WorldWideScience

Sample records for preventing oral disease

  1. Strategies to prevent oral disease in dependent older people (Protocol).

    OpenAIRE

    Brocklehurst, Paul; Williams, Lynne; Hoare, Zoe; Goodwin, Tom; McKenna, Gerry; Tsakos, Georgios; Chesnutt, Ivor G.; Pretty, Iain; Wassell, Rebecca; Jerkovic-Cosic, Katrina; Hayes, Martina; Watt, Richard G.; Burton, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows:To assess the effects and costs of primary, secondary and tertiary strategies to prevent oral disease in dependent older people.

  2. Strategies to prevent oral disease in dependent older people

    OpenAIRE

    Brocklehurst, P.; Williams, L.; Hoare, Z.; Goodwin, T.; Mckenna, G.; Tsakos, G.; Chestnutt, I. G.; Pretty, I.; Wassall, R.; Jerković-Ćosić, K.; Hayes, M.; Watt, R. G.; Burton, C.

    2016-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects and costs of primary, secondary and tertiary strategies to prevent oral disease in dependent older people.

  3. Oral health information systems--towards measuring progress in oral health promotion and disease prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Bratthall, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the essential components of oral health information systems for the analysis of trends in oral disease and the evaluation of oral health programmes at the country, regional and global levels. Standard methodology for the collection of epidemiological data on oral health has...... been designed by WHO and used by countries worldwide for the surveillance of oral disease and health. Global, regional and national oral health databanks have highlighted the changing patterns of oral disease which primarily reflect changing risk profiles and the implementation of oral health...... programmes oriented towards disease prevention and health promotion. The WHO Oral Health Country/Area Profile Programme (CAPP) provides data on oral health from countries, as well as programme experiences and ideas targeted to oral health professionals, policy-makers, health planners, researchers...

  4. Oral health information systems--towards measuring progress in oral health promotion and disease prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Bratthall, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    programmes oriented towards disease prevention and health promotion. The WHO Oral Health Country/Area Profile Programme (CAPP) provides data on oral health from countries, as well as programme experiences and ideas targeted to oral health professionals, policy-makers, health planners, researchers...... systems are being developed within the framework of the WHO STEPwise approach to surveillance of noncommunicable, chronic disease, and data stored in the WHO Global InfoBase may allow advanced health systems research. Sound knowledge about progress made in prevention of oral and chronic disease......This article describes the essential components of oral health information systems for the analysis of trends in oral disease and the evaluation of oral health programmes at the country, regional and global levels. Standard methodology for the collection of epidemiological data on oral health has...

  5. Heart Disease Prevention: Does Oral Health Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Forum. 2013;16:e232. Chapple ILC, et al. Diabetes and periodontal diseases: Consensus report of the Joint EFP/AAP Workshop on Periodontitis and Systemic Diseases. Journal of Clinical Periodontology. 2013; ...

  6. Preventive Effects of Houttuynia cordata Extract for Oral Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Sekita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Houttuynia cordata (HC (Saururaceae has been used internally and externally as a traditional medicine and as an herbal tea for healthcare in Japan. Our recent survey showed that HC poultice (HCP prepared from smothering fresh leaves of HC had been frequently used for the treatment of purulent skin diseases with high effectiveness. Our experimental study also demonstrated that ethanol extract of HCP (eHCP has antibacterial, antibiofilm, and anti-inflammatory effects against S. aureus which caused purulent skin diseases. In this study, we focused on novel effects of HCP against oral infectious diseases, such as periodontal disease and dental caries. We determined the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of water solution of HCP ethanol extract (wHCP against important oral pathogens and investigated its cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory effects on human oral epithelial cells. wHCP had moderate antimicrobial effects against some oral microorganisms and profound antibiofilm effects against Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida albicans. In addition, wHCP had no cytotoxic effects and could inhibit interleukin-8 and CCL20 productions by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human oral keratinocytes. Our findings suggested that wHCP may be clinically useful for preventing oral infectious diseases as a mouthwash for oral care.

  7. Role of Phytochemicals in Prevention of Oral Diseases

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    Sunira Chandra

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to highlight and discuss the importance of natural chemical substances available in fruits, vegetables and herbs as they interfere with multiple important cellular pathways and this property is utilized for the prevention and treatment of oral diseases.

  8. Alzheimer’s disease: oral manifestations, treatment and preventive measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Ortega-Martínez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of patients with dementia types such as Alzheimer’s, non-current and tough situations are faced. Treatment should be tailored to each stage of the disease and for each patient. In this type of disease, it is very important to involve families and caregivers to improve the patients´ quality of life. The main goal with these patients is prevention. All oral manifestations caused by the lack of inadequate oral hygiene, xerostomia and manifestations derived from taking drugs should be controlled. The aim of this review is to describe the main oral manifestations which can result from this disease and the best treatment options taking into account the patients’ clinical stages.

  9. Oral hygiene in the prevention of caries and periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löe, H

    2000-06-01

    While some periodontal disease may be as old as mankind itself, caries as a public health problem appeared with the development of flour and sugar mills, and the universal access to fermentable carbohydrates. As a consequence, during the last 500 years caries and periodontal disease have been the most common diseases afflicting the human mouth. Together, these two diseases have been responsible for untold pain and suffering, and for excessive destruction and loss of people's teeth. With improving social circumstances in most industrialised nations, increased availability and affordability of modern oral health care, and the promotion of conservative treatment concepts, the 20th century saw significant progress in eliminating pain and tooth loss. Moreover, during the last 50 years advances in the oral health sciences and in technology, have not only increased our understanding of the nature of these diseases and their causes, but also introduced and tested new approaches to their prevention.

  10. Oral health information systems--towards measuring progress in oral health promotion and disease prevention.

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Bratthall, Douglas; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the essential components of oral health information systems for the analysis of trends in oral disease and the evaluation of oral health programmes at the country, regional and global levels. Standard methodology for the collection of epidemiological data on oral health has been designed by WHO and used by countries worldwide for the surveillance of oral disease and health. Global, regional and national oral health databanks have highlighted the changing patterns of ora...

  11. Knowledge, attitude and practices of pediatricians regarding the prevention of oral diseases in Italy

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    Marinelli Alessandra

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pediatricians are in an ideal position to advise families about the prevention and management of oral diseases in children. The objective of the study was to determine knowledge, attitude, and practices regarding the prevention of oral diseases among pediatricians in Italy. Methods A systematic random sample of 1000 pediatricians received a questionnaire on socio-demographic and practice characteristics; knowledge on risk factors; attitude and practices towards the prevention of oral diseases. Results A total of 507 pediatricians participated. More than half knew the main risk factors for oral diseases and this knowledge was higher in primary care pediatricians (p = 0.007, in those with a higher number of hours worked per week (p = 0.012, and who believed that oral diseases may be prevented (p = 0.017. Pediatricians with higher knowledge about the main risk factors (p = 0.006 believe that they have an important role in preventing oral diseases and that they can perform an oral examination. Almost all (89% prescribed fluoride supplements and those younger (p = 0.016, with a higher number of patients seen in workday (p = 0.001, with longer practice activity (p = 0.004, those who believe that fluoride is effective in preventing caries (p p = 0.002 were more likely to prescribe fluoride. One-fourth and 40.6% provides and recommends a dental visit once a year and primary care pediatricians (p = 0.014 and those who believed that routine visit is important in preventing oral diseases (p Conclusion The results showed a lack of knowledge among pediatricians although almost all believed that they had an important responsibility in preventing oral diseases and provided an oral examination.

  12. Prevention and therapy of periodontal diseases and oral malodour : Brush, rinse and cool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluijs, E.

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis is one of the two most important oral diseases that contributes to the global burden of chronic disease, the prevalence of which increases with age and represents a significant burden to public health. Maintaining a healthy oral cavity involves the prevention and therapy of gingival

  13. Advances in the prevention of oral disease; the role of the International Association for Dental Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelton, Helen; Fox, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Since its foundation in 1920, prevention of oral disease has been a priority for the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) and the commitment of the organisation to the subject area is clearly expressed in its mission to improve oral health worldwide. The IADR has a current global membership of almost 11,000 people who share an interest in oral and craniofacial research. This paper provides an overview of the contribution of IADR to supporting research and associated activities in disease prevention, in disseminating knowledge and in advocating for better oral health for all citizens of the world. It looks back over time and summarises current supports. Two more recent initiatives in disease prevention are described in more detail, the Global Oral Health Inequalities Research Agenda (GOHIRA) and the proceedings at the 2013 World Conference on Preventive Dentistry (WCPD, 2013), a joint initiative between IADR and WHO. Through organisational structure, meetings, publications, scientific groups and networks and external relations, IADR has been at the forefront of advancing research for the prevention of oral diseases. IADR is committed to ensuring research advances get disseminated and implemented and at the same time encourages and advocates for basic, clinical and translational research across disciplines so that we may uncover the major breakthrough in prevention of oral disease.

  14. Chemical Plaque Control Strategies in the Prevention of Biofilm-associated Oral Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafer, Mohammed; Patil, Shankargouda; Hosmani, Jagadish; Bhandi, Shilpa H; Chalisserry, Elna P; Anil, Sukumaran

    2016-04-01

    Dental plaque is a biofilm that forms naturally on the surfaces of exposed teeth and other areas of the oral cavity. It is the primary etiological factor for the most frequently occurring oral diseases, such as dental caries and periodontal diseases. Specific, nonspecific, and ecologic plaque hypothesis explains the causation of dental and associated diseases. Adequate control of biofilm accumulation on teeth has been the cornerstone of prevention of periodontitis and dental caries. Mechanical plaque control is the mainstay for prevention of oral diseases, but it requires patient cooperation and motivation; therefore, chemical plaque control agents act as useful adjuvants for achieving the desired results. Hence, it is imperative for the clinicians to update their knowledge in chemical antiplaque agents and other developments for the effective management of plaque biofilm-associated diseases. This article explores the critical analysis of various chemical plaque control strategies and the current trends in the control and prevention of dental plaque biofilm.

  15. Rationale for the prevention of oral diseases in primary health care: an international collaborative study in oral health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Denis M; Phantumvanit, Prathip; Llodra, Juan Carlos; Horn, Virginie; Carlile, Monica; Eiselé, Jean-Luc

    2014-10-01

    Ensuring that members of society are healthy and reaching their full potential requires the prevention of oral diseases through the promotion of oral health and well-being. The present article identifies the best policy conditions of effective public health and primary care integration and the actors who promote and sustain these efforts. In this review, arguments and recommendations are provided to introduce an oral health collaborative promotion programme called Live.Learn.Laugh. phase 2, arising from an unique partnership between FDI World Dental Federation, the global company Unilever plc and an international network of National Dental Associations, health-care centres, schools and educators populations. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  16. Knowledge about prevention of oral cancer and gum disease among school teachers in Dharwad, India

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    Shodan Mangalore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the knowledge of primary school teachers in Dharwad, India, regarding the prevention of oral cancer and gum disease. Materials and Methods : In this cross sectional study a self administered questionnaire was used for data collection. A total of 184 school teachers were selected for the study. A response rate of 96.7% (n = 178 was obtained. Results : Of the respondents, 36.5% (n = 65 had poor knowledge, while 27.5% had good knowledge regarding the prevention of oral cancer and gum disease. School teachers with postgraduate qualification were better informed with regard to the prevention of oral diseases as compared to those with only a bachelor degree. Factors such as education, sex, and type of institutional funding (public/private were significantly correlated with the level of knowledge (R2 = 0.1128; P < 0.05. Conclusion : School teachers need to be motivated to improve their awareness and knowledge about the prevention of oral cancer and gum diseases, particularly the younger teachers and those with only bachelor degrees. Establishment of school-based oral-health promotion programs in India is urgently required.

  17. Preparing the dental workforce for oral disease prevention in an aging population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounis, Georgia; Ditmyer, Marcia M; McClain, Mildred A; Cappelli, David P; Mobley, Connie C

    2010-10-01

    The growing proportion of older adults in the U.S. population, as well as escalating dental expenditures, is leading to major changes in the demands on oral health care delivery. Researchers over the years have clearly demonstrated the shortcomings of traditional restorative treatment and the cycle of repeat interventional care. Oral health care professionals are constantly seeking advances in technology, protocols, methodologies, and materials to meet the needs of the growing, diverse older population. Early stages of oral diseases such as caries and periodontal disease are vigorous, preventable, and reversible. Assessment of social, systemic, and oral risk factors that emphasize patient counseling to facilitate risk reduction, along with individualized evidence-based disease prevention planning, is more cost-effective than traditional restorative treatment and will improve overall outcome. The purposes of this article are to briefly describe current issues and challenges related to oral health promotion for older adults and to examine strategies for disease prevention and health promotion in health and dental care settings.

  18. Oral Microbial Shift: Factors affecting the Microbiome and Prevention of Oral Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagli, Namrata; Dagli, Rushabh; Darwish, Shrouq; Baroudi, Kusai

    2016-01-01

    Recently, oral microbiome has gained popularity among scientists. Microorganisms are no longer considered as disease-producing pathogens, rather they are now considered as partners of human in maintaining health. Since ancient times, changes in our lifestyle have affected our microbiome and the balance with their human host has been perturbed. The present review includes the description about factors affecting oral microbiome and establishing symbiosis with the human host so that they contribute in maintaining health rather than eliciting diseases. A comprehensive literature search was performed on databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed and Medline until April 2015. First, articles were selected on the basis of their titles and then abstracts were screened and unwanted articles were excluded. Articles obtained from all the databases were checked and duplicate articles were removed. Articles obtained from various databases: PubMed = 35, Google Scholar=8. Out of these 43 articles, total 29 articles were finally selected for this review. The published literature suggests that the modern oral microbiome is less biodiverse, and possess more pathogenic bacterial species and lesser beneficial bacteria. The possible factors mainly responsible for this shift in microbiome were found to be change in diet, industrial revolution and indiscriminate use of antibiotics. Various changes in lifestyles have affected oral microbiome adversely and perturb the symbiosis between the microbiome and their hosts. The present oral microbiome is found to be less diverse and more pathogenic. The present review may be helpful in understanding the relationship between the microbiome and their human hosts so that microbiome contributes in maintaining healthy state of the body.

  19. Oral health of children with congenital heart disease following preventive treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarna, Reshma M; Rai, Kavitha; Hegde, Amitha M

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD), abnormalities in the structural development of the heart, occurs in approximately 8:1000 live births. The causative microorganism for infective endocarditis in more than 60% of the patients with positive hemoculture of viridans streptococci (s.mutans, s.mitior) thus making it mandatory for these children to maintain their oral health. The present study assessed the oral health of children with congenital heart disease following preventive treatment. A total of 74 children with congenital heart disease were selected for the study with 30 healthy controls between the ages 5-16. The oral health was assessed by measuring the microbial counts, the OHI-S and the gingival indices. The data thus obtained were subjected to paired and unpaired t-test. Poor oral health was prevalent among these children of the study group as compared to the controls indicating a lack of sound knowledge of the maintenance of oral hygiene. Following preventive treatment the oral health improved considerably.

  20. Anti-plaque agents in the prevention of biofilm-associated oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehni, P C; Takeuchi, Y

    2003-01-01

    The prevention of dental caries and periodontal diseases is targeted at the control of dental plaque. In this context, chemical agents could represent a valuable complement to mechanical plaque control. The active agents should prevent biofilm formation without affecting the biological equilibrium within the oral cavity. Depending on the goals of the preventive measures, various strategies may be considered. Anti-plaque agents with properties other than bactericidal or bacteriostatic activities may be used in primary prevention. In this approach, a modest antiplaque effect may be sufficient or even desirable, as it would decrease the side effects of the active agent. Antimicrobial agents are best indicated in secondary and tertiary prevention, as the objectives are to restore health and to prevent disease recurrence. The rational is to prevent or delay subgingival recolonization by pathogenic micro-organisms. The development of in vitro oral biofilm models certainly represents a major advance for studying and testing oral anti-plaque agents in recent years. The results of these studies have shown that chlorhexidine, hexetidine, delmopinol, amine fluoride/stannous fluoride, triclosan, phenolic compounds, among others, may inhibit biofilm development and maturation as well as affect bacterial metabolism.

  1. The importance of oral hygiene on adults with the focus on preventive measures resulting in the reduction of oral cavity diseases frequency.

    OpenAIRE

    KÁPLOVÁ, Hana

    2015-01-01

    The Dissertation work presented herein monitors the significance of oral hygiene in adults, while aiming at preventive measures leading to lowering mouth cavity illness occurrences. Within the theoretical part, I focus on the delineation of important terms relating to preventive care for oral cavity, information concerning anatomy, physiology of oral cavity, influence of foods and other problems within the oral cavity, among which there are tooth cavities and diseases of gingiva. In the pract...

  2. School teachers' knowledge of oral disease prevention: a survey from Dharwad, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shodan, Mangalore; Prasad, Karkala V V; Javali, Shivalingappa B

    2012-02-01

    To assess knowledge and the associated factors among Indian school teachers towards oral disease. A cross-sectional design was employed using a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 215 school teachers were selected, with a response rate of 95.3% (n = 205). A total of 35.6% of school teachers had "good" knowledge, while 42.4% had "medium" knowledge of the prevention of oral disease. Knowledge of dental caries was highest, as opposed to oral cancer, which was lowest. School teachers aged >50 years and those with postgraduate degrees had greater knowledge. A significant association was observed between teachers' levels of knowledge and their age groups (χ(2) = 20.9950, P education level (χ(2) = 13.9740, P education, age group, sex, and type of institutional funding (public/private) was significantly correlated to knowledge (R(2) = 0.1250, P educational qualifications, need to be further motivated to improve their awareness and knowledge about oral diseases. Therefore, the establishment of school-based oral health promotion programs in India with immediate effects is essential. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Clinical practice guidelines for oral management of Sjögren disease: Dental caries prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zero, Domenick T; Brennan, Michael T; Daniels, Troy E; Papas, Athena; Stewart, Carol; Pinto, Andres; Al-Hashimi, Ibtisam; Navazesh, Mahvash; Rhodus, Nelson; Sciubba, James; Singh, Mabi; Wu, Ava J; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Tracy, Sharon; Fox, Philip C; Ford, Theresa Lawrence; Cohen, Stephen; Vivino, Frederick B; Hammitt, Katherine M

    2016-04-01

    Salivary dysfunction in Sjögren disease can lead to serious and costly oral health complications. Clinical practice guidelines for caries prevention in Sjögren disease were developed to improve quality and consistency of care. A national panel of experts devised clinical questions in a Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcomes format and included use of fluoride, salivary stimulants, antimicrobial agents, and nonfluoride remineralizing agents. The panel conducted a systematic search of the literature according to pre-established parameters. At least 2 members extracted the data, and the panel rated the strength of the recommendations by using a variation of grading of recommendations, assessment, development, and evaluation. After a Delphi consensus panel was conducted, the experts finalized the recommendations, with a minimum of 75% agreement required. Final recommendations for patients with Sjögren disease with dry mouth were as follows: topical fluoride should be used in all patients (strong); although no study results link improved salivary flow to caries prevention, the oral health community generally accepts that increasing saliva may contribute to decreased caries incidence, so increasing saliva through gustatory, masticatory, or pharmaceutical stimulation may be considered (weak); chlorhexidine administered as varnish, gel, or rinse may be considered (weak); and nonfluoride remineralizing agents may be considered as an adjunct therapy (moderate). The incidence of caries in patients with Sjögren disease can be reduced with the use of topical fluoride and other preventive strategies. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Traditional Medicinal Plant Extracts and Natural Products with Activity against Oral Bacteria: Potential Application in the Prevention and Treatment of Oral Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo A. Palombo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral diseases are major health problems with dental caries and periodontal diseases among the most important preventable global infectious diseases. Oral health influences the general quality of life and poor oral health is linked to chronic conditions and systemic diseases. The association between oral diseases and the oral microbiota is well established. Of the more than 750 species of bacteria that inhabit the oral cavity, a number are implicated in oral diseases. The development of dental caries involves acidogenic and aciduric Gram-positive bacteria (mutans streptococci, lactobacilli and actinomycetes. Periodontal diseases have been linked to anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus, Prevotella and Fusobacterium. Given the incidence of oral disease, increased resistance by bacteria to antibiotics, adverse affects of some antibacterial agents currently used in dentistry and financial considerations in developing countries, there is a need for alternative prevention and treatment options that are safe, effective and economical. While several agents are commercially available, these chemicals can alter oral microbiota and have undesirable side-effects such as vomiting, diarrhea and tooth staining. Hence, the search for alternative products continues and natural phytochemicals isolated from plants used as traditional medicines are considered as good alternatives. In this review, plant extracts or phytochemicals that inhibit the growth of oral pathogens, reduce the development of biofilms and dental plaque, influence the adhesion of bacteria to surfaces and reduce the symptoms of oral diseases will be discussed further. Clinical studies that have investigated the safety and efficacy of such plant-derived medicines will also be described.

  5. Efficacy of Oral Administration of Sodium Iodide to Prevent Bovine Respiratory Disease Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemake, B M; Vander Ley, B L; Newcomer, B W; Heller, M C

    2018-01-01

    The prevention of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRD) in beef cattle is important to maintaining health and productivity of calves in feeding operations. Determine whether BRD bacterial and viral pathogens are susceptible to the lactoperoxidase/hydrogen peroxide/iodide (LPO/H 2 O 2 /I - ) system in vitro and to determine whether the oral administration of sodium iodide (NaI) could achieve sufficient concentrations of iodine (I) in the respiratory secretions of weaned beef calves to inactivate these pathogens in vivo. Sixteen weaned, apparently healthy, commercial beef calves from the University of Missouri, College of Veterinary Medicine teaching herd. In vitro viral and bacterial assays were performed to determine susceptibility to the LPO/H 2 O 2 /I - system at varying concentrations of NaI. Sixteen randomly selected, healthy crossbred beef weanlings were administered 70 mg/kg NaI, or water, orally in a blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Blood and nasal secretions were collected for 72 hours and analyzed for I - concentration. Bovine herpesvirus-1, parainfluenza-3, Mannheimia haemolytica and Bibersteinia trehalosi were all inactivated or inhibited in vitro by the LPO/H 2 O 2 /I - reaction. Oral administration of NaI caused a marked increase in nasal fluid I concentration with a C max  = 181 (1,420 μM I), T 12 , a sufficient concentration to inactivate these pathogens in vitro. In vitro, the LPO/H 2 O 2 /I - system inactivates and inhibits common pathogens associated with BRD. The administration of oral NaI significantly increases the I concentration of nasal fluid indicating that this system might be useful in preventing bovine respiratory infections. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Screening of Probiotic Candidates in Human Oral Bacteria for the Prevention of Dental Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, Tomohiko; Okumura, Takekazu; Imai, Susumu; Nakao, Masumi; Yamaji, Kazuaki; Ito, Masahiko; Nagata, Tsuyoshi; Kaneko, Kimiyuki; Miyazaki, Kouji; Okada, Ayako; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity in healthy subjects has a well-balanced microbiota that consists of more than 700 species. However, a disturbance of this balance, with an increase of harmful microbes and a decrease of beneficial microbes, causes oral disorders such as periodontal disease or dental caries. Nowadays, probiotics are expected to confer oral health benefits by modulating the oral microbiota. This study screened new probiotic candidates with potential oral health benefits and no harmful effects on the oral cavity. We screened 14 lactobacillus strains and 36 streptococcus strains out of 896 oral isolates derived from healthy subjects. These bacteria did not produce volatile sulfur compounds or water-insoluble glucan, had higher antibacterial activity against periodontal bacteria, and had higher adherence activity to oral epithelial cells or salivary-coated hydroxyapatite in vitro. We then evaluated the risk of primary cariogenicity and infective endocarditis of the selected oral isolates. As a result, Lactobacillus crispatus YIT 12319, Lactobacillus fermentum YIT 12320, Lactobacillus gasseri YIT 12321, and Streptococcus mitis YIT 12322 were selected because they showed no cariogenic potential in an artificial mouth system and a lower risk of experimental infective endocarditis in a rat model. These candidates are expected as new probiotics with potential oral health benefits and no adverse effects on general health. PMID:26053410

  7. Screening of Probiotic Candidates in Human Oral Bacteria for the Prevention of Dental Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, Tomohiko; Okumura, Takekazu; Imai, Susumu; Nakao, Masumi; Yamaji, Kazuaki; Ito, Masahiko; Nagata, Tsuyoshi; Kaneko, Kimiyuki; Miyazaki, Kouji; Okada, Ayako; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity in healthy subjects has a well-balanced microbiota that consists of more than 700 species. However, a disturbance of this balance, with an increase of harmful microbes and a decrease of beneficial microbes, causes oral disorders such as periodontal disease or dental caries. Nowadays, probiotics are expected to confer oral health benefits by modulating the oral microbiota. This study screened new probiotic candidates with potential oral health benefits and no harmful effects on the oral cavity. We screened 14 lactobacillus strains and 36 streptococcus strains out of 896 oral isolates derived from healthy subjects. These bacteria did not produce volatile sulfur compounds or water-insoluble glucan, had higher antibacterial activity against periodontal bacteria, and had higher adherence activity to oral epithelial cells or salivary-coated hydroxyapatite in vitro. We then evaluated the risk of primary cariogenicity and infective endocarditis of the selected oral isolates. As a result, Lactobacillus crispatus YIT 12319, Lactobacillus fermentum YIT 12320, Lactobacillus gasseri YIT 12321, and Streptococcus mitis YIT 12322 were selected because they showed no cariogenic potential in an artificial mouth system and a lower risk of experimental infective endocarditis in a rat model. These candidates are expected as new probiotics with potential oral health benefits and no adverse effects on general health.

  8. Evaluation of community-based oral health promotion and oral disease prevention--WHO recommendations for improved evidence in public health practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Kwan, Stella

    2004-12-01

    Systematic evaluation is an integral part of the organisation and delivery of community oral health care programmes, ensuring the effectiveness of these community-based interventions. As for general health promotion programmes the common problems from effectiveness reviews of oral health interventions relate to the quality and validity of programme evaluations. Problems identified mostly refer to the quality of outcome measures, short-term timescales to assess change, inadequate evaluation methodologies and inappropriate evaluation of programme implementation and processes. It remains a challenge to oral health professionals to integrate community oral health programmes into a wider health agenda. Public health research focusing on the development of evaluation methodologies has identified a variety of issues including the importance of using pluralistic evaluation approaches (quantitative and/or qualitative), limitations of the randomised controlled trial (RCT) design for evaluation of public health interventions, the need to match evaluation methods with the nature of intervention, development of outcome measures appropriate for the nature of intervention, importance of developing workforce capacity in evaluation techniques, and the need for development of partnerships between health practitioners and academics in conducting evaluations. In June 2003, the WHO Oral Health Programme at Headquarters organised a two-day workshop to take forward the development and documentation of the evaluation of oral health promotion and oral disease prevention programmes. The aims of the workshop were to: (1) identify common problems and challenges in evaluating community-based oral health interventions; (2) explore developments in the evaluation approaches in public health; (3) share experiences in evaluating oral health intervention programmes implemented at national or community levels in developing and developed countries and (4) develop guidelines for quality evaluation of

  9. Plant-based vaccines for oral delivery of type 1 diabetes-related autoantigens: Evaluating oral tolerance mechanisms and disease prevention in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posgai, Amanda L; Wasserfall, Clive H; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Daniell, Henry; Schatz, Desmond A; Atkinson, Mark A

    2017-02-13

    Autoantigen-specific immunological tolerance represents a central objective for prevention of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Previous studies demonstrated mucosal antigen administration results in expansion of Foxp3 + and LAP + regulatory T cells (Tregs), suggesting oral delivery of self-antigens might represent an effective means for modulating autoimmune disease. Early preclinical experiments using the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model reported mucosal administration of T1D-related autoantigens [proinsulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD)] delayed T1D onset, but published data are conflicting regarding dose, treatment duration, requirement for combinatorial agents, and extent of efficacy. Recently, dogma was challenged in a report demonstrating oral insulin does not prevent T1D in NOD mice, possibly due to antigen digestion prior to mucosal immune exposure. We used transplastomic plants expressing proinsulin and GAD to protect the autoantigens from degradation in an oral vaccine and tested the optimal combination, dose, and treatment duration for the prevention of T1D in NOD mice. Our data suggest oral autoantigen therapy alone does not effectively influence disease incidence or result in antigen-specific tolerance assessed by IL-10 measurement and Treg frequency. A more aggressive approach involving tolerogenic cytokine administration and/or lymphocyte depletion prior to oral antigen-specific immunotherapy will likely be required to impart durable therapeutic efficacy.

  10. Nattokinase: An Oral Antithrombotic Agent for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunqi Weng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Natto, a fermented soybean product, has been consumed as a traditional food in Japan for thousands of years. Nattokinase (NK, a potent blood-clot dissolving protein used for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, is produced by the bacterium Bacillus subtilis during the fermentation of soybeans to produce Natto. NK has been extensively studied in Japan, Korea, and China. Recently, the fibrinolytic (anti-clotting capacity of NK has been recognized by Western medicine. The National Science Foundation in the United States has investigated and evaluated the safety of NK. NK is currently undergoing a clinical trial study (Phase II in the USA for atherothrombotic prevention. Multiple NK genes have been cloned, characterized, and produced in various expression system studies. Recombinant technology represents a promising approach for the production of NK with high purity for its use in antithrombotic applications. This review covers the history, benefit, safety, and production of NK. Opportunities for utilizing plant systems for the large-scale production of NK, or for the production of edible plants that can be used to provide oral delivery of NK without extraction and purification are also discussed.

  11. [The place of chemical products in oral hygiene for the prevention and treatment of periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamagate, A; Kone, D; Coulibaly, N T; Ahnqux, A; Sixou, M

    2004-06-01

    The mechanical elimination of the bacteria plaque is the basis of the prevention and the treatment of gingivitis and periodontitis. Chemicals products used in the control of supra and subgingival plaque show a great importance because of individual and professional difficulties which constitute an impediment to the effective elimination of the bacteria plaque. However, by this time, there's no miracle product for oral hygiene capable at long term to take over from the tooth-brush and paste. The use at long term of chemicals in the bacteria plaque control can't be recommended because of their following effects and their slight effectivity-cost ratio. Nevertheless, oral hygiene chemicals combined with mechanical treatment provide very good results. Particularly, when used in the form of subgingival irrigation or slow liberation materials set in the periodontal pocket.

  12. Oral passive IgY-based immunotherapeutics: a novel solution for prevention and treatment of alimentary tract diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shofiqur; Van Nguyen, Sa; Icatlo, Faustino C; Umeda, Kouji; Kodama, Yoshikatsu

    2013-05-01

    This commentary summarizes the laboratory investigations and clinical trials published recently involving per-oral application of IgY supplemented food for specific orogastrointestinal disease prevention and control purposes. The prolonged use and misuse of conventional antibacterial drugs has spawned antibiotic resistant microbes prompting scientists to search for other germ-killing options. In particular, the use of IgY as a novel mode of immunotherapy using oral chicken immunoglobulin (IgY) to confer passive immunity has gained much interest as an inexpensive non-antibiotic alternative for the prophylaxis and treatment of a wide variety of infectious diseases. The stability of IgY in the orogastrointestinal tract and its safety profile has been well-documented. IgY has been used in the treatment or prevention of dental caries, periodontitis and gingivitis, gastritis and gastric ulcer, oral thrush and infant rotavirus diarrhea. The recent clinical trials on IgY with encouraging results has catapulted into the market novel nutraceutical or health supplements for therapeutic or prophylactic intervention based on the consumption of mono-specific or mixed IgY formulations. With recent trends in consumer preference for natural materials to alleviate health concerns, the increasing healthcare costs and the recent advances in drug delivery systems, IgY is likely to shift from its mainly functional food status toward pharmaceuticalization in the foreseeable future.

  13. Oral diagnosis and treatment planning: part 6. Preventive and treatment planning for periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbet, E; Smales, R

    2012-09-01

    A high level of sustained personal plaque control is fundamental for successful treatment outcomes in patients with active periodontal disease and, hence, oral hygiene instructions are the cornerstone of periodontal treatment planning. Other risk factors for periodontal disease also should be identified and modified where possible. Many restorative dental treatments in particular require the establishment of healthy periodontal tissues for their clinical success. Failure by patients to control dental plaque because of inappropriate designs and materials for restorations and prostheses will result in the long-term failure of the restorations and the loss of supporting tissues. Periodontal treatment planning considerations are also very relevant to endodontic, orthodontic and osseointegrated dental implant conditions and proposed therapies.

  14. Can oral vitamin D prevent the cardiovascular diseases among migrants in Australia? Provider perspective using Markov modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruwanpathirana, Thilanga; Owen, Alice; Renzaho, Andre M N; Zomer, Ella; Gambhir, Manoj; Reid, Christopher M

    2015-06-01

    The study was designed to model the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of oral Vitamin D supplementation as a primary prevention strategy for cardiovascular disease among a migrant population in Australia. It was carried out in the Community Health Service, Kensington, Melbourne. Best-case scenario analysis using a Markov model was employed to look at the health care providers' perspective. Adult migrants who were vitamin D deficient and free from cardiovascular disease visiting the medical centre at least once during the period from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2012 were included in the study. The blood pressure-lowering effect of vitamin D was taken from a published meta-analysis and applied in the Framingham 10 year cardiovascular risk algorithm (with and without oral vitamin D supplements) to generate the probabilities of cardiovascular events. A Markov decision model was used to estimate the provider costs associated with the events and treatments. Uncertainties were derived by Monte Carlo simulation. Vitamin D oral supplementation (1000 IU/day) for 10 years could potentially prevent 31 (interquartile range (IQR) 26 to 37) non-fatal and 11 (IQR 10 to 15) fatal cardiovascular events in a migrant population of 10,000 assuming 100% compliance. The provider perspective incremental cost effectiveness per year of life saved was AU$3,992 (IQR 583 to 8558). This study suggests subsidised supplementation of oral vitamin D may be a cost effective intervention to reduce non-fatal and fatal cardiovascular outcomes in high-risk migrant populations. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. MARKETING STUDIES OF LOCAL MARKET OF DRUGS WHICH ARE APPLIED FOR PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF ORAL CAVITY DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Tsarakhov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stomatological market has actively developed recent years. Domestic experts received an access to contemporary technologies of dental diseases treatment in the world. This conditioned the appearance of new drugs and parapharmaceutical products applied in dental practice on the pharmaceutical market. In this connection, study of these drugs market, their price policy, demand and supply. Assortment of parapharmaceutical products applied in dental practice for oral cavity hygiene is represented mainly by liquid forms, such as mouth rinse, balms, elixirs, and a special place is occupied by toothpastes. Their assortment amounts to more than 700 types. Drugs, applied in dental practice are represented by the following groups: anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiallergenic, anesthetics, drugs which stimulate tissues regeneration, fluoric drugs. The purpose of this study was the analysis of regional pharmaceutical market assortment, which offers parapharmaceutical goods and drugs for prevention and treatment of oral cavity diseases to the stomatological establishments. Pharmaceutical market of the Republic of North Ossetia – Alania is represented by a wide range of drugs for dental diseases treatment. This group is represented in the assortment of practically all distributors. The drugs for dental diseases treatment is not only supplied by domestic producers but also go from pharmaceutical companies of 29 foreign countries, which influences positively on the state of drug therapy of paradontum in the region.

  16. Haemophilus influenzae oral vaccination for preventing acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Edward; Lockhart, Kathleen; Purchuri, Sai Navya; Pushparajah, Jennifer; Cripps, Allan W; van Driel, Mieke L

    2017-06-19

    Chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are serious conditions in which patients are predisposed to viral and bacterial infections resulting in potentially fatal acute exacerbations. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is defined as a lung disease characterised by obstruction to lung airflow that interferes with normal breathing. Antibiotic therapy has not been particularly useful in eradicating bacteria such as non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) because they are naturally occurring flora of the upper respiratory tract in many people. However, they can cause opportunistic infection. An oral NTHi vaccine has been developed to protect against recurrent infective acute exacerbations in chronic bronchitis. To assess the effectiveness of an oral, whole-cell NTHi vaccine in protecting against recurrent episodes of acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and COPD in adults. To assess the effectiveness of NTHi vaccine in reducing NTHi colonising the respiratory tract during recurrent episodes of acute exacerbations of COPD. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2017, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1946 to January 2017), Embase (1974 to January 2017), CINAHL (1981 to January 2017), LILACS (1985 to January 2017), and Web of Science (1955 to January 2017). We also searched trials registries and contacted authors of trials requesting unpublished data. We included randomised controlled trials comparing the effects of an oral monobacterial NTHi vaccine in adults with recurrent acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis or COPD when there was overt matching of the vaccine and placebo groups on clinical grounds. The selection criteria considered populations aged less than 65 years and those older than 65 years. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data from original records and publications for incidence and severity of bronchitis episodes and carriage rate of

  17. Antifibrinolytic therapy for preventing oral bleeding in patients with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Galen, Karin Pm; Engelen, Eveline T; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien P; van Es, Robert Jj; Schutgens, Roger Eg

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Minor oral surgery or dental extractions (oral or dental procedures) are widely performed and can be complicated by hazardous oral bleeding, especially in people with an inherited bleeding disorder such as haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease. The amount and severity of singular

  18. Quantified light-induced fluorescence, review of a diagnostic tool in prevention of oral disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Josselin de Jong, Elbert; Higham, Susan M.; Smith, Philip W.; van Daelen, Catherina J.; van der Veen, Monique H.

    2009-05-01

    Diagnostic methods for the use in preventive dentistry are being developed continuously. Few of these find their way into general practice. Although the general trend in medicine is to focus on disease prevention and early diagnostics, in dentistry this is still not the case. Nevertheless, in dental research some of these methods seem to be promising for near future use by the general dental professional. In this paper an overview is given of a method called quantitative light-induced fluorescence or (QLF) in which visible and harmless light excites the teeth in the patient's mouth to produce fluorescent images, which can be stored on disk and computer analyzed. White spots (early dental caries) are detected and quantified as well as bacterial metabolites on and in the teeth. An overview of research to validate the technique and modeling to further the understanding of the technique by Monte Carlo simulation is given and it is shown that the fluorescence phenomena can be described by the simulation model in a qualitative way. A model describing the visibility of red fluorescence from within the dental tissue is added, as this was still lacking in current literature. An overview is given of the clinical images made with the system and of the extensive research which has been done. The QLF™ technology has been shown to be of importance when used in clinical trials with respect to the testing of toothpastes and preventive treatments. It is expected that the QLF™ technology will soon find its way into the general dental practice.

  19. Antifibrinolytic therapy for preventing oral bleeding in patients with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Galen, Karin P M; Engelen, Eveline T; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien P; van Es, Robert J J; Schutgens, Roger E G

    2015-12-24

    Minor oral surgery or dental extractions (oral or dental procedures) are widely performed and can be complicated by hazardous oral bleeding, especially in people with an inherited bleeding disorder such as haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease. The amount and severity of singular bleedings depend on disease-related factors, such as the severity of the haemophilia, both local and systemic patient factors (such as periodontal inflammation, vasculopathy or platelet dysfunction) and intervention-related factors (such as the type and number of teeth extracted or the dimension of the wound surface). Similar to local haemostatic measures and suturing, antifibrinolytic therapy is a cheap, safe and potentially effective treatment to prevent bleeding complications in individuals with bleeding disorders undergoing oral or dental procedures. However, a systematic review of trials reporting outcomes after oral surgery or a dental procedure in people with an inherited bleeding disorder, with or without, the use of antifibrinolytic agents has not been performed to date. The primary objective was to assess the efficacy of local or systemic use of antifibrinolytic agents to prevent bleeding complications in people with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease undergoing oral or dental procedures. Secondary objectives were to assess if antifibrinolytic agents can replace or reduce the need for clotting factor concentrate therapy in people with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease and to further establish the effects of these agents on bleeding in oral or dental procedures for each of these populations. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), of MEDLINE and from handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We additionally searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews. We searched Pub

  20. Oral Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health Cancer Health Disparities Childhood Cancer Clinical Trials Global Health Key Initiatives Cancer Moonshot Genomic Data Commons National Clinical Trials ...

  1. [Holistic integrative medicine: application in prevention and treatment of oral mucosal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X; Xie, L; Zhao, X; Li, J; Zeng, X; Chen, Q M

    2017-08-09

    Holistic integrative medicine (HIM), as one of the important ideas in the field of medicine, arouses great concern recently. HIM regards the human body as a whole, turns data and evidence in medical research back to facts, integrates technologies and experience developed in clinical research into medical skills. The repeated practices at the levels of fact, experience, and medical skills will generate true knowledge to solve the wide spread problems brought by linearized thinking and fragmented knowledge. With the development of highly divided medical disciplines, how to utilize and practice HIM has become a common concern of the medical community. Specialization of stomatology, which is a first level discipline like medicine, has also become a trend for years. However, holistic concept cannot be overlooked, especially in the development of oral medicine. This article aims at the communication and exchange of knowledge about HIM among dental professionals. In order to serve the patients better, the authors look forward to practicing the HIM concept in the field of oral medicine through the efforts of us all.

  2. Dietary counseling in the prevention and control of oral diseases – a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is recommended, that dietary counseling in dental diseases should be comprehensive for the whole human health and not just for any particular dental disease. ... In the absence of such professionals, patients/clients should as a matter of routine be referred to dental nurses and dental hygienists for nutritional counseling.

  3. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N.; Anita, N.; Babu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect imm...

  4. 75 FR 22140 - Office of Clinical and Preventive Services; Division of Oral Health; Dental Preventive and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... Services; Division of Oral Health; Dental Preventive and Clinical Support Centers Program Announcement Type...' oral health by directly addressing the perceived needs of dental personnel and Area or regional dental... clinic-based and community-based oral health promotion/disease prevention (HP/DP) initiatives. Centers...

  5. Orally-transmitted Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filigheddu, Maria Teresa; Górgolas, Miguel; Ramos, José Manuel

    2017-02-09

    Chagas disease is a zoonosis caused by protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is most frequently associated with a vectorial transmission. However, in recent years we have observed a significant increase in the oral transmission of the disease, associated mainly with the consumption of drinks made from fruit or other vegetables contaminated with triatomine faeces or secretions from infected mammals. After a latency period of 3 to 22 days after ingestion, the oral infection is characterized by more severe manifestations than those associated with vectorial transmission: prolonged fever, acute myocarditis with heart failure and, in some cases, meningoencephalitis. Mortality can reach up to 33% of those infected. The aim of this paper is to review this matter and to promote prevention practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Immunologically mediated oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N; Anita, N; Babu, R

    2015-04-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient.

  7. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Jimson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient.

  8. Efficacy of Preoperative Oral Antibiotic Prophylaxis for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections in Patients with Crohn Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Motoi; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Bando, Toshihiro; Chohno, Teruhiro; Sasaki, Hirofumi; Horio, Yuki; Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Takesue, Yoshio

    2017-10-23

    We investigated the efficacy of oral antimicrobial prophylaxis in patients undergoing surgery for Crohn disease. Although oral antibiotic prophylaxis with mechanical bowel preparation has been recommended for colorectal surgery, the use of this approach remains somewhat controversial. Moreover, the efficacy of this approach for inflammatory bowel disease also remains unclear. This study was conducted as a randomized controlled trial at the Hyogo College of Medicine. The study protocols were registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry (000013369). In this study, 335 patients with Crohn disease who were scheduled to undergo intestinal resection with an open approach were randomly assigned to either group A or group B. The patients in group A received both preoperative oral antibiotics and intravenous antimicrobial prophylaxis, and intravenous antimicrobial prophylaxis alone was given to the patients in group B. All patients underwent preoperative mechanical bowel preparation with sodium picosulfate hydrate. The primary endpoint of this study was the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) according to an intention-to-treat analysis. Although the incidences of overall and organ/space SSI were not significantly different, the incidence of incisional SSI was significantly lower in group A (12/163; 7.4%) than in group B (27/162; 16.6%) (P = 0.01). In the multivariate analysis, the absence of oral antibiotic prophylaxis was an independent risk factor for incisional SSI (odds ratio: 3.3; 95% confidence interval: 1.3-8.3; P = 0.01). Combined oral and intravenous antimicrobial prophylaxis in patients with Crohn disease contributed to the prevention of SSI.

  9. Antimicrobial therapy to prevent or treat oral mucositis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donnelly, J.P.; Bellm, L.A.; Epstein, J.B.; Sonis, S.T.; Symonds, R.P.

    2003-01-01

    Oral mucositis represents a significant source of morbidity after chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Since infection may have an important role in the pathophysiology of oral mucositis, several antimicrobial agents have been investigated for their efficacy in preventing and treating this disease.

  10. Oral Administration of GW788388, an Inhibitor of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Signaling, Prevents Heart Fibrosis in Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Fabiane L.; Araújo-Jorge, Tania C.; de Souza, Elen M.; de Oliveira, Gabriel M.; Degrave, Wim M.; Feige, Jean-Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas disease induced by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection is a major cause of mortality and morbidity affecting the cardiovascular system for which presently available therapies are largely inadequate. Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFß) has been involved in several regulatory steps of T. cruzi invasion and in host tissue fibrosis. GW788388 is a new TGFß type I and type II receptor kinase inhibitor that can be orally administered. In the present work, we studied its effects in vivo during the acute phase of experimental Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Male Swiss mice were infected intraperitoneally with 104 trypomastigotes of T. cruzi (Y strain) and evaluated clinically. We found that this compound given once 3 days post infection (dpi) significantly decreased parasitemia, increased survival, improved cardiac electrical conduction as measured by PR interval in electrocardiography, and restored connexin43 expression. We could further show that cardiac fibrosis development, evaluated by collagen type I and fibronectin expression, could be inhibited by this compound. Interestingly, we further demonstrated that administration of GW788388 at the end of the acute phase (20 dpi) still significantly increased survival and decreased cardiac fibrosis (evaluated by Masson's trichrome staining and collagen type I expression), in a stage when parasite growth is no more central to this event. Conclusion/Significance This work confirms that inhibition of TGFß signaling pathway can be considered as a potential alternative strategy for the treatment of the symptomatic cardiomyopathy found in the acute and chronic phases of Chagas disease. PMID:22720109

  11. Oral hygiene care for patients with gastrointestinal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacevska, Ivona; Toneva, Verica; Toneva, Aleksandra; Atanasova, Sandra; Kocovski, Darko

    2017-01-01

    Oral health is essential for general health and quality of life. Healthy oral cavity prevents not only the GI disorder, but contribute to well-being of the human body. According to WHO it is a state of being free from mount and facial pain, oral and throat cancer, oral infection and sores, periodontal (gum) disease, tooth decay, tooth loss and other diseases and disorders that limit an individual’s capacity in biting, chewing, smiling, speaking and psychosocial wellbeing. Good oral hygiene...

  12. A 12-month follow-up study on the preventive effect of oral lansoprazole on acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Quan-San; Zhao, Wei; Ding, Wei; Liu, Jin-Ming; Zhao, Yun-Feng

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the preventive effects of oral administration of lansoprazole on acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients with COPD in groups C and D in the stable phase were stratified into a group with neither gastroesophageal reflux nor lansoprazole therapy (group A) and a group subjected to oral lansoprazole therapy (group B1 ) and a group not subjected to oral lansoprazole therapy (group B2 ). The frequency scale for the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (FSSG) questionnaire, COPD assessment test (CAT) questionnaire, pulmonary function test and the 6-minute walk test were applied; in addition, arterial blood gas, white blood cell (WBC), hs-CRP, liver function and the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and GM-CSF in sputum were monitored during follow-up. In the 12-month follow-up period, the frequency of exacerbation in group B2 was statistically higher than that in groups A and B1 (P lansoprazole therapy decreased the frequency of acute exacerbation of COPD by alleviating gastroesophageal reflux and lowering the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and GM-CSF in the sputum. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2016 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  13. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly...... of preventive oral health care programmes. The important role of sociobehavioural and environmental factors in oral health and disease has been shown in a large number of socioepidemiological surveys. In addition to poor living conditions, the major risk factors relate to unhealthy lifestyles (i.e. poor diet.......g. diabetes or HIV/AIDS). Worldwide strengthening of public health programmes through the implementation of effective measures for the prevention of oral disease and promotion of oral health is urgently needed. The challenges of improving oral health are particularly great in developing countries....

  14. Prevention of periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentino, Andrew R; Kassab, Moawia M; Renner, Erica J

    2005-07-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal disease prevention is to maintain the dentition over a lifetime in a state of health, comfort, and function in an aesthetically pleasing presentation. This article focuses on primary and secondary periodontal disease prevention as they relate to gingivitis and periodontitis. Risk assessment, mechanical plaque control, chemical plaque control, current clinical recommendations for optimal prevention, and future preventive strategies are discussed.

  15. Evaluation of community-based oral health promotion and oral disease prevention--WHO recommendations for improved evidence in public health practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Kwan, Stella

    2004-01-01

    Systematic evaluation is an integral part of the organisation and delivery of community oral health care programmes, ensuring the effectiveness of these community-based interventions. As for general health promotion programmes the common problems from effectiveness reviews of oral health interven...

  16. Ecological therapeutic opportunities for oral diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, Anilei; Marsh, Philip D.; Diaz, Patricia I.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY The three main oral diseases of humans, that is caries, periodontal diseases and oral candidiasis, are associated with microbiome shifts initiated by changes in the oral environment and/or decreased effectiveness of mucosal immune surveillance. In this review we discuss the role that microbial-based therapies may have in the control of these conditions. Most investigations on the use of microorganisms for management of oral disease have been conducted with probiotic strains with some positive but very discrete clinical outcomes. Other strategies such as whole oral microbiome transplantation or modification of community function by enrichment with health-promoting indigenous oral strains may offer more promise but research in this field is still in its infancy. Any microbial-based therapeutics for oral conditions, however, are likely to be only one component within a holistic preventive strategy that should also aim at modification of the environmental influences responsible for the initiation and perpetuation of microbiome shifts associated with oral dysbiosis. PMID:28840820

  17. Evaluation of community-based oral health promotion and oral disease prevention--WHO recommendations for improved evidence in public health practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Kwan, Stella

    2004-01-01

    Systematic evaluation is an integral part of the organisation and delivery of community oral health care programmes, ensuring the effectiveness of these community-based interventions. As for general health promotion programmes the common problems from effectiveness reviews of oral health...... a challenge to oral health professionals to integrate community oral health programmes into a wider health agenda. Public health research focusing on the development of evaluation methodologies has identified a variety of issues including the importance of using pluralistic evaluation approaches (quantitative...... and/or qualitative), limitations of the randomised controlled trial (RCT) design for evaluation of public health interventions, the need to match evaluation methods with the nature of intervention, development of outcome measures appropriate for the nature of intervention, importance of developing...

  18. Evaluation of community-based oral health promotion and oral disease prevention--WHO recommendations for improved evidence in public health practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Kwan, Stella

    2004-01-01

    a challenge to oral health professionals to integrate community oral health programmes into a wider health agenda. Public health research focusing on the development of evaluation methodologies has identified a variety of issues including the importance of using pluralistic evaluation approaches (quantitative...... and/or qualitative), limitations of the randomised controlled trial (RCT) design for evaluation of public health interventions, the need to match evaluation methods with the nature of intervention, development of outcome measures appropriate for the nature of intervention, importance of developing...... in evaluating oral health intervention programmes implemented at national or community levels in developing and developed countries and (4) develop guidelines for quality evaluation of national and community oral health programmes. Twenty-two invitees from 15 countries attended in addition to WHO staff...

  19. The oral metagenome in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Alcaraz, Luis David; Cabrera-Rubio, Raúl; Romero, Héctor; Simón-Soro, Aurea; Pignatelli, Miguel; Mira, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The oral cavity of humans is inhabited by hundreds of bacterial species and some of them have a key role in the development of oral diseases, mainly dental caries and periodontitis. We describe for the first time the metagenome of the human oral cavity under health and diseased conditions, with a focus on supragingival dental plaque and cavities. Direct pyrosequencing of eight samples with different oral-health status produced 1 Gbp of sequence without the biases imposed by PCR or cloning. These data show that cavities are not dominated by Streptococcus mutans (the species originally identified as the ethiological agent of dental caries) but are in fact a complex community formed by tens of bacterial species, in agreement with the view that caries is a polymicrobial disease. The analysis of the reads indicated that the oral cavity is functionally a different environment from the gut, with many functional categories enriched in one of the two environments and depleted in the other. Individuals who had never suffered from dental caries showed an over-representation of several functional categories, like genes for antimicrobial peptides and quorum sensing. In addition, they did not have mutans streptococci but displayed high recruitment of other species. Several isolates belonging to these dominant bacteria in healthy individuals were cultured and shown to inhibit the growth of cariogenic bacteria, suggesting the use of these commensal bacterial strains as probiotics to promote oral health and prevent dental caries.

  20. Oral biofilms, oral and periodontal infections, and systemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddi, Abhiram; Scannapieco, Frank A

    2013-10-01

    Oral biofilms harbor several hundreds of species of bacteria as well as spirochetes, protozoa, fungi and viruses. The composition of the oral biofilm varies from health to disease. It is the source of microorganisms that cause dental and periodontal infections. Oral infections and periodontal disease have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of several important chronic systemic diseases.

  1. The prevention of oral complications in bone-marrow transplantations by means of oral hygiene and dental intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, J. E.; Abraham-Inpijn, L.; van Leeuwen, E. F.; Lustig, K. H.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Oral complications cause morbidity and mortality in patients, undergoing allogeneic or autologous bone-marrow transplantation. The clinical features and the pathogenesis of the oral sequelae of bone marrow ablative therapy and graft-versus-host disease are discussed. In addition, a preventive oral

  2. Smoking Related Systemic and Oral Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sajith Vellappally; Zdeněk Fiala; Jindra Šmejkalová; Vimal Jacob; Rakesh Somanathan

    2007-01-01

    This article reviewed smoking related systemic diseases and oral diseases. Smoking is related to lung cancer, cardiovascular diseases and many other systemic diseases. Cigarette smoke affects the oral cavity first, so it is evident that smoking has many negative influences on oral cavity, for example, staining of teeth and dental restorations, wound healing, reduction of the ability to smell and taste, and development of oral diseases such as oral cancer, periodontitis, smoker’s palate, smoke...

  3. Oral transmission of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida; Carvalho, Noemia Barbosa

    2012-03-01

    Chagas disease is now an active disease in the urban centers of countries of nonendemicity and endemicity because of congenital and blood and/or organ transplantation transmissions and the reactivation of the chronic disease in smaller scale than vectorial transmission, reported as controlled in countries of endemicity. Oral transmission of Chagas disease has emerged in unpredictable situations in the Amazon region and, more rarely, in areas of nonendemicity where the domiciliary triatomine cycle was under control because of exposition of the food to infected triatomine and contaminated secretions of reservoir hosts. Oral transmission of Chagas disease is considered when >1 acute case of febrile disease without other causes is linked to a suspected food and should be confirmed by the presence of the parasite after direct microscopic examination of the blood or other biological fluid sample from the patient.

  4. Oral microbiota and systemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Purnima S

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that bacteria are the primary cause of infectious diseases, however, evidence is emerging that these organisms are also indirectly responsible for several diseases including cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. The oral cavity is home to several million bacteria that can cause two major diseases-periodontitis and caries. The relationship between periodontopathic bacteria and systemic diseases has been explored for several years. The concept of the oral cavity as a source of distant infection has been debated for at least a century. This review will discuss the historic aspects of the development of the focal infection theory, the reasons for its demise, its re-emergence and current status. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Smoking Related Systemic and Oral Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajith Vellappally

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviewed smoking related systemic diseases and oral diseases. Smoking is related to lung cancer, cardiovascular diseases and many other systemic diseases. Cigarette smoke affects the oral cavity first, so it is evident that smoking has many negative influences on oral cavity, for example, staining of teeth and dental restorations, wound healing, reduction of the ability to smell and taste, and development of oral diseases such as oral cancer, periodontitis, smoker’s palate, smoker’s melanosis, hairy tongue, leukoplakia, oral candidiasis and implant survival rate. The article also discusses the relationship between smoking and dental caries in detail.

  6. Oral administration of Chinese herbal medicine during gestation period for preventing hemolytic disease of the newborn due to ABO incompatibility: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Cao

    Full Text Available About 85.3% of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN is caused by maternal-fetal ABO blood group incompatibility. However, there is currently no recommended "best" therapy for ABO incompatibility during pregnancy.To systematically assess the safety and effectiveness of oral Chinese herbal medicine (CHM for preventing HDN due to ABO incompatibility.The protocol of this review was registered on the PROSPERO website (No. CRD42016038637.Six databases were searched from inception to April 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs of CHM for maternal-fetal ABO incompatibility were included. The primary outcome was incidence of HDN. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality of included trials. Risk ratios (RR and mean differences with 95% confidence interval were used as effect measures. Meta-analyses using Revman 5.3 software were conducted if there were sufficient trials without obvious clinical or statistical heterogeneity available.Totally 28 RCTs involving3413 women were included in the review. The majority of the trials had unclear or high risk of bias. Our study found that the rate of HDN and the incidence of neonatal jaundice might be 70% lower in the herbal medicine group compared with the usual care group (RR from 0.25 to 0.30.After treatment with herbal medicine, women were twice as likely to have antibody titers lower than 1:64 compared with women who received usual care(RR from 2.15 to 3.14 and the umbilical cord blood bilirubin level in the herbal medicine group was 4umol/L lower than in those receiving usual care. There was no difference in Apgar scores or birthweights between the two groups.This review found very low-quality evidence that CHM prevented HDN caused by maternal-fetal ABO incompatibility. No firm conclusions can be drawn regarding the effectiveness or safety of CHM for this condition.

  7. Oral administration of Chinese herbal medicine during gestation period for preventing hemolytic disease of the newborn due to ABO incompatibility: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huijuan; Wu, Ruohan; Han, Mei; Caldwell, Patrina Ha Yuen; Liu, Jian-Ping

    2017-01-01

    About 85.3% of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) is caused by maternal-fetal ABO blood group incompatibility. However, there is currently no recommended "best" therapy for ABO incompatibility during pregnancy. To systematically assess the safety and effectiveness of oral Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) for preventing HDN due to ABO incompatibility. The protocol of this review was registered on the PROSPERO website (No. CRD42016038637).Six databases were searched from inception to April 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of CHM for maternal-fetal ABO incompatibility were included. The primary outcome was incidence of HDN. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality of included trials. Risk ratios (RR) and mean differences with 95% confidence interval were used as effect measures. Meta-analyses using Revman 5.3 software were conducted if there were sufficient trials without obvious clinical or statistical heterogeneity available. Totally 28 RCTs involving3413 women were included in the review. The majority of the trials had unclear or high risk of bias. Our study found that the rate of HDN and the incidence of neonatal jaundice might be 70% lower in the herbal medicine group compared with the usual care group (RR from 0.25 to 0.30).After treatment with herbal medicine, women were twice as likely to have antibody titers lower than 1:64 compared with women who received usual care(RR from 2.15 to 3.14) and the umbilical cord blood bilirubin level in the herbal medicine group was 4umol/L lower than in those receiving usual care. There was no difference in Apgar scores or birthweights between the two groups. This review found very low-quality evidence that CHM prevented HDN caused by maternal-fetal ABO incompatibility. No firm conclusions can be drawn regarding the effectiveness or safety of CHM for this condition.

  8. Strengthening the prevention of periodontal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the burden of periodontal disease in adult populations worldwide, to emphasize the essential risk factors common to periodontal disease and chronic diseases, to outline important new strategies for effective prevention of periodontal...... disease, and to inform about the role of the World Health Organization (WHO) in developing a national capacity for the prevention of disease. METHODS: Information about periodontal health status as measured by the Community Periodontal Index system is stored in the WHO Global Oral Health Data Bank......; advanced disease with deep periodontal pockets (> or =6 mm) affects approximately 10% to 15% of adults worldwide. The available evidence shows that important risk factors for periodontal disease relate to poor oral hygiene, tobacco use, excessive alcohol consumption, stress, and diabetes mellitus...

