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Sample records for preventing malnutrition maternal

  1. Prevention of acute malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Pee, Saskia; Grais, Rebecca; Fenn, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Acute malnutrition is associated with increased morbidity and mortality risk. When episodes are prolonged or frequent, acute malnutrition is also associated with poor growth and development, which contributes to stunting Nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive strategies to prevent...... seasons or emergencies, or increased incidence of illness, such as diarrhea or measles, additional efforts are required to prevent and treat wasting. Special nutritious foods directly meet the increased nutrient requirements of children at risk for wasting; assistance to vulnerable households, in the form...... of cash or food, enables households to better meet the food, health, and other needs of household members and may increase resilience; water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and health interventions help prevent and address illness and hence reduce wasting risk. The contributions of specific interventions...

  2. Preventing malnutrition in prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Bethan; Goodwin, Sarah

    Vulnerable patient groups are at increased risk of malnutrition. This article focuses on the importance of ensuring that the nutritional needs of those in institutional settings, in particular prisons, are met. Offenders often present with a number of health and social factors which can lead to a high risk of malnutrition. The consequences of malnutrition are significant, ranging from delayed recovery to increased mortality. The treatment of malnutrition is discussed in this article from detection through to management and monitoring. Adequate nutrition is a basic human right and those in prison should be provided with healthy food choices to optimise health.

  3. Prevalence of Malnutrition and Effects of Maternal Age, Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of Malnutrition and Effects of Maternal Age, Education and Occupation Amongst Preschool Children Attending Health Centres in a Semi Urban Area of South Western Nigeria. ... Nigerian Quarterly Journal of Hospital Medicine ... Children between the ages of 6-11 months had the highest risk for malnutrition.

  4. Preventing Malnutrition in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of food your loved one has on hand. Be sure to visit during mealtimes so you can observe their eating habits. Watch for signs of weight loss, such as clothing that is looser than normal. Easy bruising and slow wound healing are also signs of malnutrition. Know which medicines ...

  5. Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fats, vitamins, and minerals - you may suffer from malnutrition. Causes of malnutrition include: Lack of specific nutrients in your diet. ... the lack of one vitamin can lead to malnutrition. An unbalanced diet Certain medical problems, such as ...

  6. Prevention and treatment of childhood malnutrition in rural Malawi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Weight and height measured at monthly intervals until 18 mo of age and quarterly thereafter. Gains in weight and height and prevalence of malnutrition in different seasons were calculated. Results ... maternal HIV and infant morbidity are likely to reduce the burden of ... of energy, fat, iron, and zinc in the RTUF group. Both.

  7. Prevention and treatment of childhood malnutrition in rural Malawi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The review highlighted the fact that determinants of malnutrition may not have the same importance in all settings and thus preventive strategies that work in one place may not work in all settings. This meant that determination of local causes and effective interventions was one way of alleviating the problem. It had been ...

  8. Association between maternal depressive symptoms with child malnutrition or child excess weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Feres Moreira Lima

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: to verify associations between maternal depressive symptoms with child malnutrition or child excess weight. Methods: prospective study with data from the BRISA prenatal cohort in São Luís, Brazil, obtained from the 22nd to the 25th week of gestation (in 2009 and 2010 and, later, when children were aged 12 to 32 months (in 2010 and 2012. Maternal depressive symptoms were identified using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS. For the excess weight evaluation, BMI z-score for age > +2 was used. For measuring child malnutrition, height z-score for age < -2 was used. The confounding factors were identified using a directed acyclic graph in DAGitty software. Results: we did not find associations between maternal depressive symptoms with child malnutrition or child excess weight. The prevalence of maternal depressive symptoms was 27.6% during gestation and 19.8% in the second or third year of the child's life. The malnutrition rate was 6% and the excess weight rate was 10.9%. Conclusions: no associations between maternal depressive symptoms in prenatal or in the second or third year of the child's life and child malnutrition or excess weight were detected.

  9. How maternal malnutrition affects linear growth and development in the offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal malnutrition is common in the developing world and has detrimental effects on both the mother and infant. Pre-pregnancy nutritional status and weight gain during pregnancy are positively related to fetal growth and development. Internationally, there is no agreement on the method of diagnos...

  10. A Review of Nutrition-Specific and Nutrition-Sensitive Approaches to Preventing Moderate Acute Malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucha, Noreen; Jimenez, Michelle; Stone-Jimenez, Maryanne; Brown, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Recent literature reviews have demonstrated the limited efficacy of targeted supplementary feeding programmes aimed at both treating and preventing moderate acute malnutrition (MAM), with high rates of defaulting, low coverage and high associated costs. There is a growing interest in a) reviewing and improving protocols / tools for the management of acute malnutrition and b) increasing the quality and variety of products available for the treatment / prevention of moderate acute malnutrition. There is however, varying evidence on the impact of nutritional products aimed at preventing or treating acute malnutrition, or on the comparative efficacy of different products. Following several literature reviews and operational research with varying results, there is increasing consensus that MAM should be tackled not only through products, and that clearer guidance should be provided on broader preventive strategies, such as optimal infant and young child feeding (IYCF) and caregiving practices, optimal maternal nutrition, counselling, social protection, food security and livelihoods, and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). The CMAM Forum has commissioned Technical Briefs which aim to summarise current thinking and practice relating to preventive approaches to MAM, looking at the role of both nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive interventions. The work is being launched in January 2014 and results will be available for presentation at the IAEA MAM Symposium in May 2014. The briefs aim to provide: • An overview of approaches to preventing MAM across different sectors (e.g. agriculture, health, IYCF, social protection, water and sanitation) and in different contexts. • A review of current knowledge including: – Evidence from systematic and literature reviews. – Existing approaches and practice for prevention of MAM. – Current guidance on making programmatic choices relating to MAM prevention interventions and decision-making frameworks.

  11. A case-control study of maternal knowledge of malnutrition and health-care-seeking attitudes in rural South India.

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, K.; Korzenik, J. R.; Jekel, J. F.; Bhattacharji, S.

    1997-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In India, approximately 20 percent of children under the age of four suffer from severe malnutrition, while half of all the children suffer from undernutrition. The contributions of knowledge and attitudes of nutrition-conscious behaviors of the mothers to childhood malnutrition has been unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore maternal knowledge of the causes of malnutrition, health-care-seeking attitudes and socioeconomic risk factors in relation to children's nutriti...

  12. Impact of maternal malnutrition during the periconceptional period on mammalian preimplantation embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, M A

    2015-04-01

    During episodes of undernutrition and overnutrition the mammalian preimplantation embryo undergoes molecular and metabolic adaptations to cope with nutrient deficits or excesses. Maternal adaptations also take place to keep a nutritional microenvironment favorable for oocyte development and embryo formation. This maternal-embryo communication takes place via several nutritional mediators. Although adaptive responses to malnutrition by both the mother and the embryo may ensure blastocyst formation, the resultant quality of the embryo can be compromised, leading to early pregnancy failure. Still, studies have shown that, although early embryonic mortality can be induced during malnutrition, the preimplantation embryo possesses an enormous plasticity that allows it to implant and achieve a full-term pregnancy under nutritional stress, even in extreme cases of malnutrition. This developmental strategy, however, may come with a price, as shown by the adverse developmental programming induced by even subtle nutritional challenges exerted exclusively during folliculogenesis and the preimplantation period, resulting in offspring with a higher risk of developing deleterious phenotypes in adulthood. Overall, current evidence indicates that malnutrition during the periconceptional period can induce cellular and molecular alterations in preimplantation embryos with repercussions for fertility and postnatal health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Nutrition Club Approach: Community Mobilization to Prevent Child Malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nugyen, Anh Vu

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To establish a scalable and sustainable, community led approach to prevent and manage child malnutrition, and increase vulnerable families’ access to food security. Methods: The establishment of the nutrition club is a participatory community mobilization process involving local leaders including the Women’s Union, Farmers Union and Youth Union, local health workers and caregivers of young children. The first step in the process is the formation of district and commune management boards and community development boards. This is followed by a training needs assessment and capacity strengthening of local partners. Nutrition club facilitators are selected by the community and are widely respected and committed to community service. Monthly nutrition club meetings are attended by pregnant women and caregivers of children under five years old. Activities during the nutrition club meeting includes: care and nutrition during pregnancy and the post partum period, complementary feeding, child care practices, development of home gardens and hygiene and sanitation; using interactive facilitation methods such as games, skills practice, role plays and competitions. Follow up home visits are conducted to reinforce positive practices and support vulnerable families. Caregivers who attend the nutrition club have access to community led interest groups such as: chicken raising, livelihoods, agriculture and micro-credit schemes. Nutrition club members pay a small monthly fee that covers cost of refreshments and utilities. Monitoring and supervision is conducted by a team of government district and health center staff. Sustainability of the approach is promoted by mobilizing and utilizing existing resources. An agreement is made between the community development board and World Vision that support for running costs will gradually be reduced and discontinued after four years. The alignment of the nutrition club approach with government policy and priorities

  14. Association between maternal depressive symptoms with child malnutrition or child excess weight

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Thais Feres Moreira; Maciel, Warles Melo; Alencar, Monyk Neves de; Cruz, Joana Athayde da Silva; Carvalho, Carolina Abreu de; Silva, Antônio Augusto Moura da

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: to verify associations between maternal depressive symptoms with child malnutrition or child excess weight. Methods: prospective study with data from the BRISA prenatal cohort in São Luís, Brazil, obtained from the 22nd to the 25th week of gestation (in 2009 and 2010) and, later, when children were aged 12 to 32 months (in 2010 and 2012). Maternal depressive symptoms were identified using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and the Edinburgh Po...

  15. Senior Health: How to Prevent and Detect Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Caregivers Malnutrition is a serious senior health issue. Know the warning signs and how to help an older loved one avoid ... nutrient-rich diet for an older loved one. Malnutrition in older adults can lead to various health ...

  16. The outcome of acute schistosomiasis infection in adult mice with postnatal exposure to maternal malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Leal Corrêa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Maternal malnutrition during the lactation period in early development may have long-term programming effects on adult offspring. We evaluated the combined effects of parasitological behaviour and histopathological features and malnutrition during lactation. Lactating mice and their pups were divided into a control group (fed a normal diet of 23% protein, a protein-restricted group (PR (fed a diet containing 8% protein and a caloric-restricted group (CR (fed according to the PR group intake. At the age of 60 days, the offspring were infected with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae and killed at nine weeks post-infection. Food intake, body and liver masses, leptinaemia, corticosteronaemia, collagen morphometry and neogenesis and the cellular composition of liver granulomas were studied. PR offspring showed reduced weight gain and hypophagia, whereas CR offspring became overweight and developed hyperphagia. The pre-patent period was longer (45 days in both programmed offspring as compared to controls (40 days. The PR-infected group had higher faecal and intestinal egg output and increased liver damage. The CR-infected group showed a lower number of liver granulomas, increased collagen neogenesis and a higher frequency of binucleate hepatocytes, suggesting a better modulation of the inflammatory response and increased liver regeneration. Taken together, our findings suggest that neonatal malnutrition of offspring during lactation affects the outcome of schistosomiasis in mice.

  17. Possible role of the microbiome in the development of acute malnutrition and implications for food-based strategies to prevent and treat acute malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pattern of changes in the microbiome composition have been observed in the normal maturation of the human gut. Perturbations from this pattern have been described in malnourished humans and reproduced in animal models of severe malnutrition. Treatment and prevention of malnutrition in the future m...

  18. The Effects of Intrauterine Malnutrition on Maternal-Fetal Cholesterol Transport and Fetal Lipid Synthesis in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meer, Hester; van Straten, Esther M. E.; Baller, Julius F. W.; van Dijk, Theo H.; Kuipers, Folkert; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Plosch, Torsten

    Intrauterine malnutrition is associated with increased susceptibility to chronic diseases in adulthood. Growth-restricted infants display a less favorable lipid profile already shortly postnatal. Maternal low protein diet (LPD) during gestation is a well-defined model of fetal programming in rodents

  19. Maternal vaccination to prevent pertussis in infants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-09

    Sep 9, 2016 ... that maternal immunisation with the Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis) vaccine is safe. Indeed, maternal vaccination is now recommended to prevent pertussis infection in vulnerable young infants. In the USA and UK, the immunisation of pregnant women with a Tdap or dTaP/IPV (diphtheria, ...

  20. Prevention of Malnutrition in Children, Slimming Yesterday, Obesity Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sharafi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The future of any nation depends on how its children's care, According to their likely future health needs of the adult population model for healthy living and wealth has increased. One of the most pressing health diet. This study is done to aimed investigate the factors influencing malnutrition in children in the past for weight loss and weight gain can be seen today.   Methods and Methods: Related articles referring to achieve in the field of databases to Google scholar, Pub Med, proquest, SID, Magiran, Springer Link,… and studies until 2013 with the key words malnutrition, child, obesity and examine their English.   Results: In the past, malnutrition was associated with weight loss, but for now he has to weight gain and obesity. Childhood obesity is emerging as a phenomenon caused health problems in childhood and adolescence, including hyperlipidemia, obstructive sleep apnea, early puberty, diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular. In addition to the health problems of obese children will benefit from the social and psychological problems such as anxiety, fewer friends, loss of confidence, lower education, and fewer chances for marriage.... Overweight in children can be caused by poor eating habits and low activity, which is affected by the parents and the family environment.   Conclusions: Since the patterns learned in childhood affect all life on lifestyle, understand the causes of obesity and to eliminate or reduce them and reinforce the correct patterns of feeding Through education and the incidence is somewhat reduced, especially for parents to deal with this phenomenon.   Keywords: Child,Malnutrition, Obesity    

  1. Severe childhood malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Berkley, James A; Bandsma, Robert H J; Kerac, Marko; Trehan, Indi; Briend, André

    2017-09-21

    The main forms of childhood malnutrition occur predominantly in children malnutrition. Here, we use the term 'severe malnutrition' to describe these conditions to better reflect the contributions of chronic poverty, poor living conditions with pervasive deficits in sanitation and hygiene, a high prevalence of infectious diseases and environmental insults, food insecurity, poor maternal and fetal nutritional status and suboptimal nutritional intake in infancy and early childhood. Children with severe malnutrition have an increased risk of serious illness and death, primarily from acute infectious diseases. International growth standards are used for the diagnosis of severe malnutrition and provide therapeutic end points. The early detection of severe wasting and kwashiorkor and outpatient therapy for these conditions using ready-to-use therapeutic foods form the cornerstone of modern therapy, and only a small percentage of children require inpatient care. However, the normalization of physiological and metabolic functions in children with malnutrition is challenging, and children remain at high risk of relapse and death. Further research is urgently needed to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of severe malnutrition, especially the mechanisms causing kwashiorkor, and to develop new interventions for prevention and treatment.

