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Sample records for preventing migraine headaches

  1. Headache impact of chronic and episodic migraine: results from the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Dawn; Manack, Aubrey; Serrano, Daniel; Reed, Michael; Varon, Sepideh; Turkel, Catherine; Lipton, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6) has been demonstrated to be a reliable and valid measure that assesses the impact of headaches on the lives of persons with migraine. Originally used in studies of episodic migraine (EM), HIT-6 is finding increasing applications in chronic migraine (CM) research. (1) To examine the headache-impact on persons with migraine (EM and CM) using HIT-6 in a large population sample; (2) to identify predictors of headache-impact in this sample; (3) to assess the magnitude of effect for significant predictors of headache-impact in this sample. The American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention study is a longitudinal, population-based study that collected data from persons with severe headache from 2004 to 2009 through annual, mailed surveys. Respondents to the 2009 survey who met International Classification of Headache Disorders 2 criteria for migraine reported at least 1 headache in the preceding year, and completed the HIT-6 questionnaire were included in the present analysis. Persons with migraine were categorized as EM (average headache days per month) or CM (average ≥15 headache days per month). Predictors of headache-impact examined include: sociodemographics; headache days per month; a composite migraine symptom severity score (MSS); an average pain severity rating during the most recent long-duration headache; depression; and anxiety. HIT-6 scores were analyzed both as continuous sum scores and using the standard, validated categories: no impact; some impact; substantial impact; and severe impact. Group contrasts were based on descriptive statistics along with linear regression models. Multiple imputation techniques were used to manage missing data. There were 7169 eligible respondents (CM = 373, EM = 6554). HIT-6 scores were normally distributed. After converting sum HIT-6 scores to the standard categories, those with CM were significantly more likely to experience "severe" headache impact (72.9% vs 42.3%) and had higher odds of

  2. Migraine Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain) stop working properly and send the wrong signals. This may affect the nerve system that regulates pain. Whatever the cause, experts do agree that different things trigger (set off) migraines in people who have them. Eating particular foods can bring on a migraine in ...

  3. Sex differences in the prevalence, symptoms, and associated features of migraine, probable migraine and other severe headache: results of the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Dawn C; Loder, Elizabeth W; Gorman, Jennifer A; Stewart, Walter F; Reed, Michael L; Fanning, Kristina M; Serrano, Daniel; Lipton, Richard B

    2013-09-01

    The strikingly higher prevalence of migraine in females compared with males is one of the hallmarks of migraine. A large global body of evidence exists on the sex differences in the prevalence of migraine with female to male ratios ranging from 2:1 to 3:1 and peaking in midlife. Some data are available on sex differences in associated symptoms, headache-related disability and impairment, and healthcare resource utilization in migraine. Few data are available on corresponding sex differences in probable migraine (PM) and other severe headache (ie, nonmigraine-spectrum severe headache). Gaining a clear understanding of sex differences in a range of severe headache disorders may help differentiate the range of headache types. Herein, we compare sexes on prevalence and a range of clinical variables for migraine, PM, and other severe headache in a large sample from the US population. This study analyzed data from the 2004 American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study. Total and demographic-stratified sex-specific, prevalence estimates of headache subtypes (migraine, PM, and other severe headache) are reported. Log-binomial models are used to calculate sex-specific adjusted prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for each across demographic strata. A smoothed sex prevalence ratio (female to male) figure is presented for migraine and PM. One hundred sixty-two thousand seven hundred fifty-six individuals aged 12 and older responded to the 2004 American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study survey (64.9% response rate). Twenty-eight thousand two hundred sixty-one (17.4%) reported "severe headache" in the preceding year (23.5% of females and 10.6% of males), 11.8% met International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 criteria for migraine (17.3% of females and 5.7% of males), 4.6% met criteria for PM (5.3% of females and 3.9% of males), and 1.0% were categorized with other severe headache (0.9% of females and 1.0% of males). Sex differences were observed in

  4. CGRP, a target for preventive therapy in migraine and cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Sabrina; Olesen, Astrid; Ashina, Messoud

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Migraine and cluster headache are challenging to manage, with no tailored preventive medications available. Targeting the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) pathway to treat these headaches may be the first focused therapeutic option to date, with the potential for promising...... efficacy. Methods We systematically searched PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov for randomized controlled trials investigating the preventive potential of monoclonal antibodies against the CGRP pathway in the treatment of migraine and cluster headache. Results The literature search returned a total of 136...... of cluster headache. Conclusion Efficacy of anti-CGRP monoclonal antibodies spells a promising future for the many patients suffering from migraine, and possibly also for the smaller but severely-affected population with cluster headache....

  5. Headaches and Migraines: Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Headaches and Migraines Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of Contents For ... types of headache. Each has distinct symptoms and treatments. Migraine ... and Diagnosis Migraine: The most common of vascular headaches, migraines ...

  6. Cyproheptadine versus propranolol in the prevention of migraine headaches in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asadi, B.; Khorvash, F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: There are conflicting results on the efficacy of propranolol and cyproheptadine in the prevention of migraine headaches in children. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the efficacy of propranolol versus cyproheptadine in the prevention of migraine headaches. Methodology: This was a randomized, double-blind trial. Sixty children aged 8-15 yrs with migraine headaches were randomized to be treated with either propranolol (40-80 mg per day) or cyproheptadine (8-12 mg per day) for 4 weeks. The patients were requested to record the Severity and duration of their headaches during a 2-week period before starting the intervention. The patients were followed at 2-week intervals for a period of 1 month after starting treatment. The headache diary was analyzed for each patient and was compared with baseline using SPSS software and statistical tests including the student's t-test. Results: Out of 60 patients at baseline, nine patients in the cyproheptadine group and six patients in the propranolol group did not appear at the appropriate time for follow-up visits and therefore were excluded from the study. The mean age in the cyproheptadine group was 11.9+-2.23 years and in the propranolol group was 0.7 +- 2.33 years. Based on the diaries, the results Showed that propranolol and cyproheptadine decreased headaches by 54.61% and 70.53% (p < 0.05), respectively, at the end of four weeks of treatment. Conclusion: Overall, the results of our study suggest that cyproheptadine is a good choice for prevention of migraine headache in pediatric group although more prolonged study with higher number of the patient is recommended. (author)

  7. Acute treatment of migraine headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2010-04-01

    Optimum acute treatment of migraine requires prevention of headache as a top priority. Recognition of the multitude of migraine presentations, the frequency of total headache attacks, and number of days of headache disability are critical. Successful treatment requires excellent patient-clinician communication enhancing confidence and mutual trust based on patient needs and preferences. Optimum management of acute migraine nearly always requires pharmacologic treatment for rapid resolution. Migraine-specific triptans, dihydroergotamine, and several antiinflammatories have substantial empirical clinical efficacy. Older nonspecific drugs, particularly butalbital and opioids, contribute to medication overuse headache and are to be avoided. Clinicians should utilize evidence-based acute migraine-specific therapy stressing the imperative acute treatment goal of early intervention, but not too often with the correct drug, formulation, and dose. This therapy needs to provide cost-effective fast results, meaningful to the patient while minimizing the need for additional drugs. Migraine-ACT evaluates 2-hour pain freedom with return to normal function, comfort with treatment, and consistency of response. Employ a thoroughly educated patient, formulary, testimonials, stratification, and rational cotherapy against the race to central sensitization for optimum outcomes. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  8. Effects of Topiramate in the Prevention of Drug Resistant Migraine Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Khani

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction & objective: Migraine is the most common cause of headache. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of topiramate (TPM in the prevention of drug-resistant migraine headache. Materials & Methods: This is a double-blind clinical trial conducted on 70 patients between ages 15 to 45 years referred to the Bu Ali Sina Hospital in Sari with a history of migraine attacks based on International Headache Society criteria for a period of more than one years with a minimum incidence of 1 to 6 attacks per month. The drug rate performance was assessed by response rate to treatment, mean changes in the number and severity of migraine attacks compared with the placebo group for 3 months. Collected data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA, Newman-Keuls and Spearman’s Coefficient Rank Correlation as the post hoc tests. GRAPHPAD software was used for analysis of the data. Results: 66 of 70 patients completed the study. The mean age of the patients was 30.33±7.9 years. A significant reduction in the severity and frequency of migraine attacks was seen in all months (P < 0.0001 for topiramate treated group in compare to placebo group. Responder rate for patients treated with TPM was significantly higher than placebo group (63.6%, P<0.0001 in the 3rd month of the treatment Side effects of treatment were transient and well tolerated. Conclusion: Low dose of TPM showed significant efficacy in prevention of migraine attacks within the first, second, and third month of treatment. Low dose of TPM seems to be a good therapeutic option for the patients with refractory migraine.

  9. Headaches and Migraines: Migraine 101 Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for migraine headaches. Dietary triggers for migraines include: Chocolate Cheese Food additives such as MSG Alcohol A, B, and C A, B, C, and D True/False: Migraines sometimes run in families. True/False: A bad headache is usually a sign of a brain tumor. Answer Key False. In most cases of ...

  10. Randomised controlled trial of food elimination diet based on IgG antibodies for the prevention of migraine like headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamson Joy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research suggests that food intolerance may be a precipitating factor for migraine like headaches. Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of the ELISA (Enzyme Linked Immuno-Sorbent Assay Test and subsequent dietary elimination advice for the prevention of migraine like headaches. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Community based volunteers in the UK. Participants Volunteers who met the inclusion criteria for migraine like headaches and had one or more food intolerance were included in the study. Participants received either a true diet (n = 84 or a sham diet (n = 83 sheet. Participants were advised to remove the intolerant foods from their diet for 12 weeks. Main outcome measures Number of headache days over a 12 week period (item A MIDAS questionnaire. Other measures includes the total MIDAS score and total HIT-6 score. Results The results indicated a small decrease in the number of migraine like headaches over 12 weeks, although this difference was not statistically significant (IRR 1.15 95% CI 0.94 to 1.41, p = 0.18. At the 4 week assessment, use of the ELISA test with subsequent diet elimination advice significantly reduced the number of migraine like headaches (IRR 1.23 95%CI 1.01 to 1.50, p = 0.04. The disability and impact on daily life of migraines were not significantly different between the true and sham diet groups. Conclusions Use of the ELISA test with subsequent diet elimination advice did not reduce the disability or impact on daily life of migraine like headaches or the number of migraine like headaches at 12 weeks but it did significantly reduce the number of migraine like headaches at 4 weeks. Trial registration number ISRCTN: ISRTCN89559672

  11. Temporomandibular disorders and migraine headache

    OpenAIRE

    Demarin, Vida; Bašić Kes, Vanja

    2010-01-01

    Migraine headache and temporomandibular disorders show significant overlap in the area or distribution of pain, the gender prevalence and age distribution. Temporomandibular disorders may cause headaches per se, worsen existent primary headaches, and add to the burden of headache disorders. The patients with combined migraine and tension-type headaches had a higher prevelance of temporomandibular disorders. Evidence supporting a close relationship include the increased masticatory...

  12. Normobaric and hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment and prevention of migraine and cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Michael H; French, Christopher; Schnabel, Alexander; Wasiak, Jason; Kranke, Peter; Weibel, Stephanie

    2015-12-28

    Migraine and cluster headaches are severe and disabling. Migraine affects up to 18% of women, while cluster headaches are much less common (0.2% of the population). A number of acute and prophylactic therapies are available. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is the therapeutic administration of 100% oxygen at environmental pressures greater than one atmosphere, while normobaric oxygen therapy (NBOT) is oxygen administered at one atmosphere. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 3, 2008 under the title 'Normobaric and hyperbaric oxygen for migraine and cluster headache'. To examine the efficacy and safety of normobaric oxygen therapy (NBOT) and hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in the treatment and prevention of migraine and cluster headache. We updated searches of the following databases up to 15 June 2015: CENTRAL (the Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL. For the original review we searched the following databases up to May 2008: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, DORCTIHM, and reference lists from relevant articles. We handsearched relevant journals and contacted researchers to identify trials. Randomised controlled trials comparing HBOT or NBOT with one another, other active therapies, placebo (sham) interventions, or no treatment in participants with migraine or cluster headache. Three review authors independently extracted data and assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. In this update, we included 11 trials with 209 participants. Five trials (103 participants) compared HBOT versus sham therapy for acute migraine, three trials compared NBOT to sham therapy or ergotamine tartrate for cluster headache (145 participants), two trials evaluated HBOT for cluster headache (29 participants), and one trial (56 participants) compared NBOT to sham for a mixed group of headache. The risk of bias varied considerably across these trials but in general trial quality was poor to moderate. One trial may not

  13. Current management: migraine headache.

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    Silberstein, Stephen D

    2017-12-01

    Migraine varies in its frequency, severity, and impact; treatment should consider these variations and the patient's needs and goals. Migraine pharmacologic treatment may be acute (abortive) or preventive (prophylactic), and patients often require both. New medication devices are available or in development, including an intracutaneous, microneedle system of zolmitriptan and sumatriptan, and breath-powered powder sumatriptan intranasal treatment. Lasmiditan, a 5-HT1F receptor agonist, is in development for acute treatment, as are small molecule calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists (Gepants) for acute and preventive treatment. Antibodies to CGRP and its receptor are being developed for migraine prevention. All 4 treatments are effective and have, as of yet, no safety concerns.

  14. Migraine headaches in a nutshell

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to the International Headache Society, a migraine is a headache that lasts for 4–72 hours and presents with at least two of the following symptoms: unilateral localisation, moderate to severe pain intensity, aggravation by movement, and a pulsating feeling. The headache is also usually accompanied by nausea ...

  15. Adding Additional Acute Medications to a Triptan Regimen for Migraine and Observed Changes in Headache-Related Disability: Results From the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Dawn C; Serrano, Daniel; Reed, Michael L; Kori, Shashi H; Cunanan, Cedric M; Adams, Aubrey Manack; Lipton, Richard B

    2015-06-01

    Though triptans are the most widely used acute treatments for migraine, response to treatment is sometimes suboptimal. Triptan therapy is often augmented by the addition of other acute treatments. The benefits of this practice have not been examined in large-scale, real-world observational studies. To assess changes in headache-related disability associated with adding additional acute treatments to a triptan regimen by category of added treatment including: a second triptan, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), opioids or barbiturates. Subjects were participants in the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention study, a longitudinal, US population-based study of individuals with "severe" headache. Respondents who met International Classification of Headache Disorders 3 beta criteria for migraine were on triptan therapy per respondent self-report, used the same triptan, and provided headache-related disability data for at least 2 consecutive years. Subjects were divided based on headache days per month into 3 groups: low-frequency episodic migraine (LFEM, 0-4), moderate-frequency episodic migraine (MFEM, 5-9), and high-frequency episodic migraine/chronic migraine (HFEM/CM, ≥ 10 headache days per month). HFEM and CM were combined into a single group for analyses because of sample size limitations. Patterns of acute treatment for migraine were monitored from one year to the next over the following couplets of years (2005-2006, 2006-2007, 2007-2008, and 2008-2009). The first eligible couplet was analyzed for each respondent. Medication regimens studied included: (1) maintaining current triptan use (consistent group); (2) adding a different triptan; (3) adding an NSAID; or (4) adding a combination analgesic containing opioids or barbiturates. We assessed change in Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) score from the first to the second year of a couplet, contrasting scores of participants with consistent use with those who added an acute treatment to

  16. Migraine headache in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sina, Farzad; Razmeh, Saeed; Habibzadeh, Neda; Zavari, Arefeh; Nabovvati, Mona

    2017-01-01

    Migraine is a neurological disorder that afflicts many people in the world and can cause severe disability during the attacks. The pathophysiology of migraine is complex and not fully understood. It seems that migraine is common in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). However, the association between migraine headache and IIH is still unclear. The present study was conducted to assess the prevalence of migraine headache and associated factors in IIH patients. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 68 patients diagnosed with IIH underwent a medical history interview and a neurological examination. The diagnosis of migraine was based on the four diagnostic criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition. Forty-five patients (63.2%) met the diagnostic criteria of migraine headache. There was no significant difference between patients with and without migraine headache in respect of their age, gender, body mass. This study revealed high prevalence of migraine headache in IIH patients; appropriate treatment can reduce their headache and prevent unnecessary treatments for IIH. PMID:29071043

  17. Preventive Migraine Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article reviews the evidence base for the preventive treatment of migraine. Recent Findings: Evidence-based guidelines for the preventive treatment of migraine have recently been published by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the Canadian Headache Society (CHS), providing valuable guidance for clinicians. Strong evidence exists to support the use of metoprolol, timolol, propranolol, divalproex sodium, sodium valproate, and topiramate for migraine prevention, according to the AAN. Based on best available evidence, adverse event profile, and expert consensus, topiramate, propranolol, nadolol, metoprolol, amitriptyline, gabapentin, candesartan, Petasites (butterbur), riboflavin, coenzyme Q10, and magnesium citrate received a strong recommendation for use from the CHS. Summary: Migraine preventive drug treatments are underutilized in clinical practice. Principles of preventive treatment are important to improve compliance, minimize side effects, and improve patient outcomes. Choice of preventive treatment of migraine should be based on the presence of comorbid and coexistent illness, patient preference, reproductive potential and planning, and best available evidence. PMID:26252585

  18. Chronic rhinitis and its association with headache frequency and disability in persons with migraine: results of the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Vincent T; Fanning, Kristina M; Serrano, Daniel; Buse, Dawn C; Reed, Michael L; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Lipton, Richard B

    2014-04-01

    Rhinitis is a comorbidity of migraine, but its relationship to migraine headache frequency and headache-related disability is unknown. To determine if rhinitis and its subtypes are associated with an increased frequency and associated disability of migraine. The AMPP Study is a longitudinal study of individuals with "severe" headache from the US population. Respondents meeting ICHD-2 criteria for migraine in 2008 were identified and the presence of rhinitis was determined using the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS). Those with rhinitis were subtyped as allergic, non-allergic, mixed and unclassified based on a rhinitis questionnaire. The primary outcome measures were categories of headache-day frequency and headache-related disability as measured by the Migraine Disability Assessment Scale (MIDAS). Logistic regression for ordered categories was used for modeling each outcome separately, adjusted for sociodemographics profile, headache features, headache treatments and comorbidities. The AMPP Study questionnaire was mailed to 17,892 persons and returned by 60.1% of respondents. Among the migraine sample ( N  = 5849), 66.8% had rhinitis with mixed rhinitis as the most common form. The presence of rhinitis of any type was associated with headache frequency after adjusting for sociodemographic variables only (OR 1.33; 95% CI 1.16, 1.53) and in the fully adjusted model (OR 1.25; 95% CI 1.05-1.49). Headache-related disability (MIDAS category) was associated with rhinitis after adjusting for sociodemographic features (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.17-1.46), but lost significance in the fully adjusted model (OR 1.10; 95% CI 0.96-1.26). Mixed rhinitis was associated with an increased headache frequency category in the model adjusted for sociodemographics (OR 1.45; 95% CI 1.24-1.70) and in that adjusted for all covariates (OR 1.28; 95% CI 1.05-1.57). The odds ratio for MIDAS categories were similarly increased in both models for the mixed rhinitis group. The

  19. Sphenoid Sinusitis and Migraine-Type Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Three case histories of children (ages 10, 12, and 14 years with isolated sphenoid sinusitis who presented with acute, subacute, and chronic headache symptoms resembling migraine are reported from the University of Texas-Houston Medical School.

  20. Prevalence of Migraine Headache in Epileptic Patients.

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    Sayena Jabbehdari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders which a physician might come across in his career life. On the other hand, migraine is common disorders in society chronic headache such as migraine in epileptic patients give ride to difficulties in seizure treatment due to altering the sleeping pattern and calmness disarrangement. Therefore, early diagnosis and suitable treatment in epileptic patients is definitely inevitable, and it will help in a more desirable patients' treatment. So we aimed to evaluate the prevalence of migraine in epileptic patients and relation between these two disorders. Number of 150 epileptic patients attended to neurology clinic of Shohadaye Tajrish Hospital and Iranian Epilepsy Association between June 2010 to May 2011 were fulfilled the questionnaire, and the data has been assessed by SPSS software. In this study, we used MS-Q (migraine screening -questionnaire designed for early diagnosis of migraine in the general population. From all patients filling the questionnaire, the prevalence of migraine (with or without aura was as follows: 23 persons had criteria compatible with migraine with aura; 26 patients had migraine without aura. Migraine was more common in these patients: persons with academic degrees, women, patients who were used 2 antiepileptic drugs, and patients with high BMI. In this study, we showed that migraine in epileptic patients is more prevalent than the general population. Thus, early diagnosis and efficient treatment of migraine headache in these patients is mandatory. More studies are needed for evaluation of this issue.

  1. Prophylaxis of migraine headaches with riboflavin: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D F; Saluja, H S

    2017-08-01

    Migraine headache is a relatively common, debilitating condition that costs our healthcare system over 78 billion dollars per year. Riboflavin has been advocated as a safe, effective prophylactic therapy for the prevention of migraines. The purpose of this study was to provide a systematic review of the current role of riboflavin in the prophylaxis of migraine headache. A MEDLINE literature search inclusive of the dates 1966-2016 was performed using the search terms: riboflavin and migraine disorders. Excerpta Medica was searched from 1980 to 2016 using the search terms: riboflavin and migraine. Additionally, Web of Science was searched using the terms riboflavin and migraine inclusive of 1945-2016. Bibliographies of all relevant papers were reviewed for additional citations. We utilized the PRISMA guidelines to select English language, human, clinical trials of riboflavin as a single entity or in combination, review articles, and supporting pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenomic data assessing the efficacy and mechanism of riboflavin therapy in the prophylactic treatment of migraine headache. A total of 11 clinical trials reveal a mixed effect of riboflavin in the prophylaxis of migraine headache. Five clinical trials show a consistent positive therapeutic effect in adults; four clinical trials show a mixed effect in paediatric and adolescent patients, and two clinical trials of combination therapy have not shown benefit. Adverse reactions with riboflavin have generally been mild. Riboflavin is well tolerated, inexpensive and has demonstrated efficacy in the reduction of adult patient's migraine headache frequency. Additional data are needed, however, to resolve questions involving pharmacokinetic issues and pharmacogenomic implications of therapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Migraine headaches in a nutshell

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to severe pain intensity, aggravation by movement, and a pulsating feeling. ... migraine is frequently associated with the so-called medication- .... J Pain Res. 2014;. 185. doi: 10.2147/JPR.S61819. 4. Roceanu A, Antochi F, Bajenaru O. New molecules in migraine treatment. Farmacia. 2015;63(4):475-81. 5. Migraine Phases.

  3. Functioning of Women with Migraine Headaches

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    Dorota Talarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Migraines are one of the most commonly occurring ailments affecting the nervous system. The aim of this research paper was to evaluate the effect migraines have on the everyday functioning of women. Method. The study involved women with diagnosed migraine headaches (IHS-2004 undergoing treatment at a neurological clinic. In order to evaluate the influence of headaches on the everyday functioning of women, a MSQ v.2 questionnaire was used, whereas pain severity was assessed on a linear VAS scale. Results. Among the clinical factors, the most influential was the frequency of headaches. Headache duration was particularly significant for women below the age of 40. Pain severity cited at 8–10 pts on the VAS significantly disrupted and limited everyday functioning. On the emotional function subscale, the most influential factors were age, education, and the frequency of headaches. Conclusions. On account of headache frequency emerging as the most significant influencing factor, it is of the utmost importance to inform patients of the value of taking prophylactic measures. Central to this is the identification of factors that trigger the onset of migraines. This approach would greatly aid the individual in choosing the appropriate treatment, either pharmacological or others.

  4. MIGRAIN AND TENSION TYPE HEADACHE IN CHILDREN: THE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE TREATMENT. PART 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Sergeev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Headache is one of the most common complaints of children and adolescents. The most often causes of cephalgia in children are primary headaches (mainly migraine and tension-type headache. Recently there has been a significant increase in prevalence of primary headaches, which can be due to the changes of children’s way of life. The lack of the strict recommendations on symptomatic and preventive treatment of primary headaches in children in Russia often leads to erroneous indications. Inappropriate treatment can result in migraine and tension-type headache course aggravation with the formation of chronic daily headache, development of medicine-induced headache and other undesirable side-effects. The literature review covers the questions of therapy of the main forms of primary headaches in children: migraines and tension-type headaches. In the first part of the article the issues of diagnostics, algorithm of treatment and non-medicinal methods of treatment of headaches are discussed.

  5. Arterial responses during migraine headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Nielsen, T H; Olesen, J

    1990-01-01

    The superficial temporal artery has been thought to be the main focus of pain during migraine attacks, but its diameter has never been measured directly. The use of a new, high-resolution ultrasound machine to measure arterial size in 25 migraine patients with unilateral head pain showed that the...

  6. Migraine Headache Treated with Famciclovir and Celecoxib: A Case Report

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    NaPier, Bradford Lee; Morimoto, Maki; NaPier, Erin

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has been speculated to play a role in migraine headache pathophysiology. We present the first successful migraine headache treatment with therapy specifically targeting HSV infection. Case Presentation A previously healthy 21-year-old white woman presented with a severe headache and was diagnosed with severe migraine headache disorder. She initially was treated with standard migraine headache medications without symptomatic improvement. She was then given famciclovir and celecoxib. The patient fully recovered within days and continues to enjoy significant reduction in severity and frequency of symptoms. Discussion Famciclovir and celecoxib may work synergistically against HSV. The virus may play a role in the pathophysiology of migraine headaches, and this is the first case report of successful migraine headache treatment with these medications. Further studies are needed to elucidate the efficacy of these medications in treating migraine disorder. PMID:29236660

  7. [Migraine and other primary headaches in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Hugo A

    2007-01-01

    Migraine diagnosis only relies on clinical characteristics of the episodes and therefore on the doctor's skill and experience. It is recognized that migraine inclusively in the pediatric group is underdiagnosed and inadequately treated. The International Headache Society recently reviewed the international headache classification and incorporated some clinical criteria according to the different age groups. Pediatricians and pediatric neurologists now have a new document and should become familiar with it. This paper discusses these new criteria for migraine and other primary headaches.

  8. Carbachol induces headache, but not migraine-like attacks, in patients with migraine without aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, H W; Wienecke, T; Olesen, J

    2009-01-01

    Schytz HW, Wienecke T, Olesen J & Ashina M. Carbachol induces headache, but not migraine-like attacks, in patients with migraine without aura. Cephalalgia 2009. London. ISSN 0333-1024Carbachol induces headache in healthy subjects, but the migraine eliciting effect of carbachol has not previously...... been studied. We hypothesized that the cholinomimetic agonist carbachol would induce headache and migraine-like attacks in migraineurs. Carbachol (3 microg/kg) or placebo was randomly infused into 18 patients with migraine without aura in a double-blind crossover study. Headache was scored on a verbal...

  9. No Laughing Matter: Gelastic Migraine and Other Unusual Headache Syndromes.

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    Mathew, Paul G; Robertson, Carrie E

    2016-05-01

    Primary and secondary headache disorders have established diagnostic criteria in the International Classification of Headache Disorders IIIb, as well as classic findings, which although not part of the formal criteria are often suggestive of a particular diagnosis. At times, headache disorders can involve unusual symptoms that lack an identifiable secondary cause. This review will discuss some of these unusual symptoms, including headache associated auditory and olfactory symptoms, as well as two case reports involving gelastic migraine and migrainous thoracalgia.

  10. The Effect of Migraine Headache on Educational Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Daniel I.; Sabia, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that migraine headaches are common and debilitating, little is known about their effect on educational attainment. Using data drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we estimate the relationship between migraine headache and three outcomes: high school grade point average, the probability of graduating…

  11. Unique Migraine Subtypes, Rare Headache Disorders, and Other Disturbances.

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    Goadsby, Peter J

    2015-08-01

    The medical aphorism that common things happen commonly makes unique (and less common) migraine subtypes especially appropriate to review for the general neurologist. This article also identifies some rare headache disorders and other disturbances, and offers strategies to manage them. This article discusses migraine with brainstem aura, which is troublesome clinically and has had a change in terminology in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, Third Edition, beta version (ICHD-3 beta), and hemiplegic migraine, which is also troublesome in practice. The rare headache disorder hypnic headache and the exploding head syndrome are also discussed. When hypnic headache is recognized, it is eminently treatable, while exploding head syndrome is a benign condition with no reported consequences. Unique migraine subtypes, rare headache disorders, and other disturbances present to neurologists. When recognized, they can often be managed very well, which offers significant benefits to patients and practice satisfaction to neurologists.

  12. Comparison of comorbidities of migraine and tension headache in a pediatric headache clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidlitz-Markus, Tal; Zolden, Shirit; Haimi-Cohen, Yishai; Zeharia, Avraham

    2017-10-01

    Objective To compare comorbidities between migraine and tension headache in patients treated in a tertiary pediatric headache clinic. Methods Files of patients with migraine or tension headache attending a pediatric headache clinic were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of organic comorbidities. Additionally, patients were screened with the self-report Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire to identify nonorganic comorbidities. If necessary, patients were referred to a pediatric psychiatrist, psychologist or social worker for further evaluation. Results The study cohort comprised 401 patients: 200 with migraine and 201 with tension headache. The main organic comorbidities were atopic disease, asthma, and first-reported iron-deficiency anemia; all occurred with statistical significance more often with migraine than with tension headache (Familial Mediterranean fever was six times more frequent in the migraine group than in the tension headache group, but the difference was not statistically significant. Nonorganic comorbidities (psychiatric, social stressors) were associated significantly more often with tension headache than with migraine (48.3% versus 33%; p = 0.03). Conclusions Children and adolescents with migraine or tension headache treated in a dedicated clinic have high rates of organic and nonorganic comorbidities. In this setting, patients with migraine have significantly more organic comorbidities, and patients with tension headache, significantly more nonorganic comorbidities.

  13. Cognitive, Personality, and Family Factors in Patients with Migraine Headache

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Johari-Fard; Farzad Goli; Amirreza Boroumand

    2014-01-01

    Migraine is a disorder that has debilitating pain, and affects all aspects of life, including the academic, social, and family life of patients. In addition, studies show the effects of migraine on patient's relationships with family members such as spouse, children, and other family members. In addition to physical pain, migraines are tied to significant psychological and economic costs. Migraineurs tend to have high levels of depression and anxiety, and migraine headaches have a profoundly ...

  14. Factors contributing to migraine headache surgery failure and success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kelsey; Lee, Michelle; Davis, Janine; Guyuron, Bahman

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that contribute to migraine headache surgery failure and success. A retrospective chart review was conducted of patients who underwent surgery for migraine headaches performed by the senior author (B.G.) and had at least 11 months of follow-up. The study population included three groups: migraine surgery success, improvement, and failure. Thirty-six unique data points were collected for each patient. A total of 169 patients met inclusion criteria. Of these, 66 patients comprised the migraine surgery success group (S, complete elimination of migraine headaches); 67 comprised the migraine surgery improvement group (I, >50 percent reduction in migraine frequency, intensity, or duration); and 36 comprised the migraine surgery failure group (F, I, p=0.02), migraine frequency (SI, p=0.003; S>F, p=0.04), history of head or neck injury (SI, p=0.02), increased intraoperative bleeding (SF, p=0.0006; I>F, p=0.0004), site II (S>F, p=0.015), single operative site (SI, p=0.05; S>F, p=0.04). Factors associated with migraine surgery failure include increased intraoperative bleeding and surgery on fewer trigger sites. Factors associated with migraine surgery success are older age of migraine onset, higher rate of visual symptoms versus improvement group, surgery at site I or II, and deactivating all four operative sites. Risk, III.

  15. Headache Characteristics and Clinical Features of Elderly Migraine Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rijk, Pablo; Resseguier, Noémie; Donnet, Anne

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the headache characteristics and clinical features of elderly migraine patients at a tertiary headache center. We retrospectively reviewed 239 records of migraine patients, over the age of 64 at the first visit, who had migraine as defined by the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition (beta version) from 2006 to 2015 based on the Marseille registry at Timone Hospital. 13.8% (33/239) patients had migraine with aura only, 13.0% (31/239) had both diagnoses. Of the patients who presented with migraine with aura, 13.4% (32/239) presented with aura without headache. Unilateral pain location was reported by 58.6% (140/239) of patients and the throbbing type of pain was present in 50.2% (120/239) of our study group. Photo- and phonophobia were observed in 77.4% (185/239) and 79.5% (190/239) of patients. Seventy-nine out of 239 (30.1%) patients were found to have probable medication overuse. Within this group, 31.65% (25/79) overused triptan and 70.9% (56/79) overused combination analgesics. We found higher frequencies of migraine for patients whose age at onset of migraine was younger than 18 years, and low frequency migraine was reported more frequently in the later onset group (P = .0357). We assess the headache characteristics of elderly migraine patients who were seen at our tertiary headache center and report the high frequency of probable medication overuse headache in this study group. Finally, we suggest that age of onset is an important factor in the clinical profile of these patients. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  16. Sleep disturbances in tension-type headache and migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Fernández-Muñoz, Juan J.; Palacios-Ceña, María; Parás-Bravo, Paula; Cigarán-Méndez, Margarita; Navarro-Pardo, Esperanza

    2017-01-01

    Current research into the pathogenesis of tension-type headache (TTH) and migraine is focused on altered nociceptive pain processing. Among the potential factors that influence sensitization mechanisms, emotional stress, depression, or sleep disorders all have an essential role: they increase the excitability of nociceptive firing and trigger hyperalgesic responses. Sleep disturbances and headache disorders share common brain structures and pathogenic mechanisms and TTH, migraine, and sleep disturbances often occur together; for example, 50% of individuals who have either TTH or migraine have insomnia. Moreover, insomnia and poor sleep quality have been associated with a higher frequency and intensity of headache attacks, supporting the notion that severity and prevalence of sleep problems correlate with headache burden. It should be noted that the association between headaches and sleep problems is bidirectional: headache can promote sleep disturbances, and sleep disturbances can also precede or trigger a headache attack. Therefore, a better understanding of the factors that affect sleep quality in TTH and migraine can assist clinicians in determining better and adequate therapeutic programs. In this review, the role of sleep disturbances in headaches, and the association with depression, emotional stress, and pain sensitivity in individuals with TTH or migraine are discussed. PMID:29399051

  17. The relationship between migraine headache and asthma features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirican, Nigar; Demirci, Seden; Cakir, Munire

    2017-06-01

    Migraine and asthma are comorbid chronic disorders with episodic attacks thought to involve inflammatory and neurological mechanisms. The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationship of asthma features between the asthma patients with migraine and those without migraine headache. A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2015 to June 2016. Physician-diagnosed asthma patients aged 18 years and above were included. Demographic data, pulmonary function test and treatment of asthma were recorded. Asthma control was assessed using the asthma control test (ACT) and asthma control questionnaire (ACQ). The diagnosis of migraine was made by the neurologist with face-to face examinations based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition beta (ICHD-III-beta) criteria. Data about the age at onset, frequency of headache attacks, duration of headache attack, the presence of aura, and severity of headache were recorded. The severity of headache was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS). Overall 121 asthma patients were included in this study. Migraine was found to be present in 32 (26.4%) of patients. No statistically significant difference was found between asthma group and asthma with migraine groups in terms of pulmonary function test parameters. The mean ACT score in asthma with migraine patients group was significantly lower than the asthma groups. Morever, in the group asthma with migraine, a negative significant correlations were found between ACT scores with VAS scores. This study demonstrates that migraine headache may be associated with poor asthma control. On the other hand, it should not be forgotten that ACT is a subjective test and can be affected from by many clinical parameters.

  18. Atypical nummular headache or circumscribed migraine: The utility of pressure algometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barón, Johanna; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ruiz, Marina; Pedraza, María Isabel; Guerrero, Ángel Luis; Madeleine, Pascal; Cuadrado, María Luz; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2015-01-01

    A peripheral mechanism has been proposed for nummular headache; however, there have been descriptions of atypical features resembling migraine. The authors describe a case in which algometry assessment facilitated the discrimination between atypical nummular headache and circumscribed migraine. A 21-year-old woman presented with a history of focal episodic pain in a circumscribed area on the left frontal region. The algometry study showed a unilateral and diffuse decrease of the pain pressure thresholds with frontal predominance, as has been proposed for migraine patients. This result led the authors to introduce a more specific preventive therapy with topiramate, with significant relief. In conclusion, cartographic investigation of pressure pain sensitivity is a simple tool that can help to differentiate between nummular headache and migraine. Further confirmatory investigations are needed. PMID:25647287

  19. Migraine headaches in a nutshell | Schellack | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article aims to provide a concise, high-level overview of the classification, management and treatment of migraine. Migraine is a common, debilitating neurological disorder that is characterised by the presence of severe headaches, which may last anything from a few hours to a few days (4–72 hours). Thus, the ...

  20. Autonomic dysfunction in pediatric patients with headache: migraine versus tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabner, Jonathan; Caruso, Alessandra; Zurakowski, David; Lazdowsky, Lori; LeBel, Alyssa

    2016-12-01

    To examine symptoms indicating central nervous system (CNS) autonomic dysfunction in pediatric patients with migraine and tension-type headache. A retrospective chart review assessed six symptoms (i.e. constipation, insomnia, dizziness, blurry vision, abnormal blood pressure, and cold and clammy palms and soles) indicating central nervous system (CNS) autonomic dysfunction in 231 patients, ages 5-18 years, diagnosed with migraine, tension-type headache (TTH), or Idiopathic Scoliosis (IS). Higher frequencies of "insomnia," "dizziness," and "cold and clammy palms and soles" were found for both migraine and TTH patients compared to the IS control group (P pediatric headache patients is discussed.

  1. Cognitive, Personality, and Family Factors in Patients with Migraine Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Johari-Fard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a disorder that has debilitating pain, and affects all aspects of life, including the academic, social, and family life of patients. In addition, studies show the effects of migraine on patient's relationships with family members such as spouse, children, and other family members. In addition to physical pain, migraines are tied to significant psychological and economic costs. Migraineurs tend to have high levels of depression and anxiety, and migraine headaches have a profoundly negative impact on sufferers’ quality of life. In the present research, we investigated the correlations and regressions of cognitive, personality, and family factors with migraine headache, to find predictor factors of migraine. In this study, the following questionnaires were used: For migraine: six-item Headache Impact Test (HIT-6, and Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire Version 2.1.; for cognitive factors: Irrational Beliefs Test and Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale; for personality factors: NEO Personality Inventory; and for family factors: Family Assessment Device. This project was on 58 women with migraine headaches, diagnosed by neurologist. The findings show that, there is a significant regression between cognitive, personality, and family factors and HIT-6. In cognitive factors, frustration reactivity and anxious overconcern, in personality factors, extraversion trait, and in family factors, affective involvement are significant. Moreover, there is a significant regression between cognitive, personality, and family factors and MSQ. In cognitive factors, frustration reactivity, anxious overconcern, and helplessness, in personality factors, agreeableness and consciousness, and in family factors, affective involvement and general functioning are significant. This project showed that cognitive, personality, and family factors have a correlation with migraine headache.

  2. Risk of placental abruption in relation to migraines and headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananth Cande V

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine, a common chronic-intermittent disorder of idiopathic origin characterized by severe debilitating headaches and autonomic nervous system dysfunction, and placental abruption, the premature separation of the placenta, share many common pathophysiological characteristics. Moreover, endothelial dysfunction, platelet activation, hypercoagulation, and inflammation are common to both disorders. We assessed risk of placental abruption in relation to maternal history of migraine before and during pregnancy in Peruvian women. Methods Cases were 375 women with pregnancies complicated by placental abruption, and controls were 368 women without an abruption. During in-person interviews conducted following delivery, women were asked if they had physician-diagnosed migraine, and they were asked questions that allowed headaches and migraine to be classified according to criteria established by the International Headache Society. Logistic regression procedures were used to calculate odds ratios (aOR and 95% confidence intervals (CI adjusted for confounders. Results Overall, a lifetime history of any headaches or migraine was associated with an increased odds of placental abruption (aOR = 1.60; 95% CI 1.16-2.20. A lifetime history of migraine was associated with a 2.14-fold increased odds of placental abruption (aOR = 2.14; 95% CI 1.22-3.75. The odds of placental abruption was 2.11 (95% CI 1.00-4.45 for migraineurs without aura; and 1.59 (95% 0.70-3.62 for migraineurs with aura. A lifetime history of tension-type headache was also increased with placental abruption (aOR = 1.61; 95% CI 1.01-2.57. Conclusions This study adds placental abruption to a growing list of pregnancy complications associated with maternal headache/migraine disorders. Nevertheless, prospective cohort studies are needed to more rigorously evaluate the extent to which migraines and/or its treatments are associated with the occurrence of placental abruption.

  3. Frequency of Migraine Headaches in Patients With Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Brinder; Whipple, Mary O; Tepper, Stewart J; Mohabbat, Arya B; Stillman, Mark; Vincent, Ann

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of migraine headache in a large cohort of patients with fibromyalgia using a brief migraine headache-screening tool. Several studies report a high prevalence of fibromyalgia among patients with migraine headaches, but there is a dearth of research evaluating the frequency of migraine headaches in patients with fibromyalgia, despite clinical observations suggesting that migraine headaches are common in patients with fibromyalgia. This was a cross-sectional survey study. Patients (N = 3717) with a previous diagnosis of fibromyalgia who were members of the Mayo Clinic Fibromyalgia Registry were contacted by electronic survey and asked to complete a brief demographic and medical history questionnaire and the validated ID-Migraine screener. A total of 1730 patients (46.5%) completed the electronic survey. The majority of participants were white (97.2%), female (92.5%), with a mean age of 56.2 (±13.1) years. Of the respondents, 966 (55.8%) met criteria for migraine headaches. Hypertension (309 [32.3%] vs. 294 [40.1%], P = .004), asthma (312 [32.5%] vs. 189 [25.9%], P = .011), irritable bowel syndrome (520 [54.6%] vs. 348 [47.6], P = .017), chronic fatigue syndrome (486 [50.7%] vs. 271 [37.1], P fibromyalgia. Clinicians who care for either population must be aware that these conditions commonly overlap and can significantly increase a patient's cumulative disease burden. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  4. MIGRAINE AND TENSION-TYPE HEADACHE IN CHILDREN: THE APPROACH TO EFFECTIVE TREATMENT. PART 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Sergeev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric neurologists often have to prescribe drugs off-label in children, according to individual approach to every patient and weighing possible benefits and risk of side-effects. Multidisciplinary approach to migraine and tension-type headache treatment in children, including correction of comorbid psychiatric and somatic disorders, is a critical point in decrease of frequency and severity of headaches and normalization of everyday children’s activity. In the second part of the article the authors discuss the problems of symptomatic (episodic drugs taking in order to arrest a headache attack and preventive (regular prolonged drug taking directed on decrease of frequency and severity of headaches medical treatment of migraine and tension-type headaches in pediatric practice.

  5. Precipitating and relieving factors of migraine versus tension type headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque Badrul

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the differences of precipitating and relieving factors between migraine and tension type headache. Methods This is a cross sectional study. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 250 migraine patients and 250 patients diagnosed as tension type headache from the specialized headache clinic in Dept. of Neurology, Dhaka Medical College Hospital. Data were collected through a predesigned questionnaire containing information on age, sex, social status and a predetermined list of precipitating and relieving factors. Results In this study, the female patients predominated (67%. Most of the patients were within 21–30 years age group (58.6%. About 58% of them belonged to middle class families. The common precipitating factors like stress, anxiety, activity, journey, reading, cold and warm were well distributed among both the migraine and tension type headache (TTH patients. But significant difference was demonstrated for fatigue (p  Conclusion The most frequent precipitating factors for headache appear to be identical for both migraine and TTH patients. Even though some factors like fatigue, sleep deprivation, sunlight and food significantly precipitate migraine and drug, massage are effective maneuver for relieving pain among migrianeurs.

  6. Pediatric mixed headache -The relationship between migraine, tension-type headache and learning disabilities - in a clinic-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genizi, Jacob; Khourieh Matar, Amal; Schertz, Mitchell; Zelnik, Nathanel; Srugo, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Headache is a common complaint among children. The most common primary headache syndromes in childhood are migraine and TTH. However many times they seem to overlap. The purpose of our study was to assess the relationship between pediatric migraine, tension-type headache (TTH) and learning disabilities. Children presenting with headache to three pediatric neurology clinics in the last 5 years were assessed. Two hundred sixty-two children, 5-18 years of age, who met the criteria for migraine were included. Of 262 children (54 % female) who had migraine, 26.2 % had migraine with aura. 59 children (22.5 % of the full sample) reported also having headaches that met the criteria for episodic TTH/mixed headaches. Females were more than 2.8 times more likely to experience mixed headaches than males (OR: 2.81, 95 % CI: 1.43-5.54; p 0.20). Children who had migraine with aura were less likely to have mixed headaches than children who did not have aura (OR: 0.26, 95 % CI: 0.11-0.63; p headaches were 2.7 times more likely to have a learning disability than children with migraine alone. Episodic TTH and migraine without aura (mixed headaches) in children might be part of a continuum, which can explain the high incidence of their co-occurrence as opposed to migraine with aura. Children with mixed headaches have a higher incidence of learning disability compare to those with migraine alone.

  7. Longitudinal change in migraine headache-days and indirect cost consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Walter F; Wood, G Craig; Bruce, Christa; Buse, Dawn C; Runken, M Chris; Lipton, Richard B

    2011-05-01

    To determine whether change in headache-days over 1-year is associated with change in lost productive time (LPT) among a population sample of migraineurs. Data are from migraine sufferers who participated in at least two consecutive annual American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention surveys between 2005 and 2008. LPT was estimated using two questions from the validated Migraine Disability Assessment survey about missed workdays and number of days at work. The reduction in LPT (ie, missed workdays + reduced productive time) from 1 year to the next had a nonlinear relationship with reduction in headache-days. The relationship was directly linear, however, when change in employment status was considered in the regression model. A reduction in headache days over time translates into a linear reduction in LPT, including an increased likelihood of employment.

  8. Preventive treatment in migraine and the new US guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estemalik E

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available E Estemalik, S TepperCleveland Clinic, Neurological Center for Pain, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Migraine headaches are among the most common headache disorders seen in various practices. The prevalence of migraine headaches is 18% in women and 6% in men. While millions of Americans suffer from migraine headaches, roughly 3%–13% of identified migraine patients are on preventive therapy, while an estimated 38% actually need a preventive agent. The challenge among physicians is not only when to start a daily preventive agent but which preventive agent to choose. Circumstances warranting prevention have been described in the past, and in 2012, a new set of guidelines with an evidence review on preventive medications was published. A second set of guidelines provided evidence on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, herbs, minerals, and vitamins for prevention of episodic migraine. This article describes the updated US guidelines for the prevention of migraines and also outlines the major studies from which these guidelines were derived.Keywords: US guidelines, Canadian guidelines, classification, preventive medication

  9. Galeata: chronic migraine independently considered in a medieval headache classification

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero-Peral, Ángel Luís; de Frutos González, Virginia; Pedraza-Hueso, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic migraine is a quite recent concept. However, there are descriptions suggestive of episodic migraine since the beginning of scientific medicine. We aim to review main headache classifications during Classical antiquity and compared them with that proposed in the 11th century by Constantine the African in his Liber Pantegni, one of the most influential texts in medieval medicine. Method We have carried out a descriptive review of Henricum Petrum's Latin edition, year 1539. Re...

  10. Migraine Variants or Episodic Syndromes That May Be Associated With Migraine and Other Unusual Pediatric Headache Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothner, A David; Parikh, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    To provide an overview of the clinical course for children and adolescents with migraine variants (M.V.), childhood periodic syndromes or the episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine using the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd Edition Beta version [ICHD-3] International Headache Society criteria for the diagnosis of each disorder. Migraine is a complex set of neurological symptoms. This review encompasses the subtypes of M.V. or episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine within the children and adolescent population. The episodic syndromes that may be associated with migraine or migraine variant is multilayered neurological disorder in young children and adolescents. Within the these generally pediatric syndromes there are associated disorders described in this review, to provide a clinical overview and including the less common forms of migraine, such as acute confusional migraine, trauma-triggered migraine, and transient global amnesia. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  11. Psychosocial factors associated with migraine and tension-type headache in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Elena R; Kobzeva, Natalia R; Gilev, Denis V; Kislyak, Nadezhda V; Olesen, Jes

    2017-11-01

    Background In our previous study of workers, blood donors and medical students, students stood out with a higher 1-year prevalence of migraine (28%) and tension-type headache (TTH) (74%). General factors associated with headache were common for all groups except low physical activity. The hypothesis of this study was therefore that a number of psychosocial factors relating to the personal sphere would better explain the high prevalence of migraine and TTH in students. Methods The study population consisted of 1042 students (719 females, 323 males, mean age 20.6, range 17-40). Headache diagnoses and associated factors were identified by direct professional semi-structured interview. We also interviewed about the following psychosocial factors: dissatisfaction with study, dissatisfaction with family life, dissatisfaction for personal reasons, bad financial situation, overwork, stress, not enough sleep, insomnia, depressed mood, anxiety, irritability, tendency towards conflicts and not being married. We report psychosocial factors associated with headache according to diagnosis and sex using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results Several factors were significantly associated with migraine and TTH in the univariate analysis. In the multivariate analysis, two psychosocial factors were statistically significantly associated with migraine in all students: irritability (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4-3.6) and overwork (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4-3.5). Insomnia (2.7, 95% CI 1.1-6.9) and depressed mood (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.2) were associated with migraine only in females. Two psychosocial factors were associated with TTH: dissatisfaction with study in males (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.0-3.8) and depressed mood in females (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.0-3.5). Conclusion Psychosocial factors from the personal sphere showed significant association with migraine and TTH in students. Such factors should therefore be major targets for preventive efforts to reduce the prevalence of primary

  12. Efficacy of Levothyroxine in Migraine Headaches in Children with Subclinical Hypothyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    MIROULIAEI, Mehrdad; FALLAH, Razieh; BASHARDOOST, Nasrollah; PARTOVEE, Mina; ORDOOEI, Mahtab

    2012-01-01

    How to Cite this article: Mirouliaie M, Fallah R, Partovee M, Ordooei M. Efficacy of Levothyroxine in Migraine Headaches in Children with Subclinical Hypothyroidism. Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012;6(4):23-26. AbstractObjectiveHypothyroidism may be an exacerbating factor for  primary headaches and migraine is one of the most common primary headaches in childhood. Thepurpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism on children with migraine headache.M...

  13. Psychological Factors Associated with Chronic Migraine and Severe Migraine-Related Disability: an Observational Study in a Tertiary Headache Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Elizabeth K.; Buse, Dawn C.; Klepper, Jaclyn E.; Mayson, Sarah Jo; Grinberg, Amy S.; Grosberg, Brian M.; Pavlovic, Jelena M.; Robbins, Matthew S.; Vollbracht, Sarah E.; Lipton, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate relationships among modifiable psychological factors and chronic migraine and severe migraine-related disability in a clinic-based sample of persons with migraine. Background Evidence evaluating relationships between modifiable psychological factors and chronic migraine and severe migraine-related disability is lacking in people with migraine presenting for routine clinical care. Methods Adults with migraine completed surveys during routinely scheduled visits to a tertiary headache center. Participants completed surveys assessing chronic migraine (meeting criteria for migraine with ≥15 headache days in the past month), severe migraine disability (Migraine Disability Assessment Scale score ≥ 21), and modifiable psychological factors [depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), anxious symptoms (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), Pain Catastrophizing Scale and Headache Specific Locus of Control]. Logistic regression evaluated relationships between modifiable psychological factors and chronic migraine and severe migraine disability. Results Among 90 eligible participants the mean age was 45.0 (SD = 12.4); 84.8% were women. One-third (36.0%) met study criteria for chronic migraine; half of participants (51.5%) reported severe migraine-related disability. Higher depressive symptoms (OR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1,11, 3.55) and chance HSLC (OR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.13, 1.43) were associated with chronic migraine. Higher depressive symptoms (OR = 3.54, 95%CI = 1.49, 8.41), anxiety symptoms (OR = 3.65, 95% CI = 1.65, 8.06), and pain catastrophizing (OR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.14, 3.35), were associated with severe migraine-related disability. Conclusions Psychiatric symptoms and pain catastrophizing were strongly associated with severe migraine-related disability. Depression and chance locus of control were associated with chronic migraine. This study supports the need for longitudinal observational studies to evaluate relationships among naturalistic

  14. Management of Pediatric Migraine Headache in the Emergency Room and Infusion Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbouche, Marielle

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a common disorder that starts at an early age and takes a variable pattern from intermittent to chronic headache with several exacerbations throughout a lifetime. Children and adolescents are significantly affected. If an acute headache is not aborted by outpatient migraine therapy, it often causes severe disability, preventing the child from attending school and social events. Treating the acute severe headache aggressively helps prevent prolonged disability as well as possible chronification. Multiple medications are available, mostly for the outpatient management of an attack and include the use of over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications as well as prescribed medications in the triptan group. These therapies do sometime fail and the exacerbation can last from days to weeks. If the headache lasts 72 hours or longer it will fall in the category of status migrainosus. Status migrainosus is described as a severe disabling headache lasting 72 hours or more by the ICHD3 criteria. Disability is a major issue in children and adolescents and aggressive acute measures are to be taken to control it as soon as possible. Early aggressive intravenous therapy can be very effective in breaking the attack and allowing the child to be quickly back to normal functioning. This article reviews what is available for the treatment of pediatric primary headaches in the emergency room. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  15. Migraine and tension-type headache triggers in a Greek population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilios Constantinides

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Migraine and tension type headache are the two most common primary headaches. The purpose of this study was to detect differences in clinical characteristics and headache triggers and in a Greek cohort of 51 migraineurs and 12 patients with tension-type headache. (TTH Migraine patients had a significantly lower age at headache onset and frequency, higher mean visual analogue scale (VAS and greater maximum duration of headache episodes compared to TTH patients. They did not differ from (TTH patients in quality of headache, laterality of pain, way of headache installation and progression and temporal pattern of headaches. Nausea, vomiting and phonophobia were more frequent in migraine. Triggering of headaches by dietary factors was associated with migraine, whereas there was no difference between the two groups in any of the other headache triggers. Stress, both physical and psychological, were particularly common in both patient groups.

  16. Migraine headaches and mood/anxiety disorders in the ELSA Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Alessandra C; Santos, Itamar S; Brunoni, André R; Nunes, Maria Angélica; Passos, Valéria M; Griep, Rosane H; Lotufo, Paulo A; Benseñor, Isabela M

    2014-09-01

    To describe the relationship between mood/anxiety disorders and migraine headaches emphasizing the frequency of episodes based in a cross-sectional analysis in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health. It has been suggested that frequency of migraine headaches can be directly associated with the presence of psychiatric disorders. Migraine headaches (International Headache Society criteria) was classified as migraine and 10,531 without migraine headaches (reference). Our main result was an increase in the strength of association between migraine and MDD as frequency of migraine increased for all sample: odds ratio of 2.14 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.33-3.43) for migraine/month to 6.94 (95% CI 4.20-11.49) for daily headaches for all sample. Significant associations with migraine were also found for GAD, OCD, MADD, and CMD for total sample: MDD, GAD, OCD, MADD, and CMD for women, and MADD and CMD for men. Among men with daily migraine complaint, we found a significant association between migraine and OCD after correction for multiple comparisons (odds ratio 29.86 [95% CI 4.66-191.43]). Analyzing probable and definite migraine cases together, we replicated the findings in a lower magnitude. The increase in migraine frequency was associated with progressively higher frequencies of having mood/anxiety disorders in all samples suggesting for some psychiatric disorders a likely dose-response effect especially for women. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  17. Medication overuse headache and chronic migraine in a specialized headache centre: field-testing proposed new appendix criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeeberg, P; Olesen, Jes; Jensen, R

    2009-01-01

    The classification subcommittee of the International Headache Society (IHS) has recently suggested revised criteria for medication overuse headache (MOH) and chronic migraine (CM). We field tested these revised criteria by applying them to the headache population at the Danish Headache Centre...... and the possibility of a renewed effect of prophylactic drugs due to medication withdrawal. We therefore recommend the implementation of the appendix criteria for both MOH and CM into the main body of the International Classification of Headache Disorders....... and compared the results with those using the current criteria. For CM we also tested two alternative criteria, one requiring > or = 4 migraine days/month and > or = 15 headache days/month, the second requiring > or = 15 headache days/month and > or = 50% migraine days. We included 969 patients with migraine...

  18. Aggressiveness and characteristics of object-relations in students at risk of migrainous headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Škrila

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research, carried out in a sample of Slovene students, was to determine how subjects with migraine differ from subjects with migrainous disorder, subjects with non-migrainous headaches and subjects without recurrent headaches. The existence of migraine was assessed by UCSD migraine questionnaire, aggressiveness by Buss-Durkee hostility inventory and characteristics of object-relations by Bell object relations and reality testing inventory - form O. Subjects with migraine express significantly more negativism, indirect aggressiveness, irritability, hostility, suspicion and feelings of guilt than subject without recurrent headaches, while there are no differences in physical and verbal aggressiveness. There are less significant differences among subjects with different types of headache (migraine, migrainous disorder, non-migrainous headaches. Subjects with migraine and subjects without recurrent headaches differ significantly in characteristics of object-relations, subjects with migraine having more disturbed object-relations. Subject with different types of headaches do not differ in characteristics of object-relations. It is concluded that subjects with migraine have a raised level of aggressiveness, especially of indirect forms, which can indicate non-neutralized aggressiveness, and their object-relations are more disturbed.

  19. Potential Beneficial Effects of Probiotics on Human Migraine Headache: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yu-Jie; Wang, Hai-Yan; Wang, Xi-Jian; Kaye, Alan D; Sun, Yong-Hai

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that migraine headache is often associated with concomitant gastrointestinal diseases. There is a higher prevalence of headaches in patients with gastrointestinal disorders. These associations between migraine and gastrointestinal disorders suggest a potential link to a bidirectional modulation of gut microbiota and brain function. The underlying working mechanistic links between migraine and gastrointestinal diseases may include increased intestinal epithelial permeability and inflammation. This review presents an overview of the relationship between gut microbiota and brain function, especially with regard to migraine headache. Literature review. Anesthesia and Operation Center, Department of Anesthesiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital. The present investigation included a PubMed search using the following terms: migraine headache, gut microbiota, brain function, and probiotics. In this literature review, we mainly discussed the relationship between gut microbiota and brain function, especially with regard to migraine headache. The potential effects of probiotics supplement on migraine headache were also included. There is limited evidence from clinical studies of the positive effects of probiotics in patients with migraine headache. Large-scale randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials are warranted to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of probiotics in patients with migraine headache. Similar to migraine headache, disorders of the brain involving depression and anxiety have been demonstrated to be associated with increased gut permeability. An improvement in gut microbiota and reduction of inflammation can have positive effects on strengthening gut and brain function. Moreover, it can be inferred that probiotics may have a beneficial effect on the frequency and severity of migraine headache attacks. Large-scale randomized, placebo-controlled studies are warranted in the future to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety

  20. [Consensus paper of the German Migraine and Headache Society on the structure of headache care facilities in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziniak, M; Malzacher, V; Förderreuther, S; Jürgens, T; Kropp, P; May, A; Straube, A

    2014-04-01

    This consensus paper introduces a classification of headache care facilities on behalf of the German Migraine and Headache Society. This classification is based on the recommendations of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) and the European Headache Federation (EHF) and was adapted to reflect the specific situation of headache care in Germany. It defines three levels of headache care: headache practitioner (level 1), headache outpatient clinic (level 2) and headache centers (level 3). The objective of the publication is to define and establish reliable criteria in the field of headache care in Germany.

  1. Non-headache symptoms in migraine patients [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Kun Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is one of the most common neurological disorders. In addition to severe headaches, non-headache symptoms associated with migraine attacks as well as co-morbid disorders frequently aggravate the disabling of migraine patients. Some of these symptoms are related to poor outcomes. In this review, we update the advances of studies on certain non-headache symptoms, including visual disturbance, gastrointestinal symptoms, allodynia, vestibular symptoms, and symptoms of co-morbid restless legs syndrome and psychiatric disorders.

  2. Spinal Cord Injury and Migraine Headache: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Freda M; Cragg, Jacquelyn J; Weisskopf, Marc G; Kramer, John K

    2015-01-01

    Migraine headaches are a common neurological condition, negatively impacting health and quality of life. The association between migraines and spinal cord injury (SCI) is intriguing to consider from the perspective that migraine headaches may be acquired in response to damage in the spinal cord [corrected].The primary objective of this study was to further examine the association between SCI and migraine headache, controlling for potential confounding variables. A secondary objective was to determine the impact of migraine headaches on self-perceived health. Data from a sample of 61,047 participants were obtained from the cross-sectional Canadian Community Health Survey. Multivariable logistic regression was used to explore the association between SCI and migraine headache using probability weights and adjusting for confounders. The multivariable age- and sex-adjusted model revealed a strong association between SCI and migraine headache, with an adjusted odds ratio for migraine of 4.82 (95% confidence interval [3.02, 7.67]) among those with SCI compared to those without SCI. Further, individuals who experienced both SCI and migraine tended to report poorer perceived general health compared with the other groups (i.e., SCI and no migraine). In conclusion, this study established a strong association between SCI and migraine headache. Further research is needed to explore the possible mechanisms underlying this relationship. Improvements in clinical practice to minimize this issue could result in significant improvements in quality of life.