  9. Oral manifestations of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Luca; Carroccio, Antonio; Compilato, Domenico; Panzarella, Vera; Serpico, Rosario; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2008-03-01

    Contrary to early beliefs, celiac disease (CD) is relatively common; however, it still remains underdiagnosed since most cases are atypical, with few or no gastrointestinal symptoms and predominance of extraintestinal manifestations. As a consequence, the diagnosis of the disorder often requires a multidisciplinary approach. Also some oral ailments have been described in celiac patients. In this study, we review the papers that have reported oral manifestations in subjects with CD. A comprehensive literature search was conducted in Medline and Embase databases using appropriate key words. Additional papers were selected by cross-referencing from the retrieved articles. Dental enamel defects are the oral lesions most closely related to CD. There are conflicting data on the association between CD and recurrent aphthous stomatitis. A correlation of CD with atrophic glossitis has been reported, although robust evidence in support of it is lacking. Patients with CD have caries indexes seemingly lower than healthy individuals, but they may experience delay in tooth eruption. Occurrence of other oral mucosal lesions in CD subjects is likely occasional. Patients with systematic dental enamel defects should be screened for CD even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms. CD screening tests for patients with oral aphthae or idiopathic atrophic glossitis should be selectively considered during a medical evaluation that focuses on all aspects of the patient's status.

  10. Oral cancer preventive campaigns: are we reaching the real target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Renato Paladino; Victorino, Alana Asciutti; Pessoa, Gregory Bittar; Cunha, Lais Lourenção Garcia da; Silva, José Antonio Rodrigues da; Kanda, Jossi Ledo; Matos, Leandro Luongo de

    2015-01-01

    Oral cavity malignant neoplasms have a high mortality rate. For this reason, preventive campaigns have been developed, both to educate the population and to diagnose lesions at an early stage. However, there are studies that contest the validity of these endeavors, principally because the target audience of the campaigns may not conform to the group at highest risk for oral malignancy. To describe the profile of patients who avail themselves of the preventive campaign, identify the presence of oral lesions in that population, and compare that data with the epidemiological profile of patients with oral cancer. Cross-sectional historical cohort study performed by analysis of epidemiological data of the campaign "Abra a Boca para a Saúde" collected in the years from 2008 to 2013. In the years analyzed, 11,965 people were treated and 859 lesions were diagnosed, all benign. There was a female predominance (52.7%), with mean age of 44 years (±15.4 years); 26% were smokers and 29% reported alcohol consumption. It is known that the group at highest risk to develop oral cancer is 60- to 70-year-old men, who are alcoholic smokers. The population that seeks preventive campaigns is not the main risk group for the disease. This fact explains the low number of lesions and the lack of cancer detection. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Oral cancer preventive campaigns: are we reaching the real target?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Paladino Nemoto

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral cavity malignant neoplasms have a high mortality rate. For this reason, preventive campaigns have been developed, both to educate the population and to diagnose lesions at an early stage. However, there are studies that contest the validity of these endeavors, principally because the target audience of the campaigns may not conform to the group at highest risk for oral malignancy. Objective: To describe the profile of patients who avail themselves of the preventive campaign, identify the presence of oral lesions in that population, and compare that data with the epidemiological profile of patients with oral cancer. Methods: Cross-sectional historical cohort study performed by analysis of epidemiological data of the campaign "Abra a Boca para a Saúde" collected in the years from 2008 to 2013. Results: In the years analyzed, 11,965 people were treated and 859 lesions were diagnosed, all benign. There was a female predominance (52.7%, with mean age of 44 years (±15.4 years; 26% were smokers and 29% reported alcohol consumption. It is known that the group at highest risk to develop oral cancer is 60to 70-year-old men, who are alcoholic smokers. Conclusion: The population that seeks preventive campaigns is not the main risk group for the disease. This fact explains the low number of lesions and the lack of cancer detection.

  12. National strategy for prevention of oral diseases in children from 0 to 14 years old age in the Republic of Macedonia for the period 2008-2018.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarakinova, Olivera; Carcev, Mile; Getova, Biljana; Carceva Salja, Sofija; Janevska, Sevdalina

    2013-01-01

    Human principles and the fundamental values are the main principles stipulated in the Constitution of Republic of Macedonia. The Government of the Republic of Macedonia, within its program objectives, implementing the laws in the country, the international standards and the global health care as the worlds objective of the Constitution of WHO. According to the information received through the health monitoring system, as well as the results from target and selective studies, they have shown that the condition of oral health, especially the condition with the dental caries is serious health problem of all groups. The alarm was activated by the state of increase of the caries incidence, showing a value of DMFT=6.88 in children at 12 years of age, which is considered as a high value compared to the WHO recommendations for oral health (DMFT=3). The experience from the developed countries, as well as the knowledge based on scientific and professional evidence in RM, prove that this desease may be successfully prevented, eliminated and eradicated by conduction of primary preventive measures. The program objectives of the National Strategy for prevention of oral deseases are shared in shorth term, medium term and long term objectives, which aim is eradication of the caries. The Strategy include a prevention of periodontal desease and orthodontic anomalies. The prevention of the caries will be performed by using a five preventive measures: 1. mechanical and chemical control of the dental plaque 2. Discipline of sugar take regime 3. Application of fluorides (systemic and topic) 4. sealing fissures and cavities 5. Education and motivation for sustainnability of oral health. In the frame of the Strategy, we planed a dental dispensarisation of children through registering data in the patients file, as propose by WHO, and arrangement of preventive teams and professional assistance of paediatrics and gynecologists. The evaluation of the effects from the preventive program shall

  13. Flies blown disease - Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis, a term first introduced by Hope (1840, refers to the invasion of tissues and organs of animals and human wounds and certain body cavities by the dipteran larvae which manifests as subcutaneous furunculoid or boillike lesions. Oral myiasis is a rare pathology and a risk to the patient′s life. Higher incidence is seen in rural areas affecting the tropical and sub-tropical zones of Africa and America. Myiasis affecting the oro-dental complex is rare. Here is a case report of oral myiasis in an 18-year-old male patient who is mentally challenged with anterior open bite, incompetent lips, and periodontal disease. The lesion was treated with turpentine oil, which forced larvae out and irrigated with normal saline solution. Follow-up examination revealed complete remission and healing of the lesion.

  14. Interventions for treating oral leukoplakia to prevent oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi, Giovanni; Franchini, Roberto; Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Varoni, Elena Maria; Sardella, Andrea; Kerr, Alexander R; Carrassi, Antonio; MacDonald, L C I; Worthington, Helen V

    2016-07-29

    Oral leukoplakia is a relatively common oral lesion that, in a small proportion of people, precedes the development of oral cancer. Most leukoplakias are asymptomatic; therefore, the primary objective of treatment should be to prevent onset of cancer. This review updates our previous review, published in 2006. To assess the effectiveness, safety and acceptability of treatments for leukoplakia in preventing oral cancer. We searched the following electronic databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 16 May 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2016, Issue 4), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 16 May 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 16 May 2016) and CancerLit via PubMed (1950 to 16 May 2016). We searched the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (to 10 February 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov (to 16 May 2016) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials (to 16 May 2016). We placed no restrictions on the language or date of publication when searching electronic databases. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that enrolled people with a diagnosis of oral leukoplakia and compared any treatment versus placebo or no treatment. We collected data using a data extraction form. Oral cancer development, demonstrated by histopathological examination, was our primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were clinical resolution of the lesion, improvement of histological features and adverse events. We contacted trial authors for further details when information was unclear. When valid and relevant data were available, we conducted a meta-analysis of the data using a fixed-effect model when we identified fewer than four studies with no heterogeneity. For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We assessed risk of bias in studies by using the Cochrane tool. We assessed the overall quality of the evidence by using standardised

  15. As-yet-uncultivated oral bacteria: breadth and association with oral and extra-oral diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Siqueira Jr, José F.; Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that 40-60% of the bacteria found in different healthy and diseased oral sites still remain to be grown in vitro, phenotypically characterized, and formally named as species. The possibility exists that these as-yet-uncultivated bacteria play important ecological roles in oral bacterial communities and may participate in the pathogenesis of several oral infectious diseases. There is also a potential for these as-yetuncultivated oral bacteria to take part in extra-oral infect...

  16. Oral buflomedil in the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease: a randomized, placebo-controlled, 4-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leizorovicz, A; Becker, F

    2008-02-12

    Cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease remain high. We performed an international, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to investigate whether long-term administration of oral buflomedil could reduce the rate of cardiovascular events in patients with intermittent claudication. Patients >40 years of age with documented peripheral arterial obstructive disease, intermittent claudication, and an ankle-brachial index between 0.30 and 0.80 were eligible for inclusion and were randomized to receive orally either buflomedil or placebo for 2 to 4 years. Aspirin was recommended for all patients (unless they were receiving other antithrombotic treatments at inclusion). The primary efficacy outcome was critical cardiovascular events, defined as the composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, symptomatic deterioration of peripheral arterial obstructive disease, or leg amputation. A total of 2078 patients were recruited. Mean treatment duration was 33 months. The rate of critical cardiovascular events was significantly lower in buflomedil-randomized patients than in placebo-randomized patients (9.1% versus 12.4%; hazard ratio, 0.742; 95% confidence interval, 0.603 to 0.915; P=0.0163). Ankle-brachial index increased by 9.2% in buflomedil-randomized patients and decreased by 3.6% in placebo-randomized patients (Pperipheral arterial disease. The use of buflomedil should be considered in addition to an antiplatelet agent in patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease and intermittent claudication.

  17. Treatment and Prevention of Oral Candidiasis in Elderly Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hideo

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of oral candidiasis has increased in the elderly in recent years. Although the increase of the elderly population plays a big role in this rise of oral candidiasis, the broader recognition that elderly people have higher infection rates for oral candidiasis is considered to be also an important factor. Oral candidiasis can be categorized into three types. Pseudomembranous oral candidiasis is characterized by the appearance of white moss, erythematous oral candidiasis by the eruption of erythema, and hyperplastic oral candidiasis by mucosal hyperplasia. Miconazole has been commonly used when treating oral candidiasis. Elderly patients, however, have a tendency to develop oral candidiasis repeatedly. It is therefore critical to take measures to prevent recurrence. We recommend the use an oral moisturizer containing hinokitiol, an antifungal substance, on a regular basis, to help prevent recurrence of oral candidiasis.

  18. Prevention of gingival trauma : Oral hygiene devices and oral piercings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenderdos, N.L.

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining healthy teeth and soft oral tissues for life is important. Oral hygiene devices and oral piercings can damage the soft oral tissues. This thesis investigates the safety of manual toothbrushes, interdental brushes and rubber bristles interdental cleaners by analysing the gingival abrasion

  19. Prevention of gingival trauma: Oral hygiene devices and oral piercings

    OpenAIRE

    Hoenderdos, N.L.

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining healthy teeth and soft oral tissues for life is important. Oral hygiene devices and oral piercings can damage the soft oral tissues. This thesis investigates the safety of manual toothbrushes, interdental brushes and rubber bristles interdental cleaners by analysing the gingival abrasion score. The efficacy of the various oral hygiene devices is measured by the use of dental plaque scores and gingivitis scores. In addition, the prevalence, the short- and long-term effects and the ...

  20. Oral Cavity, Pharyngeal, and Laryngeal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about factors that may influence the risk of developing oral cavity, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancers and about approaches that may help in the prevention of these diseases.

  1. Dental caries and periodontal disease (prevention and control methods).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, S P

    1999-01-01

    There is a compelling need to apply preventive programs in both private and community practice of dentistry. This is to maintain improvements in oral health in developed and industrialized countries, and to stem increases in oral diseases in underserved and developing ones. At the outset, the terms prevention and control must be understood. The former is considered to mean a procedure or course of action that prevents the onset of disease, whereas the latter, implies reversing or stabilizing disease conditions. To be more precise, prevention will refer to the pre-pathologic or pre-clinical stage encompassing the promotive and specific protection levels--primary prevention stage. On the other hand, control will encompass early diagnosis and prompt treatment, disability limitation and rehabilitation levels-termed also collectively, as pathologic, clinical and final stages, or secondary and tertiary prevention. Community-based programs are usually structured to compliment therapeutic interventions of oral diseases, as well as prevention. In this era, and towards the next millennium, preventive and control programs are given high priorities in order to minimize the need for curative, restorative and therapeutic management of oral diseases. This review of the literature will give emphasis on established methods and programs for the prevention and control of the two most common oral diseases, dental caries and periodontal disease. The problems, background, and oral health objectives for the year 2000 as proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Federation Dentaire Internationale (FDI), as well as the recent advances in oral health relative to these diseases will be discussed. Finally, to better improve the efficacy of existing prevention and control methods, research needs and areas of concern relative to these diseases will be given consideration.

  2. Effects of chronic oral L-arginine administration on the L-arginine/NO pathway in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease or coronary artery disease: L-Arginine prevents renal loss of nitrite, the major NO reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jessica Y; Rothmann, Sabine; Schröder, Frank; Langen, Jennifer; Lücke, Thomas; Mariotti, François; Huneau, Jean François; Frölich, Jürgen C; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2015-09-01

    Despite saturation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) by its substrate L-arginine (Arg), oral and intravenous supplementation of Arg may enhance NO synthesis, a phenomenon known as "The L-arginine paradox". Yet, Arg is not only a source of NO, but is also a source for guanidine-methylated (N (G)) arginine derivatives which are all inhibitors of NOS activity. Therefore, Arg supplementation may not always result in enhanced NO synthesis. Concomitant synthesis of N (G)-monomethyl arginine (MMA), N (G),N (G)-dimethylarginine (asymmetric dimethylarginine, ADMA) and N (G),N (G´)-dimethylarginine (symmetric dimethylarginine, SDMA) from supplemented Arg may outweigh and even outbalance the positive effects of Arg on NO. Another possible, yet little investigated effect of Arg supplementation may be alteration of renal function, notably the influence on the excretion of nitrite in the urine. Nitrite is the autoxidation product of NO and the major reservoir of NO in the circulation. Nitrite and Arg are reabsorbed in the proximal tubule of the nephron and this reabsorption is coupled, at least in part, to the renal carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity. In the present placebo-controlled studies, we investigated the effect of chronic oral Arg supplementation of 10 g/day for 3 or 6 months in patients suffering from peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) or coronary artery disease (CAD) on the urinary excretion of nitrite relative to nitrate. We determined the urinary nitrate-to-nitrite molar ratio (UNOxR), which is a measure of nitrite-dependent renal CA activity before and after oral intake of Arg or placebo by the patients. The UNOxR was also determined in 6 children who underwent the Arg test, i.e., intravenous infusion of Arg (0.5 g Arg/kg bodyweight) for 30 min. Arg was well tolerated by the patients of the three studies. Oral Arg supplementation increased Arg (plasma and urine) and ADMA (urine) concentrations. No appreciable changes were seen in NO (in PAOD and CAD) and

  3. Oral diseases and conditions throughout the lifespan. I. Diseases and conditions directly associated with tooth loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran-Aguilar, Eugenio D; Beltran-Neira, Roberto J

    2004-01-01

    This is the first of two articles providing an overall view of oral diseases and conditions, taking the oral cavity and its organs and tissues as integrated parts of the human body. This article provides an overview of three oral diseases and conditions that are associated directly with loss of tooth structure or loss of teeth and reviews their risk factors and preventive and treatment interventions. Two of these conditions, dental caries and periodontal diseases (or their sequelae), remain the main cause of tooth loss in the U.S. Prevention, treatment, and control of these diseases require many hours of training during dental education and many hours of treatment in dental practice. The profession has fragmented into specialties based on diseases; as a result, many dentists fail to see them as integral elements of the human experience. As primary care specialists, dentists must be reminded that they need to make prevention the first choice, provide the best treatment possible based on available scientific evidence, and keep informed of new advances in research while always remembering that the oral cavity is an integral part of the human body. The changes and trends observed in the epidemiology of oral diseases will demand new skills in our dental graduates. Future dental graduates may achieve a solid understanding of oral diseases at both the biological and population level by using oral tissues and saliva to diagnose systemic diseases, relying on medical facilities to order laboratory tests, and diagnosing and treating patients in close collaboration with their medical colleagues.

  4. [Oral care recommendations for patients with oral autoimmune bullous diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobocinski, V; Dridi, S-M; Bisson, C; Jeanne, S; Gaultier, F; Prost-Squarcioni, C; Bernard, P; Pascal, F; Lefevre, B; Weber, P; Abasq, C; Agbo-Godeau, S; Joly, P; Ingen-Housz-Oro, S; Duvert-Lehembre, S

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases (AIBD) may cause chronic oral lesions that progress insidiously. To provide recommendations for optimal oral-dental management of patients presenting AIBD with oral involvement. In the absence of scientific studies with high levels of proof, these recommendations have been drawn up at two meetings by a committee of experts on AIBD comprising 7 dermatologists, 1 stomatologist, 1 maxillofacial surgeon, 2 odontologists and 4 parodontologists. The oral lesions associated with AIBD may be classified into three grades of severity: severe (generalised erosive gingivitis affecting at least 30% of dental sites), moderate (localised erosive gingivitis affecting less than 30% of dental sites) and controlled (no erosive oral lesions). Good oral-dental hygiene suited to the severity of the oral lesions, must be practised continually by these patients so as to avoid the formation of dental plaque, which aggravates symptoms. Dental and parodontal care must be considered in accordance with the severity grade of the oral lesions: in severe cases, the dental plaque must be eliminated manually with a curette, but several types of care (descaling, treatment for tooth decay, non-urgent extractions, etc.) must be suspended until the grade of severity is moderate or until the disease is stabilised. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Determinants of Oral Diseases in the African and Middle East Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidzonga, M M; Carneiro, L C; Kalyanyama, B M; Kwamin, F; Oginni, F O

    2015-07-01

    Oral health policies must be developed that emphasize the role of social determinants in health and oral diseases. The aim of this report is to review literature on determinants of oral diseases and apply the concepts to promoting oral health in the African countries in the African and Middle East region (AMER). Structural and proximal determinants of oral diseases are common to those affected by other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). Oral diseases are also heavily affected by issues of politics, poor health behaviors, underdeveloped health systems, and low oral health literacy. Wide-scale poverty exists in populations in the AMER. Oral health promotion and preventive oral health programs should therefore be integrated with those for general health and use the common risk factor approach (CRFA). Attempts should be made to improve the daily living conditions and reduce the incline of the social gradient. Oral health practitioners should use the CRFA when dealing with determinants of oral diseases and in the design of preventive oral health programs. The detrimental effects of the social determinants of health may be ameliorated by involving both the individual and community. Interventions in health promotion programs in the AMER need more research on the epidemiology of oral diseases and the role played by the social determinants of oral diseases, especially with regard to poverty. The high levels of poverty and low gross domestic product in most countries in the African region make it difficult to fund high-quality, affordable, accessible oral health services. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  6. IQuaD dental trial; improving the quality of dentistry: a multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing oral hygiene advice and periodontal instrumentation for the prevention and management of periodontal disease in dentate adults attending dental primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Jan E; Ramsay, Craig R; Averley, Paul; Bonetti, Debbie; Boyers, Dwayne; Campbell, Louise; Chadwick, Graham R; Duncan, Anne; Elders, Andrew; Gouick, Jill; Hall, Andrew F; Heasman, Lynne; Heasman, Peter A; Hodge, Penny J; Jones, Clare; Laird, Marilyn; Lamont, Thomas J; Lovelock, Laura A; Madden, Isobel; McCombes, Wendy; McCracken, Giles I; McDonald, Alison M; McPherson, Gladys; Macpherson, Lorna E; Mitchell, Fiona E; Norrie, John Dt; Pitts, Nigel B; van der Pol, Marjon; Ricketts, David Nj; Ross, Margaret K; Steele, James G; Swan, Moira; Tickle, Martin; Watt, Pauline D; Worthington, Helen V; Young, Linda

    2013-10-26

    Periodontal disease is the most common oral disease affecting adults, and although it is largely preventable it remains the major cause of poor oral health worldwide. Accumulation of microbial dental plaque is the primary aetiological factor for both periodontal disease and caries. Effective self-care (tooth brushing and interdental aids) for plaque control and removal of risk factors such as calculus, which can only be removed by periodontal instrumentation (PI), are considered necessary to prevent and treat periodontal disease thereby maintaining periodontal health. Despite evidence of an association between sustained, good oral hygiene and a low incidence of periodontal disease and caries in adults there is a lack of strong and reliable evidence to inform clinicians of the relative effectiveness (if any) of different types of Oral Hygiene Advice (OHA). The evidence to inform clinicians of the effectiveness and optimal frequency of PI is also mixed. There is therefore an urgent need to assess the relative effectiveness of OHA and PI in a robust, sufficiently powered randomised controlled trial (RCT) in primary dental care. This is a 5 year multi-centre, randomised, open trial with blinded outcome evaluation based in dental primary care in Scotland and the North East of England. Practitioners will recruit 1860 adult patients, with periodontal health, gingivitis or moderate periodontitis (Basic Periodontal Examination Score 0-3). Dental practices will be cluster randomised to provide routine OHA or Personalised OHA. To test the effects of PI each individual patient participant will be randomised to one of three groups: no PI, 6 monthly PI (current practice), or 12 monthly PI.Baseline measures and outcome data (during a three year follow-up) will be assessed through clinical examination, patient questionnaires and NHS databases.The primary outcome measures at 3 year follow up are gingival inflammation/bleeding on probing at the gingival margin; oral hygiene self

  7. Health Promotion/Disease Prevention: New Directions for Geriatric Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levkoff, Sue; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes 10 modules for primary care practitioners on health promotion/disease prevention for the elderly on these topics: Alzheimer's disease in minorities, dehydration, diabetes, elder abuse, geriatric nutrition, oncology, oral health in long-term care, incontinence, injury prevention, and physical activity. These areas are significant for…

  8. Review article about nutrition and primary prevention of oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atena Shiva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a worldwide problem that is caused by a variety of different factors increasing over a number of years. Oral cancer is a very prevalent disease and one of the most 10 common causes of death. It is important that the risk factors can be controlled. Selecting the correct health behaviors and preventing exposure to convinced environmental risk factors can help to prevent the expansion of cancer. Scientists guess that as many as 30-40 percent of all cancer-related deaths are caused by human behaviors such as smoking, consumption of alcohol, poor diet quality and physical inactivity. This result explains the tendency in the following behaviors that can influence the possibility of getting cancer, especially oral cancer in addition to providing information and classes about healthy eating habits and a subsequent healthy lifestyle at home. In fact, a diet rich in fresh fruits, whole grains and vegetables can decrease the risk of the oral cancer because of certain compounds such as vitamin C, E, carotenoids and lycopene. Moreover, limit consumption of meat, particularly processed meat, and replace it with vegetable proteins and fish (rich of omega 3 are helpful and effective.

  9. Obesity Revised. Chapter at "Periodontal Disease: Symptoms, Treatment and Prevention"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cinar, Ayse Basak

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Obesity, diabetes and oral diseases (dental cariesand periodontal diseases), largely preventable chronic diseases, are described as global pandemic due their distribution and severe consequences. WHO has called for a global action for prevention and promotion of these diseases as a vital...... the likelihood of periodontitis which is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide, described as pandemic, and closely related to DM2. Promoting good oral health is significantly essential for prevention and reducing the negative consequences of periodontal diseases, DM2 and obesity, and to maintain good...... investment in urgent need. Diabetes and obesity, showing an increasing trend, lead to disabilities and negatively impacts on the quality of life through life course along with oral diseases. WHO projects that the prevalence of diabetes and deaths/year attrituble to diabetes complications will double...

  10. ORAL BACTERIA AND SYSTEMS DISEASES: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Moromi Nakata, Hilda

    2014-01-01

    In order to show a global vision of oral bacteria in systemic diseases, it is important to analyze the presence and consequences of these microorganisms in relation with: bacteremia, endocarditis, cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, bacterial pneumonia, neonatal weight, nefritis, arthritis, dermatitis and diabetes mellitus, reaching conclusions for each one of them. Con el objeto de presentar una visión general de la bacterias orales en los procesos sistémicos, se analiza la p...

  11. Prevention of gingivitis: Oral hygiene and dentifrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sälzer, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    At the basis of Oral Health lies daily oral hygiene self-care with the result, if correctly performed, of plaque and gingivitis reduction. Epidemiological studies indicate that the level of oral hygiene in the general population has increased over the last decades. However, there still appears to be

  12. Oral Cancer and Oral Precancerous Lesions in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Roda, Giulia; Brygo, Alexandre; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    Oral cancer is historically linked to well-known behavioural risk factors such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Other risk factors include age over 40, male sex, several dietary factors, nutritional deficiencies, viruses, sexually transmitted infections, human papillomavirus, chronic irritation, and possibly genetic predisposition. Precancerous lesions in the oral cavity include leukoplakia, erythroplakia, and lichen planus. Histology of oral cancer varies widely but the great majority are squamous cell carcinomas.Epidemiological studies and cancer registries have shown a consistently increased risk of oral malignancies in kidney, bone marrow, heart, or liver transplantation, in graft vs host disease, and in patients with HIV infection. Because of the increasing use of immunosuppressive drugs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, it is useful to more accurately delineate the consequences of chronic immunosuppression to the oral cavity. Oral cancer and precancerous oral lesions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] have been scarcely reported and reviews on the topic are lacking.We conducted a literature search using the terms and variants of all cancerous and precancerous oral manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases. By retrieving the existing literature, it is evident that patients with IBD belong to the high-risk group of developing these lesions, a phenomenon amplified by the increasing HPV prevalence. Education on modifiable risk behaviours in patients with oral cancer is the cornerstone of prevention.Oral screening should be performed for all IBD patients, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or biological drug. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. C. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10 and Th3 (TGF-β regulatory T cells (Tregs plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral, formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy.

  14. Oral Hygiene in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Leonardo M; Portela de Oliveira, Millena Teles; Magalhaes, Wilrama B; Bastos, Poliana Lima

    2015-11-02

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a multifactorial etiology. The symptoms are characterized by motor disorders - tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural instability, which hinder oral hygiene. Oral and dental health in Parkinson's disease has been under-documented and findings are conflicting. Moreover, a number of dentists have limited experience regarding the management of these patients. This article reviews literature published within the last fifteen years, to better understand the impact of this disease in oral health. A literature search (MEDLINE and PUBMED), using keywords Parkinson Disease and Oral Hygiene, yielded 27 articles, from which 20 were selected. All of the articles were published in English in the last 15 years.

  15. Prevention of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V A Parfenov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the data available in the literature on the treatment of spasticity in poststroke patients. Therapeutic exercises that should be started just on the first days of stroke are noted to play a leading role in the treatment of poststroke spasticity. The local administration of botulinum toxin preparations (botox, dysport, xeomin may be effective for managing local spasticity that deteriorates motor functions. Baclofen (baklosan, tizanidine (sirdalud, and tolperisone hydrochloride (mydocalm may be used as oral medications. The paper also presents the results of a placebo-controlled trial that has indicated that mydocalm given in a dose of 300 to 900 mg/day may be effective in treating poststroke spasticity.

  16. Effect of endocrine pathology on the development and the course of oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babajanyan S.G.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available All systems of the human body are closely interconnected among themselves. The endocrine system directly influences formation, development and functioning of oral system. There is a close interrelation of endocrine disturbances with oral diseases. Clinical signs of dysfunction of glands of internal secretion firstly appear in the oral cavity. The knowledge of clinical symptoms, features of the course of diseases of internal secretion in the oral cavity will allow to diagnose and therefore, to prevent development of many complications: generalized periodontal disease, caries, osteoporosis of bone tissue and other diseases influencing quality of the oral system.

  17. Genetics, Disease Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content FAQ About Genetics, Disease Prevention and Treatment Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News ...

  18. Oral complications of HIV disease

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    Jair C. Leao

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS.

  19. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health.

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Estupinan-Day, Saskia; Ndiaye, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease, tooth loss, oral mucosal lesions and oropha...

  20. Islamic fasting and oral health and diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Javadzadeh Blouri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fasting is a religious obligation, which can be challenging for individuals with oral conditions due to its stringent code of conduct. Moreover, food abstinence during fasting can restrict oral feeding even further in patients whose nutrition has been already compromised. Previous research has mainly concentrated on oral hygiene and gum health, disregarding orodental conditions and diseases. This highlights the importance of further research in this regard. In this paper, we intended to clarify the correlation between fasting and oral injections, bleeding following tooth extraction, and brushing to overcome common misconceptions which indicate the breach of religious disciplines under such circumstances. We also aimed to determine the grave effects of fasting on health in case of severe immunological deficiencies, chronic oral ulcers and certain drug administration protocols for those with rigid religious beliefs.

  1. Prevention of diseases after menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, R A; Davis, S R; De Villiers, T J; Gompel, A; Henderson, V W; Hodis, H N; Lumsden, M A; Mack, W J; Shapiro, S; Baber, R J

    2014-10-01

    Women may expect to spend more than a third of their lives after menopause. Beginning in the sixth decade, many chronic diseases will begin to emerge, which will affect both the quality and quantity of a woman's life. Thus, the onset of menopause heralds an opportunity for prevention strategies to improve the quality of life and enhance longevity. Obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, cognitive decline, dementia and depression, and cancer are the major diseases of concern. Prevention strategies at menopause have to begin with screening and careful assessment for risk factors, which should also include molecular and genetic diagnostics, as these become available. Identification of certain risks will then allow directed therapy. Evidence-based prevention for the diseases noted above include lifestyle management, cessation of smoking, curtailing excessive alcohol consumption, a healthy diet and moderate exercise, as well as mentally stimulating activities. Although the most recent publications from the follow-up studies of the Women's Health Initiative do not recommend menopause hormonal therapy as a prevention strategy, these conclusions may not be fully valid for midlife women, on the basis of the existing data. For healthy women aged 50-59 years, estrogen therapy decreases coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality; this interpretation is entirely consistent with results from other randomized, controlled trials and observational studies. Thus. as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic disease after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered as part of the armamentarium.

  2. Provision of oral hygiene services as a potential method for preventing periodontal disease and control hypertension and diabetes in a community health centre in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Hee; Lee, Ga-Yeong; Park, Su-Kyung; Kim, Yeun-Ju; Lee, Min-Young; Kim, Chun-Bae

    2017-12-28

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a community-based oral hygiene service on general and periodontal health indicators of patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus visiting a community health centre in Korea. The study used a one-group pretest-posttest and interrupted time-series design. A total of 151 participants (45% male), with a mean age of 63 ± 8.4 years, were included in the study; these included patients with hypertension (62%), diabetes (12%) and both hypertension and diabetes (26%). Two dental hygienists dedicated 2 days per week to this project, providing oral hygiene services to 10-13 participants per day. Four oral hygiene service sessions were provided per patient. The objective oral hygiene status and subjective self-reported periodontal status were compared before and after the service. The changes in blood pressure and glycosylated haemoglobin levels were also assessed. A lower frequency of subjective swelling was reported at the fourth session (37.9%) compared to the first (55.6%) session. Further, significantly fewer cases of calculus and bleeding were observed (p oral hygiene services provided by dental hygienists can promote objective oral hygiene and subjective periodontal status in the local community, and may help in the control of hypertension and diabetes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Dentistry and population approaches for preventing dental diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baelum, Vibeke

    2011-12-01

    Dental professionals are expected to engage in oral disease prevention, but their tools limit the approach to chair side activities based on the common notion that the major dental diseases, dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis, are behavioural diseases shaped by individual lifestyles. However, lifestyles also have causes and individual behaviours reflect cultural norms, expectations and opportunities that are socio-economically determined and structurally maintained. Importantly, the effects of the societal and socio-economic determinants reach way above their influences as individual attributes, and effective approaches to the prevention and control of oral diseases are aligned with this causal chain. Unfortunately, the ethos and philosophy of dentistry is focused to a downstream, patient-centred, curative and rehabilitative approach to oral diseases. Whilst such services are needed to care for those who have already suffered the consequences of oral diseases, they do not influence population oral health. A more balanced distribution of efforts and resources along the whole range of intervention points from the downstream curative to the upstream structural healthy policy approaches is required if appropriate, evidence-based, effective, cost-effective, sustainable, equitable, universal, comprehensive and ethical delivery of health care, including oral health care, is the goal. The implementation of healthy policies and sound approaches to population oral health will require substantial commitment and political will on the part of the public and their elected officials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. How we treat oral chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treister, Nathaniel; Duncan, Christine; Cutler, Corey; Lehmann, Leslie

    2012-10-25

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation that is associated with a diminished quality of life. The oral cavity is frequently affected, with a wide variety of signs and symptoms that can result in significant short- and long-term complications ranging from mucosal sensitivity and limited oral intake to secondary malignancy and early death. This article provides a comprehensive approach to the diagnosis and clinical management of patients with oral cGVHD, with particular attention to differential diagnosis, control of symptoms, and prevention of and screening for secondary complications. The clinical considerations and recommendations presented are intended to be practical and relevant for all clinicians involved in the care of patients with oral cGVHD, with the ultimate goal of improving care and outcomes.

  5. GRAFT VERSUS HOST DISEASE- ORAL PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep P. S

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD is described as a potentially life-threatening complication caused by allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation. It is an exaggerated manifestation of a normal inflammatory mechanism in which donor lymphocytes encounter foreign antigens in an atmosphere that promote inflammation. 90% of the patients show oral features in case of cGVHD. Oral mucosal lesions and salivary gland dysfunction are the main oral features of chronic GVHD. Trismus or reduction of the mouth opening due to the perioral deposition of collagen is also commonly seen. Purpose of this review is to understand pathophysiology of oral presentations of GVHD. MATERIALS AND METHODS Review related to GVHD pathophysiology, oral lesions after haematopoietic cell transplant encompassed literature from 1966 through 2015. Review of Medline/PubMed Journals were done. RESULTS It is difficult to describe the pathophysiology of oral manifestations because there is no well accepted definition. CONCLUSION Larger well-designed clinical studies are needed to understand the pathobiology of oral cGVHD and determine best treatments for this disease.

  6. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    , nutrition and oral hygiene and use of tobacco and alcohol), and limited availability and accessibility of oral health services. Several oral diseases are linked to noncommunicable chronic diseases primarily because of common risk factors. Moreover, general diseases often have oral manifestations (e......This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly...... high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease, tooth loss, oral mucosal lesions and oropharyngeal cancers, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related oral...

  7. The prevention of neurogenetic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, R N; Iannaccone, S T

    1995-04-01

    A significant number of major neurogenetic diseases have been defined at the molecular level in recent years, making it possible to determine precisely the genotype for familial Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, Machado-Joseph disease, dominantly inherited ataxia, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, myotonic muscular dystrophy, Duchenne-Becker muscular dystrophy, familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and neurofibromatosis. This information has made it possible to identify the abnormal genotype of at-risk persons for these diseases and for at-risk pregnancies for several of them. Precise molecular diagnoses are thus possible using applied molecular markers. Prevention of disease can be achieved using these molecular markers with genetic counseling and appropriate family planning. Significant progress is being made in this regard with Tay-Sachs disease, Huntington's disease, the dominantly inherited ataxias, and the muscular dystrophies. Further, this molecular genotyping will be of indispensible value to families with these diseases when somatic cell gene therapy becomes available. The field of molecular neurogenetics is moving forward rapidly, and advances in gene identification for these diseases will lead in the near future to the means to prevent many of them.

  8. Salivary markers of oxidative stress in oral diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóthová, L'ubomíra; Kamodyová, Natália; Červenka, Tomáš; Celec, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Saliva is an interesting alternative diagnostic body fluid with several specific advantages over blood. These include non-invasive and easy collection and related possibility to do repeated sampling. One of the obstacles that hinders the wider use of saliva for diagnosis and monitoring of systemic diseases is its composition, which is affected by local oral status. However, this issue makes saliva very interesting for clinical biochemistry of oral diseases. Periodontitis, caries, oral precancerosis, and other local oral pathologies are associated with oxidative stress. Several markers of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage induced by reactive oxygen species can be measured in saliva. Clinical studies have shown an association with oral pathologies at least for some of the established salivary markers of oxidative stress. This association is currently limited to the population level and none of the widely used markers can be applied for individual diagnostics. Oxidative stress seems to be of local oral origin, but it is currently unclear whether it is caused by an overproduction of reactive oxygen species due to inflammation or by the lack of antioxidants. Interventional studies, both, in experimental animals as well as humans indicate that antioxidant treatment could prevent or slow-down the progress of periodontitis. This makes the potential clinical use of salivary markers of oxidative stress even more attractive. This review summarizes basic information on the most commonly used salivary markers of oxidative damage, antioxidant status, and carbonyl stress and the studies analyzing these markers in patients with caries or periodontitis. PMID:26539412

  9. Salivary markers of oxidative stress in oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubomíra eTóthová

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Saliva is an interesting alternative diagnostic body fluid with several specific advantages over blood. These include non-invasive and easy collection and related possibility to do repeated sampling. One of the obstacles that hinders the wider use of saliva for diagnosis and monitoring of systemic diseases is its composition, which is affected by local oral status. However, this issue makes saliva very interesting for clinical biochemistry of oral diseases. Periodontitis, caries, oral precancerosis and other local oral pathologies are associated with oxidative stress. Several markers of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage induced by reactive oxygen species can be measured in saliva. Clinical studies have shown an association with oral pathologies at least for some of the established salivary markers of oxidative stress. This association is currently limited to the population level and none of the widely used markers can be applied for individual diagnostics. Oxidative stress seems to be of local oral origin, but it is currently unclear whether it is caused by an overproduction of reactive oxygen species due to inflammation or by the lack of antioxidants. Interventional studies, both, in experimental animals as well as humans indicate that antioxidant treatment could prevent or slow-down the progress of periodontitis. This makes the potential clinical use of salivary markers of oxidative stress even more attractive. This review summarizes basic information on the most commonly used salivary markers of oxidative damage, antioxidant status and carbonyl stress and the studies analyzing these markers in patients with caries or periodontitis.

  10. Association of marijuana use with oral HPV infection and periodontitis among Hispanic adults: Implications for oral cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Ana P; González, Daisy; Ramos, Jeslie; Muñoz, Cristina; Reyes, Juan Carlos; Pérez, Cynthia M

    2018-02-22

    Despite limited data, research suggests that marijuana use is associated with oral HPV infection and periodontitis, two potential oropharyngeal cancer risk factors. We assessed these associations in a Hispanic adult population in Puerto Rico. A cross-sectional study of 735 adults assessed marijuana use, determined through an audio computer-assisted self-interview, and periodontitis and self-collection of oral HPV samples following the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey methodology. The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention/American Academy of Periodontology definition was used for periodontitis. HPV typing was performed using polymerase chain reaction with modified L1 consensus primers (MY09/MY11). 26.5% of adults reported lifetime use of marijuana, 2.7% were frequent users (lifetime use ≥ 26 times, past year use ≥ 6 times, and past 30-day use ≥2 times), 5.7% had oral HPV infection, and 20.1% had severe periodontitis. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that frequent marijuana users were more likely to have severe periodontitis (OR = 2.91, 95%CI = 1.06 - 7.96) than never/once lifetime users after adjusting for age, sex, healthcare coverage, smoking, binge drinking, number of oral sex partners, and oral HPV infection. However, frequent marijuana use was not associated with oral HPV infection. Marijuana use was associated with periodontitis, but not with oral HPV infection. Further evaluation of the role of marijuana use in oral HPV infection and periodontitis may inform novel preventive public health strategies, as marijuana users could be at increased risk of oral cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Salivaomics for oral diseases biomarkers detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasoulas, Jason; Patsouris, Efstratios; Giaginis, Constantinos; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2016-01-01

    The variation of saliva composition in different physiological and pathological states is well demonstrated. Several saliva constituents (enzymes, hormones, antibodies, cytokines etc.) are up- or down-regulated in respect to benign, premalignant and malignant conditions in the oral cavity, and several patterns of deregulation are associated with specific disorders. Omics technologies have contributed significantly in the identification of alterations in gene expression, transcription, protein coding and small molecules concentration, in biologic systems. In this aspect, salivaomics integrate these technologies in saliva analysis and represent a novel and holistic approach in oral disease management including diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring. This review summarizes the current research in the discovery of biomarkers and molecular signatures with diagnostic or prognostic utility for oral diseases in saliva. The review also focuses on the emerging issues of the salivaomics technology and saliva diagnostics and the translational potential.

  12. How a North Carolina program boosted preventive oral health services for low-income children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozier, R Gary; Stearns, Sally C; Pahel, Bhavna T; Quinonez, Rocio B; Park, Jeongyoung

    2010-12-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay), the most common chronic disease affecting young children, is exacerbated by limited access to preventive dental services for low-income children. To address this problem, North Carolina implemented a program to reimburse physicians for up to six preventive oral health visits for Medicaid-enrolled children younger than age three. Analysis of physician and dentist Medicaid claims from the period 2000-2006 shows that the program greatly increased preventive oral health services. By 2006 approximately 30 percent of well-child visits for children ages six months up to three years included these services. However, additional strategies are needed to ensure preventive oral health care for more low-income children.

  13. Oral infections and systemic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Andersen, Lone

    2003-01-01

    An association between periodontal infection and CVD has been revealed in some epidemiologic studies, whereas other studies were unable to demonstrate such an association. A link between the two diseases may be explained by shared established or nonestablished risk factors. Future studies with ex...

  14. Enzymes in therapy of biofilm-related oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleszczyńska, Małgorzata; Wiater, Adrian; Bachanek, Teresa; Szczodrak, Janusz

    2017-05-01

    Biofilm-related infections of the oral cavity, including dental caries and periodontitis, represent the most prevalent health problems. For years, the treatment thereof was largely based on antibacterial chemical agents. Recently, however, there has been growing interest in the application of more preventive and minimally invasive biotechnological methods. This review focuses on the potential applications of enzymes in the treatment and prevention of oral diseases. Dental plaque is a microbial community that develops on the tooth surface, embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances of bacterial and host origin. Both cariogenic microorganisms and the key components of oral biofilm matrix may be the targets of the enzymes. Oxidative salivary enzymes inhibit or limit the growth of oral pathogens, thereby supporting the natural host defense system; polysaccharide hydrolases (mutanases and dextranases) degrade important carbohydrate components of the biofilm matrix, whereas proteases disrupt bacterial adhesion to oral surfaces or affect cell-cell interactions. The efficiency of the enzymes in in vitro and in vivo studies, advantages and limitations, as well as future perspectives for improving the enzymatic strategy are discussed. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Prevention of diseases in Gynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebija Izetbegovic

    2013-01-01

    Results: There are five primary functions of management as: Anticipate and plan, organize, command, coordinate and control. If we introduce the following definition in the sense of medical science and apply it to the medical practice that would mean way of recognizing, managing and resolving issues of diagnosis and therapy of diseases (in this case gynecology diseases according to certain guidelines and treatment algorithms. Treatment of family doctors is an important aspect in the quality-of-life of women and their reproductive health as well as a significant issue in public, environmental and social problems. Conclusions: It is very important to deal with it on the primary care level and in addition to promote the primary and secondary prevention of diseases, which is sometimes more important than the curative procedures. The primary prevention involves regular gynecological examinations and screening. The doctors have also a duty to educate women about the risk factors for malignant diseases, as well as proposing some of the qualitative preventive measures.

  16. Colonic diverticular disease. Treatment and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargallo Puyuelo, Carla J; Sopeña, Federico; Lanas Arbeloa, Angel

    2015-12-01

    Diverticular disease represents the most common disease affecting the colon in the Western world. Most cases remain asymptomatic, but some others will have symptoms or develop complications. The aims of treatment in symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease are to prevent complications and reduce the frequency and intensity of symptoms. Fibre, probiotics, mesalazine, rifaximin and their combinations seem to be usually an effective therapy. In the uncomplicated diverticulitis, outpatient management is considered the optimal approach in the majority of patients, and oral antibiotics remain the mainstay of treatment. Admission to hospital and intravenous antibiotic are recommended only when the patient is unable to intake food orally, affected by severe comorbidity or does not improve. However, inpatient management and intravenous antibiotics are necessary in complicated diverticulitis. The role of surgery is also changing. Most diverticulitis-associated abscesses can be treated with antibiotics and/or percutaneous drainage and emergency surgery is considered only in patients with acute peritonitis. Finally, patient related factors, and not the number of recurrences, play the most important role in selecting recipients of elective surgery to avoid recurrences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  17. Interventions for preventing oral mucositis in patients with cancer receiving treatment: oral cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Philip; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Worthington, Helen V; Littlewood, Anne; Clarkson, Jan E; McCabe, Martin G

    2015-12-23

    Oral mucositis is a side effect of chemotherapy, head and neck radiotherapy, and targeted therapy, affecting over 75% of high risk patients. Ulceration can lead to severe pain and difficulty eating and drinking, which may necessitate opioid analgesics, hospitalisation and nasogastric or intravenous nutrition. These complications may lead to interruptions or alterations to cancer therapy, which may reduce survival. There is also a risk of death from sepsis if pathogens enter the ulcers of immunocompromised patients. Ulcerative oral mucositis can be costly to healthcare systems, yet there are few preventive interventions proven to be beneficial. Oral cryotherapy is a low-cost, simple intervention which is unlikely to cause side-effects. It has shown promise in clinical trials and warrants an up-to-date Cochrane review to assess and summarise the international evidence. To assess the effects of oral cryotherapy for preventing oral mucositis in patients with cancer who are receiving treatment. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 17 June 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 5), MEDLINE via Ovid (1946 to 17 June 2015), EMBASE via Ovid (1980 to 17 June 2015), CANCERLIT via PubMed (1950 to 17 June 2015) and CINAHL via EBSCO (1937 to 17 June 2015). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry, and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching databases. We included parallel-design randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of oral cryotherapy in patients with cancer receiving treatment. We used outcomes from a published core outcome set registered on the COMET website. Two review authors independently screened the results of electronic searches, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We contacted study authors for information

  18. Use of direct oral anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disease in patients with reduced renal function: a short review of the clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willett KC

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Kristine C Willett, Amanda M Morrill Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, MCPHS University, Manchester, NH, USA Background: The use of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs is restricted by the limitations of clinical trials guiding therapy for patients with renal impairment, as many of these trials excluded patients with severe renal impairment. There are currently four agents available: dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. The purpose of this review was to 1 describe current recommended dosing for each DOAC and published postmarketing data, including case reports, on the use of these agents in the renally impaired; and 2 discuss patient adherence and satisfaction and the cost of these agents. Materials and methods: A literature search was conducted using Medline and Embase with the terms “dabigatran” or “rivaroxaban” or “apixaban” or “edoxaban” and “renal impairment”. Clinical trials and case reports describing the use of DOAC therapy in patients with renal impairment were reviewed. A second search was conducted to find articles evaluating patient adherence, patient satisfaction, and pharmacoeconomics of DOACs. Results: There are a multitude of subgroup and post hoc analyses, as well as six case reports with dabigatran and one case report with apixaban, that provide insight for the clinical use of DOACs in patients with renal impairment. Dabigatran exhibits the greatest level of renal elimination, and there are data from clinical trials and several case reports that warrant reconsideration before use. Other DOACs may be a better option in patients with impaired renal function. Further, data from patient-adherence studies have suggested that DOACs that are dosed daily (rather than twice daily are optimal and preferred. There does not appear to be a cost difference between DOACs and warfarin therapy. Conclusion: DOAC therapy in patients with impaired renal function requires more critical review of

  19. Primary oral preventive practices: knowledge and practice among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Health and Biomedical Sciences. Journal Home ... Interdental cleaning was highly deficient with only 19% performing this procedure. The dental visiting ... Level of knowledge of common oral diseases such as periodontal disease was unsatisfactory among this group of students. It is recommended that ...

  20. Obesity Revised. Chapter at "Periodontal Disease: Symptoms, Treatment and Prevention"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cinar, Ayse Basak

    2011-01-01

    investment in urgent need. Diabetes and obesity, showing an increasing trend, lead to disabilities and negatively impacts on the quality of life through life course along with oral diseases. WHO projects that the prevalence of diabetes and deaths/year attrituble to diabetes complications will double......Abstract: Obesity, diabetes and oral diseases (dental cariesand periodontal diseases), largely preventable chronic diseases, are described as global pandemic due their distribution and severe consequences. WHO has called for a global action for prevention and promotion of these diseases as a vital...... worldwide by 2030. Globally, more than 1 billion adults are overweight; almost 300 million of them are clinically obese. Being obese/overweight raises steeply the likelihood of developing DM2. Approximately 85% of people with diabetes are DM2, and of these 90% are obese or overweight. Obesity increases...

  1. Natural ways to prevent and treat oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Danaraddi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is one of the usual causes of mortality all over the world, with a five-year survival rate of only 50%. Oral cancers are treated primarily by surgery with / without adjuvant radiotherapy and / or chemotherapy. However, there is significant post-treatment morbidity and mortality secondary to recurrences. Dietary supplements like fruits and vegetables are rich in phytochemicals and provide a variety of antioxidants like vitamin A, C, E. Spirulina, Selenium, Green tea (EGCG, Neem, Tomatoes (lycopene, Turmeric (curcumin, and some medicinal mushrooms are also used as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents. This overview emphasizes on natural therapies to fight against oral cancer. Thus, there are several natural compounds that can enhance the prevention of oral cancer.

  2. Oral and Dental Health in Children with Chronic Liver Disease in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... Background: It is important to be aware of oral and dental problems in the early period in children with chronic liver disease (CLD) to prevent late complications. Therefore, we aimed to analyze the oral and dental health status in children with. CLD. Methods: The three groups of children (3–18 years old); ...

  3. Oral chlorhexidine in the prevention of ventilator- associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oswell Khondowe, MSc (PT), MSc APA, BSc (PT), Dip PT (PhD candidate). Janet Bell, MCur, BCur, PGDN (PhD candidate). Division of Nursing, Stellenbosch University, Tygerberg, W Cape. Purpose. The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence on the effectiveness of oral chlorhexidine in the prevention of.

  4. Oral misoprostol in the prevention of uterine bleeding after surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-13

    Mar 13, 2013 ... Oral misoprostol in the prevention of uterine bleeding after surgical evacuation of first trimester abortion: A comparative study of three uterotonic agents. TM Aramide, AK Olusegun1, AC Akinfolarin2, DF Oriola. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, ...

  5. Oral chlorhexidine in the prevention of ventilator-associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose. The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence on the effectiveness of oral chlorhexidine in the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in critically ill adult mechanically ventilated patients in intensive care units (ICUs). Methodology. An extensive literature search of studies published in English ...

  6. Burden of Oral Disease Among Older Adults and Implications for Public Health Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Judith A.; Brunson, Diane; Griffin, Paul M.; Bailey, William D.

    2012-01-01

    Dental disease is largely preventable. Many older adults, however, experience poor oral health. National data for older adults show racial/ethnic and income disparities in untreated dental disease and oral health–related quality of life. Persons reporting poor versus good health also report lower oral health–related quality of life. On the basis of these findings, suggested public health priorities include better integrating oral health into medical care, implementing community programs to promote healthy behaviors and improve access to preventive services, developing a comprehensive strategy to address the oral health needs of the homebound and long-term-care residents, and assessing the feasibility of ensuring a safety net that covers preventive and basic restorative services to eliminate pain and infection. PMID:22390504

  7. Perceptions of Oral Health, Preventive Care, and Care-Seeking Behaviors Among Rural Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Virginia J.; Logan, Henrietta; Brown, Cameron D.; Calderon, Angela; Catalanotto, Frank

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND An asymmetrical oral disease burden is endured by certain population subgroups, particularly children and adolescents. Reducing oral health disparities requires understanding multiple oral health perspectives, including those of adolescents. This qualitative study explores oral health perceptions and dental care behaviors among rural adolescents. METHODS Semistructured individual interviews with 100 rural, minority, low socioeconomic status adolescents revealed their current perceptions of oral health and dental care access. Respondents age ranged from 12 to 18 years. The sample was 80% black and 52% male. RESULTS Perceived threat from dental disease was low. Adolescents perceived regular brushing and flossing as superseding the need for preventive care. Esthetic reasons were most often cited as reasons to seek dental care. Difficulties accessing dental care include finances, transportation, fear, issues with Medicaid coverage and parental responsibility. In general, adolescents and their parents are in need of information regarding the importance of preventive dental care. CONCLUSIONS Findings illuminate barriers to dental care faced by low-income rural adolescents and counter public perceptions of government-sponsored dental care programs as being “free” or without cost. The importance of improved oral health knowledge, better access to care, and school-based dental care is discussed. PMID:25388597

  8. Antimicrobial and Attractant Roles for Chemerin in the Oral Cavity during Inflammatory Gum Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Godlewska, Urszula; Brzoza, Piotr; Sroka, Aneta; Majewski, Pawel; Jentsch, Holger; Eckert, Martin; Eick, Sigrun; Potempa, Jan; Zabel, Brian A.; Cichy, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal inflammation is one of the most common chronic inflammatory conditions in humans. Despite recent advances in identifying and characterizing oral microbiota dysbiosis in the pathogenesis of gum disease, just how host factors maintain a healthy homeostatic oral microbial community or prevent the development of a pathogenic oral microbiota remains poorly understood. An important determinant of microbiota fate is local antimicrobial proteins. Here, we report that chemoattractant prote...

  9. Novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Dobreanu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess clinical practice in relation to stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF), particularly into the use of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prevention, among members of the EHRA electrophysiology (EP......) research network. In this EP Wire survey, we have provided some insights into current practice in Europe for the use of NOACs for stroke prevention in AF. There were clear practice differences evident, and also the need for greater adherence to the guidelines, especially since guideline adherent management...

  10. Oral potentially malignant disorders: Is malignant transformation predictable and preventable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waal, Isaäc

    2014-01-01

    Leukoplakia is the most common potentially malignant disorder of the oral mucosa. The prevalence is approximately 1% while the annual malignant transformation ranges from 2% to 3%. At present, there are no reliable clinicopathological or molecular predicting factors of malignant transformation that can be used in an individual patient and such event can not truly be prevented. Furthermore, follow-up programs are of questionable value in this respect. Cessation of smoking habits may result in regression or even disappearance of the leukoplakia and will diminish the risk of cancer development either at the site of the leukoplakia or elsewhere in the mouth or the upper aerodigestive tract. The debate on the allegedly potentially malignant character of oral lichen planus is going on already for several decades. At present, there is a tendency to accept its potentially malignant behaviour, the annual malignant transformation rate amounting less than 0.5%. As in leukoplakia, there are no reliable predicting factors of malignant transformation that can be used in an individual patient and such event can not truly be prevented either. Follow-up visits, e.g twice a year, may be of some value. It is probably beyond the scope of most dentists to manage patients with these lesions in their own office. Timely referral to a specialist seems most appropriate, indeed. Key words:Oral potentially malignant disorders, oral leukoplakia, oral lichen planus. PMID:24905952

  11. [Oral microbiota: a promising predictor of human oral and systemic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xu; Junzhi, He; Xuedong, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    A human oral microbiota is the ecological community of commensal, symbiotic, and pathogenic microorganisms found in human oral cavity. Oral microbiota exists mostly in the form of a biofilm and maintains a dynamic ecological equilibrium with the host body. However, the disturbance of this ecological balance inevitably causes oral infectious diseases, such as dental caries, apical periodontitis, periodontal diseases, pericoronitis, and craniofacial bone osteomyelitis. Oral microbiota is also correlated with many systemic diseases, including cancer, diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular diseases, and preterm birth. Hence, oral microbiota has been considered as a potential biomarker of human diseases. The "Human Microbiome Project" and other metagenomic projects worldwide have advanced our knowledge of the human oral microbiota. The integration of these metadata has been the frontier of oral microbiology to improve clinical translation. By reviewing recent progress on studies involving oral microbiota-related oral and systemic diseases, we aimed to propose the essential role of oral microbiota in the prediction of the onset, progression, and prognosis of oral and systemic diseases. An oral microbiota-based prediction model helps develop a new paradigm of personalized medicine and benefits the human health in the post-metagenomics era.

  12. The effect of preventive oral care on treatment outcomes of a cohort of oral cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Marilia Oliveira; Elias, Marcela Ramos Abrahão; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues; Dourado Pinezi, Juliana Castro; Mendonça, Elismauro Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess patient adherence to an oral preventive measures (OPM) protocol and its impact on cancer treatment outcomes. A retrospective cohort of oral cancer of 133 patients submitted to radiotherapy (RT) was selected, excluding those with metastasis. Patients were grouped according to their local tumor response after finishing RT (favorable or unfavorable) and adherence to an OPM (none, ≤6 months, and >6 months). OPM included education and counseling about adverse effects, elimination of infection foci, restorative procedures, fluoride therapy, oral rehydration, and maintenance and supervision of oral hygiene throughout treatment. Clinical and pathological characteristics were recorded, and patient outcomes (frequency of adverse effects, RT interruption, and overall survival) were analyzed. Patients with higher adherence to the OPM had greater occurrence of RT interruption as a consequence of symptoms (p = 0.01); however, these patients were more likely to complete the established RT protocol (p = 0.02). Overall survival (p = 0.01) was higher in the group with higher adherence. This study suggests that the implementation of oral preventive measures may contribute to improving the prognosis of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) treatment by reducing the negative impact of oral complications.

  13. The Oral Microbiome in Health and Its Implication in Oral and Systemic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio-Maia, B; Caldas, I M; Pereira, M L; Pérez-Mongiovi, D; Araujo, R

    2016-01-01

    The oral microbiome can alter the balance between health and disease, locally and systemically. Within the oral cavity, bacteria, archaea, fungi, protozoa, and viruses may all be found, each having a particular role, but strongly interacting with each other and with the host, in sickness or in health. A description on how colonization occurs and how the oral microbiome dynamically evolves throughout the host's life is given. In this chapter the authors also address oral and nonoral conditions in which oral microorganisms may play a role in the etiology and progression, presenting the up-to-date knowledge on oral dysbiosis as well as the known underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms involving oral microorganisms in each condition. In oral pathology, oral microorganisms are associated with several diseases, namely dental caries, periodontal diseases, endodontic infections, and also oral cancer. In systemic diseases, nonoral infections, adverse pregnancy outcomes, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes are among the most prevalent pathologies linked with oral cavity microorganisms. The knowledge on how colonization occurs, how oral microbiome coevolves with the host, and how oral microorganisms interact with each other may be a key factor to understand diseases etiology and progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Respiratory disease and the role of oral bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac S. Gomes-Filho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between oral health and systemic conditions, including the association between poor oral hygiene, periodontal disease, and respiratory disease, has been increasingly debated over recent decades. A considerable number of hypotheses have sought to explain the possible role of oral bacteria in the pathogenesis of respiratory diseases, and some clinical and epidemiological studies have found results favoring such an association. This review discusses the effect of oral bacteria on respiratory disease, briefly introduces the putative biological mechanisms involved, and the main factors that could contribute to this relationship. It also describes the role of oral care for individuals who are vulnerable to respiratory infections.