  2. Recognition and Prevention of Nosocomial Malnutrition: A Review and A Call to Action!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Lisa L; Shaughnessy, Erin

    2017-12-01

    Nosocomial malnutrition in hospitalized adults is a morbid, costly, and potentially preventable and treatable problem. Although recognized as contributing to many serious complications of hospitalization, malnutrition is often missed when present on admission and rarely diagnosed if it occurs during hospital stay. Many routine clinical practices such as holding nutrition for testing or failing to address poor intake, when added to acute inflammatory disease states, cause rapid deterioration in nutritional status in up to 70% of inpatients. Malnutrition during hospitalization is associated with increased mortality for years after discharge. In addition, unrecognized (and under-coded) malnutrition is associated with potential lost revenues for hospital systems. Low-cost interventions of recognizing at-risk patients and providing adequate nutrition have the potential to improve patient outcomes and reduce health care costs. Physicians must champion implementation of these interventions, using guidance from national organizations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Understanding the gastrointestinal tract of the elderly to develop dietary solutions that prevent malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémond, Didier; Shahar, Danit R.; Gille, Doreen; Pinto, Paula; Kachal, Josefa; Peyron, Marie-Agnès; Dos Santos, Claudia Nunes; Walther, Barbara; Bordoni, Alessandra; Dupont, Didier; Tomás-Cobos, Lidia; Vergères, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Although the prevalence of malnutrition in the old age is increasing worldwide a synthetic understanding of the impact of aging on the intake, digestion, and absorption of nutrients is still lacking. This review article aims at filling the gap in knowledge between the functional decline of the aging gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and the consequences of malnutrition on the health status of elderly. Changes in the aging GIT include the mechanical disintegration of food, gastrointestinal motor function, food transit, chemical food digestion, and functionality of the intestinal wall. These alterations progressively decrease the ability of the GIT to provide the aging organism with adequate levels of nutrients, what contributes to the development of malnutrition. Malnutrition, in turn, increases the risks for the development of a range of pathologies associated with most organ systems, in particular the nervous-, muscoskeletal-, cardiovascular-, immune-, and skin systems. In addition to psychological, economics, and societal factors, dietary solutions preventing malnutrition should thus propose dietary guidelines and food products that integrate knowledge on the functionality of the aging GIT and the nutritional status of the elderly. Achieving this goal will request the identification, validation, and correlative analysis of biomarkers of food intake, nutrient bioavailability, and malnutrition. PMID:26091351

  4. The Effectiveness of Community Health Workers Approach in Preventing Moderate Malnutrition among Infants and Young Children in Bethlehem villages in Palestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Rabadi, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Background and aims: Infant and young child feeding practices are critically important for preventing and managing moderate malnutrition. The Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics report 2011 revealed that malnutrition among children under-five in Palestine is on rise. Between the years 2000 and 2010, prevalence of malnutrition rose by 41.3% on the national level. Currently, 11 out of 100 children under-five suffer malnutrition. An assessment on maternal child health and nutrition conducted by World Vision in the same year in Bethlehem governorate in Palestine ,showed that malnutrition among children are mostly attributed to poor knowledge and practices among caregivers especially mothers in regards to breastfeeding, complementary feeding, feeding during illness and supplementation. The objective of this intervention is to assess the effectiveness of home targeted and timely visits by trained community health workers (CHWs) for increased knowledge and improved practices among caregivers regarding IYCF as a preventive approach to moderate malnutrition. Method: An intervention study was carried out by World Vision in eleven villages surrounding Bethlehem. Mothers (n = 360) of infants born during the year 2011, 2012 were identified by 17 trained CHWs. The CHWs targeted the mothers with key messages and support for positive infant and young child feeding practices during organized home-visits throughout 14 months. Baseline and end-line data were collected through household interviews. Results and discussion: Infant and young child feeding practices were significantly improved after the intervention; exclusive breastfeeding until 6 months increased from 44.7% to 65.7% (P <0.001), duration of breastfeeding above one year increased from 66.8% to 82.5% (P <0.001),timely introduction of the complementary meals increased from 71.5% to 87%,offering the minimum meal diversity increased from 28.5% to 78.9% (P <0.001), meal frequency increased from 4.2%-75.9% (P <0

  5. Treatment and prevention of malnutrition in Latin America: focus on Chile and Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisstaub, Gerardo; Aguilar, Ana Maria; Uauy, Ricardo

    2014-06-01

    Seven million children under 5 years of age died worldwide in 2011, and one-third had malnutrition. Latin America and Caribbean countries stand out for the notable improvement of their health and nutrition situation, particularly in pregnant women and young children. Nutrition-sensitive interventions such as promoting food security, women's empowerment, social safety nets, clean water, and sanitation, among others, are critical for success. In Bolivia, the program Desnutrición Cero (Malnutrition Zero) was able to reduce mortality from severe malnutrition after 5 years from 25% to less than 5%, based on widespread implementation of the World Health Organization 10-steps protocol for hospitalized care and the application of community management. The Economic Commission for Latin America estimated the cost of malnutrition for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, and the Dominican Republic as US $6,658 million. Approximately 1 million children have dropped out of school because of malnutrition, and as a result, malnourished children have 2 years less schooling, which brings social and economic losses not only to those affected but to society at large. National and international nutrition and food programs developed over the past 50 years have been implemented as integral components of broader strategies of primary healthcare and education, oriented toward preventing deaths and improving the quality of life of low-socioeconomic-status groups. Treating hundreds or thousands of affected children will not solve the global public health problem of malnutrition. Access to adequate amounts of quality foods represents a basic human right and is a necessary precondition for health. In turn, good nutrition and health are prerequisites for human, social, and economic development.

  6. Prevención de la desnutrición de la madre y el niño: el componente de nutrición de la Iniciativa Salud Mesoamérica 2015 Preventing maternal and child malnutrition: The nutrition component of the Mesoamerican Health Initiative 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Rivera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Describir un plan maestro para el desarrollo de planes nacionales para prevenir la desnutrición materno-infantil en Mesoamérica en un plazo de cinco años. Para ello se elaboró un análisis sobre los principales problemas, políticas y programas de nutrición en Mesoamérica. A partir del análisis y de la revisión de la literatura sobre las mejores prácticas en el combate a la desnutrición, el Grupo Técnico de Nutrición desarrolló, discutió y validó el plan durante varias reuniones presenciales. Se desarrolló la teoría de cambio que identifica los problemas y barreras, las acciones propuestas, los cambios e impactos esperados. Se propone la implementación de paquetes de intervenciones para reducir la desnutrición y deficiencia de micronutrientes de utilidad para diversos contextos epidemiológicos. El plan maestro de nutrición constituye un insumo que puede facilitar la elaboración de propuestas de programas y políticas dirigidos a reducir la desnutrición y promover la toma de decisiones basadas en evidencia.To describe the regional master plan of nutrition to address maternal and child malnutrition in a 5- year period developed by the Nutrition Technical Group. The Nutrition Technical Group developed a situation analysis describing the main nutrition problems, policies and programs in Mesoamerica. The situation analysis and a literature review about effective interventions to address malnutrition were conducted to develop a nutrition master plan. The Nutrition Technical Group held various meetings to develop, discuss and validate the master plan. Theory of change identified problems and barriers, the actions to be developed, the changes and impacts expected. A package of interventions is proposed to reduce undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies useful under different epidemiological contexts. The nutrition master plan provides a guideline of best practices that can be used for evidence-informed decision making and the

  7. Interventions for preventing or treating malnutrition in homeless problem-drinkers: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Ijaz, Sharea; Thorley, Helen; Porter, Katie; Fleming, Clare; Jones, Tim; Kesten, Joanna; Mamluk, Loubaba; Richards, Alison; Marques, Elsa M. R.; Savović, Jelena

    2018-01-01

    Background: Excessive drinking leads to poor absorption of nutrients and homeless problem-drinkers often have nutritionally inadequate diets. Depletion of nutrients such as vitamin B1 can lead to cognitive impairment, which can hinder efforts to reduce drinking or engage with services. This review aimed to assess effectiveness of interventions designed to prevent or treat malnutrition in homeless problem-drinkers.Methods: We systematically searched nine electronic databases and 13 grey litera...

  8. The role of maternal education in the 15-year trajectory of malnutrition in children under 5 years of age in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md Tanvir; Soares Magalhaes, Ricardo J; Williams, Gail M; Mamun, Abdullah A

    2016-10-01

    Malnutrition in children under 5 years of age (U5s) is a serious public health problem in low- and middle-income countries including Bangladesh. Improved maternal education can contribute effectively to reduce child malnutrition. We examined the long-term impact of maternal education on the risk of malnutrition in U5s and quantified the level of education required for the mothers to reduce the risk. We used pooled data from five nationwide demographic and health surveys conducted in 1996-1997, 1999-2000, 2004, 2007 and 2011 in Bangladesh involving 28 941 U5s. A log-binomial regression model was used to examine the association between maternal education (no education, primary, secondary or more) and malnutrition in children, measured by stunting, underweight and wasting controlling for survey time, maternal age, maternal body mass index, maternal working status, parity, paternal education and wealth quintile. An overall improvement in maternal educational attainment was observed between 1996 and 2011. The prevalence of malnutrition although decreasing was consistently high among children of mothers with lower education compared with those of mothers with higher education. In adjusted models incorporating time effects, children of mothers with secondary or higher education were at lower risk of childhood stunting [risk ratio (RR): 0.86, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.81, 0.89], underweight (RR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.78, 0.88) and wasting (RR: 0.82, 95% CI: 0.74, 0.91) compared with children of mothers with no education. We demonstrated the importance of promoting women's education at least up to the secondary level as a means to tackle malnutrition in Bangladesh. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Preventing hospital malnutrition: a survey on nutritional policies in an Italian University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annetta, M G; Pittiruti, M; De Rosa, S; Franchi, P; Pintaudi, G; Caricato, A; Antonelli, M

    2015-11-01

    A proper strategy for fighting hospital malnutrition should include nutritional screening of all hospitalized patients, adequate utilization of the Hospital facilities - such as Clinical Nutrition Services or Nutrition Teams - and an adequate algorithm for the adoption of proper nutrition support (oral, enteral or parenteral) with proper timing. The main aim of the present study was to investigate the current policies of different non-intensive wards of our institution (a 1100 beds University Hospital) in terms of prevention of hospital malnutrition. We conducted a one-day survey to verify the current policies of nutritional screening and the indication to nutritional support in adult patients, interviewing nurses and physicians of our non-intensive hospital wards. A total of 29 wards were considered, which sum up to 755 hospitalized patients. We found that nutritional screening at admission is routinely assessed only in 41% of wards and that oral nutrient intake is controlled regularly only in 72%. Indication to clinical nutrition support and specifically to artificial nutrition is not consistent with the current international guidelines. Only 14% of patients were receiving artificial nutrition at the moment of the survey and the majority of them were given parenteral nutrition rather than enteral feeding. Our survey confirmed that in large hospitals the main barriers to the fight against hospital malnutrition are the lack of knowledge and/or commitment by nurses and physicians as well as the lack of well-defined hospital policies on early nutritional screening, surveillance of nutritional status and indication to nutrition support.

  10. Maternal Malaria and Malnutrition (M3) initiative, a pooled birth cohort of 13 pregnancy studies in Africa and the Western Pacific

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unger, Holger W; Cates, Jordan E; Gutman, Julie

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Maternal Malaria and Malnutrition (M3) initiative has pooled together 13 studies with the hope of improving understanding of malaria-nutrition interactions during pregnancy and to foster collaboration between nutritionists and malariologists. PARTICIPANTS: Data were pooled on 14 635...

  11. Prevention of Moderate Acute Malnutrition (MAM) Positive Deviance Hearth (PDH) Approach in Burundi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madagasha, Aristide; Tse, Carmen; Baik, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Background and Objectives: PDH approach utilizes local resources and solutions to rehabilitate and prevent future malnutrition in children under five. Although PDH focuses on addressing underweight, PDH includes children with MAM and may have potential to address and prevent MAM where community-based management of acute malnutrition (CMAM), specifically targeted supplementary feeding component, may not be appropriate. The objectives are: 1) to assess the effectiveness of PDH to reduce moderate and severe underweight in participant children as well as prevent malnutrition in younger siblings of participant children; and 2) to assess PDH’s effectiveness for treatment and prevention of MAM in ten villages in Burundi. Methods: Starting September to November 2012, PDH was implemented by trained community volunteers in the ten villages. A “positive deviant” inquiry identified local practices that positively impact child nutritional status. These practices were transferred to families of malnourished children through experiential learning during 12 days of “Hearth” sessions. Two weeks of home visits followed Hearth. Mid-upper arm circumference of participant children (n = 70) were measured on the first day of Hearth, with appropriate referral for cases of severe acute malnutrition. Weights of children were assessed at Day 1 (n = 94), 12 (n = 94), 30 (n = 74) and one year after the start of Hearth (n = 92). Weight gain of children at Day 12 and 30 were compared with standard weight gains for PDH (200-250 grams for Day 12 and 400 grams for Day 30). Younger siblings were also weighed at the one year follow-up (n = 73). Results: Mean weight-for-age z-scores (WAZ) of the children improved from -3.1±0.2 to -1.1±0.1 (p<0.001), showing sustained catch-up growth at home. Almost all children achieved the standard weight gain on Day 12 and Day 30 (92.6% (87/94) and 98.6% (73/74), respectively). Within one year, severe and moderate underweight decreased from 77

  12. Cost-effectiveness of an interdisciplinary intervention in geriatric inpatients to prevent malnutrition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijpkema, G.; Adang, E.M.M.; Dicke, H.C.; Naber, A.H.J.; Swart, B.J.M. de; Disselhorst, L.; Goluke-Willemse, G.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In order to reduce protein-energy malnutrition in older people during hospitalisation an early interdisciplinary intervention is needed. We developed a protocol which includes screening for malnutrition, dysphagia and dehydration on admission, followed by immediate interventions.

  13. Maternal Obesity: Consequences and Prevention Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Yanikkerem

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat that it may have an adverse effect on health, leading to life expectancy and increased health problems. In keeping with the general international trend of rising prevalence of obesity, maternal obesity prevalence is rising. According to WHO, the prevalence of obesity in pregnancy ranges from 1.8 to 25.3%. Maternal obesity has been identified to be a risk factor for maternal and perinatal mortality. The aim of this article was reviewed in research about maternal obesity in Pubmed, which published between 2009 and 2010. 7 reviews and 13 studies was examined and they presented under this headings: impacts of maternal obesity in pregnancy, obstetric outcomes of maternal obesity, postpartum outcomes of maternal obesity, impact of maternal obesity on breastfeeding, impact of maternal obesity on procedure of anomaly scan and risk determination, maternal obesity and fetal complications, impact of maternal obesity on Apgar scores, obesity and infertility, pregnancy following bariatric surgery, long term effects of obesity, management of maternal obesity. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(3.000: 353-364

  14. Disturbed nitric oxide and homocysteine production are involved in the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases in the F1 offspring of maternal obesity and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Y Y; Tawfik, S H; Haiba, M M; Saad, M I; Hanafi, M Y; Abdelkhalek, T M; Oriquat, G A; Kamel, M A

    2017-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the changes in levels of different independent risk factors for vascular diseases in the rat offspring of maternal obesity and malnutrition as maternal health disturbances are thought to have direct consequences on the offspring health. The effect of postnatal diet on the offspring was also assessed. Three groups of female Wistar rats were used (control, obese and malnourished). After the pregnancy and delivery, the offspring were weaned to control diet or high-caloric (HCD) diet and followed up for 30 weeks. Every 5 weeks postnatal, 20 pups (10 males and 10 females) of each subgroup were sacrificed after overnight fasting, the blood sample was obtained, and the rats were dissected out to obtain heart muscle. The following parameters were assessed; lipid profile, NEFA, homocysteine (Hcy), nitric oxide end product (NOx) and myocardial triglyceride content. Maternal obesity and malnutrition caused significant elevation in the body weight, triglycerides, NEFA, Hcy and NOx in the F1 offspring especially those maintained under HCD. Also, the male offspring showed more prominent changes than female offspring. Maternal malnutrition and obesity may increase the risk of the development of cardiovascular diseases in the offspring, especially the male ones.

  15. Maternal protein-energy malnutrition during early pregnancy in sheep impacts the fetal ornithine cycle to reduce fetal kidney microvascular development.

    OpenAIRE

    Dunford, L. J.; Sinclair, K. D.; Kwong, W. Y.; Sturrock, C.; Clifford, B. L.; Giles, T. C.; Gardner, D. S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies a common nutritional pathway relating maternal through to fetal protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and compromised fetal kidney development. Thirty-one twin-bearing sheep were fed either a control (n=15) or low-protein diet (n=16, 17 vs. 8.7 g crude protein/MJ metabolizable energy) from d 0 to 65 gestation (term, ?145 d). Effects on the maternal and fetal nutritional environment were characterized by sampling blood and amniotic fluid. Kidney development was characterized ...

