare facility within 24 hours of delivery. Demographic details, delivery ...

  12. Collaborative relationship in preventive home visits to older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Yukari; Vass, Mikkel; Hvas, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    To describe what characterizes preventive home visits with collaborative relationships among non-disabled home-dwelling older people in Japan. Background. Preventive home visits have the potential to result in improved health outcomes among older people. Collaboration, mutual understanding...... communication skills and professionalism, and practical actions after the visits characterized cases, where favourable changes in behaviour were obtained in non-disabled home-dwelling older people in Japan. Relevance to clinical practice. Education should be emphasized, because preventive home visitor...

  13. Between-Visit Workload in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galpin, Kevin; Jones-Taylor, Cedrella; Anander, Steven; Demosthenes, Charles; Platt, Susan; Ponkshe, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Background The time spent and complexity of work done by primary internal medicine physicians between office visits has not been well studied. Objective To measure the time and complexity of this care. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting General internists practicing on primary care teams with electronic medical records at a tertiary Veterans Health Administration Medical Center. Participants Ten physicians. Main Measures The project was designed to measure physician work between office visits. The electronic record was used to record the number and complexity of work events by physicians for 1 month. Complexity of work was measured on five levels ranging from Level I with no change in management, Level II with change in management of one disease, Level III of two diseases, Level IV of three diseases, and Level V of four or more diseases. Time sampling was done over 5 days to determine the time spent by level of complexity. Total time per physician was calculated by multiplying the number of events each physician captured by the average time for that physician for that level of complexity. Key Results Physicians worked a median of 7.9 h per week between office visits. Work was apportioned among Level I (18.3%), Level II (38.3%), Level III (36.5%), Level IV (4.6%), and Level V (2.3%). Limitations Single VA population and self-reported data. Findings may not be generalizable to other practice settings. Conclusion Primary internists spent a median of 7.9 h per week in work between office visits with 82% of the time involved in changes in management. PMID:20700665

  14. Collaborative relationship in preventive home visits to older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Yukari; Vass, Mikkel; Hvas, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    To describe what characterizes preventive home visits with collaborative relationships among non-disabled home-dwelling older people in Japan. Background. Preventive home visits have the potential to result in improved health outcomes among older people. Collaboration, mutual understanding...... and trust between visitor and the visited person seem to work as a vehicle, but little is known about which part of the encounters contributes to a collaborative relationship. Methods. We performed a retrospective qualitative analysis of visiting records written by preventive home visitors immediately after...... the visits were made. A collaborative relationship was predefined as a favourable change in behaviour seen in the visited person during the study period. Visitor characteristics were analysed from 248 records where 37 cases of collaborative relationships were documented. Results. The three most important...

  15. A missed primary care appointment correlates with a subsequent emergency department visit among children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Colleen Marie; Redmond, Margaret; Arcoleo, Kimberly; Stukus, David R

    2017-11-01

    Since the Affordable Care Act's implementation, emergency department (ED) visits have increased. Poor asthma control increases the risk of acute exacerbations and preventable ED visits. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services support the reduction of preventable ED visits to reduce healthcare spending. Implementation of interventions to avoid preventable ED visits has become a priority for many healthcare systems yet little data exist examining children's missed asthma management primary care (PC) appointments and subsequent ED visits. Longitudinal, retrospective review at a children's hospital was conducted for children with diagnosed asthma (ICD-9 493.xx), ages 2-18 years, scheduled for a PC visit between January 1, 2010, and June 30, 2012 (N = 3895). Records were cross-referenced with all asthma-related ED visits from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2012. Logistic regression with maximum likelihood estimation was conducted. None of the children who completed a PC appointment experienced an ED visit in the subsequent 6 months whereas 2.7% of those with missed PC appointments had an ED visit (χ 2 = 64.28, p asthma as one mechanism for preventing ED visits was demonstrated. Interventions targeting missed visits could decrease asthma-related morbidity, preventable ED visits, and healthcare costs.

  16. Effectiveness of seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in preventing influenza hospitalisations and primary care visits in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, N; Pierse, N; Bissielo, A; Huang, Qs; Radke, S; Baker, Mg; Widdowson, Ma; Kelly, H

    2014-08-28

    This study reports the first vaccine effectiveness (VE) estimates for the prevention of general practice visits and hospitalisations for laboratory-confirmed influenza from an urban population in Auckland, New Zealand, in the same influenza season (2013). A case test-negative design was used to estimate propensity-adjusted VE in both hospital and community settings. Patients with a severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) or influenza-like illness (ILI) were defined as requiring hospitalisation (SARI) or attending a general practice (ILI) with a history of fever or measured temperature ≥38 °C, cough and onset within the past 10 days. Those who tested positive for influenza virus were cases while those who tested negative were controls. Results were analysed to 7 days post symptom onset and adjusted for the propensity to be vaccinated and the timing during the influenza season. Influenza vaccination provided 52% (95% CI: 32 to 66) protection against laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalisation and 56% (95% CI: 34 to 70) against presenting to general practice with influenza. VE estimates were similar for all types and subtypes. This study found moderate effectiveness of influenza vaccine against medically attended and hospitalised influenza in New Zealand, a temperate, southern hemisphere country during the 2013 winter season.

  17. Antenatal care visits and pregnancy outcomes at a Kenyan rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The goal of antenatal care (ANC) is to improve maternal and neonatal outcomes. Fewer ANC visits in focused antenatal care (FANC) model can affect maternal and perinatal outcomes in low income settings where the number ANC visits are often low. Objective: To determine the number of ANC visits and their ...

  18. Preventive home visits to elderly people in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, C; Vass, M

    2005-01-01

    are obliged to offer home visits twice a year to all citizens 75 years and older. After six years with this law, there is still variation of how the law is managed and implemented. About 60% of the elderly people accept and receive the visits. Less than 50% of the municipalities have made specific guidelines......During the last 20 years several randomised controlled trials have been published about preventive home visits to old people, but the benefit of the visits is still controversial and under debate. Based on a state law from the Ministry of Social Affairs in 1998, the municipalities in Denmark...

  19. The Relationship between Same-Day Access and Continuity in Primary Care and Emergency Department Visits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Yoon

    Full Text Available We examined how emergency department (ED visits for potentially preventable, mental health, and other diagnoses were related to same-day access and provider continuity in primary care using administrative data from 71,296 patients in 22 VHA clinics over a three-year period. ED visits were categorized as non-emergent; primary care treatable; preventable; not preventable; or mental health-related. We conducted multi-level regression models adjusted for patient and clinic factors. More same-day access significantly predicted fewer non-emergent and primary care treatable ED visits while continuity was not significantly related to any type of ED visit. Neither measure was related to ED visits for mental health problems.

  20. Prevention IS Care

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-03-26

    This podcast provides an overview of the Prevention IS Care campaign, which provides HIV prevention tools for medical care providers to use on a daily basis with patients who are living with HIV.  Created: 3/26/2009 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/26/2009.

  1. The role of the visiting doctor in primary care clinics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    visiting doctors are important members of the health care team; their presence enhances the functions of the team and gives confidence to other team members. “With combined ideas you are able to reach the goal.” “He has confidence in us, that means good teamwork and good team spirit.” Doctors' visits to clinics are also ...

  2. Measuring adequacy of prenatal care: does missing visit information matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtzman, Jordan H; Wasserman, Erin B; Suter, Barbara J; Glantz, J Christopher; Dozier, Ann M

    2014-09-01

    Kotelchuck's Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization (APNCU) Index is frequently used to classify levels of prenatal care. In the Finger Lakes Region (FLR) of upstate New York, prenatal care visit information late in pregnancy is often not documented on the birth certificate. We studied the extent of this missing information and its impact on the validity of regional APNCU scores. We calculated the "weeks between" a mother's last prenatal care visit and her infant's date of birth. We adjusted the APNCU algorithm creating the Last Visit Adequacy of Prenatal Care (LV-APNC) Index using the last recorded prenatal care visit date as the end point of care and the expected number of visits at that time. We compared maternal characteristics by care level with each index, examining rates of reclassification and number of "weeks between" by birth hospital. Stuart-Maxwell, McNemar, chi-square, and t-tests were used to determine statistical significance. Based on 58,462 births, the mean "weeks between" was 2.8 weeks. Compared with their APNCU Index score, 42.4 percent of mothers were reclassified using the LV-APNC Index. Major movement occurred from Intermediate (APNCU) to Adequate or Adequate Plus (LV-APNC) leaving the Intermediate Care group a more at-risk group of mothers. Those with Adequate or Adequate Plus Care (LV-APNC) increased by 31.6 percent, surpassing the Healthy People 2020 objective. In the FLR, missing visit information at the end of pregnancy results in an underestimation of mothers' prenatal care. Future research is needed to determine the extent of this missing visit information on the national level. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Ambulatory care visits by Taiwanese dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hwa Su

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: There were inequalities in risks of ambulatory care use among Taiwan's dentists. Further studies should be conducted to investigate the causes responsible for the observed geographic and institutional variations in the risk of morbidity among dentists in Taiwan.

  4. Preventive home visits to older people in Denmark--why, how, by whom, and when?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vass, M; Avlund, K; Hendriksen, C

    2007-01-01

    or prevent functional decline. There is an urgent need of an interdisciplinary teamwork and management for such programmes, incorporating flexible cooperation between the primary and secondary health care sector. The value and importance of geriatric and gerontological education is evidence based....... older persons not normally seen in the health care system. In-home assessment is not just a health check, but also an opportunity to meet individual needs that may be of importance for older people to stay independent. Preventive home visits may be part of an overall culture and strategy to avoid...

  5. Home Visiting and Use of Infant Health Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, M Rebecca; Cannon, Jill S

    2017-01-01

    Evaluations of home visiting models have shown that they can reduce children's health care use in the first year of life. Models that exclusively use nurses as home visitors may cost more and be infeasible given nursing shortages in some locations. The goal of this study was to test whether a universal home visiting model employing a nurse-parent educator team as home visitors reduces health care use in the first year of life. This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial of an intensive home visiting program delivered in homes of primary caregivers and their first-born children in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Intention-to-treat and contamination-adjusted intention-to-treat models were estimated, and 244 primary caregivers participated in the survey. In their first year of life, treatment group children were one-third less likely to visit the emergency department (control group mean, M C = 0.42, treatment group mean, M T = 0.28, P = .02) and were also 41% less likely to have visited a primary care provider ≥9 times (M C = 0.49, M T = 0.29, P health care use for high-risk and lower-risk families. Children in families randomly assigned to the program had less health care use in their first year, demonstrating that a universal prevention home visiting model delivered by a nurse-parent educator team can reduce infant health care use. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Palliative care team visits. Qualitative study through participant observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno Pernias, Maria José; Hueso Montoro, César; Guardia Mancilla, Plácido; Montoya Juárez, Rafael; García Caro, Maria Paz

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the clinical encounters that occur when a palliative care team provides patient care and the features that influence these encounters and indicate whether they are favorable or unfavorable depending on the expectations and feelings of the various participants. Methods: A qualitative case study conducted via participant observation. A total of 12 observations of the meetings of palliative care teams with patients and families in different settings (home, hospital and consultation room) were performed. The visits were follow-up or first visits, either scheduled or on demand. Content analysis of the observation was performed. Results: The analysis showed the normal follow-up activity of the palliative care unit that was focused on controlling symptoms, sharing information and providing advice on therapeutic regimens and care. The environment appeared to condition the patients' expressions and the type of patient relationship. Favorable clinical encounter conditions included kindness and gratitude. Unfavorable conditions were deterioration caused by approaching death, unrealistic family objectives and limited resources. Conclusion: Home visits from basic palliative care teams play an important role in patient and family well-being. The visits seem to focus on controlling symptoms and are conditioned by available resources. PMID:27226663

  7. Use of Welcome to Medicare Visits Among Older Adults Following the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Arpit; Lloyd, Jennifer T; Strawbridge, Larisa M; Wensky, Suzanne G

    2018-01-01

    To encourage greater utilization of preventive services among Medicare beneficiaries, the 2010 Affordable Care Act waived coinsurance for the Welcome to Medicare visit, making this benefit free starting in 2011. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of the Affordable Care Act on Welcome to Medicare visit utilization. A 5% sample of newly enrolled fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries for 2005-2016 was used to estimate changes in Welcome to Medicare visit use over time. An interrupted time series model examined whether Welcome to Medicare visits increased significantly after 2011, controlling for pre-intervention trends and other autocorrelation. Annual Welcome to Medicare visit rates began at 1.4% in 2005 and increased to 12.3% by 2016. The quarterly Welcome to Medicare visit rate, which was almost 1% at baseline, was increasing by 0.06% before the 2011 Affordable Care Act provision (pAct provision, the rate increased by about 1% in the first quarter of 2011 (intercept, pAct trends of lower utilization persisted over time for non-whites and improved less quickly for men, regions other than Northeast, and beneficiaries without any supplemental insurance. The Affordable Care Act, and perhaps the removal of cost sharing, was associated with increased use of the Welcome to Medicare visit; however, even with the increased use, there is room for improvement. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. determinants of first antenatal care visit by pregnant women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-09-01

    Sep 1, 2014 ... September 2014. EAsT AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL. 317. East African Medical Journal Vol. 91 No. 9 September 2014. DETERMINANTS OF FIRST ANTENATAL CARE VISIT BY PREGNANT WOMEN AT COMMUNITY BASED. EDUCATION, RESEARCH AND SERVICE SITES IN NORTHERN UGANDA.

  9. Routine Prenatal Care Visits by Provider Specialty in the United States, 2009-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the National Technical Information Service NCHS Routine Prenatal Care Visits by Provider Specialty in the United States, ... care, ambulatory obstetric care The percentage of routine prenatal care visits at which women saw non-ob/gyn ...

  10. [Role of Visiting Nursing Care in Japanese Home Healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sang-Ju

    2018-02-01

    Taiwan's rapidly aging society is expected to make it a super-aged society in 2026. By 2060, people aged 65 or older will account for 40% of the population, a ratio that will approximate that in Japan. In Japan, the elderly population was 27.3% in 2016. By 2025, when the baby-boomers become 75 years old in Japan, issues of long-term care and end-of-life care will be more important and challenging. Since 1976, more Japanese have died in hospital settings than in home settings. Although the percentage of people dying at home increased slightly to 12.7% in 2016, after the recent introduction and promotion of home healthcare, Japan will face a significant challenge to deal with the healthcare 'tsunami' of high natural death rates, which is expected to impose a heavy death burdened on society by 2040, when the death rate is expected to reach 1,670,000/year. Therefore, the Japanese authorities have begun to promote the Community-based Integrated Care System, in which home healthcare and visiting nursing play crucial roles. This article summarizes the historical trend and current situation of visiting nursing in Japan. Japan uses a hybrid payment system for visiting nursing that is financially supported both through private medical insurance policies and Kaigo insurance (Japanese long-term care insurance). The total of 8613 visiting nursing stations that were active in community settings in 2016 cooperated with 14,000 support clinics for home healthcare and cared for 570,000 patients in home settings. We believe that visiting nursing will play an important role in home healthcare in Taiwan in the future.

  11. Provider type and management of common visits in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roblin, Douglas W; Liu, Hangsheng; Cromwell, Lee F; Robbins, Michael; Robinson, Brandi E; Auerbach, David; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2017-04-01

    Debate continues on whether nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) are more likely to order ancillary services, or order more costly services among alternatives, than primary care physicians (PCPs). We compared prescription medication and diagnostic service orders associated with NP/PA versus PCP visits for management of neck or back (N/B) pain or acute respiratory infection (ARI). Retrospective, observational study of visits from January 2006 through March 2008 in the adult primary care practice of Kaiser Permanente in Atlanta, Georgia. Data were obtained from electronic health records. NP/PA and PCP visits for N/B pain or ARI were propensity score matched on patient age, gender, and comorbidities. On propensity score-matched N/B pain visits (n = 6724), NP/PAs were less likely than PCPs to order a computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance image (MRI) scan (2.1% vs 3.3%, respectively) or narcotic analgesic (26.9% vs 28.5%) and more likely to order a nonnarcotic analgesic (13.5% vs 8.5%) or muscle relaxant (45.8% vs 42.5%) (all P ≤.05). On propensity score-matched ARI visits (n = 24,190), NP/PAs were more likely than PCPs to order any antibiotic medication (73.7% vs 65.8%), but less likely to order an x-ray (6.3% vs 8.6%), broad-spectrum antibiotic (41.5% vs 42.5%), or rapid strep test (6.3% vs 9.7%) (all P ≤.05). In the multidisciplinary primary care practice of this health maintenance organization, NP/PAs attending visits for N/B pain or ARI were less likely than PCPs to order advanced diagnostic radiology imaging services, to prescribe narcotic analgesics, and/or to prescribe broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  12. Wound Care: Preventing Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or wearing your Immediate Post-op or preliminary prosthesis; keep it elevated whenever possible. The limb should be raised above the level of your heart to prevent swelling. Take care of your whole self – body, mind, and spirit. Eat well and drink plenty ...

  13. [Visitation policy, design and comfort in Spanish intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, D; Martín, L; Viña, L; Quindós, B; Espina, M J; Forcelledo, L; López-Amor, L; García-Arias, B; del Busto, C; de Cima, S; Fernández-Rey, E

    2015-01-01

    To determine the design and comfort in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs), by analysing visiting hours, information, and family participation in patient care. Descriptive, multicentre study. Spanish ICUs. A questionnaire e-mailed to members of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine, Critical and Coronary Units (SEMICYUC), subscribers of the Electronic Journal Intensive Care Medicine, and disseminated through the blog Proyecto HU-CI. A total of 135 questionnaires from 131 hospitals were analysed. Visiting hours: 3.8% open 24h, 9.8% open daytime, and 67.7% have 2 visits a day. Information: given only by the doctor in 75.2% of the cases, doctor and nurse together in 4.5%, with a frequency of once a day in 79.7%. During weekends, information is given in 95.5% of the cases. Information given over the phone 74.4%. Family participation in patient care: hygiene 11%, feeding 80.5%, physiotherapy 17%. Personal objects allowed: mobile phone 41%, computer 55%, sound system 77%, and television 30%. Architecture and comfort: all individual cubicles 60.2%, natural light 54.9%, television 7.5%, ambient music 12%, clock in the cubicle 15.8%, environmental noise meter 3.8%, and a waiting room near the ICU 68.4%. Visiting policy is restrictive, with a closed ICU being the predominating culture. On average, technological communication devices are not allowed. Family participation in patient care is low. The ICU design does not guarantee privacy or provide a desirable level of comfort. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Providing Cardiology Care in Rural Areas Through Visiting Consultant Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruca, Thomas S; Pyo, Tae-Hyung; Nelson, Gregory C

    2016-06-30

    Workforce experts predict a future shortage of cardiologists that is expected to impact rural areas more severely than urban areas. However, there is little research on how rural patients are currently served through clinical outreach. This study examines the impact of cardiology outreach in Iowa, a state with a large rural population, on participating cardiologists and on patient access. Outreach clinics are tracked annually in the Office of Statewide Clinical Education Programs Visiting Medical Consultant Database (University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine). Data from 2014 were analyzed. In 2014, an estimated 5460 visiting consultant clinic days were provided in 96 predominantly rural cities by 167 cardiologists from Iowa and adjoining states. Forty-five percent of Iowa cardiologists participated in rural outreach. Visiting cardiologists from Iowa and adjoining states drive an estimated 45 000 miles per month. Because of monthly outreach clinics, the average driving time to the nearest cardiologist falls from 42.2±20.0 to 14.7±11.0 minutes for rural Iowans. Cardiology outreach improves geographic access to office-based cardiology care for more than 1 million Iowans out of a total population of 3 million. Direct travel costs and opportunity costs associated with physician travel are estimated to be more than $2.1 million per year. Cardiologists in Iowa and adjoining states have expanded access to office-based cardiology care from 18 to 89 of the 99 counties in Iowa. In these 71 counties without a full-time cardiologist, visiting consultant clinics can accommodate more than 50% of office visits in the patients' home county. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  15. The Importance of Efficacy: Using the Extended Parallel Process Model to Examine Factors Related to Preschool-Age Children Enrolled in Medicaid Receiving Preventive Dental Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askelson, Natoshia M.; Chi, Donald L.; Momany, Elizabeth T.; Kuthy, Raymond A.; Carter, Knute D.; Field, Kathryn; Damiano, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Early preventive dental visits are vital to the oral health of children. Yet many children, especially preschool-age children enrolled in Medicaid, do not receive early visits. This study attempts to uncover factors that can be used to encourage parents to seek preventive dental care for preschool-age children enrolled in Medicaid. The extended…

  16. Home visiting and prenatal care: a survey of practical wisdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples-Sheps, M D; Efird, C; Miller, C A

    1989-06-01

    Public health nurses and other professional and paraprofessional workers have engaged in prenatal home visiting for many decades. Yet, the extent to which this and other prenatal interventions influence maternal behavior is largely unknown. This study was undertaken to collect and categorize perceptions of experts in the organization and delivery of prenatal care about the value of selected strategies for encouraging participation in care, for education, and for changing behavior, with special emphasis on home visiting. The survey sample consisted of 151 experts who were identified by directors of maternal and child health programs in 48 of the 50 states. One hundred eighteen of the experts, almost half of whom were nurses, responded to the survey. The findings suggest important discrepancies between respondents' perceptions about the effectiveness of some prenatal strategies and the actual extent of their use in practice. In addition, the results raise questions about the appropriate mix of type of home visitor and purpose of visit. These questions should form the basis for subsequent investigations.

  17. The importance of preventive dental visits from a young age: systematic review and current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar V

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vaishnavi Bhaskar,1 Kathleen A McGraw,2 Kimon Divaris3 1Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, 2Health Sciences Library, 3Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Background: Dental caries, the most common childhood chronic disease, disproportionately affects vulnerable parts of the population and confers substantial impacts to children, families, and health systems. Because efforts directed toward oral health promotion and disease prevention are fundamentally superior to dental rehabilitation secondary to disease development, early preventive dental visits (EPDVs are widely advocated by professional and academic stakeholders. The aim of this comprehensive review was to critically review and summarize available evidence regarding the effectiveness of EPDVs in improving children's oral health outcomes. Materials and methods: A systematic literature search of the PubMed and Embase electronic databases was undertaken to identify peer-reviewed publications investigating the effectiveness of EPDVs on oral health outcomes, including clinical, behavioral, and cost end points up to October 30, 2013. Outcomes of the identified studies were abstracted and summarized independently by two investigators. Results: Four manuscripts met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. All studies were conducted in the US and employed a retrospective cohort study design using public insurance-claims data, whereas one study matched claims files with kindergarten state dental surveillance data. That study found no benefit of EPDVs in future clinically determined dental caries levels in kindergarten. The other three studies found mixed support for an association of EPDVs with subsequent more preventive and fewer nonpreventive visits and lower nonpreventive service-related expenditures. Selection bias and a problem-driven dental care

  18. Dental and other health care visits among U.S. adults with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, S L; Lester, A

    2000-10-01

    This study compared yearly dental visits of diabetic adults with those of nondiabetic adults. For adults with diabetes, we compared the frequency of past-year dental visits with past-year visits for diabetes care, dilated eye examinations, and foot examinations. We conducted a cross-sectional study using a sample of 105,718 dentate individuals aged > or =25 years, including 4,605 individuals with diabetes who participated in the 1995-1998 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System in 38 states. Dentate adults (i.e., those with at least some natural teeth) with diabetes were less likely than those without diabetes to have seen a dentist within the preceding 12 months (65.8 vs. 73.1%, P = 0.0000). Adults with diabetes were less likely to have seen a dentist than to have seen a health care provider for diabetes care (86.3%); the percentage who saw a dentist was comparable with the percentage who had their feet examined (67.7%) or had a dilated eye examination (62.3%). The disparity in dental visits among racial or ethnic groups and among socioeconomic groups was greater than that for any other type of health care visit for subjects with diabetes. Promotion of oral health among diabetic patients may be necessary, particularly in Hispanic and African-American communities. Information on oral health complications should be included in clinical training programs. Oral and diabetes control programs in state health departments should collaborate to promote preventive dental services, and the oral examination should be listed as a component of continuous care in the American Diabetes Association's standards of medical care for diabetic patients.

  19. Improving newborn care practices through home visits: lessons from Malawi, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Sitrin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nearly all newborn deaths occur in low- or middle-income countries. Many of these deaths could be prevented through promotion and provision of newborn care practices such as thermal care, early and exclusive breastfeeding, and hygienic cord care. Home visit programmes promoting these practices were piloted in Malawi, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Uganda. Objective: This study assessed changes in selected newborn care practices over time in pilot programme areas in four countries and evaluated whether women who received home visits during pregnancy were more likely to report use of three key practices. Design: Using data from cross-sectional surveys of women with live births at baseline and endline, the Pearson chi-squared test was used to assess changes over time. Generalised linear models were used to assess the relationship between the main independent variable – home visit from a community health worker (CHW during pregnancy (0, 1–2, 3+ – and use of selected practices while controlling for antenatal care, place of delivery, and maternal age and education. Results: There were statistically significant improvements in practices, except applying nothing to the cord in Malawi and early initiation of breastfeeding in Bangladesh. In Malawi, Nepal, and Bangladesh, women who were visited by a CHW three or more times during pregnancy were more likely to report use of selected practices. Women who delivered in a facility were also more likely to report use of selected practices in Malawi, Nepal, and Uganda; association with place of birth was not examined in Bangladesh because only women who delivered outside a facility were asked about these practices. Conclusion: Home visits can play a role in improving practices in different settings. Multiple interactions are needed, so programmes need to investigate the most appropriate and efficient ways to reach families and promote newborn care practices. Meanwhile, programmes must take advantage of

  20. Diabetic foot wound care practices among patients visiting a tertiary care hospital in north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samreen Khan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic foot syndrome is one of the most common and devastating preventable complications of diabetes resulting in major economic consequences for the patients, their families, and the society. Aims & Objectives: The present study was carried out to assess knowledge, attitude and practices of Diabetic Foot Wound Care among the patients suffering from Diabetic Foot and to correlate them with the socio-demographic parameters. Material & Methods: It was a Hospital based cross-sectional study involving clinically diagnosed adult (>18 years patients of Diabetic Foot visiting the Surgery and Medicine OPDs at Teerthankar Mahaveer Medical College & Research Centre, Moradabad, India. Results: Significant association KAP (Knowledge, Attitude and Practices score was seen with age of the patient, education, addiction, family history of Diabetes Mellitus, prior receipt of information regarding Diabetic foot-care practices, compliance towards the treatment and the type of foot wear used. Conclusions: The results highlight areas especially Health education, use of safe footwear and life style adjustments, where efforts to improve knowledge and practice may contribute to the prevention of development of Foot ulcers and amputation. 

  1. Prevalence and Determinants of Early Antenatal Care Visit among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Antenatal care (ANC), which is given to pregnant women, is widely used for prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of general medical and .... of Ethiopia. The town has 9 kebeles - the smallest administrative units in Ethiopia. There are two hospitals (one government and one private), two health centers, ten private clinics,.

  2. The Primary Care Visit: What Else Could Be Happening?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Fulmer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Institute of Medicine Report called for a greater role for nurses within the context of oral health in two recent publications, Advancing Oral Health in America (2011 and Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Populations (2011. Nurses provide care for many vulnerable persons, including frail and functionally dependent older adults, persons with disabilities, and persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. These persons are the least likely to receive necessary, health-sustaining dental care (which is distinct from mouth care. The mouth, or more accurately, plaque, serves as a reservoir for bacteria and pathogens. The link between mouth care, oral health, and systemic health is well-documented; infections such as pneumonia have been linked to poor oral health. Nurses, therefore, need to reframe mouth care as oral infection control and infection control more broadly. The can provide the preventive measure that are crucial to minimizing systemic infections. Nurses in all settings can potentially provide mouth care, conduct oral health assessments, educate patients about best mouth care practices, and make dental referrals. Yet, nurses are often hesitant to do anything beyond basic oral hygiene—and even in this area, often fail to provide mouth care based on best practices.

  3. Obesity predicts primary health care visits: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twells, Laurie K; Bridger, Tracey; Knight, John C; Alaghehbandan, Reza; Barrett, Brendan

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between body mass index (BMI), its association with chronic disease, and its impact on health services utilization in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, from 1998 to 2002. A data linkage study was conducted involving a provincial health survey linked to 2 health care use administrative databases. The study population comprised 2345 adults between the ages of 20 and 64 years. Self-reported height and weight measures and other covariates, including chronic diseases, were obtained from a provincial survey. BMI categories include: normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9), overweight (BMI 25-29.9), obese class I (BMI 30-34.9), obese class II (BMI ≥ 35), and obese class III (BMI ≥ 40). Survey responses were linked with objective physician and hospital health services utilization over a 5-year period. Weight classifications in the study sample were as follows: 37% normal, 39% overweight, 17% obese, and 6% morbidly obese. The obese and morbidly obese were more likely to report having serious chronic conditions after adjusting for age and sex. Only the morbidly obese group (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2)) had a significantly higher number of visits to a general practitioner (GP) over a 5-year period compared to the normal weight group (median 22.0 vs. 17.0, Pchronic conditions and other relevant covariates, being morbidly obese remained a significant predictor of GP visits (Pobesity is placing a burden at the primary health care level. More resources are needed in order to support GPs in their efforts to manage and treat obese adults who have associated comorbidities.

  4. ORAL HEALTH TO PATIENTS WITH ESPECIAL NEEDS: DOMICILIARY VISIT AS A HEALTH CARE STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Boaventura Barros

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This work relates an experience that uses the domiciliary visit as strategy to extend the oral health care, offering access to people with psychological and motor difficulties. The domiciliary visit consists in a set of health actions that promotes both educative and curative assistance. The present work was developed in the area of Lírio dos Vales Health Unit in Alagoinhas BA. The aim of the activities was to promote health through the motivation and education actions, preventing illnesses, as well as the clinical treatment to the attended individuals. During the domiciliary visits the following procedures had been carried through: recognition of individual and family life conditions, medical history, clinical examination, screening for oral injuries, topical application of fluoride, dental extraction in units with periodontal illness and remaining dental roots; beyond health education and supervised brushing sessions. As results, in six months of activities were realized: 54 domiciliary visits, 34 supervised brushing sessions, 27 fluoride applications and 23 dental extractions. It can be concluded that domiciliary visit, in the context of the PSF, brings positive results for oral health promotion to a parcel of the population that would not have access to the traditional Dentistry, particularly to bedridden patients or to those patients with psychomotor difficulty. Besides this, it allows the oral injuries diagnose anticipation, attendance personalization and humanization and a better relationship between professional and user.

  5. Preventive home visits to older home-dwelling people in Denmark: are invitational procedures of importance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekmann, A; Vass, M; Avlund, K

    2010-01-01

    Since 1998 all municipalities in Denmark have been required by law to offer two annual preventive home visits to all home-dwelling citizens aged 75 or over. The influence of invitational procedures on acceptance rates has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to describe and investigate...... whether different invitational procedures were associated with first preventive home visit acceptance rates. The study was based on secondary analyses of data from the Danish Intervention Study on Preventive Home Visits. Data were collected from 1998 to 2002. Of the 4060 participants in the main study......, 3245 reported receiving an offer for an identifiable preventive home visit, of whom 2399 (73.9%) provided complete data for the main analyses in the present study. Invitational procedures were categorised as: (1) a letter with a proposed date and time for the visit, (2) a visitor telephone call, and (3...

  6. Factors associated with ambulatory care sensitive emergency department visits for South Carolina Medicaid members with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, S; Royer, J; Mann, J R; Armour, B S

    2018-03-01

    Ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) can be seen as failure of access or management in primary care settings. Identifying factors associated with ACSCs for individuals with an Intellectual Disability (ID) provide insight into potential interventions. To assess the association between emergency department (ED) ACSC visits and a number of demographic and health characteristics of South Carolina Medicaid members with ID. A retrospective cohort of adults with ID was followed from 2001 to 2011. Using ICD-9-CM codes, four ID subgroups, totalling 14 650 members, were studied. There were 106 919 ED visits, with 21 214 visits (19.8%) classified as ACSC. Of those, 82.9% were treated and released from EDs with costs averaging $578 per visit. People with mild and unspecified ID averaged greater than one ED visit per member year. Those with Down syndrome and other genetic cause ID had the lowest rates of ED visits but the highest percentage of ACSC ED visits that resulted in inpatient hospitalisation (26.6% vs. an average of 16.8% for other subgroups). When compared with other residential types, those residing at home with no health support services had the highest ED visit rate and were most likely to be discharged back to the community following an ED visit (85.2%). Adults residing in a nursing home had lower rates of ED visits but were most likely to be admitted to the hospital (38.9%) following an ED visit. Epilepsy and convulsions were the leading cause (29.6%) of ACSC ED visits across all subgroups and residential settings. Prevention of ACSC ED visits may be possible by targeting adults with ID who live at home without health support services. © 2017 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Utilising Medicare annual wellness visits to implement interprofessional education in the primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Brian; Evans, Lance; Bogschutz, Renee; Panasci, Kathryn; Sun, Grace

    2016-07-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is an important component of healthcare professional curriculum in order to optimally prepare students for their roles as part of the healthcare team. Integrating IPE activities into direct patient care in the primary care clinic setting can help improve perceptions and student understanding of other healthcare professionals' responsibilities in this ever-evolving practice setting. This report describes the implementation of an interprofessional clinic including a variety of healthcare professionals and students in the context of the Medicare Annual Wellness Visits (AWV). Design of the clinic and general roles of the professionals in optimising preventive care are described. Student perceptions of IPE and their knowledge of other healthcare professionals were also surveyed. Student knowledge of other professionals mildly improved. Student perception of actual cooperation and interprofessional interaction statistically improved, while perception of interprofessional learning slightly worsened. Utilising Medicare AWVs can be a way for various professionals to improve IPE in the primary care setting.

  8. Preventive Home Visits for Older People: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourigny, André; Bédard, Annick; Laurin, Danielle; Kröger, Edeltraut; Durand, Pierre; Bonin, Lucie; Sévigny, Andrée; Frappier, Annie; Roussel, Marie Ève; Martin, Mélanie

    2015-12-01

    RÉSUMÉ L'augmentation du nombre de personnes âgées présentant des incapacités et ayant des maladies chroniques entraîne une hausse des besoins en services de santé à domicile. Le nombre d'études et de revues systématiques traitant des approches préventives pour cette clientèle a proliféré, générant un besoin de synthèse des connaissances. Nous avons mené une revue systématique de revues systématiques évaluant l'effet des programmes de visite préventive pour les personnes âgées. Des 5 973 citations identifiées dans plus de 30 bases de données de littérature grise et scientifique, 10 articles répondaient à tous les critères d'inclusion. Les revues systématiques étaient retenues si elles comprenaient des essais randomisés contrôlés comparant des interventions de soins à domicile offerts par un professionnel de la santé et ceux sans professionnels. Les interventions sont souvent des évaluations gériatriques globales et s'accompagnent de visites de suivi. Il ressort que les visites préventives multidimensionnelles à domicile ont le potentiel de diminuer la mortalité, en particulier chez les personnes âgées plus jeunes, et offrent aussi un potentiel d'amélioration de l'autonomie fonctionnelle. Toutefois, ces résultats doivent être interprétés avec prudence vue la diversité des interventions analysées.

  9. Regional Supply of Chiropractic Care and Visits to Primary Care Physicians for Back and Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew A.; Yakusheva, Olga; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Bynum, Julie P.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether availability of chiropractic care affects use of primary care physician (PCP) services is unknown. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 17.7 million older adults who were enrolled in Medicare from 2010 to 2011. We examined the relationship between regional supply of chiropractic care and PCP services using Spearman correlation. Generalized linear models were used to examine the association between regional supply of chiropractic care and number of annual visits to PCPs for back and/or neck pain. Results We found a positive association between regional supply of chiropractic care and PCP services (rs = 0.52; P neck pain was apparent. The number of PCP visits for back and/or neck pain was 8% lower (rate ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.91–0.92) in the quintile with the highest supply of chiropractic care compared to the lowest quintile. We estimate chiropractic care is associated with a reduction of 0.37 million visits to PCPs nationally, at a cost of $83.5 million. Conclusions Greater availability of chiropractic care in some areas may be offsetting PCP services for back and/or neck pain among older adults. (J Am Board Fam Med 2015;28:000–000.) PMID:26152439

  10. Antenatal care visits' absenteeism at a secondary care medical facility in Southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloko, Olakunle; Ogunbode, Olayinka Oladunjoye; Roberts, Olumuyiwa; Arowojolu, Ayodele Olatunji

    2016-11-01

    Antenatal care (ANC) is a specialised pattern of care organised for pregnant women with the goal of maintaining good health and promoting safe delivery of healthy infants. It is an indispensable part of effective maternity care services. This study identified the factors responsible for absenteeism from ANC follow-up visits. It was a hospital-based prospective cross-sectional descriptive study conducted at a faith based secondary healthcare facility in Ibadan, Nigeria. Relevant data were retrieved using interviewer-administered structured questionnaires and antenatal health record cards. The major reasons identified for absenteeism were delay in receiving hospital services due to long queues at service points and understaffing. The pregnant women aged 35 years and above were the most likely to miss the visits. Therefore, there is the need for hospital administrators and health care givers to make the services patient-friendly.

  11. The need to include obstetric nurses in prenatal care visits in the public health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Aparecida Lagrosa Garcia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate, with a qualitative approach, the role of Obstetric Nurses at the primary level of care given to women’s health as a vital component of the multidisciplinary team, which today is fundamental for providing care, prevention as well as health education and promotion, especially in programs whose activities are geared towards primary care of pregnant, parturient, and puerpera women. Methods: Brazilian laws and the determinations of Nursing Councils in reference to the activities of the obstetric nurse were researched, including the nurse’s responsibilities and limits. The bibliographic search was conducted in health-related journals, lay publications, and the Internet. Results: The conflicts between professional physicians and nurses were discussed. Conclusions: It was concluded that the activities of the nurse, conducting low-risk prenatal clinical visits in the basic healthcare network, has legal and ethical support and provides true benefit to the clients.

  12. Preventive home visits to older home-dwelling people in Denmark: are invitational procedures of importance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmann, A; Vass, M; Avlund, K

    2010-11-01

    Since 1998 all municipalities in Denmark have been required by law to offer two annual preventive home visits to all home-dwelling citizens aged 75 or over. The influence of invitational procedures on acceptance rates has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to describe and investigate whether different invitational procedures were associated with first preventive home visit acceptance rates. The study was based on secondary analyses of data from the Danish Intervention Study on Preventive Home Visits. Data were collected from 1998 to 2002. Of the 4060 participants in the main study, 3245 reported receiving an offer for an identifiable preventive home visit, of whom 2399 (73.9%) provided complete data for the main analyses in the present study. Invitational procedures were categorised as: (1) a letter with a proposed date and time for the visit, (2) a visitor telephone call, and (3) a letter with encouragement to phone the visitor for appointment (letter without a proposed date). Covariates included sex, age, experience with preventive interventions, functional ability, self rated health, social relations and psychosocial characteristics. Statistical analyses included chi-square tests, and bi- and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Different invitational procedures were associated with first preventive home visit acceptance rates. Significantly more men (75.1%) than women (62.8%) declined the first preventive home visit regardless of the invitational procedure. Compared to 'letter with a proposed date', men had an odds ratio of 1.78 (95% CI: 1.16-2.74) for declining visits when 'telephone call' was used and an odds ratio 2.81 (95% CI: 1.79-4.40) when 'letter without a proposed date' was used as the invitational procedure. In women the odds ratios were 1.23 (95% CI: 0.91-1.68) and 1.87 (95% CI: 1.37-2.55), respectively. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Ambulatory Care Visits to Pediatricians in Taiwan: A Nationwide Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ling-Yu; Lynn, An-Min; Chen, Tzeng-Ji

    2015-11-02

    Pediatricians play a key role in the healthy development of children. Nevertheless, the practice patterns of pediatricians have seldom been investigated. The current study analyzed the nationwide profiles of ambulatory visits to pediatricians in Taiwan, using the National Health Insurance Research Database. From a dataset that was randomly sampled one out of every 500 records among a total of 309,880,000 visits in 2012 in the country, 9.8% (n = 60,717) of the visits were found paid to pediatricians. Children and adolescents accounted for only 69.3% of the visits to pediatricians. Male pediatricians provided 80.5% of the services and the main workforces were those aged 40-49 years. The most frequent diagnoses were respiratory tract diseases (64.7%) and anti-histamine agents were prescribed in 48.8% of the visits to pediatricians. Our detailed results could contribute to evidence-based discussions on health policymaking.

  14. Ambulatory Care Visits to Pediatricians in Taiwan: A Nationwide Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Yu Yang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pediatricians play a key role in the healthy development of children. Nevertheless, the practice patterns of pediatricians have seldom been investigated. The current study analyzed the nationwide profiles of ambulatory visits to pediatricians in Taiwan, using the National Health Insurance Research Database. From a dataset that was randomly sampled one out of every 500 records among a total of 309,880,000 visits in 2012 in the country, 9.8% (n = 60,717 of the visits were found paid to pediatricians. Children and adolescents accounted for only 69.3% of the visits to pediatricians. Male pediatricians provided 80.5% of the services and the main workforces were those aged 40–49 years. The most frequent diagnoses were respiratory tract diseases (64.7% and anti-histamine agents were prescribed in 48.8% of the visits to pediatricians. Our detailed results could contribute to evidence-based discussions on health policymaking.

  15. First Steps towards Evidence-Based Preventive Home Visits: Experiences Gathered in a Swedish Municipality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Löfqvist

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of preventive home visits is to promote overall health and wellbeing in old age. The aim of this paper was to describe the process of the development of evidence-based preventive home visits, targeting independent community-living older persons. The evidence base was generated from published studies and practical experiences. The results demonstrate that preventive home visits should be directed to persons 80 years old and older and involve various professional competences. The visits should be personalized, lead to concrete interventions, and be followed up. The health areas assessed should derive from a broad perspective and include social, psychological, and medical aspects. Core components in the protocol developed in this study captured physical, medical, psychosocial, and environmental aspects. Results of a pilot study showed that the protocol validly identified health risks among older people with different levels of ADL dependence.

  16. Secondary Emergency Visits: Patients seeking care for problems recently managed elsewhere

    OpenAIRE

    Mohr, Bruce; Wiley, Preston

    1991-01-01

    This study surveyed patients seeking emergency care at three Calgary hospitals during a 7-day period in February 1989. Twenty-one percent had seen another physician for the same medical problem within 72 hours. The study suggests that secondary visits at emergency departments affect health care costs. Further study is needed to investigate the extent and appropriateness of such visits.

  17. Personal reflection: critical-care visitation and the headache that follows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakma, Nijhenee; Ocampo, Justin-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Critical-care nurses, as well as other nurses, face ethical, moral, and legal issues often in their units. In some cases, the issue may cause conflict between the patient, the patient's family, and health care providers, including nurses. One possible area of conflict is critical-care visitation. This article describes visitation in critical-care units as well as possible outcomes and solutions.

  18. Virtual Visits and Patient-Centered Care: Results of a Patient Survey and Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrail, Kimberlyn Marie; Ahuja, Megan Alyssa; Leaver, Chad Andrew

    2017-05-26

    Virtual visits are clinical interactions in health care that do not involve the patient and provider being in the same room at the same time. The use of virtual visits is growing rapidly in health care. Some health systems are integrating virtual visits into primary care as a complement to existing modes of care, in part reflecting a growing focus on patient-centered care. There is, however, limited empirical evidence about how patients view this new form of care and how it affects overall health system use. Descriptive objectives were to assess users and providers of virtual visits, including the reasons patients give for use. The analytic objective was to assess empirically the influence of virtual visits on overall primary care use and costs, including whether virtual care is with a known or a new primary care physician. The study took place in British Columbia, Canada, where virtual visits have been publicly funded since October 2012. A survey of patients who used virtual visits and an observational study of users and nonusers of virtual visits were conducted. Comparison groups included two groups: (1) all other BC residents, and (2) a group matched (3:1) to the cohort. The first virtual visit was used as the intervention and the main outcome measures were total primary care visits and costs. During 2013-2014, there were 7286 virtual visit encounters, involving 5441 patients and 144 physicians. Younger patients and physicians were more likely to use and provide virtual visits (Preporting their virtual visit was "very" or "somewhat" helpful to resolve their health issue. Segmented regression analysis and the corresponding regression parameter estimates suggested virtual visits appear to have the potential to decrease primary care costs by approximately Can $4 per quarter (Can -$3.79, P=.12), but that benefit is most associated with seeing a known provider (Can -$8.68, Pintegrated into existing health care delivery systems. ©Kimberlyn Marie McGrail, Megan Alyssa

  19. Group Medical Visits to Provide Gynecologic Care for Women Affected by Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally R. Greenwald

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Women with breast cancer have complex and unique gynecologic needs that are challenging to effectively and comprehensively meet in a traditional gynecology visit format. Group medical visits are an effective and well-received model of care in other disease settings and can provide comprehensive health education as an adjunct to one-on-one evaluation and treatment. There are limited data regarding the use of this type of health care delivery in providing gynecology-focused care to women affected by breast cancer. Methods: A group medical visit model was created for gynecology providers to see new breast cancer patient consults. From May 2012 to February 2014, 148 patients (3–6 per group participated in a 1-hour informational session followed by a 15- to 30-minute individual visit with a physician that included history, physical examination and evaluation. We surveyed 101 women who attended these visits to evaluate a group model for providing gynecologic care and educational support to women with breast cancer. Results: Of those who responded to the survey question, 100% agreed or somewhat agreed that their expectations for an initial intake visit were met during the group visit; 81% agreed or somewhat agreed that they felt a group visit was preferable to an individual introductory visit. More than 95% agreed or somewhat agreed that the information was understandable and their questions were answered during the visit. Only 5 respondents expressed dissatisfaction with the additional time commitment for this type of visit. Conclusions: The majority of women surveyed expressed satisfaction with their experience with a group visit format. The women who participated preferred this format compared to an individual intake appointment when establishing gynecology care after breast cancer diagnosis/treatment, regardless of age, menopausal status, cancer stage or hormone receptor status. While further studies are warranted to directly compare and

  20. Reason for Visit: Is Migrant Health Care that Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, George F.; Graybill, Marie; George, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the reasons for which migrant agricultural workers in Pennsylvania seek health care. Methods: Participants were individuals 14 years of age and over, actively involved in agricultural labor and presenting for medical care at 6 migrant health care centers. Bilingual health care providers…

  1. Prevalence and factors associated with late antenatal care visit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flora

    Conclusion: Late first antenatal clinic visit was high in Lushoto, and was highly associated with unmarried and unemployment status. Therefore, provision of continuous health education and community sensitization on the importance of timely seeking ANC services should be strengthened. Keywords: pregnancy, antenatal ...

  2. Rethinking the Well Woman Visit: A Scoping Review to Identify Eight Priority Areas for Well Woman Care in the Era of the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Alisa; Beal, Margaret W; Fitzgerald, Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    The annual pap smear for cervical cancer screening, once a mainstay of the well woman visit (WWV), is no longer recommended for most low-risk women. This change has led many women and their health care providers to wonder if they should abandon this annual preventive health visit altogether. Changing guidelines coinciding with expanded WWV coverage for millions of American women under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act have created confusion for health care consumers and care givers alike. Is there evidence to support continued routine preventive health visits for women and, if so, what would ideally constitute the WWV of today? A scoping review of the literature was undertaken to appraise the current state of evidence regarding a wide range of possible elements to identify priority areas for the WWV. A population health perspective taking into consideration the reproductive health needs of women as well as the preventable and modifiable leading causes of death and disability was used to identify eight domains for the WWV of today: 1) reproductive life planning and sexual health, 2) cardiovascular disease and stroke, 3) prevention, screening, and early detection of cancers, 4) unintended injury, 5) anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and suicidal intent, 6) intimate partner violence, assault, and homicide, 7) lower respiratory disease, and 8) arthritis and other musculoskeletal problems. The WWV remains a very important opportunity for prevention, health education, screening, and early detection and should not be abandoned. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Preventive dental health care experiences of preschool-age children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Colleen E; Chi, Donald L; Masterson, Erin; Milgrom, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the preventive dental health care experiences of young children with special needs and determined the feasibility of conducting clinical dental examinations at a community-based early intervention services center. Study methods included 90 parent interviews and dental examinations of their preschool-age children. Thirteen percent of the children received optimal preventive care, defined as twice daily tooth brushing with fluoridated toothpaste and two preventive dental visits in the prior 12 months; 37% experienced care that fell short in both areas. Optimal care was more common among children of parents who reported tooth brushing was not a struggle and those with a personal dentist. Parents' opinion of the study experience was generally positive. Few children with special needs receive effective preventive care early, when primary prevention could be achieved. Barriers to optimal care could be readily addressed by the dental community in coordination with early intervention providers. © 2014 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Multimorbidity and quality of preventive care in Swiss university primary care cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Streit

    Full Text Available Caring for patients with multimorbidity is common for generalists, although such patients are often excluded from clinical trials, and thus such trials lack of generalizability. Data on the association between multimorbidity and preventive care are limited. We aimed to assess whether comorbidity number, severity and type were associated with preventive care among patients receiving care in Swiss University primary care settings.We examined a retrospective cohort composed of a random sample of 1,002 patients aged 50-80 years attending four Swiss university primary care settings. Multimorbidity was defined according to the literature and the Charlson index. We assessed the quality of preventive care and cardiovascular preventive care with RAND's Quality Assessment Tool indicators. Aggregate scores of quality of provided care were calculated by taking into account the number of eligible patients for each indicator.Participants (mean age 63.5 years, 44% women had a mean of 2.6 (SD 1.9 comorbidities and 67.5% had 2 or more comorbidities. The mean Charlson index was 1.8 (SD 1.9. Overall, participants received 69% of recommended preventive care and 84% of cardiovascular preventive care. Quality of care was not associated with higher numbers of comorbidities, both for preventive care and for cardiovascular preventive care. Results were similar in analyses using the Charlson index and after adjusting for age, gender, occupation, center and number of visits. Some patients may receive less preventive care including those with dementia (47% and those with schizophrenia (35%.In Swiss university primary care settings, two thirds of patients had 2 or more comorbidities. The receipt of preventive and cardiovascular preventive care was not affected by comorbidity count or severity, although patients with certain comorbidities may receive lower levels of preventive care.

  5. Missed Initial Medical Visits: Predictors, Timing, and Implications for Retention in HIV Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhawan, Ank E; Liang, Yuanyuan; Vysyaraju, Kranthi; Muñoz, Jana; Ketchum, Norma; Saber, Julie; Buchberg, Meredith; Venegas, Yvonne; Bullock, Delia; Jain, Mamta K; Villarreal, Roberto; Taylor, Barbara S

    2017-05-01

    HIV disproportionately affects racial/ethnic minorities and individuals living in the southern United States, and missed clinic visits account for much of this disparity. We sought to evaluate: (1) predictors of missed initial HIV medical visits, (2) time to initial visit, and (3) the association between initial visit attendance and retention in HIV care. Chart reviews were conducted for 200 consecutive HIV-infected patients (100 in Dallas, 100 in San Antonio) completing case management (CM) intake. Of these, 52 (26%) missed their initial visit, with 22 (11%) never presenting for care. Mean age was 40 years, 85% were men, >70% were of minority race/ethnicity, and 28% had a new HIV diagnosis. Unemployment (OR [95% CI] = 2.33 [1.04-5.24], p = 0.04) and lower attendance of CM visits (OR = 3.08 [1.43-6.66], p = 0.004) were associated with missing the initial medical visit. A shorter time to visit completion was associated with CD4 ≤ 200 (HR 1.90 [1.25-2.88], p = 0.003), Dallas study site (HR = 1.48 [1.03-2.14], p = 0.04), and recent hospitalization (HR = 2.18 [1.38-3.43], p retention in care. New, early engagement strategies are needed to decrease missed visits and reduce HIV health disparities.

  6. Preventive home visits to elderly people by community nurses in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkstra, A.; Castelein, E.; Philipsen, H.

    1991-01-01

    This study aims at a description of the current position of preventive home visits to the elderly by community nurses in The Netherlands. Over a period of 8 weeks, a representative sample of 108 community nurses and 49 community nursing auxiliaries at 47 different locations paid a total number of

  7. The Role of Home-Visiting Programs in Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Kimberly S.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2009-01-01

    Kimberly Howard and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn examine home visiting, an increasingly popular method for delivering services for families, as a strategy for preventing child abuse and neglect. They focus on early interventions because infants are at greater risk for child abuse and neglect than are older children. In their article, Howard and Brooks-Gunn…

  8. The role of the visiting doctor in primary care clinics | Couper | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concept of doctors visiting clinics to support primary health care is well established by the role that these doctors should play is not clear, and varies from area to area. As an approach to understanding the possible roles of visiting doctors in order to assist District Management Teams to produce job descriptions for such ...

  9. Home visitation programs: an untapped opportunity for the delivery of early childhood obesity prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvy, S-J; de la Haye, K; Galama, T; Goran, M I

    2017-02-01

    Extant obesity efforts have had limited impact among low-income underserved children, in part because of limitations inherent to existing programs: (i) short duration and low intensity; (ii) late timing of implementation, when children are already overweight or obese; (iii) intervention delivery limiting their accessibility and sustainability; and (iv) failure to address barriers such as a lack of culturally competent services, poverty and housing instability, which interfere with healthy lifestyle changes. This concept paper proposes an innovative model of obesity prevention implemented in infancy and sustained throughout early childhood to address the limitations of current obesity prevention efforts. Specifically, we propose to integrate sustained, weekly, in-home obesity prevention as part of the services already delivered by ongoing Home Visitation Programs, which currently do not target obesity prevention. The home visiting structure represents an ideal model for impactful obesity prevention as home visitation programs: (i) already provide comprehensive services to diverse low-income infants and families who are most at risk for obesity and poor health because of socio-economic and structural conditions; (ii) services are initiated in infancy and sustained throughout critical developmental periods for the formation of healthy/unhealthy behaviors; and (iii) have been in place for more than 40 years, with a widespread presence across the United States and nationwide, which is critical for the scalability and sustainability of obesity prevention. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  10. Home visitation programs: An untapped opportunity for the delivery of early childhood obesity prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvy, Sarah-Jeanne; de la Haye, Kayla; Galama, Titus; Goran, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extant obesity efforts have had limited impact among low-income underserved children, in part because of limitations inherent to existing programs: 1) short duration and low intensity; 2) late timing of implementation, when children are already overweight or obese; 3) intervention delivery limiting their accessibility and sustainability; and 4) failure to address barriers such as a lack of culturally competent services, poverty and housing instability, which interfere with healthy lifestyle changes. Objective This concept paper proposes an innovative model of obesity prevention implemented in infancy and sustained throughout early childhood to address the limitations of current obesity prevention efforts. Specifically, we propose to integrate sustained, weekly, in-home obesity prevention as part of the services already delivered by ongoing Home Visitation Programs, which currently do not target obesity prevention. Conclusion The home visiting structure represents an ideal model for impactful obesity prevention as home visitation programs: (1) already provide comprehensive services to diverse low-income infants and families who are most at risk for obesity and poor health due to socio-economic and structural conditions; (2) services are initiated in infancy and sustained throughout critical developmental periods for the formation of healthy/unhealthy behaviors; and (3) have been in place for more than 40 years, with a widespread presence across the United States and nationwide, which is critical for the scalability and sustainability of obesity prevention. PMID:27911984

  11. Do Patients Who Access Clinical Information on Patient Internet Portals Have More Primary Care Visits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveille, Suzanne G; Mejilla, Roanne; Ngo, Long; Fossa, Alan; Elmore, Joann G; Darer, Jonathan; Ralston, James D; Delbanco, Tom; Walker, Jan

    2016-01-01

    As health care costs alarm the nation and the debate increases about the impact of health information technologies, patients are reviewing their medical records increasingly through secure Internet portals. Important questions remain about the impact of portal use on office visits. To evaluate whether use of patient Internet portals to access records is associated with increased primary care utilization. A prospective cohort study. Primary care patients registered on patient Internet portals, within an integrated health system serving rural Pennsylvania and an academic medical center in Boston. Frequency of "clinical portal use" (days/2 mo intervals over 2 y) included secure messaging about clinical issues and viewing laboratory and radiology findings. In year 2, a subset of patients also gained access to their primary care doctor's visit notes. The main outcome was number of primary care office visits. In the first 2 months of the 2-year period, 14% of 44,951 primary care patients engaged in clinical portal use 2 or more days per month, 31% did so 1 day per month, and the remainder had no clinical portal use. Overall, adjusted for age, sex, and chronic conditions, clinical portal use was not associated with subsequent office visits. Fewer than 0.1% of patients engaged in high levels of clinical portal use (31 or more login days in 2 mo) that were associated with 1 or more additional visits in the subsequent 2 months (months 3 and 4). However, the reverse was true: office visits led to subsequent clinical portal use. Similar trends were observed among patients with or without access to visit notes. Patients turn to their portals following visits, but clinical portal use does not contribute to an increase in primary care visits.

  12. Improving Nurse Satisfaction With Open Visitation in an Adult Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozub, Elizabeth; Scheler, Stephanie; Necoechea, Gloria; OʼByrne, Noeleen

    The focus on patient- and family-centered care (PFCC) has become increasingly prevalent throughout health care. In the intensive care unit (ICU), family involvement becomes critical, as patients are often unable to fully engage in their care. After expanding family visitation to 24 hours, nurses in a surgical ICU perceived that they did not have the ability to tailor the visitation to meet the patient's condition and there was an opportunity to improve nurse satisfaction related to PFCC. The objective of this performance improvement project was to increase nurse satisfaction related to PFCC and create consistency across clinicians for visitation practices. The Unit Practice Council developed staff guidelines for family visitation that included scripting prompts the nurse could use when communicating with families. The adoption of staff guidelines for family visitation was helpful in creating a culture change toward PFCC. Nurses' overall mean stress level with PFCC decreased, and their perception of having difficulty in reducing patients' or families' anxieties also decreased. The development of guidelines for family visitation can be easily implemented across other critical care environments. Scripting prompts along with the visitation guidelines can serve as a useful strategy to build nurses' skills in communicating with families.

  13. Educational outreach visits to improve venous thromboembolism prevention in hospitalised medical patients: a prospective before-and-after intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Jed; Omari, Abdullah; Middleton, Sandy; McInnes, Elizabeth; Walker, Kim

    2013-10-08

    Despite the availability of evidence-based guidelines on venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention clinical audit and research reveals that hospitalised medical patients frequently receive suboptimal prophylaxis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acceptability, utility and clinical impact of an educational outreach visit (EOV) on the provision of VTE prophylaxis to hospitalised medical patients in a 270 bed acute care private hospital in metropolitan Australia. The study used an uncontrolled before-and-after design with accompanying process evaluation. The acceptability of the intervention to participants was measured with a post intervention survey; descriptive data on resource use was collected as a measure of utility; and clinical impact (prophylaxis rate) was assessed by pre and post intervention clinical audits. Doctors who admit >40 medical patients each year were targeted to receive the intervention which consisted of a one-to-one educational visit on VTE prevention from a trained peer facilitator. The EOV protocol was designed by a multidisciplinary group of healthcare professionals using social marketing theory. Nineteen (73%) of 26 eligible participants received an EOV. The majority (n = 16, 85%) felt the EOV was effective or extremely effective at increasing their knowledge about VTE prophylaxis and 15 (78%) gave a verbal commitment to provide evidence-based prophylaxis. The average length of each visit was 15 minutes (IQ range 15 to 20) and the average time spent arranging and conducting each visit was 92 minutes (IQ range 78 to 129). There was a significant improvement in the proportion of medical patients receiving appropriate pharmacological VTE prophylaxis following the intervention (54% to 70%, 16% improvement, 95% CI 5 to 26, p = 0.004). EOV is effective at improving doctors' provision of pharmacological VTE prophylaxis to hospitalised medical patients. It was also found to be an acceptable implementation strategy by the majority

  14. Delayed transition of care: a national study of visits to pediatricians by young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Robert J; Halterman, Jill S; Pulcino, Tiffany; Robbins, Brett W

    2012-01-01

    Despite numerous policy statements and an increased focus on transition of care, little is known about young adults who experience delayed transition to adult providers. We used cross-sectional data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey between 1998 and 2008 to examine delayed transition among young adults ages 22 to 30. We defined delayed transition as continuing to visit a pediatrician after the age of 21 years. Overall, we found that 1.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-1.7) of visits by young adults to primary care physicians were seen by pediatricians, approximately 445,000 visits per year. We did not find a significant change in delayed transition during the past decade (β = -.01; P = .77). Among young adults, visits to pediatricians were more likely than visits to adult-focused providers to be for a chronic disease (25.7% vs 12.6%; P = .002) and more likely to be billed to public health insurance (23.5% vs 14.1%; P = .01). In adjusted models, visits by young adults to pediatric healthcare providers were more likely associated with chronic disease (adjusted relative risk [ARR] 2.2; 95% CI 1.5-3.4), with public health insurance (ARR 1.9; 95% CI 1.3-2.9), or with no health insurance (ARR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-3.4). Although most young adult visits were to adult providers, a considerable number of visits were to pediatricians, indicating delayed transition of care. There has been no substantial change in delayed transition during the past decade. Visits by young adults with chronic disease, public health insurance, or no health insurance were more likely to experience delayed transition of care. Copyright © 2012 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Health screening, counseling, and hypertension control for people with serious mental illness at primary care visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Sharat P; Young, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to determine if primary care visits for people with serious mental illness (SMI) demonstrate different rates of basic physical health services compared to others, and to determine factors associated with differing rates of these measures in people with SMI. The study used 2005-2010 visit-level primary care data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. The provision of health counseling, receipt of any diagnostic or screening test, measurement of blood pressure or weight and evidence of hypertension control were assessed, adjusting for identified patient, provider and visit-level factors. After adjustment for covariates, we found no significant differences between visits for people with SMI and those without for any outcome. Probability of blood pressure measurement and diagnostic or screening testing significantly increased over time. The lack of significant differences found here might be due to adjustment for covariates, a focus only on primary care visits, the use of visit-level data or evolution over time. Mortality differences for people with SMI may be attributable to those not receiving primary care, self-management of disease or subsets of the population requiring targeted interventions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Strategies to Improve Child Immunization via Antenatal Care Visits in India: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Dixit

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have examined the empirical evidence concerning the influence of demographic and socio-economic factors influencing child immunization, but no documentation is available which shows the actual impact of antenatal care (ANC visits on subsequent child immunization. Therefore, this paper aims to examine the net impact of ANC visits on subsequent utilization of child immunization after removing the presence of selection bias. Nationwide data from India's latest National Family Health Survey conducted during 2005-06 is used for the present study. The analysis has been carried out in the two separate models, in the first model 1-2 ANC visit and in the second model three or more ANC visits has been compared with no visit. We have used propensity score matching method with a counterfactual model that assesses the actual ANC visits effect on treated (ANC visits and untreated groups (no ANC visit, and have employed Mantel-Haenszel bounds to examine whether result would be free from hidden bias or not. Using matched sample analysis result shows that child immunization among the groups of women who have completed 1-2 ANC visits and those who had more than two visits was about 13 percent and 19 percent respectively, higher than the group of women who have not made any ANC visit. Findings of nearest neighbor matching with replacement method, which completely eliminated the bias, indicate that selection bias present in data set leads to overestimates the positive effects of ANC visits on child immunization. Result based on Mantel-Haenszel bounds method suggest that if around 19 percent bias would be involved in the result then also we could observe the true positive effect of 1-2 ANC visits on child immunization. This also indicates that antenatal clinics are the conventional platforms for educating pregnant women on the benefits of child immunization.