  15. New oral anticoagulants in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmar Vega, Lara; de Francisco, A L M; Bada da Silva, Jairo; Galván Espinoza, Luis; Fernández Fresnedo, Gema

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) develop bleeding and thrombotic tendencies, so the indication of anticoagulation at the onset of atrial fibrillation (AF) is complex. AF is the most common chronic cardiac arrhythmia, and thromboembolism and ischemic stroke in particular are major complications. In recent years, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed, and they have shown superiority over the classical AVK in preventing stroke, systemic embolism and bleeding risk, constituting an effective alternative to those resources. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Role and models for compensation of tobacco use prevention and cessation by oral health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crail, Jon; Lahtinen, Aira; Beck-Mannagetta, Johann; Benzian, Habib; Enmarks, Birgitta; Jenner, Tony; Knevel, Ron; Lulic, Martina; Wickholm, Seppo

    2010-02-01

    Appropriate compensation of tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) would give oral health professionals better incentives to provide TUPAC, which is considered part of their professional and ethical responsibility and improves quality of care. Barriers for compensation are that tobacco addiction is not recognised as a chronic disease but rather as a behavioural disorder or merely as a risk factor for other diseases. TUPAC-related compensation should be available to oral health professionals, be in appropriate relation to other dental therapeutic interventions and should not be funded from existing oral health care budgets alone. We recommend modifying existing treatment and billing codes or creating new codes for TUPAC. Furthermore, we suggest a four-staged model for TUPAC compensation. Stages 1 and 2 are basic care, stage 3 is intermediate care and stage 4 is advanced care. Proceeding from stage 1 to other stages may happen immediately or over many years. Stage 1: Identification and documentation of tobacco use is part of each patient's medical history and included into oral examination with no extra compensation. Stage 2: Brief intervention consists of a motivational interview and providing information about existing support. This stage should be coded/reimbursed as a short preventive intervention similar to other advice for oral care. Stage 3: Intermediate care consists of a motivational interview, assessment of tobacco dependency, informing about possible support and pharmacotherapy, if appropriate. This stage should be coded as preventive intervention similar to an oral hygiene instruction. Stage 4: Advanced care. Treatment codes should be created for advanced interventions by oral health professionals with adequate qualification. Interventions should follow established guidelines and use the most cost-effective approaches.

  17. Oral contraceptive use and the clinical course of Crohn's disease: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosnes, J; Carbonnel, F; Carrat, F; Beaugerie, L; Gendre, J P

    1999-08-01

    Women with Crohn's disease are usually advised not to take oral contraceptives, but, unlike smoking, there is no clear association between current oral contraceptive use and more severe disease. To assess the effect of oral contraceptive use on the clinical course of Crohn's disease. 331 women, aged 16-50 years, with Crohn's disease and Crohn's disease activity index oral contraceptive users or non-users and smokers or non-smokers. A prospective 12-18 month cohort study was used. The main outcome measures were flare up rate and time to flare up. In total, 134 women used oral contraceptives, in most cases low oestrogen formulations. During the study period, 61 oral contraceptive users (46%) developed a flare up, compared with 85 non-users (43%). The hazard ratio for oral contraceptive use was 1.11 (95% confidence interval 0.80 to 1.55). Variables associated with flare up were smoking status, recently active disease, baseline Crohn's disease activity index, and presence of anoperineal lesions. The same results were obtained when the analysis was restricted to patients eligible for a relapse prevention trial. Unlike smoking, oral contraceptives have no effect on Crohn's disease activity.

  18. Timetable for oral prevention in childhood-a current opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paddy

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries in young children remains a public health problem particularly for children whose families are socioeconomically deprived. A child's first dental visit should be at approximately 12 months of age and this should facilitate the provision of anticipatory guidance concerning oral health and dental development to the child's parents/guardians. Compliance with dietary advice is of key importance and motivational interviewing shows promise in relation to parents adopting good oral health practices for their children. Twice daily toothbrushing using toothpaste that contains in the range of 1000- 1500ppmF is a most important preventive measure. It is important to use a minimal amount of toothpaste, insure that it is not swallowed, have parental or adult supervision during toothbrushing and avoid rinsing with water following brushing with toothpaste. The professional application of topical fluoride varnish twice yearly is a proven caries preventative measure. The application of pit and fissure sealants to teeth with deep pits and fissures is recommended.

  19. Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention Updated:May 8, ... possibility of heart and coronary artery involvement makes Kawasaki disease unpredictable, but these problems usually are not ...

  20. Triphala in prevention of dental caries and as an antimicrobial in oral cavity- a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanbhag, Vagish K L

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is a widely prevalent infectious disease afflicting the humans worldwide. Each year oral infections such as dental caries, periodontal diseases and oral candidiasis significantly adds to the economic burden of the world. Though there are standard management techniques for these diseases; they do have side effects and are not cost effective. Ayurveda is a traditional Indian system of medicine that is being practiced in the Indian peninsula since ages. Among the various herbal medicines in ayurveda, triphala occupies a royal position due to its wide beneficial systemic actions. Triphala is a mixture of fruits of Terminalia bellirica, Terminalia chebula and Emblica officinalis. The antimicrobial actions of triphala are well documented in the literature. However availability of review articles regarding triphala as an antimicrobial against oral infections is limited. Need was felt to review this aspect of triphala. The present article reviews the use of triphala and its constituents in the prevention and control of dental caries and other common oral infections. Thorough review of the literature indicated that triphala can be effectively used to manage dental caries, gingival and periodontal diseases. Further it can also be utilized as a root canal irrigant and against oral candida species.

  1. Relationship between the oral cavity and cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carramolino-Cuéllar, Esther; Tomás, Inmaculada; Jiménez-Soriano, Yolanda

    2014-05-01

    The components of the human body are closely interdependent; as a result, disease conditions in some organs or components can influence the development of disease in other body locations. The effect of oral health upon health in general has been investigated for decades by many epidemiological studies. In this context, there appears to be a clear relationship between deficient oral hygiene and different systemic disorders such as cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. The precise relationship between them is the subject of ongoing research, and a variety of theories have been proposed, though most of them postulate the mediation of an inflammatory response. This association between the oral cavity and disease in general requires further study, and health professionals should be made aware of the importance of adopting measures destined to promote correct oral health. The present study conducts a Medline search with the purpose of offering an update on the relationship between oral diseases and cardiovascular diseases, together with an evaluation of the bidirectional relationship between metabolic syndrome and periodontal disease. Most authors effectively describe a moderate association between the oral cavity and cardiovascular diseases, though they also report a lack of scientific evidence that oral alterations constitute an independent cause of cardiovascular diseases, or that their adequate treatment can contribute to prevent such diseases. In the case of metabolic syndrome, obesity and particularly diabetes mellitus may be associated to an increased susceptibility to periodontitis. However, it is not clear whether periodontal treatment is able to improve the systemic conditions of these patients.

  2. Oral potentially malignant disorders: is malignant transformation predictable and preventable?

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Waal, Isaäc

    2014-01-01

    Leukoplakia is the most common potentially malignant disorder of the oral mucosa. The prevalence is approximately 1% while the annual malignant transformation ranges from 2% to 3%. At present, there are no reliable clinicopathological or molecular predicting factors of malignant transformation that can be used in an individual patient and such event can not truly be prevented. Furthermore, follow-up programs are of questionable value in this respect. Cessation of smoking habits may result in ...

  3. Common risk indicators for oral diseases and obesity in 12-year-olds: a South Pacific cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Tubert-Jeannin, Stéphanie; Pichot, Hélène; Rouchon, Bernard; Pereira, Bruno; Hennequin, Martine

    2018-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing need to prevent obesity and oral diseases in adolescents worldwide, few studies have investigated the link existing between these conditions and their common risk factors. This study aims to evaluate the oral health and weight status of New Caledonian Children (aged 6,9,12 years) and to identify, amongst 12-year-olds, risk indicators that may characterize the groups of children affected by oral diseases, obesity or both diseases. Methods This survey evaluated...

  4. Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment and Care Archive STD Risk and Oral Sex Other STDs Archive Life Stages and Populations Adolescents and Young Adults Adolescents and Technology Adolescents and STDs Fact Sheet Gay, Bisexual and Other MSM Gay Men & STDs Fact ...

  5. Smoking, the oral contraceptive pill, and Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, A J; Sawyerr, A M; Hudson, M; Dhillon, A P; Pounder, R E

    1991-08-01

    Both cigarette smoking and the oral contraceptive pill have been implicated as aggravating factors in Crohn's disease. Based upon the recent demonstration of multifocal gastrointestinal infarction in Crohn's disease, a possible pathogenic mechanism for this condition, we propose how smoking and the oral contraceptive pill may potentiate a tendency for focal thrombosis and hence exacerbate the activity of Crohn's disease.

  6. Chlorhexidine rinse for prevention of urethritis in men linked to oral sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolahi Jafar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral sex among teenagers is on the rise. Similarity between the oral flora and organisms recovered from nongonococcal urethritis and prostatitis, points to retrograde entry of bacteria from oral cavity into the urethra following insertive oral intercourse. Presentation of the hypothesis Chlorhexidine has a wide spectrum of anti-bactericidal activity encompassing gram positive and negative bacteria. It is also effective against HIV and HBV. It produced large and prolonged reductions in salivary bacterial counts within 7-h of its use. Hence, it would seem logic to postulate that rinsing with chlorhexidine before oral sex will be effective for prevention of retrograde entry of bacteria from oral cavity into the urethra. The recommendation for rinsing will be: 15 ml of a 0.12% or 10 ml of 0.2% chlorhexidine rinse for 30 seconds. Also other drug delivery systems such as chlorhexidine chewing gum or spray can be used. Testing the hypothesis Men suffering from recurrent nongonococcal urethritis or prostatitis are good subjects for testing the hypothesis. They perform genital safe sex via consistent use of condom. Yet they generally received unprotected insertive oral intercourse. Chlorhexidine can be used for prevention of recurrences of the disease. Implications of the hypothesis The chlorhexidine will be a new, easy, attractive and effective method for reduction of nongonococcal urethritis, prostatitis and epidydimitis following insertive oral intercourse. It is poorly absorbed from skin, mucosa and gastrointestinal tract indicating systemic safety of chlorhexidine. The agent does not cause any bacterial resistance and supra-infection.

  7. Oral Health Knowledge, Past Oral Health Behaviors, and Barriers to Preventive Oral Care of Head Start Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay remains the most common chronic disease of childhood. The CincySmiles Foundation (CSF) developed an instrument to evaluate Head Start parents' knowledge of oral health care practices and to identify barriers Head Start parents face when seeking dental treatment for their children. Data from Head Start parents (n = 675) across 3…

  8. Nigerian family physicians' knowledge of oral diseases and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Objective: Access to oral health care in most developing countries is poor and physicians may be in a better position to facilitate early detection and prompt referrals for oral diseases in such populations. The objective of this study was to assess the oral health knowledge of family physicians in Lagos, Nigeria and to ...

  9. [Periodontal disease and prevention in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Crousaz, P

    1975-01-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies have shown that: 1. Bacterial plaque which accumulates around the teeth is responsible for chronic periodontal inflammation. From adolescence on, this inflammation is almost universal. 2. Gingivitis prepares the periodontitis, which is characterized by a migration of the epithelial attachment, pocket formation and progressive bone loss. 3. Calculus is formed by plaque calcification. Its rough surface allows bacterial retention and proliferation in contact with the epithelial covering. 4. The mechanisms of host resistance to parasitic plaque are mostly unknown. This resistance is variable and seems to decrease with age. 5. Periodontal disease in children and adolescents is a real problem in preventive medicine, because of its immediate or remote consequences on tooth loss. Thanks to fluoride, the prevention of dental caries is quite effective; the prevention of periodontal disease is on the contrary much more difficult. Mechanical removal of plaque is tedious and must be done again and again; however, it is not logical to separate prevention of caries from that of periodontal disease. Information of the public at large on oral health is of utmost importance, as well as a good cooperation of the teachers in preventive programs for schoolchildren. Every health department or service should try to apply the following measures: -Permanent employments for "school dental nurses" should be created, on a part-time or full-time basis. They should take care of the organisation and supervision of oral health programs. -In each school dental service, a dentist should be responsible for teaching the theoretical and practical aspects of periodontal prevention. -Caries reduction obtained by fluorides is no excuse to reduce the "treatment staff". This staff should be devoted to prevention at large and to refreshing courses. In a young population with regular supervision, prevention of periodontal disease can meet with considerable success

  10. Usage of Probabilistic and General Regression Neural Network for Early Detection and Prevention of Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In India, the oral cancers are usually presented in advanced stage of malignancy. It is critical to ascertain the diagnosis in order to initiate most advantageous treatment of the suspicious lesions. The main hurdle in appropriate treatment and control of oral cancer is identification and risk assessment of early disease in the community in a cost-effective fashion. The objective of this research is to design a data mining model using probabilistic neural network and general regression neural network (PNN/GRNN for early detection and prevention of oral malignancy. The model is built using the oral cancer database which has 35 attributes and 1025 records. All the attributes pertaining to clinical symptoms and history are considered to classify malignant and non-malignant cases. Subsequently, the model attempts to predict particular type of cancer, its stage and extent with the help of attributes pertaining to symptoms, gross examination and investigations. Also, the model envisages anticipating the survivability of a patient on the basis of treatment and follow-up details. Finally, the performance of the PNN/GRNN model is compared with that of other classification models. The classification accuracy of PNN/GRNN model is 80% and hence is better for early detection and prevention of the oral cancer.

  11. Usage of Probabilistic and General Regression Neural Network for Early Detection and Prevention of Oral Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neha; Om, Hari

    2015-01-01

    In India, the oral cancers are usually presented in advanced stage of malignancy. It is critical to ascertain the diagnosis in order to initiate most advantageous treatment of the suspicious lesions. The main hurdle in appropriate treatment and control of oral cancer is identification and risk assessment of early disease in the community in a cost-effective fashion. The objective of this research is to design a data mining model using probabilistic neural network and general regression neural network (PNN/GRNN) for early detection and prevention of oral malignancy. The model is built using the oral cancer database which has 35 attributes and 1025 records. All the attributes pertaining to clinical symptoms and history are considered to classify malignant and non-malignant cases. Subsequently, the model attempts to predict particular type of cancer, its stage and extent with the help of attributes pertaining to symptoms, gross examination and investigations. Also, the model envisages anticipating the survivability of a patient on the basis of treatment and follow-up details. Finally, the performance of the PNN/GRNN model is compared with that of other classification models. The classification accuracy of PNN/GRNN model is 80% and hence is better for early detection and prevention of the oral cancer.

  12. Added Sugar Consumption and Chronic Oral Disease Burden among Adolescents in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, C D S; Ribeiro, M R C; Teixeira, J X P; Alves, C M C; Franco, M M; França, A K T C; Benatti, B B; Cunha-Cruz, J; Ribeiro, C C C

    2018-01-01

    Chronic oral diseases are rarely studied together, especially with an emphasis on their common risk factors. This study examined the association of added sugar consumption on "chronic oral disease burden" among adolescents, with consideration of obesity and systemic inflammation pathways through structural equation modeling. A cross-sectional study was conducted of a complex random sample of adolescent students enrolled at public schools in São Luís, Brazil ( n = 405). The outcome was chronic oral disease burden, a latent variable based on the presence of probing depth ≥4 mm, bleeding on probing, caries, and clinical consequences of untreated caries. The following hypotheses were tested: 1) caries and periodontal diseases among adolescents are correlated with each other; 2) added sugar consumption and obesity are associated with chronic oral disease burden; and 3) chronic oral disease burden is linked to systemic inflammation. Models were adjusted for socioeconomic status, added sugar consumption, oral hygiene behaviors, obesity, and serum levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6). All estimators of the latent variable chronic oral disease burden involved factor loadings ≥0.5 and P values oral disease burden values. Obesity was associated with high IL-6 levels (SC = 0.232, P = 0.001). Visible plaque index was correlated with chronic oral disease burden (SC = 0.381, P diseases are associated with each other and with added sugar consumption, obesity, and systemic inflammation reinforces the guidance of the World Health Organization that any approach intended to prevent noncommunicable diseases should be directed toward common risk factors.

  13. Prevention of Oral Candidiasis After Free Flap Surgery: Role of 3% Sodium Bicarbonate Saline in Oral Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Zhang, Fang; Lyu, Xin; Yan, Zhimin; Hua, Hong; Peng, Xin

    2017-03-01

    Relevant reports about oral candidiasis status and prevention measures after free flap surgery for the oral and maxillofacial region are limited. The present study explored oral candidiasis status after free flap surgery and its prevention through a prospective comparative study. One hundred four patients were randomized to a control group (n = 54) and an experimental group (n = 50). Compared with the control group, the experimental group was provided an additional 3% sodium bicarbonate saline solution for oral care after free flap surgery. The incidence of oral candidiasis was evaluated by objective examination (saliva culture and salivary pH measurement) and subjective evaluation (clinical signs of oral candidiasis) at admission and from postoperative days 1 to 14. The salivary pH values of the 2 groups were lower than the normal salivary pH, and postoperative salivary pH values were always lower than the active range of oral lysozymes in the control group. The salivary pH values of the experimental group were higher than those of the control group from postoperative days 6 to 14 (P oral candidiasis was 13.0% in the control group, which was higher than that in the experimental group (2.0%; P oral candidiasis. Oral candidiasis was common in patients after free flap reconstruction surgery, and the use of 3% sodium bicarbonate saline solution for oral care effectively prevented it. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Application CDC Legionella Healthy Swimming CDC Vessel Sanitation Program Unexplained Respiratory Disease Outbreaks (URDO) European Legionnaires’ Disease Surveillance Network (ELDSNet) Prevention Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  15. Prevention and Control of Dental Disease through Improved Access to Comprehensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Dental Association, Chicago, IL.

    Prevention of dental disease is the key to improving the nation's oral health. The American Dental Association (ADA) program of prevention and control of dental disease through improved access to comprehensive care concentrates on those who have special difficulties in receiving care: the poor, the elderly, the handicapped, the institutionalized…

  16. Prevalence of periodontal disease, its association with systemic diseases and prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Muhammad Ashraf

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are prevalent both in developed and developing countries and affect about 20-50% of global population. High prevalence of periodontal disease in adolescents, adults, and older individuals makes it a public health concern. Several risk factors such as smoking, poor oral hygiene, diabetes, medication, age, hereditary, and stress are related to periodontal diseases. Robust evidence shows the association of periodontal diseases with systemic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Periodontal disease is likely to cause 19% increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease, and this increase in relative risk reaches to 44% among individuals aged 65 years and over. Type 2 diabetic individuals with severe form of periodontal disease have 3.2 times greater mortality risk compared with individuals with no or mild periodontitis. Periodontal therapy has been shown to improve glycemic control in type 2 diabetic subjects. Periodontitis is related to maternal infection, preterm birth, low birth weight, and preeclampsia. Oral disease prevention strategies should be incorporated in chronic systemic disease preventive initiatives to curtail the burden of disease in populations. The reduction in the incidence and prevalence of periodontal disease can reduce its associated systemic diseases and can also minimize their financial impact on the health-care systems. It is hoped that medical, dental practitioners, and other health-care professionals will get familiar with perio-systemic link and risk factors, and need to refer to the specialized dental or periodontal care. PMID:28539867

  17. Prevalence of periodontal disease, its association with systemic diseases and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Muhammad Ashraf

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are prevalent both in developed and developing countries and affect about 20-50% of global population. High prevalence of periodontal disease in adolescents, adults, and older individuals makes it a public health concern. Several risk factors such as smoking, poor oral hygiene, diabetes, medication, age, hereditary, and stress are related to periodontal diseases. Robust evidence shows the association of periodontal diseases with systemic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Periodontal disease is likely to cause 19% increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease, and this increase in relative risk reaches to 44% among individuals aged 65 years and over. Type 2 diabetic individuals with severe form of periodontal disease have 3.2 times greater mortality risk compared with individuals with no or mild periodontitis. Periodontal therapy has been shown to improve glycemic control in type 2 diabetic subjects. Periodontitis is related to maternal infection, preterm birth, low birth weight, and preeclampsia. Oral disease prevention strategies should be incorporated in chronic systemic disease preventive initiatives to curtail the burden of disease in populations. The reduction in the incidence and prevalence of periodontal disease can reduce its associated systemic diseases and can also minimize their financial impact on the health-care systems. It is hoped that medical, dental practitioners, and other health-care professionals will get familiar with perio-systemic link and risk factors, and need to refer to the specialized dental or periodontal care.

  18. New oral anticoagulants in the prevention of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Jarząbek

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is associated with a few folds higher risk of stroke. Traditional vitamin K antagonists used in the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation are often not efficient enough due to their interactions with a broad range of substances including medicines or food ingridients and problems with monitoring the treatment. New oral anticoagulants pose an alternative for the vitamin K antagonists. They are equally efficient in the prevention of stroke, but are safer and have no requirement for routine coagulation monitoring. We present a case of a patient with atrial fibrillation, high risk of tromboembolism and recurring episodes of hemorrhages. Considering the possible complications, rivaroxaban was administered.

  19. Molecular Epidemiologic Source Tracking of Orally Transmitted Chagas Disease, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, Maikell; Martínez, Clara E.; Messenger, Louisa A.; Nessi, Anaibeth; Londoño, Juan C.; Espinosa, Raul; Martínez, Cinda; Alfredo, Mijares; Bonfante-Cabarcas, Rafael; Lewis, Michael D.; de Noya, Belkisyolé A.; Miles, Michael A.; Llewellyn, Martin S.

    2013-01-01

    Oral outbreaks of Chagas disease are increasingly reported in Latin America. The transitory presence of Trypanosoma cruzi parasites within contaminated foods, and the rapid consumption of those foods, precludes precise identification of outbreak origin. We report source attribution for 2 peri-urban oral outbreaks of Chagas disease in Venezuela via high resolution microsatellite typing. PMID:23768982

  20. Oral potentially malignant disorders: is malignant transformation predictable and preventable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waal, Isaäc

    2014-07-01

    Leukoplakia is the most common potentially malignant disorder of the oral mucosa. The prevalence is approximately 1% while the annual malignant transformation ranges from 2% to 3%. At present, there are no reliable clinicopathological or molecular predicting factors of malignant transformation that can be used in an individual patient and such event can not truly be prevented. Furthermore, follow-up programs are of questionable value in this respect. Cessation of smoking habits may result in regression or even disappearance of the leukoplakia and will diminish the risk of cancer development either at the site of the leukoplakia or elsewhere in the mouth or the upper aerodigestive tract. The debate on the allegedly potentially malignant character of oral lichen planus is going on already for several decades. At present, there is a tendency to accept its potentially malignant behaviour, the annual malignant transformation rate amounting less than 0.5%. As in leukoplakia, there are no reliable predicting factors of malignant transformation that can be used in an individual patient and such event can not truly be prevented either. Follow-up visits, e.g twice a year, may be of some value. It is probably beyond the scope of most dentists to manage patients with these lesions in their own office. Timely referral to a specialist seems most appropriate, indeed.

  1. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) About Ebola Questions & Answers 2014- ...

  2. Is Dental Implantation Indicated in Patients with Oral Mucosal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalogirou Eleni-Marina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Dental implants are a reliable treatment choice for rehabilitation of healthy patients as well as subjects with several systemic conditions. Patients with oral mucosal diseases often exhibit oral mucosal fragility and dryness, erosions, blisters, ulcers or microstomia that complicate the use of removable dentures and emphasize the need for dental implants. The aim of the current study is to review the pertinent literature regarding the dental implantation prospects for patients with oral mucosal diseases. Material and Method: The English literature was searched through PubMed and Google Scholar electronic databases with key words: dental implants, oral mucosal diseases, oral lichen planus (OLP, epidermolysis bullosa (EB, Sjögren’s syndrome (SS, cicatricial pemphigoid, bullous pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, scleroderma/systemic sclerosis, lupus erythematosus, leukoplakia, oral potentially malignant disorders, oral premalignant lesions, oral cancer and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. Results: Literature review revealed dental implantation in patients with OLP (14 articles, EB (11 articles, pemphigus vulgaris (1 article, SS (14 articles, systemic sclerosis (11 articles, systemic lupus erythematosus (3 articles and oral SCC development associated with leukoplakia (5 articles. No articles regarding dental implants in patients with pemphigoid or leukoplakia without SCC development were identified. Most articles were case-reports, while only a few retrospective, prospective or observational studies were identified. Conclusions: Dental implants represent an acceptable treatment option with a high success rate in patients with chronic mucocutaneous and autoimmune diseases with oral manifestations, such as OLP, SS, EB and systemic sclerosis. Patients with oral possibly malignant disorders should be closely monitored to rule out the development of periimplant malignancy. Further studies with long follow-up, clinical and radiographic

  3. oral

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chlorhexidine 0,2% gluconate is used as a mouth rinse and is an effective antibacterial agent. Its primary side- effects are staining of the teeth and the oral mucosa, particularly the dorsal surface of the tongue. However, this is transient. It has been shown to be effective as a prophylactic agent in preventing oral candidosis in ...

  4. ORAL MUCOSA LESIONS AND ORAL SYMPTOMS IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno LARANJEIRA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease is known for its extra intestinal manifestations, the oral cavity is no exception. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between Inflammatory Bowel Disease and oral mucosa lesions and symptoms, and complementary to evaluate their possible relation with oral hygiene, smoking habits, drug therapy, duration and activity of the disease. Methods Patients were selected from the Gastroenterology Clinic of a Portuguese tertiary referral hospital. This sample consisted of 113 patients previously diagnosed with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease along with a control group of 58 healthy individuals that were accompanying the study group patients to their appointments. Clinical interviews and clinical examinations were performed for data collection. Results The patients in the study group were more affected by oral symptoms (P=0.011, and showed a trend towards a higher incidence of oral mucosal lesions, even though statistical significance was not reached (8.8% versus 3.4% in the control group; P=0.159. Patients in active phase were the most affected. No differences were detected between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, or concerning smoking habits. The corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy seemed to increase the incidence of oral symptoms (P=0.052. The oral mucosa lesions increased and the oral symptoms decreased over the course of the disease, however without statistical significance. Conclusion Oral mucosa’s lesions and oral symptoms were positively associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease, mainly during disease activity periods and conceivably, associated with corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy.

  5. Immunopathogenic Oral Diseases: An Overview 
Focusing on Pemphigus Vulgaris and Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Liviu; Ballyram, Raoul; Khammissa, Razia Ag; Altini, Mario; Lemmer, Johan

    Pemphigus vulgaris, mucosal pemphigoid (mucous membrane pemphigoid), lichen planus, discoid lupus erythematosus and erythema multiforme are a group of immune-mediated mucocutaneous disorders characterised clinically by the formation of blisters, erosions or ulcers. The oral mucosa is often affected, and sometimes the disease is limited to the mouth. The target antigens, autoreactive immune responses, microscopic features, treatment and prognosis vary from one disease to the other. Treatment aims to eliminate exogenous risk factors, suppress the pathogenic immuno-inflammatory reactions, promote healing and prevent infection. The aim of this article is to provide the general dental practitioner with a succinct overview of the diagnostic, clinical, aetiopathogenic features and characteristics of, as well as treatment guidelines for oral pemphigus vulgaris and oral mucosal pemphigoid. Early diagnosis and treatment could prevent severe consequences of the disease in their full-blown forms.

  6. Preventive and clinical care provided to adolescents attending public oral health services New South Wales, Australia: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoe, Angela V; Blinkhorn, Anthony S; Taylor, Jane; Blinkhorn, Fiona A

    2014-11-28

    Dental Therapists and Oral Health Therapists (Therapists) working in the New South Wales (NSW) Public Oral Health Service are charged with providing clinical dental treatment including preventive care for all children under 18 years of age. Adolescents in particular are at risk of dental caries and periodontal disease which may be controlled through health education and clinical preventive interventions. However, there is a dearth of evidence about the type or the proportion of clinical time allocated to preventive care.The aim of this study is to record the proportion and type of preventive care and clinical treatment activities provided by Therapists to adolescents accessing the NSW Public Oral Health Service. Clinical dental activity data for adolescents was obtained from the NSW Health electronic Information System for Oral Health (ISOH) for the year 2011. Clinical activities of Therapists were examined in relation to the provision of different types of preventive care for adolescents by interrogating state-wide public oral health data stored on ISOH. Therapists were responsible for 79.7 percent of the preventive care and 83.0 percent of the restorative treatment offered to adolescents accessing Public Oral Health Services over the one year period. Preventive care provided by Therapists for adolescents varied across Local Health Districts ranging from 32.0 percent to 55.8 percent of their clinical activity. Therapists provided the majority of clinical care to adolescents accessing NSW Public Oral Health Services. The proportion of time spent undertaking prevention varied widely between Local Health Districts. The reasons for this variation require further investigation.

  7. The Prevalence of Oral Inflammation Among Denture Wearing Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyłowska, D; Rubinsztajn, R; Chazan, R; Swoboda-Kopeć, E; Kostrzewa-Janicka, J; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E

    2015-01-01

    Oral inflammation is an important contributor to the etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which can impact patient's health status. Previous studies indicate that people with poor oral health are at higher risk for nosocomial pneumonia. Denture wearing is one promoting factor in the development of mucosal infections. Colonization of the denture plaque by Gram-negative bacteria, Candida spp., or other respiratory pathogens, occurring locally, may be aspirated to the lungs. The studies showed that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients treated with combinations of medicines with corticosteroids more frequently suffer from Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Treatment of oral candidiasis in patients with COPD constitutes a therapeutic problem. Therefore, it is essential to pay attention to the condition of oral mucosal membrane and denture hygiene habits. The guidelines for care and maintenance of dentures for COPD patients are presented in this paper. The majority of patients required improvement of their prosthetic and oral hygiene. Standard oral hygiene procedures in relation to dentures, conducted for prophylaxis of stomatitis complicated by mucosal infection among immunocompromised patients, are essential to maintain healthy oral tissues. The elimination of traumatic denture action in dental office, compliance with oral and denture hygiene, proper use and storage of prosthetic appliances in a dry environment outside the oral cavity can reduce susceptibility to infection. Proper attention to hygiene, including brushing and rinsing the mouth, may also help prevent denture stomatitis in these patients.

  8. Resilience of the Oral Microbiota in Health: Mechanisms That Prevent Dysbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosier, B T; Marsh, P D; Mira, A

    2018-04-01

    Dental diseases are now viewed as a consequence of a deleterious shift in the balance of the normally stable resident oral microbiome. It is known that frequent carbohydrate consumption or reduced saliva flow can lead to caries, and excessive plaque accumulation increases the risk of periodontal diseases. However, when these "disease drivers" are present, while some individuals appear to be susceptible, others are more tolerant or resilient to suffering from undesirable changes in their oral microbiome. Health-maintaining mechanisms that limit the effect of disease drivers include the complex set of metabolic and functional interrelationships that develop within dental biofilms and between biofilms and the host. In contrast, "positive feedback loops" can develop within these microbial communities that disrupt resilience and provoke a large and abrupt change in function and structure of the ecosystem (a microbial "regime shift"), which promotes dysbiosis and oral disease. For instance, acidification due to carbohydrate fermentation or inflammation in response to accumulated plaque select for a cariogenic or periopathogenic microbiota, respectively, in a chain of self-reinforcing events. Conversely, in tolerant individuals, health-maintaining mechanisms, including negative feedback to the drivers, can maintain resilience and promote resistance to and recovery from disease drivers. Recently studied health-maintaining mechanisms include ammonia production, limiting a drop in pH that can lead to caries, and denitrification, which could inhibit several stages of disease-associated positive feedback loops. Omics studies comparing the microbiome of, and its interaction with, susceptible and tolerant hosts can detect markers of resilience. The neutralization or inhibition of disease drivers, together with the identification and promotion of health-promoting species and functions, for example, by pre- and probiotics, could enhance microbiome resilience and lead to new

  9. Apoptosis and Its Significance in Oral Diseases: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a well defined mode of cell death which plays an imperative role in the development, regulation, and maintenance of the cell populations in multicellular organisms. Apoptosis is implicated in both health and diseases. Errors in apoptotic mechanisms have been allied to a wide range of pathologies including oral diseases. This review presents an update focused on the role and significance of apoptosis in various oral diseases ranging from reactive to benign and malignant pathologies.

  10. Red fluorescent dental plaque: An indicator of oral disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volgenant, C.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Oral diseases are worldwide the most common diseases, with dental caries and periodontal inflammatory diseases as most frequently occurring diseases. Both are strongly associated with dental plaque, which is the mass of bacteria (biofilm) that grows on surfaces in the mouth. Some dental plaque

  11. Orofacial function and oral health in patients with Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, Merete; Larsen, Stine L; Lautrup, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    No comprehensive study has previously been published on orofacial function in patients with well-defined Parkinson's disease (PD). Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform an overall assessment of orofacial function and oral health in patients, and to compare the findings with matched......-matched controls. Orofacial function and oral health were assessed using the Nordic Orofacial Test, masticatory ability, performance and efficiency, oral stereognosis, jaw opening, jaw muscle tenderness, the Oral Health Impact Profile-49, number of natural teeth, and oral hygiene. Orofacial dysfunction was more...... prevalent, mastication and jaw opening poorer, and impact of oral health on daily life more negative, in patients with PD than in controls. The results indicate that mastication and orofacial function are impaired in moderate to advanced PD, and with progression of the disease both orofacial and dental...

  12. The Oral Microbiome of Children: Development, Disease, and Implications Beyond Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Andres; Nelson, Karen E

    2017-02-01

    In the era of applied meta-omics and personalized medicine, the oral microbiome is a valuable asset. From biomarker discovery to being a powerful source of therapeutic targets and to presenting an opportunity for developing non-invasive approaches to health care, it has become clear that oral microbes may hold the answer for understanding disease, even beyond the oral cavity. Although our understanding of oral microbiome diversity has come a long way in the past 50 years, there are still many areas that need to be fine-tuned for better risk assessment and diagnosis, especially in early developmental stages of human life. Here, we discuss the factors that impact development of the oral microbiome and explore oral markers of disease, with a focus on the early oral cavity. Our ultimate goal is to put different experimental and methodological views into perspective for better assessment of early oral and systemic disease at an early age and discuss how oral microbiomes-at the community level-could provide improved assessment in individuals and populations at risk.

  13. Perceptions of Oral Health, Preventive Care, and Care-Seeking Behaviors among Rural Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Virginia J.; Logan, Henrietta; Brown, Cameron D.; Calderon, Angela; Catalanotto, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background: An asymmetrical oral disease burden is endured by certain population subgroups, particularly children and adolescents. Reducing oral health disparities requires understanding multiple oral health perspectives, including those of adolescents. This qualitative study explores oral health perceptions and dental care behaviors among rural…

  14. Reduced Oral Microbial Diversity in Individuals Harbor Periodontal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghua Sun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bacteria colonize a variety of surfaces of the hu-man body. The bacterial diversity in the oral cavity is estimated to be more than 700 different species. The oral cavity is home to microbial communities, with important implications for human health and disease. Oral microbial flora is responsible for two major human infectious diseases of the oral cavity, dental caries and periodontal diseases. From the clinical samples, previously, using polymerase chain reaction-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE technique, we found a significantly greater diversity of oral microbes in caries-free individuals compared with caries-active individuals. The hypothesis: We hypothesize that a greater diversity of indigenous bacteria inhabits a healthy oral environment, and that a sig-nificant proportion of oral biota may be absent, suppressed, or replaced in a periodontal diseases environment. Evaluation of the hypothesis: The microbiota undergoes a transition from a commensal to a pathogenic relationship with the host due to factors that trigger a shift in the proportions of resident microorganisms. If our hypothesis is true, many techniques which were used to detect the oral bacterial diversity can be used in diagnosis and prognosis of periodontal diseases.

  15. Oral neutrophil transcriptome changes result in a pro-survival phenotype in periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakschevitz, Flavia S; Aboodi, Guy M; Glogauer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are inflammatory processes that occur following the influx of neutrophils into the periodontal tissues in response to the subgingival bacterial biofilm. Current literature suggests that while neutrophils are protective and prevent bacterial infections, they also appear to contribute to damage of the periodontal tissues. In the present study we compare the gene expression profile changes in neutrophils as they migrate from the circulation into the oral tissues in patients with chronic periodontits and matched healthy subjects. We hypothesized that oral neutrophils in periodontal disease patients will display a disease specific transcriptome that differs from the oral neutrophil of healthy subjects. Venous blood and oral rinse samples were obtained from healthy subjects and chronic periodontitis patients for neutrophil isolation. mRNA was isolated from the neutrophils, and gene expression microarray analysis was completed. Results were confirmed for specific genes of interest by qRT-PCR and Western Blot analysis. Chronic periodontitis patients presented with increased recruitment of neutrophils to the oral cavity. Gene expression analysis revealed differences in the expression levels of genes from several biological pathways. Using hierarchical clustering analysis, we found that the apoptosis network was significantly altered in patients with chronic inflammation in the oral cavity, with up-regulation of pro-survival members of the Bcl-2 family and down-regulation of pro-apoptosis members in the same compartment. Additional functional analysis confirmed that the percentages of viable neutrophils are significantly increased in the oral cavity of chronic periodontitis patients. Oral neutrophils from patients with periodontal disease displayed an altered transcriptome following migration into the oral tissues. This resulted in a pro-survival neutrophil phenotype in chronic periodontitis patients when compared with healthy subjects, resulting in a

  16. Quantifying oral inflammatory load: oral neutrophil counts in periodontal health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landzberg, M; Doering, H; Aboodi, G M; Tenenbaum, H C; Glogauer, M

    2015-06-01

    Neutrophils are the primary white blood cells that are recruited to fight the initial phases of microbial infections. While healthy norms have been determined for circulating blood neutrophil counts in order to identify patients with suspected systemic infections, the levels of oral neutrophils (oPMNs) in oral health and in the presence of periodontal diseases have not been described. It is important to address this deficiency in our knowledge as neutrophils are the primary immune cell present in the crevicular fluid and oral environment and previous work has suggested that they may be good indicators of overall oral inflammation and periodontal disease severity. The objective of this study was to measure oPMN counts obtained in a standardized oral rinse from healthy patients and from those with chronic periodontal disease in order to determine if oPMN levels have clinical relevance as markers of periodontal inflammation. A parallel goal of this investigation was to introduce the concept of 'oral inflammatory load', which constitutes the inflammatory burden experienced by the body as a consequence of oral inflammatory disease. Periodontal examinations of patients with a healthy periodontium and chronic periodontal disease were performed (n = 124). Two standardized consecutive saline rinses of 30 s each were collected before patient examination and instrumentation. Neutrophils were quantified in the rinse samples and correlated with the clinical parameters and periodontal diagnosis. Average oPMN counts were determined for healthy patients and for those with mild, moderate and severe chronic periodontal diseases. A statistically significant correlation was found between oPMN counts and deep periodontal probing, sites with bleeding on probing and overall severity of periodontal disease. oPMN counts obtained through a 30-s oral rinse are a good marker of oral inflammatory load and correlate with measures of periodontal disease severity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A

  17. Oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoo, Keitaro; Lane, Deirdre A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2014-09-01

    The availability of 4 non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs), that is, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, has changed the landscape of stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. This review article provides an overview of the 4 phase III studies that have compared these NOACs, examining major outcomes of efficacy and safety. A range of practical questions relating to the NOACs have emerged, including topics such as patient selection, treating patients with renal impairment, treating elderly patients, and combining anticoagulant therapy with antiplatelet drugs. We also address the interaction of various patient characteristics with the treatments and suggest the features can assist the physician in the choice of a particular NOAC for a particular patient(s). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Reliability of intra-oral camera using teledentistry in screening of oral diseases – Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyana Chakravarthy Pentapati

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion/recommendations: Intra-oral camera was shown to be a reliable tool to identify common oral diseases. Further studies involving applications like sealant retention, pre-malignant lesions, recurrent apthae, gingival recession and dental malocclusion and effectiveness in regular screening are needed.

  19. Factors that influence the preventive care offered to adolescents accessing Public Oral Health Services, NSW, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoe AV

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Angela V Masoe,1 Anthony S Blinkhorn,2 Jane Taylor,1 Fiona A Blinkhorn1 1School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Oral Health, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, NSW, Australia; 2Department of Population Oral Health, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW, Australia Background: Many adolescents are at risk of dental caries and periodontal disease, which may be controlled through health education and clinical preventive interventions provided by oral health and dental therapists (therapists. Senior clinicians (SCs can influence the focus of dental care in the New South Wales (NSW Public Oral Health Services as their role is to provide clinical support and advice to therapists, advocate for their communities, and inform Local Health District (LHD managers of areas for clinical quality improvement. The objective of this study was to record facilitating factors and strategies that are used by SCs to encourage therapists to provide preventive care and advice to adolescent patients. Methods: In-depth, semistructured interviews were undertaken with 16 SCs from all of the 15 NSW LHDs (nine rural and six metropolitan. A framework matrix was used to systematically code data and enable key themes to be identified for analysis. Results: All SCs from the 15 NSW Health LHDs participated in the study. Factors influencing SCs' ability to integrate preventive care into clinical practice were: 1 clinical leadership and administrative support, 2 professional support network, 3 clinical and educational resources, 4 the clinician's patient management aptitude, and 5 clinical governance processes. Clinical quality improvement and continuing professional development strategies equipped clinicians to manage and enhance adolescents' confidence toward self-care. Conclusion: This study shows that SCs have a clear understanding of strategies to enhance the therapist's offer of scientific-based preventive care to adolescents. The problem

  20. Cardiovascular disease and the role of oral bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Lien Do

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In terms of the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD the focus has traditionally been on dyslipidemia. Over the decades our understanding of the pathogenesis of CVD has increased, and infections, including those caused by oral bacteria, are more likely involved in CVD progression than previously thought. While many studies have now shown an association between periodontal disease and CVD, the mechanisms underpinning this relationship remain unclear. This review gives a brief overview of the host-bacterial interactions in periodontal disease and virulence factors of oral bacteria before discussing the proposed mechanisms by which oral bacterial may facilitate the progression of CVD.

  1. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy People healthfinder Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Spotlight: This Diabetes Month, Don’t Forget About the Importance of Exercise for People with Type 1 Diabetes In honor ...

  2. Adherence to oral anticoagulant therapy in secondary stroke prevention – impact of the novel oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Luger,1 Carina Hohmann,2 Daniela Niemann,1 Peter Kraft,3 Ignaz Gunreben,3 Tobias Neumann-Haefelin,2 Christoph Kleinschnitz,3 Helmuth Steinmetz,1 Christian Foerch,1 Waltraud Pfeilschifter1 1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, 2Department of Neurology, Klinikum Fulda gAG, Fulda, 3Department of Neurology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany Background: Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT potently prevents strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA have been the standard of care for long-term OAT for decades, but non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC have recently been approved for this indication, and raised many questions, among them their influence on medication adherence. We assessed adherence to VKA and NOAC in secondary stroke prevention. Methods: All patients treated from October 2011 to September 2012 for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack with a subsequent indication for OAT, at three academic hospitals were entered into a prospective registry, and baseline data and antithrombotic treatment at discharge were recorded. At the 1-year follow-up, we assessed the adherence to different OAT strategies and patients’ adherence to their respective OAT. We noted OAT changes, reasons to change treatment, and factors that influence persistence to the prescribed OAT. Results: In patients discharged on OAT, we achieved a fatality corrected response rate of 73.3% (n=209. A total of 92% of these patients received OAT at the 1-year follow-up. We observed good adherence to both VKA and NOAC (VKA, 80.9%; NOAC, 74.8%; P=0.243 with a statistically nonsignificant tendency toward a weaker adherence to dabigatran. Disability at 1-year follow-up was an independent predictor of lower adherence to any OAT after multivariate analysis, whereas the choice of OAT did not have a relevant influence. Conclusion: One-year adherence to OAT after stroke is strong (>90% and patients

  3. Oral contraceptive use and cigarette smoking in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katschinski, B; Fingerle, D; Scherbaum, B; Goebell, H

    1993-09-01

    Previous studies have consistently found strong positive associations between smoking and Crohn's disease. The association between oral contraceptive use and Crohn's disease remains, however, controversial. In order to analyze whether smoking and oral contraceptive use are independent risk factors, a case-control study was performed. In 90 women with Crohn's disease and 90 community controls information was assessed about their smoking habits and their use of oral contraceptives. Smoking and oral contraceptive use were associated with one another. After adjusting for oral contraceptive use, the relative risk for smokers compared with nonsmokers was 3.0 (1.3-6.8). After controlling for smoking, the relative risk estimates for oral contraceptive use were for no use, 1-3 years, and > 3 years of use 1.0, 2.5 (1.0-6.6), and 4.3 (1.3-14.4), respectively. When oral contraceptive use was stratified by smoking habits, the data show that oral contraceptives only increased the risk for Crohn's disease in nonsmokers. From the lack of increase in risk for combined exposure, it is concluded that both factors might act through a common mechanism.

  4. Periodontal Disease and Oral Hygiene Among Children. United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    Statistical data presented on periodontal disease and oral hygiene among noninstitutionalized children, aged 6-11, in the United States are based on a probability sample of approximately 7,400 children involved in a national health survey during 1963-65. The report contains estimates of the Periodontal Index (PI) and the Simplified Oral Hygiene…

  5. Oral disease in adults treated with hemodialysis: prevalence, predictors, and association with mortality and adverse cardiovascular events: the rationale and design of the ORAL Diseases in hemodialysis (ORAL-D) study, a prospective, multinational, longitudinal, observational, cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strippoli, Giovanni F M; Palmer, Suetonia C; Ruospo, Marinella; Natale, Patrizia; Saglimbene, Valeria; Craig, Jonathan C; Pellegrini, Fabio; Petruzzi, Massimo; De Benedittis, Michele; Ford, Pauline; Johnson, David W; Celia, Eduardo; Gelfman, Ruben; Leal, Miguel R; Torok, Marietta; Stroumza, Paul; Bednarek-Skublewska, Anna; Dulawa, Jan; Frantzen, Luc; Ferrari, Juan Nin; del Castillo, Domingo; Hegbrant, Jorgen; Wollheim, Charlotta; Gargano, Letitzia

    2013-04-19

    People with end-stage kidney disease treated with dialysis experience high rates of premature death that are at least 30-fold that of the general population, and have markedly impaired quality of life. Despite this, interventions that lower risk factors for mortality (including antiplatelet agents, epoetins, lipid lowering, vitamin D compounds, or dialysis dose) have not been shown to improve clinical outcomes for this population. Although mortality outcomes may be improving overall, additional modifiable determinants of health in people treated with dialysis need to be identified and evaluated. Oral disease is highly prevalent in the general population and represents a potential and preventable cause of poor health in dialysis patients. Oral disease may be increased in patients treated with dialysis due to their lower uptake of public dental services, as well as increased malnutrition and inflammation, although available exploratory data are limited by small sample sizes and few studies evaluating links between oral health and clinical outcomes for this group, including mortality and cardiovascular disease. Recent data suggest periodontitis may be associated with mortality in dialysis patients and well-designed, larger studies are now required. The ORAL Diseases in hemodialysis (ORAL-D) study is a multinational, prospective (minimum follow-up 12 months) study. Participants comprise consecutive adults treated with long-term in-center hemodialysis. Between July 2010 and February 2012, we recruited 4500 dialysis patients from randomly selected outpatient dialysis clinics in Europe within a collaborative network of dialysis clinics administered by a dialysis provider, Diaverum, in Europe (France, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Portugal, and Spain) and South America (Argentina). At baseline, dental surgeons with training in periodontology systematically assessed the prevalence and characteristics of oral disease (dental, periodontal, mucosal, and salivary) in all participants

  6. Prevention and Conservative Therapy of Diverticular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Elena; Leifeld, Ludger

    2015-04-01

    Diverticular disease is a common problem. Prevention and treatment of complications depend on the stage of the disease. Lifestyle modifications are suitable preventive measures, aiming to reduce obesity and to balance the diet with a high amount of fiber and a low amount of meat. However, evidence to guide the pharmacological treatment of diverticular disease and diverticulitis is limited. Literature review. Antibiotics are not proven to be effective in patients with uncomplicated diverticulitis and without further risk factors; neither do they improve treatment nor prevent complications. Mesalazine might have an effect on pain relief in diverticular disease even though it has no significant effect on the outcome of diverticulitis. In complicated diverticulitis, inpatient treatment including antibiotics is mandatory. Evidence for the treatment of diverticular disease is limited. Further research is needed.

  7. Colonic Crohn's disease and use of oral contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, J M; Cockel, R; Allan, R N; Hawker, P C; Dawson, J; Elias, E

    1984-02-25

    The prevalence of use of oral contraception before the onset of disease was established in 100 consecutive women attending follow up clinics for inflammatory bowel disease. A significant excess of women with Crohn's disease confined to the colon had taken oral contraceptives in the year before developing symptoms (10/16 (63%] compared with women with small-intestinal Crohn's disease (12/49 (24%); p less than 0.02) and women with ulcerative colitis (3/35 (9%); p less than 0.0005). When the patient groups were matched for age and year of onset of disease usage of oral contraception before the onset of disease was still more common among women with isolated colonic Crohn's disease (9/12, 75%) than among those with ulcerative colitis (2/12 (17%); p less than 0.02) and was also more common than would be expected from reported figures for oral contraception in England and Wales (31.4% of women aged under 41; p less than 0.005). A survey of current patient records showed that isolated colonic disease was at least twice as common among women with Crohn's disease (63/218, 29%) compared with men (25/181, 14%; p less than 0.001). These data support the suggestion made previously that oral contraceptives may predispose to a colitis that resembles colonic Crohn's disease.

  8. Epidemiology of oral HPV in the oral mucosa in women without signs of oral disease from Yucatan, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Refugio Gonzalez-Losa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV are considered necessary for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, there is no doubt that some types of oral squamous cell carcinoma are associated with HR-HPV. The epidemiology of oral HPV infections in healthy subjects remains unclear due to a lack of knowledge. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of human papillomavirus infections of the oral mucosa without pathology. A cross-sectional study was performed; samples from 390 women seeking prenatal care, Pap smears, family planning or gynecological diseases were studied. Oral cells were collected by direct swab sampling. Information regarding sociodemographic status, sexual behavior, infectious diseases, contraceptive history and tobacco and alcohol consumption were obtained through direct interviews. HPV and genotypes were detected by type-specific polymerase chain reaction. Our results revealed that 14% of the women studied had an oral HPV infection. Women ≤ 20 years of age had the highest HPV prevalence (24.5%. In total, seven genotypes were identified, including the high-risk genotypes 16, 18, 58 and 59 and the low-risk genotypes 6, 81 and 13, the latter of which is a type exclusive to oral mucosa. Sexual behavior was not associated with the presence of genital HPV types in the oral mucosa. Genital HPV types were present in the oral mucosa of women without associated clinical manifestations; however, sexual behavior was not associated with infection, and therefore others routes of transmission should be explored.

  9. Prevention of HPV-related oral cancer: assessing dentists' readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, E; Dodd, V; DeBate, R; Vamos, C; Wheldon, C; Kline, N; Smith, S; Chandler, R; Dyer, K; Helmy, H; Driscoll, A

    2014-03-01

    Epidemiological research indicates an association between the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) with a subset of oral cancers (OC). Dentists may play a role in primary prevention of HPV-related OC by discussing the HPV vaccine with patients. This study assessed dentists' readiness to discuss the HPV vaccine with female patients. Cross-sectional web-based survey. A web-based survey based on the Transtheoretical Model was administered among Florida dentists (n = 210). The majority of participants (97%) fell into the precontemplation and contemplation stages of readiness to discuss the HPV vaccine with patients. Perceived role and liability were determined to be predictive of dentists in contemplation stage as opposed to those in precontemplation (P HPV-related OC despite high levels of knowledge. As public awareness of HPV-related OC increases, dentists may become more involved in primary prevention. Results of the current study may assist in developing intervention strategies for engaging dentists in discussing the HPV vaccine with patients. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Oral diseases and socio-economic status (SES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobdell, M H; Oliveira, E R; Bautista, R; Myburgh, N G; Lalloo, R; Narendran, S; Johnson, N W

    2003-01-25

    To determine the association between social, economic and behavioural risk factors and national prevalences of: oral cancer, dental caries (12-year-olds) and destructive periodontal disease (35-44-year-olds). Sources for the social and economic parameters were the UN Development Program; the behavioural risk factors' source was the World Health Organization, the UN Food and Agricultural Organization and the World Atlas of History. Oral diseases data came from UICC Globocan and the World Health Organization databases. Data were extracted by hand from official publications. Data were synthesized and analyzed in sequence using SPSS, Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple regression analyses. There is a discernable association between the three oral diseases and the variables selected, which varies in strength, being strongest for chronic destructive periodontitis and weakest for oral cancer. Dental caries lies in between. The degree to which variables account for differences in the three oral diseases between the countries studied is striking, being insignificant for oral cancer incidence, modest for oral cancer mortality, stronger for dental caries and strongest for destructive periodontal disease. Removing variables with strong co-linearity with the Human Development Index has little effect on the regression coefficients.

  11. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients

    OpenAIRE

    A Gupta; A Gupta; T K Singh; A Saxsena

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP.

  12. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP.

  13. Role of oral care to prevent VAP in mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Gupta, A; Singh, T K; Saxsena, A

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection in Intensive Care Unit. One major factor causing VAP is the aspiration of oral colonization because of poor oral care practices. We feel the role of simple measure like oral care is neglected, despite the ample evidence of it being instrumental in preventing VAP.

  14. Determinants of preventive oral health behaviour among senior dental students in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Folayan, Morenike O; Khami, Mohammad R; Folaranmi, Nkiru; Popoola, Bamidele O; Sofola, Oyinkan O; Ligali, Taofeek O; Esan, Ayodeji O; Orenuga, Omolola O

    2013-01-01

    Background To study the association between oral health behaviour of senior dental students in Nigeria and their gender, age, knowledge of preventive care, and attitudes towards preventive dentistry. Methods Questionnaires were administered to 179 senior dental students in the six dental schools in Nigeria. The questionnaire obtained information on age, gender, oral self-care, knowledge of preventive dental care and attitudes towards preventive dentistry. Attending a dental clinic for check-u...

  15. Does prevention for Alzheimer's disease exist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Dozzi Brucki

    Full Text Available Abstract The prevention of Alzheimer's disease is a growing public health concern amidst an ageing population. Meanwhile, there is no effective or curative treatment available where prevention could greatly reduce health costs. This review was based on reports of potential preventive factors, including modifiable lifestyle factors, as well as preventive pharmacological strategies. Although the present review was not systematic, the reports selected from PubMed using "Alzheimer's disease" and "prevention" as key-words, allow us to affirm that pursuing a healthy lifestyle; physical, cognitive, leisure activities; good social engagement; a high consumption of fish, low consumption of dietary fat and moderate consumption of wine, and control of vascular risk factors appear to be potential factors for delaying dementia.

  16. An oral ulceration associated with Morgellons disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskopf, Courtney; Desai, Bhavik; Stoopler, Eric T

    2011-08-01

    Morgellons disease is a psycho-dermatologic condition in which patients report fibers or filaments "growing" out of their skin. This case report highlights an oral ulceration in a young woman associated with Morgellons disease, a condition that has not been previously described in the dental literature. An increasing number of individuals are self-reporting this condition and oral health care providers must be familiar with this disorder. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dental and Oral Considerations in Pediatric Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Sara; Karlin, Ellen; Meiller, Timothy; Bashirelahi, Nasir

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is the world's most common genetic food intolerance disorder. Children with celiac disease cannot tolerate gluten, a storage protein in wheat, rye, and barley. The first recognizable symptom in children is often an oral manifestation, rather than the typical gastrointestinal symptoms. The purpose of this paper is to review the oral and dental manifestations of CD to help pediatric dentists identify and refer atypically symptomatic patients to their pediatricians.

  18. The efficacy of sucralfate suspension in the prevention of oral mucositis due to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, J.B.; Wong, F.L.W.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of sucralfate suspension in prevention of oral mucositis and for reduction of oral pain in patients who develop mucositis during radiation therapy. The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized prospective trial of a sucralfate suspension in the prevention and management of oral mucositis during radiation therapy. Oral mucositis was assessed using a quantitative scale and symptoms were assessed using visual analogue scales. The statistical model was developed to detect a 40% reduction in mucositis. No statistically significant reduction in mucositis was seen. Early during radiation therapy less oral pain was reported in the sucralfate group, but as treatment progressed all patients experienced pain. Patients in the sucralfate group were prescribed topical and systemic analgesics later in the course of radiation therapy. Prophylactic oral rinsing with sucralfate did not prevent oral ulcerative mucositis. Sucralfate may reduce the experience of pain during radiation therapy. 32 refs., 3 tabs

  19. Consensus Report: 2nd European Workshop on Tobacco Use Prevention and Cessation for Oral Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseier, Christoph A; Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Needleman, Ian G; Gallagher, Jennifer E; Lahtinen, Aira; Ainamo, Anja; Alajbeg, Ivan; Albert, David; Al-Hazmi, Nadia; Antohé, Magda Ecaterina; Beck-Mannagetta, Johann; Benzian, Habib; Bergström, Jan; Binnie, Viv; Bornstein, Michael; Büchler, Silvia; Carr, Alan; Carrassi, Antonio; Casals Peidró, Elias; Chapple, Ian; Compton, Sharon; Crail, Jon; Crews, Karen; Davis, Joan Mary; Dietrich, Thomas; Enmark, Birgitta; Fine, Jared; Gallagher, Jennifer; Jenner, Tony; Forna, Doriana; Fundak, Angela; Gyenes, Monika; Hovius, Marjolijn; Jacobs, Annelies; Kinnunen, Taru; Knevel, Ron; Koerber, Anne; Labella, Roberto; Lulic, Martina; Mattheos, Nikos; McEwen, Andy; Ohrn, Kerstin; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Preshaw, Philip; Radley, Nicki; Rosseel, Josine; Schoonheim-Klein, Meta; Suvan, Jean; Ulbricht, Sabina; Verstappen, Petra; Walter, Clemens; Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Wennström, Jan; Wickholm, Seppo; Zoitopoulos, Liana

    2010-02-01

    Tobacco use has been identified as a major risk factor for oral disorders such as cancer and periodontal disease. Tobacco use cessation (TUC) is associated with the potential for reversal of precancer, enhanced outcomes following periodontal treatment, and better periodontal status compared to patients who continue to smoke. Consequently, helping tobacco users to quit has become a part of both the responsibility of oral health professionals and the general practice of dentistry. TUC should consist of behavioural support, and if accompanied by pharmacotherapy, is more likely to be successful. It is widely accepted that appropriate compensation of TUC counselling would give oral health professionals greater incentives to provide these measures. Therefore, TUC-related compensation should be made accessible to all dental professionals and be in appropriate relation to other therapeutic interventions. International and national associations for oral health professionals are urged to act as advocates to promote population, community and individual initiatives in support of tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) counselling, including integration in undergraduate and graduate dental curricula. In order to facilitate the adoption of TUPAC strategies by oral health professionals, we propose a level of care model which includes 1) basic care: brief interventions for all patients in the dental practice to identify tobacco users, assess readiness to quit, and request permission to re-address at a subsequent visit, 2) intermediate care: interventions consisting of (brief) motivational interviewing sessions to build on readiness to quit, enlist resources to support change, and to include cessation medications, and 3) advanced care: intensive interventions to develop a detailed quit plan including the use of suitable pharmacotherapy. To ensure that the delivery of effective TUC becomes part of standard care, continuing education courses and updates should be implemented and

  20. Greater access to information on how to prevent oral cancer among elderly using primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; dos Santos-Neto, Pedro Eleutério; de Sá, Maria Aparecida Barbosa; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Haikal, Desireé Sant'Ana; Ferreira e Ferreira, Efigenia; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida

    2015-07-01

    Educative actions are an important component of health promotion in Brazil's primary healthcare program, the Family Health Strategy (FHS). The efficacy of these actions is evidenced by compliance with healthy behaviors and in the reduction of rates of mortality and morbidity. The objective of this study was to identify whether access to information regarding the prevention of oral cancer is greater among elders whose residences are registered with the FHS. SPSS® was utilized to obtain estimates that were corrected for sample design, considering the magnitude of the associations between access to such information with personal determinants, the use and cost of healthcare, health-related behaviors and health outcomes. 58.9% of the 492 participating elders reported having access to such information. We verified that there was a greater chance for access among residents of houses registered by the FHS; those with greater per capita income (2.01/1.183.43); non-smokers (2.00/1.16-3.46); those that realized oral self-examination (6.35/3.46-11.64); and those that did not perceive discomfort in the mouth, head or neck (2.06/1.02-4.17). Access was greater among residents of homes registered by the FHS. Personal determinants of health, health-related behaviors and health outcomes are influenced or influence access to information regarding the prevention and management of oral diseases.