  3. Spinal Cord Injury and Migraine Headache: A Population-Based Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freda M Warner

    Full Text Available Migraine headaches are a common neurological condition, negatively impacting health and quality of life. The association between migraines and spinal cord injury (SCI is intriguing to consider from the perspective that migraine headaches may be acquired in response to damage in the spinal cord [corrected].The primary objective of this study was to further examine the association between SCI and migraine headache, controlling for potential confounding variables. A secondary objective was to determine the impact of migraine headaches on self-perceived health. Data from a sample of 61,047 participants were obtained from the cross-sectional Canadian Community Health Survey. Multivariable logistic regression was used to explore the association between SCI and migraine headache using probability weights and adjusting for confounders. The multivariable age- and sex-adjusted model revealed a strong association between SCI and migraine headache, with an adjusted odds ratio for migraine of 4.82 (95% confidence interval [3.02, 7.67] among those with SCI compared to those without SCI. Further, individuals who experienced both SCI and migraine tended to report poorer perceived general health compared with the other groups (i.e., SCI and no migraine. In conclusion, this study established a strong association between SCI and migraine headache. Further research is needed to explore the possible mechanisms underlying this relationship. Improvements in clinical practice to minimize this issue could result in significant improvements in quality of life.

  4. Relationship between air mass type and emergency department visits for migraine headache across the Triangle region of North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elcik, Christopher; Fuhrmann, Christopher M.; Mercer, Andrew E.; Davis, Robert E.

    2017-12-01

    An estimated 240 million people worldwide suffer from migraines. Because migraines are often debilitating, understanding the mechanisms that trigger them is crucial for effective prevention and treatment. Synoptic air mass types and emergency department (ED) visits for migraine headaches were examined over a 7-year period within a major metropolitan area of North Carolina to identify potential relationships between large-scale meteorological conditions and the incidence of migraine headaches. Barometric pressure changes associated with transitional air masses, or changing weather patterns, were also analyzed for potential relationships. Bootstrapping analysis revealed that tropical air masses (moist and dry) resulted in the greatest number of migraine ED visits over the study period, whereas polar air masses led to fewer. Moist polar air masses in particular were found to correspond with the fewest number of migraine ED visits. On transitional air mass days, the number of migraine ED visits fell between those of tropical air mass days and polar air mass days. Transitional days characterized by pressure increases exhibited a greater number of migraine ED visits than days characterized by pressure decreases. However, no relationship was found between migraine ED visits and the magnitude of barometric pressure changes associated with transitional air masses.

  5. Migraine headache is present in the aura phase: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jakob M; Lipton, Richard B; Dodick, David W; Silberstein, Stephen D; Saper, Joel R; Aurora, Sheena K; Goadsby, Peter J; Charles, Andrew

    2012-11-13

    Migraine aura is commonly considered to be a distinct phase of a migraine attack that precedes headache. The objective of the study was to examine a large number of prospectively recorded attacks of migraine with aura and determine the timing of headache and other migraine symptoms relative to aura. As part of a clinical trial we collected prospective data on the time course of headache and other symptoms relative to the aura. Patients (n = 267) were enrolled from 16 centers, and asked to keep a headache diary for 1 month (phase I). They were asked to record headache symptoms as soon as possible after aura began and always within 1 hour of aura onset. A total of 456 attacks were reported during phase I by 201 patients. These patients were then randomized and included in phase II, during which a total of 405 attacks were reported in 164 patients. In total, we present data from 861 attacks of migraine with aura from 201 patients. During the aura phase, the majority of attacks (73%) were associated with headache. Other migraine symptoms were also frequently reported during the aura: nausea (51%), photophobia (88%), and photophobia (73%). During the first 15 minutes within the onset of aura, 54% of patients reported headache fulfilling the criteria for migraine. Our results indicate that headaches as well as associated migraine symptoms are present early, during the aura phase of the migraine attack in the majority of patients.

  6. An investigation of the manifest dream content associated with migraine headaches: a study of the dreams that precede nocturnal migraines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather-Greener, G Q; Comstock, D; Joyce, R

    1996-01-01

    Clinical observations of a relationship between unpleasant dreams and migraine headaches have been reported previously. Due to the anecdotal quality of these case reports, this study empirically investigated the significance of this relationship. Dream content categories were selected corresponding to emotional factors associated with stress that trigger migraine headaches. A total of 37 migraineurs recorded 10 dreams each, 5 that preceded migraines and 5 that did not. Univariate F tests revealed that 4 of the 5 variables contributed significantly to the overall effect, specifically anger, misfortune, apprehension, and aggressive interactions. Recommendations include discussing the predictive value of dreams with regard to nocturnal migraine attacks, and therapeutic implications are suggested.

  7. In-Depth Review of Symptoms, Triggers, and Treatment of Occipital Migraine Headaches (Site IV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascha, Mona; Kurlander, David E; Sattar, Abdus; Gatherwright, James; Guyuron, Bahman

    2017-06-01

    This study reports the surgical technique and efficacy of deactivation of occipital-triggered migraine headaches. In addition, it reports the effect of surgical deactivation of occipital-triggered migraine headaches on migraine triggers and associated symptoms other than pain. One hundred ninety-five patients undergoing surgery for occipital-triggered migraine headaches performed by a single surgeon, and followed for at least 1 year, were analyzed. Median regression adjusted for age, sex, and follow-up time was used to determine postoperative reduction in occipital-specific Migraine Headache Index, which is the product of migraine duration, frequency, and severity. Reduction in migraine-days was also measured. The association between symptom or trigger resolution and occipital-specific Migraine Headache Index reduction was studied by logistic regression. Details of surgical treatment are discussed and complication rates reported. Eighty-two percent of patients (n = 160) reported successful surgery at least 12 months postoperatively (mean follow-up, 3.67 years). Eighty-six percent (n = 168) had successful surgery as measured by migraine-days. Fifty-two percent reported complete occipital-triggered migraine headaches elimination. Symptoms resolving with successful surgery beyond headache include being bothered by light and noise, feeling lightheaded, difficulty concentrating, vomiting, blurred/double vision, diarrhea, visual aura, numbness and tingling, speech difficulty, and limb weakness (p noise; fatigue; certain smells; stress; certain foods; coughing, straining, and bending over; letdown after stress; and weather change (p < 0.05). Surgical deactivation of occipital-triggered migraine headaches provides long-lasting migraine relief. Successful site IV surgery is associated with changes in specific symptoms and triggers. This can assist in trigger avoidance and aid occipital-triggered migraine headache trigger-site identification. Therapeutic, IV.

  8. May headache triggered by odors be regarded as a differentiating factor between migraine and other primary headaches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Néto, Raimundo Pereira; Rodrigues, Ânderson Batista; Cavalcante, Dandara Coelho; Ferreira, Pedro Henrique Piauilino Benvindo; Nasi, Ema Pereira; Sousa, Kamila Maria de Holanda; Peres, Mário Fernando Pietro; Valença, Marcelo Moraes

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this article is to characterize olfactory stimulation as a trigger of headaches attacks and differentiation between migraine and other primary headaches. Participants and methods The study was prospective and experimental, with comparison of groups. A total of 158 volunteers (73 men and 85 women) were diagnosed with primary headaches, according to the criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, Third Edition (beta version) (ICHD-3β). The study was conducted by two examiners; one of them was assigned to diagnose the presence and type of primary headache, while the other was responsible for exposing the volunteers to odor and recording the effects of this exposure. Results Of the 158 volunteers with headache, there were 72 (45.6%) cases of migraine and 86 (54.4%) with other primary headaches. In both groups, there were differences in headache characteristics (χ 2  = 4.132; p = 0.046). Headache attacks (25/72; 34.7%) and nausea (5/72; 6.9%) were triggered by odor only in patients with migraine, corresponding to 19.0% (30/158) of the sample, but in none with other primary headaches (χ 2  = 43.78; p Headache occurred more often associated with nausea ( p = 0.146) and bilateral location ( p = 0.002) in migraineurs who had headache triggered by odor. Headache was triggered after 118 ± 24.6 min and nausea after 72.8 ± 84.7 min of exposure to odor. Conclusions The odor triggered headache attacks or nausea only in migraineurs. Therefore, headache triggered by odors may be considered a factor of differentiation between migraine and other primary headaches and this trigger seems very specific of migraine.

  9. Association of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms with migraine and headache after a natural disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcaya, Mariana C; Lowe, Sarah R; Asad, Asad L; Subramanian, S V; Waters, Mary C; Rhodes, Jean

    2017-05-01

    Previous research shows that migraine and general headache symptoms increase after traumatic events. Questions remain about whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) produces migraine/headache symptoms, or if individuals afflicted by migraine/headache are especially likely to develop PTSD. We test whether PTSD symptoms following a natural disaster are associated with higher odds of reporting frequent headaches/migraines postdisaster. We decompose PTSD into intrusion, avoidance, and hyperarousal symptom clusters to examine which, if any, are uniquely related to headache/migraine postdisaster. We use prospectively collected pre- and postdisaster data to explore whether overall PTSD symptoms and symptom clusters are associated with migraine/headache in a sample of Hurricane Katrina survivors. We account for severity of hurricane exposure and control for baseline migraine and headache problems to reduce the probability that heightened PTSD susceptibility among those who already suffered from the conditions could explain observed associations. PTSD symptoms were associated with higher odds of experiencing frequent headaches or migraines with a standard deviation change in PTSD score corresponding to over twice the odds (95% confidence interval [1.64, 2.68]) of having trouble with frequent headaches or migraines in the post-Katrina period. Each additional point on the intrusion subscale (sample M [SD] = 1.6 [1.1]) was associated with 55% higher odds of reporting frequent headache/migraine (95% confidence interval [1.03, 2.33]), but we found no association with avoidance or hyperarousal symptoms. Clinicians and disaster planners should be aware that disaster survivors might be at heightened risk of migraine/headache episodes, and those experiencing intrusive reminders may be most affected. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Psychological Factors Associated With Chronic Migraine and Severe Migraine-Related Disability: An Observational Study in a Tertiary Headache Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Elizabeth K; Buse, Dawn C; Klepper, Jaclyn E; J Mayson, Sarah; Grinberg, Amy S; Grosberg, Brian M; Pavlovic, Jelena M; Robbins, Matthew S; Vollbracht, Sarah E; Lipton, Richard B

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the relationships among modifiable psychological factors and chronic migraine and severe migraine-related disability in a clinic-based sample of persons with migraine. Evidence evaluating relationships between modifiable psychological factors and chronic migraine and severe migraine-related disability is lacking in people with migraine presenting for routine clinical care. Adults with migraine completed surveys during routinely scheduled visits to a tertiary headache center. Participants completed surveys assessing chronic migraine (meeting criteria for migraine with ≥15 headache days in the past month), severe migraine disability (Migraine Disability Assessment Scale score ≥ 21), and modifiable psychological factors (depressive symptoms [Patient Health Questionnaire-9], anxious symptoms [Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7], Pain Catastrophizing Scale and Headache Specific Locus of Control). Logistic regression evaluated relationships between modifiable psychological factors and chronic migraine and severe migraine disability. Among 90 eligible participants the mean age was 45.0 (SD = 12.4); 84.8% were women. One-third (36.0%) met study criteria for chronic migraine; half of participants (51.5%) reported severe migraine-related disability. Higher depressive symptoms (OR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.11, 3.55) and chance HSLC (OR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.13, 1.43) were associated with chronic migraine. Higher depressive symptoms (OR = 3.54, 95%CI = 1.49, 8.41), anxiety symptoms (OR = 3.65, 95% CI = 1.65, 8.06), and pain catastrophizing (OR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.14, 3.35), were associated with severe migraine-related disability. Psychiatric symptoms and pain catastrophizing were strongly associated with severe migraine-related disability. Depression and chance locus of control were associated with chronic migraine. This study supports the need for longitudinal observational studies to evaluate the relationships among

  11. Quasi-experimental Effectiveness of Cognitive-behavioral Therapy on Reliving Migraine Headaches in Migraine Sufferers

    Science.gov (United States)

    EBRAHIMI MOGHADAM, Hosein; KARIMI, Ahoo; SEIFI, Kimia

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy on relieving migraine headaches in migraine sufferers. Materials & Methods In this quasi-experimental study with pre-test and post-test method, the samples were outpatients of public hospitals in Ilam City, southwestern Iran since May-Jul 2010. They were selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, and divided into experimental and control groups. The data were analyzed using SPSS ver. 16 and via multivariate covariance method. Results Cognitive-behavioral therapy affected on reducing the duration of symptoms of migraine in sufferers (P<0.05). Conclusion Cognitive behavioral therapy effects on reducing the time duration of symptoms of migraine headaches. Thistherapeutic method increases the level of individual, familial, social and occupational activities by reducing the time duration of symptoms and this method helps the individuals to resume their activities and regain their previous control instead of founding themselves incapable and helpless due to the pain they suffer from. PMID:29201122

  12. Nitric oxide is a key molecule in migraine and other vascular headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J; Thomsen, L L; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    1994-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) may play a key role in migraine and other vascular headaches since glyceryl trinitrate (a donor of NO) and histamine (which probably activates endothelial NO formation) both cause a pulsating dose-dependent headache with several migrainous characteristics. At relatively high doses...

  13. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy plus Amitriptyline for Children and Adolescents with Chronic Migraine Reduces Headache Days to ≤4 Per Month.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, John W; Hershey, Andrew D; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita M; LeCates, Susan L; Allen, Janelle R; Slater, Shalonda K; Zafar, Marium; Kabbouche, Marielle A; O'Brien, Hope L; Shenk, Chad E; Rausch, Joseph R; Kroon Van Diest, Ashley M; Powers, Scott W

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this secondary analysis of results from a previously published trial (Clinical Trials Registration Number: NCT00389038) in chronic migraine in children and adolescents was to examine if participants who received cognitive behavioral therapy and amitriptyline reached a greater level of reduction in headache frequency that no longer indicated a recommendation for preventive treatment as compared to those who received headache education and amitriptyline. Chronic migraine negatively affects children's home, school, and social activities. Preventive medication therapy is suggested for 5 or more headaches per month. Reduction to one headache day per week or less may suggest that preventive treatment is no longer indicated and provide a clinically relevant outcome for treatment efficacy and patient care. Randomized study participants (N = 135) kept a daily record of their headache frequency during 20 weeks of treatment and during a 1 year follow-up period. Baseline headache frequency was determined at the end of a 28 day screening period. Post treatment frequency was determined at 20 weeks (N = 128 completed) and post treatment follow-up was measured 12 months later (N = 124 completed). A chi-square test of independence was conducted by treatment group and by time point to determine group differences in the proportion of headache days experienced. At 20 weeks (post treatment), 47% of the cognitive behavioral therapy plus amitriptyline group had ≤4 headache days per month compared to 20% of the headache education plus amitriptyline group, (P = .0011), and 32% of the cognitive behavioral therapy plus amitriptyline group had ≤3 headache days per month at 20 weeks compared to 16% of the headache education plus amitriptyline group, (P = .0304). At the month 12 follow-up, 72% of the cognitive behavioral therapy plus amitriptyline group had ≤4 headache days per month compared to 52% of the headache education plus amitriptyline group

  14. Migraine aura symptoms: Duration, succession and temporal relationship to headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Michele; Linde, Mattias; Sances, Grazia; Ghiotto, Natascia; Guaschino, Elena; Allena, Marta; Terrazzino, Salvatore; Nappi, Giuseppe; Goadsby, Peter J; Tassorelli, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    As there are no biological markers, a detailed description of symptoms, particularly temporal characteristics, is crucial when diagnosing migraine aura. Hitherto these temporal aspects have not been studied in detail. We conducted a prospective diary-aided study of the duration and the succession of aura symptoms and their temporal relationship with headache. Fifty-four patients completed the study recording in a diary the characteristics of three consecutive auras ( ITALIC! n = 162 auras). The median duration of visual, sensory and dysphasic symptoms were 30, 20 and 20 minutes, respectively. Visual symptoms lasted for more than one hour in 14% of auras ( ITALIC! n = 158), sensory symptoms in 21% of auras ( ITALIC! n = 52), and dysphasic symptoms in 17% of auras ( ITALIC! n = 18). Twenty-six percent of patients had at least one aura out of three with one symptom lasting for more than one hour. In aura with multiple symptoms the subsequent symptom, second versus first one or third versus second, might either start simultaneously (34 and 18%), during (37 and 55%), with the end (5 and 9%), or after (24 and 18%) the previous aura symptom. The headache phase started before the aura (9%), simultaneously with the onset of aura (14%), during the aura (26%), simultaneously with the end of aura (15%) or after the end of aura (36%). We provide data to suggest that symptoms may last longer than one hour in a relevant proportion of auras or migraine with aura patients, and that there is a high variability of scenarios in terms of time relationship among aura symptoms and between aura and headache. © International Headache Society 2015.

  15. Efficacy of sumatriptan nasal spray in recurrent migrainous headache: an open prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpay, J A; Linssen, W H J P; Koehler, P J J; Arends, L R; Tiedink, H G M

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of sumatriptan 20 mg via nasal spray and 100-mg tablets in treating migrainous headache in patients without a concomitant migraine diagnosis. We prospectively investigated the efficacy of sumatriptan 20 mg via nasal spray and 100-mg tablets in patients with a history of at least 5 moderate to severe headache attacks lasting 2 to 72 hours that consistently did not meet the International Headache Society (IHS) criteria for migraine or episodic tension-type headache. Nineteen headache attacks classifiable as migrainous disorder without aura (IHS 1.7) were evaluated in 13 patients using 20-mg sumatriptan nasal spray within a 10-week period. A 2-point decrease in headache severity on a four-point scale was achieved in 74% (95% confidence interval [CI], 50% to 89%) of the attacks within 2 hours. The pain-free incidence (a reduction in headache severity from moderate or severe to none) was 37% (95% CI, 17% to 63%) after 2 hours. Ten patients completed the second part of the study, taking oral sumatriptan for 14 migrainous attacks: a 2-point decrease in headache severity was achieved in 38% (95% CI, 13% to 71%) of the attacks within 2 hours and in 77% (95% CI, 48% to 92%) within 4 hours. This is the first prospective study to show that intranasal or oral sumatriptan may be effective in patients experiencing moderate to severe headache attacks which consistently do not fulfill the IHS criteria for migraine or episodic tension-type headache.

  16. Persistent post-traumatic headache vs. migraine: an MRI study demonstrating differences in brain structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedt, Todd J; Chong, Catherine D; Peplinski, Jacob; Ross, Katherine; Berisha, Visar

    2017-08-22

    The majority of individuals with post-traumatic headache have symptoms that are indistinguishable from migraine. The overlap in symptoms amongst these individuals raises the question as to whether post-traumatic headache has a unique pathophysiology or if head trauma triggers migraine. The objective of this study was to compare brain structure in individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache (i.e. headache lasting at least 3 months following a traumatic brain injury) attributed to mild traumatic brain injury to that of individuals with migraine. Twenty-eight individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury and 28 individuals with migraine underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging on a 3 T scanner. Regional volumes, cortical thickness, surface area and curvature measurements were calculated from T1-weighted sequences and compared between subject groups using ANCOVA. MRI data from 28 healthy control subjects were used to interpret the differences in brain structure between migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache. Differences in regional volumes, cortical thickness, surface area and brain curvature were identified when comparing the group of individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache to the group with migraine. Structure was different between groups for regions within the right lateral orbitofrontal lobe, left caudal middle frontal lobe, left superior frontal lobe, left precuneus and right supramarginal gyrus (p comparing the migraine cohort to healthy controls. In conclusion, persistent post-traumatic headache and migraine are associated with differences in brain structure, perhaps suggesting differences in their underlying pathophysiology. Additional studies are needed to further delineate similarities and differences in brain structure and function that are associated with post-traumatic headache and migraine and to determine their specificity for each of the headache types.

  17. Hormonal manipulation strategies in the management of menstrual migraine and other hormonally related headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, Lynne T; Faubion, Stephanie S; Sood, Richa; Casey, Petra M

    2011-04-01

    Menstrual migraine and other hormonally related headaches are common in women. Falling estrogen levels or estrogen withdrawal after periods of sustained higher levels can trigger migraine. It makes sense to target this trigger for management of hormonally related headaches, particularly when nonhormonal strategies have been unsuccessful. Decision making regarding the use of hormonal contraception and menopausal hormone therapy is complex and commonly driven by other factors, but hormonal manipulation can potentially improve the course of migraine. Providers caring for migraineurs are appropriately concerned about stroke risk. Estrogen-containing hormonal contraceptives are relatively contraindicated for women who have migraine with aura. Postmenopausal hormone therapy is acceptable for women with a history of migraine. For these women, transdermal estradiol is recommended. Estrogen replacement is important for women who undergo an early menopause, whether natural or induced. Practical strategies for hormonal manipulation in the management of migraine and other hormonally related headaches are presented.

  18. Squamous Carcinoma of the Lung Presenting as Migraine-Type Headache: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eswaran Waran

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Orthostatic hypotension has long been recognised as a paraneoplastic effect of lung cancer. Lung cancer presenting with orthostatic hypotension and migraine-type headaches has not been previously described in the literature. Case Report: A 62-year-old Caucasian male presented with headaches, typical of his migraine, after a 30-year migraine-free period. An examination revealed a significant postural drop in BP with reflex tachycardia and no other features of dysautonomia. Investigations showed a metastatic squamous cell lung cancer. Pharmacological treatment of orthostatic hypotension resolved the migraine-type headaches. Discussion: Orthostatic hypotension is associated with lung cancer. Prompt pharmacological treatment in patients not responding to non-pharmacological therapy can provide relief from disabling symptoms of orthostatic hypotension. In this patient, this included symptoms consistent with migraine-type headaches.

  19. Association of pediatric obesity and migraine with comparison to tension headache and samples from other countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidlitz-Markus, Tal; Haimi-Cohen, Yishai; Zeharia, Avraham

    2015-03-01

    The link between body weight and headache has hardly been examined in children. The aim was to evaluate the association of obesity and migraine in selected pediatric patients and compare the findings with the literature. Data on clinical symptoms, headache type, and body mass index standard deviation score were derived from the medical files of 245 patients with migraine and 87 with tension headache. Comparison of the 3 subgroups of migraine patients of normal weight, overweight, and obese with the corresponding body mass index standard deviation score subgroups of patients with tension-type headache yielded no statistically significant differences in frequency of headache attacks per month, or duration of headache attacks in hours. These results call into question earlier reports linking headache and obesity in children. Differences in findings between our study and those in the literature highlight several factors that should be addressed in further studies. A larger sample size may reveal more significant results. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. The prevalence of fibromyalgia and its relation with headache characteristics in episodic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükşen, Sami; Genç, Emine; Yılmaz, Halim; Sallı, Ali; Gezer, İlknur Albayrak; Karahan, Ali Yavuz; Salbaş, Ender; Cingöz, Havva Turaç; Nas, Ömer; Uğurlu, Hatice

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of fibromyalgia (FM) in patients with episodic migraine and to evaluate the relationship between migraine characteristics and FM. One hundred and eighteen consecutive patients (mean age = 38 years, 75% women) fulfilling the International Classification of Headache Disorders-II criteria for migraine with (n = 22) and without (n = 96) aura from an outpatient headache clinic of a university hospital were evaluated. The diagnosis of FM was made based on the 1990 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria. Participants completed some self-administered questionnaires ascertaining sociodemographics, headache severity, frequency and duration, headache-related disability (Headache Impact Test [HIT-6]) and Migraine Disability Assessment Scale, widespread musculoskeletal pain (visual analog scale), depression (Beck depression inventory), anxiety (Beck anxiety inventory), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), fatigue (Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue), and quality of life (Short Form-36 Health Survey [SF-36]). In patients with FM, the tender point count and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire were employed. FM was diagnosed in 37 (31.4%) of the patients. FM comorbidity was equally distributed across patients with and without aura. Severity of migraine headache, HIT-6, and anxiety were especially associated with FM comorbidity. Patients suffering from migraine plus FM reported lower scores on all items of the SF-36. This study indicates that the assessment and management of coexisting FM should be taken into account in the assessment and management of migraine, particularly when headache is severe or patients suffer from widespread musculoskeletal pain.

  1. Fibromyalgia and headache: an epidemiological study supporting migraine as part of the fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Bernstein, Cheryl; Rudy, Thomas E

    2005-11-01

    Fibromyalgia is defined by widespread body pain, tenderness to palpation of tender point areas, and constitutional symptoms. The literature reports headache in about half of fibromyalgia patients. The current epidemiological study was designed to determine the prevalence and characteristics of headache in fibromyalgia patients. Treatment-seeking fibromyalgia patients were evaluated with measures for fibromyalgia, chronic headache, quality of life, and psychological distress. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and t-tests were used to identify significant differences, as appropriate. A total of 100 fibromyalgia patients were screened (24 fibromyalgia without headache and 76 fibromyalgia with headache). International Headache Society diagnoses included: migraine alone (n = 15 with aura, n = 17 without aura), tension-type alone (n = 18), combined migraine and tension-type (n = 16), post-traumatic (n = 4), and probable analgesic overuse headache (n = 6). Fibromyalgia tender point scores and counts and most measures of pain severity, sleep disruption, or psychological distress were not significantly different between fibromyalgia patients with and without headache. As expected, the fibromyalgia patients with headache scored higher on the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6) (62.1 +/- 0.9 vs 48.3 +/- 1.6, p 60 in 80% of fibromyalgia plus headache patients, representing severe impact from headache, and 56-58 in 4%, representing substantial impact. In summary, chronic headache was endorsed by 76% of treatment-seeking fibromyalgia patients, with 84% reporting substantial or severe impact from their headaches. Migraine was diagnosed in 63% of fibromyalgia plus headache patients, with probable analgesic overuse headache in only 8%. General measures of pain, pain-related disability, sleep quality, and psychological distress were similar in fibromyalgia patients with and without headache. Therefore, fibromyalgia patients with headache do not appear to represent a significantly

  2. Correlation of headache frequency and psychosocial impairment in migraine: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Müller, Melanie; Blum, Bernhard; Straube, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    To investigate if a headache frequency of 15 days per month constitutes a turning point in the psychosocial impairment associated with migraine. Migraine is differentiated into episodic and chronic forms based on a headache frequency criterion (headache days per month). It is presently not clear if this criterion represents a clinically and pathophysiologically meaningful turning point of the disease. Six hundred and one migraine patients completed measures of pain-specific disability (Migraine Disability Assessment Scale, von Korff scale), health-related quality of life (Short Form-12 Health Survey), habitual well-being (Marburg questionnaire), and anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score). A significant increase of psychosocial impairment with the number of headache days per month was found at lower headache frequencies, but leveled off at higher headache frequencies. Visual inspection and spline interpolation suggested that the turning point was not exactly at 15 headache days per month but rather around 13.3 (confidence interval: 8.9-17.7) days. Accordingly, significant correlations between headache days and psychosocial impairment were found in the group with ≤13 headache days per month (Spearman's rho = 0.25, P 13 headache days (rho = -0.02, n.s.). These results suggest that a meaningful turning point in psychosocial impairment associated with migraine is located around 13.3 headache days per month, somewhat below the 15-headache days criterion that by definition separates chronic from episodic migraine. However, confidence intervals surrounding the turning point were large. Further studies will be needed to more exactly localize the turning point. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  3. Epileptic seizures and headache/migraine: a review of types of association and terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchetti, Carlo; Pruna, Dario; Ledda, Mariagiuseppina

    2013-11-01

    There are different possible temporal associations between epileptic seizures and headache attacks which have given rise to unclear or controversial terminologies. The classification of the International League Against Epilepsy does not refer to this type of disorder, while the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-2) defines three kinds of association: (1) migraine-triggered seizure ("migralepsy"), (2) hemicrania epileptica, and (3) post-ictal headache. We performed an extensive review of the literature, not including "post-ictal" and "inter-ictal" headaches. On the basis of well-documented reports, the following clinical entities may be identified: (A) "epileptic headache (EH)" or "ictal epileptic headache (IEH)": in this condition headache (with or without migrainous features) is an epileptic manifestation per se, with onset, and cessation if isolated, coinciding with the scalp or deep EEG pattern of an epileptic seizure. EH maybe followed by other epileptic manifestations (motor/sensory/autonomic); this condition should be differentiated from "pure" or "isolated" EH, in which headache/migraine is the sole epileptic manifestation (requiring differential diagnosis from other headache forms). "Hemicrania epileptica" (if confirmed) is a very rare variant of EH, characterized by ipsilateral location of headache and ictal EEG paroxysms. (B) "Pre-ictal migraine" and "pre-ictal headache": when a headache attack is followed during, or shortly after, by a typical epileptic seizure. The migraine attack may be with or without aura, and its seizure-triggering role ("migraine-triggered seizure") is still a subject of debate. A differentiation from occipital epilepsy is mandatory. The term "migralepsy" has not been used uniformly, and may therefore led to misinterpretation. On the basis of this review we suggest definitions and a terminology which may become the basis of a forthcoming classification of headaches associated with epileptic seizures. Copyright

  4. Comparative efficacy trial of cupping and serkangabin versus conventional therapy of migraine headaches: A randomized, open-label, comparative efficacy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoozabadi, Mohammad Dehghani; Navabzadeh, Maryam; Roudsari, Mohammad Khodashenas; Zahmatkash, Mohsen

    2014-12-01

    Migraine headaches are the most common acute and recurrent headaches. Current treatment of a migraine headache consists of multiple medications for control and prevention of recurrent attacks. Global emergence of alternative medicine led us to examine the efficacy of cupping therapy plus serkangabin syrup in the treatment of migraine headaches. This study was a randomized, controlled, open-label, comparative efficacy trial. We randomly assigned patients with migraine into cupping therapy plus serkangabin group (30 patients) and conventional treatment group (30 patients). An investigator assessed the severity of headache, frequency of attacks in a week and duration of attacks per hour in 5 visits (at the end of 2 weeks, 1, 3 and 6 months). Generalized estimating equations approach was used to analyze repeated measures data to compare outcomes in both groups. Average age for cupping therapy group and conventional treatment group were 31.7 (±7.6) and 32.6 (±12.7) years, respectively (P = 0.45). After treatment for 2 weeks; and 1, 3 and 6 months, severity of headache (P = 0.80), frequency of migraine attacks (P = 0.63) and duration of attacks per hours (P = 0.48) were similar in conventional and cupping groups but these symptoms were decreased in each group during the study (P cupping plus serkangabin therapy and conventional treatment in the treatment and prophylaxis of migraine. The alternative therapy may be used in cases of drug intolerance, no medication response, and in primary care.

  5. The impact of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level on migraine headache

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    Gökhan Özer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the impact of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels on migraine headache in migraineurs Patients and Methods: A total of 72 patients were included in the study. Serum vitamin D concentration and its impact on the migraine headache were assessed in migraineurs and migraine subgroups. To assess serum levels of vitamin D, 25(OH D3 was measured by enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Patients were categorized as follows based on the results of serum vitamin D measurements. Severity of migraine, average duration and frequency of attacks per month were recorded. The headache diary result (HDR was determined as: Duration of headache × frequency of headache. Results: Average vitamin D level was 7.4 ng/ml among patients with migraine with aura group and 8.5 ng/ml in patients with migraine without aura. Severe vitamin D deficiency was detected in 14 (66.7% patients with migraine with aura and 9 (64.3% patients with migraine without aura, with no statistically significant difference between the two groups. No significant correlation was found between vitamin D levels and HDR among migraineurs (r=-0.042, p=0.812 as well as in patients with migraine with aura (r=0.044, p=0.842 and in patients with migraine without aura (r=0.059, p=0.842 versus control group with respect to HDR and vitamin D levels. The severity of migraine pain was not associated with vitamin D levels. Serum vitamin D concentration was lower in male patients versus control group. Conclusion: The impact of vitamin D on the severity and number of migraine attacks is not clear. Further studies are needed to demonstrate the association between vitamin D status and neurological diseases.

  6. Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the hospital sometimes. Migraine headache is a risk factor for stroke. Risk is higher in people who smoke, more so ... not smoking, people with migraines should avoid other risk factors for stroke. These include: Taking birth control pills Eating unhealthy ...

  7. Cortical and subcortical hyperfusion during migraine and cluster headache measured by Xe CT-CBF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobari, M.; Meyer, J.S.; Ichijo, M.; Kawamura, J.; Baylor Univ., Houston, TX

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution, color-coded images of local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) were made utilizing stable xenon-enhanced computed tomography among patients with common migraine (n=18), classic migraine (n=12) and cluster headache (n=5). During spontaneously occurring headache in common and classic migraine patients, LCBF values for cerebral cortex and subcortical gray and white matter were diffusely increased by 20-40% with the exception of the occipital lobes. LCBF increases involved both hemispheres whether the head pain was unilateral or bilateral. No significant differences were noted in the degree or pattern of LCBF increases during headaches of common and classic migraineurs. Similar cerebral hyperperfusion of greater magnitude was observed during cluster headaches but was more prominent on the side of the head pain. Present observations do not support the hypothesis of spreading cortical depression as a cause of classic migraine. From a hemodynamic viewpoint, LCBF increases during headaches of common or classic migraine or cluster appear similar. Evidence is adduced that sympathetic hypofunction with denervation hypersensitivity of cerebral vessels plays a role in the cerebral hyperperfusion of migraine headaches. More pronounced unilateral autonomic derangements appear to account for the symptoms and cerebral hyperperfusion associated with cluster headaches. (orig.)

  8. Subcutaneous delivery of sumatriptan in the treatment of migraine and primary headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore JC

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Johanna C Moore, James R MinerDepartment of Emergency Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: Subcutaneous sumatriptan is an effective treatment for pain from acute migraine headache, and can be used in patients with known migraine syndrome and in patients with primary headaches when secondary causes have been excluded. In limited comparative trials, subcutaneous sumatriptan performed in a manner comparable with oral eletriptan and intravenous metoclopramide, was superior to intravenous aspirin and intramuscular trimethobenzamide-diphenhydramine, and was inferior to intravenous prochlorperazine for pain relief. The most common side effects seen with subcutaneous sumatriptan are injection site reactions and triptan sensations. As with all triptans, there is a risk of rare cardiovascular events with subcutaneous sumatriptan and its use should be limited to those without known cerebrovascular disease and limited in those with known cardiovascular risk factors and unknown disease status. In studies of patient preference and tolerability, the subcutaneous formulation has a faster time of onset and high rate of efficacy when compared with the oral formulation, but the oral formulation appears to be better tolerated. It is important to consider the needs of the patient, their past medical history, and what aspects of migraine treatment are most important to the patient when considering treatment of acute migraine or primary headache. Subcutaneous sumatriptan is a good first-line agent for the treatment of pain from acute migraine headaches and primary headaches.Keywords: sumatriptan, subcutaneous, migraine headache, primary headache

  9. Precipitating and Relieving Factors of Migraine Headache in 200 Iraqi Kurdish Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan K. Al-Shimmery

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the precipitating and relieving factors of migraine headache in a group of Iraqi Kurdish patients including the effect of fasting in Ramadan, and to estimate the percentage of family history of migraine. Methods: A series of 200 migraine cases from different parts of the Kurdistan region in the North of Iraq attending the out-patient Neurology clinic at Rizgary Teaching Hospital and a private Neurology clinic at Erbil City was carried out between October 2007 and May 2008 were reviewed. The precipitating factors and relieving factors for migraine headache were registered and tabulated to be compared with others. Case definition of migraine was based on the International Headache Society (IHS criteria.Results: 33% of the patients were aged between 30-39 years, while 40.5% of patients experienced their first attack aged between 20-29 years. Stress or psychological upset was the commonest triggering factor (80%, followed by increasing physical activity (68%, change in weather (65.5%, and in relation to fasting (65%. Fasting in Ramadan was a triggering factor for headaches in 65% of patients. However, there was no significant association between the triggering factors with regards to sex difference. Relief of migraine in the studied sample was achieved using NSAIDs in 50% of patients, and sleep (45.5%. Hence, 61% of the study population had positive family history of migraine, 32.5% of them reported maternal history of migraine. Conclusion: Psychological upset, stress and excessive physical activity were the commonest triggering factors of migraine headache, while NSAID was the commonest relieving factor of migraine in this population. Family history was present in 61% of migraine patients based mainly from maternal root.

  10. Caffeine and Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spotlight On News Content Capsule Contact Understanding Migraine Caffeine and Migraine Doctor Q&A Managing Migraine Migraine ... of Headache Disorders Cluster Headache Post-Traumatic Headache Caffeine and Migraine January 10, 2017 Key Points Caffeine ...

  11. Stress and Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spotlight On News Content Capsule Contact Understanding Migraine Stress and Migraine Doctor Q&A Managing Migraine Migraine ... of Headache Disorders Cluster Headache Post-Traumatic Headache Stress and Migraine March 16, 2017 How to cope ...

  12. Resolution of chronic migraine headaches with intrathecal ziconotide: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narain S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sachin Narain,1 Lama Al-Khoury,2 Eric Chang3–6 1Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care, 2Department of Neurology, 3Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 4Department of Neurosurgery, 5Department of Orthopedics, 6Reeve-Irvine Research Center for Spinal Cord Injury, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA Background: Migraine headaches are a common and functionally debilitating disorder affecting approximately 17% of women and 5.6% of men. Compared to episodic migraine patients, chronic migraineurs are more likely to be occupationally disabled, miss family activities, have comorbid anxiety and/or chronic pain disorders, and utilize significantly more health care dollars. Ziconotide is a calcium channel blocker used for the treatment of chronic severe pain without issues of tolerance or dependency found with opioid therapy. Case: A 59-year-old female had an intrathecal baclofen pump placed for spasticity secondary to multiple sclerosis. Her symptoms also included lower extremity neuropathic pain and severe migraine headaches with 22 migraine headache days per month. Prior treatments included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, triptans, anticonvulsants, antihypertensives, and Botox injections which reduced her symptoms to four migraine days per month at best. While her spasticity had markedly improved with intrathecal baclofen, ziconotide was added to help her neuropathic pain complaints. Following initiation of low-dose ziconotide (1 µg/day, the patient noted both lower extremity pain improvement and complete resolution of migraine headaches resulting in zero migraine days per month. She has now been migraine free for 8 months. Conclusion: Upon review of the available literature, there are no published cases of migraine improvement with intrathecal ziconotide. This represents the first case describing resolution of migraine symptoms with low-dose ziconotide. Keywords: ziconotide, migraine, symptoms, chronic

  13. Acupuncture for the prevention of episodic migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Klaus; Allais, Gianni; Brinkhaus, Benno; Fei, Yutong; Mehring, Michael; Vertosick, Emily A.; Vickers, Andrew; White, Adrian R

    2016-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is often used for migraine prevention but its effectiveness is still controversial. We present an update of our Cochrane review from 2009. Objectives To investigate whether acupuncture is a) more effective than no prophylactic treatment/routine care only; b) more effective than sham (placebo) acupuncture; and c) as effective as prophylactic treatment with drugs in reducing headache frequency in adults with episodic migraine. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL: 2016, issue 1); MEDLINE (via Ovid, 2008 to January 2016); Ovid EMBASE (2008 to January 2016); and Ovid AMED (1985 to January 2016). We checked PubMed for recent publications to April 2016. We searched the World Health Organization (WHO) Clinical Trials Registry Platform to February 2016 for ongoing and unpublished trials. Selection criteria We included randomized trials at least eight weeks in duration that compared an acupuncture intervention with a no-acupuncture control (no prophylactic treatment or routine care only), a sham-acupuncture intervention, or prophylactic drug in participants with episodic migraine. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers checked eligibility; extracted information on participants, interventions, methods and results, and assessed risk of bias and quality of the acupuncture intervention. The primary outcome was migraine frequency (preferably migraine days, attacks or headache days if migraine days not measured/reported) after treatment and at follow-up. The secondary outcome was response (at least 50% frequency reduction). Safety outcomes were number of participants dropping out due to adverse effects and number of participants reporting at least one adverse effect. We calculated pooled effect size estimates using a fixed-effect model. We assessed the evidence using GRADE and created ’Summary of findings’ tables. Main results Twenty-two trials including 4985 participants in total (median 71, range

  14. Hypoxia triggers high-altitude headache with migraine features: A prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broessner, Gregor; Rohregger, Johanna; Wille, Maria; Lackner, Peter; Ndayisaba, Jean-Pierre; Burtscher, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Given the high prevalence and clinical impact of high-altitude headache (HAH), a better understanding of risk factors and headache characteristics may give new insights into the understanding of hypoxia being a trigger for HAH or even migraine attacks. In this prospective trial, we simulated high altitude (4500 m) by controlled normobaric hypoxia (FiO2 = 12.6%) to investigate acute mountain sickness (AMS) and headache characteristics. Clinical symptoms of AMS according to the Lake Louise Scoring system (LLS) were recorded before and after six and 12 hours in hypoxia. O2 saturation was measured using pulse oximetry at the respective time points. History of primary headache, especially episodic or chronic migraine, was a strict exclusion criterion. In total 77 volunteers (43 (55.8%) males, 34 (44.2%) females) were enrolled in this study. Sixty-three (81.18%) and 40 (71.4%) participants developed headache at six or 12 hours, respectively, with height and SpO2 being significantly different between headache groups at six hours (p headache development (p headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta) in n = 5 (8%) or n = 6 (15%), at six and 12 hours, respectively. Normobaric hypoxia is a trigger for HAH and migraine-like headache attacks even in healthy volunteers without any history of migraine. Our study confirms the pivotal role of hypoxia in the development of AMS and beyond that suggests hypoxia may be involved in migraine pathophysiology. © International Headache Society 2015.

  15. Periictal and interictal headache including migraine in Dutch patients with epilepsy: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstra, W A; Hageman, G; de Weerd, A W

    2015-03-01

    As early as in 1898, it was noted that there was a need to find "a plausible explanation of the long recognized affinities of migraine and epilepsy". However, results of recent studies are clearly conflicting on this matter. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to define the prevalence and characteristics of both seizure-related and interictal headaches in patients with epilepsy (5-75years) seeking help in the tertiary epilepsy clinic SEIN in Zwolle. Using a questionnaire, subjects were surveyed on the existence of headaches including characteristics, duration, severity, and accompanying symptoms. Furthermore, details on epilepsy were retrieved from medical records (e.g., syndrome, seizure frequency, and use of drugs). Diagnoses of migraine, tension-type headache, or unclassifiable headache were made based on criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Between March and December 2013, 29 children and 226 adults were evaluated, 73% of whom indicated having current headaches, which is significantly more often when compared with the general population (pheadache, while 29% had solely seizure-related headaches and 22% had both. Migraine occurs significantly more often in people with epilepsy in comparison with the general population (pheadaches conforms to results in the general population. These results show that current headaches are a significantly more frequent problem amongst people with epilepsy than in people without epilepsy. When comparing migraine prevalence, this is significantly higher in the population of patients with epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Association of excessive daytime sleepiness with migraine and headache frequency in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavem, Knut; Kristiansen, Håvard Anton; Kristoffersen, Espen Saxhaug; Kværner, Kari Jorunn; Russell, Michael Bjørn

    2017-12-01

    Some previous studies have postulated an association between migraine and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). This study evaluated the association of EDS with migraine and headache frequency in a general population, after adjusting for potential confounding variables. The study was a postal survey of a random age and gender-stratified sample of 40,000 persons aged 20 to 80 years old drawn by the National Population Register in Norway. The questionnaire included questions about migraine, headache, the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) and various comorbidities. EDS was defined as ESS > 10. The association of EDS and migraine/headache were analysed by bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses. A total of 21,177 persons responded to the ESS and were included in the analyses. The odds ratio (OR) for EDS was increased for migraineurs (1.42 (95% CI 1.31─1.54), p 179 days per year compared to those without headache in multivariable analysis. In a general population, the odds for EDS increased significantly with the headache frequency, irrespective of migraine status. EDS was not associated with reported migraine in multivariable analysis.

  17. Temporomandibular disorder-type pain and migraine headache in women: a preliminary twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesh, Octavia; Noonan, Carolyn; Buchwald, Dedra S; Goldberg, Jack; Afari, Niloo

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether shared genetic influences are responsible for the association between pain from temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and migraine headache. Data were obtained from 1,236 monozygotic and 570 dizygotic female twin pairs from the University of Washington Twin Registry. TMD pain was assessed with a question about persistent or recurrent pain in the jaw, temple, in front of the ear, or in the ear. The presence of migraine headache was determined by self-report of doctor-diagnosed migraine. Univariate and bivariate structural equation models estimated the components of variance attributable to genetic and environmental influences. The best fitting univariate models indicated that additive genetic effects contributed 27% of the variance in TMD pain (95% confidence interval = 15% to 38%) and 49% of the variance in migraine headache (95% confidence interval = 40% to 57%). The best-fitting bivariate model revealed that 12% of the genetic component of TMD pain is shared with migraine headache. These preliminary findings suggest that the association between TMD pain and migraine headache in women may be partially due to a modest shared genetic risk for both conditions. Future studies can focus on replicating these findings with symptom- and diagnosis-based instruments.

  18. Early Maladaptive Schemas in Patients with and without Migraine and Tension Headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Rezaei Dogaheh

    2015-12-01

    Methods:  The present study was of cross sectional and correlational studies. The measures included  Headache Disability Inventory and Young Early Maladaptive Schemas Questionnaire (Short Form. The  population of the study was Tehran adult patients with migraine and tension headache aged 18 to 55  years. The final study sample included 69 participants with migraine or tension headaches and 86 non- clinical samples of both genders. After referring by psychiatrists, they were selected by convenient and  targeted sampling. The two groups were matched based on sex and education. Results: Migraine and tension headache sufferers and non-clinical participants were significantly  different in 9 schemas including Emotional deprivation, Abandonment/instability, Mistrust/abuse, Social  isolation/alienation, Failure to achieve, Enmeshment/Undeveloped Self, Subjugation, Self-sacrifice and  Emotional inhibition. In addition, a series of EMSs could significantly predict 61 percent of the total  change in position of tension headaches or migraine group correctly. Discussion: It seems that EMSs are important factors influencing migraine and tension headaches. The  recognition and manipulation of these schemas along with other medical therapies can result in reducing  the symptoms of the disorder. 

  19. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) revisited: Would migraine headaches be included in future classification criteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureldine, Mohammad Hassan A; Haydar, Ali A; Berjawi, Ahmad; Elnawar, Rody; Sweid, Ahmad; Khamashta, Munther A; Hughes, Graham R V; Uthman, Imad

    2017-02-01

    Headaches have been extensively reported in Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS)/Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL)-positive patients. The aim of this study was to highlight the prevalence of headaches among APS/aPL-positive patients and discuss its association with laboratory, clinical and imaging findings. We searched the literature through Google Scholar and PubMed for publications on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, laboratory, imaging and clinical findings, and management of headaches in APS/aPL-positive patients. The following keywords were used: Antiphospholipid, Hughes syndrome, anticardiolipin, lupus anticoagulant, anti-β2 glycoprotein I, headache, migraine, tension, and cluster. All reports published between 1969 and 2015 were included. Migraine is the most commonly reported type of headache in APS/aPL-positive patients. Thrombotic and platelet dysfunction hypotheses have been studied to uncover the pathogenic role of aPL in the development of headaches. Several studies are reporting higher levels of aPL in primary and secondary APS migraineurs, but only few reached statistical significance. Migraine patients without clinical signs/symptoms of cerebral infarction rarely show positive imaging findings. Digital subtraction angiography shows promise in demonstrating small vascular lesions otherwise not detected on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or cerebral angiograms. Although it may be solitary and harmless in many cases, the deleterious effect of migraine on the quality of life of APS patients prompts rapid diagnosis and proper management. An anticoagulation trial is advisable in APS patients with migraine as many cases of severe, refractory migraine resolved with anticoagulation therapy. The profile of migraine headaches discussed in this study permits its candidacy for inclusion in future APS classification criteria.

  20. Migraine-like headache in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Funda Uysal; Tellioglu, Serdar; Koc, Rabia Soylu; Leventoglu, Alev

    2015-01-01

    A 20-year-old female, university student presented with severe, throbbing, unilateral headache, nausea and vomiting that started 2 days ago. The pain was aggravated with physical activity and she had photophobia. She had been taking contraceptive pills due to polycystic ovary for 3 months. Cranial computed tomography was uninformative and she was considered to have the first attack of migraine. She did not benefit from triptan treatment and as the duration of pain exceeded 72 h further imaging was done. Cranial MRI and MR venography revealed a central filling defect and lack of flow in the left sigmoid sinus caused by venous sinus thrombosis. In search for precipitating factors besides the use of contraceptive pills, plasma protein C activity was found to be depressed (42%, normal 70-140%), homocystein was minimally elevated (12.7 μmol/L, normal 0-12 μmol/L) and anti-cardiolipin IgM antibody was close to the upper limit. Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  1. Migraine equivalents and related symptoms, psychological profile and headache features: which relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Samuela; De Ranieri, Cristiana; Dionisi, Cecilia; Gagliardi, Valentina; Capuano, Alessandro; Vigevano, Federico; Gentile, Simonetta; Valeriani, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Migraine equivalents are common clinical conditions in children suffering from headache. Very few studies dealt with the psychological profile of children/adolescents with migraine equivalents. Our main aim was to compare the psychological profile between migraine children with and without migraine equivalents. Moreover, as secondary aim, exclusively in children with migraine equivalents, we investigated the possible relationship between migraine attack frequency and intensity and psychological factors. We enrolled 136 young migraineurs. They were divided in two groups (patients with and without migraine equivalents). The psychological profile was assessed by means of SAFA Anxiety and Somatization questionnaires. Migraine equivalents were present in 101 patients (74.3%). Anxiety (p = 0.024) and somatization (p = 0.001) levels, but not hypochondria (p = 0.26), were higher in patients with migraine equivalents. In children with migraine equivalents, a low frequency of attacks was related to separation anxiety (p = 0.034). Migraine equivalents patients tend to feel more fearful and to experience more shyness. This, together with the tendency to somatization, may lead them to become vigilant in attachment relationships with their caregivers.

  2. Migraine and tension-type headache in Croatia: a population-based survey of precipitating factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivadinov, R; Willheim, K; Sepic-Grahovac, D; Jurjevic, A; Bucuk, M; Brnabic-Razmilic, O; Relja, G; Zorzon, M

    2003-06-01

    The careful monitoring of the trigger factors of headache could be an important step in treatment, because their avoidance may lessen the frequency and severity of attacks. Furthermore, they may provide a clue to the aetiology of headache. The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of tension-type headache (TTH) and to establish the frequency of precipitating factors in subjects with migraine and TTH in the adult population of Bakar, County of the Coast and Gorski Kotar, Croatia. Another important purpose of the study was to examine the relationship of the precipitating factors with migraine and TTH, and with migraine subtypes: migraine with aura (MA) and migraine without aura (MO). We performed a population-based survey using a 'face-to-face door-to-door' interview method. The surveyed population consisted of 5173 residents aged between 15 and 65 years. The 3794 participants (73.3%) were screened for headache history according to the International Headache Society (IHS) criteria. Headache screen-positive responders, 2475 (65.2%), were interviewed by trained medical students with a structured detailed interview focused on the precipitating factors. The following precipitating factors in lifetime migraineurs and tension-type headachers have been assessed: stress, sleep disturbances, eating habits, menstrual cycle, oral contraceptives, food items, afferent stimulation, changes in weather conditions and temperature, frequent travelling and physical activity. A total of 720 lifetime migraineurs and 1319 tension-type headachers have been identified. The most common precipitants for both migraine and TTH were stress and frequent travelling. Stress (odds ratio (OR) 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17, 1.69) was associated with migraine, whereas physical activity (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.59, 0.87) was related to TTH. Considering MA and MO, frequent travelling (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.59, 2.99), food items (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.35, 3.51) and changes in weather conditions

  3. Effect of Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise on Migraine Headache Indexes and Quality of Life Improvement in Women with Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Pairo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The beneficial effects of physical activities on migraine indices, i. e. frequency, duration, and intensity of the attacks, have been proved by different studies. Despite the fact, it is required to notice the sport characteristics, such as intensity, duration, repetition, and type of the sport, to investigate the beneficial effects of the physical activities on migraine treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the Moderate Intensity Aerobic (MIA exercises on the migraine indices and quality of life in women with migraine. Materials & Methods: In the controlled random semi-experimental study, 20 non-athlete women with migraine were studied in Kermanshah in 2015. The subjects were divided into two groups including control and MIA groups (n=10 per group. 8-weak MIA exercises (13-15 Borg RPE Scale consisted of three 40-minute sessions a weak. The migraine indices of the subjects (frequency, duration, and intensity were measured one month before and after the exercises. In addition, the quality of life and the aerobic power of the subjects were assessed 48 hours before and after the exercises. Data was analyzed by SPSS 21 software using ANCOVA, LSD post-hoc, and independent T tests. Findings: MIA exercises resulted in significant reductions in the intensity, frequency, and duration of headache attacks, as well as an increase in the aerobic power (p<0.001. Passing from pretest to posttest, the variable change percentage was significant between control and exercise groups (p<0.05. Conclusion: MIA exercises lead to a reduction in the migraine headache, as well as an improvement in the quality of life and aerobic readiness, in the women with migraine.

  4. Factors Influencing Response to Pharmacologic Treatment of Migraine in a Pediatric Headache Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Tal Eidlitz; Moad, Bder; Haimi-Cohen, Yishai; Zeharia, Avraham

    2016-07-01

    The responses of different patients to the same drug may vary as a consequence of biologic, psychosocial, and genetic differences. The aim of this study was to identify clinical factors associated with a response to pharmacologic treatment in pediatric patients with migraine. The medical files of patients with migraine attending the headache clinic of a tertiary pediatric medical center in 2010-2015 were reviewed. The children and parents (or only the parents if the child was very young) completed the International Headache Society-based questionnaire. Patients were treated with at least one of the following medications: propranolol, amitriptyline, topiramate. Response to treatment was rated as no change in migraine pattern (grade 1) or a decrease in migraine attack frequency per month by at least 50% (grade 2) or at least 75% (grade 3). The highest-grade response to any pharmacologic treatment was defined as the best clinical response. The study group included 248 patients of mean age 12.71 ± 3.04 years. A grade 3 best clinical response was significantly associated with a positive maternal history of migraine, younger age at treatment onset, lower frequency of headache attacks per month, postpubertal children had a significantly lower rate of grade 3 response than prepubertal children (P pediatric headache clinic setting should consider these factors before initiating a treatment program. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  5. Headache-Specific Locus of Control and Migraine-Related Quality of Life: Understanding the Role of Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, Amy S; Seng, Elizabeth K

    2017-02-01

    This cross-sectional study examined the relationship between headache-specific locus of control (HSLC) and migraine-related quality of life, and anxiety as a mediator of this relationship. Two hundred and thirty-two people with migraine participated in the treatment of severe migraine trial. At baseline, participants completed self-report questionnaires of headache-specific locus of control (HSLC; subscales = internal, chance, and medical professionals), anxiety, and migraine-related quality of life. Correlations examined relationships between HSLC, anxiety, and migraine-related quality of life; ordinary least squares regression evaluated anxiety as a mediator of the relationship between HSLC and migraine-related quality of life. Higher internal HSLC was related to higher overall migraine-related quality of life (ps Anxiety mediated the relationship between internal HSLC and all measures of migraine-specific quality of life (ps Anxiety mediates the relationship between internal HSLC and migraine-related quality of life.

  6. Cerebral blood flow velocity in migraine and chronic tension-type headache patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karacay Ozkalayci S

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available S Karacay Ozkalayci, B Nazliel, HZ Batur Caglayan, C Irkec Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey Introduction: The present study seeks to use transcranial Doppler ultrasound to evaluate cerebral blood flow velocities in anterior and posterior circulation arteries, during an attack-free episode in migraine patients, with and without aura, as well as in chronic tension-type headache patients who were not receiving prophylactic medication. Methods: A total of 50 patients (35 female, 15 male were evaluated during a headache-free episode: 30 migraine patients without aura (mean age: 32±8 years, 10 migraine patients with aura (mean age: 34±4 years, and 10 patients with chronic tension-type headache (mean age: 34±5 years. Results: No significant difference was present between anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral and vertebral arteries’ blood flow velocities between migraine patients, with and without aura, or in patients with a tension-type headache, and normal controls (p>0.05. However, a significant increase in basilar artery cerebral blood flow velocities relative to controls was present in patients with a tension-type headache (p>0.001. Conclusion: It is difficult to predict the main reason for the significant increase in basilar artery blood flow velocities in patients with chronic tension-type headache. It may be due to constriction of conductance or the dilatation of the resistance vessels. Keywords: cerebral blood flow, migraine without aura, migraine with aura, tension-type headache, transcranial Doppler ultrasonography 

  7. Carbon monoxide may be an important molecule in migraine and other headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik W; Hauge, Mette K

    2014-01-01

    of cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathways. Here, we review the literature about carbon monoxide-induced headache and its possible mechanisms. CONCLUSION: We suggest, for the first time, that carbon monoxide may play an important role in the mechanisms of migraine and other headaches.......INTRODUCTION: Carbon monoxide was previously considered to just be a toxic gas. A wealth of recent information has, however, shown that it is also an important endogenously produced signalling molecule involved in multiple biological processes. Endogenously produced carbon monoxide may thus play...... an important role in nociceptive processing and in regulation of cerebral arterial tone. DISCUSSION: Carbon monoxide-induced headache shares many characteristics with migraine and other headaches. The mechanisms whereby carbon monoxide causes headache may include hypoxia, nitric oxide signalling and activation...

  8. Headache and Dizziness: How to Differentiate Vestibular Migraine from Other Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joshua M; Escasena, Carlos A

    2015-07-01

    Headache and dizziness are two of the most common symptoms prompting medical evaluation and may be seen in many primary and secondary headache and dizziness syndromes. Many of these disease processes share common characteristics making determination of the diagnosis extremely challenging. As more is understood about the concurrence of these symptoms, new diagnostic considerations have emerged, and the beta version of the latest edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders describes a new entity termed vestibular migraine that may affect many patients presenting with headache and dizziness. This article examines the epidemiology of headache and dizziness, describes the presenting features of patients with conditions which often express these two symptoms, discusses recommendations for evaluation and testing for these patients, and serves to aid in the differentiation between vestibular migraine and other potential diagnoses.

  9. Headaches: Reduce Stress to Prevent the Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent headaches. Relaxation techniques can reduce symptoms of stress, including headaches. Making time for pleasurable activities, such as listening to music, dancing, playing a sport, reading a book or playing with your pet ...

  10. Headache symptoms from migraine patients with and without aura through structure-validated self-reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiawei; Zhang, Bingren; Shen, Chanchan; Zhang, Jinhua; Wang, Wei

    2017-10-12

    Headache symptoms self-reported by migraine patients are largely congruent with the clinician-used diagnostic criteria, but not always so. Patients' self-reports of headache symptoms might offer additional clues to characterize migraine with (MA) and without (MO) aura more precisely. Firstly, we invited 324 participants with a life-long headache attack to answer an item-matrix measuring symptoms of primary headaches, then we performed both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to their answers and refined a headache symptom questionnaire. Secondly, we applied this questionnaire to 28 MA and 52 MO patients. In participants with a life-long headache, we refined a 27-item, structure-validated headache symptom questionnaire, with four factors (scales) namely the Somatic /Aura Symptoms, Gastrointestinal and Autonomic Symptoms, Tightness and Location Features, and Prodromal/Aggravating Symptoms. Further, we found that MA patients reported higher than did MO patients on the Somatic/Aura Symptoms and Tightness and Location Features scales. Compared to MO, MA was conferred with more prominent tightness and location features besides its higher somatic or aura symptoms. Patients' self-reports of headache symptoms might offer more clues to distinguish two types of migraine besides their clinician-defined criteria.

  11. Relaxation training and written emotional disclosure for tension or migraine headaches: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Pamela J; Lumley, Mark A; Kraft, Christina A; Dooley, John A

    2008-08-01

    Behavioral medicine interventions that directly reduce arousal and negative emotions, such as relaxation training (RT), are conceptually different from interventions that temporarily increase negative emotions, such as written emotional disclosure (WED), but no studies have directly compared their efficacy. We compared the effects of RT and WED on people with tension or migraine headaches. College students with either tension (n = 51) or migraine (n = 90) headaches were randomized to one of three groups: RT, WED, or a neutral writing control condition; four sessions were held over 2 weeks. Mood was measured before and after each session, and outcomes (headache frequency, severity, disability, and general physical symptoms) were assessed at baseline and at 1-month and 3-month follow-ups. As expected, RT led to an immediate increase in calmness, whereas WED led to an immediate increase in negative mood, for both headache samples. Intent-to-treat analyses showed that, for the tension headache sample, RT led to improved headache frequency and disability compared to both WED and the control group, but WED had no effect. For migraine headaches, RT improved pain severity relative to the control group, but WED again had no effect. A brief RT protocol was effective for tension headaches, but WED had no effect on health status for either tension or migraine headaches. Modifications to WED, such as targeting people with unresolved stress, providing guidance to enhance the potency of the writing, or including additional at-home writing and exposure exercises, may improve its efficacy for people with headaches and other health problems.

  12. Repeated episodes of focal cerebral ischemia in a patient with mitral valve prolapse and migraine headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raičević Ranko

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is episodic, paroxysmal disorder where the headache represents the central symptom and is followed with different combinations of neurological gastrointestinal and vegetative changes. Not until the diagnostic procedures were developed, ischemic lesions were verified even in the patients with ordinary migraine. This is a report of a patient with migraine headache followed twice by verified episodes of temporary ischemic attacks and verified focal ischemic lesion of cerebral parenchyma. The mitral valve prolapse was also detected. This all imposed the administration of combined prophylactic antimigrainous and anticoagulant therapy as an imperative because of the risk of the development of repeated ischemia of cerebral tissue. This association also confirmed an opinion that migraine is a wider disorder with the dominant dysfunction of limbic system.