  17. Effectiveness of biosecurity measures in preventing badger visits to farm buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Johanna; McDonald, Robbie A; Walker, Neil; Delahay, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis is a serious and economically important disease of cattle. Badgers have been implicated in the transmission and maintenance of the disease in the UK since the 1970s. Recent studies have provided substantial evidence of widespread and frequent visits by badgers to farm buildings during which there is the potential for close direct contact with cattle and contamination of cattle feed. Here we evaluated the effectiveness of simple exclusion measures in improving farm biosecurity and preventing badger visits to farm buildings. In the first phase of the study, 32 farms were surveyed using motion-triggered infrared cameras on potential entrances to farm buildings to determine the background level of badger visits experienced by each farm. In the second phase, they were divided into four treatment groups; "Control", "Feed Storage", "Cattle Housing" and "Both", whereby no exclusion measures were installed, exclusion measures were installed on feed storage areas only, cattle housing only or both feed storage and cattle housing, respectively. Badger exclusion measures included sheet metal gates, adjustable metal panels for gates, sheet metal fencing, feed bins and electric fencing. Cameras were deployed for at least 365 nights in each phase on each farm. Badger visits to farm buildings occurred on 19 of the 32 farms in phase one. In phase two, the simple exclusion measures were 100% effective in preventing badger entry into farm buildings, as long as they were appropriately deployed. Furthermore, the installation of exclusion measures also reduced the level of badger visits to the rest of the farmyard. The findings of the present study clearly demonstrate how relatively simple practical measures can substantially reduce the likelihood of badger visits to buildings and reduce some of the potential for contact and disease transmission between badgers and cattle.

  18. Basic Risk Factors Awareness in Non-Communicable Diseases (BRAND) Study Among People Visiting Tertiary Care Centre in Mysuru, Karnataka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thippeswamy, Thippeswamy; Chikkegowda, Prathima

    2016-04-01

    Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs) are the major causes of mortality and morbidity globally. Awareness about NCDs and their risk factors has an important role in prevention and management strategies of these NCDs. 1) To assess the awareness of risk factors contributing to NCDs among the patients visiting tertiary care hospital in Mysuru district; 2) To compare the difference in awareness of risk factors for NCDs among the urban and rural patients with/ without NCD visiting the tertiary care hospital. A cross- sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care centre- JSS Hospital, Mysuru, Karnataka from March 2013 - August 2013. The patients visiting Medicine OPD during the period were the study subjects. The subjects were allocated into 4 groups: Urban without any NCD, Urban with atleast one NCD, rural without NCD, rural with atleast one NCD. A pretested questionnaire regarding awareness of risk factors for NCDs was used in the study and frequency and proportions were used to analyse the data. A total of 400 subjects, 100 subjects in each group were included in the study. Out of these subjects about 65% of the urban group and 42% of the rural group subjects were aware of the NCDs and their risk factors. Least awareness was observed among the rural subjects without any NCDs (35%). The awareness of risk factors of NCDs and knowledge regarding prevention of NCDs was not satisfactory. The results highlighted the need and scope for health education and interventions to improve the awareness about NCDs and their risk factors.

  19. Communication about chronic pain and opioids in primary care: impact on patient and physician visit experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Stephen G; Bell, Robert A; Fenton, Joshua J; Kravitz, Richard L

    2017-11-03

    Patients and physicians report that communication about chronic pain and opioids is often challenging, but there is little empirical research on whether patient-physician communication about pain affects patient and physician visit experience. This study video recorded 86 primary care visits involving 49 physicians and 86 patients taking long-term opioids for chronic musculoskeletal pain, systematically coded all pain-related utterances during these visits using a custom-designed coding system, and administered previsit and postvisit questionnaires. Multiple regression was used to identify communication behaviors and patient characteristics associated with patients' ratings of their visit experience, physicians' ratings of visit difficulty, or both. After adjusting for covariates, 2 communication variables-patient-physician disagreement and patient requests for opioid dose increases-were each significantly associated with both worse ratings of patient experience and greater physician-reported visit difficulty. Patient desire for increased pain medicine was also significantly positively associated with both worse ratings of patient experience and greater physician-reported visit difficulty. Greater pain severity and more patient questions were each significantly associated with greater physician-reported visit difficulty, but not with patient experience. The association between patient requests for opioids and patient experience ratings was wholly driven by 2 visits involving intense conflict with patients demanding opioids. Patient-physician communication during visits is associated with patient and physician ratings of visit experience. Training programs focused on imparting communication skills that assist physicians in negotiating disagreements about pain management, including responding to patient requests for more opioids, likely have potential to improve visit experience ratings for both patients and physicians.

  20. Variation in Quality of Urgent Health Care Provided During Commercial Virtual Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Adam J; Davies, Jason M; Marafino, Ben J; Dean, Mitzi; DeJong, Colette; Bardach, Naomi S; Kazi, Dhruv S; Boscardin, W John; Lin, Grace A; Duseja, Reena; Mei, Y John; Mehrotra, Ateev; Dudley, R Adams

    2016-05-01

    Commercial virtual visits are an increasingly popular model of health care for the management of common acute illnesses. In commercial virtual visits, patients access a website to be connected synchronously-via videoconference, telephone, or webchat-to a physician with whom they have no prior relationship. To date, whether the care delivered through those websites is similar or quality varies among the sites has not been assessed. To assess the variation in the quality of urgent health care among virtual visit companies. This audit study used 67 trained standardized patients who presented to commercial virtual visit companies with the following 6 common acute illnesses: ankle pain, streptococcal pharyngitis, viral pharyngitis, acute rhinosinusitis, low back pain, and recurrent female urinary tract infection. The 8 commercial virtual visit websites with the highest web traffic were selected for audit, for a total of 599 visits. Data were collected from May 1, 2013, to July 30, 2014, and analyzed from July 1, 2014, to September 1, 2015. Completeness of histories and physical examinations, the correct diagnosis (vs an incorrect or no diagnosis), and adherence to guidelines of key management decisions. Sixty-seven standardized patients completed 599 commercial virtual visits during the study period. Histories and physical examinations were complete in 417 visits (69.6%; 95% CI, 67.7%-71.6%); diagnoses were correctly named in 458 visits (76.5%; 95% CI, 72.9%-79.9%), and key management decisions were adherent to guidelines in 325 visits (54.3%; 95% CI, 50.2%-58.3%). Rates of guideline-adherent care ranged from 206 visits (34.4%) to 396 visits (66.1%) across the 8 websites. Variation across websites was significantly greater for viral pharyngitis and acute rhinosinusitis (adjusted rates, 12.8% to 82.1%) than for streptococcal pharyngitis and low back pain (adjusted rates, 74.6% to 96.5%) or ankle pain and recurrent urinary tract infection (adjusted rates, 3.4% to 40

  1. Impact of Marijuana Legalization in Colorado on Adolescent Emergency and Urgent Care Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, George Sam; Davies, Sara Deakyne; Halmo, Laurie Seidel; Sass, Amy; Mistry, Rakesh D

    2018-03-30

    Approximately 6%-8% of U.S. adolescents are daily/past-month users of marijuana. However, survey data may not reliably reflect the impact of legalization on adolescents. The objective was to evaluate the impact of marijuana legalization on adolescent emergency department and urgent cares visits to a children's hospital in Colorado, a state that has allowed both medical and recreational marijuana. Retrospective review of marijuana-related visits by International Classification of Diseases codes and urine drug screens, from 2005 through 2015, for patients ≥ 13 and marijuana-related visits were identified. Behavioral health evaluation was obtained for 2,813 (67%); a psychiatric diagnosis was made for the majority (71%) of these visits. Coingestants were common; the most common was ethanol (12%). Marijuana-related visits increased from 1.8 per 1,000 visits in 2009 to 4.9 in 2015. (p = marijuana use, our data demonstrate a significant increase in adolescent marijuana-associated emergency department and urgent cares visits in Colorado. Copyright © 2018 The Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship between primary care physician visits and hospital/emergency use for uncomplicated hypertension, an ambulatory care-sensitive condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robin L; Chen, Guanmin; McAlister, Finlay A; Campbell, Norm R C; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Dixon, Elijah; Ghali, William; Rabi, Doreen; Tu, Karen; Jette, Nathalie; Quan, Hude

    2014-12-01

    Hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs) represent an indirect measure of access and quality of community care. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between one ACSC, uncomplicated hypertension, and previous primary care physician (PCP) utilization. A cohort of patients with hypertension was identified using administrative databases in Alberta between fiscal years 1994 and 2008. We applied the Canadian Institute for Health Information's case definition to detect patients with uncomplicated hypertension as the most responsible reason for hospitalization and/or Emergency Department (ED) visit. We assessed hypertension-related and all-cause PCP visits. The overall adjusted rate of ACSC hospitalizations and ED visits for uncomplicated hypertension was 7.1 and 13.9 per 10,000 hypertensive patients, respectively. The likelihood of ACSC hospitalization for uncomplicated hypertension was associated with age, household income quintile, region of residence, and Charlson comorbidity status (all P hypertension increased from 4.8 per 10,000 hypertensive patients for those without hypertension-related PCP visits before diagnosis to 10.5 per 10,000 hypertensive patients for those with 5 or more hypertension-related PCP visits. The rate of ACSC hospitalizations and/or ED visits for uncomplicated hypertension increased as the number of hypertension-related PCP visits increased even after stratifying according to demographic and clinical characteristics. As the frequency of hypertension-related PCP visits increased, the rate of ACSC hospitalizations and/or ED visits for uncomplicated hypertension increased. This suggests that ACSC hospitalization for uncomplicated hypertension might not be a particularly good indicator for access to primary care. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Gaining information about home visits in primary care: methodological issues from a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Karen; Taché, Stephanie; Klement, Andreas; Fankhaenel, Thomas; Bojanowski, Stefan; Bergmann, Antje

    2014-05-06

    Home visits are part of general practice work in Germany. Within the context of an expanding elderly population and a decreasing number of general practitioner (GPs), open questions regarding the organisation and adequacy of GPs' care in immobile patients remain. To answer these questions, we will conduct a representative primary data collection concerning contents and organisation of GPs' home visits in 2014. Because this study will require considerable efforts for documentation and thus substantial involvement by participating GPs, we conducted a pilot study to see whether such a study design was feasible. We used a mixed methods design with two study arms in a sample of teaching GPs of the University Halle. The quantitative arm evaluates participating GPs and documentation of home visits. The qualitative arm focuses on reasons for non-participation for GPs who declined to take part in the pilot study. Our study confirms previously observed reasons for non-response of GPs in the particular setting of home visits including lack of time and/or interest. In contrast to previous findings, monetary incentives were not crucial for GPs participation. Several factors influenced the documentation rate of home visits and resulted in a discrepancy between the numbers of home visits documented versus those actually conducted. The most frequently reported problem was related to obtaining patient consent, especially when patients were unable to provide informed consent due to cognitive deficits. The results of our feasibility study provide evidence for improvement of the study design and study instruments to effectively conduct a documentation-intensive study of GPs doing home visits. Improvement of instructions and questionnaire regarding time variables and assessment of the need for home visits will be carried out to increase the reliability of future data. One particularly important methodological issue yet to be resolved is how to increase the representativeness of home

  4. A case series using a care management checklist to decrease emergency department visits and hospitalizations in children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anup D

    2014-02-01

    Each year, 1 million people are seen in an emergency department for seizures or epilepsy. We implemented a care management checklist for patients with frequent visits. A database was searched for patients with the highest number of emergency department visits and/or unplanned hospitalizations in 2011. Four patients were selected. A care management checklist was implemented in 2012. Compliance with the office visits, number of emergency department visits and/or hospitalizations, and the associated costs were tracked following implementation of the checklist for 2011 and 2012. These 4 epilepsy patients accounted for 46 visits in the year 2011 with associated health care costs of $380,209. Following a year using a care management checklist, the same patients accounted for 11 visits with a cost reduction of $188,130. Using a care management checklist was useful in these 4 epilepsy patients to decrease emergency department visits and/or unplanned hospitalizations. A limitation of this study is its small numbers.

  5. Reasons for nonurgent pediatric emergency department visits: perceptions of health care providers and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salami, Olufunmilayo; Salvador, Joselyn; Vega, Roy

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the most important reasons for pediatric nonurgent (NU) emergency department (ED) visits as perceived by caregivers, primary care pediatricians (PCPs), and ED personnel and to assess the differences among these 3 groups in perceived reasons and solutions to NUED visits. This study is a cross-sectional survey, with self-administered questionnaires given to caregivers, PCPs, and ED personnel. Responders were asked to rank reasons for NUED visits in order of perceived importance. Opinions on NUED use reduction strategies were also queried. Although almost 80% of PCPs expected to be called by caregivers before ED visits, fewer than 30% of caregivers were aware of this expectation. The most important reasons for NUED visits from the caregivers' perspective were need for medical attention outside PCP working hours, lack of health insurance, and better hospitality in the ED. For PCPs and ED personnel, the most important reason was the caregivers' lack of knowledge on what constitutes a true emergency. More than 70% of ED personnel and PCPs recommended caregiver education as the solution to NUED visits. Caregivers were more likely to recommend more PCPs with longer working hours (41%) and more EDs (31%). Misconceptions exist among caregivers, PCPs, and ED personnel on NUED visits. Our findings underscore the need to foster understanding and provide concrete areas for intervention.

  6. Encouraging early preventive dental visits for preschool-aged children enrolled in Medicaid: using the extended parallel process model to conduct formative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askelson, Natoshia M; Chi, Donald L; Momany, Elizabeth; Kuthy, Raymond; Ortiz, Cristina; Hanson, Jessica D; Damiano, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Preventive dental visits for preschool-aged children can result in better oral health outcomes, especially for children from lower income families. Many children, however, still do not see a dentist for preventive visits. This qualitative study examined the potential for the Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM) to be used to uncover potential antecedents to parents' decisions about seeking preventive dental care. Seventeen focus groups including 41 parents were conducted. The focus group protocol centered on constructs (perceived severity, perceived susceptibility, perceived self-efficacy, and perceived response efficacy) of the EPPM. Transcripts were analyzed by three coders who employed closed coding strategies. Parents' perceptions of severity of dental issues were high, particularly regarding negative health and appearance outcomes. Parents perceived susceptibility of their children to dental problems as low, primarily because most children in this study received preventive care, which parents viewed as highly efficacious. Parents' self-efficacy to obtain preventive care for their children was high. However, they were concerned about barriers including lack of dentists, especially dentists who are good with young children. Findings were consistent with EPPM, which suggests this model is a potential tool for understanding parents' decisions about seeking preventive dental care for their young children. Future research should utilize quantitative methods to test this model. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  7. Improving the Lives of Children in Foster Care: The Impact of Supervised Visitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcwey, Lenore M.; Mullis, Ann K.

    2004-01-01

    Our purpose was to test a model explaining the quality of attachment of 123 children in foster care receiving supervised visitation with their biological parents. The results indicated that for families in which reunification is a goal, children who have more consistent and frequent contact with their biological parents have stronger attachments…

  8. Preventive Care Benefits (Affordable Care Act)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For children Footer Resources About the Affordable Care Act Regulatory and Policy Information For Navigators, Assisters & Partners ... gov USA.gov Resources About the Affordable Care Act Regulatory and Policy Information For Navigators, Assisters & Partners ...

  9. Screening and diagnosing depression in women visiting GPs' drop in clinic in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson Sven-Erik

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only half of all depressions are diagnosed in Primary Health Care (PHC. Depression can remain undetected for a long time and entail high costs for care and low quality of life for the individuals. Drop in clinic is a common form of organizing health care; however the visits are short and focus on solving the most urgent problems. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and severity of depression among women visiting the GPs' drop in clinic and to identify possible clues for depression among women. Methods The two-stage screening method with "high risk feedback" was used. Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI was used to screen 155 women visiting two GPs' drop in clinic. Women who screened positive (BDI score ≥10 were invited by the GP to a repeat visit. Major depression (MDD was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria and the severity was assessed with Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS. Women with BDI score Results The two-stage method worked well with a low rate of withdrawals in the second step, when the GP invited the women to a repeat visit. The prevalence of depression was 22.4% (95% CI 15.6–29.2. The severity was mild in 43%, moderate in 53% and severe in 3%. The depressed women mentioned mental symptoms significantly more often (69% than the controls (15% and were to a higher extent sick-listed for a longer period than 14 days. Nearly one third of the depressed women did not mention mental symptoms. The majority of the women who screened as false positive for depression had crisis reactions and needed further care from health professionals in PHC. Referrals to a psychiatrist were few and revealed often psychiatric co-morbidity. Conclusion The prevalence of previously undiagnosed depression among women visiting GPs' drop in clinic was high. Clues for depression were identified in the depressed women's symptom presentation; they often mention mental symptoms when they visit the GP for somatic

  10. Effects of welfare and maternal work on recommended preventive care utilization among low-income children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Jane L; Oh, Elissa H; Yoo, Joan; Amsden, Laura B; Sohn, Min-Woong

    2012-12-01

    We examined how maternal work and welfare receipt are associated with children receiving recommended pediatric preventive care services. We identified American Academy of Pediatrics-recommended preventive care visits from medical records of children in the 1999-2004 Illinois Families Study: Child Well-Being. We used Illinois administrative data to identify whether mothers received welfare or worked during the period the visit was recommended, and we analyzed the child visit data using random-intercept logistic regressions that adjusted for child, maternal, and visit-specific characteristics. The 485 children (95%) meeting inclusion criteria made 41% of their recommended visits. Children were 60% more likely (adjusted odds ratios [AOR` = 1.60; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27, 2.01) to make recommended visits when mothers received welfare but did not work compared with when mothers did not receive welfare and did not work. Children were 25% less likely (AOR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.60, 0.94) to make preventive care visits during periods when mothers received welfare and worked compared with welfare only periods. The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families maternal work requirement may be a barrier to receiving recommended preventive pediatric health care.

  11. The influence of a mental health home visit service partnership intervention on the caregivers' home visit service satisfaction and care burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jui-Fen; Huang, Xuan-Yi; Lin, Mei-Jue; Wang, Ya-Hui; Yeh, Tzu-Pei

    2018-02-01

    To investigate a community-based and hospital-based home visit partnership intervention in improving caregivers' satisfaction with home service and reducing caregiver burden. The community-oriented mental healthcare model prevails internationally. After patients return to the community, family caregivers are the patients' main support system and they also take the most of the burden of caring for patients. It is important to assist these caregivers by building good community healthcare models. A longitudinal quasi-experimental quantitative design. The experimental group (n = 109) involved "partnership" intervention, and the control group (n = 101) maintained routine home visits. The results were measured before the intervention, 6 and 12 months after the partnership intervention. Six months after the partnership intervention, the satisfaction of the experimental group was higher than the control group for several aspects of care. Although the care burden was reduced in the experimental group, there was no significant difference between the two groups. This study confirms that the partnership intervention can significantly improve caregiver satisfaction with home services, without reducing the care burden. The community-based and hospital-based mental health home visit service partnership programme could improve the main caregiver's satisfaction with the mental health home visit services, while the reduction in care burden may need government policies for the provision of more individual and comprehensive assistance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Adolescents' preventive care experiences before entry into the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkman, Elizabeth; Youngblade, Lise; Nackashi, John

    2003-12-01

    Adolescence has traditionally been thought of as a time of good health. However, adolescents comprise an important group with unique needs among State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) enrollees. Throughout the 1990s, there was increasing evidence of unacceptably high morbidity and mortality among adolescents from injuries, suicide, sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse, and other conditions associated with risk behaviors. The establishment of relationships with the health care system can ensure prompt treatment and help promote healthy behaviors, assuming that the adolescent feels comfortable seeking help for his or her health-related concerns. However, health care systems typically are not designed to ensure that adolescents receive the primary and preventive care that might ameliorate the negative consequences of health-damaging behaviors. The purpose of this study was to examine the following hypotheses. 1) Adolescents with special health care needs, those engaging in risk behaviors, and those who were insured before program enrollment would be more likely than those who were healthy and those not engaging in risk behaviors to have a preventive care visit in the year preceding the interview. No differences would be observed in the odds of preventive care visits based on age, race/ethnicity, and gender. 2) No differences would be observed in the receipt of risk-behavior counseling for those with a preventive care visit based on the adolescents' sociodemographic and health characteristics. 3) Adolescents who were older would be more likely to engage in risk behaviors than younger adolescents. There would be no differences in reports of risk behaviors based on gender, race/ethnicity, and children with special health care needs status. Adolescents 12 to 19 years old and newly enrolled in SCHIP were eligible for the study. Telephone interviews were conducted within 3 months after enrollment with parents of adolescents to obtain sociodemographic

  13. Primary care visit use after positive fecal immunochemical test for colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Jensen, Christopher D; Zhao, Wei K; Neugut, Alfred I; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Tiro, Jasmin A; Kushi, Lawrence H; Corley, Douglas A

    2017-10-01

    For some patients, positive cancer screening test results can be a stressful experience that can affect future screening compliance and increase the use of health care services unrelated to medically indicated follow-up. Among 483,216 individuals aged 50 to 75 years who completed a fecal immunochemical test to screen for colorectal cancer at a large integrated health care setting between 2007 and 2011, the authors evaluated whether a positive test was associated with a net change in outpatient primary care visit use within the year after screening. Multivariable regression models were used to evaluate the relationship between test result group and net changes in primary care visits after fecal immunochemical testing. In the year after the fecal immunochemical test, use increased by 0.60 clinic visits for patients with true-positive results. The absolute change in visits was largest (3.00) among individuals with positive test results who were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, but significant small increases also were found for patients treated with polypectomy and who had no neoplasia (0.36) and those with a normal examination and no polypectomy performed (0.17). Groups of patients who demonstrated an increase in net visit use compared with the true-negative group included patients with true-positive results (odds ratio [OR], 1.60; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.54-1.66), and positive groups with a colorectal cancer diagnosis (OR, 7.19; 95% CI, 6.12-8.44), polypectomy/no neoplasia (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.27-1.48), and normal examination/no polypectomy (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.18-1.30). Given the large size of outreach programs, these small changes can cumulatively generate thousands of excess visits and have a substantial impact on total health care use. Therefore, these changes should be included in colorectal cancer screening cost models and their causes investigated further. Cancer 2017;123:3744-3753. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  14. Factors associated with end-of-life by home-visit nursing-care providers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Miharu; Niimura, Junko; Nishida, Atsushi

    2017-06-01

    Home-visit nursing-care services in Japan are expected to provide home hospice services for older patients with non-cancer diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine factors that contribute to the provision of end-of-life care by home-visit nursing-care providers in Japan. The present retrospective study was carried out using nationally representative cross-sectional data from the 2007, 2010, and 2013 Survey of Institutions and Establishments for Long-Term Care. A total of 138 008 randomly sampled home-visit nursing-care service users were included in this analysis. End-of-life care (study outcome) was defined as the provision of nursing-care within the last month of life. Of the 138 008 patients at home, 2280 (1.7%) received home-based nursing care within the last month of life, and end-of-life care was offered primarily to cancer patients (n = 1651; 72.4%). After accounting for patient characteristics, patients were more likely to receive end-of-life care when they used home-visit nursing-care providers that had a greater number of nursing staff or were located in a region with fewer hospital beds. Among home-visit nursing-care providers, the nursing staff ratio and the availability of hospital beds were related to the provision of end-of-life care. Home-visit nursing-care providers should establish specialist hospice care teams with enhanced staffing ratios to allow for the adequate provision of home-based end-of-life care. A community-based network between home-visit nursing-care providers and hospitals should also be established to attain an integrated end-of-life care system for elderly populations in regions with more hospital beds. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 991-998. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Timing and adequate attendance of antenatal care visits among women in Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanni Yaya

    Full Text Available Although ANC services are increasingly available to women in low and middle-income countries, their inadequate use persists. This suggests a misalignment between aims of the services and maternal beliefs and circumstances. Owing to the dearth of studies examining the timing and adequacy of content of care, this current study aims to investigate the timing and frequency of ANC visits in Ethiopia.Data was obtained from the nationally representative 2011 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey (EDHS which used a two-stage cluster sampling design to provide estimates for the health and demographic variables of interest for the country. Our study focused on a sample of 10,896 women with history of at least one childbirth event. Percentages of timing and adequacy of ANC visits were conducted across the levels of selected factors. Variables which were associated at 5% significance level were examined in the multivariable logistic regression model for association between timing and frequency of ANC visits and the explanatory variables while controlling for covariates. Furthermore, we presented the approach to estimate marginal effects involving covariate-adjusted logistic regression with corresponding 95%CI of delayed initiation of ANC visits and inadequate ANC attendance. The method used involved predicted probabilities added up to a weighted average showing the covariate distribution in the population.Results indicate that 66.3% of women did not use ANC at first trimester and 22.3% had ANC less than 4 visits. The results of this study were unique in that the association between delayed ANC visits and adequacy of ANC visits were examined using multivariable logistic model and the marginal effects using predicted probabilities. Results revealed that older age interval has higher odds of inadequate ANC visits. More so, type of place of residence was associated with delayed initiation of ANC visits, with rural women having the higher odds of delayed

  16. Patterns of opioid initiation at first visits for pain in United States primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundkur, Mallika L; Rough, Kathryn; Huybrechts, Krista F; Levin, Raisa; Gagne, Joshua J; Desai, Rishi J; Patorno, Elisabetta; Choudhry, Niteesh K; Bateman, Brian T

    2018-05-01

    The primary objective of this study was to characterize variation in patterns of opioid prescribing within primary care settings at first visits for pain, and to describe variation by condition, geography, and patient characteristics. 2014 healthcare utilization data from Optum's Clinformatics™ DataMart were used to evaluate individuals 18 years or older with an initial presentation to primary care for 1 of 10 common pain conditions. The main outcomes assessed were (1) the proportion of first visits for pain associated with an opioid prescription fill and (2) the proportion of opioid prescriptions with >7 days' supply. We identified 205 560 individuals who met inclusion criteria; 9.1% of all visits were associated with an opioid fill, ranging from 4.1% (headache) to 28.2% (dental pain). Approximately half (46%) of all opioid prescriptions supplied more than 7 days, and 10% of prescriptions supplied ≥30 days. We observed a 4-fold variation in rates of opioid initiation by state, with highest rates of prescribing in Alabama (16.6%) and lowest rates in New York (3.7%). In 2014, nearly half of all patients filling opioid prescriptions received more than 7 days' of opioids in an initial prescription. Policies limiting initial supplies have the potential to substantially impact opioid prescribing in the primary care setting. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Preventive home visits for mortality, morbidity, and institutionalization in older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Mayo-Wilson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Home visits for older adults aim to prevent cognitive and functional impairment, thus reducing institutionalization and mortality. Visitors may provide information, investigate untreated problems, encourage medication compliance, and provide referrals to services. METHODS AND FINDINGS: DATA SOURCES: Ten databases including CENTRAL and Medline searched through December 2012. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials enrolling community-dwelling persons without dementia aged over 65 years. Interventions included visits at home by a health or social care professional that were not related to hospital discharge. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Two authors independently extracted data. Outcomes were pooled using random effects. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Mortality, institutionalization, hospitalization, falls, injuries, physical functioning, cognitive functioning, quality of life, and psychiatric illness. RESULTS: Sixty-four studies with 28642 participants were included. Home visits were not associated with absolute reductions in mortality at longest follow-up, but some programs may have small relative effects (relative risk = 0.93 [0.87 to 0.99]; absolute risk = 0.00 [-0.01 to 0.00]. There was moderate quality evidence of no overall effect on the number of people institutionalized (RR = 1.02 [0.88 to 1.18] or hospitalized (RR = 0.96 [0.91 to 1.01]. There was high quality evidence for number of people who fell, which is consistent with no effect or a small effect (odds ratio = 0.86 [0.73 to 1.01], but there was no evidence that these interventions increased independent living. There was low and very low quality evidence of effects for quality of life (standardised mean difference = -0.06 [-0.11 to -0.01] and physical functioning (SMD = -0.10 [-0.17 to -0.03] respectively, but these may not be clinically important. CONCLUSIONS: Home visiting is not consistently associated with differences in mortality or

  18. Preventive home visits for mortality, morbidity, and institutionalization in older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Grant, Sean; Burton, Jennifer; Parsons, Amanda; Underhill, Kristen; Montgomery, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Home visits for older adults aim to prevent cognitive and functional impairment, thus reducing institutionalization and mortality. Visitors may provide information, investigate untreated problems, encourage medication compliance, and provide referrals to services. Ten databases including CENTRAL and Medline searched through December 2012. Randomized controlled trials enrolling community-dwelling persons without dementia aged over 65 years. Interventions included visits at home by a health or social care professional that were not related to hospital discharge. Two authors independently extracted data. Outcomes were pooled using random effects. Mortality, institutionalization, hospitalization, falls, injuries, physical functioning, cognitive functioning, quality of life, and psychiatric illness. Sixty-four studies with 28642 participants were included. Home visits were not associated with absolute reductions in mortality at longest follow-up, but some programs may have small relative effects (relative risk = 0.93 [0.87 to 0.99]; absolute risk = 0.00 [-0.01 to 0.00]). There was moderate quality evidence of no overall effect on the number of people institutionalized (RR = 1.02 [0.88 to 1.18]) or hospitalized (RR = 0.96 [0.91 to 1.01]). There was high quality evidence for number of people who fell, which is consistent with no effect or a small effect (odds ratio = 0.86 [0.73 to 1.01]), but there was no evidence that these interventions increased independent living. There was low and very low quality evidence of effects for quality of life (standardised mean difference = -0.06 [-0.11 to -0.01]) and physical functioning (SMD = -0.10 [-0.17 to -0.03]) respectively, but these may not be clinically important. Home visiting is not consistently associated with differences in mortality or independent living, and investigations of heterogeneity did not identify any programs that are associated with consistent benefits. Due to poor reporting of

  19. Visits to non-dentist health care providers for dental problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Leonard A; Manski, Richard J

    2006-09-01

    Although poor and minority adults experience greater levels of dental disease, they frequently face cost and other system-level barriers to obtaining dental care. These individuals may be forced to use physicians or hospital emergency rooms for the treatment of dental problems. This study was conducted to gain a better understanding of the role that non-dentist health care providers play in providing access to oral health care services. Dental conditions and dental condition-related visits to non-dentist health care providers during 2001 for the US civilian noninstitutionalized population were analyzed using data from the Household Component of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. During 2001, approximately 3.1% of the US population experienced at least one dental problem reported outside of the traditional office-based dental delivery system. Of these, approximately 2.7% received care in a hospital emergency room setting while 7.0% received care in other medical settings. A majority (68.1%) had contact with the formal health care system via a prescription associated with their identified dental problem. Approximately 22.5% did not seek any formal treatment for their problem. Overall, low-income individuals were more likely not to seek formal care than were middle/high-income individuals (32.5% versus 19.7%). Individuals not using traditional sources of dental care appear to have greater access to physician offices and other medical settings than to hospital emergency rooms for the treatment of dental problems.

  20. Negotiating complementary and alternative medicine use in primary care visits with older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Christopher J; Ho, Evelyn Y; Yadegar, Vivien; Tarn, Derjung M

    2012-12-01

    To empirically investigate the ways in which patients and providers discuss Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) treatment in primary care visits. Audio recordings from visits between 256 adult patients aged 50 years and older and 28 primary care physicians were transcribed and analyzed using discourse analysis, an empirical sociolinguistic methodology focusing on how language is used to negotiate meaning. Discussion about CAM occurred 128 times in 82 of 256 visits (32.0%). The most frequently discussed CAM modalities were non-vitamin, non-mineral supplements and massage. Three physician-patient interactions were analyzed turn-by-turn to demonstrate negotiations about CAM use. Patients raised CAM discussions to seek physician expertise about treatments, and physicians adopted a range of responses along a continuum that included encouragement, neutrality, and discouragement. Despite differential knowledge about CAM treatments, physicians helped patients assess the risks and benefits of CAM treatments and made recommendations based on patient preferences for treatment. Regardless of a physician's stance or knowledge about CAM, she or he can help patients negotiate CAM treatment decisions. Providers do not have to possess extensive knowledge about specific CAM treatments to have meaningful discussions with patients and to give patients a framework for evaluating CAM treatment use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Implementing chronic care for COPD: planned visits, care coordination, and patient empowerment for improved outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fromer L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Len FromerDepartment of Family Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Current primary care patterns for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD focus on reactive care for acute exacerbations, often neglecting ongoing COPD management to the detriment of patient experience and outcomes. Proactive diagnosis and ongoing multifactorial COPD management, comprising smoking cessation, influenza and pneumonia vaccinations, pulmonary rehabilitation, and symptomatic and maintenance pharmacotherapy according to severity, can significantly improve a patient's health-related quality of life, reduce exacerbations and their consequences, and alleviate the functional, utilization, and financial burden of COPD. Redesign of primary care according to principles of the chronic care model, which is implemented in the patient-centered medical home, can shift COPD management from acute rescue to proactive maintenance. The chronic care model and patient-centered medical home combine delivery system redesign, clinical information systems, decision support, and self-management support within a practice, linked with health care organization and community resources beyond the practice. COPD care programs implementing two or more chronic care model components effectively reduce emergency room and inpatient utilization. This review guides primary care practices in improving COPD care workflows, highlighting the contributions of multidisciplinary collaborative team care, care coordination, and patient engagement. Each primary care practice can devise a COPD care workflow addressing risk awareness, spirometric diagnosis, guideline-based treatment and rehabilitation, and self-management support, to improve patient outcomes in COPD.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic care model, patient-centered medical home, self-management, interdisciplinary care team, coordination of care

  2. Impact of a mental health based primary care program on emergency department visits and inpatient stays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslau, Joshua; Leckman-Westin, Emily; Han, Bing; Pritam, Riti; Guarasi, Diana; Horvitz-Lennon, Marcela; Scharf, Deborah M; Finnerty, Molly T; Yu, Hao

    2018-02-17

    Integrating primary care services into specialty mental health clinics has been proposed as a method for improving health care utilization for medical conditions by adults with serious mental illness. This paper examines the impact of a mental health based primary care program on emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations. The program was implemented in seven New York City outpatient mental health clinics in two waves. Medicaid claims were used to identify patients treated in intervention clinics and a control group of patients treated in otherwise similar clinics in New York City. Impacts of the program were estimated using propensity score adjusted difference-in-differences models on a longitudinally followed cohort. Hospital stays for medical conditions increased significantly in intervention clinics relative to control clinics in both waves (ORs = 1.21 (Wave 1) and 1.33 (Wave 2)). ED visits for behavioral health conditions decreased significantly relative to controls in Wave 1 (OR = 0.89), but not in Wave 2. No other significant differences in utilization trends between the intervention and control clinics were found. Introducing primary care services into mental health clinics may increase utilization of inpatient services, perhaps due to newly identified unmet medical need in this population. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Attendance of routine childcare visits in primary care for children of mothers with depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsøe, Bente Kjær; Vestergaard, Claus Høstrup; Rytter, Dorte

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression is a common and potentially debilitating illness worldwide. Attendance to routine childcare appointments is a key point of interest in the effort to improve the health and care for families facing depression. AIM: To evaluate the association between maternal depression...... and offspring non-attendance to the Danish childcare and vaccination programme (CCP) for children from 0-5 years of age. The CCP consists of seven separate visits and several vaccinations. To investigate if exposure to recent and previous depression may affect attendance differently. DESIGN AND SETTING......: Population-based cohort study using Danish nationwide registers. METHOD: Participants were all live-born children (n = 853 315) in Denmark in the period from 1 January 2000 until 31 August 2013, and their mothers. The outcome of interest was non-attendance of each one of the seven scheduled childcare visits...

  4. Prevention of health care-associated infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Vincent

    2014-09-15

    Health care-associated infections cause approximately 75,000 deaths annually, in addition to increasing morbidity and costs. Over the past decade, a downward trend in health care-associated infections has occurred nationwide. Basic prevention measures include administrative support, educating health care personnel, and hand hygiene and isolation precautions. Prevention of central line- or catheter-associated infections begins with avoidance of unnecessary insertion, adherence to aseptic technique when inserting, and device removal when no longer necessary. Specific recommendations for preventing central line-associated bloodstream infections include use of chlorhexidine for skin preparation, as a component of dressings, and for daily bathing of patients in intensive care units. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections are the most common device-related health care-associated infection. Maintaining a closed drainage system below the patient reduces the risk of infection. To prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia, which is associated with high mortality, mechanically ventilated patients should be placed in the semirecumbent position and receive antiseptic oral care. Prevention of surgical site infections includes hair removal using clippers, glucose control, and preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Reducing transmission of Clostridium difficile and multidrug-resistant organisms in the hospital setting begins with hand hygiene and contact precautions. Institutional efforts to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing are also strongly recommended. Reducing rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection can be achieved through active surveillance cultures and decolonization therapy with mupirocin.

  5. Opportunity Knocks: HIV Prevention in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrun, Mark W

    2014-06-01

    Expansions in health care coverage, a comprehensive framework for HIV prevention and care, electronic medical records, and novel HIV prevention modalities create a current opportunity to change the trajectory of the HIV epidemic in the United States. HIV is increasingly disproportionately found in populations historically at higher risk, including gay men and other men who have sex with men, transgender women, injection drug users, and persons of color. This underscores the need for providers to identify persons at higher risk for HIV and assure the provision of screening and prevention services. In turn, universal screening for HIV-testing every adolescent and adult at least once in their lifetime-will increasingly be necessary to find the infrequent cases of HIV in lower risk populations. In both these domains, primary care providers will play a unique role in complementing traditional providers of HIV prevention and care services by increasing the proportion of their patients who have been screened for HIV, opening dialogues around sexual health, including asking about sexual orientation and gender identity, and prescribing antivirals as pre- and postexposure prophylaxis for their non-HIV-infected patients. Primary care providers must understand and embrace their importance along the HIV prevention and care continuum.

  6. Improving Continuity of Care Reduces Emergency Department Visits by Long-Term Care Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Emily Gard; Clarke, Barry; Burge, Frederick; Varatharasan, Nirupa; Archibald, Greg; Andrew, Melissa K

    2016-01-01

    Care by Design™ (CBD) (Canada), a model of coordinated team-based primary care, was implemented in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, to improve access to and continuity of primary care and to reduce high rates of transfers to emergency departments (EDs). This was an observational time series before and after the implementation of CBD (Canada). Participants are LTCF residents with 911 Emergency Health Services calls from 10 LTCFs, representing 1424 beds. Data were abstracted from LTCF charts and Emergency Health Services databases. The primary outcome was ambulance transports from LTCFs to EDs. Secondary outcomes included access (primary care physician notes in charts) and continuity (physician numbers and contacts). After implementation of CBD (Canada), transports from LTCFs to EDs were reduced by 36%, from 68 to 44 per month (P = .01). Relational and informational continuity of care improved with resident charts with ≥10 physician notes, increasing 38% before CBD to 55% after CBD (P = .003), and the median number of chart notes increased from 7 to 10 (P = .0026). Physicians contacted before 911 calls and onsite assessment increased from 38% to 54% (P = .01) and 3.7% to 9.2% (P = .03), respectively, before CBD to after CBD. A 34% reduction in overall transports from LTCFs to EDs is likely attributable to improved onsite primary care, with consistent physician and team engagement and improvements in continuity of care. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  7. [Headache, does it cause a health care overload in primary health care? Urban area vs rural area medical visit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano Martínez, V; Esquembre, R; Genovés, A

    2008-06-01

    Headache causes an overload and a problem to out-patient neurology. There are few studies that quantify the overload that the headache causes in a primary health care out-patient clinic visit. The aim of the present study is to identify and quantify the real load that this disease supposes in two primary health care consultations, one located in a rural area and another in an urban area. A 6 month long observational and descritive study. The total number of patients seen, the number of patients seen for headache and their diagnostic classification were recorded. A total of 6,014 visits were counted. Only 46 patients consulted due to headache (0,76%). Tensional headache was the most frequently diagnosed headache (43.48%) followed by migraine (23.91%). Our study verifies that published by other authors and determines that, on the contrary to that which occurs in the neurology out-patient clinic, headache does not cause a daily work overload for the general practitioner. The scarce number of consultations for headache, with the diagnosis and management involved in this disease, makes it necessary to consider a multidisciplinary health care problem such as headache differently according to the health care level involved.

  8. Comorbidity and health care visit burden in working-age commercially insured patients with diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiss S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Szilárd Kiss,1 Hitesh S Chandwani,2 Ashley L Cole,2 Vaishali D Patel,2 Orsolya E Lunacsek,3 Pravin U Dugel4 1Department of Ophthalmology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, 2Global Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, 3Global Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Xcenda, LLC, Palm Harbor, FL, 4Retinal Consultants of Arizona and USC Eye Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA Purpose: To examine the comorbidity profile and update estimates of health care resource utilization for commercially insured, working-age adults with diabetic macular edema (DME relative to a matched comparison group of diabetic adults without DME. Additional comparisons were made in the subgroup of pseudophakic patients. Patients and methods: A retrospective matched-cohort study of commercially insured diabetic adults aged 18–63 years was conducted using medical and outpatient pharmacy claims (July 1, 2008–June 30, 2013. Outcomes included diabetes-related and ocular comorbidities and health care resource utilization (any health care visit days, outpatient visit days, inpatient visit days, emergency room visits, eye care-related visit days, unique medications in the 12-month post-index period. Results: All diabetes-related and ocular comorbidities were significantly more prevalent in DME cases versus non-DME controls (P<0.05. A significantly greater proportion of DME cases utilized eye care-related visits compared with non-DME controls (P<0.001. DME cases had almost twice the mean number of total health care visit days compared to non-DME controls (28.6 vs 16.9 days, P<0.001, with a minority of visit days being eye care-related (mean 5.1 vs 1.5 days, P<0.001. Similar trends were observed in pseudophakic cohorts. Conclusion: This working-age DME population experienced a mean of 29 health care visit days per year. Eye care-related visit days were a minority of the overall visit burden (mean 5 days emphasizing the trade-offs DME patients

  9. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Ambulatory Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... informed member of your health care team. The “Speak Up” program is sponsored by The Joint Commission. ... prevent health care mistakes, patients are urged to “Speak Up.” S peak up if you have questions or ...

  10. Preventing re-entry to foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnochan, Sarah; Rizik-Baer, Daniel; Austin, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Re-entry to foster care generally refers to circumstances in which children who have been discharged from foster care to be reunified with their family of origin, adopted, or provided kinship guardianship are returned to foster care. In the context of the federal performance measurement system, re-entry refers specifically to a return to foster care following an unsuccessful reunification. The federal Children and Family Services Review measures re-entry to foster care with a single indicator, called the permanency of reunification indicator, one of four indicators comprising the reunification composite measure. This review focuses on research related to the re-entry indicator, including the characteristics of children, caregivers and families, as well as case and child welfare services that are associated with a higher or lower risk of re-entry to foster care. Promising post-reunification services designed to prevent re-entry to foster care are described.

  11. Barriers to Providing Health Education During Primary Care Visits at Community Health Centers: Clinical Staff Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Planas, Jessica; Pose, Alix; Smith, Linda

    2016-04-01

    The rapid increase of diverse patients living in the US has created a different set of needs in healthcare, with the persistence of health disparities continuing to challenge the current system. Chronic disease management has been discussed as a way to improve health outcomes, with quality patient education being a key component. Using a community based participatory research framework, this study utilized a web-based survey and explored clinical staff perceptions of barriers to providing patient education during primary care visits. With a response rate of nearly 42 %, appointment time allotment seemed to be one of the most critical factors related to the delivery of health education and should be considered key. The importance of team-based care and staff training were also significant. Various suggestions were made in order to improve the delivery of quality patient education at community health centers located in underserved areas.

  12. Association of ambient air pollution and meteorological factors with primary care visits at night due to asthma attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Shin; Shima, Masayuki; Yoda, Yoshiko; Oka, Katsumi; Kurosaka, Fumitake; Shimizu, Shigeta; Takahashi, Hironobu; Nakatani, Yuji; Nishikawa, Jittoku; Fujiwara, Katsuhiko; Mizumori, Yasuyuki; Mogami, Akira; Yamada, Taku; Yamamoto, Nobuharu

    2013-09-01

    The association of outdoor air pollution and meteorological elements with primary care visits at night due to asthma attack was studied. A case-crossover study was conducted in a primary care clinic in Himeji City, Japan. The subjects were 956 children aged 0-14 years who visited the clinic with an asthma attack between the hours of 9 p.m. and 6 a.m. Daily concentrations of particulate matter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and a number of meteorological elements were measured, and a conditional logistic regression model was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) of primary care visits per unit increment of air pollutants or meteorological elements. The analyses took into consideration the effects of seasonality. Of the 956 children, 73 (7.6 %) were aged asthma attack at night in the spring or summer was found. An inverse relation between suspended particulate matter and primary care visits due to asthma attack was detected in the winter. ORs in the summer per degree increment in daily mean temperature was 1.31 [95 % confidential interval (CI) 1.09-1.56], and ORs in the autumn per hourly increment in daily hours of sunshine was 0.94 (95 % CI 0.90-0.99). The findings of our study fail to support any association between daily mean concentration of air pollutant and primary care visits at night. However, we did find evidence indicating that certain meteorological elements may be associated with primary care visits.

  13. Lean implementation in primary care health visiting services in National Health Service UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, A L; Meredith, J O; Macintyre, M; Angelis, J; Neailey, K

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents the findings of a 13-month lean implementation in National Health Service (NHS) primary care health visiting services from May 2008 to June 2009. Lean was chosen for this study because of its reported success in other healthcare organisations. Value-stream mapping was utilised to map out essential tasks for the participating health visiting service. Stakeholder mapping was conducted to determine the links between all relevant stakeholders. Waste processes were then identified through discussions with these stakeholders, and a redesigned future state process map was produced. Quantitative data were provided through a 10-day time-and-motion study of a selected number of staff within the service. This was analysed to provide an indication of waste activity that could be removed from the system following planned improvements. The value-stream map demonstrated that there were 67 processes in the original health visiting service studied. Analysis revealed that 65% of these processes were waste and could be removed in the redesigned process map. The baseline time-and-motion data demonstrate that clinical staff performed on average 15% waste activities, and the administrative support staff performed 46% waste activities. Opportunities for significant waste reduction have been identified during the study using the lean tools of value-stream mapping and a time-and-motion study. These opportunities include simplification of standard tasks, reduction in paperwork and standardisation of processes. Successful implementation of these improvements will free up resources within the organisation which can be redirected towards providing better direct care to patients.

  14. Varicella-related Primary Health-care Visits, Hospitalizations and Mortality in Norway, 2008-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirinaviciute, Grazina; Kristensen, Erle; Nakstad, Britt; Flem, Elmira

    2017-11-01

    Norway does not currently implement universal varicella vaccination in childhood. We aimed to characterize health care burden of varicella in Norway in the prevaccine era. We linked individual patient data from different national registries to examine varicella vaccinations and varicella-coded primary care consultations, hospitalizations, outpatient hospital visits, deaths and viral infections of central nervous system in the whole population of Norway during 2008-2014. We estimated health care contact rates and described the epidemiology of medically attended varicella infection. Each year approximately 14,600 varicella-related contacts occurred within primary health care and hospital sector in Norway. The annual contact rate was 221 cases per 100,000 population in primary health care and 7.3 cases per 100,000 in hospital care. Both in primary and hospital care, the highest incidences were observed among children 1 year of age: 2,654 and 78.1 cases per 100,000, respectively. The annual varicella mortality was estimated at 0.06 deaths per 100,000 and in-hospital case-fatality rate at 0.3%. Very few (0.2-0.5%) patients were vaccinated against varicella. Among hospitalized varicella patients, 22% had predisposing conditions, 9% had severe-to-very severe comorbidities and 5.5% were immunocompromised. Varicella-related complications were reported in 29.3% of hospitalized patients. Varicella zoster virus was the third most frequent virus found among 16% of patients with confirmed viral infections of central nervous system. Varicella causes a considerable health care burden in Norway, especially among children. To inform the policy decision on the use of varicella vaccination, a health economic assessment of vaccination and mathematical modeling of vaccination impact are needed.

  15. Occupational Therapy Predischarge Home Visits in Acute Hospital Care: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemson, Lindy; Lannin, Natasha A; Wales, Kylie; Salkeld, Glenn; Rubenstein, Laurence; Gitlin, Laura; Barris, Sarah; Mackenzie, Lynette; Cameron, Ian D

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether an enhanced occupational therapy discharge planning intervention that involved pre- and postdischarge home visits, goal setting, and follow-up (the HOME program) would be superior to a usual care intervention in which an occupational therapy in-hospital consultation for planning and supporting discharge to home is provided to individuals receiving acute care. Randomized controlled trial. Acute and medical wards. Individuals aged 70 and older (N = 400). Primary outcomes: activities daily living (ADLs; Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living) and participation in life roles and activities (Late Life Disability Index (LLDI)). Occupational therapist recommendations differed significantly between groups (P occupational therapy recommendations as the in-hospital only consultation, which had a greater emphasis on equipment provision, but HOME did not demonstrate greater benefit in global measures of ADLs or participation in life tasks than in-hospital consultation alone. It is not recommended that home visits be conducted routinely as part of discharge planning for acutely hospitalized medical patients. Further work should develop guidelines for quality in-hospital consultation. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Characteristics of communication with older people in home care: A qualitative analysis of audio recordings of home care visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Dorte V; Sundler, Annelie J; Eide, Hilde; Hafskjold, Linda; Ruud, Iren; Holmström, Inger K

    2017-12-01

    To describe the characteristics of communication practice in home care visits between older people (over 65 years old) and nurse assistants and to discuss the findings from a person-centered perspective. The older population is increasing worldwide, along with the need for healthcare services in the person's home. To achieve a high-quality care, person-centered communication is crucial. A descriptive design with a qualitative inductive approach was used. Fifteen audio recordings of naturally occurring conversations between 12 nurse assistants and 13 older people in Norway were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Four categories were revealed through analysis: (i) supporting older people's connection to everyday life; (ii) supporting older people's involvement in their own care; (iii) attention to older people's bodily and existential needs; and (iv) the impact of continuity and predictability on older people's well-being. The communication between the older people and the nurse assistants during home care visits was mainly task-oriented, but also related to the person. The older people were involved in the tasks to be carried out and humour was part of the communication. Greater attention was paid to bodily than existential needs. The communication was connected with the older people's everyday life in several ways. Time frames and interruptions concern the older people; hearing and speech impairments were a challenge to communication. To enhance person-centred communication, further studies are needed, especially intervention studies for healthcare professionals and students. Being responsive to older people's subjective experiences is important in meeting their needs in home care. Communication that addresses the need for trust and predictability is important for older people. Responding to existential needs require more attention. The home care setting has an impact on communication. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Early antenatal care visit: a systematic analysis of regional and global levels and trends of coverage from 1990 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Ann-Beth; Petzold, Max; Chou, Doris; Say, Lale

    2017-10-01

    The timing of the first antenatal care visit is paramount for ensuring optimal health outcomes for women and children, and it is recommended that all pregnant women initiate antenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy (early antenatal care visit). Systematic global analysis of early antenatal care visits has not been done previously. This study reports on regional and global estimates of the coverage of early antenatal care visits from 1990 to 2013. Data were obtained from nationally representative surveys and national health information systems. Estimates of coverage of early antenatal care visits were generated with linear regression analysis and based on 516 logit-transformed observations from 132 countries. The model accounted for differences by data sources in reporting the cutoff for the early antenatal care visit. The estimated worldwide coverage of early antenatal care visits increased from 40·9% (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 34·6-46·7) in 1990 to 58·6% (52·1-64·3) in 2013, corresponding to a 43·3% increase. Overall coverage in the developing regions was 48·1% (95% UI 43·4-52·4) in 2013 compared with 84·8% (81·6-87·7) in the developed regions. In 2013, the estimated coverage of early antenatal care visits was 24·0% (95% UI 21·7-26·5) in low-income countries compared with 81·9% (76·5-87·1) in high-income countries. Progress in the coverage of early antenatal care visits has been achieved but coverage is still far from universal. Substantial inequity exists in coverage both within regions and between income groups. The absence of data in many countries is of concern and efforts should be made to collect and report coverage of early antenatal care visits to enable better monitoring and evaluation. Department of Reproductive Health and Research, WHO and UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Copyright © This is an Open Access article published under the

  18. Women's education level, antenatal visits and the quality of skilled antenatal care: a study of three African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babalola, Stella

    2014-02-01

    Many pregnant women in Africa who access professional antenatal care do not receive all the WHO-recommended components of care. Using Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data from Kenya, Malawi and Nigeria, this study assesses the relationship of education level with the quality of antenatal care received and highlights how the number of antenatal visits mediates this relationship. The results show that a large proportion of the effect of education level on quality of care is direct, while only a small portion is mediated through the number of antenatal visits. Efforts to improve pregnancy outcomes for under-privileged women should focus on removing structural barriers to access, strengthening the technical and interpersonal skills of providers, and addressing providers' biases and discriminatory practices towards these women. Such efforts should also seek to empower underprivileged women to insist on quality antenatal care by explaining what to expect during an antenatal visit.

  19. Impact of the ABCDE triage in primary care emergency department on the number of patient visits to different parts of the health care system in Espoo City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantonen Jarmo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many Finnish emergency departments (ED serve both primary and secondary health care patients and are therefore referred to as combined emergency departments. Primary care doctors are responsible for the initial assessment and treatment. They, thereby, also regulate referral and access to secondary care. Primary health care EDs are easy for the public to access, leading to non-acute patient visits to the emergency department. This has caused increased queues and unnecessary difficulties in providing immediate treatment for urgent patients. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether the flow of patients was changed by implementing the ABCDE-triage system in the EDs of Espoo City, Finland. Methods The numbers of monthly visits to doctors were recorded before and after intervention in Espoo primary care EDs. To study if the implementation of the triage system redirects patients to other health services, the numbers of monthly visits to doctors were also scored in the private health care, the public sector health services of Espoo primary care during office hours and local secondary health care ED (Jorvi hospital. A face-to-face triage system was applied in the primary care EDs as an attempt to provide immediate treatment for the most acute patients. It is based on the letters A (patient sent directly to secondary care, B (to be examined within 10 min, C (to be examined within 1 h, D (to be examined within 2 h and E (no need for immediate treatment for assessing the urgency of patients' treatment needs. The first step was an initial patient assessment by a health care professional (triage nurse. The introduction of this triage system was combined with information to the public on the "correct" use of emergency services. Results After implementation of the ABCDE-triage system the number of patient visits to a primary care doctor decreased by up to 24% (962 visits/month as compared to the three previous years in the EDs

  20. Impact of the ABCDE triage in primary care emergency department on the number of patient visits to different parts of the health care system in Espoo City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantonen, Jarmo; Menezes, Ricardo; Heinänen, Tuula; Mattila, Juho; Mattila, Kari J; Kauppila, Timo

    2012-01-04

    Many Finnish emergency departments (ED) serve both primary and secondary health care patients and are therefore referred to as combined emergency departments. Primary care doctors are responsible for the initial assessment and treatment. They, thereby, also regulate referral and access to secondary care. Primary health care EDs are easy for the public to access, leading to non-acute patient visits to the emergency department. This has caused increased queues and unnecessary difficulties in providing immediate treatment for urgent patients. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether the flow of patients was changed by implementing the ABCDE-triage system in the EDs of Espoo City, Finland. The numbers of monthly visits to doctors were recorded before and after intervention in Espoo primary care EDs. To study if the implementation of the triage system redirects patients to other health services, the numbers of monthly visits to doctors were also scored in the private health care, the public sector health services of Espoo primary care during office hours and local secondary health care ED (Jorvi hospital). A face-to-face triage system was applied in the primary care EDs as an attempt to provide immediate treatment for the most acute patients. It is based on the letters A (patient sent directly to secondary care), B (to be examined within 10 min), C (to be examined within 1 h), D (to be examined within 2 h) and E (no need for immediate treatment) for assessing the urgency of patients' treatment needs. The first step was an initial patient assessment by a health care professional (triage nurse). The introduction of this triage system was combined with information to the public on the "correct" use of emergency services. After implementation of the ABCDE-triage system the number of patient visits to a primary care doctor decreased by up to 24% (962 visits/month) as compared to the three previous years in the EDs. The Number of visits to public sector GPs during

  1. Reducing High-Users’ Visits to the Emergency Department by a Primary Care Intervention for the Uninsured: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Han; Xirasagar, Sudha; Carroll, Scott; Bryan, Charles S.; Gallagher, Pamela J.; Davis, Kim; Jauch, Edward C.

    2018-01-01

    Reducing avoidable emergency department (ED) visits is an important health system goal. This is a retrospective cohort study of the impact of a primary care intervention including an in-hospital, free, adult clinic for poor uninsured patients on ED visit rates and emergency severity at a nonprofit hospital. We studied adult ED visits during August 16, 2009-August 15, 2011 (preintervention) and August 16, 2011-August 15, 2014 (postintervention). We compared pre- versus post-mean annual visit rates and discharge emergency severity index (ESI; triage and resource use–based, calculated Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality categories) among high-users (≥3 ED visits in 12 months) and occasional users. Annual adult ED visit volumes were 16 372 preintervention (47.5% by high-users), versus 18 496 postintervention. High-users’ mean annual visit rates were 5.43 (top quartile) and 0.94 (bottom quartile) preintervention, versus 3.21 and 1.11, respectively, for returning high-users, postintervention (all P < .001). Postintervention, the visit rates of new high-users were lower (lowest and top quartile rates, 0.6 and 3.23) than preintervention high-users’ rates in the preintervention period. Visit rates of the top quartile of occasional users also declined. Subgroup analysis of medically uninsured high-users showed similar results. Upon classifying preintervention high-users by emergency severity, postintervention mean ESI increased 24.5% among the lowest ESI quartile, and decreased 12.2% among the top quartile. Pre- and post-intervention sample demographics and comorbidities were similar. The observed reductions in overall ED visit rates, particularly low-severity visits; highest reductions observed among high-users and the top quartile of occasional users; and the pattern of changes in emergency severity support a positive impact of the primary care intervention. PMID:29591539

  2. Reducing High-Users' Visits to the Emergency Department by a Primary Care Intervention for the Uninsured: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Han; Xirasagar, Sudha; Carroll, Scott; Bryan, Charles S; Gallagher, Pamela J; Davis, Kim; Jauch, Edward C

    2018-01-01

    Reducing avoidable emergency department (ED) visits is an important health system goal. This is a retrospective cohort study of the impact of a primary care intervention including an in-hospital, free, adult clinic for poor uninsured patients on ED visit rates and emergency severity at a nonprofit hospital. We studied adult ED visits during August 16, 2009-August 15, 2011 (preintervention) and August 16, 2011-August 15, 2014 (postintervention). We compared pre- versus post-mean annual visit rates and discharge emergency severity index (ESI; triage and resource use-based, calculated Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality categories) among high-users (≥3 ED visits in 12 months) and occasional users. Annual adult ED visit volumes were 16 372 preintervention (47.5% by high-users), versus 18 496 postintervention. High-users' mean annual visit rates were 5.43 (top quartile) and 0.94 (bottom quartile) preintervention, versus 3.21 and 1.11, respectively, for returning high-users, postintervention (all P < .001). Postintervention, the visit rates of new high-users were lower (lowest and top quartile rates, 0.6 and 3.23) than preintervention high-users' rates in the preintervention period. Visit rates of the top quartile of occasional users also declined. Subgroup analysis of medically uninsured high-users showed similar results. Upon classifying preintervention high-users by emergency severity, postintervention mean ESI increased 24.5% among the lowest ESI quartile, and decreased 12.2% among the top quartile. Pre- and post-intervention sample demographics and comorbidities were similar. The observed reductions in overall ED visit rates, particularly low-severity visits; highest reductions observed among high-users and the top quartile of occasional users; and the pattern of changes in emergency severity support a positive impact of the primary care intervention.