  16. Prevention of falls, malnutrition and pressure ulcers among older persons - nursing staff's experiences of a structured preventive care process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannering, Christina; Ernsth Bravell, Marie; Johansson, Linda

    2017-05-01

    A structured and systematic care process for preventive work, aimed to reduce falls, pressure ulcers and malnutrition among older people, has been developed in Sweden. The process involves risk assessment, team-based interventions and evaluation of results. Since development, this structured work process has become web-based and has been implemented in a national quality registry called 'Senior Alert' and used countrywide. The aim of this study was to describe nursing staff's experience of preventive work by using the structured preventive care process as outlined by Senior Alert. Eight focus group interviews were conducted during 2015 including staff from nursing homes and home-based nursing care in three municipalities. The interview material was subjected to qualitative content analysis. In this study, both positive and negative opinions were expressed about the process. The systematic and structured work flow seemed to only partly facilitate care providers to improve care quality by making better clinical assessments, performing team-based planned interventions and learning from results. Participants described lack of reliability in the assessments and varying opinions about the structure. Furthermore, organisational structures limited the preventive work. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The IAEA Establishes Partnerships with International Organizations to Prevent Malnutrition in Children and Older People

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf, Omar

    2014-01-01

    The period from conception to 2 years of age — the first thousand days of a child’s life — represents a critical window of opportunity for avoiding health risks later in life. The assessment of growth during this crucial period of early vulnerability has traditionally been largely based on anthropometric measurements such as body weight and length, with less attention to the quality of growth and the relative partitioning of nutrients to fat-free mass or fat mass. However, now, the amount and distribution of body fat and the amount and composition of lean mass are understood to be very important for the long term health prospects of infants and children. Isotope techniques can be used to measure body composition with a high degree of accuracy. This provides governments with key data to enable them to make decisions about national nutrition interventions on the basis of evidence. The IAEA is working in partnership with international organizations around the world to reduce malnutrition, and, consequently, to alleviate the multitude of preventable diseases caused by poor nutrition

  18. Interventions for preventing or treating malnutrition in homeless problem-drinkers: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaz, Sharea; Thorley, Helen; Porter, Katie; Fleming, Clare; Jones, Tim; Kesten, Joanna; Mamluk, Loubaba; Richards, Alison; Marques, Elsa M R; Savović, Jelena

    2018-01-16

    Excessive drinking leads to poor absorption of nutrients and homeless problem-drinkers often have nutritionally inadequate diets. Depletion of nutrients such as vitamin B1 can lead to cognitive impairment, which can hinder efforts to reduce drinking or engage with services. This review aimed to assess effectiveness of interventions designed to prevent or treat malnutrition in homeless problem-drinkers. We systematically searched nine electronic databases and 13 grey literature sources for studies evaluating interventions to improve nutrition in homeless populations, without regional or language restrictions. Screening for inclusion was done in duplicate. One reviewer extracted data and assessed risk of bias, and another checked the extractions. Primary outcomes were nutrition status/deficiency, liver damage, and cognitive function. Secondary outcomes included abstinence, comorbidities, resource use, acceptability and engagement with intervention. Results were synthesised narratively. We included 25 studies (2 Randomised Controlled Trials; 15 uncontrolled before and after; 7 surveys; 1 case-control). Nine studies evaluated educational and support interventions, five food provision, and three supplement provision. Eight studies evaluated a combination of these interventions. No two interventions were the same, and all studies were at high risk of bias. Nutritional status (intake/ deficiency) were reported in 11 studies and liver function in one. Fruit and vegetable intake improved with some education and support interventions (n = 4 studies) but not others (n = 2). Vitamin supplements appeared to improve vitamin deficiency levels in the blood (n = 2). Free or subsidised meals (n = 4) and food packs (n = 1) did not always fulfil dietary needs, but were usually considered acceptable by users. Some multicomponent interventions improved nutrition (n = 3) but acceptability varied (n = 3). No study reported cost effectiveness. The evidence for

  19. Maternal and fetal cytomegalovirus infection: diagnosis, management, and prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Robert F.; Arav-Boger, Ravit

    2018-01-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus infection is a major cause of central nervous system and sensory impairments that affect cognition, motor function, hearing, language development, vestibular function, and vision. Although the importance of congenital cytomegalovirus infection is readily evident, the vast majority of maternal and fetal infections are not identified, even in developed countries. Multiple studies of prenatal cytomegalovirus infections have produced a body of knowledge that can inform the clinical approach to suspected or proven maternal and fetal infection. Reliable diagnosis of cytomegalovirus infection during pregnancy and accurate diagnosis of fetal infection are a reality. Approaches to preventing the transmission of cytomegalovirus from mother to fetus and to the treatment of fetal infection are being studied. There is evidence that public health approaches based on hygiene can dramatically reduce the rate of primary maternal cytomegalovirus infections during pregnancy. This review will consider the epidemiology of congenital cytomegalovirus infection, the diagnosis and management of primary infection during pregnancy, and approaches to preventing maternal infection. PMID:29560263

  20. Preventing acute malnutrition among young children in crises: a prospective intervention study in Niger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Langendorf

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Finding the most appropriate strategy for the prevention of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM and severe acute malnutrition (SAM in young children is essential in countries like Niger with annual "hunger gaps." Options for large-scale prevention include distribution of supplementary foods, such as fortified-blended foods or lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs with or without household support (cash or food transfer. To date, there has been no direct controlled comparison between these strategies leading to debate concerning their effectiveness. We compared the effectiveness of seven preventive strategies-including distribution of nutritious supplementary foods, with or without additional household support (family food ration or cash transfer, and cash transfer only-on the incidence of SAM and MAM among children aged 6-23 months over a 5-month period, partly overlapping the hunger gap, in Maradi region, Niger. We hypothesized that distributions of supplementary foods would more effectively reduce the incidence of acute malnutrition than distributions of household support by cash transfer. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a prospective intervention study in 48 rural villages located within 15 km of a health center supported by Forum Santé Niger (FORSANI/Médecins Sans Frontières in Madarounfa. Seven groups of villages (five to 11 villages were allocated to different strategies of monthly distributions targeting households including at least one child measuring 60 cm-80 cm (at any time during the study period whatever their nutritional status: three groups received high-quantity LNS (HQ-LNS or medium-quantity LNS (MQ-LNS or Super Cereal Plus (SC+ with cash (€38/month [US$52/month]; one group received SC+ and family food ration; two groups received HQ-LNS or SC+ only; one group received cash only (€43/month [US$59/month]. Children 60 cm-80 cm of participating households were assessed at each monthly distribution from August to

  1. Preventing Acute Malnutrition among Young Children in Crises: A Prospective Intervention Study in Niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langendorf, Céline; Roederer, Thomas; de Pee, Saskia; Brown, Denise; Doyon, Stéphane; Mamaty, Abdoul-Aziz; Touré, Lynda W.-M.; Manzo, Mahamane L.; Grais, Rebecca F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Finding the most appropriate strategy for the prevention of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) and severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in young children is essential in countries like Niger with annual “hunger gaps.” Options for large-scale prevention include distribution of supplementary foods, such as fortified-blended foods or lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs) with or without household support (cash or food transfer). To date, there has been no direct controlled comparison between these strategies leading to debate concerning their effectiveness. We compared the effectiveness of seven preventive strategies—including distribution of nutritious supplementary foods, with or without additional household support (family food ration or cash transfer), and cash transfer only—on the incidence of SAM and MAM among children aged 6–23 months over a 5-month period, partly overlapping the hunger gap, in Maradi region, Niger. We hypothesized that distributions of supplementary foods would more effectively reduce the incidence of acute malnutrition than distributions of household support by cash transfer. Methods and Findings We conducted a prospective intervention study in 48 rural villages located within 15 km of a health center supported by Forum Santé Niger (FORSANI)/Médecins Sans Frontières in Madarounfa. Seven groups of villages (five to 11 villages) were allocated to different strategies of monthly distributions targeting households including at least one child measuring 60 cm–80 cm (at any time during the study period whatever their nutritional status): three groups received high-quantity LNS (HQ-LNS) or medium-quantity LNS (MQ-LNS) or Super Cereal Plus (SC+) with cash (€38/month [US$52/month]); one group received SC+ and family food ration; two groups received HQ-LNS or SC+ only; one group received cash only (€43/month [US$59/month]). Children 60 cm–80 cm of participating households were assessed at each monthly distribution from

  2. Maternal protein-energy malnutrition during early pregnancy in sheep impacts the fetal ornithine cycle to reduce fetal kidney microvascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Louise J; Sinclair, Kevin D; Kwong, Wing Y; Sturrock, Craig; Clifford, Bethan L; Giles, Tom C; Gardner, David S

    2014-11-01

    This paper identifies a common nutritional pathway relating maternal through to fetal protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and compromised fetal kidney development. Thirty-one twin-bearing sheep were fed either a control (n=15) or low-protein diet (n=16, 17 vs. 8.7 g crude protein/MJ metabolizable energy) from d 0 to 65 gestation (term, ∼ 145 d). Effects on the maternal and fetal nutritional environment were characterized by sampling blood and amniotic fluid. Kidney development was characterized by histology, immunohistochemistry, vascular corrosion casts, and molecular biology. PEM had little measureable effect on maternal and fetal macronutrient balance (glucose, total protein, total amino acids, and lactate were unaffected) or on fetal growth. PEM decreased maternal and fetal urea concentration, which blunted fetal ornithine availability and affected fetal hepatic polyamine production. For the first time in a large animal model, we associated these nutritional effects with reduced micro- but not macrovascular development in the fetal kidney. Maternal PEM specifically impacts the fetal ornithine cycle, affecting cellular polyamine metabolism and microvascular development of the fetal kidney, effects that likely underpin programming of kidney development and function by a maternal low protein diet. © FASEB.

  3. Wernicke's encephalopathy: a preventable cause of maternal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedisinghe, Lilantha; Jayakody, Kaushadh; Arambage, Kirana

    2011-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare cause of maternal death. It is a difficult diagnosis to make but prevention and treatment is straightforward. Severe thiamine deficiency causes Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Correct diagnosis and treatment with thiamine will decrease the case fatality rate.

  4. Interventions for preventing or treating malnutrition in problem drinkers who are homeless or vulnerably housed: protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorley, Helen; Porter, Katie; Fleming, Clare; Jones, Tim; Kesten, Joanna; Marques, Elsa; Richards, Alison; Savović, Jelena

    2015-09-29

    Problem alcohol drinking in homeless and vulnerably housed people can lead to malnutrition, which is associated with complications such as alcohol-related brain damage. Homeless alcohol drinkers are likely to have worse health outcomes and different nutritional needs compared with housed alcohol-drinking persons. It is not clear whether interventions to improve nutritional status in this population have been effective. The purpose of this review is to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of interventions for preventing or correcting micronutrient deficiencies and other forms of malnutrition and related comorbidities in this population. A systematic search for studies of a nutrition-based intervention applied in the homeless or vulnerably housed population with problem drinking will be conducted. The following electronic databases will be systematically searched for relevant studies: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, PsycINFO, CAB abstracts, CINAHL, Cochrane Public Health Group Register and Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group Register. Screening of identified abstracts for relevance and assessment of papers for inclusion will be done in duplicate. One reviewer will extract data from the studies and assess quality, and this will be checked by another reviewer. Discrepancies will be resolved by consensus. The primary outcomes are (mal)nutrition status or micronutrient deficiencies or change in (mal)nutrition status or micronutrient deficiencies, measures of liver damage and cognitive function. Secondary outcomes include comorbidities, quality of life and functional scales, resources used to deliver treatment, uptake/acceptability of the intervention and engagement with treatment services. Results will be analysed descriptively, and, if appropriate, meta-analyses will be performed. The results of this review should help to inform the development of effective interventions that can be implemented in the community to improve the health of homeless people who are

  5. Malnutrition in Dutch health care: prevalence, prevention, treatment, and quality indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, Judith M M; Halfens, Ruud J G; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, Marian A E; Dassen, Theo; Schols, Jos M G A

    2009-05-01

    In most health care organizations there is still insufficient awareness for recognizing and treating malnourished patients. To gain more insight into nutritional care policies in Dutch health care organizations, this study investigated screening, treatment, and other quality indicators of nutritional care. In 2007 a cross-sectional multicenter study was performed that included 20 255 patients (hospitals, n = 6021; nursing homes, n = 11 902; home care, n = 2332). A standardized questionnaire was used to study nutritional screening and treatment at the patient level and quality indicators at institutional and ward levels (e.g., malnutrition guidelines/protocols, nutritional education, and weighing policy). Nutritional screening was performed more often in nursing homes (60.2%) than in hospitals (40.3%) and home care (13.9%, P hospitals, and home care. At ward level nursing homes focused more on the quality of nutritional care than did hospitals and home care, especially with respect to controlling the use of nutritional guidelines (54.6%, P malnutrition is still a considerable problem in one of every five patients in all participating health care settings. It furthermore demonstrates that recognizing and treating malnutrition continues to be problematic. To target the problem of malnutrition adequately, more awareness is needed of the importance of nutritional screening, appropriate treatment, and other nutritional quality indicators.

  6. A study of Community Based Nutritional Intervention and prevention of malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Anupama Toppo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: PEM is one of the major health and nutritional problem in India. It is not only an important cause of childhood mortality and morbidity but also leads to permanent impairment of both physical and mental growth of those who survive. Malnutrition is implicated in >50% of deaths of <5 children (5 million/yr. Improving nutrition for children is crucial in meeting two of the Millennium Development Goals. According to national family health survey-3 there is considerable variation across states with Madhya Pradesh recording the highest rate for underweight children (60.3% and Kerala among the lowest (28.8%. The great majority of cases of PEM nearly 80% are intermediate that is mild and moderate cases which frequently go unrecognized. These are the fact that made us to pick this issue in order to benefit the children of locality to some extent. Objectives: To identify under 5 year children with malnutrition, To demonstrate the method of preparing high protein mix diet and to educate mothers about adequate recommended diet as per age of children, To find out whether high protein mix improves nutritional status of identified malnourished children. Methodology: It was cross sectional and interventional study carried out in two villages of Jabalpur districts during the period of three months among 100 under five children. We had screened them and calculated weight for age (% and categorized them according to Gomez Classification that is normal, mild, moderate and severe malnutrition. Intervention was done on malnourished children then 4 follow ups at the interval of 15 days. Intervention strategies: Nutrition education and provision of High Protein Mix Diet. Result: 12% children were identified as malnourished where 7% were having mild grade malnutrition and 5% with moderate grade of malnutrition. Among male there were 14.04% children were malnourished while among female 9.3% were malnourished. After intervention 50% children were showing

  7. Maternal early warning systems-Towards reducing preventable maternal mortality and severe maternal morbidity through improved clinical surveillance and responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwise, Lisa C; Lipkind, Heather S

    2017-04-01

    Despite increasing awareness of obstetric safety initiatives, maternal mortality and severe maternal morbidity in the United States have continued to increase over the past 20 years. Since results from large-scale surveillance programs suggest that up to 50% of maternal deaths may be preventable, new efforts are focused on developing and testing early warning systems for the obstetric population. Early warning systems are a set of specific clinical signs or symptoms that trigger the awareness of risk and an urgent patient evaluation, with the goal of reducing severe morbidity and mortality through timely diagnosis and treatment. Early warning systems have proven effective at predicting and reducing mortality and severe morbidity in medical, surgical, and critical care patient populations; however, there has been limited research on how to adapt these tools for use in the obstetric population, where physiologic changes of pregnancy render them inadequate. In this article, we review the available obstetric early warning systems and present evidence for their use in reducing maternal mortality and severe maternal morbidity. We also discuss considerations and strategies for implementation and acceptance of these early warning systems for clinical use in obstetrics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A study of Community Based Nutritional Intervention and prevention of malnutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Neelam Anupama Toppo

    2015-01-01

    Background: PEM is one of the major health and nutritional problem in India. It is not only an important cause of childhood mortality and morbidity but also leads to permanent impairment of both physical and mental growth of those who survive. Malnutrition is implicated in >50% of deaths of <5 children (5 million/yr). Improving nutrition for children is crucial in meeting two of the Millennium Development Goals. According to national family health survey-3 there is considerable variatio...

  9. Prevention and management of maternal obesity in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    E. Alexopoulou; N. Giannousi; I. K. Thanasas

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays obesity is one of the most important nutritional problems with features contemporary epidemic which concerns not only the developed but also the developing countries. Obesity during pregnancy associate with maternal and perinatal risks that make the management of obesity, before and during pregnancy imperative. The best and most effective treatment of obesity in pregnancy is prevention. A healthy diet and regular exercise of pregnant woman is crucial for the normal dev...

  10. Protein energy malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Zubin; Ee, Looi C

    2009-10-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) is a common problem worldwide and occurs in both developing and industrialized nations. In the developing world, it is frequently a result of socioeconomic, political, or environmental factors. In contrast, protein energy malnutrition in the developed world usually occurs in the context of chronic disease. There remains much variation in the criteria used to define malnutrition, with each method having its own limitations. Early recognition, prompt management, and robust follow up are critical for best outcomes in preventing and treating PEM.