  13. A cognitive-behavioral study of self-reported stress factors in migraine headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, M A

    1984-01-01

    Self-reported stress factors in migraine headache were examined from a cognitive-behavioral point of view. 18 migraine patients completed the Rathus Assertiveness Schedule and the Fear Survey Schedule. In addition, the migraine sufferers reported on all factors, either psychological or physical, which they felt were associated with headaches, answered a 'secondary gain' question, and completed a set of questions composed by the author. In conflict with more traditional viewpoints, migraine sufferers do not report themselves to be atypically reactive to ambiguity, uncertainty, or major life changes. Factors which do appear to be involved are quite diverse, and include tension over performed assertiveness behaviors, concern with perfectionism and evaluation, and reactions to small life changes. The impossibility of a cause and effect analysis is noted, and the quantity of reported stress factors is discussed as an argument for the author's concept of homeostatic reconditioning.

  14. Prevalence of neck pain in migraine and tension-type headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Sait; Bendtsen, Lars; Lyngberg, Ann C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We assessed the prevalence of neck pain in the population in relation to headache. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, a total of 797 individuals completed a headache interview and provided self-reported data on neck pain. We identified migraine, TTH or both migraine and TTH (M......+TTH) groups. Pericranial tenderness was recorded in 496 individuals. A total tenderness score (TTS) was calculated as the sum of local scores with a maximum score of 48. RESULTS: The one-year prevalence of neck pain was 68.4% and higher in those with vs. without primary headache (85.7% vs. 56.7%; adjusted...... OR 3.0, 95% CI 2.0-4.4, pneck pain (56.7%) was significantly higher in those with M+TTH (89.3%), pure TTH (88.4%) and pure migraine (76.2%) (p

  15. Neuroticism, depression and pain perception in migraine and tension-type headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, S; Bendtsen, L; Buse, D C

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: People with migraine and tension-type headache (TTH) have psychiatric comorbidities. We aimed to test differences in mental health constructs by type and frequency of primary headache and associated pain sensitivity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data on headache features, neuroticism (Eysenck...... Personality Questionnaire) and depression (Major Depression Inventory) were obtained from 547 individuals classified into chronic (≥15) or episodic (diagnosis (controls, n......=324) groups. A pericranial total tenderness score (TTS) and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were measured. Differences in mental health constructs were examined by headache frequency and type using generalized linear mixed models adjusting for sociodemographic covariates. RESULTS: Depression scores...

  16. Self- Reported Comorbid Pains in Severe Headaches or Migraines in a US National Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesh, Octavia; Adams, Sally H; Gansky, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    Aims To compare prevalence of self-reported comorbid temporomandibular joint muscle disorder (TMJMD)-type, neck, back and joint pains in people with severe headache or migraine; analyze these self-reported pains in the 2000–2005 US National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) by gender and age for Non-Hispanic Whites, Hispanics and Non-Hispanic Blacks (African Americans). Methods NHIS data included information on gender, age, race, ethnicity, health status, and common pain types: severe headache or migraine, TMJMD-type, neck, and low back in the last 3 months, as well as prior month joint pains. Analyses included survey prevalence estimation and survey logistic regression to obtain odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results 189,967 adults, 48% males, 52% females; 73% White, 12% Hispanic, and 11% Black were included. 29,712 (15%) of the entire sample reported severe headache or migraine, 19,228 (64%) had severe headache or migraine with at least one comorbid pain. 10,200 (33%) reported 2 or more comorbid pains, with no gender difference, and with Hispanics (n=1,847 or 32%) and Blacks (n=1,301 or 30%) less likely to report 2 or more comorbid pains than Whites (n=6,747 or 34%) (OR=0.91, p=0.032; OR=0.82, pheadache or migraine is often associated with other common pains, seldom existing alone. Two or more comorbid pains are common, similarly affecting gender and racial/ethnic groups. PMID:22553936

  17. A clinical interview versus prospective headache diaries in the diagnosis of menstrual migraine without aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetvik, Kjersti G; MacGregor, E Anne; Lundqvist, Christofer; Russell, Michael B

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this article is to compare the diagnosis of menstrual migraine without aura (MM) from a clinical interview with prospective headache diaries in a population-based study. A total of 237 women with self-reported migraine in at least half of menstruations were interviewed by a neurologist about headache and diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders II (ICHD II). Additionally, the MM criteria were expanded to include other types of migraine related to menstruation. Subsequently, all women were asked to complete three month prospective headache diaries. A total of 123 (52%) women completed both clinical interview and diaries. Thirty-eight women were excluded from the analyses: Two had incomplete diaries and 36 women recorded ≤1 menstruation, leaving 85 diaries eligible for analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value and Kappa for the diagnosis of MM in clinical interview vs. headache diary were 82%, 83%, 90%, 71% and 0.62 (95% CI 0.45-0.79). Using a broader definition of MM, Kappa was 0.64 (95% CI 0.47-0.83). A thorough clinical interview is valid for the diagnosis of MM. When this is undertaken, prospective headache diaries should not be mandatory to diagnose MM but may be necessary to exclude a chance association. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. Daily Migraine Prevention and Its Influence on Resource Utilization in the Military Health System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    from migraine, many people go untreated and do not seek care for the illness or self -manage the condition with over-the- counter products (Lipton...Hemodialysis DGD Peritoneal Dialysis DGE Ambulatory Nursing Services DGX Same Day Services Cost Pool DGZ Ambulatory Procedures Visits NEC DH...headaches. While the safety and efficacy of this treatment has been established, it is unclear what impact migraine prevention has on health care resource

  19. Headache Attributed to Fibrous Dysplasia of the Ethmoid Bone Mimicking Menstrual Migraine Without Aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Soo

    2016-06-01

    The authors experienced a patient of fibrous dysplasia originating from the ethmoid bone which presented with severe headache with some features suggestive of menstrual migraine without aura. Fibrous dysplasia originating from the ethmoid bone is a rare disease entity, but may cause severe headache that can be misdiagnosed as "menstrual migraine" because of similar symptoms in female patients. Because the primary objective of surgery is symptomatic relief, conservative transnasal endoscopic approach may be considered an alternative to more invasive external surgical techniques in carefully selected patients, especially originating from the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  20. Prevalence of neck pain in migraine and tension-type headache: a population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashina, Sait; Bendtsen, Lars; Lyngberg, Ann C; Lipton, Richard B; Hajiyeva, Nazrin; Jensen, Rigmor

    2015-03-01

    We assessed the prevalence of neck pain in the population in relation to headache. In a cross-sectional study, a total of 797 individuals completed a headache interview and provided self-reported data on neck pain. We identified migraine, TTH or both migraine and TTH (M+TTH) groups. Pericranial tenderness was recorded in 496 individuals. A total tenderness score (TTS) was calculated as the sum of local scores with a maximum score of 48. The one-year prevalence of neck pain was 68.4% and higher in those with vs. without primary headache (85.7% vs. 56.7%; adjusted OR 3.0, 95% CI 2.0-4.4, pneck pain (56.7%) was significantly higher in those with M+TTH (89.3%), pure TTH (88.4%) and pure migraine (76.2%) (pneck pain had higher TTS than individuals without neck pain (15.1±10.5 vs. 8.4±8.0, pNeck pain is highly prevalent in the general population and even more prevalent in individuals with primary headaches. Prevalence is highest in coexistent M+TTH, followed by pure TTH and migraine. Myofascial tenderness is significantly increased in individuals with neck pain. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. Migraine Headache Treatment & Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a variety of drugs for these treatment methods. Headache drug use should be monitored by a physician, ... new treatments or perhaps ways to block debilitating headache pain. Studies by other investigators are adding insight ...

  2. Dietary intake patterns and diet quality in a nationally representative sample of women with and without severe headache or migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, E Whitney; Lipton, Richard B; Peterlin, B Lee; Raynor, Hollie A; Thomas, J Graham; O'Leary, Kevin C; Pavlovic, Jelena; Wing, Rena R; Bond, Dale S

    2015-04-01

    The role of diet in migraine is not well understood. We sought to characterize usual dietary intake patterns and diet quality in a nationally representative sample of women with and without severe headache or migraine. We also examined whether the relationship between migraine and diet differs by weight status. In this analysis, women with migraine or severe headache status was determined by questionnaire for 3069 women, ages 20-50 years, who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Study, 1999-2004. Women who experienced severe headaches or migraines were classified as migraine for the purposes of this analysis. Dietary intake patterns (micro- and macronutrient intake and eating frequency) and diet quality, measured by the Healthy Eating Index, 2005, were determined using one 24-hour dietary recall. Dietary intake patterns did not significantly differ between women with and without migraine. Normal weight women with migraine had significantly lower diet quality (Healthy Eating Index, 2005 total scores) than women without migraine (52.5 ± 0.9 vs. 45.9 ± 1.0; P quality differs by migraine status in normal weight women. Prospective analyses are needed to establish how diet relates to migraine onset, characteristics, and clinical features in individuals of varying weight status. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  3. Comparative efficacy trial of cupping and serkangabin versus conventional therapy of migraine headaches: A randomized, open-label, comparative efficacy trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Dehghani Firoozabadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine headaches are the most common acute and recurrent headaches. Current treatment of a migraine headache consists of multiple medications for control and prevention of recurrent attacks. Global emergence of alternative medicine led us to examine the efficacy of cupping therapy plus serkangabin syrup in the treatment of migraine headaches. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized, controlled, open-label, comparative efficacy trial. We randomly assigned patients with migraine into cupping therapy plus serkangabin group (30 patients and conventional treatment group (30 patients. An investigator assessed the severity of headache, frequency of attacks in a week and duration of attacks per hour in 5 visits (at the end of 2 weeks, 1, 3 and 6 months. Generalized estimating equations approach was used to analyze repeated measures data to compare outcomes in both groups. Results: Average age for cupping therapy group and conventional treatment group were 31.7 (±7.6 and 32.6 (±12.7 years, respectively (P = 0.45. After treatment for 2 weeks; and 1, 3 and 6 months, severity of headache (P = 0.80, frequency of migraine attacks (P = 0.63 and duration of attacks per hours (P = 0.48 were similar in conventional and cupping groups but these symptoms were decreased in each group during the study (P < 0.001. Conclusion: There was no significant difference between cupping plus serkangabin therapy and conventional treatment in the treatment and prophylaxis of migraine. The alternative therapy may be used in cases of drug intolerance, no medication response, and in primary care.

  4. Cluster headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... Doctors do not know exactly what causes cluster headaches. They ... (chemical in the body released during an allergic response) or ...

  5. Understanding Menstrual Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Anne H

    2018-04-01

    Menstrual-related migraine is very prevalent, very disabling, yet very easy to manage given a good understanding of its cause. This article is intended to help with that understanding and to enable headache specialists to prescribe or create effective hormonal preventives of menstrual-related migraine. © 2018 American Headache Society.

  6. Association between tension-type headache and migraine with sleep bruxism: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca Canto, Graziela; Singh, Vandana; Bigal, Marcelo E; Major, Paul W; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the association between tension-type headache and migraine with sleep bruxism (SB). The association between SB and headaches has been discussed in both children and adults. Although several studies suggested a possible association, no systematic analysis of the available published studies exists to evaluate the quantity, quality, and risk of bias among those studies. A systematic review was undertaken, including articles that classified the headaches according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders and SB according to the criteria of the American Association of Sleep Medicine. Only articles in which the objective was to investigate the association between primary headaches (tension-type and migraine) and SB were selected. Detailed individual search strategies for The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and LILACS were developed. The reference lists from selected articles were also checked. A partial grey literature search was taken by using Google Scholar. The methodology of selected studies was evaluated using the quality in prognosis studies tool. Of 449 identified citations, only 2 studies, both studying adults, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The presence of SB significantly increased the odds (study 1: odds ratio [OR] 3.12 [1.25-7.7] and study 2: OR 3.8; 1.83-7.84) for headaches, although studies reported different headache type. There is not enough scientific evidence to either support or refute the association between tension-type headache and migraine with SB in children. Adults with SB appear to be more likely to have headache. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  7. The acute and preventative treatment of episodic migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Miller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Episodic migraine is a common debilitating condition with significant worldwide impact. An effective management plan must include acute treatment to relieve the pain and potential disability associated with the attacks and may also include preventative treatments with an aim of decreasing attack frequency and severity in the longer term. Acute treatments must be limited to a maximum of 2-3 days a week to prevent medication overuse headache and focus on simple analgesia, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and triptans. Preventative treatments are numerous and should be considered when migraine attacks are frequent and or disabling, acute medication is failing, in special circumstances such as hemiplegic migraines or if the patient requests them. All preventative medications must be given at therapeutic doses for at least 6-8 weeks before an adequate trial can be judged ineffective. The most important factor in choosing drugs is the patient and the clinical features of their attack and treatment should be tailored to these. Relative co-morbidities will influence drug choice, as will the side effect profile and the efficacy of the drug. First line preventative drugs include ß-blockers, amitriptyline and anti-epileptic drugs such as topiramate and valproate. Drugs with lower efficacy or poorer side effect profiles include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, calcium channel antagonists, gabapentin and herbal medicines.

  8. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among US Adults With Headache or Migraine: Results from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Dennis, Jeff A; Leach, Matthew J; Bishop, Felicity L; Cramer, Holger; Chung, Vincent C H; Moore, Craig; Lauche, Romy; Cook, Ron; Sibbritt, David; Adams, Jon

    2017-09-01

    Given the safety concerns regarding pharmacological agents, and the considerable impact of headache and migraine on the sufferer's quality of life, many people seek other treatment options beyond conventional medication and care to address their symptoms; this includes complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Some CAM interventions have shown promising results in clinical trials of headache and migraine management. Nonetheless, there has been little research exploring the reasons for using CAM, and the types of CAM used, among this population. The study aimed to answer the following questions: (1) Which CAM modalities are used most frequently among migraine/headache sufferers? and (2) What are the self-reported reasons for CAM use among migraine/headache sufferers? This secondary analysis of data from the 2012 U.S. NHIS (a national cross-sectional survey) examined the use of CAM among migraine/headache sufferers, including the main reasons related to CAM use. Data were weighted and analyzed using STATA 14.0. The sample of 34,525 adults included 6558 (18.7%) headache/migraine sufferers. Of the headache/migraine sufferers, a substantial proportion (37.6%, n = 2427) used CAM for various conditions; however, CAM use specifically for headache/migraine was much less prevalent (3.3%, n = 216). Of those who used CAM for headache/migraine, about half used CAM in conjunction with prescription (47.8%, n = 100) or over-the-counter medication (55.1%, n = 113). As severity of headache/migraine increased so did the likelihood of using CAM (severe migraine odds ratio [OR] = 2.32; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.41, 3.82; both recurring headache/severe migraine OR = 3.36; 95% CI: 2.08, 5.43; when compared to those with recurring headache only). The most frequently used CAM modality among all headache/migraine sufferers (N = 6558) was manipulative therapy (22.0%, n = 1317), herbal supplementation (21.7%, n = 1389) and mind-body therapy (17

  9. Dietary Intake Patterns and Diet Quality in a Nationally Representative Sample of Women With and Without Severe Headache or Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, E. Whitney; Lipton, Richard B.; Peterlin, B. Lee; Raynor, Hollie A.; Thomas, J. Graham; O'Leary, Kevin C.; Pavlovic, Jelena; Wing, Rena R.; Bond, Dale S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective/Background The role of diet in migraine is not well understood. We sought to characterize usual dietary intake patterns and diet quality in a nationally representative sample of women with and without severe headache or migraine. We also examined whether the relationship between migraine and diet differs by weight status. Methods In this analysis, women with migraine or severe headache status was determined by questionnaire for 3069 women, ages 20-50 years, who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Study, 1999-2004. Women who experienced severe headaches or migraines were classified as migraine for the purposes of this analysis. Dietary intake patterns (micro- and macronutrient intake and eating frequency) and diet quality, measured by the Healthy Eating Index, 2005, were determined using one 24-hour dietary recall. Results Dietary intake patterns did not significantly differ between women with and without migraine. Normal weight women with migraine had significantly lower diet quality (Healthy Eating Index, 2005 total scores) than women without migraine (52.5 ± 0.9 vs 45.9 ± 1.0; P < .0001). Conclusions Whereas findings suggest no differences in dietary intake patterns among women with and without migraine, dietary quality differs by migraine status in normal weight women. Prospective analyses are needed to establish how diet relates to migraine onset, characteristics, and clinical features in individuals of varying weight status. PMID:25758250

  10. Weight change associated with the use of migraine-preventive medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2008-06-01

    Medications administered long term, such as those used for migraine prophylaxis, are often associated with weight change as a side effect. Such effects may compromise general health status, exacerbate coexisting medical conditions, and affect medication adherence. Weight gain should be of particular concern in patients with migraine, as there is evidence that overweight and obese patients with migraine are at risk for an increased frequency and severity of migraine attacks. This article reviews weight-change data from recent clinical studies of migraine-preventive medications in children, adolescents, and adults with migraine. A PubMed search was conducted for English-language articles published between January 1970 and November 2007. Among the search terms were migraine prevention, migraine prophylaxis, migraine treatment, antidepressant drug, beta-adrenergic-receptor blockers, antiepileptic drug, anticonvulsant drug, weight gain, and weight loss. Studies that reported weight-change data (gain, loss, or neutral) were included. When available, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies were selected for review. Open-label, retrospective or prospective trials may also have been included. Most of the migraine-preventive medications classified by the United States Headache Consortium as group 1 based on the high level of evidence for their efficacy--for instance, amitriptyline, propranolol, and divalproex sodium-have been associated with varying degrees of weight gain. The exceptions are timolol, which is weight neutral, and topiramate, which is associated with weight loss. Among the drugs that have been associated with weight gain, a higher incidence of weight gain was observed with amitriptyline and divalproex sodium than with propranolol. Weight-change effects require careful consideration when selecting migraine-preventive medications, and weight should be monitored carefully over the course of any migraine treatment plan.

  11. Anxiety and hopelessness levels in patients with migraine and tension headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüksel Kıvrak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Migraine and tension type headache (TTH are two most common headaches. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether the hopelessness, anxiety and social self-esteem scores are different in two headache groups.Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with 72 migraine patients, 28 TTH patients and 50 healthy controls. Participants filled the General Information Form, Hopeless-ness Scale (HS, Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-II and Social Comparison Scale (SCS. Results: There were no differences between the groups with respect to gender, age, education years, marital status and economical status. Hopelessness scores of the TTH group was higher than the migraine and control group (p=0.001. There were no statistical differences between the migraine and TTH groups with respect to STAI-II scores but TTH group scores higher in study groups (p=0.003. Control group SCS scores were higher than both patient groups with no significant differences (p=0.072.Conclusion: These findings indicate that the patients with TTH have more hopelessness than the migraine group and more anxious than the healthy control group.

  12. Timing and topography of cerebral blood flow, aura, and headache during migraine attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J; Friberg, L; Olsen, T S

    1990-01-01

    contralaterally but presumably originated in the hypoperfused hemisphere). Our results suggest a simple model for migraine attacks: A pathological disturbance in one cerebral hemisphere causes the aura symptoms and after a time delay, it also causes the headache by stimulating local vascular nociceptors...

  13. Electron Microscopic and Proteomic Comparison of Terminal Branches of the Trigeminal Nerve in Patients with and without Migraine Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyuron, Bahman; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Miller, Robert; Chim, Harvey; Reed, Deborah; Chance, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the ultrastructural appearance and protein expression of the zygomaticotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve in patients with and without migraine headaches. Methods After confirmation of migraine headache diagnosis on 15 patients, a 5-mm segment of the zygomaticotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve that is routinely removed during migraine surgery was compared to similarly sized nerve segments obtained from 15 control patients without a history of migraine headaches, who underwent an endoscopic forehead lift where this nerve is routinely transected. The segments were snap-frozen at −80°C for the downstream proteomics analysis. In addition, the cytoarchitectural differences of the nerve segments obtained from the 15 migraine and 15 control subjects were examined in detail under the electron microscope. Results Analysis of liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry data sets identified differentially expressed proteins and networks composed of highly connected molecular modules (p = 10−44 and p = 10−34) in patients with migraine headaches. The nerves from patients with migraine headaches had a linear organization, disrupted myelin sheaths and target axons, and discontinuous neurofilaments that were poorly registered with the discontinuous myelin sheaths, suggesting axonal abnormality. Conclusions This study offers electron microscopic and proteomic evidence of axonal abnormality and deregulation of the myelination process in patients with migraine headaches compared with controls, offering the first objective evidence to support the role of peripheral mechanisms in the migraine headache cascade and an explanation as to why the surgical treatment of migraine headaches is efficacious. PMID:25347655

  14. Lifting the burden of headache in China: managing migraine in a SMART way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shengyuan; Steiner, Timothy J

    2017-12-01

    With support from Lifting The Burden , a UK-registered charitable organization, a nationwide survey of headache disorders in the Chinese adult population was conducted in 2008-2009. This project, which was within the Global Campaign against Headache, showed that headache disorders have a major adverse impact on public health in China. Subsequently, as essential support for implementing headache services around the country, an enactment of stage 3 (intervention) of the Global Campaign against Headache - the continuing medical education (CME) program Headache Schools - was established. 'SMART' (Screen, Migraine, Aura, Red flag and Treatment), a systematic and operational disease management model, was introduced with the aims of enhancing neurologists' knowledge of migraine, standardizing their diagnostic and treatment approaches, and improving their practices and outcomes. To date, 615 neurologists have been trained and 135 headache clinics have been established. In future, as we promote SMART in CME, we can use the database of our computerized clinical decision support systems to evaluate the impact on treatment outcomes.

  15. Herbal medicines in migraine prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeWeerdt, CJ; Bootsma, HPR; Hendriks, H

    1996-01-01

    The efficacy of feverfew capsules on migraine prophylaxis was investigated in a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study in which 50 patients, who had not used feverfew before, participated. The capsules were filled with a dried alcoholic extract of feverfew on microcristalline

  16. Migraine headaches in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS: Comparison of two prospective cross-sectional studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merck Samantha J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Headaches are more frequent in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS than healthy control (HC subjects. The 2004 International Headache Society (IHS criteria were used to define CFS headache phenotypes. Methods Subjects in Cohort 1 (HC = 368; CFS = 203 completed questionnaires about many diverse symptoms by giving nominal (yes/no answers. Cohort 2 (HC = 21; CFS = 67 had more focused evaluations. They scored symptom severities on 0 to 4 anchored ordinal scales, and had structured headache evaluations. All subjects had history and physical examinations; assessments for exclusion criteria; questionnaires about CFS related symptoms (0 to 4 scale, Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI and Medical Outcome Survey Short Form 36 (MOS SF-36. Results Demographics, trends for the number of diffuse "functional" symptoms present, and severity of CFS case designation criteria symptoms were equivalent between CFS subjects in Cohorts 1 and 2. HC had significantly fewer symptoms, lower MFI and higher SF-36 domain scores than CFS in both cohorts. Migraine headaches were found in 84%, and tension-type headaches in 81% of Cohort 2 CFS. This compared to 5% and 45%, respectively, in HC. The CFS group had migraine without aura (60%; MO; CFS+MO, with aura (24%; CFS+MA, tension headaches only (12%, or no headaches (4%. Co-morbid tension and migraine headaches were found in 67% of CFS. CFS+MA had higher severity scores than CFS+MO for the sum of scores for poor memory, dizziness, balance, and numbness ("Neuro-construct", p = 0.002 and perceived heart rhythm disturbances, palpitations and noncardiac chest pain ("Cardio-construct"; p = 0.045, t-tests after Bonferroni corrections. CFS+MO subjects had lower pressure-induced pain thresholds (2.36 kg [1.95-2.78; 95% C.I.] n = 40 and a higher prevalence of fibromyalgia (47%; 1990 criteria compared to HC (5.23 kg [3.95-6.52] n = 20; and 0%, respectively. Sumatriptan was beneficial for 13 out of 14 newly diagnosed

  17. Importance of Pain Acceptance in Relation to Headache Disability and Pain Interference in Women With Migraine and Overweight/Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Jason; Graham Thomas, J; Seng, Elizabeth K; Lipton, Richard B; Pavlović, Jelena M; Rathier, Lucille; Roth, Julie; O'Leary, Kevin C; Bond, Dale S

    2017-05-01

    Pain acceptance involves willingness to experience pain and engaging in valued activities while pain is present. Though pain acceptance could limit both headache-related disability and pain interference in individuals with migraine, few studies have addressed this issue. This study evaluated whether higher levels of total pain acceptance and its two subcomponents, pain willingness and activity engagement, were associated with lower levels of headache-related impairment in women who had both migraine and overweight/obesity. In this cross-sectional study, participants seeking weight loss and headache relief in the Women's Health and Migraine trial completed baseline measures of pain acceptance (Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire [CPAQ]), headache-related disability (Headache Impact Test-6), and pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory). Migraine headache frequency and pain intensity were assessed daily via smartphone diary. Using CPAQ total and subcomponent (pain willingness and activity engagement) scores, headache frequency, pain intensity, and body mass index (BMI) as predictors in linear regression, headache-related disability, and pain interference were modeled as outcomes. On average, participants (n = 126; age = 38.5 ± 8.2 years; BMI = 35.3 ± 6.6 kg/m 2 ) reported 8.4 ± 4.7 migraine days/month and pain intensity of 6.0 ± 1.5 on a 0-10 scale on headache days. After correcting for multiple comparisons (adjusted α = .008), pain willingness was independently associated with both lower headache-related disability (P treatment-seeking women with migraine and overweight/obesity. Future studies are needed to clarify direction of causality and test whether strategies designed to help women increase pain willingness, or relinquish ineffective efforts to control pain, can improve functional outcomes in women who have migraine and overweight/obesity. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  18. The role of migraine headache severity, associated features and interactions with overweight/obesity in inhibitory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galioto, Rachel; O'Leary, Kevin C; Gunstad, John; Thomas, J Graham; Lipton, Richard B; Pavlović, Jelena M; Roth, Julie; Rathier, Lucille; Bond, Dale S

    2018-01-01

    While migraine and obesity are related and both conditions are associated with reduced executive functioning, no study has examined whether obesity exacerbates executive dysfunction in migraine. This cross-sectional study examined whether overweight/obesity moderated associations of migraine severity and associated features with inhibitory control, one aspect of executive function. Women (n = 124) aged 18-50 years old with overweight/obesity body mass index (BMI) = 35.1 ± 6.4 kg/m 2 and migraine completed a 28-day smartphone-based headache diary assessing migraine headache severity (attack frequency, pain intensity) and frequency of associated features (aura, photophobia, phonophobia, nausea). They then completed computerized measures of inhibitory control during an interictal (headache-free) period. Participants with higher migraine attack frequency performed worse on the Flanker test (accuracy and reaction time; p < .05). Migraine attack frequency and pain intensity interacted with BMI to predict slower Stroop and/or Flanker Reaction Time (RT; p < .05). More frequent photophobia, phonophobia and aura were independently related to slower RT on the Stroop and/or Flanker tests (p < .05), and BMI moderated the relationship between the occurrence of aura and Stroop RT (p = .03). Associations of migraine severity and presence of associated features with inhibitory control varied by BMI in overweight/obese women with migraine. These findings warrant consideration of weight status in clarifying the role of migraine in executive functioning.

  19. Quality of life in adolescents with migraine and other headaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Langeveld

    1998-01-01

    textabstractIn 1975 Ihe research line "Stress and Migraine" was started at the "Free University", Amsterdam. Later this research program was continued at the Institute for Medical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Erasmus University Rotterdam. A first aim of this research line was to investigate the

  20. Study of Helicobacter Pylori Antibody Serum Level in Patients with Migraine Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Mazaheri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Mechanisms underlying migraine precipitation are largely unknown. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection has recently been associated with various extraintes-tinal pathologies and migraine. The relation between Helicobacter pylori and Migraine is controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of the H. pylori infec-tion with migraine.Materials & Methods: In a case-control study, a total of 80 patients with migraine with aura and without aura who came to neurology clinic of ّFarshchian hospital affiliated with Hamedan Medical University were enrolled in the study and compared with a group of 80 controls. The patients with the history of anti h. pylori medication, chronic inflammatory dis-eases and malignancy were excluded. Helicobacter pylori infection was diagnosed by ELISA test for IgG. The diagnosis and classification of migraine were made according to the Inter-national Headache Society (IHS criteria. The serum level of IgG was compared in each group by student t test.Results: The mean age in migraine and control groups were 27.26±8.99 and 29.04±9.75 years respectively. The serum level of anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG were 39.75±45.09 and 24.93±27.88 Uarb/ml in migraine and control groups respectively (P=0.013. The mean of IgG based on the demographic data were not different in both group (P>0.05.Conclusion: This study demonstrated a higher level of anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG in patients with migraine.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 19 (4:57-61

  1. Cost and predictors of lost productive time in chronic migraine and episodic migraine: results from the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Daniel; Manack, Aubrey N; Reed, Michael L; Buse, Dawn C; Varon, Sepideh F; Lipton, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    To quantify the cost differences and predictors of lost productive time (LPT) in persons with chronic migraine (CM) and episodic migraine (EM). The American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) study is a US national longitudinal survey of severe headache. Cost estimates were obtained via U.S. Census income data. To elucidate the unique predictors of LPT, the optimal distribution for modeling was determined. Zero inflation models for LPT were predicted from sociodemographics, headache features, characteristics and disability, medication use, and depression. The interaction between headache status and age was the primary effect of interest. The eligible sample included 6329 persons with EM and 374 persons with CM. Men with CM aged 45 to 54 years cost employers nearly $200 per week more than do their EM counterparts. Likewise, for women, costs were higher for CM, with the cost differential between EM and CM being $90 per week. After comprehensive adjustment, increases in LPT with age were significantly higher in CM than in EM (rate ratio 1.03; 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.05). When age was recoded to a decade, metric rates of LPT increased 25% more per decade for CM than for EM (rate ratio 1.25; 95% confidence interval 1.004-1.5). LPT is more costly and increases more rapidly for those with CM than for those with EM as age increases. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Patients' preference in migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, François (Frans)

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is about migraine. Three elements are discussed. First element is preventive treatment, second element is attack treatment and the third part focuses on medication overuse headache. The preventive treatment of migraine is a valuable intervention in primary care. If preventive treatment

  3. Structural gray matter abnormalities in migraine relate to headache lateralization, but not aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal M; Hoffmann, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The hallmark of migraine aura (MA) is transient cortical dysfunction but it is not known if MA is associated with structural cortical or subcortical changes. To determine the relation between MA and structural gray matter abnormalities, we studied a unique sample of 20 patients...... with frequent side-locked MA, i.e. visual aura consistently occurring in the same hemifield. METHODS: We applied a highly sensitive within-patient design to assess anatomical differences with both voxel-based morphometry and surface-based morphometry on a whole-hemisphere level and for specific anatomical...... regions of interest. Within-subject comparisons were made with regard to aura symptoms (N = 20 vs 20) and with regard to headache (N = 13 vs 13). RESULTS: We found no differences in gray matter structure with regard to aura symptoms in MA patients. Comparing the typical migraine headache side...

  4. Migraine is the most prevalent primary headache in individuals with temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Ana L; Gonçalves, Daniela A G; Castanharo, Sabrina M; Speciali, José G; Bigal, Marcelo E; Camparis, Cinara M

    2010-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of primary headaches (HA) in adults with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) who were assessed in a specialty orofacial pain clinic, as well as in controls without TMD. The sample consisted of 158 individuals with TMD seen at a university-based specialty clinic, as well as 68 controls. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD were used to diagnose the TMD patients. HAs were assessed using a structured interview and classified according to the Second Edition of the International Classification for Headache Disorders. Data were analyzed by chi-square tests with a significance level of 5% and odds ratio (OR) tests with a 95% confidence interval (CI). HAs occurred in 45.6% of the control group (30.9% had migraine and 14.7% had tension-type headache [TTH]) and in 85.5% of individuals with TMD. Among individuals with TMD, migraine was the most prevalent primary HA (55.3%), followed by TTH (30.2%); 14.5% had no HA. In contrast to controls, the odds ratio (OR) for HA in those with TMD was 7.05 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.65-13.61; P = .000), for migraine, the OR was 2.76 (95% CI = 1.50-5.06; P = .001), and for TTH, the OR was 2.51 (95% CI = 1.18-5.35; P = .014). Myofascial pain/arthralgia was the most common TMD diagnosis (53.2%). The presence of HA or specific HAs was not associated with the time since the onset of TMD (P = .714). However, migraine frequency was positively associated with TMD pain severity (P = .000). TMD was associated with increased primary HA prevalence rates. Migraine was the most common primary HA diagnosis in individuals with TMD.

  5. Sedative Dosing of Propofol for Treatment of Migraine Headache in the Emergency Department: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Mosier, Jarrod; Roper, Grant; Hays, Daniel; Guisto, John

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Migraine headaches requiring an emergency department visit due to failed outpatient rescue therapy present a significant challenge in terms of length of stay (LOS) and financial costs. Propofol therapy may be effective at pain reduction and reduce that length of stay given its pharmacokinetic properties as a short acting intravenous sedative anesthetic and pharmacodynamics on GABA mediated chloride flux.Methods: Case series of 4 patients presenting to an urban academic medical c...

  6. Study of General health, resiliency, and defense mechanisms in patients with migraine headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Aghayusefi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine is a neurological disease that the etiology, several factors affect its onset or its exacerbation. One of the factors affecting disease is psychological factors such as defense mechanisms, resiliency, and general health. This study assessed the relationship between general health, resiliency, and general defense mechanisms, and also predicts the general health of people with migraine headaches that have a high resiliency and use mature defense mechanisms. Material and Methods: 50 women with migraine headache in the city of Bushehr using defense mechanisms, resiliency, and general health questionnaires were studied. For statistical analysis, Pearson correlation and multiple regression tests were used by SPSS 17 software. Results: The results showed that most of the defense mechanisms of migraine sufferers are Immature and Neuroticism. There is significant negative correlation between the deterioration of general health and resiliency as well as the mature defense mechanism (p=0/003, and also there is a significant positive correlation between this deterioration with neuroticism (p=0/040 and immature defense mechanisms (p=0/041. On the other hand there is significant negative correlation between resiliencies with immature (p=0/009 and neuroticism defense mechanisms (p=0/04, and also with mature defense mechanism has a significant positive correlation (p=0/003. Also, as more people use the mature defense mechanism, their deterioration of general health will be reduced, but this relationship will be stronger with the presence of resiliency. So migraine people use the mature defense mechanisms with high resiliency will have more favorable general health (less deterioration of general health. Conclusion: This study showed that migraine patients use the mature defense mechanisms with high resiliency will have more favorable general health (less deterioration of general health.

  7. Diamine oxidase (DAO) supplement reduces headache in episodic migraine patients with DAO deficiency: A randomized double-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Casas, Joan; Comas-Basté, Oriol; Latorre-Moratalla, M Luz; Lorente-Gascón, Marian; Duelo, Adriana; Soler-Singla, Luis; Vidal-Carou, M Carmen

    2018-02-15

    Histamine intolerance is a disorder in the homeostasis of histamine due to a reduced intestinal degradation of this amine, mainly caused by a deficiency in the enzyme diamine oxidase (DAO). Among histamine related symptoms, headache is one of the most recorded. Current clinical strategies for the treatment of the symptomatology related to this disorder are based on the exclusion of foods with histamine or other bioactive amines and/or exogenous DAO supplementation. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a food supplement consisting of DAO enzyme as a preventive treatment of migraine in patients with DAO deficiency through a randomized double-blind trial. 100 patients with confirmed episodic migraine according to current International Headache Society (IHS) criteria and DAO deficiency (levels below 80 HDU/ml) were randomized in two groups. One group received DAO enzyme supplementation and the other received placebo for one month. Clinical outcomes assessed were duration and number of attacks, perception of pain intensity and adverse effects during treatment. The use of triptans was also recorded. Great variability was found in the duration of migraine attacks reported by placebo and DAO groups. A significant reduction (p = 0.0217) in hours of pain was achieved in patients treated with DAO supplement, with mean durations of 6.14 (±3.06) and 4.76 (±2.68) hours before and after treatment, respectively. A smaller reduction without statistical signification was also observed for this outcome in the placebo group, from 7.53 (±4.24) to 6.68 (±4.42) hours. Only in DAO group, a decrease in the percentage of patients taking triptans was observed. The number of attacks and the scores of pain intensity showed a similar reduction in both groups. No adverse effects were registered in patients treated with DAO enzyme. Migrainous patients supplemented with DAO enzyme during one month significantly reduced the duration of their migraine attacks by 1.4 h. No

  8. Topiramate: Effects on cognition in patients with epilepsy, migraine headache and obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Erica L.; Wroolie, Tonita E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the clinical implications of topiramate (TPM)-induced cognitive deficits in patients with epilepsy, migraine headache, obesity, and in normal populations, followed by reviews of the literature describing the reversal of such deficits upon medication discontinuation. It also discusses animal investigations of TPM’s role of neuroprotection in brain injury. TPM’s most intolerable adverse effects (AEs) are on verbal fluency and reaction time, resulting in high discontinuation rates in patients taking it for epilepsy and migraine headache. However, because TPM is so effective in the treatment of epilepsy and migraine headache, its use is expected to continue. There appears to be greater tolerance of TPM’s cognitive AEs when it is used in the treatment of obesity, perhaps because of the lower doses required. Research attempting to predict the populations most vulnerable to the cognitive effects caused by TPM is ongoing. Studies suggest that one such population may include patients with a past psychiatric history. Slow titration and administration of the lowest possible doses may decrease risk of cognitive deficits. PMID:23858325

  9. Sedative dosing of propofol for treatment of migraine headache in the emergency department: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, Jarrod; Roper, Grant; Hays, Daniel; Guisto, John

    2013-11-01

    Migraine headaches requiring an emergency department visit due to failed outpatient rescue therapy present a significant challenge in terms of length of stay (LOS) and financial costs. Propofol therapy may be effective at pain reduction and reduce that length of stay given its pharmacokinetic properties as a short acting intravenous sedative anesthetic and pharmacodynamics on GABA mediated chloride flux. Case series of 4 patients presenting to an urban academic medical center with migraine headache failing outpatient therapy. Each patient was given a sedation dose (1 mg/kg) of propofol under standard procedural sedation precautions. Each of the 4 patients experienced dramatic reductions or complete resolution of headache severity. LOS for 3 of the 4 patients was 50% less than the average LOS for patients with similar chief complaints to our emergency department. 1 patient required further treatment with standard therapy but had a significant reduction in pain and a shorter LOS. There were no episodes of hypotension, hypoxia, or apnea during the sedations. In this small case series, sedation dose propofol appears to be effective and safe for the treatment of refractory migraines, and may result in a reduced LOS.

  10. Sedative Dosing Of Propofol For Treatment Of Migraine Headache In The Emergency Department: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosier, Jarrod

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Migraine headaches requiring an emergency department visit due to failed outpatient rescue therapy present a significant challenge in terms of length of stay (LOS and financial costs. Propofol therapy may be effective at pain reduction and reduce that length of stay given its pharmacokinetic properties as a short acting intravenous sedative anesthetic and pharmacodynamics on GABA mediated chloride flux.Methods: Case series of 4 patients presenting to an urban academic medical center with migraine headache failing outpatient therapy. Each patient was given a sedation dose (1 mg/kg of propofol under standard procedural sedation precautions.Results: Each of the 4 patients experienced dramatic reductions or complete resolution of headache severity. LOS for 3 of the 4 patients was 50% less than the average LOS for patients with similar chief complaints to our emergency department. 1 patient required further treatment with standard therapy but had a significant reduction in pain and a shorter LOS. There were no episodes of hypotension, hypoxia, or apnea during the sedations.Conclusion: In this small case series, sedation dose propofol appears to be effective and safe for the treatment of refractory migraines, and may result in a reduced LOS. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(6:646-649.

  11. The Childhood and Adolescent Migraine Prevention (CHAMP) Study: A Report on Baseline Characteristics of Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Scott W; Hershey, Andrew D; Coffey, Christopher S; Chamberlin, Leigh A; Ecklund, Dixie J D; Sullivan, Stephanie M; Klingner, Elizabeth A; Yankey, Jon W; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Korbee, Leslie L; Costigan, Michele L; Riss, Holly H; Porter, Linda L

    2016-04-04

    To describe baseline headache characteristics of children and adolescents participating in a multicenter, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, comparative effectiveness study of amitriptyline, topiramate, and placebo for the prevention of migraine (CHAMP Study). Children and adolescents (age 8-17 years old, inclusive) diagnosed with migraine with or without aura, having headaches at least four times per month were enrolled from 2012 through 2014. The trial involved a baseline period (minimum of 28 days) during which prospective diaries were completed and demographics and headache features obtained. A total of 488 children and adolescents (mean age 14.0 ± 2.4 years) agreed to participate in the trial, with 361 randomized and 127 not randomized. Randomized subjects had a 5.5 ± 3.1 year history of headaches, with 15.1 ± 7.1 headache days per month (based upon retrospective report at screening visit). Prospective diaries reported 11.5 ± 6.1 headache days per 28 day baseline. Across this 28 day period, reported headache days per week were stable (about 3 headache days per week). Recording of individual headache features by diary (n = 4136 headache days) showed characteristics consistent with migraine (mean duration 10.5 ± 8.1 hours, mean severity 6.0 ± 2.1, 60% throbbing, 55% with activity worsening headaches, 55% with photophobia, and 47% with phonophobia). Baseline data from the CHAMP Study suggested that the randomized sample was representative of the real world population of children and adolescents that present for treatment of migraine. Headaches in children and adolescents recorded during a 28 day prospective baseline period in this multi-site comparative effectiveness study did not change over the course of the baseline period, even though a clear diagnosis, recommendation for effective acute treatment, and standardized education about healthy habits occurred prior to the diary collection period. © 2016 American

  12. Associations between stress and migraine and tension-type headache: results from a school-based study in adolescents from grammar schools in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milde-Busch, Astrid; Blaschek, Astrid; Heinen, Florian; Borggräfe, Ingo; Koerte, Inga; Straube, Andreas; Schankin, Christoph; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2011-05-01

    Stress is considered the major contributor to migraine and tension-type headache in adolescents. Previous studies have focused on general stressors, whereas the aim of the present study was to investigate associations between individuals' stressful experiences and different types of headache. Adolescents from 10th and 11th grades of grammar schools filled in questionnaires. Stressful experiences were measured with the Trier Inventory of Chronic Stress. Type of headache was classified according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Linear regressions, adjusted for sex and grade, were calculated to estimate differences in stress scores that can be attributed to migraine, tension-type headache or miscellaneous headache. A total of 1260 questionnaires were analysed. Tension-type headache, migraine and co-existing migraine plus tension-type headache were found in 48.7%, 10.2% and 19.8% of the participants. In subjects with migraine or co-existing migraine plus tension-type headache, high increases in stress scores were found in all investigated dimensions, whereas much weaker and inconsistent associations were found in subjects with tension-type headache only. The characteristic of migraine is more associated with stressful experiences than this is the case for tension-type headache. This suggests that adolescent migraine patients might especially benefit from behavioural interventions regarding stress.

  13. Patients with migraine are right about their perception of temperature as a trigger: time series analysis of headache diary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Albert C; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Huang, Norden E; Shia, Ben-Chang; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2015-01-01

    Researches to date on the association between headache and weather have yielded inconsistent results. Only a limited number of studies have examined the clinical significance of self-reported weather sensitivity. This study aimed to identify the difference in the association of headache with temperature between migraine patients with and without temperature sensitivity. 66 migraine patients (75.8 % female; mean age 43.3 ± 12.9 years) provided their 1-year headache diaries from 2007 to a headache clinic in Taipei, Taiwan. 34 patients (51.5 %) reported sensitivity to temperature change but 32 (48.5 %) did not. Time series of daily headache incidence was modeled and stratified by temperature sensitivity. Empirical mode decomposition was used to identify temporal weather patterns that were correlated to headache incidence, and regression analysis was used to examine the amount of variance in headache incidence that could be explained by temperature in different seasons. Among all migraine patients, temperature change accounted for 16.5 % of variance in headache incidence in winter and 9.6 % in summer. In winter, the explained variance increased to 29.2 % among patients with temperature sensitivity, but was not significant among those without temperature sensitivity. Overall, temperature change explained 27.0 % of the variance of the mild headache incidence but only 4.8 % of the incidence of moderate to severe headache during winter. This diary-based study provides evidence to link the perception of temperature sensitivity and headache incidence in migraine patients. Those who reported temperature sensitivity are more likely to have headache increase during the winter, particular for mild headaches.

  14. The Relationship between Sleep Quality and Academic Achievement with Migraine Headaches among Alborz Medical Sciences University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Sadati

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : Considering the issue of sleep quality in medical students as a stratum of society who are concerned with human health and its relationship with other psychological variables (in particular academic achievement and headaches seems essential. So, the present study was done to evaluate the relationship between Sleep Quality and academic achievement with migraine headaches. Materials and Methods: The present study was descriptive _ correlation. The population in this study includes all the students in Alborz Medical Sciences University in the academic year of 2014. 256 students (156 females and 100 males who were selected according to research entrance criteria by stratified sampling method; and they answered to the Sleep of Quality Test and Examine Migraine Headaches Symptom Questionnaires. Also, the mean of first term scores were considered as an index of the academic achievement. The data were analyzed by SPSS 19 software. Results: The results showed that there were statistically significant correlation between migraine headaches with academic achievement, Sleep of Quality and substandard mental sleep quality, delay into going to sleep, sleep disorders, taking hypnotic pills, and daily function disorder; and sleep disorders, daily function disorder, academic achievement and taking hypnotic pills could predict and explain 25/6 changes associated to migraine headaches. Conclusion: Those students with inappropriate Sleep of Quality; they experienced more migraine headaches and failure in academic achievements.

  15. Migraine Trainers as Models: the effectiveness of Lay trainerswith migraine for behavioural attack prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.Y.M. Mérelle (Saskia)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractMigraine is a chronic brain disorder, characterized by attacks of severe headache accompanied by nausea, vomiting and sensitivity to light, sound and smell. Attacks can be preceded by premonitory symptoms such as fatigue, muscular stiff ness or negative aff ect. It has been shown that

  16. Chronic migraine--classification, characteristics and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Dodick, David W; Goadsby, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    According to the revised 2nd Edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, primary headaches can be categorized as chronic or episodic; chronic migraine is defined as headaches in the absence of medication overuse, occurring on =15 days per month for =3 months, of which...... headaches on =8 days must fulfill the criteria for migraine without aura. Prevalence and incidence data for chronic migraine are still uncertain, owing to the heterogeneous definitions used to identify the condition in population-based studies over the past two decades. Chronic migraine is severely...... disabling and difficult to manage, as affected patients experience substantially more-frequent headaches, comorbid pain and affective disorders, and fewer pain-free intervals, than do those with episodic migraine. Data on the treatment of chronic migraine are scarce because most migraine-prevention trials...

  17. Real-time sharing and expression of migraine headache suffering on Twitter: a cross-sectional infodemiology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Thiago D; DosSantos, Marcos F; Danciu, Theodora; DeBoer, Misty; van Holsbeeck, Hendrik; Lucas, Sarah R; Aiello, Christine; Khatib, Leen; Bender, MaryCatherine A; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; DaSilva, Alexandre F

    2014-04-03

    Although population studies have greatly improved our understanding of migraine, they have relied on retrospective self-reports that are subject to memory error and experimenter-induced bias. Furthermore, these studies also lack specifics from the actual time that attacks were occurring, and how patients express and share their ongoing suffering. As technology and language constantly evolve, so does the way we share our suffering. We sought to evaluate the infodemiology of self-reported migraine headache suffering on Twitter. Trained observers in an academic setting categorized the meaning of every single "migraine" tweet posted during seven consecutive days. The main outcome measures were prevalence, life-style impact, linguistic, and timeline of actual self-reported migraine headache suffering on Twitter. From a total of 21,741 migraine tweets collected, only 64.52% (14,028/21,741 collected tweets) were from users reporting their migraine headache attacks in real-time. The remainder of the posts were commercial, re-tweets, general discussion or third person's migraine, and metaphor. The gender distribution available for the actual migraine posts was 73.47% female (10,306/14,028), 17.40% males (2441/14,028), and 0.01% transgendered (2/14,028). The personal impact of migraine headache was immediate on mood (43.91%, 6159/14,028), productivity at work (3.46%, 486/14,028), social life (3.45%, 484/14,028), and school (2.78%, 390/14,028). The most common migraine descriptor was "Worst" (14.59%, 201/1378) and profanity, the "F-word" (5.3%, 73/1378). The majority of postings occurred in the United States (58.28%, 3413/5856), peaking on weekdays at 10:00h and then gradually again at 22:00h; the weekend had a later morning peak. Twitter proved to be a powerful source of knowledge for migraine research. The data in this study overlap large-scale epidemiological studies, avoiding memory bias and experimenter-induced error. Furthermore, linguistics of ongoing migraine reports

  18. Importance of Pain Acceptance in Relation to Headache Disability and Pain Interference in Women with Migraine and Overweight/Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Jason; Thomas, J. Graham; Seng, Elizabeth K.; Lipton, Richard B.; Pavlovic, Jelena; Rathier, Lucille; Roth, Julie; O’Leary, Kevin C.; Bond, Dale S.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pain acceptance involves willingness to experience pain and engaging in valued activities while pain is present. Though pain acceptance could limit both headache-related disability and pain interference in individuals with migraine, few studies have addressed this issue. The current study evaluated whether higher levels of total pain acceptance and it’s 2 subcomponents, pain willingness and activity engagement, were associated with lower levels of headache-related impairment in women who had both migraine and overweight/obesity. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, participants seeking weight loss and headache relief in the Women’s Health and Migraine (WHAM) trial completed baseline measures of pain acceptance (Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire [CPAQ]), headache-related disability (Headache Impact Test-6 [HIT-6]), and pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]). Migraine headache frequency and pain intensity were assessed daily via smartphone diary. Using CPAQ total and subcomponent (pain willingness and activity engagement) scores, headache frequency, pain intensity, and BMI as predictors in linear regression, headache-related disability and pain interference were modeled as outcomes. RESULTS On average, participants (n=126; age=38.5±8.2 years; BMI=35.3±6.6 kg/m2) reported 8.4±4.7 migraine days/month and pain intensity of 6.0±1.5 on a 0–10 scale on headache days. After correcting for multiple comparisons (adjusted α=.008), pain willingness was independently associated with both lower headache related disability (pheadache related disability (p=.128; β= −.138) and pain interference (p=.042; β= −.154). CPAQ Total Score was not associated with headache related disability (p=.439; β=.066) and pain interference (p=.305; β=.074). Pain intensity was significantly associated with outcomes in all analyses (p’s headache-related disability and general pain interference in treatment-seeking women with migraine and overweight

  19. Attacks of common migraine or hortons headache may not be accompanied by changes in regional cerebral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, L.; Aebelholt Krabbe, A.; Tfelt-Hansen, P.; Olesen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Vasospasm and cerebral ischemia, followed by cerebral and extracerebral vasodilation and hyperemia, are generally believed to form the common pathophysiology of the various subtypes of migraine. Mild forms of reactions are thought to result in common migraine (no neurological prodromes or accompaniments), and more severe reactions are thought to induce classical migraine. 8 induced common migraine attacks in 6 patients do not support this unitarian view, as no regional cerebral blood flow changes was found, but suggests a different pathophysiology in common migraine compaired to classical migraine. There are few features in Hortons headache to incriminate the cerebral vessels, and generally patients do not have symptoms attributable to cerebral involvement. In 6 out of 14 patients with known Hortons headache we succesfully induced an attack after alcohol alone or in combination with sublingual nitroglycerine. A slight hyperventilation occurred during the attack, correcting cerebral blood flow for these changes left mean CBF totally unchanged. No regional abnormalities occurred in any of the about 700 regions measured from during each investigation in neither the group with common migraine, nor in the patients with Hortons headache. (Author)

  20. Weather and emergency room visits for migraine headaches in Ottawa, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, P J; Szyszkowicz, M; Stieb, D; Bourque, D A

    2006-01-01

    Self-reported surveys have indicated that weather can trigger migraine headaches. However, to date, we know of no previous study that has examined the relationship between weather and emergency room (ER) visits for this condition. To examine associations between ER visits for migraines and selected meteorological conditions within the 24 hours preceding the visit. A case-crossover design was used to study 4039 visits for migraines (ICD-9: 346) that occurred at an Ottawa hospital between 1993 and 2000. Meteorological conditions were defined using hourly readings from a fixed-site monitoring station. Conditional logistic regression was used to compare the occurrence of meteorological conditions during the 24 hours leading up to the time of the visit to control periods occurring 1 week before and after. Precipitation-related weather events (fog, snow, rain, thunder) were not associated with migraine visits. Similarly, no associations were observed with changes in atmospheric pressure, wind speed, and relative humidity during the 24 hours preceding presentation. No statistically significant differences in the frequency distribution of clusters defined by relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, and temperature were found between case and control intervals. Conversely, a mean wind speed in excess of 19 km per hour was associated with a reduction in ER visits 8 to 12 hours later. Our findings provide little support for the hypothesis that ER visits for migraines are related to weather conditions occurring within the 24 hours preceding presentation. These results should be interpreted cautiously as some comparisons are based on a small number of cases, and ER visits for migraine may represent a highly selective group of patients who suffer from this condition.

  1. Efficacy and feasibility of antidepressants for the prevention of migraine in adults: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X-M; Yang, C; Liu, Y; Dong, M-X; Zou, D-Z; Wei, Y-D

    2017-08-01

    Migraine has greatly impacted the quality of life for migraineurs and was ranked as the seventh highest specific cause of disability worldwide in 2012. Because of the role of serotonin in migraine mechanisms, antidepressants have been used in the prevention of migraine. However, the role of antidepressants for migraine prophylaxis in adults has not been completely established. Our aim was systematically to assess the efficacy and feasibility of antidepressants for the prevention of migraine in adults based on currently available literature. A comprehensive search of databases was conducted including the Cochrane, PubMed, Web of Science and Embase databases from inception to July 2016. Randomized controlled trials that assigned adults with a clinical diagnosis of migraine to antidepressant or placebo treatment were included. The primary outcome was the reduction of migraine frequency or index. Overall, 16 randomized controlled trials including 1082 participants were identified. Antidepressants had a significant advantage over placebo in reducing the migraine frequency or index of adults with a standardized mean difference of -0.79 [95% confidence interval (CI) -1.13 to -0.45, P antidepressant therapy were more likely to experience an at least 50% reduction of headache burden than those receiving placebo (28.9% vs. 20.2%; risk ratio 1.40; 95% CI 0.97-2.02; P = 0.07). However, antidepressants were less well tolerated than placebo because of some adverse events (risk ratio 1.74, 95% CI 1.05-2.89, P = 0.03). Antidepressants are effective in the prophylaxis of migraine in adults, but the level of evidence for antidepressants except for amitriptyline seems to be quite shaky. © 2017 EAN.

  2. Personality traits in patients with cluster headache: a comparison with migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, I; Hernández, M S; Santos, S; Jurado, C; Ruiz, L; Toribio, E; Sotelo, E M; Guerrero, A L; Molina, V; Uribe, F; Cuadrado, M L

    2016-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH) has been associated with certain personality traits and lifestyle features, but there are few studies assessing personality profiles in CH. We aimed to analyze personality traits in patients with CH, and to compare them with those found in migraine. We included all consecutive patients with CH attending 5 outpatient offices between January and December 2013. Personality traits were evaluated using the Salamanca screening test, a validated inventory assessing 11 personality traits grouped in 3 clusters. We analyzed the test results in this population, and compared them with those of a migraine population previously assessed with the same test. Eighty patients with CH (75 men, 5 women; mean age, 43.2 ± 9.9 years) were recruited. The reference population consisted of 164 migraine patients (30 men, 134 women; mean age 36.4 ± 12.7 years). In CH patients, the most frequent personality traits were anancastic (52.5 %), anxious (47.5 %), histrionic (45 %), schizoid (42.5 %), impulsive (32.5 %) and paranoid (30 %). When compared to migraine patients, paranoid (p personality traits included in cluster A (odd or eccentric disorders) are more prevalent in CH patients than in a population of migraineurs. Larger studies are needed to determine whether certain personality traits are related to CH.

  3. Mindfulness and Chronic Headache/Migraine: Mechanisms Explored through the Fear-Avoidance Model of Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komandur, Biyanka; Martin, Paul R; Bandarian-Balooch, Siavash

    2017-12-21

    (1) To replicate a study by Schutze, Rees, Preece, and Schutze (2010) on a headache sample, rather than a heterogeneous chronic pain sample, investigating whether level of mindfulness predicts key components in the fear-avoidance model of chronic pain (pain intensity, negative affect, pain catastrophizing, pain-related fear, pain hypervigilance, and functional disability); (2) to investigate the relationships between level of mindfulness and headache/migraine pain intensity, frequency, and duration. Participants were 217 self-reported chronic headache/migraine sufferers (51 male, 166 female), aged between 18 and 65 years. Participants completed an online survey measuring demographics, mindfulness, the key components of the fear-avoidance model, and headache pain intensity, duration, and frequency. Mindfulness had significant negative correlations (P<0.05) with all variables except headache pain intensity and headache frequency. Mindfulness significantly predicted negative affect, pain catastrophizing, fear of pain, pain hypervigilance, and headache duration (P<0.05). Mindfulness remained a significant predictor of negative affect and pain hypervigilance after controlling for other key components and background characteristics (P<0.05). Mindfulness did not moderate the relationship between pain intensity and pain catastrophizing (P=0.204). Findings suggest that mindfulness may be integrated into the fear-avoidance model of chronic pain for chronic headache/migraine sufferers. Directions for future research are discussed.

  4. Ecological momentary assessment of the relationship between headache pain intensity and pain interference in women with migraine and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J Graham; Pavlovic, Jelena; Lipton, Richard B; Roth, Julie; Rathier, Lucille; O'Leary, Kevin C; Buse, Dawn C; Evans, E Whitney; Bond, Dale S

    2016-11-01

    Background While pain intensity during migraine headache attacks is known to be a determinant of interference with daily activities, no study has evaluated: (a) the pain intensity-interference association in real-time on a per-headache basis, (b) multiple interference domains, and (c) factors that modify the association. Methods Participants were 116 women with overweight/obesity and migraine seeking behavioral treatment to lose weight and decrease headaches in the Women's Health and Migraine trial. Ecological momentary assessment, via smartphone-based 28-day headache diary, and linear mixed-effects models were used to study associations between pain intensity and total- and domain-specific interference scores using the Brief Pain Inventory. Multiple factors (e.g. pain catastrophizing (PC) and headache management self-efficacy (HMSE)) were evaluated either as independent predictors or moderators of the pain intensity-interference relationship. Results Pain intensity predicted degree of pain interference across all domains either as a main effect (coeff = 0.61-0.78, p < 0.001) or interaction with PC, allodynia, and HMSE ( p < 0.05). Older age and greater allodynia consistently predicted higher interference, regardless of pain intensity (coeff = 0.04-0.19, p < 0.05). Conclusions Pain intensity is a consistent predictor of pain interference on migraine headache days. Allodynia, PC, and HMSE moderated the pain intensity-interference relationship, and may be promising targets for interventions to reduce pain interference.

  5. Histamine-1 receptor blockade does not prevent nitroglycerin induced migraine. Support for the NO-hypothesis of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L H; Thomsen, L L; Kruuse, C

    1996-01-01

    . To evaluate whether GTN causes headache via liberation of histamine, we studied the effect of GTN 0.5 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 for 20 min in seven migraine sufferers, once after pretreatment with the histamine-1 (H1)-receptor blocker mepyramine (0.5 mg.kg-1) and once without pretreatment. This mepyramine dose......It has previously been shown that in migraine sufferers infusion of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) and histamine causes an immediate headache during the infusion and a genuine migraine attack one to several hours after the infusion. This identical time profile indicates a common mechanism of action...... is known to completely abolish histamine-induced headache. After pretreatment with mepyramine five patients experienced migraine, and without pretreatment six patients did so. The median peak headache score was 7 on a 0-10 scale with and without mepyramine pretreatment. The arterial responses, evaluated...

  6. The journey from genetic predisposition to medication overuse headache to its acquisition as sequela of chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelletti, Paolo

    2018-01-10

    Migraine remains one of the biggest clinical case to be solved among the non-communicable diseases, second to low back pain for disability caused as reported by the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. Despite this, its genetics roots are still unknown. Its evolution in chronic forms hits 2-4% of the population and causes a form so far defined Medication Overuse Headache (MOH), whose pathophysiological basis have not been explained by many dedicated studies. The Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 has not recognized MOH as independent entity, but as a sequela of Chronic Migraine. This concept, already reported in previous studies, has been confirmed by the efficacy of OnabotulinumtoxinA in Chronic Migraine independently from the presence of MOH. The consistency of the current definitions of both Medication Overuse Headache and Chronic Migraine itself might be re-read on the basis of new evidences.

  7. Calcitonin gene-related peptide in blood: is it increased in the external jugular vein during migraine and cluster headache? A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Le, Han

    2009-01-01

    during migraine and cluster headache attacks in the extracerebral circulation as measured in the external jugular vein (EJV) has been regarded as an established fact. Then in 2005, a study, using the migraine patients as their own controls, showed; however, no changes of CGRP in EJV. For migraine...