  3. Primary Health Care Follow-Up Visits: Investigation Of Care Continuity Of Preterm Newborns From A Kangaroo-Mother Care Unit

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    Marielle Ribeiro Feitosa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The kangaroo-mother care method is an approach adopted in Brazil as a public police, which has helped in the reduction of neonatal mortality rate. Premature birth and its vulnerabilities can trigger, especially in mothers, feelings of fear and insecurity related to taking care of newborns. OBJECTIVE: Investigate care continuity of preterm newborns from a kangaroo-mother care method unit in primary health care facilities. METHODS: It was a transversal study performed with 43 mothers of preterm newborns who were hospitalized in the rooming-in care unit of a kangaroo-mother care method unit of a Brazilian public maternity school. Data collection was carried out through a questionnaire, which was used to interview mothers between September 2015 and February 2016. RESULTS: It was found a relationship between sociodemographic status and risk of premature birth, and the following variables: age, education, marital status, and family income. Regarding findings from the follow-up home visits in primary health care, most of the participants were still breastfeeding and using the kangaroo position. However, 60.5% of the interviewed mothers reported not receiving home visits from health professionals of primary health care facilities. CONCLUSION: It is essential the support of health professionals and the participation of mothers and families to improve, through health education, quality of life promotion for newborns from kangaroo care approach.

  4. The value of a poison control center in preventing unnecessary ED visits and hospital charges: A multi-year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Casey R; Malheiro, Marty C; Bennett, Heather K W; Crouch, Barbara I

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the economic value of the Utah Poison Control Center (UPCC) by examining its contribution to the reduction of unnecessary emergency department (ED) visits and associated charges across multiple years. A multi-year (2009-2014) analysis of cross-sectional data was performed. Callers were asked what they would do for a poison emergency if the UPCC was not available. Healthcare charges for ED visits averted were calculated according to insurance status using charges obtained from a statewide database. Of the 10,656 survey attempts, 5018 were completed. Over 30,000 cases were managed on-site each year. Using the proportion of callers who noted they would call 911, visit an ED, or call a physician's office, between 20.0 and 24.2 thousand ED visits were potentially prevented each year of the survey. Between $16.6 and $24.4 million dollars in unnecessary healthcare charges were potentially averted annually. Compared to the cost of operation, the service UPCC provides demonstrates economic value by reducing ED visits and associated charges. As the majority of patients have private insurance, the largest benefit falls to private payers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Distribution of HIV among pregnant women visiting a tertiary care hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal

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    Manish Rijal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the distribution of HIV among the pregnant women visiting a tertiary care hospital in Kathmandu. Methods: A total of 1 440 blood samples from pregnant women were collected and tested for antiHIV antibodies using rapid screening assay kits and ELISA in Paropakar Maternity and Women ’s Hospital during May to November, 2011. Results: The overall sero-prevalence of HIV among pregnant women was 0.62%, the prevalence being highest (1.4% in age group 35-39 years old, and during second trimester of gestation (0.75%. Similarly, it was found to be highest among the illiterates (1.92%, commercial sex worker (10.00% and those having multiple sexual partners (30.00%. Conclusions: Sero-prevalence of HIV infection was higher among the pregnant women of Kathmandu.

  6. Visiting nursery, kindergarten and after-school day care as astronomy for development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Akihiko

    2015-08-01

    One of the frontiers of astronomy for development is astronomy education for young children. Note that it is not too-much-going-ahead education nor education for so-called gifted children. It is for all children in various situations. As an example, I present "Uchu no O-hanashi," a visiting activity which includeds slide show, story telling, and enjoying pictures on large sheets for children. Not only just for young children, but this activity also aims at intercultural understanding. Sometimes guest educator from abroad join the activity. Video letter exchange was successful even though there is a language barrier. For assessment of the activity, I have recorded the voice of children. I will present various examples of written records and their analysis of activites, at nursery, kindergarten, preschool, after-school day care for primary school children, and other sites. I hope exchanging the record will make a worldwide connection among educators for very young children.

  7. Maternal education, dental visits and age of pacifier withdrawal: pediatric dentist role in malocclusion prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Suárez, V; Carrillo-Diaz, M; Crego, A; Romero, M

    2013-01-01

    Although discouraged, pacifier usage is widespread and often practiced beyond two years of age. The current study explored the effects of maternal education and dental visits on the age of pacifier withdrawal. The dental histories of 213 children (53.1% male) attending a primary school in Madrid were obtained along with maternal education level and age at pacifier withdrawal. Data were analyzed by using independent samples t-test, one-way ANOVA two-way ANOVA and a complementary non-parametric approach was also used. There was a significant effect of maternal education on the age of pacifier withdrawal; the higher the maternal education, the younger the age of withdrawal. The frequency of dental visits influenced the relationship between maternal education and the age of pacifier withdrawal. Dental visits considerably shortened pacifier use among children with low- and medium-educated mothers. Pediatric dentists play a critical role in the correction of unhealthy oral habits such as prolonged pacifier use. The educational component of pediatric dentistry could reverse the lack of knowledge or misinformation among high-risk groups (e.g. low maternal education). As a consequence, we recommend that children start dental visits at an early age and maintain visits with a high frequency.

  8. Emergency Department Visits Following Elective Total Hip and Knee Replacement Surgery: Identifying Gaps in Continuity of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, Micaela A; Shaffer, Robyn; Remington, Austin; Kwong, Jereen; Curtin, Catherine; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina

    2017-06-21

    Major joint replacement surgical procedures are common, elective procedures with a care episode that includes both inpatient readmissions and postoperative emergency department (ED) visits. Inpatient readmissions are well studied; however, to our knowledge, little is known about ED visits following these procedures. We sought to characterize 30-day ED visits following a major joint replacement surgical procedure. We used administrative records from California, Florida, and New York, from 2010 through 2012, to identify adults undergoing total knee and hip arthroplasty. Factors associated with increased risk of an ED visit were estimated using hierarchical regression models controlling for patient variables with a fixed hospital effect. The main outcome was an ED visit within 30 days of discharge. Among the 152,783 patients who underwent major joint replacement, 5,229 (3.42%) returned to the inpatient setting and 8,883 (5.81%) presented to the ED for care within 30 days. Among ED visits, 17.94% had a primary diagnosis of pain and 25.75% had both a primary and/or a secondary diagnosis of pain. Patients presenting to the ED for subsequent care had more comorbidities and were more frequently non-white with public insurance relative to those not returning to the ED (p replacement surgical procedure were numerous and most commonly for pain-related diagnoses. Medicaid patients had almost double the risk of an ED or pain-related ED visit following a surgical procedure. The future of U.S. health-care insurance coverage expansions are uncertain; however, there are ongoing attempts to improve quality across the continuum of care. It is therefore essential to ensure that all patients, particularly vulnerable populations, receive appropriate postoperative care, including pain management. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  9. Health information technology and physician-patient interactions: impact of computers on communication during outpatient primary care visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, John; Huang, Jie; Fung, Vicki; Robertson, Nan; Jimison, Holly; Frankel, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of introducing health information technology (HIT) on physician-patient interactions during outpatient visits. This was a longitudinal pre-post study: two months before and one and seven months after introduction of examination room computers. Patient questionnaires (n = 313) after primary care visits with physicians (n = 8) within an integrated delivery system. There were three patient satisfaction domains: (1) satisfaction with visit components, (2) comprehension of the visit, and (3) perceptions of the physician's use of the computer. Patients reported that physicians used computers in 82.3% of visits. Compared with baseline, overall patient satisfaction with visits increased seven months after the introduction of computers (odds ratio [OR] = 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-2.22), as did satisfaction with physicians' familiarity with patients (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.01-2.52), communication about medical issues (OR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.05-2.47), and comprehension of decisions made during the visit (OR = 1.63; 95% CI: 1.06-2.50). In contrast, there were no significant changes in patient satisfaction with comprehension of self-care responsibilities, communication about psychosocial issues, or available visit time. Seven months post-introduction, patients were more likely to report that the computer helped the visit run in a more timely manner (OR = 1.76; 95% CI: 1.28-2.42) compared with the first month after introduction. There were no other significant changes in patient perceptions of the computer use over time. The examination room computers appeared to have positive effects on physician-patient interactions related to medical communication without significant negative effects on other areas such as time available for patient concerns. Further study is needed to better understand HIT use during outpatient visits.

  10. Comorbidity and health care visit burden in working-age commercially insured patients with diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Szilárd; Chandwani, Hitesh S; Cole, Ashley L; Patel, Vaishali D; Lunacsek, Orsolya E; Dugel, Pravin U

    2016-01-01

    To examine the comorbidity profile and update estimates of health care resource utilization for commercially insured, working-age adults with diabetic macular edema (DME) relative to a matched comparison group of diabetic adults without DME. Additional comparisons were made in the subgroup of pseudophakic patients. A retrospective matched-cohort study of commercially insured diabetic adults aged 18-63 years was conducted using medical and outpatient pharmacy claims (July 1, 2008-June 30, 2013). Outcomes included diabetes-related and ocular comorbidities and health care resource utilization (any health care visit days, outpatient visit days, inpatient visit days, emergency room visits, eye care-related visit days, unique medications) in the 12-month post-index period. All diabetes-related and ocular comorbidities were significantly more prevalent in DME cases versus non-DME controls ( P patients face between managing DME and their overall diabetic disease. Insights into the complex comorbidity profile and health care needs of diabetic patients with DME will better inform treatment decisions and help optimize disease management.

  11. The Preventable Admissions Care Team (PACT): A Social Work-Led Model of Transitional Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso Lipani, Maria; Holster, Kathleen; Bussey, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    In 2010, the Preventable Admissions Care Team (PACT), a social work-led transitional care model, was developed at Mount Sinai to reduce 30-day readmissions among high-risk patients. PACT begins with a comprehensive bedside assessment to identify the psychosocial drivers of readmission. In partnership with the patient and family, a patient-centered action plan is developed and carried out through phone calls, accompaniments, navigations and home visits, as needed, in the first 30 days following discharge. 620 patients were enrolled during the pilot from September 2010-August 2012. Outcomes demonstrated a 43% reduction in inpatient utilization and a 54% reduction in emergency department visits among enrollees. In addition, 93% of patients had a follow-up appointment within 7-10 days of discharge and 90% of patients attended the appointment. The success of PACT has led to additional funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services under the Community-based Care Transitions Program and several managed care companies seeking population health management interventions for high risk members.

  12. Socio Demographic Factors Determining the Adequacy of Antenatal Care among Pregnant Women Visiting Ekiti State Primary Health Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikeoluwapo O. Ajayi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A cross sectional study was conducted in Primary Health Centers among pregnant women to elucidate adequacy of antenatal care across different socio demographic variables. Four hundred respondents were proportionately selected from 18 primary health centers using simple random sampling. Exit interviews were conducted using the adapted antenatal care exit interview form of the Safe Motherhood Needs Assessment package. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi square test. Adequacy of antenatal care in this study was measured by the single adequacy indicators which are duration of pregnancy at entry into antenatal care and number of antenatal visits; which are particularly suitable for developing countries. Age of respondents, means of transportation to the PHCs, occupation, location and level of education of the respondents were found to be determinants of whether the pregnant women attended their first antenatal visit in the first trimester, similarly, age of the respondents was a predictor of whether the women made up to four antenatal visits by their third trimester. Occupation and level of education were determinants of whether or not the pregnant women made their first antenatal visits at the first trimester. More respondents who were not working and those who were unskilled workers made their first antenatal visit at the first trimester compared to those who were skilled workers; work place policies and the fact that antenatal booking are made on weekdays and at work hours may hinder or be discouraging to the working class mothers.

  13. Family risk as a predictor of initial engagement and follow-through in a universal nurse home visiting program to prevent child maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Marsden, Shelley; Dodge, Kenneth A; O'Donnell, Karen J; Murphy, Robert A; Sato, Jeannine M; Christopoulos, Christina

    2013-08-01

    As nurse home visiting to prevent child maltreatment grows in popularity with both program administrators and legislators, it is important to understand engagement in such programs in order to improve their community-wide effects. This report examines family demographic and infant health risk factors that predict engagement and follow-through in a universal home-based maltreatment prevention program for new mothers in Durham County, North Carolina. Trained staff members attempted to schedule home visits for all new mothers during the birthing hospital stay, and then nurses completed scheduled visits three to five weeks later. Medical record data was used to identify family demographic and infant health risk factors for maltreatment. These variables were used to predict program engagement (scheduling a visit) and follow-through (completing a scheduled visit). Program staff members were successful in scheduling 78% of eligible families for a visit and completing 85% of scheduled visits. Overall, 66% of eligible families completed at least one visit. Structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses indicated that high demographic risk and low infant health risk were predictive of scheduling a visit. Both low demographic and infant health risk were predictive of visit completion. Findings suggest that while higher demographic risk increases families' initial engagement, it might also inhibit their follow-through. Additionally, parents of medically at-risk infants may be particularly difficult to engage in universal home visiting interventions. Implications for recruitment strategies of home visiting programs are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Are family physician visits and continuity of care associated with acute care use at end-of-life? A population-based cohort study of homecare cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaawiy, Ummukulthum; Pond, Gregory R; Sussman, Jonathan; Brazil, Kevin; Seow, Hsien

    2014-02-01

    Previous end-of-life cancer research has shown an association between increased family physician continuity of care and reduced use of acute care services; however, it did not focus on a homecare population or control for homecare nursing. Among end-of-life homecare cancer patients, to investigate the association of family physician continuity with location of death and hospital and emergency department visits in the last 2 weeks of life while controlling for nursing hours. Retrospective population-based cohort study. Cancer patients with ≥ 1 family physician visit in 2006 from Ontario, Canada. Family physician continuity of care was assessed using two measures: Modified Usual Provider of Care score and visits/week. Its association with location of death and hospital and emergency department visits in the last 2 weeks of life was examined using logistic regression. Of 9467 patients identified, the Modified Usual Provider of Care score demonstrated a dose-response relationship with increasing continuity associated with decreased odds of hospital death and visiting the hospital and emergency department in the last 2 weeks of life. More family physician visits/week were associated with lower odds of an emergency department visit in the last 2 weeks of life and hospital death, except for patients with greater than 4 visits/week, where they had increased odds of hospitalizations and hospital deaths. These results demonstrate an association between increased family physician continuity of care and decreased odds of several acute care outcomes in late life, controlling for homecare nursing and other covariates.

  15. Impact of improved recording of work-relatedness in primary care visits at occupational health services on sickness absences: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Salla; Ojajärvi, Ulla; Talola, Nina; Viljamaa, Mervi; Nevalainen, Jaakko; Uitti, Jukka

    2017-07-26

    Employment protects and fosters health. Occupational health services, particularly in Finland, have a central role in protecting employee health and preventing work ability problems. However, primary care within occupational health services is currently underused in informing preventive activities. This study was designed to assess whether the recording of work ability problems and improvement of follow-up of work-related primary care visits can reduce sickness absences and work disability pensions after 1 year. A pragmatic trial will be conducted using patient electronic registers and registers of the central pensions agency in Finland. Twenty-two occupational health centres will be randomised to intervention and control groups. Intervention units will receive training to improve recording of work ability illnesses in the primary care setting and improved follow-up procedures. The intervention impact will be assessed through examining rates of sickness absence across intervention and control clinics as well as before and after the intervention. The trial will develop knowledge of the intervention potential of primary care for preventing work disability pensions and sickness absence. The use of routine patient registers and pensions registers to assess the outcomes of a randomised controlled trial will bring forward trial methodology, particularly when using register-based data. If successful, the intervention will improve the quality of occupational health care primary care and contribute to reducing work disability. ISRCTN Registry reference number ISRCTN45728263 . Registered on 18 April 2016.

  16. Modifying effect of age on the association between ambient ozone and nighttime primary care visits due to asthma attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Shin; Shima, Masayuki; Ando, Michiko; Nitta, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    We examined the association between short-term exposure to outdoor air pollution and nighttime primary care visits due to asthma attack. We also investigated the modifying effects of age on this association. A case-crossover study was conducted at a primary care clinic in metropolitan Tokyo. The subjects were 308 children aged 0-14 years and 95 adolescents and adults aged 15-64 years. All subjects made visits to the clinic for an asthma attack at between 7 PM and 12 AM. Data on hourly concentrations of particulate matter with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter asthma attack in warmer months; the association was greater among preschool children.

  17. Barriers and facilitators to optimize function and prevent disability worsening: a content analysis of a nurse home visit intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebel, Dianne V; Powers, Bethel Ann; Friedman, Bruce; Watson, Nancy M

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a report of an analysis of how to better understand the results of the nurse home visit intervention in the Medicare Primary and Consumer-Directed Care Demonstration in terms of facilitators and barriers to disability improvement/maintenance as compared with disability worsening. There is a lack of literature describing how nurse home visit interventions are able to maintain/improve disability among older persons with disability. The present study is one of only six reporting beneficial disability outcomes. Cases were purposefully sampled to represent change in the disability construct leading to selection of ten cases each of disability maintenance/improvement (no change or decrease in total Activities of Daily Living score from baseline) and worsening (an increase in total Activities of Daily Living score from baseline). Data from nurses' progress notes and case studies (collected in March 1998-June 2002) were analysed using qualitative descriptive analysis (May 2009). These results remain relevant because the present study is one of the few studies to identify select nurse activities instrumental in postponing/minimizing disability worsening. Three primary themes captured the facilitators and barriers to effective disability maintenance/improvement: (1) building and maintaining patient-centred working relationships, (2) negotiating delivery of intervention components and (3) establishing balance between patients' acute and chronic care needs. Sub-themes illustrate nurse, patient and system factors associated with effective disability maintenance/improvement (e.g. nurse caring, communicating, facilitating interdisciplinary communication) and barriers associated with disability worsening (e.g. dementia, depression and recurring acute illnesses). This study provides new insights about the facilitators and barriers to effective disability maintenance/improvement experienced by patients receiving home visits. Potential opportunities exist to integrate

  18. Personnel decontamination and preventive skin care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Klaus; Gojowczyk, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Skin contamination arises from contact with contaminated aqueous solutions and from transmission of radioactively contaminated dirt particles. As long as the surface of the skin is neither inflamed nor showing any lesions, normally only a limited part of the top layer (epidermis), i.e. the upper layers of the stratum corneum, is contaminated. The intact horny layer has a barrier function protecting against the penetration of chemicals and dirt particles. The horny layer can be damaged by water, solvents, alkaline substances, and acids. In general, it is safe to say that the horny layer acts as a natural barrier to the penetration of liquid and particulate impurities into lower layers of the skin. As long as the horny layer is intact and free from lesions, the risk of incorporation can be considered low. When decontaminating and cleansing the skin, also in daily skin cleansing, care must be taken to prevent the acid protective layer and the horny layer from being compromised. Daily cleansing and cleansing for decontamination must be carried out with a mild, weakly acidic detergent. In addition, prevention should be achieved daily by applying a non-greasy skin lotion to protect the skin. Following a systematic regular regimen in skin cleansing and preventive skin care as well as a specific approach in skin decontamination and cleansing will avoid damage to the skin and remove any contamination incurred. This approach comprises a three-pronged concept, namely skin protection, cleansing and care. (orig.)

  19. Informed and patient-centered decision-making in the primary care visits of African Americans with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Anika L; Roter, Debra; Ghods Dinoso, Bri K; Carson, Kathryn A; Daumit, Gail L; Cooper, Lisa A

    2018-02-01

    We examined the prevalence and extent of informed decision-making (IDM) and patient-centered decision-making (PCDM) in primary care visits of African Americans with depression. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of audiotaped clinical encounters and post-visit surveys of 76 patients and their clinicians. We used RIAS to characterize patient-centeredness of visit dialogue. IDM entailed discussion of 3 components: the nature of the decision, alternatives, and pros/cons. PCDM entailed discussion of: lifestyle/coping strategies, knowledge/beliefs, or treatment concerns. We examined the association of IDM and PCDM with visit duration, overall patient-centeredness, and patient/clinician interpersonal ratings. Approximately one-quarter of medication and counseling decisions included essential IDM elements and 40% included at least one PCDM element. In high patient-centered visits, IDM was associated with patients feeling respected in counseling and liking clinicians in medication decisions. IDM was not related to clinician ratings. In low patient-centered visits, PCDM in counseling decisions was positively associated with patients feeling respected and clinicians respecting patients. The associations between IDM and PCDM with interpersonal ratings was moderated by overall patient-centeredness of the visit, which may be indicative of broader cross-cultural communication issues. Strengthening partnerships between depressed African Americans and their clinicians may improve patient-engaged decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cancer Survivorship Care Plan Utilization and Impact on Clinical Decision-Making at Point-of-Care Visits with Primary Care: Results from an Engineering, Primary Care, and Oncology Collaborative for Survivorship Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, SarahMaria; Haine, James E; Li, Zhanhai; Feldstein, David A; Micek, Mark; Trowbridge, Elizabeth R; Kamnetz, Sandra A; Sosman, James M; Wilke, Lee G; Sesto, Mary E; Tevaarwerk, Amye J

    2017-11-02

    Every cancer survivor and his/her primary care provider should receive an individualized survivorship care plan (SCP) following curative treatment. Little is known regarding point-of-care utilization at primary care visits. We assessed SCP utilization in the clinical context of primary care visits. Primary care physicians and advanced practice providers (APPs) who had seen survivors following provision of an SCP were identified. Eligible primary care physicians and APPs were sent an online survey, evaluating SCP utilization and influence on decision-making at the point-of-care, accompanied by copies of the survivor's SCP and the clinic note. Eighty-eight primary care physicians and APPs were surveyed November 2016, with 40 (45%) responding. Most respondents (60%) reported discussing cancer or related issues during the visit. Information needed included treatment (66%) and follow-up visits, and the cancer team was responsible for (58%) vs primary care (58%). Respondents acquired this information by asking the patient (79%), checking oncology notes (75%), the SCP (17%), or online resources (8%). Barriers to SCP use included being unaware of the SCP (73%), difficulty locating it (30%), and finding needed information faster via another mechanism (15%). Despite largely not using the SCP for the visit (90%), most respondents (61%) believed one would be quite or very helpful for future visits. Most primary care visits included discussion of cancer or cancer-related issues. SCPs may provide the information necessary to deliver optimal survivor care but efforts are needed to reduce barriers and design SCPs for primary care use.

  1. Short-Term Associations between Air Pollution Concentrations and Respiratory Health-Comparing Primary Health Care Visits, Hospital Admissions, and Emergency Department Visits in a Multi-Municipality Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taj, Tahir; Malmqvist, Ebba; Stroh, Emilie; Oudin Åström, Daniel; Jakobsson, Kristina; Oudin, Anna

    2017-05-31

    Acute effects of air pollution on respiratory health have traditionally been investigated with data on inpatient admissions, emergency room visits, and mortality. In this study, we aim to describe the total acute effects of air pollution on health care use for respiratory symptoms (ICD10-J00-J99). This will be done by investigating primary health care (PHC) visits, inpatient admissions, and emergency room visits together in five municipalities in southern Sweden, using a case-crossover design. Between 2005 and 2010, there were 81,019 visits to primary health care, 38,217 emergency room visits, and 25,271 inpatient admissions for respiratory symptoms in the study area. There was a 1.85% increase (95% CI: 0.52 to 3.20) in the number of primary health care visits associated with a 10 µg/m³ increase in nitrogen dioxide (NO₂) levels in Malmö, but not in the other municipalities. Air pollution levels were generally not associated with emergency room visits or inpatient admissions, with one exception (in Helsingborg there was a 2.52% increase in emergency room visits for respiratory symptoms associated with a 10 µg/m³ increase in PM 10 ). In conclusion, the results give weak support for short-term effects of air pollution on health care use associated with respiratory health symptoms in the study area.

  2. Primary Care Comprehensiveness Can Reduce Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalization in People with Hypertension in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Nak-Jin; Choi, Yong-Jun; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2018-02-05

    Hypertension has been the leading risk factor contributing to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, which needs comprehensive measures to manage and can be controlled effectively in primary care. In the health care context of South Korea, where specialists can see patients directly at their own community clinics and there has been no consensus on the definition of primary care, the authors used the nationally representative 2013 Korea Health Panel data, categorized adults (≥18 years) with hypertension by types of usual source of care (USC), and analyzed the association of having a comprehensive community clinic (i.e., primary care) physician as a USC with experience of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalization within a year. After adjusting for cofounding variables including Charlson comorbidity index scores, those having a primary care physician as a USC remained associated with a decrease in an experience of ED visits (OR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.40-0.93) and hospitalization (OR: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.49-0.96), compared to those not having a usual physician. Health policies that promote having a primary care physician as a USC could decrease unnecessary experience of ED visits and hospitalization by adults with hypertension. This can partly reduce ED overcrowding and avoidable hospitalization in Korea.

  3. Point-of-care testing of HbA1c in diabetes care and preventable hospital admissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Troels; Rose Olsen, Kim

    Background: Point-of-care testing (POCT) of HbA1c may result in improved diabetic control, better patient outcomes and enhanced clinical efficiency with fewer patient visits and subsequent reductions in hospitalizations and costs. In 2008, the Danish regulators agreed to create a new tariff...... for the remuneration of POCT of HbA1c in primary care. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess whether there is an association between the use of POCT of HbA1c and preventable hospital admissions among diabetes patients in general practice. Method: We apply logistic regression analyses to examine whether......, socioeconomic covariates, municipality classifications and case mix measure in terms of the charlson index and costs of care in primary care and secondary care. Results: There was a significant link between POCT of HbA1c among diabetes patients in general practice and an ACSC-measure of preventable out...

  4. [Evaluating the professors visits on the care of patients with knee osteoarthrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseguera-Rodríguez, Jorge; Martínez-López, Guadalupe; Díaz-Torres, Yaneth; Gómez-Rocha, Santiago A; Carriles-Ortiz, Martha; Rodríguez-Gálvez, Ana M

    2012-01-01

    visits of professors is an educational strategy (ES) that allow the exchange of clinical experience between specialists and physicians of first contact and let to both reconsider their daily work, incorporate useful tools to promote learning, and implement strategies to solve problems in clinical work. The aim was to describe an ES carried out in a program of knee osteoarthritis, differentiating clinical competence from professional performance. ten family physicians and an orthopaedic specialist participated. The ES took place by assessing competence in clinical cases; clinical performance with an observation guide as well as reviewing grounds for transfers to a second level. competence skills had found an initial media of 25 and at the end of 38 (p=0.025). On the observation guide a middle initial of 29 and final 91; finally, in submission evaluation a 50 % was adequate at the beginning of the ES with a 100 % at the end. development in doctors' clinical competence skill was observed and a better performance in medical care.

  5. Associations between proximity to livestock farms, primary health care visits and self-reported symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Christel E; Smit, Lidwien A M; Hooiveld, Mariette; Zock, Jan-Paul; Wouters, Inge M; Heederik, Dick J J; Yzermans, C Joris

    2016-02-19

    Living in a neighbourhood with a high density of livestock farms has been associated with adverse respiratory health effects, but less is known about healthcare utilisation. This study aimed at investigating the associations between livestock exposure and primary health care visits and self-reported symptoms. In addition, we examined the potentially confounding effect of distance from home to general practice. Contact data between 2006 and 2009 were obtained from electronic medical records of 54,777 persons registered within 16 general practices in an area with a high density of livestock farms in the Netherlands. Data on self-reported symptoms were used from a cross-sectional sample of 531 patients in 2010. Livestock presence in a 500 m radius from home was computed using Geographic Information System data. In general, livestock exposure was associated with fewer contacts and self-reported symptoms for respiratory and other conditions. The number of poultry within 500 m was positively associated with the number of contacts. A longer distance to general practice was associated with fewer contacts, but did not confound associations. People living close to livestock farms less often see their general practitioner and report symptoms.

  6. Text messaging to improve attendance at post-operative clinic visits after adult male circumcision for HIV prevention: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Odeny

    Full Text Available Following male circumcision for HIV prevention, a high proportion of men fail to return for their scheduled seven-day post-operative visit. We evaluated the effect of short message service (SMS text messages on attendance at this important visit.We enrolled 1200 participants >18 years old in a two-arm, parallel, randomized controlled trial at 12 sites in Nyanza province, Kenya. Participants received daily SMS text messages for seven days (n = 600 or usual care (n = 600. The primary outcome was attendance at the scheduled seven-day post-operative visit. The primary analysis was by intention-to-treat.Of participants receiving SMS, 387/592 (65.4% returned, compared to 356/596 (59.7% in the control group (relative risk [RR] = 1.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.20; p = 0.04. Men who paid more than US$1.25 to travel to clinic were at higher risk for failure to return compared to those who spent ≤ US$1.25 (adjusted relative risk [aRR] 1.35, 95% CI 1.15-1.58; p<0.001. Men with secondary or higher education had a lower risk of failure to return compared to those with primary or less education (aRR 0.87, 95% CI 0.74-1.01; p = 0.07.Text messaging resulted in a modest improvement in attendance at the 7-day post-operative clinic visit following adult male circumcision. Factors associated with failure to return were mainly structural, and included transportation costs and low educational level.ClinicalTrials.govNCT01186575.

  7. Frequency and associated factors for care giving among elderly patients visiting a teaching hospital in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Qidwai

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study frequency and associated factors for care giving among elderly patients visiting a teaching hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. METHODOLOGY: A cross sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted at the Community Health Centre (CHC, Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH Karachi, Pakistan from September to November 2009. All individuals, visiting the CHC and aged 65 years or above were interviewed after taking written informed consent. RESULTS: A total of 400 elderly completed the interview. Majority were females, 65-69 years age, More than half of the individuals ie: 227 (85% had received Care Giver experience for assistance and among these 195(72% had care provided by an immediate family member. A large proportion of them stated that their Care Givers managed to provide less than four hours in a day for care giving. Around 37% showed substantial improvement in their relationship with the care givers. About 70% of the respondents stated that the care provided by the Care Giver improved their quality of life. CONCLUSION: Elderly care is provided by majority of the family members resulting in increased satisfaction level, however small number still not satisfied due to unfulfilled need of these older people. This demands that efforts should be made to strengthen the family support by increasing awareness regarding elderly care and arranging support system by the government.

  8. Naturopathic Practice at North American Academic Institutions: Description of 300,483 Visits and Comparison to Conventional Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Chamberlin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study collected patient visit data to explore similarities and differences between conventional and naturopathic primary care (PC. Administrative data from practice management software systems from the main teaching clinics of four of the eight accredited North American naturopathic academic institutions were abstracted into an integrated database containing five years (2006–2010 of visit, patient, laboratory, and prescribing data. Descriptive analyses of healthcare services were compared to the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS. Over the five-year period, 300,483 patient visits to naturopathic doctors occurred at clinics, excluding visits at clinics operated by the schools in community settings. Patients were 69% female; mean age was 39 (SE 0.09. Older adults (>65 comprised 9% of the population and children (<16 comprised 8%. Comparing academic naturopathic clinics to national conventional PC (NAMCS, we found more patients paid out of pocket at naturopathic clinics (50 vs. 4% and naturopathic clinics more frequently offered discounted care (26 vs. 0.3%. There was a 44% overlap in the most frequent 25 diagnoses for PC at conventional community clinics. Overall, these data suggest substantial similarities in care offered by academic naturopathic clinics, at which most Naturopathic Doctor (ND students are trained, and by conventional PC practices.

  9. Working in clients' homes: the impact on the mental health and well-being of visiting home care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Margaret A; Zeytinoğlu, Işk Urla; Davies, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of working in clients' homes on the mental health and well-being of visiting home care workers. This paper reports the results of a survey of 674 visiting staff from three non-profit home care agencies in a medium-sized city in Ontario, Canada. Survey results are also complimented by data from 9 focus groups with 50 employees. For purposes of this study, home care workers include visiting therapists, nurses, and home support workers. Mental health and well-being is measured by three dependent variables: stress; job stress; and intrinsic job satisfaction. Multiple least squared regression analyses show several structural, emotional, physical, and organizational working conditions associated with the health and well-being of visiting home care workers. Overall, results show that workload, difficult clients, clients who take advantage of workers, sexual harassment, safety hazards, a repetitious job, and work-related injuries are associated with poorer health. Being fairly paid, having good benefits, emotional labour, organizational support, control over work, and peer support are associated with better health. Results suggest that policy change is needed to encourage healthier work environments for employees who work in clients' homes.

  10. The Value Proposition of Prevention: The Impacts of Pure North S’Energy Foundation’s Preventive Care Program on Acute Care Utilization in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Herbert Emery

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This analysis of Pure North S’Energy Foundation’s preventive health services shows that the acute health care cost savings of being pro-active, rather than reactive, and averting chronic disease, are significant, immediate and worth pursuing further. Chronic disease, such as cardiovascular maladies, diabetes, cancer and other long-term illnesses, represents the leading cause of disability and death in Canada. An estimated 25 per cent of expenditures in the public health system go towards treating these frequently avoidable diseases. This health-care cost curve, which sees more money expended on fighting the increase of chronic disease, can be bent, so to speak, through prevention services that offer long-term benefits to people’s health. Preventing disease is not just good for individuals, but for the health system in general, as prevention frees up acute care beds for more timely access by those who need them. The concern for health care decision makers struggling to find dollars to meet current health care needs is that investment in prevention is risky compared spending on medical treatment. It is often expressed that the health cost savings of prevention are too far off in the future and there is a lack of convincing evidence that preventive services and interventions will achieve the health gains expected. Pure North offers participants in its eight-year-old program access to a variety of healthcare practitioners, including doctors, naturopaths, nurses, nurse practitioners and dentists. Participants receive lifestyle counselling and dietary supplements aimed at combating vitamin D insufficiency, obesity, insulin resistance and other problems that can lead to chronic disease. Our study found that participants who stay with the program for two years demonstrate significant reductions in their number of visits to emergency rooms and hospitals. Indeed, after just one year in the program, the number of hospital visits was down 27 per cent

  11. Growing old at home – A randomized controlled trial to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of preventive home visits to reduce nursing home admissions: study protocol [NCT00644826

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riedel-Heller Steffi G

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regarding demographic changes in Germany it can be assumed that the number of elderly and the resulting need for long term care is increasing in the near future. It is not only an individual's interest but also of public concern to avoid a nursing home admission. Current evidence indicates that preventive home visits can be an effective way to reduce the admission rate in this way making it possible for elderly people to stay longer at home than without home visits. As the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of preventive home visits strongly depends on existing services in the social and health system existing international results cannot be merely transferred to Germany. Therefore it is necessary to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of such an intervention in Germany by a randomized controlled trial. Methods The trial is designed as a prospective multi-center randomized controlled trial in the cities of Halle and Leipzig. The trial includes an intervention and a control group. The control group receives usual care. The intervention group receives three additional home visits by non-physician health professionals (1 geriatric assessment, (2 consultation, (3 booster session. The nursing home admission rate after 18 months will be defined as the primary outcome. An absolute risk reduction from a 20% in the control-group to a 7% admission rate in the intervention group including an assumed drop out rate of 30% resulted in a required sample size of N = 320 (n = 160 vs. n = 160. Parallel to the clinical outcome measurement the intervention will be evaluated economically. The economic evaluation will be performed from a society perspective. Discussion To the authors' knowledge for the first time a trial will investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of preventive home visits for people aged 80 and over in Germany using the design of a randomized controlled trial. Thus, the trial will contribute to

  12. The Long Term Effects of “Consumer-Directed” Health Plans on Preventive Care Use1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Matthew D.; Haviland, Amelia M.; Mehrotra, Ateev; Huckfeldt, Peter J.; Sood, Neeraj

    2017-01-01

    “Consumer-Directed” Health Plans (CDHPs), those with high deductibles and personal medical accounts, have been shown to reduce health care spending. The impact of CDHPs on preventive care is unclear. On the one hand CDHPs might increase use of preventive care as such care is exempt from the deductible. However, CDHPs also decrease visits to physicians which might results in less screening. Prior research has found conflicting results. In this study, using data from 37 employers we examine the effects of CDHPs on the use of cancer screenings up to three years after the initial CDHP offering with ITT and LATE approaches. Being offered a CDHP or enrolling in a CDHP had little or no effect on cancer screening rates but individuals increase screenings prior to enrolling in a CDHP. Our findings suggest the importance of examining CDHP effects on periodic care over the longer-term and carefully controlling for anticipatory stockpiling. PMID:28712437

  13. Point-of-care testing of HbA1c in diabetes care and preventable hospital admissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Troels; Rose Olsen, Kim; Skovsgaard, Christian

    Background: Point-of-care testing (POCT) of HbA1c may result in improved diabetic control, better patient outcomes and enhanced clinical efficiency with fewer patient visits and subsequent reductions in hospitalizations and costs. In 2008, the Danish regulators agreed to create a new tariff...... for the remuneration of POCT of HbA1c in primary care. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess whether there is an association between the use of POCT of HbA1c and preventable hospital admissions among diabetes patients in general practice. Method: We apply logistic regression analyses to examine whether...... there is a link between preventable hospital admissions and POCT of HbA1c in general practice. Preventable hospital admissions were assessed through the ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) classification of hospital admissions. We include independent variables such as gender, age, ethnicity...

  14. Pattern of skin diseases in patients visiting a tertiary care health facility at hyderabad, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, K.N.; Soomro, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The morbidity associated with skin diseases makes them an important public health problem. Very scanty literature is found on the problem which is either disease-based, community based or a specified population group-based. objective of this study was to assess the pattern of skin diseases in patients and to determine their relation with demographic characteristics. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted at dermatology out-patient department of liaquat university hospital, jamshoro, pakistan for the period from 10th january to 10th february 2008. Four hundred and eleven patients were enrolled during the study period. The study population comprised of newly diagnosed cases as well as relapsing cases presenting at the facility. The criterion for registering the patients was clinical diagnosis although few cases were supported by investigations, too. The data was collected through a pre-designed questionnaire and analysed through spss-12. Result: Skin problems are fairly common among children and women. in children of less than 10 years age, 82.5% visiting the facility suffer from infectious skin diseases. among the infectious diseases, scabies is highly prevalent disease (45.5%). the majority of the patients belong to rural or slum areas (77.2%), low socio-economic strata (68.9%), and living in overcrowded families (82%). a strong association between skin infections and water inadequacy (p=0.016) was found, and scabies shows a strong statistical association with overcrowding (p=0.025). Conclusion: The skin diseases involve every age strata of our population but it is fairly common in younger age group, women, and people who do not practice hygiene. Out-reach services for the rural and slum communities and health education will give good results on prevention of skin diseases. (author)

  15. Frequency Of Hyperthermia In Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Visiting A Tertiary Care Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maheshwari, A. K.; Kumar, P.; Alam, M. T.; Aurangzeb, M.; Imran, K.; Masroor, M.; Parkash, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of hyperthermia in acute ischemic stroke patients visiting a tertiary care hospital in a developing country. Study Design: Cross-sectional, observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical Wards of Civil Hospital, Karachi, from January to June 2013. Methodology: Patients aged = 18 years of either gender with acute ischemic stroke presenting within 24 hours of onset of symptoms were included. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants as well as approval of ethical review committee of the institute. Axillary temperature by mercury thermometer was monitored at the time of admission and after every 6 hours for 3 days. The data was analyzed using SPSS version 17.0 (SPSS Inc., IL, Chicago, USA). Result: A total of 106 patients of ischemic stroke were included. The mean age of enrolled participants was 60.1 ±9.5 years. Among these, 61 (57.5 percentage) were males and 45 (42.5 percentage) females. Among all patients, 51.9 percentage presented with loss of consciousness, 30.2 percentage with slurred speech, 77.4 percentage with limb weakness, and 9.4 percentage with decrease vision. A total of 17 (16 percentage) patients with ischemic stroke developed hyperthermia. When the prevalence of hyperthermia was stratified according to age, among patients of < 60 years of age, 26 percentage developed hyperthermia compared to 7.1 percentage in patients of = 60 years of age (p=0.008). On gender stratification, among male patients, 14.8 percentage developed hyperthermia compared to 17.8 percentage in female patients (p=0.43). Conclusion: It is concluded from this study that the frequency of hyperthermia in ischemic stroke was 16 percentage and it should be looked for as it has significant impact on the outcome. The hyperthermia was significantly more common in younger adults as compared to older adults. However, gender had no influence on the prevalence rate of hyperthermia. (author)

  16. Utilization of outpatient medical care and substance use among rural stimulant users: Do the number of visits matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucciare, Michael A; Kennedy, Kristina M; Han, Xiaotong; Timko, Christine; Zaller, Nickolas; Booth, Brenda M

    2018-03-01

    Rural substance users are less likely than their urban peers to use formal substance use treatment. It is therefore important to understand how the utilization of potentially more appealing care options, such as outpatient medical care (OMC), may affect substance use over time. This study sought to examine whether the number of OMC visits, after controlling for important covariates, was associated with days of alcohol, crack and powder cocaine, and methamphetamine use among a sample of rural stimulant users over a three year period. Data were collected from a natural history study of 710 stimulant users living in rural communities in Arkansas, Kentucky, and Ohio. Participants were adults, not in drug treatment, and reporting stimulant use in the last 30days. In terms of alcohol use, for participants with higher employment-related problems, having 3 or more OMC visits (relative to none) was associated with fewer days of alcohol use. The results for days of cocaine and methamphetamine use were mixed. However, we did find that for participants reporting at least one substance use treatment or mutual help care visit in the past 6-months, having 1-2 OMC visits (compared to none) was associated with fewer days of crack cocaine use. Regarding methamphetamine use, results showed that for participants without medical insurance, having 3 or more OMC visits (compared to none) was associated with significantly fewer days of methamphetamine use if they also reported greater than or equal to a high school education. The findings from this study may help us begin to understand some of the characteristics of rural drug users, who utilize OMCs, associated with reductions in substance use. These findings may help health care administrators better plan, coordinate, and allocate resources to rural OMCs to more effectively address substance use in this population. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Propensity for paying home visits among general practitioners and the associations with cancer patients' place of care and death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winthereik, Anna K; Hjertholm, Peter; Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies of associations between home visits by general practitioners and end-of-life care for cancer patients have been subject to confounding. AIM: To analyse associations between general practitioners' propensity to pay home visits and the likelihood of hospitalisation...... and dying out of hospital among their cancer patients. DESIGN: A national register cohort study with an ecological exposure. Standardised incidence rates of general practitioner home visits were calculated as a measure for propensity. Practices were grouped into propensity quartiles. Associations between...... propensity groups and end-of-life outcomes for cancer patients aged 40 or above were calculated. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: Danish general practitioners and citizens aged 40 or above were included from 2003 to 2012. RESULTS: We included 2670 practices with 2,518,091 listed patients (18,364,679 person...

  18. Colorectal cancer in Jordan: prevention and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muayyad M; Dardas, Latefa; Dardas, Lubna; Ahmad, Huthaifa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward colorectal cancer prevention and care in Jordan. A survey was designed to produce reliable estimates for the population's knowledge, attitudes, and practices in all 12 governorates of Jordan by using stratified random sampling. A representative sample of the adult population in Jordan completed a comprehensive tool which explored participants' knowledge about the risk factors associated with colorectal cancer, cancer prevention through lifestyle changes, and early cancer diagnosis and screening. According to the participants (n = 3196), colorectal cancer had the second highest percentage of screening recommendation (12.6%) after breast cancer (57.3%). Only 340 individuals (11%) reported ever screening for cancer. About 20% of the participants had heard of one of the screening tests for colorectal cancer. In fact, only 290 (9.1%) participants had performed the colorectal cancer screening tests. This study provides data that will help colorectal cancer prevention and treatment programs and may enhance the efficiency of colorectal cancer-controlling programs. The findings confirm the necessity of starting colorectal screening intervention that targets the most vulnerable individuals. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Predictors of Better Self-Care in Patients with Heart Failure after Six Months of Follow-Up Home Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojahn, Melina Maria; Ruschel, Karen Brasil; Nogueira de Souza, Emiliane; Mussi, Cláudia Motta; Naomi Hirakata, Vânia; Nogueira Mello Lopes, Alexandra; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the predictors of better self-care behavior in patients with heart failure (HF) in a home visiting program. This is a longitudinal study nested in a randomized controlled trial (ISRCTN01213862) in which the home-based educational intervention consisted of a six-month followup that included four home visits by a nurse, interspersed with four telephone calls. The self-care score was measured at baseline and at six months using the Brazilian version of the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behaviour Scale. The associations included eight variables: age, sex, schooling, having received the intervention, social support, income, comorbidities, and symptom severity. A simple linear regression model was developed using significant variables (P ≤ 0.20), followed by a multivariate model to determine the predictors of better self-care. One hundred eighty-eight patients completed the study. A better self-care behavior was associated with patients who received intervention (P < 0.001), had more years of schooling (P = 0.016), and had more comorbidities (P = 0.008). Having received the intervention (P < 0.001) and having a greater number of comorbidities (P = 0.038) were predictors of better self-care. In the multivariate regression model, being in the intervention group and having more comorbidities were a predictor of better self-care. PMID:24083023

  20. Inappropriate prescribing in outpatient healthcare: an evaluation of respiratory infection visits among veterans in teaching versus non-teaching primary care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M. Parente

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent study led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC revealed at least 30% of antibiotic prescriptions in the outpatient setting were inappropriate. In this study of all ages, among adult patients, results were similar to the overall population, with the majority of inappropriate prescribing relating to respiratory infections. We applied the same methodology to investigate rates of antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections in outpatient primary care clinics at the Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The results of our evaluation reflected comparable rates of inappropriate prescribing, but when stratified by teaching versus non-teaching primary care clinics, inappropriate prescribing was significantly higher in non-teaching clinics (17.6% vs 44.0%, p < .0001. Respiratory infection visits in non-teaching outpatient clinics may be a pragmatic target for antimicrobial stewardship programs.

  1. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Citywide Emergency Department Care Coordination Program to Reduce Prescription Opioid Related Emergency Department Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neven, Darin; Paulozzi, Leonard; Howell, Donelle; McPherson, Sterling; Murphy, Sean M; Grohs, Becky; Marsh, Linda; Lederhos, Crystal; Roll, John

    2016-11-01

    Increasing prescription overdose deaths have demonstrated the need for safer emergency department (ED) prescribing practices for patients who are frequent ED users. We hypothesized that the care of frequent ED users would improve using a citywide care coordination program combined with an ED care coordination information system, as measured by fewer ED visits by and decreased controlled substance prescribing to these patients. We conducted a multisite randomized controlled trial (RCT) across all EDs in a metropolitan area; 165 patients with the most ED visits for complaints of pain were randomized. For the treatment arm, drivers of ED use were identified by medical record review. Patients and their primary care providers were contacted by phone. Each patient was discussed at a community multidisciplinary meeting where recommendations for ED care were formed. The ED care recommendations were stored in an ED information exchange system that faxed them to the treating ED provider when the patient presented to the ED. The control arm was subjected to treatment as usual. The intervention arm experienced a 34% decrease (incident rate ratios = 0.66, p prescription from the ED relative to the control group. Declines of 43.7%, 53.1%, 52.9%, and 53.1% were observed in the treatment group for morphine milligram equivalents, controlled substance pills, prescriptions, and prescribers, respectively. This RCT showed the effectiveness of a citywide ED care coordination program in reducing ED visits and controlled substance prescribing. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Integrated care coordination by an interprofessional team reduces emergency department visits and hospitalisations at an academic health centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglioti, Anne H; Barlow, Patrick; Thoma, Kate DuChene; Bergus, George R

    2017-09-01

    People with chronic behavioural and physical health conditions have higher healthcare costs and mortality rates than patients with chronic physical conditions alone. As a result, there has been promotion of integrated care for this group. It is important to train primary care residents to practice in integrated models of care with interprofessional teams and to evaluate the effectiveness of integrated care models to promote high-quality care for this at-risk group. We implemented an integrated, interprofessional care management programme for adults with chronic mental and physical health needs as part of a curriculum for family medicine and family medicine psychiatry residents. We then evaluated the clinical effectiveness of this programme by describing participants' healthcare utilisation patterns pre- and post-enrolment. Patients enrolled in the programme were approximately 60-70% less likely to utilise the emergency room and 50% less likely to be admitted to the hospital after enrolment in the programme compared to before enrolment. The odds of individual attendance at outpatient primary care and mental health visits improved after enrolment. In the context of the implementation of integrated behavioural and physical healthcare in primary care, this interprofessional care management programme reduced emergency department utilisation and hospitalisations while improving utilisation of primary care and psychiatry outpatient care. Further studies should focus on replication of this model to further discern the model's cost-savings and health promotion effects.

  3. Urgent Care Facilities: Geographic Variation in Utilization and Charges for Common Lab Tests, Office Visits, and Flu Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Jeff; Okurowski, Eric; Gelburd, Robin; Limpahan, Lorraine; Iny, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The rapid growth of urgent care facilities (UCFs) and other types of convenient care centers has largely been attributed to increasing consumer demand for more convenient and affordable healthcare. UCFs typically treat non-emergency, acute conditions and are increasingly serving as an alternative to "traditional" care settings, such as physician offices and emergency departments (EDs). A study was conducted to characterize geographic variation in both utilization and charges for common lab tests, office visits, and flu vaccines by care settings. Based on claims data from FAIR Health's National Private Insurance Claims (FHNPIC) database, the results suggest that utilization and charge patterns for common procedures vary significantly by care setting across geographic region and over time but the variations are generally small in magnitude. For example, across geographic regions, charges for the flu vaccine are found to be higher when performed in a physician's office in contrast to being performed in a UCF.

  4. A group randomized controlled trial integrating obesity prevention and control for postpartum adolescents in a home visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haire-Joshu, Debra L; Schwarz, Cynthia D; Peskoe, Sarah B; Budd, Elizabeth L; Brownson, Ross C; Joshu, Corinne E

    2015-06-26

    Adolescence represents a critical period for the development of overweight that tracks into adulthood. This risk is significantly heightened for adolescents that become pregnant, many of whom experience postpartum weight retention. The aim of this study was to evaluate Balance Adolescent Lifestyle Activities and Nutrition Choices for Energy (BALANCE), a multicomponent obesity prevention intervention targeting postpartum adolescents participating in a national home visiting child development-parent education program. A group randomized, nested cohort design was used with 1325 adolescents, 694 intervention and 490 control, (mean age = 17.8 years, 52 % underrepresented minorities) located across 30 states. Participatory methods were used to integrate lifestyle behavior change strategies within standard parent education practice. Content targeted replacement of high-risk obesogenic patterns (e.g. sweetened drink and high fat snack consumption, sedentary activity) with positive behaviors (e.g. water intake, fruit and vegetables, increased walking). Parent educators delivered BALANCE through home visits, school based classroom-group meetings, and website activities. Control adolescents received standard child development information. Phase I included baseline to posttest (12 months); Phase II included baseline to follow-up (24 months). When compared to the control group, BALANCE adolescents who were ≥12 weeks postpartum were 89 % more likely (p = 0.02) to maintain a normal BMI or improve an overweight/obese BMI by 12 months; this change was not sustained at 24 months. When compared to the control group, BALANCE adolescents significantly improved fruit and vegetable intake (p = .03). In stratified analyses, water intake improved among younger BALANCE teens (p = .001) and overweight/obese BALANCE teens (p = .05) when compared to control counterparts. There were no significant differences between groups in sweetened drink and snack consumption

  5. Work engagement and attitudes toward caring for dying patients and families among home-visiting nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiro, Sakai; Takashi, Naruse; Satoko, Nagata

    2014-07-01

    Nurses with higher levels of work engagement tend to be highly efficient in their work and more willing to keep working and to provide patient-centred care. However, whether more engaged nurses provide end-of-life care more proactively has not been examined in the home-care setting. This study aimed to examine work engagement among home-visiting nurses in Japan and its relationship with their attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their families. A total of 343 nurses working in 62 agencies across Chiba prefecture, eastern Japan, received an anonymous self-administered questionnaire from July to August 2012. The authors performed multiple regression analysis to explore the relationships between home-visiting nurses' work engagement and attitudes. Data from 184 nurses (53.6%) was analysed. Work engagement was significantly positively related to the nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their families. As more engaged nurses tend to have more positive attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their families, further research is needed to identify the factors that might help nursing managers to enhance their staff's engagement and perhaps thereby improve their attitudes, with the ultimate aim of achieving better outcomes for patients and families.

  6. An evaluation of family-centered care services and organization of visiting policies in Belgian intensive care units: a multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandijck, Dominique M; Labeau, Sonia O; Geerinckx, Cindy E; De Puydt, Ellen; Bolders, Ann C; Claes, Brigitte; Blot, Stijn I

    2010-01-01

    Admission in an intensive care unit (ICU) is a major cause of psychologic stress for the patient and the entire family, and liberalization of visitation has been shown to have a beneficial impact. However, despite the data available, practice has not changed much to incorporate these findings. This study aimed to evaluate the visiting policies of Belgian ICUs. A descriptive multicenter questionnaire survey was prospectively conducted. Fifty-seven ICUs completed the questionnaire (75.0%). All (100%) reported restricted visiting-hour policies, and limited numbers of visitors. Mean total daily visiting time was 69+/-33 minutes. The type of visitors was restricted to only immediate relatives in 11 ICUs (19.3%). Children were not allowed in 5 ICUs (8.8%), and 46 ICUs (80.7%) fixed an age limit for visiting. Thirty ICUs (52.6%) were providing families with information in a special room in addition to the waiting room, whereas 6 (10.5%) reported having no waiting room available, and 9 ICUs (15.8%) provided an information leaflet. A structured first family meeting at time of admission was organized in 42 ICUs (73.7%). A final family meeting at ICU discharge was planned in only 16 centers (28.1%). Participating ICUs homogeneously reported restricted visiting policies regarding visiting hours and type and number of visitors. According to the evidence available, providing a plea for more liberal visitation, these results may be a first step toward reorganization of visiting policies in Belgian ICUs. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Home visit delegation in primary care: acceptability to general practitioners in the state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, Lorena; Sarganas, Giselle; Heintze, Christoph; Braun, Vittoria

    2012-11-01

    Shortages and maldistribution of primary care physicians (PCPs) are affecting many countries today, including in Germany. As has been suggested, the ensuing problems might be alleviated by delegating some medical tasks to physicians' assistants (PAs). This was tried in three regions of the German state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania under a pilot project entitled AGnES (Arztentlastende gemeindenahe E-Health-gestützte Systemische Intervention, i.e., a community-based, e-health-assisted, systemic intervention to reduce physicians' workloads). We conducted a survey of all practicing PCPs in the state to assess their overall attitude toward the delegation of home visit tasks, and to determine what they would prefer as the job description and type of employment contract for a PA who would be hired to assist them. All PCPs practicing in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania were asked in a quantitative survey about their willingness to delegate home visits, their perceived barriers to and benefits of home visit delegation to a qualified assistant, the skills they would require of a PA who would be hired to carry out home visits, and their preferred type of employment contract for the PA. 47% of the PCPs (515/1096) responded to the survey. 46% of the respondents were already informally delegating home visit tasks to qualified PAs. Female PCPs were more likely to do so (odds ratio [OR] 1.70), as were PCPs practicing in rural areas (OR 1.63) and those working in individual practice (OR 1.94). Most PCPs were in favor of delegating home visits to qualified PAs (77%). Main advantages were seen in reducing physicians' workloads (70%) and in increasing their job satisfaction (48%). 34% of PCPs said they would not cover the cost of training PAs. Acceptance of home visit delegation among PCPs in the state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania is high, mainly among the younger physicians. Perceived barriers and benefits of delegation of home visits to qualified PAs should be taken into

  8. Preconception care: preventing and treating infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassi, Zohra S; Imam, Ayesha M; Dean, Sohni V; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2014-09-26

    Infections can impact the reproductive health of women and hence may influence pregnancy related outcomes for both the mother and the child. These infections range from sexually transmitted infections (STIs) to TORCHS infections to periodontal disease to systemic infections and may be transmitted to the fetus during pregnancy, labor, delivery or breastfeeding. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence was conducted to ascertain the possible impact of preconception care for adolescents, women and couples of reproductive age on MNCH outcomes. A comprehensive strategy was used to search electronic reference libraries, and both observational and clinical controlled trials were included. Cross-referencing and a separate search strategy for each preconception risk and intervention ensured wider study capture. Preconception behavioral interventions significantly declines re-infection or new STI rates by 35% (95% CI: 20-47%). Further, condom use has been shown to be the most effective way to prevent HIV infection (85% protection in prospective studies) through sexual intercourse. Intervention trials showed that preconception vaccination against tetanus averted a significant number of neonatal deaths (including those specifically due to tetanus) when compared to placebo in women receiving more than 1 dose of the vaccine (OR 0.28; 95% CI: 0.15-0.52); (OR 0.02; 95% CI: 0.00-0.28) respectively. Preconception counseling should be offered to women of reproductive age as soon as they test HIV-positive, and conversely women of reproductive age should be screened with their partners before pregnancy. Risk assessment, screening, and treatment for specific infections should be a component of preconception care because there is convincing evidence that treatment of these infections before pregnancy prevents neonatal infections.

  9. Help-seeking behavior of patients with mental health problems visiting a tertiary care center in north India

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Nitin; Nagpal, Sajanjiv Singh; Chadda, Rakesh K.; Sood, Mamta

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients with mental health problems in the nonwestern world seek help from a variety of sources, such as the family physicians, psychiatrists, psychologists, traditional faith-healers, or alternative medicine practitioners. Understanding the help-seeking behavior is important from the public health perspective. Materials and Methods: Two hundred new patients visiting a psychiatric outpatient service at a tertiary care hospital were interviewed on a semi-structured questionnaire f...

  10. Health care and social service professionals' perceptions of a home-visit program for young, first-time mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-A. Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little is known about health care and social service professionals' perspective on the acceptability of long-term home-visit programs serving low-income, first-time mothers. This study describes the experiences and perspectives of these community care providers involved with program referrals or service delivery to mothers who participated in the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP, a targeted nurse home-visit program. Methods: The study included two phases. Phase I was a secondary qualitative data analysis used to analyze a purposeful sample of 24 individual interviews of community care providers. This was part of a larger case study examining adaptations required to increase acceptability of the NFP in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. In Phase II (n = 4, themes identified from Phase I were further explored through individual, semi-structured interviews with community health care and social service providers, giving qualitative description. Results: Overall, the NFP was viewed as addressing an important service gap for first-time mothers. Providers suggested that frequent communication between the NFP and community agencies serving these mothers could help improve the referral process, avoid service duplication, and streamline the flow of service access. The findings can help determine key components required to enhance the success of integrating a home-visit program into an existing network of community services. Conclusion: The function of home-visit programs should not be viewed in isolation. Rather, their potential can be maximized when they collaborate and share information with other agencies to provide better services for first-time mothers.

  11. Mobile phone messaging for preventive health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodopivec-Jamsek, Vlasta; de Jongh, Thyra; Gurol-Urganci, Ipek; Atun, Rifat; Car, Josip

    2012-12-12

    Preventive health care promotes health and prevents disease or injuries by addressing factors that lead to the onset of a disease, and by detecting latent conditions to reduce or halt their progression. Many risk factors for costly and disabling conditions (such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, and chronic respiratory diseases) can be prevented, yet healthcare systems do not make the best use of their available resources to support this process. Mobile phone messaging applications, such as Short Message Service (SMS) and Multimedia Message Service (MMS), could offer a convenient and cost-effective way to support desirable health behaviours for preventive health care. To assess the effects of mobile phone messaging interventions as a mode of delivery for preventive health care, on health status and health behaviour outcomes. We searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 2), MEDLINE (OvidSP) (January 1993 to June 2009), EMBASE (OvidSP) (January 1993 to June 2009), PsycINFO (OvidSP) (January 1993 to June 2009), CINAHL (EbscoHOST) (January 1993 to June 2009), LILACS (January 1993 to June 2009) and African Health Anthology (January 1993 to June 2009).We also reviewed grey literature (including trial registers) and reference lists of articles. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised controlled trials (QRCTs), controlled before-after (CBA) studies, and interrupted time series (ITS) studies with at least three time points before and after the intervention. We included studies using SMS or MMS as a mode of delivery for any type of preventive health care. We only included studies in which it was possible to assess the effects of mobile phone messaging independent of other technologies or interventions. Two review authors independently assessed all studies against the inclusion criteria, with any disagreements resolved by a third review author. Study design features

  12. The Home Care Crew Scheduling Problem: Preference-based visit clustering and temporal dependencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Matias Sevel; Justesen, Tor Fog; Dohn, Anders Høeg

    2012-01-01

    branch-and-price solution algorithm, as this method has previously given solid results for classical vehicle routing problems. Temporal dependencies are modelled as generalised precedence constraints and enforced through the branching. We introduce a novel visit clustering approach based on the soft...

  13. The role of the visiting doctor in primary care clinics | Couper | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... not serve their purpose. Recommendations to optimise the role of the visiting doctor, which emerged from the groups, included the involvement of administrators to address some of the constraints, orientation and training of doctors, developing respect as a basis for teamwork, and ensuring networking and co-ordination.