  11. Postpartum haemorrhage: a preventable cause of maternal mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaheen, B.; Hassan, L.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the preventable predictors of severe postpartum haemorrhage and the adverse outcome associated with it. All the admitted patients who developed severe postpartum haemorrhage (>1500 ml) were included in the study. Clinical and sociodemographic data was obtained along with results of investigations to categorize the complications encountered. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were determined. During the study period, 75 out of 4683 obstetrical admissions, developed severe postpartum haemorrhage (1.6 %). About 65% of the patients were admitted with some other complications including obstructed labour, antepartum haemorrhage and eclampsia. The risk factors were grand multiparity (OR=3.4), pre-eclampsia (OR=2.75), antepartum haemorrhage (OR=13.35), active labour of more than 10 hours (OR=46.92), twin delivery (OR=3.25), instrumental delivery (OR=8.62) and caesarean section (OR=9.74). Maternal mortality in these cases was 2.66% and residual morbidity being 40%. Birth attendant other than doctor and delivery outside the study unit were significantly associated with the adverse outcome in these patients. Maternal outcome associated with postpartum haemorrhage is a function of care given during labour and postnatal period with early diagnosis and management of the complication and its risk factors, being the key of good maternal outcome. (author)

  12. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PREVENTION AND IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM OF MALNUTRITION IN CHILDREN UNDER FIVE YEARS AT SIAK HULU III PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    winda septiani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Prevention and tackling malnutrition is an effort to anticipate potential problem of malnutrition before incident malnutrition and combat cases of malnutrition has happebed. Puskesmas Siak Hulu III has happened malnutrished cases for three years successive. The aim of this research is aware of the problem of malnutrition program of prevention and tacking Puskesmas Siak Hulu III the program implementation so far, and wich has operated community health center. The reseach a qualitative method being used. This research executed in june until july 2015. An analysis of the data done is analysis before in the feald, during analysis in the field, and analysis of after in a fieldwork constisting of an analysis of the domain, taxonomic analysis, componencial analysis and the theme of it’s cultural analysis. Informants in this research is 8 of a person taken based in the principle of sufficiency (Adequasy. The research result obtained important themes of human resources, financing system, as well as advice remains a big problem in achieving the program. Most being considerate in the research is not stead a source of the national budget in the form of vehicle operational cost calculation in the program implementation. While the implementation of the program against the technical level is still experiencing a sumber of problems that could actualy be solved well namely coordination between health workers (midwives cadres parents with toddkers and of health worker was recommended to all community health center head, the program nutrition and holders the village midwives priority heath to be more effort to promote compared with the effort to curative is cases of malnutrition.

  13. [Dietary prevention of protein-energy malnutrition during early postoperative period in elderly patients with gastroduodenal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranovskiĭ, A Iu; Protopopova, O B

    2012-01-01

    The modified diet of postoperative rehabilitation program in elderly patients with gastroduodenal ulcers and prognosis of development of protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is presented. It is shown that early initiated special diet in postoperative period, blocks mechanisms of malnutrition and can significantly improve the functional status of the small intestine and activate, thus, membrane digestion, which leads to normalization of all types of metabolism in elderly patients. In comparison with control group, where 72% of patients in postoperative period had malnutrition, malnutrition in the study group revealed a mild degree in only 17.3% of patients.

  14. Stool frequency recording in severe acute malnutrition ('StoolSAM'); an agreement study comparing maternal recall versus direct observation using diapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskuijl, Wieger; Potani, Isabel; Bandsma, Robert; Baan, Anne; White, Sarah; Bourdon, Celine; Kerac, Marko

    2017-06-07

    Approximately 50% of the deaths of children under the age of 5 can be attributed to undernutrition, which also encompasses severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Diarrhoea is strongly associated with these deaths and is commonly diagnosed solely based on stool frequency and consistency obtained through maternal recall. This trial aims to determine whether this approach is equivalent to a 'directly observed method' in which a health care worker directly observed stool frequency using diapers in hospitalised children with complicated SAM. This study was conducted at 'Moyo' Nutritional Rehabilitation Unit, Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Malawi. Participants were children aged 5-59 months admitted with SAM. We compared 2 days of stool frequency data obtained with next-day maternal-recall versus a 'gold standard' in which a health care worker observed stool frequency every 2 h using diapers. After study completion, guardians were asked their preferred method and their level of education. We found poor agreement between maternal recall and the 'gold standard' of directly observed diapers. The sensitivity to detect diarrhoea based on maternal recall was poor, with only 75 and 56% of diarrhoea cases identified on days 1 and 2, respectively. However, the specificity was higher with more than 80% of children correctly classified as not having diarrhoea. On day 1, the mean stool frequency difference between the two methods was -0.17 (SD; 1.68) with limits of agreement (of stool frequency) of -3.55 and 3.20 and, similarly on day 2, the mean difference was -0.2 (SD; 1.59) with limits of agreement of -3.38 and 2.98. These limits extend beyond the pre-specified 'acceptable' limits of agreement (±1.5 stool per day) and indicate that the 2 methods are non-equivalent. The higher the stool frequency, the more discrepant the two methods were. Most primary care givers strongly preferred using diapers. This study shows lack of agreement between the assessment of stool frequency in SAM

  15. Malaria, malnutrition, and birthweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cates, Jordan E.; Unger, Holger W.; Briand, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    were identified by the Maternal Malaria and Malnutrition (M3) initiative using a convenience sampling approach and were eligible for pooling given adequate ethical approval and availability of essential variables. Study-specific adjusted effect estimates were calculated using inverse probability...... be multiplicative interaction between malaria infection at enrollment and low MUAC within studies conducted in Africa; however, this finding was not consistent on the additive scale, when accounting for multiple comparisons, or when using other definitions of malaria and malnutrition. The major limitations...... of the study included availability of only 2 cross-sectional measurements of malaria and the limited availability of ultrasound-based pregnancy dating to assess impacts on preterm birth and fetal growth in all studies.  Conclusions : Pregnant women with malnutrition and malaria infection are at increased risk...

  16. Adaptation of the Positive Deviance Hearth Approach in Urban Slums, Phnom Penh, for the Prevention and Treatment of Moderate Malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vong, Lenin

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To sustainably rehabilitate malnourished children living in poor urban communities, and prevent future child malnutrition. Methods: Survey data shows an increase in young child malnutrition in urban areas. During the last decade there has been a huge influx of poor rural migrant families to Phnom Penh. Migrant parents work long hours in factories or construction sites, while their young children are cared for by grandmothers or older relatives. Housing conditions are basic with limited sanitation facilities. Following a situational analysis in the target communities, an adapted Positive Deviance approach was implemented. At the beginning of the program 1,127 children aged 0-36 months were weighed; 29% or 328 children were mild and moderately underweight. The following steps were conducted: community mobilization around the issue of child malnutrition, positive deviance inquiry, training of community volunteers, implementation of positive deviance hearth sessions, follow up home visits and ongoing community growth monitoring. Innovations introduced to the project were: mobilization and training of local food vendors to promote, prepare and sell safe, nutritious and affordable locally available complementary foods. The food vendor’s menus were also promoted during the Hearth sessions. In addition mobile phone messages were sent to the caregivers to reinforce key infant and young child care and feeding practices. The length of hearth sessions were adapted to the urban context with five days, then five day practice of new behaviors at home, followed by five additional days of Hearth sessions, to share experiences and challenges for practicing the new behaviors. Despite their low income all the caregivers were able to contribute food for the preparation of complementary food, such as meat, vegetables and rice. Caregiver also actively participated in cooking nutritious foods and discussions about the importance of food variety, amounts and

  17. Postnatal protein malnutrition induces neurochemical alterations leading to behavioral deficits in rats: prevention by selenium or zinc supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, Olusegun L; Adenuga, Gbenga A; Sandhir, Rajat

    2014-11-01

    Protein malnutrition (PM) is a worldwide problem affecting brain development in a large number of children. The present study was aimed at studying the perturbations in antioxidant defense system resulting from protein deficiency and to evaluate the preventive effect of Se and Zn on cortex and cerebellum. Well-fed (WF) and PM rats were fed on 16 and 5% protein diet, respectively. After 10 weeks, animals were supplemented with Se and Zn at a concentration of 0.15 and 227 mg/l in drinking water for 3 weeks. PM rats showed significant increase in lipid peroxidation, nitrite, and protein carbonyl levels. Reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, thiol levels, GSH/GSSG ratio, and neurobehavioral deficits were observed in PM groups. Se and Zn supplementation reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation, nitrite, and protein carbonyl and restored the activity of antioxidant enzymes and thiol levels in the cortex and cerebellum of PM rats along with neurobehavioral deficits. The study showed that Se and Zn supplementation might be beneficial in preventing biochemical alterations and neurobehavioral deficits in PM children.

  18. Possible role of the microbiome in the development of acute malnutrition and implications for food-based strategies to prevent and treat acute malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manary, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Full text: The microbiome is the ecological community of commensal, symbiotic, and pathogenic microorganisms within our bodies. Housed primarily in the small intestine, it contains over 100 trillion microorganisms, 100-fold more genes than the human genome. The microbiome facilitates the absorption of food and plays a role in homeostasis, micronutrient synthesis, detoxification and immune function. The microbiome has adapted to diet and environments to help the host best utilize dietary intakes where dietary intake affects the species and relative abundance of bacteria and genes in the microbiome. In young children, malnutrition hinders the co-evolution of the microbiome and immune system, often impairing the function of the small intestine mucosal lining, which can cause enteropathogen infection and impede nutrient absorption. The core microbiota is made up of a broad spectrum of bacterial species that vary from person-to-person based on age and environment. This finding was observed in a comparative metagenomic study of the gut microbiomes of 531 healthy infants, children, and adults living in the USA, Venezuela, and Malawi which found that the representation of genes related to micro- and macronutrient biosynthesis and metabolism changed during development and based on environment. In a study examining 317 Malawian twin pairs during the first three years of life, 50% remained well nourished, 43% became discordant and 7% manifested concordance for acute malnutrition. Fecal samples were taken from each twin over time, and those samples were transferred into germ-free mice where meaningful changes in the fecal taxonomic, genetic, and metabolic content accompanied the transplantations. Specifically in kwashiorkor mice, a rapid weight loss was experienced when initially fed a Malawian diet followed by a rapid weight gain with the introduction of therapeutic food and subsequent weight loss after return to the Malawian diet. These data provide evidence that food

  19. Prevention and management of maternal obesity in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Alexopoulou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays obesity is one of the most important nutritional problems with features contemporary epidemic which concerns not only the developed but also the developing countries. Obesity during pregnancy associate with maternal and perinatal risks that make the management of obesity, before and during pregnancy imperative. The best and most effective treatment of obesity in pregnancy is prevention. A healthy diet and regular exercise of pregnant woman is crucial for the normal development of pregnancy. Moreover every obese pregnant woman should be informed about the importance of calorie - intake regulation and weight reduction both before and after pregnancy. Additional therapeutic options are bariatric surgical procedures that a woman can have before pregnancy and anticoagulation therapy during pregnancy. This article attempts brief review on the current scientific knowledge that exists about the role of nutrition and physical activity in controlling the weight of obese pregnant women and its beneficial contribution to the health of both the mother and the newborn.

  20. The impact of integrated prevention and treatment on child malnutrition and health: the PROMIS project, a randomized control trial in Burkina Faso and Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieven Huybregts

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence suggests that both preventive and curative nutrition interventions are needed to tackle child acute malnutrition (AM in developing countries. In addition to reducing the incidence of AM, providing preventive interventions may also help increase attendance (and coverage of AM screening, a major constraint in the community-based management of child acute malnutrition (CMAM model. There is a paucity of evidence-based strategies to deliver integrated preventive and curative interventions effectively and affordably at scale. The aim of the Innovative Approaches for the Prevention of Childhood Malnutrition (PROMIS study is to assess the feasibility, quality of implementation, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an integrated child malnutrition prevention and treatment intervention package implemented through a community-based platform in Mali and a facility-based platform in Burkina Faso. Methods/Design The PROMIS intervention entails a comprehensive preventive package offered on a monthly basis to caregivers of children, while children are screened for acute malnutrition (AM. The package consists of behavior change communication on essential nutrition and hygiene actions, and monthly preventive doses of small quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (SQ-LNS for children aged 6 to 23.9 months. Positive AM cases are referred to treatment services offered by first-line health services according to the CMAM model. The PROMIS intervention will be evaluated using a mixed methods approach. The impact study encompasses two types of study design: i repeated cross-sectional surveys conducted at baseline and at endline after 24 months of program implementation and ii a longitudinal study with a monthly follow-up for 18 months. Primary study impact measures include the incidence and endpoint prevalence of AM, AM screening coverage and treatment compliance. A process evaluation will assess the feasibility and quality of

  1. Preventing Hospital and Home Malnutrition. Nutrition in Health Promotion Series, Number 25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Roberta Smith

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  2. Use of Gastrostomy Tube to Prevent Maternal PKU Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwoerer, Jessica A Scott; Obernolte, Lisa; Van Calcar, Sandra; Heighway, Susan; Bankowski, Heather; Williams, Phillip; Rice, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Maternal Phenylketonuria Syndrome (MPKU) can occur in infants born to mothers with PKU with poor metabolic control during pregnancy. Elevated phenylalanine (phe) acts as a teratogen to the developing fetus with consequences including intellectual disability, microcephaly, facial dysmorphism, growth retardation, and congenital heart disease. MPKU can be prevented if metabolic control is achieved by 8-10 weeks gestation. If control is not achieved, there is a significant risk for MPKU. Therefore, in women with poor metabolic control at time of pregnancy, establishing metabolic control quickly is important.Clinically, establishing metabolic control in women with PKU can present challenges. Social issues, psychological issues, and insufficient education about PKU play an important role in a patient's inability to reinstitute this challenging diet. Maintaining phe levels within a range to allow for infant growth, while preventing toxicity, is challenging, particularly for those women who no longer follow the PKU diet. Gastrostomy tube placement is an option to deliver medical formula to women who are unable to restart diet due to severe nausea or palatability issues.Here we discuss two pregnancies in which a gastrostomy tube was placed to achieve metabolic control after other measures failed to reduce phe concentrations into the recommended range. For these two pregnancies, placement of the gastrostomy tube led to improvement in phe levels with normal infant outcomes including normal growth, head circumference, and heart structure.

  3. Hypercaloric diet prevents sexual impairment induced by maternal food restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, M M; Macrini, D J; Teodorov, E; Bonamin, L V; Dalboni, L C; Coelho, C P; Chaves-Kirsten, G P; Florio, J C; Queiroz-Hazarbassanov, N; Bondan, E F; Kirsten, T B

    2017-05-01

    Prenatal undernutrition impairs copulatory behavior and increases the tendency to become obese/overweight, which also reduces sexual behavior. Re-feeding rats prenatally undernourished with a normocaloric diet can restore their physiological conditions and copulatory behavior. Thus, the present study investigated whether a hypercaloric diet that is administered in rats during the juvenile period prevents sexual impairments that are caused by maternal food restriction and the tendency to become overweight/obese. Female rats were prenatally fed a 40% restricted diet from gestational day 2 to 18. The pups received a hypercaloric diet from postnatal day (PND) 23 to PND65 (food restricted hypercaloric [FRH] group) or laboratory chow (food restricted control [FRC] group). Pups from non-food-restricted dams received laboratory chow during the entire experiment (non-food-restricted [NFR] group). During the juvenile period and adulthood, body weight gain was evaluated weekly. The day of balanopreputial separation, sexual behavior, sexual organ weight, hypodermal adiposity, striatal dopamine and serotonin, serum testosterone, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) were evaluated. The FRH group exhibited an increase in body weight on PND58 and PND65. The FRC group exhibited an increase in the latency to the first mount and intromission and an increase in serum TNF-α levels but a reduction of dopaminergic activity. The hypercaloric diet reversed all of these effects but increased adiposity. We concluded that the hypercaloric diet administered during the juvenile period attenuated reproductive impairments that were induced by maternal food restriction through increases in the energy expenditure but not the tendency to become overweight/obese. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Malnutrition Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Iron-binding Capacity (TIBC, UIBC) Trichomonas Testing Triglycerides Troponin Tryptase Tumor Markers Uric Acid Urinalysis Urine ... biomarker of malnutrition in elderly patients. Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute. Available online at http://www.ncbi. ...

  5. Hospital Malnutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Asumadu-Sarkodie, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Malnutrition seen in hospitals usually occurs as some form of protein-energy malnutrition (PEM). Primary PEM results from an acute or chronic deficiency of both protein and calories. Secondary PEM, or cachexia, results from a disease or medical condition such as cancer or gastrointestinal disease that alters requirements or impairs utilization of nutrients. This record was migrated from the OpenDepot repository service in June, 2017 before shutting down.