  8. Psychosocial factors associated with migraine and tension-type headache in medical students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, Elena R; Kobzeva, Natalia R; Gilev, Denis V

    2017-01-01

    . The hypothesis of this study was therefore that a number of psychosocial factors relating to the personal sphere would better explain the high prevalence of migraine and TTH in students. Methods The study population consisted of 1042 students (719 females, 323 males, mean age 20.6, range 17-40). Headache...... diagnoses and associated factors were identified by direct professional semi-structured interview. We also interviewed about the following psychosocial factors: dissatisfaction with study, dissatisfaction with family life, dissatisfaction for personal reasons, bad financial situation, overwork, stress......, not enough sleep, insomnia, depressed mood, anxiety, irritability, tendency towards conflicts and not being married. We report psychosocial factors associated with headache according to diagnosis and sex using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results Several factors were...

  9. Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... migraine without aura. Migraine with aura (previously called classical migraine). With a migraine with aura, a person ... take this time to read or listen to music, rather than deal with traffic. For stressors you ...

  10. The Headache Action Plan Project for Youth (HAPPY): School Nurses as Facilitators of System Change in Pediatric Migraine Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Mark; Bickel, Jennifer; Wingert, Tammie; Galemore, Cynthia

    2018-01-01

    Migraine is a common health problem in youth that is ranked highest for disability among neurological conditions and is one of the leading reasons for school absences. Children with migraines frequently are seen by the school nurse for care, sometimes before ever being seen by another healthcare provider for evaluation and treatment. As such, school nurses have the unique opportunity to provide education and resources to children with migraines and their family. This article provides information on the Headache Action Plan Program for Youth (HAPPY), a project involving the provision of live and online migraine education and management resources to school nurses, children, families, and primary care providers in an effort to improve migraine recognition and care in the community.

  11. Level of physical activity, well-being, stress and self-rated health in persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krøll, Lotte Skytte; Hammarlund, Catharina Sjödahl; Westergaard, Maria Lurenda; Nielsen, Trine; Sloth, Louise Bönsdorff; Jensen, Rigmor Højland; Gard, Gunvor

    2017-12-01

    The prevalence of migraine with co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain is high in the general population. However, there is very little literature on the characteristics of these combined conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate a) the prevalence of migraine with co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain in a clinic-based sample, b) the level of physical activity, psychological well-being, perceived stress and self-rated health in persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain compared to healthy controls, c) the perceived ability of persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain to perform physical activity, and d) which among the three conditions (migraine, tension-type headache or neck pain) is rated as the most burdensome condition. The study was conducted at a tertiary referral specialised headache centre where questionnaires on physical activity, psychological well-being, perceived stress and self-rated health were completed by 148 persons with migraine and 100 healthy controls matched by sex and average age. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to assess characteristics of migraine, tension-type headache and neck pain. Out of 148 persons with migraine, 100 (67%) suffered from co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain. Only 11% suffered from migraine only. Persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain had lower level of physical activity and psychological well-being, higher level of perceived stress and poorer self-rated health compared to healthy controls. They reported reduced ability to perform physical activity owing to migraine (high degree), tension-type headache (moderate degree) and neck pain (low degree). The most burdensome condition was migraine, followed by tension-type headache and neck pain. Migraine with co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain was highly prevalent in a clinic-based sample. Persons with migraine and co

  12. The Relationship between Sleep Quality and Academic Achievement with Migraine Headaches among Alborz Medical Sciences University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Leila Sadati; Katayon Bakhteyar; Meysam Saadatmand; Saeid Saadatmand; Saeid Asadnia

    2017-01-01

    Background : Considering the issue of sleep quality in medical students as a stratum of society who are concerned with human health and its relationship with other psychological variables (in particular academic achievement and headaches) seems essential. So, the present study was done to evaluate the relationship between Sleep Quality and academic achievement with migraine headaches. Materials and Methods: The present study was descriptive _ correlation. The population in this study incl...

  13. Chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache are associated with concomitant low back pain: results of the German Headache Consortium study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Min-Suk; Manack, Aubrey; Schramm, Sara; Fritsche, Guenther; Obermann, Mark; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Moebus, Susanne; Katsarava, Zaza

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between low and frequent low back pain and chronic migraine (CM) and chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) in a large, German population-based sample. Headaches were diagnosed according to International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 criteria and categorized according to frequency (episodic 1-14 days/month or chronic ≤15 days/month) and headache type (migraine or TTH). We defined frequent low back pain as self-reported low back pain on ≥15 days/month. We calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using logistic regression analyses, adjusting for sociodemographic covariates. There were 5605 respondents who reported headache in the previous year, of whom 255 (4.5%) had Chronic Headache. Migraine was diagnosed in 2933 respondents, of whom 182 (6.2%) had CM. TTH was diagnosed in 1253 respondents, of whom 50 (4.0%) had CTTH. Among 9944 respondents, 6030 reported low back pain, of whom 1267 (21.0%) reported frequent low back pain. In adjusted models, the odds of having frequent low back pain were between 2.1 (95% CI 1.7-2.6) and 2.7 (95% CI 2.3-3.2) times higher in all episodic headache subtypes when compared to No Headache. The odds of having frequent low back pain were between 13.7 (95% CI 7.4-25.3) and 18.3 (95% CI 11.9-28.0) times higher in all chronic headache subtypes when compared to No Headache. Low and frequent low back pain was associated with CM and CTTH. Multiple explanations may contribute to the association of headache and back pain, including the notion that the neurobiology of chronic headache, independent of primary headache type, not only involves the trigeminal pain pathway, but is also a part of abnormal general pain processing. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Rare Cause of Chronic Headache that May Be Misdiagnosed as Migraine: Chronic Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kenan KANBUROGLU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Differential diagnosis of primary headache disorders can be challenging for physicians. Although the association of headache with acute carbon monoxide intoxication is very well-defined, in refractory nonspecific headaches associated with chronic low dose exposure to carbon monoxide, CO intoxication is usually overlooked, mostly due to vague symptoms. Herein we present a 15-year-old female patient with chronic carbon monoxide poisoning who was undergoing two years of follow-up care for migraines. Chronic carbon monoxide intoxication may mimic the episodic nature and familial predisposition of migraine attacks. Normal carboxyhemoglobin levels do not exclude the diagnosis, and smoking is a confounding factor. In emergency rooms, patients presenting with headaches had higher levels of carboxyhemoglobin, but, as far as we know, there have been no studies investigating carboxyhemoglobin levels in migraine patients. Chronic carbon monoxide poisoning should be suspected in migraine patients, especially if the attacks occur during winter months. ÖZET: Primer baş ağrısında ayırıcı tanının yapılması bazen doktorlar açısından zor olabilmektedir. Literatürde karbon monoksit ile baş ağrısı arasındaki ilişki çok iyi ortaya konulmuş olmasına karşın, dirençli ve nonspesifik başağrısı nedenlerinden biri olan kronik düşük doz karbon monoksit maruziyeti kendine özgü bulgusu olmadığından sıklıkla atlanmaktadır. Bu yazıda, iki yıl migren tanısı ile takip ve tedavi edilen kronik karbon monoksit zehirlenmesi olan bir olgu sunuldu. Kronik karbon monoksit zehirlenmesi epizodik paterni ve aile fertlerinde benzer şikayetlerin olması nedeniyle migren ataklarını andırabilmektedir. Karboksihemoglobin konsantrasyonlarının normal saptanması tanıyı ekarte ettirmemekte, ayrıca sigara kullanımı da karıştırıcı bir faktör olabilmektedir. Acil servislerine baş ağrısı ile başvuran hastalar

  15. Efficacy of topical Rose (Rosa damascena Mill.) oil for migraine headache: A randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Maria; Hashempur, Mohammad Hashem; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Heydari, Mojtaba; Shariat, Abdolhamid

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of topical formulation of Rosa damascena Mill. (R. damascena) oil on migraine headache, applying syndrome diffrentiation model. Forty patients with migraine headache were randomly assigned to 2 groups of this double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial. The patients were treated for the first 2 consecutive migraine headache attacks by topical R. damascena oil or placebo. Then, after one week of washout period, cross-over was done. Pain intensity of the patients' migraine headache was recorded at the beginnig and ten-sequence time schadule of attacks up to 24h. In addition, photophobia, phonophobia, and nausea and/or vomitting (N/V) of the patients were recorded as secondary outcomes. Finally, gathered data were analysed in a syndrome differentiation manner to assess the effect of R. damascena oil on Hot- and Cold-type migraine headache. Mean pain intensity of the patients' migraine headache in the different time-points after R. damascena oil or placebo use, was not significantly different. Additionally, regarding mean scores of N/V, photophobia, and phonophobia severity of the patients, no significant differences between the two groups were observed. Finally, applying syndrome differentiation model, the mean score of migraine headache pain intensity turned out to be significantly lower in patients with "hot" type migraine syndrome at in 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120min after R. damascena oil application compared to "cold" types (P values: 0.001, 0.001, <0.001, <0.001, and 0.02; respectively). It seems that syndrome differentiation can help in selection of patients who may benefit from the topical R. damascena oil in short-term relief of pain intensity in migraine headache. Further studies of longer follow-up and larger study population, however, are necessitated for more scientifically rigorous judgment on efficacy of R. damascena oil for patients with migraine headache. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The quality of diagnosis and management of migraine and tension-type headache in three social groups in Russia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, Elena R; Kobzeva, Natalia R; Gilev, Denis V

    2017-01-01

    Background Three successive editions of the International Classification of Headache Disorders and multiple guideline papers on headache care have described evidence based diagnosis and treatment of headache disorders. It remains unknown, however, to which extent this has improved the diagnosis...... and management of headache. That was the aim of our study in which we also analysed differences between three social groups in Russia. Methods We studied 1042 students (719 females, 323 males, mean age 20.6, age range 17-40), 1075 workers (146 females, 929 males, mean age 40.4, age range 21-67) and 1007 blood...... of this paper. Results Only 496 of 2110 participants (23%) with headache in Russia had consulted because of headache. Students consulted more frequently (35%), workers and blood donors less often (13% and 14%). Only 12% of the patients with ICHD-3beta diagnosis of migraine and 11.7% with ICHD-3beta diagnosis...

  17. Headache and Migraine in Children with Sickle Cell Disease are Associated with Lower Hemoglobin and Higher Pain Event Rates but not Silent Cerebral Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Michael M; Noetzel, Michael J; Rodeghier, Mark J; Quinn, Charles T; Hirtz, Deborah G; Ichord, Rebecca N; Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Roach, E Steven; Kirkham, Fenella J; Casella, James F; DeBaun, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify risk factors for headache and migraine and test the hypothesis that either or both are independently associated with silent cerebral infarcts. Study design In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated the history, laboratory values, and brain MRI of participants with SCD (HbSS or HbSβ°-thalassemia) without history of overt stroke, or seizures. Participants described headache severity and quality. Migraine was defined by International Headache Society criteria modified for increased sensitivity in children. Neuroradiology and neurology committees adjudicated the presence of silent cerebral infarction by review of MRI and standardized examination by pediatric neurologists. Results Of 872 children, 51.1% were male, ages 5-15 (mean 9.1) years, 317 (36.4%) reported recurrent headaches and 132 (15.1%) reported migraine. In multivariable logistic regression analyses, both were associated with lower steady state hemoglobin (p=0.01 for headache, pheadache or migraine. Only 1.9% (6 of 317) of children with recurrent headaches received medications for headache prophylaxis. Conclusions Recurrent headaches and migraine are common and undertreated in SCD. Low hemoglobin levels and high pain rates are associated with recurrent headaches and migraine, and silent cerebral infarction are not. PMID:24529619

  18. Multicenter prevalence of opioid medication use as abortive therapy in the ED treatment of migraine headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Neil; Silverman, Daniel; Bradford, Heather; Finkelstein, Jeffrey

    2017-12-01

    Despite a range of therapeutic options for treating acute migraine headaches, the use of opioids is still reported to be common practice. This study describes treatment practices in regards to migraines in the ED. It characterizes the prevalence of opioid orders during visits in three different settings, an academic medical center, a non-academic urban ED, and a community ED. Fourteen months of consecutive migraine visits were identified. All medications ordered were separated into first-line and rescue medications. Number of visits, length of stay, door to provider time, and total provider time were compared. A total of 1222 visits were identified. Opioids were ordered in 35.8% of these visits. By facility, opioids were ordered in 12.3% of academic medical center visits, 40.9% of urban ED visits, and 68.6% of community ED visits. This ranged from 6.9% of first-line therapies in the academic center to 69.9% of rescue therapies in the community ED. Of those who received opioids, 36.0% versus 25.1% required rescue medications. Patients who received opioids had more repeat visits, 1.79 versus 1.30. The academic center and urban ED both found greater than 30% decrease in length of stay in visits where opioids were not given. In the face of evidence against opioids for migraines, over one third of patients received them. There was a higher prevalence in the community setting. There were no significant benefits in overall throughput time, however, opioid visits required more rescue medications, increased length of stay, and resulted in more repeat visits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Childhood and Adolescent Migraine Prevention (CHAMP) study: a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, comparative effectiveness study of amitriptyline, topiramate, and placebo in the prevention of childhood and adolescent migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, Andrew D; Powers, Scott W; Coffey, Christopher S; Eklund, Dixie D; Chamberlin, Leigh Ann; Korbee, Leslie L

    2013-05-01

    Migraine is one of the most common health problems for children and adolescents. If not successfully treated, it can impact patients and families with significant disability due to loss of school, work, and social function. When headaches become frequent, it is essential to try to prevent the headaches. For children and adolescents, this is guided by extrapolation from adult studies, a limited number of small studies in children and adolescents and practitioner preference. The aim of the Childhood and Adolescent Migraine Prevention (CHAMP) study is to determine the most effective preventive agent to use in children and adolescents. CHAMP is a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, multicenter, comparative effectiveness study of amitriptyline and topiramate for the prevention of episodic and chronic migraine, designed to mirror real-world practice, sponsored by the US National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/National Institutes of Health (U01NS076788). The study will recruit 675 subjects between the ages of 8 and 17 years old, inclusive, who have migraine with or without aura or chronic migraine as defined by the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd Edition, with at least 4 headaches in the 28 days prior to randomization. The subjects will be randomized in a 2:2:1 (amitriptyline: topiramate: placebo) ratio. Doses are weight based and will be slowly titrated over an 8-week period to a target dose of 1 mg/kg of amitriptyline and 2 mg/kg of topiramate. The primary outcome will be a 50% reduction in headache frequency between the 28-day baseline and the final 28 days of treatment (weeks 20-24). The goal of the CHAMP study is to obtain level 1 evidence for the effectiveness of amitriptyline and topiramate in the prevention of migraine in children and adolescents. If this study proves to be positive, it will provide information to the practicing physician as how to best prevent migraine in children and adolescents and subsequently

  20. The effects of aerobic exercise for persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain. A randomized, controlled, clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøll, Lotte Skytte; Hammarlund, Catharina Sjödahl; Linde, Mattias

    2018-01-01

    Aim To evaluate aerobic exercise in migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain. Methods Consecutively recruited persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain were randomized into an exercise group or control group. Aerobic exercise consisted of bike...... impact of tension-type headache and neck pain. Exercise also reduced migraine frequency, pain intensity and duration, although this was not significant compared to controls. These results emphasize the importance of regular aerobic exercise for reduction of migraine burden.......-two persons completed the study. Significant between-group improvements for the exercise group were found for physical fitness, level of physical activity, migraine burden and the ability to engage in physical activity because of reduced impact of tension-type headache and neck pain. Within the exercise group...

  1. Primary intracranial angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma presenting with anaemia and migraine-like headaches and aura as early clinical features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Larsen, Vibeke Andrée; Scheie, David

    2015-01-01

    A 17-year-old female with migraine with aura complained of fatigue and was diagnosed with anemia. Three years later, changes in her headache pattern prompted hospital referral. Brain MRI showed a bi-lobed extra-axial intracerebral tumor encroaching both parieto-occipital regions. The resection sp...

  2. Drug Interaction and Serotonin Toxicity with Opioid Use: Another Reason to Avoid Opioids in Headache and Migraine Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Hossein; Kouti, Leila

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of headache, specifically migraine attacks, has always been a challenging subject, especially for neurologist and pain specialists. Triptans are generally underutilized, despite being the gold standard abortive medication for migraine attacks. On the other hand, opioid analgesics are overused as a treatment for headache. One reason for this could be physician unfamiliarity with drug interactions between opioids and other medications, especially the possibility of serotonin toxicity. The general awareness of potential serotonin toxicity with using opioid analgesics is low. In this review, we will conduct a theoretic and evidence-based review of the potential for developing serotonin syndrome in patients who are using opioids analgesics, especially in combination with antidepressants, a common co-prescribed combination. We also review the current diagnostic criteria for serotonin syndrome and identify possible shortcomings of those criteria. Our aim is to increase the awareness of health care providers about potential drug interaction of opioid analgesics with other classes of medication. We place particular emphasis on tramadol since this drug is one of the most commonly used opioid analgesics for headache. The potential for developing serotonin syndrome is relatively high in the patients who are using opioid for pain control. The use of opioids in migraine headache is already discouraged due to the high risk of medication overuse headache and also an increase in headache-related disability (Katsarava et al. Neurology 62:788-790, 2004; Bigal and Lipton. Neurology 71:1821-8, 2008; Casucci and Cevoli. Neurol Sci. 34 Suppl 1:S125-8, 2013). This is another reason that physicians and health care providers should avoid using this class of medication for pain, specifically headache and migraine treatment.

  3. Diclofenac with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Sheena; Rabbie, Roy; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers choose not to, or are unable to, seek professional help and rely on over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics. Diclofenac is an established analgesic, and new formulations using the potassium or epolamine salts, which can be dissolved in water, have been developed for rapid absorption, which may be beneficial in acute migraine. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce the nausea and vomiting commonly associated with migraine. Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of diclofenac, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine headaches in adults. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Oxford Pain Relief Database, ClinicalTrials.gov, and reference lists for studies through 27 September 2011. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- and/or active-controlled studies using self administered diclofenac to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used numbers of participants achieving each outcome to calculate relative risk (or ‘risk ratio’) and numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or a different active treatment. Main results Five studies (1356 participants) compared oral diclofenac with placebo, and one also compared it with sumatriptan; none combined diclofenac with a self administered antiemetic. Four studies treated attacks with single doses of medication, and two allowed an optional second dose for inadequate response. Only two studies, with three active treatment arms, provided data for pooled analysis of primary outcomes. For single doses of diclofenac

  4. Prevalence of right-to-left shunts on transcranial Doppler in chronic migraine and medication-overuse headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Shalchian, Sarvnaz; Gérard, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It was suggested that right-to-left shunt (RLS) may be highly prevalent in chronic migraine (CM) patients, indicating that patent foramen ovale (PFO) might be an aggravating and chronifying factor of migraine. Since a high proportion of chronic migraineurs also have medication......-overuse headache (MOH), one may wonder if they have a more severe form of the disorder and more frequently a PFO. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence and grade of RLS in patients suffering from CM and MOH. METHODS: A cross-sectional multicenter study of air-contrast transcranial...... prevalence in CM is within the upper range of those reported in episodic migraine without aura or in the general population, and not higher in MOH. PFO is thus unlikely to have a significant causal role in these chronic headaches....

  5. Clinical characteristics of migraine and episodic tension-type headache in relation to old and new diagnostic criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Langemark, M; Andersson, P G

    1990-01-01

    Eighty-one patients were diagnosed as having migraine, tension headache or both according to previously used criteria. Then we performed a standardized interview to determine the frequency and severity of headache characteristics used in the new operational diagnostic criteria of the International...... Headache Society (IHS). In every patient the original diagnosis fulfilled also the IHS criteria, but in 9 patients the criteria were only fulfilled in half or less of the attacks, and applying the IHS criteria they also achieved an additional diagnosis. In one patient these attacks did not fulfill the pain...

  6. International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition beta-based field testing of vestibular migraine in China: Demographic, clinical characteristics, audiometric findings and diagnosis statues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yixin; Kong, Qingtao; Chen, Jinjin; Li, Lunxi; Wang, Dayan; Zhou, Jiying

    2016-03-01

    This study explored the clinical characteristics of vestibular migraine in Chinese subjects and performed a field test of the criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition beta version. Consecutive patients with vestibular migraine were surveyed and registered in a headache clinic during the study period. The diagnosis of vestibular migraine was made according to International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition beta version. Assessments included standardized neuro-otology bedside examination, pure-tone audiogram, bithermal caloric testing, neurological imaging, cervical X-ray or magnetic resonance imaging, Doppler ultrasound of cerebral arteries and laboratory tests. A total of 67 patients (62 female/five male, 47.8 ± 10.3 years old) were enrolled in this study. The mean ages of migraine and vertigo onset were 32.2 ± 11.5 and 37.9 ± 10.1 years, respectively. The most common migraine subtype was migraine without aura (79%), followed by migraine with aura (12%) and chronic migraine (9%). The duration of vertigo attacks varied from seconds to days and 25% of patients had attacks that lasted less than 5 minutes. Among the patients with short-lasting attacks, 75% of these patients had ≥5 attacks per day within 72 hours. Auditory symptoms were reported in 36% of the patients. Migraine prophylactic treatments were effective in 77% of the patients. Our study showed that the clinical features of vestibular migraine in China were similar to those of Western studies. The definition of vertigo episodes and migraine subtypes of vestibular migraine in International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition beta version might be modified further. More than five vertigo attacks per day within 72 hours might be helpful as far as identifying vestibular migraine patients with short-lasting attacks. © International Headache Society 2015.

  7. Effect of sumatriptan on cerebral blood flow during migraine headache. Measurement by sequential SPECT used 99mTc-ECD background subtraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Takashi; Torihara, Yoshito; Tsuneyoshi, Noritaka; Ikeda, Yoshitomo

    2001-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the effect of sumatriptan on regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) during migraine headache. Nine cases were examined by 99m Tc-ECD background subtraction method for the absolute value measurement of regional CBF before and after sumatriptan injection. rCBF except for occipital and perioccipital lobes, were increased 10-20% during migraine headache and significant decreases were observed by sumatriptan injection. Two cases of nine had transiently increased systemic blood pressure and cardiac pulse rate, however, all cases improved migraine headache after injection of sumatriptan. (author)

  8. [Chronic migraine and work: occupational risks and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Herrero, M T; Ramírez Iñiguez de la Torre, M V; Capdevila García, L M; López-González, Á A; Terradillos García, M J

    2013-09-01

    Chronic migraine is a clinically difficult to manage primary headache which affects the quality of life of the patients. This impact is important in the occupational world, where along with the clinical aspects of the disease, the therapies used for the control of the symptoms or preventive aspects, must be assessed. The side effects of the drugs and the limitations associated with their symptoms are aspects to highlight in occupational health, especially in individual workplaces, where there is a high risk of work-related injuries. The medical officer must assess the occupational risks of particular importance in the progression of this disease, as well as preventive actions, within the ambit of the current Spanish legislation, that may be favorable for both the company and the worker. The coordinated medical intervention and knowledge of these occupational aspects can provide clinically relevant tools, andoccupational and social optimization in the use of available resources. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. MIGRAINE: BASIC PRINCIPLES OF TREATMENT AND PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. R. Esin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern recommendations for the migraine attack treatment and it's prophylaxis are analyzed in this review. Established, that acetylsalicylic acid, diclofenac potassium, ibuprofen, naproxen, paracetamol, metamizol and their combination with caffeine are drugs of the first choice for migraine attack treatment. Metoclopramide and domperidone are used to reduce nausea and vomiting. Also triptans are high effective drugs for migraine attack treatment. Metoprolol, propranolol, flunarizine, valproic acid can be used for migraine prophylaxis. Drugs of the second choice are: amitriptyline, venlafaxine, naproxen and bisoprolol.

  10. Interictal Spect with Tc-99m ECD studies in migraine patients. Role of Spect in the diagnosis of migraine with ura in headache-free periods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, F.M.; Martinez, J.J.; Bermudez, M.C.; Fernandez, B.; Delgado, J.; Martin, A.; Padilla, O.; Nieto, R.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The migraine is one of the neurological alterations more frequent provoking a discharge morbility and big inconveniences the one that endures it. The presence of brain perfusion abnormalities during the pain-free intervals of migraine even is fueling of controversies being so numerous the supporters of its existence as whom they deny it. This study was aimed at assessing the presence of cerebral perfusion abnormalities also during the interictal phase and the role of SPECT with Tc99 ECD on diagnosis of this migrainous patients. Materials And Methods: We studied 20 patients (16 woman and 4 man) with diagnose of migraine with aura during a periods without headache and 20 apareaded controls for age and sex of this patients.Was realized brain spect with 925 MBq Tc99m-ECD on a two heads rotating gamma camera (Piker Axis) equipped with a fan-beam collimator. The images were reconstructed using a filter Mezt and presented in courts in the three axes and reconstruction in three dimensions and later they were analyzed by two observers. Results: We found 14 of the patients (70%) with images of focal hypoperfusion with clear interhemispheric asymmetry while on control groups only two have this find (10%) being this difference statistically significant. The part of the brain more affected was the occipital one, though also they predominated over the more widespread hipocaptations. Conclusion: The brain Spect is a useful technology to identify the patients with migraine, being able to be used in the periods without pain. The boss of perfusion in the patients is the located hypoperfusion and is significantly different from that of the controls, It can be explained by an impaired regional cerebral vascular autoregulation may exist even during headache-free intervals in patients suffering from migraine. Future studies must be realized to determine if it exists relation between the zone of hypoperfusion and the type of present symptomatology in the aura

  11. Preventive Agents for Migraine: Focus on the Antiepileptic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shahien

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is among the 10 most disabling disorders worldwide. It is characterized by episodes of moderate or severe headaches with various degree of disability, resulting in a considerable health burden upon the sufferers and their family. The objective of this article is to review the use of prophylaxis with antiepileptic drugs. Particular focus is given to their mechanism of action, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, safety profile, efficacy and to provide a summary of the most relevant clinical studies and patient preference.

  12. Risk factors associated with migraine or chronic daily headache in out-patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, C-I; Wang, S-J; Hsu, K-H; Juang, Y-Y; Liu, C-Y

    2005-04-01

    This study investigated independent comorbidities and factors associated with migraine and chronic daily headache (CDH) in out-patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Consecutive psychiatric out-patients fulfilling the DSM-IV criteria of MDD were enrolled. Headaches were diagnosed based on the criteria proposed by the second edition of the International Classification of the Headache Disorders. Psychiatric comorbidities were checked using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Scores of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and duration of major depressive episodes (MDE) were evaluated. Multivariate logistic regression was used to decide risk factors. One hundred and fifty-one patients (34 men and 117 women) participated in the study, among which 73 (48.3%) reported a history of migraine and 32 (21.2%) reported CDH during this MDE. Higher HAMD scores, female gender, and chronic depression were independently associated with migraine or CDH. For MDD patients with a higher depressive severity and longer duration of MDE, especially female gender, surveillance of migraine and CDH might be indicated.

  13. Chronic Daily Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chronic migraine or chronic tension-type headache Hemicrania continua These headaches: Affect only one side of your ... development of migraine-like symptoms In addition, hemicrania continua headaches are associated with at least one of ...

  14. Headache, migraine, and structural brain lesions and function: population based Epidemiology of Vascular Ageing-MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurth, T.; Mohamed, S.; Zhu, Y.C.; Dufouil, C.; Tzourio, Ch.; Kurth, T.; Zhu, Y.C.; Dufouil, C.; Tzourio, Ch.; Kurth, T.; Maillard, P.; Mazoyer, B.; Zhu, Y.C.; Chabriat, H.; Bousser, M.G.; Tzourio, Ch.; Zhu, Y.C.; Chabriat, H.; Bousser, M.G.; Mazoyer, B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the association of overall and specific headaches with volume of white matter hyper-intensities, brain infarcts, and cognition. Design: Population based, cross sectional study. Setting: Epidemiology of Vascular Ageing study, Nantes, France. Participants: 780 participants (mean age 69, 58.5% women) with detailed headache assessment. Main outcome measures: Brain scans were evaluated for volume of white matter hyper-intensities (by fully automated imaging processing) and for classification of infarcts (by visual reading with a standardised assessment grid). Cognitive function was assessed by a battery of tests including the mini-mental state examination. Results: 163 (20.9%) participants reported a history of severe headache and 116 had migraine, of whom 17 (14.7%) reported aura symptoms. An association was found between any history of severe headache and increasing volume of white matter hyper-intensities. The adjusted odds ratio of being in the highest third for total volume of white matter hyper-intensities was 2.0 (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 3.1, P for trend 0.002) for participants with any history of severe headache when compared with participants without severe headache being in the lowest third. The association pattern was similar for all headache types. Migraine with aura was the only headache type strongly associated with volume of deep white matter hyper-intensities (highest third odds ratio 12.4, 1.6 to 99.4, P for trend 0.005) and with brain infarcts (3.4, 1.2 to 9.3). The location of infarcts was predominantly outside the cerebellum and brain stem. Evidence was lacking for cognitive impairment for any headache type with or without brain lesions. Conclusions: In this population based study, any history of severe headache was associated with an increased volume of white matter hyper-intensities. Migraine with aura was the only headache type associated with brain infarcts. Evidence that headache of any type by itself or in

  15. Clinical and pathophysiological observations in migraine and tension-type headache explained by integration of vascular, supraspinal and myofascial inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, J

    1991-08-01

    A vascular-supraspinal-myogenic (VSM) model for pain in migraine based on our previous clinical and pathophysiological observations is proposed. According to the model, perceived pain (headache) intensity is determined by the sum of nociception from cephalic arteries and pericranial myofascial tissues converging upon the same neurons and integrated with supraspinal effects (usually facilitating). Vascular input predominates over myofascial input in migraine, whereas significance of supraspinal facilitation is difficult to estimate. The importance of these 3 effects may vary between patients and in the same individual with time. The model is in accordance with recent experimental studies showing convergence of somatovisceral afferents upon n. caudalis neurons. Also, long term potentiation due to nociceptive activation and sensitization of neurons to input from wider areas and non-nociceptive stimuli are relevant to our model. In tension-type headache, nociception is primarily myofascial, but vascular input cannot be disregarded. Supraspinal facilitation probably plays a large, sometimes dominant role (the MSV model). The model explains much of the complexity of the clinical picture of these disorders as well as their tendency to overlap and to change into one another. Also, a number of pathophysiological observations such as why muscles are tender during migraine, why trigger-point injection may cure migraine attacks and why chronic tension-type headache is often associated with episodes of pulsating pain, can be explained. The model gives a rational explanation of empirically developed, internationally accepted, multimodal treatment strategies for migraine and tension-type headache. It may thus serve a useful purpose in explaining the disorder to patients. Finally, the model points to several avenues of future research in animals and man.

  16. Symptoms of central sensitization and comorbidity for juvenile fibromyalgia in childhood migraine: an observational study in a tertiary headache center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, Marina; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Delussi, Marianna; Vecchio, Eleonora; Goffredo, Marvita; Simeone, Michele; Barbaro, Maria Grazia Foschino

    2017-12-01

    Central sensitization is an important epiphenomenon of the adult migraine, clinically expressed by allodynia, pericranial tenderness and comorbidity for fibromyalgia in a relevant number of patients. This study aimed to evaluate the frequency and the clinical characteristics of allodynia, pericranial tenderness, and comorbidity for Juvenile Fibromialgia (JFM) in a cohort of migraine children selected in a tertiary headache center. This was an observational cross-sectional study on 8-15 years old migraine patients. Allodynia was assessed by a questionnaire. Pericranial tenderness and comorbidity for JFM as well as their possible association with poor quality of life and migraine related disability, and with other clinical symptoms as anxiety, depression, sleep disorders and pain catastrophizing, were also evaluated. One hundred and fifty one patients were selected, including chronic migraine (n°47), migraine without aura (n° 92) and migraine with aura (n° 12) sufferers. Allodynia was reported in the 96,6% and pericranial tenderness was observed in the 68.8% of patients. Pericranial tenderness was more severe in patients with more frequent migraine and shorter sleep duration. Allodynia seemed associated with anxiety, pain catastrophizing and high disability scores. Comorbidity for JFM was present in the 0.03% ofpatients. These children presented with a severe depression and a significant reduction of quality of life as compared to the other patients. This study outlined a relevant presence of symptoms of central sensitization among children with migraine. Severe allodynia and comorbidity for JFM seemed to cause a general decline of quality of life, which would suggest the opportunity of a routine assessment of these clinical features.

  17. A Comparative Effectiveness Meta-Analysis of Drugs for the Prophylaxis of Migraine Headache.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey L Jackson

    Full Text Available To compare the effectiveness and side effects of migraine prophylactic medications.We performed a network meta-analysis. Data were extracted independently in duplicate and quality was assessed using both the JADAD and Cochrane Risk of Bias instruments. Data were pooled and network meta-analysis performed using random effects models.PUBMED, EMBASE, Cochrane Trial Registry, bibliography of retrieved articles through 18 May 2014.We included randomized controlled trials of adults with migraine headaches of at least 4 weeks in duration.Placebo controlled trials included alpha blockers (n = 9, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (n = 3, angiotensin receptor blockers (n = 3, anticonvulsants (n = 32, beta-blockers (n = 39, calcium channel blockers (n = 12, flunarizine (n = 7, serotonin reuptake inhibitors (n = 6, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (n = 1 serotonin agonists (n = 9 and tricyclic antidepressants (n = 11. In addition there were 53 trials comparing different drugs. Drugs with at least 3 trials that were more effective than placebo for episodic migraines included amitriptyline (SMD: -1.2, 95% CI: -1.7 to -0.82, -flunarizine (-1.1 headaches/month (ha/month, 95% CI: -1.6 to -0.67, fluoxetine (SMD: -0.57, 95% CI: -0.97 to -0.17, metoprolol (-0.94 ha/month, 95% CI: -1.4 to -0.46, pizotifen (-0.43 ha/month, 95% CI: -0.6 to -0.21, propranolol (-1.3 ha/month, 95% CI: -2.0 to -0.62, topiramate (-1.1 ha/month, 95% CI: -1.9 to -0.73 and valproate (-1.5 ha/month, 95% CI: -2.1 to -0.8. Several effective drugs with less than 3 trials included: 3 ace inhibitors (enalapril, lisinopril, captopril, two angiotensin receptor blockers (candesartan, telmisartan, two anticonvulsants (lamotrigine, levetiracetam, and several beta-blockers (atenolol, bisoprolol, timolol. Network meta-analysis found amitriptyline to be better than several other medications including candesartan, fluoxetine, propranolol, topiramate and valproate and no different than

  18. A Comparative Effectiveness Meta-Analysis of Drugs for the Prophylaxis of Migraine Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness and side effects of migraine prophylactic medications. Design We performed a network meta-analysis. Data were extracted independently in duplicate and quality was assessed using both the JADAD and Cochrane Risk of Bias instruments. Data were pooled and network meta-analysis performed using random effects models. Data Sources PUBMED, EMBASE, Cochrane Trial Registry, bibliography of retrieved articles through 18 May 2014. Eligibility Criteria for Selecting Studies We included randomized controlled trials of adults with migraine headaches of at least 4 weeks in duration. Results Placebo controlled trials included alpha blockers (n = 9), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (n = 3), angiotensin receptor blockers (n = 3), anticonvulsants (n = 32), beta-blockers (n = 39), calcium channel blockers (n = 12), flunarizine (n = 7), serotonin reuptake inhibitors (n = 6), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (n = 1) serotonin agonists (n = 9) and tricyclic antidepressants (n = 11). In addition there were 53 trials comparing different drugs. Drugs with at least 3 trials that were more effective than placebo for episodic migraines included amitriptyline (SMD: -1.2, 95% CI: -1.7 to -0.82), -flunarizine (-1.1 headaches/month (ha/month), 95% CI: -1.6 to -0.67), fluoxetine (SMD: -0.57, 95% CI: -0.97 to -0.17), metoprolol (-0.94 ha/month, 95% CI: -1.4 to -0.46), pizotifen (-0.43 ha/month, 95% CI: -0.6 to -0.21), propranolol (-1.3 ha/month, 95% CI: -2.0 to -0.62), topiramate (-1.1 ha/month, 95% CI: -1.9 to -0.73) and valproate (-1.5 ha/month, 95% CI: -2.1 to -0.8). Several effective drugs with less than 3 trials included: 3 ace inhibitors (enalapril, lisinopril, captopril), two angiotensin receptor blockers (candesartan, telmisartan), two anticonvulsants (lamotrigine, levetiracetam), and several beta-blockers (atenolol, bisoprolol, timolol). Network meta-analysis found amitriptyline to be better than several other medications including

  19. National Headache Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Headache Topic Sheets (Spanish) Headache FAQ NHF Webinars Education Modules MigrainePro™ Children’s Headache Disorders New Perspectives on Caffeine and Headache War Veterans Health Resource Initiative National Headache Foundation Brochures ...

  20. A feasible repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation clinical protocol in migraine prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn Zardouz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This case series was conducted to determine the clinical feasibility of a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol for the prevention of migraine (with and without aura. Methods: Five patients with migraines underwent five repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation sessions separated in 1- to 2-week intervals for a period of 2 months at a single tertiary medical center. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied to the left motor cortex with 2000 pulses (20 trains with 1s inter-train interval delivered per session, at a frequency of 10 Hz and 80% resting motor threshold. Pre- and post-treatment numerical rating pain scales were collected, and percent reductions in intensity, frequency, and duration were generated. Results: An average decrease in 37.8%, 32.1%, and 31.2% were noted in the intensity, frequency, and duration of migraines post-repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, respectively. A mean decrease in 1.9±1.0 (numerical rating pain scale ± standard deviation; range: 0.4–2.8 in headache intensity scores was noted after the repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation sessions. Conclusion: The tested repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol is a well-tolerated, safe, and effective method for migraine prevention.

  1. A feasible repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation clinical protocol in migraine prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardouz, Shawn; Shi, Lei; Leung, Albert

    2016-01-01

    This case series was conducted to determine the clinical feasibility of a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol for the prevention of migraine (with and without aura). Five patients with migraines underwent five repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation sessions separated in 1- to 2-week intervals for a period of 2 months at a single tertiary medical center. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied to the left motor cortex with 2000 pulses (20 trains with 1s inter-train interval) delivered per session, at a frequency of 10 Hz and 80% resting motor threshold. Pre- and post-treatment numerical rating pain scales were collected, and percent reductions in intensity, frequency, and duration were generated. An average decrease in 37.8%, 32.1%, and 31.2% were noted in the intensity, frequency, and duration of migraines post-repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, respectively. A mean decrease in 1.9±1.0 (numerical rating pain scale ± standard deviation; range: 0.4-2.8) in headache intensity scores was noted after the repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation sessions. The tested repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol is a well-tolerated, safe, and effective method for migraine prevention.

  2. Forecasting Individual Headache Attacks Using Perceived Stress: Development of a Multivariable Prediction Model for Persons With Episodic Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Timothy T; Turner, Dana P; Golding, Adrienne N; Porter, John A H; Martin, Vincent T; Penzien, Donald B; Tegeler, Charles H

    2017-07-01

    To develop and validate a prediction model that forecasts future migraine attacks for an individual headache sufferer. Many headache patients and physicians believe that precipitants of headache can be identified and avoided or managed to reduce the frequency of headache attacks. Of the numerous candidate triggers, perceived stress has received considerable attention for its association with the onset of headache in episodic and chronic headache sufferers. However, no evidence is available to support forecasting headache attacks within individuals using any of the candidate headache triggers. This longitudinal cohort with forecasting model development study enrolled 100 participants with episodic migraine with or without aura, and N = 95 contributed 4626 days of electronic diary data and were included in the analysis. Individual headache forecasts were derived from current headache state and current levels of stress using several aspects of the Daily Stress Inventory, a measure of daily hassles that is completed at the end of each day. The primary outcome measure was the presence/absence of any headache attack (head pain > 0 on a numerical rating scale of 0-10) over the next 24 h period. After removing missing data (n = 431 days), participants in the study experienced a headache attack on 1613/4195 (38.5%) days. A generalized linear mixed-effects forecast model using either the frequency of stressful events or the perceived intensity of these events fit the data well. This simple forecasting model possessed promising predictive utility with an AUC of 0.73 (95% CI 0.71-0.75) in the training sample and an AUC of 0.65 (95% CI 0.6-0.67) in a leave-one-out validation sample. This forecasting model had a Brier score of 0.202 and possessed good calibration between forecasted probabilities and observed frequencies but had only low levels of resolution (ie, sharpness). This study demonstrates that future headache attacks can be forecasted for a diverse group of

  3. Level of physical activity, well-being, stress and self-rated health in persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøll, Lotte Skytte; Hammarlund, Catharina Sjödahl; Westergaard, Maria Lurenda

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of migraine with co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain is high in the general population. However, there is very little literature on the characteristics of these combined conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate a) the prevalence of migraine with co...

  4. The Association Between Childhood Traumatic Events and Headache-Related Parameters in Patients with Migraine: A Cross-Sectional Study in Turkish Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdil Demiryürek, Esra; Demiryürek, Bekir Enes; Tekin, Atilla; Güzey Aras, Yeşim; Doğan Güngen, Belma; Erdoğan, Sebatiye

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the association between childhood traumatic events and headache-related clinical parameters in migraine patients. 95 patients diagnosed with migraine and 50 healthy controls were included in the study. A socio-demographic form, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) were completed by all participants. Additionally, the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the Migraine Disability Assessment Test (MIDAS) were applied to migraine patients. Positive correlations were found between emotional abuse, physical abuse, physical neglect, CTQ total scores, and headache frequency (r=0.33, r=0.24, r=0.26 and r=0.28 respectively) in migraine patients. A positive correlation was found between physical neglect and headache duration (r=0.28). Positive correlations were also found between emotional abuse and physical neglect, and MIDAS total scores (r=0.22 and r=0.23, respectively). Emotional abuse and CTQ total scores were associated with younger mean age of headache onset (r=-0.24 and r=-0.23). Childhood traumatic events are associated with more frequent and more severe headache episodes, and younger headache onset in migraine patients.

  5. Migrainous infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, K; Artto, V; Bendtsen, L

    2011-01-01

    Migrainous infarction (MI), i.e. an ischemic stroke developing during an attack of migraine with aura is rare and the knowledge of its clinical characteristics is limited. Previous case series using the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) included......Migrainous infarction (MI), i.e. an ischemic stroke developing during an attack of migraine with aura is rare and the knowledge of its clinical characteristics is limited. Previous case series using the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) included...

  6. Headache induced by a nitric oxide donor (nitroglycerin) responds to sumatriptan. A human model for development of migraine drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Olesen, J

    1996-01-01

    sumatriptan 6 mg s.c. or placebo succeeded by 20 min NTG (0.12 microgram/kg/min) infusion. Headache was rated on a 10 points scale. Temporal and radial artery diameters and velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) were measured with ultrasound. Sumatriptan reduced the NTG-induced headache, median score 1.......5 versus 4 after placebo (p velocity in the MCA was unaffected. The NTG model may prove to be a valuable tool in the development of future migraine drugs. The results suggest...

  7. Vestibular migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lempert, Thomas; Olesen, Jes; Furman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine, jointly formulated by the Committee for Classification of Vestibular Disorders of the Bárány Society and the Migraine Classification Subcommittee of the International Headache Society (IHS). The classification includes vestibular...... migraine and probable vestibular migraine. Vestibular migraine will appear in an appendix of the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) as a first step for new entities, in accordance with the usual IHS procedures. Probable vestibular migraine may be included...

  8. Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the body Difficulty speaking Hearing noises or music Uncontrollable jerking or other movements Sometimes, a migraine ... genetics and environmental factors appear to play a role. Migraines may be caused by changes in the ...

  9. Migraines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or skipping meals may also trigger migraines. Hormone changes: Women may experience migraines related to their menstrual cycles, to menopause, or to using hormonal birth control or hormone replacement therapy. Stress: Stress ...

  10. Level of physical activity, well-being, stress and self-rated health in persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøll, Lotte Skytte; Hammarlund, Catharina Sjödahl; Westergaard, Maria Lurenda

    2017-01-01

    -existing tension-type headache and neck pain in a clinic-based sample, b) the level of physical activity, psychological well-being, perceived stress and self-rated health in persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain compared to healthy controls, c) the perceived ability of persons...... where questionnaires on physical activity, psychological well-being, perceived stress and self-rated health were completed by 148 persons with migraine and 100 healthy controls matched by sex and average age. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to assess characteristics of migraine, tension-type...... well-being, higher level of perceived stress and poorer self-rated health compared to healthy controls. They reported reduced ability to perform physical activity owing to migraine (high degree), tension-type headache (moderate degree) and neck pain (low degree). The most burdensome condition...

  11. Randomized controlled trial of the CGRP receptor antagonist telcagepant for migraine prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, Tony W; Connor, Kathryn M; Zhang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    elevations do not support the use of telcagepant for daily administration. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class II evidence that in patients with migraine, telcagepant taken daily reduces headache days by 1.4 days per month compared to placebo and causes 2.5% of patients to have elevations......-14 migraine days during a 4-week baseline were randomized to telcagepant 140 mg, telcagepant 280 mg, or placebo twice daily for 12 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by mean monthly headache days and migraine/probable migraine days (headache plus ≥ 1 associated symptom). RESULTS: The trial was terminated following...... initiation and resolved after treatment discontinuation. The originally planned efficacy analysis over 12 weeks was not performed due to limited data at later time points, but there was evidence that telcagepant resulted in a larger reduction from baseline than placebo for mean monthly headache days (month 1...

  12. Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... well as visits to the doctor. The International Classification of Headache Disorders, published by the International Headache Society, is ... well as visits to the doctor. The International Classification of Headache Disorders, published by the International Headache Society, is ...

  13. Has aerobic exercise effect on pain perception in persons with migraine and coexisting tension-type headache and neck pain? A randomized, controlled, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krøll, L S; Sjödahl Hammarlund, C; Gard, G; Jensen, R H; Bendtsen, L

    2018-04-10

    A large subset of persons with migraine suffers from coexisting tension-type headache and neck pain which may adversely affect the prognosis of migraine. Aerobic exercise has been shown to decrease migraine burden in these persons. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the effect of aerobic exercise in persons with migraine and coexisting tension-type headache and neck pain can be explained by changes in pain perception. Seventy consecutively recruited persons with migraine and coexisting tension-type headache and neck pain were randomized into exercise group or control group. Aerobic exercise consisted of bike/cross-trainer/brisk walking for 45 min, three times/week for 3 months. Controls continued their usual daily activities. Pericranial tenderness, pain thresholds, supra-thresholds and temporal summation were assessed at baseline, after treatment and at follow-up (6 months from baseline). Fifty-two persons with migraine and coexisting tension-type headache and neck pain completed the study. Aerobic exercise did not induce consistent changes in nociceptive pathways measured by pericranial tenderness, pressure pain thresholds and sensitivity to electrical stimulation. The effect of aerobic exercise cannot be explained by measurable effects on the pain modulation system. Thus, the positive effect on migraine burden may rather be explained by positive alteration of avoidance behaviour. Aerobic exercise can be recommended as a safe and inexpensive migraine treatment strategy. This study adds further knowledge about the positive effect of aerobic exercise for persons with migraine and coexisting tension-type headache and neck pain. This effect cannot be measured by changes in pain modulation, but may rather be explained by positive alteration of avoidance behaviour. © 2018 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  14. Impact of sex hormonal changes on tension-type headache and migraine: a cross-sectional population-based survey in 2,600 women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlı, Necdet; Baykan, Betül; Ertaş, Mustafa; Zarifoğlu, Mehmet; Siva, Aksel; Saip, Sabahattin; Ozkaya, Güven; Onal, Ayşe Emel

    2012-10-01

    Sex hormones have some implications on headaches. The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of hormonal changes comparatively on tension-type headache (TTH) and migraine, in a population-based sample. A nationwide face-to-face prevalence study was conducted using a structured electronic questionnaire. 54.3 % of the migraineurs reported that the probability of experiencing headache during menstruation was high, whereas 3.9 % had headache only during menstruation. Forward logistic regression analysis revealed that menstruation was a significant trigger for migraine in comparison to TTH. On the other hand, nearly double the number of TTH sufferers reported "pure menstrual headache" compared to migraineurs (p = 0.02). Menstrual headaches caused significantly higher MIDAS grades. One-third of the definite migraineurs reported improvement during pregnancy and oral contraceptives significantly worsened migraine. Menopause had a slight improving effect on migraine compared to TTH. Sex hormonal changes have major impacts particularly on migraine; however, the effects of hormonal fluctuations on TTH should not be underestimated.

  15. Treatment of Menstrual-Related Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A review and meta-analysis of therapy trials for menstrual-related migraine headache (MRM and evidence-based recommendations for acute and short-term preventive treatment are reported from Toronto Western Hospital, ON, Canada.

  16. Not only headache: higher degree of sexual pain symptoms among migraine sufferers

    OpenAIRE

    Ifergane, Gal; Ben-Zion, Itzhak Z.; Plakht, Ygal; Regev, Keren; Wirguin, Itzhak

    2008-01-01

    Chronic illness and chronic pain can have profound negative effects on relationship and sexual satisfaction, yet the influence of migraine on sexuality has not been previously evaluated. To assess sexual functions in subjects with migraine compared to those with no migraine. We evaluated female university students using the Israeli sexual behavior inventory (ISBI). Migraine was diagnosed according to self-reported symptoms according to the IHS criteria. Several dimensions of female sexuality—...

  17. Pizotifen relieves acute migraine symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S.M. Kamrul Huda

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To The Editor: Various pharmacological agents are used for the treatment of migraine. In the last five years, various drug companies in Bangladesh have been marketing pizotifen as a preventive treatment of all types of migraine. Pizotifen is a serotonin antagonist acting mainly at the 5-HT1, 5-HT2A and 5HT2C receptors. It also has some activity as an antihistamine (1. Pizotifen is a well-established preventative therapy of migraine. I would like to report my own experience in using pizotifen in treating the acute attacks of migraine. Pizotifen was prescribed as acute therapy in 11 patients, 6 females (4 had migraine without aura and 2 had migraine with aura and 5 males (all had migraine without aura. Three female and 5 male patients, who had migraine without aura, reported no beneficial effect of pizotifen as treatment for the acute attacks. Three female patients (two with migraine with aura and one with migraine without aura had their headache relieved by use of pizotifen as treatment for the acute attacks. This is an initial observation about the effectiveness of pizotifen as acute therapy in migraine. However, this could be simply a placebo affect. Nevertheless, it will be worth exploring the role of pizotifen as a therapeutic agent for acute attacks of migraine by conducting well-designed randomized, controlled studies.

  18. Migraine with Aura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migraine with aura Overview Migraine with aura (also called classic migraine) is a headache that strikes after or along with sensory disturbances called aura. These disturbances can include flashes ...

  19. The effect of foetal growth restriction on the development of migraine and tension-type headache in adulthood. The HUNT Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Børte

    Full Text Available There is little knowledge about how factors early in life affect the development of migraine and tension-type headache. We aimed to examine whether growth restriction in utero is associated with development of migraine and frequent tension-type headache in adults.The population-based Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT 3 contained a validated headache questionnaire, which differentiated between migraine and tension-type headache. These data were linked to information on weight and gestational age at birth from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry. In total 4557 females and 2789 males, aged 19-41 years, were included in this registry-based study. Participants were categorized as appropriate for gestational age (AGA, 10th-90th percentile, small for gestational age (SGA, 3rd-10th percentile or very small for gestational age (VSGA, < 3rd percentile. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI for migraine and tension-type headache, with exposure being growth restriction at birth.The effect of growth restriction on migraine was modified by sex, with a significant association in males (p<0.001, but not in females (p = 0.20. In particular, males born VSGA were at increased risk of developing migraine (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.63-4.58, p<0.001, with an intermediate risk among those born SGA (OR 1.50, 95% CI 0.96-2.35, p = 0.08 compared to those born AGA. There was no significant association between growth restriction and frequent TTH (p = 0.051.Growth restriction was associated with increased risk of migraine in adulthood among males, but not among females. This suggests that migraine might, in part, be influenced by early life events, and that males seem to be particularly vulnerable.

  20. Potential effect and mechanism of action of topical chamomile (Matricaria chammomila L.) oil on migraine headache: A medical hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargaran, Arman; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Faridi, Pouya; Daneshamouz, Saeid; Kordafshari, Gholamreza; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali

    2014-11-01

    Migraine is a chronic recurring headache for which no complete treatment has been found yet. Therefore, finding new treatment approaches and medicines is important. In this review, we consider the probable mechanism of action of a traditional and ethnic formulary of chamomile extract in sesame oil as a new topical medication for migraine pain relief. Chamomile oil is prepared in Traditional Persian Medicine by boiling aqueous extract of chamomile in sesame oil. To optimize the procedure, we can use a Clevenger-type apparatus to extract the essential oil and add it to the end product. The preparation includes both essential oils (chamazulene and bisabolol oxide) and polyphenols (a flavonoid such as apigenin and its derivatives). It probably possesses pain relief effects for migraines because of the following properties: (1) chamazulene and apigenin, which inhibit iNOS expression in activated macrophages and can lead to the prohibition of NO release and synthesis; (2) chamomile flavonoids, which have a strong inhibitory effect on endogenous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels in RAW 264.7 macrophages and can play the role of selective COX-2 inhibitor; (3) chamomile polyphenols, which possess anti-inflammatory effects due to the inhibition of pro-inflammatory biomarkers in THP1 macrophages and which can reduce inflammation in neurovascular units (NVU) at the site of migraine pain; (4) chamomile, which has neuroprotective effects because of reduced NO levels; (5) sesamine in sesame oil, which possesses an anti-inflammatory effect. These effects are supported by main pathophysiological theories of migraine such as neural and sensitization theories. Chamomile oil is a traditional formulation still used in Iran as an ethno-medicine. Because of the mentioned mechanisms of action, it can be hypothesized that chamomile oil is a novel medicine for the relief of migraine pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almost everyone has had a headache. Headache is the most common form of pain. It's a major reason people miss days at work or school or visit the doctor. The most common type of headache is a tension headache. Tension headaches are due ...

  2. Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accessed March 8, 2016. Seifert T. Headache in sports. Current Pain and Headache Reports. 2014;18:448. ... article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/headache/basics/definition/SYM-20050800 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  3. The auriculotemporal nerve in etiology of migraine headaches: compression points and anatomical variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chim, Harvey; Okada, Haruko C; Brown, Matthew S; Alleyne, Brendan; Liu, Mengyuan T; Zwiebel, Samantha; Guyuron, Bahman

    2012-08-01

    The auriculotemporal nerve has been identified as one of the peripheral trigger sites for migraine headaches. However, its distal course is poorly mapped following emergence from the parotid gland. In addition, a reliable anatomical landmark for locating the potential compression points along the course of the nerve during surgery has not been sufficiently described. Twenty hemifaces on 10 fresh cadavers were dissected to trace the course of the auriculotemporal nerve from the inferior border of the zygomatic arch to its termination in the temporal scalp. The compression points were mapped and the distances were measured from the most anterosuperior point of the external auditory meatus, which was used as a fixed anatomical landmark. Three potential compression points along the course of the auriculotemporal nerve were identified. Compression points 1 and 2 corresponded to preauricular fascial bands. Compression point 1 was centered 13.1±5.9 mm anterior and 5.0±7.0 mm superior to the most anterosuperior point of the external auditory meatus, whereas compression point 2 was centered at 11.9±6.0 mm anterior and 17.2±10.4 mm superior to the most anterosuperior point of the external auditory meatus. A significant relationship was found between the auriculotemporal nerve and superficial temporal artery (compression point 3) in 80 percent of hemifaces, with three patterns of interaction: a single site of artery crossing over the nerve (62.5 percent), a helical intertwining relationship (18.8 percent), and nerve crossing over the artery (18.8 percent). Findings from this cadaver study provide information relevant to the operative localization of potential compression points along the auriculotemporal nerve.

  4. Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stress, anxiety, hormonal changes, bright or flashing lights, lack of food or sleep, and dietary substances. Migraine in some women may ... stress, anxiety, hormonal changes, bright or flashing lights, lack of food or sleep, and dietary substances. Migraine in some women may ...

  5. Reliability and validity of Hindi translation of the migraine disability assessment and headache impact test-6 questionnaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juyal Ratish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the reliability and validity of the Hindi translation of the Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS and Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6 questionnaires. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on the migraine patients. For test-retest reliability, the respondents filled the MIDAS and HIT-6 questionnaires twice, at an interval of three weeks. For validity, the same population of patients filled the headache diary for three months. After three months they filled the MIDAS and HIT-6 questionnaires again. The patients were subgrouped according to their occupation and level of education. The test-retest reliability and validity were calculated by the Pearson correlation coefficient. Internal consistency was calculated using the Cronbach alpha. Results: A total of 236 migraine patients were screened. Seventy-nine patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A total of 69 patients completed the study. The HIT-6 questionnaire was applicable to all the subgroups of patients and had better comprehensibility than the MIDAS. Housewives missed out on the first two questions of the MIDAS and had lower mean MIDAS scores than HIT-6. The test-retest correlation coefficients for the total MIDAS and HIT-6 scores were 0.94 and 0.81, respectively. The correlation coefficients between the total score in the headache diary equivalent and the MIDAS and HIT-6 total score were 0.91 and 0.77, respectively. Cronbach alpha, a measure of internal consistency for the MIDAS questionnaire was > 0.90 at all the compilations. For the HIT-6 questionnaire, it ranged from 0.67 to 0.79. Conclusion: The Hindi versions of MIDAS and HIT-6 questionnaires were reliable and valid, but could not be interchanged. HIT-6 had better comprehensibility.

  6. Prophylaxis of migraine: general principles and patient acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico D’Amico

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Domenico D’Amico1, Stewart J Tepper21Headache Center, Department of Neurological Sciences, C Besta Neurological Institute, Milan, Italy; 2Center for Headache and Pain, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Migraine is a chronic neurological condition with episodic exacerbations. Migraine is highly prevalent, and associated with significant pain, disability, and diminished quality of life. Migraine management is an important health care issue. Migraine management includes avoidance of trigger factors, lifestyle modifications, non-pharmacological therapies, and medications. Pharmacological treatment is traditionally divided into acute or symptomatic treatment, and preventive treatment or prophylaxis. Many migraine patients can be treated using only acute treatment. Patients with severe and/or frequent migraines require long-term preventive therapy. Prophylaxis requires daily administration of anti-migraine compounds with potential adverse events or contraindications, and may also interfere with other concurrent conditions and treatments. These problems may induce patients to reject the idea of a preventive treatment, leading to poor patient adherence. This paper reviews the main factors influencing patient acceptance of anti-migraine prophylaxis, providing practical suggestions to enhance patient willingness to accept pharmacological anti-migraine preventive therapy. We also provide information about the main clinical characteristics of migraine, and their negative consequences. The circumstances warranting prophylaxis in migraine patients as well as the main characteristics of the compounds currently used in migraine prophylaxis will also be briefly discussed, focusing on those aspects which can enhance patient acceptance and adherence.Keywords: migraine, prophylaxis, preventive therapy, acceptance, adherence

  7. Temporo-mandibular disorders are an important comorbidity of migraine and may be clinically difficult to distinguish them from tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ariovaldo Alberto da; Brandão, Karina Viana; Faleiros, Bruno Engler; Tavares, Rafael Mattos; Lara, Rodrigo Pinto; Januzzi, Eduardo; Carvalho, Anísio Bueno de; Carvalho, Eliane Maria Duarte de; Gomes, João Bosco Lima; Leite, Frederico Mota Gonçalves; Alves, Betania Mara Franco; Gómez, Rodrigo Santiago; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio

    2014-02-01

    Clinical differentiation between the primary headaches and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) can be challenging. To investigate the relationship between TMD and primary headaches by conducting face to face assessments in patients from an orofacial pain clinic and a headache tertiary center. Sample consists of 289 individuals consecutively identified at a headache center and 78 individuals seen in an orofacial pain clinic because of symptoms suggestive of TMD. Migraine was diagnosed in 79.8% of headache sufferers, in headache tertiary center, and 25.6% of those in orofacial pain clinic (pheadache was present in 20.4% and 46.1%, while the TMD painful occurred in 48.1% and 70.5% respectively (pheadache, and this headache was more frequent in the dental center than at the medical center.

  8. Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... should you do about it? Anatomy of a Headache Although it may feel like it, a headache is not actually a pain in your brain. ... to the brain, and this brings on a headache. Different Kinds of Headaches The most common type ...