  1. Prevention of Infectious Mastitis by Oral Administration of Lactobacillus salivarius PS2 During Late Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Leónides; Cárdenas, Nivia; Arroyo, Rebeca; Manzano, Susana; Jiménez, Esther; Martín, Virginia; Rodríguez, Juan Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that oral administration of lactobacilli can be an efficient approach to treat lactational infectious mastitis. In this trial, we have evaluated the potential of Lactobacillus salivarius PS2 to prevent this condition when orally administered during late pregnancy to women who had experienced infectious mastitis after previous pregnancies. In this study, 108 pregnant women were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups. Those in the probiotic group (n = 55) ingested daily 9 log10 colony-forming units of L. salivarius PS2 from approximately week 30 of pregnancy until delivery, whereas those in the placebo group (n = 53) received a placebo. The occurrence of mastitis was evaluated during the first 3 months after delivery. Globally, 44 of 108 women (41%) developed mastitis; however, the percentage of women with mastitis in the probiotic group (25% [n = 14]) was significantly lower than in the control group (57% [n = 30]). When mastitis occurred, the milk bacterial counts in the probiotic group were significantly lower than those obtained in the placebo group. Oral administration of L. salivarius PS2 during late pregnancy appears to be an efficient method to prevent infectious mastitis in a susceptible population. NCT01505361. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Diet, nutrition and the prevention of dental diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moynihan, Paula; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2004-01-01

    Oral health is related to diet in many ways, for example, nutritional influences on craniofacial development, oral cancer and oral infectious diseases. Dental diseases impact considerably on self-esteem and quality of life and are expensive to treat. The objective of this paper is to review...

  3. Possible neuroimmunomodulation therapy in T-cell-mediated oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Sato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and oral lichen planus are local chronic inflammatory diseases which are implicated in T cell-mediated immunity. According to the systematic review, there is insufficient evidence to support any specific treatment for T-cell mediated oral diseases. The hypothesis: In this paper, we propose a hypothesis that recurrent aphthous stomatitis and oral lichen planus can be treated with selective α7 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 -nAChR agonists. Our hypothesis is supported by the following two facts. First, the pathophysiological conditions, T h 1/T h 17 cell activation and autonomic nervous system dysfunction, are observed in T-cell mediated oral diseases as well as in T-cell mediated systemic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Second, the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is inhibited in systemic T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory diseases. On the other hand, treatment with α7 -nAChR agonists which activate the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway suppresses neuroinflammation via inhibition of T h 1/T h 17 responses in animal model of systemic T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory diseases. We thus expect that selective α7 -nAChR agonists will be effective for the treatment of T-cell mediated oral diseases. Evaluation of the hypothesis: To test our hypothesis, we need to develop in vivo mouse model of T-cell mediated oral diseases. To evaluate the therapeutic effect of a selective α7 -nAChR agonist, we choose ABT-107 because of its safety and tolerability. We believe that the selective α7 -nAChR agonist, especially ABT-107, may be a therapeutic drug to treat T-cell mediated oral diseases.

  4. Educação e motivação em saúde bucal: prevenindo doenças e promovendo saúde em pacientes sob tratamento ortodôntico Education and motivation in oral health: preventing disease and promoting health in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Ariede Petinuci Bardal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇãO: os cirurgiões-dentistas têm a responsabilidade de prevenir doenças, minimizar riscos e promover saúde. Os pacientes também precisam ser despertados sobre o seu papel nos cuidados com a saúde bucal. No caso de pacientes em tratamento ortodôntico, é particularmente difícil manter uma higiene bucal satisfatória devido à presença de bandas, fios e ligaduras. Torna-se, então, indispensável a instituição de métodos preventivos de motivação e orientação para o controle mecânico da placa dentária. OBJETIVO: verificar os efeitos de ações educativas, preventivas e motivacionais sobre a saúde bucal de pacientes em tratamento ortodôntico fixo. MéTODOS: os participantes receberam gratuitamente dentifrício e escova dental durante todo o estudo e instruções sobre higiene bucal foram fornecidas e reforçadas no decorrer dos 6 meses da pesquisa. Foram realizados exames clínicos baseline e após 6, 12 e 24 semanas, para verificação dos índices de Placa, Gengival e Sangramento. RESULTADOS: as condições de saúde bucal dos participantes, que inicialmente eram insatisfatórias, melhoraram significativamente no decorrer do estudo, considerando-se todos os índices. As ações preventivas, educativas e motivacionais realizadas foram estatisticamente eficazes na melhora da saúde bucal dos pacientes ortodônticos. CONCLUSõES: a promoção de saúde e a prevenção de doenças devem fazer parte do atendimento que os ortodontistas direcionam aos seus pacientes, sendo que a orientação e motivação quanto aos cuidados com a saúde bucal devem estar presentes antes e durante o tratamento.INTRODUCTION: It is incumbent upon dentists to prevent disease, minimize risks and promote health. Patients also need to be made aware of their role in oral health care. Patients undergoing orthodontic treatment find it particularly difficult to maintain satisfactory oral hygiene owing to the presence of bands, wires and ligatures. It

  5. Altered oral viral ecology in association with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Melissa; Abeles, Shira R; Boehm, Tobias K; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Naidu, Mayuri; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha; Pride, David T

    2014-05-20

    The human oral cavity is home to a large and diverse community of viruses that have yet to be characterized in patients with periodontal disease. We recruited and sampled saliva and oral biofilm from a cohort of humans either periodontally healthy or with mild or significant periodontal disease to discern whether there are differences in viral communities that reflect their oral health status. We found communities of viruses inhabiting saliva and the subgingival and supragingival biofilms of each subject that were composed largely of bacteriophage. While there were homologous viruses common to different subjects and biogeographic sites, for most of the subjects, virome compositions were significantly associated with the oral sites from which they were derived. The largest distinctions between virome compositions were found when comparing the subgingival and supragingival biofilms to those of planktonic saliva. Differences in virome composition were significantly associated with oral health status for both subgingival and supragingival biofilm viruses but not for salivary viruses. Among the differences identified in virome compositions was a significant expansion of myoviruses in subgingival biofilm, suggesting that periodontal disease favors lytic phage. We also characterized the bacterial communities in each subject at each biogeographic site by using the V3 hypervariable segment of the 16S rRNA and did not identify distinctions between oral health and disease similar to those found in viral communities. The significantly altered ecology of viruses of oral biofilm in subjects with periodontal disease compared to that of relatively periodontally healthy ones suggests that viruses may serve as useful indicators of oral health status. Little is known about the role or the constituents of viruses as members of the human microbiome. We investigated the composition of human oral viral communities in a group of relatively periodontally healthy subjects or significant

  6. [Condom effectiveness to prevent sexually transmitted diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Eduardo Gayón; Orozco, Hilda Hernández; Soto, Selene Sam; Aburto, Esther Lombardo

    2008-02-01

    Sexual transmitted diseases (included HIV/AIDS) are a common and preventable cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. When used consistently and correctly, condoms are effective to prevent these diseases, however, its protection does not account for 100%. To know the effectiveness of male condom, through bibliographic evidence, to prevent sexual transmitted infections in heterosexual serodiscordant partners. A bibliographical review of Medline/Pubmed, LILACS and Cochrane databases, and publications of the National Health Institutes, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, World Health Organization, and WHO AIDS Global Program was done to analyze male condom effectiveness to prevent sexual transmitted diseases. Reports demonstrated that male condom protection against HIV/AIDS in heterosexual serodiscordant partners goes from 60 to 95%. Most recent information (2006) showed 80%. Two studies demonstrated no HPV protection with male condom, and another one 70% of protection. Male condom demonstrated no HPV-1 protection, but decrease of risk in HVS-2 transmission in women (0.85 of protection). Male condom protection against sexual transmitted diseases is not 100%. There must be used additional measures that have demonstrated its utility to decrease transmission risk.

  7. Systematic review of cost-effectiveness analyses of novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, João; Mirco, Ana

    2015-03-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants are emerging options for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. They are increasingly used in clinical practice due to their simplicity of use and clinical benefits, but an important step is to evaluate their cost-effectiveness. The aim of the AFFORD study (A Review of Cost EFFectiveness of Novel ORal Anticoagulant Drugs) was to perform a systematic review of cost-effectiveness studies of novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). A systematic review of the literature was conducted by searching the PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane and Web of Knowledge databases to identify all cost-effectiveness studies of novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in AF. The search identified 27 studies, 18 with dabigatran, three with apixaban, two with rivaroxaban and four with at least two of these drugs. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were 30 405 ± 16 101 euros per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) for dabigatran 110 mg, 17 566 ± 16 902 euros/QALY for dabigatran 150 mg, 8102 ± 3252 euros/QALY for age-adjusted dabigatran, 11 897 ± 3341 euros/QALY for apixaban and 17 960 ± 12 005 euros/QALY for rivaroxaban. The present systematic review demonstrates that novel oral anticoagulants are cost-effective for stroke prevention in AF. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. [Association between oral hygiene, chronic diseases, and oral squamous cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiangfeng; He, Baochang; Chen, Fa; Liu, Fangping; Yan, Lingjun; Hu, Zhijian; Lin, Lisong; He, Fei; Cai, Lin

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the association between oral hygiene, chronic diseases, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. We performed a case-control study with 414 cases and 870 controls in Fujian during September 2010 to January 2015. Patients were newly diagnosed oral squamous cell carcinoma cases according to the pathologic diagnoses, control subjects were enrolled from community population. Epidemiological data were collected by in-person interviews using a standard questionnaire. The contents of the questionnaire included demography character, history of tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking, dietary habits, oral hygiene status, family history of cancer, etc. Using unconditional logistic regression analysis to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) for oral hygiene and chronic diseases. We also stratified by sex, smoking and drinking to explore possible difference in association between subgroups. The multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that number of teeth (20-27 and oral ulceration were the risk factors of oral squamous cell carcinoma, the adjusted OR (95% CI) values were 2.01 (1.49-2.73), 3.51 (2.39-5.15), 2.33 (1.79-3.04), 3.96 (2.11-7.44), respectively; brushing tooth once per bay, brushing tooth more than once per day, regular oral health examination at least 5 years per time were the protective factors of oral squamous cell carcinoma, the adjusted OR (95% CI) values were 0.24 (0.13-0.43), 0.13 (0.07-0.24), 0.37 (0.26-0.53), respectively. The stratification analysis indicated that recurrent oral ulceration could increase the risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma for non-smokers and non-drinking, the adjusted OR (95% CI) value was 5.21 (2.42-11.18) and 4.71 (2.37-9.36); and a risky effect of hypertension on risk of oral squamous cell carcinoma was observed for non-smokers and non-drinking, the adjusted OR (95% CI) values were 1.70 (1.10-2.61) and 1.58 (1.07-2.34). Oral hygiene and chronic diseases could affect the

  9. Bicarbonate therapy for prevention of chronic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łoniewski, Igor; Wesson, Donald E

    2014-03-01

    Kidney injury in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is likely multifactorial, but recent data support that a component is mediated by mechanisms used by the kidney to increase acidification in response to an acid challenge to systemic acid-base status. If so, systemic alkalization might attenuate this acid-induced component of kidney injury. An acid challenge to systemic acid-base status increases nephron acidification through increased production of endothelin, aldosterone, and angiotensin II, each of which can contribute to kidney inflammation and fibrosis that characterizes CKD. Systemic alkalization that ameliorates an acid challenge might attenuate the contributions of angiotensin II, endothelin, and aldosterone to kidney injury. Some small clinical studies support the efficacy of alkalization in attenuating kidney injury and slowing glomerular filtration rate decline in CKD. This review focuses on the potential that orally administered NaHCO₃ prevents CKD progression and additionally addresses its mechanism of action, side effects, possible complications, dosage, interaction, galenic form description, and contraindications. Current National Kidney Foundation guidelines recommend oral alkali, including NaHCO₃(-), in CKD patients with serum HCO₃(-) <22 mmol/l. Although oral alkali can be provided by other medications and by base-inducing dietary constituents, oral NaHCO₃ will be the focus of this review because of its relative safety and apparent efficacy, and its comparatively low cost.

  10. Oral insulin treatment suppresses virus-induced antigen-specific destruction of beta cells and prevents autoimmune diabetes in transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    von Herrath, M G; Dyrberg, T; Oldstone, M B

    1996-01-01

    Oral administration of self-antigens has been proposed as a therapy to prevent and treat autoimmune diseases. Here we report that oral treatment with insulin prevents virus-induced insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in a transgenic (tg) mouse model. Such mice express the viral nucleoprotein (NP) of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) under control of the rat insulin promoter in their pancreatic beta cells and < 2% spontaneously develop diabetes. However, 2 mo after challenge wit...

  11. Prevention of allergic disease in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, Susanne

    2004-01-01

    manifestations e.g. CMA and atopic dermatitis can be reduced significantly by simple dietary measures for the first4 months of life. In all infants breastfeeding should beencouraged for at least 4-6 months, and exposure to tobacco smoke should be avoided during pregnancy and early childhood. In HR infants...... for this review was to evaluate possible preventive measures as regards prevention of development of allergic disease in childhood--primary prevention--and also some aspects of the effect of specific allergy treatment as regards secondary prevention in children with allergic asthma and allergic......) and/or hydrolyzed cow's milk-based formula the first 4-6 months as regards: (i) the allergy preventive effect of BM/extensively hydrolysed formula (eHF) compared with ordinary cow's milk-based formula, (ii) the effect of two different eHFs, a whey (Profylac) and a casein-based (Nutramigen) formula...

  12. Systemic consequences of poor oral health in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Harun; Akar, Gulcan Coskun; Carrero, Juan Jesús; Stenvinkel, Peter; Lindholm, Bengt

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the oral cavity, such as periodontitis and other manifestations of poor oral health, are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and may contribute to increased morbidity and mortality because of systemic consequences such as inflammation, infections, protein-energy wasting, and atherosclerotic complications. Poor oral health in CKD patients may thus represent an important, but often overlooked, problem. Several studies show that uremic patients have higher rates of decayed, missing, and filled teeth, loss of attachment, and periapical and mucosal lesions than the general population. The consequences of poor oral health may be more severe in CKD patients because of advanced age, common comorbidities such as diabetes, concurrent medications, and a state of immune dysfunction that may increase the risk for systemic consequences of periodontitis and other oral and dental pathologic conditions. Poor dentition and other signs of poor oral health should be an alarm clock also at early stages of CKD. However, it remains to be determined whether more successful management of poor oral health and periodontitis will reduce the risk of inflammation, infection, protein-energy wasting, and atherosclerotic complications in CKD patients. This review explores etiological factors and potential systemic consequences of poor oral health in CKD patients as well as possible preventive and therapeutic strategies.

  13. Evidence summary: the relationship between oral health and pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manger, D; Walshaw, M; Fitzgerald, R; Doughty, J; Wanyonyi, K L; White, S; Gallagher, J E

    2017-04-07

    Introduction This paper is the second of four reviews exploring the relationships between oral health and general medical conditions, in order to support teams within Public Health England, health practitioners and policymakers.Aim This review aimed to explore the most contemporary evidence on whether poor oral health and pulmonary disease occurs in the same individuals or populations, to outline the nature of the relationship between these two health outcomes, and discuss the implication of any findings for health services and future research.Methods The work was undertaken by a group comprising consultant clinicians from medicine and dentistry, trainees, public health, and academics. The methodology involved a streamlined rapid review process and synthesis of the data.Results The results identified a number of systematic reviews of medium to high quality which provide evidence that oral health and oral hygiene habits have an impact on incidence and outcomes of lung diseases, such as pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in people living in the community and in long-term care facilities. The findings are discussed in relation to the implications for service and future research.Conclusion The cumulative evidence of this review suggests an association between oral and pulmonary disease, specifically COPD and pneumonia, and incidence of the latter can be reduced by oral hygiene measures such as chlorhexidine and povidone iodine in all patients, while toothbrushing reduces the incidence, duration, and mortality from pneumonia in community and hospital patients.

  14. The prevention of tobacco-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raw, M; McNeill, A

    1994-11-01

    The key components of a strategy to prevent tobacco-related disease are outlined. These measures aim to increase the cessation of tobacco use and reduce its uptake. Components are wide-ranging, including a taxation policy, a ban on advertising and promotion, a comprehensive health promotion programme including advice from primary health care professionals and the development of campaigning skills, particularly by the medical profession. The prevention of tobacco-related disease has moved into the domain of campaigners and lobbyists at political, economic and international levels. The key target is countering the activities, especially the unethical trade practices, of the wealthy and powerful tobacco industry.

  15. Preventive management plans recorded by Dental Therapists and Oral Health Therapists using clinical vignettes for adolescents accessing Public Oral Health Services, NSW Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoe, Angela V; Blinkhorn, Anthony S; Taylor, Jane; Blinkhorn, Fiona A

    2015-04-25

    To investigate factors that influence Dental Therapists and Oral Health Therapists (Therapists) plan preventive oral health care for adolescents attending New South Wales (NSW) Public Oral Health Services. A cross-sectional postal survey using two clinical vignettes were used to record the preventive care treatment plans offered by Therapists working across sixteen NSW Local Health Districts (LHDs). Data were tabulated and Chi square statistics were used in the analysis. One hundred and seventeen Therapists returned questionnaires giving a 64.6% response rate. The participants highlighted the importance of offering oral hygiene instruction (97.0%); dietary advice (95.0%) and topical fluoride applications (74.0%). Recommended home use products included fluoride toothpaste 5000ppmF (59.0%) and casein phosphopeptide amorphous phosphates plus fluoride (CPP-ACPF) paste (57.7%). Over 50% used fissure sealants. More respondents (88%) would utilise Motivational Interviewing strategies for a patient with dental caries concerns, however, only 63% would use this technique for a patient in pain (pdental disease, suggesting a need for Clinical Directors to consider providing more advice to Therapists on the scientific basis of preventing dental caries. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Oral cancer prevention and control--the approach of the World Health Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality today. It is estimated that around 43% of cancer deaths are due to tobacco use, unhealthy diets, alcohol consumption, inactive lifestyles and infection. Low-income and disadvantaged groups are generally more exposed to avoidable risk factors such as environmental carcinogens, alcohol, infectious agents, and tobacco use. These groups also have less access to the health services and health education that would empower them to make decisions to protect and improve their own health. Oro-pharyngeal cancer is significant component of the global burden of cancer. Tobacco and alcohol are regarded as the major risk factors for oral cancer. The population-attributable risks of smoking and alcohol consumption have been estimated to 80% for males, 61% for females, and 74% overall. The evidence that smokeless tobacco causes oral cancer was confirmed recently by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Studies have shown that heavy intake of alcoholic beverages is associated with nutrient deficiency, which appears to contribute independently to oral carcinogenesis. Oral cancer is preventable through risk factors intervention. Prevention of HIV infection will also reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS-related cancers such as Kaposi sarcoma and lymphoma. The WHO Global Oral Health Programme is committed to work for country capacity building in oral cancer prevention, inter-country exchange of information and experiences from integrated approaches in prevention and health promotion, and the development of global surveillance systems for oral cancer and risk factors. The WHO Global Oral Health Programme has established a global surveillance system of oral cavity cancer in order to assess risk factors and to help the planning of effective national intervention programmes. Epidemiological data on oral cancer (ICD-10: C00-C08) incidence and mortality are stored in the Global Oral Health Data Bank. In 2007, the World

  17. Oral Immunization with OspC Does Not Prevent Tick-Borne Borrelia burgdorferi Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Rita; Richer, Luciana; Johnson, Daniel L; Gomes-Solecki, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Oral vaccination strategies are of interest to prevent transmission of Lyme disease as they can be used to deliver vaccines to humans, pets, and to natural wildlife reservoir hosts of Borrelia burgdorferi. We developed a number of oral vaccines based in E. coli expressing recombinant OspC type K, OspB, BBK32 from B. burgdorferi, and Salp25, Salp15 from Ixodes scapularis. Of the five immunogenic candidates only OspC induced significant levels of antigen-specific IgG and IgA when administered to mice via the oral route. Antibodies to OspC did not prevent dissemination of B. burgdorferi as determined by the presence of spirochetes in ear, heart and bladder tissues four weeks after challenge. Next generation sequencing of genomic DNA from ticks identified multiple phyletic types of B. burgdorferi OspC (A, D, E, F, I, J, K, M, Q, T, X) in nymphs that engorged on vaccinated mice. PCR amplification of OspC types A and K from flat and engorged nymphal ticks, and from heart and bladder tissues collected after challenge confirmed sequencing analysis. Quantification of spirochete growth in a borreliacidal assay shows that both types of spirochetes (A and K) survived in the presence of OspC-K specific serum whereas the spirochetes were killed by OspA specific serum. We show that oral vaccination of C3H-HeN mice with OspC-K induced significant levels of antigen-specific IgG. However, these serologic antibodies did not protect mice from infection with B. burgdorferi expressing homologous or heterologous types of OspC after tick challenge.

  18. Oral triiodothyronine for the prevention of thyroid hormone reduction in adult valvular cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.A. Magalhães

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of non-thyroidal illness by intravenous triiodothyronine (T3 after cardiac surgery causes a disproportional elevation of hormone levels. The administration of oral T3, which has never been studied in this context, could cause physiological hormone levels. The aim of this study was to test oral T3 for the prevention of T3 reduction during the postoperative period of valvular cardiac surgery in adults. Eighteen patients who underwent cardiac surgery for valvular disease with invasive hemodynamic monitoring were randomly assigned to 2 groups: the T group received oral T3 (N = 8, 25 µg three times/day, initiated 24 h before surgery and maintained for 48 h and the NT group (N = 10 received placebo. Serum T3, thyroxine and thyrotropin were determined at baseline, 1 h before surgery, within 30 min of cardiopulmonary bypass and 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after removal of the aortic cross-clamp. Baseline T3 was similar in both groups (T: 119 ± 13; NT: 131 ± 9 ng/dL. Serum T3 increased during the first 24 h in the T group compared to the NT group (232 ± 18 vs 151 ± 13 ng/dL; P < 0.001. In the NT group, T3 was reduced by 24% (P = 0.007 6 h after removal of the aortic cross-clamp, confirming the non-thyroidal illness syndrome. There were no differences in clinical or hemodynamic parameters between groups. Administration of oral T3 prevented its serum reduction after valvular cardiac surgery in adults, with normal serum levels for 48 h without disproportional elevations.

  19. Seven challenges in modeling vaccine preventable diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.J.E. Metcalf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination has been one of the most successful public health measures since the introduction of basic sanitation. Substantial mortality and morbidity reductions have been achieved via vaccination against many infections, and the list of diseases that are potentially controllable by vaccines is growing steadily. We introduce key challenges for modeling in shaping our understanding and guiding policy decisions related to vaccine preventable diseases.

  20. Oral health and oromotor function in rare diseases--a database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögreen, Lotta; Andersson-Norinder, Jan; Bratel, John

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to study oral health and oromotor function in individuals with rare diseases. A disease is defined as rare when it affects no more than 100 individuals per million population and leads to a marked degree of disability. An affected nervous or musculoskeletal system, cognitive impairment, neuropsychiatric disorders and craniofacial malformations are common in rare diseases and may all be risk factors for oral health and oromotor function. In 1996-2008, 1,703 individuals with 169 rare diseases, aged 3-67 years, answered a questionnaire about general health, oral health and orofacial function and 1,614 participated in a clinical examination. A control group of 135 healthy children, aged 3-14 years, was also included in the study. Oral health was examined by a dentist and oromotor function by a speech-language pathologist. The participants with rare diseases were recruited via family programmes, referrals to the clinic and research projects, while the controls were randomly selected from a Swedish municipality. In the diagnosis group, 40% had moderate or severe problems coping with dental treatment, 43% were receiving specialised dental care. Difficulties related to tooth brushing were common compared with the controls. Approximately two thirds of the study group and the control group were caries free. Frontal open bite, long face and high palate were common in individuals with rare diseases compared with controls. Oromotor impairment was a frequent finding (43%) and was absent among the controls. There was a significant correlation between oromotor impairment and certain structural deviations and oral-health issues. Compared with healthy controls, individuals with rare diseases often have difficulty coping with dental treatment and managing tooth brushing. Dysmorphology and oromotor dysfunction are frequent findings in this population and they often require extra prophylactic dental care and access to specialised dental care in order to prevent oral disease.

  1. Darier disease with oral and esophageal involvement: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magesh Karuppur Thiagarajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old man presented with itchy papular eruptions all over the body since 15 years. Intraoral examination revealed raised papular lesions on the labial mucosa, hard palate, and tongue. The histopathology of the oral and skin lesions was confirmative of Darier disease (DD. This patient also showed esophageal involvement, which was confirmed histopathologically. Such a presentation of DD, with oral and esophageal involvement, is rare.

  2. The dynamics of gene expression changes in a mouse model of oral tumorigenesis may help refine prevention and treatment strategies in patients with oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Jean-Philippe; Tortereau, Antonin; Caulin, Carlos; Le Texier, Vincent; Lavergne, Emilie; Thomas, Emilie; Chabaud, Sylvie; Perol, David; Lachuer, Joël; Lang, Wenhua; Hong, Waun Ki; Goudot, Patrick; Lippman, Scott M; Bertolus, Chloé; Saintigny, Pierre

    2016-06-14

    A better understanding of the dynamics of molecular changes occurring during the early stages of oral tumorigenesis may help refine prevention and treatment strategies. We generated genome-wide expression profiles of microdissected normal mucosa, hyperplasia, dysplasia and tumors derived from the 4-NQO mouse model of oral tumorigenesis. Genes differentially expressed between tumor and normal mucosa defined the "tumor gene set" (TGS), including 4 non-overlapping gene subsets that characterize the dynamics of gene expression changes through different stages of disease progression. The majority of gene expression changes occurred early or progressively. The relevance of these mouse gene sets to human disease was tested in multiple datasets including the TCGA and the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer project. The TGS was able to discriminate oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) from normal oral mucosa in 3 independent datasets. The OSCC samples enriched in the mouse TGS displayed high frequency of CASP8 mutations, 11q13.3 amplifications and low frequency of PIK3CA mutations. Early changes observed in the 4-NQO model were associated with a trend toward a shorter oral cancer-free survival in patients with oral preneoplasia that was not seen in multivariate analysis. Progressive changes observed in the 4-NQO model were associated with an increased sensitivity to 4 different MEK inhibitors in a panel of 51 squamous cell carcinoma cell lines of the areodigestive tract. In conclusion, the dynamics of molecular changes in the 4-NQO model reveal that MEK inhibition may be relevant to prevention and treatment of a specific molecularly-defined subgroup of OSCC.

  3. Oral hygiene and cardiometabolic disease risk in the survey of the health of Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Acharya, Amit; Greenlee, Robert T; Nieto, Francisco Javier

    2013-08-01

    Poor oral health is an increasingly recognized risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), but little is known about the association between toothbrushing or flossing and cardiometabolic disease risk. The purpose of this study was to examine the degree to which an oral hygiene index was associated with CVD and T2D risk scores among disease-free adults in the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin. All variables were measured in 2008-2010 in this cross-sectional design. Based on toothbrushing and flossing frequency, an oral hygiene index (poor, fair, good, excellent) was created as the primary predictor variable. The outcomes, CVD and T2D risk score, were based on previous estimates from large cohort studies. There were 712 and 296 individuals with complete data available for linear regression analyses in the CVD and T2D samples, respectively. After covariate adjustment, the final model indicated that participants in the excellent (β ± SE = -0.019 ± 0.008, P = 0.020) oral hygiene category had a significantly lower CVD risk score as compared to participants in the poor oral hygiene category. Sensitivity analyses indicated that both toothbrushing and flossing were independently associated with CVD risk score, and various modifiable risk factors. Oral hygiene was not significantly associated with T2D risk score. Regular toothbrushing and flossing are associated with a more favorable CVD risk profile, but more experimental research is needed in this area to precisely determine the effects of various oral self-care maintenance behaviors on the control of individual cardiometabolic risk factors. These findings may inform future joint medical-dental initiatives designed to close gaps in the primary prevention of oral and systemic diseases. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Oral sequelae of common geriatric diseases, disorders, and impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ship, J A

    1992-08-01

    The oral cavity is responsible for two essential functions: the production of speech and the initiation of alimentation. All of the specialized oral tissues and sensory systems that allow for the execution of these functions are susceptible to age-, disease-, and treatment-related changes, and alterations in any one or more function may result in deleterious consequences to the host and impact on the quality of life. Oral physiology is generally believed to be age-stable in healthy individuals; however, in the presence of single or multiple medical diseases and their treatment, these functions deteriorate. This article focuses on the influence of common geriatric diseases, disorders, and impairments on oral health and function. Data are presented to suggest that oral health is altered in the presence of heart, cerebrovascular, liver, and renal diseases, cancer, COPD, diabetes, pneumonia, and influenza. Arthritic, hearing, visual, orthopedic, and speech impairments multiple medical problems. Finally, adjustments in treatment and management strategies may be necessary for older patients with these diseases and impairments.

  5. The normal bacterial flora prevents GI disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. The normal bacterial flora prevents GI disease. Inhibits pathogenic enteric bacteria. Decrease luminal pH; Secrete bacteriocidal proteins; Colonization resistance; Block epithelial binding – induce MUC2. Improves epithelial and mucosal barrier integrity. Produce ...

  6. Preventive Dental Care: An Educational Program to Integrate Oral Care Into Pediatric Oncology
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, Erin; Krainovich-Miller, Barbara

    2017-10-01

    Early childhood dental caries (dental cavities) is an infectious process. The development of oral problems during cancer care results in pain, fever, and delay in treatment. 
. The objective of this project was to integrate preventive oral care into pediatric oncology care. 
. This project consisted of an educational program for pediatric oncology providers who completed pre- and postprogram surveys assessing oral health knowledge, attitudes, and practice; attended an oral health education session; and performed oral assessment and fluoride varnish application on children during cancer treatment. 
. Three major outcomes resulted from this project.

  7. Recommendations for the diagnosis of human papilloma virus (HPV) high and low risk in the prevention and treatment of diseases of the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx. Guide of experts PTORL and KIDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Józefiak, Agata; Szydłowski, Jarosław; Marszałek, Andrzej; Stankiewicz, Czesław; Hassman-Poznańska, Elżbieta; Osuch-Wójcikiewicz, Ewa; Składzień, Jacek; Klatka, Janusz; Pietruszewska, Wioletta; Puacz, Elżbieta; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Szyfter, Witold

    2013-01-01

    The role of human papilloma viruses (HPV) in malignant and nonmalignant ENT diseases and the corresponding epidemiological burden has been widely described. International head and neck oncology community discussed growing evidence that oral HPV infection contributes to the risk of oro-pharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) and recommended HPV testing as a part of the work up for patients with OPC. Polish Society of ENT Head Neck Surgery and National Chamber of Laboratory Diagnosticians have worked together to define the minimum requirements for assigning a diagnosis of HPV-related conditions and testing strategy that include HPV specific tests in our country. This paper briefly frames the literature information concerning low risk (LR) and high risk (HR) HPV, reviews the epidemiology, general guidance on the most appropriate biomarkers for clinical assessment of HPV. The definition of HPV-related cancer was presented. The article is aiming to highlight some of major issues for the clinician dealing with patients with HPV-related morbidities and to introduce the diagnostic algorithm in Poland. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. Disease outcome for children who present with oral manifestations of Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hussey, S

    2011-06-01

    To describe the outcome for children with oral Crohn\\'s disease (OCD) at diagnosis, and to determine if there was a difference in the Paediatric Crohn\\'s Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) scores between those with and those without oral lesions at follow-up.

  9. Oral manifestations of connective tissue disease and novel therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Kenisha R; Rogers, Roy S; Fazel, Nasim

    2015-10-16

    Connective tissue diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and Sjögren syndrome (SS) have presented many difficulties both in their diagnosis and treatment. Known causes for this difficulty include uncertainty of disease etiology, the multitude of clinical presentations, the unpredictable disease course, and the variable cell types, soluble mediators, and tissue factors that are believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of connective tissue diseases. The characteristic oral findings seen with these specific connective tissue diseases may assist with more swift diagnostic capability. Additionally, the recent use of biologics may redefine the success rate in the treatment and management of the disease. In this review we describe the oral manifestations associated with SLE, SSc, and SS and review the novel biologic drugs used to treat these conditions.

  10. Oral inflammation and infection, and chronic medical diseases: implications for the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scannapieco, Frank A; Cantos, Albert

    2016-10-01

    Oral diseases, such as caries and periodontitis, not only have local effects on the dentition and on tooth-supporting tissues but also may impact a number of systemic conditions. Emerging evidence suggests that poor oral health influences the initiation and/or progression of diseases such as atherosclerosis (with sequelae including myocardial infarction and stoke), diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative diseases (such as Alzheimer's disease, rheumatoid arthritis and others). Aspiration of oropharyngeal (including periodontal) bacteria causes pneumonia, especially in hospitalized patients and the elderly, and may influence the course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article addresses several pertinent aspects related to the medical implications of periodontal disease in the elderly. There is moderate evidence that improved oral hygiene may help prevent aspiration pneumonia in high-risk patients. For other medical conditions, because of the absence of well-designed randomized clinical trials in elderly patients, no specific guidance can be provided regarding oral hygiene or periodontal interventions that enhance the medical management of older adults. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Oral contraceptive use and the risk of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, R S; Wurzelmann, J I; Lyles, C M

    1992-07-01

    We used rosters of the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America to identify potential cases and peer-nominated controls to explore the reported association between oral contraceptives and inflammatory bowel disease. Overall, women who used oral contraceptives were at increased risk of developing Crohn's disease (odds ratio = 1.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.99-2.26). The findings persisted after adjustment for age at symptom onset, decade of onset, education, marital status, and location of disease. There was an interaction with cigarette smoking; the risk associated with oral contraceptives was elevated in current smokers (odds ratio = 2.64, 95% CI = 1.22-5.75), but not in former smokers or never-smokers. The risk was not elevated for ulcerative colitis (odds ratio = 1.10, 95% CI = 0.65-1.85).

  12. Alzheimer's disease prevention: A way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo-Pareja, F; Llamas-Velasco, S; Villarejo-Galende, A

    2016-12-01

    This review proposes a more optimistic view of Alzheimer's disease (AD), in contrast to that contributed by the ageing of the population and the failure of potentially curative therapies (vaccines and others). Treatment failure is likely due to the fact that AD gestates in the brain for decades but manifests in old age. This review updates the concept of AD and presents the results of recent studies that show that primary prevention can reduce the incidence and delay the onset of the disease. Half of all cases of AD are potentially preventable through education, the control of cardiovascular risk factors, the promotion of healthy lifestyles and specific drug treatments. These approaches could substantially reduce the future incidence rate of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  13. Oral cancer prevention and control--the approach of the World Health Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2009-01-01

    national intervention programmes. Epidemiological data on oral cancer (ICD-10: C00-C08) incidence and mortality are stored in the Global Oral Health Data Bank. In 2007, the World Health Assembly (WHA) passed a resolution on oral health for the first time in 25 years, which also considers oral cancer...... risk factors such as environmental carcinogens, alcohol, infectious agents, and tobacco use. These groups also have less access to the health services and health education that would empower them to make decisions to protect and improve their own health. Oro-pharyngeal cancer is significant component....... Prevention of HIV infection will also reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS-related cancers such as Kaposi sarcoma and lymphoma. The WHO Global Oral Health Programme is committed to work for country capacity building in oral cancer prevention, inter-country exchange of information and experiences from integrated...

  14. Targeting of Streptococcus mutans Biofilms by a Novel Small Molecule Prevents Dental Caries and Preserves the Oral Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, S S; Blackledge, M S; Michalek, S; Su, L; Ptacek, T; Eipers, P; Morrow, C; Lefkowitz, E J; Melander, C; Wu, H

    2017-07-01

    Dental caries is a costly and prevalent disease characterized by the demineralization of the tooth's enamel. Disease outcome is influenced by host factors, dietary intake, cariogenic bacteria, and other microbes. The cariogenic bacterial species Streptococcus mutans metabolizes sucrose to initiate biofilm formation on the tooth surface and consequently produces lactic acid to degrade the tooth's enamel. Persistence of S. mutans biofilms in the oral cavity can lead to tooth decay. To date, no anticaries therapies that specifically target S. mutans biofilms but do not disturb the overall oral microbiome are available. We screened a library of 2-aminoimidazole antibiofilm compounds with a biofilm dispersion assay and identified a small molecule that specifically targets S. mutans biofilms. At 5 µM, the small molecule annotated 3F1 dispersed 50% of the established S. mutans biofilm but did not disperse biofilms formed by the commensal species Streptococcus sanguinis or Streptococcus gordonii. 3F1 dispersed S. mutans biofilms independently of biofilm-related factors such as antigen I/II and glucosyltransferases. 3F1 treatment effectively prevented dental caries by controlling S. mutans in a rat caries model without perturbing the oral microbiota. Our study demonstrates that selective targeting of S. mutans biofilms by 3F1 was able to effectively reduce dental caries in vivo without affecting the overall oral microbiota shaped by the intake of dietary sugars, suggesting that the pathogenic biofilm-specific treatment is a viable strategy for disease prevention.

  15. Preventing Wrong-Site Surgery in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assael, Leon A

    2017-05-01

    This article discusses the risk for wrong-site surgery in oral and maxillofacial surgery and the development and utility of checklists. The intent of checklists and the specific applicability of each of them to ambulatory oral and maxillofacial surgery are presented. Checklists and other considerations to mitigate the risk of wrong-site surgery are evaluated. The role of interprofessional teams in improving patient care outcomes with the checklist as a vehicle is evaluated. Recommendations for the use of checklists and related methods in the ambulatory oral and maxillofacial surgery setting are made. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Secondary syphilis in the oral cavity and the role of the dental surgeon in STD prevention, diagnosis and treatment: a case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibt, Creta Elisa; Munerato, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Syphilis is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. Syphilis has three clinical stages and may present various oral manifestations, mainly at the secondary stage. The disease mimics other more common oral mucosa lesions, going undiagnosed and with no proper treatment. Despite the advancements in medicine toward prevention, diagnosis, and treatment syphilis remains a public health problem worldwide. In this sense, dental surgeons should be able to identify the most common manifestations of the disease in the oral cavity, pointing to the role of this professional in prevention and diagnosis. This study describes a case series of seven patients with secondary syphilis presenting different oral manifestations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Autophagy and its implication in human oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ya-Qin; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Gang

    2017-02-01

    Macroautophagy/autophagy is a conserved lysosomal degradation process essential for cell physiology and human health. By regulating apoptosis, inflammation, pathogen clearance, immune response and other cellular processes, autophagy acts as a modulator of pathogenesis and is a potential therapeutic target in diverse diseases. With regard to oral disease, autophagy can be problematic either when it is activated or impaired, because this process is involved in diverse functions, depending on the specific disease and its level of progression. In particular, activated autophagy functions as a cytoprotective mechanism under environmental stress conditions, which regulates tumor growth and mediates resistance to anticancer treatment in established tumors. During infections and inflammation, activated autophagy selectively delivers microbial antigens to the immune systems, and is therefore connected to the elimination of intracellular pathogens. Impaired autophagy contributes to oxidative stress, genomic instability, chronic tissue damage, inflammation and tumorigenesis, and is involved in aberrant bacterial clearance and immune priming. Hence, substantial progress in the study of autophagy provides new insights into the pathogenesis of oral diseases. This review outlines the mechanisms of autophagy, and highlights the emerging roles of this process in oral cancer, periapical lesions, periodontal diseases, and oral candidiasis.

  18. Oral health in patients with renal disease: a longitudinal study from predialysis to kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylund, Karita M; Meurman, Jukka H; Heikkinen, Anna Maria; Furuholm, Jussi O; Ortiz, Fernanda; Ruokonen, Hellevi M

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to compare the oral health of chronic kidney disease patients at the predialysis (baseline) and post-transplantation (follow-up) stages and to investigate differences in oral health between diabetic nephropathy and other kidney disease patients at follow-up. Fifty-three kidney disease patients (34 men) aged 31-86 years were followed up to 157 months. Clinical and radiological oral examinations, salivary and laboratory analyses, and oral health behavior questionnaires were conducted at the predialysis and follow-up stages at Helsinki University Hospital, Finland. Oral inflammatory burden was estimated by calculating deep periodontal pockets, periodontal inflammatory burden (PIBI), decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT), and total dental indices (TDI). Results were analyzed using cross-tabulation Pearson chi-square or Fisher's exact test and the Mann-Whitney U test, and the McNemar and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. At the predialysis stage, patients more often had calculus and deep periodontal pockets; TDI, PIBI, number of teeth, and salivary flow rates were also statistically significantly higher compared to follow-up. At follow-up, diabetic nephropathy patients more often had Candida growth, more plaque, and used more drugs and had lower stimulated salivary flow than patients with other kidney diseases. Oral health was better at follow-up than at the predialysis stage; however, attention should be given to the lower salivary flow rate and higher number of drugs used at that stage. This study confirms the importance of treating oral infectious foci at the predialysis stage in order to prevent adverse outcomes after kidney transplantation.

  19. New oral antithrombotics: focus on dabigatran, an oral, reversible direct thrombin inhibitor for the prevention and treatment of venous and arterial thromboembolic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahl OE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ola E Dahl1,21Department of Orthopaedics, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Elverum Central Hospital, Elverum, Norway; 2Thrombosis Research Institute, London, UKAbstract: Venous thromboembolism, presenting as deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, is a major challenge for health care systems. It is the third most common vascular disease after coronary heart disease and stroke, and many hospitalized patients have at least one risk factor. In particular, patients undergoing hip or knee replacement are at risk, with an incidence of asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis of 40%–60% without thromboprophylaxis. Venous thromboembolism is associated with significant mortality and morbidity, with patients being at risk of recurrence, post-thrombotic syndrome, and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Arterial thromboembolism is even more frequent, and atrial fibrillation, the most common embolic source (cardiac arrhythmia, is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of stroke. Strokes due to atrial fibrillation tend to be more severe and disabling and are more often fatal than strokes due to other causes. Currently, recommended management of both venous and arterial thromboembolism involves the use of anticoagulants such as coumarin and heparin derivatives. These agents are effective, although have characteristics that prevent them from providing optimal anticoagulation and convenience. Hence, new improved oral anticoagulants are being investigated. Dabigatran is a reversible, direct thrombin inhibitor, which is administered as dabigatran etexilate, the oral prodrug. Because it is the first new oral anticoagulant that has been licensed in many countries worldwide for thromboprophylaxis following orthopedic surgery and for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation, this compound will be the main focus of this review. Dabigatran has been investigated for the treatment of established venous thromboembolism and prevention of

  20. [Oral diseases in auto-immune polyendocrine syndrome type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Guyot, Sylvie

    2017-09-01

    Auto-immune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) also called Auto-immune Polyendocrinopathy Candidiasis Ectodermal Dystrophy (APECED) is a rare monogenic childhood-onset auto-immune disease. This autosomal recessive disorder is caused by mutations in the auto-immune regulator (AIRE) gene, and leads to autoimmunity targeting peripheral tissues. There is a wide variability in clinical phenotypes in patients with APSI, with auto-immune endocrine and non-endocrine disorders, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. These patients suffer from oral diseases such as dental enamel hypoplasia and candidiasis. Both are frequently described, and in recent series, enamel hypoplasia and candidiasis are even the most frequent components of APS1 together with hypoparathyroidism. Both often occur during childhood (before 5 years old for canrdidiasis, and before 15 years old for enamel hypoplasia). Oral candidiasis is recurrent all life long, could become resistant to azole antifungal after years of treatment, and be carcinogenic, leading to severe oral squamous cell carcinoma. Oral components of APS1 should be diagnosed and rigorously treated. Dental enamel hypoplasia and/or recurrent oral candidiasis in association with auto-immune diseases in a young child should prompt APS1 diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Oral cancer - improving early detection and promoting prevention. Are you up to date?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mighell, A J; Gallagher, J E

    2012-09-01

    Oral cancer is increasingly common. The need for early detection and promoting prevention is greater than ever and relevant to all who are responsible for the care of patients. Recent addition of oral cancer detection to the list of continuing professional development (CPD) topics recommended by the General Dental Council (GDC) reflects this importance.

  2. The analgesic efficacy of intravenous versus oral tramadol for preventing postoperative pain after third molar surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, Cliff K. S.; Lirk, Phillip; Tan, Juliana M. H.; Sow, Belle W. Y.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of single-dose preoperative intravenous versus oral tramadol for preventing pain after third molar surgery. Seventy-two patients undergoing elective third molar surgery were randomized to receive either intravenous (n = 36) or oral (n = 36)

  3. Prevention of HPV-Related Oral Cancer by Dentists: Assessing the Opinion of Dutch Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelman, Marcella R; Brand, Henk S; Forouzanfar, Thymour; Daley, Ellen M; Jager, Derk H Jan

    2017-07-24

    The aim of this study is to assess dental students' opinions of the dentists' role in primary prevention of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral cancer using a cross-sectional web-based survey. A questionnaire, containing questions about knowledge of HPV and oral cancer, confidence in head and neck examination and role of the dentist in preventing HPV-related oral cancer, was sent to all students of the Academic Centre of Dentistry Amsterdam (n = 912). One hundred and twenty-six (n = 126) students completed the questionnaire. Significantly, more master students (75%) than bachelor students (54.3%) were aware that HPV is a causative factor for oral cancer. Master students had more knowledge of HPV than bachelor students, but knowledge about HPV vaccination was irrespective of the study phase. The majority of dental students agreed that it is important to discuss HPV vaccination with patients. Eighty-nine percent of the students think that more education about symptoms of oral cancer will increase screening for oral cancer. Development of a protocol for screening in dental practices was considered even more important. According to dental students, dentists should discuss HPV as a risk factor for oral cancer with patients. Future dentists are willing to be involved in both primary and secondary prevention of HPV-related oral cancer. Therefore, screening for oral cancer and education about HPV vaccination should be integral elements of the dental curriculum.

  4. PREVENTION OF CUTANEOUS SIDE EFFECTS OF TOPICAL TRETINOIN: USE OF ORAL VITAMINE E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G FAGHIHI

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acne vulgaris is an inflammatory disease of pilosebaceous folicles. Tretinoin is used as one of the topical treatments for acne vulgaris. It has different cutaneous side effects such as erythema, scaling, irritation and photosensitivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of oral Vitamine E in preventing the cutaneous side effects of topical tretinoin in acne patients.
    Methods: A clinical trial was performed in AI-Zahra Hospital in Isfahan for six months in 2000. 80 patients with mild to moderate facial acne were randomized into 2 groups. Group 1 (controls received topical solution of tretinoin 0.05 percent nightly and group 2 (cases received daily oral 100mg of Vit. E in addition. All patients were followed at 1, 4 and 6 weeks after initiation of treatment. Children under 12 years old, pregnant or lactating women were excluded.
    Results: At the end of one week, no cutaneous side effects were observed in 25 percent (10 of group 1 and 15 percent (6 of group 2 (P > 0.05. At the end of 4 weeks, 25 percent (10 of group 1 and 60 percent (24 of group 2 were without any cutaneous complications, while at the end of 6 weeks, 35 percent (14 of group 1 in comparison to 75 percent (30 of group 2 were free of any cutaneous side effects (P < 0.05. The most common side effect in both groups was exfoliation.
    Discussion: Daily oral 100 mg of Vit. E has been effective in preventing cutaneous complications of topical tretinoin in acne management, but there is a delay of one week in its onset of action. Meanwhile, Vitamine E is a safe modality with no undesirable effects in acne patients.

  5. Ultrasonography - A diagnostic modality for oral and maxillofacial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Shirish Joshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many diseases present themselves in oral and maxillofacial regions and various modalities may be applied for their diagnosis, including intraoral and panoramic radiography, ultrasonography (USG, computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine methods such as positron emission tomography. Of these modalities, USG is easy to-use for the detection of non-invasive and soft tissue related diseases in oral and maxillofacial regions. USG plays an important role in analyzing normal and abnormal structures. In particular, in oral and maxillofacial regions, the USG may be clinically applied to evaluate lymph nodes, subcutaneous, and oral cavity-related diseases. Aims: The aim was to correlate the findings of USG and histopathology for the diagnosis of oral and maxillofacial pathology and to evaluate whether USG can be used as an adjunct in diagnosing oral and maxillofacial pathology. Materials and Methods: A total of 10 clinically diagnosed patients with intraoral cancerous growths, swellings in maxillary and neck region were included in this study. Incision biopsy was obtained for confirming provisional clinical diagnosis. The selected cases were advised USG. All patients were then posted either for hemi-glossectomy, hemi-mandibulectomy, and partial maxillectomy with or without radical neck dissection. Statistical Analysis: Student′s t-test and coefficient of correlation was used to statistically analyze significant relationship of both the methods. Result: In all 10 cases, USG correlated well with histopathology findings, it could also delineate tumor extent and measure tumor thickness. Conclusion: USG is an excellent method for the diagnosis of soft tissue lesions and can be used as an adjunct in diagnosing oral and maxillofacial pathology.

  6. Oral protein calorie supplementation for children with chronic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Damian K; Smith, Joanne; Saljuqi, Tawab; Watling, Ruth M

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor growth and nutritional status are common in children with chronic diseases. Oral protein calorie supplements are used to improve nutritional status in these children. These expensive products may be associated with some adverse effects, e.g. the development of inappropriate eating behaviour patterns. This is a new update of a Cochrane review last updated in 2009. Objectives To examine evidence that in children with chronic disease, oral protein calorie supplements alter daily nutrient intake, nutritional indices, survival and quality of life and are associated with adverse effects, e.g. diarrhoea, vomiting, reduced appetite, glucose intolerance, bloating and eating behaviour problems. Search methods Trials of oral protein calorie supplements in children with chronic diseases were identified through comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Companies marketing these products were also contacted. Most recent search of the Group's Trials Register: 24 February 2015. Selection criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing oral protein calorie supplements for at least one month to increase calorie intake with existing conventional therapy (including advice on improving nutritional intake from food or no specific intervention) in children with chronic disease. Data collection and analysis We independently assessed the outcomes: indices of nutrition and growth; anthropometric measures of body composition; calorie and nutrient intake (total from oral protein calorie supplements and food); eating behaviour; compliance; quality of life; specific adverse effects; disease severity scores; and mortality; we also assessed the risk of bias in the included trials. Main results Four studies (187 children) met the inclusion criteria. Three studies were carried out in children with cystic fibrosis and one study included children with paediatric malignant disease

  7. Will Maintenance of Oral Hygiene in Nursing Home Residents Prevent Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylotte, Joseph M

    2018-03-01

    This article is an evaluation of the literature on oral hygiene as a risk factor for nursing home-associated pneumonia (NHAP) and with interventions to improve oral hygiene and reduce the incidence of NHAP. The background for this article is that studies that have evaluated interventions to improve oral hygiene and prevent NHAP have conflicting results. To try to understand the reason for these results, the objective was to examine risk factor and intervention studies and determine their methodological validity. Review of studies evaluating oral hygiene status as a risk factor for NHAP found multiple methodological problems, resulting in limited evidence to support this association. Studies of intervention methods, whether finding benefit or not in preventing NHAP, all had methodological limitations. Therefore, it is unclear whether oral hygiene is a risk factor for NHAP and whether improving oral hygiene decreases the incidence of this infection. A recommendation is made that future studies should carefully define the etiology of suspected NHAP using molecular techniques when evaluating methods to prevent this infection because viral pneumonia and aspiration pneumonitis may mimic bacterial pneumonia even though, at times, there may be coinfection with bacteria. In this latter situation, improving oral hygiene may not prevent pneumonia. Therefore, viral infection and pneumonitis with or without bacterial coinfection need to be excluded so that the focus is on prevention of bacterial pneumonia. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  8. Preventive protocols and oral management in childhood leukemia--the pediatric specialist's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Arun M; Hegde, Amitha M

    2010-01-01

    The leukemias are the most common form of childhood malignancy. The pediatric dental professional plays a major role in the prevention, stabilization and treatment of the oral and dental problems that can compromise the child's health and quality of life before, during and after the cancer treatment. This manuscript highlights the incidence of oral complications in leukemic children receiving oncology treatment and the systematic preventive protocol followed during different phases of medical treatment.

  9. [Prevention and treatment of Alzheimer disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso S, Archibaldo; Delgado D, Carolina

    2009-02-01

    The pharmacological interventions for Alzheimer disease should be based in its pathogenic mechanisms such as amyloidogenesis, tau hyperphosphorilation, disturbances in neurotransmission and changes in neuronal trophism. Other therapies derive from epidemiological observations, such as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory drugs, estrogens, statins and anti hypertensive drugs. Some life style interventions, such as changes in diet, exercise and brain stimulation could also be beneficial for the prevention of Alzheimer disease. Ongoing research on pathogenic mechanisms promises the discovery of more effective therapies. Healthy life style should always be recommended due to its benefit and lack of untoward effects.

  10. Garlic for Cardiovascular Disease: Prevention or Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Feras Q; El-Elimat, Tamam; Khalid, Lila; Hudaib, Reema; Al-Shehabi, Tuqa Saleh; Eid, Ali H

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of global mortality with a substantial economic impact. The annual deaths are expected to increase in the next decade. An array of dietary supplements is being used by people worldwide to ameliorate cardiovascular risk factors. Garlic (Allium sativum L.), a top-selling herbal dietary supplement, is renowned for its wide range beneficial effects, particularly in the treatment and prevention of CVD. This review aims to present a thorough discussion of the available evidence-based data which support the use of garlic in the treatment or prevention of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. The molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are dissected as well. This review supports the notion that garlic has the potential to treat mild hypertension, to decrease hypercholesterolemia, and to prevent atherosclerosis. More clinical studies are essential to unequivocally understand the mechanisms underlying treatment or prevention of these cardiovascular conditions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Prediction and prevention of ischemic placental disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Alexander M; Cleary, Kirsten L

    2014-04-01

    Preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and placental abruption are obstetrical conditions that constitute the syndrome of ischemic placental disease or IPD, the leading cause of indicated preterm birth and an important cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. While the phenotypic manifestations vary significantly for preeclampsia, IUGR, and abruption, these conditions may share a common underlying etiology as evidenced by: (1) shared clinical risk factors, (2) increased recurrence risk across pregnancies as well as increased co-occurrence of IPD conditions within a pregnancy, and (3) findings that suggest the underlying pathophysiologic processes may be similar. IPD is of major clinical importance and accounts for a large proportion of indicated preterm delivery ranging from the periviable to late preterm period. Successful prevention of IPD and resultant preterm delivery could substantially improve neonatal and maternal outcomes. This article will review the following topics: (1) The complicated research literature on aspirin and the prevention of preeclampsia and IUGR. (2) Research evidence on other medical interventions to prevent IPD. (3) New clinical interventions currently under investigations, including statins. (4) Current clinical recommendations for prevention of ischemic placental disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dermatoglyphics in patients with oral potentially malignant diseases and oral cancer

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    Prashant B Patil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study and compare the dermatoglyphic and palmar prints of subjects without tobacco chewing/smoking habit, with tobacco chewing/smoking habits without lesions, with potentially malignant diseases, and with oral cancer. Material and Methods: A comparative preliminary study was conducted in 60 subjects who visited Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Navodaya Dental College and Hospital, Raichur, Karnataka, India. The subjects were divided into four groups; 15 healthy controls (Group A, 15 subjects with tobacco habits and without associated lesions (Group B, 15 subjects with potentially malignant diseases (Group C, and 15 subjects with oral cancer (Group D. Dermatoglyphic and palmar prints were obtained by standard India ink method. Prints were analyzed by single observer twice at an interval of 15 days. The data obtained was subjected to statistical test using SPSS software 19 version. Chi-square test was applied to compare the different patterns among groups, and weighted kappa test for intraobserver variability. Results: Among dermatoglyphic patterns, whorl pattern was increased by 60.66% in Group C and 46% in Group D. Oral cancer subjects showed significant decrease in mean accessory tri-radii digital angle (37.13°. Conclusion: Dermatoglyphics can aid as a screening tool for early detection of high-risk individuals with potentially malignant disorders and oral cancer.

  13. Histopathology of vaccine-preventable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Isaac H; Milner, Danny A

    2017-01-01

    The widespread use of vaccines has been one of the most important medical advances in the last century, saving trillions of dollars and millions of lives. Despite local eradication of some infections, travellers returning from affected areas may cause outbreaks through reintroduction of pathogens to individuals who are unable to receive vaccines for medical reasons or who have declined vaccination for non-medical reasons. Infections that would otherwise be uncommonly encountered by anatomical pathologists should therefore remain in the differential diagnosis for immunocompromised and unvaccinated patients. We review here the histopathological features and ancillary testing required for diagnosis of all illnesses preventable by vaccines that are currently approved for use by the United States Food and Drug Administration, organized into three sections: viral infections preventable by routine vaccination (measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, rotavirus, polio, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, influenza, and human papillomavirus), bacterial infections preventable by routine vaccination (diptheria, tetanus, pertussis, Haemophilus influenzae, pneumococcus, and meningococcus), and infections with specific vaccine indications (anthrax, typhoid, tuberculosis, rabies, Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever, smallpox, and adenovirus). Histopathology for the less common diseases is illustrated in this review. Awareness of a patient's immune and/or vaccine status is a crucial component of the infectious disease work-up, especially for rare diseases that may not otherwise be seen. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Biofilm Implication in Oral Diseases of Dogs and Cats

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    Csilla Zambori

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The importance of biofilm in disease processes in humans and animals is now widely recognized. In animal species,the risk of infection is probably greater than the risk in humans. This is due to the difference in animal housing andliving environments – animals naturally live in environments with a large and much more diverse microbialcommunity. Most oral bacteria live symbiotically in biofilm. This symbiotic association gives the bacteria differentcommunal properties than individual planktonic bacteria.Bacteria that form biofilm live and develop in communities which are an important property for dental plaqueformation that leads to dental calculus formation, periodontal diseases, dental caries and systemic diseases.The objective of this study is to reveal the role of dental plaque (oral biofilm in pathogenesis of dental calculus,periodontal disease and dental caries in dogs and cats.

  15. Disease scoring systems for oral lichen planus; a critical appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; van der Waal, I.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study has been to critically review 22 disease scoring systems (DSSs) on oral lichen planus (OLP) that have been reported in the literature during the past decades. Although the presently available DSSs may all have some merit, particularly for research purposes, the diversity

  16. The human oral metaproteome reveals potential biomarkers for caries disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Williamson, James; Simón-Soro, Áurea

    2015-01-01

    Tooth decay is considered the most prevalent human disease worldwide. We present the first metaproteomic study of the oral biofilm, using different mass spectrometry approaches that have allowed us to quantify individual peptides in healthy and caries-bearing individuals. A total of 7771 bacterial...

  17. Inflammatory Bowel Disease, the Oral Contraceptive Pill and Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, Robert N

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes our current knowledge of the role of the oral contraceptive pill in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBO), followed by a review of fertility in women and men. IBD and pregnancy, including the impact on the fetus and the mother with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease, is considered. The safety of drug treatment during pregnancy, the outcome of surgical treatment during pregnancy and the problems that may be encountered during pregnancy in patients with a...

  18. Acute Demyelinating Disease after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts

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    Alex Kostianovsky

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis constitute a group of diseases not completely understood in their physiopathology. Environmental and toxic insults are thought to play a role in priming autoimmunity. The aim of the present report is to describe a case of acute demyelinating disease with fatal outcome occurring 15 days after oral exposure to herbal extracts.

  19. Innate Immunity and Saliva in Candida albicans–mediated Oral Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, O.; Puri, S.; Tati, S.; Edgerton, M.