  6. The Determination of National Growth Charts to Prevent and Manage Malnutrition in Iranian Children: Necessity and Importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abtahi, Mitra; Doustmohammadian, Aazam; Pouraram, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Objectives: Standard height and weight charts are the most important evaluation tools for the assessment of growth and development of children which could be further used to develop preventive interventions both in individual and epidemiologic assessments in the community. Children of different populations differ a lot in size and shape, resulting from differences in their genetic pattern, their needs and interaction of these two. Regarding the existence of different standards, it seems that a national standard can provide a more accurate functional individual and social evaluation tool and many problems will be solved in case of availability of an Iranian standard for comparison of children’s height, weight, and their growth follow-ups. One of these problems is the abnormal results regarding mal nourishment, overweight, or obesity in Iranian children. Considerable rate of childhood malnutrition in Iran and other countries necessitates the implementation of interventional programs including development of local growth charts to prevent and manage malnutrition in the community. This study was undertaken with the aim of reviewing different current growth curves, their advantages and disadvantages, and performing a review of the studies conducted in Iran and other countries on determination of weight and height standards. Methods: In order to collect materials for this review, a detailed search of Scientific Information Database (SID), Iran Medex, MEDLINE, Pub Med, and Web of Science was carried out for the time period 2005-2011 using the keywords: national standard, height, weight, children, and growth chart. Initially, we reviewed international standards of weight and height. Results: The results of performed studies in European and Asian countries showed that the height and weight curves of these children were different from WHO and NCHS growth standards. The finding of growth trend study of Iranian children showed that the mean height and weight of

  7. Effect of Short-Term Supplementation with Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food or Micronutrients for Children after Illness for Prevention of Malnutrition: A Randomised Controlled Trial in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kam, Saskia; Roll, Stephanie; Swarthout, Todd; Edyegu-Otelu, Grace; Matsumoto, Akiko; Kasujja, Francis Xavier; Casademont, Cristian; Shanks, Leslie; Salse-Ubach, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Background Globally, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) treats more than 300,000 severely malnourished children annually. Malnutrition is not only caused by lack of food but also by illnesses and by poor infant and child feeding practices. Breaking the vicious cycle of illness and malnutrition by providing ill children with nutritional supplementation is a potentially powerful strategy for preventing malnutrition that has not been adequately investigated. Therefore, MSF investigated whether incidence of malnutrition among ill children malnutrition rate between 8.4% and 11.5% of which 2% to 3% severe malnutrition, more than half (58%) of the population in the district of Kaabong is considered food insecure. Methods and Findings We investigated the effect of two types of nutritional supplementation on the incidence of malnutrition in ill children presenting at outpatient clinics during March 2011 to April 2012 in Kaabong, Karamoja region, Uganda, a resource-poor region where malnutrition is a chronic problem for its seminomadic population. A three-armed, partially-blinded, randomised controlled trial was conducted in children diagnosed with malaria, diarrhoea, or lower respiratory tract infection. Non-malnourished children aged 6 to 59 mo were randomised to one of three arms: one sachet/d of ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF), two sachets/d of micronutrient powder (MNP), or no supplement (control) for 14 d for each illness over 6 mo. The primary outcome was the incidence of first negative nutritional outcome (NNO) during the 6 mo follow-up. NNO was a study-specific measure used to indicate progression to moderate or severe acute malnutrition; it was defined as weight-for-height z-score malnutrition in eastern Uganda. The low incidence of malnutrition in this population may warrant a more targeted intervention to improve cost effectiveness. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT01497236 PMID:26859481

  8. Effect of Short-Term Supplementation with Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food or Micronutrients for Children after Illness for Prevention of Malnutrition: A Randomised Controlled Trial in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kam, Saskia; Salse-Ubach, Nuria; Roll, Stephanie; Swarthout, Todd; Gayton-Toyoshima, Sayaka; Jiya, Nma Mohammed; Matsumoto, Akiko; Shanks, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Background Globally, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) treats more than 300,000 severely malnourished children annually. Malnutrition is not only caused by lack of food and poor infant and child feeding practices but also by illnesses. Breaking the vicious cycle of illness and malnutrition by providing ill children with nutritional supplementation is a potentially powerful strategy for preventing malnutrition that has not been adequately investigated. Therefore, MSF investigated whether incidence of malnutrition among ill children malnutrition rates. Methods and Findings We investigated the effect of supplementation with ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) and a micronutrient powder (MNP) on the incidence of malnutrition in ill children presenting at an outpatient clinic in Goronyo during February to September 2012. A three-armed, partially-blinded, randomised controlled trial was conducted in children diagnosed as having malaria, diarrhoea, or lower respiratory tract infection. Children aged 6 to 59 mo were randomised to one of three arms: one sachet/d of RUTF; two sachets/d of micronutrients or no supplement (control) for 14 d for each illness over 6 mo. The primary outcome was the incidence of first negative nutritional outcome (NNO) during the 6 mo follow-up. NNO was a study-specific measure used to indicate occurrence of malnutrition; it was defined as low weight-for-height z-score (malnutrition. The lack of effect in Goronyo may be due to a high frequency of morbidity, which probably further affects a child’s nutritional status and children’s ability to escape from the illness–malnutrition cycle. The duration of the supplementation may have been too short or the doses of the supplements may have been too low to mitigate the effects of high morbidity and pre-existing malnutrition. An integrated approach combining prevention and treatment of diseases and treatment of moderate malnutrition, rather than prevention of malnutrition by nutritional

  9. Autopsy as a tool in the prevention of maternal mortality | Daramola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maternal mortality rates are an index of the state of a nation's health system. Maternal autopsies help to determine these rates, provide information on avoidable/unavoidable causes of mortality, consequently leading to the development of strategies for treatment and prevention ofmaternalmortality andmorbidity. The lesson ...

  10. 76 FR 10908 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Maternal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Maternal Vitamin D Status and Preterm Birth, DP11-002, Initial... and other committee management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and...

  11. 75 FR 78999 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Maternal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Maternal Vitamin D Status and Preterm Birth, DP11-002, Initial... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Time and Date: 11 a...

  12. The efficacy of a nutrition education intervention to prevent risk of malnutrition for dependent elderly patients receiving Home Care: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Barrés, Sílvia; García-Barco, Montse; Basora, Josep; Martínez, Teresa; Pedret, Roser; Arija, Victoria

    2017-05-01

    To assess the effect of a nutrition education intervention included in the Home Care Program for caregivers to prevent the increasing risk of malnutrition of dependent patients at risk of malnutrition. Randomized controlled multicenter trial of 6 months of duration and 12 months follow-up. 10 Primary Care Centers, Spain. Patients enrolled in the Home Care Program between January 2010 and March 2012, who were dependent and at risk of malnutrition, older than 65, and had caregivers (n=190). The nurses conducted initial educational intervention sessions for caregivers and then monitored at home every month for 6 months. The nutritional status was assessed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment test (primary outcome), diet, anthropometry, and biochemical parameters (albumin, prealbumin, hemoglobin and cholesterol). Other descriptive and outcome measures were recorded: current medical history, Activities of daily living (Barthel test), cognitive state (Pfeiffer test), and mood status (Yesavage test). All the measures were recorded in a schedule of 0-6-12 months. 173 individuals participated after exclusions (intervention n=101; control n=72). Mean age was 87.8±8.9years, 68.2% were women. Difference were found between the groups for Mini Nutritional Assessment test score change (repeated measures ANOVA, F=10.1; Pintervention improved the Mini Nutritional Assessment test score of the participants in the intervention group. The egg consumption (F=4.1; P=0.018), protein intake (F=3.0; P=0.050), polyunsaturated fatty acid intake (F=5.3; P=0.006), folate (F=3.3; P=0.041) and vitamin E (F=6.4; P=0.002) showed significant group×time interactions. A nutrition education intervention for caregivers halted the tendency of nutritional decline, and reduced the risk of malnutrition of older dependent patients. Clinical Trial Registration-URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT01360775. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. FERMENTED SOYBEAN CAKE AND ALBUMIN FORMULA AS NUTRITIONAL SUPPORT PREVENTS PROTEIN ENERGY MALNUTRITION AND AKI IN STROKE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanny Djaya

    2012-06-01

    Natrium and Kalium, could be corrected with appropriate nutritional support (adequate calorie, protein and mineral and therefore prevents acute kidney injury and protein energy malnutrition in elderly patients with anorexia.

  14. Prevention of malnutrition among young children in rural Bangladesh by a food-health-care educational intervention: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Swapan Kumar; Jolly, Saira Parveen; Shafique, Sohana; Fuchs, George J; Mahmud, Zeba; Chakraborty, Barnali; Roy, Suchismita

    2007-12-01

    As a result of inappropriate feeding, poor health and hygiene, and poor caring practices, the nutritional status of many young infants deteriorates with advancing age. To explore the effectiveness of a nutrition education package to prevent malnutrition among young children. A community-based, randomized, controlled trial was conducted among 605 normal and mildly malnourished children aged 6 to 9 months in 121 Community Nutrition Centers (CNCs) of the Bangladesh Integrated Nutrition Project (BINP) in four regions of Bangladesh from 2000 to 2002. The intervention group received weekly nutrition education based on the nutrition triangle concept of UNICEF for 6 months, whereas the control group received regular BINP services. Both groups were observed for a further 6 months to assess the sustainability of the effects. Information on socioeconomic status, feeding patterns, morbidity, and anthropometric features was collected. A significant increase in the frequency of complementary feeding was observed in the intervention group as compared with the control group, and the increase was sustained throughout the observation period. The intervention group had a higher weight gain than the control group after the end of the intervention (0.86 vs. 0.77 kg, p = 0.053) and after the end of the observation period (1.81 vs. 1.39 kg, p intervention group than in the control group after the end of the observations (88.9% vs. 61.5%, p Nutrition education successfully prevented malnutrition in all the areas. Variation in the outcome of nutrition education among the regions was observed. This culturally appropriate nutrition education package based on the nutrition triangle model effectively prevented growth faltering and malnutrition among young children.

  15. Gut microbiota and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Matthieu; Diallo, Aldiouma; Raoult, Didier

    2017-05-01

    Malnutrition is the leading cause of death worldwide in children under the age of five, and is the focus of the first World Health Organization (WHO) Millennium Development Goal. Breastfeeding, food and water security are major protective factors against malnutrition and critical factors in the maturation of healthy gut microbiota, characterized by a transient bifidobacterial bloom before a global rise in anaerobes. Early depletion in gut Bifidobacterium longum, a typical maternal probiotic, known to inhibit pathogens, represents the first step in gut microbiota alteration associated with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Later, the absence of the Healthy Mature Anaerobic Gut Microbiota (HMAGM) leads to deficient energy harvest, vitamin biosynthesis and immune protection, and is associated with diarrhea, malabsorption and systemic invasion by microbial pathogens. A therapeutic diet and infection treatment may be unable to restore bifidobacteria and HMAGM. Besides refeeding and antibiotics, future trials including non-toxic missing microbes and nutrients necessary to restore bifidobacteria and HMAGM, including prebiotics and antioxidants, are warranted in children with severe or refractory disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interventions for preventing or treating malnutrition in problem drinkers who are homeless or vulnerably housed: protocol for a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Thorley, Helen; Porter, Katie; Fleming, Clare; Jones, Tim; Kesten, Joanna; Marques, Elsa; Richards, Alison; Savović, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Background Problem alcohol drinking in homeless and vulnerably housed people can lead to malnutrition, which is associated with complications such as alcohol-related brain damage. Homeless alcohol drinkers are likely to have worse health outcomes and different nutritional needs compared with housed alcohol-drinking persons. It is not clear whether interventions to improve nutritional status in this population have been effective. The purpose of this review is to assess the effectiveness and c...

  17. Maternal Antiviral Immunoglobulin Accumulates in Neural Tissue of Neonates To Prevent HSV Neurological Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yike Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available While antibody responses to neurovirulent pathogens are critical for clearance, the extent to which antibodies access the nervous system to ameliorate infection is poorly understood. In this study on herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1, we demonstrate that HSV-specific antibodies are present during HSV-1 latency in the nervous systems of both mice and humans. We show that antibody-secreting cells entered the trigeminal ganglion (TG, a key site of HSV infection, and persisted long after the establishment of latent infection. We also demonstrate the ability of passively administered IgG to enter the TG independently of infection, showing that the naive TG is accessible to antibodies. The translational implication of this finding is that human fetal neural tissue could contain HSV-specific maternally derived antibodies. Exploring this possibility, we observed HSV-specific IgG in HSV DNA-negative human fetal TG, suggesting passive transfer of maternal immunity into the prenatal nervous system. To further investigate the role of maternal antibodies in the neonatal nervous system, we established a murine model to demonstrate that maternal IgG can access and persist in neonatal TG. This maternal antibody not only prevented disseminated infection but also completely protected the neonate from neurological disease and death following HSV challenge. Maternal antibodies therefore have a potent protective role in the neonatal nervous system against HSV infection. These findings strongly support the concept that prevention of prenatal and neonatal neurotropic infections can be achieved through maternal immunization.

  18. The effect of interventions to prevent and treat malnutrition in patients admitted for rehabilitation: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J; Porter, J

    2015-02-01

    Malnutrition occurs frequently among patients in rehabilitation, leading to poorer outcomes. Evidence of the effects of interventions to prevent or treat malnutrition is required to guide clinical practice in this setting. This systematic review aimed to determine the effect of oral nutrition interventions implemented in rehabilitation on nutritional and functional outcomes. Five databases were searched to identify relevant publications; intervention trials of oral nutrition interventions (such as oral nutrition supplements, foodservice interventions, clinical care processes, enhanced eating environments) conducted with patients admitted for rehabilitation, reporting dietary intake, anthropometric, biochemical or functional outcomes. The reviewers determined study eligibility and assessed the included studies for risk of bias. Outcome data were combined narratively and by meta-analyses. From 1765 publications, 10 studies trialling oral nutrition supplements, foodservice interventions and clinical care processes (of neutral or positive quality) were identified. Compared to meals alone, oral nutritional supplements significantly improved energy and protein intake, with some evidence for improvements in anthropometry and length of stay. There was little evidence that speciality supplements were beneficial compared to standard versions. Meta-analyses demonstrated significantly greater energy [weighted mean difference (WMD) = 324 kcal, 212-436 kcal 95% confidence interval (CI)] and protein (WMD = 9.1 g, 0.2-17.9 g 95% CI) intake with energy dense meals. Opposing results were reported in studies investigating enhanced clinical care processes. The provision of oral nutrition supplements and energy dense meals improved energy and protein intake and therefore may comprise effective strategies for addressing malnutrition in rehabilitation. The effect of these strategies on other nutritional and functional outcomes should be explored further. © 2014 The British

  19. The use of educational video to promote maternal self-efficacy in preventing early childhood diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joventino, Emanuella Silva; Ximenes, Lorena Barbosa; da Penha, Jardeliny Corrêa; Andrade, Lucilande Cordeiro de Oliveira; de Almeida, Paulo César

    2017-06-01

    Diarrhoea is responsible for high rates of infant morbidity and mortality. It is multifactorial, manifested by socioeconomic, hygienic, and maternal factors. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of an educational video on maternal self-efficacy for the prevention of childhood diarrhoea. This was a randomized trial conducted in the state of Ceará, Brazil. Participants were 2 groups (comparison and intervention), composed of mothers of children under 5 years of age. Group membership was allocated by cluster randomization. Outcomes were maternal self-efficacy measured using the Maternal Self-efficacy Scale for Prevention of Early Childhood Diarrhoea; outcome data collectors were blinded to group allocation. Ninety participants were randomized to each group; 83 intervention group and 80 comparison group members were contained in the final analysis. Maternal self-efficacy in preventing childhood diarrhoea increased in both groups, but average scores of the intervention group were higher at all time than those of the comparison group. The educational video had a significant effect on maternal self-efficacy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Hunger and Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Hunger and Malnutrition KidsHealth / For Parents / Hunger and Malnutrition What's in ... to meet their needs. What Are Hunger and Malnutrition? Everyone feels hungry at times. Hunger is the ...