  9. Treatment in chronic migraine: choice of reabilitation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana STANESCU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a disabling neurologic condition with a spontaneous clinical evolution into a chronic form. Migraine progression from an episodic into a chronic form is realized through a period of time involving several months or years, during which an increase attack frequency occurs. .According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 chronic migraine is a type of primary headache occurring on 15 or more days per month for more than 3 months, in which more than 8 days per month headache meet criteria for migraine with or without aura or respond to specific migraine treatment. The prevalence of chronic migraine is estimated between 1- 3% of general population. Persons with chronic migraine are more likely to suffer from severe disability; chronic migraine has an important socio-economic impact. Diagnostic approach in chronic migraine includes exclusion of a secondary headache disorder and confirmation of a primary episodic headache. When a patient is found to overuse pain medication, diagnosis of both chronic migraine and MOH should be considered. Treating episodic migraine early and managing attack frequency using preventive medication and behavioural interventions will be benefic in reducing the risk of chronicisation. Lifestyle changes are important for avoiding triggers for migraine attacks; treatment of comorbidities is equally important because these conditions exacerbate patient’s tendency to have headaches. The initial relief step for drug abusers always relies in drug withdrawal. For migraine attacks treatment begins with non-pharmacologic interventions (staying in a quiet, dark room, pressure on painful areas, applying cold compresses , simple OTC analgetics (NSAIDs, paracetamol, aspirin, acetaminophen. If these are not effective, triptans are the drugs of choice. Preventive treatment is always recommended in patients with chronic migraine because the high frequency of headache attacks. Treatment should be

  10. Temporo-mandibular disorders are an important comorbidity of migraine and may be clinically difficult to distinguish them from tension-type headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariovaldo Alberto da Silva Júnior

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Clinical differentiation between the primary headaches and temporomandibular disorders (TMD can be challenging. Objectives : To investigate the relationship between TMD and primary headaches by conducting face to face assessments in patients from an orofacial pain clinic and a headache tertiary center. Method : Sample consists of 289 individuals consecutively identified at a headache center and 78 individuals seen in an orofacial pain clinic because of symptoms suggestive of TMD. Results : Migraine was diagnosed in 79.8% of headache sufferers, in headache tertiary center, and 25.6% of those in orofacial pain clinic (p<0.001. Tension-type headache was present in 20.4% and 46.1%, while the TMD painful occurred in 48.1% and 70.5% respectively (p<0.001. Conclusion : TMD is an important comorbidity of migraine and difficult to distinguish clinically from tension-type headache, and this headache was more frequent in the dental center than at the medical center.

  11. Allodynia Is Associated With Initial and Sustained Response to Acute Migraine Treatment: Results from the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Richard B; Munjal, Sagar; Buse, Dawn C; Bennett, Alix; Fanning, Kristina M; Burstein, Rami; Reed, Michael L

    2017-07-01

    In a population sample of persons with migraine treating with a single category of acute migraine medication, to identify rates and factors associated with acute treatment outcomes, including 2-hour pain freedom (2hPF), 24-hour pain response (24hPR), and 24-hour sustained pain response (24hSPR). Key predictors include acute treatment type (triptans and other medication categories), the influence of allodynia on response to medication, and the interaction between medication category and presence of allodynia in response to treatment among people with migraine. Cutaneous allodynia was previously associated with inadequate 2hPF, 24hPR, and 24hSPR (sustained response at 24 hours among those with adequate 2hPF) among people with migraine in the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) Study. The AMPP Study obtained data from a representative US sample of persons with migraine by mailed questionnaire. The 2006 survey included 8233 people with migraine aged 18 or over who completed the Migraine Treatment Optimization Questionnaire (mTOQ). mTOQ was used to assess acute treatment outcomes including 2hPF, 24hPR, and 24hSPR. Eligible individuals used only a single category of acute prescription migraine treatments (n  =  5236, 63.6%). This sample was stratified into 5 categories of type of acute prescription headache medication used (triptans, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, barbiturate-combinations, opioids, and opioid combinations and ergot alkaloids). Separate binary logistic regression models evaluated: (1) triptans vs other medication types; (2) presence of allodynia vs no allodynia; and (3) the interaction of medication category with allodynia. Sociodemographic variables, health insurance status, over-the-counter and preventive medication use were included as covariates. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were generated for each acute treatment outcome. Among eligible participants, the mean age was 46 years, and 82.5% were women

  12. [The importance of chronic migraine in a general neurology service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia-Naya, M; Alarcia-Alejos, R; Modrego-Pardo, P J

    Chronic migraine is a primary headache that is difficult to treat and has an important impact on the patient's quality of life. The international headache classification recently modified the criteria for chronic migraine and therefore few studies have been conducted that analyse groups according to these new criteria. AIM. To analyse a group of patients with chronic migraine who were referred to a general neurology service. The first 100 patients with migraine were selected. Researchers established and analysed a number of subgroups of patients with episodic, chronic or chronic migraine with probable headache due to medication abuse, in accordance with the International Headache Society (IHS) headache classification and its revised version from 2006. Of the total sample of 738 new patients, 100 (13.5%) suffered from migraines and of these 100 new patients with migraine 42 (5.6% of the total series) satisfied criteria for chronic migraine and 15 patients with chronic migraine met the criteria for probable headache due to medication abuse. Before visiting the neurology service, only 41% had been diagnosed as suffering from migraine, 38% had received no information about this condition, only 17% took triptans for symptomatic relief and 23% had followed some kind of preventive treatment. One notable finding was the importance of episodic and chronic migraine in a general neurology service, on applying the recent IHS criteria. A high percentage of patients with chronic migraine who were referred to the neurology service have not been diagnosed or given any information or proper treatment; an elevated degree of self-medication and medication abuse also exists. Preventive treatment and triptans in cases of intense migraines are still not commonly used in primary care.

  13. Vitamin supplementation as possible prophylactic treatment against migraine with aura and menstrual migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Munvar Miya; Gan, Siew Hua

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common form of headache disorder globally. The etiology of migraine is multifactorial, with genetic components and environmental interactions considered to be the main causal factors. Some researchers postulate that deficits in mitochondrial energy reserves can cause migraine or an increase in homocysteine levels can lead to migraine attacks; therefore, vitamins could play a vital role in migraine prevention. For instance, riboflavin influences mitochondrial dysfunction and prevents migraine. Genes such as flavoenzyme 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), especially the C677T variant, have been associated with elevated plasma levels of homocysteine and migraine with aura. Homocysteine catalyzation requires the presence of vitamins B6, B12, and folic acid, which can decrease the severity of migraine with aura, making these vitamins potentially useful prophylactic agents for treating migraine with aura. Menstrual migraine, on the other hand, is associated with increased prostaglandin (PG) levels in the endometrium, indicating a role for vitamin E, which is an anti-PG. Vitamin C can also be used as a scavenger of reactive oxygen species for treating neurogenic inflammation in migraine patients. This paper reviews possible therapies based on vitamin supplementation for migraine prophylaxis, focusing on migraine with aura and menstrual migraine.

  14. When to Go to the Emergency Room for a Headache or Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... migraine with aura face a higher risk of ischemic stroke — a stroke that occurs because of a clot ... with aura can take control of their elevated stroke risk. For young women with aura on birth control, Dr. Diener ...

  15. Practice Guidelines for Management of Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature (166 articles identified and reviewed on the pharmacological treatment of the child with migraine headache was classified according to acute headache and preventive medications, and the results of drug trials were evaluated by Committees of the Child Neurology Society and American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Gender Differences in the Association of Life Style Factors to the Prevalence and Symptoms of Migraines and Other Headaches Among Navy Personnel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wingard, Deborah

    1997-01-01

    Migraine is a serious and painful disorder characterized by severe headaches. A questionnaire-based survey was performed of 2,914 women crew members and a comparison group of 2,841 men assigned aboard 36 Navy ships during 1994-1996...

  17. Cilostazol induces C-fos expression in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis and behavioural changes suggestive of headache with the migraine-like feature photophobia in female rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S L; Petersen, Steffen; Sørensen, Dorte B

    2018-01-01

    in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Furthermore, trigeminal - but not hind paw hyperalgesia was observed. Conclusion The altered behaviours are suggestive of cilostazol induced headache with migraine-like features, but not specific. The presence of head specific hyperalgesia and the c-fos response in the trigeminal...

  18. [Prevalence and indirect costs of headache in a Brazilian Company].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, M; Rodrigues, A de J; De Oliveira, G V; De Souza, K F; Doi, L M; Rocha, M B; Saporta, M A; Orleans, R B; Kotecki, R; Estrela, V V; De Medeiros, V A; Borges, W I

    1998-12-01

    Employees from a Brazilian oil company research centre (n = 993) were interviewed on the occurrence of headache during a 30 days period. Headache prevalence was 49.8%, with a mean frequency of 4.3 +/- 7.0 attacks per month, lasting 12.2 +/- 21.4 hours each. According to the International Headache Society diagnostic criteria, migraine (5.5%), episodic tension-type headache (26.4%), chronic tension-type headache (1.7%) and headaches not fulfilling the criteria for such disorders (16.2%) were observed. Women suffered comparatively more headache and specifically migraine than men. The pain interfered with work productivity in 10% of the subjects, corresponding to 538.75 hours off. According to an indirect costs estimation for each headache, the company may loose up to US$125.98 per employee annually. Since among headaches migraine has the highest indirect cost, migraine prevention and treatment is particularly important at the working environment. Migraine frequency may be prevented to a large extent, resulting on positive effects in both the quality of life and productivity. The cost-benefit ratio clearly favours therapeutic and preventive programs against chronic headaches.

  19. CONSORT recommendations in abstracts of randomised, controlled trials on migraine and headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer Carsten

    2011-01-01

    A CONSORT statement on the content of abstracts of randomised, controlled trials (RCTs) was published in 2008. I therefore reviewed the abstracts from 2009 to 2010 published on RCTs in Cephalalgia, Headache and other (non-headache) journals. The following items were reviewed: number of patients, ....... The influence of the CONSORT statement on reporting in abstracts has so far only had a limited influence on the headache literature....

  20. Erenumab (AMG 334) in episodic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Messoud; Dodick, David; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    ) study will receive erenumab 70 mg every 4 weeks for up to 5 years. This preplanned interim analysis, conducted after all participants had completed the 1-year open-label follow-up, evaluated changes in monthly migraine days (MMD), achievement of ≥50%, ≥75%, and 100% reductions, Headache Impact Test (HIT...... improvements and favorable safety and tolerability profiles, supports further investigation of erenumab as a preventive treatment in patients with EM. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01952574. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with episodic migraine, erenumab...... reduces long-term MMD and improves headache-related disability and migraine-specific quality of life....

  1. Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Migraines may be triggered by foods, such as chocolate, certain cheeses, or monosodium glutamate (MSG). Caffeine withdrawal, ... such as: Bleeding in the area between the brain and the thin tissue that covers the brain ( ...

  2. Analysis of Trigger Factors in Episodic Migraineurs Using a Smartphone Headache Diary Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Wook Park

    Full Text Available Various stimuli can trigger migraines in susceptible individuals. We examined migraine trigger factors by using a smartphone headache diary application.Episodic migraineurs who agreed to participate in our study downloaded smartphone headache diary application, which was designed to capture the details regarding headache trigger factors and characteristics for 3 months. The participants were asked to access the smartphone headache diary application daily and to confirm the presence of a headache and input the types of trigger factors.Sixty-two participants kept diary entries until the end of the study. The diary data for 4,579 days were analyzed. In this data set, 1,099 headache days (336 migraines, 763 non-migraine headaches were recorded; of these, 772 headache events had with trigger factors, and 327 events did not have trigger factors. The common trigger factors that were present on headache days included stress, fatigue, sleep deprivation, hormonal changes, and weather changes. The likelihood of a headache trigger was 57.7% for stress, 55.1% for sleep deprivation, 48.5% for fatigue, and 46.5% for any trigger. The headaches with trigger factors were associated with greater pain intensity (p<0.001, headache-related disability (p<0.001, abortive medication use (p = 0.02, and the proportion of migraine (p < 0.001, relative to those without trigger factors. Traveling (odd ratios [OR]: 6.4, hormonal changes (OR: 3.5, noise (OR: 2.8, alcohol (OR: 2.5, overeating (OR: 2.4, and stress (OR:1.8 were significantly associated with migraines compared to non-migraine headaches. The headaches that were associated with hormonal changes or noise were more often migraines, regardless of the preventive medication. The headaches due to stress, overeating, alcohol, and traveling were more often migraines without preventive medication, but it was not evident with preventive medication.Smartphone headache diary application is an effective tool to assess migraine

  3. Effect of a traditional syrup from Citrus medica L. fruit juice on migraine headache: A randomized double blind placebo controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarpour, Mehrnaz; Yousefi, Gholamhossein; Hamedi, Azadeh; Shariat, Abdolhamid; Salehi, Alireza; Heydari, Mojtaba

    2016-02-17

    In Persian ethnomedicine several herbal remedies and functional foods have been used to treat migraine headache which are mostly summarized in Qarabadin-e-kabir (Aghili-Shirazi MH, 1773). One of them is Citron syrup (Sharbat-e-Balang) containing edible Citrus medica L. fruit juice and sugar. The present study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of Citron syrup on patients with migraine headache. Citron syrup was prepared as described in Qarabadin-e-kabir. In this double blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial, ninety patients with migraine headache were allocated to three parallel groups (Citron syrup, propranolol or placebo). Patients received 15ml of Citron syrup, placebo syrup or 20mg of propranolol tablet three times daily after a meal for 4 weeks. Primary outcomes were obtained from three measures: the frequency (per month), mean duration (hour) and mean intensity (visual analogue scale "VAS" 0-10 score) of headache attacks evaluated prior to and following 4 weeks of the intervention. Citron syrup was superior to placebo in reduction of headache attacks intensity (P0.05). However, unlike propranolol, Citron syrup could not significantly reduce the frequency of attacks compared to placebo. No indication of any serious side effects from Citron syrup was observed. According to obtained results, Citron syrup as a traditional Persian remedy can be suggested as an effective treatment for decreasing pain intensity and duration of attacks in migraine headache and the effectiveness is comparable to propranolol. However, the syrup did not show significant effect on frequency of attacks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Frequency-Dependent Habituation Deficit of the Nociceptive Blink Reflex in Aura With Migraine Headache. Can Migraine Aura Modulate Trigeminal Excitability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Armando; Anastasio, Maria Grazia; De Icco, Roberto; Coppola, Gianluca; Ambrosini, Anna; Serrao, Mariano; Sandrini, Giorgio; Pierelli, Francesco

    2017-06-01

    To study the influence of the migraine aura on the trigeminal nociception, we investigated the habituation of the nociceptive blink reflex (nBR) R2 responses in aura with migraine headache (AwMH) and comparatively in migraine without aura (MWoA) and healthy subjects (HS). A clear deficit of habituation in trigeminal nociceptive responses has been documented in MWoA; however, similar data in MWA are lacking. Seventeen AwMH, 29 MWoA, and 30 HS were enrolled and a nonrandomized clinical neurophysiological study examining nBR habituation by clinical diagnosis was devised. We delivered a series of 26 electrical stimuli, at different stimulation frequencies (SF) (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, and 1 Hz), subsequently subdivided in five blocks of five responses for each SF. The mean area values of the second to the fifth block expressed as the percentage of the mean area value of the first block were taken as an index of habituation for each SF. A significant lower mean percentage decrease of the R2 area across all blocks was found at 1, 0.5, 0.3, and 0.2 Hz SF in MWoA and at 0.3 and 0.2 Hz SF in AwMH, when compared to HS. In the most representative fifth block of responses, we found in MWoA vs HS at 1 Hz, 57.0 ± 27.8 vs 30.6 ± 12.0; at 0.5 Hz, 54.8 ± 26.1 vs 32.51 ± 17.7; at 0.3 Hz, 44.7 ± 21.6 vs 27.6 ± 13.2; at 0.2 Hz, 61.3 ± 29.5 vs 32.6 ± 18.0, and in AwMH vs HS at 0.3 Hz, 52.7 ± 24.7 vs 27.6 ± 13.2; at 0.2 Hz, 69.3 ± 38.6 vs 32.6 ± 18.0 as mean ± SD of the R2 area percentage of the first block, respectively. Interestingly, AwMH subjects did not show differences in mean percentage decrease of the R2 area at 1 and 0.5 Hz SF when compared to HS. No differences between groups were found at 0.1 and 0.05 Hz SF. We demonstrated in AwMH a deficit of habituation of the nBR R2 responses after repeated stimulations, although less pronounced than that observed in MWoA of comparable clinical severity. We hypothesize

  5. Personality Traits and Anxiety and Depressive Disorders in Patients With Medication-Overuse Headache Versus Episodic Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Nima; Togha, Mansooreh; Arzaghi, Seyed Masoud; Nekooie, Sepideh; Tafti, Mehrnaz Fallah; Fatehi, Farzad

    2017-12-14

    An episodic migraine (EM) may lead to medication-overuse headache (MOH), an abnormal behavioral pattern of noncompliance. Anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and disorders caused by psychoactive substances other than analgesics all have been reported with MOH at higher rates than with EM. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationships between personality traits and anxiety and depressive disorders and headache type. In this cross-sectional study, 55 patients with EM and 50 patients with MOH were recruited from were recruited from 2 university hospital clinics in Tehran, Iran, from January 2013 to November 2015. Personality traits were assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI-125). Patients were assessed for depression with the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and anxiety with the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups regarding sex, age, or educational level. The TCI-125 analysis between the 2 groups showed a significant mean ± SD difference in reward dependence (EM: 9.77 ± 2.06, MOH: 8.69 ± 2.15, P = .01) and self-transcendence (EM: 8.42 ± 2.45, MOH: 6.83 ± 3.90, P = .03). The GAD-7 and PHQ-9 analyses demonstrated no significant difference between the 2 groups. Reward-dependence and self-transcendence scores were significantly lower in patients with MOH than in those with EM. These results suggest that people with lower reward-dependence and self-transcendence scores may not adequately respond to prescribed medications, leading them to the frequent use of multiple drugs at higher doses. A multidisciplinary approach to management may be suggested for migraine patients, and it is reasonable to consider behavioral therapy in conjunction with pharmacotherapy to ameliorate comorbid conditions. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  6. [Chronic daily headache in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvellier, J-C; Cuisset, J-M; Vallée, L

    2008-12-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) affects 2-4% of adolescent females and 0.8-2% of adolescent males. Chronic daily headache is diagnosed when headaches occur more than 4h/day, 15 headache days per month or more, over a period of 3 consecutive months, without an underlying pathology. It is manifested by severe intermittent, migraine-like headaches as well as by chronic baseline headaches. Both Silberstein-Lipton criteria and the second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) can be used to classify chronic daily headache in children and adolescents. Chronic daily headache is classified into four diagnostic categories: transformed (Silberstein-Lipton criteria)/chronic (ICHD) migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache, and hemicrania continua. Children and adolescents with chronic daily headache frequently have sleep disturbance, pain at other sites, dizziness, medication-overuse headache, and a psychiatric comorbidity (anxiety and mood disorders). Chronic daily headache frequently results in school absence. Successful approaches to treatment include reassurance, education, use of preventative medication, avoidance of analgesics, and helping the child return to a functional daily routine and a regular school schedule.

  7. The Economic Cost of Patients With Migraine Headache Referred to Specialist Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osumili, Beatrice; McCrone, Paul; Cousins, Sian; Ridsdale, Leone

    2018-02-01

    To conduct a cost of illness study to estimate the economic impact of referring people with headache to specialists. Headache is one of the commonest health conditions affecting individuals in society. Participants formed a convenience sample and were recruited from specialist headache clinics across London. Self-report data on service use over a 4-month period and lost employment were provided. These data were used to estimate economic costs. Predictors of cost were identified using multivariate analyses. The mean (standard deviation) service costs for the 4-month period was £857 (£845). The mean total cost (including lost employment) was £6588 (£11,982) with costs of informal care accounting for 74% of this figure. Total costs were on average £1079 higher for a unit increase on the headache impact test scale (P < .001; 95% CI £330 to £1784). Costs of headache are high, and increase with severity of symptoms. The annual cost to the country for those referred to specialists is estimated at £835 million. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  8. [New physiopathological knowledge applied to migraine therapy and prophylaxis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visens, Laura S

    2014-01-01

    Migraine is a very common condition that has a significant socioeconomic impact. Based on the most recent reports from the World Health Organization, its diagnosis and treatment are far from being optimal. Specialists have made great efforts to classify headaches, including migraines, in order to have a useful diagnostic tool and to guide treatment. On the other hand, advances made in the knowledge of the pathophysiology of migraines, new treatment options were developed. These new options include onabotulinum toxin A and topiramate. The prompt detection of migraine disorders and an appropriate treatment, both symptomatic and preventive, are key to relieve the personal, familiar, and social burden with special focus on chronic migraine.

  9. Migraine in menopausal women: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripa, Patrizia; Ornello, Raffaele; Degan, Diana; Tiseo, Cindy; Stewart, Janet; Pistoia, Francesca; Carolei, Antonio; Sacco, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that migraine activity is influenced by hormonal factors, and particularly by estrogen levels, but relatively few studies have investigated the prevalence and characteristics of migraine according to the menopausal status. Overall, population-based studies have shown an improvement of migraine after menopause, with a possible increase in perimenopause. On the contrary, the studies performed on patients referring to headache centers have shown no improvement or even worsening of migraine. Menopause etiology may play a role in migraine evolution during the menopausal period, with migraine improvement more likely occurring after spontaneous rather than after surgical menopause. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy has been found to be associated with migraine worsening in observational population-based studies. The effects of several therapeutic regimens on migraine has also been investigated, leading to nonconclusive results. To date, no specific preventive measures are recommended for menopausal women with migraine. There is a need for further research in order to clarify the relationship between migraine and hormonal changes in women, and to quantify the real burden of migraine after the menopause. Hormonal manipulation for the treatment of refractory postmenopausal migraine is still a matter of debate. PMID:26316824

  10. Menstrual migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Moschiano, Franca; Grazzi, Licia; D?Amico, Domenico; Schieroni, Ferdinando; Bussone, Gennaro

    2001-01-01

    An association between migraine and menstruation can be ascertained by use of a diary for a minimum of three cycles. The pathophysiological and clinical peculiarities of menstrual migraine indicate that its management should differ from that of non?menstrual migraine. NSAIDS or migraine-specific medications (e.g. triptans) are often effective for the acute management of menstrual migraine. Preventive treatment is indicated when the attacks are long?lasting, severe and disabling and do not res...

  11. Living with chronic migraine: a qualitative study on female patients’ perspectives from a specialised headache clinic in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Neira-Martín, Beatriz; Silva-Hernández, Lorenzo; Mayo-Canalejo, Diego; Florencio, Lidiane Lima; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; García-Moreno, Héctor; García-Azorín, David; Cuadrado, María Luz

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to explore the views and experiences of a group of Spanish women suffering from chronic migraine (CM). Setting Headache clinic at a university hospital in Madrid (Spain). Participants Purposeful sampling of patients that attended a specialised headache clinic for the first time between June 2016 and February 2017 was performed. The patients included were females aged 18–65 and with positive diagnoses of CM according to the International Classification of Headache disorders (third edition, beta version), with or without medication overuse. Accordingly, 20 patients participated in the study with a mean age of 38.65 years (SD 13.85). Design Qualitative phenomenological study. Methods Data were collected through in-depth interviews, researchers’ field notes and patients’ drawings. A thematic analysis was performed following appropriate guidelines for qualitative research. Results Five main themes describing the significance of suffering emerged: (a) the shame of suffering from an invisible condition; (b) treatment: between need, scepticism and fear; (c) looking for physicians’ support and sincerity and fighting misconceptions; (d) limiting the impact on daily life through self-control; and (e) family and work: between understanding and disbelief. The disease is experienced as an invisible process, and the journey to diagnosis can be a long and tortuous one. Drug prescription by the physician is greeted with distrust and scepticism. Patients expect sincerity, support and the involvement of their doctors in relation to their disease. Pain becomes the main focus of the patient’s life, and it requires considerable self-control. The disease has a strong impact in the work and family environment, where the patient may feel misunderstood. Conclusions Qualitative research offers insight into the way patients with CM experience their disease and it may be helpful in establishing a more fruitful relationship with these patients

  12. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) for the prevention of migraine in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzi, Rita; Cusi, Cristina; Randazzo, Concetta; Sterzi, Roberto; Tedesco, Dario; Moja, Lorenzo

    2015-04-01

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in 2005 on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for preventing migraine and tension-type headache. The original review has been split in two parts and this review now only regards migraine prevention. Another updated review is under development to cover tension-type headache.Migraine is a common disorder. The chronic forms are associated with disability and have a high economic impact. In view of discoveries about the role of serotonin and other neurotransmitters in pain mechanisms, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) have been evaluated for the prevention of migraine. To determine the efficacy and tolerability of SSRIs and SNRIs compared to placebo and other active interventions in the prevention of episodic and chronic migraine in adults. For the original review, we searched MEDLINE (1966 to January 2004), EMBASE (1994 to May 2003), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2003, Issue 4), and Headache Quarterly (1990 to 2003). For this update, we applied a revised search strategy to reflect the broader type of intervention (SSRIs and SNRIs). We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 10), MEDLINE (1946 to November 2014), EMBASE (1980 to November 2014), and PsycINFO (1987 to November 2014). We also checked the reference lists of retrieved articles and searched trial registries for ongoing trials. We included randomised controlled trials comparing SSRIs or SNRIs with any type of control intervention in participants 18 years and older of either sex with migraine. Two authors independently extracted data (migraine frequency, index, intensity, and duration; use of symptomatic/analgesic medication; days off work; quality of life; mood improvement; cost-effectiveness; and adverse events) and assessed the risk of bias of trials. The primary outcome of this updated review is migraine frequency. The original review

  13. Update on chronic daily headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, James R

    2011-02-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH), defined as a primary headache occurring at least 15 days per month, is a problem of worldwide scope, which is seen in 3% to 5% of the population. Though it has been recognized since ancient times, only recently have there been attempts to define and classify it. CDH usually consists of a mixture of migraine and tension-type headaches (TTH), with the more severe headaches having migraine features and the less severe headaches fitting the definition of TTH. Some patients have pure chronic TTH and no migrainous features, and others have only migraine, but most have a mixed migraine-TTH pattern. New daily persistent headache, a CDH pattern that comes on over a few days, constitutes 9% to 10% of this group and is otherwise indistinguishable from CDH. Hemicrania continua (1% of CDH) appears to be unique in being absolutely responsive to indomethacin. Accurate diagnosis of CDH is critical to management, as all organic etiologies of chronic headache must be ruled out. Problems often associated with CDH and complicating the diagnosis are head injury or medication overuse (rebound-withdrawal headache). These accompanying issues must be recognized and treated appropriately in the management plan. Finally, psychiatric problems (unipolar depression, bipolar disease, generalized anxiety disorder, and obsessive/compulsive disorder) often accompany CDH, as they are comorbid with migraine. These conditions must be recognized and treated along with the headache itself for treatment to succeed fully. Treatment of CDH is multimodal. The cornerstone of therapy is the use of prophylactic antimigraine medications to prevent or modulate the next headache. Amitriptyline, topiramate, valproic acid, and gabapentin have all had class I studies showing effectiveness in reducing headache occurrence. Recent studies with botulinum toxin have also shown effectiveness in reducing the headache burden. Recognition and treatment of medication overuse headache (MOH) must

  14. Managing migraines at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foods that contain monosodium glutamate (MSG) Baked goods, chocolate, nuts, and dairy products Fruits (such as avocado, ... care Images Migraine cause CT scan of the brain Migraine headache References Garza I, Schwedt TJ, Robertson ...

  15. Childhood maltreatment and migraine (part I). Prevalence and adult revictimization: a multicenter headache clinic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietjen, Gretchen E; Brandes, Jan L; Peterlin, B Lee; Eloff, Arnolda; Dafer, Rima M; Stein, Michael R; Drexler, Ellen; Martin, Vincent T; Hutchinson, Susan; Aurora, Sheena K; Recober, Ana; Herial, Nabeel A; Utley, Christine; White, Leah; Khuder, Sadik A

    2010-01-01

    To examine the prevalence of childhood maltreatment and adult revictimization in migraineurs and the association with sociodemographic factors, depression and anxiety. Population and practice-based studies have demonstrated an association of childhood abuse and headache in adults, although further details on headache diagnoses, characteristics, and comorbid conditions are lacking. There are mounting data suggesting substantial impact of early maltreatment on adult physical and mental health. Electronic surveys were completed by patients seeking treatment in 11 headache centers across the United States and Canada. Physicians determined the primary headache diagnoses based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 criteria and average monthly headache frequency. Self-reported information on demographics (including body mass index), social history, and physician-diagnosed depression and anxiety was collected. The survey also included validated screening measures for current depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9) and anxiety (The Beck Anxiety Inventory). History and severity of childhood (or=15 days/month) was reported by 34%. The prevalence of childhood maltreatment types was as follows: physical abuse 21%, sexual abuse 25%, emotional abuse 38%, physical neglect 22%, and emotional neglect 38%. Nine percent reported all 3 categories of childhood abuse (physical, sexual, and emotional) and 17% reported both physical and emotional neglect. Overlap between maltreatment types ranged between 40% and 81%. Of those reporting childhood abuse, 43% reported abuse in adulthood, but infrequently (17%) over the age of 30 years. In logistic regression models adjusted for sociodemographic variables, current depression was associated with physical (P = .003), sexual (P = .007), and emotional abuse (P revictimization in adulthood. All types of childhood abuse and neglect are strongly associated with remote and current depression and anxiety, and the relationship

  16. Reconsideration of the diagnosis and treatment of childhood migraine: A practical review of clinical experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Yamanaka, Gaku; Shimomura, Hideki; Shiraishi, Kazuhiro; Nakazawa, Tomoyuki; Kato, Fumihide; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Sasaki, Masayuki; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2017-05-01

    To provide insight into the wide spectrum of migraine during childhood to establish practical and comprehensive treatment strategies. Although recent studies have confirmed the effect of anti-migraine agents in childhood headaches fulfilling the criteria of migraine without aura, there have been no studies regarding the efficacy of these drugs in childhood migraine without aura not filling the diagnostic criteria. In total, 154 patients with a clinical diagnosis of migraine, with onset of repetitive headaches at the age of ⩽15years, were retrospectively included from clinics in seven tertiary medical centers. Patients' diagnoses included migraine with aura (n=49), migraine without aura (n=65), clinical migraine without aura not fulfilling International Classification of Headache Disorders-3 beta criteria (suspected migraine without aura; n=38), and hemiplegic migraine (n=2). Abortive medicine was effective in 74 of 97 patients, and preventive medicine was effective in 61 of 84 patients. Drugs with high efficacy were acetaminophen and ibuprofen for abortive therapy and cyproheptadine, amitriptyline, and propranolol for preventive therapy. Psychosocial problems were less common, and abnormalities on electroencephalography were more common in the suspected migraine without aura group. Otherwise, clinical features and drug responsibility were comparable among the migraine with aura, migraine without aura, and suspected migraine without aura groups. Retrospectively, experts clinically diagnosed childhood migraine without aura when the headache met at least one of the three criteria B, C, and D in International Classification of Headache Disorders-3 beta in addition to A and E. Abortive and preventive medication including paroxetine (n=2) benefited 10 and 15 of the 33 patients with daily headache, respectively. Psychotherapy/counseling (n=4), treatment for orthostatic dysregulation (n=4), and elimination of stressors (n=3) markedly alleviated headache in this group

  17. Headache - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Migraine - what to ask your doctor; Tension-type headache - what to ask your doctor; Cluster headache - what to ask your doctor ... How can I tell if the headache I am having is dangerous? What are ... headache ? A migraine headache ? A cluster headache ? What medical ...

  18. Human migraine models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2001-01-01

    The need for experimental models is obvious. In animal models it is possible to study vascular responses, neurogenic inflammation, c-fos expression etc. However, the pathophysiology of migraine remains unsolved, why results from animal studies not directly can be related to the migraine attack......, which is a human experience. A set-up for investigations of experimental headache and migraine in humans, has been evaluated and headache mechanisms explored by using nitroglycerin and other headache-inducing agents. Nitric oxide (NO) or other parts of the NO activated cascade seems to be responsible...... for the induced headache and migraine. Perspectives are discussed....

  19. Basilar migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, W F; Kuhn, S C; Daylida, L

    1997-03-01

    Basilar migraine is a complicated headache which the International Headache Society describes as 'migraine with aura symptoms clearly originating from the brainstem or from both occipital lobes'. For years this headache was thought to originate from a transient disturbance in the vertebrobasilar circulation, but more recent studies suggest that a central neuronal disorder may be the source of migraine. Basilar migraines may have certain symptoms which are similar to other neurologic, vascular, psychiatric and metabolic diseases, yet there are specific criteria which can help differentiate it from other diagnoses. It is characterized by a throbbing occipital headache which may be preceded by an aura. The unusual symptoms of basilar migraine, which may precede and continue throughout the duration of the headache and even after it, include bilateral visual symptoms, altered mental status, vertigo, gait ataxia, bilateral paresthesia, bilateral paralysis and dysarthria. We describe a 29-year-old black female whose husband brought her to the emergency department complaining of confusion, headache, and left-sided weakness for 2 h prior to arrival.

  20. Migraine vestibulaire 

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lempert, T; Olesen, J; Furman, J

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine, jointly formulated by the Committee for Classification of Vestibular Disorders of the Bárány Society and the Migraine Classification Subcommittee of the International Headache Society (IHS). The classification includes vestibular...... migraine and probable vestibular migraine. Vestibular migraine will appear in an appendix of the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) as a first step for new entities, in accordance with the usual IHS procedures. Probable vestibular migraine may be included...

  1. The migraine postdrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giffin, Nicola J.; Lipton, Richard B; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    collected on a daily basis. Visual analogue scales were used to capture the overall level of functioning and the severity of the headache. The postdrome was defined as the time from resolution of troublesome headache to return to normal.  Results: Of 120 evaluable patients, 97 (81%) reported at least one...... in the postdrome were common and may contribute to the distress and disability in the patients studied. Postdrome symptoms merit larger observational studies and careful recording in clinical trials of acute and preventive migraine treatments....

  2. The migraine postdrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giffin, Nicola J; Lipton, Richard B; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    collected on a daily basis. Visual analogue scales were used to capture the overall level of functioning and the severity of the headache. The postdrome was defined as the time from resolution of troublesome headache to return to normal. RESULTS: Of 120 evaluable patients, 97 (81%) reported at least one...... in the postdrome were common and may contribute to the distress and disability in the patients studied. Postdrome symptoms merit larger observational studies and careful recording in clinical trials of acute and preventive migraine treatments....

  3. Acupuncture Treatment in Migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jihe; Arsovska, Blagica; Kozovska, Kristina; Vasileva, Dance; Krstonijevikj, Jelena

    2017-01-01

    Introduction - Migraines are one of the most common types of headaches that occur periodically. There are two type of migraine: classical (with aura) and common migraines (without aura). Migraine occurs in women two to three times more often than in men. Material and methods - In the research are included 30 patients, 12 male and 18 female, on age from 29 to 79, treated for migraine in a period of one year. All patients had acupuncture treatment in a clinic for Traditional Chinese Medicine...

  4. Headache And Hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many reasons to suggest a link between headache and hormones. Migraine is three times common in women as compared to men after puberty, cyclic as well as non-cyclic fluctuations in sex hormone levels during the entire reproductive life span of a women are associated with changes in frequency or severity of migraine attack, abnormalities in the hypothalamus and pineal gland have been observed in cluster headache, oestrogens are useful in the treatment of menstrual migraine and the use of melatonin has been reported in various types of primary headaches. Headache associated with various endocrinological disorders may help us in a better understanding of the nociceptive mechanisms involved in headache disorders. Prospective studies using headache diaries to record the attacks of headache and menstrual cycle have clarified some of the myths associated with menstrual migraine. Although no change in the absolute levels of sex hormones have been reported, oestrogen withdrawal is the most likely trigger of the attacks. Prostaglandins, melatonin, opioid and serotonergic mechanisms may also have a role in the pathogenesis of menstrual migraine. Guidelines have been published by the IHS recently regarding the use of oral contraceptives by women with migraine and the risk of ischaemic strokes in migraineurs on hormone replacement therapy. The present review includes menstrual migraine, pregnancy and migraine, oral contraceptives and migraine, menopause and migraine as well as the hormonal changes in chronic migraine.

  5. Onabotulinumtoxin A for the management of chronic migraine in current clinical practice: results of a survey of sixty-three Italian headache centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassorelli, Cristina; Aguggia, Marco; De Tommaso, Marina; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Grazzi, Licia; Pini, Luigi Alberto; Sarchielli, Paola; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Martelletti, Paolo; Cortelli, Pietro

    2017-12-01

    Chronic migraine is a complex clinical condition often undertreated. Onabotulinumtoxin A (OBT-A) was approved in Italy in 2013 for symptom relief in patients with chronic migraine who have failed, or do not tolerate, oral prophylactic treatments. However, the impact of OBT-A in clinical practice remains to be defined. To investigate the current management of chronic migraine with OBT-A in clinical practice, a web-based survey was conducted among clinicians working in third-level headache centers across Italy. A 26-item questionnaire was designed and developed by a group of 10 Italian headache specialists to address the following issues: treatment paradigm and OBT-A injection intervals, frequency of treatment and retreatment, definition of responders/non-responders, satisfaction with treatment potential impact of early treatment with OBT-A. Ninety-six headache centers were selected and contacted via e-mail. The online survey was anonymous and carried out using a secure website. Overall, 64 of the 96 centers (66.7%) completed the questionnaire. Most centers (98.4%) had been using OBT-A for >1 year. OBT-A was administered according to the PREEMPT paradigm in most centers (88.9%). While during the first year of prophylaxis with OBT-A most clinicians (93.6%) repeated OBT-A treatment every 3 months, as recommended, in the following years interval duration was variable. Response to OBT-A was defined as a ≥ 50% reduction in the headache days by 58.7% of the clinicians, and as a ≥ 30% reduction by 25.4% of them. Almost 60% of the clinicians considered OBT-A as a long-lasting therapy, while for one-third of them treatment could be discontinued in patients showing a benefit for ≥6 months. According to 80% of the clinicians, early administration of OBT-A after the onset of chronic migraine was associated with better outcomes, and 47.6% felt that OBT-A should be recommended as a first-line option. This survey indicates that in third-level headache centers in Italy

  6. Role of the Attachment Style in Determining the Association Between Headache Features and Psychological Symptoms in Migraine Children and Adolescents. An Analytical Observational Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Samuela; De Ranieri, Cristiana; Dionisi, Cecilia; Gagliardi, Valentina; Paniccia, Maria Francesca; Capuano, Alessandro; Frusciante, Roberto; Balestri, Martina; Vigevano, Federico; Gentile, Simonetta; Valeriani, Massimiliano

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to study the role of attachment style on headache severity and psychological symptoms in migraineurs children/adolescents. Moreover, we investigated the association between attachment style, migraine severity, and psychological symptoms. Attachment theory suggests that early interpersonal relationships may be important determinants of psychopathology and pain management. In particular, individuals with insecure attachment styles have been shown to experience more pain than people with secure attachment style. Few studies focused on headache and data on attachment style in pediatric headache are scarce. We studied 90 migraineurs (mean age 12.2 ± 2.6 years; female: 54, male: 36). Patients were divided in two groups according to headache attack frequency: (1) high frequency (HF) patients, having from weekly to daily episodes and (2) low frequency (LF) patients, showing ≤3 episodes per month. According to headache attack intensity, patients were classified in two groups: (1) mild pain (MP), allowing the patient to continue his/her daily activities and (2) severe pain (SP), leading to interruption of patient activities or forcing the child to go to bed. The psychological screening was assessed by SAFA Anxiety, Depression, and Somatization questionnaires. Attachment style was measured by the semi-projective test Separation Anxiety Test. Patients were divided into "secure," "avoidant," "ambivalent," and "disorganized/confused" attachment patterns. We found a significant relationship between the attachment style and migraine features. The ambivalent attachment was the most common style among patients reporting high attack frequency (51%) and severe pain intensity (50%). Anxiety (SAFA-A Tot: F = 23.3, P Headache Society.

  7. Ictal headache and visual sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piccioli, M.; Parisi, P.; Tisei, P.; Villa, M. P.; Buttinelli, C.; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenite, D. G. A.

    Migrainous headache is reported by patients with photosensitive epilepsy, whereas their relatives complain more often about headache than the relatives of patients with other types of epilepsy. We therefore investigated whether headache itself could be an epileptic symptom related to

  8. [A chronic problem-the chronic headache patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, A

    2004-10-01

    Chronic daily headache is a frequent problem which affects 3-5% of the population. Until the 2nd edition of the IHS headache classification, the diagnosis of chronic headache was synonymous with the diagnosis of chronic tension type headache. Now one has to differentiate, not only in symptomatic headache, but also between other primary headache syndromes, such as chronic migraine, hemicrania continua and acute persisting daily headache. Epidemiological studies point to a particular importance of chronic migraine and headache due to chronic analgetica use, since both types of headache are responsible for more than 60% of all cases with chronic headache. Although the mechanisms which cause chronification of headache are not well understood, the new headache classification prompts some direct therapeutical consequences: 1) the indication for drug withdrawal and 2) the indication for a migraine preventive therapy. In general, as with other chronic pain syndromes, there is increasing evidence that a multimodal therapy, consisting of patient education, behavioral therapy and pharmacological therapy, is more successful than a singular therapy.

  9. Pediatric Headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slover, Robin; Kent, Sheryl

    2015-08-01

    Pediatric headaches are common, and many may never require intervention by a health care provider. However, migraines can become more difficult to treat, especially if they become chronic daily headaches. Pediatric headache is a subjective and unique experience that requires attention to both psychological and physiologic components in diagnosis and treatment. A biopsychosocial, multidisciplinary approach, including both medication management and psychological treatment, is considered essential for effective management.

  10. Migraine in menopausal women: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripa P

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Patrizia Ripa,1 Raffaele Ornello,1 Diana Degan,1 Cindy Tiseo,1 Janet Stewart,2 Francesca Pistoia,1 Antonio Carolei,1 Simona Sacco1 1Department of Applied Clinical Sciences and Biotechnology, Institute of Neurology, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Italy; 2Psychology Division, School of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Scotland, UK Abstract: Evidence suggests that migraine activity is influenced by hormonal factors, and particularly by estrogen levels, but relatively few studies have investigated the prevalence and characteristics of migraine according to the menopausal status. Overall, population-based studies have shown an improvement of migraine after menopause, with a possible increase in perimenopause. On the contrary, the studies performed on patients referring to headache centers have shown no improvement or even worsening of migraine. Menopause etiology may play a role in migraine evolution during the menopausal period, with migraine improvement more likely occurring after spontaneous rather than after surgical menopause. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy has been found to be associated with migraine worsening in observational population-based studies. The effects of several therapeutic regimens on migraine has also been investigated, leading to nonconclusive results. To date, no specific preventive measures are recommended for menopausal women with migraine. There is a need for further research in order to clarify the relationship between migraine and hormonal changes in women, and to quantify the real burden of migraine after the menopause. Hormonal manipulation for the treatment of refractory postmenopausal migraine is still a matter of debate. Keywords: headache, female, menstrual cycle, sex hormones

  11. Pharmacological migraine provocation: a human model of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Messoud; Hansen, Jakob Møller

    2010-01-01

    for migraine mechanisms. So far, however, animal models cannot predict the efficacy of new therapies for migraine. Because migraine attacks are fully reversible and can be aborted by therapy, the headache- or migraine-provoking property of naturally occurring signaling molecules can be tested in a human model....... If a naturally occurring substance can provoke migraine in human patients, then it is likely, although not certain, that blocking its effect will be effective in the treatment of acute migraine attacks. To this end, a human in vivo model of experimental headache and migraine in humans has been developed...

  12. Rounding behavior in the reporting of headache frequency complicates headache chronification research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Timothy T; Turner, Dana P; Houle, Thomas A; Smitherman, Todd A; Martin, Vincent; Penzien, Donald B; Lipton, Richard B

    2013-06-01

    To characterize the extent of measurement error arising from rounding in headache frequency reporting (days per month) in a population sample of headache sufferers. When reporting numerical health information, individuals tend to round their estimates. The tendency to round to the nearest 5 days when reporting headache frequency can distort distributions and engender unreliability in frequency estimates in both clinical and research contexts. This secondary analysis of the 2005 American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention study survey characterized the population distribution of 30-day headache frequency among community headache sufferers and determined the extent of numerical rounding ("heaping") in self-reported data. Headache frequency distributions (days per month) were examined using a simplified version of Wang and Heitjan's approach to heaping to estimate the probability that headache sufferers round to a multiple of 5 when providing frequency reports. Multiple imputation was used to estimate a theoretical "true" headache frequency. Of the 24,000 surveys, headache frequency data were available for 15,976 respondents diagnosed with migraine (68.6%), probable migraine (8.3%), or episodic tension-type headache (10.0%); the remainder had other headache types. The mean number of headaches days/month was 3.7 (standard deviation = 5.6). Examination of the distribution of headache frequency reports revealed a disproportionate number of responses centered on multiples of 5 days. The odds that headache frequency was rounded to 5 increased by 24% with each 1-day increase in headache frequency (odds ratio: 1.24, 95% confidence interval: 1.23 to 1.25), indicating that heaping occurs most commonly at higher headache frequencies. Women were more likely to round than men, and rounding decreased with increasing age and increased with symptoms of depression. Because of the coarsening induced by rounding, caution should be used when distinguishing between episodic and chronic

  13. Evidence of and experience with the use of onabotulinumtoxinA in trigeminal neuralgia and primary headaches other than chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Lasaosa, S; Cuadrado, M L; Gago-Veiga, A B; Guerrero-Peral, A L; Irimia, P; Láinez, J M; Leira, R; Pascual, J; Porta-Etessam, J; Sánchez Del Río, M; Viguera Romero, J; Pozo-Rosich, P

    2017-11-20

    In the field of headaches, onabotulinumtoxinA (onabotA) is well established as a treatment for chronic migraine (CM). In recent years, it has been used increasingly to treat other primary headaches (high-frequency episodic migraine, trigeminal-autonomic cephalalgias, nummular headache) and trigeminal neuralgia. As this treatment will progressively be incorporated in the management of these patients, we consider it necessary to reflect, with a fundamentally practical approach, on the possible indications of onabotA, beyond CM, as well as its administration protocol, which will differ according to the type of headache and/or neuralgia. This consensus document was drafted based on a thorough review and analysis of the existing literature and our own clinical experience. The aim of the document is to serve as guidelines for professionals administering onabotA treatment. The first part will address onabotA's mechanism of action, and reasons for its use in other types of headache, from a physiopathological and clinical perspective. In the second part, we will review the available evidence and studies published in recent years. We will add an "expert recommendation" based on our own clinical experience, showing the best patient profile for this treatment and the most adequate dose and administration protocol. Treatment with onabotA should always be individualised and considered in selected patients who have not responded to conventional therapy. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Neurovascular pharmacology of migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MaassenVanDenBrink, Antoinette; Chan, Kayi Y.

    2008-01-01

    Migraine is a paroxysmal neurovascular disorder, which affects a significant proportion of the population. Since dilation of cranial blood vessels is likely to be responsible for the headache experienced in migraine, many experimental models for the study of migraine have focussed on this feature.

  15. Additional Effects of a Physical Therapy Protocol on Headache Frequency, Pressure Pain Threshold, and Improvement Perception in Patients With Migraine and Associated Neck Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora; Gonçalves, Maria Claudia; Carvalho, Gabriela Ferreira; Florencio, Lidiane Lima; Dach, Fabíola; Speciali, José Geraldo; Bigal, Marcelo Eduardo; Chaves, Thaís Cristina

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the additional effect provided by physical therapy in migraine treatment. Randomized controlled trial. Tertiary university-based hospital. Among the 300 patients approached, 50 women (age range, 18-55y) diagnosed with migraine were randomized into 2 groups: a control group (n=25) and a physiotherapy plus medication group (n=25) (N=50). Both groups received medication for migraine treatment. Additionally, physiotherapy plus medication patients received 8 sessions of physical therapy over 4 weeks, comprised mainly of manual therapy and stretching maneuvers lasting 50 minutes. A blinded examiner assessed the clinical outcomes of headache frequency, intensity, and self-perception of global change and physical outcomes of pressure pain threshold and cervical range of motion. Data were recorded at baseline, posttreatment, and 1-month follow-up. Twenty-three patients experienced side effects from the medication. Both groups reported a significantly reduced frequency of headaches; however, no differences were observed between groups (physiotherapy plus medication patients showed an additional 18% improvement at posttreatment and 12% improvement at follow-up compared with control patients, P>.05). The reduction observed in the physiotherapy plus medication patients was clinically relevant at posttreatment, whereas clinical relevance for control patients was demonstrated only at follow-up. For pain intensity, physiotherapy plus medication patients showed statistical evidence and clinical relevance with reduction posttreatment (P<.05). In addition, they showed better self-perception of global change than control patients (P<.05). The cervical muscle pressure pain threshold increased significantly in the physiotherapy plus medication patients and decreased in the control patients, but statistical differences between groups were observed only in the temporal area (P<.05). No differences were observed between groups regarding cervical range of motion. We cannot

  16. Non-pharmacological self-management for people living with migraine or tension-type headache: a systematic review including analysis of intervention components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Hannah; Mistry, Dipesh; Caldwell, Fiona; Underwood, Martin; Patel, Shilpa; Sandhu, Harbinder Kaur; Matharu, Manjit; Pincus, Tamar

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effect of non-pharmacological self-management interventions against usual care, and to explore different components and delivery methods within those interventions Participants People living with migraine and/or tension-type headache Interventions Non-pharmacological educational or psychological self-management interventions; excluding biofeedback and physical therapy. We assessed the overall effectiveness against usual care on headache frequency, pain intensity, mood, headache-related disability, quality of life and medication consumption in meta-analysis. We also provide preliminary evidence on the effectiveness of intervention components and delivery methods. Results We found a small overall effect for the superiority of self-management interventions over usual care, with a standardised mean difference (SMD) of −0.36 (−0.45 to −0.26) for pain intensity; −0.32 (−0.42 to −0.22) for headache-related disability, 0.32 (0.20 to 0.45) for quality of life and a moderate effect on mood (SMD=0.53 (−0.66 to −0.40)). We did not find an effect on headache frequency (SMD=−0.07 (−0.22 to 0.08)). Assessment of components and characteristics suggests a larger effect on pain intensity in interventions that included explicit educational components (−0.51 (−0.68 to −0.34) vs −0.28 (−0.40 to −0.16)); mindfulness components (−0.50 (−0.82 to −0.18) vs 0.34 (−0.44 to −0.24)) and in interventions delivered in groups vs one-to-one delivery (0.56 (−0.72 to −0.40) vs −0.39 (−0.52 to −0.27)) and larger effects on mood in interventions including a cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) component with an SMD of −0.72 (−0.93 to −0.51) compared with those without CBT −0.41 (−0.58 to −0.24). Conclusion Overall we found that self-management interventions for migraine and tension-type headache are more effective than usual care in reducing pain intensity, mood and headache-related disability, but have no

  17. Principles of headaches evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Rosa Rolim de Andrade

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT However common tension-type headache is in epidemiologic population-based studies, migraine is the most common diagnosis in patients seeking treatment for headache in primary care. The appropriate evaluation of headache should be as follows: 1 To rule out the most serious underlying pathologies and to look for other secondary causes of headache, 2 To determine the type of primary headache using the patient's history as a primary diagnostic tool. Symptoms can always overlap, particularly between migraine and tension-type headache and between migraine and some secondary causes of headache (such as neurologic or systemic disease. A brief headache screen based only on anamnesis and physical examination data which direct to an underlying pathology is useful to primary care physicians in particular. An imaging study is not necessary in the vast majority of patients presenting with headache. Nevertheless, imaging (usually CT scan is warranted in the patients outlined above.

  18. Acupuncture for the prevention of tension-type headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Klaus; Allais, Gianni; Brinkhaus, Benno; Fei, Yutong; Mehring, Michael; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Vickers, Andrew; White, Adrian R

    2016-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is often used for prevention of tension-type headache but its effectiveness is still controversial. This is an update of our Cochrane review originally published in Issue 1, 2009 of The Cochrane Library. Objectives To investigate whether acupuncture is a) more effective than no prophylactic treatment/routine care only; b) more effective than ‘sham’ (placebo) acupuncture; and c) as effective as other interventions in reducing headache frequency in adults with episodic or chronic tension-type headache. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and AMED to 19 January 2016. We searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform to 10 February 2016 for ongoing and unpublished trials. Selection criteria We included randomised trials with a post-randomisation observation period of at least eight weeks, which compared the clinical effects of an acupuncture intervention with a control (treatment of acute headaches only or routine care), a sham acupuncture intervention or another prophylactic intervention in adults with episodic or chronic tension-type headache. Data collection and analysis Two review authors checked eligibility; extracted information on participants, interventions, methods and results; and assessed study risk of bias and the quality of the acupuncture intervention. The main efficacy outcome measure was response (at least 50% reduction of headache frequency) after completion of treatment (three to four months after randomisation). To assess safety/acceptability we extracted the number of participants dropping out due to adverse effects and the number of participants reporting adverse effects. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation). Main results Twelve trials (11 included in the previous version and one newly identified) with 2349 participants (median 56, range 10 to 1265) met the inclusion criteria

  19. National awareness campaign to prevent medication-overuse headache in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Louise Ninett; Westergaard, Maria Lurenda; Bisgaard, Mette

    2018-01-01

    Background Medication-overuse headache is prevalent, but in principle preventable. Objective To describe the Danish national awareness campaign for medication-overuse headache. Methods The Danish Headache Center, the Association of Danish Pharmacies, and headache patient organizations implemented...... a four-month medication-overuse headache awareness campaign in 2016. Target groups were the general public, general practitioners, and pharmacists. Key messages were: Overuse of pain-medication can worsen headaches; pain-medication should be used rationally; and medication-overuse headache is treatable....... A range of communication technologies was used. A survey on the public's awareness of medication-overuse headache was conducted. Results The Danish adult population is 4.2 million. Online videos were viewed 297,000 times in three weeks. All 400 pharmacies received campaign materials. Over 28,000 leaflets...

  20. Straight Talk about Migraines, Cindy McCain Speaks Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Migraine Headaches Straight Talk About Migraines, Cindy McCain Speaks Out Past ... www.headaches.org Read More "Migraine Headaches" Articles Straight Talk About Migraines, Cindy McCain Speaks Out / What ...

  1. Behavioral migraine management modifies behavioral and cognitive coping in people with migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Elizabeth K; Holroyd, Kenneth A

    2014-10-01

    This is a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial which aims to examine changes in cognitive and behavioral responses to migraine with cognitive behavioral treatment for migraine, preventive medication for migraine, and their combination, and the relationship between these changes and reductions in migraine-related disability. Cognitive behavioral treatment is thought to reduce migraine-related disability through modifying maladaptive cognitive and behavioral responses to migraine. Two hundred thirty-two people with migraine who did not respond to 5 weeks of optimized acute therapy were randomized into a 2 (beta-blocker vs placebo) X 2 (behavioral migraine management [BMM] vs no BMM) treatment design. Participants received BMM and/or beta-blocker dose adjustment for 4 months, and were followed for an additional 12 months. Participants completed measures of catastrophizing, behavioral coping, and migraine-related disability throughout the study. Compared to drug therapy only, BMM demonstrated larger decreases in catastrophizing scores (19.16 to 9.89 vs 16.78 to 11.84, P cognitive and behavioral factors postulated to be mechanisms of cognitive behavioral treatments for migraine. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  2. Brain stimulation in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighina, Filippo; Cosentino, Giuseppe; Fierro, Brigida

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a very prevalent disease with great individual disability and socioeconomic burden. Despite intensive research effort in recent years, the etiopathogenesis of the disease remains to be elucidated. Recently, much importance has been given to mechanisms underlying the cortical excitability that has been suggested to be dysfunctional in migraine. In recent years, noninvasive brain stimulation techniques based on magnetic fields (transcranial magnetic stimulation, TMS) and on direct electrical currents (transcranial direct current stimulation, tDCS) have been shown to be safe and effective tools to explore the issue of cortical excitability, activation, and plasticity in migraine. Moreover, TMS, repetitive TMS (rTMS), and tDCS, thanks to their ability to interfere with and/or modulate cortical activity inducing plastic, persistent effects, have been also explored as potential therapeutic approaches, opening an interesting perspective for noninvasive neurostimulation for both symptomatic and preventive treatment of migraine and other types of headache. In this chapter we critically review evidence regarding the role of noninvasive brain stimulation in the pathophysiology and treatment of migraine, delineating the advantages and limits of these techniques together with potential development and future application. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Individuals with tension and migraine headaches exhibit increased heart rate variability during post-stress mindfulness meditation practice but a decrease during a post-stress control condition - A randomized, controlled experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Muhammad Abid; Katz, Joel; Mohabir, Vina; Ritvo, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Current research suggests that associations between headache conditions (migraine, tension) and imbalances in the autonomic nervous system (ANS) are due to stress-related dysregulation in the activity of the parasympathetic-sympathetic branches. Mindfulness meditation has demonstrated effectiveness in reducing pain-related distress, and in enhancing heart rate variability-a vagal-mediated marker of ANS balance. This study examined HRV during cognitive stress and mindfulness meditation in individuals with migraine and tension headaches. Undergraduate students with tension and migraine headaches (n=36) and headache-free students (n=39) were recruited for an experiment involving HRV measurement during baseline, cognitive stress-induction, and after randomization to post-stress conditions of audio-guided mindfulness meditation practice (MMP) or mindfulness meditation description (MMD). HRV was derived using electrocardiograms as the absolute power in the high frequency bandwidth (ms 2 ). A three-way ANOVA tested the effects of Group (headache vs. headache-free), Phase (baseline, stress, & post-stress), and Condition (MMP vs. MMD) on HRV. ANOVA revealed a significant three-way interaction. Simple effects tests indicated: 1) HRV increased significantly from stress to MMP for headache and headache-free groups (pmindfulness practice can promote effective heart rate regulation, and thereby promote effective recovery after a stressful event for individuals with headache conditions. Moreover, headache conditions may be associated with dysregulated stress recovery, thus more research is needed on the cardiovascular health and stress resilience of headache sufferers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Refractory chronic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martelletti, Paolo; Katsarava, Zaza; Lampl, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The debate on the clinical definition of refractory Chronic Migraine (rCM) is still far to be concluded. The importance to create a clinical framing of these rCM patients resides in the complete disability they show, in the high risk of serious adverse events from acute and preventative drugs and...... of these patients, the correct application of innovative therapeutic techniques and lastly aim to be acknowledged as clinical entity in the next definitive version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3 (ICHD-3 beta)....... and in the uncontrolled application of therapeutic techniques not yet validated.The European Headache Federation Expert Group on rCM presents hereby the updated definition criteria for this harmful subset of headache disorders. This attempt wants to be the first impulse towards the correct identification...

  5. Tension headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, D K

    1978-05-01

    Headache is an extremely common symptom, and many headaches undoubtedly have a relationship to stressful situations. The clear definition, however, of a "tension headache" complex and its differentiation from migraine in some patients is difficult. The problems are in the identification of a specific headache pattern induced by stress or "tension" and the relationship of the symptom to involuntary contraction of neck and scalp muscles. Treatment consists of analgesics and occasionally mild tranquilizers. Psychotherapy consists of reassurance and often other supportive measures, including modification of life styles. Various feedback techniques have been reported of value, but their superiority to suggestion and hypnosis is still problematic.

  6. The impact of migraine prevention on daily activities: a longitudinal and responder analysis from three topiramate placebo-controlled clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papadopoulos George

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Topiramate is approved for the prophylaxis (prevention of migraine headache in adults. The most common adverse events in the three pivotal, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials were paresthesia, fatigue, cognitive impairment, anorexia, nausea, and taste alteration. In these trials, topiramate 100 mg/d significantly improved Migraine-Specific Questionnaire (MSQ scores versus placebo (p Methods Mean MSQ and Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36 (SF-36 change scores (baseline to each double-blind assessment point were calculated for pooled intent-to-treat (ITT patients. Additionally, pooled ITT patients receiving topiramate 100 mg/d or placebo were combined and divided into two responder groups according to percent reduction in monthly migraine frequency: Results Of 756 patients (mean age 39.8 years, 86% female, 384 received topiramate 100 mg/d and 372 placebo. Topiramate significantly improved all three MSQ domains throughout the double-blind phase versus placebo (p = 0.024 [week 8], p Conclusion Topiramate 100 mg/d significantly improved daily activities and patient functioning at all time points throughout the double-blind phase. Daily function and health status significantly improved for those achieving a ≥ 50% migraine frequency reduction.

  7. A Comparison of Cerebral Blood Flow in Migraineurs During Headache, Headache-Free and Treatment Periods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bednarczyk, Edward

    1999-01-01

    ...: Otherwise healthy patients with a minimum of one migraine headache per month (IHS criteria) were scanned using H215O, and positron emission tomography, within 24 hours of the onset of migraine headache...