  14. Emancipatory practices of nurses in primary health care: the home visit as an instrument of health needs assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Maria Sivalli Campos

    Full Text Available Objective Identify nurses’ emancipatory practices in primary care, to contribute to the improvement of health care. Method A case study type social research of qualitative nature, in which nurses of a primary health care service unit in São Paulo were interviewed. Results The home visit was identified as a nursing practice possible to be expanded in order to identify social determinants of health, triggering emancipatory practices in the service. This expansion occurred because the design of health care labour intended by the service team changed its focus from the traditional object of health services, the disease. Conclusion First, it is advocated that social policies lead projects with the purpose of improving health needs. On the other hand, the daily labour needs to provide opportunities for reflection and discussion of healthcare projects, leading workers to propose labour-processes targeted to both the social determinants of health and people’s illness.

  15. Emancipatory practices of nurses in primary health care: the home visit as an instrument of health needs assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Maria Sivalli Campos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective Identify nurses’ emancipatory practices in primary care, to contribute to the improvement of health care. Method A case study type social research of qualitative nature, in which nurses of a primary health care service unit in São Paulo were interviewed. Results The home visit was identified as a nursing practice possible to be expanded in order to identify social determinants of health, triggering emancipatory practices in the service. This expansion occurred because the design of health care labour intended by the service team changed its focus from the traditional object of health services, the disease. Conclusion First, it is advocated that social policies lead projects with the purpose of improving health needs. On the other hand, the daily labour needs to provide opportunities for reflection and discussion of healthcare projects, leading workers to propose labour-processes targeted to both the social determinants of health and people’s illness.

  16. Development of STEADI: a fall prevention resource for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Judy A; Phelan, Elizabeth A

    2013-09-01

    Falls among people aged ≥65 years are the leading cause of both injury deaths and emergency department visits for trauma. Research shows that many falls are preventable. In the clinical setting, an effective fall intervention involves assessing and addressing an individual's fall risk factors. This individualized approach is recommended in the American and British Geriatrics Societies' (AGS/BGS) practice guideline. This article describes the development of STEADI (Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries), a fall prevention tool kit that contains an array of health care provider resources for assessing and addressing fall risk in clinical settings. As researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Injury Center, we reviewed relevant literature and conducted in-depth interviews with health care providers to determine current knowledge and practices related to older adult fall prevention. We developed draft resources based on the AGS/BGS guideline, incorporated provider input, and addressed identified knowledge and practice gaps. Draft resources were reviewed by six focus groups of health care providers and revised. The completed STEADI tool kit, Preventing Falls in Older Patients-A Provider Tool Kit, is designed to help health care providers incorporate fall risk assessment and individualized fall interventions into routine clinical practice and to link clinical care with community-based fall prevention programs.

  17. How Well Is CHIP Addressing Primary and Preventive Care Needs and Access for Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kimberly V; Dye, Claire

    2015-01-01

    To examine differences in primary care outcomes under the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) compared to private coverage and being uninsured in 10 states. We used data from a survey of parents of recent and established CHIP enrollees conducted from January 2012 through March 2013. We compared the primary care experiences of established CHIP enrollees to the preenrollment experiences of previously uninsured and privately insured recent CHIP enrollees to estimate differences in care outcomes. Parents of 4142 recent enrollees and 5518 established enrollees responded to the survey (response rates were 46% for recent enrollees and 51% for established enrollees). Compared to being uninsured, CHIP enrollees were more likely to have a well-child visit, receive a range of preventive care services, and have patient-centered care experiences. They were also more likely than uninsured children to have a regular source of care or provider, an easy time making appointments, and shorter wait times for those appointments. Relative to privately insured children, CHIP enrollees received preventive care services at similar rates and to be more likely to receive effective care coordination services. However, CHIP enrollees were less likely than privately insured children to have a regular source of care or provider and nighttime and weekend access to a usual source of care. CHIP continues to provide high levels of access to primary care, especially compared to uninsured children, and to provide benefits comparable to private insurance. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. All rights reserved.

  18. The Association Between Antihypertensive Medication Nonadherence and Visit-to-Visit Variability of Blood Pressure: Findings From the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronish, Ian M; Lynch, Amy I; Oparil, Suzanne; Whittle, Jeff; Davis, Barry R; Simpson, Lara M; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Cushman, William C; Chang, Tara I; Muntner, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Low adherence to antihypertensive medication has been hypothesized to increase visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of blood pressure (BP). We assessed the association between antihypertensive medication adherence and VVV of BP in the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT). VVV of BP was calculated using SD independent of mean, SD, and average real variability across study visits conducted 6 to 28 months after randomization. Participants who reported taking heart disease or nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, or mortality risk. In conclusion, improving medication adherence may lower VVV of BP. However, VVV of BP is associated with cardiovascular outcomes independent of medication adherence. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Does participation in preventive child health care at the general practitioner minimise social differences in the use of specialist care outside the hospital system?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mårtensson, Solvej; Hansen, KH; Olsen, KR

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The primary purposes of preventive child health care in Denmark are to help ensure a healthy childhood and to create preconditions for a healthy adult life. The aim of this study is to examine whether participation in age-appropriate preventative child health care affects...... the association between the socioeconomic position of the family and subsequent use of specialised health care outside the hospital system. METHODS: The study population was children born in 1999 and living in Denmark between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2006 (n=68,366). The study investigated whether...... was listed. RESULTS: If the children attended any preventive child health care visits, they had the same probability of contact with a specialist regardless of the parents' income. However, children from low-income families not participating in any preventive care had a lower probability of contact...

  20. Capacity utilization and the cost of primary care visits: Implications for the costs of scaling up health interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johns Benjamin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective A great deal of international attention has been focussed recently on how much additional funding is required to scale up health interventions to meet global targets such as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs. Most of the cost estimates that have been made in response have assumed that unit costs of delivering services will not change as coverage increases or as more and more interventions are delivered together. This is most unlikely. The main objective of this paper is to measure the impact of patient load on the cost per visit at primary health care facilities and the extent to which this would influence estimates of the costs and financial requirements to scale up interventions. Methods Multivariate regression analysis was used to explore the determinants of variability in unit costs using data for 44 countries with a total of 984 observations. Findings Controlling for other possible determinants, we find that the cost of an outpatient visit is very sensitive to the number of patients seen by providers each day at primary care facilities. Each 1% increase in patient through-put results, on average, in a 27% reduction in the cost per visit (p Conclusion Variability in capacity utilization, therefore, need to be taken into account in cost estimates, and the paper develops a method by which this can be done.

  1. The challenge of tetradic relationships in medically interpreted pediatric primary care visits: A descriptive study of communication practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, C A; Escobar-Gomez, M; Davis, B H; Roberts, J R; O'Brien, E S; Hinton, E; Darden, P M

    2016-04-01

    To examine spoken interactions between pediatricians and community-based interpreters speaking with adolescents and parents with Limited English proficiency (LEP) in primary care to identify the challenges of interpreting in a four-person or tetradic visit, its sources of co-constructed errors, and specific practices for educational intervention. As part of a larger study of vaccine decision-making at six clinical sites in two states, this descriptive study used discourse analysis to examine 20 routine primary care visits in a Latino Clinic in interactions between adolescents, parents, community-based interpreters, and pediatricians. Specific patterns of communication practices were identified that contributed to inaccuracies in medical interpretation Practices needing improvement were tallied for simple frequencies and included: omissions; false fluency; substitutions; editorializing; added clarification, information, or questions; medical terminology; extra explanation to mother; and, cultural additions. Of these speaking practices, omissions were the most common (123 out of 292 total) and the most affected by pediatricians. The dynamics of both pediatricians and interpreters contributed to identification of areas for improvement, with more adolescent participation in bilingual than monolingual visits. These observations provide opportunities for mapping a communication skills training intervention based on observations for future testing of an evidence-based curriculum. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Factors associated with preventive care practice among adults with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Hon K

    2012-04-01

    Adherence to annual preventive care (foot, eye, and dental examinations) in this group of study participants with diabetes (n=253) was suboptimal. Participants were 2.6-5.8 times more likely to have a specific preventive care in the past 12 months if they were told to do so by a health care professional. Copyright © 2011 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Health literacy: varying relations with control over care and number of GP visits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, I. van der; Heijmans, M.; Schuit, A.J.; Uiters, E.; Rademakers, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In chronic care, patients are expected to exert a certain degree of control over the care for their condition, for instance by fulfilling care tasks in their home environment. Health literacy is considered relevant in this regard, especially critical health literacy. The aim of this

  4. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Behavioral Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TM Help Prevent Errors in Your Care Behavioral Health Care To prevent health care errors, patients are urged to... SpeakUP TM Service ... individuals should be involved in their own behavioral health care. These efforts to increase consumer awareness and involvement ...

  5. Association between complementary and alternative medicine use, preventive care practices, and use of conventional medical services among adults with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrow, Donald; Egede, Leonard E

    2006-01-01

    To assess the association between complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use, preventive care practices, and use of conventional medical services among adults with diabetes. We analyzed data on 2,474 adults with diabetes. We created an overall CAM-use category based on use of any of the following: diets, herbs, chiropractic care, yoga, relaxation, acupuncture, ayuverda, biofeedback, chelation, energy healing, Reiki therapy, hypnosis, massage, naturopathy, and homeopathy. We used multiple logistic regression to assess the effect of CAM use on preventive care practices (receipt of influenza and pneumonia vaccines) and use of conventional medical services (number of primary care and emergency department visits). STATA was used for statistical analysis to account for the complex survey design. A total of 48% of adults with diabetes used some form of CAM. CAM use was independently associated with receipt of pneumonia vaccination (odds ratio 1.56 [95% CI 1.26-1.94]) but not significantly associated with receipt of influenza vaccination (1.17 [0.92-1.48]). CAM use was independently associated with visiting the emergency department (1.34 [1.06-1.70]), having six or more primary care visits (1.44 [1.14-1.83]), and having eight or more primary care visits (1.66 [1.22-2.25]). In contrast to the findings of previous studies, CAM use appears to be associated with increased likelihood of receipt of preventive care services and increased emergency department and primary care visits. CAM use may not be a barrier to use of conventional medical services in adults with diabetes.

  6. Characteristics of workplace violence prevention training and violent events among home health and hospice care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladutiu, Catherine J; Casteel, Carri; Nocera, Maryalice; Harrison, Robert; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    In the rapidly growing home health and hospice industry, little is known about workplace violence prevention (WVP) training and violent events. We examined the characteristics of WVP training and estimated violent event rates among 191 home health and hospice care providers from six agencies in California. Training characteristics were identified from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines. Rates were estimated as the number of violent events divided by the total number of home visit hours. Between 2008 and 2009, 66.5% (n = 127) of providers reported receiving WVP training when newly hired or as recurrent training. On average, providers rated the quality of their training as 5.7 (1 = poor to 10 = excellent). Among all providers, there was an overall rate of 17.1 violent events per 1,000 visit-hours. Efforts to increase the number of home health care workers who receive WVP training and to improve training quality are needed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Direct and indirect patient costs of dermatology clinic visits and their impact on access to care and provider preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, Brooke E; Gonzalez, Jessica; Cunningham, Kiera; Saraiya, Ami; Dornelles, Adriana C; Nguyen, Bichchau M

    2017-12-01

    The direct and indirect costs of dermatology clinic visits are infrequently quantified. Indirect costs, such as the time spent traveling to and from appointments and the value of lost earnings from time away from work, are substantial costs that often are not included in economic analyses but may pose barriers to receiving care. Due to the national shortage of dermatologists, patients may have to wait longer for appointments or travel further to see dermatologists outside of their local community, resulting in high time and travel costs for patients. Patients' lost time and earnings comprise the opportunity cost of obtaining care. A monetary value for this opportunity cost can be calculated by multiplying a patient's hourly wage by the number of hours that the patient dedicated to attending the dermatology appointment. Using a single institution survey, this study quantified the direct and indirect patient costs, including opportunity costs and time burden, associated with dermatology clinic visits to better appreciate the impact of these factors on health care access and dermatologic provider preference.

  8. Activating older adults with serious mental illness for collaborative primary care visits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, S.J.; Aschbrenner, K.A.; Rolin, S.A.; Hendrick, D.C.; Naslund, J.A.; Faber, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Persons with serious mental illness frequently receive inadequate medical care and are more likely to experience difficulty navigating the health care system compared with the general population. To address this gap in quality, we developed a program of peer co-led collaborative

  9. Pain as a reason for primary care visits: Cross-sectional survey in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The median pain score was eight on a scale of 0-10 (interquartile range: 6-8). Respondents experienced limitations in a number of activities of daily living as a result of pain. Conclusion: Pain is a central problem in public primary care settings in the EC Province and must therefore be a priority area for primary care research.

  10. Managed care, consumerism, preventive medicine: does a causal connection exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, John A; Xie, Yang

    2006-07-01

    Managed care plans, and HMOs in particular, have long touted that their emphasis is on preventive care, to avoid expensive illness later in life. However, few articles in the contemporary literature adequately address this claim. The available evidence seems to support that HMOs do, in fact, provide greater access to preventive services, but the limitations of this research are substantial. This article discusses the scientific evidence on the relationships between managed care arrangements and the implications for preventive care in the current era, emphasizing consumer choices and less-restrictive plan structures.

  11. Comparison of preventive care in Medicaid managed care and Medicaid fee for service in institutions and private practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, G; Hanson, K L; Butts, G C; Friedman, S

    2001-01-01

    To compare preventive screening for children in Medicaid managed care (MMC) with children in Medicaid fee for service (M-FFS) in private and institutional settings. The sample included randomly selected institutions and private practice physicians in New York City. Within setting, children in MMC and M-FFS were sampled randomly and charts reviewed for immunizations and lead and anemia screening. In both institutions and private practices, children enrolled in MMC appeared more likely to be up-to-date than their M-FFS counterparts for immunizations (institution, P private practice, P institution, P private practice, P institution, P private practice, P private physicians. When considering 10 different attributes of managed care plans, no clear pattern of association with better preventive care services was observed. The positive effect of managed care on preventive care services was largely explained by more visits and longer follow-up time; however, there were differences between institutions and private practices, with enrollment in MMC associated with some positive effect on screenings in private practices.

  12. Differentiating clinical care from disease prevention: a prerequisite for practicing quaternary prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Dalcanale Tesser

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article contends that the distinction between clinical care (illness and prevention of future disease is essential to the practice of quaternary prevention. The authors argue that the ongoing entanglement of clinical care and prevention transforms healthy into "sick" people through changes in disease classification criteria and/or cut-off points for defining high-risk states. This diverts health care resources away from those in need of care and increases the risk of iatrogenic harm in healthy people. The distinction in focus is based on: (a management of uncertainty (more flexible when caring for ill persons; (b guarantee of benefit (required only in prevention; (c harm tolerance (nil or minimal in prevention. This implies attitudinal differences in the decision-making process: greater skepticism, scientism and resistance towards preventive action. These should be based on high-quality scientific evidence of end-outcomes that displays a net positive harm/benefit ratio.

  13. Age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing care are critical factors in home care for malignant diseases; a retrospective study involving 346 patients in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background We aimed to clarify the factors affecting outcomes of home care for patients with malignant diseases. Methods Of 607 patients who were treated in 10 clinics specialized in home care between January and December 2007 at Chiba, Fukuoka, Iwate, Kagoshima, Tochigi and Tokyo prefectures across Japan, 346 (57%; 145 men and 201 women) had malignant diseases. We collected information on medical and social backgrounds, details of home care, and its outcomes based on their medical records. Results Median age of the patients was 77 years (range, 11-102), and 335 patients were economically self-sufficient. Their general condition was poor; advanced cancer (n = 308), performance status of 3-4 (n = 261), and dementia (n = 121). At the beginning of home care, 143 patients and 174 family members expressed their wish to die at home. All the patients received supportive treatments including fluid replacement and oxygenation. Median duration of home care was 47 days (range, 0-2,712). 224 patients died at home. For the remaining 122, home care was terminated due to complications (n = 109), change of attending physicians (n = 8), and others (n = 5). The factors which inhibited the continuity of home care were the non-use of home-visit nursing care (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.00, p = 0.03), the fact that the patients themselves do not wish to die at home (HR = 1.83, CI: 1.09-3.07, p = 0.02), women (HR = 1.81, CI: 1.11-2.94, p = 0.02), and age (HR = 0.98, CI: 0.97-1.00, p = 0.02). Conclusions Continuation of home care is influenced by patients' age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing. PMID:22044683

  14. Age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing care are critical factors in home care for malignant diseases; a retrospective study involving 346 patients in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodama Yuko

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to clarify the factors affecting outcomes of home care for patients with malignant diseases. Methods Of 607 patients who were treated in 10 clinics specialized in home care between January and December 2007 at Chiba, Fukuoka, Iwate, Kagoshima, Tochigi and Tokyo prefectures across Japan, 346 (57%; 145 men and 201 women had malignant diseases. We collected information on medical and social backgrounds, details of home care, and its outcomes based on their medical records. Results Median age of the patients was 77 years (range, 11-102, and 335 patients were economically self-sufficient. Their general condition was poor; advanced cancer (n = 308, performance status of 3-4 (n = 261, and dementia (n = 121. At the beginning of home care, 143 patients and 174 family members expressed their wish to die at home. All the patients received supportive treatments including fluid replacement and oxygenation. Median duration of home care was 47 days (range, 0-2,712. 224 patients died at home. For the remaining 122, home care was terminated due to complications (n = 109, change of attending physicians (n = 8, and others (n = 5. The factors which inhibited the continuity of home care were the non-use of home-visit nursing care (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.00, p = 0.03, the fact that the patients themselves do not wish to die at home (HR = 1.83, CI: 1.09-3.07, p = 0.02, women (HR = 1.81, CI: 1.11-2.94, p = 0.02, and age (HR = 0.98, CI: 0.97-1.00, p = 0.02. Conclusions Continuation of home care is influenced by patients' age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing.

  15. Preventive Dental Care in Older Adults with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chan; Sambamoorthi, Nethra; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between poor oral health and diabetes is well documented. Therefore, preventive oral health is strongly indicated for individuals with diabetes. The purposes of this study were 1) to determine if there were a difference in preventive dental care utilization among older adults with diabetes from 2002 and 2011, and 2) to compare preventive dental care utilization of older adults with and without diabetes from 2002 and 2011. Methods The data were from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey. The sample included older, fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries (ages 65 years and above). The key outcome was self-reported preventive dental care. In 2002, there were 8,725 participants; in 2011, there were 7,425 participants. Chi square and logistic regressions were conducted. Results In 2002, 28.8 % of participants with diabetes had preventive dental care. In 2011, this percentage increased to 36.0%. Similar results were seen among individuals without diabetes (42.9% in 2002 and 45.5% in 2011). The increase in preventive dental care was statistically significant for individuals with and without diabetes. The participants with diabetes, as compared with participants without diabetes, remained statistically less likely to have preventive dental care in adjusted logistic regression analysis with and without considering the interaction between observation year and diabetes (adjusted odds ratios= 0.73, and 0.86, respectively). Conclusion While the increase in preventive dental care is welcoming, older adults with diabetes continue to have significant preventive dental care need. Practical Implication Additional efforts are needed to encourage individuals with diabetes to obtain preventive dental care. PMID:27189741

  16. Effectiveness and Safety of an Extended ICU Visitation Model for Delirium Prevention: A Before and After Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Regis Goulart; Tonietto, Tulio Frederico; da Silva, Daiana Barbosa; Gutierres, Franciele Aparecida; Ascoli, Aline Maria; Madeira, Laura Cordeiro; Rutzen, William; Falavigna, Maicon; Robinson, Caroline Cabral; Salluh, Jorge Ibrain; Cavalcanti, Alexandre Biasi; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar; Cremonese, Rafael Viegas; Haack, Tarissa Ribeiro; Eugênio, Cláudia Severgnini; Dornelles, Aline; Bessel, Marina; Teles, José Mario Meira; Skrobik, Yoanna; Teixeira, Cassiano

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of an extended visitation model compared with a restricted visitation model on the occurrence of delirium among ICU patients. Prospective single-center before and after study. Thirty-one-bed medical-surgical ICU. All patients greater than or equal to 18 years old with expected length of stay greater than or equal to 24 hours consecutively admitted to the ICU from May 2015 to November 2015. Change of visitation policy from a restricted visitation model (4.5 hr/d) to an extended visitation model (12 hr/d). Two hundred eighty-six patients were enrolled (141 restricted visitation model, 145 extended visitation model). The primary outcome was the cumulative incidence of delirium, assessed bid using the confusion assessment method for the ICU. Predefined secondary outcomes included duration of delirium/coma; any ICU-acquired infection; ICU-acquired bloodstream infection, pneumonia, and urinary tract infection; all-cause ICU mortality; and length of ICU stay. The median duration of visits increased from 133 minutes (interquartile range, 97.7-162.0) in restricted visitation model to 245 minutes (interquartile range, 175.0-272.0) in extended visitation model (p interquartile range, 1.0-3.0] vs 3.0 d [interquartile range, 2.5-5.0]; p = 0.03) and ICU stay (3.0 d [interquartile range, 2.0-4.0] vs 4.0 d [interquartile range, 2.0-6.0]; p = 0.04). The rate of ICU-acquired infections and all-cause ICU mortality did not differ significantly between the two study groups. In this medical-surgical ICU, an extended visitation model was associated with reduced occurrence of delirium and shorter length of delirium/coma and ICU stay.

  17. Forecasting emergency department visits using internet data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, Andreas; Kurland, Lisa; Farrokhnia, Nasim; Castrén, Maaret; Nordberg, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Using Internet data to forecast emergency department (ED) visits might enable a model that reflects behavioral trends and thereby be a valid tool for health care providers with which to allocate resources and prevent crowding. The aim of this study is to investigate whether Web site visits to a regional medical Web site, the Stockholm Health Care Guide, a proxy for the general public's concern of their health, could be used to predict the ED attendance for the coming day. In a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study, a model for forecasting the daily number of ED visits was derived and validated. The model was derived through regression analysis, using visits to the Stockholm Health Care Guide Web site between 6 pm and midnight and day of the week as independent variables. Web site visits were measured with Google Analytics. The number of visits to the ED within the region was retrieved from the Stockholm County Council administrative database. All types of ED visits (including adult, pediatric, and gynecologic) were included. The period of August 13, 2011, to August 12, 2012, was used as a training set for the model. The hourly variation of visits was analyzed for both Web site and the ED visits to determine the interval of hours to be used for the prediction. The model was validated with mean absolute percentage error for August 13, 2012, to October 31, 2012. The correlation between the number of Web site visits between 6 pm and midnight and ED visits the coming day was significant (r=0.77; PInternet data to predict ED visits is promising. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Association between home-visit nursing utilization and all-cause hospitalization among long-term care insurance beneficiaries: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yeong Jun; Lee, Hyo Jung; Kim, Woorim; Lee, Sang Ah; Han, Kyu-Tae; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2017-10-01

    Ensuring and improving long-term care services that use limited healthcare resources more efficiently is a major concern for many aging societies. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between use of home-visit nursing services and all-cause hospitalization in a home-visit nursing-recommended group. A retrospective cohort study. Population-based sample of long-term care insurance beneficiaries from the long-term care insurance 2002-2013 claims database in South Korea. Long-term care insurance beneficiaries who need one or more types of nursing care were defined as the home-visit nursing -recommended group (n=4173). The dependent variable in this study was all-cause hospitalization in the home-visit nursing-recommended population. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to identify the association between home-visit nursing service use and all-cause hospitalization. A total of 3.8% of the subjects used home-visit nursing services. When participants who used home-visit nursing services were set as the reference group, participants who did not use home-visit nursing services had a higher risk of hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR]=1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.07-1.47). Additionally, participants who did not use home-visit nursing services and who did not have a caregiver showed a marked increase in the risk of hospitalization (HR=6.81, 95% CI=1.17-39.66). Participants who did not use home-visit nursing services with greater comorbidity showed a considerable increase in risk of hospitalization (HR=1.36, 95% CI=1.09-1.70). Non-use of home-visit nursing services was associated with an increased risk of all-cause hospitalization in the home-visit nursing-recommended population. The present results suggest that the use of home-visit nursing services reduced the risk of hospitalization. Moreover, home-visit nursing may play an essential role in reducing hospitalization risk in the absence of caregiver support. Copyright

  19. One of the Best Friends I Ever Had: An In-Depth Study of a Teen Parent Home Visiting Program for Ounce of Prevention Fund Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godley, Susan Harrington

    This report describes a qualitative research study of an Ounce of Prevention Fund (OPF) teenage parent home visiting program located in an Illinois county with a population of 125,000. The sample consisted of 28 present and former program participants, most of whom had never been married, ages 15 to 24. Sixty percent had one child; the remainder…

  20. Are acceptance rates of a national preventive home visit programme for older people socially imbalanced?: a cross sectional study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Yukari; Ekmann, Anette Addy; Nilsson, Charlotte Juul

    2012-01-01

    Preventive home visits are offered to community dwelling older people in Denmark aimed at maintaining their functional ability for as long as possible, but only two thirds of older people accept the offer from the municipalities. The purpose of this study is to investigate 1) whether socioeconomi...

  1. Evaluation of the use of health care services for non-communicable disease and prevention by children and adolescents in south Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascione, Flora; Cascone, Diana; Napolitano, Francesco; Di Giuseppe, Gabriella

    2017-08-04

    The objectives of this investigation are to evaluate the use of health care services for non-communicable disease and prevention by children and adolescents and to identify the factors linked to the use of health care services. This cross-sectional survey was conducted between December 2014 and January 2015 among 1198 parents of students aged between 5 and 18 years attending 12 selected schools in the geographic area of Salerno and Naples, Italy, using a self-administered questionnarie. 68.2% of parents stated that had visited their general practitioner (GP) or family pediatrician (FP) with their child in the last year. 66.2% of children had had at least one visit to a specialist and more than half (54.8%) had had preventive care visits in the last year. The use of preventive care visits within last year was significantly higher amongst female, among those who had visited their GP or FP and among those who had a parent with a college degree or higher. The proportion of emergency department visits and hospital admissions reported were 12.8% and 4.7% respectively. This results highlights the need of educational interventions for parents and adolescents in order to increase the utilization of preventive health services.

  2. Erythrocyte Alloimmunization and Autoimmunization among Blood Donors and Recipients visiting a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Daljit; Bains, Lovenish; Kandwal, Manoj; Parmar, Indu

    2017-03-01

    The ultimate aim of pretransfusion testing is the acceptable survival of donor red cells in recipient's body and antibody detection plays a critical role in achieving the same. The cornerstone of antibody detection method is detecting an unexpected antibody as against the expected antibodies of ABO blood group system. Autoantibodies can also interfere with the detection of clinically significant alloantibodies. To study the frequency of alloantibodies and autoantibodies in the healthy blood donors and patient population visiting our hospital. The Column Agglutination Technology (CAT) was used for ABO RhD blood grouping, Direct Antiglobulin Test (DAT), Autocontrol (AC), Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT) and red cell antibody screening and the unexpected reactions in any of these tests were recorded for further evaluation. Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic Acid (EDTA) blood samples were used for all these tests for both blood donors and admitted patients. The CAT was exercised for the blood grouping (using ABD-Reverse Diluent cassettes) and antibody screening (using 0.8% Surgiscreen, Ortho Clinical Diagnostics Limited, USA and Low Ionic Strength Saline Ortho BLISS with AHG cassettes) on the automated immunohaematology platform ORTHO AutoVue ® Innova system (Ortho Clinical Diagnostics Limited, USA). Among all blood donors (n=6350), seven (0.11%) donors had showed unexpected reaction. Of these, four had positive antibody screen (three having naturally occuring antibodies 2=anti-M, 1=anti-Le a and 1=inconclusive) and the other three had positive DAT. Of all the patient samples (n=6136) screened for irregular red cell antibodies, four (0.06%) patients were found to have unexpected reaction revealing one (0.02%) with anti-M antibody and the other three (0.05%) had autoantibodies in their serum. The combined prevalence for both blood donor and recipient population (n=12,486) was found to be 0.11% at our center. The alloimmunisation among patient population was found to be

  3. Large discrepancy between prehospital visitation to mobile emergency care unit and discharge diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Christine Puck; Wichmann, Sine; Nielsen, Søren Loumann

    2012-01-01

    In Copenhagen, Denmark, patients in need of prehospital emergency assistance dial 112 and may then receive evaluation and treatment by physicians (from the Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU)). ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a severe condition leaving only a limited time frame to del...

  4. [The motivation of patients to visit private stomatology institutions for the orthopedic stomatological care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustov, I N

    2010-01-01

    The article deals with the results of sociological survey of patients concerning the motivation of their appealability to private stomatology institutions for the orthopedic stomatological care. The survey data includes the information needed for planning functioning and management of orthopedic stomatological service.

  5. Large discrepancy between prehospital visitation to mobile emergency care unit and discharge diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Christine Puck; Wichmann, Sine; Nielsen, Søren Loumann

    2012-01-01

    In Copenhagen, Denmark, patients in need of prehospital emergency assistance dial 112 and may then receive evaluation and treatment by physicians (from the Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU)). ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a severe condition leaving only a limited time frame...

  6. Preventive health care of Pony Club horses in rural New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, P; Buckley, D; Coleman, G T; Morton, J M

    2016-08-01

    To describe preventive health care provided to a cohort of Pony Club horses in rural New South Wales, Australia, and the associated veterinary involvement. Prospective longitudinal study Observational data collected for 48 Pony Club horses using daily owner-kept diaries and monthly veterinary visits for 9-12 months. Frequency of healthcare events varied markedly between the horses; 54% of horses received 5 or more foot-care treatments, 69% received 1-3 anthelmintic treatments, 40% received dental care, 21% received chiropractic care; only 8% were vaccinated. Farriers and owners administered most of the health care. Veterinarians were infrequently involved, administering 2 of the 111 anthelmintic administrations and 2 of the 244 foot-care treatments. No annual health checks or prepurchase examinations were recorded. All dental care was provided by non-veterinary dentists. Horse turnover appeared quick, with 54% of horses acquired within the previous 12 months. The majority of preventive health care was provided by farriers and the owners themselves. The type and frequency of healthcare events varied markedly and most commonly involved foot care and anthelmintic administration. The reasons for the lack of veterinary involvement are unclear. Veterinarians engaging with Pony Club families in a preventive context would likely bring health benefits to this population of horses. This may require adaptation of existing veterinary services to meet the demands of this unique population of horses and young riders. Furthermore, epidemiological studies are required to describe the effects of various preventive healthcare interventions on subsequent and long-term horse health. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  7. Use of healthcare information and advice among non-urgent patients visiting emergency department or primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, Ann-Sofie; Lagerlund, Magdalena; Svensson, Tobias; Blomqvist, Paul; Adami, Johanna

    2012-12-01

    Healthcare information provided by telephone service and internet sources is growing but has not been shown to reduce inappropriate emergency department (ED) visits. To describe the use of advice or healthcare information among patients with non-urgent illnesses seeking care before attendance at an ED, or primary care (PC) centres in an urban region in Sweden. Patients with non-urgent illnesses seeking care at an ED or patients attending the PC were followed up with a combination of patient interviews, a questionnaire to the treating physician and a prospective follow-up of healthcare use through a population-based registry. Half of the non-urgent patients attending the ED had used healthcare information or advice before the visit, mainly from a healthcare professional source. In PC, men were more likely to have used information or advice compared with women (OR 2.5 95% CI 1.3 to 5.0), whereas the situation was reversed among ED patients (OR=0.4 95% CI 0.2 to 0.9). Men with no previous healthcare experience attending the ED had the lowest use of healthcare information (pinformation on the internet in a case of perceived emergency. ED patients rated as non-urgent by the triage nurse used more advice and healthcare information than PC patients, irrespective of the physician-rated urgency of the symptoms. The problem seems not to be lack of information about appropriate ED use, but to find ways to direct the information to the right target group.

  8. Effect of nurse home visits vs. usual care on reducing intimate partner violence in young high-risk pregnant women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Mejdoubi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expectant mothers and mothers of young children are especially vulnerable to intimate partner violence (IPV. The nurse-family partnership (NFP is a home visitation program in the United States effective for the prevention of adverse child health outcomes. Evidence regarding the effect of nurse home visiting on IPV is inconsistent. This study aims to study the effect of VoorZorg, the Dutch NFP, on IPV. METHODS: A random sample of 460 eligible disadvantaged women <26 years, with no previous live births, was randomized. Women in the control group (C; n=223 received usual care; women in the intervention group (I; n=237 received usual care plus nurse home visits periodically during pregnancy and until the child's second birthday. RESULTS: At 32 weeks of pregnancy, women in the intervention group self-reported significantly less IPV victimization than women in the control group in: level 2 psychological aggression (C: 56% vs. I: 39%, physical assault level 1 (C: 58% vs. I: 40% and level 2 (C: 31% vs. I: 20%, and level 1 sexual coercion (C: 16% vs. I: 8%. Furthermore, women in the intervention group reported significantly less IPV perpetration in: level 2 psychological aggression (C: 60% vs. I: 46%, level 1 physical assault (C: 65% vs. I: 52%, and level 1 injury (C: 27% vs. I: 17%. At 24 months after birth, IPV victimization was significantly lower in the intervention group for level 1 physical assault (C: 44% vs. I: 26%, and IPV perpetration was significantly lower for level 1 sexual assault (C: 18% vs. I: 3%. Multilevel analyses showed a significant improvement in IPV victimization and perpetration among women in the intervention group at 24 months after birth. CONCLUSION: VoorZorg, compared with the usual care, is effective in reducing IPV during pregnancy and in the two years after birth among young high-risk women. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Dutch Trial Register NTR854 http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=854.

  9. [Psychological effects of preventive voice care training in student teachers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusseck, M; Richter, B; Echternach, M; Spahn, C

    2017-07-01

    Studies on the effectiveness of preventive voice care programs have focused mainly on voice parameters. Psychological parameters, however, have not been investigated in detail so far. The effect of a voice training program for German student teachers on psychological health parameters was investigated in a longitudinal study. The sample of 204 student teachers was divided into the intervention group (n = 123), who participated in the voice training program, and the control group (n = 81), who received no voice training. Voice training contained ten 90-min group courses and an individual visit by the voice trainer in a teaching situation with feedback afterwards. Participants were asked to fill out questionnaires (self-efficacy, Short-Form Health Survey, self-consciousness, voice self-concept, work-related behaviour and experience patterns) at the beginning and the end of their student teacher training period. The training program showed significant positive influences on psychological health, voice self-concept (i.e. more positive perception and increased awareness of one's own voice) and work-related coping behaviour in the intervention group. On average, the mental health status of all participants reduced over time, whereas the status in the trained group diminished significantly less than in the control group. Furthermore, the trained student teachers gained abilities to cope with work-related stress better than those without training. The training program clearly showed a positive impact on mental health. The results maintain the importance of such a training program not only for voice health, but also for wide-ranging aspects of constitutional health.

  10. A critical care network pressure ulcer prevention quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Joanna; Richardson, Annette

    2015-03-30

    Pressure ulcer prevention is an important safety issue, often underrated and an extremely painful event harming patients. Critically ill patients are one of the highest risk groups in hospital. The impact of pressure ulcers are wide ranging, and they can result in increased critical care and the hospital length of stay, significant interference with functional recovery and rehabilitation and increase cost. This quality improvement project had four aims: (1) to establish a critical care network pressure ulcer prevention group; (2) to establish baseline pressure ulcer prevention practices; (3) to measure, compare and monitor pressure ulcers prevalence; (4) to develop network pressure ulcer prevention standards. The approach used to improve quality included strong critical care nursing leadership to develop a cross-organisational pressure ulcer prevention group and a benchmarking exercise of current practices across a well-established critical care Network in the North of England. The National Safety Thermometer tool was used to measure pressure ulcer prevalence in 23 critical care units, and best available evidence, local consensus and another Critical Care Networks' bundle of interventions were used to develop a local pressure ulcer prevention standards document. The aims of the quality improvement project were achieved. This project was driven by successful leadership and had an agreed common goal. The National Safety Thermometer tool was an innovative approach to measure and compare pressure ulcer prevalence rates at a regional level. A limitation was the exclusion of moisture lesions. The project showed excellent engagement and collaborate working in the quest to prevent pressure ulcers from many critical care nurses with the North of England Critical Care Network. A concise set of Network standards was developed for use in conjunction with local guidelines to enhance pressure ulcer prevention. © 2015 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  11. Design and pilot results of a single blind randomized controlled trial of systematic demand-led home visits by nurses to frail elderly persons in primary care [ISRCTN05358495

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tybout Willemijn

    2005-09-01

    nurses. From two pilots we learned that of three potential postal frailty measures, the COOP-WONCA charts were completed best by elderly and that preventive home visits by nurses were positively evaluated to have potential for quality of care improvement.

  12. Impact of a New York City Supportive Housing Program on Housing Stability and Preventable Health Care among Homeless Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sungwoo; Singh, Tejinder P; Hall, Gerod; Walters, Sarah; Gould, L Hannah

    2018-03-12

    To assess the impact of a New York City supportive housing program on housing stability and preventable emergency department (ED) visits/hospitalizations among heads of homeless families with mental and physical health conditions or substance use disorders. Multiple administrative data from New York City and New York State for 966 heads of families eligible for the program during 2007-12. We captured housing events and health care service utilization during 2 years prior to the first program eligibility date (baseline) and 2 years postbaseline. We performed sequence analysis to measure housing stability and compared housing stability and preventable ED visits and hospitalizations between program participants (treatment group) and eligible applicants not placed in the program (comparison group) via marginal structural modeling. We matched electronically collected data. Eighty-seven percent of supportive housing tenants experienced housing stability in 2 years postbaseline. Compared with unstably housed heads of families in the comparison group, those in the treatment group were 0.60 times as likely to make preventable ED visits postbaseline (95% CI = 0.38, 0.96). Supportive housing placement was associated with improved housing stability and reduced preventable health care visits among homeless families. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  13. Cultural factors in preventive care: Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Victor Alejandro

    2002-09-01

    For many, the term "Hispanic" places undue emphasis on the European influence of Spanish colonialism and may even have negative connotations for some. "Latino" is a more encompassing term that gives recognition to the influences of the indigenous and African cultures on modern day Latin Americans. Nevertheless, recognition of typical Latino attitudes and beliefs may assist health care providers. Poverty, unemployment, and low level of education usually account for adverse health in this population. Anti-immigrant sentiment and discrimination in health care and education add adversity to the immigrant's experience. Lack of health insurance and access to quality health care typically plague the adult immigrant. For many, the nearest emergency department is their only source of medical care.

  14. Public Health Investment in Team Care: Increasing Access to Clinical Preventive Services in Los Angeles County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Kuo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available As part of federal and local efforts to increase access to high quality, clinical preventive services (CPS in underserved populations, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (DPH partnered with six local health system and community organization partners to promote the use of team care for CPS delivery. Although these partners were at different stages of organizational capacity, post-program review suggests that each organization advanced team care in their clinical or community environments, potentially affecting >250,000 client visits per year. Despite existing infrastructure and DPH’s funding support of CPS integration, partner efforts faced several challenges. They included lack of sustainable funding for prevention services; limited access to community resources that support disease prevention; and difficulties in changing health-care provider behavior. Although team care can serve as a catalyst or vehicle for delivering CPS, downstream sustainability of this model of practice requires further state and national policy changes that prioritize prevention. Public health is well positioned to facilitate these policy discussions and to assist health system and community organizations in strengthening CPS integration.

  15. Gender inequities in curative and preventive health care use among infants in Bihar, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilms, Rohan J; McDougal, Lotus; Atmavilas, Yamini; Hay, Katherine; Triplett, Daniel P; Silverman, Jay; Raj, Anita

    2017-12-01

    India has the highest rate of excess female infant deaths in the world. Studies with decade-old data suggest gender inequities in infant health care seeking, but little new large-scale research has examined this issue. We assessed differences in health care utilization by sex of the child, using 2014 data for Bihar, India. This was a cross-sectional analysis of statewide representative survey data collected for a non-blinded maternal and child health evaluation study. Participants included mothers of living singleton infants (n = 11 570). Sex was the main exposure. Outcomes included neonatal illness, care seeking for neonatal illness, hospitalization, facility-based postnatal visits, immunizations, and postnatal home visits by frontline workers. Analyses were conducted via multiple logistic regression with survey weights. The estimated infant sex ratio was 863 females per 1000 males. Females had lower rates of reported neonatal illness (odds ratio (OR) = 0.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.6-0.9) and hospitalization during infancy (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.3-0.6). Girl neonates had a significantly lower odds of receiving care if ill (80.6% vs 89.1%; OR = 0.5; 95% CI = 0.3-0.8) and lower odds of having a postnatal checkup visit within one month of birth (5.4% vs 7.3%; OR = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.6-0.9). The gender inequity in care seeking was more profound at lower wealth and higher numbers of siblings. Gender differences in immunization and frontline worker visits were not seen. Girls in Bihar have lower odds than boys of receiving facility-based curative and preventive care, and this inequity may partially explain the persistent sex ratio imbalance and excess female mortality. Frontline worker home visits may offer a means of helping better support care for girls.

  16. Suicide Prevention: An Emerging Priority For Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Michael F; Grumet, Julie Goldstein

    2016-06-01

    Suicide is a significant public health problem. It is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States, and the rate has risen in recent years. Many suicide deaths are among people recently seen or currently under care in clinical settings, but suicide prevention has not been a core priority in health care. In recent years, new treatment and management strategies have been developed, tested, and implemented in some organizations, but they are not yet widely used. This article examines the feasibility of improving suicide prevention in health care settings. In particular, we consider Zero Suicide, a model for better identification and treatment of patients at risk for suicide. The approach incorporates new tools for screening, treatment, and support; it has been deployed with promising results in behavioral health programs and primary care settings. Broader adoption of improved suicide prevention care may be an effective strategy for reducing deaths by suicide. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  17. Does Greater Continuity of Veterans Administration Primary Care Reduce Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalization in Older Veterans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, David A; McCoy, Kim D; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary S

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the association between longitudinal continuity of primary care and use of emergency department (ED) and inpatient care in older veterans. Retrospective cohort study. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care clinics in 15 regional health networks, ED and inpatient facilities. Medicare-eligible veterans aged 65 and older with three or more VA primary care visits during fiscal year 2007-08 (baseline period) (N = 243,881). Two measures of longitudinal continuity were estimated using merged VA-Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services administrative data: Usual Provider of Continuity (UPC) and Modified Modified Continuity Index (MMCI). Negative binomial and multivariable logistic regression models were used to predict ED use and inpatient hospitalization during fiscal year 2009, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, medical and psychiatric comorbidity, and baseline use of health services. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) of ED visits was greater in patients with high (IRR = 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.02-1.07), intermediate (IRR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.02-1.07), and low (IRR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.03-1.09) UPC than in those with very high UPC (0.9-1.0). Patients with high (odds ratio (OR) = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.01-1.07), intermediate (OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 1.00-1.06), and low (OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.01-1.07) UPC were also more likely to be hospitalized during follow-up. Results were similar for MMCI continuity scores. Even slightly lower primary care provider (PCP) continuity was associated with modestly greater ED use and inpatient hospitalization in older veterans. Additional efforts should be made to schedule older adults with their assigned PCP whenever possible. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Uptake of preventive health care among Mediterranean migrants in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Stuyft, P; Woodward, M; Amstrong, J; De Muynck, A

    1993-02-01

    The aim was to investigate the influence of ethnicity on the demand for preventive care by Mediterranean migrants in Belgium. This was a survey of patient contacts with general practitioners. 33 general practitioners working in Belgian localities with the highest migrant density collaborated in the study. During two months they recorded information on consultations with an estimated 72,600 clients. Participation was obtained from all subjects attending for preventive care or for a new episode of illness (n = 6256). An average of 30% of the patients sought preventive care, but multivariate analysis showed ethnicity to be a strong independent predictor of this type of demand. The higher primary preventive uptake by female Moroccans and Turks and the higher secondary preventive uptake by males from the same ethnic groups, as compared with the Belgian reference population, contrasted with a lower demand for tertiary prevention in migrants of either gender. The relative demand for preventive care by the more acculturated migrants was, however, quite similar to the demand of the Belgian population. The differential uptake of primary preventive care could be partly explained by the higher fertility rates of immigrant women, and the differential secondary uptake by a lower incidence of tuberculosis in the indigenous population. The meagre demand for tertiary prevention by Moroccan and Turkish migrants could be due to weaker compliance with treatments for chronic disorders, which is related to the perceptions of illness in these ethnic groups. The establishment of cross cultural mechanisms of dialogue should enhance compliance and improve the access of immigrants to the benefits of tertiary preventive care.

  19. Contributions of Physical Therapists to Primary Preventive Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    The limitations of what physical therapists can differ from country to country. In Japan, physical therapists are national licensed health care professionals who can help patients improve or restore their mobility. Most Japanese physical therapists provide care for people in health care facilities, medical-welfare transitional facilities, and welfare facilities for the elderly. Currently, physical therapists are unable to sufficiently contribute to primary preventive health care in Japan. However, there are many health problems that physical therapists could help alleviate. For example, low back pain (LBP) more likely than any other condition prevents people from working; thus, making the establishment of effective measures to prevent and reduce LBP vital. An estimated 20,500,000 Japanese individuals have diabetes mellitus (DM) or are at a high risk of developing the disease. DM commonly accompanies stroke and/or heart disease, and is characterized by complications that result from chronic hyperglycemia. Evidence-based physical therapy is effective for the prevention and treatment of LBP and DM. The Japanese Physical Therapy Association established the Japanese Society of Physical Therapy (JSPT) in June 2013. The JSPT has 12 departmental societies and 10 sections. We believe that the JSPT will advance the study of the potential role of physical therapists in primary preventive health care. In the future, it is expected that Japanese physical therapists will contribute to primary preventive health care.

  20. Adapting pressure ulcer prevention for use in home health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra; Daley, Christine Makosky

    2011-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines on pressure ulcer (PU)prevention have been written primarily for inpatient settings,but we currently lack data as to how these guidelines have been adapted for use in home health care. The purpose of this study was to delineate interventions and activities used to prevent PU in home health care. Focus group study using text analysis. A focus group was conducted with 9 certified wound care nurses who practiced in home health care at least 50% of the time. Most of the participants had 10 or more years of home health experience and 5 or more years of wound care experience. The single 75-minute focus group was convened by teleconference and audiotaped. A semistructured moderator's guide was used to lead the discussion. Transcribed data were analyzed using standard text analysis. Preliminary results were distributed to focus group participants for review, comment, or clarification, and refined as needed. Certified wound care nurse participants used an array of interventions, including those recommended by clinical practice guidelines, to prevent PU in home health patients.However, specific activities differed from those performed in hospitals and nursing homes. Interventions unique to homehealth care included (1) assessment of patients' economic and insured status to determine implementation options, (2) assessment of caregiving resources and caregivers' ability to manage PU prevention, and (3) collaboration with community resources and health care vendors to obtain needed prevention materials and supplies. Findings provide insight into guideline adaptation in home health care and suggest that PU prevention in the homehealth care setting is more complex than that in hospitals and nursing homes and requires significant skills in communication and collaboration.

  1. Associations of the type of childcare with reported preventive medical and dental care utilization for 1- to 5-year-old children in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juhee; Kaste, Linda M

    2013-10-01

    Despite that the majority of US children use nonparental childcare (NPC), research examining its effects on children's preventive healthcare utilization is lacking. Our aim was to contrast NPC against parental childcare in terms of preventive medical and dental care utilization. Associations of childcare and healthcare utilization were evaluated using the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, a telephone interview of parent-reported children's health (22,773 children ages 1- to 5-year old). The type of childcare was categorized as parental care, center-based care (CBC), nonrelative home care (NRHC), relative care (RCC), and mixed care (MCC). The outcome measures were preventive medical care (≥ 1 physical examination/well child check-up visit) and preventive dental care (≥ 1 check-ups/dental cleanings visit) during the past 12 months. Overall, 94.7% of 1- to 5-year-old children received preventive medical care, while only 53.6% received preventive dental care. The highest odds for preventive medical care was for 1- to 2-year-old children utilizing CBC [Odds Ratio (OR) = 2.85, 95% CI = 1.11-7.30] and for 3- to 5-year-old children utilizing MCC (OR = 2.00, 95% CI = 1.23-3.26) followed by CBC (OR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.13-2.42). Considering preventive dental care, a statistically significant increase occurred for 1- to 2-year-old children with CBC (OR = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.62-2.30), and none occurred for any NPC above the parental childcare rates for 3- to 5-year-old children. Childcare use, particularly center-based care, may provide a means to raise preventive healthcare utilization for young children. Future regulations, as well as policy and program development, should consider promoting childcare settings as a means to improve preventive health care utilization. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Assessment of the management factors that influence the development of preventive care in the New South Wales public dental service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoe, Angela V; Blinkhorn, Anthony S; Taylor, Jane; Blinkhorn, Fiona A

    2015-01-01

    Oral diseases, particularly dental caries, remain one of the most common chronic health problems for adolescents, and are a major public health concern. Public dental services in New South Wales, Australia offer free clinical care and preventive advice to all adolescents under 18 years of age, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds. This care is provided by dental therapists and oral health therapists (therapists). It is incumbent upon clinical directors (CDs) and health service managers (HSMs) to ensure that the appropriate clinical preventive care is offered by clinicians to all their patients. The aims of this study were to 1) explore CDs' and HSMs' perceptions of the factors that could support the delivery of preventive care to adolescents, and to 2) record the strategies they have utilized to help therapists provide preventive care to adolescents. In-depth, semistructured interviews were undertaken with 19 CDs and HSMs from across NSW local health districts. A framework matrix was used to systematically code data and enable key themes to be identified for analysis. The 19 CDs and HSMs reported that fiscal accountability and meeting performance targets impacted on the levels and types of preventive care provided by therapists. Participants suggested that professional clinical structures for continuous quality improvement should be implemented and monitored, and that an adequate workforce mix and more resources for preventive dental care activities would enhance therapists' ability to provide appropriate levels of preventive care. CDs and HSMs stated that capitalizing on the strengths of visiting pediatric dental specialists and working with local health district clinical leaders would be a practical way to improve models of preventive oral health care for adolescents. The main issue raised in this study is that preventive dentistry per se lacks strong support from the central funding agency, and that increasing prevention activities is not a simple

  3. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Make sure your home care professional checks your identity. Make sure they do this before giving you ... for written information about it. Find out its brand and generic names. Ask about the side effects ...

  4. A low-cost ultrasound program leads to increased antenatal clinic visits and attended deliveries at a health care clinic in rural Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B Ross

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In June of 2010, an antenatal ultrasound program to perform basic screening for high-risk pregnancies was introduced at a community health care center in rural Uganda. Whether the addition of ultrasound scanning to antenatal visits at the health center would encourage or discourage potential patients was unknown. Our study sought to evaluate trends in the numbers of antenatal visits and deliveries at the clinic, pre- and post-introduction of antenatal ultrasound to determine what effect the presence of ultrasound at the clinic had on these metrics. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Records at Nawanyago clinic were reviewed to obtain the number of antenatal visits and deliveries for the 42 months preceding the introduction of ultrasound and the 23 months following. The monthly mean deliveries and antenatal visits by category (first visit through fourth return visit were compared pre- and post- ultrasound using a Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA. Following the introduction of ultrasound, significant increases were seen in the number of mean monthly deliveries and antenatal visits. The mean number of monthly deliveries at the clinic increased by 17.0 (13.3-20.6, 95% CI from a pre-ultrasound average of 28.4 to a post-ultrasound monthly average of 45.4. The number of deliveries at a comparison clinic remained flat over this same time period. The monthly mean number of antenatal visits increased by 97.4 (83.3-111.5, 95% CI from a baseline monthly average of 133.5 to a post-ultrasound monthly mean of 231.0, with increases seen in all categories of antenatal visits. CONCLUSIONS: The availability of a low-cost antenatal ultrasound program may assist progress towards Millennium Development Goal 5 by encouraging women in a rural environment to come to a health care facility for skilled antenatal care and delivery assistance instead of utilizing more traditional methods.

  5. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Laboratory Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... informed member of your health care team. The “Speak Up” program is sponsored by The Joint Commission. ... prevent health care mistakes, patients are urged to “Speak Up.” S peak up if you have questions or ...

  6. Racial/Ethnic and social class differences in preventive care practices among persons with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnett Elizabeth

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Persons with diabetes are at increased risk for serious complications including CVD, stroke, retinopathy, amputation, and nephropathy. Minorities have the highest incidence and prevalence of diabetes and related complications compared to other racial groups. Preventive care practices such as smoking cessation, eye examinations, feet examinations, and yearly checkups can prevent or delay the incidence and progression of diabetes related complications. The purpose of this study was to examine racial/ethnic differences in diabetes preventive care practices by several socio-demographic characteristics including social class. Methods Data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey for 1998–2001 were used for analyses. The study population consisted of persons who indicated having diabetes on the BRFSS, 35 yrs and older, and Non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic White, or Hispanic persons. Logistic regression was used in analyses. Results Contrary to our hypotheses, Blacks and Hispanics engaged in preventive care more frequently than Whites. Whites were less likely to have seen a doctor in the previous year, less likely to have had a foot exam, more likely to smoke, and less likely to have attempted smoking cessation. Persons of lower social class were at greatest risk for not receiving preventive care regardless of race/ethnicity. Persons with no health care coverage were twice as likely to have not visited the doctor in the previous year and twice as likely to have not had an eye exam, 1.5 times more likely to have not had a foot exam or attempted smoking cessation. Conclusion This study showed that persons of lower social class and persons with no health insurance are at greatest risk for not receiving preventive services.

  7. "Let him speak:" a descriptive qualitative study of the roles and behaviors of family companions in primary care visits among older adults with cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Judith B; Amjad, Halima; Smith, Katherine C; Boyd, Cynthia M; Gitlin, Laura N; Roth, David L; Roter, Debra L; Wolff, Jennifer L

    2018-01-01

    Cognitive impairment poses communication challenges in primary care. Although family "companions" commonly attend primary care visits of older adults with cognitive impairment, little is known about how their involvement affects communication. Therefore, we sought to understand how companion involvement affects the quality of primary care visit communication for older adults with cognitive impairment. Cross-sectional, descriptive qualitative study participants were as follows: (1) English-speaking adults age 65 or older with mild, moderate, or severe cognitive impairment; (2) family members or other unpaid companions who accompany older adults to primary care visits; and (3) primary care clinicians. Twenty semi-structured and in-depth qualitative interviews of older adults and their companions (N = 20 dyads) and two focus groups (N = 10 primary care clinicians) were conducted. Interviews and focus groups were transcribed and analyzed thematically. Family companions commonly facilitate communication by advocating for patients, ensuring the accuracy of information exchange and understanding, and preserving rapport. Significant communication challenges were also identified, including patient and companion role ambiguity, competing visit agendas, and primary care clinician confusion regarding the most accurate source of information. Patients, companions, and clinicians each identified strategies to improve communication, chief among them being to identify, differentiate, and respect both patient and companion priorities and perspectives. Family companions actively participate in primary care visits of older adults with cognitive impairment in ways that promote and inhibit effective communication. Findings suggest the need for strategies that more effectively and purposefully involve family in the care of primary care patients with cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The long term effects of "Consumer-Directed" health plans on preventive care use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Matthew D; Haviland, Amelia M; Mehrotra, Ateev; Huckfeldt, Peter J; Sood, Neeraj

    2017-09-01

    "Consumer-Directed" Health Plans (CDHPs), those with high deductibles and personal medical accounts, have been shown to reduce health care spending. The impact of CDHPs on preventive care is unclear. On the one hand CDHPs might increase use of preventive care as such care is exempt from the deductible. However, CDHPs also decrease visits to physicians which might results in less screening. Prior research has found conflicting results. In this study, using data from 37 employers we examine the effects of CDHPs on the use of cancer screenings up to three years after the initial CDHP offering with ITT and LATE approaches. Being offered a CDHP or enrolling in a CDHP had little or no effect on cancer screening rates but individuals increase screenings prior to enrolling in a CDHP. Our findings suggest the importance of examining CDHP effects on periodic care over the longer-term and carefully controlling for anticipatory stockpiling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Racial, Ethnic, and Nativity Differences in Mental Health Visits to Primary Care and Specialty Mental Health Providers: Analysis of the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey, 2010-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Audrey L; Cochran, Susan D; Leibowitz, Arleen; Wells, Kenneth B; Kominski, Gerald; Mays, Vickie M

    2018-03-22

    Black and Latino minorities have traditionally had poorer access to primary care than non-Latino Whites, but these patterns could change with the Affordable Care Act (ACA). To guide post-ACA efforts to address mental health service disparities, we used a nationally representative sample to characterize baseline race-, ethnicity-, and nativity-associated differences in mental health services in the context of primary care. Data were obtained from the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey (MEPS), a two-year panel study of healthcare use, satisfaction with care, and costs of services in the United States (US). We pooled data from six waves (14-19) of participants with serious psychological distress to examine racial, ethnic, and nativity disparities in medical and mental health visits to primary care (PC) and specialty mental health (SMH) providers around the time of ACA reforms, 2010-2015. Of the 2747 respondents with serious psychological distress, 1316 were non-Latino White, 632 non-Latino Black, 532 identified as Latino with Mexican, Central American, or South American (MCS) origins, and 267 as Latino with Caribbean island origins; 525 were foreign/island born. All racial/ethnic groups were less likely than non-Latino Whites to have any PC visit. Of those who used PC, non-Latino Blacks were less likely than Whites to have a PC mental health visit, while foreign born MCS Latinos were less likely to visit an SMH provider. Conditional on any mental health visit, Latinos from the Caribbean were more likely than non-Latino Whites to visit SMH providers versus PC providers only, while non-Latino Blacks and US born MCS Latinos received fewer PC mental health visits than non-Latino Whites. Racial-, ethnic-, and nativity-associated disparities persist in PC provided mental health services.

  10. Diabetes, kidney disease and cardiovascular disease patients. Assessing care of complex patients using outpatient testing and visits: additional metrics by which to evaluate health care system functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Adeera; Chaudhry, Munaza R; Djurdjev, Ognjenka; Beaulieu, Monica; Komenda, Paul

    2009-09-01

    The triad of cardiovascular disease (CVD), chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) share many fundamental disease pathways. Patients with these conditions contribute excessively to health care costs. Opportunities for system redesign require metrics by which to evaluate the impact. Using a provincial comprehensive set of administrative billing databases (outpatient visits, laboratory tests, pharmacy and hospital inpatient services), we itemized the prevalence of each and combination of conditions, resource utilization associated with each condition and combinations, using ICD 9-10 billing codes and standard definitions. Three consecutive years (2003-2005) were used to establish stability of findings. CKD, CVD and DM diagnoses are found in 422 124 persons within a province of 4.3 million individuals (10%); 1.7% had all three conditions. The median age of each cohort varied significantly between those with multiple conditions (67-79 years) versus those with single condition (56-72 years). The median number of physician visits was 26 per patient year. Duplicate testing accounted for expenditures of $3 million/annum; 7.55% of patients accounted for 34.4% of duplicate tests. Those with DM or CKD had similar use of medications, physician visits and hospital days. Those with all conditions (CVD-CKD-DM) had a median of 6 in-hospital days/year. A significant proportion were not on ACE/ARB or statin medications (30 and 45%, respectively). Patients with chronic, complex conditions consume a large number of outpatient and inpatient resources. Documenting these allows identification of a set of metrics by which to design and measure health care system redesign initiatives. Potential targets to benchmark in designing more effective systems have been identified.

  11. Safe care spaces and places: exploring urban Aboriginal families' access to preventive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herk, Kimberley A; Smith, Dawn; Tedford Gold, Sara

    2012-05-01

    Many Aboriginal children living in Canadian cities experience high levels of perinatal and infant health challenges. Despite efforts to reduce inequities in early childhood development, numerous urban Aboriginal families have poor access to preventive care. In this paper, we challenge conventional notions of access and use a postcolonial population health perspective to explain how access to preventive care for Aboriginal families is influenced by safety and responsiveness within care experiences. We explore an approach to care that addresses the safety of care spaces and care places. The potential of this approach for improving access to preventive services for Aboriginal families may be of considerable interest to urban preventive health policy or health system managers. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Long term effects of preventive activities of youth health care in The Netherlands: results of a four-part study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter A. Wiegersma

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Background. In this article the results are presented of a four part study on the effect of screening for scoliosis and (repeated well-care visits and freely accessible consultation hours at secondary schools, on the incidence and prevalence of (parasuicide, mental health, adolescent health compromising behaviour and lastly obesity.

    Methods. An ecologic case-referent study design was used with data from the Netherlands Bureau of Statistics, the Ministry of Defence, the 1992 High-School Student Study, all of the youth health care departments in The Netherlands and relevant censuses.

    Results. Attention to mental and physical health and health compromising behaviour, either during screening, open consultation hours or during well-care visits seems to be ineffective and in some instances even detrimental to youth health.

    Of the 18 different outcome measurements, 5 were significantly negative and none were significantly positive.

    Conclusions. This four part study does not support the hypothesis that on a population level, the preventive activities of youth health care departments such as screening for scoliosis, (more frequent well-care visits or offering open consultation hours at secondary schools, have a beneficial effect on prevention of (parasuicide, poor mental health, health compromising behaviour or obesity.