  1. Stool frequency recording in severe acute malnutrition ('StoolSAM'); an agreement study comparing maternal recall versus direct observation using diapers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuijl, Wieger; Potani, Isabel; Bandsma, Robert; Baan, Anne; White, Sarah; Bourdon, Celine; Kerac, Marko

    2017-01-01

    Background: Approximately 50% of the deaths of children under the age of 5 can be attributed to undernutrition, which also encompasses severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Diarrhoea is strongly associated with these deaths and is commonly diagnosed solely based on stool frequency and consistency

  2. Prevention of congenital cytomegalovirus complications by maternal and neonatal treatments: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Stuart T; van Zuylen, Wendy; Shand, Antonia; Scott, Gillian M; Naing, Zin; Hall, Beverley; Craig, Maria E; Rawlinson, William D

    2014-11-01

    Human cytomegalovirus is the leading non-genetic cause of congenital malformation in developed countries. Congenital CMV may result in fetal and neonatal death or development of serious clinical sequelae. In this review, we identified evidence-based interventions for prevention of congenital CMV at the primary level (prevention of maternal infection), secondary level (risk reduction of fetal infection and disease) and tertiary level (risk reduction of infected neonates being affected by CMV). A systematic review of existing literature revealed 24 eligible studies that met the inclusion criteria. Prevention of maternal infection using hygiene and behavioural interventions reduced maternal seroconversion rates during pregnancy. However, evidence suggested maternal adherence to education on preventative behaviours was a limiting factor. Treatment of maternal CMV infection with hyperimmune globulin (HIG) showed some evidence for efficacy in prevention of fetal infection and fetal/neonatal morbidity with a reasonable safety profile. However, more robust clinical evidence is required before HIG therapy can be routinely recommended. Limited evidence also existed for the safety and efficacy of established CMV antivirals (valaciclovir, ganciclovir and valganciclovir) to treat neonatal consequences of CMV infection, but toxicity and lack of randomised clinical trial data remain major issues. In the absence of a licensed CMV vaccine or robust clinical evidence for anti-CMV therapeutics, patient education and behavioural interventions that emphasise adherence remain the best preventative strategies for congenital CMV. There is a strong need for further data on the use of HIG and other antivirals in pregnancy, as well as the development of less toxic, novel, antiviral agents. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Prospects for preventing infant invasive GBS disease through maternal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhi, Shabir A; Dangor, Ziyaad

    2017-08-16

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal sepsis, with the highest incidence (1.3 per 1000 live births) reported from Africa. Although the incidence of invasive GBS disease is reportedly low in South Asia, there is disconnect between prevalence of maternal recto-vaginal colonization and the incidence of early-onset disease (EOD). This is possibly due to case-ascertainment biases that omit investigation of newborns dying on day-0 of life, which accounts for >90% of EOD. Furthermore, GBS is associated with approximately 15% of all infection related stillbirths. Vaccination of pregnant women with a serotype-specific polysaccharide epitope vaccine could possibly protect against EOD and late-onset disease (LOD) in their infants through transplacental transfer of serotype-specific capsular antibody. Furthermore, vaccination of pregnant women might also protect against impaired neurodevelopment following GBS associated neonatal sepsis, and fetal loss/stillbirths. Licensure of a GBS vaccine might be feasible based on safety evaluation and a sero-correlate of protection, with vaccine effectiveness subsequently being demonstrated in phase IV studies. A randomized-controlled trial would, however, be best suited as a vaccine-probe to fully characterize the contribution of GBS to neonatal sepsis associated morbidity and mortality and adverse fetal outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interventions to prevent adverse fetal programming due to maternal obesity during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanielsz, Peter W; Ford, Stephen P; Long, Nathan M; Vega, Claudia C; Reyes-Castro, Luis A; Zambrano, Elena

    2013-10-01

    Maternal obesity is a global epidemic affecting both developed and developing countries. Human and animal studies indicate that maternal obesity adversely programs the development of offspring, predisposing them to chronic diseases later in life. Several mechanisms act together to produce these adverse health effects. There is a consequent need for effective interventions that can be used in the management of human pregnancy to prevent these outcomes. The present review analyzes the dietary and exercise intervention studies performed to date in both altricial and precocial animals, rats and sheep, with the aim of preventing adverse offspring outcomes. The results of these interventions present exciting opportunities to prevent, at least in part, adverse metabolic and other outcomes in obese mothers and their offspring. © 2013 International Life Sciences Institute.

  5. Factors influencing the pattern of malnutrition among acutely ill ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors influencing the pattern of malnutrition among acutely ill children presenting in a tertiary hospital in Nigeria. ... The factors associated with malnutrition included early introduction of complementary diets, number of children in the home, maternal illiteracy and lower socioeconomic status of the parents. Female children ...

  6. Prevention of maternal cytomegalovirus infection: current status and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Nyholm

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Jessica L Nyholm1, Mark R Schleiss21Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Women’s Health, and 2Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis, MN, USAAbstract: Human cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is the most common cause of perinatal viral infection in the developed world, resulting in approximately 40,000 congenitally infected infants in the United States each year. Congenital CMV infection can produce varying degrees of neurodevelopmental disabilities. The significant impact of congenital CMV has led the Institute of Medicine to rank development of a CMV vaccine as a top priority. Vaccine development has been ongoing; however no licensed CMV vaccine is currently available. Treatment of pregnant women with CMV hyperimmune globulin has shown promising results, but has not been studied in randomized controlled trials. Education on methods to prevent CMV transmission, particularly among young women of child-bearing age, should continue until a CMV vaccine becomes available. The epidemiology, clinical manifestations, prevention strategies, and treatment of CMV infections are reviewed.Keywords: cytomegalovirus, CMV vaccines, congenital CMV, CMV infection, immunoglobulin

  7. Influence of Feeding Practices on Malnutrition in Haitian Infants and Young Children

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    Belén Irarrázaval

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Infant malnutrition remains an important cause of death and disability, and Haiti has the highest prevalence in the Americas. Therefore, preventive strategies are needed. Our aims were (1 To assess the prevalence of malnutrition among young children seen at a health center in Haiti; (2 Examine adherence to infant feeding practices recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO and the association to nutritional status. This cross-sectional study recruited children from the Saint Espri Health Center in Port Au Prince in 2014. We recorded feeding practices, socio-demographic data, and anthropometric measurements (WHO-2006. We evaluated 278 infants and children younger than two years old, aged 8.08 ± 6.5 months, 53.2% female. 18.35% were underweight (weight/age <−2 SD; 13.31% stunted (length/age <−2 SD, and 13.67% had moderate or severe wasting (weight/length <−2 SD. Malnutrition was associated with male gender, older age, lower maternal education level, and greater numbers of siblings (Chi2, p < 0.05. Adherence to recommended breastfeeding practices was 11.8–97.9%, and to complementary feeding practices was 9.7–90.3%. Adherence was associated with a lower prevalence of malnutrition. Conclusion: Prevalence of infant and young child malnutrition in this population is high. Adherence to WHO-recommended feeding practices was associated with a better nutritional status.

  8. Long-Term Effects of Maternal Citrulline Supplementation on Renal Transcriptome Prevention of Nitric Oxide Depletion-Related Programmed Hypertension: The Impact of Gene-Nutrient Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Lin Tain

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Maternal malnutrition can elicit gene expression leading to fetal programming. l-citrulline (CIT can be converted to l-arginine to generate nitric oxide (NO. We examined whether maternal CIT supplementation can prevent NG-nitro-l-arginine-methyl ester (l-NAME, NO synthase inhibitor-induced programmed hypertension and examined their effects on the renal transcriptome in male offspring using next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq technology. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received l-NAME administration at 60mg/kg/day subcutaneously via osmotic minipump during pregnancy alone or with additional 0.25% l-citrulline solution in drinking water during the whole period of pregnancy and lactation. Male offspring were assigned to three groups: control, l-NAME, and l-NAME + CIT. l-NAME exposure induced hypertension in the 12-week-old offspring, which CIT therapy prevented. Identified differentially expressed genes in l-NAME and CIT-treated offspring kidneys, including Guca2b, Hmox1, Hba2, Hba-a2, Dusp1, and Serpine1 are related to regulation of blood pressure (BP and oxidative stress. In conclusion, our data suggests that the beneficial effects of CIT supplementation are attributed to alterations in expression levels of genes related to BP control and oxidative stress. Our results suggest that early nutritional intervention by CIT has long-term impact on the renal transcriptome to prevent NO depletion-related programmed hypertension. However, our RNA-Seq results might be a secondary phenomenon. The implications of epigenetic regulation at an early stage of programming deserve further clarification.

  9. Effects of welfare and maternal work on recommended preventive care utilization among low-income children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Jane L; Oh, Elissa H; Yoo, Joan; Amsden, Laura B; Sohn, Min-Woong

    2012-12-01

    We examined how maternal work and welfare receipt are associated with children receiving recommended pediatric preventive care services. We identified American Academy of Pediatrics-recommended preventive care visits from medical records of children in the 1999-2004 Illinois Families Study: Child Well-Being. We used Illinois administrative data to identify whether mothers received welfare or worked during the period the visit was recommended, and we analyzed the child visit data using random-intercept logistic regressions that adjusted for child, maternal, and visit-specific characteristics. The 485 children (95%) meeting inclusion criteria made 41% of their recommended visits. Children were 60% more likely (adjusted odds ratios [AOR` = 1.60; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27, 2.01) to make recommended visits when mothers received welfare but did not work compared with when mothers did not receive welfare and did not work. Children were 25% less likely (AOR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.60, 0.94) to make preventive care visits during periods when mothers received welfare and worked compared with welfare only periods. The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families maternal work requirement may be a barrier to receiving recommended preventive pediatric health care.

  10. Maternal complication prevention: evidence from a case-control study in southwest Nigeria

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    Kayode O. Osungbade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The importance of strengthening maternal health services as a preventive intervention for morbidities and complications during pregnancy and delivery in developing countries cannot be over-emphasised, since use of prenatal health services improves maternal health outcomes.Aim: This study investigated differences in risk factors for maternal complications in booked and unbooked pregnant women in Nigeria, and provided evidence for their prevention.Setting: The study was carried out in a postnatal ward in a secondary health facility.Methods: This was a case-control study involving booked and unbooked pregnant women who had delivered. Consecutive enrolment of all unbooked pregnant women (cases was done, and one booked pregnant woman (control was enrolled and matched for age with each of these. Both groups were interviewed using a questionnaire, whilst records of delivery were extracted from the hospital files. Findings were subjected to logistical regression at a significance level of p < 0.05.Results: Booked women had a lower median length of labour (10 hours compared to unbooked women (13 hours. More women in the booked control group (139; 35.1% than in the unbooked case group (96; 23.6% reported at least one type of morbidity during the index pregnancy (p = 0.0004. Booking status was associated with a likelihood of spontaneous vaginal delivery. Young maternal age, low education, rural residence and low socio-economic status were associated with less likelihood of using prenatal services. Young maternal age, low education and intervention in the delivery were associated with a likelihood of experiencing a complication of delivery.Conclusion: Strengthening antenatal and secondary healthcare services as short- and mediumterm measures might be cost-effective as a preventive strategy in complications of pregnancy,whilst socio-economic dimensions of health are accorded priority in the long term.

  11. Maternal and fetal cytomegalovirus infection: diagnosis, management, and prevention [version 1; referees: 3 approved

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    Robert F. Pass

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cytomegalovirus infection is a major cause of central nervous system and sensory impairments that affect cognition, motor function, hearing, language development, vestibular function, and vision. Although the importance of congenital cytomegalovirus infection is readily evident, the vast majority of maternal and fetal infections are not identified, even in developed countries. Multiple studies of prenatal cytomegalovirus infections have produced a body of knowledge that can inform the clinical approach to suspected or proven maternal and fetal infection. Reliable diagnosis of cytomegalovirus infection during pregnancy and accurate diagnosis of fetal infection are a reality. Approaches to preventing the transmission of cytomegalovirus from mother to fetus and to the treatment of fetal infection are being studied. There is evidence that public health approaches based on hygiene can dramatically reduce the rate of primary maternal cytomegalovirus infections during pregnancy. This review will consider the epidemiology of congenital cytomegalovirus infection, the diagnosis and management of primary infection during pregnancy, and approaches to preventing maternal infection.

  12. Maternal Antioxidant Supplementation Prevents Adiposity in the Offspring of Western Diet?Fed Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Sarbattama; Simmons, Rebecca A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Obesity in pregnancy significantly increases the risk of the offspring developing obesity after birth. The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that maternal obesity increases oxidative stress during fetal development, and to determine whether administration of an antioxidant supplement to pregnant Western diet-fed rats would prevent the development of adiposity in the offspring. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Female Sprague Dawley rats were started on the designated diet at ...

  13. Melatonin Therapy Prevents Programmed Hypertension and Nitric Oxide Deficiency in Offspring Exposed to Maternal Caloric Restriction

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    You-Lin Tain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO deficiency is involved in the development of hypertension, a condition that can originate early in life. We examined whether NO deficiency contributed to programmed hypertension in offspring from mothers with calorie-restricted diets and whether melatonin therapy prevented this process. We examined 3-month-old male rat offspring from four maternal groups: untreated controls, 50% calorie-restricted (CR rats, controls treated with melatonin (0.01% in drinking water, and CR rats treated with melatonin (CR + M. The effect of melatonin on nephrogenesis was analyzed using next-generation sequencing. The CR group developed hypertension associated with elevated plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, decreased L-arginine, decreased L-arginine-to-ADMA ratio (AAR, and decreased renal NO production. Maternal melatonin treatment prevented these effects. Melatonin prevented CR-induced renin and prorenin receptor expression. Renal angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 protein levels in the M and CR + M groups were also significantly increased by melatonin therapy. Maternal melatonin therapy had long-term epigenetic effects on global gene expression in the kidneys of offspring. Conclusively, we attributed these protective effects of melatonin on CR-induced programmed hypertension to the reduction of plasma ADMA, restoration of plasma AAR, increase of renal NO level, alteration of renin-angiotensin system, and epigenetic changes in numerous genes.

  14. Modeling maternal mortality in Bangladesh: the role of misoprostol in postpartum hemorrhage prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Bangladesh is one of the few countries that may actually achieve the fifth Millennium Development Goal (MDG) in time, despite skilled birth attendance remaining low. The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential role misoprostol can play in the decline of maternal deaths attributed to postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) in Bangladesh. Methods Using data from a misoprostol and blood loss measurement tool feasibility study in Bangladesh, observed cause specific maternal mortality ratios (MMRs) were estimated and contrasted with expected ratios using estimates from the Bangladesh Maternal Mortality Survey (BMMS) data. Using Crystal Ball 7 we employ Monte Carlo simulation techniques to estimate maternal deaths in four scenarios, each with different levels of misoprostol coverage. These scenarios include project level misoprostol coverage (69%), no (0%), low (40%), and high (80%) misoprostol coverage. Data on receipt of clean delivery kit, use of misoprostol, experience of PPH, and cause of death were used in model assumptions. Results Using project level misoprostol coverage (69%), the mean number of PPH deaths expected was 40 (standard deviation = 8.01) per 100,000 live births. Assuming no misoprostol coverage (0%), the mean number of PPH deaths expected was 51 (standard deviation = 9.30) per 100,000 live births. For low misoprostol coverage (40%), the mean number of PPH deaths expected was 45 (standard deviation = 8.26) per 100,000 live births, and for high misoprostol coverage (80%), the mean number of PPH deaths expected was 38 (standard deviation = 7.04) per 100,000 live births. Conclusion This theoretical exercise hypothesizes that prophylactic use of misoprostol at home births may contribute to a reduction in the risk of death due to PPH, in addition to reducing the incidence of PPH. If findings from this modeling exercise are accurate and uterotonics can prevent maternal death, misoprostol could be the tool countries need to further

  15. Hypospadias and maternal exposure to atrazine via drinking water in the National Birth Defects Prevention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Jennifer J; Emch, Michael; Meyer, Robert E; Langlois, Peter; Weyer, Peter; Mosley, Bridget; Olshan, Andrew F; Band, Lawrence E; Luben, Thomas J

    2016-07-15

    Hypospadias is a relatively common birth defect affecting the male urinary tract. It has been suggested that exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals might increase the risk of hypospadias by interrupting normal urethral development. Using data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a population-based case-control study, we considered the role of maternal exposure to atrazine, a widely used herbicide and potential endocrine disruptor, via drinking water in the etiology of 2nd and 3rd degree hypospadias. We used data on 343 hypospadias cases and 1,422 male controls in North Carolina, Arkansas, Iowa, and Texas from 1998-2005. Using catchment level stream and groundwater contaminant models from the US Geological Survey, we estimated atrazine concentrations in public water supplies and in private wells. We assigned case and control mothers to public water supplies based on geocoded maternal address during the critical window of exposure for hypospadias (i.e., gestational weeks 6-16). Using maternal questionnaire data about water consumption and drinking water, we estimated a surrogate for total maternal consumption of atrazine via drinking water. We then included additional maternal covariates, including age, race/ethnicity, parity, and plurality, in logistic regression analyses to consider an association between atrazine and hypospadias. When controlling for maternal characteristics, any association between hypospadias and daily maternal atrazine exposure during the critical window of genitourinary development was found to be weak or null (odds ratio for atrazine in drinking water = 1. 00, 95 % CI = 0.97 to 1.03 per 0.04 μg/day increase; odds ratio for maternal consumption = 1.02, 95 % CI = 0.99 to 1.05; per 0.05 μg/day increase). While the association that we observed was weak, our results suggest that additional research into a possible association between atrazine and hypospadias occurrence, using a more sensitive exposure metric

  16. Backcasting to identify food waste prevention and mitigation opportunities for infant feeding in maternity services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan-Fogarty, Yvonne; Becker, Genevieve; Moles, Richard; O'Regan, Bernadette

    2017-03-01

    Food waste in hospitals is of major concern for two reasons: one, healthcare needs to move toward preventative and demand led models for sustainability and two, food system sustainability needs to seek preventative measures such as diet adaptation and waste prevention. The impact of breast-milk substitute use on health services are well established in literature in terms of healthcare implications, cost and resourcing, however as a food demand and waste management issue little has been published to date. This paper presents the use of a desk based backcasting method to analyse food waste prevention, mitigation and management options within the Irish Maternity Service. Best practice in healthcare provision and waste management regulations are used to frame solutions. Strategic problem orientation revealed that 61% of the volume of ready to use breast-milk substitutes purchased by maternity services remains unconsumed and ends up as waste. Thirteen viable strategies to prevent and manage this waste were identified. Significant opportunities exist to prevent waste and also decrease food demand leading to both positive health and environmental outcomes. Backcasting methods display great promise in delivering food waste management strategies in healthcare settings, especially where evidenced best practice policies exist to inform solution forming processes. In terms of food waste prevention and management, difficulties arise in distinguishing between demand reduction, waste prevention and waste reduction measures under the current Waste Management Hierarchy definitions. Ultimately demand reduction at source requires prioritisation, a strategy which is complimentary to health policy on infant feeding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevention of Treacher Collins syndrome craniofacial anomalies in mouse models via maternal antioxidant supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Daisuke; Dixon, Jill; Achilleos, Annita; Dixon, Michael; Trainor, Paul A

    2016-01-21

    Craniofacial anomalies account for approximately one-third of all birth defects and are a significant cause of infant mortality. Since the majority of the bones, cartilage and connective tissues that comprise the head and face are derived from a multipotent migratory progenitor cell population called the neural crest, craniofacial disorders are typically attributed to defects in neural crest cell development. Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a disorder of craniofacial development and although TCS arises primarily through autosomal dominant mutations in TCOF1, no clear genotype-phenotype correlation has been documented. Here we show that Tcof1 haploinsufficiency results in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage and neuroepithelial cell death. Consistent with this discovery, maternal treatment with antioxidants minimizes cell death in the neuroepithelium and substantially ameliorates or prevents the pathogenesis of craniofacial anomalies in Tcof1(+/-) mice. Thus maternal antioxidant dietary supplementation may provide an avenue for protection against the pathogenesis of TCS and similar neurocristopathies.