    2016-01-01

    The oral cavity is a unique niche where Candida albicans infections occur in immunocompetent as well as immunosuppressed individuals. Here we critically review the significance of human innate immune response in preventing oral candidiasis. One important line of defense against oropharyngeal candidiasis is the oral microbiota that prevents infection by competing for space and nutrients as well as by secreting antagonistic molecules and triggering local inflammatory responses. C. albicans is able to induce mucosal defenses through activation of immune cells and production of cytokines. Also, saliva contains various proteins that affect C. albicans growth positively by promoting mucosal adherence and negatively through immune exclusion and direct fungicidal activity. We further discuss the role of saliva in unifying host innate immune defenses against C. albicans as a communicating medium and how C. albicans overgrowth in the oral cavity may be a result of aberrations ranging from microbial dysbiosis and salivary dysfunction to epithelial damage. Last we underscore select oral diseases in which C. albicans is a contributory microorganism in immune-competent individuals. PMID:26747422

  20. Can oral infection be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingar Olsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a scourge of longevity that will drain enormous resources from public health budgets in the future. Currently, there is no diagnostic biomarker and/or treatment for this most common form of dementia in humans. AD can be of early familial-onset or sporadic with a late-onset. Apart from the two main hallmarks, amyloid-beta and neurofibrillary tangles, inflammation is a characteristic feature of AD neuropathology. Inflammation may be caused by a local central nervous system insult and/or by peripheral infections. Numerous microorganisms are suspected in AD brains ranging from bacteria (mainly oral and non-oral Treponema species, viruses (herpes simplex type I, and yeasts (Candida species. A causal relationship between periodontal pathogens and non-oral Treponema species of bacteria has been proposed via the amyloid-beta and inflammatory links. Periodontitis constitutes a peripheral oral infection that can provide the brain with intact bacteria and virulence factors and inflammatory mediators due to daily, transient bacteremias. If and when genetic risk factors meet environmental risk factors in the brain, disease is expressed, in which neurocognition may be impacted, leading to the development of dementia. To achieve the goal of finding a diagnostic biomarker and possible prophylactic treatment for AD, there is an initial need to solve the etiological puzzle contributing to its pathogenesis. This review therefore addresses oral infection as the plausible etiology of late-onset AD (LOAD.

  1. Antioxidant agents: a future alternative approach in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced oral mucositis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas Cuba, Letícia; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves; Cherubini, Karen; de Figueiredo, Maria Antonia Zancanaro

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a therapeutic modality frequently employed for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). It destroys tumor cells, but it is not selective, also affecting healthy tissues and producing adverse effects. One that stands out is oral mucositis because of the morbidity that it is capable of causing. This lesion is characterized by the presence of erythema, ulcerations, pain, opportunistic infections, and weight loss. These side effects can lead to serious situations that require the interruption of the antineoplastic treatment and can result in hospitalization and even death. The complex mechanisms linked to the pathogenesis of oral mucositis were recently established, and since then, the control of oxidative stress (OS) has been tied to the prevention and management of this disease. The authors have carried out a review of the literature about the use of antioxidant agents in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced oral mucositis, using the PubMed database. This review has shown that the research on use of antioxidants (AOX) has proved insufficient to justify suggesting the products in treatment protocols. Results are promising, however, and AOX may represent a future alternative in the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis.

  2. Burden of Oral Diseases in Iran, 1990-2010: Findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoaee, Shervan; Ghasemian, Anoosheh; Mehrabani, Kamran; Naderimagham, Shohreh; Delavari, Farnaz; Sheidaei, Ali; Hajizadeh, Nastaran; Varmaghani, Mehdi; Hessari, Hossein

    2015-08-01

    cleft lip and cleft palate over this period. DALY rates per 100,000 population due to dental caries and edentulism were higher among Iranian women than for Iranian men at all ages, while Iranian men suffered from a higher burden of periodontal disease, mouth cancer, cleft lip, and cleft palate. The most significant burden due to dental caries and periodontal diseases was found in Iranians aged 15-49 and 50-69 years, respectively and edentulism and mouth cancer led to the highest burden in Iranians older than 70 years of age. The highest burden caused by cleft lip and cleft palate occurred in children younger than 5 years old. The findings address the challenging changes in oral diseases and difficulties in responding to the urgent oral health needs in Iran. The burden of oral diseases should be considered as a priority in Iran. A need also exists to pay more attention to the oral health policies and principles of preventive oral care. Global analyses of disease burdens provide a useful framework to guide a suitable policy in response to disease changes. In fact, strong national and sub-national analyses will be required to provide more effective public health strategies.

  3. Meningococcal disease: changes in epidemiology and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Q

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Qiuzhi Chang,1 Yih-Ling Tzeng,2 David S Stephens1–31Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 2Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, 3Laboratories of Microbial Pathogenesis, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Atlanta, GAAbstract: The human bacterial pathogen Neisseria meningitidis remains a serious worldwide health threat, but progress is being made toward the control of meningococcal infections. This review summarizes current knowledge of the global epidemiology and the pathophysiology of meningococcal disease, as well as recent advances in prevention by new vaccines. Meningococcal disease patterns and incidence can vary dramatically, both geographically and over time in populations, influenced by differences in invasive meningococcal capsular serogroups and specific genotypes designated as ST clonal complexes. Serogroup A (ST-5, ST-7, B (ST-41/44, ST-32, ST-18, ST-269, ST-8, ST-35, C (ST-11, Y (ST-23, ST-167, W-135 (ST-11 and X (ST-181 meningococci currently cause almost all invasive disease. Serogroups B, C, and Y are responsible for the majority of cases in Europe, the Americas, and Oceania; serogroup A has been associated with the highest incidence (up to 1000 per 100,000 cases and large outbreaks of meningococcal disease in sub-Saharan Africa and previously Asia; and serogroups W-135 and X have emerged to cause major disease outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa. Significant declines in meningococcal disease have occurred in the last decade in many developed countries. In part, the decline is related to the introduction of new meningococcal vaccines. Serogroup C polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines were introduced over a decade ago, first in the UK in a mass vaccination campaign, and are now widely used; multivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccines containing serogroups A, C, W-135, and/or Y were first used for adolescents in the US in 2005 and have now expanded

  4. Oral esomeprazole vs injectable omeprazole for the prevention of hemorrhage after endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Takashi; Higurashi, Takuma; Kuriyama, Hitoshi; Kondo, Yoshinobu; Hata, Yasuo; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2017-10-16

    To evaluate the effectiveness of oral esomeprazole (EPZ) vs injectable omeprazole (OPZ) therapy to prevent hemorrhage after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). A case-control study was conducted using a quasi-randomized analysis with propensity score matching. A total of 258 patients were enrolled in this study. Patients were treated with either oral EPZ or injectable OPZ. The endpoint was the incidence of hemorrhage after ESD. Data of 71 subjects treated with oral EPZ and 172 subjects treated with injectable OPZ were analyzed. Analysis of 65 matched samples revealed no difference in the incidence of hemorrhage after ESD between the oral EPZ and injectable OPZ groups (OR = 0.89, 95%CI: 0.35-2.27, P ≥ 0.99). We conclude that oral EPZ therapy is a useful alternative to injectable PPI therapy for the prevention of hemorrhage after ESD.

  5. Apitherapy - a natural antidote for oral diseases: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Gopal, Akkala Satya; Veluru, Lakshmi Sindhuri; K, Sai Sankar A.; Sunil, C H Ram

    2016-01-01

    Natural commodities of honeybees have various ingredients within them, which contribute to their incredible properties. These products have been used in traditional medicine since ancient times, due to its biologically active nature in preventing infections, wound healing and in promoting health. This nature is credited to their antibacterial, antioxidant, immunomodulating, anti-inflammatory and wound healing property. As natural remedies are showing promising results in management of oral di...

  6. Application of high-throughput sequencing in understanding human oral microbiome related with health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hui; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The oral microbiome is one of most diversity habitat in the human body and they are closely related with oral health and disease. As the technique developing,, high throughput sequencing has become a popular approach applied for oral microbial analysis. Oral bacterial profiles have been studied to explore the relationship between microbial diversity and oral diseases such as caries and periodontal disease. This review describes the application of high-throughput sequencing for characterizati...

  7. Co-existence of Oral Lichen Planes & Chronic Liver Disease - A Coincidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Gupta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available "Oral cavity is the reflection of an individual′s general health" .Many systemic diseases have manifestations in the oral cavity. Systemic influences,such as endocrinal, immtlnological, nutritional and psychological states have an important role in thebalance between oral health and disease. This also holds good for a well known mucocutaneous disorder - "Oral Lichen Planus". The present study is carried out to deteremine any co-relation between oral lichen planes and chronic liver diseases.

  8. Effectiveness of prevention-oriented school oral health program in a private school in Pimpri, Pune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Programs oriented toward prevention have proven to be highly rewarding in reducing the dental disease burden in western populations. Some developing countries have also reported studies of school health programs with varying effectiveness. However, reports regarding improved effectiveness due to mobile dental unit are scarce. Thus, the present study aims at assessment of effectiveness of prevention-oriented school health program in a private school in Pimpri, Pune. Materials and Methods: A longitudinal study was conducted from May 2015 to June 2016 in Dr. D.Y. Patil school among 449 students aged 5 and 10 years using census sampling. Ethical clearance was obtained from Institutional Ethics Committee of Dr. D. Y. Patil Dental College and Hospital and permission was obtained from the school principal. The study was conducted in 3 phases. SPSS version 18 was used for analyzing the data. Results: There was significant reduction in decayed component and a significant increase in filled component in primary and permanent dentition. There was a significant reduction in treatment needs, i.e., one surface, two surface fillings, and pulp care and restoration. Conclusion: It can be concluded that this prevention-oriented 1-year program was helpful in improving the oral health of the children.

  9. Oral health and risk factors for dental disease of Australian young people in custody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haysom, Leigh; Indig, Devon; Byun, Roy; Moore, Elizabeth; van den Dolder, Paul

    2014-11-02

    To describe the prevalence and risk factors for markers of poor oral health in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal young people in custody in Australia. All incarcerated youth, aged 13-21 years, in New South Wales Juvenile Custodial Centres between August and October 2009 were invited to participate and undertake a dental exam. The main outcome measures were an assessment of moderate/abundant plaque, periodontal disease, dental caries experience, mean decayed and/or filled and/or missing teeth (DMFT) index and untreated decay. Two hundred ninety-four participants (91% male, 46% Aboriginal) underwent a dental exam. Markers of poor oral health were common - 49.4% with moderate/abundant plaque, 34.4% with periodontal disease, mean DMFT 3.56 and 54% having untreated decay. Risk factors independently associated with poor oral health were geographical remoteness and non-fluoridation of the water supply of the usual residence, a shorter incarceration time and dental treatment outside of custody. Young people entering custody have poor oral health, with those from geographically remote areas without water fluoridation at highest risk. The incarceration period is an opportunity for oral health improvements in these young people through access to dental treatment services. Better triaging systems are needed to identify those of greatest priority, and prevention services are needed. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  10. Diet, nutrition and the prevention of dental diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Paula; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2004-02-01

    Oral health is related to diet in many ways, for example, nutritional influences on craniofacial development, oral cancer and oral infectious diseases. Dental diseases impact considerably on self-esteem and quality of life and are expensive to treat. The objective of this paper is to review the evidence for an association between nutrition, diet and dental diseases and to present dietary recommendations for their prevention. Nutrition affects the teeth during development and malnutrition may exacerbate periodontal and oral infectious diseases. However, the most significant effect of nutrition on teeth is the local action of diet in the mouth on the development of dental caries and enamel erosion. Dental erosion is increasing and is associated with dietary acids, a major source of which is soft drinks. Despite improved trends in levels of dental caries in developed countries, dental caries remains prevalent and is increasing in some developing countries undergoing nutrition transition. There is convincing evidence, collectively from human intervention studies, epidemiological studies, animal studies and experimental studies, for an association between the amount and frequency of free sugars intake and dental caries. Although other fermentable carbohydrates may not be totally blameless, epidemiological studies show that consumption of starchy staple foods and fresh fruit are associated with low levels of dental caries. Fluoride reduces caries risk but has not eliminated dental caries and many countries do not have adequate exposure to fluoride. It is important that countries with a low intake of free sugars do not increase intake, as the available evidence shows that when free sugars consumption is countries with high consumption levels it is recommended that national health authorities and decision-makers formulate country-specific and community-specific goals for reducing the amount of free sugars aiming towards the recommended maximum of no more than 10% of energy

  11. Oral health and later coronary heart disease: Cohort study of one million people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, G David; Jung, Keum Ji; Mok, Yejin; Lee, Sun Ju; Back, Joung Hwan; Lee, Sunmi; Jee, Sun Ha

    2018-04-01

    Aims Systematic reviews report an association between poorer oral health and an increased risk of coronary heart disease. This contentious relationship may not be causal but existing studies have been insufficiently well powered comprehensively to examine the role of confounding, particularly by cigarette smoking. Accordingly, we sought to examine the role of smoking in generating the relationship between oral health and coronary heart disease in life-long non-smokers. Methods and results In the Korean Cancer Prevention Study, 975,685 individuals (349,579 women) aged 30-95 years had an oral examination when tooth loss, a widely used indicator of oral health, was ascertained. Linkage to national mortality and hospital registers over 21 years of follow-up gave rise to 64,784 coronary heart disease events (19,502 in women). In the whole cohort, after statistical adjustment for age, there was a moderate, positive association between tooth loss and coronary heart disease in both men (hazard ratio for seven or more missing teeth vs. none; 95% confidence interval 1.08; 1.02, 1.14; P trend across tooth loss groups disease events), however, resulted in an elimination of this association in men (1.01; 0.85, 1.19); P trend 0.7506) but not women (1.08; 0.99, 1.18; P trend 0.0086). Conclusion In men in the present study, the relationship between poor oral health and coronary heart disease risk appeared to be explained by confounding by cigarette smoking so raising questions about a causal link.

  12. Oral potentially malignant disorders: is malignant transformation predictable and preventable?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, I.

    2014-01-01

    Leukoplakia is the most common potentially malignant disorder of the oral mucosa. The prevalence is approximately 1% while the annual malignant transformation ranges from 2% to 3%. At present, there are no reliable clinicopathological or molecular predicting factors of malignant transformation that

  13. The Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance: updated case definitions of oral disease endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiboski, C H; Patton, L L; Webster-Cyriaque, J Y; Greenspan, D; Traboulsi, R S; Ghannoum, M; Jurevic, R; Phelan, J A; Reznik, D; Greenspan, J S

    2009-07-01

    The Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance (OHARA) is part of the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG), the largest HIV clinical trials organization in the world. Its main objective is to investigate oral complications associated with HIV/AIDS as the epidemic is evolving, in particular, the effects of antiretrovirals on oral mucosal lesion development and associated fungal and viral pathogens. The OHARA infrastructure comprises: the Epidemiologic Research Unit (at the University of California San Francisco), the Medical Mycology Unit (at Case Western Reserve University) and the Virology/Specimen Banking Unit (at the University of North Carolina). The team includes dentists, physicians, virologists, mycologists, immunologists, epidemiologists and statisticians. Observational studies and clinical trials are being implemented at ACTG-affiliated sites in the US and resource-poor countries. Many studies have shared end-points, which include oral diseases known to be associated with HIV/AIDS measured by trained and calibrated ACTG study nurses. In preparation for future protocols, we have updated existing diagnostic criteria of the oral manifestations of HIV published in 1992 and 1993. The proposed case definitions are designed to be used in large-scale epidemiologic studies and clinical trials, in both US and resource-poor settings, where diagnoses may be made by non-dental healthcare providers. The objective of this article is to present updated case definitions for HIV-related oral diseases that will be used to measure standardized clinical end-points in OHARA studies, and that can be used by any investigator outside of OHARA/ACTG conducting clinical research that pertains to these end-points.

  14. THE DYNAMIC EVOLUTION OF ORAL HEALTH STATUS OF SCHOOLCHILDREN IN IASI UNDER THE IMPACT OF THE NATIONAL PREVENTION PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia BOBU

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In most of the developing countries, dental caries continues to represent a major issue of public health. In Romania, the National Program for Oral and Dental Diseases Prevention was implemented between 1999-2010, addressed to children attending primary school and consisting of weekly mouth rinses with 0.2% NaF solution. In the present study, the dynamic evolution of oral health status of schoolchildren aged 6-12 years in Iasi, under the impact of this Program, was analyzed. The results showed a decreasing trend in the prevalence and incidence of dental caries, a constant decrease of caries experience indices DMFT and DMFS and, within them, the increasing trend of fillings indicator FS and the decrease of deep lesions weight. The conclusion is that tooth decay has declined in schoolchildren in Iasi during the development of the National Prevention Program.

  15. Oral hygiene in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Larsen, Palle

    2017-01-01

    SCOPING REVIEW OBJECTIVE: It is hypothesized that systematic oral hygiene may reduce airway infections in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Before considering doing a systematic review, a scoping review is necessary to explore and map literature on the subject and identify......-invasive interventions that have been carried out to improve oral hygiene and relieve and/or reduce respiratory tract infections, exacerbation and/or hospital readmission in patients with diagnosed with COPD. A further objective is to undertake a comprehensive search to identify qualitative literature reporting...... on the experiences of oral hygiene in people diagnosed with COPD and/or their relatives and/or healthcare providers (HCPs).Specifically, the scoping review questions are as follows....

  16. Preventing Mitochondrial Disease: A Path Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adashi, Eli Y; Cohen, I Glenn

    2018-03-01

    In a possible first, the heritable transmission of a fatal mitochondrial DNA disease (Leigh syndrome) may have been prevented by replacing the mutation-bearing mitochondria of oocytes with donated mutation-free counterparts. The procedure, carried out by a U.S.-led team, took place in Mexico in circumvention of a statutory U.S. moratorium on mitochondrial replacement. This development calls into question the regulatory utility of a national moratorium in a globalized world wherein cross-border care is increasingly prevalent. This development also calls to account the moral defensibility of a moratorium that acquiesces in the birth of gravely ill children whose afflictions could have been prevented. In this Current Commentary, we outline a potential path forward by analyzing the dual imprint of the moratorium, examining its legislative shortcomings, exploring its motivational roots, considering its national effect, and proposing its unlinking from the related yet distinct ban on editing the genome of the human embryo.

  17. Heart failure: preventing disease and death worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D; AlHabib, Khalid F; Cowie, Martin R; Force, Thomas L; Hu, Shengshou; Jaarsma, Tiny; Krum, Henry; Rastogi, Vishal; Rohde, Luis E; Samal, Umesh C; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Budi Siswanto, Bambang; Sliwa, Karen; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure is a life-threatening disease and addressing it should be considered a global health priority. At present, approximately 26 million people worldwide are living with heart failure. The outlook for such patients is poor, with survival rates worse than those for bowel, breast or prostate cancer. Furthermore, heart failure places great stresses on patients, caregivers and healthcare systems. Demands on healthcare services, in particular, are predicted to increase dramatically over the next decade as patient numbers rise owing to ageing populations, detrimental lifestyle changes and improved survival of those who go on to develop heart failure as the final stage of another disease. It is time to ease the strain on healthcare systems through clear policy initiatives that prioritize heart failure prevention and champion equity of care for all. Despite the burdens that heart failure imposes on society, awareness of the disease is poor. As a result, many premature deaths occur. This is in spite of the fact that most types of heart failure are preventable and that a healthy lifestyle can reduce risk. Even after heart failure has developed, premature deaths could be prevented if people were taught to recognize the symptoms and seek immediate medical attention. Public awareness campaigns focusing on these messages have great potential to improve outcomes for patients with heart failure and ultimately to save lives. Compliance with clinical practice guidelines is also associated with improved outcomes for patients with heart failure. However, in many countries, there is considerable variation in how closely physicians follow guideline recommendations. To promote equity of care, improvements should be encouraged through the use of hospital performance measures and incentives appropriate to the locality. To this end, policies should promote the research required to establish an evidence base for performance measures that reflect improved outcomes for patients

  18. Acute recurrent diverticulitis is prevented by oral administration of a polybacterial lysate suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dughera, L; Serra, A M; Battaglia, E; Tibaudi, D; Navino, M; Emanuelli, G

    2004-06-01

    The main cause of acute diverticulitis is the abnormal accumulation of fecal bacteria within the diverticular lumen, leading to a balancing between normal probiotic microflora and pathogenic species; Gram negative Entero-bacteriaceae, mainly Escherichia coli and Proteus spp, are the genders that usually cause the disease-related symptoms, due to their ability to adhere to intestinal mucosa. The intestine is well known as the largest human lymphoepithelial organ and daily produces more antibodies, mainly secretory IgAs, than do all other lymphoid tissues. IgAs have different immune and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to verify the efficacy of an oral immunostimulant highly-purified, polymicrobial lysate in the prevention of recurrent attacks of diverticulitis and in the improvement of symptoms. The study was carried out on 83 consecutive patients suffering from recurrent symptomatic acute diverticulitis and with at least 2 attacks in the previous year; patients were randomly assigned to receive (group A) an oral polybacterial lysate suspension or to a no-treatment clinical follow-up as controls (group B). A total of 76 patients (41 in group A and 35 in group B) terminated the study period. the sums of the scores for symptoms, reported on day schedules, were calculated and examined by means of ANOVA statistical analysis. Statistical differences between group A vs group B were recorded after 1 month (precurrent diverticulitis is effective and well tolerated, probably due to a direct stimulation of IgA-mediated mucosal defences.

  19. Mouth-rinses for the prevention of chemotherapy induced oral mucositis in children: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, A; Bahrololoumi, Z; Khaksar, Y; Saffarzadeh, N; Neamatzade, H; Foroughi, E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate studies in basic oral care interventions to update evidence based practice guidelines for preventing oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Pub Med database and Google Scholar were searched for all papers published between 2000 and December 2014 in English that were conducted using the search terms including ''mocusitis, chemotherapy, mouth-rinses, oral care, oral care protocol, dental care,dental cleaning, oral decontamination, oral hygiene", and the combined phrases in order to obtain all relevant studies. The initial search concluded 151 published papers representing both research and clinical work. Review articles, clinical case reports, literature reviews, and other nonresearch articles were excluded from the review. Following this process, 30 papers remained. Among these, chlorhexidine, normal saline, sodium bicarbonate, iseganan, benzydamine, sucralfate and Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor have been used in the form of mouth-rinse for prevention of chemotherapy induced mucositis. However, none of these mouthrinses have been shown to be definitely effective in preventing chemotherapy induced oral mucositis.

  20. Guidelines for the secondary prevention of rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrazaq Al-Jazairi

    2017-03-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease can be prevented with appropriate antibiotics administration to prevent the progression of valve damage. The current use of primary and secondary prevention antibiotics in Saudi Arabia is not known. Therefore, this clinical practice guideline is developed, based on the best available evidence, to promote appropriate antibiotics secondary prophylaxis use for prevention of rheumatic heart disease.

  1. Oral protein calorie supplementation for children with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Damian K; Smith, Joanne; Saljuqi, Tawab; Watling, Ruth M

    2015-05-27

    Poor growth and nutritional status are common in children with chronic diseases. Oral protein calorie supplements are used to improve nutritional status in these children. These expensive products may be associated with some adverse effects, e.g. the development of inappropriate eating behaviour patterns. This is a new update of a Cochrane review last updated in 2009. To examine evidence that in children with chronic disease, oral protein calorie supplements alter daily nutrient intake, nutritional indices, survival and quality of life and are associated with adverse effects, e.g. diarrhoea, vomiting, reduced appetite, glucose intolerance, bloating and eating behaviour problems. Trials of oral protein calorie supplements in children with chronic diseases were identified through comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearching relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Companies marketing these products were also contacted.Most recent search of the Group's Trials Register: 24 February 2015. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing oral protein calorie supplements for at least one month to increase calorie intake with existing conventional therapy (including advice on improving nutritional intake from food or no specific intervention) in children with chronic disease. We independently assessed the outcomes: indices of nutrition and growth; anthropometric measures of body composition; calorie and nutrient intake (total from oral protein calorie supplements and food); eating behaviour; compliance; quality of life; specific adverse effects; disease severity scores; and mortality; we also assessed the risk of bias in the included trials. Four studies (187 children) met the inclusion criteria. Three studies were carried out in children with cystic fibrosis and one study included children with paediatric malignant disease. Overall there was a low risk of bias for blinding and incomplete outcome data.Two studies had a high

  2. Determinants of preventive oral health behaviour among senior dental students in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folayan, Morenike O; Khami, Mohammad R; Folaranmi, Nkiru; Popoola, Bamidele O; Sofola, Oyinkan O; Ligali, Taofeek O; Esan, Ayodeji O; Orenuga, Omolola O

    2013-06-18

    To study the association between oral health behaviour of senior dental students in Nigeria and their gender, age, knowledge of preventive care, and attitudes towards preventive dentistry. Questionnaires were administered to 179 senior dental students in the six dental schools in Nigeria. The questionnaire obtained information on age, gender, oral self-care, knowledge of preventive dental care and attitudes towards preventive dentistry. Attending a dental clinic for check-up by a dentist or a classmate within the last year was defined as preventive care use. Students who performed oral self-care and attended dental clinic for check-ups were noted to have complied with recommended oral self-care. Chi-square test and binary logistic regression models were used for statistical analyses. More male respondents agreed that the use of fluoride toothpaste was more important than the tooth brushing technique for caries prevention (P dental floss was very low (7.3%), more females were more likely to report using dental floss (p=0.03). Older students were also more likely to comply with recommended oral self-care (pdental care (p=0.008) were more likely to consume sugary snacks less than once a day. Gender differences in the awareness of the superiority of using fluoridated toothpaste over brushing in caries prevention; and in the use of dental floss were observed. While older students were more likely to comply with recommended oral self-care measures, younger students with good knowledge of preventive dental care were more likely to consume sugary snacks less than once a day.

  3. The role of oral antibiotics prophylaxis in prevention of surgical site infection in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koullouros, Michalis; Khan, Nadir; Aly, Emad H

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) continues to be a challenge in colorectal surgery. Over the years, various modalities have been used in an attempt to reduce SSI risk in elective colorectal surgery, which include mechanical bowel preparation before surgery, oral antibiotics and intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis at induction of surgery. Even though IV antibiotics have become standard practice, there has been a debate on the exact role of oral antibiotics. The primary aim was to identify the role of oral antibiotics in reduction of SSI in elective colorectal surgery. The secondary aim was to explore any potential benefit in the use of mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) in relation to SSI in elective colorectal surgery. Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched. Any randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or cohort studies after 1980, which investigated the effectiveness of oral antibiotic prophylaxis and/or MBP in preventing SSIs in elective colorectal surgery were included. Twenty-three RCTs and eight cohorts were included. The results indicate a statistically significant advantage in preventing SSIs with the combined usage of oral and systemic antibiotic prophylaxis. Furthermore, our analysis of the cohort studies shows no benefits in the use of MBP in prevention of SSIs. The addition of oral antibiotics to systemic antibiotics could potentially reduce the risk of SSIs in elective colorectal surgery. Additionally, MBP does not seem to provide a clear benefit with regard to SSI prevention.

  4. Molecular epidemiology of human oral Chagas disease outbreaks in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Juan David; Montilla, Marleny; Cucunubá, Zulma M; Floréz, Astrid Carolina; Zambrano, Pilar; Guhl, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, displays significant genetic variability revealed by six Discrete Typing Units (TcI-TcVI). In this pathology, oral transmission represents an emerging epidemiological scenario where different outbreaks associated to food/beverages consumption have been reported in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador and Venezuela. In Colombia, six human oral outbreaks have been reported corroborating the importance of this transmission route. Molecular epidemiology of oral outbreaks is barely known observing the incrimination of TcI, TcII, TcIV and TcV genotypes. High-throughput molecular characterization was conducted performing MLMT (Multilocus Microsatellite Typing) and mtMLST (mitochondrial Multilocus Sequence Typing) strategies on 50 clones from ten isolates. Results allowed observing the occurrence of TcI, TcIV and mixed infection of distinct TcI genotypes. Thus, a majority of specific mitochondrial haplotypes and allelic multilocus genotypes associated to the sylvatic cycle of transmission were detected in the dataset with the foreseen presence of mitochondrial haplotypes and allelic multilocus genotypes associated to the domestic cycle of transmission. These findings suggest the incrimination of sylvatic genotypes in the oral outbreaks occurred in Colombia. We observed patterns of super-infection and/or co-infection with a tailored association with the severe forms of myocarditis in the acute phase of the disease. The transmission dynamics of this infection route based on molecular epidemiology evidence was unraveled and the clinical and biological implications are discussed.

  5. Tobacco use, oral cancer screening, and oral disease burden in Indian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Immanuel Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: India lacks data on national level adaptation of oral cancer screening measures and burden of oral diseases. We intend to address the issue through a secondary data analysis of existing data and reports. Materials and Methods: Data were acquired from the National Family Health Survey-4 (2015-2016. Of the 699,686 responses, representing 99% of India's women population living in all of India, the following data from the age group of 15–49 years were mined – any tobacco use, desire to quit tobacco use, and oral cavity screening for cancers. Data from Central Health Intelligence Bureau 2016 was used to identify population served by dentists in each state. The state-level data of the District Level Household and Facility Survey-4 (2012–2013 were mined for household population having symptoms of chronic illness including mouth/dental illness persisting for more than 1 month and had sought treatment. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS version 20; Descriptive statistics for values in proportions; Pearson's correlation test assessed between the various factors. Results: Tobacco use in any form was highly prevalent among the North Eastern states, and there was also a lack of willingness to quit the habit. There was unequal distribution of dentists in different states. No significant statistical correlation was found between the proportions. Conclusion: There is disparity existing in treating seeking behavior of the general population as well as the need for dental treatment. The skewedness in dentists' distribution among the nation as compared with oral burden of diseases needs to be correlated before oral health policies are planned.

  6. Prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, Ieda Lessa de Souza; Camargo, Teresa Caldas

    2007-01-01

    The prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis have still not been fully defined. The current study thus involved a literature search aimed at identifying preventive and therapeutic measures in relation to oral mucositis in patients submitted to radiotherapy, analyzing the level of evidence in the selected studies, identifying which indications for prevention and treatment in the literature pertain to the field of nursing, and critically analyzing the results and their implications for nursing care. This was a systematic literature survey without a meta analysis, consulting the following databases: BIREME, Medline, CancerLit, Scirus, CAPES, Free medical journal, High wire press, SCIELO, and Medscape, from 2000 to 2005. According to observations, nursing care was capable of improving patient's quality of life, promoting education of patients, implementing and supervising oral care programs, and providing guidance on hygiene, prevention, and treatment of oral mucositis, including pain management. However, no Brazilian nursing publications were found on the subject. Research and publications focusing on nursing experience in the prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-related oral mucositis and the implications for patients and nurses are important to provide evidence-based nursing guidelines. (author)

  7. Polypills for the prevention of Cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolte, Dhaval; Aronow, Wilbert S; Banach, Maciej

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) remain the leading cause of death worldwide with an estimated 17.5 million deaths per year. Since its initial conception over a decade ago, the use of cardiovascular polypills has gained increasing momentum as a strategy to lower risk factor levels and prevent CVD. Several new data have emerged including the recent publication of the first outcomes trial using polypills. Areas covered: In this review, the authors summarize the current literature on the safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of polypills for primary and secondary prevention of CVD, describe the current controversies in this field, and identify important areas for future research. The authors searched PubMed, CENTRAL, and ClinicalTrials.gov from inception till 25 June 2016 using the search term 'polypill.' Expert opinion: Cardiovascular polypills containing aspirin, statin, and one or more anti-hypertensive medications, along with lifestyle interventions, represent an attractive, safe, and cost-effective strategy for primary and secondary prevention of CVD. Future research efforts should focus on identifying patients who will benefit the most from the use of polypills, marketing several polypills with different components and doses, and developing novel regulatory strategies for making polypills more readily available in all countries worldwide.

  8. Oral precancerous lesions: Problems of early detection and oral cancer prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gileva, Olga S.; Libik, Tatiana V.; Danilov, Konstantin V.

    2016-08-01

    The study presents the results of the research in the structure, local and systemic risk factors, peculiarities of the clinical manifestation, and quality of primary diagnosis of precancerous oral mucosa lesions (OMLs). In the study a wide range of OMLs and high (25.4%) proportion of oral precancerous lesions (OPLs) in their structure was indicated. The high percentage of different diagnostic errors and the lack of oncological awareness of dental practitioners, as well as the sharp necessity of inclusion of precancer/cancer early detection techniques into their daily practice were noted. The effectiveness of chemilumenescence system of early OPLs and oral cancer detection was demonstrated, the prospects of infrared thermography as a diagnostic tool were also discussed.

  9. Saliva as a diagnostic tool for oral and systemic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Javaid, Mohammad A.; Ahmed, Ahad S.; Durand, Robert; Tran, Simon D.

    2015-01-01

    Early disease detection is not only vital to reduce disease severity and prevent complications, but also critical to increase success rate of therapy. Saliva has been studied extensively as a potential diagnostic tool over the last decade due to its ease and non-invasive accessibility along with its abundance of biomarkers, such as genetic material and proteins. This review will update the clinician on recent advances in salivary biomarkers to diagnose autoimmune diseases (Sjogren's syndrome,...

  10. Erlotinib and the Risk of Oral Cancer: The Erlotinib Prevention of Oral Cancer (EPOC) Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William, William N; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Lee, J Jack; Mao, Li; Cohen, Ezra E W; Lin, Heather Y; Gillenwater, Ann M; Martin, Jack W; Lingen, Mark W; Boyle, Jay O; Shin, Dong M; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Shinn, Nancy; Heymach, John V; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Tang, Ximing; Kim, Edward S; Saintigny, Pierre; Blair, Elizabeth A; Meiller, Timothy; Gutkind, J Silvio; Myers, Jeffrey; El-Naggar, Adel; Lippman, Scott M

    2016-02-01

    Standard molecularly based strategies to predict and/or prevent oral cancer development in patients with oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) are lacking. To test if the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib would reduce oral cancer development in patients with high-risk OPLs defined by specific loss of heterozygosity (LOH) profiles. Secondary objectives included prospective determination of LOH as a prognostic marker in OPLs. The Erlotinib Prevention of Oral Cancer (EPOC) study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-bind trial. Accrual occurred from November 2006 through July 2012, with a median follow-up time of 35 months in an ambulatory care setting in 5 US academic referral institutions. Patients with OPLs were enrolled in the protocol, and each underwent LOH profiling (N = 379); they were classified as high-risk (LOH-positive) or low-risk (LOH-negative) patients based on their LOH profiles and oral cancer history. The randomized sample consisted of 150 LOH-positive patients. Oral erlotinib treatment (150 mg/d) or placebo for 12 months. Oral cancer-free survival (CFS). A total of 395 participants were classified with LOH profiles, and 254 were classified LOH positive. Of these, 150 (59%) were randomized, 75 each to the placebo and erlotinib groups. The 3-year CFS rates in placebo- and erlotinib-treated patients were 74% and 70%, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95% CI, 0.68-2.38; P = .45). The 3-year CFS was significantly lower for LOH-positive compared with LOH-negative groups (74% vs 87%, HR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.25-3.83; P = .01). Increased EGFR gene copy number correlated with LOH-positive status (P < .001) and lower CFS (P = .01). The EGFR gene copy number was not predictive of erlotinib efficacy. Erlotinib-induced skin rash was associated with improved CFS (P = .01). In this trial, LOH was validated as a marker of oral cancer risk and found to be associated with increased EGFR copy number (the target of the intervention

  11. Oral necrotizing microvasculitis in a patient affected by Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardina, Giuseppe Alessandro; Fucà, Gerlandina; Carini, Francesco; Valenza, Vincenzo; Spicola, Michele; Procaccianti, Paolo; Messina, Pietro; Maresi, Emiliano

    2007-12-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) was first described in 1967 by Kawasaki, who defined it as "mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome". KD is an acute systemic vasculitis, which mainly involves medium calibre arteries; its origin is unknown, and it is observed in children under the age of 5, especially in their third year. The principal presentations of KD include fever, bilateral nonexudative conjunctivitis, erythema of the lips and oral mucosa, changes in the extremities, rash, and cervical lymphadenopathy. Within KD, oral mucositis - represented by diffuse mucous membrane erythema, lip and tongue reddening and lingual papillae hypertrophy with subsequent development of strawberry tongue - can occur both in the acute stage of the disease (0-9 days), and in the convalescence stage (>25 days) as a consequence of the pharmacological treatment. KD vascular lesions are defined as systemic vasculitis instead of systemic arteritis. This study analyzed the anatomical-pathological substrata of oral mucositis in a baby affected by Kawasaki disease and suddenly deceased for cardiac tamponade caused by coronary aneurysm rupture (sudden cardiac death of a mechanical type).

  12. A model for Chagas disease with oral and congenital transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffield, Daniel J; Spagnuolo, Anna Maria; Shillor, Meir; Mema, Ensela; Pell, Bruce; Pruzinsky, Amanda; Zetye, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new mathematical model for the domestic transmission of Chagas disease, a parasitic disease affecting humans and other mammals throughout Central and South America. The model takes into account congenital transmission in both humans and domestic mammals as well as oral transmission in domestic mammals. The model has time-dependent coefficients to account for seasonality and consists of four nonlinear differential equations, one of which has a delay, for the populations of vectors, infected vectors, infected humans, and infected mammals in the domestic setting. Computer simulations show that congenital transmission has a modest effect on infection while oral transmission in domestic mammals substantially contributes to the spread of the disease. In particular, oral transmission provides an alternative to vector biting as an infection route for the domestic mammals, who are key to the infection cycle. This may lead to high infection rates in domestic mammals even when the vectors have a low preference for biting them, and ultimately results in high infection levels in humans.

  13. Oral contraceptives, reproductive factors and risk of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Hamed; Higuchi, Leslie M; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Richter, James M; Feskanich, Diane; Fuchs, Charles S; Chan, Andrew T

    2013-08-01

    Oral contraceptive use has been associated with risk of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). To determine whether this association is confounded or modified by other important lifestyle and reproductive factors. A prospective cohort study was carried out of 117,375 US women enrolled since 1976 in the Nurses Health Study I (NHS I) and 115,077 women enrolled since 1989 in the Nurses' Health Study II (NHS II) with no prior history of UC or CD. These women had provided information every 2 years, on age at menarche, oral contraceptive use, parity, menopause status and other risk factors. Diagnoses of CD and UC were confirmed by review of medical records. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate HRs and 95% CIs. Among 232,452 women with over 5,030,196 person-years of follow-up, 315 cases of CD and 392 cases of UC were recorded through 2007 in NHS II and 2008 in NHS I. Compared with never users of oral contraceptives, the multivariate-adjusted HRs for CD were 2.82 (95% CI 1.65 to 4.82) among current users and 1.39 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.85) among past users. The association between oral contraceptives and UC differed according to smoking history (pheterogeneity=0.04). Age at menarche, age at first birth and parity were not associated with risk of UC or CD. In two large prospective cohorts of US women, oral contraceptive use was associated with risk of CD. The association between oral contraceptive use and UC was limited to women with a history of smoking.

  14. [Nursing staff's knowledge and attitudes concerning preventive oral hygiene in palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloir, Marie-Noëlle; Riou, Françoise

    2014-06-01

    Preventive mouth care is essential for the well-being of palliative care patients, though it is not performed enough outside units devoted to these patients. Our study aimed at getting a better knowledge of carers' attitudes and knowledge regarding this basic care. A validated questionnaire was sent anonymously to nurses and nursing aides working in the medical units of ten hospitals in Brittany. Of the 2,467 questionnaires sent, 54% were validated for use. The years of experience have little influence on nursing staff's answers. One in twenty does not think that preventive mouth care is part of his/her duties. This care is considered unpleasant, and difficult, by 11% and 22% of nurses, and 13.5% and 20.5% of nursing aides, respectively. A lack of knowledge is openly expressed with regards to oral diseases and dental prostheses. More than one in four cannot say if he/she knows the functions of the mouth, or he/she can identify a healthy mouth. These results show the scope for improvement as well as the priorities. They will be used as baseline for our future program assessment.

  15. Antimicrobial and Attractant Roles for Chemerin in the Oral Cavity during Inflammatory Gum Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewska, Urszula; Brzoza, Piotr; Sroka, Aneta; Majewski, Pawel; Jentsch, Holger; Eckert, Martin; Eick, Sigrun; Potempa, Jan; Zabel, Brian A; Cichy, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal inflammation is one of the most common chronic inflammatory conditions in humans. Despite recent advances in identifying and characterizing oral microbiota dysbiosis in the pathogenesis of gum disease, just how host factors maintain a healthy homeostatic oral microbial community or prevent the development of a pathogenic oral microbiota remains poorly understood. An important determinant of microbiota fate is local antimicrobial proteins. Here, we report that chemoattractant protein chemerin, which we recently identified as a potent endogenous antimicrobial agent in body barriers such as the skin, is present in the oral cavity under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. Chemerin and a chemerin-derived antimicrobial peptide are bactericidal against select bacteria strategically positioned in dental biofilm. Gingival crevicular samples from patients with gingivitis but not periodontitis contain abundant bioactive chemerin capable of inducing CMKLR1-dependent leukocyte migration. Gingipains secreted by the periodontopathogen P. gingivalis inactivate chemerin. Together, these data suggest that as an antimicrobial agent and leukocyte chemoattractant, chemerin likely contributes to antimicrobial immune defense in the oral cavity.

  16. Homocysteine, vitamins, and prevention of vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCully, Kilmer S

    2004-04-01

    examining whether lowering plasma homocysteine levels with supplemental B vitamins will prevent mortality and morbidity from arteriosclerotic vascular disease.

  17. Prevention of urogenital infections by oral administration of probiotic lactobacilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedran Slačanac

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In general, lactobacilli are nonpathogenic part of the normal urogenital microflora and have been recognized as a barrier against colonization of unwanted (pathogen microflora. The results of many in vitro studies suggest following mechanisms of probiotic lactobacilli action in urogenital tract: adhesion to urogenital cells, competition with pathogens for adhesive sites, production of biosurfactants, co-aggregation with pathogens, production of antimicrobial substances (organic acids, hydrogen peroxide and bacteriocins and stimulation of immune system. From 80 different lactobacilli species isolated from human or animal intestinal and urogenital tract, only few lactobacilli strains possess optimal properties to be effective as probiotic therapeutics against infections in the urogenital tract. Combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus fermentum RC-14 was proposed as the best one for epithelial vaginal cells colonization and inhibition of uropathogens adhesion. The results of a number of clinical studies confirmed beneficial role of oral lactobacilli. However, the most of commercially available Lactobacillus strains, which are ordinary used in fermented dairy products,are seriously limited in protection of urogenital tract when they are ingested orally.

  18. Apocynin, a low molecular oral treatment for neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    't Hart, Bert A; Copray, Sjef; Philippens, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammatory mediators secreted by activated resident or infiltrated innate immune cells have a significant impact on the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. This may imply that patients affected by a neurodegenerative disease may benefit from treatment with selective inhibitors of innate immune activity. Here we review the therapeutic potential of apocynin, an essentially nontoxic phenolic compound isolated from the medicinal plant Jatropha multifida. Apocynin is a selective inhibitor of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase Nox2 that can be applied orally and is remarkably effective at low dose.

  19. Apocynin, a Low Molecular Oral Treatment for Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert A. ‘t Hart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammatory mediators secreted by activated resident or infiltrated innate immune cells have a significant impact on the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. This may imply that patients affected by a neurodegenerative disease may benefit from treatment with selective inhibitors of innate immune activity. Here we review the therapeutic potential of apocynin, an essentially nontoxic phenolic compound isolated from the medicinal plant Jatropha multifida. Apocynin is a selective inhibitor of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase Nox2 that can be applied orally and is remarkably effective at low dose.

  20. Degenerative periodontal-diseases and oral osteonecrosis: The role of gene-environment interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, D.; Izzotti, A.; Bonica, P.; Pera, P.; Pulliero, A.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic-degenerative dentistry diseases, including periodontal diseases and oral osteonecrosis, are widespread in human populations and represent a significant problem for public health. These diseases result from pathogenic mechanisms created by the interaction between environmental genotoxic risk-factors and genetic assets conferring individual susceptibility. Osteonecrosis occurs in subjects undergoing exposure to high doses of DNA-damaging agents for chemo- and radiotherapy of neoplastic diseases. In susceptible patients, ionizing radiation and biphosphonate-chemotherapy induce severe, progressive, and irreversible degeneration of facial bones, resulting in avascular necrosis of the jaw. This may also occur in patients receiving biphosphonate for osteoporosis therapy. Periodontal diseases include chronic, aggressive, and necrotizing periodontitis, often resulting in severe alteration of periodontal tissues and tooth loss. Cigarette smoking and chronic inflammation caused by specific bacteria are the main risk factors for periodontitis. Oxidative damage plays a fundamental pathogenic role, as established by detection of mitochondrial DNA damage in the gingival tissue of patients with periodontitis. Endogenous risk factors in dental diseases include polymorphisms for metabolic enzymes such as glutathione transferases M1 and T1, N-acetyl transferase 2, and CYP 1A1. Other genetic polymorphisms that confer susceptibility to dentistry diseases affect genes encoding metalloproteases (involved in periodontal tissue remodeling and degradation), cytokines (involved in inflammation), prothrombin, and DNA repair activities. These findings provide evidence that dentistry diseases are related to risk factors associated with environmental mutagenesis. This issue warrants future investigations aimed at improving oral health and preventing oral degenerative diseases using molecular and experimental approaches currently utilized in mutagenicity studies.

  1. Degenerative periodontal-diseases and oral osteonecrosis: The role of gene-environment interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldi, D. [Department of Medical, Biophysical, and Dentistry Sciences and Technologies, University of Genoa (Italy); Izzotti, A. [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Via A. Pastore 1 (Italy); Bonica, P.; Pera, P. [Department of Medical, Biophysical, and Dentistry Sciences and Technologies, University of Genoa (Italy); Pulliero, A., E-mail: alessandra.pulliero@unige.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Via A. Pastore 1 (Italy)

    2009-07-10

    Chronic-degenerative dentistry diseases, including periodontal diseases and oral osteonecrosis, are widespread in human populations and represent a significant problem for public health. These diseases result from pathogenic mechanisms created by the interaction between environmental genotoxic risk-factors and genetic assets conferring individual susceptibility. Osteonecrosis occurs in subjects undergoing exposure to high doses of DNA-damaging agents for chemo- and radiotherapy of neoplastic diseases. In susceptible patients, ionizing radiation and biphosphonate-chemotherapy induce severe, progressive, and irreversible degeneration of facial bones, resulting in avascular necrosis of the jaw. This may also occur in patients receiving biphosphonate for osteoporosis therapy. Periodontal diseases include chronic, aggressive, and necrotizing periodontitis, often resulting in severe alteration of periodontal tissues and tooth loss. Cigarette smoking and chronic inflammation caused by specific bacteria are the main risk factors for periodontitis. Oxidative damage plays a fundamental pathogenic role, as established by detection of mitochondrial DNA damage in the gingival tissue of patients with periodontitis. Endogenous risk factors in dental diseases include polymorphisms for metabolic enzymes such as glutathione transferases M1 and T1, N-acetyl transferase 2, and CYP 1A1. Other genetic polymorphisms that confer susceptibility to dentistry diseases affect genes encoding metalloproteases (involved in periodontal tissue remodeling and degradation), cytokines (involved in inflammation), prothrombin, and DNA repair activities. These findings provide evidence that dentistry diseases are related to risk factors associated with environmental mutagenesis. This issue warrants future investigations aimed at improving oral health and preventing oral degenerative diseases using molecular and experimental approaches currently utilized in mutagenicity studies.

  2. Oral insulin (human, murine, or porcine) does not prevent diabetes in the non-obese diabetic mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Minh N; Gibson, Claire; Rydén, Anna K E; Perdue, Nikole; Boursalian, Tamar E; Pagni, Philippe P; Coppieters, Ken; Skonberg, Christian; Porsgaard, Trine; von Herrath, Matthias; Vela, Jose Luis

    2016-03-01

    Studies have shown oral insulin prevents type 1 diabetes (T1D) in mouse models, however human trials were inconclusive. We tested the ability of different insulins to prevent T1D in non-obese diabetic mice. Mice received oral insulin or PBS twice weekly and disease was monitored. Contrary to previous studies, no insulin tested showed significant ability to prevent T1D, nor did testing of linked suppression in a delayed type hypersensitivity model have reproducible effect. To investigate delivery of antigen within the GI tract, blue dye was fed to mice. Dye traveled 5-8 cm from stomach to small intestine within 10s, suggesting orally administered antigen may not get digested in the stomach in mice. Insulin incubated with jejunum extracts was instantly digested. Thus, in humans large doses of insulin may be required to achieve tolerance as antigen may be more vulnerable to digestion in the stomach even before reaching the small intestine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Preventing disability in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Patrick B; Gower-Rousseau, Corinne; Danese, Silvio; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2017-11-01

    Disability is a common worldwide health challenge and it has been increasing over the past 3 decades. The treatment paradigm has changed dramatically in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) from control of symptoms towards full control of disease (clinical and endoscopic remission) with the goal of preventing organ damage and disability. These aims are broadly similar to rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Since the 1990s, our attention has focused on quality of life in IBD, which is a subjective measure. However, as an objective end-point in clinical trials and population studies, measures of disability in IBD have been proposed. Disability is defined as '…any restriction or lack (resulting from an impairment) of ability to perform an activity in the manner or within the range considered normal for a human being.' Recently, after 10 years of an international collaborative effort with the World Health Organization (WHO), a disability index was developed and validated. This index ideally would assist with the assessment of disease progression in IBD. In this review, we will provide the evidence to support the use of disability in IBD patients, including experience from rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. New treatment strategies, and validation studies that have underpinned the interest and quantification of disability in IBD, will be discussed.

  4. Mediterranean Diet and Prevention of Chronic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnolo, Donato F.; Selmin, Ornella I.

    2017-01-01

    A large body of research data suggests that traditional dietary habits and lifestyle unique to the Mediterranean region (Mediterranean diet, MD) lower the incidence of chronic diseases and improve longevity. These data contrast with troubling statistics in the United States and other high income countries pointing to an increase in the incidence of chronic diseases and the projected explosion in cost of medical care associated with an aging population. In 2013, the MD was inscribed by UNESCO in the “Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.” The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans included the MD as a healthy dietary pattern. Therefore, specific objectives of this article are to provide an overview of the nutritional basis of this healthful diet, its metabolic benefits, and its role in multiple aspects of disease prevention and healthy aging. Whereas recommendations about the MD often focus on specific foods or bioactive compounds, we suggest that the eating pattern as a whole likely contributes to the health promoting effects of the MD. PMID:29051674

  5. Cardiovascular disease: primary prevention, disease modulation and regenerative therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, Sherif

    2012-10-01

    Cardiovascular primary prevention and regeneration programs are the contemporary frontiers in functional metabolic vascular medicine. This novel science perspective harnesses our inherent ability to modulate the interface between specialized gene receptors and bioavailable nutrients in what is labeled as the nutrient-gene interaction. By mimicking a natural process through the conveyance of highly absorbable receptor specific nutrients, it is feasible to accelerate cell repair and optimize mitochondrial function, thereby achieving cardiovascular cure. We performed a comprehensive review of PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Review databases for articles relating to cardiovascular regenerative medicine, nutrigenomics and primary prevention, with the aim of harmonizing their roles within contemporary clinical practice. We searched in particular for large-scale randomized controlled trials on contemporary cardiovascular pharmacotherapies and their specific adverse effects on metabolic pathways which feature prominently in cardiovascular regenerative programs, such as nitric oxide and glucose metabolism. Scientific research on \\'cardiovascular-free\\' centenarians delineated that low sugar and low insulin are consistent findings. As we age, our insulin level increases. Those who can decelerate the rapidity of this process are prompting their cardiovascular rejuvenation. It is beginning to dawn on some clinicians that contemporary treatments are not only failing to impact on our most prevalent diseases, but they may be causing more damage than good. Primary prevention programs are crucial elements for a better outcome. Cardiovascular primary prevention and regeneration programs have enhanced clinical efficacy and quality of life and complement our conventional endovascular practice.

  6. World Workshop on Oral Medicine VI: Patient-reported outcome measures and oral mucosal disease: current status and future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Ríordáin, Rícheal; Shirlaw, Penelope; Alajbeg, Ivan; Al Zamel, Ghada Y; Fung, Pok Lam; Yuan, Anna D; McCreary, Christine; Stoopler, Eric T; De Rossi, Scott S; Lodi, Giovanni; Greenberg, Martin S; Brennan, Michael T

    2015-08-01

    This systematic review aimed to (1) explore the patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) currently used in the oral mucosal disease literature and report on the type and context of the use of these instruments and (2) provide a future direction for PROMs in Oral Medicine practice and research. A systematic review of published English-language articles relating to the use of PROMs in the oral mucosal diseases literature was performed in November 2013. In total, 131 articles met the inclusion criteria; these articles addressed the following oral mucosal conditions: lichen planus (75); recurrent aphthous stomatitis (30); mucous membrane pemphigoid/pemphigus vulgaris (14); orofacial granulomatosis (1); and multiple oral mucosal diseases (11). The most commonly used instruments were visual analog scales (VAS) and the oral health impact profile (OHIP). Limited progress has been achieved with use of PROMs in Oral Medicine in the last few decades in both clinical practice and a research setting. With the engagement of allied medical disciplines in PROM usage and the promotion of PROMs by national health care bodies globally, advancement of PROMs is imperative for Oral Medicine. Exposure through the World Workshop on Oral Medicine (WWOM), along with potential involvement in the Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials (COMET) or other such initiatives, will enable worldwide collaboration to promote the development and utilization of valid and reliable PROMs in oral medicine, and improve patient care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Oral diseases affect some 3.9 billion people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Medline, Embase, Lilacs. Published and unpublished observational population-based studies presenting information on the prevalence, incidence, case fatality and cause-specific mortality related to untreated caries, severe periodontitis and severe tooth loss between January 1980 and December 2010. There were no language restrictions. Study quality was assessed using the STROBE checklist (http://www.strobe-statement.org/). Prevalence estimates were calculated on the database for all age-gender-country-year groups using a specifically developed Bayesian meta-regression tool. Disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLDs) metrics were used to quantify the disease burden. Disability weights were calculated based on population-based surveys in five countries (USA, Peru, Tanzania, Bangladesh and Indonesia) and an open Internet survey. Uncertainties in estimates were examined using Monte Carlo simulation techniques with uncertainty levels presented as the 2.5th and 97.5th centiles, which can be interpreted as a 95% UI. Oral diseases remain highly prevalent in 2010 affecting 3.9 billion people. Untreated caries in permanent teeth was the most prevalent condition evaluated for the entire GBD (Global Burden of Disease) 2010 Study with a global prevalence of 35% for all ages combined. Severe periodontitis and untreated caries in deciduous teeth were the 6th and 10th most prevalent conditions, affecting, respectively, 11% and 9% of the global population. Oral conditions combined accounted for 15 million DALYs globally (1.9% of all YLDs and 0.6% of all DALYs), implying an average health loss of 224 years per 100,000 people. DALYs due to oral conditions increased 20.8% between 1990 and 2010, mainly due to population growth and aging. While DALYs due to severe periodontitis and untreated caries increased, those due to severe tooth loss decreased. The findings highlight the challenge in responding to the diversity of urgent oral health needs world

  8. Inverse Association Between Poor Oral Health and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weiyao; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Liu, Zhiwei; Roosaar, Ann; Axéll, Tony; Ye, Weimin

    2017-04-01

    The hygiene hypothesis (a lack of childhood exposure to microorganisms increases susceptibility to allergic diseases by altering immune development) has been proposed as an explanation for the increasing incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, there are few data on the relationship between oral hygiene and development of IBD, and study results have been inconsistent. We investigated the association between poor oral health and risks of IBD, ulcerative colitis (UC), and Crohn's disease (CD). We performed a population-based cohort study of 20,162 individuals followed for 40 years (from 1973 to 2012). Residents of 2 municipalities of Uppsala County, Sweden (N = 30,118), 15 years or older, were invited, and among them 20,333 were examined for tooth loss, dental plaques, and oral mucosal lesions at the time of study entry. Other exposure data were collected from questionnaires. Patients who later developed IBD (UC or CD) were identified by international classification codes from Swedish National Patient and Cause of Death Registers. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios for IBD, UC, and CD. From National Patient and Cause of Death Registers, we identified 209 individuals who developed IBD (142 developed UC and 67 developed CD), with an incidence rate of 37.3 per 100,000 person-years. We found an inverse relationship between poor oral health and IBD, especially in individuals with severe oral problems. Loss of 5-6 teeth of the 6 teeth examined was associated with a lower risk of IBD (hazard ratio, 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.98). Having dental plaques that covered more than 33% of tooth surface was negatively associated with CD (hazard ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.97). In a population-based cohort study of more than 20,000 people in Sweden, we associated poor oral health with reduced risk of future IBD. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Common risk indicators for oral diseases and obesity in 12-year-olds: a South Pacific cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubert-Jeannin, Stéphanie; Pichot, Hélène; Rouchon, Bernard; Pereira, Bruno; Hennequin, Martine

    2018-01-08

    Despite the increasing need to prevent obesity and oral diseases in adolescents worldwide, few studies have investigated the link existing between these conditions and their common risk factors. This study aims to evaluate the oral health and weight status of New Caledonian Children (aged 6,9,12 years) and to identify, amongst 12-year-olds, risk indicators that may characterize the groups of children affected by oral diseases, obesity or both diseases. This survey evaluated in 2011-2012 the oral health and stature-weight status and related risk indicators in a national representative sample of 6, 9 and 12 years-old children in New Caledonia. Dental status, chewing efficiency, height, weight and waist circumference were clinically recorded at school. The body mass index (BMI) and the waist to height ratio (WtHR) were calculated. For BMI the WHO Cut-offs were used. Twelve years-old participants responded to a questionnaire concerning socio-demographic and behavioural variables. For statistical analysis, the Clinical Oral and Global Health Index (COGHI) was developed and used. Twelve years-old children were categorised into four groups; Oral Diseases (ODG), Obesity (OG), Obesity and Oral Diseases (ODOG) and a Healthy Group (HG). A multivariate analysis was conducted using mixed-effects multinomial logistic regression models. Prevalence of overweight and obesity was greatly increasing from 6 years (respectively 10.8% [8.8;13.3] and 7.8% [6.0;9.9]) to 12 years (respectively 22.2% [19.9;24.7] and 20.5% [18.2;22.9]) and one third of the 12-yr-olds had an excess of abdominal adiposity. At age 12, 36.6% of the children were healthy (HG), 27.3% had oral diseases (ODG), 19.7% were obese (OG) and 16.5% had both conditions (ODOG). Geographical location, ethnicity, tooth-brushing frequency and masticatory disability were significant risk factors for the OG, ODOG and ODG groups. Ethnicity and masticatory impairment were common risk indicators for the association of oral

  10. Prevention of Carcinogen-Induced Oral Cancer by Sulforaphane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Julie E; Zang, Yan; Sen, Malabika; Li, Changyou; Wang, Lin; Egner, Patricia A; Fahey, Jed W; Normolle, Daniel P; Grandis, Jennifer R; Kensler, Thomas W; Johnson, Daniel E

    2016-07-01

    Chronic exposure to carcinogens represents the major risk factor for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Beverages derived from broccoli sprout extracts (BSE) that are rich in glucoraphanin and its bioactive metabolite sulforaphane promote detoxication of airborne pollutants in humans. Herein, we investigated the potential chemopreventive activity of sulforaphane using in vitro models of normal and malignant mucosal epithelial cells and an in vivo model of murine oral cancer resulting from the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). Sulforaphane treatment of Het-1A, a normal mucosal epithelial cell line, and 4 HNSCC cell lines led to dose- and time-dependent induction of NRF2 and the NRF2 target genes NQO1 and GCLC, known mediators of carcinogen detoxication. Sulforaphane also promoted NRF2-independent dephosphorylation/inactivation of pSTAT3, a key oncogenic factor in HNSCC. Compared with vehicle, sulforaphane significantly reduced the incidence and size of 4NQO-induced tongue tumors in mice. A pilot clinical trial in 10 healthy volunteers evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacodynamic activity of three different BSE regimens, based upon urinary sulforaphane metabolites and NQO1 transcripts in buccal scrapings, respectively. Ingestion of sulforaphane-rich BSE demonstrated the greatest, most consistent bioavailability. Mucosal bioactivity, defined as 2-fold or greater upregulation of NQO1 mRNA, was observed in 6 of 9 evaluable participants ingesting glucoraphanin-rich BSE; 3 of 6 ingesting sulforaphane-rich BSE; and 3 of 9 after topical-only exposure to sulforaphane-rich BSE. Together, our findings demonstrate preclinical chemopreventive activity of sulforaphane against carcinogen-induced oral cancer, and support further mechanistic and clinical investigation of sulforaphane as a chemopreventive agent against tobacco-related HNSCC. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 547-57. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Developing a model to assess community-level risk of oral diseases for planning public dental services in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Andrea M; Gkolia, Panagiota; Carpenter, Lauren; Cole, Deborah

    2016-03-31

    Poor oral health is a chronic condition that can be extremely costly to manage. In Australia, publicly funded dental services are provided to community members deemed to be eligible-those who are socio-economically disadvantaged or determined to be at higher risk of dental disease. Historically public dental services have nominally been allocated based on the size of the eligible population in a geographic area. This approach has been largely inadequate for reducing disparities in dental disease, primarily because the approach is treatment-focused, and oral health is influenced by a variety of interacting factors. This paper describes the developmental process of a multi-dimensional community-level risk assessment model, to profile a community's risk of poor oral health. A search of the evidence base was conducted to identify robust frameworks for conceptualisation of risk factors and associated performance indicators. Government and other agency websites were also searched to identify publicly available data assets with items relevant to oral diseases. Data quality and analysis considerations were assessed for the use of mixed data sources. Several frameworks and associated indicator sets (twelve national and eight state-wide data collections with relevant indicators) were identified. Determination of the system inputs for the Model were primarily informed by the World Health Organisation's (WHO) operational model for an Integrated Oral Health-Chronic Disease Prevention System, and Australia's National Oral Health Plan 2004-2013. Data quality and access informed the final selection of indicators. Despite limitations in the quality and regularity of data collections, there are numerous data sources available that provide the required data inputs for community-level risk assessment for oral health. Assessing risk in this way will enhance our ability to deliver appropriate public oral health care services and address the uneven distribution of oral disease across the

  12. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S

    2012-03-29

    This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

  13. [Prevention of dementia (including Alzheimer's disease)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhuber, H H

    2004-05-01

    Prevention of dementia: Life expectancy still increases linearly, and the elderly part of the European population grows rapidly in relation to the young. Dementia, however, grows even more rapidly, because it increases exponentially after age 65; it will become a great burden if nothing is done. The discussion so far is concentrated on treatment, whereas prevention is neglected. The therapy of dementia, however, has limited effect. Contrary to a widespread opinion prevention is possible. Genetic factors alone dominate the fate of cognition only in about 3 % of the cases. Besides age, lifestyle and the vascular risk factors exercise a great influence. High blood pressure carries a fourfold risk, diabetes more than doubles the risk both of the vascular and of the Alzheimer type; combined even more. Especially cerebral microangiopathy is strongly associated with Alzheimer's dementia, it triggers the vicious circle which leads to amyloid deposition. The importance of the circulation is underestimated, because most of the microvascular cerebral lesions are not perceived by the patient. All the risk factors for Alzheimer's disease after age 65 are also vascular risk factors especially for microangiopathy: Apo-E4, oestrogen deficiency, insulin resistance, diabetes, arterial hypertension, high cholesterol, old age and increased plasma homocystin which is often caused by alcohol consumption even in moderate doses. A healthy life style with daily outdoor activity and a Mediterranean diet not only reduces the risk of dementia, but also of coronary death and cancer. Cognitively stimulating activity protects even more than physical activity against dementia; the basis for this is acquired in youth by education. Therapy with statins is advisable if atherosclerosis cannot be reasonably counteracted by physical activity and diet.