  13. Visit safety

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Experiment areas, offices, workshops: it is possible to have co-workers or friends visit these places.     You already know about the official visits service, the VIP office, and professional visits. But do you know about the safety instruction GSI-OHS1, “Visits on the CERN site”? This is a mandatory General Safety Instruction that was created to assist you in ensuring safety for all your visits, whatever their nature—especially those that are non-official. Questions? The HSE Unit will be happy to answer them. Write to safety-general@cern.ch.   The HSE Unit

  14. School-located influenza vaccination reduces community risk for influenza and influenza-like illness emergency care visits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuc H Tran

    Full Text Available School-located influenza vaccination (SLIV programs can substantially enhance the sub-optimal coverage achieved under existing delivery strategies. Randomized SLIV trials have shown these programs reduce laboratory-confirmed influenza among both vaccinated and unvaccinated children. This work explores the effectiveness of a SLIV program in reducing the community risk of influenza and influenza-like illness (ILI associated emergency care visits.For the 2011/12 and 2012/13 influenza seasons, we estimated age-group specific attack rates (AR for ILI from routine surveillance and census data. Age-group specific SLIV program effectiveness was estimated as one minus the AR ratio for Alachua County versus two comparison regions: the 12 county region surrounding Alachua County, and all non-Alachua counties in Florida.Vaccination of ∼50% of 5-17 year-olds in Alachua reduced their risk of ILI-associated visits, compared to the rest of Florida, by 79% (95% confidence interval: 70, 85 in 2011/12 and 71% (63, 77 in 2012/13. The greatest indirect effectiveness was observed among 0-4 year-olds, reducing AR by 89% (84, 93 in 2011/12 and 84% (79, 88 in 2012/13. Among all non-school age residents, the estimated indirect effectiveness was 60% (54, 65 and 36% (31, 41 for 2011/12 and 2012/13. The overall effectiveness among all age-groups was 65% (61, 70 and 46% (42, 50 for 2011/12 and 2012/13.Wider implementation of SLIV programs can significantly reduce the influenza-associated public health burden in communities.

  15. School-Located Influenza Vaccination Reduces Community Risk for Influenza and Influenza-Like Illness Emergency Care Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Cuc H.; Sugimoto, Jonathan D.; Pulliam, Juliet R. C.; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Myers, Paul D.; Castleman, Joan B.; Doty, Randell; Johnson, Jackie; Stringfellow, Jim; Kovacevich, Nadia; Brew, Joe; Cheung, Lai Ling; Caron, Brad; Lipori, Gloria; Harle, Christopher A.; Alexander, Charles; Yang, Yang; Longini, Ira M.; Halloran, M. Elizabeth; Morris, J. Glenn; Small, Parker A.

    2014-01-01

    Background School-located influenza vaccination (SLIV) programs can substantially enhance the sub-optimal coverage achieved under existing delivery strategies. Randomized SLIV trials have shown these programs reduce laboratory-confirmed influenza among both vaccinated and unvaccinated children. This work explores the effectiveness of a SLIV program in reducing the community risk of influenza and influenza-like illness (ILI) associated emergency care visits. Methods For the 2011/12 and 2012/13 influenza seasons, we estimated age-group specific attack rates (AR) for ILI from routine surveillance and census data. Age-group specific SLIV program effectiveness was estimated as one minus the AR ratio for Alachua County versus two comparison regions: the 12 county region surrounding Alachua County, and all non-Alachua counties in Florida. Results Vaccination of ∼50% of 5–17 year-olds in Alachua reduced their risk of ILI-associated visits, compared to the rest of Florida, by 79% (95% confidence interval: 70, 85) in 2011/12 and 71% (63, 77) in 2012/13. The greatest indirect effectiveness was observed among 0–4 year-olds, reducing AR by 89% (84, 93) in 2011/12 and 84% (79, 88) in 2012/13. Among all non-school age residents, the estimated indirect effectiveness was 60% (54, 65) and 36% (31, 41) for 2011/12 and 2012/13. The overall effectiveness among all age-groups was 65% (61, 70) and 46% (42, 50) for 2011/12 and 2012/13. Conclusion Wider implementation of SLIV programs can significantly reduce the influenza-associated public health burden in communities. PMID:25489850

  16. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients

    OpenAIRE

    A Gupta; A Gupta; T K Singh; A Saxsena

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP.

  17. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP.

  18. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Gupta, A; Singh, T K; Saxsena, A

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP.

  19. Communities Putting Prevention to Work: Results of an Obesity Prevention Initiative in Child Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Ruby; Camejo, Stephanie; Sanders, Lee M.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a significant public health issue affecting even our youngest children. Given that a significant amount of young children are enrolled in child care, the goal of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of a child care facility-based obesity prevention program. Over 1,000 facilities participated in the study. The intervention…

  20. Pediatric dentist density and preventive care utilization for Medicaid children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, James F.; Kim, Amy S.; Scott, JoAnna M.; Chi, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates the relationship between county-level pediatric dentist density and dental care utilization for Medicaid-enrolled children in Washington State. Methods This is a cross-sectional analysis of 604,885 children ages 0-17 enrolled in the Washington State Medicaid Program for ≥11 months in 2012. The relationship between county-level pediatric dentist density, defined as the number of pediatric dentists per 10,000 Medicaid-enrolled children, and preventive dental care utilization was evaluated using linear regression models. Results In 2012, 179 pediatric dentists practiced in 16 of the 39 counties in Washington. County-level pediatric dentist density varied from zero to 5.98 pediatric dentists per 10,000 Medicaid-enrolled children. County-level preventive dental care utilization ranged from 32 percent to 81 percent, with 62 percent of Medicaid-enrolled children in Washington utilizing preventive dental services. After adjusting for confounders, county-level density was significantly associated with county-level dental care utilization (β=1.67, 95 percent CI=0.02, 3.32, p=0.047). Conclusions There is a significant relationship between pediatric dentist density and the proportion of Medicaid-enrolled children who utilize preventive dental care services. Policies aimed at improving pediatric oral health disparities should include strategies to increase the number of oral health care providers, including pediatric dentists, in geographic areas with large proportions of Medicaid-enrolled children. PMID:26314606

  1. Unplanned Hospital Visits - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Unplanned Hospital Visits – national data. This data set includes national-level data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures, the...

  2. Unplanned Hospital Visits - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Unplanned Hospital Visits – state data. This data set includes state-level data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures, the unplanned...

  3. Unplanned Hospital Visits - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Unplanned Hospital Visits – provider data. This data set includes provider data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures, the unplanned...

  4. Pressure ulcer prevention in intensive care patients: guidelines and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Eman S M; Dassen, Theo; Halfens, Ruud J G

    2009-04-01

    Pressure ulcers are a potential problem in intensive care patients, and their prevention is a major issue in nursing care. This study aims to assess the allocation of preventive measures for patients at risk for pressure ulcers in intensive care and the evidence of applied pressure ulcer preventive measures in intensive care settings in respect to the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP) and Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR) guidelines for pressure ulcer prevention. The design of this study was a cross-sectional study (point prevalence). Setting The study setting was intensive care units. The sample consisted of 169 patients - 60 patients from surgical wards, 59 from interdisciplinary wards and 50 from medical intensive care wards. The study results revealed that pressure reducing devices like mattresses (alternating pressure air, low air loss and foam) are applied for 58 (36.5%) patients, and all of these patients are at risk for pressure ulcer development. Most patients receive more than one nursing intervention, especially patients at risk. Nursing interventions applied are skin inspection, massage with moisture cream, nutrition and mobility (81.8%, 80.5%, 68.6% and 56.6%) respectively. Moreover, all applied pressure ulcer preventive measures in this study are in line with the guidelines of the EPUAP and AHCPR except massage which is applied to 8.8% of all patients. The use of pressure reducing devices and nursing interventions in intensive care patients are in line with international pressure ulcer guidelines. Only massage, which is also being used, should be avoided according to the recommendation of national and international guidelines.

  5. Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Báez, María Valeria; Acuña-Reyes, Raquel; Cigarroa-Martínez, Didier; Ureña-Bogarín, Enrique; Orgaz-Fernández, Jose David

    2014-01-01

    Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish) was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. The overall internal consistency of CPEP is α= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01). Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1) than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8). The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population.

  6. Preventive physical therapy and care humanization in the treatment of a bedridden, home care, neurologic patient

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, Lina; Gonçalves, Maria do Céu Pereira; Silva, Elirez Bezerra da

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: This case study investigated the impact of preventive physical therapy on shoulder problems and the prevention of pressure ulcers (PU) in a bedridden, home care, post-neurological surgery patient. Objective: To highlight the importance of physical therapy in the prevention of comorbidities, chronic neurological sequelae, and PU. Materials and Methods: In the immediate post-surgical phase, the patient was treated with preventive measures against PU, according to the...

  7. Workplace managed care: collaboration for substance abuse prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, D M

    2000-05-01

    This article describes the history, purpose, and overall methodology of the Workplace Managed Care (WMC) study sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP). This study was initiated to discern best practices for workplaces and managed care organizations integrating their substance abuse prevention and early intervention programs, strategies, and activities for employees and their families. CSAP funded nine WMC grants to study their retrospective and prospective data. Results of the WMC study suggested the addition of substance abuse prevention material to existing workplace health promotion offerings that resulted in improved substance abuse attitudes without jeopardizing existing health promotion programs. Stress management programming was successful at improving substance abuse attitudes indirectly. This study provides a platform for multidisciplinary research in workplace and managed care settings.

  8. [Pediatrician-parent interaction and early prevention : A review about the limits in addressing psychosocial risks during well-child visits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Pediatricians can be a door opener to early prevention for families at risk. The German well-child program is well-established, but there is a gap between the structural possibilities and the observed placements. The aim of this review is to show how pediatricians and parents talk about psychosocial risks under the very structured conditions of well-child visits. The challenges and traps of the framed interactions will be described and options for early prevention will be shown. The review is primarily based on the work of conversational and ethnomethodological studies reconstructing the pediatrician's discussion with parents about psychosocial issues in the family. Well-child visits are a highly routinized practice. Talking about family issues for both partners is a difficult task. Discussions about psychosocial issues are seldom and vague . Predominantly, they work cooperatively on reciprocal normalization of the child's development. Based on this shared orientation, pediatricians make an early, mostly general, prescription of parental tasks, supporting the child in the next developmental step. This kind of routine anticipatory counselling puts some pressure on the parents. Parents under unknown stress could be overburdened with this advice. In the script of well-child visits, there are no slots that indicate to pediatricians and parents when, which, how and for what purpose psychosocial issues can be discussed and negotiated. For implementing such slots in well-child visits, three steps are necessary: a structured and regular assessment of psychosocial issues, a trained pediatrician in motivational interviewing and a social worker guiding the family in the network of early prevention.

  9. Pastoral care of patients with Ebola Virus Disease: A medical and canonical opinion about pastoral visits to patients with contagious and highly fatal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Stephen E; Nguyen, Benedict T

    2015-05-01

    The Ebola Virus Disease is a contagious and highly fatal illness that up until recently had been geographically limited to remote areas of Africa. In 2014, Ebola patients have been transported to the United States for care or have been newly diagnosed in the United States. With the intensive medical care and isolation policies usually needed by these patients, we inquired whether pastoral care would be possible. Using clinical and canonical considerations, we analyzed the permissibility and logistical challenges pastoral care presents to the priests and lay ministers, as well as the healthcare system. We conclude that with the approval of local, state, and federal health officials, pastoral care, including provision of the sacraments, is possible. It would require proper training, proper equipment and policies, and a significant commitment of time. While the risk to the pastoral team is difficult to define, it seems low in an Ebola-capable medical system. These risks to priests and ministers seem reasonable given the inestimable benefits of receiving the sacraments during critical illness. Lay summary: Traditional pastoral visits to hospitalized patients might prove difficult or impossible for diseases that are contagious and highly fatal. This inquiry examines the feasibility, challenges, and logistical solutions to these visits. With input from bishops, priests, a canon lawyer, an epidemiologist, a physician, the CDC, and others, we conclude that pastoral visits are possible. Visits will require permission of health authorities, commitments of time, training, and a small but significant risk to the health of priests and others who volunteer for this ministry.

  10. Development of a Patient Charting System to Teach Family Practice Residents Disease Management and Preventive Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dickerman, Joel

    1997-01-01

    .... Designing notes which 'prompt' residents to gather patient information vital to optimal care can teach residents the concepts of longitudinal care, particularly chronic disease management and preventive care...

  11. Evaluating a statewide home visiting program to prevent child abuse in at-risk families of newborns: fathers' participation and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Anne; Fuddy, Loretta; McFarlane, Elizabeth; Burrell, Lori; Windham, Amy; Higman, Susan; Sia, Calvin

    2004-02-01

    This study sought to describe fathers' participation in a statewide home-visiting program to prevent child abuse and to assess program impact on their parenting. This randomized trial followed 643 at-risk families for 3 years. Data were collected through program record review, staff surveys, and annual maternal interviews. Participation in visits varied by the parents' relationship and paternal employment, violence, and heavy drinking at baseline. Overall, the program had no apparent impact on fathers' accessibility to the child, engagement in parenting activities, and sharing of responsibility for the child's welfare. The program promoted parenting involvement for nonviolent fathers in couples who lived together but also for violent fathers in couples with little contact at baseline; it decreased the father's accessibility to the child in couples who lived apart but saw each other frequently at baseline. Infrequent participation in visits and differential program impact on violent versus nonviolent fathers demonstrate the need to consider family context in developing, implementing, and studying home-visiting models.

  12. Promoting Prevention Through the Affordable Care Act: Workplace Wellness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffenbender, Jason S.; Goetzel, Ron Z.; Millard, Francois; Wildenhaus, Kevin; DeSantis, Charles; Novelli, William

    2012-01-01

    Public health in the United States can be improved by building workplace “cultures of health” that support healthy lifestyles. The Affordable Care Act (ACA), which includes the Prevention and Public Health Fund, will support a new focus on prevention and wellness, offering opportunities to strengthen the public’s health through workplace wellness initiatives. This article describes the opportunity the ACA provides to improve worker wellness. PMID:23237245

  13. Improving Obesity Prevention and Management in Primary Care in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Sharma, Arya Mitra

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for chronic diseases with significant morbidity, mortality and health care cost. There is concern due to the dramatic increase in overweight and obesity in Canada in the last 20 years. The causes of obesity are multifactorial, with underestimation by patients and healthcare providers of the long-term nature of the condition, and its complexity. Solutions related to prevention and management will require multifaceted strategies involving education, health policy, public health and health systems across the care continuum. We believe that to support such strategies we need to have a strong primary care workforce equipped with appropriate knowledge, skills and attitudes to support persons at risk for, or with, obesity. To achieve this end, significant skills building is required to improve primary care obesity prevention and management efforts. This review will first examine the current state, and then will outline how we can improve.

  14. Visit ISOLDE!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    CERN Internal Communication is organising a visit to ISOLDE – an opportunity for you to see the CERN set-up that can produce over 1000 different isotopes!   If you wish to participate, you can sign up for a visit by sending us an e-mail. Note that the visits will take place between 18 and 22 February, and will be open only to CERN access-card holders.   The visit will include an introduction by experts and a tour of the ISOLDE set-up. NB: For security reason, pregnant women and kids under the age of 16 can not take the tour.  

  15. Identification, Prevention, and Management of Childhood Overweight and Obesity in a Pediatric Primary Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Monique; Cygan, Heide; Lui, Karen; Mullen, Mary

    2016-08-01

    Background In the United States, overweight/obesity among youth has reached epidemic proportions. The purpose of this project was to (1) examine primary care provider adherence to American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines; (2) compare adherence based on patients' weight classification, age, race, and gender; and (3) identify areas for improvement in health care delivery. Methods A retrospective chart audit and feedback quality improvement project was conducted with a stratified random sample of 175 charts of 6- to 19-year-olds seen for well-child visits. Frequencies of provider adherence were reported. χ(2) Analyses of weight classification, age, race, or gender influence on adherence was calculated. Results After discussion with the primary care providers, 5 areas were identified as priorities for change (diagnosis based on BMI, parental history of obesity, sleep assessment, endocrine assessment, and attendance of patients at the follow-up visit). Conclusion Cost-efficient, feasible strategies to improve provider adherence to recommendations for identification, prevention and management of childhood overweight and obesity were identified. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Effect of Nurse Home Visits vs. Usual Care on Reducing Intimate Partner Violence in Young High-Risk Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mejdoubi, J.; van den Heijkant, S.C.C.M.; van Leerdam, F.J.M.; Heymans, M.W.; Hirasing, R.A.; Crijnen, A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background:Expectant mothers and mothers of young children are especially vulnerable to intimate partner violence (IPV). The nurse-family partnership (NFP) is a home visitation program in the United States effective for the prevention of adverse child health outcomes. Evidence regarding the effect

  17. Menopausal symptoms and quality of life among Saudi women visiting primary care clinics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlDughaither, Aida; AlMutairy, Hind; AlAteeq, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Menopause is associated with somatic, vasomotor, psychological, and sexual complaints that may affect quality of life. We determined the prevalence and severity of menopausal symptoms and their impact on the quality of life among Saudi women visiting primary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study was conducted from October to November 2010. In total, 119 women aged 45-60 years were randomly interviewed using a questionnaire. Participants were divided into three categories: premenopausal (n=31), perimenopausal (n=49), and postmenopausal (n=39). The Menopause Rating Scale (MRS) assessed the prevalence and severity of eleven menopausal symptoms. Mean scores of menopausal categories were compared for different symptoms. The mean age at menopause was 48.3±3 years (median, 49 years). The symptoms reported to be most prevalent were joint and muscle pain (80.7%), physical and mental exhaustion (64.7%), and hot flushes and sweating (47.1%). Somatic and psychological symptoms were highly prevalent in perimenopausal women compared to other groups. The mean overall quality-of-life score was higher in perimenopausal women, while the total MRS score indicated that the symptoms were mild in severity (MRS women; however, the prevalence of classic symptoms of hot flushes and night sweats was lower than reported in Western studies. Saudi women reported an MRS score indicating milder severity of symptoms, reflecting better quality of life and ability to cope with climacteric symptoms.

  18. Awareness and use of Benzodiazepines in healthy volunteers and ambulatory patients visiting a tertiary care hospital: a cross sectional survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Raoof

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Indiscriminate prescription of Benzodiazepines in Pakistan and subsequent availability over-the-counter without prescription is a major public health problem, requiring systematic inquiry through research. Additionally, there is limited data on the awareness and use of Benzodiazepines from developing countries making it impossible to devise meaningful health policies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This was an Observational, Cross-Sectional study. conducted at Aga Khan University. A total of 475 (58.5% males, 41.5% females people visiting a tertiary care hospital were interviewed by means of a structured questionnaire. The results showed that majority of population was aware of one or more Benzodiazepines (80.4% and 30.4% had used them at some point in life. 42.4% of the users had been using it for more than a year. Commonest reason for use was sleep disturbance. Frequency of usage was higher for females, married individuals, educated (>Grade12, high socioeconomic status and housewives. More (59% were prescribed than not and of them most by GP (58.5%. Only 36.5% of them were particularly told about the long-term addiction potential by the use of these drugs. CONCLUSION: Easy availability, access to re-fills without prescription and self prescription compounded with the lack of understanding of abuse potential of benzodiazepines constitutes a significant problem demanding serious consideration from health policy makers.

  19. Impact of community based, specialist palliative care teams on hospitalisations and emergency department visits late in life and hospital deaths: a pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Hsien; Brazil, Kevin; Sussman, Jonathan; Pereira, José; Marshall, Denise; Austin, Peter C; Husain, Amna; Rangrej, Jagadish; Barbera, Lisa

    2014-06-06

    To determine the pooled effect of exposure to one of 11 specialist palliative care teams providing services in patients' homes. Pooled analysis of a retrospective cohort study. Ontario, Canada. 3109 patients who received care from specialist palliative care teams in 2009-11 (exposed) matched by propensity score to 3109 patients who received usual care (unexposed). The palliative care teams studied served different geographies and varied in team composition and size but had the same core team members and role: a core group of palliative care physicians, nurses, and family physicians who provide integrated palliative care to patients in their homes. The teams' role was to manage symptoms, provide education and care, coordinate services, and be available without interruption regardless of time or day. Patients (a) being in hospital in the last two weeks of life; (b) having an emergency department visit in the last two weeks of life; or (c) dying in hospital. In both exposed and unexposed groups, about 80% had cancer and 78% received end of life homecare services for the same average duration. Across all palliative care teams, 970 (31.2%) of the exposed group were in hospital and 896 (28.9%) had an emergency department visit in the last two weeks of life respectively, compared with 1219 (39.3%) and 1070 (34.5%) of the unexposed group (Pteams, despite variation in team composition and geographies, were effective at reducing acute care use and hospital deaths at the end of life. © Seow et al 2014.

  20. Pediatricians, Well-Baby Visits, and Video Intervention Therapy: Feasibility of a Video-Feedback Infant Mental Health Support Intervention in a Pediatric Primary Health Care Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Facchini, Sergio; Martin, Valentina; Downing, George

    2016-01-01

    This case series study evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of a behavioral/cognitive psychological intervention in a pediatric primary health care setting during standard well-baby visits. The aim of the intervention was to support caregivers’ sensitivity and mentalization in order to promote infant mental health. Four neonates from birth to eight months were consecutively enrolled to test a short video-feedback intervention (Primary Care - Video Intervention Therapy, an adaptation ...

  1. Access to Difficult-to-reach Population Subgroups: A Family Midwife Based Home Visiting Service for Implementing Nutrition-related Preventive Activities - A Mixed Methods Explorative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Walz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Health and social inequality are tightly linked and still pose an important public health problem. However, vulnerable and disadvantaged populations are difficult to reach for health-related interventions. Given the long-lasting effects of an adverse, particular nutrition-related, intrauterine and neonatal environment on health development (perinatal programming, an early and easy access is essential for sustainable interventions. The goal of this explorative study was therefore to elucidate whether an existing access of family midwives (FMs to families in need of support could be an option to implement effective public health and nutrition interventions. To that end three research objectives were formulated: (1 to determine whether a discernible impact of home visits by FMs can be described; (2 to identify subgroups among these families in need of more specific interventions; (3 to determine how relevant nutrition-related topics are for both FMs and the supported families. For addressing these objectives a mixed methods design was used: Routine documentation data from 295 families visited by a family midwife (FM were analyzed (secondary analysis, and structured expert interviews with FMs were conducted and analyzed. Study reporting followed the STROBE (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology statement. Based on the FMs reports, a significant improvement (p < 0.001 regarding psycho-social variables could be determined after the home visits. Single mothers, however, seemed to benefit less from the FMs service compared to their counterparts (p = 0.015. Nutritional counseling was demanded by 89% of the families during the home visits. In addition, nutrition-related topics were reported in the interviews to be of high interest to both families and the FMs. Based on the obtained results it is concluded that FMs home visits offer a promising access to vulnerable and disadvantaged families for implementing nutrition

  2. Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect: An Evaluation of a Home Visitation Parent Aide Program Using Recidivism Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Jeanette

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this research was to examine the secondary and tertiary prevention of child abuse and neglect through an evaluation of the Parent Aide Program at the Child Abuse Prevention Center in Dallas, Texas. Method: Using a quasi-experimental, retrospective research design, this project compared abuse recidivism rates for those…

  3. The Durham Family Initiative: A Preventive System of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Kenneth A.; Berlin, Lisa J.; Epstein, Matthew; Spitz-Roth, Adele; O'Donnell, Karen; Kaufman, Martha; Amaya-Jackson, Lisa; Rosch, Joel; Christopoulos, Christina

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the Durham Family Initiative (DFI), an innovative effort to bring together child welfare and juvenile justice systems to reach DFI's goal of reducing the child abuse rate in Durham, North Carolina, by 50% within the next 10 years. DFI will follow principles of a preventive system of care (PSoC), which focuses on nurturing…

  4. Preventing crime in cooperation with the mental health care profession

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harte, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Although major mental disorders do not have a central position in many criminological theories, there seems to be an evident relationship between these disorders and criminal behavior. In daily practice police officers and mental health care workers work jointly to prevent nuisance and crime and to

  5. Compliance With Infection Prevention Guidelines By Health Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the level of health-care workers' compliance with Infection Prevention Guidelines and identify factors that influence compliance at Ronald Ross General Hospital, Mufulira District. Methods: A quantitative study was carried out in 2007. Convenient sampling method was used. Data was obtained using ...

  6. Industrial Pollution Prevention Programme (IPPP) Progress report Visit to Environmental Council of Zambia (ECZ) 20.09.-01.10.98

    OpenAIRE

    Aanes, K.

    1998-01-01

    A visit to ECZ was paid by Mr. Karl Jan Aanes, NIVA, with the intention to assess to capacity of the chosen laboratories in Zambia to analyse water samples in the Water Quality Survey Programme. Along with the visting of laboratories a field trip was carried out to collect water samples from the upper part of Kafue and the main tributaries from mine sites. Parallel samples were taken and analysed both at laboratories in Zambia and at NIVA to conduct a preliminary intercalibration between the ...

  7. Nurse home visits with or without alert buttons versus usual care in the frail elderly: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favela J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Jesús Favela,1 Luis A Castro,2 Francisco Franco-Marina,3 Sergio Sánchez-García,4 Teresa Juárez-Cedillo,4 Claudia Espinel Bermudez,4 Julia Mora-Altamirano,4 Marcela D Rodriguez,5 Carmen García-Peña41Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education of Ensenada, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico; 2Sonora Institute of Technology, Ciudad Obregon, Mexico; 3National Institute of Respiratory Diseases, Mexican Ministry of Health, Mexico City, Mexico; 4Epidemiologic and Health Service Research Unit, Aging Area, XXI Century National Medical Center, Mexican Institute of Social Security, Mexico City, Mexico; 5School of Engineering, MyDCI, Autonomous University of Baja California, Mexicali, MexicoObjective: To assess whether an intervention based on nurse home visits including alert buttons (NV+AB is effective in reducing frailty compared to nurse home visits alone (NV-only and usual care (control group for older adults.Design: Unblinded, randomized, controlled trial.Setting: Insured population covered by the Mexican Social Security Institute living in the city of Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico.Participants: Patients were aged over 60 years with a frailty index score higher than 0.14.Intervention: After screening and informed consent, participants were allocated randomly to the control, NV+AB, or NV-only groups.Measurements: The primary outcome was the frailty score 9 months later. Quality of life, depression, comorbidities, health status, and health service utilization were also considered.Results: The framing sample included 819 patients. Of those, 591 were not located because they did not have a landline/telephone (341 patients, they had died (107, they were ill (50, or they were not currently living in the city (28. A screening interview was applied to 228 participants, and 57 had a score ≤0.14, 171 had ≥0.14, and 16 refused to complete the baseline questionnaire. A home visit was scheduled for 155 patients. However, 22 did not complete

  8. Undocumented migrants lack access to pregnancy care and prevention

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    Andreoli Nicole

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Illegal migration is an increasing problem worldwide and the so-called undocumented migrants encounter major problems in access to prevention and health care. The objective of the study was to compare the use of preventive measures and pregnancy care of undocumented pregnant migrants with those of women from the general population of Geneva, Switzerland. Methods Prospective cohort study including pregnant undocumented migrants presenting to the University hospital from February 2005 to October 2006. The control group consisted of a systematic sample of pregnant women with legal residency permit wishing to deliver at the same public hospital during the same time period. Results 161 undocumented and 233 control women were included in the study. Mean ages were 29.4 y (SD 5.8 and 31.1 y (SD 4.8 (p Conclusion Compared to women who are legal residents of Geneva, undocumented migrants have more unintended pregnancies and delayed prenatal care, use fewer preventive measures and are exposed to more violence during pregnancy. Not having a legal residency permit therefore suggests a particular vulnerability for pregnant women. This study underscores the need for better access to prenatal care and routine screening for violence exposure during pregnancy for undocumented migrants. Furthermore, health care systems should provide language- and culturally-appropriate education on contraception, family planning and cervical cancer screening.

  9. Treatment of Veterans with depression who died by suicide: timing and quality of care at last Veterans Health Administration visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric G; Craig, Thomas J; Ganoczy, Dara; Walters, Heather M; Valenstein, Marcia

    2011-05-01

    To examine the recency and quality of the last Veterans Health Administration (VHA) visit for patients with depression who died by suicide. We obtained services and pharmacy data for all 1,843 VHA patients with diagnosed depressive disorders (DSM-IV criteria) who died by suicide from April 1999 through September 2004. We ascertained the location and timing of their final VHA visit. For visits occurring within 30 days of suicide, we examined 3 quality indicators: (1) evidence that mental illness was a focus of the final visit, (2) adequacy of antidepressant dosage, and (3) recent receipt of mental health services. Just over half of the patients (51%) with depression diagnoses had a VHA visit within 30 days of suicide. A minority of these patients (43%) died by suicide within 30 days of a final visit with mental health services, although 64% had received such services within 91 days of their suicide. Among the 57% of patients who died by suicide within 30 days and who were seen in non-mental health settings for their final visit, only 34% had a mental health condition coded at the final visit, and only 41% were receiving adequate dosages of antidepressant (versus 55% for those last seen by mental health services) (P depression who died by suicide within 30 days of their final visit received relatively high rates of mental health services, but most final visits still occurred in non-mental health settings. Increased referrals to mental health services, attention to mental health issues in non-mental health settings, and focus on antidepressant treatment adequacy by all providers might have reduced suicide risks for these patients. © Copyright 2011 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  10. [Analysis of the status and influential factors for prenatal care and postpartum visit among pregnant women based on the First Health Service Survey in Hunan Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Cheng, Xunjie; Zhang, Lin; Ning, Peishan; Li, Li; Deng, Xin; Deng, Jing; Hu, Guoqing

    2016-11-28

    To evaluate the status and influential factors for prenatal care and postpartum visit among pregnant women in Hunan Province from 2008 to 2013 based on the data from the First Health Service Survey in Hunan Province.
 Methods: Based on the data of prenatal care and postpartum visit among pregnant women from the First Health Service Survey of Hunan Province in 2013, proportion of pregnant women, who didn't meet the criteria for prenatal care and postpartum visit, were calculated (≥5 times for prenatal care and ≥2 times for postpartum visit, according to the National Basic Public Health Service program, 2009 Edition). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify the influencial factors.
 Results: A total of 1 035 eligible women were included in data analysis. The proportion of pregnant women who did not meet the criteria were 40.12% (95% CI 24.91%-55.33%) for prenatal care and 64.88% (95% CI 39.70%-90.06%) for postpartum visit. After adjusting other confounding factors, pregnant women with middle- and high-income had lower proportions of not meeting the criteria than those with low-income, with adjusted odds ratios of 0.41 and 0.39, respectively. Multiparae had higher proportion of not meeting the criteria than primiparas, with adjusted odds ratio of 1.54, and pregnant women with age 25-34 years and 35-64 years had lower proportions of not meeting the criteria than those with age 15-24 years. In term of postpartum visit, pregnant women with middle- to high-income had lower proportions of not meeting the criteria than those with low-income, with adjusted odds ratios of 0.50, 0.46 and 0.54, respectively; multiparae had higher proportion of not meeting the criteria than primiparas, with the adjusted odds ratio of 2.30.
 Conclusion: Proportions of pregnant women of not meeting the criteria are high in Hunan Province. Local government should strengthen the management to decrease the proportions of pregnant women who do not meet the standard in

  11. Delinquency and Crime Prevention: Overview of Research Comparing Treatment Foster Care and Group Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, Gershon K.; Gorey, Kevin M.; Jozefowicz, Debra M. Hernandez

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence of treatment foster care (TFC) and group care's (GC) potential to prevent delinquency and crime has been developing. Objectives: We clarified the state of comparative knowledge with a historical overview. Then we explored the hypothesis that smaller, probably better resourced group homes with smaller staff/resident ratios have…

  12. Informal Caregiver Disability and Access to Preventive Care in Care Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Joshua M; Thorpe, Carolyn T; Schulz, Richard; Van Houtven, Courtney H; Schleiden, Loren

    2015-09-01

    Many informal caregivers of dependent midlife and older adults suffer from their own functional limitations. The impact of caregiver functional limitations on care recipient receipt of preventive services is unknown. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between caregiver functional limitations and decreased access to recommended preventive services in dependent care recipients. Dependent adults (those receiving assistance with activities of daily living or instrumental activities of daily living) and their primary informal caregiver were identified from pooled alternate years (2000-2008) of the nationally representative Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (data analyzed February-October 2014). The impact of caregiver limitations (cognitive, mobility, sensory, emotional health) on care recipient's receipt of up to seven different preventive services was assessed via survey-weighted linear and logistic regression. Of the 5-year weighted estimate of 14.2 million caregiver-care recipient dyads, 38.0% of caregivers reported at least one functional limitation. The percentage of recommended preventive services received by care recipients was significantly lower if the caregiver had cognitive, mobility, or emotional health limitations. Each type of caregiver functional limitation was negatively associated with at least four different preventive services. Informal caregivers burdened by their own functional impairments may face challenges in facilitating access to preventive care in dependent midlife and older adults. Policies and interventions designed to prevent or mitigate the impact of caregiver functional impairments are critical to the success of community-based models of care for dependent adults. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Income-related inequalities in preventive and curative dental care use among working-age Japanese adults in urban areas: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Keiko; Aida, Jun; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2014-09-19

    Preventive dental care use remains relatively low in Japan, especially among working-age adults. Universal health insurance in Japan covers curative dental care with an out-of-pocket payment limit, though its coverage of preventive dental care is limited. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that income inequality in dental care use is found in preventive, but not curative dental care among working-age Japanese adults. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a computer-assisted, self-administered format for community residents aged 25-50 years. In all, 4357 residents agreed to participate and complete the questionnaire (valid response rate: 31.3%). Preventive dental care use was measured according to whether the participant had visited a dentist or a dental hygienist during the past year for dental scaling or fluoride or orthodontic treatments. Curative dental care use was assessed by dental visits for other reasons. The main explanatory variable was equivalent household income. Logistic regression analyses with linear trend tests were conducted to determine whether there were significant income-related gradients with curative or preventive dental care use. Among the respondents, 40.0% of men and 41.5% of women had used curative dental care in the past year; 24.1% of men and 34.1% of women had used preventive care. We found no significant income-related gradients of curative dental care among either men or women (p = 0.234 and p = 0.270, respectively). Significant income-related gradients of preventive care were observed among both men and women (p income-related differences were no longer significant (p = 0.126) after adjusting for education and other covariates. Compared with men with the lowest income, the highest-income group had a 1.79-fold significantly higher probability for using preventive dental care. The prevalence of preventive dental care use was lower than that of curative care. The results showed income-related inequality in

  14. [Infection prevention and control in neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Elisiane; Lorenzini, Elisiane; da Costa, Tatiane Costa; da Silva, Eveline Franco

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed to identify the knowledge of the nursing team of a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) on infection control, identijfying the factors that facilitate or hinder the prevention and control of Healthcare Associated Infections (HICAI). A descriptive study using a qualitative research method conducted with three nurses and 15 nurse technicians, who work in a NICU of a charitable organization, in southern Brazil. It became evident that the nursing staff had great knowledge about the factors that facilitate the prevention and control of HCAI in NICU, the most important factor being proper hand hygiene. Among the factors that hinder infection prevention and control are to overcrowding and excessive workload. The efficient performance of the nursing staff is an important part of the strategy for prevention and control of HCAI.

  15. Visit Itinerary

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The visit itinerary includes five area of halls 191 and 180:. End-Cap Toroid Integration Area . Barrel Toroid Integration Area . Cryogenic Test Facility for Toroid Magnets and Helium Pumps . Liquid Argon Cryostats Assembly Area . Central Solenoid Magnet Test Station

  16. Technology-Based Innovations in Child Maltreatment Prevention Programs: Examples from SafeCare®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Cowart-Osborne

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Each year, hundreds of thousands of children in the U.S. are victims of child maltreatment. Experts recommend behavioral, skill-based parent training programs as a strategy for the prevention of child abuse and neglect. These programs can be enhanced using innovative technology strategies. This paper presents a brief history of the use of technology in SafeCare®, a home visiting program shown to prevent child neglect and physical abuse, and highlights current work that takes a technology-based hybrid approach to SafeCare delivery. With this unique approach, the provider brings a tablet computer to each session, and the parent interacts with the software to receive psychoeducation and modeling of target skills. The provider and parent then work together to practice the targeted skills until mastery is achieved. Initial findings from ongoing research of both of these strategies indicate that they show potential for improving engagement and use of positive parenting skills for parents and ease of implementation for providers. Future directions for technology enhancements in SafeCare are also presented.

  17. Control beliefs are related to smoking prevention in prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemola, Sakari; Meyer-Leu, Yvonne; Samochowiec, Jakub; Grob, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Smoking during pregnancy is one of the most important avoidable health risks for the unborn child. Gynaecologists and midwives play a fundamental role in the prevention of smoking during pregnancy. However, a large number of health care practitioners still do not address smoking in pregnant patients. We examined whether gynaecologists and midwives engage in screening and counselling of pregnant women and conducting interventions to prevent smoking during pregnancy. Further, we examined the role of gynaecologists' and midwives' control beliefs. Control beliefs involve efficacy expectations--the practitioner's confidence in his capacity to conduct prevention efforts adequately--and outcome expectations--the practitioner's expectation that such prevention efforts are successful in general. A total of 486 gynaecologists and 366 midwives completed a questionnaire on screening of smoking, counselling and other interventions they conduct to prevent smoking during pregnancy. Moreover, gynaecologists and midwives rated their control beliefs regarding their influence on pregnant patients' smoking habits. The majority of gynaecologists and midwives reported screening all pregnant patients regarding smoking, explaining the risks and recommending smoking cessation. By contrast, only a minority engages in more extensive prevention efforts. Strong control beliefs were predictive of a higher likelihood of screening and counselling, as well as of engaging in more extensive interventions. The findings point to the importance of strengthening gynaecologists' and midwives' control beliefs by professional education and training on smoking prevention. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Are the timings and risk factors changing? Survival analysis of timing of first antenatal care visit among pregnant women in Nigeria (2003–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagbamigbe AF

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Adeniyi Francis Fagbamigbe,1,2 Baitshephi Mashabe,1 Lornah Lepetu,1 Clearance Abel1 1Department of Mathematics and Statistical Sciences, Botswana International University of Science and Technology, Palapye, Botswana; 2Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria Background: Child and maternal mortality and morbidity remain among the top global health challenges despite various efforts and multitude of resources directed to improving this situation over time. This study assessed trend of the timings of first antenatal care (ANC visit in Nigeria and also identified the risk factors associated with it.Methods: The data obtained from three consecutive Nigerian Demographic and Health Surveys in 2003, 2008, and 2013 were pooled. We focused on the ANC attendance history during the current pregnancies or the last pregnancies within 5 years preceding the survey irrespective of how the pregnancy ended. The gestational age at time of first ANC visit was computed as the survival time, while others who did not attend ANC were censored. Basic descriptive statistics and survival analysis methods were used to analyze the data.Results: A total of 45,690 pregnancies were studied, of which 70% were from rural areas. Mothers were mostly (45% aged 25–34 years and 47.1% had no formal education, while only 37.9% were involved in decisions on the use of health care facility. Prevalence of ANC use was 60.5% in 2008 and 65.8% in both 2003 and 2013. Less than one-third (32.3% of the women accessed ANC within first 3 months of pregnancy, with highest rate (41.7% among women with higher education and those from North Central Nigeria (42.7%. The hazard of the timing of first ANC visit was higher in years 2003 and 2013 than in 2008.Conclusion: Initiation of ANC visit in Nigeria is generally late with most women making first visit during second trimester, with significant variations across the years studied. The increase in

  19. National infection prevention and control programmes: Endorsing quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempliuk, Valeska; Ramon-Pardo, Pilar; Holder, Reynaldo

    2014-01-01

    Core components Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In addition to pain and suffering, HAIs increase the cost of health care and generates indirect costs from loss of productivity for patients and society as a whole. Since 2005, the Pan American Health Organization has provided support to countries for the assessment of their capacities in infection prevention and control (IPC). More than 130 hospitals in 18 countries were found to have poor IPC programmes. However, in the midst of many competing health priorities, IPC programmes are not high on the agenda of ministries of health, and the sustainability of national programmes is not viewed as a key point in making health care systems more consistent and trustworthy. Comprehensive IPC programmes will enable countries to reduce the mobility, mortality and cost of HAIs and improve quality of care. This paper addresses the relevance of national infection prevention and control (NIPC) programmes in promoting, supporting and reinforcing IPC interventions at the level of hospitals. A strong commitment from national health authorities in support of national IPC programmes is crucial to obtaining a steady decrease of HAIs, lowering health costs due to HAIs and ensuring safer care.

  20. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in Intensive Care Unit: Prevention, Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy has substantial prognostic implications in an intensive care unit, given its increased mortality risk and association with life-threatening complications. This report seeks to discuss diagnostic modalities that can be useful in accurately differentiating Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy from Acute Coronary Syndrome, and also briefly discuss prevention and management of this cardiomyopathy in an intensive care unit. For critically ill Takotsubo patients, intensive clinicians can consider establishment of diagnosis by specific electrocardiograph changes, distinctive marked release of cardiac enzymes, characteristic echocardiograph findings, as well as invasive coronary angiography or noninvasive cardiac magnetic imaging.

  1. Perceptions of Oral Health, Preventive Care, and Care-Seeking Behaviors Among Rural Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Virginia J.; Logan, Henrietta; Brown, Cameron D.; Calderon, Angela; Catalanotto, Frank

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND An asymmetrical oral disease burden is endured by certain population subgroups, particularly children and adolescents. Reducing oral health disparities requires understanding multiple oral health perspectives, including those of adolescents. This qualitative study explores oral health perceptions and dental care behaviors among rural adolescents. METHODS Semistructured individual interviews with 100 rural, minority, low socioeconomic status adolescents revealed their current perceptions of oral health and dental care access. Respondents age ranged from 12 to 18 years. The sample was 80% black and 52% male. RESULTS Perceived threat from dental disease was low. Adolescents perceived regular brushing and flossing as superseding the need for preventive care. Esthetic reasons were most often cited as reasons to seek dental care. Difficulties accessing dental care include finances, transportation, fear, issues with Medicaid coverage and parental responsibility. In general, adolescents and their parents are in need of information regarding the importance of preventive dental care. CONCLUSIONS Findings illuminate barriers to dental care faced by low-income rural adolescents and counter public perceptions of government-sponsored dental care programs as being “free” or without cost. The importance of improved oral health knowledge, better access to care, and school-based dental care is discussed. PMID:25388597

  2. Designing a patient-centered personal health record to promote preventive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krist Alex H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based preventive services offer profound health benefits, yet Americans receive only half of indicated care. A variety of government and specialty society policy initiatives are promoting the adoption of information technologies to engage patients in their care, such as personal health records, but current systems may not utilize the technology's full potential. Methods Using a previously described model to make information technology more patient-centered, we developed an interactive preventive health record (IPHR designed to more deeply engage patients in preventive care and health promotion. We recruited 14 primary care practices to promote the IPHR to all adult patients and sought practice and patient input in designing the IPHR to ensure its usability, salience, and generalizability. The input involved patient usability tests, practice workflow observations, learning collaboratives, and patient feedback. Use of the IPHR was measured using practice appointment and IPHR databases. Results The IPHR that emerged from this process generates tailored patient recommendations based on guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and other organizations. It extracts clinical data from the practices' electronic medical record and obtains health risk assessment information from patients. Clinical content is translated and explained in lay language. Recommendations review the benefits and uncertainties of services and possible actions for patients and clinicians. Embedded in recommendations are self management tools, risk calculators, decision aids, and community resources - selected to match patient's clinical circumstances. Within six months, practices had encouraged 14.4% of patients to use the IPHR (ranging from 1.5% to 28.3% across the 14 practices. Practices successfully incorporated the IPHR into workflow, using it to prepare patients for visits, augment health behavior counseling, explain test results

  3. Preventive care and recall intervals. Targeting of services in child dental care in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N J; Aspelund, G Ø

    2010-03-01

    Skewed caries distribution has made interesting the use of a high risk strategy in child dental services. The purpose of this study was to describe the preventive dental care given and the recall intervals used for children and adolescents in a low caries risk population, and to study how the time spent for preventive care and the length of intervals were associated with characteristics of the children and factors related to care delivery. Time spent for and type of preventive care, recall intervals, oral health and health behaviour of children and adolescents three to 18 years of age (n = 576) and the preventive services delivered were registered at routine dental examinations in the public dental services. The time used for preventive dental care was on average 22% of the total time used in a course of treatment (7.3 of 33.4 minutes). Less than 15% of the variation in time spent for prevention was explained by oral health, oral health behaviours and other characteristics of the children and the service delivery. The mean (SD) recall intervals were 15.4 (4.6) months and 55% of the children were given intervals equal to or longer than 18 months. Approximately 30% of the variation in the length of the recall intervals was explained by characteristics of the child and the service delivery. The time used for preventive dental care of children in a low risk population was standardized, while the recall intervals to a certain extent were individualized according to dental health and dental health behaviour.

  4. Prevention of mental handicaps in children in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, P M

    1991-01-01

    Some 5-15% of children aged 3 to 15 years in both developing and developed countries suffer from mental handicaps. There may be as many as 10-30 million severely and about 60-80 million mildly or moderately mentally retarded children in the world. The conditions causing mental handicaps are largely preventable through primary health care measures in developing countries. Birth asphyxia and birth trauma are the leading causes of mental handicaps in developing countries where over 1.2 million newborns die each year from moderate or severe asphyxia and an equal number survive with severe morbidity due to brain damage. The other preventable or manageable conditions are: infections such as tuberculous and pyogenic meningitides and encephalopathies associated with measles and whooping cough; severe malnutrition in infancy; hyperbilirubinaemia in the newborn; iodine deficiency; and iron deficiency anaemia in infancy and early childhood. In addition, recent demographic and socioeconomic changes and an increase in the number of working mothers tend to deprive both infants and young children of stimulation for normal development. To improve this situation, the primary health care approach involving families and communities and instilling the spirit of self-care and self-help is indispensable. Mothers and other family members, traditional birth attendants, community health workers, as well as nurse midwives and physicians should be involved in prevention and intervention activities, for which they should be trained and given knowledge and skills about appropriate technologies such as the risk approach, home-based maternal record, partograph, mobilogram (kick count), home-risk card, icterometer, and mouth-to-mask or bag and mask resuscitation of the newborn. Most of these have been field-tested by WHO and can be used in the home, the health centre or day care centres to detect and prevent the above-mentioned conditions which can cause mental handicap.

  5. Assessment of the management factors that influence the development of preventive care in the New South Wales public dental service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoe AV

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Angela V Masoe,1 Anthony S Blinkhorn,2 Jane Taylor,1 Fiona A Blinkhorn1 1Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Health Sciences, Oral Health, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, 2Department of Population Oral Health, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Background: Oral diseases, particularly dental caries, remain one of the most common chronic health problems for adolescents, and are a major public health concern. Public dental services in New South Wales, Australia offer free clinical care and preventive advice to all adolescents under 18 years of age, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds. This care is provided by dental therapists and oral health therapists (therapists. It is incumbent upon clinical directors (CDs and health service managers (HSMs to ensure that the appropriate clinical preventive care is offered by clinicians to all their patients. The aims of this study were to 1 explore CDs’ and HSMs’ perceptions of the factors that could support the delivery of preventive care to adolescents, and to 2 record the strategies they have utilized to help therapists provide preventive care to adolescents. Subjects and methods: In-depth, semistructured interviews were undertaken with 19 CDs and HSMs from across NSW local health districts. A framework matrix was used to systematically code data and enable key themes to be identified for analysis. Results: The 19 CDs and HSMs reported that fiscal accountability and meeting performance targets impacted on the levels and types of preventive care provided by therapists. Participants suggested that professional clinical structures for continuous quality improvement should be implemented and monitored, and that an adequate workforce mix and more resources for preventive dental care activities would enhance therapists’ ability to provide appropriate levels of preventive care. CDs and HSMs stated that capitalizing on the strengths of visiting pediatric

  6. Opportunities for Prevention: Assessing Where Low-Income Patients Seek Care for Preventable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaiman, Tamar A; Valdmanis, Vivian G; Bernet, Patrick; Moises, James

    2015-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act has many aspects that are aimed at improving health care for all Americans, including mandated insurance coverage for individuals, as well as required community health needs assessments (CHNAs), and reporting of investments in community benefit by nonprofit hospitals in order to maintain tax exemptions. Although millions of Americans have gained access to health insurance, many--often the most vulnerable--remain uninsured, and will continue to depend on hospital community benefits for care. Understanding where patients go for care can assist hospitals and communities to develop their CHNA and implementation plans in order to focus resources where the need for prevention is greatest. This study evaluated patient care-seeking behavior among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) in Florida in 2008--analyzed in 2013--to assess whether low-income patients accessed specific safety net hospitals for treatment or received care from hospitals that were geographically closer to their residence. This study found evidence that low-income patients went to hospitals that treated more low-income patients, regardless of where they lived. The findings demonstrate that hospitals-especially public safety net hospitals with a tradition of treating low-income patients suffering from CAD-should focus prevention activities where low-income patients reside.

  7. Optimizing the Primary Prevention of Type-2 Diabetes in Primary Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-18

    Interprofessional Relations; Primary Health Care/Organization & Administration; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/Prevention & Control; Primary Prevention/Methods; Risk Reduction Behavior; Randomized Controlled Trial; Life Style

  8. Polish visit

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    On 6 October, Professor Michal Kleiber, Polish Minister of Science and Chairman of the State Committee for Scientific Research, visited CERN and met both the current and designated Director General, Luciano Maiani and Robert Aymar. Professor Kleiber visited the CMS and ATLAS detector assembly halls, the underground cavern for ATLAS, and the LHC superconducting magnet string test hall. Michal Kleiber (left), Polish minister of science and Jan Krolikowski, scientist at Warsaw University and working for CMS, who shows the prototypes of the Muon Trigger board of CMS.

  9. Austrian visit

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Hans Hoffmann, Director for Technology Transfer and Scientific Computing, and Maria Rauch-Kallat, Minister of Health and Women's Issues, Austria, signing the visitors' book.Maria Rauch-Kallat, Minister of Health and Women's Issues, Austria, was welcomed by Hans Hoffmann, Director for Technology Transfer and Scientific Computing, on her visit to CERN on 19 May 2003. The theme of the visit was Technology Transfer and spin-offs from CERN for medical applications. Maria Rauch-Kallat toured also the installations of ATLAS.

  10. Analysis of team types based on collaborative relationships among doctors, home-visiting nurses and care managers for effective support of patients in end-of-life home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Junko; Fukui, Sakiko; Ikezaki, Sumie; Otoguro, Chizuru; Tsujimura, Mayuko

    2017-11-01

    To define the team types consisting of doctors, home-visiting nurses and care managers for end-of-life care by measuring the collaboration relationship, and to identify the factors related to the team types. A questionnaire survey of 43 teams including doctors, home-visiting nurses and care managers was carried out. The team types were classified based on mutual evaluations of the collaborative relationships among the professionals. To clarify the factors between team types with the patient characteristics, team characteristics and collaboration competency, univariate analysis was carried out with the Fisher's exact test or one-way analysis and multiple comparison analysis. Three team types were classified: the team where the collaborative relationships among all healthcare professionals were good; the team where the collaborative relationships between the doctors and care managers were poor; and the team where the collaborative relationships among all of the professionals were poor. There was a statistically significant association between the team types and the following variables: patient's dementia level, communication tool, professionals' experience of working with other team members, home-visiting nurses' experience of caring for dying patients, care managers' background qualifications, doctor's face-to-face cooperation with other members and home-visiting nurses' collaborative practice. It is suggested that a collaborative relationship would be fostered by more experience of working together, using communication tools and enhancing each professional's collaboration competency. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1943-1950. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  11. Health care providers' missed opportunities for preventing femicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharps, P W; Koziol-McLain, J; Campbell, J; McFarlane, J; Sachs, C; Xu, X

    2001-11-01

    Homicide of women (femicide) by intimate partners is the most serious form of violence against women. The purpose of this analysis of a larger multisite study was to describe health care use in the year prior to murder of women by their intimate partner in order to identify opportunities for intervention to prevent femicide. A sample of femicide cases was identified from police or medical examiner records. Participants (n = 311) were proxy informants (most often female family members) of victims of intimate partner femicide from 11 U.S. cities. Information about prior domestic abuse and use of health care and other helping agencies for victims and perpetrators was obtained during structured telephone interviews. Most victims had been abused by their partners (66%) and had used health care agencies for either injury or physical or mental health problems (41%). Among women who had been pregnant during the relationship, 23% were beaten by partners during pregnancy. Among perpetrators with fair or poor physical health, 53% had contact with physicians and 15% with fair or poor mental health had seen a doctor about their mental health problem. Among perpetrators with substance problems, 5.4% had used alcohol treatment programs and 5.7% had used drug treatment programs. Frequent contacts with helping agencies by victims and perpetrators represent opportunities for the prevention of femicide by health care providers. Copyright 2001 American Health Foundation and Academic Press.

  12. Impact of community based, specialist palliative care teams on hospitalisations and emergency department visits late in life and hospital deaths: a pooled analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazil, Kevin; Sussman, Jonathan; Pereira, José; Marshall, Denise; Austin, Peter C; Husain, Amna; Rangrej, Jagadish; Barbera, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the pooled effect of exposure to one of 11 specialist palliative care teams providing services in patients’ homes. Design Pooled analysis of a retrospective cohort study. Setting Ontario, Canada. Participants 3109 patients who received care from specialist palliative care teams in 2009-11 (exposed) matched by propensity score to 3109 patients who received usual care (unexposed). Intervention The palliative care teams studied served different geographies and varied in team composition and size but had the same core team members and role: a core group of palliative care physicians, nurses, and family physicians who provide integrated palliative care to patients in their homes. The teams’ role was to manage symptoms, provide education and care, coordinate services, and be available without interruption regardless of time or day. Main outcome measures Patients (a) being in hospital in the last two weeks of life; (b) having an emergency department visit in the last two weeks of life; or (c) dying in hospital. Results In both exposed and unexposed groups, about 80% had cancer and 78% received end of life homecare services for the same average duration. Across all palliative care teams, 970 (31.2%) of the exposed group were in hospital and 896 (28.9%) had an emergency department visit in the last two weeks of life respectively, compared with 1219 (39.3%) and 1070 (34.5%) of the unexposed group (Pteams, despite variation in team composition and geographies, were effective at reducing acute care use and hospital deaths at the end of life. PMID:24906901

  13. Factors associated with dental visit and barriers to utilisation of oral health care services in a sample of antenatal mothers in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Saddki, Norkhafizah; Yusoff, Azizah; Hwang, Yew L

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The aims of this study were to determine factors associated with dental visit and to describe barriers to utilisation of oral health care services among antenatal mothers attending the Obstetric and Gynaecology Specialist clinic in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia. Methods A structured, self-administered questionnaire was used obtain information on the variables of interest pertaining to the current pregnancy from 124 antenatal mothers. Results The majority of the mother...

  14. Preventive physical therapy and care humanization in the treatment of a bedridden, home care, neurologic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Faria

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: This case study investigated the impact of preventive physical therapy on shoulder problems and the prevention of pressure ulcers (PU in a bedridden, home care, post-neurological surgery patient. Objective: To highlight the importance of physical therapy in the prevention of comorbidities, chronic neurological sequelae, and PU. Materials and Methods: In the immediate post-surgical phase, the patient was treated with preventive measures against PU, according to the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Protocol of the University of São Paulo, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, and the Braden Scale. In addition, we used the modified Ashworth scale to assess spasticity. A kinesiotherapy program based on the Bobath's concept was used to prevent subluxation of the plegic arm and help in the recovery of functional movements. Results: The use of preventive measures and delivery of humanized care during a six-month period helped prevent the development of stage 3 and 4 PU and physical, functional, and respiratory complications. By the end of six months, the patient was found to be at low risk of developing PU. Conclusion: Notwithstanding the difficulties experienced during treatment, especially for the positioning of the arm and performance of transferring and positioning techniques, the results of this study are in agreement with aspects considered important for treatment outcomes.

  15. Clinical Updates in Women's Health Care Primary and Preventive Care Review Summary: Common Dermatologic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorsand, Kate O; Iyer, Jayasri G; Abson, Kim Gittere

    2018-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ in the human body, and as such, cutaneous problems constitute a common component of visits to medical professionals. The skin functions as a physiologic barrier and a major organ of homeostasis. The practicing obstetrician-gynecologist can play an important role in identifying skin diseases and initiating management. Additionally, the skin often reflects internal disease states. An astute health care provider can identify systemic conditions early, with the goal of improving management. This monograph reviews common cutaneous conditions, both benign and malignant, hair and nail disorders, and skin conditions unique to the adult woman.

  16. Paging "Dr. Google": does technology fill the gap created by the prenatal care visit structure? Qualitative focus group study with pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; Chuang, Cynthia H; Poole, Erika S; Peyton, Tamara; Blubaugh, Ian; Pauli, Jaimey; Feher, Alyssa; Reddy, Madhu

    2014-06-03

    The prenatal care visit structure has changed little over the past century despite the rapid evolution of technology including Internet and mobile phones. Little is known about how pregnant women engage with technologies and the interface between these tools and medical care, especially for women of lower socioeconomic status. We sought to understand how women use technology during pregnancy through a qualitative study with women enrolled in the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program. We recruited pregnant women ages 18 and older who owned a smartphone, at a WIC clinic in central Pennsylvania. The focus group guide included questions about women's current pregnancy, their sources of information, and whether they used technology for pregnancy-related information. Sessions were audiotaped and transcribed. Three members of the research team independently analyzed each transcript, using a thematic analysis approach. Themes related to the topics discussed were identified, for which there was full agreement. Four focus groups were conducted with a total of 17 women. Three major themes emerged as follows. First, the prenatal visit structure is not patient-centered, with the first visit perceived as occurring too late and with too few visits early in pregnancy when women have the most questions for their prenatal care providers. Unfortunately, the educational materials women received during prenatal care were viewed as unhelpful. Second, women turn to technology (eg, Google, smartphone applications) to fill their knowledge gaps. Turning to technology was viewed to be a generational approach. Finally, women reported that technology, although frequently used, has limitations. The results of this qualitative research suggest that the current prenatal care visit structure is not patient-centered in that it does not allow women to seek advice when they want it most. A generational shift seems to have occurred, resulting in pregnant women in our study turning to the Internet

  17. The effect of community health nurse home visit on self-care self-efficacy of the elderly living in selected Falavarjan villages in Iran in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Habibollah; Torkani, Sara; Tavakol, Khosrow

    2013-01-01

    Perceived self-efficacy is a strong predictor for behavior. Considering the importance of health-promoting self-care behaviors in increasing quality of life in the elderly, this study was aimed at defining the effect of nurse home visits on self-care self-efficacy of the elderly in rural areas. This is a pre and post quasi-experimental study conducted on 33 older adults randomly selected from five villages in Falavarjan province in Iran. Intervention program was in the direction of self-care self-efficacy in four domains including nutrition, health practice, physical activity, and well-being in the form of five home visit programs and one group session by a nurse during 6 weeks, and included two different sections of education and nursing interventions administered based on needs assessment and determination of the tasks for the clients and their families. Theoretical framework of this study was supported by Bandura's self-efficacy, Orem's self-care theory, and Pender's revised health promotion model. The data were collected by self-care self-efficacy and demographic information questionnaire before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and paired t-test. The mean elderly score in the four aforementioned domains increased after the home visit program. A significant difference was seen in the mean total scores of self-care self-efficacy and its subscales by paired t-test before and after intervention (P health promotion of the elderly, multifaceted low-cost interventions with the highest effect seem essential.

  18. Group Medical Visits (GMVs) in primary care: an RCT of group-based versus individual appointments to reduce HbA1c in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Karim M; Windt, Adriaan; Davis, Jennifer C; Dawes, Martin; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Madden, Ken; Marra, Carlo A; Housden, Laura; Hoppmann, Christiane; Adams, David J

    2015-07-13

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) affects more than 1.1 million Canadians aged ≥65 years. Group Medical Visits are an emerging health service delivery method. Recent systematic reviews show that they can significantly reduce glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, but Group Visits have not been evaluated within primary care. We intend to determine the clinical effectiveness, quality of life and economic implications of Group Medical Visits within a primary care setting for older people with T2DM. A 2-year proof-of-concept, single-blinded (measurement team) randomised control trial to test the efficacy of Group Medical Visits in an urban Canadian primary care setting. Participants ≥65 years old with T2DM (N=128) will be equally randomised to either eight groups of eight patients each (Group Medical Visits; Intervention) or to Individual visits (Standard Care; Controls). Those administering cointerventions are not blinded to group assignment. Our sample size is based on estimates of variance (±1.4% for HbA1c) and effect size (0.9/1.4=0.6) from the literature and from our own preliminary data. Forty participants per group will provide a β likelihood of 0.80, assuming an α of 0.05. A conservative estimation of an effect size of 0.7/1.4 changes the N in the power calculation to 59 per group. Hence, we aim to enrol 64 participants in each study arm. We will use intention-to-treat analysis and compare mean HbA1c (% glycosylated HbA1c) (primary outcome) of Intervention/Control participants at 12 months, 24 months and 1 year postintervention on selected clinical, patient-rated and economic measures. NCT02002143. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. European visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The European Commissioner for Science and Research, Janez Potočnik, (on the right) visited the CMS assembly hall accompanied by Jim Virdee, Deputy Spokesman of CMS (on the left), and Robert Aymar, Director-General of CERN. The European Commissioner for Science and Research, Janez Potočnik, visited CERN on Tuesday 31 January. He was welcomed by the Director-General, Robert Aymar, who described the missions and current activities of CERN to him, in particular the realisation of the LHC with its three components: accelerator, detectors, storage and processing of data. The European Commissioner then visited the CMS assembly hall, then the hall for testing the LHC magnets and the ATLAS cavern. During this first visit since his appointment at the end of 2004, Janez Potočnik appeared very interested by the operation of CERN, an example of successful scientific co-operation on a European scale. The many projects (30 on average) that CERN and the European Commission carry out jointly for the benefit of res...