  18. Nutriepigenomics and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, Arnaud; Hankard, Regis; Borys, Jean-Michel; Sinnett, Daniel; Marcil, Valérie; Levy, Emile

    2017-06-01

    Epigenetics is defined as the modulation of gene expression without changes to the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic alterations, as a consequence of in utero malnutrition, may play a role in susceptibility to develop adulthood diseases and inheritance. However, the mechanistic link between epigenetic modifications and abnormalities in nutrition remains elusive. This review provides an update on the association of suboptimal nutritional environment and the high propensity to produce adult-onset chronic illnesses with a particular focus on modifications in genome functions that occur without alterations to the DNA sequence. We will mention the drivers of the phenotype and pattern of epigenetic markers set down during the reprogramming along with novel preventative and therapeutic strategies. New knowledge of epigenetic alterations is opening a gate toward personalized medicine.

  19. Prevention of Acute Malnutrition during the hunger gap in urban Chad using Ready-to-Use Supplementary Food: Challenges and lessons learned from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huybregts, Lieven; Salpeteur, Cecile; Houngbe, Freddy Gloria; Ait Aissa, Myriam; Kolsteren, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Background: In Abeche town in eastern Chad, Action contre la Faim - France (ACF-France) implemented a food-based intervention during the seasonal ‘hunger gap’ in 2010. The objectives were to assess the acceptability, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of RUSF to prevent acute malnutrition or wasting (WH <80% of the median of NCHS reference and/or presence of bilateral pitting edema) among children 6-36 months living in vulnerable households. Method: The study was a two-arm cluster randomized controlled intervention. All enrolled households in the project received a monthly food package provided by World Food Program (WFP), estimated to cover approximately 1800 kcal/day. Number of food rations received per household was proportional to its size. The intervention group was given a daily 46g of RUSF (Plumpy Doz®, Nutriset, Malaunay, France) during 6 months. A follow up visit was organized 2 months after the last distribution. All analyses were done on an intention-to-treat basis. All the data were double entered in EpiData version 3.1. Statistical analyses were conducted using STATA 11.2 (Statacorp, USA). The statistical significance for all analyses was set at 5% and all tests were two-sided. Results: In the end, the intervention achieved a sample of 1038 children. Adding RUSF to a package of monthly household food rations did not result in an important reduction in cumulative incidence of wasting (Incidence Risk Ratio: 0.86; 95%CI: 0.67, 1.11; P = 0.25). However, the intervention group had a modestly higher Height-for-Age gain (+0.03 Z-score per month; 95%CI: 0.02, 0.05; P<0.001). In addition, children from the intervention group had a significantly higher hemoglobin concentration at the end of the study compared to children from the control group (+3.8g/L; 95%CI: 0.6, 7.0; P = 0.02), thereby reducing the odds of anemia (Odds Ratio: 0.52; 95%CI: 7.1, 23.9; P = 0.004). Adding RUSF also resulted in a significantly lower risk of self-reported diarrhea

  20. Catalase prevents maternal diabetes-induced perinatal programming via the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shiao-Ying; Chen, Yun-Wen; Zhao, Xin-Ping; Chenier, Isabelle; Tran, Stella; Sauvé, Alexandre; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2012-10-01

    We investigated whether overexpression of catalase (CAT) in renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) could prevent the programming of hypertension and kidney disease in the offspring of dams with maternal diabetes. Male offspring of nondiabetic and diabetic dams from two transgenic (Tg) lines (Hoxb7-green fluorescent protein [GFP]-Tg [controls] and Hoxb7/CAT-GFP-Tg, which overexpress CAT in RPTCs) were studied from the prenatal period into adulthood. Nephrogenesis, systolic blood pressure, renal hyperfiltration, kidney injury, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were assessed. Gene expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), nuclear factor erythroid 2p45-related factor-2 (Nrf2), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was tested in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Renal dysmorphogenesis was observed in offspring of Hoxb7-GFP-Tg dams with severe maternal diabetes; the affected male offspring displayed higher renal ROS generation and developed hypertension and renal hyperfiltration as well as renal injury with heightened TGF-β1 expression in adulthood. These changes were ameliorated in male offspring of diabetic Hoxb7/CAT-GFP-Tg dams via the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system. CAT promoted Nrf2 nuclear translocation and HO-1 gene expression, seen in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In conclusion, CAT overexpression in the RPTCs ameliorated maternal diabetes-induced perinatal programming, mediated, at least in part, by triggering the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system.

  1. Pediatric Obesity: It’s Time for Prevention Before Conception Can Maternal Obesity Program Pediatric Obesity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Ferraro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Global increases in obesity have led public health experts to declare this disease a pandemic. Although prevalent in all ages, the dire consequences associated with maternal obesity have a pronounced impact on the long-term health of their children as a result of the intergenerational effects of developmental programming. Previously, fetal under-nutrition has been linked to the predisposition to pediatric obesity explained by the adiposity rebound and ‘catch-up’ growth that occurs when a child born to a nutrient deprived mother is exposed to the obesogenic environment of present day. Given the recent increase in maternal overweight/obesity (OW/OB our attention has shifted from nutrient restriction to overabundance and excess during pregnancy. Consideration must now be given to interventions that could mitigate pregravid body mass index (BMI, attenuate gestational weight gain (GWG and reduce postpartum weight retention (PPWR in an attempt to prevent the downstream signaling of pediatric obesity and halt the intergenerational cycle of weight related disease currently plaguing our world. Thus, this paper will briefly review current research that best highlights the proposed mechanisms responsible for the development of child OW/OB and related sequalae (e.g. type II diabetes (T2D and cardiovascular disease (CVD resulting from maternal obesity.

  2. Pediatric Obesity: It's Time for Prevention before Conception Can Maternal Obesity Program Pediatric Obesity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Ferraro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Global increases in obesity have led public health experts to declare this disease a pandemic. Although prevalent in all ages, the dire consequences associated with maternal obesity have a pronounced impact on the long-term health of their children as a result of the intergenerational effects of developmental programming. Previously, fetal under-nutrition has been linked to the predisposition to pediatric obesity explained by the adiposity rebound and ‘catch-up’ growth that occurs when a child born to a nutrient deprived mother is exposed to the obesogenic environment of present day. Given the recent increase in maternal overweight/obesity (OW/OB our attention has shifted from nutrient restriction to overabundance and excess during pregnancy. Consideration must now be given to interventions that could mitigate pregravid body mass index (BMI, attenuate gestational weight gain (GWG and reduce postpartum weight retention (PPWR in an attempt to prevent the downstream signaling of pediatric obesity and halt the intergenerational cycle of weight related disease currently plaguing our world. Thus, this paper will briefly review current research that best highlights the proposed mechanisms responsible for the development of child OW/OB and related sequalae (e.g. type II diabetes (T2D and cardiovascular disease (CVD resulting from maternal obesity.

  3. Severe childhood malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Berkley, James A; Bandsma, Robert H J

    2017-01-01

    The main forms of childhood malnutrition occur predominantly in children middle-income countries and include stunting, wasting and kwashiorkor, of which severe wasting and kwashiorkor are commonly referred to as severe acute malnutrition. Here, we use...... nutritional status and suboptimal nutritional intake in infancy and early childhood. Children with severe malnutrition have an increased risk of serious illness and death, primarily from acute infectious diseases. International growth standards are used for the diagnosis of severe malnutrition and provide...... and metabolic functions in children with malnutrition is challenging, and children remain at high risk of relapse and death. Further research is urgently needed to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of severe malnutrition, especially the mechanisms causing kwashiorkor, and to develop new...

  4. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's maternal health response to 2009 H1N1 influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Laura G; Ellington, Sascha R; Forhan, Sara E; Yeung, Lorraine F; Perez, Mirna; Shah, Melisa M; MacFarlane, Kitty; Laird, Susan K; House, Lawrence D; Jamieson, Denise J

    2011-06-01

    We describe the efforts of the Maternal Health Team, which was formed to address the needs of pregnant and breastfeeding women during the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) 2009 pandemic influenza A (2009 H1N1) emergency response. We examined the team's activities, constructed a timeline of key pandemic events, and analyzed the Maternal Health 2009 H1N1 inquiry database. During the pandemic response, 9 guidance documents that addressed the needs of pregnant and breastfeeding women and their providers were developed by the Maternal Health Team. The Team received 4661 maternal health-related inquiries that came primarily from the public (75.5%) and were vaccine related (69.3%). Peak inquiry volume coincided with peak hospitalizations (October-November 2009). The Maternal Health 2009 H1N1 inquiry database proved useful to identify information needs of the public and health care providers during the pandemic. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Maternal methyl donors supplementation during lactation prevents the hyperhomocysteinemia induced by a high-fat-sucrose intake by dams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Paul; Milagro, Fermin I; Campion, Javier; Martinez, J Alfredo

    2013-12-16

    Maternal perinatal nutrition may program offspring metabolic features. Epigenetic regulation is one of the candidate mechanisms that may be affected by maternal dietary methyl donors intake as potential controllers of plasma homocysteine levels. Thirty-two Wistar pregnant rats were randomly assigned into four dietary groups during lactation: control, control supplemented with methyl donors, high-fat-sucrose and high-fat-sucrose supplemented with methyl donors. Physiological outcomes in the offspring were measured, including hepatic mRNA expression and global DNA methylation after weaning. The newborns whose mothers were fed the obesogenic diet were heavier longer and with a higher adiposity and intrahepatic fat content. Interestingly, increased levels of plasma homocysteine induced by the maternal high-fat-sucrose dietary intake were prevented in both sexes by maternal methyl donors supplementation. Total hepatic DNA methylation decreased in females due to maternal methyl donors administration, while Dnmt3a hepatic mRNA levels decreased accompanying the high-fat-sucrose consumption. Furthermore, a negative association between Dnmt3a liver mRNA levels and plasma homocysteine concentrations was found. Maternal high-fat-sucrose diet during lactation could program offspring obesity features, while methyl donors supplementation prevented the onset of high hyperhomocysteinemia. Maternal dietary intake also affected hepatic DNA methylation metabolism, which could be linked with the regulation of the methionine-homocysteine cycle.

  6. Effect of Short-Term Supplementation with Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food or Micronutrients for Children after Illness for Prevention of Malnutrition: A Randomised Controlled Trial in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia van der Kam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Globally, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF treats more than 300,000 severely malnourished children annually. Malnutrition is not only caused by lack of food and poor infant and child feeding practices but also by illnesses. Breaking the vicious cycle of illness and malnutrition by providing ill children with nutritional supplementation is a potentially powerful strategy for preventing malnutrition that has not been adequately investigated. Therefore, MSF investigated whether incidence of malnutrition among ill children <5 y old could be reduced by providing a fortified food product or micronutrients during their 2-wk convalescence period. Two trials, one in Nigeria and one in Uganda, were conducted; here we report on the trial that took place in Goronyo, a rural region of northwest Nigeria with high morbidity and malnutrition rates.We investigated the effect of supplementation with ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF and a micronutrient powder (MNP on the incidence of malnutrition in ill children presenting at an outpatient clinic in Goronyo during February to September 2012. A three-armed, partially-blinded, randomised controlled trial was conducted in children diagnosed as having malaria, diarrhoea, or lower respiratory tract infection. Children aged 6 to 59 mo were randomised to one of three arms: one sachet/d of RUTF; two sachets/d of micronutrients or no supplement (control for 14 d for each illness over 6 mo. The primary outcome was the incidence of first negative nutritional outcome (NNO during the 6 mo follow-up. NNO was a study-specific measure used to indicate occurrence of malnutrition; it was defined as low weight-for-height z-score (<-2 for non-malnourished and <-3 for moderately malnourished children, mid-upper arm circumference <115 mm, or oedema, whichever came first. Of the 2,213 randomised participants, 50.0% were female and the mean age was 20.2 (standard deviation 11.2 months; 160 (7.2% were lost to follow-up, 54 (2.4% were

  7. Malnutrition and vaccination in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition contributes to an estimated 45% of deaths among children under 5 years of age in developing countries, predominantly due to infections. Malnourished children therefore stand to benefit hugely from vaccination, but malnutrition has been described as the most common immunodeficiency globally, suggesting that they may not be able to respond effectively to vaccines. The immunology of malnutrition remains poorly characterized, but is associated with impairments in mucosal barrier integrity, and innate and adaptive immune dysfunction. Despite this, the majority of malnourished children can mount a protective immune response following vaccination, although the timing, quality and duration of responses may be impaired. This paper reviews the evidence for vaccine immunogenicity in malnourished children, discusses the importance of vaccination in prevention of malnutrition and highlights evidence gaps in our current knowledge. PMID:25964453

  8. Malnutrition in Patients with Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella D. Bouziana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a devastating event that carries a potential for long-term disability. Malnutrition is frequently observed in patients with stroke, and dysphagia contributes to malnutrition risk. During both the acute phase of stroke and rehabilitation, specific nutritional interventions in the context of a multidisciplinary team effort can enhance the recovery of neurocognitive function. Early identification and management of malnutrition with dietary modifications or specific therapeutic strategies to ensure adequate nutritional intake should receive more attention, since poor nutritional status appears to exacerbate brain damage and to contribute to adverse outcome. The main purpose of nutritional intervention should be the prevention or treatment of complications resulting from energy-protein deficit. This paper reviews the evaluation and management of malnutrition and the use of specialized nutrition support in patients with stroke. Emphasis is given to enteral tube and oral feeding and to strategies to wean from tube feeding.

  9. The study of malnutrition in elderly people of Kurdistan in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimi Z

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: This study seems to take care intervention programs extensively by the health authorities and policymakers to prevent malnutrition in all age groups, especially the elderly appears necessary. Keywords: Elderly - Malnutrition - BMI

  10. Alcoholic Liver Disease and Malnutrition

    OpenAIRE

    McClain, Craig J.; Barve, Shirish S.; Barve, Ashutosh; Marsano, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Malnutrition, both protein energy malnutrition (PEM) and deficiencies in individual nutrients, is a frequent complication of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Severity of malnutrition correlates with severity of ALD. Malnutrition also occurs in patients with cirrhosis due to etiologies other than alcohol. The mechanisms for malnutrition are multifactorial, and malnutrition frequently worsens in the hospital due to fasting for procedures and metabolic complications of liver disease, such as hepat...