  14. [Cardiovascular disease prevention and life style modifications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudet, M; Daugareil, C; Ferrieres, J

    2012-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are mainly caused by atherosclerosis, the development of which is highly dependent on our Western lifestyle. Slowing this pathology depends on the reduction of risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, high blood pressure, smoking, lack of physical activity, excess weight and diabetes. Drug treatment exists and is very effective, but too often they treat the immediate abnormality such as diabetes, high blood pressure and hypercholesterolemia and not the underlying causes: poor eating habits, lack of physical activity and excess weight. These have a negative impact on endothelial function, oxidative stress, and can trigger inflammation, arrythmias and thrombosis. Cardiovascular prevention must therefore target sedentary lifestyle, excess weight, and favor low-calorie, low-salt food and Mediterranean diet. The way this diet works begins to be understood and goes beyond simple cardiovascular prevention. Therapeutic education holds a growing and complementary role in the Public Health system which should call upon the strengths of all healthcare professionals. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  15. Ipratropium Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipratropium oral inhalation is used to prevent wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, and chest tightness in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; a group of diseases that affect the lungs and airways) such as chronic bronchitis (swelling of ...

  16. Chemokine Function in Periodontal Disease and Oral Cavity Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Esra Sahingur

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The chemotactic cytokines, or chemokines, comprise a superfamily of polypeptides with a wide range of activities that include recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as stimulation of cell proliferation. As such, they function as antimicrobial molecules and play a central role in host defenses against pathogen challenge. However, their ability to recruit leukocytes and potentiate or prolong the inflammatory response may have profound implications for the progression of oral diseases such as chronic periodontitis, where tissue destruction may be widespread. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that chronic inflammation is a key component of tumor progression. Interaction between cancer cells and their microenvironment is mediated in large part by secreted factors such as chemokines, and serves to enhance the malignant phenotype in oral and other cancers. In this article, we will outline the biological and biochemical mechanisms of chemokine action in host-microbiome interactions in periodontal disease and in oral cancer, and how these may overlap and contribute to pathogenesis.

  17. Chemokine Function in Periodontal Disease and Oral Cavity Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahingur, Sinem Esra; Yeudall, W. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The chemotactic cytokines, or chemokines, comprise a superfamily of polypeptides with a wide range of activities that include recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as stimulation of cell proliferation. As such, they function as antimicrobial molecules and play a central role in host defenses against pathogen challenge. However, their ability to recruit leukocytes and potentiate or prolong the inflammatory response may have profound implications for the progression of oral diseases such as chronic periodontitis, where tissue destruction may be widespread. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that chronic inflammation is a key component of tumor progression. Interaction between cancer cells and their microenvironment is mediated in large part by secreted factors such as chemokines, and serves to enhance the malignant phenotype in oral and other cancers. In this article, we will outline the biological and biochemical mechanisms of chemokine action in host–microbiome interactions in periodontal disease and in oral cancer, and how these may overlap and contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:25999952

  18. Oral contraceptive use and the clinical course of Crohn's disease: a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Cosnes, J; Carbonnel, F; Carrat, F; Beaugerie, L; Gendre, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Women with Crohn's disease are usually advised not to take oral contraceptives, but, unlike smoking, there is no clear association between current oral contraceptive use and more severe disease.
AIM—To assess the effect of oral contraceptive use on the clinical course of Crohn's disease.
PATIENTS—331 women, aged 16-50 years, with Crohn's disease and Crohn's disease activity index

  19. Prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Debora C

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this guidance is to support the dental team to; manage patients with periodontal diseases in primary care appropriately; improve the quality of decision making for referral to secondary care; improve the overall oral health of the population. It focuses on the prevention and non-surgical treatment of periodontal diseases and implant diseases in primary care. The surgical treatment of periodontal and implant diseases and the management of patients by periodontal specialists or in a secondary care setting are outwith the scope of this guidance and are not discussed in detail. The guidance is based on existing guidelines, including those from the British Society of Periodontology, relevant systematic reviews, research evidence and the opinion of experts and experienced practitioners. The methodological approach is based on the international standards set out by the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE) Collaboration (www.agreetrust.org). The guiding principle for developing guidance within SDCEP is to first source existing guidelines, policy documents, legislation or other recommendations. Similarly, relevant systematic reviews are also initially identified. These documents are appraised for their quality of development, evidence base and applicability to the remit of the guidance under development. In the absence of these documents or when supplementary information is required, other published literature and unpublished work may be sought.Review and updating. The guidance will be reviewed in three years and updated accordingly. Recommendations are provided for assessment and diagnosis; changing patient behaviour; treatment of gingival conditions; periodontal conditions; long term maintenance; management of patients with dental implants; referral and record keeping. The key recommendations highlighted are: Assess and explain risk factors for periodontal diseases to patients. Screen all patients for periodontal diseases at every routine

  20. Tobacco Use, Oral Health, and Risk of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiwei; Roosaar, Ann; Axéll, Tony; Ye, Weimin

    2017-04-01

    Few studies have investigated the associations between use of Swedish moist snuff (snus), associated poor oral health, and risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). We followed 20,175 participants who were free of PD in 1973-1974 in Uppsala, Sweden, until the end of 2012. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate hazard ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals for the associations between tobacco use, oral health indicators, and PD risk. We found that tobacco use was associated with a lower risk of PD in males. Compared with males who never used any tobacco daily, pure ever tobacco smokers, pure ever snus users, and combined users had adjusted hazard ratios of 0.68 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49, 0.93; n = 83), 0.51 (95% CI: 0.27, 0.95; n = 11), and 0.21 (95% CI: 0.07, 0.67; n = 3), respectively. No association was observed for number of teeth, dental plaque, or detectable oral mucosal lesions and PD risk, although there was a suggestive association with Candida-related oral mucosal lesions in males (hazard ratio = 1.56, 95% CI: 0.92, 2.65; P = 0.098). Use of snus is associated with a lower risk of PD in males, while poor oral health seems not to be associated with PD occurrence. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of human oral Chagas disease outbreaks in Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan David Ramírez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, displays significant genetic variability revealed by six Discrete Typing Units (TcI-TcVI. In this pathology, oral transmission represents an emerging epidemiological scenario where different outbreaks associated to food/beverages consumption have been reported in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador and Venezuela. In Colombia, six human oral outbreaks have been reported corroborating the importance of this transmission route. Molecular epidemiology of oral outbreaks is barely known observing the incrimination of TcI, TcII, TcIV and TcV genotypes. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: High-throughput molecular characterization was conducted performing MLMT (Multilocus Microsatellite Typing and mtMLST (mitochondrial Multilocus Sequence Typing strategies on 50 clones from ten isolates. Results allowed observing the occurrence of TcI, TcIV and mixed infection of distinct TcI genotypes. Thus, a majority of specific mitochondrial haplotypes and allelic multilocus genotypes associated to the sylvatic cycle of transmission were detected in the dataset with the foreseen presence of mitochondrial haplotypes and allelic multilocus genotypes associated to the domestic cycle of transmission. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest the incrimination of sylvatic genotypes in the oral outbreaks occurred in Colombia. We observed patterns of super-infection and/or co-infection with a tailored association with the severe forms of myocarditis in the acute phase of the disease. The transmission dynamics of this infection route based on molecular epidemiology evidence was unraveled and the clinical and biological implications are discussed.

  2. State of oral hygiene and identification of the main risk factors for inflammatory diseases of periodontal tissues in young people.

    OpenAIRE

    Makarenko, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    A high percentage of prevalence of inflammatory periodontal diseases in young age causes urgency of treatment and prevention of inflammatory diseases of periodontal tissue in young age. Therefore, the research purpose was to investigate the hygienic condition and identification of the main risk factors for gingivitis in patients aged 18-30 years. 286 people aged from 18 to 30 years were observed in the study. To assess hygienic condition of the oral cavity and to determine the thickness of pl...

  3. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  4. Oral CPSI-2364 Treatment Prevents Postoperative Ileus in Swine without Impairment of Anastomotic Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim O. Vilz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative ileus (POI is an iatrogenic complication of abdominal surgery, mediated by a severe inflammation of the muscularis externa (ME. We demonstrated that orally applicated CPSI-2364 prevents POI in rodents by blockade of p38 MAPK pathway and abrogation of NO production in macrophages. In the present experimental swine study we compared the effect of orally and intravenously administered CPSI-2364 on POI and examined CPSI-2364 effect on anastomotic healing. Methods: CPSI-2364 was administered preoperatively via oral or intravenous route. POI was induced by intestinal manipulation of the small bowel. ME specimens were examined by quantitative PCR for CCL2 chemokine gene expression and myeloperoxidase activity. Functional analyzes included measurement of ileal smooth-muscle ex vivo contractility, in vivo intestinal and colonic transit. Furthermore, anastomotic healing of a rectorectostomy after CPSI-2364 treatment was assessed by perianastomotic hydroxyproline concentration, a histochemically evaluated healing score and anastomotic bursting pressure (ABP. Results: CPSI-2364 abolished inflammation of the ME and improved postoperative smooth muscle contractility and intestinal transit independently of its application route. Hydroxyproline concentration and ABP measurement revealed no wound healing disturbances after oral or intravenous CPSI-2364 treatment whereas histological scoring demonstrated delayed anastomotic healing after intravenous treatment. Conclusion: CPSI-2364 effectively prevents POI in swine independently of its application route. Impairment of anastomotic healing could be observed after intravenous but not oral preoperative CPSI-2364 treatment. Subsumed, an oral preoperative administration of CPSI-2364 appears to be a safe and efficient strategy for prophylaxis of POI.

  5. Salivary bacterial fingerprints of established oral disease revealed by the Human Oral Microbe Identification using Next Generation Sequencing (HOMINGS) technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Paster, Bruce J; Fiehn, Nils-Erik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The composition of the salivary microbiota, as determined using various molecular methods, has been reported to differentiate oral health from diseases. Thus, the purpose of this study was to utilize the newly developed molecular technique HOMINGS (Human Oral Microbe Ide...

  6. Usage of Probabilistic and General Regression Neural Network for Early Detection and Prevention of Oral Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Neha; Om, Hari

    2015-01-01

    In India, the oral cancers are usually presented in advanced stage of malignancy. It is critical to ascertain the diagnosis in order to initiate most advantageous treatment of the suspicious lesions. The main hurdle in appropriate treatment and control of oral cancer is identification and risk assessment of early disease in the community in a cost-effective fashion. The objective of this research is to design a data mining model using probabilistic neural network and general regression neural...

  7. Compliance with infection prevention and control in oral health-care facilities: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosthuysen, Jeanné; Potgieter, Elsa; Fossey, Annabel

    2014-12-01

    Many publications are available on the topic of compliance with infection prevention and control in oral health-care facilities all over the world. The approaches of developing and developed countries show wide variation, but the principles of infection prevention and control are the same globally. This study is a systematic review and global perspective of the available literature on infection prevention and control in oral health-care facilities. Nine focus areas on compliance with infection-control measures were investigated: knowledge of infectious occupational hazards; personal hygiene and care of hands; correct application of personal protective equipment; use of environmental barriers and disposable items; sterilisation (recirculation) of instruments and handpieces; disinfection (surfaces) and housekeeping; management of waste disposal; quality control of dental unit waterlines, biofilms and water; and some special considerations. Various international studies from developed countries have reported highly scientific evidence-based information. In developed countries, the resources for infection prevention and control are freely available, which is not the case in developing countries. The studies in developing countries also indicate serious shortcomings with regard to infection prevention and control knowledge and education in oral health-care facilities. This review highlights the fact that availability of resources will always be a challenge, but more so in developing countries. This presents unique challenges and the opportunity for innovative thinking to promote infection prevention and control. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  8. Early Childhood Caries (ECC): an infectious transmissible oral disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poureslami, H.R.; van Amerongen, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries in babies and toddlers is called Early Childhood Caries (ECC). It is an infectious and transmissible die-to-bacterial disease. Detailed knowledge regarding the acquisition and transmission of infectious agents facilitates a more comprehensive approach toward prevention. Mutans

  9. Electronic Cigarette: Role in the Primary Prevention of Oral Cavity Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Franco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Cigarette smoke has been identified as the main cause of oral cavity carcinoma. Recently, the electronic cigarette, a battery-operated device, was developed to help smokers stop their tobacco addiction. This study aimed to evaluate the safety of electronic cigarettes and to establish the possible role of such device in the primary prevention of oral cavity cancer. Subjects and Methods This study included 65 subjects who were divided into three groups (smokers, e-cigarette smokers, and nonsmokers. All subjects were submitted to cytologic examination by scraping of oral mucosa. The slides were microscopically evaluated through a micronucleus assay test. Results The prevalence of micronuclei was significantly decreased in the e-cigarette smoker group. There were no statistically significant differences in micronuclei distribution according to the type of cigarette, gender, and age. Conclusions The use of electronic cigarettes seems to be safe for oral cells and should be suggested as an aid to smoking cessation.

  10. Interactions between Host and Oral Commensal Microorganisms are Key Events in Health and Disease Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Rouabhia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The oral cavity has sometimes been described as a mirror that reflects a person's health. Systemic diseases such as diabetes or vitamin deficiency may be seen as alterations in the oral mucosa. A variety of external factors cause changes in the oral mucosa, thus altering mucosal structure and function, and promoting oral pathologies (most frequently bacterial, fungal and viral infections. Little is known, however, about immune surveillance mechanisms that involve the oral mucosa.

  11. Oral Dysbiotic Communities and Their Implications in Systemic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Sudhakara

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The human body supports the growth of a wide array of microbial communities in various niches such as the oral cavity, gastro-intestinal and urogenital tracts, and on the surface of the skin. These host associated microbial communities include yet-un-cultivable bacteria and are influenced by various factors. Together, these communities of bacteria are referred to as the human microbiome. Human oral microbiome consists of both symbionts and pathobionts. Deviation from symbiosis among the bacterial community leads to “dysbiosis”, a state of community disturbance. Dysbiosis occurs due to many confounding factors that predispose a shift in the composition and relative abundance of microbial communities. Dysbiotic communities have been a major cause for many microbiome related systemic infections. Such dysbiosis is directed by certain important pathogens called the “keystone pathogens”, which can modulate community microbiome variations. One such persistent infection is oral infection, mainly periodontitis, where a wide array of causal organisms have been implied to systemic infections such as cardio vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, and Alzheimer’s disease. The keystone pathogens co-occur with many yet-cultivable bacteria and their interactions lead to dysbiosis. This has been the focus of recent research. While immune evasion is one of the major modes that leads to dysbiosis, new processes and new virulence factors of bacteria have been shown to be involved in this important process that determines a disease or health state. This review focuses on such dysbiotic communities, their interactions, and their virulence factors that predispose the host to other systemic implications.

  12. A Study on Oral Health of Children with Cardiac Diseases in Mashhad, Iran in 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mahmoudi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. Preventing oral disease is the most desirable way of ensuring good dental health for children with heart disease. Dental and gingival infections in patients with cardiac problems may lead to infective endocarditis. The aim of this study was to evaluate oral and dental health status in children with heart disease referred to a cardiac center compared with the control group.

    Materials and Methods. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, case group consisting of 100 patients 2-12 years old with heart disease were examined for oral and dental status in Pediatric Cardiac Center in Mashhad, Iran, in 2004. Fifty healthy children with the same age as the case group referring to the Department of Pedodontics, Mashhad Faculty of Dentistry served as the control group. For each patient, dental and medical history, dmft, DMFT, debris index, tooth brushing status as well as parental knowledge of infective endocarditis and their economic status was registered on a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square and t-tests.

    Results. There were no significant differences between case and control groups in dmft (3.92 ± 3.99 and 3.54 ± 3.33, respectively, DMFT (3.7 ± 4 and 1.47 ± 1.72, respectively and their components. Tooth brushing status and debris index were significantly worse in the study group (P = 0.001 and P = 0.008, respectively. 35% of parents were aware of the importance of good oral health in cardiac children although none of them knew about infective endocarditis. Most of the parents in study group had low (30% to medium (53% economic status.

    Conclusion. In this study, the children with cardiac disease did not have a good oral and dental health status. Developing strategies toward preventive dental care of children with cardiac problems and informing their parents is suggested.

  13. THE ROLE OF NUTRITION IN CARIES PREVENTION AND MAINTENANCE OF ORAL HEALTH DURING PREGNANCY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevtić, Marija; Pantelinaci, Jelena; Jovanović Ilić, Tatjana; Petrović, Vasa; Grgić, Olja; Blazić, Larisa

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy may pose an increased risk for the development of caries and other oral health problems. Continuous screening of oral health status, implementing appropriate preventive measures (particularly oral hygiene, healthy diet plans and education) is of paramount importance not only for oral health but also for the general health status of the future mother and her offspring. EFFECTS OF FOOD ON CARIES DEVELOPMENT: Caries prevention through healthy diet implicates the reduction in frequency and amount of intake of cariogenic food, above all ofrefined carbohydrates, i.e. sugars and sweets. Foods known to have caries-prophylactic effects should predominate in healthy diet plans. They mainly include solid foods, which have mechanical effects on teeth cleaning, as well as foods providing sufficient amounts of vitamins (A, C, D) and a variety of elements and compounds (calcium, phosphates, fluorides) favoring the preservation and remineralization of tooth structures. EDUCATION OF PREGNANT WOMEN ON HEALHY DEIT: In accomplishing these goals, education and direct positive communication between the educator and the pregnant woman play a crucial role. Educative approach is always individual and determined by the patient's specific cultural and socioeconomic features and status, as well as her habits, motivation and willingness to accept relevant recommendations. Accomplishing the aforementioned goals requires the appropriate organization and professional competence within the preventive dental service and its close cooperation with the relevant medical institutions and social support in the framework of public health protection. Preserving of oral health during pregnancy is predominantly influenced by the following factors: 1) healthy diet, 2) oral hygiene, 3) patients' education, 4) regular control of oral health, 5) appropriate organization of dental services and 6) community engagement.

  14. Acute allergic reaction to oral quinine for malarial prevention: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sora Yasri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinine is a classical antimalarial drug that is used worldwide. It is also used for pre-exposure of malaria before visiting to the jungle in the endemic area of malaria. In this article, the authors reported a case of acute allergic reaction to oral quinine for malarial prevention.

  15. Effects of LEDs on oral mucositis prevention in a patient with classic Hodgkin's lymphoma - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicudo, Leticia Lang

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this case report was to evaluate the efficacy of therapy using LEDs (light-emitting diodes), at a wavelength of 880 nm, in the prevention of oral mucositis in a patient with Hodgkin's disease treated with ABVD regimen. Mucositis is a dose limiting complication of cancer treatment, of high incidence, which severity can lead to alterations of treatment planning or even to suspension of cancer therapy, with serious consequences in tumor response and even survival. Lesions develop most commonly on the nonkeratinized mucosa and present symptoms that begin like mild burning and evolve to severe pain. For this reason, low power laser and, recently, LEDs have been considered for preventing and management of oral mucositis, with great results. In this study, a 34-year-old male received intraoral irradiations with an infrared LEDs array (3,6 J/cm 2 , 74 mW), for five consecutive days, starting on the day of chemotherapy. In each chemotherapy cycle, he received ABVD protocol on day 1 and day 15, and received LEDs treatment during five days on each ABVD infusion. To analyze results, the WHO (World Health Organization) scale was used for grading of mucositis and VAS (Visual Analogue Scale) for pain evaluation, on days 1, 3, 7, 10 and 13 post-chemotherapy. The results obtained showed the patient did not develop oral mucositis, during the five chemotherapy cycles and did not present any pain symptom. Therapy with LEDs was a safe and effective method for the prevention of oral mucositis in this case report. However, new studies are needed in order to prove the efficacy of this methodology with more patients, increasing their quality of life. (author)

  16. Assessing Oral Hygiene in Hospitalized Older Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Poor oral health for all older adults can result in higher risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and oral cancer. Findings from this study indicated older veterans needed to improve their oral hygiene habits but barriers to oral hygiene performance prevented them from receiving and performing oral hygiene measures.

  17. Prevention of cardiovascular disease in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollan, I; Dessein, P H; Ronda, N; Wasko, M C; Svenungsson, E; Agewall, S; Cohen-Tervaert, J W; Maki-Petaja, K; Grundtvig, M; Karpouzas, G A; Meroni, P L

    2015-10-01

    The increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been recognized for many years. However, although the characteristics of CVD and its burden resemble those in diabetes, the focus on cardiovascular (CV) prevention in RA has lagged behind, both in the clinical and research settings. Similar to diabetes, the clinical picture of CVD in RA may be atypical, even asymptomatic. Therefore, a proactive screening for subclinical CVD in RA is warranted. Because of the lack of clinical trials, the ideal CVD prevention (CVP) in RA has not yet been defined. In this article, we focus on challenges and controversies in the CVP in RA (such as thresholds for statin therapy), and propose recommendations based on the current evidence. Due to the significant contribution of non-traditional, RA-related CV risk factors, the CV risk calculators developed for the general population underestimate the true risk in RA. Thus, there is an enormous need to develop adequate CV risk stratification tools and to identify the optimal CVP strategies in RA. While awaiting results from randomized controlled trials in RA, clinicians are largely dependent on the use of common sense, and extrapolation of data from studies on other patient populations. The CVP in RA should be based on an individualized evaluation of a broad spectrum of risk factors, and include: 1) reduction of inflammation, preferably with drugs decreasing CV risk, 2) management of factors associated with increased CV risk (e.g., smoking, hypertension, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, kidney disease, depression, periodontitis, hypothyroidism, vitamin D deficiency and sleep apnea), and promotion of healthy life style (smoking cessation, healthy diet, adjusted physical activity, stress management, weight control), 3) aspirin and influenza and pneumococcus vaccines according to current guidelines, and 4) limiting use of drugs that increase CV risk. Rheumatologists should take responsibility for the education of

  18. Tick-Associated Diseases: Symptoms, Treatment and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alice; Chaney, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are eleven tick-associated diseases prevalent in the United States. Most commonly diagnosed are Lyme disease, anaplasmosis (ehrlichiosis) and babeisois, with Lyme disease being the most common vector-borne disease in the country. In southeastern states, studies have shown the…

  19. Effect of endocrine pathology on the development and the course of oral diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Babajanyan S.G.; Kazakova L.N.

    2013-01-01

    All systems of the human body are closely interconnected among themselves. The endocrine system directly influences formation, development and functioning of oral system. There is a close interrelation of endocrine disturbances with oral diseases. Clinical signs of dysfunction of glands of internal secretion firstly appear in the oral cavity. The knowledge of clinical symptoms, features of the course of diseases of internal secretion in the oral cavity will allow to diagnose and therefore, to...

  20. Probiotics as oral health biotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shyamali; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Tabrizian, Maryam; Prakash, Satya

    2012-09-01

    Oral health is affected by its resident microorganisms. Three prominent oral disorders are dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis, with the oral microbiota playing a key role in the initiation/progression of all three. Understanding the microbiota and the diseases they may cause is critical to the development of new therapeutics. This review is focused on probiotics for the prevention and/or treatment of oral diseases. This review describes the oral ecosystem and its correlation with oral health/disease. The pathogenesis and current prevention/treatment strategies of periodontal diseases (PD) and dental caries (DC) are depicted. An introduction of probiotics is followed by an analysis of their role in PD and DC, and their potential role(s) in oral health. Finally, a discussion ensues on the future research directions and limitations of probiotics for oral health. An effective oral probiotic formulation should contribute to the prevention/treatment of microbial diseases of the oral cavity. Understanding the oral microbiota's role in oral disease is important for the development of a therapeutic to prevent/treat dental diseases. However, investigations into clinical efficacy, delivery/dose optimization, mechanism(s) of action and other related parameters are yet to be fully explored. Keeping this in mind, investigations into oral probiotic therapies are proving promising.

  1. [The changing trends of demography and oral diseases for Chinese dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, D

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the changed trends of population, oral diseases and their effects on Chinese dentistry. The demographic and epidemiologic data published in recent books and journals were reviewed and analyzed. As the 21st century approached, dentistry in China would face many changing trends and challenges. 1. a growing population and an aging population: The two sub-populations with the greatest need for prevention and treatment were children and old patients who were outpacing the supply of dental manpower. 2. The changed dental disease patterns: The prevalence of caries was increasing and more than two thirds of Chinese suffered from periodontal disease. The traditional dental approaches have not been able to satisfy the needs of Chinese. The challenge created by these demographic, economic and advances in dental technology is changing Chinese dentistry.

  2. Disease Prevention and Health Promotion: How Integrative Medicine Fits

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Ather; Katz, David L.

    2015-01-01

    As a discipline, preventive medicine has traditionally been described to encompass primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention. The fields of preventive medicine and public health share the objectives of promoting general health, preventing disease, and applying epidemiologic techniques to these goals. This paper discusses a conceptual approach between the overlap and potential synergies of integrative medicine principles and practices with preventive medicine in the context of these levels o...

  3. Oral-Fluid Thiol-Detection Test Identifies Underlying Active Periodontal Disease Not Detected by the Visual Awake Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queck, Katherine E; Chapman, Angela; Herzog, Leslie J; Shell-Martin, Tamara; Burgess-Cassler, Anthony; McClure, George David

    2018-03-20

    Periodontal disease in dogs is highly prevalent but can only be accurately diagnosed by performing an anesthetized oral examination with periodontal probing and dental radiography. In this study, 114 dogs had a visual awake examination of the oral cavity and were administered an oral-fluid thiol-detection test prior to undergoing a a full-mouth anesthetized oral examination and digital dental radiographs. The results show the visual awake examination underestimated the presence and severity of active periodontal disease. The thiol-detection test was superior to the visual awake examination at detecting the presence and severity of active periodontal disease and was an indicator of progression toward alveolar bone loss. The thiol-detection test detected active periodontal disease at early stages of development, before any visual cues were present, indicating the need for intervention to prevent periodontal bone loss. Early detection is important because without intervention, dogs with gingivitis (active periodontal disease) progress to irreversible periodontal bone loss (stage 2+). As suggested in the current AAHA guidelines, a thiol-detection test administered in conjunction with the visual awake examination during routine wellness examinations facilitates veterinarian-client communication and mitigates under-diagnosis of periodontal disease and underutilization of dental services. The thiol-detection test can be used to monitor the periodontal health status of the conscious patient during follow-up examinations based on disease severity.

  4. Salivary mucins in host defense and disease prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Shapiro Frenkel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucus forms a protective coating on wet epithelial surfaces throughout the body that houses the microbiota and plays a key role in host defense. Mucins, the primary structural components of mucus that creates its viscoelastic properties, are critical components of the gel layer that protect against invading pathogens. Altered mucin production has been implicated in diseases such as ulcerative colitis, asthma, and cystic fibrosis, which highlights the importance of mucins in maintaining homeostasis. Different types of mucins exist throughout the body in various locations such as the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, and female genital tract, but this review will focus on mucins in the oral cavity. Salivary mucin structure, localization within the oral cavity, and defense mechanisms will be discussed. These concepts will then be applied to present what is known about the protective function of mucins in oral diseases such as HIV/AIDS, oral candidiasis, and dental caries.

  5. Adherence of preventive oral care products in the Syrian market to evidence-based international recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habes, D; Mahzia, R; Nakhleh, K; Joury, E

    2016-09-25

    No study has investigated the availability and adherence of preventive oral care products on the Syrian market to evidence-based international recommendations. Data were collected in 2012, and updated in 2016, in terms of availability, characteristics and adherence to evidence-based international recommendations. Few preventive products adhered to the recommendations. Despite the large decrease in the number of oral care products on the Syrian market, due to the Syrian crisis, nonadherence of some of the available products is still present. A multisectorial approach at a policy level is needed to address such important limitations. The Syrian Ministry of Health should reform regulations for fluoride products to become subject to drug monitoring systems; the Syrian Arab Committee for Measurements and Standards needs to update its standards; and the Syrian General Dental Association should distribute a preventive booklet to dental practitioners.

  6. Topical curcumin for the prevention of oral mucositis in pediatric patients: case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, Sharon; Meidan, Irit; Sellam, Gila; Simaan, Sohair; Zeevi, Itai; Waldman, Elisha; Weintraub, Michael; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a common complication of cancer therapy. Animal models suggest that curcumin may prevent oral mucositis. To date, no clinical studies have been reported. The primary aim of this pilot study was to assess the tolerability of a curcumin mouthwash. The secondary aim was to describe oral mucositis in pediatric patients undergoing doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy who were using the curcumin mouthwash. The research team had originally designed a placebo-controlled study, but gastrointestinal adverse events (nausea and vomiting) affected the compliance of the first three participants who entered the study. An independent researcher found that all three had received the placebo. Believing it unethical to continue using the study's original design, the research team discontinued the control group, and the resulting study is comparable to a case series. The research team performed the study at Hadassah University Medical Center in Jerusalem, Israel. Participants were seven pediatric and young-adult oncology patients. In addition to standard, preventive oral care (chlorhexidine 0.2% mouthwash for 30 s twice per day), participants also used 10 drops of Curcumall twice per day in a mouthwash during treatment with highdose chemotherapy. Oral mucositis was assessed on days 0, 7, 10, 14, and 21. The World Health Organization (WHO) scale, the Oral Mucositis Assessment Scale (OMAS), and a Visual Analog pain scale (VAS; patient reporting scale of 0-10) were used. Adverse events were tracked. No oral adverse events were documented. No systemic adverse events that possibly could be related to the use of the curcumin mouthwash were observed. In the four patients who fulfilled the compliance criteria, the WHO, OMAS and VAS scores were lower than the severity of oral mucositis previously reported in the literature. Four out of the five participants developed OM, but the values were low, reflecting a relatively mild case. In this study, the research team suggested that

  7. Oral immunoglobulin for the prevention of rotavirus infection in low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pammi, Mohan; Haque, Khalid N

    2011-11-09

    Rotavirus is a common neonatal nosocomial viral infection and epidemics with the newer P(6)G9 strains have been reported. Local mucosal immunity in the intestine to rotavirus is important in the resolution of infection and protection against subsequent infections. Oral administration of anti-rotaviral immunoglobulin preparations might be a useful strategy in preventing rotaviral infections, especially in low birth weight babies. To determine the effectiveness and safety of oral immunoglobulin preparations for the prevention of rotavirus infection in hospitalized low birthweight infants (birthweight rotavirus infection compared to placebo OR no intervention; 4) at least one of the following outcomes were reported: all cause mortality during hospital stay, mortality due to rotavirus infection during hospital stay, rotavirus infection , duration of diarrhea, need for rehydration, duration of viral excretion, duration of infection control measures, length of hospital stay in days, recurrent diarrhea or chronic diarrhea. The two review authors independently abstracted data from the included trials. One published study (Barnes 1982) was eligible for inclusion in this review. Barnes 1982 found no significant difference in the rates of rotavirus infection after oral gammaglobulin versus placebo in hospitalized low birthweight babies [RR 1.27 (95% CI 0.65 to 2.37)]. In the subset of infants who became infected with rotavirus after receiving gammaglobulin or placebo for prevention of rotavirus infection, there was no significant difference in the duration of rotavirus excretion between the group who had gammaglobulin (mean 2 days, range 1 to 4 days) and the group who had placebo (mean 3 days, range 1 to 6 days). Barnes 1982 reported no adverse effects after administration of oral immunoglobulin preparations. Current evidence does not support the use of oral immunoglobulin preparations to prevent rotavirus infection in low birthweight infants. Researchers are encouraged to

  8. Oral hygiene status of individuals with cardiovascular diseases and associated risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Shetty

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dentist and oral health screening may be the latest weapon in identifying persons at risk of cardiovascular disease. Oral infections, specifically periodontitis, may confer independent risks for different systemic conditions. The risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases also suggest that the relationship between periodontal disease and diabetes works in both ways. The aim of this study was to support and strengthen the association and relationship between oral hygiene status of individuals with cardiovascular diseases and its associated risk factors. A simple random sampling was carried out in 200 inhabitants of Western Utter Pradesh, India. An oral health visit and examination was made for an equal number of males and females of different age groups with cardiovascular diseases. Evaluation of the oral status was made by means of an oral hygiene index, community periodontal index of treatment needs and loss of attachment. Evaluation of oral status in patients with cardiovascular diseases and in the control group has shown a statistically significant low level of oral health in patients with cardiovascular diseases as compared to control. Prevalence of systemic diseases in different age groups significantly correlated with the prevalence of severe periodontal diseases. Treating gum disease may reduce the risk of heart disease and improve health outcomes for patients with periodontal disease and vascular heart problems.

  9. Global strategies to prevent chronic diseases1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    diseases have been the leading causes of death and disease in most wealthy countries. Only recently has it ... Of all chronic disease deaths 80% occur in low- and middle-income countries, and the death rates .... know, especially in low- and middle-income countries that will bear the brunt of the global chronic disease.

  10. Iatrogenic disease in the elderly: risk factors, consequences, and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sompol Permpongkosol

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Sompol PermpongkosolDivision of Urology, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, ThailandAbstract: The epidemiology of iatrogenic disease in the elderly has not been extensively reported. Risk factors of iatrogenic disease in the elderly are drug-induced iatrogenic disease, multiple chronic diseases, multiple physicians, hospitalization, and medical or surgical procedures. Iatrogenic disease can have a great psychomotor impact and important social consequences. To identify patients at high risk is the first step in prevention as most of the iatrogenic diseases are preventable. Interventions that can prevent iatrogenic complications include specific interventions, the use of a geriatric interdisciplinary team, pharmacist consultation and acute care for the elderly units.Keywords: iatrogenic disease, elderly, risk factors, prevention

  11. Recognition and management of common acute conditions of the oral cavity resulting from tooth decay, periodontal disease, and trauma: an update for the family physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Paul C; Kanjirath, Preetha

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an overview of common and/or significant diseases of the oral cavity that the family physician is likely to encounter, with an emphasis on pathogenesis, recognition, complications, and management. Topics reviewed include the sequelae of dental caries, periodontal disease, and trauma. Prevention and early intervention strategies are emphasized. Recent updates and practical issues for the family physician are highlighted.

  12. New approaches to the implementation of cardiovascular disease prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jørstad, H.T.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the biggest contemporary health problems worldwide. To aid preventive measures, risk calculators have been developed to estimate the risk of dying of cardiovascular disease within 10 years, for use in healthy individuals. Decisions to initiate preventive measures are

  13. Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Pignone, Michael; Williams, Craig D.

    2010-01-01

    Aspirin is effective for the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with a history of vascular disease, as so-called secondary prevention. In general populations with no history of previous myocardial infarction or stroke, aspirin also seems useful for primary prevention of cardiovascular events, although the absolute benefits are smaller than those seen in patients with previous cardiovascular disease. Patients with diabetes mellitus are at an increased risk of cardiovascular events...

  14. Risk assessment a key to periodontal health promotion and disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, Deborah M

    2014-06-01

    Prevention of periodontal infection is a complex and integrated process that includes risk assessment, detailed medical and dental histories, evaluation of personal habits, and patient values and expectations. The assessment and data findings provide the basis for an individualized and comprehensive plan to reduce risk for periodontal disease and promote oral health. Periodontal treatment outcomes or expectations are based on these findings, as well as changes in modifiable risk factors and adherence to a prevention regimen. This article will discuss the relevance of risk assessment, the impact of risks such as type 2 diabetes and smoking on periodontal health, and systematic reviews on self-care regimens.

  15. Awareness and attitude of diabetic patients about their increased risk for oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldarrat, Aziza H

    2011-01-01

    To assess: 1) awareness of diabetic patients about their increased risk for oral diseases, 2) attitudes of diabetic patients towards maintaining good oral health through oral self-care and regular dental visits and 3) their sources of information on oral health. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess the main objectives of the study. Two hundred diabetic patients ranging in age from 17 to 78 years old participated in the study. A majority of the participants had type 2 diabetes. The awareness of diabetic patients of their increased risk for oral diseases is low compared to their awareness of systemic diseases. Their attitude towards maintaining good oral health is poor. Of the participants, only 17% brush their teeth twice daily, 61% never use dental floss, and 67% had not visited a dental clinic within the last year. Regarding participants' sources of awareness, 53% learned from a dentist and 30% through other media sources. A significant association (P diabetes and denture problems. Diabetic patients were found to have little awareness of their increased risk for oral diseases. In order to promote proper oral health and to reduce the risk of oral diseases, health professionals in both the dental and medical fields need to develop programs to educate the public about the oral manifestations of diabetes and its complications for oral health.

  16. [Research progress on a nanodrug delivery system for prevention and control of dental caries and periodontal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaling, Jiang; Mingye, Feng; Lei, Cheng

    2017-02-01

    Dental caries and periodontal diseases are common chronic infectious diseases that cause serious damage to oral health. Bacteria is the primary factor leading to such conditions. As a dental plaque control method, chemotherapeutic agents face serious challenges in dental care because of the specific physiological and anatomical characteristics of the oral cavity. Nanodrug delivery system is a series of new drug delivery systems at nanoscale, and it can target cells, promote sustainedrelease effects, and enhance biodegradation. This review focuses on research progress on nanodrug delivery systems for prevention and control of dental caries and periodontal diseases.

  17. PRIMARY PREVENTION OF POSTOPERATIVE REFLUX DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Martynov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Creation of anastomoses between hollow organs of the abdominal cavity, retroperitoneal space and the small intestine always raises the question of the prevention of reflux from the small intestine into the cavity drained the esophagus, stomach, gallbladder, liver outer duct cysts of the liver and pancreas. After surgery, any reflux becomes pathological. Reflux – is an obligate precancer. So, throw the bile and pancreatic juices in the stomach, the stump of the stomach, esophagus contributes to reflux esophagitis, reflux gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer, or a stump. After an internal drainage of cavity formation in the small intestine develops postoperative reflux disease, which is caused by the actions of the surgeon who tried sincerely to help the patient. It is possible to give the definition of such states “Iatrogenic Postoperative Reflux Disease”.The aim of this work was to develop and put into practice a “cap” on the afferent loop of the small intestine, do not migrate into the gut lumen, with an internal cavity drainage structures of the abdominal cavity and retroperitoneal space and to evaluate clinical outcomes. As a result, the authors have developed a way to create a “cap” on a loop of the small intestine, which is used for the drainage of cavity formation, conducted research on its safety, proper functioning, accessibility, analyzed the clinical situation offers. For drainage of cavernous fistula formation impose between him and a loop of small intestine 40–50 cm from the Treitz ligament. Form a intestine anastomosis by Brown.Above this junction length leads to the formation of the drained portion of the small intestine is about 10 cm, in the middle of which impose a “stub”. Length of discharge from the drainage area of education of the small intestine to interintestinal Brownian anastomosis is about 30 cm. To form a “plug” free land use of the greater omentum, through which by puncture-poke perform

  18. [Statins in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adham, S; Miranda, S; Doucet, J; Lévesque, H; Benhamou, Y

    2018-01-01

    Cardiovascular events are the second leading cause of death in France. The assessment of overall cardiovascular risk using a personalized assessment with weighting risk factors can predict the risk of cardiovascular events in ten years. The validated treatments to reduce cardiovascular mortality in primary prevention are few. The use of statins in primary prevention is discussed. We report in this review the updated conclusions from clinical trials regarding the treatment with statins in primary prevention. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Plant-made oral vaccines against human infectious diseases-Are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hui-Ting; Daniell, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Although the plant-made vaccine field started three decades ago with the promise of developing low-cost vaccines to prevent infectious disease outbreaks and epidemics around the globe, this goal has not yet been achieved. Plants offer several major advantages in vaccine generation, including low-cost production by eliminating expensive fermentation and purification systems, sterile delivery and cold storage/transportation. Most importantly, oral vaccination using plant-made antigens confers both mucosal (IgA) and systemic (IgG) immunity. Studies in the past 5 years have made significant progress in expressing vaccine antigens in edible leaves (especially lettuce), processing leaves or seeds through lyophilization and achieving antigen stability and efficacy after prolonged storage at ambient temperatures. Bioencapsulation of antigens in plant cells protects them from the digestive system; the fusion of antigens to transmucosal carriers enhances efficiency of their delivery to the immune system and facilitates successful development of plant vaccines as oral boosters. However, the lack of oral priming approaches diminishes these advantages because purified antigens, cold storage/transportation and limited shelf life are still major challenges for priming with adjuvants and for antigen delivery by injection. Yet another challenge is the risk of inducing tolerance without priming the host immune system. Therefore, mechanistic aspects of these two opposing processes (antibody production or suppression) are discussed in this review. In addition, we summarize recent progress made in oral delivery of vaccine antigens expressed in plant cells via the chloroplast or nuclear genomes and potential challenges in achieving immunity against infectious diseases using cold-chain-free vaccine delivery approaches. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Salivary immunoglobulin classes in Nigerian cigarette smokers: Indication for increased risk of oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olayanju, Ayodeji Olatunde; Rahamon, Sheu Kadiri; Arinola, Olatunbosun Ganiyu

    2012-09-01

    Cigarette smoking is a worldwide social epidemic and it is one of the main causes of preventable death and disability. Gingivitis, periodontitis, pocket depth, attachment loss, alveolar bone loss, and tooth loss are some of oral pathologies commonly found in cigarette smokers. The aim of this study was to explore, for the first time among Nigerians, the interplay between components of cigarette smoke and salivary levels of immunoglobulin classes so as to provide oral immunological based reasons for oral diseases in cigarette smokers. In this case-control study, 5 mL of unstimulated saliva was collected in plain sample bottles from 24 active smokers who smoke at least 6 sticks of cigarette per day and 21 sex and age-matched non-smokers who were apparently healthy. The samples were spun and supernatant stored at -20°C until assayed. The immunoglobulin levels of the samples were estimated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Student's t-test (unpaired) was used to determine significant differences between the two groups. P values less than 0.05 was considered significant. No significant differences were observed in the mean salivary levels of IgG, IgA, and IgE. Only IgM was significantly lower in smokers compared with non-smokers (P = 0.038). The proportion of smokers with detectable level of salivary IgE was lower compared with controls. Our study showed that there is decreased salivary IgM in smokers. This observation suggests that reduced salivary immunoglobulin level of IgM might be involved in the pathogenesis of oral diseases in cigarette smokers.

  1. Prevention of irinotecan-induced diarrhea by oral sodium bicarbonate and influence on pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takao; Yasutake, Koichi; Nishisaki, Hogara; Nakashima, Takatoshi; Horita, Kazutugu; Hirohata, Sigeya; Ishii, Arata; Hamano, Kenichi; Aoyama, Nobuo; Shirasaka, Daisuke; Kamigaki, Takashi; Kasuga, Masato

    2004-01-01

    Alkalization of the intestinal tract by oral administration of sodium bicarbonate has been reported to be a promising method for preventing delayed diarrhea, a dose-limiting toxicity in patients receiving chemotherapy with irinotecan hydrochloride. However, it is feared that this method may adversely affect the pharmacokinetics of irinotecan by inhibiting its intestinal absorption and that of its active metabolites. We compared the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of irinotecan with and without oral alkalization in a cross-over study that enrolled 10 colorectal cancer patients. We found that alkalization did not decrease the blood levels of irinotecan and its active metabolite. In fact, the area under concentration versus time curves (AUCs) of irinotecan and 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin glucuronide (SN-38G) were statistically equivalent both with and without oral alkalization. Also, the AUC of SN-38 with alkalization was statistically equivalent or larger than that without alkalization. Oral alkalization reduced the incidence of diarrhea and gastrointestinal symptoms, and these adverse effects were not worsened by long-term administration. These results suggest that oral alkalization can control diarrhea and gastrointestinal toxicity without decreasing the blood levels of irinotecan and its active metabolites, thus improving the tolerability of long-term chemotherapy without reducing efficacy. Copyright (c) 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Infusing Oral Health Care into Nursing Curriculum: Addressing Preventive Health in Aging and Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Earle Hahn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Access to oral health care is essential for promoting and maintaining overall health and well-being, yet oral health disparities exist among vulnerable and underserved populations. While nurses make up the largest portion of the health care work force, educational preparation to address oral health needs of elders and persons with disabilities is limited across nursing curricula. This descriptive study reports on the interdisciplinary development, implementation, and testing of an oral health module that was included and infused into a graduate nursing curriculum in a three-phase plan. Phase 1 includes evaluation of a lecture presented to eight gerontological nurse practitioner (GNP students. Phase 2 includes evaluation of GNP students’ perceptions of learning, skills, and confidence following a one-time 8-hour practicum infused into 80 required practicum hours. The evaluation data show promise in preparing nurse practitioner students to assess and address preventive oral health needs of persons aging with disabilities such that further infusion and inclusion in a course for nurse practitioners across five specialties will implemented and tested in Phase 3.

  3. Infusing Oral Health Care into Nursing Curriculum: Addressing Preventive Health in Aging and Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Joan Earle; FitzGerald, Leah; Markham, Young Kee; Glassman, Paul; Guenther, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Access to oral health care is essential for promoting and maintaining overall health and well-being, yet oral health disparities exist among vulnerable and underserved populations. While nurses make up the largest portion of the health care work force, educational preparation to address oral health needs of elders and persons with disabilities is limited across nursing curricula. This descriptive study reports on the interdisciplinary development, implementation, and testing of an oral health module that was included and infused into a graduate nursing curriculum in a three-phase plan. Phase 1 includes evaluation of a lecture presented to eight gerontological nurse practitioner (GNP) students. Phase 2 includes evaluation of GNP students' perceptions of learning, skills, and confidence following a one-time 8-hour practicum infused into 80 required practicum hours. The evaluation data show promise in preparing nurse practitioner students to assess and address preventive oral health needs of persons aging with disabilities such that further infusion and inclusion in a course for nurse practitioners across five specialties will implemented and tested in Phase 3. PMID:22619708

  4. Oral candidiasis in patients with psoriasis: correlation of oral examination and cytopathological evaluation with psoriasis disease severity and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciani, Bruna Lavinas Sayed; Michalski-Santos, Bruna; Carneiro, Sueli; Sampaio, Ana Luisa; Avelleira, Joao Carlos Regazzi; Azulay, David Rubem; Pinto, Jane Marcy Neffa; Dias, Eliane Pedra

    2013-06-01

    Infections are known to trigger and exacerbate psoriasis. Although oral candidiasis is often clinically diagnosed, it is not always confirmed by laboratory tests such as oral cytopathology. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of oral candidiasis in patients with psoriasis through clinical and cytopathological diagnosis and to investigate the association between oral candidiasis and psoriasis with regards to the severity of the clinical presentation and the type of treatment for psoriasis. A total of 140 patients with psoriasis and 140 healthy control subjects received an oral examination. Scrapings of the tongue were also obtained for a cytopathological examination. The oral examination and the results of the cytopathological smear revealed 37 (26%) cases of candidiasis in the patients with psoriasis and no cases of candidiasis in the healthy control subjects. There was no correlation between the type of psoriasis treatment and the presence of oral candidiasis (P = .616). There was a statistically significant association (P = .033) between the clinical severity of psoriasis and the presence of Candida. This study was limited by the small number of subjects and the lack of follow-up to determine the development of psoriasis after treatment for oral candidiasis. The presence of oral candidiasis is higher in patients with psoriasis and it is associated with disease severity. This increased presence of oral candidiasis was apparent despite any type of treatment for the psoriasis. Cytopathology to rule out oral candidiasis should be used in the routine medical workup of patients with psoriasis. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mongersen, an oral SMAD7 antisense oligonucleotide, and Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Giovanni; Neurath, Markus F; Ardizzone, Sandro; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Fantini, Massimo C; Castiglione, Fabiana; Scribano, Maria L; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Caprioli, Flavio; Sturniolo, Giacomo C; Rogai, Francesca; Vecchi, Maurizio; Atreya, Raja; Bossa, Fabrizio; Onali, Sara; Fichera, Maria; Corazza, Gino R; Biancone, Livia; Savarino, Vincenzo; Pica, Roberta; Orlando, Ambrogio; Pallone, Francesco

    2015-03-19

    Crohn's disease-related inflammation is characterized by reduced activity of the immunosuppressive cytokine transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) due to high levels of SMAD7, an inhibitor of TGF-β1 signaling. Preclinical studies and a phase 1 study have shown that an oral SMAD7 antisense oligonucleotide, mongersen, targets ileal and colonic SMAD7. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial, we evaluated the efficacy of mongersen for the treatment of persons with active Crohn's disease. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 10, 40, or 160 mg of mongersen or placebo per day for 2 weeks. The primary outcomes were clinical remission at day 15, defined as a Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI) score of less than 150, with maintenance of remission for at least 2 weeks, and the safety of mongersen treatment. A secondary outcome was clinical response (defined as a reduction of 100 points or more in the CDAI score) at day 28. The proportions of patients who reached the primary end point were 55% and 65% for the 40-mg and 160-mg mongersen groups, respectively, as compared with 10% for the placebo group (P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the percentage of participants reaching clinical remission between the 10-mg group (12%) and the placebo group. The rate of clinical response was significantly greater among patients receiving 10 mg (37%), 40 mg (58%), or 160 mg (72%) of mongersen than among those receiving placebo (17%) (P=0.04, P<0.001, and P<0.001, respectively). Most adverse events were related to complications and symptoms of Crohn's disease. We found that study participants with Crohn's disease who received mongersen had significantly higher rates of remission and clinical response than those who received placebo. (Funded by Giuliani; EudraCT number, 2011-002640-27.).

  6. Salivary bacterial fingerprints of established oral disease revealed by the Human Oral Microbe Identification using Next Generation Sequencing (HOMINGS technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Belstrøm

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The composition of the salivary microbiota, as determined using various molecular methods, has been reported to differentiate oral health from diseases. Thus, the purpose of this study was to utilize the newly developed molecular technique HOMINGS (Human Oral Microbe Identification using Next Generation Sequencing for comparison of the salivary microbiota in patients with periodontitis, patients with dental caries, and orally healthy individuals. The hypothesis was that this method could add on to the existing knowledge on salivary bacterial profiles in oral health and disease. Design: Stimulated saliva samples (n=30 were collected from 10 patients with untreated periodontitis, 10 patients with untreated dental caries, and 10 orally healthy individuals. Salivary microbiota was analyzed using HOMINGS and statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal–Wallis test with Benjamini–Hochberg's correction. Results: From a total of 30 saliva samples, a mean number of probe targets of 205 (range 120–353 were identified, and a statistically significant higher mean number of targets was registered in samples from patients with periodontitis (mean 220, range 143–306 and dental caries (mean 221, range 165–353 as compared to orally healthy individuals (mean 174, range 120–260 (p=0.04 and p=0.04. Nine probe targets were identified with a different relative abundance between groups (p<0.05. Conclusions: Cross-sectional comparison of salivary bacterial profiles by means of HOMINGS analysis showed that different salivary bacterial profiles were associated with oral health and disease. Future large-scale prospective studies are needed to evaluate if saliva-based screening for disease-associated oral bacterial profiles may be used for identification of patients at risk of acquiring periodontitis and dental caries.

  7. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ORAL AND INTRALESIONAL VERAPAMIL IN PEYRONIE’S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saju P. R

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Treatment of Peyronie's disease is a dilemma for the treating urologist. Part of this problem is due to an incomplete understanding of the aetiopathophysiology of the disease. Multiple nonsurgical treatment are available for Peyronie’s Disease (PD including calcium channel blocker verapamil, both oral and intraplaque injectable. The use of verapamil is based on its capacity to alter fibroblast function and promote collagen degradation. As a result, calcium channel antagonists may have the capacity to slow, prevent or even reverse plaque formation. There are many studies suggesting benefits of intraplaque verapamil injection. In our study, we aim to compare the outcomes of oral versus intraplaque verapamil injection in terms of pain reduction, decrease in curvature and improved sexual function. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this randomised study, 20 patients were randomly divided into 2 groups of 10 patients each (Group I patients were treated with oral verapamil and group II patients were treated with intraplaque verapamil injection. Results from both the groups were compared and interpreted in terms of change in plaque size, curvature, erectile function and pain. Size of plaque was assessed with the help of color Doppler in pre and post-treatment period. All the 20 patients were followed for 3 years after completion of treatment. None of the 20 patients lost to follow up. RESULTS 30% of group I patients (oral verapamil showed decreased plaque volume. Softening of plaque was noted in only 60% of the patients. Subjective erectile dysfunction improved in only 40% of the patients. In group, II patients who received intraplaque verapamil injection, 70% showed decreased plaque volume with improvement in penile curvature. There was softening of the plaque in all the patients in group II. Subjective erectile dysfunction improved in 60% of the patients. No local or systemic toxicity was noted except mild ecchymosis in 2 patients of group II

  8. Pathogenetics aspects of relationship mouth infectious diseases with development and progression atherosclerosis and possibility for their integrated prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Avdeeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the modern literature data about impact of various infectious agents on the development and progression of atherosclerotic disease. The data are demonstrated the role of various infectious diseases, including periodontal diseases, in the development of biological degradation and destabilization of atherosclerotic plaques. The article questions of organization of primary prevention of cardiovascular disease based on the screening assessment by stomatologist the oral sanitary status. Necessary to carry out sanitation of chronic infection foci of the mouth on the basis of existing children’s health centers. The children’s health centers have a set of dental equipment, with which can perform a screening diagnosis of dental caries, periodontal diseases, non-carious lesions, diseases of the mucous membranes, and conduct preventive oral sanitation. The duties of dental hygienists is teaching children of different age groups to the rules of oral care, demonstration of skills, brushing teeth, information about the importance of prevention of dental caries and periodontal disease, as it is not only important for the preservation of the teeth, but also may prevent the development of ardiovasculardisease adulthood.

  9. Getting the Incentives Right: Improving Oral Health Equity With Universal School-Based Caries Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederman, Richard; Huang, Shulamite S; Trescher, Anna-Lena; Listl, Stefan

    2017-05-01

    Despite significant financial, training, and program investments, US children's caries experience and inequities continued to increase over the last 20 years. We posit that (1) dental insurance payment systems are not aligned with the current best evidence, exacerbating inequities, and (2) system redesign could meet health care's triple aim and reduce children's caries by 80%. On the basis of 2013 to 2016 Medicaid and private payment rates and the caries prevention literature, we find that effective preventive interventions are either (1) consistently compensated less than ineffective interventions or (2) not compensated at all. This economic and clinical misalignment may account for underuse of effective caries prevention and subsequent overuse of restorative care. We propose universal school-based comprehensive caries prevention to address this misalignment. Preliminary modeling suggests that universal caries prevention could eliminate 80% of children's caries and cost less than one fifth of current Medicaid children's oral health spending. If implemented with bundled payments based on cycle of care and measurable outcomes, there would be an alignment of incentives, best evidence, care, and outcomes. Such a program would meet the Healthy People Oral Health goals for children, as well as health care's triple aim.

  10. Gingival Inflammation Associates with Stroke--A Role for Oral Health Personnel in Prevention: A Database Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Söder

    Full Text Available Gingival inflammation is the physiological response to poor oral hygiene. If gingivitis is not resolved the response will become an established lesion.We studied whether gingivitis associates with elevated risk for stroke. The hypothesis was based on the periodontitis-atherosclerosis paradigm.In our prospective cohort study from Sweden 1676 randomly selected subjects were followed up from 1985 to 2012. All subjects underwent clinical oral examination and answered a questionnaire assessing background variables such as socio-economic status and pack-years of smoking. Cases with stroke were recorded from the Center of Epidemiology, Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, Sweden, and classified according to the WHO International Classification of Diseases. Unpaired t-test, chi-square tests, and multiple logistic regression analyses were used.Of the 1676 participants, 39 subjects (2.3% had been diagnosed with stroke. There were significant differences between the patients with stroke and subjects without in pack-years of smoking (p = 0.01, prevalence of gingival inflammation (GI (p = 0.03, and dental calculus (p = 0.017. In a multiple regression analysis the association between GI, confounders and stroke, GI showed odds ratio 2.20 (95% confidence interval 1.02-4.74 for stroke.Our present findings showed that gingival inflammation clearly associated with stroke in this 26-year cohort study. The results emphasize the role of oral health personnel in prevention.