  8. Prophylactic onabotulinumtoxinA in patients with chronic migraine and comorbid depression: An open-label, multicenter, pilot study of efficacy, safety and effect on headache-related disability, depression, and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boudreau GP

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Guy P Boudreau,1 Brian M Grosberg,2 Peter J McAllister,3 Richard B Lipton,2 Dawn C Buse2 1Clinique de la Migraine et Céphalées, Département de Neurologie, Centre Hospitalier de L’Université de Montréal, Hôpital Notre-Dame, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Montefiore Headache Center and the Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA; 3New England Institute for Neurology and Headache, Stamford, and The Frank H Netter School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT, USA Background: Chronic migraine is associated with significant headache-related disability and psychiatric comorbidity. OnabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX® is effective and well tolerated in the prophylactic treatment of chronic migraine. This study aimed to provide preliminary data on the efficacy and safety of prophylactic onabotulinumtoxinA in patients with chronic migraine and comorbid depressive symptoms. Methods: This was a prospective, open-label, multicenter pilot study. Eligible patients met International Classification of Headache Disorders 2nd edition Revision criteria for chronic migraine and had associated depressive symptoms, including Patient Health Questionnaire depression module scores of 5–19. Eligible participants received 155 units of onabotulinumtoxinA, according to the PREEMPT protocol, at baseline and week 12. Assessments included headache frequency, the Headache Impact Test™, the Migraine Disability Assessment, the Beck Depression Inventory®-II, the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire depression module, and the seven-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder questionnaire. Adverse events were also monitored. Results: Overall, 32 participants received treatment. At week 24, there were statistically significant mean (standard deviation [SD] improvements relative to baseline in the number of headache/migraine-free days (+8.2 [5.8] (P<0.0001 and in the number of headache/migraine days (–8.2 [5.8] (P<0.0001 per 30-day period. In

  9. Attitudes of a group of Brazilian orthodontists towards the diagnosis and management of primary headache (migraine: an electronic-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Leite Martins Junior

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge and attitudes of orthodontists in the diagnosis and management of migraine without aura. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Participants were dentists, recruited among members of the Brazilian Association of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (ABOR. An e-mail was sent to all ABOR members, with a link to a website, especially prepared for this research. Dentists were presented to a report of a fictional patient fulfilling diagnostic criteria for a primary headache disorder, known as migraine without aura. Participants were asked to describe how they would relieve the patient's pain. Professional procedures were classified as "adequate" or "inadequate" according to the answers given. RESULTS: 161 valid answers were received (18.8% response rate. Of them, 36% of the actions were considered to be "adequate" procedures, while 64% were "inadequate". The results yielded 12 main procedures, based on common characteristics. Eighty-two orthodontists suggested orthodontic treatment with or without orthognathic surgery, and some suggested using stabilization appliances prior to the orthodontic treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of participants proposed inadequate therapies, and 51% suggested orthodontic correction of occlusion, including orthognathic surgery. Educational activities on migraine should also target orthodontists.

  10. Migraine before rupture of intracranial aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, Elena R; Gurary, Natalia M; Sakovich, Vladimir P

    2013-01-01

    Rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) causes thunderclap headache but it remains unclear whether headache in general and migraine in particular are more prevalent in patients with unruptured SIA.......Rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) causes thunderclap headache but it remains unclear whether headache in general and migraine in particular are more prevalent in patients with unruptured SIA....

  11. Anxiety and depression in migraine.

    OpenAIRE

    Devlen, J

    1994-01-01

    The present study examined the prevalence and severity of anxiety and depression among people with migraine. To obtain a spectrum of migraine experience two potentially different samples were identified: over 600 patients attending migraine clinics and 87 migraine sufferers in the general population. International Headache Society criteria were used to establish the diagnosis of migraine. Anxiety and depression were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale and studies using th...

  12. Effect of Clopidogrel and Aspirin vs Aspirin Alone on Migraine Headaches After Transcatheter Atrial Septal Defect Closure: The CANOA Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Horlick, Eric; Ibrahim, Reda; Cheema, Asim N; Labinaz, Marino; Nadeem, Najaf; Osten, Mark; Côté, Mélanie; Marsal, Josep Ramon; Rivest, Donald; Marrero, Alier; Houde, Christine

    2015-11-24

    The occurrence of new-onset migraine attacks is a complication of transcatheter atrial septal defect (ASD) closure. It has been suggested that clopidogrel may reduce migraine attacks after ASD closure. To assess the efficacy of clopidogrel, used in addition to taking aspirin, for the prevention of migraine attacks following ASD closure. Randomized, double-blind clinical trial performed in 6 university hospitals in Canada. Participants were 171 patients with an indication for ASD closure and no history of migraine. Patients were randomized (1:1) to receive dual antiplatelet therapy (aspirin + clopidogrel [the clopidogrel group], n = 84) vs single antiplatelet therapy (aspirin + placebo [the placebo group], n = 87) for 3 months following transcatheter ASD closure. The first patient was enrolled in December 2008, and the last follow-up was completed in February 2015. The primary efficacy outcome was the monthly number of migraine days within the 3 months following ASD closure in the entire study population. The incidence and severity of new-onset migraine attacks, as evaluated by the Migraine Disability Assessment questionnaire, were prespecified secondary end points. A zero-inflated Poisson regression model was used for data analysis. The mean (SD) age of the participants was 49 (15) years and 62% (106) were women. Patients in the clopidogrel group had a reduced mean (SD) number of monthly migraine days within the 3 months following the procedure (0.4 [95% CI, 0.07 to 0.69] days) vs the placebo group (1.4 [95% CI, 0.54 to 2.26] days; difference, -1.02 days [95% CI, -1.94 to -0.10 days]; incident risk ratio [IRR], 0.61 [95% CI, 0.41 to 0.91]; P = .04) and a lower incidence of migraine attacks following ASD closure (9.5% for the clopidogrel group vs 21.8% for the placebo group; difference, -12.3% [95% CI, -23% to -1.6%]; odds ratio [OR], 0.38 [95% CI, 0.15 to 0.89]; P = .03). Among patients with migraines, those in the clopidogrel group had less

  13. Chiropractic spinal manipulative treatment of migraine headache of 40-year duration using Gonstead method: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaibi, Aleksander; Tuchin, Peter J

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a case study of chiropractic spinal manipulative treatment (CSMT) using the Gonstead method for a patient with migraines. The patient was a 52-year-old married woman with a long-term history of chronic migraines, which included nausea, vomiting, and photophobia. The patient had endometriosis, but did not relate the migraines to her menstrual cycles. She also reported not using medication for her migraines due to previous drug-related issues. The average frequency of episodes before treatment was 1 per month, and her migraines often included an aura. The pain was moderate, was located on the right side, was pulsating, and lasted for approximately 15 hours. The numeric pain scale for an average episode was 8 out of a possible 10. The aura involved nausea, photophobia, and visual disturbances including black dots in the visual field lasting for approximately 10 minutes. The patient reported all episodes being eliminated following CSMT. At 6-month follow-up, the patient had not had a single migraine episode in this period. The patient was certain that there had been no other lifestyle changes that could have contributed to her improvement. This case adds to previous research suggesting that some migraine patients may respond favorably to CSMT. The case also provides information on the Gonstead method. A case study does not represent significant scientific evidence in context with other studies conducted; this study suggests that a trial of CSMT using the Gonstead methods could be considered for chronic, nonresponsive migraines. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cranial Autonomic Symptoms in Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Cranial autonomic symptoms (CAS in patients with migraine and cluster headaches (CH were characterized and compared in a prospective study of consecutive patients attending a headache clinic at Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan.

  15. [Migraine with psychiatric co-morbidity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radat, F

    2005-07-01

    Investigation of migraine co-morbidity has confirmed a strong association between depression, anxiety disorders (particularly panic and phobia) and migraine. However, research into the possible mechanisms underlying these associations remains limited. The literature also indicates that migrainers are at reduced risk of suffering from anxiety, mood disorders and substance-related disorders compared with medication overuse headache sufferers. Patients suffering from medication overuse headache sometimes exhibit addictive behavior for acute migraine drugs. Finally, migrainers show increased non-specific neurotic suffering.

  16. Burden of migraine related to menses: results from the AMPP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, Jelena M; Stewart, Walter F; Bruce, Christa A; Gorman, Jennifer A; Sun, Haiyan; Buse, Dawn C; Lipton, Richard B

    2015-03-18

    Studies of the difference between menstrually associated and non-menstrually associated migraine are somewhat controversial. The majority of studies have focused on comparing menstrual to non-menstrual attacks rather than comparing study groups with different migraine diagnoses with respect to menstruation. As there is limited knowledge available on the overall impact and burden of migraine among groups of women with and without menstrually associated migraine our goal was to examine differences between these groups. We hypothesized that there would be greater burden of migraine related to menstruation and headache frequency in a population study across groups of women. We analyzed data from the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) Study, a longitudinal, US, population-based study. We included female respondents to the 2009 survey, aged 18 to 60, who met modified ICHD-2 criteria for migraine, were actively menstruating and fit one of three definitions based on the self-reported association of menses and migraine attacks: self-reported predominantly menstrual migraine (MM, attacks that only or predominantly occur at the time of menses), self-reported menstrually-associated migraine (MAM, attacks commonly associated with menses, but that also occur at other times of the month), and self-reported menstrually-unrelated migraine (MUM). These three groups were compared on characteristics and measures of headache impact and burden (Headache Impact Test- 6 item (HIT-6) and Migraine Disability Assessment Scale (MIDAS). There were 1,697 eligible subjects for this study in the following categories: MM (5.5%), MAM (53.8%), or MUM (40.7%). Women with MM had an older age of migraine onset. Those with predominantly menstrually-related attacks (MM) had fewer headache-days but appeared to be more impaired by attacks. HIT-6 and MIDAS scores were significantly higher for both the MM and MAM groups compared with the MUM groups; however, effects were more robust for MM

  17. Comportamiento de la cefalea migrañosa: interconsulta de proyección comunitaria Behavior of migraine headache: community projection interconsultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniuska Rodríguez Tudela

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. El tratamiento del paciente migrañoso es controversial y difícil, a lo cual se suma el hecho de que la migraña es el motivo de consulta más frecuente en atención primaria de salud y en las áreas de urgencias. El objetivo del presente estudio fue evaluar el comportamiento de la migraña en niños y adolescentes que abusaron del consumo de analgésicos antes del diagnóstico y el patrón de presentación de la migraña cambió y esta se convirtió en cefalea diaria. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio clínico-epidemiológico con 80 niños y adolescentes que se atendieron en la consulta de neuropediatría en el Hospital "Leonor Pérez", como parte del algoritmo de la consulta de cefalea originario del Hospital Pediátrico "William Soler" y generalizado al Municipio Boyeros. RESULTADOS. Predominó el sexo femenino (67,5 % y las edades entre 9 y 14 años (68,7 %. El antecedente familiar más relevante fue el de migraña (42,5 %, por vía materna, y el motivo principal de consulta fue la existencia de crisis migrañosa diaria producida por la ingestión excesiva de analgésico (duralgina, lo cual se convirtió en el principal factor desencadenante de las crisis. CONCLUSIONES. El hecho de que la mayoría de los pacientes tuvieran madres migrañosas pudiera demostrar el posible carácter genético de la dolencia. La ingestión excesiva de analgésicos del tipo de la duralgina resultó ser el principal factor desencadenante de las crisis.INTRODUCTION. The treatment of the migraine patient is controversial and difficult, in addition to the fact that migraine is the most frequent chief complaint in primary health care and in the emergency areas. The objective of this study was to evaluate the behaviour of migraine in children and adolescents that abused analgesics before the diagnosis. The pattern of presentation of migraine changed and it became a daily headache. METHODS. A clinical epidemiological study was conducted among 80 children

  18. Safety and efficacy of AMG 334 for prevention of episodic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Hong Yan; Dodick, David W; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    laboratory values, vital signs, and anti-AMG 334 antibodies. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01952574. An open-label extension phase of up to 256 weeks is ongoing and will assess the long-term safety of AMG 334. FINDINGS: From Aug 6, 2013, to June 30, 2014, 483 patients were......BACKGROUND: The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) pathway is a promising target for preventive therapies in patients with migraine. We assessed the safety and efficacy of AMG 334, a fully human monoclonal antibody against the CGRP receptor, for migraine prevention. METHODS: In this multicentre...... in monthly migraine days from baseline to the last 4 weeks of the 12-week double-blind treatment phase. The primary endpoint was calculated using the least squares mean at each timepoint from a generalised linear mixed-effect model for repeated measures. Safety endpoints were adverse events, clinical...

  19. A case study for calculating employer costs for lost productive time in episodic migraine and chronic migraine: results of the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Walter F; Bruce, Christa; Manack, Aubrey; Buse, Dawn C; Varon, Sepideh F; Lipton, Richard B

    2011-10-01

    To model workplace lost productive time (LPT) from episodic migraine (EM) and chronic migraine (CM). We used published estimates of migraine epidemiology and related LPT to model the impact of migraine on two typical US workforce scenarios that differ by gender and age. In a simulated service sector workforce of 10,000 individuals, the migraine-related LPT was $2.9 million annually compared with $2.1 million for a manufacturing workforce. Individuals with moderate frequency EM accounted for 42% of the cost. Individuals with high frequency EM and CM comprised 10% of all migraine sufferers and accounted for 22% of the LPT. Lost productive time impact of migraine and other health problems depends on workforce demographics and the cost of labor. Employers can often estimate LPT costs to reveal priorities for optimizing use of health care.

  20. Experimental headache in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    1995-01-01

    The need for valid human experimental models of headache is obvious. Several compounds have been proposed as headache-inducing agents, but only the nitroglycerin (NTG) model has been validated. In healthy subjects, intravenous infusions of the nitric oxide (NO) donor NTG induce a dose......-dependent headache and dilatation of the temporal, radial and middle cerebral artery. NTG-induced headache, although less intense, resembles migraine in pain characteristics, but the accompanying symptoms are rarely present. Cephalic large arteries are dilated during migraine headache as well as during NTG headache....... N-acetylcysteine enhances the formation of NO and potentiates NTG-induced headache, whereas mepyramine, a H1-antagonist capable of blocking histamine-induced headache, has no effect. Thus, the headache is dependent on NO or other steps in the NO cascade. The model is useful for pharmacological...

  1. Safety and efficacy of AMG 334 for prevention of episodic migraine: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Dodick, David W; Silberstein, Stephen; Goadsby, Peter J; Reuter, Uwe; Ashina, Messoud; Saper, Joel; Cady, Roger; Chon, Yun; Dietrich, Julie; Lenz, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) pathway is a promising target for preventive therapies in patients with migraine. We assessed the safety and efficacy of AMG 334, a fully human monoclonal antibody against the CGRP receptor, for migraine prevention. In this multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial, patients aged 18-60 years with 4 to 14 migraine days per month were enrolled at 59 headache and clinical research centres in North America and Europe, and randomly assigned in a 3:2:2:2 ratio to monthly subcutaneous placebo, AMG 334 7 mg, AMG 334 21 mg, or AMG 334 70 mg using a sponsor-generated randomisation sequence centrally executed by an interactive voice response or interactive web response system. Study site personnel, patients, and the sponsor study personnel were masked to the treatment assignment. The primary endpoint was the change in monthly migraine days from baseline to the last 4 weeks of the 12-week double-blind treatment phase. The primary endpoint was calculated using the least squares mean at each timepoint from a generalised linear mixed-effect model for repeated measures. Safety endpoints were adverse events, clinical laboratory values, vital signs, and anti-AMG 334 antibodies. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01952574. An open-label extension phase of up to 256 weeks is ongoing and will assess the long-term safety of AMG 334. From Aug 6, 2013, to June 30, 2014, 483 patients were randomly assigned to placebo (n=160), AMG 334 7 mg (n=108), AMG 334 21 mg (n=108), or AMG 334 70 mg (n=107). The mean change in monthly migraine days at week 12 was -3·4 (SE 0·4) days with AMG 334 70 mg versus -2·3 (0·3) days with placebo (difference -1·1 days [95% CI -2·1 to -0·2], p=0·021). The mean reductions in monthly migraine days with the 7 mg (-2·2 [SE 0·4]) and the 21 mg (-2·4 [0·4]) doses were not significantly different from that with placebo. Adverse events were recorded in 82 (54

  2. Migraine aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charles, Andrew; Hansen, Jakob Møller

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The migraine aura is a dramatic spontaneous change in brain activity resulting in a variety of transient neurological symptoms. The purpose of this review is to address recent advances in the understanding of aura and its role in migraine. RECENT FINDINGS: The formal...... classification of migraine aura is becoming both broader and more detailed. Traditionally viewed as a primary event that triggers a migraine attack, studies regarding the timing of aura relative to other symptoms of migraine indicate that it may not in fact play a primary role in initiating an attack. Careful...... recording and analysis of visual aura symptoms provides new insight into the initiation and propagation of the underlying brain phenomenon, and the different regions of visual cortex that produce different visual perceptions. Migraine with aura may have different responses to acute and preventive therapies...

  3. Administration of palmitoylethanolamide in combination with topiramate in the preventive treatment of nummular headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirchiglia D

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Domenico Chirchiglia,1 Attilio Della Torre,2 Francesco Signorelli,2 Giorgio Volpentesta,2 Giusy Guzzi,2 Carmelino Angelo Stroscio,2 Federica Deodato,2 Donatella Gabriele,2 Angelo Lavano,2 1Department of Neurosurgery, Neurophysiopathology Unit, 2Department of Neurosurgery, University of Catanzaro “Magna Graecia”, Catanzaro, Italy Abstract: Nummular headache has been recently described as a primary disorder characterized by head pain exclusively felt in a small rounded area typically 2–6 cm in diameter, not attributed to another disorder. Both size and shape of the painful area remain constant since the onset of symptoms. A 57-year-old woman presented with a history of focal episodic pain in a circumscribed area on the right parietal region. The administration of standard oral doses of palmitoylethanolamide and topiramate in combination showed an improvement in pain symptoms and on pain measuring scales. Keywords: algometry, migraine, nummular headache, palmitoylethanolamide, topiramate

  4. Aura and Other Neurologic Dysfunction in or with Migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissoon, Narayan R; Cutrer, Fred Michael

    2017-07-01

    Migraine can present with a wide range of neurological symptoms. Based on currently available data, the symptoms of typical migraine aura are most likely related to cortical spreading depression (CSD), and evidence supports that CSD can lead to trigeminovascular activation resulting in the headache phase of migraine. An alternative diagnosis to migraine aura should be considered if migrainous headaches present with transient neurological symptoms that have features inconsistent with aura. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  5. Cerebral hemodynamics in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hachinski, V C; Olesen, Jes; Norris, J W

    1977-01-01

    Clinical and angiographic findings in migraine are briefly reviewed in relation to cerebral hemodynamic changes shown by regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies. Three cases of migraine studied by the intracarotid xenon 133 method during attacks are reported. In classic migraine, with typical...... prodromal symptoms, a decrease in cerebral blood flow has been demonstrated during the aura. Occasionally, this flow decrease persists during the headache phase. In common migraine, where such prodromata are not seen, a flow decrease has not been demonstrated. During the headache phase of both types...... of migraine, rCBF has usually been found to be normal or in the high range of normal values. The high values may represent postischemic hyperemia, but are probably more frequently secondary to arousal caused by pain. Thus, during the headache phase rCBF may be subnormal, normal or high. These findings do...

  6. Pharmacological migraine provocation: a human model of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Messoud; Hansen, Jakob Møller

    2010-01-01

    . If a naturally occurring substance can provoke migraine in human patients, then it is likely, although not certain, that blocking its effect will be effective in the treatment of acute migraine attacks. To this end, a human in vivo model of experimental headache and migraine in humans has been developed...

  7. Dipyridamole may induce migraine in patients with migraine without aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, C; Lassen, L H; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2006-01-01

    Dipyridamole inhibits phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) and adenosine re-uptake. The most prominent side-effect is headache. We examined the migraine-generating effects of dipyridamole as well as the cerebral blood velocity response in a single-blind study, including 10 patients with migraine without aura...... repeatedly. Headache was induced in all migraine patients and in eight of 10 healthy subjects (P = 0.47) with no significant difference in headache intensity (P = 0.53). However, five patients but only one healthy subject experienced the symptoms of migraine without aura, according to ICHD-2 criteria, within....... Thus, dipyridamole induces symptoms of migraine and an initial decrease in V(mca) in migraine patients, but not significantly more than in healthy subjects. This relatively low frequency of migraine induction, compared with nitric oxide donors and sildenafil, is probably due to the less specific action...

  8. Other primary headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Bahra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ′Other Primary Headaches′ include eight recognised benign headache disorders. Primary stabbing headache is a generally benign disorder which often co-exists with other primary headache disorders such as migraine and cluster headache. Primary cough headache is headache precipitated by valsalva; secondary cough has been reported particularly in association with posterior fossa pathology. Primary exertional headache can occur with sudden or gradual onset during, or immediately after, exercise. Similarly headache associated with sexual activity can occur with gradual evolution or sudden onset. Secondary headache is more likely with both exertional and sexual headache of sudden onset. Sudden onset headache, with maximum intensity reached within a minute, is termed thunderclap headache. A benign form of thunderclap headache exists. However, isolated primary and secondary thunderclap headache cannot be clinically differentiated. Therefore all headache of thunderclap onset should be investigated. The primary forms of the aforementioned paroxysmal headaches appear to be Indomethacin sensitive disorders. Hypnic headache is a rare disorder which is termed ′alarm clock headache′, exclusively waking patients from sleep. The disorder can be Indomethacin responsive, but can also respond to Lithium and caffeine. New daily persistent headache is a rare and often intractable headache which starts one day and persists daily thereafter for at least 3 months. The clinical syndrome more often has migrainous features or is otherwise has a chronic tension-type headache phenotype. Management is that of the clinical syndrome. Hemicrania continua straddles the disorders of migraine and the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and is not dealt with in this review.

  9. Part II--Management of pediatric post-traumatic headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchefsky, Elana; Dubrovsky, Alexander Sasha; Friedman, Debbie; Shevell, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Post-traumatic headache is one of the most common symptoms occurring after mild traumatic brain injury in children. This is an expert opinion-based two-part review on pediatric post-traumatic headaches. In part II, we focus on the medical management of post-traumatic headaches. There are no randomized controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of therapies specifically for pediatric post-traumatic headaches. Thus, the algorithm we propose has been extrapolated from the primary headache literature and small noncontrolled trials of post-traumatic headache. Most post-traumatic headaches are migraine or tension type, and standard medications for these headache types are used. A multifaceted approach is needed to address all the possible causes of headache and any comorbid conditions that may delay recovery or alter treatment choices. For acute treatment, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories can be used. If the headaches have migrainous features and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories are not effective, triptans may be beneficial. Opioids are not indicated. Medication overuse should be avoided. For preventive treatments, some reports indicate that amitriptyline, gabapentin, or topiramate may be beneficial. Amitriptyline is a good choice because it can be used to treat both migraine and tension-type headaches. Nerve blocks, nutraceuticals (e.g. melatonin), and behavioral therapies may also be useful, and lifestyle factors, especially adequate sleep hygiene and strategies to cope with anxiety, should be emphasized. Improved treatment of acute post-traumatic headache may reduce the likelihood of developing chronic headaches, which can be especially problematic to effectively manage and can be functionally debilitating. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tinnitus and Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthold Langguth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tinnitus and headache are frequent disorders. Here, we aimed to investigate whether the occurrence of headache among tinnitus patients is purely coincidental or whether tinnitus and headache are pathophysiologically linked. We investigated a large sample of patients with tinnitus and headache to estimate prevalence rates of different headache forms, to determine the relationship between tinnitus laterality and headache laterality, and to explore the relationship between tinnitus and headache over time. Method. Patients who presented at a tertiary referral center because of tinnitus and reported comorbid headache were asked to complete validated questionnaires to determine the prevalence of migraine and tension-type headache and to assess tinnitus severity. In addition, several questions about the relationship between headache and tinnitus were asked. Results. Datasets of 193 patients with tinnitus and headache were analysed. 44.6% suffered from migraine, 13% from tension-type headache, and 5.7% from both. Headache laterality was significantly related to tinnitus laterality and in the majority of patients fluctuations in symptom severity of tinnitus and headache were interrelated. Conclusion. These findings suggest a significant relationship between tinnitus and headache laterality and symptom interaction over time and argue against a purely coincidental cooccurrence of tinnitus and headache. Both disorders may be linked by common pathophysiological mechanisms.

  11. The migraine postdrome

    OpenAIRE

    Giffin, Nicola J.; Lipton, Richard B.; Silberstein, Stephen D.; Olesen, Jes; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report migraine postdrome symptoms in patients who report nonheadache symptoms as part of their attacks. Methods: A prospective daily electronic diary study was conducted over 3 months in 120 patients with migraine. Nonheadache symptoms before, during, and after headache were collected on a daily basis. Visual analogue scales were used to capture the overall level of functioning and the severity of the headache. The postdrome was defined as the time from resolution of troublesom...

  12. [Cerebrovascular accidents and migraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaigne, P; Brunet, P; Pierrot-Deseilligny, C; Roullet, E

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-three clinical cases are reported, illustrating the difficulties of diagnosing migrainous focal cerebrovascular accidents. Cases of constituted cerebral infarcts and transient cerebral ischemia occurring during the cephalalgic phase, without headache and in patients with no previous history of typical migrainous attacks are described. Migraine may be considered to be the cause on convincing clinical criteria, but the diagnosis can only be established after negative results of investigations to exclude other causes of focal cerebral ischemia.

  13. Survey on treatments for primary headaches in 13 specialized juvenile Headache Centers: The first multicenter Italian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toldo, Irene; Rattin, Martina; Perissinotto, Egle; De Carlo, Debora; Bolzonella, Barbara; Nosadini, Margherita; Rossi, Livia Nicoletta; Vecchio, Angelo; Simonati, Alessandro; Carotenuto, Marco; Scalas, Cinzia; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Raieli, Vincenzo; Mazzotta, Giovanni; Tozzi, Elisabetta; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Cianchetti, Carlo; Balottin, Umberto; Guidetti, Vincenzo; Sartori, Stefano; Battistella, Pier Antonio

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this retrospective multicenter study was to evaluate the use and the self-perceived efficacy and tolerability of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments in children and adolescents with primary headaches. Study of a cohort of children and adolescents diagnosed with primary headache, consecutively referred to 13 juvenile Italian Headache Centers. An ad hoc questionnaire was used for clinical data collection. Among 706 patients with primary headaches included in the study, 637 cases with a single type of headache (migraine 76% - with and without aura in 10% and 67% respectively; tension-type headache 24%) were selected (mean age at clinical interview: 12 years). Acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (in particular ibuprofen) were commonly used to treat attacks, by 76% and 46% of cases respectively. Triptans were used overall by 6% of migraineurs and by 13% of adolescents with migraine, with better efficacy than acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Preventive drugs were used by 19% of migraineurs and by 3% of subjects with tension-type headache. In migraineurs, flunarizine was the most frequently used drug (18%), followed by antiepileptic drugs (7%) and pizotifen (6%), while cyproheptadine, propanolol and amitriptyline were rarely used. Pizotifen showed the best perceived efficacy and tolerability. Melatonin and nutraceuticals were used by 10% and 32% of subjects, respectively, both for migraine and tension-type headache, with good results in terms of perceived efficacy and tolerability. Non-pharmacological preventive treatments (i.e. relaxation techniques, biofeedback, cognitive-behavioral therapy, acupuncture) were used only by 10% of cases (migraine 9%, tension-type headache 15%). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, especially ibuprofen, should be preferred to acetaminophen for acute attacks of migraine or tension-type headache, because they were usually more effective and well tolerated. Triptans

  14. Is topiramate effective for migraine prevention in patients less than 18 years of age? A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Kai; Yu, Dafan; Wang, Jiamin; Ali, Abdoulaye Idriss; Guo, Yijing

    2017-12-01

    Mainly based on evidence of success in adults, various medications are commonly used to prevent pediatric migraines. Topiramate has been approved for migraine prevention in children as young as 12 years of age. In this meta-analysis, we aimed to assess the currently published data pertaining to the efficacy of topiramate for migraine prevention in patients less than 18 years of age. We searched PubMed/Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library (from inception to April 2017) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in English. Two independent investigators performed data extraction and quality evaluation using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. The data extracted were analyzed by Review Manager 5.3 software. A total of four RCTs matching the inclusion criteria were included, with an aggregate of 465 patients. Of these patients, 329 were included in the topiramate group, and 136 were included in the placebo group. This meta-analysis revealed that compared with placebo, topiramate failed to decrease the number of patients experiencing a ≥ 50% relative reduction in headache frequency (n = 465, RR = 1.26, 95% CI = [0.94,1.67], Z = 1.55, P = 0.12) or the number of headache days (n = 465, MD = -0.77, 95% CI = [-2.31,0.76], Z = 0.99, P = 0.32) but did reduce PedMIDAS scores (n = 205, MD = -9.02, 95% CI = [-17.34, -0.70], Z = 2.13, P = 0.03). Higher rates of side effects and adverse events in the topiramate group than in the placebo group were observed in the included trials. Topiramate may not achieve a more effective clinical trial endpoint than placebo in the prevention of migraines in patients less than 18 years of age, and topiramate may lead to more side effects or adverse events in the included patients.

  15. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) for the prevention of tension-type headache in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzi, Rita; Cusi, Cristina; Randazzo, Concetta; Sterzi, Roberto; Tedesco, Dario; Moja, Lorenzo

    2015-05-01

    This is an updated version of the Cochrane review published in 2005 on selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for preventing migraine and tension-type headache. The original review has been split in two parts and this review now only regards tension-type headache prevention. Another updated review covers migraine. Tension-type headache is the second most common disorder worldwide and has high social and economic relevance. As serotonin and other neurotransmitters may have a role in pain mechanisms, SSRIs and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) have been evaluated for the prevention of tension-type headache. To determine the efficacy and tolerability of SSRIs and SNRIs compared to placebo and other active interventions in the prevention of episodic and chronic tension-type headache in adults. For the original review, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2003, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2004), EMBASE (1994 to May 2003), and Headache Quarterly (1990 to 2003). For this update, we revised the original search strategy to reflect the broader type of intervention (SSRIs and SNRIs). We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 10) on the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (1946 to November 2014), EMBASE (1980 to November 2014), and PsycINFO (1987 to November 2014). We also checked the reference lists of retrieved articles and searched trial registries for ongoing trials. We included randomised controlled trials comparing SSRIs or SNRIs with any type of control intervention in participants 18 years and older, of either sex, with tension-type headache. Two authors independently extracted data (headache frequency, index, intensity, and duration; use of symptomatic/analgesic medication; quality of life; and withdrawals) and assessed the risk of bias of trials. The primary outcome is tension-type headache frequency, measured by the number of headache attacks or the number of days with headache per evaluation period. The original

  16. Migraine pathogenesis and state of pharmacological treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goadsby Peter J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Migraine is a largely inherited disorder of the brain characterized by a complex, but stereotypical, dysfunction of sensory processing. Often the most obvious clinical symptom is head pain, but non-headache symptoms such as photophobia, phonophobia and nausea are clearly part of the typical presentation. This review discusses the current pathophysiological concepts of migraine and migraine aura, such as a possible brainstem dysfunction and cortical spreading depression. Acute and preventive migraine treatment approaches are briefly covered with a focus on shortcomings of the currently available treatment options. A number of different receptors, such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, TRPV1 and glutamate receptors, are currently being targeted by potential novel migraine therapeutics. The prospects of this research are exciting and are likely to improve patient care.

  17. Sleep features and central sensitization symptoms in primary headache patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, Marina; Delussi, Marianna; Vecchio, Eleonora; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Invitto, Sara; Livrea, Paolo

    2014-09-26

    Association between sleep disorders and headache is largely known. The aim of the present study was to evaluate sleep quality and quantity in a large cohort of primary headache patients, in order to correlate these scores with symptoms of central sensitization as allodynia, pericranial tenderness and comorbidity with diffuse muscle-skeletal pain. One thousand six hundreds and seventy primary headache out patients were submitted to the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) within a clinical assessment, consisting of evaluation of frequency of headache, pericranial tenderness, allodynia and coexistence of fibromyalgia syndrome (FM). Ten groups of primary headache patients were individuated, including patients with episodic and chronic migraine and tension type headache, mixed forms, cluster headache and other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. Duration but not sleep disturbances score was correlated with symptoms of central sensitization as allodynia and pericranial tenderness in primary headache patients. The association among allodynia, pericranial tenderness and short sleep characterized chronic migraine more than any other primary headache form. Patients presenting with FM comorbidity suffered from sleep disturbances in addition to reduction of sleep duration. Self reported duration of sleep seems a useful index to be correlated with allodynia, pericranial tenderness and chronic headache as a therapeutic target to be assessed in forthcoming studies aiming to prevent central sensitization symptoms development.

  18. Diagnosis and Development of Screening Items for Migraine in Neurological Practice in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuu-Jiun Wang

    2008-06-01

    Conclusion: Migraine was the most common headache diagnosis in the neurologists’ clinics. Probable migraine was not completely adopted as a migraine spectrum among neurologists. In contrast to ID™, moderate or severe headache intensity replaced headache-related disability as one screening item for migraine in Taiwan.

  19. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome and Migraine in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Pei Lin

    2011-06-01

    Conclusion: Results of the study show that younger onset age and headache during CVS attacks may have increased risk of migraine development. Large-scale prospective studies are warranted to further clarify the relationship between CVS and migraine.

  20. Impact of Migraine on School Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Karceski, MD The impact of migraine on school performance Daniel Kantor, MD e168 WHAT QUESTION DID THE ... overlooked problem: how migraine headache affects the school performance of children. 1 It is bad enough to ...

  1. Migraine and Central Sensitization: Clinical Features, Main Comorbidities and Therapeutic Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, Marina; Sciruicchio, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a very common neurologic disorder, characterized by recurrent attacks of severe headache, autonomic nervous system dysfunction and in some patients by an aura. Migraine is a very common neurologic disorder of neuro-vascular origin, being amongst the 20 most disabling diseases. Migraine attacks are characterized by severe headache, associated to autonomic nervous system dysfunction and in some patients by aura. Pathophysiology and Role of Central Sensitization: Abnormal neuronal excitability may subtend altered processing of sensory stimuli, leading to cortical spreading depression and trigeminal activation. A dysfunction of pain modulation enhances central sensitization phenomena, contributing to acute allodynia and headache persistence. The peculiarity of migraine pain facilitates the use of analgesics, and causes an adjunctive invalidating tendency toward drug over-use. Comorbidity: Chronic migraine patients are frequently affected by diffuse pain, framed in fibromyalgia diagnosis. This comorbidity seems to be supported by common pathophysiological mechanisms. It may aggravate migraine invalidity being worth of consideration for therapeutic management. Migraine Management: Acute and preventive treatments need to be tailored to single cases. Main comorbidity and factors facilitating central sensitization should be taken into account. The management of migraine patients should include a link between headache centers and general practitioner, in order to provide for a better patient information and treatment just at the onset of the disease. Despite its high epidemiologic impact, migraine is frequently underestimated and destined to evolve into chronic form and drugs abuse. A more focused attention to factors facilitating central sensitization and invalidating comorbidities, should reduce the global burden of the disease. migraine, pathophysiology, central sensitization, fibromyalgia comorbidity, acute and preventive therapy, patients - centered approach.

  2. Premonitory symptoms in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, Katarina; Artto, Ville; Bendtsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe the frequency and number of premonitory symptoms (PS) in migraine, the co-occurrence of different PS, and their association with migraine-related factors. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, a validated questionnaire was sent to Finnish migraine families between 2002 and 2013...... to obtain data on 14 predefined PS, migraine diagnoses, demographic factors, and migraine characteristics. The estimated response rate was 80%. RESULTS: Out of 2714 persons, 2223 were diagnosed with migraine. Among these, 77% reported PS, with a mean number of 3.0 symptoms compared to 30% (p ....5 symptoms (p migraine headaches. Yawning was the most commonly reported symptom (34%) among migraineurs. Females reported PS more frequently than males (81 versus 64%, p 

  3. The Role of Melatonin in the Treatment of Primary Headache Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Amy A.; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide a summary of knowledge about the use of melatonin in the treatment of primary headache disorders. Background Melatonin is secreted by the pineal gland; its production is regulated by the hypothalamus and increases during periods of darkness. Methods We undertook a narrative review of the literature on the role of melatonin in the treatment of primary headache disorders. Results There are randomized placebo-controlled trials examining melatonin for preventive treatment of migraine and cluster headache. For cluster headache, melatonin 10 mg was superior to placebo. For migraine, a randomized placebo-controlled trial of melatonin 3 mg (immediate release) was positive, though an underpowered trial of melatonin 2 mg (sustained release) was negative. Uncontrolled studies, case series, and case reports cover melatonin’s role in treating tension-type headache, hypnic headache, hemicrania continua, SUNCT/SUNA and primary stabbing headache. Conclusions Melatonin may be effective in treating several primary headache disorders, particularly cluster headache and migraine. Future research should focus on elucidating the underlying mechanisms of benefit of melatonin in different headache disorders, as well as clarifying optimal dosing and formulation. PMID:27316772

  4. Headache and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Negro, A; Delaruelle, Z; Ivanova, T A

    2017-01-01

    This systematic review summarizes the existing data on headache and pregnancy with a scope on clinical headache phenotypes, treatment of headaches in pregnancy and effects of headache medications on the child during pregnancy and breastfeeding, headache related complications, and diagnostics...... of headache in pregnancy. Headache during pregnancy can be both primary and secondary, and in the last case can be a symptom of a life-threatening condition. The most common secondary headaches are stroke, cerebral venous thrombosis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, pituitary tumor, choriocarcinoma, eclampsia......, preeclampsia, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. Migraine is a risk factor for pregnancy complications, particularly vascular events. Data regarding other primary headache conditions are still scarce. Early diagnostics of the disease manifested by headache...

  5. [Headache: classification and diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbaat, P A T; Couturier, E G M

    2016-11-01

    There are many types of headache and, moreover, many people have different types of headache at the same time. Adequate treatment is possible only on the basis of the correct diagnosis. Technically and in terms of content the current diagnostics process for headache is based on the 'International Classification of Headache Disorders' (ICHD-3-beta) that was produced under the auspices of the International Headache Society. This classification is based on a distinction between primary and secondary headaches. The most common primary headache types are the tension type headache, migraine and the cluster headache. Application of uniform diagnostic concepts is essential to come to the most appropriate treatment of the various types of headache.

  6. Behavioral and nonpharmacologic treatments of headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, A E

    2001-07-01

    Cognitive-behavioral analysis and the multiaxial assessment of relevant behavioral domains (headache frequency and severity, analgesic and abortive use and misuse, behavioral and stress-related risk factors, comorbid psychiatric disorders, and degree of overall functional impairment) help set the stage for CBT of headache disorders. Controlled studies of CBTs for migraine, such as biofeedback and relaxation therapy, have a prophylactic efficacy of about 50%, roughly equivalent to propranolol. Cluster headache responds poorly to behavioral treatment. The persistent overuse of symptomatic medication impedes the effectiveness of behavioral and prophylactic medical therapies. Behavioral treatment can help sustain improvement after analgesic withdrawal, however, and prevent relapse in cases of analgesic overuse. Cognitive factors (e.g., an enhanced sense of self-efficacy and internal locus of control) appear to be important mediators of successful behavioral treatment. Patients with CDH are more likely to overuse symptomatic medication (and in some cases abuse analgesics), have more psychiatric comorbidity; have more functional impairment and disability, and are at least as likely to experience stress-related intensification of headache as patients whose episodic headaches occur less than 15 days per month. Despite the significance of these behavioral factors, patients with CDH (particularly those with migrainous features) are less likely to benefit from behavioral treatment without concomitant prophylactic medication than is the case for episodic TTH and migraine sufferers. Continuous daily pain may be more refractory to behavioral treatment as a solo modality than CDH marked by at least some pain-free days or periods of time. The combination of behavioral therapies with prophylactic medication creates a synergistic effect, increasing efficacy beyond either type of treatment alone. Compliance-enhancement techniques, including behavioral contracts for patients with

  7. Migraine, Osmophobia, and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Filho, Pedro Augusto Sampaio; Marques, Karine Sobral; Torres, Rinailda Cascia Santos; Leal, Kamila Nazare Ribas

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the association between osmophobia and the characteristics of patients and their headaches, among migraine patients. This was a cross-sectional study. Patients who consecutively sought medical attendance in a primary care unit were asked about their headaches over the last 12 months. Those who had migraine were included. A semi-structured interview, the Headache Impact Test and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used. 147 patients had migraine; 78 had osmophobia; 60 had significant anxiety symptoms; and 78 had significant depression symptoms. The mean age of these patients was 43.2 years (± 13.7); 91.2% were women. The mean length of time with complaints of headache was 13.8 years (± 12). Among the migraine patients, those with anxiety, more years of headache history, and phonophobia presented significantly more osmophobia (multivariate logistic regression). Osmophobia in migraine patients is associated with significant anxiety symptoms, length of headache history, and phonophobia. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. [Migraine prophylaxis with trigger point therapy and lymphatic drainage : A pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedikardachian, Delphine; Quasthoff, Stefan; Lechner, Anita T; Giuliani, Albrecht; Fazekas, Franz

    2017-11-01

    Migraine is a complex, multifactorial, neurovascular disorder of the brain. Patients frequently have pericranial trigger points, but trigger point (TP) therapy for migraine has not yet been adequately studied. In contrast, lymphatic drainage (LD) has been studied in patients with migraine. The multifactorial origin of migraine suggests using a combination of approaches such as TP therapy and lymphatic drainage. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of TP therapy alone and in combination with LD in preventing migraine during treatment period and over an 8‑week period after completion of treatment. A wait list control group served as a control group. Patients completed a headache calendar. The results of this pilot study suggest a beneficial effect for TP alone and TP combined with LD for migraine prophylaxis for 8 weeks after completion of treatment.

  9. Low levels of serum serotonin and amino acids identified in migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Caixia; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Juntuo; Liang, Hui; Wang, Yayun; Sun, Yinping; Ma, Bin; Yin, Yuxin

    2018-02-05

    Migraine is a highly disabling primary headache associated with a high socioeconomic burden and a generally high prevalence. The clinical management of migraine remains a challenge. This study was undertaken to identify potential serum biomarkers of migraine. Using Liquid Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS), the metabolomic profile of migraine was compared with healthy individuals. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (orthoPLS-DA) showed the metabolomic profile of migraine is distinguishable from controls. Volcano plot analysis identified 10 serum metabolites significantly decreased during migraine. One of these was serotonin, and the other 9 were amino acids. Pathway analysis and enrichment analysis showed tryptophan metabolism (serotonin metabolism), arginine and proline metabolism, and aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis are the three most prominently altered pathways in migraine. ROC curve analysis indicated Glycyl-l-proline, N-Methyl-dl-Alanine and l-Methionine are potential sensitive and specific biomarkers for migraine. Our results show Glycyl-l-proline, N-Methyl-dl-Alanine and l-Methionine may be as specific or more specific for migraine than serotonin which is the traditional biomarker of migraine. We propose that therapeutic manipulation of these metabolites or metabolic pathways may be helpful in the prevention and treatment of migraine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacological migraine provocation: a human model of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Messoud; Hansen, Jakob Møller

    2010-01-01

    for migraine mechanisms. So far, however, animal models cannot predict the efficacy of new therapies for migraine. Because migraine attacks are fully reversible and can be aborted by therapy, the headache- or migraine-provoking property of naturally occurring signaling molecules can be tested in a human model......In vitro studies have contributed to the characterization of receptors in cranial blood vessels and the identification of possible new antimigraine agents. Animal models enable the study of vascular responses, neurogenic inflammation, and peptide release, and thus have provided leads in the search....... If a naturally occurring substance can provoke migraine in human patients, then it is likely, although not certain, that blocking its effect will be effective in the treatment of acute migraine attacks. To this end, a human in vivo model of experimental headache and migraine in humans has been developed...

  11. Coping styles of headache sufferers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniatchkin, M; Riabus, M; Hasenbring, M

    1999-04-01

    Psychological factors are important in the chronification and aggravation of headaches. We studied 90 patients suffering from migraine, chronic daily headache (CDH) evolved from migraine, and episodic or chronic tension-type headache (TTH). Emotional, cognitive, and behavioral pain coping were assessed using the Kiel Pain Inventory (KPI), Beck's Depression Inventory, the State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory, and Quality of Life Questionnaire. In addition, the clinical course of headache was analyzed using a validated headache diary. The results were as follows. Firstly, the KPI is reliable internally for the assessment of pain-coping strategy employment among headache patients. Secondly, migraine sufferers were characterized by pronounced psychological abnormalities during the headache phase, demonstrating a less adaptive coping behavior. This was in contrast to the TTH patients, who showed more general distress manifesting in elevated anxiety and lower quality of life. The only factor which appeared to be essential for differentiating between migraine and TTH was the intensity of headache. Thirdly, chronic TTH and CDH evolved from migraine demonstrated more pronounced psychological disabilities and more severe clinical courses of headaches than episodic TTH or nontransformed migraine. The predictor variable for transformation of migraine was impairment of well-being/quality of life, and for transformation of TTH, the frequency of headaches and depression. Finally, analgesic misuse seems to be less important for chronification and transformation of headaches than the degree of psychological disability. This study draws attention to the role of psychological factors in the chronification of TTH and transformation of migraine and provides some recommendations for the behavioral treatment of chronic headaches.

  12. Headache and hormone replacement therapy in the postmenopausal woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, E Anne

    2009-01-01

    Headache and migraine are common symptoms of the menopause, often associated with irregular periods, hot flashes, and night sweats. Perimenopausal women should routinely be asked about headache and migraine, so that they can be offered appropriate advice. If attacks are infrequent, it may be sufficient to optimize acute treatment strategies. Lifestyle changes, alone or combined with a nonprescription treatment such as isoflavones, may be considered, although evidence of efficacy is limited. In women with migraine and more severe menopause symptoms, continuous hormone replacement therapy should be considered, using a nonoral route and the lowest dose effective in controlling symptoms. For women who have contraindications to estrogen therapy or do not wish to use it, compounds that inhibit serotonin reuptake, such as venlafaxine, fluoxetine, and paroxetine, have all shown efficacy for the control of hot flashes and prevention of migraine. Gabapentin is another nonhormonal option that has clinical trial evidence of effectiveness in treating hot flashes and reducing the frequency and severity of migraine attacks. Although clonidine is licensed in several countries for migraine prophylaxis and treatment of vasomotor symptoms, any benefit from treatment is often offset by adverse events. There is evidence that hysterectomy can increase the frequency of migraine and menopause symptoms, with added morbidity and risk of mortality. Therapy should regularly be evaluated to assess its ongoing need, as hormonal triggers are self-limiting and abate after menopause.

  13. Headache of neurally mediated syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Ramesh K; Van Meerbeke, Sara

    2016-12-01

    Neurally mediated syncope and migraine have a complex relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate whether patients developing syncope in the laboratory would experience migraine. Thirty-one consecutive patients were evaluated for precipitation of headache during head-up tilt (HUT)-induced syncope (reduction of systolic blood pressure [SBP] >20 mmHg and prodromal symptoms with or without loss of consciousness). Autonomic functions were assessed using heart rate response to deep breathing (HRDB), Valsalva maneuver and HUT. Blood pressure and heart rate (via electrocardiography) were continuously monitored. Headache diagnosis was based on ICHD-3 criteria. Eighteen patients (58%) experienced syncope without headache and 13 (42%) had syncope and headache (SH). No difference was observed in time of syncope onset, reduction in SBP, Valsalva ratio, HRDB or tachycardia during initial 10 minutes of HUT. Of the 13 SH patients, 11 (85%) had a past history of migraine. Two reported headache just before tilt, eight developed headache during tilt and three developed headache only after tilt. Headache resolved within 1-15 minutes in 10 out of 13 patients. No patient experienced migraine. Syncope did not precipitate migraine. Headache during syncope may be due to cerebral hypoperfusion, and cerebral hyperperfusion may cause post-syncopal headache. © International Headache Society 2016.

  14. Migraine among medical students in Kuwait University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashel, Jasem Y; Ahmed, Samar Farouk; Alroughani, Raed; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-05-10

    Medical students routinely have triggers, notably stress and irregular sleep, which are typically associated with migraine. We hypothesized that they may be at higher risk to manifest migraine. We aimed to determine the prevalence of migraine among medical students in Kuwait University. This is cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study. Participants who had two or more headaches in the last 3 months were subjected to two preliminary questions and participants with at least one positive response were asked to perform the validated Identification of Migraine (ID Migraine™) test. Frequency of headache per month and its severity were also reported. Migraine headache was suggested in 27.9% subjects based on ID-Migraine™. Migraine prevalence (35.5% and 44%, versus 31.1%, 25%, 21.1%, 14.8%, 26.5%, p Kuwait University compared to other published studies. The migraine prevalence, frequency and headache severity, all increased in the final two years of education.

  15. One hundred years of migraine research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Koehler, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    ); oligemia in the wake of CSD in rats (1982); neurogenic inflammation theory of migraine (1987); a new headache classification (1988); the discovery of sumatriptan (1988); migraine and calcitonin gene-related peptide (1990); the brainstem "migraine generator" and PET studies (1995); migraine......Pain research, and headache research in particular, during the 20th century, has generated an enormous volume of literature promulgating theories, questions, and temporary answers. This narrative review describes the most important events in the history of migraine research between 1910 and 2010....... Based on the standard textbooks of headache: Wolff's Headache (1948 and 1963) and The Headaches (1993, 2000, and 2006) topics were selected for a historical review. Most notably these included: isolation and clinical introduction of ergotamine (1918); further establishment of vasodilation in migraine...

  16. Headache in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soee, Ann Britt L; Skov, Liselotte; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this article is to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific multidisciplinary treatment programme for children with headache and to describe the concept and settings of the Children's Headache Clinic in Denmark. Method: All new patients were included and evaluations were conducted...... after six and 12 months. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments were offered by a team of specialists (physicians, headache nurses, a physiotherapist and a psychologist). Patients: The subjects comprised 169 children (mean age 11.7 (range 4-17), 91 females, 78 males), 39% of whom suffered...... from chronic headache (≥15 days/month). All children were diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition; 20% had migraine, 34% tension-type headache, 27% mixed headache, 4% medication- overuse headache, and 15% were diagnosed with other types of headaches...

  17. Migraine treatment and placebo effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciali, José G; Peres, Mário; Bigal, Marcelo E

    2010-03-01

    Placebos are typically defined as physiologically inactive substances that elicit a therapeutic response. The antipode of the placebo effect is the nocebo effect, or the negative effects of placebo, where unpleasant symptoms (e.g., adverse events) emerge after the administration of placebo. Placebo analgesia is one of the most striking examples of the cognitive modulation of pain perception. Herein we focus on the importance of placebo in headache research. We first review the mechanisms of the placebo effect. We then focus on the importance of placebo in the acute treatment of migraine. We follow by discussing the importance of placebo on the preventive treatment of migraine and our perspectives for the 5 years to come regarding the study of the placebos.

  18. Chiropractic management using a brain-based model of care for a 15-year-old adolescent boy with migraine headaches and behavioral and learning difficulties: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Kurt W; Cambron, Jerrilyn

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe chiropractic management, using a brain-based model of care, of a teen who had migraine headaches and several social and learning difficulties. A 15-year-old adolescent boy with a chronic history of migraines and more than 10 years of learning and behavioral difficulties, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and Tourette syndrome, presented for chiropractic care. The patient received spinal manipulation and was given home physical coordination activities that were contralateral to the side of the involved basal ganglia and ipsilateral to the involved cerebellum, along with interactive metronome training. Quantitative changes were noted in neurological soft signs, tests of variables of attention Conners' Parent Rating Scale, the California Achievement Test, grade point, and reduction of medications. The patient reported qualitative improvements in tics, attention, reading, vision, health, relationships with his peers and his family, and self-esteem. The patient with migraine headaches and learning difficulties responded well to the course of chiropractic care. This study suggests that there may be value in a brain-based model of care in the chiropractic management of conditions that are beyond musculoskeletal in nature.

  19. Association Between Severity of Temporomandibular Disorders and the Frequency of Headache Attacks in Women With Migraine: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florencio, Lidiane Lima; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani; Carvalho, Gabriela Ferreira; Dach, Fabiola; Bigal, Marcelo Eduardo; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the magnitude of association of the severity of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) in women with episodic and chronic migraine. Thirty-one women with episodic migraine (mean age: 33 years), 21 with chronic migraine (mean age: 35 years) and 32 healthy controls (mean age: 31 years) were included. The Fonseca Anamnestic Index was applied to assess severity of TMDs. TMD severity was considered as follows: no TMD (0-19 points), mild TMD (20-49 points), moderate TMD (50-69 points), and severe TMD (70-100 points). To compare the proportion of TMD severity among groups, a χ 2 test was performed. Prevalence ratio (PR) was calculated to determine the association of TMD severity and both migraine groups using the control group as the reference. Women with chronic and episodic migraine were more likely to exhibit TMD signs and symptoms of any severity than healthy controls (χ 2 = 30.26; P < .001). TMD prevalence was 54% for healthy controls, 78% for episodic migraine, and 100% for chronic migraine. Women with chronic migraine exhibited greater risk of more severe manifestations of TMD than healthy controls (PR: 3.31; P = .008). This association was not identified for episodic migraine (PR: 2.18; P = .101). The presence of TMD signs and symptoms was associated with migraine independently of the frequency; however, the magnitude of the association of more severe TMD was significantly greater in chronic, but not episodic, migraine. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. An Association between Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Migraine Headaches—National Health Interview Survey, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huay-Zong Law, MD

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: This study is the first to demonstrate an association between CTS and migraine headache. Longitudinal and genetic studies with physician verification of migraine headaches and CTS are needed to further define this association.

  1. Clinical aspects of perimenstrual headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2009-02-01

    Menstrual migraine (MM) is either pure, if attacks are limited solely during the perimenstrual window (PMW), or menstrually related (MRM), if two of three PMWs are associated with attacks with additional migraine events outside the PMW. Acute migraine specific therapy is equally effective in MM and non-MM. Although the International Classification of Headache Disorders-II classifies MM without aura, data suggest this needs revision. The studies on extended-cycle oral contraceptives suggest benefits for headache-prone individuals. Triptan mini-prophylaxis outcomes are positive, but a conclusion of "minimal net benefit compared to placebo" is not entirely unwarranted. In a 2008 evidence-based review, grade B recommendations exist for sumatriptan (50 and 100 mg), mefenamic acid (500 mg), and riza-triptan (10 mg) for the acute treatment of MRM. For the preventive mini-prophylactic treatment of MRM, grade B recommendations are provided for transcutaneous estrogen (1.5 mg), frovatriptan (2.5 mg twice daily), and naratriptan (1 mg twice daily).

  2. Epidemiology and comorbidity of headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stovner, L.J.; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2008-01-01

    The burden associated with headache is a major public health problem, the true magnitude of which has not been fully acknowledged until now. Globally, the percentage of the adult population with an active headache disorder is 47% for headache in general, 10% for migraine, 38% for tension-type...... headache, and 3% for chronic headache that lasts for more than 15 days per month. The large costs of headache to society, which are mostly indirect through loss of work time, have been reported. On the individual level, headaches cause disability, suffering, and loss of quality of life that is on a par...

  3. Management of cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of cluster headache is 0.1% and cluster headache is often not diagnosed or misdiagnosed as migraine or sinusitis. In cluster headache there is often a considerable diagnostic delay - an average of 7 years in a population-based survey. Cluster headache is characterized by very severe...... or severe orbital or periorbital pain with a duration of 15-180 minutes. The cluster headache attacks are accompanied by characteristic associated unilateral symptoms such as tearing, nasal congestion and/or rhinorrhoea, eyelid oedema, miosis and/or ptosis. In addition, there is a sense of restlessness...... and agitation. Patients may have up to eight attacks per day. Episodic cluster headache (ECH) occurs in clusters of weeks to months duration, whereas chronic cluster headache (CCH) attacks occur for more than 1 year without remissions. Management of cluster headache is divided into acute attack treatment...

  4. Team players against headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaul, Charly; Visscher, Corine M; Bhola, Rhia

    2011-01-01

    Multidisciplinary approaches are gaining acceptance in headache treatment. However, there is a lack of scientific data about the efficacy of various strategies and their combinations offered by physiotherapists, physicians, psychologists and headache nurses. Therefore, an international platform...... for more intense collaboration between these professions and between headache centers is needed. Our aims were to establish closer collaboration and an interchange of knowledge between headache care providers and different disciplines. A scientific session focusing on multidisciplinary headache management...... was organised at The European Headache and Migraine Trust International Congress (EHMTIC) 2010 in Nice. A summary of the contributions and the discussion is presented. It was concluded that effective multidisciplinary headache treatment can reduce headache frequency and burden of disease, as well as the risk...

  5. Temporomandibular dysfunction and headache disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speciali, José G; Dach, Fabíola

    2015-02-01

    It has been well established that primary headaches (especially migraine, chronic migraine, and tension-type headache) and temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) are comorbid diseases, with the presence of one of them in a patient increasing the prevalence of the others. The relationship between the 2 diseases may involve the sharing of common physiopathological aspects. Studies about the treatment of this disease association have shown that a simultaneous therapeutic approach to the 2 diseases is more effective than the separate treatment of each. As a consequence, specialists in orofacial pain are now required to know the criteria for the diagnosis of headaches, and headache physicians are required to know the semiologic aspects of orofacial pain. Nevertheless, a headache may be attributed to TMD, instead be an association of 2 problems - TMD and primary headaches - in these cases a secondary headache, described in item 11.7 of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, is still a controversial topic. Attempts to determine the existence of this secondary headache with a specific or suggestive phenotype have been frustrated. The conclusion that can be reached based on the few studies published thus far is that this headache has a preferential unilateral or bilateral temporal location and migraine-like or tension-type headache-like clinical characteristics. In the present review, we will consider the main aspects of the TMD-headache relationship, that is, comorbidity of primary headaches and TMD and clinical aspects of the headaches attributed to TMD from the viewpoint of the International Headache Society and of a group of specialists in orofacial pain. This paper aims to explore our understanding of the association between TMD and headaches in general and migraine in particular. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  6. Neurobiology of chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschiano, F; D'Amico, D; Schieroni, F; Bussone, G

    2003-05-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is an important problem for clinicians. It is frequent in tertiary care structures, although at present there is no clear consensus about definitions and operational criteria. In fact, CDH is a group of headache disorders that includes chronic migraine (CM). CDH usually evolves from an episodic headache form, which was migraine in most cases. Several psychopathological factors (e.g. psychiatric comorbidity, personality traits or stressful life events) and some somatic disorders (e.g. like arterial hypertension, allergic condition, sleep disturbances) are frequent in CM patients. Caffeine consumption, alcohol overuse and medication overuse (abortive drugs for migraine) could favour chronicity. The possible role of these factors remains poorly understood. Prospective studies and research about the pathophysiology of chronic pain will lead to a better understanding of CM.

  7. The power features of Masseter muscle activity in tension-type and migraine without aura headache during open-close clench cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Alizadeh Savareh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Different types of headaches and TMJ click influence the masseter muscle activity. The aim of this study was to assess the trend of energy level of the electromyography (EMG activity of the masseter muscle during open-close clench cycles in migraine without aura (MOA and tension-type headache (TTH with or without TMJ click. Methods Twenty-five women with MOA and twenty four women with TTH participated in the study. They matched with 25 healthy subjects, in terms of class of occlusion and prevalence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ with click. The EMG of both masseter muscles were recorded during open-close clench cycles at a rate of 80 cycles per minute for 15 seconds. The mouth opening was restricted to two centimeters by mandibular motion frame. Signal processing steps have been done on the EMG as: noise removing, smoothing, feature extraction, and statistical analyzing. The six statistical parameters of energy computed were mean, Variance, Skewness, Kurtosis, and first and second half energy over all signal energy. Results A three-way ANOVA indicated that during all the cycles, the mean of energy was more and there was a delay in showing the peak of energy in the masseter of the left side with clicked TMJ in MOA group compared to the two other groups, while this pattern occurred inversely in the side with no-clicked TMJ (P < 0.009. The variation of energy was significantly less in MOA group compared to the two other groups in the no-clicked TMJ (P < 0.003. However, the proportion of the first or second part of signal energy to all energy showed that TTH group had less energy in the first part and more energy in the second part in comparison to the two other groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion The study showed different changes in the energy distribution of masseter muscle activity during cycles in MOA and TTH. MOA, in contrast to TTH, had lateralization effect on EMG and interacted with TMJ click.

  8. [Management of chronic daily headache in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvellier, J-C

    2009-01-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) affects 2 to 4% of adolescent females and 0,8 to 2% of adolescent males. CDH is diagnosed when headaches occur more than 4 hours a day, for greater than or equal to 15 headache days per month, over a period of 3 consecutive months, without an underlying pathology. It is manifested by severe intermittent headaches, that are migraine-like, as well as a chronic baseline headache. Silberstein and Lipton divided patients into four diagnostic categories: transformed migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily-persistent headache, and hemicrania continua. The second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders did not comprise any CDH category as such, but provided criteria for all four types of CDH: chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily-persistent headache, and hemicrania continua. Evaluation of CDH needs to include a complete history and physical examination to identify any possibility of the headache representing secondary headaches. Children and adolescents with CDH frequently have sleep disturbance, pain at other sites, dizziness, medication-overuse headache and a psychiatric comorbidity (anxiety and mood disorders). CDH frequently results in school absence. CDH management plan is dictated by CDH subtype, the presence or absence of medication overuse, functional disability and presence of attacks of full-migraine superimposed. Reassuring, explaining, and educating the patient and family, starting prophylactic therapy and limiting aborting medications are the mainstay of treatment. It includes pharmacologic (acute and prophylactic therapy) and nonpharmacologic measures (biobehavioral management, biofeedback-assisted relaxation therapy, and psychologic or psychiatric intervention). Part of the teaching process must incorporate life-style changes, such as regulation of sleep and eating habits, regular exercise, avoidance of identified triggering factors and stress management. Emphasis must be

  9. Clinical Profile of Primary Headache disorders in Kano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most common primary headache subtypes were migraine and tension type headache. Migraine without aura (MWOA) was commoner than migraine with aura (MWA) (58% and 42% respectively). Associated symptoms, such as nausea (OR=6.5, 95%CI= 2.98-14.48), vomiting (OR=19, 95%CI= 7.38-51.35 and visual ...