  20. Early intervention of multiple home visits to prevent childhood obesity in a disadvantaged population: a home-based randomised controlled trial (Healthy Beginnings Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alperstein Garth

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that a proportion of children as young as two years are already overweight. This indicates that obesity prevention programs that commence as early as possible and are family-focused are needed. This Healthy Beginnings Trial aims to determine the efficacy of a community-based randomized controlled trial (RCT of a home visiting intervention in preventing the early onset of childhood overweight and obesity. The intervention will be conducted over the first two years of life to increase healthy feeding behaviours and physical activity, decrease physical inactivity, enhance parent-child interaction, and hence reduce overweight and obesity among children at 2 and 5 years of age in the most socially and economically disadvantaged areas of Sydney, Australia. Methods/design This RCT will be conducted with a consecutive sample of 782 first time mothers with their newborn children. Pregnant women who are expecting their first child, and who are between weeks 24 and 34 of their pregnancy, will be invited to participate in the trial at the antenatal clinic. Informed consent will be obtained and participants will then be randomly allocated to the intervention or the control group. The allocation will be concealed by sequentially numbered, sealed opaque envelopes containing a computer generated random number. The intervention comprises eight home visits from a specially trained community nurse over two years and pro-active telephone support between the visits. Main outcomes include a duration of breastfeeding measured at 6 and 12 months, b introduction of solids measured at 4 and 6 months, c nutrition, physical activity and television viewing measured at 24 months, and d overweight/obesity status at age 2 and 5 years. Discussion The results of this trial will ascertain whether the home based early intervention is effective in preventing the early onset of childhood overweight and obesity. If proved to be effective, it

  1. Technologies for HIV prevention and care: challenges for health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksud, Ivia; Fernandes, Nilo Martinez; Filgueiras, Sandra Lucia

    2015-09-01

    This article aims to consider some relevant challenges to the provision of "new prevention technologies" in health services in a scenario where the "advances" in the global response to AIDS control are visible. We take as material for analysis the information currently available on the HIV post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), treatment as prevention (TASP) and over the counter. The methodology consisted of the survey and analysis of the Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (BVS: MEDLINE, LILACS, WHOLIS, PAHO, SciELO) articles that addressed the issue of HIV prevention and care in the context of so-called new prevention technologies. The results of the studies show that there is assistance on the ground of clinics for the treatment of disease responses, but there are several challenges related to the sphere of prevention. The articles list some challenges regarding to management, organization of services and the attention given by health professionals to users. The current context shows evidence of the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy in reducing the risk of HIV transmission, but the challenges for the provision of preventive technologies in health services permeate health professionals and users in their individual dimensions and health services in organizational and structural dimension. Interventions should be made available in a context of community mobilization; there should be no pressure on people to make HIV testing, antiretroviral treatment or for prevention. In the management is responsible for the training of health professionals to inform, clarify and make available to users, partners and family information about the new antiretroviral use strategies.

  2. Improving preventive health care in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailie, Jodie; Matthews, Veronica; Laycock, Alison; Schultz, Rosalie; Burgess, Christopher P; Peiris, David; Larkins, Sarah; Bailie, Ross

    2017-07-14

    Like other colonised populations, Indigenous Australians experience poorer health outcomes than non-Indigenous Australians. Preventable chronic disease is the largest contributor to the health differential between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, but recommended best-practice preventive care is not consistently provided to Indigenous Australians. Significant improvement in health care delivery could be achieved through identifying and minimising evidence-practice gaps. Our objective was to use clinical audit data to create a framework of the priority evidence-practice gaps, strategies to address them, and drivers to support these strategies in the delivery of recommended preventive care. De-identified preventive health clinical audit data from 137 primary health care (PHC) centres in five jurisdictions were analysed (n = 17,108 audited records of well adults with no documented major chronic disease; 367 system assessments; 2005-2014), together with stakeholder survey data relating to interpretation of these data, using a mixed-methods approach (n = 152 responses collated in 2015-16). Stakeholders surveyed included clinicians, managers, policy officers, continuous quality improvement (CQI) facilitators and academics. Priority evidence-practice gaps and associated barriers, enablers and strategies to address the gaps were identified and reported back through two-stages of consultation. Further analysis and interpretation of these data were used to develop a framework of strategies and drivers for health service improvement. Stakeholder identified priorities were: following-up abnormal test results; completing cardiovascular risk assessments; timely recording of results; recording enquiries about living conditions, family relationships and substance use; providing support for clients identified with emotional wellbeing risk; enhancing systems to enable team function and continuity of care. Drivers identified for improving care in these areas included

  3. Falls prevention in community care: 10 years on

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton E

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Elissa Burton,1 Gill Lewin,2 Hilary O’Connell,3 Keith D Hill1 1School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, 2School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, Curtin University, 3Independent Living Centre WA, Perth, WA, Australia Background: A million older people living in Australia receive community care services each year due to experiencing functional or mental health difficulties. This group may be at greater risk of falling than similar-aged people not receiving services. However, there is limited falls prevention research for this population.Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify the falls prevalence rates of older people from 10 Australian community care organizations and compare current falls prevention data to a study 10 years prior that utilized the same 10 organizations. This study also identified factors associated with falling for this population.Patients and methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study, in which 5,338 questionnaires were mailed to a random sample of community care recipients aged ≥65 years. Results: A total of 1,991 questionnaires were returned (37.3%, with 47.7% of respondents having fallen in the previous year, and 32.7% in the month prior to completing the questionnaire, similar to 10 years prior. Community care clients had a 50% higher falls rate than that reported for similar-aged people not receiving services, and this remained unchanged over the last 10 years. Eighty-six per cent of fallers had fallen once or twice, and 60% reported being injured. Thirty-six per cent of respondents reported not being able to get up independently, and only 27.4% of fallers were referred to a falls prevention program (significantly fewer than 10 years ago; 95% CI: 0.821–6.366, p=0.01. Balance issues (odds ratio [OR]: 2.06, 95% CI: 1.288–3.290, p=0.003 and perceived risk of falling in the future being “definite” (OR: 6.42, 95% CI: 1.890–21.808, p=0.003 or “unsure” (OR: 3

  4. Personalized Web-Based Advice in Combination With Well-Child Visits to Prevent Overweight in Young Children: Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Grieken, Amy; Vlasblom, Eline; Wang, Lu; Beltman, Maaike; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M; L'Hoir, Monique P; Raat, Hein

    2017-07-27

    Overweight is a major health issue, and parent-targeted interventions to promote healthy development in children are needed. The study aimed to evaluate E-health4Uth Healthy Toddler, an intervention that educates parents of children aged 18 to 24 months regarding health-related behaviors, as compared with usual care. The effect of this intervention on the following primary outcomes was evaluated when the children were 36 months of age: health-related behaviors (breakfast daily, activity and outside play, sweetened beverage consumption, television (TV) viewing and computer time), body mass index (BMI), and the prevalence of overweight and obesity. The BeeBOFT (acronym for breastfeeding, breakfast daily, outside playing, few sweet drinks, less TV viewing) study is a cluster randomized controlled trial involving 51 Youth Health Care (YHC) teams. In total, 1094 parents participated in the control group, and 1008 parents participated in the E-health4Uth Healthy Toddler intervention group. The intervention consisted of Web-based personalized advice given to parents who completed an eHealth module and discussion of the advice during a regular well-child visit. In this study the eHealth module was offered to parents before two regular well-child visits at 18 and 24 months of age. During the well-child visits, the parents' personalized advice was combined with face-to-face counseling provided by the YHC professional. Parents in the control group received usual care, consisting of the regular well-child visits during which general information on child health-related behavior was provided to parents. Parents completed questionnaires regarding family characteristics and health-related behaviors when the child was 1 month (inclusion), 6 months, 14 months, and 36 months (follow-up) of age. The child's height and weight were measured by trained health care professionals from birth through 36 months of age at fixed time points. Multilevel linear and logistic regression models were

  5. Purpose in life and use of preventive health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S; Strecher, Victor J; Ryff, Carol D

    2014-11-18

    Purpose in life has been linked with better health (mental and physical) and health behaviors, but its link with patterns of health care use are understudied. We hypothesized that people with higher purpose would be more proactive in taking care of their health, as indicated by a higher likelihood of using preventive health care services. We also hypothesized that people with higher purpose would spend fewer nights in the hospital. Participants (n = 7,168) were drawn from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative panel study of American adults over the age of 50, and tracked for 6 y. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, each unit increase in purpose (on a six-point scale) was associated with a higher likelihood that people would obtain a cholesterol test [odds ratio (OR) = 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.08-1.29] or colonoscopy (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.99-1.14). Furthermore, females were more likely to receive a mammogram/X-ray (OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.16-1.39) or pap smear (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.06-1.28), and males were more likely to receive a prostate examination (OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.18-1.45). Each unit increase in purpose was also associated with 17% fewer nights spent in the hospital (rate ratio = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.77-0.89). An increasing number of randomized controlled trials show that purpose in life can be raised. Therefore, with additional research, findings from this study may inform the development of new strategies that increase the use of preventive health care services, offset the burden of rising health care costs, and enhance the quality of life among people moving into the ranks of our aging society.

  6. Purpose in life and use of preventive health care services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S.; Strecher, Victor J.; Ryff, Carol D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose in life has been linked with better health (mental and physical) and health behaviors, but its link with patterns of health care use are understudied. We hypothesized that people with higher purpose would be more proactive in taking care of their health, as indicated by a higher likelihood of using preventive health care services. We also hypothesized that people with higher purpose would spend fewer nights in the hospital. Participants (n = 7,168) were drawn from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative panel study of American adults over the age of 50, and tracked for 6 y. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, each unit increase in purpose (on a six-point scale) was associated with a higher likelihood that people would obtain a cholesterol test [odds ratio (OR) = 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.08–1.29] or colonoscopy (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.99–1.14). Furthermore, females were more likely to receive a mammogram/X-ray (OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.16–1.39) or pap smear (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.06–1.28), and males were more likely to receive a prostate examination (OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.18–1.45). Each unit increase in purpose was also associated with 17% fewer nights spent in the hospital (rate ratio = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.77–0.89). An increasing number of randomized controlled trials show that purpose in life can be raised. Therefore, with additional research, findings from this study may inform the development of new strategies that increase the use of preventive health care services, offset the burden of rising health care costs, and enhance the quality of life among people moving into the ranks of our aging society. PMID:25368165

  7. The role of health centers in preventive care provision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shemetova G.N.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to assess the importance of the Centers of Health in the organization and provision of preventive care to the population, in the early detection of risk factors for the development of chronic non-communicable diseases and the development of a healthy lifestyle. Material and Methods. On the basis of the Health Center of Engels Center for Medical Prevention in the Saratov Region, the detection of risk factors for 2011-2015 was analyzed according to statistical reporting (form No. 68 and health cards (form025-CZ/y of 207 patients. To assess the satisfaction of visitors with the work of the Center, a specially developed questionnaire was conducted, which included 22 questions that characterize the patient profile, his attitude to the organization and the results of the survey, and the motivation to modify the way of life. Results. The study confirmed the important role of the Centers of Health in the organization and provision of preventive care to the population, the formation of a healthy lifestyle and the early detection of diseases and risk factors for their development. Conclusion. Only joint efforts of medical institutions, authorities, educational organizations, mass media can lead to the formation of the population's responsibility for their health and readiness to modify the way of life.

  8. Attendance of routine childcare visits in primary care for children of mothers with depression: a nationwide population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyngsøe, Bente Kjær; Vestergaard, Claus Høstrup; Rytter, Dorte; Vestergaard, Mogens; Munk-Olsen, Trine; Bech, Bodil Hammer

    2018-02-01

    Depression is a common and potentially debilitating illness worldwide. Attendance to routine childcare appointments is a key point of interest in the effort to improve the health and care for families facing depression. To evaluate the association between maternal depression and offspring non-attendance to the Danish childcare and vaccination programme (CCP) for children from 0-5 years of age. The CCP consists of seven separate visits and several vaccinations. To investigate if exposure to recent and previous depression may affect attendance differently. Population-based cohort study using Danish nationwide registers. Participants were all live-born children ( n = 853 315) in Denmark in the period from 1 January 2000 until 31 August 2013, and their mothers. The outcome of interest was non-attendance of each one of the seven scheduled childcare visits and two vaccination entities in the CCP. Exposure was maternal (both previous and recent) depression. All information was obtained from Danish national registries. The risk of not attending CCP was higher for children of mothers with depression. For children of mothers with previous depression, the relative risk (RR) was 1.01 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.98 to 1.03) at the 5-week childcare visit, and 1.12 (95% CI = 1.09 to 1.14) at the 5-year childcare visit. For children of mothers with recent depression, the RR was 1.07 (95% CI = 1.03 to 1.13) at the 5-week visit, and 1.15 (95% CI = 1.13 to 1.17) at the 5-year visit. Furthermore, the risk of missing at least four of the seven childcare visits was higher for children of females with maternal depression (RR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.13 to 1.19). Maternal depression seems to compromise CCP attendance. These findings suggest a need for careful clinical attention to these vulnerable families, even years after a diagnosis of depression. © British Journal of General Practice 2018.

  9. The effect of systematic clinical interventions with cigarette smokers on quit status and the rates of smoking-related primary care office visits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Land

    Full Text Available The United States Public Health Service (USPHS Guideline for Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence includes ten key recommendations regarding the identification and the treatment of tobacco users seen in all health care settings. To our knowledge, the impact of system-wide brief interventions with cigarette smokers on smoking prevalence and health care utilization has not been examined using patient population-based data.Data on clinical interventions with cigarette smokers were examined for primary care office visits of 104,639 patients at 17 Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates (HVMA sites. An operational definition of "systems change" was developed. It included thresholds for intervention frequency and sustainability. Twelve sites met the criteria. Five did not. Decreases in self-reported smoking prevalence were 40% greater at sites that achieved systems change (13.6% vs. 9.7%, p<.01. On average, the likelihood of quitting increased by 2.6% (p<0.05, 95% CI: 0.1%-4.6% per occurrence of brief intervention. For patients with a recent history of current smoking whose home site experienced systems change, the likelihood of an office visit for smoking-related diagnoses decreased by 4.3% on an annualized basis after systems change occurred (p<0.05, 95% CI: 0.5%-8.1%. There was no change in the likelihood of an office visit for smoking-related diagnoses following systems change among non-smokers.The clinical practice data from HVMA suggest that a systems approach can lead to significant reductions in smoking prevalence and the rate of office visits for smoking-related diseases. Most comprehensive tobacco intervention strategies focus on the provider or the tobacco user, but these results argue that health systems should be included as an integral component of a comprehensive tobacco intervention strategy. The HVMA results also give us an indication of the potential health impacts when meaningful use core tobacco measures are widely adopted.

  10. The future of digital games for HIV prevention and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Muessig, Kathryn E; Bauermeister, José A; LeGrand, Sara; Fiellin, Lynn E

    2017-09-01

    Although there has been a significant increase in mHealth interventions addressing the HIV prevention and care continuum, interventions using game mechanics have been less explored. Digital games are rapidly becoming an important tool for improving health behaviors and supporting the delivery of care and education. The purpose of this review is to provide a historical context for the use of gamification and videogames (including those using virtual reality) used in technology-based HIV interventions and to review new research in the field. A review of recently published (1 January 2016-31 March 2017) or presented abstracts (2016) identified a paucity of technology-based interventions that included gamification elements or any terms associated with videogames or gameplay. A larger portfolio of digital gaming interventions is in the pipeline. Use of digital games that include elements of gamification or consist of standalone videogames or virtual-reality-based games, represent a promising intervention strategy to address the HIV prevention and care continuum, especially among youth. Our review demonstrates that there is significant room for growth in this area in designing, developing, testing and most importantly, implementation and dissemination these novel interventions.

  11. The role of income in reducing racial and ethnic disparities in emergency room and urgent care center visits for asthma-United States, 2001-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Huay-Zong; Oraka, Emeka; Mannino, David M

    2011-05-01

    To examine racial/ethnic disparities and associated factors in asthma-related emergency room (ER) and urgent care center (UCC) visits among US adults and determine whether disparities vary across increasing income strata. We analyzed data from 238,678 adult respondents from the 2001 to 2009 National Health Interview Survey and calculated the weighted annual prevalence of an ER/UCC visit for persons with current asthma. We used logistic regression to calculate adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for asthma-related ER/UCC visits by race/ethnicity and income, adjusting for demographics, socioeconomic, and other health-related factors. The average annual prevalence of asthma-related ER/UCC visits among adults with current asthma was highest for Puerto Ricans (24.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.3-29.9) followed by non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaskan Natives (22.1%, 95% CI: 14.4-32.4), non-Hispanic blacks (20.4%, 95% CI: 18.5-22.4), other Hispanics (17.3%, 95% CI: 15.0-19.9), Asians (11.0%, 95% CI: 7.8-15.4), and non-Hispanic whites (10.1%, 95% CI: 9.4-10.9). Puerto Ricans (AOR: 2.01; 95% CI: 1.54-2.62), non-Hispanic blacks (AOR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.46-2.03), and other Hispanics (AOR: 1.55; 95% CI: 1.25-1.92) with current asthma had significantly higher odds of an asthma-related ER/UCC visit than non-Hispanic whites. Lower socioeconomic status, obesity, and serious psychological distress were also associated with higher odds of asthma-related ER/UCC visits. Puerto Ricans with the lowest income (AOR: 3.52; 95% CI: 2.27-5.47), non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaskan Natives with the highest income (AOR: 5.71; 95% CI: 1.48-22.13), and non-Hispanic blacks in every income stratum had significantly higher odds of asthma-related ER/UCC visits compared to non-Hispanic whites in the highest income stratum. Racial/ethnic disparities in asthma-related ER/UCC visits persist after accounting for income and other socioeconomic factors. Further research is needed to identify modifiable risk

  12. Improving access and provision of preventive oral health care for very young, poor, and low-income children through a new interdisciplinary partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biordi, Diana L; Heitzer, Marjet; Mundy, Eric; DiMarco, Marguerite; Thacker, Sherrey; Taylor, Evelyn; Huff, Marlene; Marino, Deborah; Fitzgerald, Karen

    2015-04-01

    We provided oral health care services at 2 sites using a nurse practitioner-dietitian team to increase dental workforce capacity and improve access to care for low-income preschool children. Our team provided oral health assessments and education, fluoride varnish application, and dentist referrals. The primary endpoint was participants' access to oral health care. Secondary endpoints included increasing the practice scope of registered dietitians through training programs for oral health assessment and the application of fluoride varnishes for children. The oral health and hygiene and dietary habits of the participants were also determined. From 2010 to 2013, 4360 children received fluoride varnishes in 7195 total visits. Although the proportion of children with dental caries at the first visit was greater at the urban site, both sites were similar by visits 2 and 3. The number of caries declined with increased program visits, which coincided with an increase in the proportion of participants visiting a dentist. Progress toward eliminating dental health disparities requires addressing barriers to dental care access. We showed that expanding access to oral health services through nurse practitioner-dietitian cooperation improved access to preventive fluoride varnishing use in low-income children.

  13. Preventive Dental Care: An Educational Program to Integrate Oral Care Into Pediatric Oncology
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, Erin; Krainovich-Miller, Barbara

    2017-10-01

    Early childhood dental caries (dental cavities) is an infectious process. The development of oral problems during cancer care results in pain, fever, and delay in treatment. 
. The objective of this project was to integrate preventive oral care into pediatric oncology care. 
. This project consisted of an educational program for pediatric oncology providers who completed pre- and postprogram surveys assessing oral health knowledge, attitudes, and practice; attended an oral health education session; and performed oral assessment and fluoride varnish application on children during cancer treatment. 
. Three major outcomes resulted from this project.

  14. Innovative Information Technology-Powered Population Health Care Management Improves Outcomes and Reduces Hospital Readmissions and Emergency Department Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sharon; Campbell, Michele; Mahoney, Donna; Muther, Ann Kathryn; Nevin, Janice; Resnik, Patricia; Salam, Tabassum; Steinberg, Terri

    2017-07-01

    Patients with chronic conditions are often the most frequent users of health care. Moreover, adapting to developments in one's illness, understanding how to self-manage a chronic illness, and sharing information between primary care and specialty providers, can be a full-time job for someone with a chronic illness. In response to these challenges, Christiana Care Health System (Wilmington, Delaware) developed Care Link, an information technology (IT)-enhanced care management support to enable populations of patients to achieve better clinical outcomes at lower cost. In 2012 Christiana Care received a grant to design a generalizable, scalable, and replicable IT-driven care model that would integrate disparate clinical and registry data generated from routine care to support longitudinal care management for patients with ischemic heart disease. The single-disease care management program was expanded beginning in mid-2015 to serve risk-based models for many diseases and chronic conditions. More than 8,600 patients in several surgical and medical populations, including joint replacement, cervical spine surgery, and congestive heart failure, have been supported by Care Link. For example, preoperative assessment of patients with elective joint replacement to predict post-acute care needs led to an increase in the volume of patients discharged to home with self-care or with home health care by 30%-from 61% to 80%. Care Link IT functions can be replicated to address the unique longitudinal care needs of any population. Care Link's next steps are to continue to increase the number of patients served throughout the region and to expand the scope of care management programming. Copyright © 2017 The Joint Commission. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of patient flow analysis to improve patient visit efficiency by decreasing wait time in a primary care-based disease management programs for anticoagulation and chronic pain: a quality improvement study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potisek, Nicholas M; Malone, Robb M; Shilliday, Betsy Bryant; Ives, Timothy J; Chelminski, Paul R; DeWalt, Darren A; Pignone, Michael P

    2007-01-15

    Patients with chronic conditions require frequent care visits. Problems can arise during several parts of the patient visit that decrease efficiency, making it difficult to effectively care for high volumes of patients. The purpose of the study is to test a method to improve patient visit efficiency. We used Patient Flow Analysis to identify inefficiencies in the patient visit, suggest areas for improvement, and test the effectiveness of clinic interventions. At baseline, the mean visit time for 93 anticoagulation clinic patient visits was 84 minutes (+/- 50 minutes) and the mean visit time for 25 chronic pain clinic patient visits was 65 minutes (+/- 21 minutes). Based on these data, we identified specific areas of inefficiency and developed interventions to decrease the mean time of the patient visit. After interventions, follow-up data found the mean visit time was reduced to 59 minutes (+/-25 minutes) for the anticoagulation clinic, a time decrease of 25 minutes (t-test 39%; p time for the chronic pain clinic was reduced to 43 minutes (+/- 14 minutes) a time decrease of 22 minutes (t-test 34 %; p < 0.001). Patient Flow Analysis is an effective technique to identify inefficiencies in the patient visit and efficiently collect patient flow data. Once inefficiencies are identified they can be improved through brief interventions.

  16. Associations between the patient-centered medical home and preventive care and healthcare quality for non-elderly adults with mental illness: A surveillance study analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdoin, Jennifer J; Rodriguez-Monguio, Rosa; Puleo, Elaine; Keller, David; Roche, Joan

    2016-08-24

    Patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) may improve outcomes for non-elderly adults with mental illness, but the extent to which PCMHs are associated with preventive care and healthcare quality for this population is largely unknown. Our study addresses this gap by assessing the associations between receipt of care consistent with the PCMH and preventive care and healthcare quality for non-elderly adults with mental illness. This surveillance study used self-reported data for 6,908 non-elderly adults with mental illness participating in the 2007-2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Preventive care and healthcare quality measures included: participant rating of all healthcare; cervical, breast, and colorectal cancer screening; current smoking; smoking cessation advice; flu shot; foot exam and eye exam for people with diabetes; and follow-up after emergency room visit for mental illness. Multiple logistic regression models were developed to compare the odds of meeting preventive care and healthcare quality measures for participants without a usual source of care, participants with a non-PCMH usual source of care, and participants who received care consistent with the PCMH. Compared to participants without a usual source of care, those with a non-PCMH usual source of care had better odds of meeting almost all measures examined, while those who received care consistent with the PCMH had better odds of meeting most measures. Participants who received care consistent with the PCMH had better odds of meeting only one measure compared to participants with a non-PCMH usual source of care. Compared with having a non-PCMH usual source of care, receipt of care consistent with the PCMH does not appear to be associated with most preventive care or healthcare quality measures. These findings raise concerns about the potential value of the PCMH for non-elderly adults with mental illness and suggest that alternative models of primary care are needed to improve outcomes and address

  17. Cosmic visits

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2015-01-01

    On Saturday, 19 September, ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano and Amalia Ercoli Finzi, Principal Investigator of the SD2 experiment on board the ESA Rosetta spacecraft, visited the AMS Control Centre and other CERN installations.   From left to right: Sergio Bertolucci (CERN Director of Research and Computing), Amalia Ercoli Finzi (Emeritus Professor in the Aerospace department of the Polytechnic University of Milan and Principal Investigator of the SD2 experiment on board the ESA Rosetta spacecraft), Maurice Bourquin (AMS-02 Senior Scientist and Honorary Professor in the Nuclear and Corpuscular Physics department of the University of Geneva) and Luca Parmitano (Major in the Italian Air Force and European Space Agency astronaut) in the AMS Payload and Operation Control Centre. They were welcomed in the early morning by Sergio Bertolucci and then headed to the Prévessin site to visit the CERN Control Centre and the Payload and Operation Control Centre (POCC) of the Alpha Magnetic Sp...

  18. Armenian visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    During his visit to CERN on 4 July 2003, Karen Chshmaritian, Armenian Minister for Trade and Economic Development, toured the ATLAS experimental cavern and assembly hall. From left to right: Aram Kotzinian, from the international organization JINR from Dubna, Marzio Nessi from ATLAS, Karen Chshmaritian, Armenian Minister for Trade and Economic Development, Zohrab Mnatsakanian, Ambassador at the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Armenia to the United Nations in Geneva, Alexandre Sissakian, Vice-Director of JINR and Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesman.

  19. OECD Health Care Quality Indicator Project. The expert panel on primary care prevention and health promotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Martin; Klazinga, Niek; Leatherman, Sheila; Hardy, Charlie; Bergmann, Eckhard; Pisco, Luis; Mattke, Soeren; Mainz, Jan

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: This article describes a project undertaken as part of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)'s Healthcare Quality Indicator (HCQI) Project, which aimed to develop a set of quality indicators representing the domains of primary care, prevention and health

  20. [A comparative study of the physical conditions of elderly people with care needs receiving rehabilitation services from a nurse or a physiotherapist from a visiting nurse service station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Akiko; Kunori, Miwako

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the roles of rehabilitation by a nurse, comparing the attributes of utilization of care services and physical conditions of elderly people receiving rehabilitation services from a nurse or a physiotherapist. Two hundred and fifty four care receivers at the Saiseikai visiting nurse service station, Shiga Prefecture, were interviewed by a nurse or a physiotherapist. They were divided into two groups: 1) receivers of rehabilitation services by a nurse (RRSN group), and 2) receivers of rehabilitation services by a physiotherapist (RRSP group). The subjects were matched for gender and age, and 36 participants for each of the two groups were included in the analysis. Level of dementia, activities of daily living (ADL; Barthel Index), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and use of visiting services were assessed in the interview. Analysis of variance and the chi2 test were used to compare values for the two groups. Level of dementia in the RRSN group was significantly severe than in the RRSP group (Pservices was significantly more in the RRSN group (P<0.05). Physical status in the RRSN group was significantly lower for ADL, GCS than in the RRSP group. IADL of males in the RRSN group was significantly lower. Thus, we conclude that it is important for nurses to make opportunities to visit elderly people with physiotherapists to assess their physical conditions.

  1. Association between PM2.5 and primary care visits due to asthma attack in Japan: relation to Beijing's air pollution episode in January 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Shin; Shima, Masayuki; Yoda, Yoshiko; Oka, Katsumi; Kurosaka, Fumitake; Shimizu, Shigeta; Takahashi, Hironobu; Nakatani, Yuji; Nishikawa, Jittoku; Fujiwara, Katsuhiko; Mizumori, Yasuyuki; Mogami, Akira; Yamada, Taku; Yamamoto, Nobuharu

    2014-03-01

    In January 2013, extremely high concentrations of fine particles (PM2.5) were observed around Beijing, China. In Japan, the health effects of transboundary air pollution have been a matter of concern. We examined the association between the levels of outdoor PM2.5 and other air pollutants with primary care visits (PCVs) at night due to asthma attack in Himeji City, western Japan. A case-crossover study was conducted in a primary care clinic in Himeji City, Japan, involving 112 subjects aged 0-80 years who visited the clinic due to an asthma attack between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m. during the period January-March, 2013. Daily concentrations of particulate matter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and some meteorological elements were measured, and a conditional logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) of PCVs per unit increment in air pollutants or meteorological elements. Of the 112 subjects, 76 (68 %) were aged asthma attack at night. A positive relation between ozone and PCVs due to asthma attack was detected. The OR per 10 ppb increment in daily mean ozone the day before the visit was 2.31 (95 % confidence interval 1.16-4.61). These findings do not support an association between daily mean concentration of PM2.5 and PCVs at night. However, we did find evidence suggesting that ozone is associated with PCVs.

  2. Effect of Village Health Team Home Visits and Mobile Phone Consultations on Maternal and Newborn Care Practices in Masindi and Kiryandongo, Uganda: A Community-Intervention Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Mangwi Ayiasi

    Full Text Available The World Health Organisation recommends home visits conducted by Community Health Workers (in Uganda known as Village Health Teams--VHTs in order to improve maternal and newborn health. This study measured the effect of home visits combined with mobile phone consultations on maternal and newborn care practices.In a community intervention trial design 16 health centres in Masindi and Kiryandongo districts, Uganda were randomly and equally allocated to one of two arms: control and intervention arms. Eight control health centres received the usual maternal and newborn educational messages offered by professional health workers and eight intervention health centres that received an intervention package for maternal care and essential newborn care practices. In the intervention arm VHTs made two prenatal and one postnatal home visit to households. VHTs were provided with mobile phones to enable them make regular telephone consultations with health workers at the health centre serving the catchment area. The primary outcome was health facility delivery. Other outcomes included antenatal attendances, birth preparedness, cord and thermal care and breastfeeding practices. Analysis was by intention-to-treat.A total of 1385 pregnant women were analysed: 758 and 627 in the control and intervention arms respectively. Significant post-intervention differences were: delivery place [adjusted Odds Ratio aOR: 17.94(95%CI: 6.26-51.37; p<0.001], cord care [aOR: 3.05(95%CI: 1.81-5.12; p<0.001] thermal care [aOR: 7.58(95%CI: 2.52-22.82; p<0.001], and timely care-seeking for newborn illness [aOR: 4.93(95%CI: 1.59-15.31; p = 0.006].VHTs can have an effect in promoting proper cord and thermal care for the newborn and improve timely care-seeking for health facility delivery and newborn illness, because they could answer questions and refer patients correctly. However, VHTs should be supported by professional health workers through the use of mobile phones

  3. Preventive Dental Checkups and Their Association With Access to Usual Source of Care Among Rural and Urban Adult Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aishah; Thapa, Janani R; Zhang, Donglan

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationship between rural or urban residence and having a usual source of care (USC), and the utilization of preventive dental checkups among adults. Cross-sectional analysis was conducted using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2012. We performed a logit regression on the relationship between rural and urban residence, having a USC, and having at least 1 dental checkup in the past year, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and health status. After controlling for covariates, rural adult residents had significantly lower odds of having at least 1 dental checkup per year compared to their urban counterparts (odds ratio [OR] = 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.62-0.86, P rural and urban residents, having a USC was significantly associated with an 11% (95% CI = 9%-13%) increase in the probability of having a preventive dental checkup within a year. Individuals with a USC were more likely to obtain a preventive dental visit, with similar effects in rural and urban settings. We attributed the lower odds of having a checkup in rural regions to the lower density of oral health care providers in these areas. Integration of rural oral health care into primary care may help mitigate the challenges due to a shortage of oral health care providers in rural areas. © 2017 National Rural Health Association.

  4. Fall prevention in acute care hospitals: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Patricia C; Carroll, Diane L; Hurley, Ann; Lipsitz, Stuart; Benoit, Angela; Chang, Frank; Meltzer, Seth; Tsurikova, Ruslana; Zuyov, Lyubov; Middleton, Blackford

    2010-11-03

    Falls cause injury and death for persons of all ages, but risk of falls increases markedly with age. Hospitalization further increases risk, yet no evidence exists to support short-stay hospital-based fall prevention strategies to reduce patient falls. To investigate whether a fall prevention tool kit (FPTK) using health information technology (HIT) decreases patient falls in hospitals. Cluster randomized study conducted January 1, 2009, through June 30, 2009, comparing patient fall rates in 4 urban US hospitals in units that received usual care (4 units and 5104 patients) or the intervention (4 units and 5160 patients). The FPTK integrated existing communication and workflow patterns into the HIT application. Based on a valid fall risk assessment scale completed by a nurse, the FPTK software tailored fall prevention interventions to address patients' specific determinants of fall risk. The FPTK produced bed posters composed of brief text with an accompanying icon, patient education handouts, and plans of care, all communicating patient-specific alerts to key stakeholders. The primary outcome was patient falls per 1000 patient-days adjusted for site and patient care unit. A secondary outcome was fall-related injuries. During the 6-month intervention period, the number of patients with falls differed between control (n = 87) and intervention (n = 67) units (P=.02). Site-adjusted fall rates were significantly higher in control units (4.18 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 3.45-5.06] per 1000 patient-days) than in intervention units (3.15 [95% CI, 2.54-3.90] per 1000 patient-days; P = .04). The FPTK was found to be particularly effective with patients aged 65 years or older (adjusted rate difference, 2.08 [95% CI, 0.61-3.56] per 1000 patient-days; P = .003). No significant effect was noted in fall-related injuries. The use of a fall prevention tool kit in hospital units compared with usual care significantly reduced rate of falls. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT

  5. Focus on Parental Visiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Welfare Information Services, Inc., New York, NY.

    This report consists of seven charts which present data on patterns of parental visiting of children in foster care in New York City from October 1976 through March 1977. Information contained in the charts is derived from the quarterly Child Welfare Information Services (CWIS) reports developed by David Fanshel and John Grundy. The charts present…

  6. Pediatricians, well-baby visits, and Video Intervention Therapy: feasibility of a video-feedback infant mental health support intervention in a pediatric primary health care setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eFacchini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This case series study evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of a behavioral/cognitive psychological intervention in a pediatric primary health care setting during standard well-baby visits. The aim of the intervention was to support caregivers’ sensitivity and mentalization in order to promote infant mental health. Four neonates from birth to eight months were consecutively enrolled to test a short video-feedback intervention (Primary Care - Video Intervention Therapy, an adaptation of George Downing's Video Intervention Therapy to primary care conducted by a pediatrician.The five minute interaction recording and the video-feedback session were performed during the same well-baby visit and in the same pediatrician's office where the physical examination was conducted. During the study period, six video-feedback sessions were performed for each baby at different ages (1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 months. Filmed and discussed were a series of different interactional situations: touch, cry, affective matching, descriptive language, feeding, separation and autonomy.The intervention was easily accepted and much appreciated by all four families enrolled. This study aimed to answer a dilemma which pediatric providers generally face: if the provider wishes to respond to not only physical but also infant mental health issues, how on a practical level can this be done? This case series study indicates that Primary Care - Video Intervention Therapy deserves to be seen as a promising new tool for such a purpose.

  7. Pediatricians, Well-Baby Visits, and Video Intervention Therapy: Feasibility of a Video-Feedback Infant Mental Health Support Intervention in a Pediatric Primary Health Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Sergio; Martin, Valentina; Downing, George

    2016-01-01

    This case series study evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of a behavioral/cognitive psychological intervention in a pediatric primary health care setting during standard well-baby visits. The aim of the intervention was to support caregivers' sensitivity and mentalization in order to promote infant mental health (IMH). Four neonates from birth to 8 months were consecutively enrolled to test a short video-feedback intervention (Primary Care - Video Intervention Therapy, an adaptation of George Downing's Video Intervention Therapy to primary care) conducted by a pediatrician. The 5 min interaction recording and the video-feedback session were performed during the same well-baby visit and in the same pediatrician's office where the physical examination was conducted. During the study period, six video-feedback sessions were performed for each baby at different ages (1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 months). A series of different interactional situations were filmed and discussed: touch, cry, affective matching, descriptive language, feeding, separation and autonomy. The intervention was easily accepted and much appreciated by all four families enrolled. This study aimed to answer a dilemma which pediatric providers generally face: if the provider wishes to respond not only to physical but also IMH issues, how on a practical level can this be done? This case series study indicates that Primary Care - Video Intervention Therapy can be a promising new tool for such a purpose.

  8. Association Between Parental Barriers to Accessing a Usual Source of Care and Children's Receipt of Preventive Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellettiere, John; Chuang, Emmeline; Hughes, Suzanne C; Quintanilla, Isaac; Hofstetter, C Richard; Hovell, Melbourne F

    Preventive health services are important for child development, and parents play a key role in facilitating access to services. This study examined how parents' reasons for not having a usual source of care were associated with their children's receipt of preventive services. We used pooled data from the 2011-2014 National Health Interview Survey (n = 34 843 participants). Parents' reasons for not having a usual source of care were framed within the Penchansky and Thomas model of access and measured through 3 dichotomous indicators: financial barriers (affordability), attitudes and beliefs about health care (acceptability), and all other nonfinancial barriers (accessibility, accommodation, and availability). We used multivariable logistic regression models to test associations between parental barriers and children's receipt of past-year well-child care visits and influenza vaccinations, controlling for other child, family, and contextual factors. In 2014, 14.3% (weighted percentage) of children had at least 1 parent without a usual source of care. Children of parents without a usual source of care because they "don't need a doctor and/or haven't had any problems" or they "don't like, trust, or believe in doctors" had 35% lower odds of receiving well-child care (adjusted odds ratio = 0.65; 95% CI, 0.56-0.74) and 23% lower odds of receiving influenza vaccination (adjusted odds ratio = 0.77; 95% CI, 0.69-0.86) than children of parents without those attitudes and beliefs about health care. Financial and other nonfinancial parental barriers were not associated with children's receipt of preventive services. Results were independent of several factors relevant to children's access to preventive health care, including whether the child had a usual source of care. Parents' attitudes and beliefs about having a usual source of care were strongly associated with their children's receipt of recommended preventive health services. Rates of receipt of child preventive

  9. Home visits as part of a new care pathway (iAID) to improve quality of care and quality of life in ostomy patients: a cluster-randomized stepped-wedge trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sier, M. F.; Oostenbroek, R. J.; Dijkgraaf, M. G. W.; Veldink, G. J.; Bemelman, W. A.; Pronk, A.; Spillenaar-Bilgen, E. J.; Kelder, W.; Hoff, C.; Ubbink, D. T.; Havenga, K.; Veltkamp, S. C.; T Dekker, J. W.; Boerma, D.; Eijsbouts, Q. A. J.; Lamme, B.; Vuylsteke, R. J. C. L. M.; Tobon Morales, R. E.; van Tets, W. F.

    2017-01-01

    Aim Morbidity in patients with an ostomy is high. A new care pathway, including perioperative home visits by enterostomal therapists, was studied to assess whether more elaborate education and closer guidance could reduce stoma-related complications and improve quality of life (QoL), at acceptable

  10. [Recognition, care and prevention of suicidal behaviour in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihmer, Zoltán; Németh, Attila; Kurimay, Tamás; Perczel-Forintos, Dóra; Purebl, György; Döme, Péter

    2017-01-01

    Suicide is a major public health problem everywhere in the world and in the WHO European Region suicide accounts for over 120,000 deaths per year. 1. Recognition and diagnosis: An underlying psychiatric disorder is present in up to 90% of people who completed suicide. Comorbidity with depression, anxiety, substance abuse and personality disorders is high. In order to achieve successful prevention of suicidality, adequate diagnostic procedures and appropriate treatment for the underlying disorder are essential. 2. Treatment and care: Acute intervention should start immediately in order to keep the patient alive. Existing evidence supports the efficacy of pharmacological treatment and cognitive behavioural therapy (including dialectical behavior therapy and problem-solving therapy) in preventing suicidal behaviour. Some other psychological treatments are promising, but the supporting evidence is currently insufficient. Studies show that antidepressant and mood stabilizer treatments decrease the risk for suicidality among responders in mood disorder patients. However, the risk of suicidal behaviour in depressed patients treated with antidepressants exists during the first 10-14 days of treatment, which requires careful monitoring. Short-term supplementary medication with anxiolytics and hypnotics in the case of anxiety and insomnia is recommended. Treatment with antidepressants of children and adolescents should only be given under supervision of a specialist. Long-term treatment with lithium has been shown to be very effective in preventing both suicide and attempted suicide in patients with unipolar and bipolar depression. Treatment with clozapine is effective in reducing suicidal behaviour in patients with schizophrenia. Other atypical antipsychotics are promising but more evidence is required. 3. Family and social support: The suicidal person should always be motivated to involve family in the treatment. Psychosocial treatment and support is recommended, as the

  11. Factors associated with dental visit and barriers to utilisation of oral health care services in a sample of antenatal mothers in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Yew L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of this study were to determine factors associated with dental visit and to describe barriers to utilisation of oral health care services among antenatal mothers attending the Obstetric and Gynaecology Specialist clinic in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia. Methods A structured, self-administered questionnaire was used obtain information on the variables of interest pertaining to the current pregnancy from 124 antenatal mothers. Results The majority of the mothers claimed that their oral health status was good (67.0% or very good (2.4%. On the contrary, most of them admitted of having had at least one oral health problem (59.7% including cavitated (43.5% and painful teeth (15.3%, bleeding gum (21.0%, and bad breath (10.5%. However, only 29% of the mothers visited dentist during the current pregnancy. Factors associated with the mothers' dental visit were exposure to oral health education before the pregnancy and awareness of relationship between poor maternal oral health and adverse pregnancy outcomes with odds ratio of 4.06 (95% CI: 1.67-9.78 and 3.57 (95% CI: 1.30-9.77 respectively. Common excuses given by most mothers include perceptions of not having any oral health problems (65.9%, long waiting time at the clinic (71.6%, and no immediate treatment given by the dentist (64.8%. Conclusions Utilisation of oral health care services among antenatal mothers was low. Mothers who reported dental visit were more likely to be those who had received oral health education before the current pregnancy and knew of the association between poor maternal oral health and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Dissatisfaction with the services rendered and perceptions of not having any oral health problems were the main barriers.

  12. Factors associated with dental visit and barriers to utilisation of oral health care services in a sample of antenatal mothers in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddki, Norkhafizah; Yusoff, Azizah; Hwang, Yew L

    2010-02-18

    The aims of this study were to determine factors associated with dental visit and to describe barriers to utilisation of oral health care services among antenatal mothers attending the Obstetric and Gynaecology Specialist clinic in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia. A structured, self-administered questionnaire was used obtain information on the variables of interest pertaining to the current pregnancy from 124 antenatal mothers. The majority of the mothers claimed that their oral health status was good (67.0%) or very good (2.4%). On the contrary, most of them admitted of having had at least one oral health problem (59.7%) including cavitated (43.5%) and painful teeth (15.3%), bleeding gum (21.0%), and bad breath (10.5%). However, only 29% of the mothers visited dentist during the current pregnancy. Factors associated with the mothers' dental visit were exposure to oral health education before the pregnancy and awareness of relationship between poor maternal oral health and adverse pregnancy outcomes with odds ratio of 4.06 (95% CI: 1.67-9.78) and 3.57 (95% CI: 1.30-9.77) respectively. Common excuses given by most mothers include perceptions of not having any oral health problems (65.9%), long waiting time at the clinic (71.6%), and no immediate treatment given by the dentist (64.8%). Utilisation of oral health care services among antenatal mothers was low. Mothers who reported dental visit were more likely to be those who had received oral health education before the current pregnancy and knew of the association between poor maternal oral health and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Dissatisfaction with the services rendered and perceptions of not having any oral health problems were the main barriers.

  13. Tailored Communications for Obesity Prevention in Pediatric Primary Care: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Julie A.; Whiteley, Jessica A.; Watson, Bonnie L.; Sheinfeld Gorin, Sherri N.; Hayman, Laura L.

    2018-01-01

    Recommendations for the prevention of childhood obesity encourage providers to counsel parents and their children on healthy diet and activity behaviors. This study evaluated the feasibility of a theory-based, tailored communication intervention for obesity prevention ("Team Up for Health") delivered during a well-child visit. A…

  14. [Urgent Visits to Nursing Homes: A General Practitioner's Perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleckwenn, Markus; Ashrafnia, David; Schnakenberg, Rieke; Weckbecker, Klaus

    2017-06-06

    Aim of the study Due to demographic changes, home visits to nursing care facilities are increasing. Urgent home visits represent a challenge for general practitioners. There are no recommendations for the implementation of urgent home visits. Therefore, in this study, we investigated how GP practices deal with urgent home visits and what improvements can be made to the medical emergency care. Methods A total of 15 teaching doctors of the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Bonn were interviewed using semi-structured interviews on the subject. We evaluated the interviews with the qualitative content analysis according to Mayring. Results Urgent house visits were requested by telephone or fax. The home visits were carried out usually after the consultation hours during the lunch break of the doctors. General practitioners consider forwarding the request for a house visit to the rescue service as an absolute exception. At the nursing home, there were waiting times until the responsible nursing staff could do a joint emergency visit. In addition, there were clear differences in the qualifications of nurses and in dealing with emergencies. The physicians therefore saw improvements in their ability to provide further training to the nursing staff, to preventive house visits, and to assess the urgency of home visits. Conclusion To improve emergency care in elderly homes, the suggestions for improvement proposed by the family doctors should be tested in controlled studies. In addition, the cooperation between general practitioners and nursing homes could be strengthened by joint training in geriatric emergency care. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. The Relationship of Repeated Technical Assistance Support Visits to the Delivery of Positive Health, Dignity, and Prevention (PHDP) Messages by Healthcare Providers in Mozambique: A Longitudinal Multilevel Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutin, Sarah A; Amico, K Rivet; Hunguana, Elsa; Munguambe, António Orlando; Rose, Carol Dawson

    Positive health, dignity, and prevention (PHDP) is Mozambique's strategy to engage clinicians in the delivery of prevention messages to their HIV-positive clients. This national implementation strategy uses provider trainings on offering key messages and focuses on intervening on 9 evidence-based risk reduction areas. We investigated the impact of longitudinal technical assistance (TA) as an addition to this basic training. We followed 153 healthcare providers in 5 Mozambican provinces over 6 months to evaluate the impact of on-site, observation-based TA on PHDP implementation. Longitudinal multilevel models were estimated to model change in PHDP message delivery over time among individual providers. With each additional TA visit, providers delivered about 1 additional PHDP message ( P < .001); clinicians and nonclinicians started at about the same baseline level, but clinicians improved more quickly ( P = .004). Message delivery varied by practice sector; maternal and child health sectors outperformed other sectors. Longitudinal TA helped reach the programmatic goals of the PHDP program in Mozambique.

  16. [Guidelines for the preventive health care of hairdressing apprentices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golińska-Zach, Aleksandra; Wiszniewska, Marta; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2017-07-26

    Hairdressing is one of the most developing branch of the service industry in Poland. Providing representatives of this occupational group with preventive health care services it should be remembered that they are at risk of skin and respiratory diseases, which occur due to a quite frequent exposure to harmful agents in the work environment of hairdressers and hairdressing apprentices. Interestingly, a much lower number of researches concentrate on respiratory symptoms than on skin disorders in hairdressers. The authors of this article have carried out the first Polish follow-up study focused not only on skin disorders but also on respiratory tract symptoms in hairdressing apprentices. The results of the study have been reported in other publications while this paper presents a literature review based on EBSCO and PubMed databases, Elsevier and contained articles (on the subject discussed in this paper). On the basis of information obtained from the authors' own research evidence and from the literature review, the guidelines for the preventive health care of hairdressing apprentices were developed. It was confirmed that neither determination of allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) nor performance of skin prick tests (SPTs) and patch tests for hairdressing factors are necessary. They should be performed as a part of preventive medical examination only in those apprentice candidates and trainees in this profession who report work-related symptoms and it is suspected that they result from exposure to particular factor in the work environment. Med Pr 2017;68(5):677-687. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  17. Measuring quality of dental care: Caries prevention services for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Jill Boylston; Tomar, Scott L; Catalanotto, Frank A; Rudner, Nancy; Huang, I-Chan; Aravamudhan, Krishna; Shenkman, Elizabeth A; Crall, James J

    2015-08-01

    The authors conducted a study to validate the following 3 evidence-based, process-of-care quality measures focused on dental caries prevention for children with an elevated risk of experiencing caries: sealants for 6- to 9-year-olds, sealants for 10- to 14-year-olds, and topical fluoride. Using evidence-based guidelines, the Dental Quality Alliance developed measures for implementation with administrative data at the plan and program levels. To validate the measures, the authors used data from the Florida and Texas Medicaid programs and Children's Health Insurance Programs and from national commercial dental benefit plans. Data were extracted from 414 randomly selected dental office records to validate the use of administrative data to accurately calculate the measures. The authors also assessed statistically significant variations in overall measure performance. Agreement between administrative data and dental records was 95% for sealants (κ = 0.82) and 90% for topical fluoride (κ = 0.78). Sensitivity and specificity were 90.7% and 88.5% for topical fluoride and 77.8% and 98.8% for sealants, respectively. Variation in overall measure performance was greatest for topical fluoride (χ(2) = 5,887.1; P caries received at least 2 topical fluoride applications during the reporting year. Although there was greater variation in performance for sealants for 6- to 9-year-olds (range, 21.0-31.3%; χ(2) = 548.6; P caries prevention process-of-care quality measures can be implemented feasibly and validly using administrative claims data. The measures can be used to assess, monitor, and improve the proportion of children with an elevated risk of experiencing dental caries who receive evidence-based caries prevention services. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Guidelines for the preventive health care of hairdressing apprentices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Golińska-Zach

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hairdressing is one of the most developing branch of the service industry in Poland. Providing representatives of this occupational group with preventive health care services it should be remembered that they are at risk of skin and respiratory diseases, which occur due to a quite frequent exposure to harmful agents in the work environment of hairdressers and hairdressing apprentices. Interestingly, a much lower number of researches concentrate on respiratory symptoms than on skin disorders in hairdressers. The authors of this article have carried out the first Polish follow-up study focused not only on skin disorders but also on respiratory tract symptoms in hairdressing apprentices. The results of the study have been reported in other publications while this paper presents a literature review based on EBSCO and PubMed databases, Elsevier and contained articles (on the subject discussed in this paper. On the basis of information obtained from the authors’ own research evidence and from the literature review, the guidelines for the preventive health care of hairdressing apprentices were developed. It was confirmed that neither determination of allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE nor performance of skin prick tests (SPTs and patch tests for hairdressing factors are necessary. They should be performed as a part of preventive medical examination only in those apprentice candidates and trainees in this profession who report work-related symptoms and it is suspected that they result from exposure to particular factor in the work environment. Med Pr 2017;68(5:677–687

  19. Spanish Visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 23 January, CERN welcomed a visit by Pedro Morenés Eulate, Spanish Secretary of State for Scientific and Technological Policy. He was taken on a tour of the LHC Superconducting test facility, the CMS magnet assembly hall and the civil engineering works at Point 5. After a brief presentation on the AMS (Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer) experiment, delivered by Sam Ting, and lunch hosted by Director General Robert Aymar, he continued his tour of the ATLAS assembly hall and the ISOLDE experimental hall. Pedro Morenés finished his visit by meeting with the Spanish scientific community working at CERN. From left to right: Juan-Antonio Rubio, CERN, Responsible for the Education & Communication, Technology transfer and Scientific Information groups; Gonzalo León, General Secretary of the Spanish Ministry; Joaquín Pérez-Villanueva y Tovar, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of Spain to the United Nations Office; Robert Aymar, CERN Director General; Maria-José Garcia-Borge, ISOLDE and NTOF, CSIC Madrid Tea...

  20. Effectiveness of educational nursing home visits on quality of life, functional status and care dependency in older adults with mobility impairments: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Arne; Wolf-Ostermann, Karin; Dassen, Theo; Lahmann, Nils; Strupeit, Steve

    2016-04-01

    Facilitating and maintaining functional status (FS) and quality of life (QoL) and avoiding care dependency (CD) are and will increasingly become major tasks of nursing. Educational nursing home visits may have positive effects on FS and QoL in older adults. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of educational home visits on FS, QoL and CD in older adults with mobility impairments. We performed a randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in the living environments of 123 participants with functional impairments living in Hamburg, Germany. The intervention group received an additional nursing education intervention on mobility and QoL; the control group received care as usual. Data were collected from August 2011 to December 2012 at baseline, 6 months and 12 months of follow-up. The main outcomes were FS (Barthel Index), QoL (WHOQOL-BREF) and CD (Care Dependency Scale). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and generalized linear models. In total, 113 participants (57 in the intervention and 56 in the control group) were included in the study. The intervention had no statistical significant effect on FS, QoL and CD. The intervention did not show the benefits that we assumed. Further studies on the effects of educational nursing interventions should be performed using different concepts and rigorous research methods. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Visits to Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Emese C.; Kong, Kevin; Watts, Leslie A.; Schwarz, Eleanor B.; Darney, Philip D.; Thiel de Bocanegra, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Background In 2013, California passed Assembly Bill (A.B.) 2348, approving registered nurses (RNs) to dispense patient self-administered hormonal contraceptives and administer injections of hormonal contraceptives. The Family Planning, Access, Care and Treatment (Family PACT) program, which came into effect in 1997 to expand low-income, uninsured California resident access to contraceptives at no cost, is one program in which qualified RNs can dispense and administer contraceptives. Aims The aims of this study were to (a) describe utilization of RN visits within California's Family PACT program and (b) evaluate the impact of RN visits on client birth control acquisition during the first 18 months after implementation of A.B. 2348 (January 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014). Methods A descriptive observational design using administrative databases was used. Family PACT claims were retrieved for RN visits and contraception. Paid claims for contraceptive dispensing and/or administration visits by physicians, nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and physician assistants were compared before and after the implementation of A.B. 2348 at practice sites where RN visits were and were not utilized. Contraceptive methods and administration procedures were identified using Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System codes, National Drug Codes, and Common Procedural Terminology codes. Claims data for healthcare facilities were abstracted by site location based on a unique combination of National Provider Identifier (NPI), NPI Owner, and NPI location number. Results RN visits were found mainly in Northern California and the Central Valley (73%). Sixty-eight percent of RN visits resulted in same-day dispensing and/or administration of hormonal (and/or barrier) methods. Since benefit implementation, RN visits resulted in a 10% increase in access to birth control dispensing and/or administration visits. RN visits were also associated with future birth control acquisition and other

  2. Urban-rural differences in GP care utilization: the effect of social suport and attitude on visiting the general practitioner.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruysbroek, A.; Droomers, M.; Westert, G.P.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Urban residents tend to use more health care services than rural inhabitants do. AIM. We explore the contribution of social support and people's attitude towards their GP to the explanation of urban-rural differences in the use of GP care. METHODS. The second Dutch National Survey of

  3. A study of the user's perception of economic value in nursing visits to primary care by the method of contingent valuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conde-López Juan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of the attribution of economic value that users of a health system assign to a health service could be useful in planning these services. The method of contingent valuation can provide information about the user's perception of value in monetary terms, and therefore comparable between services of a very different nature. This study attempts to extract the economic value that the subject, user of primary care nursing services in a public health system, attributes to this service by the method of contingent valuation, based on the perspectives of Willingness to Pay (WTP and Willingness to Accept [Compensation] (WTA. Methods/Design This is an economic study with a transversal design. The contingent valuation method will be used to estimate the user's willingness to pay (WTP for the care received from the primary care nurse and the willingness to accept [compensation] (WTA, were this service eliminated. A survey that meets the requisites of the contingent valuation method will be constructed and pilot-tested. Subsequently, 600 interviews will be performed with subjects chosen by systematic randomized sampling from among those who visit nursing at twenty health centers with different socioeconomic characteristics in the Community of Madrid. The characteristics of the subject and of the care received that can explain the variations in WTP, WTA and in the WTP/WTA ratio expressed will be studied. A theoretical validation of contingent valuation will be performed constructing two explanatory multivariate mixed models in which the dependent variable will be WTP, and the WTP/WTA relationship, respectively. Discussion The identification of the attribution of economic value to a health service that does not have a direct price at the time of use, such as a visit to primary care nursing, and the definition of a profile of "loss aversion" in reference to the service evaluated, can be relevant elements in planning

  4. First-visit patients without a referral to the Department of Internal Medicine at a medium-sized acute care hospital in Japan: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajiwara N

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nobuyuki Kajiwara,1 Kazuyuki Hayashi,1 Masahiro Misago,2 Shinichiro Murakami,2 Takato Ueoka2 1Department of Nephrology, Ikeda City Hospital, 2Department of General Medicine, Ikeda City Hospital, Johnan, Osaka, Japan Purpose: We sought to profile first-time patients without a referral who sought medical care at the Department of Internal Medicine at a medium-sized acute care hospital in Japan. We anticipated that the analysis would highlight the demand for medical care needs from acute care hospitals and help confirm one of the problems associated with primary care in Japan. Patients and methods: The study population comprised 765 patients who sought outpatient consultation without a referral at “the Department of General Internal Medicine” at the Ikeda City Hospital on Fridays over 4 years. Data on the following variables were collected: age, sex, examination date, reason for encounter (RFE, diagnosis, as well as history of consultation with or without antibiotic treatment at another medical institution for the same RFE. We used the International Classicication of Primary Care, Revised Second edition (ICPC-2-R codes for RFEs and diagnoses. Results: The main RFE fields were digestive (ICPC-2-R Chapter D, general and unspecified (A, and respiratory (R. The main diagnosis fields were digestive (D, respiratory (R, general and unspecified (A, and musculoskeletal (L. In total, 27.6% of patients had sought consultation at another medical institution for the same RFE. Of these, 64.7% of patients for whom the RFE was cough (ICPC-2-R code, R05, and 72.0% for whom the RFE was fever (A03 were prescribed antibiotics. In total, 62.4% of patients underwent emergency investigations and waited for the results; 4.3% were hospitalized on the same day; and 60.5% were medicated at the initial examination. In 11.5%, the main underlying problem appeared to be psychosomatic. Conclusion: We used the ICPC-2-R to analyze the state of first-visit patients without a

  5. The Nordic maintenance care program: the clinical use of identified indications for preventive care

    OpenAIRE

    Ax?n, Iben; Bodin, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent condition and has been found to be recurrent and persistent in a majority of cases. Chiropractors have a preventive strategy, maintenance care (MC), aimed towards minimizing recurrence and progression of such conditions. The indications for recommending MC have been identified in the Nordic countries from hypothetical cases. This study aims to investigate whether these indications are indeed used in the clinical encounter. Methods Data were collec...

  6. Key role in the prevention of child neglect and abuse in Germany: continuous care by qualified family midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerle, Gertrud M; Makowsky, Katja; Schücking, Beate A

    2012-08-01

    the aim of two related studies was an in-depth knowledge of psychosocially and health-related vulnerable families and the 'portfolio' of care that family midwives (FM) provide. Besides factors which influence acceptance and access from the mothers' perspective, the effectiveness of FM with regard to care, infant nutrition, and parent-child relationship as well as multidisciplinary collaboration were of interest, especially against the backdrop of Germany's national aim to strengthen prevention of neglect and abuse of infants. In addition, the reasons why families did not want FM care were explored. two FM model projects in Saxony-Anhalt (SA) and Lower Saxony (LS), Germany, were evaluated. Quantitative data were prospectively collected on 93% of vulnerable families being cared for by FM (SA) and regarding vulnerable families that declined FM care (LS). These data were complemented by problem-focused interviews with 14 mothers and six social workers (LS). the 33 FM in SA and 11 FM in LS are community-based and visit vulnerable families from pregnancy up to the first birthday of the child, maximally. They provide health promotion, maternal and infant care, and multidisciplinary support geared towards early prevention of child neglect and abuse. from May 2006 until 2008 (SA) and from January 2008 until December 2009 (LS) 814 and 235 vulnerable families, respectively, were cared for by FM. Complete data on 734 families were analysed (SA) as were 30 questionnaires on 'non-compliant' families (LS). Problem-focused interviews were conducted with 14 mothers and 6 social workers (LS). many families exhibited a high vulnerability score of complex risk factors. Four vulnerability patterns were statistically extracted explaining 40% of the total variance. The highest frequencies of care activities related to infant care and nutrition, giving advice on the Mother-Child relationship, and psychosocial support. The Youth Welfare Services (YWS) were significant collaboration

  7. Visit a Farm? Surely Not!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Popular myth has it that visiting a farm can be dangerous, but there are only a few occasions when children have become ill during a school visit to a farm. Simple, sensible precautions, including wearing appropriate clothing, such as trousers and wellington boots (if wet) or sensible shoes, and careful hand-washing, are all that is required. The…

  8. Propensity for paying home visits among general practitioners and the associations with cancer patients' place of care and death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winthereik, Anna K; Hjertholm, Peter; Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern

    2017-01-01

    ): odds ratio: 1.13 (95% confidence interval: 1.08; 1.17) for ⩽3 bed-days and odds ratio: 0.95 (0.91-0.99) for ⩾20 bed-days. Group 4 patients were more likely to die out of hospital (odds ratio: 1.20 (1.16; 1.24)) than Group 1 patients. CONCLUSION: We found a dose-response-like association between general......-years); of whom 116,677 died from cancer. General practitioners were grouped into quartiles based on the general practitioners' propensity to pay home visits, which varied 6.6-fold between quartiles. Cancer patients in Group 4 (highest propensity) were less hospitalised than patients in Group 1 (lowest propensity...