  11. Gingival Inflammation Associates with Stroke--A Role for Oral Health Personnel in Prevention: A Database Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söder, Birgitta; Meurman, Jukka H; Söder, Per-Östen

    2015-01-01

    Gingival inflammation is the physiological response to poor oral hygiene. If gingivitis is not resolved the response will become an established lesion.We studied whether gingivitis associates with elevated risk for stroke. The hypothesis was based on the periodontitis-atherosclerosis paradigm. In our prospective cohort study from Sweden 1676 randomly selected subjects were followed up from 1985 to 2012. All subjects underwent clinical oral examination and answered a questionnaire assessing background variables such as socio-economic status and pack-years of smoking. Cases with stroke were recorded from the Center of Epidemiology, Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, Sweden, and classified according to the WHO International Classification of Diseases. Unpaired t-test, chi-square tests, and multiple logistic regression analyses were used. Of the 1676 participants, 39 subjects (2.3%) had been diagnosed with stroke. There were significant differences between the patients with stroke and subjects without in pack-years of smoking (p = 0.01), prevalence of gingival inflammation (GI) (p = 0.03), and dental calculus (p = 0.017). In a multiple regression analysis the association between GI, confounders and stroke, GI showed odds ratio 2.20 (95% confidence interval 1.02-4.74) for stroke. Our present findings showed that gingival inflammation clearly associated with stroke in this 26-year cohort study. The results emphasize the role of oral health personnel in prevention.

  12. Gingival Inflammation Associates with Stroke – A Role for Oral Health Personnel in Prevention: A Database Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Gingival inflammation is the physiological response to poor oral hygiene. If gingivitis is not resolved the response will become an established lesion.We studied whether gingivitis associates with elevated risk for stroke. The hypothesis was based on the periodontitis–atherosclerosis paradigm. Methods In our prospective cohort study from Sweden 1676 randomly selected subjects were followed up from 1985 to 2012. All subjects underwent clinical oral examination and answered a questionnaire assessing background variables such as socio-economic status and pack-years of smoking. Cases with stroke were recorded from the Center of Epidemiology, Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, Sweden, and classified according to the WHO International Classification of Diseases. Unpaired t-test, chi-square tests, and multiple logistic regression analyses were used. Results Of the 1676 participants, 39 subjects (2.3%) had been diagnosed with stroke. There were significant differences between the patients with stroke and subjects without in pack-years of smoking (p = 0.01), prevalence of gingival inflammation (GI) (p = 0.03), and dental calculus (p = 0.017). In a multiple regression analysis the association between GI, confounders and stroke, GI showed odds ratio 2.20 (95% confidence interval 1.02–4.74) for stroke. Conclusion Our present findings showed that gingival inflammation clearly associated with stroke in this 26-year cohort study. The results emphasize the role of oral health personnel in prevention. PMID:26405803

  13. Oral contraception, smoking and inflammatory bowel disease--findings in the Royal College of General Practitioners Oral Contraception Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, R F; Kay, C R

    1989-03-01

    Data from the Royal College of General Practitioners Oral Contraception Study have been examined to determine whether oral contraceptive use was associated with the development of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Over a 17 year period Crohn's disease developed in 42 women and ulcerative colitis in 78. The incidence of both diseases was greater in oral contraceptive users compared to non-users with the rate ratio for Crohn's disease being 1.7 (95% confidence limits, 0.88, 3.2) and for ulcerative colitis being 1.3 (95% confidence limits 0.82, 2.0). For both diseases incidence was unrelated to parity or social class, but women smoking at recruitment had a greater incidence of Crohn's disease (rate ratio 1.8, 95% confidence limits 0.93, 3.3) and a reduced incidence of ulcerative colitis (rate ratio 0.68, 95% confidence limits 0.41, 1.1). Although these results are based on small numbers and could be chance findings, they are consistent with other studies showing associations between oral contraceptive use, smoking and the development of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

  14. Oral health-related quality of life of children and teens with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Matta Felisberto Fernandes, Maria Luiza; Kawachi, Ichiro; Fernandes, Alexandre Moreira; Corrêa-Faria, Patrícia; Paiva, Saul Martins; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida

    2016-01-01

    Children with sickle cell disease may have their quality of life affected by oral alterations. However, there is still little data on oral health-related quality of life in these children. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sickle cell disease, socioeconomic characteristics, and oral conditions on oral health-related quality of life of children and teens. One hundred and six children and teens with sickle cell disease were compared to a similar sample of 385 healthy peers. Data were collected through oral examinations, interviews to assess quality of life (Child Perceptions Questionnaire for children aged 8-10 and 11-14) and questionnaires containing questions on socioeconomic status. There were no statistically significant differences in the total scores of the Child Perceptions Questionnaires or domain scores comparing sickle cell disease patients to control subjects. When sub-scales were compared, oral symptoms and functional limitations had a greater negative impact on the quality of life of adolescents with sickle cell disease (p-value sickle cell disease and the control group. Of the oral alterations, there was a significant difference in the oral health-related quality of life between adolescents with sickle cell disease and controls only in relation to malocclusion. Among the socioeconomic characteristics, only overcrowding was significantly associated with a negative impact on oral health-related quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Hematologia, Hemoterapia e Terapia Celular. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Trends in Oral Diseases in the U.S. Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozier, R Gary; White, B Alexander; Slade, Gary D

    2017-08-01

    This article reviews trends in dental caries, periodontal disease, and tooth loss for the United States along with population dynamics and risk factors that might influence these trends going forward. Dental caries experience remains high in the primary dentition. Caries severity in permanent teeth of children has declined to historically low levels, and long-standing inequalities in untreated caries appear to be narrowing. Declines in caries severity of children's permanent teeth have stabilized at a low level, but likely will contribute to future reductions in dental caries severity in adults. The prevalence of periodontal disease is high in adults, and only a small percentage have severe forms of the disease. Countervailing trends in determinants would suggest little change in the prevalence of periodontal disease in the future, but the lack of an obvious trend over the last two decades makes projections uncertain. Tooth loss as a consequence of dental disease has declined markedly over the last half century and has been all but eliminated in high-income groups. However, notable exceptions to these favorable trends are evident. Progress in prevention policies and programs that affect disease experience appears slower than progress in meeting population-level caries treatment needs. Clearly, long-standing inequities related to political and social determinants remain for all dental diseases, and income disparities in dental disease are widening for some indicators. Growing inequalities raise ethical and public health concerns that should be prominent in discussions of dental workforce needs and strategies for the next 25 years. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  16. Dietary nutrients in preventing cardiovascular diseases: a narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijeh Saket

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Foods play an important role in preparing the health of body. Foods and nutrients are effective in increasing health and regulating the immune system as well as in prevention of different diseases such as cardiovascular diseases. In the past few years, the prevalence of cardiovascular disease is progressively increasing. Change in lifestyle and dietary pattern of the societies plays an important role in inducing cardiovascular diseases. Studies have shown that the risk of cardiovascular disease among people consuming more vegetables is lower. Recent findings suggest that foods rich in omega-3, vitamins, antioxidants and fibers are useful for the health of cardiovascular system and such nutrition, in addition to disease prevention, reduces the cost and side effects of chemical treatments. In this article, different clinical trials introducing beneficial dietary approaches in preventing cardiovascular diseases are reviewed

  17. Degranulated mast cells and TNF-α in oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reactions diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parichehr Ghalayani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to assess mast cells and TNF-α in oral lichen planus (OLP and oral lichenoid reactions (OLR patients as diagnostic marker to the differential diagnosis of OLP and OLR diseases. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, samples were obtained from 30 OLP and 30 OLR patients, between June 2010 and March 2011 in Dental clinic of the University of Isfahan, Iran. Mast cells in the reticular layer of the lamina propria for samples were evaluated using toluidine blue method and immunohistochemical technique. The clinical relevant data taken into account were: demographical data, total number and degranulated mast cells, ratio of degranulated mast cells and TNF-α positive degranulated mast cells. Results: In OLP and OLR, the total mast cells were 21.2 ± 7.9 and 20.3 ± 6.8, degranulated mast cells were 15.5 ± 6.9 and 19.2 ± 6.9, ratio of degranulated mast cells to total mast cells were 0.716 ± 0.067 and 0.946 ± 0.081, and TNF-α positive degranulated mast cells were 13.6 ± 6.3 and 17.1 ± 6.04, respectively. There was no significant difference for the total mast cells. But degranulated mast cells, ratio of degranulated mast cells and TNF-α positive degranulated mast cells in OLR were significantly higher than OLP patients. Conclusions: Our results showed that the degranulated mast cells, ratio of degranulated mast cells and TNF-α in OLR was significantly more than OLP patients and these may be able to be used as diagnostic markers to the differential diagnosis of OLP and OLR.

  18. Essentials of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators.

  19. Prevention of postoperative recurrence in Crohn's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Haens, G.

    1999-01-01

    Postoperative recurrence of Crohn's disease is often inevitable. Certain risk factors such as smoking, young age, and a perforating disease behavior have been identified. Patients with an enhanced risk profile should be treated with mesalamine or with azathioprine, the latter of which has higher

  20. Prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis: a literature review; Prevencao e tratamento da mucosite oral induzida por radioterapia: revisao de literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, Ieda Lessa de Souza [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital do Cancer I. Servico de Enfermagem]. E-mail: iedalessa@yahoo.com.br; Camargo, Teresa Caldas [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital do Cancer III. Servico de Enfermagem]. E-mail: tcamargo@inca.gov.br

    2007-04-15

    The prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis have still not been fully defined. The current study thus involved a literature search aimed at identifying preventive and therapeutic measures in relation to oral mucositis in patients submitted to radiotherapy, analyzing the level of evidence in the selected studies, identifying which indications for prevention and treatment in the literature pertain to the field of nursing, and critically analyzing the results and their implications for nursing care. This was a systematic literature survey without a meta analysis, consulting the following databases: BIREME, Medline, CancerLit, Scirus, CAPES, Free medical journal, High wire press, SCIELO, and Medscape, from 2000 to 2005. According to observations, nursing care was capable of improving patient's quality of life, promoting education of patients, implementing and supervising oral care programs, and providing guidance on hygiene, prevention, and treatment of oral mucositis, including pain management. However, no Brazilian nursing publications were found on the subject. Research and publications focusing on nursing experience in the prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-related oral mucositis and the implications for patients and nurses are important to provide evidence-based nursing guidelines. (author)

  1. Physician Performance Assessment: Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipner, Rebecca S.; Weng, Weifeng; Caverzagie, Kelly J.; Hess, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Given the rising burden of healthcare costs, both patients and healthcare purchasers are interested in discerning which physicians deliver quality care. We proposed a methodology to assess physician clinical performance in preventive cardiology care, and determined a benchmark for minimally acceptable performance. We used data on eight…

  2. Research Award: Non-Communicable Disease Prevention

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    In 2015,. NCDP invites research award proposals that advance our program by exploring the challenges of adopting and implementing policies that prevent NCDs and reduce the major risk factors, such as tobacco use, unhealthy diet, alcohol misuse, and physical inactivity. This includes evidence for policies and laws that:.

  3. Instruments for oral disease-intervention strategies : recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing tetanus toxin fragment C for vaccination or myelin proteins for oral tolerance induction in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen, C.B.M.; Laman, J.D.; Heijne den Bak-Glashouwer, M.J.; Tielen, F.J.; Holten-Neelen, J.C.P.A. van; Hoogteijling, L.; Antonissen, C.; Leer, R.J.; Pouwels, P.H.; Boersma, W.J.A.; Shaw, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    Lactobacillus strains possess properties that make them attractive candidates as vehicles for oral administration of therapeutics. In this report we describe the construction and analysis of recombinant Lactobacillus casei applicable in oral vaccination against an infectious disease (tetanus) and in

  4. State of oral cavity hygiene, sIgA level, mineral content of oral fluid, and optimization of preventive intervention in children with enamel hypoplasia and underlying comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liubarets, S F; Kopylova, O V; Belingio, T O; Kolbasynska, V M; Sechina, I M; Liubarets, T F

    2015-12-01

    To advance the efficiency of tooth caries prevention in children with enamel hypoplasia through a com plex intervention focused at amelioration of oral hygiene, secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) level, and mineral con tent of oral fluid. Hypoplasia of permanent teeth enamel was the target of research. State of oral cavity hygiene, sIgA, total calcium and orthophosphate content in oral fluid were the research subject. Enamel vital stain ing, transillumination, immunoenzymometric and photometric techniques were applied. Indices of oral cavity hygiene: simplified oral hygiene index (OHI S) by Green and Vermillion (1964) and Silness Loe (1964, 1967) plaque index were the assayed. Assessment of oral cavity hygiene and assay of sIgA, calcium and orthophosphate content in oral fluid were held in 43 children 6-14 years old (n=21, Group 1; n=22, Group 2) with a systemic enamel hypoplasia and underlying diffuse non toxic (euthyroid) goiter. All children were born from the ChNPP accident clean up work ers and evacuees from territories of mandatory resettlement. Children in the Group 1 were prescribed a set of preven tive interventions including recommendations on choice of the oral care tools and teaching the standard dental cleaning skills. Children in the Group 2 additionally used the remineralizing gel with calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and xylitol (Sanction of the State Sanitary and Epidemiological Service of Ukraine # 05.03.02 03/9351 from 07.02.2014). State of oral cavity hygiene in children of the both study groups was assayed by a "dissatisfactory" criteri on according to the OHI S by Green and Vermillion and by a "poor" criterion according to the Silness Loe plaque index. Upon application of preventive intervrntions the state of oral cavity hygiene improved in children of Group 1 and Group 2: there was a significant decrease of OHI S by Green and Vermillion (p=0.0001) and Silness Loe plaque index (p=0.0003). Administration of remineralizing gel resulted in a

  5. Reorienting a paediatric oral health service towards prevention: lessons from a qualitative study of dental professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashmore, Aaron W; Noller, Jennifer; Ritchie, Jan; Johnson, Bronwyn; Blinkhorn, Anthony S

    2011-04-01

    Reorienting primary care dental services towards prevention is a priority for improving the oral health of Australian children with extensive dental caries. We explored the attitudes and beliefs of dental staff about the factors that helped or hindered the establishment and implementation of a hospital-based parent counselling program to manage existing, and prevent new, carious lesions in children. A further aim was to explore the influence of the program on the hospital's reorientation to prevention. Eight of nine program staff participated in two focus group interviews, and two co-ordinating staff participated in semi-structured interviews. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Interview recordings and transcripts were analysed by qualitative thematic analysis. The participants identified a number of factors that they felt influenced the establishment and implementation of the program, including the dental team's support of the initiative, the advantages of building on existing clinic infrastructure and procedures, the utility of harnessing dental assistants as a resource for oral health promotion, and the confidence of dental professionals to provide parent counselling. Efforts to establish a preventive program in a public paediatric dental service should ensure that all members of the dental team are engaged during all phases of the program, that dental assistants are trained and supported to deliver parent counselling, and that interprofessional partnerships with services such as dietetics are fostered.

  6. A survey of veterinarian involvement in zoonotic disease prevention practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Beth A; Hopkins, Sharon G; Koehler, Jane E; DiGiacomo, Ronald F

    2008-10-15

    To determine the extent to which practicing veterinarians in King County, Washington, engaged in commonly recommended practices for the prevention of zoonotic diseases. Cross-sectional survey. Sample Population-Licensed veterinarians practicing clinical medicine in King County, Washington. A survey was sent between September and November 2006 to 454 licensed veterinarians practicing clinical medicine in King County. 370 valid responses were received. A high proportion (280/362 [77%]) of respondents agreed that it was very important for veterinarians to educate clients on zoonotic disease prevention, but only 43% (158/367) reported that they had initiated discussions about zoonotic diseases with clients on a daily basis, and only 57% (203/356) indicated that they had client educational materials on zoonotic diseases available in their practices. Thirty-one percent (112/360) of respondents indicated that there were no written infection-control guidelines for staff members in the practice, and 28% (105/371) reported having been infected with a zoonotic disease in practice. Results illustrated that veterinarians recognize their important role in zoonotic disease prevention and suggested that veterinarians would welcome stronger partnerships with public health agencies and other health professionals in this endeavor. Methods to increase veterinarians' involvement in zoonotic disease prevention include discussing zoonotic diseases more frequently with clients, physicians, and public health agencies; encouraging higher risk individuals to discuss zoonotic diseases; having educational materials on zoonotic diseases available for clients; improving infection-control practices; and ensuring that continuing education courses on zoonotic diseases are regularly available.

  7. An oral Aujeszky's disease vaccine (YS-400) induces neutralizing antibody in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong-Kun; Kim, Ha-Hyun; Choi, Sung-Suk; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Song, Jae-Young

    2016-07-01

    Aujeszky's disease (AD) is an economically important disease affecting both wild and domestic pigs of the species Sus scrofa. A previous study yielded serological evidence of AD in Korean wild boars, which could spread AD to other animals. A new Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) bait vaccine is required to prevent AD outbreaks in swine. In the present study, we investigated the safety and immunogenicity of a gE-deleted marker vaccine, strain YS-400, in young domestic pigs. The YS-400 strain was propagated in Vero cells, and the trial ADV bait vaccine (a vaccine blister in a matrix including an attractant) was prepared. Pigs were orally immunized with the vaccine (2 mL, 10(7.5) TCID50/mL) delivered using a syringe or in the bait vaccine. The animals were observed for 9 weeks after vaccination, and immunogenicity was assessed using a virus neutralization (VN) test and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The YS-400 strain was non-pathogenic to pigs when given orally and induced high VN titers (1:32-1:128) 6 weeks post-administration. Of the pigs given the ADV bait vaccine twice or three times, 40% were seropositive by 2 weeks, and 100% were seropositive by 7 weeks after the first dose. Pigs that consumed the AD bait vaccine three times developed VN titers that were slightly higher than those of pigs given the vaccine twice. Domestic pigs given the trial ADV bait vaccine exhibited no adverse effects and developed high VN titers against ADV, indicating that the YS-400 strain is safe and can prevent ADV infection in domestic pigs.

  8. Salivary bacterial fingerprints of established oral disease revealed by the Human Oral Microbe Identification using Next Generation Sequencing (HOMINGS) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Paster, Bruce J.; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Bardow, Allan; Holmstrup, Palle

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective The composition of the salivary microbiota, as determined using various molecular methods, has been reported to differentiate oral health from diseases. Thus, the purpose of this study was to utilize the newly developed molecular technique HOMINGS (Human Oral Microbe Identification using Next Generation Sequencing) for comparison of the salivary microbiota in patients with periodontitis, patients with dental caries, and orally healthy individuals. The hypothesis was that this method could add on to the existing knowledge on salivary bacterial profiles in oral health and disease. Design Stimulated saliva samples (n=30) were collected from 10 patients with untreated periodontitis, 10 patients with untreated dental caries, and 10 orally healthy individuals. Salivary microbiota was analyzed using HOMINGS and statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal–Wallis test with Benjamini–Hochberg's correction. Results From a total of 30 saliva samples, a mean number of probe targets of 205 (range 120–353) were identified, and a statistically significant higher mean number of targets was registered in samples from patients with periodontitis (mean 220, range 143–306) and dental caries (mean 221, range 165–353) as compared to orally healthy individuals (mean 174, range 120–260) (p=0.04 and p=0.04). Nine probe targets were identified with a different relative abundance between groups (pdental caries. PMID:26782357

  9. Oral Anticoagulants to Prevent Stroke in Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With CKD Stage 5D: An NKF-KDOQI Controversies Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Vinod K; Herzog, Charles A; Sarnak, Mark J; Choi, Michael J; Mehta, Ravindra; Jaar, Bernard G; Rocco, Michael V; Kramer, Holly

    2017-12-01

    Stroke risk may be more than 3-fold higher among patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5D (CKD-5D) compared to the general population, with the highest stroke rates noted among those 85 years and older. Atrial fibrillation (AF), a strong risk factor for stroke, is the most common arrhythmia and affects >7% of the population with CKD-5D. Warfarin use is widely acknowledged as an important intervention for stroke prevention with nonvalvular AF in the general population. However, use of oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in patients with CKD-5D and nonvalvular AF continues to be debated by the nephrology community. In this National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) controversies report, we discuss the existing observational studies that examine warfarin use and associated stroke and bleeding risks in adults with CKD-5D and AF. Non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants and their potential use for stroke prevention in patients with CKD-5D and nonvalvular AF are also discussed. Data from randomized clinical trials are urgently needed to determine the benefits and risks of oral anticoagulant use for stroke prevention in the setting of AF among patients with CKD-5D. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Possible oral transmission of Chagas disease among hydrocarbons sector workers in Casanare, Colombia, 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuleta-Dueñas, Liliana Patricia; López-Quiroga, Ángela Johana; Torres-Torres, Fernando; Castañeda-Porras, Oneida

    2017-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent for Chagas disease, can be transmitted by oral intake of contaminated food or drinks. During epidemiological week 14 of 2014, two cases of acute Chagas disease were notified among hydrocarbons sector workers in Paz de Ariporo, Casanare. To characterize the affected population, to establish control and prevention measures and to confirm the outbreak. We conducted an outbreak investigation that included the following components: a) Search for symptomatic people compatible with Chagas disease according to the case definition for their referral to medical services; b) entomological survey (192/197 houses); c) sanitary inspection and microbiological analysis of food samples; and d) study of reservoirs. Data management and analysis were done with Epi-Info 7.1.5 using descriptive statistics. We also calculated intradomicile and peridomicile triatomine infestation indexes. We detected 552 exposed people; 40 had the disease (7.2%), of whom seven were women (17,5%) and 33, men (82.5%), i.e., a male-female ratio of 5:1. The mean age was 39.1 ± 10.8 years; the attack rate was 7.2% and lethality, 5% (2/40). Symptoms included fever (100% of cases), headache (80%), myalgia and arthralgia (65%), facial edema (55%), and abdominal pain (37.5%). The mean incubation time was 17 days (range: 3-21). Rhodnius prolixus domiciliary infestation index was 3.3 % and 2.2% in the peridomicile. In the five restaurants inspected sanitary conditions were deficient and food samples were microbiologically non-conforming. We found a dog and two opossums positive for IgG antibodies by ELISA. Environmental, sanitary and epidemiological conditions at the place confirmed an outbreak of Chagas diseases related to occupational exposure, possibly by oral transmission, which may be the largest to date in Colombia.

  11. Leveraging human-centered design in chronic disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Gordon O; Pacione, Chris; Shultz, Rebecca K; Klügl, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Bridging the knowing-doing gap in the prevention of chronic disease requires deep appreciation and understanding of the complexities inherent in behavioral change. Strategies that have relied exclusively on the implementation of evidence-based data have not yielded the desired progress. The tools of human-centered design, used in conjunction with evidence-based data, hold much promise in providing an optimal approach for advancing disease prevention efforts. Directing the focus toward wide-scale education and application of human-centered design techniques among healthcare professionals will rapidly multiply their effective ability to bring the kind of substantial results in disease prevention that have eluded the healthcare industry for decades. This, in turn, would increase the likelihood of prevention by design. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Knowledge of parents about oral health in children with heart diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Noorollahian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transient bacteremia in dentistry is discussed as an important causative factor in bacterial endocarditis. The aim of this study was evaluate the knowledge of importance of dental caries prevention in parents whose children had heart disease. Materials and Method: In this descriptive cross sectional study a simple consecutive sampling was used and 320 parents (125 fathers, 195 mothers referred to the heart clinics of Zahedan were evaluated by a questionnaire. Questions were about the demographic information and their knowledge about oral health and it's relation to heart diseases. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests.Results: The results showed that the mean of their knowledge was 21.3±10.1 of 100. The father's knowledge (24.4±8.7 was higher compared to the mothers (19.23±10.3. The knowledge rural families were more than the urban families (22.5±9.8 and 14.51±9.1 respectively. Conclusion: Our findings showed limited knowledge of the parents about the interactions between oral hygiene and the risk bacterial endocarditis

  13. Effects of Physician-Based Preventive Oral Health Services on Dental Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Ashley M; Preisser, John S; Rozier, R Gary

    2015-07-01

    Most Medicaid programs reimburse nondental providers for preventive dental services. We estimate the impact of comprehensive preventive oral health services (POHS) on dental caries among kindergarten students, hypothesizing improved oral health among students with medical visits with POHS. We conducted a retrospective study in 29,173 kindergarten students by linking Medicaid claims (1999-2006) with public health surveillance data (2005-2006). Zero-inflated regression models estimated the association between number of visits with POHS and (1) decayed, missing, and filled primary teeth (dmft) and (2) untreated decayed teeth while adjusting for confounding. Kindergarten students with ≥4 POHS visits averaged an adjusted 1.82 dmft (95% confidence interval: 1.55 to 2.09), which was significantly less than students with 0 visits (2.21 dmft; 95% confidence interval: 2.16 to 2.25). The mean number of untreated decayed teeth was not reduced for students with ≥4 POHS visits compared with those with 0 visits. POHS provided by nondental providers in medical settings were associated with a reduction in caries experience in young children but were not associated with improvement in subsequent use of treatment services in dental settings. Efforts to promote oral health in medical settings should continue. Strategies to promote physician-dentist collaborations are needed to improve continuity of care for children receiving dental services in medical settings. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Oral health and cardiovascular care: Perceptions of people with cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamonson, Yenna; Ajwani, Shilpi; Bhole, Sameer; Bishop, Joshua; Lintern, Karen; Nolan, Samantha; Rajaratnam, Rohan; Redfern, Julie; Sheehan, Maria; Skarligos, Fiona; Spencer, Lissa; Srinivas, Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Main objective The aim of this study was to explore the perception of patients with cardiovascular disease towards oral health and the potential for cardiac care clinicians to promote oral health. Method A needs assessment was undertaken with twelve patients with cardiovascular disease attending cardiac rehabilitation between 2015 and 2016, in three metropolitan hospitals in Sydney, Australia. These patients participated in face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data was analysed using thematic analysis. Results Results suggested that while oral health was considered relevant there was high prevalence of poor oral health among participants, especially those from socioeconomic disadvantaged background. Awareness regarding the importance of oral health care its impact on cardiovascular outcomes was poor among participants. Oral health issues were rarely discussed in the cardiac setting. Main barriers deterring participants from seeking oral health care included lack of awareness, high cost of dental care and difficulties in accessing the public dental service. Findings also revealed that participants were interested in receiving further information about oral health and suggested various mediums for information delivery. The concept of cardiac care clinicians, especially nurses providing education, assessment and referrals to ongoing dental care was well received by participants who felt the post-acute period was the most appropriate time to receive oral health care advice. The issues of oral health training for non-dental clinicians and how to address existing barriers were highlighted by participants. Relevance to clinical practice The lack of oral health education being provided to patients with cardiovascular disease offers an opportunity to improve care and potentially, outcomes. In view of the evidence linking poor oral health with cardiovascular disease, cardiac care clinicians, especially nurses, should be appropriately trained to promote oral health in

  15. Oral health and cardiovascular care: Perceptions of people with cardiovascular disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Sanchez

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the perception of patients with cardiovascular disease towards oral health and the potential for cardiac care clinicians to promote oral health.A needs assessment was undertaken with twelve patients with cardiovascular disease attending cardiac rehabilitation between 2015 and 2016, in three metropolitan hospitals in Sydney, Australia. These patients participated in face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data was analysed using thematic analysis.Results suggested that while oral health was considered relevant there was high prevalence of poor oral health among participants, especially those from socioeconomic disadvantaged background. Awareness regarding the importance of oral health care its impact on cardiovascular outcomes was poor among participants. Oral health issues were rarely discussed in the cardiac setting. Main barriers deterring participants from seeking oral health care included lack of awareness, high cost of dental care and difficulties in accessing the public dental service. Findings also revealed that participants were interested in receiving further information about oral health and suggested various mediums for information delivery. The concept of cardiac care clinicians, especially nurses providing education, assessment and referrals to ongoing dental care was well received by participants who felt the post-acute period was the most appropriate time to receive oral health care advice. The issues of oral health training for non-dental clinicians and how to address existing barriers were highlighted by participants.The lack of oral health education being provided to patients with cardiovascular disease offers an opportunity to improve care and potentially, outcomes. In view of the evidence linking poor oral health with cardiovascular disease, cardiac care clinicians, especially nurses, should be appropriately trained to promote oral health in their practice. Affordable and accessible

  16. Oral health and cardiovascular care: Perceptions of people with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Paula; Everett, Bronwyn; Salamonson, Yenna; Ajwani, Shilpi; Bhole, Sameer; Bishop, Joshua; Lintern, Karen; Nolan, Samantha; Rajaratnam, Rohan; Redfern, Julie; Sheehan, Maria; Skarligos, Fiona; Spencer, Lissa; Srinivas, Ravi; George, Ajesh

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the perception of patients with cardiovascular disease towards oral health and the potential for cardiac care clinicians to promote oral health. A needs assessment was undertaken with twelve patients with cardiovascular disease attending cardiac rehabilitation between 2015 and 2016, in three metropolitan hospitals in Sydney, Australia. These patients participated in face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data was analysed using thematic analysis. Results suggested that while oral health was considered relevant there was high prevalence of poor oral health among participants, especially those from socioeconomic disadvantaged background. Awareness regarding the importance of oral health care its impact on cardiovascular outcomes was poor among participants. Oral health issues were rarely discussed in the cardiac setting. Main barriers deterring participants from seeking oral health care included lack of awareness, high cost of dental care and difficulties in accessing the public dental service. Findings also revealed that participants were interested in receiving further information about oral health and suggested various mediums for information delivery. The concept of cardiac care clinicians, especially nurses providing education, assessment and referrals to ongoing dental care was well received by participants who felt the post-acute period was the most appropriate time to receive oral health care advice. The issues of oral health training for non-dental clinicians and how to address existing barriers were highlighted by participants. The lack of oral health education being provided to patients with cardiovascular disease offers an opportunity to improve care and potentially, outcomes. In view of the evidence linking poor oral health with cardiovascular disease, cardiac care clinicians, especially nurses, should be appropriately trained to promote oral health in their practice. Affordable and accessible dental care services

  17. Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention: Data Trends & Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention's Data Trends & Maps online tool allows searching for and view of health indicators related to Heart...

  18. Nutrition in the prevention and treatment of disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coulston, Ann M; Boushey, Carol; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2013-01-01

    .... Given its unique focus and extensive coverage of clinical applications and disease prevention, this edition is organized for easy integration into advanced upper-division or graduate nutrition curriculums...

  19. The re-emergency and persistence of vaccine preventable diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODRIGO C.N. BORBA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of vaccination worldwide dramatically reduced the incidence of pathogenic bacterial and viral diseases. Despite the highly successful vaccination strategies, the number of cases among vaccine preventable diseases has increased in the last decade and several of those diseases are still endemic in different countries. Here we discuss some epidemiological aspects and possible arguments that may explain why ancient diseases such as, measles, polio, pertussis, diphtheria and tuberculosis are still with us.

  20. Perspectives toward oral mucositis prevention from parents and health care professionals in pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, Marie-Chantal; Regier, Dean A; Tomlinson, Deborah; Judd, Peter; Doyle, John; Gassas, Adam; Naqvi, Ahmed; Sung, Lillian

    2012-08-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) to describe parents and health care professionals (HCPs) perceived importance of oral mucositis prevention in children with cancer; (2) To describe utilities and willingness-to-pay (WTP) to prevent mucositis. Respondents included parents of children receiving intensive chemotherapy for leukemia/lymphoma or undergoing stem cell transplantation and HCPs caring for children with cancer. Importance of mild and severe oral mucositis was estimated using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Mucositis-associated utilities were elicited using the time trade-off technique (TTO). WTP to avoid mucositis was obtained using contingent valuation. These techniques quantify how much time or money the participant is willing to relinquish in order to prevent mucositis. Eighty-two parents and 60 HCPs were included. Parents and HCPs believed mild mucositis to be of similar importance (median VAS 2.5 versus 3.6; P = 0.357) while parents considered severe mucositis less important than HCPs (median VAS 8.3 versus 9.0; P < 0.0001). No differences in parent versus HCP responses were seen with TTO (mild or severe mucositis) and most parents were not willing to trade any survival time to prevent severe mucositis. Parents were willing to pay significantly more than HCPs to prevent mild mucositis (average median WTP $1,371 CAN vs. $684 CAN, P = 0.031). No differences were seen in WTP to prevent severe mucositis. Parents and HCP believe severe mucositis to be important, although it is more important to HCPs. Parents would not be willing to reduce life expectancy to eliminate mucositis.

  1. Oral squamous cell carcinoma proliferative phenotype is modulated by proanthocyanidins: a potential prevention and treatment alternative for oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapp Aaron

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the recently reported drop in the overall death rate from cancer, the estimated survival rate and number of deaths from oral cancer remain virtually unchanged. Early detection efforts, in combination with strategies for prevention and risk-reduction, have the potential to dramatically improve clinical outcomes. The identification of non-toxic, effective treatments, including complementary and alternative therapies, is critical if the survival rate is to be improved. Epidemiologic studies have suggested a protective effect from certain plant-derived foods and extracts; however, it has been difficult to isolate and identify the compounds most responsible for these observations. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the response of human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC to proanthocyanidin (PAC, a plant-derived compound that may inhibit the progression of several other cancers. Methods Using a series of in vitro assays, we sought to quantify the effects of PAC on OSCC, cervical carcinoma, and non-cancerous cell lines, specifically the effects of PAC on cell proliferation. Recent data suggest that infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV may also modulate the proliferative potential of OSCC; therefore, we also measured the effects of PAC administration on HPV-transfected OSCC proliferation. Results Our results demonstrated that PAC administration was sufficient to significantly suppress cellular proliferation of OSCC in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the increased proliferation of OSCC after transfection with HPV 16 was reduced by the administration of PAC, as was the proliferation of the cervical cancer and non-cancerous cell lines tested. Our results also provide preliminary evidence that PAC administration may induce apoptosis in cervical and oral cancer cell lines, while acting merely to suppress proliferation of the normal cell line control. Conclusion These results signify that PAC may be

  2. Prevention of sexually transmitted diseases The Shurugwi sex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sex-workers play an important role in the spread of sexually trans:mitted diseases (STDs) and this article tries to show that they can also play an important role in their prevention. Community participation by sex-workers in the prevention of STDs can also decrease the incidence thereof.

  3. Preventing invasive Group B Streptococcus (GBS) disease in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    9 No. 3 has been successfully used for the prevention of tetanus, influenza and pertussis in infants.[11] A trivalent GBS polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine (against serotypes Ia, Ib and III) has completed phase-II evaluation among pregnant women and has the potential to prevent 70 - 80% of all invasive GBS disease.

  4. Mediterranean Diet in Prevention of Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin Meryem

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bad eating habits lead to the emergence of chronic health problems such as coronary artery diseases, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, cancer and obesity and the relationship between diet and diseases is emphasized and the relationship between them is clearly revealed in studies conducted over many years. The Mediterranean diet, which is first described by Angel Keys at the beginning of the 1960’s, is not a specific diet but a natural way of eating in olive-growing region. With the properties such as the use of vegetable oils such as olive oil in particular, and the consumption of fish instead of red meat, the diet constitutes a health-protective nutrition. So, this review conducted the relationship between Mediterranean diet and chronic diseases.

  5. Peroxide alkaline for cleansing the baby bottle nipple to prevent oral thrush relaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maharani Laillyza Apriasari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral candidiasis is the most prevalent opportunistic infection affecting the oral mucosa. A number of predisposing factors have the capacity to convert Candida from the normal commensal flora to a pathogenic organism. Oral candidiasis is divided into primary and secondary infection. The primary infections are restricted to the oral and perioral sites, where as secondary infections are accompanied by sistemic mucocutaneous manifestation. Oral thrush is one of the candidiasis primary infection. Some presdiposing factors of oral thrush are neonatal, old people, or where oral microflora is disturbed by the treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics. Final diagnosis is determined by fungal culture examination, although through clinical examination oral thrush can be determined by swabbing the white pseudomembran. Purpose: This case report presents about the importance of using the antiseptic cleanser for baby bottle nipple to prevent oral thrush relaps and shows about peroxide alkaline as the alternatif of antiseptic cleanser for baby bottle nipple that can substitute chlorhexidine gluconat 0.2%. Case: A baby girl, 15 months old, when she was suffering influenza the pediatry gave amoxycillin 125 mg three times a day for ten days. Then the white plaque appeared on her dorsum of tongue. The therapy was Gentian Violet 1% four times a day for ten days was applied on dorsum of the tongue. The patient was suspected to suffer alergy reaction after using nistatin oral suspension four times a day had applied for 1 day. The instruction was doing sterilization for the baby bottle nipple in boiling water. Three days after the baby was cured, the white plaque was appeared on upper n lower lips mucous. Case management: The diagnosis was Oral thrush. The therapy was Gentian violet 1% four times a day for ten days that applied on upper and lower lips mucous. The instruction was doing the sterilization for baby bottle nipple in denture cleanser contain

  6. Incidence of Congenital Heart Diseases Anomalies in Newborns with Oral Clefts, Zahedan, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Noor Mohammad Noori; Alireza Teimouri; Tahereh Boryri; Sirous Risbaf Fakour; Fateme Shahramian

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral cleft is the most common orofacial congenital anomaly among live births. This anomaly at birth is one of the main causes of children disability and mortality.  Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most common anomalies in oral clefts.  This study aimed to assess the incidence of congenital heart diseases anomalies in newborns with oral clefts. Materials and Methods This study performed on 48,692 live born to estimate incidence of oral clefts from 1 st December 2013 to ...

  7. Dental plaque as a biofilm - a risk in oral cavity and methods to prevent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Chałas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria living constantly in the oral cavity are in the form of a biofilm. The biofilm formed on a solid base such as the enamel of the teeth, fillings, restorations, orthodontic appliances or obturators is dental plaque. Disturbance of homeostasis of biofilm, excessive growth or increase in the number of acid-forming bacteria leads to the development of the most common diseases of the oral cavity, i.e. dental caries and periodontal disease. The presence of bacterial biofilm on the walls of the root canal or at the top of the root on an outer wall leads to complications and failure in endodontic treatment. The aim of the study was to present the latest information on the occurrence, development and the role of biofilm in the etiopathogenesis of oral diseases and its control. Based on the literature analyzed, it can be concluded that the biofilm, due to its complex structure and numerous mechanisms of bacteria adaptation, is an effective barrier against the traditional agents with antibacterial properties. There are now great hopes for nanotechnology as an innovative method for obtaining new structures of nanometric size and different properties than source materials. The use of antibacterial properties of nano-silver used in dentistry significantly reduces the metabolic activity and the number of colony forming bacteria and lactic acid production in the biofilm.

  8. [Dental plaque as a biofilm - a risk in oral cavity and methods to prevent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chałas, Renata; Wójcik-Chęcińska, Ilona; Woźniak, Michał J; Grzonka, Justyna; Święszkowski, Wojciech; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof J

    2015-10-13

    Bacteria living constantly in the oral cavity are in the form of a biofilm. The biofilm formed on a solid base such as the enamel of the teeth, fillings, restorations, orthodontic appliances or obturators is dental plaque. Disturbance of homeostasis of biofilm, excessive growth or increase in the number of acid-forming bacteria leads to the development of the most common diseases of the oral cavity, i.e. dental caries and periodontal disease. The presence of bacterial biofilm on the walls of the root canal or at the top of the root on an outer wall leads to complications and failure in endodontic treatment. The aim of the study was to present the latest information on the occurrence, development and the role of biofilm in the etiopathogenesis of oral diseases and its control. Based on the literature analyzed, it can be concluded that the biofilm, due to its complex structure and numerous mechanisms of bacteria adaptation, is an effective barrier against the traditional agents with antibacterial properties. There are now great hopes for nanotechnology as an innovative method for obtaining new structures of nanometric size and different properties than source materials. The use of antibacterial properties of nano-silver used in dentistry significantly reduces the metabolic activity and the number of colony forming bacteria and lactic acid production in the biofilm.

  9. Oral health-related quality of life of children and teens with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza da Matta Felisberto Fernandes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Children with sickle cell disease may have their quality of life affected by oral alterations. However, there is still little data on oral health-related quality of life in these children. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sickle cell disease, socioeconomic characteristics, and oral conditions on oral health-related quality of life of children and teens. METHOD: One hundred and six children and teens with sickle cell disease were compared to a similar sample of 385 healthy peers. Data were collected through oral examinations, interviews to assess quality of life (Child Perceptions Questionnaire for children aged 8-10 and 11-14 and questionnaires containing questions on socioeconomic status. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in the total scores of the Child Perceptions Questionnaires or domain scores comparing sickle cell disease patients to control subjects. When sub-scales were compared, oral symptoms and functional limitations had a greater negative impact on the quality of life of adolescents with sickle cell disease (p-value <0.001 and p-value <0.01, respectively when compared to healthy controls. The only statistically significant determinants of negative impact on oral health-related quality of life in the overall sample was home overcrowding (more than two people/room in the younger children's group, and dental malocclusion among teens. CONCLUSION: There was no significant difference in the negative impact on the oral health-related quality of life between the group with sickle cell disease and the control group. Of the oral alterations, there was a significant difference in the oral health-related quality of life between adolescents with sickle cell disease and controls only in relation to malocclusion. Among the socioeconomic characteristics, only overcrowding was significantly associated with a negative impact on oral health-related quality of life.

  10. Mind Your Mouth: Preventing Gum Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gum disease. Smoking greatly increases your risk for periodontitis—another reason not to smoke. Other factors that boost your risk include hormonal changes in women, certain medications and some illnesses like diabetes, cancer and AIDS. NIH-supported researchers are working ...

  11. Vitamins in the prevention of human diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herrmann, Wolfgang, Prof; Obeid, Rima

    2011-01-01

    ... in ancient Egypt. One-sided nutrition, smoking, alcohol, genetic factors, and even geographical origin interfere with our dietary intake of the vitamins. Insufficient vitamin intake can impact our health and contribute significantly to the development of diseases. This book offers expert reviews and judgements on the role of vitamins in health and ...

  12. Preventing Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors through Aerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focused on the reduction of cardiovascular disease risk factors, through aerobic exercises. The central argument here is that through exercise there is the tendency for increased strength of the heart muscles. When this is the case, what follows is a reduction in body weight and ultimately less risk on the ...

  13. Travel related diseases and optimizing preventive strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieten, R.W.

    2016-01-01

    With the figure of 1 billion annual travellers continuously increasing, travel is becoming more and more common. The binding element of this thesis is the aim to contribute to the improvement of pre-travel healthcare. The diseases studied either carry a high mortality (rabies, malaria, yellow fever)

  14. treatment and prevention of pneumococcal disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    other pro-inflammatory activities of this toxin contribute to disease pathogenesis and pathology, as well as various ... Medical Research Council Unit for Inflammation and Immunity, Department of. Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, ... primarily as the sentinels of the innate immune system. Exposure to small numbers of ...

  15. Differentiating clinical care from disease prevention: a prerequisite for practicing quaternary prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Dalcanale Tesser

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article contends that the distinction between clinical care (illness and prevention of future disease is essential to the practice of quaternary prevention. The authors argue that the ongoing entanglement of clinical care and prevention transforms healthy into "sick" people through changes in disease classification criteria and/or cut-off points for defining high-risk states. This diverts health care resources away from those in need of care and increases the risk of iatrogenic harm in healthy people. The distinction in focus is based on: (a management of uncertainty (more flexible when caring for ill persons; (b guarantee of benefit (required only in prevention; (c harm tolerance (nil or minimal in prevention. This implies attitudinal differences in the decision-making process: greater skepticism, scientism and resistance towards preventive action. These should be based on high-quality scientific evidence of end-outcomes that displays a net positive harm/benefit ratio.

  16. The Oral Microbiota in Health and Disease: An Overview of Molecular Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2017-01-01

    Culture-independent nucleic acid technologies have been extensively applied to the analysis of oral bacterial communities associated with healthy and diseased conditions. These methods have confirmed and substantially expanded the findings from culture studies to reveal the oral microbial inhabitants and candidate pathogens associated with the major oral diseases. Over 1000 bacterial distinct species-level taxa have been identified in the oral cavity and studies using next-generation DNA sequencing approaches indicate that the breadth of bacterial diversity may be even much larger. Nucleic acid technologies have also been helpful in profiling bacterial communities and identifying disease-related patterns. This chapter provides an overview of the diversity and taxonomy of oral bacteria associated with health and disease.

  17. Direct oral anticoagulants for secondary prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF, both permanent and paroxysmal, and history of previous transient ischemic attack (TIA or stroke represent a category of patients at high risk of new embolic events, independently of the presence of other risk factors. In these patients, national and international guidelines recommend oral anticoagulants as first choice for antithrombotic prevention. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs have been demonstrated to be not inferior to warfarin for many end points in NVAF patients in terms of efficacy and safety. The post hoc analysis in selected subgroups of patients enrolled in the three mega trials of phase III comparing DOACs (RE-LY, ROCKET-AF and ARISTOTLE with warfarin help to evaluate whether superiority and non-inferiority persist in these subgroups. Here, patients with NVAF and history of previous TIA/stroke receiving DOACs as secondary prevention are compared with patients with the same characteristics receiving warfarin. An analysis of these patients has been recently published (separately for each of three DOACs. This analysis shows that DOACs maintain their non-inferiority when compared with warfarin in secondary prevention, representing a real alternative in this context of patients at high risk for ischemic and bleeding events.

  18. Direct oral anticoagulants in the prevention of venous thromboembolism: evidence from major clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandoni, Paolo; Temraz, Sally; Taher, Ali

    2014-04-01

    Hospitalized medical and surgical patients encompass a group of patients in whom venous thromboembolism (VTE) poses a major concern on morbidity and mortality. Recently, direct oral anticoagulants for the prevention of VTE have been developed to overcome the drawbacks of the food/drug interactions and the need for frequent laboratory monitoring and dose adjustments associated with the use of vitamin K antagonists and the inconvenience of the subcutaneous administration of low-molecular-weight heparins and fondaparinux. The novel oral anticoagulants that have been tested in major clinical trials for VTE prevention in medical and surgical patients are the thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and the factor Xa inhibitors apixaban, rivaroxaban, and edoxaban, which will be the focus of this review. While the new drugs proved to be highly effective and safe in the prevention of VTE following major orthopedic surgery, they failed to show a favorable benefit-to-risk profile in hospitalized medical patients receiving extended anticoagulation beyond the hospital stay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chamomile infusion cryotherapy to prevent oral mucositis induced by chemotherapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz; Ciol, Marcia A; de Melo, Nilce Santos; Figueiredo, Paulo Tadeu de Souza; Leite, André Ferreira; Manzi, Natália de Melo

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to compare cryotherapy made only with water and cryotherapy made with chamomile infusion for prevention and reduction of intensity of oral mucositis in patients with cancer receiving 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. This is a randomized pilot study with two groups: cryotherapy made only with water (control group, n = 18) and cryotherapy made with chamomile infusion (chamomile group, n = 20). Both groups were instructed to swish the ice around in their oral cavity for at least 30 min during chemotherapy. Assessment of oral mucosa occurred on days 8, 15, and 22 after the first day of chemotherapy. Fifty percent of the patients in the control and 30 % in the chamomile group developed oral mucositis. Mouth pain score was higher in patients in the control group on all evaluations (p = 0.02 for day 8, p = 0.09 for day 15, and p = 0.14 for day 22). Patients in the chamomile group never developed mucositis with grade 2 or higher. Presence of ulceration was statistically significant on day 8 (16 % in the control vs. 0 % in the chamomile group, p = 0.10), but not in days 15 and 22, although 11 % still had ulcerations in the control group and none in the chamomile group. The occurrence of oral mucositis was lower in patients in the chamomile group than in the control group. When compared to the controls, the chamomile group presented less mouth pain and had no ulcerations. Cryotherapy was well tolerated by both groups, and no toxicity related to chamomile was identified.

  20. State of oral hygiene and identification of the main risk factors for inflammatory diseases of periodontal tissues in young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarenko M.V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A high percentage of prevalence of inflammatory periodontal diseases in young age causes urgency of treatment and prevention of inflammatory diseases of periodontal tissue in young age. Therefore, the research purpose was to investigate the hygienic condition and identification of the main risk factors for gingivitis in patients aged 18-30 years. 286 people aged from 18 to 30 years were observed in the study. To assess hygienic condition of the oral cavity and to determine the thickness of plaque indices OHI-S (simplified oral hygiene index Green Vermilyona and Silness Loe were used. Studies of oral hygiene status suggests that in patients with different etiologies of periodontal tissue inflammation, oral hygienic condition ranged from "satisfactory" to "poor." Therefore the results of study of hygiene and periodontal indices and samples confirmed presence of moderately expressed inflammation in the gums in young adults with chronic catarrhal gingivitis. Most often inflammation in the gums, namely, chronic catarrhal gingivitis was determined in patients with fixed prosthesis designs in the mouth or in violation of the bite, related to the major risk factors for periodontal disease occurring in young adults aged from 18 to 30 years.

  1. Nutritional Recommendations for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Sinai, Tali; Yosefy, Chaim; Henkin, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Lifestyle factors, including nutrition, play an important role in the etiology of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). This position paper, written by collaboration between the Israel Heart Association and the Israel Dietetic Association, summarizes the current, preferably latest, literature on the association of nutrition and CVD with emphasis on the level of evidence and practical recommendations. The nutritional information is divided into three main sections: dietary patterns, individual food it...

  2. Pertussis: Microbiology, Disease, Treatment, and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Abdulbaset M.; Zervos, Marcus J.; Schmitt, Heinz-Josef

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Pertussis is a severe respiratory infection caused by Bordetella pertussis, and in 2008, pertussis was associated with an estimated 16 million cases and 195,000 deaths globally. Sizeable outbreaks of pertussis have been reported over the past 5 years, and disease reemergence has been the focus of international attention to develop a deeper understanding of pathogen virulence and genetic evolution of B. pertussis strains. During the past 20 years, the scientific community has recognized pertussis among adults as well as infants and children. Increased recognition that older children and adolescents are at risk for disease and may transmit B. pertussis to younger siblings has underscored the need to better understand the role of innate, humoral, and cell-mediated immunity, including the role of waning immunity. Although recognition of adult pertussis has increased in tandem with a better understanding of B. pertussis pathogenesis, pertussis in neonates and adults can manifest with atypical clinical presentations. Such disease patterns make pertussis recognition difficult and lead to delays in treatment. Ongoing research using newer tools for molecular analysis holds promise for improved understanding of pertussis epidemiology, bacterial pathogenesis, bioinformatics, and immunology. Together, these advances provide a foundation for the development of new-generation diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. PMID:27029594

  3. The role of saliva in oral health: strategies for prevention and management of xerostomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosky, Mary Elizabeth

    2007-05-01

    Oral complications are the most frequent and debilitating sequelae of radiation treatment for patients with head and neck cancer. Impaired salivary function and consequent xerostomia can persist for years after radiation treatment, significantly increasing the risk of oral and dental disease and negatively affecting patients' quality of life. Current evidence indicates that many patients undergoing radiation treatment do not receive adequate oral and dental care and follow-up and that patients' compliance with oral care recommendations is frequently poor. Topical lubricants, coating agents,and saliva substitutes or lozenges may provide transient relief from xerostomia. Cholinergic stimulants such as pilocarpine improve salivary flow but have had mixed results in improving patients' assessments of symptoms or other quality-of-life measures. Advances in radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, have enabled increased delivery of therapeutic doses of radiation to tumors while limiting exposure to normal tissues, thereby reducing the incidence, duration, and severity of xerostomia in some patients with head and neck cancers. Additionally, radioprotective agents such as amifostine have been shown to reduce radiation-induced toxicity to normal tissues within the radiation field. Studies are ongoing to determine the optimal approaches for these techniques and agents to maximize clinical response while improving the overall quality of life for patients with head and neck cancer.

  4. Relationship between obesity and oral diseases | Sede | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Their weight and height were measured and body mass index (BMI) estimated in kg/m2, gingival health assessed using bleeding on probing index, oral hygiene estimated using the simplified oral hygiene index (OHI‑S), periodontal health estimated using the basic periodontal examination (BPE) and caries experience was ...

  5. Making the Case for Disease Prevention in Perfectly Healthy Vineyards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseased vineyards can produce a disproportionately low ratio of yield to ecosystem services or dis-services (habitat loss, poor water quality), and have little to no returns on the capital invested. Minimizing such environmental and economic impacts depends on effective disease prevention, but ado...

  6. Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  7. Theory in Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael; Elise, Eifert

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality related to chronic diseases are a primary concern of health professionals, including Health Educators. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over one half of the adult population in the United States suffer from one or more chronic conditions. Understanding the health risk behaviors that contribute to…

  8. [Probable outbreak of oral transmission of Chagas disease in Turbo, Antioquia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Juan Fernando; Arboleda, Margarita; Montoya, Alba Nelly; Alarcón, Erika Patricia

    2011-06-01

    Chagas' disease is endemic in 21 countries of South and Central America, including Colombia, where 700,000 to 1.2 million persons are infected and eight millions are at risk. In endemic areas, chronic cases are predominant. However, in recent years, increasing reports of acute oral transmission have appeared. Objective. An outbreak of acute Chagas' disease was verified in the municipality of Turbo (Antioquia), and the most probable cause of transmission was determined in order to establish prevention and control measures. A descriptive study was done. A search for information from local health authorities was conducted to uncover all case reports. Laboratory tests, risk factor analysis and search for vectors and reservoirs were undertaken in Turbo. Of the 156 people evaluated, 11 cases of acute Chagas' disease were identified. Ten had significant titers of IgM and IgG antibodies against the Trypanosoma cruzi parasite by IFAT and Elisa tests; one fatal case was linked epidemiologically. In 3 cases, PCR was positive for T. cruzi, two of which displayed Chagas cardiomyopathy, and one with acute fever. Four cases required specialized health care for acute cardiomyopathy. All positive cases had a common source of food. One specimen of the triatomid vector species, Panstrongylus geniculatus, and one reservoir, the woolly opossum Caluromys lanatus, were collected; both were negative to T. cruzi. An outbreak of acute Chagas' disease occurred in Turbo, Antioquia. The mode of transmission may have occurred by the ingestion of T. cruzi-contaminated food by infected triatomines or opossum feces.

  9. Wine Flavonoids in Health and Disease Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Iva; Pérez-Gregorio, Rosa; Soares, Susana; Mateus, Nuno; de Freitas, Victor

    2017-02-14

    Wine, and particularly red wine, is a beverage with a great chemical complexity that is in continuous evolution. Chemically, wine is a hydroalcoholic solution (~78% water) that comprises a wide variety of chemical components, including aldehydes, esters, ketones, lipids, minerals, organic acids, phenolics, soluble proteins, sugars and vitamins. Flavonoids constitute a major group of polyphenolic compounds which are directly associated with the organoleptic and health-promoting properties of red wine. However, due to the insufficient epidemiological and in vivo evidences on this subject, the presence of a high number of variables such as human age, metabolism, the presence of alcohol, the complex wine chemistry, and the wide array of in vivo biological effects of these compounds suggest that only cautious conclusions may be drawn from studies focusing on the direct effect of wine and any specific health issue. Nevertheless, there are several reports on the health protective properties of wine phenolics for several diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, some cancers, obesity, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, allergies and osteoporosis. The different interactions that wine flavonoids may have with key biological targets are crucial for some of these health-promoting effects. The interaction between some wine flavonoids and some specific enzymes are one example. The way wine flavonoids may be absorbed and metabolized could interfere with their bioavailability and therefore in their health-promoting effect. Hence, some reports have focused on flavonoids absorption, metabolism, microbiota effect and overall on flavonoids bioavailability. This review summarizes some of these major issues which are directly related to the potential health-promoting effects of wine flavonoids. Reports related to flavonoids and health highlight some relevant scientific information. However, there is still a gap between the knowledge of wine flavonoids bioavailability and their health

  10. Medico-social aspects of the prevention of noncommunicable diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Peresypkina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The noncommunicable disease (NCDs are very common among population around the world. They are the main cause of preventable mortality, cause temporary and permanent disability. NCDs are the major reason for attending for medical care and lead to economic losses. The implementations of preventive strategy, increasing the role of preventive measures are general tasks for all health care system. The analysis of trends of preventive measure for NCD nowadays is the aim of this research. Materials and methods. The study included the result of analysis of science publication and WHO database about NCD and preventive measure used as well as the results of the analysis of data of the Center for Statistics in Medicine of MoH of Ukraine. Results. Diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases are the major NCDs. The base factors which lead to NCD are behavioral risk factors, namely tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, and alcohol abuse. The WHO prepared a lot of documents, among which the most significant are the strategies on noncommunicable diseases prevention, convention against smoking, strategy on diet and physical activity, global strategy on reducing alcohol abusing and so on. Nowadays the world population follows Global Action Plan for Prevention of Noncommunicable Diseases for 2013–2020. The documents emphasize the importance of state support, the use of scientific potential and intersectoral interaction to effectively combat noncommunicable diseases. The major of scientific direction are NCD monitoring, detection of the determinant of NCD development and making strategy for usage it in conditions of limited resources. The role of Digital marketing today increases that leads to the acquisition and consolidation of the habits and behavior of modern youth. Internet marketing is very effective to form unhealthy food behavior in children and adolescents that requires adequate and urgent actions. The

  11. Treatment and prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Alegría, A R; Pintado, V; Barbolla, I

    2018-02-12

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is a severe infection that mainly affects patients with associated comorbidity. The paediatric conjugate vaccination has resulted in a change in the adult vaccination strategy. The antibiotic resistance of pneumococcus is not currently a severe problem. Nevertheless, the World Health Organisation has included pneumococcus among the bacteria whose treatment requires the introduction of new drugs, such as ceftaroline and ceftobiprole. Although the scientific evidence is still limited, the combination of beta-lactams and macrolides is recommended as empiric therapy for bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  12. Malignant transformation of oral lichen planus by a chronic inflammatory process. Use of topical corticosteroids to prevent this progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-Rey, Eva Maria; Suarez-Alen, Fatima; Peñamaria-Mallon, Manuel; Lopez-Lopez, Jose; Blanco-Carrion, Andres

    2014-11-01

    Oral lichen planus is a potentially malignant disorder with a capacity, although low, for malignant transformation. Of all the factors related to the process of malignant transformation, it is believed that the chronic inflammatory process plays a key role in the development of oral cancer. This inflammatory process is capable of providing a microenvironment based on different inflammatory cells and molecules that affect cellular growth, proliferation and differentiation. The objectives of our study are: to review the available evidence about the possible relationship between the chronic inflammatory process present in oral lichen planus and its malignant transformation, to discuss the potential therapeutic implications derived from this relationship and to study the role that topical corticosteroids play in the control of oral lichen planus inflammation and its possible progression to malignant transformation. The maintenance of a minimum dose of topical corticosteroids could prevent the inflammatory progression of oral lichen planus to oral cancer.