  10. Pediatric Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, Andrew D

    2015-08-01

    Headache is one of the most common health concerns in children and adolescents, yet remains underrecognized as a disease. A variety of factors, including the unique aspects of childhood headaches, contribute to this underrecognition. Improving recognition of childhood and adolescent headaches and using a standardized approach for their evaluation is expected to lead to the appropriate diagnosis and subsequent additional evaluation and management to improve the overall outcome in children and adolescents with headaches. Building on limited studies in children and adolescents and translating adult studies to children can assist in designing a multidisciplinary treatment plan. This review focuses on some of the unique aspects of evaluating children and adolescents with headaches; the impact of these headaches on school, home, and family function; determination of disability and influence of comorbid conditions; and development of a treatment plan that incorporates acute, preventive, and biobehavioral management tools.

  11. Aerobic Exercise for Reducing Migraine Burden: Mechanisms, Markers, and Models of Change Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Megan B; Bond, Dale S; Lipton, Richard B; Nicklas, Barbara; Houle, Timothy T; Penzien, Donald B

    2016-02-01

    Engagement in regular exercise routinely is recommended as an intervention for managing and preventing migraine, and yet empirical support is far from definitive. We possess at best a weak understanding of how aerobic exercise and resulting change in aerobic capacity influence migraine, let alone the optimal parameters for exercise regimens as migraine therapy (eg, who will benefit, when to prescribe, optimal types, and doses/intensities of exercise, level of anticipated benefit). These fundamental knowledge gaps critically limit our capacity to deploy exercise as an intervention for migraine. Clear articulation of the markers and mechanisms through which aerobic exercise confers benefits for migraine would prove invaluable and could yield insights on migraine pathophysiology. Neurovascular and neuroinflammatory pathways, including an effect on obesity or adiposity, are obvious candidates for study given their role both in migraine as well as the changes known to accrue with regular exercise. In addition to these biological pathways, improvements in aerobic fitness and migraine alike also are mediated by changes in psychological and sociocognitive factors. Indeed a number of specific mechanisms and pathways likely are operational in the relationship between exercise and migraine improvement, and it remains to be established whether these pathways operate in parallel or synergistically. As heuristics that might conceptually benefit our research programs here forward, we: (1) provide an extensive listing of potential mechanisms and markers that could account for the effects of aerobic exercise on migraine and are worthy of empirical exploration and (2) present two exemplar conceptual models depicting pathways through which exercise may serve to reduce the burden of migraine. Should the promise of aerobic exercise as a feasible and effective migraine therapy be realized, this line of endeavor stands to benefit migraineurs (including the many who presently remain

  12. Comparison of Levetiracetam and sodium Valproate in migraine prophylaxis: A randomized placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Sadeghian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Migraine is a chronic and disabling disorder. Treatment of migraine often comprises of symptomatic (abortive and preventive (prophylactic treatment. The current drugs used in migraine prophylaxis include antidepressant drugs (Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, Tricyclic antidepressants, and anti-epileptic drugs (valproate, gabapentin, etc. Objective: The objective of our study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of levetiracetam in adult migraine prophylaxis, compared to valproate and placebo. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study. A total of 85 patients were randomized to receive levetiracetam 500 mg/d (n = 27, valproate 500 mg/d (n = 32 or placebo (n = 26. The patients were evaluated for treatment efficacy after 6 months. Efficacy was assessed as a more than 50% decrease in headache frequency. Results: In levetiracetam group, 17 (63.0% patients experienced a more than 50% decrease in headache frequency, while this efficacy number was 21 (65.6% for valproate group and 4 (15.4% for placebo group. The difference was not statistically significant between levetiracetam and valproate, while it was significant when comparing either levetiracetam or valproate to placebo. Conclusion: Compared to placebo, levetiracetam offers improvement in headache frequency in patients with migraine. The efficacy of levetiracetam in migraine prophylaxis is comparable to currently used drugs such as valproate.

  13. CGRP as the target of new migraine therapies - successful translation from bench to clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvinsson, Lars; Haanes, Kristian Agmund; Warfvinge, Karin; Krause, Diana N

    2018-04-24

    Treatment of migraine is on the cusp of a new era with the development of drugs that target the trigeminal sensory neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or its receptor. Several of these drugs are expected to receive approval for use in migraine headache in 2018 and 2019. CGRP-related therapies offer considerable improvements over existing drugs as they are the first to be designed specifically to act on the trigeminal pain system, they are more specific and they seem to have few or no adverse effects. CGRP receptor antagonists such as ubrogepant are effective for acute relief of migraine headache, whereas monoclonal antibodies against CGRP (eptinezumab, fremanezumab and galcanezumab) or the CGRP receptor (erenumab) effectively prevent migraine attacks. As these drugs come into clinical use, we provide an overview of knowledge that has led to successful development of these drugs. We describe the biology of CGRP signalling, summarize key clinical evidence for the role of CGRP in migraine headache, including the efficacy of CGRP-targeted treatment, and synthesize what is known about the role of CGRP in the trigeminovascular system. Finally, we consider how the latest findings provide new insight into the central role of the trigeminal ganglion in the pathophysiology of migraine.

  14. Direct and Indirect Healthcare Resource Utilization and Costs Among Migraine Patients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafede, Machaon; Sapra, Sandhya; Shah, Neel; Tepper, Stewart; Cappell, Katherine; Desai, Pooja

    2018-02-15

    clinical characteristics. A second analysis, conducted among the migraine patients only, compared the odds of having a short-term disability claim between (1) patients treated with acute or preventive migraine medications only during the baseline period and patients with no migraine treatment during baseline and (2) patients treated with both acute and preventive migraine medications during the baseline period and patients with no migraine treatment during baseline, after controlling for patient demographic and clinical characteristics. Migraine patients had total annual direct plus indirect costs that were $8924 (in 2014 United States dollars) higher than those of demographically similar individuals without evidence of migraine. Migraine patients' mean annual direct all-cause healthcare costs were $6575 higher than those of matched patients without migraine ($11,010 [standard deviation = $19,663] vs $4436 [standard deviation=$13,081]; P United States. Compared to matched nonmigraine patients, migraine patients were more likely to have work loss and longer periods of work loss, leading to significantly higher indirect costs. Migraine patients also had higher levels of healthcare utilization, despite the relatively stable prevalence of migraine and the available acute and preventive treatment options for migraine management. © 2018 American Headache Society.

  15. Chronic daily headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayyaz Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Daily Headache is a descriptive term that includes disorders with headaches on more days than not and affects 4% of the general population. The condition has a debilitating effect on individuals and society through direct cost to healthcare and indirectly to the economy in general. To successfully manage chronic daily headache syndromes it is important to exclude secondary causes with comprehensive history and relevant investigations; identify risk factors that predict its development and recognise its sub-types to appropriately manage the condition. Chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache and medication overuse headache accounts for the vast majority of chronic daily headaches. The scope of this article is to review the primary headache disorders. Secondary headaches are not discussed except medication overuse headache that often accompanies primary headache disorders. The article critically reviews the literature on the current understanding of daily headache disorders focusing in particular on recent developments in the treatment of frequent headaches.

  16. Comparison of propranolol and pregabalin for prophylaxis of childhood migraine: a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MohammadKazem Bakhshandeh Bali

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Migraine involves 5-10% of children and adolescents. Thirty percent of children with severe migraine attacks have school absence and reduced quality of life that need preventive therapy. The purpose of this randomised control trial study is to compare the effectiveness, safety and the tolerability of pregabalin toward Propranolol in migraine prophylaxis of children. From May 2011 to October 2012, 99 children 3-15 years referred to the neurology clinic of Mofid Children's Hospital with a diagnosis of migraine enrolled the study. Patients randomly divided into two groups (A&B. We treated children of group A with capsule of pregabalin as children of group B with tablet of propranolol for at least 8 weeks. In this study, 99 patients were examined that 91 children reached the last stage. The group A consistsed of 46 patients, 12(26.1% girls, 34 (73.9% boys and the group B consisted of 45 patients, 14(31.1% girls, 31 (68.9% boys. Basis of age, gender, headache onset, headache frequency, migraine type, triggering and relieving factors there was no significant difference among these groups (P>0.05. After 4 and 8 weeks of Pregabalin usage monthly headache frequency decreased to 2.2±4.5 and 1.76±6.2 respectively. Propranolol reduced monthly headache frequency up to 3.73±6.11 and 3.34±5.95 later 4 and 8 weeks respectively. There was a significant difference between these two groups according to headache frequency reduction (P=0.04. Pregabalin efficacy in reducing the frequency and duration of pediatric migraine headache is considerable in comparison with propranolol.

  17. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Abbott, Jeremy J

    2016-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and primary headaches can be perpetual and debilitating musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. The presence of both can affect up to one-sixth of the population at any one time. Initially, TMDs were thought to be predominantly musculoskeletal disorders, and migraine was thought to be solely a cerebrovascular disorder. The further understanding of their pathophysiology has helped to clarify their clinical presentation. This article focuses on the role of the trigeminal system in associating TMD and migraine. By discussing recent descriptions of prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of headache and TMD, we will further elucidate this relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. CPD: The patient with daily headaches. | Maizels | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The term "chronic daily headache" (CDH) describes a variety of headache types, of which chronic migraine is the most common. Daily headaches often are disabling and may be challenging to diagnose and treat. Medication overuse, or drug rebound headache, is the most treatable cause of refractory daily headache.

  19. Tension type headaches: a review | Magazi | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Headache disorders are a common condition affecting present-day societies worldwide. Headaches are classified by the International Headache Society as being either primary or secondary. Primary headaches are those without an underlying, physical cause, e.g. migraine, cluster and other benign-type headaches.

  20. Effects of Coriandrum sativum Syrup on Migraine: A Randomized, Triple-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavar Kasmaei, Hosein; Ghorbanifar, Zahra; Zayeri, Farid; Minaei, Bagher; Kamali, Seyed Hamid; Rezaeizadeh, Hossein; Amin, Gholamreza; Ghobadi, Ali; Mirzaei, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most common and debilitating neurological problems. Although numerous preventive drugs are used to treat migraine, their complications are unavoidable. Application of herbal medicine, especially well-known medicinal plants, to treatment of chronic diseases, like migraine, could be effective. Coriandrum sativum L. (C. sativum) fruit is one of the most commonly prescribed herbs in Persian medicine, which has been used to treat headache. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of C. sativum syrup on duration, severity and frequency of migraine. A total of 68 migraineurs, who had the eligibility criteria, according to international headache society diagnostic criteria, were randomly assigned to intervention group (n = 34) or control group (n = 34). In addition to 500 mg of sodium valproate per day, in intervention group, they received 15 mL of Coriander fruit syrup and 15 mL of placebo syrup, in control group, three times a day, during a month. The subjects were followed for clinical efficacy at weeks 1, 2, 3 and 4. The number of migraine attacks per week, as well as the duration and severity of attacks, were evaluated. Of 68 patients randomized, 66 were included in analysis. The generalized estimating equations analysis showed that the Coriander fruit syrup decreased duration, severity and frequency of migraine, in the intervention group (P sativum fruit is efficient in reduction of the duration and frequency of migraine attacks and in diminishing pain degree.

  1. Food and migraine in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Bouhairet

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Migraine headaches are a common problem worldwide, especially in adolescents. They are usually chronic, with frequent relapses. Therefore, any dietary risk factor for headaches has important implications on migraineurs. However, the association between migraine and diet needs to be examined further. Objective To investigate the association between diet and migraine in adolescents. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in August to September 2009 on 13 - 18 year old adolescents in a senior high school in Medan, North Sumatera. We included subjects diagnosed with migraine, according to the International Headache Society (IHS criteria. Ninety participants completed the questionnaire. Foods we observed for a link to migraine included milk, chocolate, ice cream, cheese, bread, instant noodles, meatballs, chili sauce, sweetener, yoghurt, pizza, and other foods and beverages. Results Of the 90 participants with migraines, there were more females (61.1% than males. There were statistically significant associations between migraine and triggering foods (P = 0.045, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.79 as well as between migraine and family history of migraine (P = 0.043, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.66. Stress (P = 0.164, menstruation (P = 0.369, and sound or light (P= 0.577 had no significant association with migraine. A wide variety of foods and beverages were implicated as migraine precipitants. The most common were chili sauce (75.8%, ice cream (71.0%, milk (67.7%, instant noodles (67.7%, chocolate (61.3%, peanuts (59.7%, cheese (54.8% and meatballs (54.8%. Conclusion Food and family history have a significant association with the occurrence of migraine in adolescents.

  2. Recurrent Painful Ophthalmoplegic Neuropathy with Residual Mydriasis in an Adult: Should it Be Classified as Ophthalmoplegic Migraine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yuya; Kondo, Yasufumi; Uchibori, Kana; Tsuyuzaki, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy (RPON) is a rare condition that manifests as headache and ophthalmoplegia. It typically occurs in children. Although migraine or neuropathy have been suggested as etiologies, the precise etiology remains unclear. In the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition-beta version (ICHD3β) (code 13.9), RPON was categorized into painful cranial neuropathies and other facial pains. We encountered a 48-year-old woman who had diplopia and right ptosis. The administration of prednisolone led to the immediate improvement of her oculomotor palsy, but residual mydriasis remained. Based on this case, the pathophysiology of RPON may involve temporary nerve inflammation with migraine. Repeated and severe migraine attacks may cause irreversible nerve damage. Thus, medication for migraine prophylaxis might be needed to prevent RPON. PMID:28924127

  3. PACAP38 induces migraine-like attacks in patients with migraine without aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik Winther; Birk, Steffen; Wienecke, Troels

    2009-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that infusion of vasoactive neurotransmitters may trigger headache or migraine-like attacks in man. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide-38 (PACAP38) is a strong vasodilator found in trigeminal sensory and parasympathetic perivascular nerve fibers. We...... therefore hypothesized that infusion of PACAP38 would cause headache in healthy subjects and migraine-like attacks in migraine patients. Twelve healthy subjects and 12 migraine patients were examined in two separate studies. All subjects were allocated to receive 10 pmol/kg/min PACAP38 and placebo......) by high resolution ultrasonography were recorded during hospital phase in migraineurs. PACAP38 infusion caused headache in all healthy subjects and 11 out of 12 migraine patients. Seven migraine patients experienced migraine-like attacks after PACAP38 and none after placebo (P = 0.016). Most of attacks (6...

  4. Prostaglandins and prostaglandin receptor antagonism in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonova, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Human models of headache may contribute to understanding of prostaglandins' role in migraine pathogenesis. The current thesis investigated the migraine triggering effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in migraine patients without aura, the efficacy of a novel EP4 receptor antagonist, BGC20....... The infusion of PGE2 caused the immediate migraine-like attacks and vasodilatation of the middle cerebral artery in migraine patients without aura. The highly specific and potent EP4 receptor antagonist, BGC20-1531, was not able to attenuate PGE2-induced headache and vasodilatation of both intra- and extra......-cerebral arteries. The intravenous infusion of PGF2α did not induce headache or statistically significant vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries in healthy volunteers. Novel data on PGE2-provoked immediate migraine-like attacks suggest that PGE2 may be one of the important final products in the pathogenesis...

  5. The KATP channel in migraine pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Karagholi, Mohammad Al-Mahdi; Hansen, Jakob Møller; Severinsen, Johanne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To review the distribution and function of KATP channels, describe the use of KATP channels openers in clinical trials and make the case that these channels may play a role in headache and migraine. DISCUSSION: KATP channels are widely present in the trigeminovascular system and play...... an important role in the regulation of tone in cerebral and meningeal arteries. Clinical trials using synthetic KATP channel openers report headache as a prevalent-side effect in non-migraine sufferers, indicating that KATP channel opening may cause headache, possibly due to vascular mechanisms. Whether KATP...... channel openers can provoke migraine in migraine sufferers is not known. CONCLUSION: We suggest that KATP channels may play an important role in migraine pathogenesis and could be a potential novel therapeutic anti-migraine target....

  6. Prednisolone reduces nitric oxide-induced migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, P; Daugaard, D; Lassen, L H

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) induces delayed migraine attacks in migraine patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pre-treatment with prednisolon could decrease this effect of GTN. METHODS: In this double-blind, randomized and placebo-controlled, crossover...... study 15 migraineurs with migraine without aura were pre-treated with 150 mg of prednisolone or placebo followed by a 20-min infusion of GTN (0.5 ug/kg/min). One hour after the GTN-infusion, the participants were sent home, but continued to rate headache and possible associated symptoms by filling out...... a headache diary every hour for 12 h. There were two equal primary efficacy end-points: frequency of delayed migraine and intensity of delayed headache. RESULTS: Nine patients experienced a GTN headache fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for migraine without aura on the placebo day compared with four...

  7. Ischaemia-induced (symptomatic) migraine attacks may be more frequent than migraine-induced ischaemic insults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Friberg, L; Olsen, T S

    1993-01-01

    with or without headache. A severe internal carotid stenosis/occlusion and reduced regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was demonstrated. Borderline ischaemia may thus prime the brain for developing migrainous aura with or without migraine (symptomatic migraine). Four patients had a combination of permanent...... deficits after the very first migraine attack, severe atherosclerosis, risk factors for stroke, high age and no family history of migraine. In these cases the evidence indicates that thromboembolic ischaemia had triggered an attack of migraine with aura (likely symptomatic migraine). Three young females...... presented long-lasting typical and severe idiopathic migraine with aura. Attack-associated rCBF reduction was likely to have caused permanent, mild, visual or somatosensory deficits (migrainous infarction). In five patients the relationship between migraine and stroke remained unresolved. It seems...

  8. The Relationship between Migraine and Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayçıl Özturan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a kind of headache accompanied by neurologic, gastrointestinal, and autonomous variations. The roles of factors that trigger migraine, especially nutrition triggers, have become much more questionable with the increase in the rate of migraine occurrence. Some patients with migraine have stated that their headache attacks start without any reason. However, inner triggers such as hormonal changes or external triggers such as air exchange, some smells or the association of both triggers can start the headache. Each patient may not have same sensitivity to these triggers. A single factor might become prominent in some patients, but more than one factor may need to be required in other patients. Although the connection between migraine and the factors such as stress, environmental factors, chronic diseases, and nutritional and sleep status has been known, their mechanisms are still not clear. Nutritional status and the effects of nutrition play an important role being pain triggers in everybody, especially children and young people who suffer from migraine headache. Considering the migraine triggers generally, it has been suggested in studies that there is at least one nutrition-related trigger and hunger is the most frequently reported trigger in terms of diet. Moreover it is known that chocolate, tea, coffee, cheese, and alcohol may trigger migraine because of some specific elements within them. In recently conducted studies, using some functional foods have raised on the treatment of migraine. For this reason, the relationship between migraine and triggering factors as food and nutrition are examined in this study.

  9. Intravenous valproate sodium (depacon) aborts migraine rapidly: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, N T; Kailasam, J; Meadors, L; Chernyschev, O; Gentry, P

    2000-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate the efficacy and safety of intravenous valproate in the treatment of acute migraine attacks. Numerous studies have shown oral valproate therapy to be effective in preventing migraine. To date, no published studies have explored the use of valproate in the acute treatment of migraine. After obtaining written informed consent, 61 patients presenting to a clinic with acute migraine were infused with 300 mg of intravenous valproate sodium. Sixty-six attacks were treated. The time at the beginning of infusion; the time at the end of infusion; the time to onset of relief of headache, nausea, and other associated symptoms; the time to meaningful relief; and the time to complete relief were recorded. Patient's pulse, blood pressure, and respiration were monitored. Adverse events were recorded. Mean time to onset of relief was 8 minutes, mean time to meaningful relief was 16 minutes, and mean time to complete relief was 25 minutes. A reduction in pain from severe or moderate to mild or no pain in 30 minutes was reported in 37 of 66 attacks; in 11 attacks, a reduction of more than 50% in headache severity in 30 minutes was reported. Thus, 48 (73%) of 66 attacks had significant improvement. After treatment with valproate, headache severity was significantly decreased (P<.0001); nausea, disability, and photophobia decreased; and patients became more alert. No serious adverse events were reported. Intravenous valproate appears to be safe and effective for the acute treatment of migraine. Double-blind, placebo-controlled studies to further investigate the use of this agent in acute treatment of migraine attacks are warranted.

  10. Update of Inpatient Treatment for Refractory Chronic Daily Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tzu-Hsien; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is a group of headache disorders, in which headaches occur daily or near-daily (>15 days per month) and last for more than 3 months. Important CDH subtypes include chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, hemicrania continua, and new daily persistent headache. Other headaches with shorter durations (CDH. Common comorbidities of CDH are medication overuse headache and various psychiatric disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Indications of inpatient treatment for CDH patients include poor responses to outpatient management, need for detoxification for overuse of specific medications (particularly opioids and barbiturates), and severe psychiatric comorbidities. Inpatient treatment usually involves stopping acute pain, preventing future attacks, and detoxifying medication overuse if present. Multidisciplinary integrated care that includes medical staff from different disciplines (e.g., psychiatry, clinical psychology, and physical therapy) has been recommended. The outcomes of inpatient treatment are satisfactory in terms of decreasing headache intensity or frequency, withdrawal from medication overuse, reducing disability, and improving life quality, although long-term relapse is not uncommon. In conclusion, inpatient treatment may be useful for select patients with refractory CDH and should be incorporated in a holistic headache care program.

  11. [Headache: Otorhinolaryngological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, O

    2016-01-01

    Headache is the main symptom in a wide variety of diseases of which ear, nose and throat (ENT) entities are only a small fraction but are not reflected in the number of patients. Comprehensive knowledge of the clinical signs of the most common primary headaches, e. g. migraine, is therefore essential for the ENT specialist because the few patients with secondary headache from ENT-related causes must be identified. Reasons for confusing primary headache with e. g. sinusitis are mostly symptoms mediated by the trigeminal nerve, such as nasal obstruction and rhinorrhea because branches of the trigeminal nerve also innervate the meninges. The ENT-specific origin of headaches is characterized by clinical findings of physical organ disease; therefore, from an ENT perspective imaging should be part of the diagnostic procedure as normal imaging findings are indicative of primary headache, which would not normally be treated by an ENT specialist.

  12. Menstrual migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Simić Svetlana; Slankamenac Petar; Cvijanović Milan; Banić-Horvat Sofija; Jovin Zita; Ilin Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. The prevalence of migraine in childhood and adolescence has not changed to a great extent, but it increases in adolescence, especially in female adolescents. Menstrual migraine – definition. There are two types of menstrual migraine: true menstrual migraine and menstrual related migraine. True menstrual migraine occurs predominantly around menstruation, whereas menstrual related migraine occurs during menstruation, but also at other times during the month. Causes. Exaggerated or...

  13. Pediatric headache: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Howard; Gladstein, Jack

    2012-02-01

    In this review we describe the epidemiology, classification, and approach to the diagnosis and treatment of episodic and chronic migraine in children. We review both traditional and alternative medications, and offer a glimpse into the future of pediatric headache. © 2012 American Headache Society.

  14. [Migraine in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annequin, D

    2005-07-01

    In childhood and adolescence, migraine is the main primary headache. This diagnosis is largely underestimated and misdiagnosed in the pediatric population. Because of the lack of specific biologic markers, specific investigation tools or brain imaging techniques, these clinical entities are too often considered to be a psychological illness. Migraine is a severe headache evolving by stereotyped attacks associated with marked digestive symptoms (nausea and vomiting); throbbing pain and sensitivity to sound or light are common symptoms; the attack is sometimes preceded by a visual or sensory aura. During attacks, pain intensity is severe; most of the children have to lie down. Abdominal pain is frequently associated, rest brings relief and sleep often ends the attack. The prevalence of migraine varies between 5 percent and 10 percent in childhood. In children, the duration of the headache is quite often shorter than in adults; it is more often frontal and bilateral (2/3 of cases) than one-sided. Migraine is a disabling illness: children with migraine miss more school days in a school year than their matched controls. Migraine episodes are frequently triggered by several factors: emotional stress (school pressure, vexation, excitement: upset), hypoglycemia, lack of sleep or excess (week end migraine), sensorial stimulation (loud noise, bright light, strong odor, heat or cold...), sympathetic stimulation (sports, physical exercise). Treatment must be given early at onset of attacks; oral ibuprofen (10 mg/kg) is recommended. If the oral route in not available because of nausea or vomiting, the rectal or nasal routes can be used. Triptan can be prescribed (body weight above 30 kg) when NSAID (prescribed at right dose and time) fail to abort the attack. Non-drug treatments (relaxation training, self hypnosis, biofeedback) have shown to have good efficacy as prophylactic measures. Daily prophylactic drug treatments are prescribed in second line after failure of non

  15. Migraine-like episodic pain behavior in a dog: can dogs suffer from migraines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessas, I N; Volk, H A; Kenny, P J

    2013-01-01

    Migraines and other primary headache disorders commonly affect people. There is evidence to suggest that migraines can occur in dogs. In this review, we present a dog with paroxysmal episodes that have a striking resemblance to human migraine, and we give an overview of migraine in people. The current classification, clinical signs, and diagnosis in people are discussed, as well as the anatomy of head pain, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and treatment options. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  16. Epidemiology and comorbidity of headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stovner, L.J.; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2008-01-01

    The burden associated with headache is a major public health problem, the true magnitude of which has not been fully acknowledged until now. Globally, the percentage of the adult population with an active headache disorder is 47% for headache in general, 10% for migraine, 38% for tension......-type headache, and 3% for chronic headache that lasts for more than 15 days per month. The large costs of headache to society, which are mostly indirect through loss of work time, have been reported. On the individual level, headaches cause disability, suffering, and loss of quality of life that is on a par...... with other chronic disorders. Most of the burden of headache is carried by a minority who have substantial and complicating comorbidities. Renewed recognition of the burden of headache and increased scientific interest have led to a better understanding of the risk factors and greater insight...

  17. OnabotulinumtoxinA for the treatment of headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Avi; Blumenfeld, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    Botulinum toxin, a potent muscle relaxant, has been found to have analgesic effects in patients with various pain syndromes. Both in vitro and in vivo studies showed the ability of the toxin to block the release of pain neurotransmitters, such as substance P, glutamate, and calcitonin gene-related peptide. The effect of the toxin, and specifically of one of its serotypes, botulinum neurotoxin type A, on headaches, has been extensively studied. This serotype is available in the United States in 3 forms, including as onabotulinumtoxinA. Data from clinical trials confirmed the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of onabotulinumtoxinA in the prophylactic treatment of chronic migraine, the most severe and debilitating type of migraine, in adults. The drug was approved by the Food and Drug Administration for this indication in 2010. The drug was not found to be effective for episodic migraine or tension-type headache. Noncontrolled studies suggest the efficacy of the toxin for headache associated with craniocervical dystonia. Proper injection technique and appropriate patient selection are essential for achieving positive results after treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA. The recommended injection paradigm combines a fixed site/fixed dose and follow the pain approaches, with the toxin injected to multiple sites of the head and neck, at a total dose of 155U-195U. The treatment is given at intervals of 12 weeks on average. The efficacy of onabotulinumtoxinA for some headaches, its long duration of action, and its favorable adverse effect profile make it a viable treatment option for the appropriate headache patients. The drug may be particularly suitable for patients who cannot tolerate, or are not compliant with, the daily intake of oral headache preventive drugs. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  18. Treatment of chronic migraine: a 3-month comparator study of naproxen sodium vs SumaRT/Nap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Roger; Nett, Robert; Dexter, Kent; Freitag, Fred; Beach, M E; Manley, Heather R

    2014-01-01

    To compare the use of a combination of 85 mg sumatriptan plus 500 mg naproxen sodium in a combination tablet with 500 mg naproxen sodium in an identically appearing tablet when used as a daily preventative and acute treatment for 1 month and episodic acute treatment for an additional 2 months in patients with chronic migraine. To date, there has been minimal study of acute medications for patients with chronic migraine. Consequently, there is a paucity of study methodology or evidence-based guidance on the use of acute treatment medications in patients with chronic migraine. This two-center, double-blind, randomized, parallel-group, comparator pilot trial of 28 subjects, 18 to 65 years of age, with ICHD-II defined chronic migraine, was designed to generate hypotheses about the efficacy of 2 established acute migraine medications used both as a daily preventive treatment (month 1) and episodic acute treatment (months 1, 2, and 3). Subjects were randomized 1:1 to treat daily with SumaRT/Nap (85 mg sumatriptan + 500 mg naproxen sodium) (group A) or naproxen sodium (500 mg) (group B) in a prophylactic strategy for 1 month followed by 2 months of the same medications used for episodic acute treatment. The combination of SumaRT/Nap used over a 3-month period did not appear to significantly reduce the number of migraine headache days. In the subset of subjects using naproxen sodium and completing the study per protocol, there was a marked reduction in migraine headache days (P Nap (group A) did not appear to reduce migraine headache frequency over a 3-month period. Subjects using naproxen sodium (group B) alone and completing the study per protocol had a marked statistically significant reduction in migraine headache days. Both groups completing the study per protocol had experienced clinically meaningful 2-hour headache relief. This suggests there may be a subset of patients with chronic migraine that are responsive to high doses of naproxen as an acute

  19. Behavioural management of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to recognise that migraine is a ′biological′ and not a ′psychological′ entity. However, psychological factors can be involved in migraine in 4 different ways:- 1 Migraines can be triggered by psychological stressors; 2 Severe migraine can itself be a cause of significant psychological stress which can, in turn, exacerbate the problem; 3 Even if psychological stress is not significantly involved in the genesis of the headache, pain management techniques can help people cope with their pain more effectively; 4 Longitudinal data demonstrate a complex bidirectional association between mood disorders and migraine. Treatment of a co-existing mood disorder, for example with cognitive behavioural techniques, may therefore reduce the impact of migraine. It would thus appear logical to view medical and psychological approaches as potentially synergistic rather than mutually exclusive. Functional imaging indicates that cognition, emotions, and pain experiences change the way the brain processes pain inputs. This may provide a physiological rationale for psychological interventions in pain management. As most studies of psychological management of migraine have been relatively small and the approach often varies between clinicians, the magnitude of benefit, optimum method of delivery, and the length of intervention are uncertain.

  20. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of headaches among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    type headache, 36 (2.4%) for migraine headache, and 133 (8.9%) had nonclassified headaches. The most frequent headache‑associated symptoms are photophia – 100 students (6.7%), phonophobia – 159 students (10.6%), while 62 students ...

  1. Efficacy of ibuprofen on prevention of high altitude headache: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xiong

    Full Text Available Ibuprofen is used to prevent high altitude headache (HAH but its efficacy remains controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled trials (RCTs of ibuprofen for the prevention of HAH.Studies reporting efficacy of ibuprofen for prevention of HAH were identified by searching electronic databases (until December 2016. The primary outcome was the difference in incidence of HAH between ibuprofen and placebo groups. Risk ratios (RR were aggregated using a Mantel-Haenszel random effect model. Heterogeneity of included trials was assessed using the I2 statistics.In three randomized-controlled clinical trials involving 407 subjects, HAH occurred in 101 of 239 subjects (42% who received ibuprofen and 96 of 168 (57% who received placebo (RR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.96, Z = 2.43, P = 0.02, I2 = 0%. The absolute risk reduction (ARR was 15%. Number needed to treat (NNT to prevent HAH was 7. Similarly, The incidence of severe HAH was significant in the two groups (RR = 0.40, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.93, Z = 2.14, P = 0.03, I2 = 0%. Severe HAH occurred in 3% treated with ibuprofen and 10% with placebo. The ARR was 8%. NNT to prevent severe HAH was 13. Headache severity using a visual analogue scale was not different between ibuprofen and placebo. Similarly, the difference between the two groups in the change in SpO2 from baseline to altitude was not different. One included RCT reported one participant with black stools and three participants with stomach pain in the ibuprofen group, while seven participants reported stomach pain in the placebo group.Based on a limited number of studies ibuprofen seems efficacious for the prevention of HAH and may therefore represent an alternative for preventing HAH with acetazolamide or dexamethasone.

  2. Effect of “Gol-e-ghand”, a mixture of rose petals and honey, on migraine attacks: a before-after pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Maddahian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Migraine is the seventh most common cause of disability among all ailments according to the World Health Organization. Despite the availability of some medicines for prevention of migraine, their complications are a cause for concern. Traditional system of medicine and use of medicinal herbs can be beneficial in management of migraine. “Gol-e-ghand” is one of the most commonly prescribed products for the management of headaches in the Iranian traditional medicine. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of “Ghol-e-ghand” on decreasing the frequency of migraine attacks. Methods: Nineteen migraine patients, who met the eligibility criteria, according to the International Headache Society diagnostic criteria were assigned to the intervention. The study was conducted as a before-after clinical trial and included two phases of drug administration. Propranolol was given during the first phase, while “Ghol-e-ghand” was administered along with propranolol in the second phase. The severity, duration, and frequency of headaches were measured before and after the intervention. Results: The analysis showed that “Ghol-e-ghand” decreased the frequency of migraine (20%, p=0.04, but it was not effective in decreasing the duration and severity of the attacks. Conclusion: “Ghol-e-ghand”can be suggested in migraine patients for reducing frequency of attacks.

  3. New Developments in the Prophylactic Drug Treatment of Pediatric Migraine: What Is New in 2017 and Where Does It Leave Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacperski, Joanne; Bazarsky, Allyson

    2017-08-01

    Headaches in children are quite common; however, the study and characterization of headache disorders in the pediatric age group has historically been limited. Because of the lack of controlled studies on prophylactic treatment of headache disorders in this age group, the diagnosis of migraine rests on criteria similar those in adults. Likewise, data from adult studies is often inferred and applied to children. Although it appears that many preventives are safe in children, currently none are FDA or EMA approved for this age group. Consequently, many children who present to their primary care physicians with migraines do not receive any preventive therapy despite experiencing significant disability. Controlled clinical trials investigating the use of preventive medications in children have suffered from high placebo response rates. The shorter duration of headaches and other characteristic features seen in children are such that designing randomized controlled trials in this age group is more problematic and limiting. Treatment practices vary widely, even among specialists, due to the absence of evidence-based guidelines from clinical trials. The Childhood and Adolescent Migraine Prevention Study (CHAMP) was developed to examine the effectiveness of two of the most widely prescribed preventive medications for pediatric migraine and help narrow this gap. To date, it has been the largest enrolling study of its kind within the pediatric migraine world; its results and implications will be discussed and considered here. The CHAMP trial was discontinued early on account of futility and exhibited that neither of two preventive medications for pediatric migraine was more effective than placebo in reducing the number of headache days over a period of 24 weeks. Subjects in the amitriptyline and topiramate groups had higher rates of adverse events than those who had received placebo.

  4. Percutaneous Closure of Patent Foramen Ovale in Patients With Migraine: The PREMIUM Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobis, Jonathan M; Charles, Andrew; Silberstein, Stephen D; Sorensen, Sherman; Maini, Brijeshwar; Horwitz, Phillip A; Gurley, John C

    2017-12-05

    Migraine is a prevalent and disabling disorder. Patent foramen ovale (PFO) has been associated with migraine, but its role in the disorder remains poorly understood. This study examined the efficacy of percutaneous PFO closure as a therapy for migraine with or without aura. The PREMIUM (Prospective, Randomized Investigation to Evaluate Incidence of Headache Reduction in Subjects With Migraine and PFO Using the AMPLATZER PFO Occluder to Medical Management) was a double-blind study investigating migraine characteristics over 1 year in subjects randomized to medical therapy with a sham procedure (right heart catheterization) versus medical therapy and PFO closure with the Amplatzer PFO Occluder device (St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, Minnesota). Subjects had 6 to 14 days of migraine per month, had failed at least 3 migraine preventive medications, and had significant right-to-left shunt defined by transcranial Doppler. Primary endpoints were responder rate defined as 50% reduction in migraine attacks and adverse events. Secondary endpoints included reduction in migraine days and efficacy in patients with versus without aura. Of 1,653 subjects consented, 230 were enrolled. There was no difference in responder rate in the PFO closure (45 of 117) versus control (33 of 103) groups. One serious adverse event (transient atrial fibrillation) occurred in 205 subjects who underwent PFO closure. Subjects in the PFO closure group had a significantly greater reduction in headache days (-3.4 vs. -2.0 days/month, p = 0.025). Complete migraine remission for 1 year occurred in 10 patients (8.5%) in the treatment group versus 1 (1%) in the control group (p = 0.01). PFO closure did not meet the primary endpoint of reduction in responder rate in patients with frequent migraine. (Prospective, Randomized Investigation to Evaluate Incidence of Headache Reduction in Subjects With Migraine and PFO Using the AMPLATZER PFO Occluder to Medical Management [PREMIUM]; NCT00355056). Copyright

  5. Clinic and Emergency Room Evaluation and Testing of Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Barbara L; Ward, Thomas N

    2015-10-01

    Evaluation of the headache patient in the outpatient clinic and emergency department (ED) has different focuses and goals. The focus of this paper is to review the evaluation of patients in both settings with mention of evaluation in the pediatric and pregnant patient population.  The patient's history should drive the practitioner's decision and evaluation choices. We review recommendations made by the American Board of Internal Medicine and American Headache Society through the Choosing Wisely Campaign, which has an emphasis on choosing the right imaging modality for the clinical situation and elimination/prevention of medication overuse headache, as well as the US Headache Consortium guidelines for migraine headache. We will also review focusing on ED evaluation of the pediatric patient and pregnant patient presenting with headache. At the end of the review we hope to have provided you with a framework to think about the headache patient and what is the appropriate test in the given clinical setting in order to ensure that the patient gets the right diagnosis and is set on a path to the appropriate management plan. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  6. Migraine Treatment: Current Acute Medications and Their Potential Mechanisms of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jonathan Jia Yuan; De Felice, Milena

    2017-12-12

    Migraine is a common and disabling primary headache disorder with a significant socioeconomic burden. The management of migraine is multifaceted and is generally dichotomized into acute and preventive strategies, with several treatment modalities. The aims of acute pharmacological treatment are to rapidly restore function with minimal recurrence, with the avoidance of side effects. The choice of pharmacological treatment is individualized, and is based on the consideration of the characteristics of the migraine attack, the patient's concomitant medical problems, and treatment preferences. Notwithstanding, a good understanding of the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of the various drug options is essential to guide therapy. The current approach and concepts relevant to the acute pharmacological treatment of migraine will be explored in this review.

  7. Improved description of the migraine aura by a diagnostic aura diary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russell, M B; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Olesen, J

    1994-01-01

    We present a diagnostic aura diary for prospective recordings of migraine with aura. Three questionnaires are supplemented with sheets for drawings and plottings of visual and sensory auras. Twenty patients recorded 54 attacks of migraine with aura and 2 attacks of migraine aura without headache...... head pain, headache and aura symptoms were contralateral in 90% and ipsilateral in 10%....

  8. Prevalence and impact of headache in undergraduate students in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence, characteristics and impact of headache among university students. METHOD: The criteria established by the International Headache Society were used to define the primary headache subtypes and the Migraine Disability Assessment Questionnaire (MIDAS, to assess the disability. The students were then grouped into six categories: [1] migraine; [2] probable migraine; [3] tension-type headache; [4] probable tension-type headache; [5] non-classifiable headache; [6] no headache. RESULTS: Of all undergraduate students interviewed, 74.5% had at least one headache episode in the last three months. Regarding disability, there was a significant difference between the headache types (p<0.0001. In the post-hoc analysis, migraine was the headache type with most reported disability. CONCLUSION: Headache is a highly prevalent condition among the students at the University of Caxias do Sul. This disease may have a major impact on the students' lives and in some cases, ultimately lead to educational failure.

  9. Sphenopalatine ganglion neuromodulation in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Sabrina; Schoenen, Jean; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article is to review the prospect of treating migraine with sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) neurostimulation. BACKGROUND: Fuelled by preliminary studies showing a beneficial effect in cluster headache patients, the potential of treating migraine with neurostimulation...... has gained increasing interest within recent years, as current treatment strategies often fail to provide adequate relief from this debilitating headache. Common migraine symptoms include lacrimation, nasal congestion, and conjunctival injection, all parasympathetic manifestations. In addition......, studies have suggested that parasympathetic activity may also contribute to the pain of migraineurs. The SPG is the largest extracranial parasympathetic ganglion of the head, innervating the meninges, lacrimal gland, nasal mucosa, and conjunctiva, all structures involved in migraine with cephalic...

  10. Dietary Treatment for Migraine Under Six Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical factors and response to treatment were compared in children < 6 years and older children treated for migraine by nonpharmacologic measures in a pediatric headache clinic at Schneider Children’s Medical Center, Petah Tiqwa, Israel.

  11. Anxiety and Depression Symptomatology in Migraine: Retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disorders among patients with migraine attending the outpatient clinic of Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Kaduna Methods: This is a retrospective study. Case files of all patients who presented with 'headache syndrome' from January, 2000 to ...

  12. Olfactory hallucination in childhood primary headaches: case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M A S; Donaldson, Sarah; Akor, Francis; Cahill, Denise; Akilani, Raed

    2015-03-01

    Although olfactory hallucination (OH) has been reported in patients with primary headaches, olfactory aura has not been recognised by the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-2). In this study, we examined the frequency and characteristics of OH among children and adolescents with primary headaches. 839 neurologically normal patients with primary headaches (537 migraine) were eligible for the assessment of olfactory hallucination. Headache diagnosis was based on the ICHD. Data were prospectively collected during clinic sessions and using headache diaries. Olfactory hallucination was reported exclusively during headache attacks by 21/839 (2.5%) patients, all of whom had migraine. The prevalence of olfactory hallucination was 3.9% among migraineurs (6.5% among those with migraine aura). Olfactory hallucination shortly followed the onset of headaches and lasted from 15 to 50 minutes. Of those with MA, 10 patients had visual aura; two had somatosensory aura; one had motor aura; and two had a combination of visual and somatosensory aura. Using the ICHD-2, both OH and migraine aura occurred in the same headache attacks. In 12/15 patients, OH occurred simultaneously with migraine aura, whereas in 3/12 patients, it preceded aura. Our findings show that olfactory hallucination occurs in migraine and it has similarities to migraine aura. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. Classification of perimenstrual headache: clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, E Anne

    2012-10-01

    Although more than 50% of women with migraine report an association between migraine and menstruation, menstruation has generally considered to be no more than one of a variety of different migraine triggers. In 2004, the second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders introduced specific diagnostic criteria for menstrual migraine. Results from research undertaken subsequently lend support to the clinical impression that menstrual migraine should be seen as a distinct clinical entity. This paper reviews the recent research and provides specific recommendations for consideration in future editions of the classification.

  14. Influence of caffeine and caffeine withdrawal on headache and cerebral blood flow velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couturier, EGM; Laman, DM; vanDuijn, MAJ; vanDuijn, H

    Caffeine consumption may cause headache, particularly migraine. Its withdrawal also produces headaches and may be related to weekend migraine attacks. Transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) has shown changes in cerebral blood flow velocities (BFV) during and between attacks of migraine. In order to

  15. Headache classification and aspects of reproductive life in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhado, Eliana M; Bigal, Marcelo E; Galego, Andressa R; Galdezzani, João P; Queiroz, Luiz P

    2014-01-01

    To classify headaches as a function of the menstrual cycle and to contrast aspects relating to the reproductive cycle as a function of headache type. Participants responded to a structured questionnaire consisting of 44 questions. Detailed headache information, enabling the classification of headaches, and questions relating to the menstrual cycle were obtained. The sample consisted of 422 students. Menstrual headaches were experienced by 31.8%. Migraine without aura (MO) occurred in 13.3%, migraine with aura (MA) in 7.8%, and probable migraine in 6.4%. Women with MA were significantly more likely to have reached menarche at earlier ages than women without headaches (p=0.03). Use of a hormonal contraceptive was related to the function of having MA headaches or not. Most female college students are affected by menstrual headaches. Although the vast majority experience MO, other headaches also occur. Women with MA are equally likely to receive hormonal contraceptives as others.

  16. Extended cycle combined oral contraceptives and prophylactic frovatriptan during the hormone-free interval in women with menstrual-related migraines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee, Andrea L; Sulak, Patricia J; Hill, Alexandria J; Hansen, Darci J; Kuehl, Thomas J; Clark, Jeffrey W

    2014-04-01

    Migraine headaches are a significant problem for American women with many of them suffering from headaches around the time of their menstrual cycle. Women taking oral contraceptives in the standard 21/7 cycle regimen often suffer from headaches around the time of the hormone free intervals (HFIs) as well. Extended oral contraceptive regimens have been shown to decrease the frequency, but not eliminate these headaches. This study is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study of participants with menstrual-related migraines (MRMs) who were initiated on extended combined oral contraceptives and given frovatriptan prophylactically during HFIs. Participants having spontaneous menstrual cycles or taking daily combined oral contraceptives in a 21/7 regimen with MRMs were placed on a contraceptive containing levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol. Analyses compared headache scores during pre-study baseline cycles to those in a 168-day extended regimen with placebo versus frovatriptan treatments during HFIs. Daily headache scores decreased (p=0.034) from 1.29 ± 0.10 during pre-study cycles to 1.10 ± 0.14 during extended combined oral contraceptive use. Frovatriptan blocked the increase in headache score over the placebo during HFIs. However, following the withdrawal of frovatriptan, headache scores increased (p>0.01) despite resuming combined oral contraceptive use. Extended combined oral contraceptive regimen reduces MRM severity. Frovatriptan prevents headaches during HFIs, but is associated with new headache symptoms when withdrawn.

  17. Primary headache diagnosis among chronic daily headache patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krymchantowski, Abouch Valenty

    2003-06-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) refers to a group of non-paroxysmal daily or near-daily headaches with peculiar characteristics that are highly prevalent in populations of neurological clinics and not uncommon among non-patient populations. Most of the patients with CDH had, as primary diagnosis, episodic migraine, which, with the time, presented a progressive frequency, pattern modification and loss of specific migraine characteristics. Other CDH patients had chronic tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache and hemicrania continua, which evolved thru the time to the daily or near-daily presentation. The objective of this study was to determine the primary headache diagnosis among a population of chronic daily headache patients attending a tertiary center for headache treatment. During a 5-year period 651 consecutive chronic daily headache patients attending a private subspecialty center were studied prospectively. The criteria adopted were those proposed by Silberstein et al (1994, revised 1996). Five hundred seventy four patients (88.1%) had episodic migraine as primary headache before turning into daily presentation, 52 (8%) had chronic tension-type headache, 14 (2.2%) had hemicrania continua and 11 patients (1.7%) had new daily persistent headache. CDH is quite frequent in patients from clinic-based studies suggesting a high degree of disability. Emphasis on education of patients suffering from frequent primary headaches with regard to measures that are able to decrease suffering and disability as well as better medical education directed to more efficient ways to handle these patients are necessary to improve outcome of such a prevalent condition.

  18. Exercise Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... headaches may require emergency medical attention. Symptoms Primary exercise headaches These headaches: Are usually described as throbbing ... sides of the head in most cases Secondary exercise headaches These headaches may cause: The same symptoms ...

  19. Remission of migraine after clipping of saccular intracranial aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, E R; Busygina, A V; Kolotvinov, V S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Unruptured saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) is associated with an increased prevalence of migraine, but it is unclear whether this is altered by clipping of the aneurysm. The aim of our study was to determine whether remission rate of migraine and other recurrent headaches...... was greater in patients with SIA after clipping than in controls. METHODS: We prospectively studied 87 SIA patients with migraine or other recurrent headaches. They were interviewed about headaches in the preceding year before and 1 year after clipping using a validated semi-structured neurologist conducted...... interview. The remission rates of migraine and tension-type headache (TTH) in these patients were compared to 92 patients from a headache center. Diagnoses were made according to the ICHD-2. RESULTS: During 1 year preceding rupture 51 patients with SIA had migraine. During the year after clipping...

  20. Epidemiology, etiology and study of clinical findings of headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffarpoor M

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available In a cross-sectional epidemiological study of headache disorders in neurology clinic of Fatemieh hospital of Semnan (August 22-November 20.1996, information on types of headaches, quality, severity, location, duration, frequency, precipitating factors, age of onset, influence of menstruation and pregnancy, positive familial history, use of oral contraceptive pills and other epidemiological factors including socioeconomic and age/sex composition was collected. The presence of any types of headaches was ascertained by a clinical interview and examination using the operational diagnostic criteria of the International Headaches Society. The prevalence of migraine and tension type headache was also analysed in relation to variables of life style (physical activity and sleep pattern and associated signs and symptoms (nausea, vomiting, photophobia and phonophobia. In this study migraine and tension headache were also compared in variable aspects with each other. 1 Headache was more prevalent in women than men (F/M=3/1. 2 The most common types of headache included: tension type headache (41.4%, migraine (31.2% and unclassified headaches (17.2%. 3 Migraine and T.T.H were more prevalent in early adult life and middle ages. 4 In both migraine and tension type headache the time profiles (duration, frequency, age of onset, quality and location were like that noted in textbook and previous studies. 5 In both migraine and tension type headache the most conspicuous precipitating factor was stress and mental tension and frequent headaches were accompanied with psychiatric problems (e.g depression and or anxiety. 6 Nausea, vomiting, phonophobia and photophobia were the most common associated symptoms in both of them. 7 Positive familial history and aggravation of headache in perimenstual period were more commonly seen in patients with migraine than tension type headache. In conclusion using the operational diagnostic criteria of International Headache Society in

  1. Positron emission tomography and migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabriat, H.

    1992-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a brain imaging technique that allows in vivo studies of numerous physiological parameters. There have been few PET studies in migraine patients. Cerebral blood flow changes with no variations in brain oxygen consumption have been reported in patients with prolonged neurologic manifestations during migraine attacks. Parenteral administration of reserpine during migraine headache has been followed by a fall in the overall cerebral uptake of glucose. The small sample sizes and a number of methodologic problems complicate the interpretation of these results. Recent technical advances and the development of new PET tracers can be expected to provide further insight into the pathophysiology of migraine. Today cerebral cortex 5 HT 2 serotonin receptors can be studied in migraine patients with PET

  2. Tension-Type Headache - The Normal and Most Prevalent Headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2018-01-01

    PREMISE: Tension-type headache (TTH) is the most prevalent form of primary headache in the general population but paradoxically the least studied headache. PROBLEM: In this article, the epidemiology and diagnostic challenges of TTH are presented and discussed. The typical features and differential...... diagnosis of TTH are highlighted and the situations more likely to raise doubts are discussed. POTENTIAL SOLUTION: A structured approach to the patient and a better comprehension of the very frequent coexistence of migraine and medication overuse headache in the clinical population are emphasized. According...

  3. [The migraine of Immanual Kant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podoll, K; Hoff, P; Sass, H

    2000-07-01

    The German philosopher Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) suffered, since his forties, from a migraine with aura which showed a significant exacerbation in his seventies, coinciding with the onset of symptoms of a senile dementia of Alzheimer's type. Recorded symptoms of Kant's migraine include recurrent scintillating scotomas, one episode of diplopia, two episodes of complete amaurosis and frequent headaches described as oppressions of the head. The said symptoms of Kant's migraine can be traced not only in his letters and in accounts of his contemporary biographers, but also in the philosopher's published work.

  4. Computed tomography scan of the head in patients with migraine or tension-type headache Tomografia computadorizada do crânio em pacientes com migrânea ou cefaléia tensional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Moraes Valença

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study was performed in order to evaluate the frequency of abnormalities found by computed tomography (CT scan of the head in 78 patients with migraine or tension-type headache. In the present study CT scan was normal in 61.5% of the patients with migraine or tension-type headache. A number of abnormalities were encountered in more than one third of the patients studied, including inflammatory sinus disease (19.2%, cysticercosis (3.9%, unruptuted cerebral aneurysm (2.6%, basilar impression (2.6%, intracranial lipoma (2.6%, arachnoid cyst (2.6%, empty sella (2.6%, intracranial neoplasm (2.6%, and others (2.6%. None of these lesions were symptomatic or responsible by the headache picture, therefore, considered incidental findings. In conclusion, the fortuitous encounter of some abnormalities on CT scan of the head is often higher than what we could predict in patients suffering migraine or tension-type headache. We briefly discuss clinical, epidemiologic, and practical management of some of the abnormalities detected by CT scan as well as the indication to request a neuroimaging investigation.Um estudo retrospectivo foi realizado visando avaliar a frequência de anormalidades encontradas durante a realização de estudo por tomografia computadorizada (TC em 78 pacientes com migrânea ou cefaléia do tipo tensional. A TC foi normal em 61,5% dos pacientes examinados. Em um terço dos pacientes estudados foram detectadas anormalidades, como doença inflamatória dos seios paranasais (19,2%, cisticercose (3,9%, aneurisma cerebral não-roto (2,6%, impressão basilar (2,6%, lipoma intracraniano (2,6%, cisto aracnoideo (2,6%, sela vazia (2,6%, neoplasia intracraniana (2,6% e outras afecções (2,6%. Nenhuma destas lesões era sintomática (achado incidental. Concluindo, o encontro fortuito de algumas anormalidades na TC é frequentemente mais elevado do que se prediz em pacientes com cefaléia primária. Nós discutimos brevemente alguns

  5. Safety and efficacy of ALD403, an antibody to calcitonin gene-related peptide, for the prevention of frequent episodic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodick, David W; Goadsby, Peter J; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    and one had one serious adverse event, and in the placebo group, one patient had one serious adverse event. There were no differences in vital signs or laboratory safety data between the two treatment groups. The mean change in migraine days between baseline and weeks 5-8 was -5·6 (SD 3·0) for the ALD403......BACKGROUND: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is crucial in the pathophysiology of migraine. We assessed the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of ALD403, a genetically engineered humanised anti-CGRP antibody, for migraine prevention. METHODS: In this randomised, double-blind, placebo...... to treatment allocation during the study. The primary objective was to assess safety at 12 weeks after infusion. The primary efficacy endpoint was the change from baseline to weeks 5-8 in the frequency of migraine days, as recorded in patient electronic diaries. Patients were followed up until 24 weeks...

  6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide induced migraine attacks in patients with and without familial aggregation of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Christensen, Anne Francke; Liu, Marie Louise

    2017-01-01

    Background Calcitonin gene-related peptide provokes migraine attacks in 65% of patients with migraine without aura. Whether aggregation of migraine in first-degree relatives (family load) or a high number of risk-conferring single nucleotide polymorphisms contributes to migraine susceptibility...... to calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion in migraine patients is unknown. We hypothesized that genetic enrichment plays a role in triggering of migraine and, therefore, migraine without aura patients with high family load would report more migraine attacks after calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion than...... patients with low family load. Methods We allocated 40 previously genotyped migraine without aura patients to receive intravenous infusion of 1.5 μg/min calcitonin gene-related peptide and recorded migraine attacks including headache characteristics and associated symptoms. Information of familial...

  7. CGRP and migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Cauchi, M.; Robertson, N. P.

    2016-01-01

    Migraine has been estimated to be the seventh highest cause of disability worldwide, and the third most common disease worldwide after dental caries and tension type headache. However, the use of currently available acute and prophylactic medications to control this condition, such as 5-HT1 agonists (triptans) and beta-blockers, is limited by side effects and efficacy so that alternative and more specific treatments are required. More recently, an improved understanding of the pathophysiology...

  8. Psychiatric comorbidity and suicide risk in patients with chronic migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Pompili

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Pompili1,2, Gianluca Serafini1, Daniela Di Cosimo1, Giovanni Dominici1, Marco Innamorati1, David Lester3, Alberto Forte1, Nicoletta Girardi1, Sergio De Filippis4, Roberto Tatarelli1, Paolo Martelletti41Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Functions, Suicide Prevention Center, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 2McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston,  Massachusetts, USA; 3The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, USA; 4Department of Medical Sciences, Second School of Medicine, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, ItalyAbstract: The aim of this study was to explore the impact of mental illness among patients with migraine. We performed MedLine and PsycINFO searches from 1980 to 2008. Research has systematically documented a strong bidirectional association between migraine and psychiatric disorders. The relationship between migraine and psychopathology has often been clinically discussed rather than systematically studied. Future research should include sound methodologically-based studies focusing on the interplay of factors behind the relationship between migraine, suicide risk, and mental illness.Keywords: headache, migraine, suicide*, psychiatric disorders

  9. Efficacy of enalapril in migraine prophylaxis: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Sonbolestan

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Enalapril may be effective in migraine prophylaxis according to its effect in decreasing the frequency, severity, and duration of headaches. The results support the previous suggestions on usage of ACE inhibitors in migraine prophylaxis.

  10. Vascular Effects of Antimigraine Drugs: pharmacology of human in vitro models in migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W.M. van den Broek

    2002-01-01

    textabstractMigraine is defined as an idiopathic, paroxysmal neurological disorder with moderate to severe attacks of unilateral, throbbing headache exacerbated by physical activity. The migraine attack is accompanied by associated features such as nausea, vomiting, photophobia and phonophobia

  11. Comparison of the effects of dietary factors in the management and prophylaxis of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyazit Zencirci

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Beyazit Zencirci11Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Medical Faculty of Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaras, TurkeyAbstract: Migraine is defined as a disorder characterized by intermittent headache episodes, accompanied with nausea, photophobia and/or phonophobia. Pharmacological therapy is in accordance with the severity of pain and may include acute, prophylactic and most commonly both approaches. The aim of the acute therapy is stopping or alleviating the attack or progression of the pain and in case of a migraine attack that has started, lessening the pain it. Preventive therapy aims to reduce attack frequency and severity. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of dietary factors in the management and prophylaxis of migraine in cases diagnosed as having migraine disorder according to the 2003-IHS criteria. Fifty consecutive Turkish patients (13 men, 37 women with diagnosis of migraine were randomly divided into two groups for treatment protocols with the written approval of the ethics committee. The cases in the first group (K were treated with metoprolol, vitamin B2 (riboflavin, and naproxen sodium just at the aura or at the beginning of the attacks. The cases in the second group (D were also supplied with a comprehensive dietary list arranged by our algology clinics in addition to the same medication protocol. There were no demographic differences between the cases (P > 0.05. VAS scores were lower in group D than group K (P < 0.01, and also the migraine attack frequencies and monthly amounts of analgesic consumed amounts were also statistically significantly less. It was concluded that beta-blocker and riboflavin therapy supplemented with convenient diet with appropriate alternatives in patients with migraine disorder was associated with statistically significant decreases in headache frequency, intensity, duration and medication intake.Keywords: migraine, food intake, trigger

  12. Somatic symptoms in headache patients: the influence of headache diagnosis, frequency, and comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizels, Morris; Burchette, Raoul

    2004-01-01

    Mood disorders of anxiety and depression are well known to be comorbid with primary headache disorders. Less is known of the comorbidity of other somatic symptoms with headache. Headache Clinic patients were screened with the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD), a multidimensional psychiatric screening tool. The prevalence of somatic symptoms was compared by headache diagnosis, frequency of severe headache, and psychiatric diagnosis. Follow-up data were obtained 6 months after consultation. Clinical diagnoses and PRIME-MD data were available for 289 patients. Associated somatic symptoms were more frequent in patients with chronic migraine (mean 5.5, PCDH) (6.3, P=.008) compared to episodic migraine (4.0); in patients with severe headache >2 days per week compared to 2 days per week had significantly higher somatic counts (P=.01). Six-month follow-up data were available for 140 patients. Associated symptoms decreased both for patients with and without decrease in severe headache frequency (mean reduction of 1.0, P=.01 and 0.8, P=.003, respectively). Associated somatic symptoms are more common in patients with chronic migraine and CDH, with more frequent severe headaches, and with associated anxiety or depression. Patients with episodic migraine have similar somatic prevalence as a previously studied primary care population. The spectrum of headache disorders may be characterized as showing increasing somatic prevalence as headaches, particularly severe headaches, become more frequent.

  13. Hijab (headscarf) headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Huma N; Solomon, Glen D

    2015-03-01

    Hijab (headscarf) headache is well known among wearers and is a common topic of discussion. It has never previously been reported in the medical literature. Five women described bilateral headache either prompted by or worsened by donning the hijab, or headscarf. The headache always resolved soon after removal of the headscarf. Hijab headache may also be alleviated by minimal modifications in style while allowing women to maintain their moral conviction. It likely represents an extracranial etiology of headache, and recognition may prevent unnecessary evaluation and suffering in hijab wearers. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  14. Needle gauge and tip designs for preventing post-dural puncture headache (PDPH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalo-Rodriguez, Ingrid; Muñoz, Luis; Godoy-Casasbuenas, Natalia; Ciapponi, Agustín; Arevalo, Jimmy J; Boogaard, Sabine; Roqué I Figuls, Marta

    2017-04-07

    Post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) is one of the most common complications of diagnostic and therapeutic lumbar punctures. PDPH is defined as any headache occurring after a lumbar puncture that worsens within 15 minutes of sitting or standing and is relieved within 15 minutes of the patient lying down. Researchers have suggested many types of interventions to help prevent PDPH. It has been suggested that aspects such as needle tip and gauge can be modified to decrease the incidence of PDPH. To assess the effects of needle tip design (traumatic versus atraumatic) and diameter (gauge) on the prevention of PDPH in participants who have undergone dural puncture for diagnostic or therapeutic causes. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and LILACS, as well as trial registries via the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) search portal in September 2016. We adopted the MEDLINE strategy for searching the other databases. The search terms we used were a combination of thesaurus-based and free-text terms for both interventions (lumbar puncture in neurological, anaesthesia or myelography settings) and headache. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in any clinical/research setting where dural puncture had been used in participants of all ages and both genders, which compared different tip designs or diameters for prevention of PDPH DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included 70 studies in the review; 66 studies with 17,067 participants were included in the quantitative analysis. An additional 18 studies are awaiting classification and 12 are ongoing. Fifteen of the 18 studies awaiting classification mainly correspond to congress summaries published before 2010, in which the available information does not allow the complete evaluation of all their risks of bias and characteristics. Our main outcome was prevention of PDPH, but we also

  15. Classification of headache on the basis of the IHS diagnostic criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn-Kofman, AT; van de Wiel, H; Sorbi, MJ

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To test the effects of a mass-media behavioral treatment program on migraine and tension-type headache, patients with pure migraine, and with pure tension-type headache were to be selected. Patient Selection: A random sample of 233 headache sufferers of 15,000 subscribers to the program.