  9. GPs' perspectives on preventive care for older people: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Yvonne M; Koenen, Julia M; de Ruijter, Wouter; van Dijk-van Dijk, D J Annemarie; van der Weele, Gerda M; Middelkoop, Barend J C; Reis, Ria; Assendelft, Willem J J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2012-11-01

    Preventive care traditionally aims to prevent diseases or injuries. For older people, different aims of prevention, such as maintenance of independence and wellbeing, are increasingly important. To explore GPs' perspectives on preventive care for older people. Qualitative study comprising six focus groups with GPs in the Netherlands. The focus-group discussions with 37 GPs were analysed using the framework analysis method. Whether or not to implement preventive care for older people depends on the patient's individual level of vitality, as perceived by the GP. For older people with a high level of vitality, GPs confine their role to standardised disease-oriented prevention on a patient's request; when the vitality levels in older people fall, the scope of preventive care shifts from prevention of disease to prevention of functional decline. For older, vulnerable people, GPs expect most benefit from a proactive, individualised approach, enabling them to live as independently as possible. Based on these perspectives, a conceptual model for preventive care was developed, which describes GPs' different perspectives toward older people who are vulnerable and those with high levels of vitality. It focuses on five main dimensions: aim of care (prevention of disease versus prevention of functional decline), concept of care (disease model versus functional model), initiator (older persons themselves versus GP), target groups (people with requests versus specified risk groups), and content of preventive care (mainly cardiovascular risk management versus functional decline). GPs' perspectives on preventive care are determined by their perception of the level of vitality of their older patients. Preventive care for older people with high levels of vitality may consist of a standardised disease-oriented approach; those who are vulnerable will need an individualised approach to prevent functional decline.

  10. The role of post-migration living difficulties on somatization among first-generation immigrants visited in a primary care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Aragona

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of post-migration living difficulties (PMLD on somatization was studied in 101 first generation immigrants visited in primary care. Premigratory traumas and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD were also assessed. About one third of patients somatized. Sociodemographic variables were similar in somatizers and non-somatizers. Premigratory traumas, PTSD and the likelihood to report at least one serious or very serious PMLD were higher in somatizers. Four kinds of PMLD were more frequent in somatizers: worries about unavailability of health assistance, working problems, discrimination and poor social help. Traumas and PTSD influenced the effect of PMLD on somatization. Findings suggest that in specific samples of primary care immigrants severe premigratory traumas increase the sensitivity to PMLD and in turn distress due to PMLD amplifies the tendency to somatize.

  11. [Minors visits (ages 14-18) at primary clinics without an accompanying guardian: attitudes of primary care physicians of Clalit Health Services - South District].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildesheimer, Efrat; Orkin, Jacob; Biderman, Aya

    2010-04-01

    According to Israeli law, for a minor to receive medical treatment, the physician is obligated to obtain informed consent from the minor's parents. In practice, minors under the age of 18 often attend the clinics on their own. In past years, only a few attempts have been made to revise the law, however, none were implemented. To evaluate the attitudes and knowledge of physicians in primary care clinics regarding the legal aspects of minors' visits at the clinics, relating to how widespread is the phenomena, the influencing factors, the physician's opinion and approach. A descriptive study based on self-administered questionnaires that were distributed by post during 2005, to primary care physicians belonging to Clalit Health Services, south district. The questionnaires included demographic details, attitudes and knowledge of minors' visits. Analysis of 103 questionnaires found that minors attending clinics without their parent is a common phenomenon. The reasons noted were: acquaintance with the parents, and that their children are "mature enough". The physician's knowledge about the Israeli law on the subject was found to be deficient: 56% answered incorrectly to questions on which the law is very clear, and in most of the other questions many claimed they did not know the correct answer. Many of the physicians think that minors should not visit the clinic by themselves; only 6% attended an educational program related to this matter. The subject of minors attending clinics without an accompanying parent warrants discussion, and clear and updated legislation. In addition, as stems from the study, there is a need to update physicians regarding this issue.

  12. Adoption of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Practices in Primary Care for Older Adults with a History of Falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Phelan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A multifactorial approach to assess and manage modifiable risk factors is recommended for older adults with a history of falls. Limited research suggests that this approach does not routinely occur in clinical practice, but most related studies are based on provider self-report, with the last chart audit of United States practice published over a decade ago. We conducted a retrospective chart review to assess the extent to which patients aged 65+ with a history of repeated falls or fall-related healthcare use received multifactorial risk assessment and interventions. The setting was an academic primary care clinic in the Pacific Northwest. Among the 116 patients meeting our inclusion criteria, 48% had some type of documented assessment. Their mean age was 79±8 years; 68% were female, and 10% were non-white. They averaged 6 primary care visits over a 12-month period subsequent to their index fall. Frequency of assessment of fall risk factors varied from 24% (for home safety to 78% (for vitamin D. An evidence-based intervention was recommended for identified risk factors 73% of the time, on average. Two risk factors were addressed infrequently: medications (21% and home safety (24%. Use of a structured visit note template independently predicted assessment of fall risk factors (P=0.003. Geriatrics specialists were more likely to use a structured note template (p=.04 and perform more fall risk factor assessments (4.6 vs. 3.6, p=.007 than general internists. These results suggest opportunities for improving multifactorial fall risk assessment and management of older adults at high fall risk in primary care. A structured visit note template facilitates assessment. Given that high-risk medications have been found to be independent risk factors for falls, increasing attention to medications should become a key focus of both public health educational efforts and fall prevention in primary care practice.

  13. Prevention of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Paolo; De Luca, Daniele; Stronati, Mauro; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Ruffinazzi, Giulia; Luparia, Martina; Tavella, Elena; Boano, Elena; Castagnola, Elio; Mostert, Michael; Farina, Daniele

    2013-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis causes a huge burden of morbidity and mortality and includes bloodstream, urine, cerebrospinal, peritoneal, and lung infections as well as infections starting from burns and wounds, or from any other usually sterile sites. It is associated with cytokine - and biomediator-induced disorders of respiratory, hemodynamic, and metabolic processes. Neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit feature many specific risk factors for bacterial and fungal sepsis. Loss of gut commensals such as Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli spp., as occurs with prolonged antibiotic treatments, delayed enteral feeding, or nursing in incubators, translates into proliferation of pathogenic microflora and abnormal gut colonization. Prompt diagnosis and effective treatment do not protect septic neonates form the risk of late neurodevelopmental impairment in the survivors. Thus prevention of bacterial and fungal infection is crucial in these settings of unique patients. In this view, improving neonatal management is a key step, and this includes promotion of breast-feeding and hygiene measures, adoption of a cautious central venous catheter policy, enhancement of the enteric microbiota composition with the supplementation of probiotics, and medical stewardship concerning H2 blockers with restriction of their use. Additional measures may include the use of lactoferrin, fluconazole, and nystatin and specific measures to prevent ventilator associated pneumonia. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Perceived quality of care, receipt of preventive care, and usual source of health care among undocumented and other Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Michael A; Bustamante, Arturo Vargas; Ang, Alfonso

    2009-11-01

    Latinos are the largest minority group in the United States and experience persistent disparities in access to and quality of health care. (1) To determine the relationship between nativity/immigration status and self-reported quality of care and preventive care. (2) To assess the impact of a usual source of health care on receipt of preventive care among Latinos. Using cross-sectional data from the 2007 Pew Hispanic Center/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Hispanic Healthcare Survey, a nationally representative telephone survey of 4,013 Latino adults, we compared US-born Latinos with foreign-born Latino citizens, foreign-born Latino permanent residents and undocumented Latinos. We estimated odds ratios using separate multivariate ordered logistic models for five outcomes: blood pressure checked in the past 2 years, cholesterol checked in the past 5 years, perceived quality of medical care in the past year, perceived receipt of no health/health-care information from a doctor in the past year, and language concordance. Undocumented Latinos had the lowest percentages of insurance coverage (37% vs 77% US-born, P Undocumented Latinos also reported the highest percentage receiving no health/health-care information from their doctor (40% vs 20% US-born, P undocumented status was associated with lower likelihood of blood pressure checked in the previous 2 years (OR = 0.60; 95% CI, 0.43-0.84), cholesterol checked in the past 5 years (OR = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.39-0.99), and perceived receipt of excellent/good care in the past year (OR = 0.56; 95% CI, 0.39-0.77). Having a usual source of care increased the likelihood of a blood pressure check in the past 2 years and a cholesterol check in the past 5 years. In this national sample, undocumented Latinos were less likely to report receiving blood pressure and cholesterol level checks, less likely to report having received excellent/good quality of care, and more likely to receive no health/health-care information from doctors, even

  15. How Often Are Parents Counseled About Family Planning During Pediatric Visits? Results of a Nationally Representative Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramani, Maya; Cheng, Tina L; Solomon, Barry S; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2017-07-01

    Maternal family planning plays an important role in child, maternal, and family health; children's health care providers are in a unique position to counsel adult caregivers regarding contraception and appropriate birth spacing. We sought to determine the prevalence of caregiver family planning counseling by children's health care providers during preventive care visits for infants and young children. Data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 2009 to 2012 as well as National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 2009 to 2011 were analyzed to determine the weighted frequency of family planning/contraception counseling provided during preventive, primary care visits for children younger than the age of 2 years. Family planning/contraception counseling or education was documented in only 16 of 4261 preventive care visits in primary care settings for children younger than the age of 2 years, corresponding to 0.30% (95% confidence interval, -0.08% to 0.68%) of visits nationally. Similar frequencies were calculated for preventive visits with children younger than 1 year and with infants younger than 60 days of age. Despite Bright Futures' recommendations for children's health care providers to address caregiver family planning during well infant visits, documented counseling is rare. The results indicate that there are missed opportunities to promote family health in the pediatric setting. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. "An ounce of prevention": a primary care based prevention program for pre-diabetic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, Clare E; Cullen-Arseneau, Pamela; Merizzi, Shannon; Blazhko, Valeriya

    2013-02-01

    Given the existing and projected number of individuals with diabetes mellitus, there is an urgent need to implement effective prevention programs. Research trials have demonstrated reductions in risk through programs targeted at adopting a healthier lifestyle however translating this research evidence into primary care can be challenging. We examined the feasibility of implementing a pre-diabetes program into a primary care clinic in Ottawa, Canada. "An Ounce of Prevention" Healthy Lifestyle and Diabetes Program was adapted from best evidence clinical trials and uses educational tools developed by the Diabetes Prevention Program for long-term behavior change, relies on principles of self-management, is group based and includes an integrated exercise component. We used a multimethod evaluation approach and examined feasibility and practical implementation aspects such as space, staffing, recruitment and retention issues. We have implemented the program and have offered 10 courses from June 2010 through to August 2012 with 74 participants in total. Results of the evaluation surveys show that participants are highly satisfied with the content as well as the format of the program and think that the content is relevant to them. Recruitment of patients is time- intensive and requires dedicated resources. Evaluation of effectiveness with follow-up surveys and clinical measures has been challenging due to limited resources and is ongoing. The translation and implementation of research evidence into clinical practice is complex and requires consideration of real-life practicalities such as time demands on participants, staffing costs, effective recruiting and ongoing evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Decolonization in Prevention of Health Care-Associated Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Marin L.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Colonization with health care-associated pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci, Gram-negative organisms, and Clostridium difficile is associated with increased risk of infection. Decolonization is an evidence-based intervention that can be used to prevent health care-associated infections (HAIs). This review evaluates agents used for nasal topical decolonization, topical (e.g., skin) decolonization, oral decolonization, and selective digestive or oropharyngeal decontamination. Although the majority of studies performed to date have focused on S. aureus decolonization, there is increasing interest in how to apply decolonization strategies to reduce infections due to Gram-negative organisms, especially those that are multidrug resistant. Nasal topical decolonization agents reviewed include mupirocin, bacitracin, retapamulin, povidone-iodine, alcohol-based nasal antiseptic, tea tree oil, photodynamic therapy, omiganan pentahydrochloride, and lysostaphin. Mupirocin is still the gold standard agent for S. aureus nasal decolonization, but there is concern about mupirocin resistance, and alternative agents are needed. Of the other nasal decolonization agents, large clinical trials are still needed to evaluate the effectiveness of retapamulin, povidone-iodine, alcohol-based nasal antiseptic, tea tree oil, omiganan pentahydrochloride, and lysostaphin. Given inferior outcomes and increased risk of allergic dermatitis, the use of bacitracin-containing compounds cannot be recommended as a decolonization strategy. Topical decolonization agents reviewed included chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG), hexachlorophane, povidone-iodine, triclosan, and sodium hypochlorite. Of these, CHG is the skin decolonization agent that has the strongest evidence base, and sodium hypochlorite can also be recommended. CHG is associated with prevention of infections due to Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms as well as Candida. Conversely, triclosan use is discouraged, and

  18. Tests and visits before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before surgery - tests; Before surgery - doctor visits ... Pre-op is the time before your surgery. It means "before operation." During this time, you will meet with one of your doctors. This may be your surgeon or primary care ...

  19. Estimating Demand for and Supply of Pediatric Preventive Dental Care for Children and Identifying Dental Care Shortage Areas, Georgia, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shanshan; Gentili, Monica; Griffin, Paul M; Griffin, Susan O; Harati, Pravara; Johnson, Ben; Serban, Nicoleta; Tomar, Scott

    Demand for dental care is expected to outpace supply through 2025. The objectives of this study were to determine the extent of pediatric dental care shortages in Georgia and to develop a general method for estimation that can be applied to other states. We estimated supply and demand for pediatric preventive dental care for the 159 counties in Georgia in 2015. We compared pediatric preventive dental care shortage areas (where demand exceeded twice the supply) designated by our methods with dental health professional shortage areas designated by the Health Resources & Services Administration. We estimated caries risk from a multivariate analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data and national census data. We estimated county-level demand based on the time needed to perform preventive dental care services and the proportion of time that dentists spend on pediatric preventive dental care services from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Pediatric preventive dental care supply exceeded demand in Georgia in 75 counties: the average annual county-level pediatric preventive dental care demand was 16 866 hours, and the supply was 32 969 hours. We identified 41 counties as pediatric dental care shortage areas, 14 of which had not been designated by the Health Resources & Services Administration. Age- and service-specific information on dental care shortage areas could result in more efficient provider staffing and geographic targeting.

  20. Translating evidence into practice: Hong Kong Reference Framework for Preventive Care for Children in Primary Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Natalie P Y; Too, L C; Tsang, Caroline S H; Young, Betty W Y

    2015-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that supports the close relationship between childhood and adult health. Fostering healthy growth and development of children deserves attention and effort. The Reference Framework for Preventive Care for Children in Primary Care Settings has been published by the Task Force on Conceptual Model and Preventive Protocols under the direction of the Working Group on Primary Care. It aims to promote health and prevent disease in children and is based on the latest research, and contributions of the Clinical Advisory Group that comprises primary care physicians, paediatricians, allied health professionals, and patient groups. This article highlights the comprehensive, continuing, and patient-centred preventive care for children and discusses how primary care physicians can incorporate the evidence-based recommendations into clinical practice. It is anticipated that the adoption of this framework will contribute to improved health and wellbeing of children.

  1. "Macho men" and preventive health care: implications for older men in different social classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Kristen W; Mouzon, Dawne M

    2011-06-01

    The gender paradox in mortality--where men die earlier than women despite having more socioeconomic resources--may be partly explained by men's lower levels of preventive health care. Stereotypical notions of masculinity reduce preventive health care; however, the relationship between masculinity, socioeconomic status (SES), and preventive health care is unknown. Using the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, the authors conduct a population-based assessment of masculinity beliefs and preventive health care, including whether these relationships vary by SES. The results show that men with strong masculinity beliefs are half as likely as men with more moderate masculinity beliefs to receive preventive care. Furthermore, in contrast to the well-established SES gradient in health, men with strong masculinity beliefs do not benefit from higher education and their probability of obtaining preventive health care decreases as their occupational status, wealth, and/or income increases. Masculinity may be a partial explanation for the paradox of men's lower life expectancy, despite their higher SES.

  2. Smoking, Cardiac Symptoms, and an Emergency Care Visit: A Mixed Methods Exploration of Cognitive and Emotional Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyn A. Tappe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency departments and hospitals are being urged to implement onsite interventions to promote smoking cessation, yet little is known about the theoretical underpinnings of behavior change after a healthcare visit. This observational pilot study evaluated three factors that may predict smoking cessation after an acute health emergency: perceived illness severity, event-related emotions, and causal attribution. Fifty smokers who presented to a hospital because of suspected cardiac symptoms were interviewed, either in the emergency department (ED or, for those who were admitted, on the cardiac inpatient units. Their data were analyzed using both qualitative and quantitative methodologies to capture the individual, first-hand experience and to evaluate trends over the illness chronology. Reported perceptions of the event during semistructured interview varied widely and related to the individual’s intentions regarding smoking cessation. No significant differences were found between those interviewed in the ED versus the inpatient unit. Although the typical profile was characterized by a peak in perceived illness severity and negative emotions at the time the patient presented in the ED, considerable pattern variation occurred. Our results suggest that future studies of event-related perceptions and emotional reactions should consider using multi-item and multidimensional assessment methods rated serially over the event chronology.

  3. The Role of eHealth in Optimizing Preventive Care in the Primary Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Mariko; Noble, Natasha; Mansfield, Elise; Waller, Amy; Henskens, Frans; Sanson-Fisher, Rob

    2015-05-22

    Modifiable health risk behaviors such as smoking, overweight and obesity, risky alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition contribute to a substantial proportion of the world's morbidity and mortality burden. General practitioners (GPs) play a key role in identifying and managing modifiable health risk behaviors. However, these are often underdetected and undermanaged in the primary care setting. We describe the potential of eHealth to help patients and GPs to overcome some of the barriers to managing health risk behaviors. In particular, we discuss (1) the role of eHealth in facilitating routine collection of patient-reported data on lifestyle risk factors, and (2) the role of eHealth in improving clinical management of identified risk factors through provision of tailored feedback, point-of-care reminders, tailored educational materials, and referral to online self-management programs. Strategies to harness the capacity of the eHealth medium, including the use of dynamic features and tailoring to help end users engage with, understand, and apply information need to be considered and maximized. Finally, the potential challenges in implementing eHealth solutions in the primary care setting are discussed. In conclusion, there is significant potential for innovative eHealth solutions to make a contribution to improving preventive care in the primary care setting. However, attention to issues such as data security and designing eHealth interfaces that maximize engagement from end users will be important to moving this field forward.

  4. Information Technology: The Preventive Health Care Application and an Associated Upgrade

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    The Preventive Health Care Application was a tool designed to enable clinicians to deliver and track appropriate and timely preventive services provided to all enrolled military health system members...

  5. Behavioral counseling to prevent childhood obesity--study protocol of a pragmatic trial in maternity and child health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustila, Taina; Keskinen, Päivi; Luoto, Riitta

    2012-07-03

    Prevention is considered effective in combating the obesity epidemic. Prenatal environment may increase offspring's risk for obesity. A child starts to adopt food preferences and other behavioral habits affecting weight gain during preschool years. We report the study protocol of a pragmatic lifestyle intervention aiming at primary prevention of childhood obesity. A non-randomized controlled pragmatic trial in maternity and child health care clinics. The control group was recruited among families who visited the same clinics one year earlier. Eligibility criteria was mother at risk for gestational diabetes: body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2, macrosomic newborn in any previous pregnancy, immediate family history of diabetes and/or age ≥ 40 years. All maternity clinics in town involved in recruitment. The gestational intervention consisted of individual counseling on diet and physical activity by a public health nurse, and of two group counseling sessions. Intervention continues until offspring's age of five years. An option to participate a group counseling at child's age 1 to 2 years was offered. The intervention includes advice on healthy diet, physical activity, sedentary behavior and sleeping pattern. The main outcome measure is offspring BMI z-score and its changes by the age of six years. Early childhood is a critical time period for prevention of obesity. Pragmatic trials targeting this period are necessary in order to find effective obesity prevention programs feasible in normal health care practice.

  6. Older persons' worries expressed during home care visits: Exploring the content of cues and concerns identified by the Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafskjold, Linda; Eide, Tom; Holmström, Inger K; Sundling, Vibeke; van Dulmen, Sandra; Eide, Hilde

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about how older persons in home care express their concerns. Emotional cues and concerns can be identified by the Verona coding definitions of emotional sequences (VR-CoDES), but the method gives no insight into what causes the distress and the emotions involved. The aims of this study are to explore (1) older persons' worries and (2) the content of these expressions. An observational exploratory two-step approach was used to investigate audiotaped recordings from 38 Norwegian home care visits with older persons and nurse assistants. First, 206 cues and concerns were identified using VR-CoDES. Second, the content and context of these expressions were analysed inductively. Four main categories emerged: worries about relationships with others, worries about health care-related issues, worries about aging and bodily impairment, and life narratives and value issues, with several subcategories showing the causes of worry and emotions involved. The two-step approach provides an in-depth knowledge of older persons' worries, causes of worries, and their related emotions. The subcategories described in a language close to the experience can be useful in practice development and communication training for students and health care providers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Predictors of Frequent Emergency Room Visits among a Homeless Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakarar, Kinna; Morgan, Jake R; Gaeta, Jessie M; Hohl, Carole; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness, HIV, and substance use are interwoven problems. Furthermore, homeless individuals are frequent users of emergency services. The main purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for frequent emergency room (ER) visits and to examine the effects of housing status and HIV serostatus on ER utilization. The second purpose was to identify risk factors for frequent ER visits in patients with a history of illicit drug use. A retrospective analysis was performed on 412 patients enrolled in a Boston-based health care for the homeless program (HCH). This study population was selected as a 2:1 HIV seronegative versus HIV seropositive match based on age, sex, and housing status. A subgroup analysis was performed on 287 patients with history of illicit drug use. Chart data were analyzed to compare demographics, health characteristics, and health service utilization. Results were stratified by housing status. Logistic models using generalized estimating equations were used to predict frequent ER visits. In homeless patients, hepatitis C was the only predictor of frequent ER visits (OR 4.49, phomeless patients. HIV seropositivity did not predict frequent ER visits, likely because HIV seropositive HCH patients are engaged in care. In patients with history of illicit drug use, hepatitis C and mental health disorders predicted frequent ER visits. Supportive housing for patients with mental health disorders and hepatitis C may help prevent unnecessary ER visits in this population.

  8. [Compliance with recommendations in secondary prevention of stroke in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo-Ojeda, Carmen; Parellada-Esquius, Neus; Salvador-González, Betlem; Oriol-Torón, Pilar Ángeles; Rodríguez-Garrido, M Dolores; Muñoz-Segura, Dolores

    Knowing compliance with secondary prevention recommendations of stroke in primary care and to identify factors associated with compliance. Multi-centre cross-sectional. Health primary care centres in a metropolitan area (944,280 inhabitants). Patients aged 18years and over with ischemic brain disease diagnosis prior to 6months before the study. Clinical history records of demographic variables, risk factors and cardiovascular comorbidity, drugs, blood pressure values (BP), LDL-cholesterol and medical visits by doctor and nurses after the event. Good adherence was considered when BP <140/90 mmHg, LDL-cholesterol <100 mg/dL, smoking abstention and preventive drugs prescription (anti-platelet/anticoagulants, statins and angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-receptor-antagonists or diuretics) during the last 18months. A total of 21,976 patients, mean age 73.12 years (SD: 12.13), 48% women, 72.7% with stroke. Co-morbidity: hypertension 70.8%, dyslipidemia 55.1%, DM 30.9%, atrial fibrillation 14.1%, ischemic heart disease 13.5%, chronic renal failure 12.5%, heart failure 8.8%, peripheral arterial disease 6.2%, dementia 7.8%. No record was found for smoking in 3.7%, for BP in 3.5% and for LDL in 6.5%. Optimal control: abstention smoking in 3.7%, BP <140/90 in 65.7% and LDL <100 mg/dL in 41.0%. 86.2% anti-platelet/anticoagulants, 61.3% statins and 61.8% angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor-antagonists or diuretic. Registration and risk factors control was higher in 66-79years aged and lower in 18-40years aged. The implementation of clinical guidelines recommendations for stroke prevention in primary care must be improved, especially among younger population. Organizational changes and more active involvement by professionals and strategies against therapeutic inertia must be taken. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids: a randomized trial of a pediatric primary care-based obesity prevention intervention for at-risk 5-10 year olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Nancy E; Levy, Rona L; Langer, Shelby L; Senso, Meghan M; Crain, A Lauren; Hayes, Marcia G; Anderson, Julie D; Seburg, Elisabeth M; Jeffery, Robert W

    2013-09-01

    Pediatric primary care is an important setting in which to address obesity prevention, yet relatively few interventions have been evaluated and even fewer have been shown to be effective. The development and evaluation of cost-effective approaches to obesity prevention that leverage opportunities of direct access to families in the pediatric primary care setting, overcome barriers to implementation in busy practice settings, and facilitate sustained involvement of parents is an important public health priority. The goal of the Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids (HHHK 5-10) randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the efficacy of a relatively low-cost primary care-based obesity prevention intervention aimed at 5 to 10 year old children who are at risk for obesity. Four hundred twenty one parent/child dyads were recruited and randomized to either the obesity prevention arm or a Contact Control condition that focuses on safety and injury prevention. The HHHK 5-10 obesity prevention intervention combines brief counseling with a pediatric primary care provider during routine well child visits and follow-up telephone coaching that supports parents in making home environmental changes to support healthful eating, activity patterns, and body weight. The Contact Control condition combines the same provider counseling with telephone coaching focused on safety and injury prevention messages. This manuscript describes the study design and baseline characteristics of participants enrolled in the HHHK 5-10 trial. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids: A Randomized Trial of a Pediatric Primary Care Based Obesity Prevention Intervention for At-Risk 5-10 Year Olds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Nancy E.; Levy, Rona L.; Langer, Shelby L.; Senso, Meghan M.; Crain, A. Lauren; Hayes, Marcia G.; Anderson, Julie D.; Seburg, Elisabeth M.; Jeffery, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric primary care is an important setting in which to address obesity prevention, yet relatively few interventions have been evaluated and even fewer have been shown to be effective. The development and evaluation of cost-effective approaches to obesity prevention that leverage opportunities of direct access to families in the pediatric primary care setting, overcome barriers to implementation in busy practice settings, and facilitate sustained involvement of parents is an important public health priority. The goal of the Healthy Homes/Healthy Kids (HHHK 5-10) randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the efficacy of a relatively low-cost primary care-based obesity prevention intervention aimed at 5 to 10 year old children who are at risk for obesity. Four hundred twenty one parent/child dyads were recruited and randomized to either the obesity prevention arm or a contact control condition that focuses on safety and injury prevention. The HHHK 5-10 obesity prevention intervention combines brief counseling with a pediatric primary care provider during routine well-child visits and follow-up telephone coaching that supports parents in making home environmental changes to support healthful eating, activity patterns, and body weight. The contact control condition combines the same provider counseling with telephone coaching focused on safety and injury prevention messages. This manuscript describes the study design and baseline characteristics of participants enrolled in the HHHK 5-10 trial. PMID:23816490

  11. Women's Preventive Services Guidelines Affordable Care Act Expands Prevention Coverage for Women's Health and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Act Expands Prevention Coverage for Women’s Health and Well-Being The Affordable Care Act – the health insurance reform ... preventive services are necessary for women’s health and well-being and therefore should be considered in the development ...

  12. Cancer preventive services, socioeconomic status, and the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Gregory S; Kou, Tzuyung Doug; Dor, Avi; Koroukian, Siran M; Schluchter, Mark D

    2017-05-01

    Out-of-pocket expenditures are thought to be an important barrier to the receipt of cancer preventive services, especially for those of a lower socioeconomic status (SES). The Affordable Care Act (ACA) eliminated out-of-pocket expenditures for recommended services, including mammography and colonoscopy. The objective of this study was to determine changes in the uptake of mammography and colonoscopy among fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries before and after ACA implementation. Using Medicare claims data, this study identified women who were 70 years old or older and had not undergone mammography in the previous 2 years and men and women who were 70 years old or older, were at increased risk for colorectal cancer, and had not undergone colonoscopy in the past 5 years. The receipt of procedures in the 2-year period before the ACA's implementation (2009-2010) and after its implementation (2011 to September 2012) was also identified. Multivariate generalized estimating equation models were used to determine the independent association and county-level quartile of median income and education with the receipt of testing. For mammography, a lower SES quartile was associated with less uptake, but the post-ACA disparities were smaller than those in the pre-ACA period. In addition, mammography rates increased from the pre-ACA period to the post-ACA period in all SES quartiles. For colonoscopy, in both the pre- and post-ACA periods, there was an association between uptake and educational level and, to some extent, income. However, there were no appreciable changes in colonoscopy and SES after implementation of the ACA. The removal of out-of-pocket expenditures may overcome a barrier to the receipt of recommended preventive services, but for colonoscopy, other procedural factors may remain as deterrents. Cancer 2017;123:1585-1589. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  13. Urban–rural disparity in utilization of preventive care services in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Li, Ningxiu; Liu, Chaojie; Ren, Xiaohui; Liu, Danping; Gao, Bo; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Preventive care service is considered pivotal on the background of demographic ageing and a rise in chronic diseases in China. The disparity in utilization of preventive care services between urban and rural in China is a serious issue. In this paper, we explored factors associated with urban–rural disparity in utilization of preventive care services in China, and determined how much of the urban–rural disparity was attributable to each determinant of utilization in preventive care services. Using representative sample data from China Health and Nutrition Survey in 2011 (N = 12,976), the present study performed multilevel logistic model to examine the factors that affected utilization of preventive care services in last 4 weeks. Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition method was applied to divide the utilization of preventive care disparity between urban and rural residents into a part that can be explained by differences in observed covariates and unobserved part. The percentage of rural residents utilizing preventive care service in last 4 weeks was lower than that of urban residents (5.1% vs 9.3%). Female, the aged, residents with higher education level and household income, residents reporting self-perceived illness in last 4 weeks and physician-diagnosed chronic disease had higher likelihood of utilizing preventive care services. Household income was the most important factor accounting for 26.6% of urban–rural disparities in utilization of preventive care services, followed by education (21.5%), self-perceived illness in last 4 weeks (7.8%), hypertension (4.4%), diabetes (3.3%), other chronic diseases (0.8%), and health insurance (−1.0%). Efforts to reduce financial barriers for low-income individuals who cannot afford preventive services, increasing awareness of the importance of obtaining preventive health services and providing more preventive health services covered by health insurance, may help to reduce the gap of preventive care services

  14. Urban-rural disparity in utilization of preventive care services in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Li, Ningxiu; Liu, Chaojie; Ren, Xiaohui; Liu, Danping; Gao, Bo; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2016-09-01

    Preventive care service is considered pivotal on the background of demographic ageing and a rise in chronic diseases in China. The disparity in utilization of preventive care services between urban and rural in China is a serious issue. In this paper, we explored factors associated with urban-rural disparity in utilization of preventive care services in China, and determined how much of the urban-rural disparity was attributable to each determinant of utilization in preventive care services. Using representative sample data from China Health and Nutrition Survey in 2011 (N = 12,976), the present study performed multilevel logistic model to examine the factors that affected utilization of preventive care services in last 4 weeks. Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition method was applied to divide the utilization of preventive care disparity between urban and rural residents into a part that can be explained by differences in observed covariates and unobserved part. The percentage of rural residents utilizing preventive care service in last 4 weeks was lower than that of urban residents (5.1% vs 9.3%). Female, the aged, residents with higher education level and household income, residents reporting self-perceived illness in last 4 weeks and physician-diagnosed chronic disease had higher likelihood of utilizing preventive care services. Household income was the most important factor accounting for 26.6% of urban-rural disparities in utilization of preventive care services, followed by education (21.5%), self-perceived illness in last 4 weeks (7.8%), hypertension (4.4%), diabetes (3.3%), other chronic diseases (0.8%), and health insurance (-1.0%). Efforts to reduce financial barriers for low-income individuals who cannot afford preventive services, increasing awareness of the importance of obtaining preventive health services and providing more preventive health services covered by health insurance, may help to reduce the gap of preventive care services utilization between

  15. The Effect of a Physical Activity Program on the Total Number of Primary Care Visits in Inactive Patients: A 15-Month Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giné-Garriga

    Full Text Available Effective promotion of exercise could result in substantial savings in healthcare cost expenses in terms of direct medical costs, such as the number of medical appointments. However, this is hampered by our limited knowledge of how to achieve sustained increases in physical activity.To assess the effectiveness of a Primary Health Care (PHC based physical activity program in reducing the total number of visits to the healthcare center among inactive patients, over a 15-month period.Randomized controlled trial.Three hundred and sixty-two (n = 362 inactive patients suffering from at least one chronic condition were included. One hundred and eighty-three patients (n = 183; mean (SD; 68.3 (8.8 years; 118 women were randomly allocated to the physical activity program (IG. One hundred and seventy-nine patients (n = 179; 67.2 (9.1 years; 106 women were allocated to the control group (CG. The IG went through a three-month standardized physical activity program led by physical activity specialists and linked to community resources.The total number of medical appointments to the PHC, during twelve months before and after the program, was registered. Self-reported health status (SF-12 version 2 was assessed at baseline (month 0, at the end of the intervention (month 3, and at 12 months follow-up after the end of the intervention (month 15.The IG had a significantly reduced number of visits during the 12 months after the intervention: 14.8 (8.5. The CG remained about the same: 18.2 (11.1 (P = .002.Our findings indicate that a 3-month physical activity program linked to community resources is a short-duration, effective and sustainable intervention in inactive patients to decrease rates of PHC visits.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00714831.

  16. Weight loss in nonalcoholic Fatty liver disease patients in an ambulatory care setting is largely unsuccessful but correlates with frequency of clinic visits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Dudekula

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NALFD is a leading cause of liver disease. Weight loss improves clinical features of NAFLD; however, maintenance of weight loss outside of investigational protocols is poor. The goals of this study were to characterize patterns and clinical predictors of long-term weight loss in ambulatory patients with NAFLD.We retrospectively reviewed 924 non-cirrhotic patients with NAFLD presenting to a liver clinic from May 1st 2007 to April 30th 2013. Overweight and obese patients were counseled on lifestyle modifications for weight loss as per USPSTF guidelines. The primary outcome was percent weight change between the first and last recorded visits: % weight change  =  (weightinitial - weightfinal/(weightinitial. Baseline BMI and percent BMI change were secondary measures. Predictors of weight loss were determined using logistic regression.The mean baseline BMI was 33.3±6.6 kg/m2, and the mean follow-up duration was 17.3±17.6 months. Most patients with NAFLD were in either overweight (26.1% or class I obesity (30.5% categories at baseline, while the prevalence of underweight and class III obesity was lower (0.2% and 15.4%, respectively. Overall, there was no change in mean weight or BMI during the follow-up period, and only 183 patients (19.8% lost at least 5% body weight during the follow up period. Independent predictors of weight loss included number of clinic visits and baseline BMI, and patients with higher baseline BMI required more clinic visits to lose weight.Weight loss is largely unsuccessful in NAFLD patients in the ambulatory care setting. Frequent clinical encounters are associated with weight reduction, especially among individuals with high baseline BMI. Future studies are required to define effective weight loss strategies in NAFLD patients.

  17. Effects of a training program for home health care workers on the provision of preventive activities and on the health-related behavior of their clients : A quasi-experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walters, Maaike E; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; van der Meulen, Anja; Dijkstra, Arie; de Winter, Andrea F

    BACKGROUND: Because home health care workers repeatedly visit the same older adults, they are in an excellent position to improve the health-related behavior of older adults, their clients, by providing preventive activities. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to determine the short- and

  18. Social class inequalities in the utilization of health care and preventive services in Spain, a country with a national health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Cumbrera, Marco; Borrell, Carme; Palència, Laia; Espelt, Albert; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Pasarín, M Isabel; Kunst, Anton

    2010-01-01

    In Spain, despite the existence of a National Health System (NHS), the utilization of some curative health services is related to social class. This study assesses (1) whether these inequalities are also observed for preventive health services and (2) the role of additional private health insurance for people of advantaged social classes. Using data from the Spanish National Health Survey of 2006, the authors analyze the relationships between social class and use of health services by means of Poisson regression models with robust variance, controlling for self-assessed health. Similar analyses were performed for waiting times for visits to a general practitioner (GP) and specialist. After controlling for self-perceived health, men and women from social classes IV-V had a higher probability of visiting the GP than other social classes, but a lower probability of visiting a specialist or dentist. No large class differences were observed in frequency of hospitalization or emergency services use, or in breast cancer screening or influenza vaccination; cervical cancer screening frequency was lower among women from social classes IV-V. The inequalities in specialist visits, dentist visits, and cervical cancer screening were larger among people with only NHS insurance than those with double health insurance. Social class differences in waiting times were observed for specialist visits, but not for GP visits. Men and women from social classes IV-V had longer waits for a specialist; this was most marked among people with only NHS insurance. Clearly, within the NHS, social class inequalities are still evident for some curative and preventive services. Further research is needed to identify the factors driving these inequalities and to tackle these factors from within the NHS. Priority areas include specialist services, dental care, and cervical cancer screening.

  19. Clinical Updates in Women's Health Care Summary: Ischemic Heart Disease: Primary and Preventive Care Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Brittany S; Carlyle, Lynn; Voeltz, Michele D

    2017-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among women in the United States. Obstetrician-gynecologists often are the sole health care providers for otherwise healthy women. Therefore, they must be aware of risk factors, signs, and symptoms of cardiovascular disease and be prepared to recognize and treat this condition in patients as well as provide referrals when specialized care is indicated. Women with cardiac problems typically present with chest discomfort; however, they also are more likely than healthy women to present with other common symptoms, such as shortness of breath, back pain, jaw pain, or nausea and vomiting. This monograph, with a primary focus on ischemic heart disease (IHD), discusses the basic anatomy of the heart and coronary arteries; vascular biology; pathogenesis of atherosclerosis; and the screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of IHD as well as the multiple risk factors associated with the development of IHD that contribute to both increased morbidity and mortality.

  20. Physical examinations and laboratory tests in antenatal care visits in Denmark. Do reported practice and current official guidelines concord with results of literature reviews? A nationwide study of the public scheme of shared antenatal care in general practice, centres of midwifery and hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, F B; Andersen, K V; Andersen, A M

    1995-01-01

    To analyse physical examinations and laboratory tests reported in antenatal care visits in relation to official guidelines and reviews of appropriateness.......To analyse physical examinations and laboratory tests reported in antenatal care visits in relation to official guidelines and reviews of appropriateness....

  1. Temporal association of implementation of the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS) with changes in dental-related emergency department visits in Maricopa County from 2006 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ahmed; Alhanti, Brooke; McCullough, Mac; Goodin, Kate; Roling, Kirsten; Glickman, Larry

    2018-12-01

    To evaluate changes in emergency department (ED) dental-related visits in Maricopa County before and after the elimination of dental benefits for adult Medicaid-insured patients as of October 2010. Hospital visits extracted from a hospital discharge dataset were used to calculate a yearly rate ratio of dental-related versus non-dental-related ED visits (as a comparison group) for adults, children, and payer types. Changes in ED visits over time were evaluated from 2006 to 2012. Overall, 1.3 percent of all ED visits (8,030,767) were for dental-related purposes. Medicaid-insured patients accounted for 41.9 percent and 44.3 percent of all dental-related ED visits in 2006 and 2012, respectively. The rate ratio for the percentage of dental-related versus non-dental-related ED visits in each age category and payer type showed little fluctuation over time indicating no evidence of change in the dental-related ED visits as a proportion of the overall number of visits due to the cuts in the dental benefits for adult Medicaid-insured patients. We found no evidence that cuts in dental benefits for adult Medicaid-insured patients resulted in increased dental-related ED visits in Maricopa County during the study period. Rather, we found evidence of a shift in payer type after the 2010 policy change where dental-related ED visits by self-paid patients increased as dental-related ED visits by Medicaid-insured patients decreased. Such payer shifts will result in high uncompensated care burdens for providers and, ultimately, governmental payers. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  2. Preconceptional care of women at booking visit at De Soysa Maternity Hospital and Castle Street Hospital for Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickremasinghe, V P; Prageeth, P P; Pulleperuma, D S; Pushpakumara, K S

    2003-09-01

    To study the preconceptional preparedness of women attending two antenatal clinics. Cross-sectional descriptive study done in August and September 2001. Pregnant women attending the antenatal clinics De Soysa Maternity Hospital and Castle Street Hospital for Women for their booking visit. Pregnant women were randomly selected. Before collecting data the purpose of the study was explained and those who consented were recruited for the study. Data were collected on the basis of an interviewer administered questionnaire. Ethical approval was obtained from the Ethical Review Committee of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo. 225 pregnant women were recruited. 55% of them were between the ages of 18 and 30 years. 96% had achieved an educational level of above year five. 55% were in their first pregnancy and 2.75 were grand-multipara. 186 (82.7%) were housewives. 81% had a planned pregnancy. Only 21% had received pre-pregnancy counselling, 52% of them from a specialist obstetrician, and 21% and 19% from a general practitioner and public health midwife. Only 15 (6.6%) had taken preconceptional folic acid supplementation, and all of them had a level of education of GCE (A/L) or above. 11 of those who took preconceptional folic acid were primipara. 159 (70.6%) had received rubella vaccination. Of those who did not take the vaccine, 44% knew about it but did not know its importance, and 38% did not know about its availability. 18% did not take it because of various myths that they believed in. Preconceptional health knowledge regarding pregnancy was assessed by asking 10 questions and expressing it as a score out of 10. This score showed a positive correlation to the level of education of the woman. A majority received information from the print (81.7%) and electronic (72.4%) media. 50% received information from a public health midwife, and 36% from doctors. Preconceptional preparedness among our women is poor. However, rubella vaccination is relatively successful

  3. The Nordic Maintenance Care Program: when do chiropractors recommend secondary and tertiary preventive care for low back pain?

    OpenAIRE

    Lange Fredrik; Lövgren Peter W; Jørgensen Kristian; Halasz Laszlo; Eklund Andreas; Jensen Irene B; Axén Iben; Rosenbaum Annika; Leboeuf-Yde Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Among chiropractors the use of long-term treatment is common, often referred to as "maintenance care". Although no generally accepted definition exists, the term has a self-explanatory meaning to chiropractic clinicians. In public health terms, maintenance care can be considered as both secondary and tertiary preventive care. The objective of this study was to explore what factors chiropractors consider before recommending maintenance care to patients with low back pain (L...

  4. Low serum ferritin and G6PD deficiency as potential predictors of anaemia in pregnant women visiting Prime Care Hospital Enugu Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engwa, Godwill Azeh; Unaegbu, Marcellus; Unachukwu, Marian N; Njoku, Mary-Gloria C; Agbafor, Kingsley N; Mbacham, Wilfred Fon; Okoh, Anthony

    2017-12-08

    Though iron deficiency is known to be a major risk factor of anaemia, the association of G6PD deficiency and malaria with anaemia still remains unclear. Hence, a cross-sectional study involving 95 pregnant women visiting Prime Care Hospital in Trans-Ekulu region of Enugu Nigeria was conducted to determine possible predictors of anaemia in pregnancy. The prevalence of anaemia, malaria and G6PD deficiency were 53.7, 12.6 and 60% respectively. Low serum ferritin (OR 5.500, CI 2.25-13.42, p G6PD deficiency (OR 0.087, CI 0.03-0.23, p G6PD deficiency as high risk factors of anaemia.

  5. Type D Personality and Essential Hypertension in Primary Care: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study Within a Cohort of Patients Visiting General Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Francesco; Versino, Elisabetta; Gammino, Lorenzo; Colombi, Nicoletta; Ostacoli, Luca; Carletto, Sara; Furlan, Pier Maria; Picci, Rocco Luigi

    2016-01-01

    To estimate the relationship between type D personality and essential hypertension among patients visiting their GPs for any health problem, 101 hypertensive and 138 nonhypertensive patients were consecutively recruited and assessed using the Type D Personality Scale (DS14). The predictive value of type D personality was determined using a logistic regression model, taking into account the differences in recognized confounders between groups. Type D personality in the hypertension group was twice as frequent as in the no hypertension group and hypertension was more frequent among type D than non-type D patients. Logistic regression showed a significant predictive value of type D personality for hypertension, adjusting for sex, age, body mass index, family history of hypertension, living condition, education, and employment. Therefore, type D personality was strongly related to hypertension and it was a noteworthy predictor of hypertension in a real-world cohort of primary care patients.

  6. [Analysis of a Family-centred Care Programme with Follow-up Home-visits in Neonatology - In Times of the Directive from G-BA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüning, B M; Reimann, M; Sahlmen, S; Leibold, S; Nabring, J C; Felderhoff-Müser, U

    2016-07-01

    Marked progress in neonatology changed care of very preterm infants (VLBW) over the last decades - but also the attitude towards family-centred care (FCC). With the directive of the German Federal Joined Committee (G-BA), politicians recognize the necessity of neonatal FCC. To evaluate time and personnel costs necessary at a centre of established FCC. Elternberatung "Frühstart" is a FCC programme for VLBW and seriously ill neonates from preganancy at risk to follow-up home-visits delivered by one interdisciplinary team. Analysis (2011-2014): 1.) Number of cases /participation in programme, 2.) resources of time, 3) and personnel, 4.) funding, 5) economic impact. 1.1.2011-31.12.2014: 441 cases (total cases: 2 212) participated in the programme. Participation of VLBW: mean 92% (86.4-97,2%). Costs of time are highest in neonates with congenital malformations: median 13.8 h, VLBW: median 11,2 h. Transition to home is most time intensive: median 7,3 (0-42.5) h. In average of 3.1 full-time nurses (part-time workers) are able to counsel 48 families/quarter. In severe cases funding is partly provided by health care insurances for social medical aftercare: positive applications: mean 92.7% (79.6-97.7%). Participation in the FCC programme in neonatology is high and costs of time are manageable. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. The prevalence and burden of psychiatric disorders in primary health care visits in Qatar: Too little time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbari Bener

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric disorders including anxiety, depression, somatization, obsessive compulsive, and bipolar disorders are recognized as causing the biggest burden of disease worldwide. Aim: In this study, we aimed to assess the prevalence and burden of common mental disorders at Primary Health Care Centers (PHCC using the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WHO-CIDI in the Qatari population, aged 18-65 who attended Primary Health Care (PHC settings. Design: A prospective cross-sectional study conducted during November 2011 to October 2012. Setting: Primary Health Care Centers of the Supreme Council of Health, Qatar. Subjects: A total of 2,000 Qatari subjects aged 18-65 years were approached; 1475 (73.3% agreed to participate. Methods: Prevalence and severity of International Classification of Disease-10 disorders were assessed with the WHO-CIDI (Version 3.0. Results: Of the 1475 participants, 830 (56.3% were females and 645 (43.7% was males. One-third were aged 35-49 years 558 (37.8%. The three most common disorders were major depression disorders (18.31%, any anxiety disorders (17.3%, any mood disorders (16.95%, followed by separation anxiety disorders (15.25%, personality disorder (14.1%. In the present study, prevalence in women was significantly higher than men for the most common psychiatric disorders, specifically generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, specific phobias, obsessive compulsive disorders, posttraumatic disorder, somatization, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, dysthymia, and oppositional defiant disorder. Of the total 20% had only one psychiatric diagnosis and 12% had two disorders, 9.7% respondents with three diagnoses, and finally 4.3% of respondents had four or more diagnoses. Conclusion: One-fifth of all adults who attended the PHCC (20% had at least one psychiatric diagnosis. The CIDI is a useful instrument for psychiatric diagnosis in community

  8. A survey of practice patterns and the health promotion and prevention attitudes of US chiropractors. Maintenance care: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, R L

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the primary care, health promotion activities associated with what has historically been called "maintenance care" (MC) as used in the practice of chiropractic in the United States. This includes issues such as investigating the purpose of MC, what conditions and patient populations it best serves, how frequently it is required, what therapeutic interventions constitute MC, how often it is recommended, and what percent of patient visits are for prevention and health promotion services. It also investigates the economic impact of these services. Postal survey of a randomized sample of practicing US chiropractors. The questionnaire was structured with a 5-point ordinal Likert scale (28 questions) and brief fill-in questionnaire (12 questions). The 40-question survey was mailed to 1500 chiropractors selected at random from a pool of chiropractors with active practices in the United States. The National Directory of Chiropractic database was the source of actively practicing chiropractors from which doctor selection was made. The sample was derived by using the last numbers composing the zip codes assigned by the US Postal Service. This sampling method assured potential inclusion of chiropractors from all 50 states, from rural areas and large cities, and assured a sample weighting based on population density that might not have been afforded by a simple random sample. Six hundred and fifty-eight (44%) of the questionnaires were completed and returned. US chiropractors agreed or strongly agreed that the purpose of MC was to optimize health (90%), prevent conditions from developing (88%), provide palliative care (86%), and minimize recurrence or exacerbations (95%). MC was viewed as helpful in preventing both musculoskeletal and visceral health problems. There was strong agreement that the therapeutic composition of MC placed virtually equal weight on exercise (96%) and adjustments/manipulation (97%) and that other interventions, including dietary

  9. The effect of topical olive oil on prevention of bedsore in intensive care units patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zahra Abbas Ali Madadi; Reza Zeighami; Jalil Azimian; Amir Javadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bedsores are injuries to skin and underlying tissues caused by prolonged pressure. Although, some methods like frequently changing position and using particular tools are used for preventing and caring of pressure ulcers, their prevention would still be as a vital urgency. Olive oil is an herbal product with potential preventive effects to prevent bedsores because of its numerous medical properties. The major aim of this study was to determine whether topical olive oil can prevent...

  10. Improving chronic disease prevention and screening in primary care: results of the BETTER pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunfeld, Eva; Manca, Donna; Moineddin, Rahim; Thorpe, Kevin E; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Meaney, Christopher; Rogers, Jess; Beca, Jaclyn; Krueger, Paul; Mamdani, Muhammad

    2013-11-20

    Primary care provides most of the evidence-based chronic disease prevention and screening services offered by the healthcare system. However, there remains a gap between recommended preventive services and actual practice. This trial (the BETTER Trial) aimed to improve preventive care of heart disease, diabetes, colorectal, breast and cervical cancers, and relevant lifestyle factors through a practice facilitation intervention set in primary care. Pragmatic two-way factorial cluster RCT with Primary Care Physicians' practices as the unit of allocation and individual patients as the unit of analysis. The setting was urban Primary Care Team practices in two Canadian provinces. Eight Primary Care Team practices were randomly assigned to receive the practice-level intervention or wait-list control; 4 physicians in each team (32 physicians) were randomly assigned to receive the patient-level intervention or wait-list control. Patients randomly selected from physicians' rosters were stratified into two groups: 1) general and 2) moderate mental illness. The interventions involved a multifaceted, evidence-based, tailored practice-level intervention with a Practice Facilitator, and a patient-level intervention involving a one-hour visit with a Prevention Practitioner where patients received a tailored 'prevention prescription'. The primary outcome was a composite Summary Quality Index of 28 evidence-based chronic disease prevention and screening actions with pre-defined targets, expressed as the ratio of eligible actions at baseline that were met at follow-up. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted. 789 of 1,260 (63%) eligible patients participated. On average, patients were eligible for 8.96 (SD 3.2) actions at baseline. In the adjusted analysis, control patients met 23.1% (95% CI: 19.2% to 27.1%) of target actions, compared to 28.5% (95% CI: 20.9% to 36.0%) receiving the practice-level intervention, 55.6% (95% CI: 49.0% to 62.1%) receiving the patient

  11. Prevention of unhealthy behaviour by youth health care in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegersma, P.A.; Hofman, A.; Zielhuis, G.A.

    Background In this study the effect is assessed of (repeated) well-care visits and freely accessible consultation hours at secondary schools on the prevalence of adolescent health-compromising behaviour and later obesity. Methods An ecological case-referent study design was used with data from the

  12. Emergency visits for sports-related injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, C W; Overpeck, M D

    2001-03-01

    We sought to estimate the effect and magnitude of patients with sports-related injuries presenting to hospital emergency departments in the United States and to examine differences in patient and visit characteristics between sports- and nonsports-related injuries. Data from the 1997 and 1998 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, a national probabilistic sample of 496 US hospital EDs, were combined to examine emergency visits for sports-related injuries. Data from 16,997 sample ED encounter records for injuries that included narrative cause of injury text were analyzed. Narrative text entries were coded to 1 of 84 sport and recreational activity codes. Sample weights were applied to provide annual national estimates. Estimates of sports-related injury visits were based on 1,775 records with an assigned sports-related activity code. There were an average annual estimated 2.6 million emergency visits for sports-related injuries by persons between the ages of 5 and 24 years. They accounted for over 68% of the total 3.7 million sport injuries presented to the ED by persons of all ages. As a proportion of all kinds of injuries presenting to the ED, sports-related injuries accounted for more than one fifth of the visits by persons 5 to 24 years old. The use rate was 33.9 ED visits per 1,000 persons in this age group (95% confidence interval 30.3 to 37.5). The sports-related injury visit rate for male patients was more than double the rate for female patients (48.2 versus 19.2 per 1,000 persons between 5 and 24 years of age). Visits from sports-related activities for this age group were more frequent for basketball and cycling compared with other categories (eg, baseball, skateboarding, gymnastics). Compared with nonsports-related injuries for this age group, sports-related injuries were more likely to be to the brain or skull and upper and lower extremities. Patients with sports-related injuries were more likely to have a diagnosis of fracture and sprain or

  13. Patient-, organization-, and system-level barriers and facilitators to preventive oral health care: a convergent mixed-methods study in primary dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Anna Rose; Young, Linda; Bish, Alison; Gnich, Wendy; Cassie, Heather; Treweek, Shaun; Bonetti, Debbie; Stirling, Douglas; Macpherson, Lorna; McCann, Sharon; Clarkson, Jan; Ramsay, Craig

    2016-01-12

    Dental caries is the most common chronic disease of adult and childhood, a largely preventable yet widespread, costly public health problem. This study identified patient-, organization-, and system-level factors influencing routine delivery of recommended care for prevention and management of caries in primary dental care. A convergent mixed-methods design assessed six guidance-recommended behaviours to prevent and manage caries (recording risk, risk-based recall intervals, applying fluoride varnish, placing preventive fissure sealants, demonstrating oral health maintenance, taking dental x-rays). A diagnostic questionnaire assessing current practice, beliefs, and practice characteristics was sent to a random sample of 651 dentists in National Health Service (NHS) Scotland. Eight in-depth case studies comprising observation of routine dental visits and dental team member interviews were conducted. Patient feedback was collected from adult patients with recent checkups at case study practices. Key informant interviews were conducted with decision makers in policy, funding, education, and regulation. The Theoretical Domains Framework within the Behaviour Change Wheel was used to identify and describe patient-, organization-, and system-level barriers and facilitators to care. Findings were merged into a matrix describing theoretical domains salient to each behaviour. The matrix and Behaviour Change Wheel were used to prioritize behaviours for change and plan relevant intervention strategies. Theoretical domains associated with best practice were identified from the questionnaire (N-196), case studies (N = 8 practices, 29 interviews), and patient feedback (N = 19). Using the study matrix, key stakeholders identified priority behaviours (use of preventive fissure sealants among 6-12-year-olds) and strategies (audit and feedback, patient informational campaign) to improve guidance implementation. Proposed strategies were assessed as appropriate for immediate

  14. Bringing Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection Prevention Home: CLABSI Definitions and Prevention Policies in Home Health Care Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Michael L.; Bundy, David G.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Deuber, Kristin; Chen, Allen R.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Miller, Marlene R.

    2015-01-01

    Background A study was conducted to investigate home health care agency central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) definitions and prevention policies and compare them to the Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal (NPSG.07.04.01), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) CLABSI prevention recommendations, and a best-practice central line care bundle for inpatients. Methods A telephone-based survey was conducted in 2011 of a convenience sample of home health care agencies associated with children’s hematology/oncology centers. Results Of the 97 eligible home health care agencies, 57 (59%) completed the survey. No agency reported using all five aspects of the National Healthcare and Safety Network/Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology CLABSI definition and adjudication process, and of the 50 agencies that reported tracking CLABSI rates, 20 (40%) reported using none. Only 10 agencies (18%) had policies consistent with all elements of the inpatient-focused NPSG.07.04.01, 10 agencies (18%) were consistent with all elements of the home care targeted CDC CLABSI prevention recommendations, and no agencies were consistent with all elements of the central line care bundle. Only 14 agencies (25%) knew their overall CLABSI rate: mean 0.40 CLABSIs per 1,000 central line days (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.61). Six agencies (11%) knew their agency’s pediatric CLABSI rate: mean 0.54 CLABSIs per 1,000 central line days (95% CI, 0.06 to 1.01). Conclusions The policies of a national sample of home health care agencies varied significantly from national inpatient and home health care agency targeted standards for CLABSI definitions and prevention. Future research should assess strategies for standardizing home health care practices consistent with evidence-based recommendations. PMID:23991509

  15. Prevention and Control of Dental Disease through Improved Access to Comprehensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Dental Association, Chicago, IL.

    Prevention of dental disease is the key to improving the nation's oral health. The American Dental Association (ADA) program of prevention and control of dental disease through improved access to comprehensive care concentrates on those who have special difficulties in receiving care: the poor, the elderly, the handicapped, the institutionalized…

  16. Social capital and preventive care use among the elderly under Taiwan's National Health Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yu-I; Lin, Tsui-Fang

    The National Health Insurance (NHI) system in Taiwan provides free annual preventive care services and other disease-specific preventive care services under low copayments to people aged 65 and older, yet their utilization rates remain low ever since implementation. This study investigates whether social capital is associated with preventive care use among people aged 65 and older. Using the 2009 National Health Interview Study, this study measures social capital by the elderly's social network and social participation, and employs the logistic regressions to estimate the association between social capital and the odds of using a variety of preventive care services. The results show that social capital in terms of social network and social participation is significantly associated with the use of NHI general preventive care services. For disease-specific preventive care, it is social participation, rather than social network, that is related to the utilization rate. The associations between social capital and different types of preventive care use found in our study could be considered as an important factor when making policies to promote the utilization of preventive care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Improved Prevention Counseling by HIV Care Providers in a Multisite, Clinic-Based Intervention: Positive STEPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrun, Mark; Cook, Paul F.; Bradley-Springer, Lucy A.; Gardner, Lytt; Marks, Gary; Wright, Julie; Wilson, Tracey E.; Quinlivan, E. Byrd; O'Daniels, Christine; Raffanti, Stephen; Thompson, Melanie; Golin, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have recommended that HIV care clinics incorporate prevention into clinical practice. This report summarizes HIV care providers' attitudes and counseling practices before and after they received training to deliver a counseling intervention to patients. Providers at seven HIV clinics received training…

  18. Prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Debora C

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this guidance is to support the dental team to; manage patients with periodontal diseases in primary care appropriately; improve the quality of decision making for referral to secondary care; improve the overall oral health of the population. It focuses on the prevention and non-surgical treatment of periodontal diseases and implant diseases in primary care. The surgical treatment of periodontal and implant diseases and the management of patients by periodontal specialists or in a secondary care setting are outwith the scope of this guidance and are not discussed in detail. The guidance is based on existing guidelines, including those from the British Society of Periodontology, relevant systematic reviews, research evidence and the opinion of experts and experienced practitioners. The methodological approach is based on the international standards set out by the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE) Collaboration (www.agreetrust.org). The guiding principle for developing guidance within SDCEP is to first source existing guidelines, policy documents, legislation or other recommendations. Similarly, relevant systematic reviews are also initially identified. These documents are appraised for their quality of development, evidence base and applicability to the remit of the guidance under development. In the absence of these documents or when supplementary information is required, other published literature and unpublished work may be sought.Review and updating. The guidance will be reviewed in three years and updated accordingly. Recommendations are provided for assessment and diagnosis; changing patient behaviour; treatment of gingival conditions; periodontal conditions; long term maintenance; management of patients with dental implants; referral and record keeping. The key recommendations highlighted are: Assess and explain risk factors for periodontal diseases to patients. Screen all patients for periodontal diseases at every routine

  19. Complementary and alternative medicine use in rheumatoid arthritis: an audit of patients visiting a tertiary care centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Tarique; Agarwal, Shikhar; Handa, Rohini

    2007-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) enjoys widespread popularity in chronic illnesses such as rheumatic diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the commonest inflammatory joint disease seen in clinical practice. No systematic study on the use of CAM by patients with RA is available from northern India. We evaluated the prevalence and usage characteristics of CAM in Indian patients with RA using a questionnaire at a tertiary care centre in northern India. Of the 102 patients with RA included in the study, 39% reported current CAM use. As many as 84 respondents (82%) reported having tried CAM during the course of their disease. A total of 215 CAM courses were used, out of which 77 were being continued. Ayurveda was the commonest (28% courses) followed by homoeopathy (20%), yoga asana (17%) and pranayama (12%). Pain control was the primary reason for using CAM (69% of users). Most CAM therapies (78%) were started on the advice of friends and relatives. Discontinuation of CAM was attributed to lack of clinical benefit (78%) and adverse effects (10%). Of the patients using CAM, 87% did not reveal its use to their physicians, primarily because the physician did not enquire about it. Patients with RA frequently use CAM for pain control. These practices are often not revealed to the treating physician. Knowledge of the concurrent use of CAM may serve to alert the physician about potential side-effects or drug interactions.