  13. [Problem of motivation of the population to prevention and treatment dental diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochlashvili, L Sh; Gogilashvili, K T; Gerzmava, O Kh

    2012-10-01

    Dental health is an integral part of a normal state of a human body and, first of all, depends on knowledge of the population of bases of individual hygiene of an oral cavity and ability to use them in practical life. Numerous researches indicate low level of knowledge of the population in questions of prevention of dental diseases and individual hygiene of an oral cavity that testifies to existence of problems in the organization of sanitary education. Existing practice of hygienic training and education, in a certain measure, lags behind modern requirements, and some questions demand specification and optimization. For efficiency of sanitary and preventive actions it is necessary to study character and motivation structure to prevention and treatment of dental diseases and to develop an effective method of its increase. Therefore actual search of new forms of psycho hygiene and psycho prevention with use of modern information technologies which should provide high level of dental health of the military personnel is represented. The purpose of the real research was establishment of the factors forming motivation to prevention and treatment of the main dental diseases, and development of a psycho physiological method of its increase. The carried-out research allows to expand and systematize ideas necessary for the practical doctor of the major factors forming motivation to prevention and treatment of the main dental diseases. Development of an objective technique of a complex assessment of level of motivation of patients to prevention and treatment of dental pathology will allow to prove the new perspective direction of the sanitary educational work, allowing to reduce fobiya level, effectively to increase motivation of the patient to receiving the timely dental help. It especially is important if to consider that numerous programs of hygienic training and the education, applied in our country, didn't lead to change of hygienic skills of the population in expected

  14. Wine Flavonoids in Health and Disease Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Fernandes

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wine, and particularly red wine, is a beverage with a great chemical complexity that is in continuous evolution. Chemically, wine is a hydroalcoholic solution (~78% water that comprises a wide variety of chemical components, including aldehydes, esters, ketones, lipids, minerals, organic acids, phenolics, soluble proteins, sugars and vitamins. Flavonoids constitute a major group of polyphenolic compounds which are directly associated with the organoleptic and health-promoting properties of red wine. However, due to the insufficient epidemiological and in vivo evidences on this subject, the presence of a high number of variables such as human age, metabolism, the presence of alcohol, the complex wine chemistry, and the wide array of in vivo biological effects of these compounds suggest that only cautious conclusions may be drawn from studies focusing on the direct effect of wine and any specific health issue. Nevertheless, there are several reports on the health protective properties of wine phenolics for several diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, some cancers, obesity, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, allergies and osteoporosis. The different interactions that wine flavonoids may have with key biological targets are crucial for some of these health-promoting effects. The interaction between some wine flavonoids and some specific enzymes are one example. The way wine flavonoids may be absorbed and metabolized could interfere with their bioavailability and therefore in their health-promoting effect. Hence, some reports have focused on flavonoids absorption, metabolism, microbiota effect and overall on flavonoids bioavailability. This review summarizes some of these major issues which are directly related to the potential health-promoting effects of wine flavonoids. Reports related to flavonoids and health highlight some relevant scientific information. However, there is still a gap between the knowledge of wine flavonoids

  15. Strengthening of oral health systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    Around the globe many people are suffering from oral pain and other problems of the mouth or teeth. This public health problem is growing rapidly in developing countries where oral health services are limited. Significant proportions of people are underserved; insufficient oral health care...... is either due to low availability and accessibility of oral health care or because oral health care is costly. In all countries, the poor and disadvantaged population groups are heavily affected by a high burden of oral disease compared to well-off people. Promotion of oral health and prevention of oral...... diseases must be provided through financially fair primary health care and public health intervention. Integrated approaches are the most cost-effective and realistic way to close the gap in oral health between rich and poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Programme will work...

  16. Benefits of olive oil phenolic compounds in disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martinez, Olga; Ruiz, Concepcion; Gutierrez-Ibanez, Alvaro; Illescas-Montes, Rebeca; Melguizo-Rodriguez, Lucia

    2018-02-12

    The preventive effects of olive oil against different diseases have been attributed to its high phenolic compound content. The objective of this study was to examine available scientific evidence on the beneficial effects against chronic diseases of olive oil phenolic compounds. This article examines recently published data on olive oil phenolic compounds and their potential benefits in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, cancer, neurodegenerative disease, and osteoporosis. The antioxidant, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory activities of olive oil phenolic compounds have preventive effects against heart disease and cancer. These compounds also exert neuroprotective and neuromodulator effects against neurodegenerative disease, inhibiting the development of amyloid plaques. Finally, they are known to protect against osteoporosis, favoring bone regeneration. Dietary intake of olive oil can be recommended by healthcare professionals as an important source of phenolic compounds that play a role in the prevention of chronic disease and the consequent improvement in quality of life. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Nutritional recommendations for cardiovascular disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Sinai, Tali; Yosefy, Chaim; Henkin, Yaakov

    2013-09-17

    Lifestyle factors, including nutrition, play an important role in the etiology of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). This position paper, written by collaboration between the Israel Heart Association and the Israel Dietetic Association, summarizes the current, preferably latest, literature on the association of nutrition and CVD with emphasis on the level of evidence and practical recommendations. The nutritional information is divided into three main sections: dietary patterns, individual food items, and nutritional supplements. The dietary patterns reviewed include low carbohydrate diet, low-fat diet, Mediterranean diet, and the DASH diet. Foods reviewed in the second section include: whole grains and dietary fiber, vegetables and fruits, nuts, soy, dairy products, alcoholic drinks, coffee and caffeine, tea, chocolate, garlic, and eggs. Supplements reviewed in the third section include salt and sodium, omega-3 and fish oil, phytosterols, antioxidants, vitamin D, magnesium, homocysteine-reducing agents, and coenzyme Q10.

  18. Nutritional Recommendations for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov Henkin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lifestyle factors, including nutrition, play an important role in the etiology of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD. This position paper, written by collaboration between the Israel Heart Association and the Israel Dietetic Association, summarizes the current, preferably latest, literature on the association of nutrition and CVD with emphasis on the level of evidence and practical recommendations. The nutritional information is divided into three main sections: dietary patterns, individual food items, and nutritional supplements. The dietary patterns reviewed include low carbohydrate diet, low-fat diet, Mediterranean diet, and the DASH diet. Foods reviewed in the second section include: whole grains and dietary fiber, vegetables and fruits, nuts, soy, dairy products, alcoholic drinks, coffee and caffeine, tea, chocolate, garlic, and eggs. Supplements reviewed in the third section include salt and sodium, omega-3 and fish oil, phytosterols, antioxidants, vitamin D, magnesium, homocysteine-reducing agents, and coenzyme Q10.

  19. Nutritional epigenomics: a portal to disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang-Woon; Claycombe, Kate J; Martinez, J Alfredo; Friso, Simonetta; Schalinske, Kevin L

    2013-09-01

    Epigenetics can be defined as inheritable and reversible phenomena that affect gene expression without altering the underlying base pair sequence. Epigenomics is the study of genome-wide epigenetic modifications. Because gene expression changes are critical in both normal development and disease progression, epigenetics is widely applicable to many aspects of biological research. The influences of nutrients and bioactive food components on epigenetic phenomena such as DNA methylation and various types of histone modifications have been extensively investigated. Because an individual's epigenetic patterns are established during early gestation and are changed and personalized by environmental factors during our lifetime, epigenetic mechanisms are quite important in the development of transgenerational and adult obesity as well as in the development of diabetes mellitus. Aging and cancer demonstrate profound genome-wide DNA methylation changes, suggesting that nutrition may affect the aging process and cancer development through epigenetic mechanisms.

  20. Nutritional Recommendations for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Sinai, Tali; Yosefy, Chaim; Henkin, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Lifestyle factors, including nutrition, play an important role in the etiology of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). This position paper, written by collaboration between the Israel Heart Association and the Israel Dietetic Association, summarizes the current, preferably latest, literature on the association of nutrition and CVD with emphasis on the level of evidence and practical recommendations. The nutritional information is divided into three main sections: dietary patterns, individual food items, and nutritional supplements. The dietary patterns reviewed include low carbohydrate diet, low-fat diet, Mediterranean diet, and the DASH diet. Foods reviewed in the second section include: whole grains and dietary fiber, vegetables and fruits, nuts, soy, dairy products, alcoholic drinks, coffee and caffeine, tea, chocolate, garlic, and eggs. Supplements reviewed in the third section include salt and sodium, omega-3 and fish oil, phytosterols, antioxidants, vitamin D, magnesium, homocysteine-reducing agents, and coenzyme Q10. PMID:24067391

  1. Burrow Dusting or Oral Vaccination Prevents Plague-Associated Prairie Dog Colony Collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Daniel W; Rocke, Tonie E; Runge, Jonathan P; Abbott, Rachel C; Miller, Michael W

    2017-09-01

    Plague impacts prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), the endangered black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) and other sensitive wildlife species. We compared efficacy of prophylactic treatments (burrow dusting with deltamethrin or oral vaccination with recombinant "sylvatic plague vaccine" [RCN-F1/V307]) to placebo treatment in black-tailed prairie dog (C. ludovicianus) colonies. Between 2013 and 2015, we measured prairie dog apparent survival, burrow activity and flea abundance on triplicate plots ("blocks") receiving dust, vaccine or placebo treatment. Epizootic plague affected all three blocks but emerged asynchronously. Dust plots had fewer fleas per burrow (P plague emerged. Patterns in corresponding dust and vaccine plots were less consistent and appeared strongly influenced by timing of treatment applications relative to plague emergence. Deltamethrin or oral vaccination enhanced apparent survival within two blocks. Applying insecticide or vaccine prior to epizootic emergence blunted effects of plague on prairie dog survival and abundance, thereby preventing colony collapse. Successful plague mitigation will likely entail strategic combined uses of burrow dusting and oral vaccination within large colonies or colony complexes.

  2. Burrow dusting or oral vaccination prevents plague-associated prairie dog colony collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Daniel W.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Runge, Jonathan P.; Abbott, Rachel C.; Miller, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    Plague impacts prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), the endangered black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes) and other sensitive wildlife species. We compared efficacy of prophylactic treatments (burrow dusting with deltamethrin or oral vaccination with recombinant “sylvatic plague vaccine” [RCN-F1/V307]) to placebo treatment in black-tailed prairie dog (C. ludovicianus) colonies. Between 2013 and 2015, we measured prairie dog apparent survival, burrow activity and flea abundance on triplicate plots (“blocks”) receiving dust, vaccine or placebo treatment. Epizootic plague affected all three blocks but emerged asynchronously. Dust plots had fewer fleas per burrow (P vaccine or placebo plots. Burrow activity and prairie dog density declined sharply in placebo plots when epizootic plague emerged. Patterns in corresponding dust and vaccine plots were less consistent and appeared strongly influenced by timing of treatment applications relative to plague emergence. Deltamethrin or oral vaccination enhanced apparent survival within two blocks. Applying insecticide or vaccine prior to epizootic emergence blunted effects of plague on prairie dog survival and abundance, thereby preventing colony collapse. Successful plague mitigation will likely entail strategic combined uses of burrow dusting and oral vaccination within large colonies or colony complexes.

  3. Prevention of Rheumatic Diseases: Strategies, Caveats and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finckh, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases affect a significant portion of the population and lead to increased health care costs, disability and even premature mortality; as such, effective preventive measures for these diseases could lead to substantial improvements in public health. Importantly, established and emerging data from natural history studies show that for most rheumatic diseases there is a period of ‘preclinical’ disease development during which abnormal biomarkers or other processes can be detected. These changes are useful to understand mechanisms of disease pathogenesis; in addition, they may be applied to estimate a personal risk of future disease, while individuals are still relatively asymptomatic. Based on this, a hope is to implement effective screening and preventive approaches for some rheumatic diseases, perhaps in the near future. However, a key part of such approaches is a deep understanding of the mechanisms of disease development as well as evidence-based and effective screening and preventive interventions that incorporate disease biology as well as ethical and public health concerns. PMID:25437291

  4. Orally administered Taenia solium Calreticulin prevents experimental intestinal inflammation and is associated with a type 2 immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fela Mendlovic

    Full Text Available Intestinal helminth antigens are inducers of type 2 responses and can elicit regulatory immune responses, resulting in dampened inflammation. Several platyhelminth proteins with anti-inflammatory activity have been reported. We have identified, cloned and expressed the Taenia solium calreticulin (rTsCRT and shown that it predominantly induces a type 2 response characterized by IgG1, IL-4 and IL-5 production in mice. Here, we report the rTsCRT anti-inflammatory activity in a well-known experimental colitis murine model. Mice were orally immunized with purified rTsCRT and colitis was induced with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS. Clinical signs of disease, macroscopic and microscopic tissue inflammation, cytokine production and micronuclei formation, as a marker of genotoxicity, were measured in order to assess the effect of rTsCRT immunization on experimentally induced colitis. rTsCRT administration prior to TNBS instillation significantly reduced the inflammatory parameters, including the acute phase cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. Dampened inflammation was associated with increased local expression of IL-13 and systemic IL-10 and TGF-β production. Genotoxic damage produced by the inflammatory response was also precluded. Our results show that oral treatment with rTsCRT prevents excessive TNBS-induced inflammation in mice and suggest that rTsCRT has immunomodulatory properties associated with the expression of type 2 and regulatory cytokines commonly observed in other helminths.

  5. An Oral Selective Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor Agonist Prevents Doxorubicin Cardiotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Youn Beak, PhD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs play adaptive and protective roles in the heart. Dabuzalgron is an oral selective α1A-AR agonist that was well tolerated in multiple clinical trials of treatment for urinary incontinence, but has never been used to treat heart disease in humans or animal models. In this study, the authors administered dabuzalgron to mice treated with doxorubicin (DOX, a widely used chemotherapeutic agent with dose-limiting cardiotoxicity that can lead to heart failure (HF. Dabuzalgron protected against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, likely by preserving mitochondrial function. These results suggest that activating cardiac α1A-ARs with dabuzalgron, a well-tolerated oral agent, might represent a novel approach to treating HF. Key Words: alpha adrenergic receptors, anthracyclines, cardioprotection, catecholamines, heart failure

  6. View and practices of dermatologists regarding preventable skin diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, N.; Seir, F.; Qadir, S.N.R.

    2014-01-01

    To find out views and practice of dermatologists regarding prevention of preventable skin diseases. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was set up in Apr-May 2010 at PAF Hospital Faisal, Karachi, Pakistan. Material and Methods: A close-ended questionnaire was sent to 100 dermatologists through resource persons at different places throughout the country. It included basic information about them, their views and practice regarding prevention of these diseases. Data was managed and analyzed using SPSS-17. Results: Fifty dermatologists thought that frequency of preventable skin diseases in their clinical practice is 26-50%. Fifty-six observed educated community as the most important link for prevention, 46 held governments responsible and 42 consider busy schedule as barrier to educate community. Thirty dermatologists delivered talk to general public, 11 at schools, colleges and factories, 07 appeared on mass media and 08 prepared leaflets, pamphlets and brochures regarding preventive aspects of skin diseases at least once during last one year. Conclusion: Dermatologists in Pakistan are aware of magnitude of the problem and understand importance of public education; however only a few dermatologists have endeavored to take up this task. (author)

  7. Long-term comparative pharmacovigilance of orally transmitted Chagas disease: first report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón de Noya, Belkisyolé; Ruiz-Guevara, Raiza; Noya, Oscar; Castro, Julio; Ossenkopp, John; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Colmenares, Cecilia; Suárez, José Antonio; Noya-Alarcón, Oscar; Naranjo, Laura; Gutiérrez, Humberto; Quinci, Giuseppa; Torres, Jaime

    2017-03-01

    Two old drugs are the only choice against Trypanosoma cruzi and little is known about their secondary effects in the acute stage of oral-transmitted Chagas disease (ChD). A cross-sectional analytical surveillance study was conducted in a sizable cohort of patients seen during the largest acute foodborne ChD microepidemic registered so far. Individuals were treated with benznidazole (BNZ) or nifurtimox (NFX). 'Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events' was assessed to categorize side effects according to severity. Out of 176 treatments applied, 79% had one or more adverse effects, which predominated in adults (97.8%) as compared to children (75.5%). Risk of side effects with NFX was significantly higher than BNZ. Four adults and a child treated with NFX had severe side effects (pulmonary infarction, facial paralysis, neutropenia, blurred vision, bone marrow hypoplasia) warranting hospitalization, and drug suspension. Adverse effects frequently reported with NFX were abdominal pain, hyporexia, weight loss, headache, nausea and lymphocytosis, whereas skin rash, neurosensory effects, hyporexia, fatigue, pyrosis, abdominal pain and eosinophilia were observed with BNZ. Frequency and severity of side effects during treatment of acute oral infection by T. cruzi demand direct supervision and close follow-up, even in those asymptomatic, to prevent life-threatening situations.

  8. Influence of a chitosan on oral bacterial adhesion and growth in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Henk J.; Engels, Eefje; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2008-01-01

    Generally, mechanical plaque control without chemical support is insufficient to prevent oral diseases, and an ongoing quest exists for new antimicrobials for use in oral healthcare. Chitosans are polycationic, naturally occurring antimicrobials that are rapidly finding their way into oral

  9. Sensitization to palladium and nickel in Europe and the relationship with oral disease and dental alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muris, J.; Goossens, A.; Gonçalo, M.; Bircher, A.J.; Giménez-Arnau, A.; Foti, C.; Rustemeyer, T.; Feilzer, A.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of palladium and nickel sensitization in oral disease and dermatitis is not fully understood. Objectives To investigate whether sensitization to these metals was associated with exposure to dental alloys and oral and skin complaints/symptoms in a European multicentre study.

  10. Study of oral hygiene status and prevalence of gingival diseases in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The study was carried out to assess the oral hygiene status and to determine the prevalence of gingival and periodontal diseases in 10-12-year-old school children in Sholapur City, India. Method: A total of 1045 children (560 boys and 485 girls) aged 10-12 years were evaluated by questionnaires related to oral ...

  11. Spectrum of diseases and pattern of referral at the Oral Diagnosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the scope of oral diseases and referrals within the Dental Centre at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH). Method: The clinic logbook of the Oral diagnosis clinic of the Dental centre, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital was reviewed ...

  12. Palladium-based dental alloys are associated with oral disease and palladium-induced immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muris, J.; Scheper, R.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Rustemeyer, T.; van Hoogstraten, I.M.W.; von Blomberg, M.E.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Palladium (Pd) and gold (Au) based dental alloys have been associated with oral disease. Objectives This study was designed to explore possible associations between the presence of Au-based and Pd-based dental alloys, and oral lesions, systemic complaints, and specific in vivo and

  13. Improving disease prevention and treatment in controlled fish culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terech-Majewska Elżbieta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to evaluate long-term results of studies focusing on improving methods for preventing and treating fish diseases using selected natural and syntetic immunomodulators and vaccines in fish culture. Simultaneously, attention is drawn to infectious or environmental threats against which appropriately composed immunoprophylaxis can be used in production cycles. Fish culture is intensifying in Poland and globally, which means that the role of prevention and well-designed prophylaxis is of increasing significance to the prevention and treatment of fish diseases. Currently, 33 fish species are cultured in Poland as stocking material or for production. The primary methods for preventing diseases in controlled fish culture are ensuring the welfare of fish and other prophylactic methods, including immunoprophylaxis. Many infectious and non-infectious threats that can cause direct losses and limit fish culture are present in the aquatic environment. Fish diseases generally stem from the simultaneous action of many factors that coincide and are difficult to distinguish. Pesticides (organochlorine insecticides, organophosphorus herbicides, aromatic hydrocarbons, pentachlorophenol, heavy metals, and chemotherapeutics are particularly toxic to fish. Biodegradation, which is continual in aquatic environments, is a process by which toxic and other substances that negatively affect fish become bioavailable and impact the immune system, the functioning of which is a specific bioindicator of environmental quality. Innate immunity plays a key role in the defense against disadvantageous factors, which also include pathogens. Immunomodulation methods can protect resistance mechanisms, thereby increasing disease prevention and treatment in controlled fish culture.

  14. Advancing oral health policy and advocacy to prevent childhood obesity and reduce children's consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghavi, Ankit; Siddiqui, Nadia J

    2017-06-01

    While a large body of work documents the interconnections between oral health and obesity, less is known about the role that oral health professionals and organizations play to prevent childhood obesity, especially by influencing children's consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). This review identifies efforts by oral health professionals and organizations to influence such policy and advocacy, while informing future opportunities to leverage and expand on existing efforts. A scoping review of peer-reviewed literature and a web-based review of oral health policy and advocacy initiatives addressing prevention of obesity and reducing children's consumption of SSBs were conducted. Of 30 unique references identified, four peer-reviewed and seven non-peer-reviewed references met selection criteria. Qualitative and quantitative data were extracted using a priori determined headings. Findings suggest a strong role for oral health professionals in preventing childhood obesity and reducing children's consumption of SSBs; however, only a few national, state, and local oral-health-advocacy and -policy efforts were identified, such as policy statements by national associations, state and local education campaigns, and clinical guidelines. Evidence was limited on the role of oral health professionals in influencing broader communitywide advocacy and policy efforts such as soda taxation and limiting SSB consumption in schools. This review provides an emerging evidence base to support growing recognition among oral health professionals of their dual role in preventing childhood obesity and dental caries by targeting SSB consumption. It also identifies opportunities for oral health professionals to build on initial efforts to more proactively influence future policy and advocacy. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  15. Preventable and potentially preventable serious adverse reactions induced by oral protein kinase inhibitors through a database of adverse drug reaction reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egron, Adeline; Olivier-Abbal, Pascale; Gouraud, Aurore; Babai, Samy; Combret, Sandrine; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Bondon-Guitton, Emmanuelle

    2015-06-01

    Antineoplastic drugs are one of the pharmacological classes more frequently involved in occurrence of "serious" adverse drug reactions. However, few epidemiological data are available regarding the preventability of adverse drug reactions with ambulatory cancer chemotherapy. We assessed the rate and characteristics of "preventable" or "potentially preventable" "serious" adverse drug reactions induced by oral protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs). We performed a retrospective study with all "serious" adverse drug reactions (ADRs) recorded from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2009 in the French Pharmacovigilance Database with the eight oral protein kinase inhibitors marketed in France: sorafenib, imatinib, erlotinib, sunitinib, dasatinib, lapatinib, nilotinib and everolimus (Afinitor®) using the French adverse drug reactions preventability scale. This study was carried out on 265 spontaneous notifications. Most of adverse drug reactions were "unpreventable" (63.8 %). Around one third were "unevaluable" due to notifications poorly documented (medical history, dosage, use of drugs as first or second intention, concomitant drugs). One (0.4 %) adverse drug reaction was "preventable" with dasatinib (subdural hematoma) and three (1.1 %) were "potentially preventable" (hepatic adverse drug reactions): two with imatinib and one with sorafenib. For these four cases, we identified some characteristics: incorrect dosages, drug interactions and off-label uses. An appropriate prescription could avoid the occurrence of 1.5 % "serious" adverse drug reactions with oral PKIs. This rate is low and further studies are needed to compare our results by using other preventability instruments and to improve the French ADRs Preventability Scale.

  16. Vaccine-preventable diseases and vaccination rates in South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kightlinger, Lon

    2013-01-01

    Vaccine-preventable diseases have historically caused much illness and death in South Dakota. Sixty-seven diphtheria deaths were reported in 1892 and 1,017 polio cases were reported at the peak of the polio epidemic in 1952. As vaccines have been developed, licensed and put into wide use, the rates of diphtheria, polio, measles, smallpox and other diseases have successfully decreased leading to control, statewide elimination or eradication. Other diseases, such as pertussis, have been more difficult to control by vaccination alone. Although current vaccination coverage rates for South Dakota's kindergarten children surpass the Healthy People 2020 targets of 95 percent, the coverage rates for 2-year-old children and teenagers are below the target rates. Until vaccine-preventable diseases are eradicated globally, we must vigilantly maintain high vaccination coverage rates and aggressively apply control measures to limit transmission when diseases do occur in South Dakota.

  17. New South Wales annual vaccine-preventable disease report, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosewell, Alexander; Spokes, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Aim To describe the epidemiology of selected vaccine-preventable diseases in New South Wales, Australia for 2013. Methods Data from the New South Wales Notifiable Conditions Information Management System were analysed by local health district of residence, age, Aboriginality, vaccination status and organism. Risk factor and vaccination status data were collected by public health units. Results Pertussis notification rates in infants were low, and no infant pertussis deaths were reported. Despite a high number of imported measles cases, there was limited secondary transmission. The invasive meningococcal disease notification rate declined, and disease due to serogroup C remained low and stable. Conclusion Vaccine-preventable diseases were relatively well controlled in New South Wales in 2013, with declining or stable notification rates in most diseases compared with the previous year. PMID:26306215

  18. The role of aspirin in the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittaman, Sunitha V; VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Rezkalla, Shereif H

    2014-12-01

    Aspirin therapy is well-accepted as an agent for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and current guidelines also define a role for aspirin in primary prevention. In this review, we describe the seminal trials of aspirin use in the context of current guidelines, discuss factors that may influence the effectiveness of aspirin therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, and briefly examine patterns of use. The body of evidence supports a role for aspirin in both secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events in selected population groups, but practice patterns may be suboptimal. As a simple and inexpensive prophylactic measure for cardiovascular disease, aspirin use should be carefully considered in all at-risk adult patients, and further measures, including patient education, are necessary to ensure its proper use. © 2013 Marshfield Clinic.

  19. Preventing Infections in Sickle Cell Disease: The Unfinished Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaro, Stephen K; Iroh Tam, P Y

    2016-05-01

    While encapsulated bacterial agents, particularly Streptococcus pneumoniae, are recognized as important microbes that are associated with serious illness in hosts with sickle cell disease (SCD), multiple pathogens are implicated in infectious manifestations of SCD. Variations in clinical practice have been an obstacle to the universal implementation of infection preventive management through active, targeted vaccination of these individuals and routine usage of antibiotic prophylaxis. Paradoxically, in low-income settings, there is evidence that SCD also increases the risk for several other infections that warrant additional infection preventive measures. The infection preventive care among patients with SCD in developed countries does not easily translate to the adoption of these recommendations globally, which must take into account the local epidemiology of infections, available vaccines and population-specific vaccine efficacy, environment, health care behaviors, and cultural beliefs, as these are all factors that play a complex role in the manifestation of SCD and the prevention of infectious disease morbidity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The Role of Aspirin in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittaman, Sunitha V.; VanWormer, Jeffrey J.; Rezkalla, Shereif H.

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin therapy is well-accepted as an agent for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and current guidelines also define a role for aspirin in primary prevention. In this review, we describe the seminal trials of aspirin use in the context of current guidelines, discuss factors that may influence the effectiveness of aspirin therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, and briefly examine patterns of use. The body of evidence supports a role for aspirin in both secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events in selected population groups, but practice patterns may be suboptimal. As a simple and inexpensive prophylactic measure for cardiovascular disease, aspirin use should be carefully considered in all at-risk adult patients, and further measures, including patient education, are necessary to ensure its proper use. PMID:24573704

  1. IMMUNIZATION AND GETTING DISEASED FROM SOME RESPIRATORY, VACCINE-PREVENTABLE DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozidar Jovanovic

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Contagious diseases present the leading causes of getting diseased and mortality in different parts of the world, regardless of improved socio-economic life conditions. The most important among them are the diseases which can be spread by air and water. Immunization against contagious diseases presents the most effective form of prevention, ending, elimination and, where possible, eradication of disease. When there are good programs of immunization properly implemented, and when they greatly cover the population which they refer to, the changes in frequency of vaccinable diseases can be observed, eg. contagious nosological entities that could be prevented by vaccination. Certain vaccines protect from bacterial or viral infections and reduce the possibility of infection, that is, prevent its transmission. The objective of the research is to point to the results of conducting the compulsory systematic immunization and to examine the effect of immunization on spreading of some respiratory vaccine-preventable diseases within Sumadija Region. This study shows the scope of immunization and spreading of some respiratory vaccine-preventable diseases, before all morbilli, parottitis epidemica, rubella and pertussis, in Sumadija Region for the last ten years. By means of great scope of compulsory immunization, the aforementioned respiratory vaccine-preventable diseases could be prevented.

  2. Putative periodontopathogens in "diseased" and "non-diseased" persons exhibiting poor oral hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlén, G; Manji, F; Baelum, V; Fejerskov, O

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the occurrence of some putative periodonto-pathogens in "test" and "control" sites in "diseased" and "non-diseased" persons, respectively, from an adult rural Kenyan population exhibiting poor oral hygiene and widespread loss of attachment (LA). 14 persons (less than 35 years) were assigned to a "diseased" category on the basis of at least 4 sites with LA greater than or equal to 4 mm; at least 5 mm LA and a pocket greater than or equal to 4 mm interproximally in a lower incisor ("test" site): and less than 2 mm LA and no pocket greater than or equal to 4 mm distal to a lower canine or mesial to a lower first premolar ("control" site). Age-matched "non-diseased" persons were identified on the basis of no sites with LA greater than 2 mm and no pockets greater than or equal to 4 mm associated with LA. Paperpoint samples from test and control sites as well as a scraping sample from the dorsum of tongue were examined for presence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteroides intermedius, B. melaninogenicus group, Capnocytophaga, Selenomonas spp., and Wolinella recta. P. gingivalis was found in 79% of test sites and 36% of control sites in "diseased" persons, and in 18% and 35% of test and control sites, respectively, in "non-diseased" persons. "No other bacterial group discriminated significantly between test and control sites or between diseased and non-diseased subjects. The surprisingly high occurrence of P. gingivalis in non-diseased subjects, both subgingivally and on tongue, indicates that deep periodontal pockets are not prerequisite ecological environments for P. gingivalis establishment.

  3. Childhood nutrition education in health promotion and disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    In the last 10 to 15 years, nutrition has become a major component of health promotion and chronic disease prevention. Two widely recommended strategies for incorporating nutrition education directed toward children and youth into health promotion and disease prevention efforts are school-based nutrition education and the integration of nutritional care into health care. School-based nutrition education programs targeted toward very specific eating behaviors are showing very promising results in regard to behavior and attitude change of children and adolescents. Substantial changes in health care providers' attitudes and practices and in the funding and financing of health care will be needed if nutrition education delivered in the context of routine health care is to be a major force in health promotion and disease prevention for youth. PMID:2629968

  4. Salivary immunoglobulin classes in Nigerian cigarette smokers: Indication for increased risk of oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodeji Olatunde Olayanju

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study showed that there is decreased salivary IgM in smokers. This observation suggests that reduced salivary immunoglobulin level of IgM might be involved in the pathogenesis of oral diseases in cigarette smokers.

  5. Inequalities in oral health and oral health promotion

    OpenAIRE

    Moysés, Samuel Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This article offers a critical review of the problem of inequalities in oral health and discusses strategies for disease prevention and oral health promotion. It shows that oral health is not merely a result of individual biological, psychological, and behavioral factors; rather, it is the sum of collective social conditions created when people interact with the social environment. Oral health status is directly related to socioeconomic position across the socioeconomic gradient in almost all...

  6. Triggers of oral lichen planus flares and the potential role of trigger avoidance in disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hannah X; Blasiak, Rachel; Kim, Edwin; Padilla, Ricardo; Culton, Donna A

    2017-09-01

    Many patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) report triggers of flares, some of which overlap with triggers of other oral diseases, including oral allergy syndrome and oral contact dermatitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of commonly reported triggers of OLP flares, their overlap with triggers of other oral diseases, and the potential role of trigger avoidance as a management strategy. Questionnaire-based survey of 51 patients with biopsy-proven lichen planus with oral involvement seen in an academic dermatology specialty clinic and/or oral pathology clinic between June 2014 and June 2015. Of the participants, 94% identified at least one trigger of their OLP flares. Approximately half of the participants (51%) reported at least one trigger that overlapped with known triggers of oral allergy syndrome, and 63% identified at least one trigger that overlapped with known triggers of oral contact dermatitis. Emotional stress was the most commonly reported trigger (77%). Regarding avoidance, 79% of the study participants reported avoiding their known triggers in daily life. Of those who actively avoided triggers, 89% reported an improvement in symptoms and 70% reported a decrease in the frequency of flares. Trigger identification and avoidance can play a potentially effective role in the management of OLP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease associated with oral contraceptive use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, E J; Theis, M K; Vaughan, T L; Nicol-Blades, B

    1994-08-01

    Research on inflammatory bowel disease risk among oral contraceptive users has reached conflicting conclusions. This population-based case-control study evaluated the effects of oral contraceptive use on ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease risk. Cases were women enrollees, aged 15-68 years, of Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound (a prepaid health plan based in western Washington State) who had ulcerative colitis (n = 211) or Crohn's disease (n = 91). Age-matched controls were randomly selected from the health plan enrollment file. An in-person interview obtained information about lifetime contraceptive use. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals for disease. Women who reported oral contraceptive use within 6 months before disease onset were at increased risk for both diseases compared with never users (relative risk (RR) of ulcerative colitis = 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-3.3; RR of Crohn's disease = 2.6, 95% CI 1.2-5.5). Women who had used oral contraceptives for more than 6 years had the highest risk of Crohn's disease (RR = 5.1, 95% CI 1.8-14.3). In contrast, increasing duration of use was not associated with increased risk of ulcerative colitis. Adjustment for race, smoking, income, or pregnancy history did not substantially alter these results. Higher ulcerative colitis risk tended to occur among users of high estrogen dose oral contraceptives, while Crohn's disease risk was similar regardless of estrogen potency.

  8. [Treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolic disease: what's new?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Marie-Antoinette; Bron, Cédric; Haesler, Erik; Mazzolai, Lucia

    2009-02-04

    Venous thromboembolic (VTE) disease is frequent and questions regarding its treatment or prevention are numerous. This review is aimed at summarizing and pointing out the novelties on VTE treatment and prevention recently published in the Chest journal earlier this year (8th edition of ACCP guidelines). Generally, the aim of guidelines and of this review as well, is to offer guidance to practictioners in making the most appropriate choice for treating or preventing VTE. They are not intended for strict application and doctors will always have to decide individually case by case taking into account patients preference and the risk-benefit balance.

  9. The profile of health - oral disease and treatment of urban Lima 2012 seniors needs

    OpenAIRE

    Campodónico Reátegui, Carlos; Docente del Departamento Académico de stomatología Preventiva y Social de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM; Chein Villacampa, Sylvia; Docente del Departamento Académico de stomatología Preventiva y Social de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM; Benavente Lipa, Lourdes; Docente del Departamento Académico de stomatología Preventiva y Social de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM; Vidal Goñi, Raúl; Docente del Departamento Académico de stomatología Preventiva y Social de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM; Delgadillo Ávila, Juana Rosa; Docente del Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM; Álvarez Paúcar, María Angélica; Docente del Departamento Académico de Estomatología Pediátrica de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM; Evaristo Chiyong, Teresa; Docente del Departamento Académico de Estomatología Preventiva y Social de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM; Campodónico Morales, Carla; Cirujano Dentista. Estudios Segunda Especialización Unidad de Postgrado de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM; Lara Téllez, Lourdes; Docente del Departamento Académico de Estomatología Rehabilitadora de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM; Díaz Soriano, Ana María; Docente del Departamento Académico de Estomatología Preventiva y Social de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the profile of oral health and disease of the elderly adults of urban Lima, taking into account the prevalence of dental caries, periodontal disease, oral mucosa injuries and treatment needs. Descriptive and transversal study was using over 120 elderly adults (over 60 years old), living in Lima center and district. Data collection was performed by the method of clinical observation and interview using rates and procedures of the WHO. The resul...

  10. Meta-analysis of the role of oral contraceptive agents in inflammatory bowel disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Godet, P G; May, G R; Sutherland, L R

    1995-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have been performed to determine factors that might contribute to the development of inflammatory bowel disease. Although the role of oral contraceptive agents in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) have been assessed, most studies were of small sample size and characterised by low statistical precision. A meta-analysis was performed to increase the statistical power and to investigate the association between the use of oral contraceptives and the...

  11. Oral health and cardiovascular care: Perceptions of people with cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Paula; Everett, Bronwyn; Salamonson, Yenna; Ajwani, Shilpi; Bhole, Sameer; Bishop, Joshua; Lintern, Karen; Nolan, Samantha; Rajaratnam, Rohan; Redfern, Julie; Sheehan, Maria; Skarligos, Fiona; Spencer, Lissa; Srinivas, Ravi; George, Ajesh

    2017-01-01

    Main objective The aim of this study was to explore the perception of patients with cardiovascular disease towards oral health and the potential for cardiac care clinicians to promote oral health. Method A needs assessment was undertaken with twelve patients with cardiovascular disease attending cardiac rehabilitation between 2015 and 2016, in three metropolitan hospitals in Sydney, Australia. These patients participated in face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data was analysed using them...

  12. Oral signs and symptoms in relation to disease activity and site of involvement in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, J; Shenkman, A; Stavropoulos, F; Melzer, E

    2003-01-01

    An assessment of oral symptoms and signs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Fifty-four patients with IBD, 34 with Crohn's disease (CD) and 20 with ulcerative colitis (UC) participated in the study. Forty-two patients without gastrointestinal disease or complaints attending the orthopedic clinic served as controls. Each patient completed a written questionnaire and was subjected to an oral examination. The main findings of this study were the higher prevalence of halitosis (50% vs 10% P halitosis (29% vs 10%, P halitosis and regurgitation (50 and 60% vs 10 and 17%, P signs and symptoms in patients with IBD. Patients with active CD had more oral signs compared with non-active CD patients. Manifestations such as nausea, vomiting, regurgitation and dry mouth may have detrimental effects on teeth and soft tissues of the oral cavity. Communication between gastroenterologists and dentists is imperative for success of the overall treatment of their patients.

  13. Allergen immunotherapy for the prevention of allergic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Halken, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for the Prevention of Allergic Disease. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of AIT in the pre......BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for the Prevention of Allergic Disease. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of AIT...

  14. Social-Biological Interactions in Oral Disease: A 'Cells to Society' View.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha Gomaa

    Full Text Available Oral diseases constitute a major worldwide public health problem, with their burden concentrating in socially disadvantaged and less affluent groups of the population, resulting in significant oral health inequalities. Biomedical and behavioural approaches have proven relatively ineffective in reducing these inequalities, and have potentially increased the health gap between social groups. Some suggest this stems from a lack of understanding of how the social and psychosocial contexts in which behavioural and biological changes occur influence oral disease. To unravel the pathways through which social factors affect oral health outcomes, a better understanding is thus needed of how the social 'gets under the skin,' or becomes embodied, to alter the biological. In this paper, we present the current knowledge on the interplay between social and biological factors in oral disease. We first provide an overview of the process of embodiment in chronic disease and then evaluate the evidence on embodiment in oral disease by reviewing published studies in this area. Results show that, in periodontal disease, income, education and perceived stress are correlated with elevated levels of stress hormones, disrupted immune biomarkers and increased allostatic load. Similarly, socioeconomic position and increased financial stress are related to increased stress hormones and cariogenic bacterial counts in dental caries. Based on these results, we propose a dynamic model depicting social-biological interactions that illustrates potential interdependencies between social and biological factors that lead to poor oral health. This work and the proposed model may aid in developing a better understanding of the causes of oral health inequalities and implicate the importance of addressing the social determinants of oral health in innovating public health interventions.

  15. Social-Biological Interactions in Oral Disease: A 'Cells to Society' View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Noha; Glogauer, Michael; Tenenbaum, Howard; Siddiqi, Arjumand; Quiñonez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Oral diseases constitute a major worldwide public health problem, with their burden concentrating in socially disadvantaged and less affluent groups of the population, resulting in significant oral health inequalities. Biomedical and behavioural approaches have proven relatively ineffective in reducing these inequalities, and have potentially increased the health gap between social groups. Some suggest this stems from a lack of understanding of how the social and psychosocial contexts in which behavioural and biological changes occur influence oral disease. To unravel the pathways through which social factors affect oral health outcomes, a better understanding is thus needed of how the social 'gets under the skin,' or becomes embodied, to alter the biological. In this paper, we present the current knowledge on the interplay between social and biological factors in oral disease. We first provide an overview of the process of embodiment in chronic disease and then evaluate the evidence on embodiment in oral disease by reviewing published studies in this area. Results show that, in periodontal disease, income, education and perceived stress are correlated with elevated levels of stress hormones, disrupted immune biomarkers and increased allostatic load. Similarly, socioeconomic position and increased financial stress are related to increased stress hormones and cariogenic bacterial counts in dental caries. Based on these results, we propose a dynamic model depicting social-biological interactions that illustrates potential interdependencies between social and biological factors that lead to poor oral health. This work and the proposed model may aid in developing a better understanding of the causes of oral health inequalities and implicate the importance of addressing the social determinants of oral health in innovating public health interventions.

  16. Oral and Anal vaccination against enteric red mouth disease protection against yersiniosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Lukas; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Kragelund Strøm, Helene

    fish. The objective for this project is to investigate whether oral and anal vaccination of rainbow trout against Yersinia ruckeri O1 (biotype 1) causing Enteric Red Mouth disease (ERM) can protect rainbow trout against a subsequent experimental bath challenge.The rainbow trout were given oral......The effect of oral vaccines against bacterial fish diseases has been a topic for debate in many years. Recently both M-cells and dendritic cells have been found in fish and it is therefore likely that antigens can be taken up from the intestine and induce immunity in orally and anally vaccinated...... vaccinations with AquaVacTM ERM Oral vet. (MSD animal health) or an experimental vaccine based on formalin killed Yersinia ruckeri O1, (biotype 1) bacteria. Eight groups were studied: 1) Control group (no vaccination, no infection), 2) infected control, 3) experimental vaccine, 4) experimental vaccine w...

  17. Does Oral Vaccination Protect Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Against Enteric Red Mouth Disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Lukas; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Kragelund Strøm, Helene

    . The objective for this project is to investigate whether oral vaccination of rainbow trout against Yersinia ruckeri O1 (biotype 1) causing Enteric Red Mouth disease (ERM) can protect rainbow trout against a subsequent experimental bath challenge with Y. ruckeri. The rainbow trout were given oral vaccinations......The effect of oral vaccines against bacterial fish diseases has been a topic for debate in many years. Recently both M-cells and dendritic cells have been found in fish and it is therefore likely that antigens can be taken up from the intestine and induce immunity in orally vaccinated fish...... with AquaVacTM ERM Oral vet. (MSD animal health) or an experimental vaccine based on killed Yersinia ruckeri O1, (biotype 1) bacteria. Seven groups were studied: 1) Control group (no vaccination, no infection), 2) infected control, 3) experimental vaccine, 4) experimental vaccine w/ booster (4 months post...

  18. Oral and anal vaccination confers full protection against enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Neumann, Lukas; Otani, Maki

    2014-01-01

    The effect of oral vaccines against bacterial fish diseases has been a topic for debate for decades. Recently both M-like cells and dendritic cells have been discovered in the intestine of rainbow trout. It is therefore likely that antigens reaching the intestine can be taken up and thereby induce...... immunity in orally vaccinated fish. The objective of this project was to investigate whether oral and anal vaccination of rainbow trout induces protection against an experimental waterborne infection with the pathogenic enterobacteria Yersinia ruckeri O1 biotype 1 the causative agent of enteric redmouth...... disease (ERM). Rainbow trout were orally vaccinated with AquaVac ERM Oral (MERCK Animal Health) or an experimental vaccine bacterin of Y. ruckeri O1. Both vaccines were tested with and without a booster vaccination four months post the primary vaccination. Furthermore, two groups of positive controls were...

  19. Oral and Anal vaccination against enteric red mouth disease protection against yersiniosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Lukas; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Kragelund Strøm, Helene

    The effect of oral vaccines against bacterial fish diseases has been a topic for debate in many years. Recently both M-cells and dendritic cells have been found in fish and it is therefore likely that antigens can be taken up from the intestine and induce immunity in orally and anally vaccinated...... fish. The objective for this project is to investigate whether oral and anal vaccination of rainbow trout against Yersinia ruckeri O1 (biotype 1) causing Enteric Red Mouth disease (ERM) can protect rainbow trout against a subsequent experimental bath challenge.The rainbow trout were given oral...... vaccinations with AquaVacTM ERM Oral vet. (MSD animal health) or an experimental vaccine based on formalin killed Yersinia ruckeri O1, (biotype 1) bacteria. Eight groups were studied: 1) Control group (no vaccination, no infection), 2) infected control, 3) experimental vaccine, 4) experimental vaccine w...

  20. Does Oral Vaccination Protect Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Against Enteric Red Mouth Disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Lukas; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Kragelund Strøm, Helene

    The effect of oral vaccines against bacterial fish diseases has been a topic for debate in many years. Recently both M-cells and dendritic cells have been found in fish and it is therefore likely that antigens can be taken up from the intestine and induce immunity in orally vaccinated fish....... The objective for this project is to investigate whether oral vaccination of rainbow trout against Yersinia ruckeri O1 (biotype 1) causing Enteric Red Mouth disease (ERM) can protect rainbow trout against a subsequent experimental bath challenge with Y. ruckeri. The rainbow trout were given oral vaccinations...... with AquaVacTM ERM Oral vet. (MSD animal health) or an experimental vaccine based on killed Yersinia ruckeri O1, (biotype 1) bacteria. Seven groups were studied: 1) Control group (no vaccination, no infection), 2) infected control, 3) experimental vaccine, 4) experimental vaccine w/ booster (4 months post...

  1. Oral health in patients with chronic kidney disease - emphasis on periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Nylund, Karita

    2017-01-01

    ORAL HEALTH IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE - EMPHASIS ON PERIODONTITIS Background: Periodontitis is a common bacteria-induced chronic inflammatory disease with mild symptoms. It leads to destruction of the periodontium and finally to tooth loss in a susceptible patient. Periodontitis is associated with many systemic diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) through low-grade systemic inflammation. However, no causality c...

  2. Dental calculus: recent insights into occurrence, formation, prevention, removal and oral health effects of supragingival and subgingival deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D J

    1997-10-01

    Dental calculus, both supra- and subgingival occurs in the majority of adults worldwide. Dental calculus is calcified dental plaque, composed primarily of calcium phosphate mineral salts deposited between and within remnants of formerly viable microorganisms. A viable dental plaque covers mineralized calculus deposits. Levels of calculus and location of formation are population specific and are affected by oral hygiene habits, access to professional care, diet, age, ethnic origin, time since last dental cleaning, systemic disease and the use of prescription medications. In populations that practice regular oral hygiene and with access to regular professional care, supragingival dental calculus formation is restricted to tooth surfaces adjacent to the salivary ducts. Levels of supragingival calculus in these populations is minor and the calculus has little if any impact on oral-health. Subgingival calculus formation in these populations occurs coincident with periodontal disease (although the calculus itself appears to have little impact on attachment loss), the latter being correlated with dental plaque. In populations that do not practice regular hygiene and that do not have access to professional care, supragingival calculus occurs throughout the dentition and the extent of calculus formation can be extreme. In these populations, supragingival calculus is associated with the promotion of gingival recession. Subgingival calculus, in "low hygiene" populations, is extensive and is directly correlated with enhanced periodontal attachment loss. Despite extensive research, a complete understanding of the etiologic significance of subgingival calculus to periodontal disease remains elusive, due to inability to clearly differentiate effects of calculus versus "plaque on calculus". As a result, we are not entirely sure whether subgingival calculus is the cause or result of periodontal inflammation. Research suggests that subgingival calculus, at a minimum, may expand the

  3. [Current developments in prevention of coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windler, E

    1996-02-01

    The Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study (4S-Studie) has provided proof beyond any doubt that reduction of plasma cholesterol decreases mortality. The enormous rise of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease in both gender calls for preventative measures as an urgent task. With a reduction of cardiac events by 30-40% and of mortality in the same order of magnitude, cholesterol lowering and increase in HDL-cholesterol are most effective measures for the treatment of coronary artery disease. However, not treatment of late stages of the disease, but primary prevention to reduce the incidence of coronary artery disease in this country should be the principle aim. Thus, the international guidelines for the treatment of lipid disorders considering the individual patient's risk profile have been revised.

  4. Mast Cell Stabilizers as Host Modulatory Drugs to Prevent and Control Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhoom Singh Mehta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mast cells are among the first cells to get in-volved in periodontal inflammation. Their numbers have been shown to be in-creased in cases of gingivitis and periodontal disease. The hypothesis: Since mast cell stabilizers like sodium cromogly-cate (SCG and nedocromil sodium (NS have been used in the prophylaxis of bronchial asthma without any significant adverse effects and also the fact that drugs like SCG show significant anti-inflammatory activities, it would be logical to use mast cell stabilizers as host modulating drugs for the treatment and prevention of peri-odontal disease. Evaluation of the hypothesis: Safety and efficacy of both SCG and NS are well documented. So, it will be systemically safe to use in humans. However, oral administration SCG or delivery of the drug by means local irrigation will not be very useful because SCG may not be secreted in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF(as in the case of oral administraion or the drug may get washed out from periodontal pocket due to the constant flow of GCF(as in the case of irrigation. A local or targeted drug delivery of mast cell stabilizers can be used in patients with periodontal disease. Role of mast cells in periodontal disease has been dealt in-depth in many studies and articles. However, limited amount of research has been done on using mast cell stabilizers in the prevention and control of periodontal diseases. More studies are needed to study the efficacy and effective-ness of mast cell stabilizers as an adjunct to phase I therapy in the control of periodontal disease.

  5. Oral Astragalus (Huang qi) for preventing frequent episodes of acute respiratory tract infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guobin; Chen, Xiankun; Liu, Zhuangzhu; Yang, Lihong; Zhang, La; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia; Wen, Zehuai; Guo, Xinfeng; Qin, Xindong; Liang, Jueyao; Liu, Xusheng

    2016-12-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) are common in children and can involve both upper and lower airways. Many children experience frequent ARTI episodes or recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTIs) in early life, which creates challenges for paediatricians, primary care physicians, parents and carers of children.In China, Astragalus (Huang qi), alone or in combination with other herbs, is used by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioners in the form of a water extract, to reduce the risk of ARTIs; it is believed to stimulate the immune system. Better understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of Astragalus may provide insights into ARTI prevention, and consequently reduced antibiotic use. To assess the effectiveness and safety of oral Astragalus for preventing frequent episodes of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) in children in community settings. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 12, 2015), MEDLINE (Ovid) (1946 to 31 December 2015), Embase (Elsevier) (1974 to 31 December 2015), AMED (Ovid) (1985 to 31 December 2015), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (1979 to 31 December 2015) and Chinese Scientific Journals full text database (CQVIP) (1989 to 31 December 2015), China Biology Medicine disc (CBM 1976 to 31 December 2015) and Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform (WanFang) (1998 to 31 December 2015). We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing oral Astragalus as a sole Chinese herbal preparation with placebo to prevent frequent episodes of ARTIs in children. We used standard Cochrane methodological procedures for this review. We assessed search results to identify relevant studies. We planned to extract data using standardised forms. Disagreements were to be resolved through discussion. Risk of bias was to be assessed using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool. We planned to use mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) for continuous data and risk

  6. Impact of rheumatic diseases on oral health and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola, K; Saarinen, A; Kuuliala, A; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Murtomaa, H; Meurman, J H

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the effects of rheumatic diseases on oral symptoms, health habits, and quality of life in subjects with and without rheumatic diseases. The hypothesis was that patients with rheumatic diseases have more oral symptoms impairing their quality of life than healthy controls. A questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 1500 members of the Finnish Rheumatism Association, including those with and without rheumatic diseases. We focused on symptoms of the mouth and temporomandibular area, and health habits. Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP14) was used to evaluate the oral health-related quality of life. We analyzed differences between subjects with and without rheumatic diseases, controlled for age, gender, smoking, and non-rheumatic chronic diseases. Completed questionnaires were received from 995 participants (response rate 66%). Of them, 564 reported rheumatic disease, 431 were used as controls. The patients reported significantly more all orofacial symptoms than controls. Severe dry mouth was reported by 19.6% of patients and 2.9% of controls (P rheumatic diseases reported oral discomfort and reduced quality of life more often when compared with controls. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Oral misoprostol for preventing postpartum haemorrhage in home births in rural Bangladesh: how effective is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasreen, Hashima-E-; Nahar, Shamsun; Al Mamun, Mahfuz; Afsana, Kaosar; Byass, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Aims Evidence exists about prevention of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) by oral administration of misoprostol in low-income countries, but effectiveness of prevention by lay community health workers (CHW) is not sufficient. This study aimed to investigate whether a single dose (400 µg) of oral misoprostol could prevent PPH in a community home-birth setting and to assess its acceptability and feasibility among rural Bangladeshi women. Methods This quasi-experimental trial was conducted among 2,017 rural women who had home deliveries between November 2009 and February 2010 in two rural districts of northern Bangladesh. In the intervention district 1,009 women received 400 µg of misoprostol immediately after giving birth by the lay CHWs, and in the control district 1,008 women were followed after giving birth with no specific intervention against PPH. Primary PPH (within 24 hours) was measured by women's self-reported subjective measures of the normality of blood loss using the ‘cultural consensus model.’ Baseline data provided socio-economic, reproductive, obstetric, and bleeding disorder information. Findings The incidence of primary PPH was found to be lower in the intervention group (1.6%) than the control group (6.2%) (pMisoprostol provided 81% protection (RR: 0.19; 95% CI: 0.08–0.48) against developing primary PPH. The proportion of retained and manually removed placentae was found to be higher in the control group compared to the intervention group. Women in the control group were more likely to need an emergency referral to a higher level facility and blood transfusion than the intervention group. Unexpectedly few women experienced transient side effects of misoprostol. Eighty-seven percent of the women were willing to use the drug in future pregnancy and would recommend to other pregnant women. Conclusion Community-based distribution of oral misoprostol (400 µg) by CHW appeared to be effective, safe, acceptable, and feasible in reducing the incidence

  8. Oral health attitudes and caries-preventive behaviour of Czech parents of preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Lenčová

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To characterize the oral health-related attitudes and behavior of Czech parents of preschool children. Materials and methods. A representative sample of 796 parents was recruited for the crosssectional questionnaire survey. Study data were collected using a validated questionnaire with 44 attitudinal items related to different aspects of caries prevention. The data were analyzed by explorative factor analysis, extracted factors were subjected to reliability analysis and Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA was used to test differences in the factor scores in respondents with different levels of education and selfperceived SES. Results. The factor analysis extracted 3 factors, labeled ”Toothbrushing – perceived significance and parental efficacy”; ”External caries control” and ”Internal caries control”. They explained 28.9% of the data variability. The comparison of the factor scores in groups with different SES and education of mothers showed highly significant differences. For all three factors, median values of the aggregated Likert scale increased with increasing SES and education of the mother. Conclusion. The parents report that they are aware of their responsibility for the prevention of tooth decay in their children. In caries prevention they concentrate on toothbrushing. Dietary measures do not seem to be of similar importance to them. The increasing self-perceived SES of the family and the education level of the mother have a significantly positive effect on the caries-preventive attitudes of the parents. Based on the study results, the message to the publichealth sector in the Czech Republic should include the need to highlight the importance of a non-cariogenic diet and the role of fluorides in caries prevention.

  9. Preventing the Epidemic of Non-Communicable Diseases: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Robson , Anthony ,

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Diet, lifestyle and environment do not just affect a person's health, they also determine the health of their children and possibly the health of their grandchildren. Non-communicable disease is a global epidemic because of the combined effect of the modern diet (including drug abuse) and a sedentary lifestyle. A low energy dense, drug-free diet rich in bioavailable nutrients-plus-exercise is most effective for preventing non-communicable disease throughout life. Nanoc...

  10. The impact of oral care on oral health status and prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Abdullah; Shafipour, Vida; Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Gholipour Baradari, Afshin; Yazdani Charati, Jamshid

    2017-03-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is one of the most common nosocomial infections which increase mortality rate and length stay of hospitalisation. Oral care would not only improve patient's oral health and well-being, but it can also reduce the incidence rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia. The objective of this study was to identify the impact of oral care practices on oral health status of patients in intensive care unit and the incidence rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia. This clinical trial recruited 100 participants who were randomly assigned to a control group (receiving oral care by nurses) and an intervention group (receiving systematic care by the researcher) during 2015-2016. Beck Oral Assessment Scale was used to determine the required number of times for receiving oral care with regard to patient's oral health in the intervention group. Each care included adjusting endotracheal tube cuff pressure, brushing with toothpaste, using antiseptics and moistening the lips. The oral cavity was examined using BOAS and Mucosal-Plaque Score, and Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score was used for detecting pneumonia. The BOAS scoring showed significant differences between the two groups from the first to fifth day (P<0.001). The mucosal-plaque index was significantly different between the two groups from the third day to fifth day (P<0.001). The incidence rate of pneumonia on the third and fifth day was 10% (5) and 14% (7) in the control group, and 4% (2) and 10% (5) in the intervention group, respectively. The Fisher test did not show significant difference (P=0.538), however, the incidence rate in the intervention group reduced compared with the control group. Although following a systematic oral care program could not significantly decrease the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia in critically ill patients compared to the conventional oral care practices, it significantly improved the oral health and mucosal-plaque index. Copyright © 2016

  11. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients on novel oral anticoagulants: Risk, prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ka-Shing; Leung, Wai K

    2017-03-21

    Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which include direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran) and direct factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban), are gaining popularity in the prevention of embolic stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation as well as in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, similar to traditional anticoagulants, NOACs have the side effects of bleeding, including gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). Results from both randomized clinical trials and observations studies suggest that high-dose dabigatran (150 mg b.i.d), rivaroxaban and high-dose edoxaban (60 mg daily) are associated with a higher risk of GIB compared with warfarin. Other risk factors of NOAC-related GIB include concomitant use of ulcerogenic agents, older age, renal impairment, Helicobacter pylori infection and a past history of GIB. Prevention of NOAC-related GIB includes proper patient selection, using a lower dose of certain NOACs and in patients with renal impairment, correction of modifiable risk factors, and prescription of gastroprotective agents. Overt GIB can be managed by withholding NOACs followed by delayed endoscopic treatment. In severe bleeding, additional measures include administration of activated charcoal, use of specific reversal agents such as idarucizumab for dabigatran and andexanent alfa for factor Xa inhibitors, and urgent endoscopic management.

  12. Oral disease in free-living red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Anthony W; Kountouri, Amalia; DuBoulay, George; Kertesz, Peter

    2004-04-01

    Ninety-one red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) found dead in the UK between January 1994 and August 1998 were necropsied at the Institute of Zoology (London, UK); their oral cavities were examined visually, and in eight cases, radiographically. Four red squirrels, which had evidence of oral disease when necropsied as part of a mortality survey, also were examined. A low prevalence (prevalence = 0.033, SE = 0.02, n = 91) of oral disease was found in free-living red squirrels. In only two cases was oral disease the probable cause of death. Attrition of the check teeth (three cases) and overgrowth of the incisors (four cases) were the most common lesions found. Partial anodontia was recorded in one squirrel.

  13. Changes in the oral-health-related quality of life of Brazilian children after an educational preventive programme: an 1-month longitudinal evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, J N; Barbosa, T S; Kobayashi, F Y; Gavião, M B D

    2014-08-01

    This 1-month longitudinal study assessed whether the oral status and the oral-health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of children changed after four sessions of an educational preventive programme. Fifty Brazilian students (11-12 year old) were examined for signs and symptoms of gingivitis using the Community Periodontal Index and two questions about gingival bleeding. The OHRQoL was measured using the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Child Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (Child-OIDP). Higher scores indicated worse OHRQoL. The results were analysed using the Shapiro-Wilk, Chi-square, Wilcoxon signed-rank and Mann-Whitney tests. The magnitude of the mean change was calculated using the effect size. Twenty-four percentage of children had more than six sites with bleeding at follow-up compared with 58% at baseline. There was a significant decline in the intensity and extension of impacts at follow-up. A significant improvement in the clinical status and oral hygiene was observed for both transitional categories. There was a significant decline in the Child-OIDP scores of those reporting 'much improved'. A significant improvement in the global ratings of oral health was observed at follow-up. In the studied sample, an improvement occurred with respect to the severity of disease, intensity and extension of impacts and global ratings of oral health after 1-month follow-up. These results suggest that improving the global transition in health by enhancing coping and management skills while inducing slight changes in the clinical status and the specific aspects of health compromised by the disease is possible. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Antibiotics for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sethi, Naqash J.; Safi, Sanam; Korang, Steven Kwasi

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of antibiotics for the secondary prevention of c