  16. headache associated disability in medical students at the kenya'ita ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-10-01

    Oct 1, 2002 ... Photo phobia nausea and vomiting are part and parcel of migraine headache and these may have an effect on working ability than the severity of headache. The severity of these symptoms were not pursued in our study. Headache and more so migraine are often associated with other co-morbidities. Major.

  17. Safety and efficacy of erenumab for preventive treatment of chronic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tepper, Stewart; Ashina, Messoud; Reuter, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    assignment. The primary endpoint was the change in monthly migraine days from baseline to the last 4 weeks of double-blind treatment (weeks 9-12). Safety endpoints were adverse events, clinical laboratory values, vital signs, and anti-erenumab antibodies. The efficacy analysis set included patients who......BACKGROUND: The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) pathway is important in migraine pathophysiology. We assessed the efficacy and safety of erenumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody against the CGRP receptor, in patients with chronic migraine. METHODS: This was a phase 2, randomised, double...... received at least one dose of investigational product and completed at least one post-baseline monthly measurement. The safety analysis set included patients who received at least one dose of investigational product. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02066415. FINDINGS: From April...

  18. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide and migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zagami, Alessandro S; Edvinsson, Lars; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) is found in human trigeminocervical complex and can trigger migraine. PACAP levels were measured using a sensitive radioimmunoassay. Stimulation of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in cat elevated PACAP levels in cranial blood. Patients...... with moderate or severe migraine headache had elevated PACAP in the external jugular vein during headache (n = 15), that was reduced 1 h after treatment with sumatriptan 6 mg (n = 11), and further reduced interictally (n = 9). The data suggest PACAP, or its receptors, are a promising target for migraine...

  19. Psychological functioning in headache sufferers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrasik, F; Blanchard, E B; Arena, J G; Teders, S J; Teevan, R C; Rodichok, L D

    1982-05-01

    The present study examined the psychological test responses of 99 headache sufferers and 30 matched nonheadache controls. Headache subjects were of four types: migraine (n = 26), muscle contraction (n = 39), combined migraine-muscle contract ion (n = 22), and cluster (n = 12). Measures consisted of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, a modified hostility scale derived from the MMPI, Back Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Autonomic Perception Questionnaire, Rathus Assertiveness Schedule, Social Readjustment Rating Scale, Psychosomatic Symptom Checklist, Schalling-Sifneos Scale, Need for Achievement, and Hostile Press. Significant differences were found on five clinical scales of the MMPI--1, 2, 3, 6, and 7. Of the non-MMPI scales, only the Psychosomatic Symptom Checklist and Trait Anxiety Inventory were significant. Control subjects revealed no significant findings on any tests. The headache groups fell along a continuum, beginning with cluster subjects, who showed only minimal distress, continuing through migraine and combined migraine-muscle contraction, and ending with muscle contraction subjects, who revealed the greatest degree of psychological disturbance. However, none of the headache groups could be characterized by marked elevations on any of the psychological tests, which contrasts with past research findings. It is suggested that the present results may be more representative of the "typical" headache sufferer.

  20. Trigger factors and mechanisms in migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonman, Geurt Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Migraine is a severe headache syndrome, affecting approximately 33% of females and 13% of males. Patients suffer from recurring headache episodes in combination with nausea, vomiting, phono and photophobia. It is a paroxysmal disorder for which several several trigger factors have been identified by

  1. The association between candidate migraine susceptibility loci and severe migraine phenotype in a clinical sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Christensen, Anne Francke; Steinberg, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    -structured migraine interviews, blood sampling and genotyping were performed on 1806 unrelated migraineurs recruited from the Danish Headache Center. Genotyping was also performed on a control group of 6415 people with no history of migraine. Association analyses were carried out using logistic regression and odds...

  2. Alcoholic drinks as triggers in primary headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panconesi, Alessandro; Franchini, Michela; Bartolozzi, Maria Letizia; Mugnai, Stefania; Guidi, Leonello

    2013-08-01

    This project aims to investigate the role of alcoholic drinks (ADs) as triggers for primary headaches. Patients followed in the Headache Centre and presenting with migraine without aura, migraine with aura (MA), chronic migraine (CM), and tension-type headache (TH) were asked if their headache was precipitated by AD and also about their alcohol habits. Individual characteristics and drink habits were evaluated within two binary logistic models. About one half (49.7%) of patients were abstainers, 17.6% were habitual consumers, and 32.5% were occasional consumers. Out of 448 patients, only 22 (4.9%), all with migraine, reported AD as a trigger factor. None of 44 patients with MA and none of 47 patients with TH reported AD as a trigger factor. Among those patients with migraine who consume AD, only 8% reported that AD can precipitate their headache. Multivariate analyses showed that AD use, both occasional and habitual, is unrelated to TH. Moreover, analysis performed among migraine patients, points out that occasional and habitual drinkers have a lower risk of presenting with CM than abstainers, although statistical significance occurred only among occasional drinkers. Only 3% of migraine patients who abstain from AD reported that they do not consume alcohol because it triggers their headache. Our study shows that AD acts as headache triggers in a small percentage of migraine patients. Differing from some prior studies, our data suggest that AD do not trigger MA and TH attacks. Moreover, the percentage of abstainers in our sample is higher compared with that reported in general population surveys. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Sumatriptan-naproxen fixed combination for acute treatment of migraine: a critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaouki K Khoury

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chaouki K Khoury, James R CouchDepartment of Neurology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USAAbstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, including naproxen and naproxen sodium, are effective yet nonspecific analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs, which work for a variety of pain and inflammatory syndromes, including migraine. In migraine, their analgesic effect helps relieve the headache, while their anti-inflammatory effect decreases the neurogenic inflammation in the trigeminal ganglion. This is the hypothesized mechanism by which they prevent the development of central sensitization. Triptans, including sumatriptan, work early in the migraine process at the trigeminovascular unit as agonists of the serotonin receptors (5-HT receptors 1B and 1D. They block vasoconstriction and block transmission of signals to the trigeminal nucleus and thus prevent peripheral sensitization. Therefore, combining these two drugs is an attractive modality for the abortive treatment of migraine. Sumatriptan–naproxen fixed combination tablet (Treximet® [sumatriptan–naproxen] proves to be an effective and well tolerated drug that combines these two mechanisms; yet is far from being the ultimate in migraine abortive therapy, and further research remains essential.Keywords: Treximet®, sumatriptan–naproxen, migraine, treatment

  4. Are headache and temporomandibular disorders related? A blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballegaard, V; Thede-Schmidt-Hansen, P; Svensson, P; Jensen, R

    2008-08-01

    To investigate overlaps between headache and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a clinical headache population and to describe the prevalence of TMD in headache patients, 99 patients referred to a specialized headache centre were diagnosed according to Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) and classified in headache groups according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition for headache diagnoses in a blinded design. The prevalence of TMD in the headache population was 56.1%. Psychosocial dysfunction caused by TMD pain was observed in 40.4%. No significant differences in TMD prevalence were revealed between headache groups, although TMD prevalence tended to be higher in patients with combined migraine and tension-type headache. Moderate to severe depression was experienced by 54.5% of patients. Patients with coexistent TMD had a significantly higher prevalence of depression-most markedly in patients with combined migraine and tension-type headache. Our studies indicate that a high proportion of headache patients have significant disability because of ongoing chronic TMD pain. The trend to a higher prevalence of TMD in patients with combined migraine and tension-type headache suggests that this could be a risk factor for TMD development. A need for screening procedures and treatment strategies concerning depression in headache patients with coexistent TMD is underlined by the overrepresentation of depression in this group. Our findings emphasize the importance of examination of the masticatory system in headache sufferers and underline the necessity of a multidimensional approach in chronic headache patients.

  5. Rare Complications of Migraine With Aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plato, Brian M

    2016-09-01

    To provide a review of the diagnostic criteria, pathophysiology, and potential treatments of the complications of migraine as identified by the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3β, with the exception of status migrainosus. Migraine with aura may be associated with the onset of rare, but significantly disabling neurological symptoms. This review provides an overview of the associated complications that may arise from migraine with aura. The complications of migraine that arise from migraine aura are infrequently encountered in clinical practice; however, they can be severely disabling for patients. As these conditions are encountered, thorough diagnostic evaluation is necessary. In some cases, it may be difficult to find a consistently reliable therapeutic option for these patients; however, as more cases enter the literature, a greater understanding of these conditions and how to treat them may arise. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  6. Obesity and headache: part I--a systematic review of the epidemiology of obesity and headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Nu Cindy; Scher, Ann I; Moghekar, Abhay; Bond, Dale S; Peterlin, B Lee

    2014-02-01

    Individually, both obesity and headache are conditions associated with a substantial personal and societal impact. Recent data support that obesity is comorbid with headache in general and migraine specifically, as well as with certain secondary headache conditions such as idiopathic intracranial hypertension. In the current manuscript, we first briefly review the epidemiology of obesity and common primary and secondary headache disorders individually. This is followed by a systematic review of the general population data evaluating the association between obesity and headache in general, and then obesity and migraine and tension-type headache disorders. Finally, we briefly discuss the data on the association between obesity and a common secondary headache disorder that is associated with obesity, idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Taken together, these data suggest that it is important for clinicians and patients to be aware of the headache/migraine-obesity association, given that it is potentially modifiable. Hypotheses for mechanisms of the obesity-migraine association and treatment considerations for overweight and obese headache sufferers are discussed in the companion manuscript, as part II of this topic. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  7. Central and peripheral mechanisms in chronic tension-type headache

    OpenAIRE

    Lipchik, Gay L.; Holroyd, Kenneth A.; France, Christopher R.; Kvaal, Steven A.; Segal, David; Cordingley, Gary E.; Rokicki, Lori A.; McCool, Heidi R.

    1996-01-01

    The second exteroceptive suppression of masseter muscle activity (ES2) and tenderness in pericranial muscles were evaluated in 112 young adults who met IHS criteria in the following diagnostic classifications: 31 chronic tension headache, 31 episodic tension headache, 33 migraine without aura and 17 migraine with aura. An additional 31 subjects served as controls. Pericranial muscle tenderness better distinguished diagnostic subgroups and better distinguished recurrent headache sufferers from...

  8. Cough Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... secondary cough headaches may require surgery. Symptoms Primary cough headaches Begin suddenly with and just after coughing ... by a dull, aching pain for hours Secondary cough headaches Secondary cough headaches often have symptoms similar ...

  9. Menstrual Migraine

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-01-01

    The association between migraine and menstruation was determined using diary data from 155 women of median age 44 years (range, 15 to 58 years) who were not using hormonal contraception and attended the City of London Migraine Clinic, UK.

  10. Genetics of Migraine: Insights into the Molecular Basis of Migraine Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Heidi G; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-04-01

    Migraine is a complex, debilitating neurovascular disorder, typically characterized by recurring, incapacitating attacks of severe headache often accompanied by nausea and neurological disturbances. It has a strong genetic basis demonstrated by rare migraine disorders caused by mutations in single genes (monogenic), as well as familial clustering of common migraine which is associated with polymorphisms in many genes (polygenic). Hemiplegic migraine is a dominantly inherited, severe form of migraine with associated motor weakness. Family studies have found that mutations in three different ion channels genes, CACNA1A, ATP1A2, and SCN1A can be causal. Functional studies of these mutations has shown that they can result in defective regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission and the excitatory/inhibitory balance in the brain, which lowers the threshold for cortical spreading depression, a wave of cortical depolarization thought to be involved in headache initiation mechanisms. Other putative genes for monogenic migraine include KCKN18, PRRT2, and CSNK1D, which can also be involved with other disorders. There are a number of primarily vascular disorders caused by mutations in single genes, which are often accompanied by migraine symptoms. Mutations in NOTCH3 causes cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a hereditary cerebrovascular disease that leads to ischemic strokes and dementia, but in which migraine is often present, sometimes long before the onset of other symptoms. Mutations in the TREX1 and COL4A1 also cause vascular disorders, but often feature migraine. With respect to common polygenic migraine, genome-wide association studies have now identified single nucleotide polymorphisms at 38 loci significantly associated with migraine risk. Functions assigned to the genes in proximity to these loci suggest that both neuronal and vascular pathways also contribute to the pathophysiology of common

  11. Pathophysiology of Headaches with a Prominent Vascular Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Pareja

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular changes, whether preliminary or secondary, seem to accompany most headaches. The literature concerning pathophysiological mechanisms in headaches where vascular phenomena are a major, integral part, ie, migraine and cluster headache syndrome, is reviewed and the most common forms of headache associated with cerebrovascular disease are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the vascular phenomena and on the abundant hypotheses and theories regarding headache mechanisms. This review also presents alternative explanatory models, and compares the available anatomical, physiological and biochemical results.

  12. Migraine comorbidity constellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietjen, Gretchen E; Herial, Nabeel A; Hardgrove, Jacqueline; Utley, Christine; White, Leah

    2007-06-01

    To identify distinct constellations of comorbid disorders occurring in migraineurs, and to examine differences in demographics, headache profiles, and psychosocial features between the comorbidity constellations. This is a retrospective electronic chart review of consecutive new female outpatients diagnosed with migraine (n = 223) using International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD)-II criteria. Questionnaire collected information on comorbid diagnoses, current depression, somatic symptoms, psychosocial stressors, and antidepressant use, social and abuse history. Cluster analysis, based on nonheadache disorders, was performed and differences between the resulting groups were examined. We identified 3 groups. Group 1 (n = 55) was defined by hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and hypothyroidism; Group 2 (n = 83) by depression, anxiety, and fibromyalgia; Group 3 (n = 85) by the absence of defining comorbidities. Group 1 had more males (22% vs 5% vs 12%, P constellations, with differing headache and psychosocial profiles, suggesting heterogeneity of genetic and environmental factors. This may have implications for diagnosis and disease management.

  13. [Migraine with visual aura].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidot, S; Biotti, D

    2016-06-01

    Migraine with visual aura is marked by recurrent episodes of transient visual disturbance, often followed by headaches. Its pathophysiology has not been fully understood, but visual auras might be related to a self-propagating wave of cortical depolarization called "cortical spreading depression", triggering a trigemino-vascular "storm" ultimately leading to headaches. The most specific visual symptom is the "fortification spectrum" consisting of glimmering jagged lines spreading from the center to the periphery, and leaving a transient scotoma in its wake. Other visual symptoms are numerous, ranging from elementary positive or negative visual phenomena to complex and elaborate hallucinations. The diagnosis can be made according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders revised in 2013. The main goal of the treatment is to relieve the patient's pain quickly and to decrease the frequency of the episodes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Classification and clinical features of headache patients: an outpatient clinic study from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Jiying; Fan, Xiaoping; Li, Xuelian; Ran, Li; Tan, Ge; Chen, Lixue; Wang, Kuiyun; Liu, Bowen

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to analyze and classify the clinical features of headache in neurological outpatients. A cross-sectional study was conducted consecutively from March to May 2010 for headache among general neurological outpatients attending the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University. Personal interviews were carried out and a questionnaire was used to collect medical records. Diagnosis of headache was according to the International classification of headache disorders, 2nd edition (ICHD-II). Headache patients accounted for 19.5% of the general neurology clinic outpatients. A total of 843 (50.1%) patients were defined as having primary headache, 454 (27%) secondary headache, and 386 (23%) headache not otherwise specified (headache NOS). For primary headache, 401 (23.8%) had migraine, 399 (23.7%) tension-type headache (TTH), 8 (0.5%) cluster headache and 35 (2.1%) other headache types. Overall, migraine patients suffered (1) more severe headache intensity, (2) longer than 6 years of headache history and (3) more common analgesic medications use than TTH ones (p headaches than migraine patients, and typically headache frequency exceeded 15 days/month (p headache patients were defined as chronic daily headache. Almost 20% of outpatient visits to the general neurology department were of headache patients, predominantly primary headache of migraine and TTH. In outpatient headaches, more attention should be given to headache intensity and duration of headache history for migraine patients, while more attention to headache frequency should be given for the TTH ones.

  15. The complex interrelations between two paroxysmal disorders: headache and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchetti, Carlo; Avanzini, Giuliano; Dainese, Filippo; Guidetti, Vincenzo

    2017-06-01

    The interrelations between headache/migraine and epileptic seizures are an interesting topic, still lacking a systematization, which is the objective of the present revision. We organize the general setting on: (a) a distinction between pre-ictal, ictal, post-ictal and inter-ictal headaches, assuming "ictal" as epileptic seizure, and (b) the kind of headache, if it is of migraine type or not. Concerning pre-ictal migraine/headache, the necessity of its differentiation from an epileptic headache presenting as an aura of a seizure is stressed; this is connected with the indefiniteness of the term "migralepsy". The term "migraine aura-triggered seizure" should be used only in front of a proven triggering effect of migraine. Epileptic headache (called also "ictal epileptic headache") is a well-characterized entity, in which different types of head pain may occur and an ictal EEG is necessary for the diagnosis. It may present as an isolated event ("isolated epileptic headache"), requiring a differential diagnosis from other kinds of headache, or it may be uninterruptedly followed by other epileptic manifestations being in this case easily identifiable as an epileptic aura. Hemicrania epileptica is a very rare variant of epileptic headache, characterized by the ipsilaterality of head pain and EEG paroxysms. Ictal non-epileptic headache needs to be differentiated from epileptic headache. Post-ictal headaches are a frequent association of headache with seizures, particularly in patients suffering also from inter-ictal headache-migraine. The reported systematization of the topic led us to suggest a classification which is shown in Appendix.

  16. Pediatric Inpatient Headache Therapy: What is Available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbouche, Marielle

    2015-01-01

    Status migrainosus is defined by the international classification of headache disorders (ICHD) criteria as a debilitating migraine lasting more then 72 hours. The epidemiology of status migrainosus is still unknown in adult and children, and frequently underdiagnosed. Children and adolescents often end up in the emergency room with an intractable headache that failed outpatient therapy. Six to seven percent of these children do not respond to acute infusion therapy and require hospitalization. It is imperative that more aggressive therapy is considered when patients are affected by a severe intractable headache to prevent further disability and returning the child to baseline activity. Multiple therapies are available for adults and children. Studies for acute therapy in the emergency room are available in adults and pediatric groups. Small studies are available for inpatient therapy in children and, along with available therapies for children and adolescents, are described in this review. A review of the literature shows growing evidence regarding the use of dihydroergotamine intravenously once patients are hospitalized. Effectiveness and safety have been proven in the last decades in adults and small studies in the pediatric populations. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  17. Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics of Headaches among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-24

    Jan 24, 2018 ... 42.5%). Based on age, TTH was the most prevalent head subtype reported by 60.4% of students below 21 years followed by migrainous headache in 69.5% of students. The other headache types by their age and sex distribution are shown in Table 3. Majority of the students (90.2%) used acetaminophen.

  18. Primary headaches in restless legs syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Earlier studies conducted among migraineurs have shown an association between migraine and restless legs syndrome (RLS. We chose RLS patients and looked for migraine to exclude sample bias. Materials and Methods: 99 consecutive subjects of idiopathic RLS were recruited from the sleep clinic during four months period. Physician diagnosis of headache and depressive disorder was made with the help of ICHD-2 and DSM-IV-TR criteria, respectively. Sleep history was gathered. Severity of RLS and insomnia was measured using IRLS (Hindi version and insomnia severity index Hindi version, respectively. Chi-square test, one way ANOVA and t-test were applied to find out the significance. Results: Primary headache was seen in 51.5% cases of RLS. Migraine was reported by 44.4% subjects and other types of ′primary headaches′ were reported by 7.1% subjects. Subjects were divided into- RLS; RLS with migraine and RLS with other headache. Females outnumbered in migraine subgroup (χ2 =16.46, P<0.001. Prevalence of depression (χ2 =3.12, P=0.21 and family history of RLS (χ2 =2.65, P=0.26 were not different among groups. Severity of RLS (P=0.22 or insomnia (P=0.43 were also similar. Conclusion: Migraine is frequently found in RLS patients in clinic based samples. Females with RLS are prone to develop migraine. Depression and severity of RLS or insomnia do not affect development of headache.

  19. Endovascular thrombectomy and post-procedural headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sabrina; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Holtmannspötter, Markus; Hansen, Klaus; Florescu, Anna Maria; Fakhril-Din, Zainab; Petersen, Julie Falkenberg; Ghanizada, Hashmat; Ayata, Cenk; Gaist, David; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the prevalence of post-procedural headache in patients who have undergone thrombectomy for ischemic stroke, and correlated history of migraine with risk of peri-procedural complications. A total of 314 patients underwent thrombectomy at the Danish National Hospital from January 2012 to December 2014. Eligible subjects were phone-interviewed using a purpose-developed semi-structured questionnaire according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3, beta version criteria. Among 96 eligible subjects, there was a significant decrease in migraine (p = 0.022) within the first 3 months after EVT compared to 1 year before treatment, which was further evident at interview time (on average 1.6 years after EVT, p = 0.013). A minority of patients experienced headaches for the first time within 3 months of their EVT (migraine 2, TTH 9), which persisted at interview time for subjects with migraine. Out of 12 subjects with peri-procedural complications, 2 had a history of migraine with aura. Thrombectomy leads to a significant decrease in previously known migraine, and new onset of headache in a small subset of patients. A history of migraine does not appear to predispose to peri-procedural complications.

  20. Towards a pragmatic human migraine model for drug testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Emma Katrine; Olesen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    .003). Difference in area under the headache score curve (AUC) 0-4 hours between sumatriptan and placebo was not significant ( p = 0.30). Conclusion 5-ISMN is a very powerful inducer of migraine-like headache in healthy individuals but the headache does not respond to sumatriptan. The model is not useful for future...

  1. Maternal stress and childhood migraine: a new perspective on management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito M

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Maria Esposito,1 Beatrice Gallai,2 Lucia Parisi,3 Michele Roccella,3 Rosa Marotta,4 Serena Marianna Lavano,4 Antonella Gritti,5 Giovanni Mazzotta,6 Marco Carotenuto11Center for Childhood Headache, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Department of Mental Health, Physical, and Preventive Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, 2Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, 3Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, 4Department of Psychiatry, "Magna Graecia" University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, 5Suor Orsola Benincasa University, Naples, 6Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Azienda Sanitaria Locale 4, Terni, ItalyBackground: Migraine without aura is a primary headache which is frequent and disabling in the developmental age group. No reports are available concerning the prevalence and impact of migraine in children on the degree of stress experienced by parents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of maternal stress in a large pediatric sample of individuals affected by migraine without aura.Methods: The study population consisted of 218 children (112 boys, 106 girls of mean age 8.32 ± 2.06 (range 6–13 years suffering from migraine without aura and a control group of 405 typical developing children (207 boys, 198 girls of mean age 8.54 ± 2.47 years. Mothers of children in each group answered the Parent Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF questionnaire to assess parental stress levels.Results: The two groups were matched for age (P = 0.262, gender (P = 0.983, and body mass index adjusted for age (P = 0.106. Mothers of children with migraine without aura reported higher mean PSI-SF scores related to the Parental Distress domain (P < 0.001, Dysfunctional Parent-Child Interaction domain (P < 0.001, Difficult Child subscale (P < 0.001, and Total Stress domain than mothers of controls (P < 0.001. No differences between the two groups were

  2. Migraine, cerebrovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J Sinclair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is emerging that migraine is not solely a headache disorder. Observations that ischemic stroke could occur in the setting of a migraine attack, and that migraine headaches could be precipitated by cerebral ischemia, initially highlighted a possibly association between migraine and cerebrovascular disease. More recently, large population-based studies that have demonstrated that migraineurs are at increased risk of stroke outside the setting of a migraine attack have prompted the concept that migraine and cerebrovascular disease are comorbid conditions. Explanations for this association are numerous and widely debated, particularly as the comorbid association does not appear to be confined to the cerebral circulation as cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease also appear to be comorbid with migraine. A growing body of evidence has also suggested that migraineurs are more likely to be obese, hypertensive, hyperlipidemic and have impaired insulin sensitivity, all features of the metabolic syndrome. The comorbid association between migraine and cerebrovascular disease may consequently be explained by migraineurs having the metabolic syndrome and consequently being at increased risk of cerebrovascular disease. This review will summarise the salient evidence suggesting a comorbid association between migraine, cerebrovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome.

  3. Suicide risk in patients with migraine and comorbid fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hung-Yu; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Lin, Yung-Yang; Chen, Wei-Ta; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2015-09-22

    To identify the frequency, clinical effects, and suicide risk in comorbid fibromyalgia(FM) among patients with migraine. We surveyed patients with migraine who attended a headache clinic. All patients completed questionnaires containing demographics, headache profiles based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition, FM questionnaires based on the modified 2010 American College of Rheumatology preliminary diagnostic criteria, Migraine Disability Assessment, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Suicide risk was evaluated by self-report of lifetime suicidal ideation and attempts. Of the 1,318 recruited patients with migraine (aged 42.6 ± 12.7 years; female/male = 4.5), 10.1% (aged 44.3 ± 12.6 years; female/male = 7.9) had comorbidity of FM. Patients with migraine and comorbid FM had higher headache frequency and headache-related disability, poor sleep quality, and were more depressed/anxious than those with migraine only (p < 0.001). Suicidal ideation and attempts were reported in 27.3% and 6.9% of patients with migraine, respectively, and were higher in patients with comorbid FM than in those without (ideation: 58.3% vs 24%; attempt: 17.6% vs 5.7%; p < 0.001). In addition, comorbidity of FM was associated with a higher suicide risk in 3 different migraine subgroups, i.e., migraine without aura, migraine with aura, and chronic migraine. After controlling for covariates, comorbidity of FM remained as a predictor of suicidal ideation and attempts (odds ratio 2.61 and 1.99, respectively, p < 0.05)in patients with migraine. Comorbidity with FM is associated with a high suicide risk in patients with migraine.

  4. Adherence to Biobehavioral Recommendations in Pediatric Migraine as Measured by Electronic Monitoring: The Adherence in Migraine (AIM) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon Van Diest, Ashley M; Ramsey, Rachelle; Aylward, Brandon; Kroner, John W; Sullivan, Stephanie M; Nause, Katie; Allen, Janelle R; Chamberlin, Leigh A; Slater, Shalonda; Hommel, Kevin; LeCates, Susan L; Kabbouche, Marielle A; O'Brien, Hope L; Kacperski, Joanne; Hershey, Andrew D; Powers, Scott W

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine treatment adherence to medication and lifestyle recommendations among pediatric migraine patients using electronic monitoring systems. Nonadherence to medical treatment is a significant public health concern, and can result in poorer treatment outcomes, decreased cost-effectiveness of medical care, and increased morbidity. No studies have systematically examined adherence to medication and lifestyle recommendations in adolescents with migraine outside of a clinical trial. Participants included 56 adolescents ages 11-17 who were presenting for clinical care. All were diagnosed with migraine with or without aura or chronic migraine and had at least 4 headache days per month. Medication adherence was objectively measured using electronic monitoring systems (Medication Event Monitoring Systems technology) and daily, prospective self-report via personal electronic devices. Adherence to lifestyle recommendations of regular exercise, eating, and fluid intake were also assessed using daily self-report on personal electronic devices. Electronic monitoring indicates that adolescents adhere to their medication 75% of the time, which was significantly higher than self-reported rates of medication adherence (64%). Use of electronic monitoring of medication detected rates of adherence that were significantly higher for participants taking once daily medication (85%) versus participants taking twice daily medication (59%). Average reported adherence to lifestyle recommendations of consistent noncaffeinated fluid intake (M = 5 cups per day) was below recommended levels of a minimum of 8 cups per day. Participants on average also reported skipping 1 meal per week despite recommendations of consistently eating three meals per day. Results suggest that intervention focused on adherence to preventive treatments (such as medication) and lifestyle recommendations may provide more optimal outcomes for children and adolescents with

  5. Migraine and hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Tabeeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of a relationship between migraine and hypertension are being continued. In spite of numerous studies, the association of some types of migraine (migraine with aura and migraine without aura with hypertension has not been fully elucidated. This issue is particularly relevant since these forms differ both clinically and pathophysiologically. Of even greater importance are the analysis and prediction of associations between migraine and cardiovascular diseases (ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease. The review deals with the clinical and pathophysiological features of the relationship between hypertension and migraine. There is evidence for the anatomic and functional correlation between the antinociceptive system and blood pressure (BP regulation control. It has been speculated that the increase in pain threshold is not the result of just hypertension as a disease, but it is caused by elevated BP-related hypalgesia. The efficacy of antihypertensive drugs is the fact that supports the association between hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. Identification of groups of patients having migraine and a high cardiovascular risk will allow timely early primary prevention and therapy. Introduction of a stratification approach at diagnostic stages may cause a reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates.

  6. The evolution of headache from childhood to adulthood: a review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Headache is one of the most common disorders in childhood, with an estimated 75% of children reporting significant headache by the age of 15 years. Pediatric migraine is the most frequent recurrent headache disorder, occurring in up to 28% of older teenagers. Headaches rank third among the illness-related causes of school absenteeism and result in substantial psychosocial impairment among pediatric patients. The aim of this study was to clarify the evolution of the clinical features of primary headache in the transition from childhood to adulthood through a review of relevant data available in the PubMed and Google Scholar databases for the period 1988 to July 2013. The search strategy identified 15 published articles which were considered eligible for inclusion in the analysis (i.e. relevant to the investigation of pediatric headache outcome). All were carried out after the publication of the first version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-I). The availability of data on the evolution of primary headaches over a period of time is important from both a clinical and a public health perspective. The identification of prognostic factors of the evolution of headache (remission or evolution into another headache form) over time should be an objective of future headache research for the development of prevention strategies. Given that headache is a major factor contributing to school absenteeism and poorer quality of life not only in childhood but also in adolescence, understanding the natural history and the management of the different headache forms is vital for our future. PMID:24641507

  7. Pre-attack signs and symptoms in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoer, Agneta; Lund, Nunu; Beske, Rasmus

    2018-01-01

    Introduction In contrast to the premonitory phase of migraine, little is known about the pre-attack (prodromal) phase of a cluster headache. We aimed to describe the nature, prevalence, and duration of pre-attack symptoms in cluster headache. Methods Eighty patients with episodic cluster headache...... or chronic cluster headache, according to ICHD-3 beta criteria, were invited to participate. In this observational study, patients underwent a semi-structured interview where they were asked about the presence of 31 symptoms/signs in relation to a typical cluster headache attack. Symptoms included previously...... reported cluster headache pre-attack symptoms, premonitory migraine symptoms and accompanying symptoms of migraine and cluster headache. Results Pre-attack symptoms were reported by 83.3% of patients, with an average of 4.25 (SD 3.9) per patient. Local and painful symptoms, occurring with a median of 10...

  8. Migraines and meditation: does spirituality matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachholtz, Amy B; Pargament, Kenneth I

    2008-08-01

    Migraine headaches are associated with symptoms of depression and anxiety (Waldie and Poulton Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry 72: 86-92, 2002) and feelings of low self-efficacy (French et al. Headache, 40: 647-656, 2000). Previous research suggests that spiritual meditation may ameliorate some of the negative traits associated with migraine headaches (Wachholtz and Pargament Journal of behavioral Medicine, 30: 311-318, 2005). This study examined two primary questions: (1) Is spiritual meditation more effective in enhancing pain tolerance and reducing migraine headache related symptoms than secular meditation and relaxation? and, (2) Does spiritual meditation create better mental, physical, and spiritual health outcomes than secular meditation and relaxation techniques? Eighty-three meditation naïve, frequent migraineurs were taught Spiritual Meditation, Internally Focused Secular Meditation, Externally Focused Secular Meditation, or Muscle Relaxation which participants practiced for 20 min a day for one month. Pre-post tests measured pain tolerance (with a cold pressor task), headache frequency, and mental and spiritual health variables. Compared to the other three groups, those who practiced spiritual meditation had greater decreases in the frequency of migraine headaches, anxiety, and negative affect, as well as greater increases in pain tolerance, headache-related self-efficacy, daily spiritual experiences, and existential well being.

  9. Obesity and Headache: Part I – A Systematic Review of the Epidemiology of Obesity and Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Nu Cindy; Scher, Ann I.; Moghekar, Abhay; Bond, Dale S.; Peterlin, B. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Individually, both obesity and headache are conditions associated with a substantial personal and societal impact. Recent data support that obesity is comorbid with headache in general and migraine specifically, as well as with certain secondary headache conditions such as idiopathic intracranial hypertension. In the current manuscript, we first briefly review the epidemiology of obesity and common primary and secondary headache disorders individually. This is followed by a systematic review of the general population data evaluating the association between obesity and headache in general, and then obesity and migraine and tension-type headache disorders. Finally, we briefly discuss the data on the association between obesity and a common secondary headache disorder that is associated with obesity, idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Taken together, these data suggest that it is important for clinicians and patients to be aware of the headache/migraine-obesity association, given that it is potentially modifiable. Hypotheses for mechanisms of the obesity-migraine association and treatment considerations for overweight and obese headache sufferers are discussed in the companion manuscript, as part II of this topic. PMID:24512574

  10. Effectiveness of preventive and treatment interventions for primary headaches in the workplace: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardon, Arnaud; Girard, Marie-Pier; Zaïm, Chérine; Lemeunier, Nadège; Descarreaux, Martin; Marchand, Andrée-Anne

    2017-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this systematic literature review is to assess the benefits of workplace-based occupational therapies and interventions, including acute and preventive medication, on headache intensity and frequency, related disability as well as work-related outcomes. Methods A search of the literature was conducted in PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane library, CINAHL and Embase using terms related to headache, workplace and occupational health. The Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias assessment tool was used on individual studies to assess internal validity and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system was applied to studies by clinical outcome and used to rate quality of evidence. Results Fifteen articles were included in the systematic review. None of them were classified as low risk of bias according to the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. This systematic review found preliminary low-quality evidence suggesting that exercise and acupuncture can reduce workers' headache pain intensity, frequency and related disability. Conclusion Although this systematic review provided preliminary low evidence in favour of work-based intervention, studies with more rigorous designs and methodologies are needed to provide further evidence of the effectiveness of workplace-based headache management strategies.

  11. Frequency of Migraine as a Chief Complaint in Otolaryngology Outpatient Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad Ali, Maria; Al Zayer, Maha

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To identify the frequency of typical (headache and dizziness) and common atypical (ear fullness, pressure, pain, tinnitus, facial fullness, and nasal congestion) migraine symptoms as chief complaints among patients presenting to otolaryngology clinic. Methods. This is a descriptive study of prospectively collected data from a general otolaryngology practice. Typical migraine presentations were diagnosed by applying international headache society (IHS) criteria for migraine headache and Neuhauser's criteria for migrainous vertigo. Atypical otologic and rhinologic migraine symptoms were diagnosed using individualized criteria. Charts were reviewed at 6-month interval from the first presentation. Results. Out of 1002 consecutive patients, 10.8% presented with “migrainous chief complaint.” All migrainous chief complaint patients had a history of headache but not all of them presented with headache. Corrected female to male ratio in the migraine group was 3 to 1; age distributions were significantly different between the migraine and nonmigraine groups by applying t-test. Out of the atypical complaints, 86% of the patients had a history of concomitant typical presentation. Conclusion. Actual diagnostic criteria for migraine do not satisfy the diversity of its presentation. Investigating the history of migraine is enough to diagnose most atypical presentations. Sound knowledge about migraine seems essential for any ENT practitioner. PMID:25695049

  12. Safety and tolerability of frovatriptan in the acute treatment of migraine and prevention of menstrual migraine: Results of a new analysis of data from five previously published studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, E Anne; Pawsey, Stephen P; Campbell, John C; Hu, Xiaojun

    2010-04-01

    Triptans are a recommended first-line treatment for moderate to severe migraine. Using clinical trial data, we evaluated the safety and tolerability of frovatriptan as acute treatment (AT) and as short-term preventive (STP) therapy for menstrual migraine (MM). Data from 2 Phase III AT trials (AT1: randomized, placebo controlled, 1 attack; AT2: 12-months, noncomparative, open label) and 3 Phase IIIb STP trials in MM (MMP1 and MMP2: randomized, placebo controlled, double blind, 3 perimenstrual periods; MMP3: open label, noncomparative, 12 perimenstrual periods) were analyzed. In AT1, patients treated each attack with frovatriptan 2.5 mg, sumatriptan 100 mg, or placebo. In AT2, they used frovatriptan 2.5 mg. In MMP1 and MMP2, women administered frovatriptan 2.5 mg for 6 days during the perimenstrual period, taking a loading dose of 2 or 4 tablets on day 1, followed by once-daily or BID frovatriptan 2.5 mg, respectively; in MMP3, they used BID frovatriptan 2.5 mg. In AT1, which was previously published in part, group differences in adverse events (AEs) were analyzed using the Fisher exact test, and response rates were compared using logistic regression. Post hoc analyses of sustained pain-free status with no AEs (SNAE) and sustained pain response with no AEs (SPRNAE) were performed using a 2-sample test for equality of proportions without continuity correction. For AT2 and the STP studies, data were summarized using descriptive statistics. Results of individual safety analyses for the STP studies were previously reported; the present report includes new results from a pooled analysis of MMP1 and MMP2 and a new analysis of MMP3 in which AEs were coded using Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities version 8.0. AT1 included 1206 patients in the safety group; AT2 included 496. In the STP studies, safety data were collected for 1487 women. In AT1 and AT2, 85.6% and 88.3%, respectively, of enrolled patients were women. Overall, AEs were generally mild to moderate (AT

  13. Chronic daily headache in children and adolescents: a multi-faceted syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshia, Shashi S; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Abu-Arafeh, Ishaq; Hershey, Andrew D; Guidetti, Vincenzo; Winner, Paul; Wöber-Bingöl, Ciçek

    2010-11-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is a multi-faceted, often complex pain syndrome in children and adolescents. Chronic daily headache may be primary or secondary. Chronic migraine and chronic tension-type are the most frequent subtypes. Chronic daily headache is co-morbid with adverse life events, anxiety and depressive disorders, possibly with other psychiatric disorders, other pain syndromes and sleep disorders; these conditions contribute to initiating and maintaining CDH. Hence, early management of episodic headache and treatment of associated conditions are crucial to prevention. There is evidence for the benefit of psychological therapies, principally relaxation and cognitive behavioral, and promising information on acupuncture for CDH. Data on drug treatment are based primarily on open label studies. The controversies surrounding CDH are discussed and proposals for improvement presented. The multifaceted nature of CDH makes it a good candidate for a multi-axial classification system. Such an approach should facilitate biopsychosocial management and enhance consistency in clinical research.

  14. Validation of The 3-Question Headache Screen in The Diagnosis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diagnosed and undertreated. A rapid diagnostic method is desirable so that treatment can be initiated early. We compared the 3-question headache screen with the International Headache Society (IHS) criteria in the diagnosis of migraine among ...

  15. Characteristics of menstrual versus non-menstrual migraine during pregnancy: a longitudinal population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovski, Beáta Éva; Vetvik, Kjersti G; Lundqvist, Christofer; Eberhard-Gran, Malin

    2018-04-02

    Migraine is a common headache disorder that affects mostly women. In half of these, migraine is menstrually associated, and ranges from completely asymptomatic to frequent pain throughout pregnancy. The aim of the study was to define the pattern (frequency, intensity, analgesics use) of migrainous headaches among women with and without menstural migraine (MM) during pregnancy, and define how hormonally-related factors affect its intensity. The analysis was based upon data from 280 women, 18.6% of them having a self-reported MM. Women with MM described a higher headache intensity during early pregnancy and postpartum compared those without MM, but both groups showed improvement during the second half of pregnancy and directly after delivery. Hormonal factors and pre-menstrual syndrome had no effect upon headache frequency, but may affect headache intensity. Individual treatment plan is necessary for women with migrainous headaches during pregnancy, especially for those suffering highest symptoms load.

  16. Pure menstrual migraine with sensory aura: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiann-Jy; Hsu, Yung-Chu; Chen, Dem-Lion

    2012-07-01

    Hormonal changes related to the menstrual cycle have a great impact on migraines in women. Menstrual migraine attacks are almost invariably without aura. Categorizing migraines into menstrual or non-menstrual types is one way to stratify migraines without aura according to the appendix criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. We report a peri-menopausal woman whose sensory aura exclusively heralded menstrual migraine. A 51-year-old woman had suffered from monthly episodic headaches since the age of 46. Before a headache, and within 1 h on the first day of her menstruation, she always experienced numbness in her entire left upper limb. After the sensory aura, migrainous headaches occurred with nausea and photophobia. In the postmenopausal period, she no longer had sensory aura, and her headache pattern changed and became less severe. Her physical and neurologic exams as well as electroencephalography, brain magnetic resonance imaging, and conventional angiography were all normal. She fulfilled the diagnosis of pure menstrual migraine with typical sensory aura. To our knowledge, this is the first formal case report of pure menstrual migraine with aura.

  17. Prophylatic treatment of migraine and migraine clinical variants with topiramate: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Carmona

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Sergio Carmona1, Osvaldo Bruera1,21Department of Neuro-otology and Pain and Headache, Instituto de Neurociencias de Buenos Aires INEBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 2Department of Pain and Headache, Fundación Favaloro, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaAbstract: Migraine and migraine variants are common, chronic and incapacitating neurovascular disorders with a high impact on health resources. There is an extensive evidence base provided by double-blind, placebo-controlled trials showing that topiramate is a safe, effective and well tolerated drug in the management of migraine and its variants, being especially promising in the management of migraine-vertigo syndrome. Models both in the US and the UK have also shown that it offers a cost benefit when direct and indirect costs are evaluated, by reducing work loss, improving quality of life and reducing the use of increasingly scarce health resources.Keywords: migraine, migraine prophylaxis, topiramate, quality of life, basilar migraine, cluster headache, vestibular migraine

  18. Auditory hallucinations associated with migraine: Case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eli E; Grosberg, Brian M; Crystal, Sara C; Robbins, Matthew S

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this review is to describe auditory hallucinations (paracusias) associated with migraine attacks to yield insights into their clinical significance and pathogenesis. Isolated observations have documented rare associations of migraine with auditory hallucinations. Unlike visual, somatosensory, language, motor, and brainstem symptoms, paracusias with acute headache attacks are not a recognized aura symptom by the International Headache Society, and no systematic review has addressed this association. We retrospectively studied patients experiencing paracusias associated with migraine at our center and in the literature. We encountered 12 patients (our center = 5, literature = 7), 58% were female, and 75% had typical migraine aura. Hallucinations most commonly featured voices (58%), 75% experienced them during headache, and the duration was most often <1 hour (67%). No patients described visual aura evolving to paracusias. Most patients (50%) had either a current or previous psychiatric disorder, most commonly depression (67%). The course of headache and paracusias were universally congruent, including improvement with headache prophylaxis (58%). Paracusias uncommonly co-occur with migraine and usually feature human voices. Their timing and high prevalence in patients with depression may suggest that paracusias are not necessarily a form of migraine aura, though could be a migraine trait symptom. Alternative mechanisms include perfusion changes in primary auditory cortex, serotonin-related ictal perceptual changes, or a release phenomenon in the setting of phonophobia with avoidance of a noisy environment. © International Headache Society 2014.

  19. Calcitonin gene-related peptide does not cause the familial hemiplegic migraine phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.M.; Thomsen, L.L.; Olesen, J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a migraine trigger that plays a crucial role in migraine pathophysiology, and CGRP antagonism is efficient in the treatment of migraine attacks. Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a dominantly inherited subtype of migraine w...... without aura. This indicates that the pathophysiologic pathways underlying migraine headache in FHM may be different from the common types of migraine and questions whether CGRP antagonists would be effective in the treatment of FHM patients Udgivelsesdato: 2008/9/9...

  20. CILOSTAZOL INDUCES C-FOS EXPRESSION IN THE TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS CAUDALIS AND BEHAVIOURAL CHANGES SUGGESTIVE OF HEADACHE WITH MIGRAINE-LIKE MANIFESTATIONS IN RATS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S. L. T.; Petersen, S.; Sorensen, D. B.

    2016-01-01

    in rats. Also, we tested the response to sumatriptan in order to evaluate the predictive properties of the model. Methods: The effect of cilostazol (125 mg/kg p.o.) was evaluated on a range of spontaneous behavioural parameters, light sensitivity and mechanical sensitivity thresholds. To assess headache...... specificity we evaluated the c-fos expression in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. All experiments were done in female Sprague Dawley rats and the oestrous cycle was included in the analyses. Results: We found that cilostazol increased the light sensitivity and grooming behaviour of the rats and decreased...... their head twitching. These manifestations were not inhibited by sumatriptan. Cilostazol also induced c-fos expression in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Locomotion, rearing, eating and drinking activity as well as the amount of wet dog shakes and mechanical sensitivity thresholds were unaltered. Discussion...

  1. Headache diaries and calendars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torelli, Paola; Jensen, Rigmor

    2010-01-01

    Headache is one of the most common types of pain and, in the absence of biological markers, headache diagnosis depends only on information obtained from clinical interviews and physical and neurological examinations. Headache diaries make it possible to record prospectively the characteristics...... of every attack and the use of headache calendars is indicated for evaluating the time pattern of headache, identifying aggravating factors, and evaluating the efficacy of preventive treatment. This may reduce the recall bias and increase accuracy in the description. The use of diagnostic headache diaries...... practice for diagnosis and follow-up of treatments; and (2) describe the tools that have been developed for research and their main applications in the headache field. In addition, we include information on diaries available online and proposals for future areas of research....

  2. Migraine & paediatric obesity: a plausible link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Ravid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and migraine are both highly prevalent disorders in the general population, influenced by genetic and environmental risk factors. In recent studies, obesity was found to be a strong risk factor for transformed migraine and, among migraineurs, obesity was associated with frequent headaches and higher disability scores. Suggested mechanisms included: (i obesity as a pro-inflammatory state may be associated with neurovascular inflammation in patients with migraine; (ii elevated levels of plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP in obese individuals may play a role as an important post-synaptic mediator of trigeminovascular inflammation in migraine; (iii dismodulation in the hypothalamic neuropeptide, orexin, in obese persons may be associated with increased susceptibility to neurogenic inflammation causing migraine attacks; and (iv leptin and adiponectin can activate proinflammatory cytokine release that is involved in the pathogenesis of migraine. In addition, both conditions are associated with psychiatric co-morbidities, such as depression and anxiety, that can further increase headache frequency and disability. Therefore, the effect of obesity on migraine outcome is important. Weight and BMI should be measured and calculated in all children presenting with migraine, and weight control should be a part of the treatment.

  3. Interface Between Cosmetic and Migraine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfrerer, Lisa; Guyuron, Bahman

    2017-10-01

    This article describes connections between migraine surgery and cosmetic surgery including technical overlap, benefits for patients, and why every plastic surgeon may consider screening cosmetic surgery patients for migraine headache (MH). Contemporary migraine surgery began by an observation made following forehead rejuvenation, and the connection has continued. The prevalence of MH among females in the USA is 26%, and females account for 91% of cosmetic surgery procedures and 81-91% of migraine surgery procedures, which suggests substantial overlap between both patient populations. At the same time, recent reports show an overall increase in cosmetic facial procedures. Surgical techniques between some of the most commonly performed facial surgeries and migraine surgery overlap, creating opportunity for consolidation. In particular, forehead lift, blepharoplasty, septo-rhinoplasty, and rhytidectomy can easily be part of the migraine surgery, depending on the migraine trigger sites. Patients could benefit from simultaneous improvement in MH symptoms and rejuvenation of the face. Simple tools such as the Migraine Headache Index could be used to screen cosmetic surgery patients for MH. Similarity between patient populations, demand for both facial and MH procedures, and technical overlap suggest great incentive for plastic surgeons to combine both. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  4. The prevalence and impact of headache in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Luiz P; Silva Junior, Ariovaldo A

    2015-02-01

    In Brazil, several epidemiological studies on headache have been produced, most with an emphasis on prevalence and the association of primary headaches with some sociodemographic characteristics of the population. Data on the burden of headache, however, are scarce. The aim of this paper is to review all Brazilian population-based studies on headache, as well as to analyze the Migraine Disability Assessment Score (MIDAS) data collected with the PhD thesis of the senior author (LPQ). A literature review was performed using the keywords ("headache" or "migraine") and ("epidemiology" or "prevalence") and (Brazil). Another part of this paper will look at unpublished data on disability (MIDAS), collected with the prevalence data of the Brazilian nationwide epidemiological study of headache. There are 6 published epidemiological studies of headache in Brazil. The mean 1-year prevalence of headache in Brazil is 70.6%, of migraine 15.8%, of tension-type headache (TTH) 29.5%, and of chronic daily headache (CDH) 6.1%. Disability is significantly higher: in females compared to males; in patients with migraine and CDH compared to patients with TTH; and in those with headaches ≥15 days per month rather than those with episodic headaches. There was also a positive relationship between pain intensity and severity of disability. Patients with higher disability used more both abortive and prophylactic medication. The mean prevalence of headache in Brazil, and some of its subtypes, is similar to the rates described in other countries of the world. Disability is higher in females, in patients with migraine, in individuals with headaches ≥15 days per month, and in those with severe head pain. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  5. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Problems of Geriatric Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviyan Ghandehari

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available There is no difference in clinical characteristics of headache between old individuals and younger’s. However, differential diagnosis of migrainous aura and transient ischemic attacks may be difficult in old people who frequently have vascular risk factors. Old people have less headache than the young’s. Chronic tension headache is the most common primary type of headache in the elderly. Chronic paroxismal hemicrania and headache due to giant cell arterities are specified to the elderly, Secondary headaches; e.g headache due to cervical spondylosis and brain tumors is more common in the old people than young. Old people poorly tolerate headache drugs, i.e. Ergotamine, Triptans and Tricyclics. Trigeminal neuralgia is often seen in the elderly and is resistant to medical therapy in the old people. Headache could be the main manifestation of depression in old people. Headaches secondary to disorders of internal medicine; i.e. hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have importance in the elderly. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is considered in every old person with sudden onset explosive headache especially in cases with decreased consciousness and neck stiffness. Old individuals use a collection of different drugs due to suffering various diseases and commonly have drug induced headaches. Neuroimaging should be performed in a geriatric patient with new onset sever headache without medical disorder or consumption of drug induced headache. Some of the old people suffer of multiple types of headache.

  6. Tinnitus Patients with Comorbid Headaches: The Influence of Headache Type and Laterality on Tinnitus Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthold Langguth

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBoth clinical experience and clinical studies suggest a relationship between tinnitus and headache. Here, we aimed to investigate the influence of comorbid headache type and headache laterality on tinnitus characteristics.MethodThe Tinnitus Research Initiative database was screened for patients of the Tinnitus Center of the University Regensburg who reported comorbid headaches. These patients were contacted to complete additional validated questionnaires. Based on these data, patients were categorized according to headache type and headache laterality, and their clinical characteristics were compared with tinnitus patients, who did not report comorbid headaches.ResultsData from 193 patients with tinnitus and comorbid headaches were compared with those from 765 tinnitus patients without comorbid headaches. Tinnitus patients with comorbid headache have higher scores in tinnitus questionnaires, a lower quality of life and more frequently comorbidities such as painful sensation to loud sounds, vertigo, pain (neck, temporomandibular, and general, and depressive symptoms when compared with tinnitus patients without headaches. Both headache laterality and headache type interact with the degree of comorbidity with higher impairment in patients with left-sided and bilateral headaches as well as in patients with migraine or cluster headache.ConclusionThe observed increased impairment in tinnitus patients with comorbid headache can be explained as an additive effect of both disorders on health-related quality of life. The more frequent occurrence of further comorbidities suggests a generally increased amplification of sensory signals in a subset of tinnitus patients with comorbid headaches.

  7. Pediatric Headache and Epilepsy Comorbidity in the Pragmatic Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavasiliou, Antigone S; Bregianni, Marianna; Nikaina, Irene; Kotsalis, Charalambos; Paraskevoulakos, Evangelos; Bazigou, Helen

    2016-04-01

    Demographic and clinical data were collected from three cross-sectional samples, from the headache and epilepsy clinics according to respective protocols. During structured interviews, we examined the co-occurrence of headaches and epilepsy in children and their families: (1) 172 children from the headache clinic, were questioned for the number and type of epileptic seizures and epilepsy diagnosis. (2) Around 70 children from the epilepsy clinic for the frequency and type of headaches and headache syndrome diagnosis. (3) A total of 149 parents of children with benign childhood epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BCECTS) and childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), for the relative frequency of headaches in first- and second-degree relatives. Out of 172, 84 (48.8%) children with headache had a migraine and 60 (34.9%) had tension headaches; 3 children (1.7%) had epilepsy or unprovoked seizures. Migraine and epilepsy, co-occurred in 2/84 (2.3%). Eight out of 70 patients with epilepsy had headaches (11.4%); none had migraine. Around 43% of patients with BCECTS or CAE had a family history of headache, more prevalent in first-degree relatives of children with BCECTS than CAE. Contrary to existing literature, migraine and epilepsy, co-occurred infrequently in these highly selected samples. Family history of headache was frequent in patients with BCECTS and CAE, without any significant difference between the two. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Recent developments in pediatric headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, Andrew D

    2010-06-01

    This review will focus on some of the recent findings in pediatric headache including headache characteristics, epidemiology, comorbid associations and treatment updates. Pediatric headache remains a frequent health problem for children and their families, yet there remain many gaps in our knowledge. This review will broadly address some of the recent findings and highlight the gaps in our understanding and treatment of pediatric headache. There will be a focus on pediatric migraine as this has been the best characterized and studied. Our understanding of pediatric headache is improving with increased recognition of the characteristics and associated symptomology. This should further guide the individualized treatment approaches for improved outcome and reduction of progression into adulthood.

  9. Virchow-Robin spaces in childhood migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, S; Gahleitner, A; Wöber-Bingöl, C; Wöber, C; Ba-Ssalamah, A; Schoder, M; Schindler, E; Prayer, D

    1999-04-01

    Virchow-Robin spaces (VRS) are pia-lined extensions of the subarachnoid space which surround penetrating arteries as they enter the brain on its surface. Using high-resolution MRI, which shows small penetrating arteries, we studied a possible association of accentuated VRS in children with tension-type headache (TTH) or migraine. We studied 58 children aged 3-14 years (mean 10.8 years) with a clinical diagnosis of migraine (31) or TTH (27), who underwent cerebral MRI, and 30 headache-free patients of the same age (mean 10.2 years) and 30 adult migraineurs with postpubertal onset of symptoms, who served as controls. The images were reviewed for structural abnormalities in the regions of the small penetrating arteries. Accentuated VRS were found in 61% of the children with migrainous headaches and in 22% of children of those with TTH. Prominent VRS were seen in 27% of the control children and in only 13% of the adults. Small infarcts and gliosis were rare in children with or without headache, but were seen in 30% of the adult migraineurs. Our findings show that accentuated VRS are significantly more common in children with migraine than in those with TTH or headache-free controls. Detection of accentuated VRS may therefore enhance differential diagnosis of primary headaches in children, contributing to an improvement in management.

  10. The comparison of sleep disturbances between the subjects with headache and healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Bostani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Headache is one of the most common complaints of the patients referring to the treatment centers. Also, some studies have reported the correlation of sleep disturbances with migraine and tension headaches. This study was aimed to analyze the association of sleep disturbances with migraine and tension headaches. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 1005 students of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences were selected by stratified random sampling during the academic year 2013-2014. Having attracted the participation and cooperation of the participants, sleep disorder and symptoms of headache (migraine and tension tests were administered. Results: The overall prevalence of headache, migraine headache and tension headache in students of medical science were 73.8 %, 16.7 % and 30.9 %, respectively. 20.3% of medical students had sleep disorder. Difficulty in sleep onset, daytime fatigue, apnea and sadness and anxiety were associated with headache. Total sleep disorder was directly associated with migraine headache (P<0.05.Conclusion: There was a correlation between sleep disorders and headache, especially migraine headache. Considering the importance of sleep in the incidence of headaches, sleep hygiene education and changes in the quality and patterns of sleep are essential for students, which can greatly affect their individual and social life.

  11. Auditory Processing in Children with Migraine: A Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agessi, Larissa Mendonça; Villa, Thaís Rodrigues; Carvalho, Deusvenir de Souza; Pereira, Liliane Desgualdo

    2017-04-01

    Background  This study aimed to investigate central auditory processing performance in children with migraine and compared with controls without headache. Methods  Twenty-eight children of both sexes, aged between 8 and 12 years, diagnosed with migraine with and without aura, and a control group of the same age range and with no headache history, were included. Gaps-in-noise (GIN), duration pattern test (DPT), synthetic sentence identification (SSI) test, and nonverbal dichotic test (NVDT) were used to assess central auditory processing performance. Results  Children with migraine performed significantly worse in DPT, SSI test, and NVDT when compared with controls without headache; however, no significant differences were found in the GIN test. Conclusions  Children with migraine demonstrate impairment in the physiologic mechanism of temporal processing and selective auditory attention. In our short communication, migraine could be related to impaired central auditory processing in children. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Association between Body Mass Index and Migraine: A Survey of Adult Population in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Both migraine and obesity are prevalent disorders in the general population, which are characterized by disability and impaired quality of life. Although so many researches had studied the association between migraine and obesity, there are still no full knowledge of the relationship between body mass index (BMI and migraine, especially chronic migraine (CM. In this study, we analyzed a previous epidemiological survey data of primary headache patients in Chongqing, which surveyed consecutive neurological outpatients through face-to-face interview with physicians using a headache questionnaire. 166 episodic migraine (EM patients and 134 chronic migraine (CM patients were included in the study out of 1327 primary headache patients. And 200 healthy adults from the physical examination center were included as a control group. Finally, we found that the patients with migraine (EM and CM were more likely to be overweight, obese, or morbidly obese compared to those in the healthy group. Significant difference was found between BMI and frequency of migraine attacks but not severity or duration of headache onset. And no significant difference was found in severity and duration of headache onset between episodic and chronic migraine among different BMI classifications. Such may update our knowledge about the clinical features of migraine and BMI, revealing that the frequency of attacks may be associated with being overweight, obese, or morbidly obese in patients with migraine and that the extent of being overweight, obese, or morbidly obese in CM patients was lower than that in EM patients.

  13. Stress as a major determinant of migraine in women aged 25-65 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woro Riyadina

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Migraine is a primary headache causing substantial disability in patients. The prevalence of migraine in women is still high. Menarche, menstruation, pregnancy, menopause, and the use of hormonal contraceptives and hormone replacement treatment may influence migraine occurrence. The aim of this study was to determine the major determinants of migraine in adult women aged 25-65 years. Methods A cross-sectional study of 2,747 women from the baseline study “Cohort Study of Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases”. The dependent variable was migraine based on the diagnosis of health providers or symptoms. Independent variables were demographic (age, marital status, education and behavioral (smoking, diet, and stress characteristics, metabolic disorders (obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hormonal factors (contraception and hormone therapy. Data were collected through interviews (characteristics, health and hormonal status, diet, measurement (anthropometrics, blood pressure, and health examination (blood specimens, neurology. Data were analyzed by chi-square test and multiple logistic regression. Results Migraine in adult women was found in 710 cases (25.8% with symptoms of worsening with activity (15%, nausea and vomiting (13%, and photophobia/phonophobia (4.1%. The main determinant of migraine in adult women was stress with a 2.47-fold risk [95% CI = 2.07 to 2.95] as compared with no stress, after controlling for smoking, menstruation and hormonal drug consumption. Conclusion Stress is a major determinant of migraine in adult women, therefore health programs should be instituted through health promotion, prevention and education to control stress.

  14. Headaches with ocular localization and involvement Cefaleas de localización y compromiso oculares

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Lucía Muñoz Cardona; Dionis Magnary Vallejo Mesa; José David Paulo Trujillo; Rodrigo Alberto Isaza Bermúdez

    2005-01-01

    The most frequent primary headaches, including migraine variants, and intrinsic optic nerve disorders that produce headache, are reviewed. The latter are often accompanied by autonomic nervous system alterations which lead to vasomotor changes, frequently present in neuralgic processes known as headaches with disautonomic involvement. Epidemiological, semiological, clinical, and therapeutical aspects of different cranial, facial and ocular diseases that produce headache are included. Some phy...

  15. Migraine and its relation with lifestyle in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, F; Safavi, M; Mahmudi, M

    2010-01-01

    Migraine is a very common primary headache disorder with no underlying identifiable pathological cause. It has a profound effect on the well-being and general functioning of its victims. Migraine is best understood as a chronic disorder with episodic manifestations, progressive in some individuals, having dramatic social and economic costs. Migraine causes stress in patients and their families, changes the roles and lifestyles and disturbs the social interactions between family members. Being more common in women, migraine is a significant women's health concern. The low rate of headaches with identifiable organic causes suggests that individual and environmental factors are determinants of migraine. Therefore, studying lifestyle and its relation with migraine is very important. This study examines the relation between migraine headaches and lifestyle in women refereed to university clinics in Iran. This is a case-control study of 170 patients selected randomly using Poisson sampling. The study population included female patients suffering from headache referred to the neurology clinics and health centers in Iran (with neurologist-diagnosed migraine according to the criteria of the International Society of