  20. Prescription Pattern of Antihypertensive Agents in T2DM Patients Visiting Tertiary Care Centre in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethiraj Dhanaraj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypertension management is of a paramount importance in diabetic patients for cardiovascular risk reduction. Aim. To evaluate prescribing pattern of antihypertensive in T2DM (type 2 diabetes patients and compare with existing recent guidelines. Methods. A cross-sectional study involving evaluation of all T2DM patients referred to endocrinology unit at tertiary care centre for hypertension, comorbid complications, and recording prescription. Utilization of 5 different antihypertensive drug classes was compared for all patients receiving 1, 2, 3, 4, or more drugs. Logistical regression was used to assess likelihood of prescription of drugs and/or therapy for specific conditions mentioned in the guidelines. Results. Out of 1358, T2DM enrolled patients 1186 (87% had hypertension (males 52%, females 48%. The median duration (IQ of hypertension diabetics was 4 (1–10 years. A total of 25% patients had controlled BP and 75% with uncontrolled blood pressure (13% isolated systolic hypertension, 6% isolated diastolic hypertension, and 55% both elevated. Overall, ACE inhibitors (ACEIs were prescribed the highest (59% followed by angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs (52%, calcium channel blockers (CCBs (29%, diuretics (27%, and beta-blockers (14%. Overall, 55% of T2DM patients were on polytherapy, 41% on monotherapy, and 4% had no antihypertensive treatment. Polytherapy was more predominant with age, duration of diabetes, duration of hypertension, and comorbid complications. Conclusion. Although prescribing pattern of antihypertensive showed adherence to existing evidence-based guidelines, higher proportion of uncontrolled hypertensive patients was found.

  1. Feasibility of a Video-Based Advance Care Planning Website to Facilitate Group Visits among Diverse Adults from a Safety-Net Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Carly; Lum, Hillary D; Wistar, Emily; Horton, Claire; Sudore, Rebecca L

    2018-02-20

    Primary care providers in safety-net settings often do not have time to discuss advance care planning (ACP). Group visits (GV) may be an efficient means to provide ACP education. To assess the feasibility and impact of a video-based website to facilitate GVs to engage diverse adults in ACP. Feasibility pilot among patients who were ≥55 years of age from two primary care clinics in a Northern California safety-net setting. Participants attended two 90-minute GVs and viewed the five steps of the movie version of the PREPARE website ( www.prepareforyourcare.org ) concerning surrogates, values, and discussing wishes in video format. Two clinician facilitators were available to encourage participation. We assessed pre-to-post ACP knowledge, whether participants designated a surrogate or completed an advance directive (AD), and acceptability of GVs and PREPARE materials. We conducted two GVs with 22 participants. Mean age was 64 years (±7), 55% were women, 73% nonwhite, and 55% had limited literacy. Knowledge improved about surrogate designation (46% correct pre vs. 85% post, p = 0.01) and discussing decisions with others (59% vs. 90%, p = 0.01). Surrogate designation increased (48% vs. 85%, p = 0.01) and there was a trend toward AD completion (9% vs. 24%, p = 0.21). Participants rated the GVs and PREPARE materials a mean of 8 (±3.1) on a 10-point acceptability scale. Using the PREPARE movie to facilitate ACP GVs for diverse adults in safety net, primary care settings is feasible and shows potential for increasing ACP engagement.

  2. VA Outpatient Visits by Administrative Parent, FY2010-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Outpatient visits by Administrative Parent. A visit is counted as a visit to one or more clinics or units within 1 calendar day at the site of care level. A patient...

  3. Predictors of Frequent Emergency Room Visits among a Homeless Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinna Thakarar

    Full Text Available Homelessness, HIV, and substance use are interwoven problems. Furthermore, homeless individuals are frequent users of emergency services. The main purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for frequent emergency room (ER visits and to examine the effects of housing status and HIV serostatus on ER utilization. The second purpose was to identify risk factors for frequent ER visits in patients with a history of illicit drug use.A retrospective analysis was performed on 412 patients enrolled in a Boston-based health care for the homeless program (HCH. This study population was selected as a 2:1 HIV seronegative versus HIV seropositive match based on age, sex, and housing status. A subgroup analysis was performed on 287 patients with history of illicit drug use. Chart data were analyzed to compare demographics, health characteristics, and health service utilization. Results were stratified by housing status. Logistic models using generalized estimating equations were used to predict frequent ER visits.In homeless patients, hepatitis C was the only predictor of frequent ER visits (OR 4.49, p<0.01. HIV seropositivity was not predictive of frequent ER visits. In patients with history of illicit drug use, mental health (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.07-5.95 and hepatitis C (OR 2.85, 95% CI 1.37-5.93 were predictors of frequent ER use. HIV seropositivity did not predict ER use (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.21 - 0.97.In a HCH population, hepatitis C predicted frequent ER visits in homeless patients. HIV seropositivity did not predict frequent ER visits, likely because HIV seropositive HCH patients are engaged in care. In patients with history of illicit drug use, hepatitis C and mental health disorders predicted frequent ER visits. Supportive housing for patients with mental health disorders and hepatitis C may help prevent unnecessary ER visits in this population.

  4. Reconciling a "pleasant exchange" with evidence of information bias: A three-country study on pharmaceutical sales visits in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Ellen; Guénette, Line; Lexchin, Joel; Cassels, Alan; Wilkes, Michael S; Durrieu, Geneviève; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Mintzes, Barbara

    2018-03-01

    To examine and compare the experiences and attitudes of primary care physicians in three different regulatory environments (United States, Canada, and France) towards interactions with pharmaceutical sales representatives, particularly their perspectives on safety information provision and self-reported influences on prescribing. We recruited primary care physicians for 12 focus groups in Montreal, Sacramento, Toulouse and Vancouver. A thematic analysis of the interview data followed a five-stage framework analysis approach. Fifty-seven family physicians (19 women, 38 men) participated. Physicians expected a commercial bias and generally considered themselves to be immune from influence. They also appreciated the exchange and the information on new drugs. Across all sites, physicians expressed concern about missing harm information; however, attitudes to increased regulation of sales visits in France and the US were generally negative. A common solution to inadequate harm information was to seek further commercially sourced information. Physicians at all sites also expressed sensitivity to critiques from medical students and residents about promotional interactions. Physicians have contradictory views on the inadequate harm information received from sales representatives, linked to their lack of awareness of the drugs' safety profiles. Commonly used strategies to mitigate information bias are unlikely to be effective. Alternate information sources to inform prescribing decisions, and changes in the way that physicians and sales representatives interact are needed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. EUCYS prizewinner visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Jennifer Toes

    2016-01-01

    Young Turkish student Baris Volkan Gürses visited CERN from 4 to 8 July after winning the prize in the 2015 European Contest for Young Scientists (EUCYS).    Baris Volkan Gürses, EUCYS prizewinner, visiting the Microcosm. After winning both regional and national competitions in Turkey, 18-year-old student Baris Volkan Gürses competed against 169 young scientists and was awarded a visit to CERN by EIROforum for his physics project in EUCYS 2015. His project, entitled “Generation of artificial gravity by using electrostatic force for prevention of muscle atrophy and osteoporosis occurring in gravity-free environments”, focused on the design of a mechanism to help with the impact of spaceflight on the human body. “My objective was to eliminate the negative effects of a gravity-free environment on astronauts who stay in space for longer periods of time, like in the International Space Station,” explained Volkan. &...

  6. Cross-sectional study of preventive dental knowledge among adult patients seeking dental care in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa A. AlSadhan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the current knowledge about oral health and preventive dentistry among adults seeking dental care in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in which 900 questionnaires were randomly distributed to adults seeking dental care in all health settings in Riyadh; 450 questionnaires were distributed in each of the governmental and the private sectors. The questionnaire included questions regarding socio-demographic factors (age, education, occupation, etc and others concerning the patient’s knowledge of preventive dental measures; the oral hygiene procedures, fluoride and sealant applications and the healthy dietary habits. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS and simple descriptive statistics as means and frequency distributions were calculated for the study variables. Comparisons were performed using Chi-square test. Results: Eighty-six percent of the study subjects knew that dental caries could be prevented. Almost 59% were aware of the relation between frequency of sugar intake and dental caries. The prevalence of patients who knew that fluoride prevents dental caries was 50.3%, however, only 34.2% reported previous applications of topical fluoride in dental clinics. About 16% of the participants had received fissure sealants although 42.4% knew about them. The study sample’s dietary knowledge had statistically significant relations with education and occupation (p < 0.0001. Correct knowledge of visiting the dental clinic was statistically significantly related to education (p < 0.0001. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the majority of adults in Riyadh have the correct preventive dental knowledge, which is mostly related to the individuals’ educational level and occupation.

  7. Adoption of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Practices in Primary Care for Older Adults with a History of Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Elizabeth A; Aerts, Sally; Dowler, David; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Casey, Colleen M

    2016-01-01

    A multifactorial approach to assess and manage modifiable risk factors is recommended for older adults with a history of falls. Limited research suggests that this approach does not routinely occur in clinical practice, but most related studies are based on provider self-report, with the last chart audit of United States practice published over a decade ago. We conducted a retrospective chart review to assess the extent to which patients aged 65+ years with a history of repeated falls or fall-related health-care use received multifactorial risk assessment and interventions. The setting was an academic primary care clinic in the Pacific Northwest. Among the 116 patients meeting our inclusion criteria, 48% had some type of documented assessment. Their mean age was 79 ± 8 years; 68% were female, and 10% were non-white. They averaged six primary care visits over a 12-month period subsequent to their index fall. Frequency of assessment of fall-risk factors varied from 24% (for home safety) to 78% (for vitamin D). An evidence-based intervention was recommended for identified risk factors 73% of the time, on average. Two risk factors were addressed infrequently: medications (21%) and home safety (24%). Use of a structured visit note template independently predicted assessment of fall-risk factors (p = 0.003). Geriatrics specialists were more likely to use a structured note template (p = 0.04) and perform more fall-risk factor assessments (4.6 vs. 3.6, p = 0.007) than general internists. These results suggest opportunities for improving multifactorial fall-risk assessment and management of older adults at high fall risk in primary care. A structured visit note template facilitates assessment. Given that high-risk medications have been found to be independent risk factors for falls, increasing attention to medications should become a key focus of both public health educational efforts and fall prevention in primary care practice.

  8. Prevention of falls, malnutrition and pressure ulcers among older persons - nursing staff's experiences of a structured preventive care process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannering, Christina; Ernsth Bravell, Marie; Johansson, Linda

    2017-05-01

    A structured and systematic care process for preventive work, aimed to reduce falls, pressure ulcers and malnutrition among older people, has been developed in Sweden. The process involves risk assessment, team-based interventions and evaluation of results. Since development, this structured work process has become web-based and has been implemented in a national quality registry called 'Senior Alert' and used countrywide. The aim of this study was to describe nursing staff's experience of preventive work by using the structured preventive care process as outlined by Senior Alert. Eight focus group interviews were conducted during 2015 including staff from nursing homes and home-based nursing care in three municipalities. The interview material was subjected to qualitative content analysis. In this study, both positive and negative opinions were expressed about the process. The systematic and structured work flow seemed to only partly facilitate care providers to improve care quality by making better clinical assessments, performing team-based planned interventions and learning from results. Participants described lack of reliability in the assessments and varying opinions about the structure. Furthermore, organisational structures limited the preventive work. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Minimal intervention dentistry: part 3. Paediatric dental care--prevention and management protocols using caries risk assessment for infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Gomez, F J; Crystal, Y O; Domejean, S; Featherstone, J D B

    2012-11-01

    Recent increases in caries prevalence in young children throughout the world highlight the need for a simple but effective infant oral care programme. This programme needs to include a medical disease prevention management model with an early establishment of a dental home and a treatment approach based on individual patient risk. This article presents an updated approach with practical forms and tools based on the principles of caries management by risk assessment, CAMBRA. This method will aid the general practitioner to develop and maintain a comprehensive protocol adequate for infant and young children oral care visits. Perinatal oral health is vitally important in preventing early childhood caries (ECC) in young children. Providing dental treatment to expectant mothers and their young children in a 'dual parallel track' is an effective innovative strategy and an efficient practice builder. It promotes prevention rather than intervention, and this may be the best way to achieve long-lasting oral health for young patients. General dental practice can adopt easy protocols that will promote early preventive visits and anticipatory guidance/counselling rather than waiting for the need for restorative treatment.

  10. Falls prevention among older people and care providers: protocol for an integrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Cuesta Benjumea, Carmen de la; Henriques, Maria Adriana; Abad Corpa, Eva; Roe, Brenda; Orts-Cortés, María Isabel; Lidón-Cerezuela, Beatriz; Avendaño-Céspedes, Almudena; Oliver-Carbonell, José Luis; Sánchez Ardila, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To review the evidence about the role of care providers in fall prevention in older adults aged ≥ 65 years, this includes their views, strategies, and approaches on falls prevention and effectiveness of nursing interventions. Background. Some fall prevention programmes are successfully implemented and led by nurses and it is acknowledged the vital role they play in developing plans for fall prevention. Nevertheless, there has not been a systematic review of the literature that describes ...

  11. Developing clinical decision tools to implement chronic disease prevention and screening in primary care: the BETTER 2 program (building on existing tools to improve chronic disease prevention and screening in primary care).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, Donna Patricia; Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Kandola, Kami; Aguilar, Carolina; Baxter, Julia; Meaney, Christopher; Salvalaggio, Ginetta; Carroll, June C; Faria, Vee; Nykiforuk, Candace; Grunfeld, Eva

    2015-08-04

    The Building on Existing Tools to Improve Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening in Family Practice (BETTER) trial demonstrated the effectiveness of an approach to chronic disease prevention and screening (CDPS) through a new skilled role of a 'prevention practitioner'(PP). The PP has appointments with patients 40-65 years of age that focus on primary prevention activities and screening of cancer (breast, colorectal, cervical), diabetes and cardiovascular disease and associated lifestyle factors. There are numerous and occasionally conflicting evidence-based guidelines for CDPS, and the majority of these guidelines are focused on specific diseases or conditions; however, primary care providers often attend to patients with multiple conditions. To ensure that high-level evidence guidelines were used, existing clinical practice guidelines and tools were reviewed and integrated into blended BETTER tool kits. Building on the results of the BETTER trial, the BETTER tools were updated for implementation of the BETTER 2 program into participating urban, rural and remote communities across Canada. A clinical working group consisting of PPs, clinicians and researchers with support from the Centre for Effective Practice reviewed the literature to update, revise and adapt the integrated evidence algorithms and tool kits used in the BETTER trial. These resources are nuanced, based on individual patient risk, values and preferences and are designed to facilitate decision-making between providers across the target diseases and lifestyle factors included in the BETTER 2 program. Using the updated BETTER 2 toolkit, clinicians 1) determine which CDPS actions patients are eligible to receive and 2) develop individualized 'prevention prescriptions' with patients through shared decision-making and motivational interviewing. The tools identify the patients' risks and eligible primary CDPS activities: the patient survey captures the patient's health history; the prevention visit form

  12. Compliance With Infection Prevention Guidelines By Health Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    infection prevention. The study further reviewed revealed varied levels of compliance on different components of infection prevention. The highest level of compliance (100%) was ... having a Surgical Site Infection (SSI) increases a patient's hospital stay by ... operative wound infection rate of 5%10. LITERATURE REVIEW.

  13. Feasibility of an intervention to enhance preventive care for people with low health literacy in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruqi, Nighat; Lloyd, Jane; Ahmad, Raghib; Yeong, Lin-Lee; Harris, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to explore the feasibility of an intervention that enhances preventive care for primary care patients with low health literacy. A mixed method study was conducted in four Sydney general practices in areas of socioeconomic disadvantage. The intervention included screening for low health literacy in patients aged 40-69 years, clinical record audits of care for prevention of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and provider training and meetings. Surveys and interviews were conducted to identify providers' approaches to, and delivery of, preventive care for people with low health literacy. Our study found variable response rates and prevalence of low health literacy. Of the eligible patients screened, 29% had low health literacy. Providers described three approaches to preventive care, which remained largely unchanged. However, they demonstrated recognition of the importance of better communication and referral support for patients with low health literacy. Fewer patients with low health literacy were identified than expected. Despite improved awareness of the need for better communication, there was limited evidence of change in providers' approach to providing preventive care, suggesting a need for more attention towards providers' attitudes to support these patients.

  14. Disparities in the use of preventive health care among children with disabilities in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Chen; Kung, Pei-Tseng; Wang, Jong-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Children with disabilities face more barriers accessing preventive health services. Prior research has documented disparities in the receipt of these services. However, most are limited to specific types of disability or care. This study investigates disparities in the use of preventive health care among children with disabilities in Taiwan. Three nationwide databases from the Ministry of the Interior, Bureau of Health Promotion, and National Health Research Institutes were linked to gather related information between 2006 and 2008. A total of 8572 children with disabilities aged 1-7 years were included in this study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to adjust for covariates. Nationally, only 37.58% of children with disabilities received preventive health care in 2008. Children with severe and very severe disabilities were less likely to use preventive care than those with mild severity. Children with disabilities from the lowest income family were less likely to have preventive care than other income groups. Urbanization was strongly associated with the receipt of preventive health care. However, surprisingly, urban children with disabilities were less likely to receive preventive care than all others. Under universal health insurance coverage, the overall usage of preventive health care is still low among children with disabilities. The study also identified several disparities in their usage. Potential factors affecting the lack of use deserve additional research. Policymakers should target low socioeconomic brackets and foster education about the importance of preventive care. Mobile health services should be continually provided in those areas in need. Capitation reimbursement and other incentives should be considered in improving the utilization among children with disabilities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Home and community care services: a major opportunity for preventive health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lujic Sanja

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Australia, the Home and Community Care (HACC program provides services in the community to frail elderly living at home and their carers. Surprisingly little is known about the health of people who use these services. In this study we sought to describe health-related factors associated with use of HACC services, and to identify potential opportunities for targeting preventive services to those at high risk. Methods We obtained questionnaire data from the 45 and Up Study for 103,041 men and women aged 45 years and over, sampled from the general population of New South Wales, Australia in 2006-2007, and linked this with administrative data about HACC service use. We compared the characteristics of HACC clients and non-clients according to a range of variables from the 45 and Up Study questionnaire, and estimated crude and adjusted relative risks for HACC use with generalized linear models. Results 4,978 (4.8% participants used HACC services in the year prior to completing the questionnaire. Increasing age, female sex, lower pre-tax household income, not having a partner, not being in paid work, Indigenous background and living in a regional or remote location were strongly associated with HACC use. Overseas-born people and those speaking languages other than English at home were significantly less likely to use HACC services. People who were underweight, obese, sedentary, who reported falling in the past year, who were current smokers, or who ate little fruit or vegetables were significantly more likely to use HACC services. HACC service use increased with decreasing levels of physical functioning, higher levels of psychological distress, and poorer self-ratings of health, eyesight and memory. HACC clients were more likely to report chronic health conditions, in particular diabetes, stroke, Parkinson's disease, anxiety and depression, cancer, heart attack or angina, blood clotting problems, asthma and osteoarthritis

  16. Exposure to air pollution and meteorological factors associated with children's primary care visits at night due to asthma attack: case-crossover design for 3-year pooled patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Shin; Shima, Masayuki; Yoda, Yoshiko; Oka, Katsumi; Kurosaka, Fumitake; Shimizu, Shigeta; Takahashi, Hironobu; Nakatani, Yuji; Nishikawa, Jittoku; Fujiwara, Katsuhiko; Mizumori, Yasuyuki; Mogami, Akira; Yamada, Taku; Yamamoto, Nobuharu

    2015-05-03

    We examined the association of outdoor air pollution and meteorological parameters with primary care visits (PCVs) at night due to asthma attack. A case-crossover study was conducted in a primary care clinic in Himeji City, Japan. Participants were 1447 children aged 0-14 years who visited the clinic with an asthma attack from April 2010 until March 2013. Daily concentrations of air pollutants and meteorological parameters were measured. PCVs at night due to asthma attack. A conditional logistic regression model was used to estimate ORs of PCVs per unit increment of air pollutants or meteorological parameters (the per-unit increments of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm (PM₂.₅) and ozone were 10 μg/m(3) and 10 ppb, respectively). Analyses took into consideration the effects of seasonality. We noted an association between PCVs and daily ozone levels on the day before a PCV (OR=1.17; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.35; p=0.04), as well as between PCVs and 3-day mean ozone levels before a PCV (OR=1.29; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.46; p=0.04), from April until June. We also observed an association between PCVs and daily PM₂.₅ levels on the day before a PCV from December until March (OR=1.16; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.33; p=0.05). Meteorological parameters, such as hours of sunshine from September until November, atmospheric pressure from April until June, and temperature from April until August, were also found to be associated with PCVs. The findings in the present study supported an association between ozone and PCVs and suggest that certain meteorological items may be associated with PCVs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Vaccines for preventing hepatitis B in health-care workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Gluud, C

    2005-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes acute and chronic liver diseases. Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for health-care workers.......Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes acute and chronic liver diseases. Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for health-care workers....

  18. Effect of participatory women's groups and counselling through home visits on children's linear growth in rural eastern India (CARING trial): a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nirmala; Tripathy, Prasanta; Sachdev, H S; Pradhan, Hemanta; Bhattacharyya, Sanghita; Gope, Rajkumar; Gagrai, Sumitra; Rath, Shibanand; Rath, Suchitra; Sinha, Rajesh; Roy, Swati Sarbani; Shewale, Suhas; Singh, Vijay; Srivastava, Aradhana; Costello, Anthony; Copas, Andrew; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene; Haghparast-Bidgoli, Hassan; Saville, Naomi; Prost, Audrey

    2017-10-01

    Around 30% of the world's stunted children live in India. The Government of India has proposed a new cadre of community-based workers to improve nutrition in 200 districts. We aimed to find out the effect of such a worker carrying out home visits and participatory group meetings on children's linear growth. We did a cluster-randomised controlled trial in two adjoining districts of Jharkhand and Odisha, India. 120 clusters (around 1000 people each) were randomly allocated to intervention or control using a lottery. Randomisation took place in July, 2013, and was stratified by district and number of hamlets per cluster (0, 1-2, or ≥3), resulting in six strata. In each intervention cluster, a worker carried out one home visit in the third trimester of pregnancy, monthly visits to children younger than 2 years to support feeding, hygiene, care, and stimulation, as well as monthly women's group meetings to promote individual and community action for nutrition. Participants were pregnant women identified and recruited in the study clusters and their children. We excluded stillbirths and neonatal deaths, infants whose mothers died, those with congenital abnormalities, multiple births, and mother and infant pairs who migrated out of the study area permanently during the trial period. Data collectors visited each woman in pregnancy, within 72 h of her baby's birth, and at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months after birth. The primary outcome was children's length-for-age Z score at 18 months of age. Analyses were by intention to treat. Due to the nature of the intervention, participants and the intervention team were not masked to allocation. Data collectors and the data manager were masked to allocation. The trial is registered as ISCRTN (51505201) and with the Clinical Trials Registry of India (number 2014/06/004664). Between Oct 1, 2013, and Dec 31, 2015, we recruited 5781 pregnant women. 3001 infants were born to pregnant women recruited between Oct 1, 2013, and Feb 10, 2015

  19. Interventions for prevention of childhood obesity in primary care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Nicole; Brauer, Paula; Simpson, Janis Randall; Kim, Susie; Haines, Jess

    2016-01-01

    Preventing childhood obesity is a public health priority, and primary care is an important setting for early intervention. Authors of a recent national guideline have identified a need for effective primary care interventions for obesity prevention and that parent perspectives on interventions are notably absent from the literature. Our objective was to determine the perspectives of primary care clinicians and parents of children 2-5 years of age on the implementation of an obesity prevention intervention within team-based primary care to inform intervention implementation. We conducted focus groups with interprofessional primary care clinicians (n = 40) and interviews with parents (n = 26). Participants were asked about facilitators and barriers to, and recommendations for implementing a prevention program in primary care. Data were recorded and transcribed, and we used directed content analysis to identify major themes. Barriers existed to addressing obesity-related behaviours in this age group and included a gap in well-child primary care between ages 18 months and 4-5 years, lack of time and sensitivity of the topic. Trust and existing relationships with primary care clinicians were facilitators to program implementation. Offering separate programs for parents and children, and addressing both general parenting topics and obesity-related behaviours were identified as desirable. Despite barriers to addressing obesity-related behaviours within well-child primary care, both clinicians and parents expressed interest in interventions in primary care settings. Next steps should include pilot studies to identify feasible strategies for intervention implementation.

  20. Predictors of Frequent Emergency Room Visits among a Homeless Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakarar, Kinna; Morgan, Jake R.; Gaeta, Jessie M.; Hohl, Carole; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Homelessness, HIV, and substance use are interwoven problems. Furthermore, homeless individuals are frequent users of emergency services. The main purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for frequent emergency room (ER) visits and to examine the effects of housing status and HIV serostatus on ER utilization. The second purpose was to identify risk factors for frequent ER visits in patients with a history of illicit drug use. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 412 patients enrolled in a Boston-based health care for the homeless program (HCH). This study population was selected as a 2:1 HIV seronegative versus HIV seropositive match based on age, sex, and housing status. A subgroup analysis was performed on 287 patients with history of illicit drug use. Chart data were analyzed to compare demographics, health characteristics, and health service utilization. Results were stratified by housing status. Logistic models using generalized estimating equations were used to predict frequent ER visits. Results In homeless patients, hepatitis C was the only predictor of frequent ER visits (OR 4.49, phealth (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.07–5.95) and hepatitis C (OR 2.85, 95% CI 1.37–5.93) were predictors of frequent ER use. HIV seropositivity did not predict ER use (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.21 – 0.97). Conclusions In a HCH population, hepatitis C predicted frequent ER visits in homeless patients. HIV seropositivity did not predict frequent ER visits, likely because HIV seropositive HCH patients are engaged in care. In patients with history of illicit drug use, hepatitis C and mental health disorders predicted frequent ER visits. Supportive housing for patients with mental health disorders and hepatitis C may help prevent unnecessary ER visits in this population. PMID:25906394

  1. The Nordic Maintenance Care Program: when do chiropractors recommend secondary and tertiary preventive care for low back pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axén, Iben; Jensen, Irene B; Eklund, Andreas; Halasz, Laszlo; Jørgensen, Kristian; Lange, Fredrik; Lövgren, Peter W; Rosenbaum, Annika; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2009-01-22

    Among chiropractors the use of long-term treatment is common, often referred to as "maintenance care". Although no generally accepted definition exists, the term has a self-explanatory meaning to chiropractic clinicians. In public health terms, maintenance care can be considered as both secondary and tertiary preventive care. The objective of this study was to explore what factors chiropractors consider before recommending maintenance care to patients with low back pain (LBP). Structured focus group discussions with Swedish chiropractors were used to discuss pre-defined cases. A questionnaire was then designed on the basis of the information obtained. In the questionnaire, respondents were asked to grade the importance of several factors when considering recommending maintenance care to a patient. The grading was done on a straight line ranging from "Very important" to "Not at all important". All members of the Swedish Chiropractors' Association (SCA) were invited to participate in the discussions and in the questionnaire survey. Thirty-six (22%) of SCA members participated in the group discussions and 129 (77%) returned the questionnaires. Ninety-eight percent of the questionnaire respondents claimed to believe that chiropractic care can prevent future relapses of back pain. According to the group discussions tertiary preventive care would be considered appropriate when a patient improves by 75% or more. According to the results of the questionnaire survey, two factors were considered as "very important" by more than 70% of the respondents in recommending secondary preventive care, namely frequency past year and frequency past 10 years of the low back pain problem. Eight other factors were considered "very important" by 50-69% of the respondents, namely duration (over the past year and of the present attack), treatment (effect and durability), lifestyle, work conditions, and psychosocial factors (including attitude). The vast majority of our respondents believe

  2. The Nordic Maintenance Care Program: when do chiropractors recommend secondary and tertiary preventive care for low back pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lange Fredrik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among chiropractors the use of long-term treatment is common, often referred to as "maintenance care". Although no generally accepted definition exists, the term has a self-explanatory meaning to chiropractic clinicians. In public health terms, maintenance care can be considered as both secondary and tertiary preventive care. The objective of this study was to explore what factors chiropractors consider before recommending maintenance care to patients with low back pain (LBP. Method Structured focus group discussions with Swedish chiropractors were used to discuss pre-defined cases. A questionnaire was then designed on the basis of the information obtained. In the questionnaire, respondents were asked to grade the importance of several factors when considering recommending maintenance care to a patient. The grading was done on a straight line ranging from "Very important" to "Not at all important". All members of the Swedish Chiropractors' Association (SCA were invited to participate in the discussions and in the questionnaire survey. Results Thirty-six (22% of SCA members participated in the group discussions and 129 (77% returned the questionnaires. Ninety-eight percent of the questionnaire respondents claimed to believe that chiropractic care can prevent future relapses of back pain. According to the group discussions tertiary preventive care would be considered appropriate when a patient improves by 75% or more. According to the results of the questionnaire survey, two factors were considered as "very important" by more than 70% of the respondents in recommending secondary preventive care, namely frequency past year and frequency past 10 years of the low back pain problem. Eight other factors were considered "very important" by 50–69% of the respondents, namely duration (over the past year and of the present attack, treatment (effect and durability, lifestyle, work conditions, and psychosocial factors (including

  3. Marriage, Cohabitation, and Men's Use of Preventive Health Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... received these screenings in the past 12 months. Definitions Blood pressure screening : Based on responses to the ... of service, such as accidents or dental care. Hypertension : To be classified with diagnosed hypertension, also called ...

  4. Perception of preventive care and readiness for lifestyle change in rural and urban patients in Poland: a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Panasiuk, Lech; Brotons, Carlos; Bulc, Mateja; Zakowska, Izabela

    2017-12-23

    The idiosyncrasies of rural health demand further research to instigate rural health initiatives and to monitor progress in rural health care. In 2008, a study examined health-related behaviour, perception of importance of preventive interventions, readiness to change lifestyle and willingness to receive support from GPs, according to gender and place of residence. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among patients who visited any of ten randomly-selected general practices in Poland. Four hundred patients were enrolled: 50% from rural areas, 50.3% were females; 23.8% declared a primary level of education (35% rural vs. 12.5% urban) respondents; the median age was 50 years (IQR=18), The predicted means for prevention importance scores for rural residents were 0.623 and for urban residents - 0.682. Place of residence had a significant effect on the importance of prevention (prural vs. 16% urban residents (prural respondents would like to receive individual counselling from their GP regarding eating habits, physical activity, body weight, giving up smoking and safe alcohol use. Urban respondents were more likely to expect leaflets from their GPs on normalizing body weight.

  5. Informing comprehensive HIV prevention: a situational analysis of the HIV prevention and care context, North West Province South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri A Lippman

    Full Text Available Building a successful combination prevention program requires understanding the community's local epidemiological profile, the social community norms that shape vulnerability to HIV and access to care, and the available community resources. We carried out a situational analysis in order to shape a comprehensive HIV prevention program that address local barriers to care at multiple contextual levels in the North West Province of South Africa.The situational analysis was conducted in two sub-districts in 2012 and guided by an adaptation of WHO's Strategic Approach, a predominantly qualitative method, including observation of service delivery points and in-depth interviews and focus groups with local leaders, providers, and community members, in order to recommend context-specific HIV prevention strategies. Analysis began during fieldwork with nightly discussions of findings and continued with coding original textual data from the fieldwork notebooks and a select number of recorded interviews.We conducted over 200 individual and group interviews and gleaned four principal social barriers to HIV prevention and care, including: HIV fatalism, traditional gender norms, HIV-related stigma, and challenges with communication around HIV, all of which fuel the HIV epidemic. At the different levels of response needed to stem the epidemic, we found evidence of national policies and programs that are mitigating the social risk factors but little community-based responses that address social risk factors to HIV.Understanding social and structural barriers to care helped shape our comprehensive HIV prevention program, which address the four 'themes' identified into each component of the program. Activities are underway to engage communities, offer community-based testing in high transmission areas, community stigma reduction, and a positive health, dignity and prevention program for stigma reduction and improve communication skills. The situational analysis

  6. The quality of pressure ulcer prediction and prevention in home health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist, Sandra

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of pressure ulcer prediction and prevention in home health care. Randomly selected Medicare-certified home care agencies in four midwestern states were surveyed. The overall response rate was 44% (n = 128). Approximately half (57.8%) of the responding agencies assessed all patients for pressure ulcer risk upon admission; another 4.7% assessed only chair or bed-bound patients. Clinical nursing judgment was the most commonly (72%) used method for assessing risk; only 21% of the agencies used a validated tool such as the Braden Scale or the Norton Scale to identify those at risk. Approximately one third of the reporting agencies had prediction and/or prevention policies. Only 18.0% of home health care agencies identified recommended interventions in a pressure ulcer prevention protocol. Findings suggest opportunities for improvement in pressure ulcer prediction and prevention practice in home health care.

  7. Diabetes: Good Diabetes Management and Regular Foot Care Help Prevent Severe Foot Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amputation and diabetes: How to protect your feet Good diabetes management and regular foot care help prevent severe foot sores that ... and may require amputation. By Mayo Clinic Staff Diabetes complications can include nerve damage and poor blood ...

  8. Preventive youth health care in 11 European countries: An exploratory analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieske, R.C.N.; Nijnuis, M.G.; Carmiggelt, B.C.; Wagenaar-Fischer, M.M.; Boere-Boonekamp, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To systematically identify similarities and differences in the way preventive youth health care (YHC) is organized in 11 European countries. Method Questionnaire survey to EUSUHM (European Union for School and University Health and Medicine) representatives. Results The greatest

  9. Working conditions and parents' ability to care for children's preventive health needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Alison; Heymann, Jody

    2014-04-01

    To determine whether workplace flexibility policies influence parents' ability to meet their children's preventive primary health care needs. Study sample included 917 employed adults with at least 1 child younger than 18 years in their household from a nationally representative survey of US adults. Multivariate logistic regression analyses of factors influencing parental ability to meet their children's preventive primary health care needs were conducted. Analyses assessed the effect of having access to schedule flexibility, a supervisor who is accommodating about work adjustments when family issues arise, and the ability to make personal calls without consequences on the odds of a parents' being unable to meet their child's preventive health care needs. Being able to make a personal phone call at work was associated with a 56% (P flexibility at work could make a substantial difference in parents' ability to obtain preventive care for their children.

  10. [Participation as Target of Social Medicine and Nursing Care: - Legal Definition of Long-Term Care Dependency - Strategies to Prevent Long-Term Care Dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüchtern, Elisabeth; Gansweid, Barbara; Gerber, Hans; von Mittelstaedt, Gert

    2017-01-01

    Objective: By the "Second Bill to Strengthen Long-Term Care", a new concept of long-term care dependency will be introduced, valid from 2017. Long-term care dependency according to Social Code XI will be defined covering more aspects than today. Therefore, the working group "Nursing Care" of the division "Social Medicine in Practice and Rehabilitation" in the German Society for Social Medicine and Prevention presents their results after working on the social medicine perspective of the definition and prevention of long-term care dependency. Methods: Both the definition and strategies to prevent long-term care dependency are systematically taken into consideration from the point of view of social medicine on the basis of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), as long-term care dependency means a defined condition of disability. Results: Both the current and the new concept of long-term care dependency focus activity limitations. The perspective of social medicine considers the interactions of health condition, its effects on daily activities and personal as well as environmental factors. From this point of view approaches for social benefits concerning prevention and rehabilitation can be identified systematically so as to work against the development and progression of long-term care dependency. The reference to the ICF can facilitate the communication between different professions. The new "graduation" of long-term care dependency would allow an international "translation" referring to the ICF. Conclusion: Experts from the field of social medicine as well as those of nursing care, care-givers and nursing researchers have in common the objective that persons in need of nursing care can participate in as many aspects of life of importance to them in an autonomous and self-determined way. The point of view of social medicine on long-term care dependency is fundamental for all occupational groups that are involved and for their

  11. Visits To Retail Clinics Grew Fourfold From 2007 To 2009, Although Their Share Of Overall Outpatient Visits Remains Low

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Ateev; Lave, Judith R.

    2013-01-01

    Retail clinics have rapidly become a fixture of the United States health care delivery landscape. In our analyses of trends in retail clinic utilization, we find there has been a four-fold increase in retail clinic visits between 2007 to 2009, with an estimated 5.9 million retail clinic visits in 2009. Compared with the period from 2000–2006, in the period from 2007–9 retail clinic patients are now more likely to be greater than 65 years old (18.9 percent vs. 7.8 percent) and preventive care, in particular the influenza vaccine, has become a larger component of their care (47.5 percent vs. 21.8 percent of visits). Across all retail clinic visits, 44.4 percent are on the weekend or on the weekdays when physician offices are typically closed. Retail clinics appear to be meeting a need for convenient care, in particular during times when physician offices are not open. PMID:22895454

  12. Stepped-care prevention of anxiety and depression in late life. A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    van 't Veer-Tazelaar, P.J.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; van Oppen, P.C.; van Hout, H.P.J.; van der Horst, H.E.; Cuijpers, P.; Smit, H.F.E.; Beekman, A.T.F.

    2009-01-01

    Centext: Given the public health significance of latelife depression and anxiety, and the limited capacity of treatment, there is an urgent need to develop effective strategies to prevent these disorders. Objectjve: To determine the effectiveness of an indicated stepped-care prevention program for depression and anxiety disorders in the elderly. Design: Randomized controlled trial with recruitment between October 1, 2004, and October 1, 2005. Setting: Thirty-three primary care practices in th...

  13. Home visits as part of a new care pathway (iAID) to improve quality of care and quality of life in ostomy patients: a cluster-randomized stepped-wedge trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sier, M F; Oostenbroek, R J; Dijkgraaf, M G W; Veldink, G J; Bemelman, W A; Pronk, A; Spillenaar-Bilgen, E J; Kelder, W; Hoff, C; Ubbink, D T

    2017-08-01

    Morbidity in patients with an ostomy is high. A new care pathway, including perioperative home visits by enterostomal therapists, was studied to assess whether more elaborate education and closer guidance could reduce stoma-related complications and improve quality of life (QoL), at acceptable cost. Patients requiring an ileostomy or colostomy, for any inflammatory or malignant bowel disease, were included in a 15-centre cluster-randomized 'stepped-wedge' study. Primary outcomes were stoma-related complications and QoL, measured using the Stoma-QOL, 3 months after surgery. Secondary outcomes included costs of care. The standard pathway (SP) was followed by 113 patients and the new pathway (NP) by 105 patients. Although the overall number of stoma-related complications was similar in both groups (SP 156, NP 150), the proportion of patients experiencing one or more stoma-related complications was significantly higher in the NP (72% vs 84%, risk difference 12%; 95% CI: 0.3-23.3%). Although in the NP more patients had stoma-related complications, QoL scores were significantly better (P NP (60.6% vs 33.7%, respectively; risk difference 26.9%, 95% CI: 13.5-40.4%). Stoma revision was done more often in the SP (n = 11) than in the NP (n = 2). Total costs in the SP did not differ significantly from the NP. The NP did not reduce the number of stoma-related complications but did lead to improved quality of care and life, against similar costs. Based on these results the NP, including perioperative home visits by an enterostomal therapist, can be recommended. Colorectal Disease © 2017 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  14. Effect of the Newhints home-visits intervention on neonatal mortality rate and care practices in Ghana: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirkwood, Betty R.; Manu, Alexander; ten Asbroek, Augustinus H. A.; Soremekun, Seyi; Weobong, Benedict; Gyan, Thomas; Danso, Samuel; Amenga-Etego, Seeba; Tawiah-Agyemang, Charlotte; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Hill, Zelee

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, on the basis of promising evidence from trials in south Asia, WHO and UNICEF issued a joint statement about home visits as a strategy to improve newborn survival. In the Newhints trial, we aimed to test this home-visits strategy in sub-Saharan Africa by assessing the effect on all-cause

  15. The Nordic maintenance care program: the clinical use of identified indications for preventive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axén, Iben; Bodin, Lennart

    2013-03-06

    Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent condition and has been found to be recurrent and persistent in a majority of cases. Chiropractors have a preventive strategy, maintenance care (MC), aimed towards minimizing recurrence and progression of such conditions. The indications for recommending MC have been identified in the Nordic countries from hypothetical cases. This study aims to investigate whether these indications are indeed used in the clinical encounter. Data were collected in a multi-center observational study in which patients consulted a chiropractor for their non-specific LBP. Patient baseline information was a) previous duration of the LBP, b) the presence of previous episodes of LBP and c) early improvement with treatment. The chiropractors were asked if they deemed each individual patient an MC candidate. Logistic regression analyses (uni- and multi-level) were used to investigate the association of the patient variables with the chiropractor's decision. The results showed that "previous episodes" with LBP was the strongest predictor for recommending MC, and that the presence of all predictors strengthens the frequency of this recommendation. However, there was considerable heterogeneity among the participating chiropractors concerning the recommendation of MC. The study largely confirms the clinical use of the previously identified indications for recommending MC for recurrent and persistent LBP. Previous episodes of LBP was the strongest indicator.

  16. EFFICIENT MEASURES FOR BURNOUT PREVENTION IN PALLIATIVE CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina DOBRE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The term burnout, meaning ”professional exhaustion”, was introduced by Herbert Freudenberger in 1974. On May 21, 2014 , the World Health Assembly, the decisional organ of the World Health Organization, voted the resolution for the integration and development of the capacity of palliative care services as a constituent part of the health systems. The resolution represents a major pace in the development of palliative care at world level, once the ministers responsible for the field took upon themselves - by means of information and training programs - the task of services’ development, mainly at community level, the support from the part of the next of kins, the elaboration of educational programs, of guides and clinical protocols for specialists, of instruments for the monitorization of the quality of services provided, an easier access of patients to medication, as well as partnerships with the civil society. Burnout is a state of emotional, mental and physical overfatigue caused by excessive and prolongued stress. It is installed mainly when the person affected with it feels care-worn and uncapable of fulfilling his/her usual duties. As the stress continues, he/she will come to lose the interest or motivation which made him/her assume a certain position in the organizational hierarchy. The burnout phenomenon includes three components: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and lack of professional accomplishment. The main observations on the phenomenon indicate that, apparently, the burnout level in palliative care is not higher than in other services, such as intensive therapy or surgery. Nevertheless, mention should be made of a characteristic of the palliative care services which influences the burnout level, namely the emotional relation created between the patient and the medical team, as a result of the prolongued duration of the care services

  17. Type 2 diabetes: Primary health care approach for prevention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    possible. Patients with high risk pre-diabetic conditions like IGT and IFG have about a 25%–50% lifetime risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and should be targeted for primary prevention.2 A number of well-designed intervention studies using lifestyle (diet and exercise) or drug therapy have been performed to this end.

  18. The evidence base for professional and self-care prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante

    2015-01-01

    and fissure sealants. The quality of evidence for fluoride gel, fluoride mouth rinse, xylitol gums and silver diamine fluoride (SDF) was rated as low. For secondary caries prevention and caries arrest, only fluoride interventions and SDF proved consistent benefits, although the quality of evidence was low...

  19. Orthopedic Health: Joint Health and Care: Prevention, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prevention Regular exercise, a balanced diet, and a healthful weight can help you reduce your risk of developing osteoarthritis, especially in the hips and knees, or suffering sports injuries. Exercise helps bone density, improves muscle strength and ...

  20. Does antenatal care attendance prevent anemia in pregnancy at term?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anemia in pregnancy is one of the public health problems in the developed and developing world. If uncontrolled it is a major indirect cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. This is worst in settings with poor prenatal practices. Quality prenatal interventions therefore are expected to prevent or ...

  1. Preventive risk assessment in forensic child and youth care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assink, M.

    2017-01-01

    Risk assessment is central to the work of forensic mental health professionals, since it serves as a guide for prevention and intervention strategies. For effective risk assessment, knowledge on risk factors and their effects as well as the availability of valid and reliable instruments for risk

  2. Prevention of acute kidney injury and protection of renal function in the intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joannidis, Michael; Druml, Wilfred; Forni, Lui G.; Groeneveld, A. B. Johan; Honore, Patrick; Oudemans-van Straaten, Heleen M.; Ronco, Claudio; Schetz, Marie R. C.; Woittiez, Arend Jan

    Acute renal failure on the intensive care unit is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. To determine recommendations for the prevention of acute kidney injury (AKI), focusing on the role of potential preventative maneuvers including volume expansion, diuretics, use of inotropes,

  3. Child/Youth Homelessness: housing affordability, early intervention, and preventive care in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Shiga, Fumiya

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the child/youth homelessness including its preventive care.This paper explores the housing support program implemented across Australia in brief at first, and then profile child/youth homelessness and housing policy. Based on that, it discusses early intervention and preventive methods followed by the conclusion.

  4. Nursing approach in primary care of diabetes and heart as a key tool for prevention, care and promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daulys Alessa Mendinueta Marin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently it is clear the impact of primary care for people with diabetes and the belief that education about this disease is indispensable in the therapeutic approach, as this can contribute to an individualized patient plan that allows their subsequent treatment and the preservation of their health. Therefore, the nursing professional and the family should play a leading role, in performing preventive and educational activities, and rehabilitative care through building individual and community strategies. In the following guide you will find a series of interventions in primary care, such as: the role of the nurse and the vision of her in diabetes, assessment, monitoring and implementation of the model of Callista Roy, nursing care process, nutritional recommendations and indicators about the patient and family; in order to decrease risk factors and prevent such diseases.

  5. Preventative foot care in people with diabetes: Quality patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Foot ulceration and amputation cause extensive burden on individuals and health care systems. One of the reasons for the poor outcome of foot complications in developing countries is the lack of patient education. Due to the multi-factorial pathology of diabetic foot ulceration, the person with diabetes should receive health ...

  6. Challenges to delivering quality care in a prevention of mother-to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. There has been little focus on the quality of care provided in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV services in South Africa (SA). Objective. To assess the quality of care in PMTCT services in Soweto, SA, focusing on the knowledge and experiences of healthcare workers and ...

  7. Emergency presurgical visit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Castro Díaz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective has been to create a Protocol of Structured Presurgical Visit applicable to the patients who are undergoing an emergency surgery, to provide the user and his family all the necessary cares on the basis of those nursing diagnosis that prevail in all the cases of surgical emergency interventions. The used method has been an analysis of the emergency surgical interventions more prevalent from February 2007 until October 2008 in our area (a regional hospital, and statistic of those nursing diagnosis that more frequently appeared in these interventions, the previous moment to the intervention and in addition common to all of them. The results were the following ones: the more frequent emergency operations were: Caesarean, ginecological curettage, laparotomy, help in risk childbirth, orthopaedic surgery and appendectomy. The more frequent nursing diagnosis in all the emergency operations at the previous moment of the intervention were: risk of falls, pain, anxiety, deficit of knowledge, risk of infection, movement stress syndrome, risk of hemorrhage, cutaneous integrity deterioration. The conclusion is that users present at the previous moment to an emergency operation several problems, which force to the emergency surgical ward nurse to the introduction of the nursing methodology, in order to identify the problems, to mark results and to indicate the interventions to achieve those results, besides in a humanitarian way and with quality. This can be obtained by performing a Structured Emergency Presurgical Visit.

  8. Vaccine-Preventable Admissions to an Irish Paediatric Intensive Care

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doyle, Y

    2017-05-01

    In the Republic of Ireland, the schedule of state-funded immunisation for children is comprehensive and includes diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, pneumococcus, hepatitis B, meningococcus C, haemophilus B, polio, measles, rubella and mumps. Varicella and meningococcal B vaccines are commercially available but are not currently funded by the government. Each of the illnesses preventable by these vaccines can cause substantial morbidity, and rarely mortality, in infants and children. Our PICU continues to see serious illness due to avoidable infection. There were 39 admissions in a 4 year period, with 34 children surviving to discharge. Nine children were infected with pneumococcus, with 4 deaths. There was one case of pertussis, causing death. Most infections occurred in previously healthy children. These preventable conditions represent a significant burden on children, families, and on social and healthcare resources

  9. Analysis & commentary. The foundation that health reform lays for improved payment, care coordination, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Kenneth E; Ogden, Lydia L

    2010-06-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act represents a major opportunity to achieve several key goals at once: improving disease prevention; reforming care delivery; and bending the cost curve of health spending while also realizing greater value for the dollars spent. Reform-based initiatives could produce major gains in a relatively short time. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services should develop an action plan detailing how the programs that the health reform law sets into motion throughout various agencies can work synergistically. It should also detail how best practices in finance and payment, in the organization and delivery of care, and in prevention can be expanded nationally.

  10. Oncologic prevention and suggested working standards in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinović Dejan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available On the ground of the available data, this paper presents the problem of malignant diseases in Central Serbia, and most common carcinogens. Division of carcinogens, cancerogenesis and natural history of disease, early detection of cancer and palliative management are explained. The role and capacities of primary health care doctors in treatment of patients with suspect malignant disease are presented. Authors are suggesting standards for medical tasks and contemporary principles in approach to patients with malignant diseases in everyday practice.

  11. The challenge of preventing and treating obesity in low-income, preschool children: perceptions of WIC health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Leigh A; Sherman, Susan N; Jain, Anjali; Powers, Scott W; Whitaker, Robert C

    2002-07-01

    Obesity has become a common nutritional concern among low-income, preschool children, a primary target population of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Nutrition counseling efforts in WIC target childhood obesity, but new approaches are needed that address the different perceptions about obesity that are held by clients and health care professionals. To develop these new approaches, we examined WIC health care professionals' perceptions about the challenges that exist in preventing and managing childhood obesity. A qualitative study using data transcribed from audiotapes of focus groups and individual interviews. We independently read each transcript and coded themes; then, the common themes were selected through group meetings of the authors. Kentucky WIC. Of the 19 health care professionals participating, all had provided nutrition counseling in WIC and all but one were white women. Twelve major themes clustered into 3 domains. The first domain centered on how WIC health care professionals perceived the life experiences, attitudes, and behaviors of the mothers they counseled. They perceived that mothers (1) were focused on surviving their daily, life stresses; (2) used food to cope with these stresses and as a tool in parenting; (3) had difficulty setting limits with their children around food; (4) lacked knowledge about normal child development and eating behavior; (5) were not committed to sustained behavioral change; and (6) did not believe their overweight children were overweight. The second domain described WIC health care professionals' perceptions of counseling interactions. They felt that (7) they might offend mothers when talking about weight, (8) counseling was driven by protocols, and (9) their nutritional advice often conflicted with the advice from the mothers' relatives, friends, or primary care physicians. The last domain described programmatic suggestions WIC health care professionals offered to

  12. Impact of a patient incentive program on receipt of preventive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Ateev; An, Ruopeng; Patel, Deepak N; Sturm, Roland

    2014-06-01

    Patient financial incentives are being promoted as a mechanism to increase receipt of preventive care, encourage healthy behavior, and improve chronic disease management. However, few empirical evaluations have assessed such incentive programs. In South Africa, a private health plan has introduced a voluntary incentive program which costs enrollees approximately $20 per month. In the program, enrollees earn points when they receive preventive care. These points translate into discounts on retail goods such as airline tickets, movie tickets, or cell phones. We chose 8 preventive care services over the years 2005 to 2011 and compared the change between those who entered the incentive program and those that did not. We used multivariate regression models with individual random effects to try to address selection bias. Of the 4,186,047 unique individuals enrolled in the health plan, 65.5% (2,742,268) voluntarily enrolled in the incentive program. Joining the incentive program was associated with statistically higher odds of receiving all 8 preventive care services. The odds ratio (and estimated percentage point increase) for receipt of cholesterol testing was 2.70 (8.9%); glucose testing 1.51 (4.7%); glaucoma screening 1.34 (3.9%); dental exam 1.64 (6.3%); HIV test 3.47 (2.6%); prostate specific antigen testing 1.39 (5.6%); Papanicolaou screening 2.17 (7.0%); and mammogram 1.90 (3.1%) (P < .001 for all 8 services). However, preventive care rates among those in the incentive program was still low. Voluntary participation in a patient incentive program was associated with a significantly higher likelihood of receiving preventive care, though receipt of preventive care among those in the program was still lower than ideal.

  13. What factors influence the provision of preventive care by general dental practitioners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbaraini, A

    2012-06-08

    What factors influence a general dental practitioner to offer preventive care to patients? A potential answer to this question is presented based on the findings of a qualitative study recently undertaken in general dental practice in Australia. A model of how practices come to be oriented towards preventive or restorative care is described, condensing all of the findings of the study into a single framework. Eight practices were studied and highlighted the interaction between two factors: leadership in practice and prioritisation of cultural, social and economic resources. In this model, dentists' leadership to reorient the prioritisation of resources towards preventive care was crucial. Ideally a whole practice changed to preventive philosophy, but change was also possible in a single dentist within a practice. Prioritisation of resources was also key and interacted with dentist leadership. Prioritisation could be seen in the reorganisation of space, routines and fee schedules. During this process, one key support factor for dentists was their external networks of trusted peers and respected practicing dentists. These peers were crucial for transferring preventive knowledge within small networks of dentists who trusted one another; their influence was reportedly more important than centrally produced guidelines or academic advice. In order to help dentists change their practices towards preventive care, the findings from our study suggest that it is important to intervene in these local networks by identifying local dental opinion leaders. During this study, the key conditions needed for practices to reorient to preventive care included the presence of a committed leader with a prevention-supportive peer network, and the reorientation of space, routines and fee schedules to support preventive practice.

  14. Disabled persons' knowledge of HIV prevention and access to health care prevention services in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Arne Henning; Schür, Clare; Ranchod, Chitra; Rohleder, Poul; Swartz, Leslie; Schneider, Marguerite

    2011-12-01

    The main research question in this article is how access to information about HIV/AIDS and level of HIV/AIDS prevention related knowledge are distributed among disabled people, and whether level of knowledge predicts access to HIV/AIDS related services. A survey was carried out among a sample of 285 disabled people from three provinces in South Africa. Analyses of the data revealed that gender and level of education, together with geographical differences, are key predictors for access to information and knowledge about HIV/AIDS among disabled people. For male respondents number of information sources predicts access to voluntary counselling and testing services and HIV testing, while knowledge about prevention predicts access to Voluntary Counselling and Testing centres. Significant gender differences with regards to information, knowledge and access to services highlight the need for gender specific prevention strategies among disabled people.

  15. Treating Addictions: Harm Reduction in Clinical Care and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, Ernest; Anderson, Kenneth; Haemmig, Robert; Heimer, Robert; Small, Dan; Walley, Alex; Wood, Evan; van Beek, Ingrid

    2016-06-01

    This paper examines the role of clinical practitioners and clinical researchers internationally in establishing the utility of harm-reduction approaches to substance use. It thus illustrates the potential for clinicians to play a pivotal role in health promoting structural interventions based on harm-reduction goals and public health models. Popular media images of drug use as uniformly damaging, and abstinence as the only acceptable goal of treatment, threaten to distort clinical care away from a basis in evidence, which shows that some ways of using drugs are far more harmful than others and that punitive approaches and insistence on total abstinence as the only goal of treatment often increases the harms of drug use rather than reducing drug use. Therefore the leadership and scientific authority of clinicians who understand the health impact of harm-reduction strategies is needed. Through a review of harm-reduction interventions in Canada, the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, Switzerland, and the Netherlands, we identify three ways that clinicians have helped to achieve a paradigm shift from punitive approaches to harm-reduction principles in clinical care and in drug policy: (1) through clinical research to provide data establishing the effectiveness and feasibility of harm-reduction approaches, (2) by developing innovative clinical programmes that employ harm reduction, and thereby (3) changing the standard of care to include routine use of these evidence-based (but often misunderstood) approaches in their practices. We argue that through promotion of harm-reduction goals and methods, clinicians have unique opportunities to improve the health outcomes of vulnerable populations.

  16. HALOTHERAPY FOR PREVENTION AND MEDICAL REHABILITATION IN PEDIATRIC HEALTH CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina V. Chervinskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary focus of medical rehabilitation is the approach of model simulation of natural environment. Halotherapy is one of the nonpharmacological methods widely used in Russian public health care delivery including prophylaxis and rehabilitation in children. This method is based on the recreation of the air environment of a natural underground salt mine. The article presents an innovative method using a next generation of equipment for halotherapy: a guided halocomplex where the control on dosage regiments and aerodisperse medium parameters is implemented. The mechanisms of the effect of halotherapy are considered, the data of the clinical effectiveness for various paediatric diseases are outlined. 

  17. Exploring practice variation in preventive pressure-ulcer care using data from a clinical data repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, InSook; Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Chung, Eunja

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to explore pressure ulcer incidences and practice variations in the nursing intervention provided for preventive pressure-ulcer care to patients either with pressure ulcers or at risk of pressure ulcers, and to examine them in relation to the patients' medical problems and the characteristics of the nurses who cared for them. The narrative nursing notes of 427 intensive-care patients who were discharged in 2007 that were documented at the point-of-care using standardized nursing statements were extracted from a clinical data repository at a teaching hospital in Korea and analyzed. The frequencies of five nursing interventions for pressure-ulcer prevention were compared between pressure-ulcer and pressure-ulcer risk groups, as were the characteristics of the nurses who were treating the patients in these two groups. Nursing interventions for pressure-ulcer prevention were also assessed relative to the patients' medical problems. The overall incidence of pressure ulcers was 15.0%. Position change was the most popular nursing intervention provided for pressure-ulcer prevention in both the pressure-ulcer and at-risk groups, followed by skin care. There was a statistically significant tendency toward a greater frequency of providing skin care and nutritional care in the at-risk group than in the pressure-ulcer group. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean frequencies of nursing interventions relative to the patients' medical problems in the pressure-ulcer group. However, frequencies of nursing interventions did differ significantly between patients with neurological problems and those with other medical problems in the at-risk group. Analysis of the nurses' characteristics revealed that more nursing interventions were documented by those who were younger, less experienced, and more educated. A standardized nursing-terminology-based electronic nursing record system allowed us to monitor the variations in nursing practice

  18. The Use of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System and the RAND VSQ9 to Measure the Quality of Life and Visit-Specific Satisfaction of Pregnant Patients Under Chiropractic Care Utilizing the Webster Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Joel; Nazarenko, Andrea Lamont; Ohm, Jeanne; Alcantara, Junjoe

    2018-01-01

    To quantify the quality of life (QoL) and visit-specific satisfaction of pregnant women. A prospective cohort within a practice-based research network (PBRN). Setting/Locations: Individual chiropractic offices. Pregnant women (age ≥18 years) attending chiropractic care. Chiropractic care (i.e., The Webster Technique, spinal adjustments, and adjunctive therapies). The RAND VSQ9 to measure visit-specific satisfaction and the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS ® )-29 to measure QoL. A convenience sample of 343 pregnant patients (average age = 30.96 years) comprised their study population. They were highly educated with 75% attaining a 2-year associate's degree or higher. The pregnant patients presented for chiropractic care with a mean week of gestation of 25.67 weeks (median = 28 weeks; range = 0-42 weeks) and parity (i.e., the number of live births) of 0.92 live births (median = 1; range = 0-6). From baseline (i.e., at study entrance with minimum first visit) and comparative (i.e., following a course of chiropractic care), the VSQ9 measurements revealed increasingly high satisfaction on the part of the subjects (i.e., the mean difference of baseline minus comparative measures = -0.7322; p < 0.005). The median number of visits (i.e., visits attended) at baseline and comparative measures was 1.00 (standard deviation [SD] = 22.69) and 3.30 (SD = 22.71), respectively. Across outcomes, QoL improved from baseline to comparative measurement after holding constant for visit number and time lapse, trimester of pregnancy, and care provider type. There was a reduction in mean T scores associated with fatigue (p < 0.05), pain interference (p < 0.05), sleep disturbance (p < 0.05), and an improvement in satisfaction with social roles (p < 0.05). A significant decrease was also found with pain interference (p < 0.05). No evidence was found that anxiety (p = 0.1404) or depression (p = 0

  19. Strategic prevention of musculoskeletal disorders in elderly care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seim, Rikke; Edwards, Kasper; Poulsen, Signe

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a common designation for pain, stiffness or tenderness in the joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles or bones and the associated cardiovascular and nervous system often resulting in symptoms as swelling, restriction of motion and functional impairment. MSD...... is a serious and comprehensive work environment problem. It is also recognized as such in the Danish National Work Environment Strategy 2020, where MSD is ranked as one of three main focus areas with the aim of reducing the number of MSD incidents with 20% by the year 2020 (WEA 2020). It is estimated...... that the number of cases of occupational musculoskeletal disorders will increase in the coming years. MSD as a result of repetitive movements of the upper extremities will continue to be a challenge. Furthermore a great challenge is the prevention of MSD among younger employees (under 25), who are often more...