  11. Malnutrition, Learning, and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Merrill S.; Felson, David

    The problems of those children who are chronically malnourished, the cultural environment of malnutrition, and the extent to which children are temporarily or permanently handicapped in learning because of malnutrition are discussed in this booklet. It also describes hunger and its effects on child development. The topics addressed are: definition…

  12. Do Maternal Caregiver Perceptions of Childhood Obesity Risk Factors and Obesity Complications Predict Support for Prevention Initiatives Among African Americans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Dayna S; Alfonso, Moya L; Cao, Chunhua; Wright, Alesha R

    2017-07-01

    Objectives African American maternal caregiver support for prevention of childhood obesity may be a factor in implementing, monitoring, and sustaining children's positive health behaviors. However, little is known about how perceptions of childhood obesity risk factors and health complications influence caregivers' support of childhood obesity prevention strategies. The objective of this study was to determine if childhood obesity risk factors and health complications were associated with maternal caregivers' support for prevention initiatives. Methods A convenience sample of maternal caregivers (N = 129, ages 22-65 years) completed the childhood obesity perceptions (COP) survey. A linear regression was conducted to determine whether perceptions about childhood obesity risk factors and subsequent health complications influenced caregivers' support for prevention strategies. Results Caregivers' perceptions of childhood obesity risk factors were moderate (M = 3.4; SD = 0.64), as were their perceptions of obesity-related health complications (M = 3.3; SD = 0.75); however, they perceived a high level of support for prevention strategies (M = 4.2; SD = 0.74). In the regression model, only health complications were significantly associated with caregiver support (β = 0.348; p Childhood obesity prevention efforts should emphasize health complications by providing education and strategies that promote self-efficacy and outcome expectations among maternal caregivers.

  13. Development and acceptability of ready-to-use supplementary food made of local food ingredients for preventing and treating moderate acute malnutrition (contributed paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M Munirul; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Choudhury, Nuzhat; Hossain, M Iqbal; Alam, Md. Shafiqul Alam; Schumacher, Britta; De Pee, Saskia; Muiruri, Juliana; Fuli, Rachel; Parveen, Monira; Tangsuphoom, Nattapol; West, Keith; Christian, Parul

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Background and objectives: Inadequate energy and micronutrient intake during childhood is a major public health problem in many developing countries including Bangladesh, particularly in food insecure communities. Locally produced ready-to-use supplementary food (RUSF) can improve growth, development and micronutrient status of children. The study was conducted to develop recipes for RUSF based on locally available food ingredients and to test their acceptability among children. Methods: A checklist was prepared of available and commonly consumed food ingredients that have the potential of being used for RUSF. Linear programming was used to determine possible combinations of ingredients and required micronutrient premix composition, and samples were prepared in the icddr,b food-processing lab. To test the acceptability of the RUSF recipes compared to Pushti-packet (a cereal based food-supplement), an acceptability trial was conducted among 90 children aged 6-18 months in a slum in Mirpur, Dhaka, Bangladesh. The mothers were asked to rate the color, flavor, mouth-feel, and overall liking of the RUSF by using a 7-point hedonic scale (1 = dislike extremely, 2 = dislike moderately, 3 = dislike, 4 = neither dislike nor like, 5 = like slightly, 6 = like moderately, 7 = like extremely). Results: Two RUSFs were developed, one based on rice and lentils and the other one on chickpea. Mean response for each sensory quality of all products was more than 6. The two RUSFs scored significantly better compared to Pushti-packet in terms of ‘overall liking’. Children were offered 50g of food and they consumed (mean+SD) 26.1±15.1g RUSF and 17.1±14.3g Pushti-packet which took them 20.9±9.6 minutes. There was no significant difference between two RUSF consumption, but there was a significant difference between chickpea-based RUSF and Pushti-packet (28.4 vs.17.1g) consumption. Conclusions: Locally available food ingredients were used to develop RUSFs for preventing and

  14. Maternal autoimmune disease and birth defects in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley, Meredith M; Browne, Marilyn L; Van Zutphen, Alissa R; Richardson, Sandra D; Blossom, Sarah J; Broussard, Cheryl S; Carmichael, Suzan L; Druschel, Charlotte M

    2016-11-01

    Little is known about the association between maternal autoimmune disease or its treatment and the risk of birth defects. We examined these associations using data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a multi-site, population-based, case-control study. Analyses included 25,116 case and 9897 unaffected control infants with estimated delivery dates between 1997 and 2009. Information on autoimmune disease, medication use, and other pregnancy exposures was collected by means of telephone interview. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for birth defects with five or more exposed cases; crude ORs and exact 95% CIs were estimated for birth defects with three to four exposed cases. Autoimmune disease was reported by 373 mothers (279 case and 94 control mothers). The majority of birth defects evaluated were not associated with autoimmune disease; however, a statistically significant association between maternal autoimmune disease and encephalocele was observed (OR, 4.64; 95% CI, 1.95-11.04). Eighty-two mothers with autoimmune disease used an immune modifying/suppressing medication during pregnancy; this was associated with encephalocele (OR, 7.26; 95% CI, 1.37-24.61) and atrial septal defects (OR, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.16-7.80). Our findings suggest maternal autoimmune disease and treatment are not associated with the majority of birth defects, but may be associated with some defects, particularly encephalocele. Given the low prevalence of individual autoimmune diseases and the rare use of specific medications, we were unable to examine associations of specific autoimmune diseases and medications with birth defects. Other studies are needed to confirm these findings. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:950-962, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. [Prevalence of malnutrition in Spanish schoolchildren].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ríos, Mónica; Santiago-Pérez, María I; Leis, Rosaura; Malvar, Alberto; Suanzes, Jorge; Hervada, Xurxo

    2017-11-01

    The term malnutrition includes malnutrition due to excess or obesity, underweight as well as stunted growth. Its prevalence in a population can be estimated using anthropometric variables. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of malnutrition in Galician schoolchildren aged 6 to 15years in the school year 2013-2014. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a representative sample by gender and age of the Galician population of 6 to 15years old. The prevalence of obesity, underweight, and short stature was estimated by age and gender using the reference standards proposed by the World Health Organisation. Of the total of 7,438 schoolchildren weighed and measured, 16.4% had malnutrition. The prevalence of obesity was 14.8%, underweight was 0.7%, and short stature for age was estimated at 1%. Obesity was more prevalent among boys. As regards underweight and short stature, when there were differences, prevalence was higher among girls. In Galicia, 16 out of every 100 schoolchildren aged 6 to 15years had malnutrition, with that due to excess or obesity being the most frequent. Prevalence of underweight and short stature did not exceed 1%. This data shows that primary prevention measures should be promoted at an early age to reduce malnutrition due to excess or adiposity, in particular. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  16. Malnutrition predicting factors in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Soodeh Razeghi; Hosseini, Saeed; Razeghi, Effat; Meysamie, Ali pasha; Sadrzadeh, Haleh

    2010-09-01

    Malnutrition is a predictor of increased mortality in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients. Various factors may contribute to malnutrition in these patients including energy and protein intake, inflammation, and comorbidity. To determine the importance of these factors in malnutrition of chronic HD patients, we studied 112 chronic HD patients in two centers was evaluated with the Dialysis Malnutrition Score (DMS) and anthropometric and biochemical indices. Seventy six (67.8%) patients were classified as malnourished. According to DMS score, poor protein intake (r= -0.34, Penergy intake (r= - 0.18, Pmalnutrition in descending order of importance. Multiple regression analysis showed that only poor protein intake was the explanatory variable of anthropometric measurements decline including body mass index, triceps skin fold thick-ness, mid arm circumference, mid arm muscle circumference, fat free mass, fat mass, albumin, creatinine and transferrine. None of the mentioned factors predicted the decrease of biochemical markers. We conclude that the frequency of malnutrition is high in our population and poor protein intake is the primary contributing factor for this condition. Therefore, providing enough protein may be a simple and effective way in preventing malnutrition in these patients.

  17. Malnutrition related deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparre-Sørensen, Maja; Kristensen, Gustav N

    2016-10-01

    Studies have shown that malnutrition increases the risk of morbidity, mortality, the length of hospital stay, and costs in the elderly population. Approximately one third of all patients admitted to geriatric wards in Denmark are malnourished according to the Danish Geriatric database. The aim of this study is to describe and examine the sudden increase in deaths due to malnutrition in the elderly population in Denmark from 1999 and, similarly, the sudden decline in malnutrition related deaths in 2007. A descriptive epidemiologic study was performed. All Danes listed in the national death registry who died from malnutrition in the period from 1994 to 2012 are included. The number of deaths from malnutrition increased significantly during the period from 1999 to 2007, especially in the age group 70 years and over. Additionally, we document a surprising similarity between the development in excess mortality from malnutrition in the five Danish regions during the same period. During the period 1999-2007 malnutrition was the direct cause of 340 extra deaths, and probably ten times more registered under other diseases. This development in excess mortality runs parallel in all five Danish regions over time. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The intrauterine metabolic environment modulates the gene expression pattern in fetal rat islets: prevention by maternal taurine supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusens, B; Sparre, T; Kalbe, L; Bouckenooghe, T; Theys, N; Kruhøffer, M; Orntoft, T F; Nerup, J; Remacle, C

    2008-05-01

    Events during fetal life may in critical time windows programme tissue development leading to organ dysfunction with potentially harmful consequences in adulthood such as diabetes. In rats, the beta cell mass of progeny from dams fed with a low-protein (LP) diet during gestation is decreased at birth and metabolic perturbation lasts through adulthood even though a normal diet is given after birth or after weaning. Maternal and fetal plasma taurine levels are suboptimal. Maternal taurine supplementation prevents these induced abnormalities. In this study, we aimed to reveal changes in gene expression in fetal islets affected by the LP diet and how taurine may prevent these changes. Pregnant Wistar rats were fed an LP diet (8% [wt/wt] protein) supplemented or not with taurine in the drinking water or a control diet (20% [wt/wt] protein). At 21.5 days of gestation, fetal pancreases were removed, digested and cultured for 7 days. Neoformed islets were collected and transcriptome analysis was performed. Maternal LP diet significantly changed the expression of more than 10% of the genes. Tricarboxylic acid cycle and ATP production were highly targeted, but so too were cell proliferation and defence. Maternal taurine supplementation normalised the expression of all altered genes. Development of the beta cells and particularly their respiration is modulated by the intrauterine environment, which may epigenetically modify expression of the genome and programme the beta cell towards a pre-diabetic phenotype. This mis-programming by maternal LP diet was prevented by early taurine intervention.

  19. Socio-economic risk factors for severe protein energy malnutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: There seems to be a strong association between severe malnutrition and some indicators of poverty, lack of breastfeeding, and failure to complete immunisation. Programmes aimed at poverty alleviation, promotion of breastfeeding and immunisation, will go a long way in preventing malnutrition.

  20. Behaviour of postnatally growth-impaired mice during malnutrition and after partial weight recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Reinhard C.; Kolb, Andreas F.; Lillico, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Early malnutrition is a highly prevalent condition in developing countries. Different rodent models of postnatal early malnutrition have been used to approach the subject experimentally, inducing early malnutrition by maternal malnutrition, temporal maternal separation, manipulation...... of litter size or the surgical nipple ligation to impair lactation. Studies on the behaviour of (previously) malnourished animals using animal models have produced sometimes contradictory results regarding the effects of early postnatal malnutrition and have been criticized for introducing potential...... confounding factors. The present paper is a first report on the behavioural effects of early malnutrition induced by an alternative approach: mice nursed by a-casein-deficient knockout dams showed a severe growth delay during early development and substantial catch-up growth after weaning when compared...

  1. Effect of Short-Term Supplementation with Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food or Micronutrients for Children after Illness for Prevention of Malnutrition: A Randomised Controlled Trial in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia van der Kam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Globally, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF treats more than 300,000 severely malnourished children annually. Malnutrition is not only caused by lack of food but also by illnesses and by poor infant and child feeding practices. Breaking the vicious cycle of illness and malnutrition by providing ill children with nutritional supplementation is a potentially powerful strategy for preventing malnutrition that has not been adequately investigated. Therefore, MSF investigated whether incidence of malnutrition among ill children <5 y old could be reduced by providing a fortified food product or micronutrients during their 2-wk convalescence period. Two trials, one in Nigeria and one in Uganda, were conducted; here, we report on the trial that took place in Kaabong, a poor agropastoral region of Karamoja, in east Uganda. While the region of Karamoja shows an acute malnutrition rate between 8.4% and 11.5% of which 2% to 3% severe malnutrition, more than half (58% of the population in the district of Kaabong is considered food insecure.We investigated the effect of two types of nutritional supplementation on the incidence of malnutrition in ill children presenting at outpatient clinics during March 2011 to April 2012 in Kaabong, Karamoja region, Uganda, a resource-poor region where malnutrition is a chronic problem for its seminomadic population. A three-armed, partially-blinded, randomised controlled trial was conducted in children diagnosed with malaria, diarrhoea, or lower respiratory tract infection. Non-malnourished children aged 6 to 59 mo were randomised to one of three arms: one sachet/d of ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF, two sachets/d of micronutrient powder (MNP, or no supplement (control for 14 d for each illness over 6 mo. The primary outcome was the incidence of first negative nutritional outcome (NNO during the 6 mo follow-up. NNO was a study-specific measure used to indicate progression to moderate or severe acute malnutrition; it was

  2. Preventing Early Child Maltreatment: Implications from a Longitudinal Study of Maternal Abuse History, Substance Use Problems, and Offspring Victimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleyard, Karen; Berlin, Lisa J.; Rosanbalm, Katherine D.; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    In the interest of improving child maltreatment prevention science, this longitudinal, community based study of 499 mothers and their infants tested the hypothesis that mothers’ childhood history of maltreatment would predict maternal substance use problems, which in turn would predict offspring victimization. Mothers (35% White/non-Latina, 34% Black/non-Latina, 23% Latina, 7% other) were recruited and interviewed during pregnancy, and child protective services records were reviewed for the presence of the participants’ target infants between birth and age 26 months. Mediating pathways were examined through structural equation modeling and tested using the products of the coefficients approach. The mediated pathway from maternal history of sexual abuse to substance use problems to offspring victimization was significant (standardized mediated path [ab]=.07, 95% CI [.02, .14]; effect size=.26), as was the mediated pathway from maternal history of physical abuse to substance use problems to offspring victimization (standardized mediated path [ab]=.05, 95% CI [.01, .11]; effect size =.19). There was no significant mediated pathway from maternal history of neglect. Findings are discussed in terms of specific implications for child maltreatment prevention, including the importance of assessment and early intervention for maternal history of maltreatment and substance use problems, targeting women with maltreatment histories for substance use services, and integrating child welfare and parenting programs with substance use treatment. PMID:21240556

  3. [Epidemiology of malnutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoberdorf, Reinhard; Ballmer, Peter E

    2014-03-01

    The World Health Organisation classifies malnutrition worldwide as the greatest threat to public health. An expert report of the Council of Europe clearly showed that malnutrition in hospitalised patients is a real existing problem in all European countries, including Switzerland. According to the literature, malnutrition is prevalent in 20 - 60 % of patients on hospital admission. Malnutrition increases with age and is found more and more in obese subjects. Unintentional weight loss is the main feature of disease-related malnutrition in normalweight and obese individuals. The nutritional problem in obese persons manifests itself through nutrient imbalances and micronutrient deficiency. The cause for nutritional deficiencies is a hypercaloric diet with its energy - dense, but qualitative low - value foods. Depending on the extent of obesity, certain micronutrients are to be critically evaluated. It has been proven that for instance the vitamin D and iron metabolism are pathologically impaired by the increased fatty tissue. In Switzerland, the proportion of people under 20 years has decreased from 40.7 % (1900) to 20.6 % (2011), whereas in the elderly over 64 years, an increase from 5.8 % to 17.2 % has been recorded. In the very elderly people over 80 years, the increase from 0.5 % to 4.8 % has been particularly pronounced. Because malnutrition increases with age, it will be an important issue in the future and hospitals, nursing homes and home care will be particularly affected.

  4. Syphilis during pregnancy: a preventable threat to maternal-fetal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rac, Martha W F; Revell, Paula A; Eppes, Catherine S

    2017-04-01

    Syphilis remains the most common congenital infection worldwide and has tremendous consequences for the mother and her developing fetus if left untreated. Recently, there has been an increase in the number of congenital syphilis cases in the United States. Thus, recognition and appropriate treatment of reproductive-age women must be a priority. Testing should be performed at initiation of prenatal care and twice during the third trimester in high-risk patients. There are 2 diagnostic algorithms available and physicians should be aware of which algorithm is utilized by their testing laboratory. Women testing positive for syphilis should undergo a history and physical exam as well as testing for other sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. Serofast syphilis can occur in patients with previous adequate treatment but persistent low nontreponemal titers (Syphilis can infect the fetus in all stages of the disease regardless of trimester and can sometimes be detected with ultrasound >20 weeks. The most common findings include hepatomegaly and placentomegaly, but also elevated peak systolic velocity in the middle cerebral artery (indicative of fetal anemia), ascites, and hydrops fetalis. Pregnancies with ultrasound abnormalities are at higher risk of compromise during syphilotherapy as well as fetal treatment failure. Thus, we recommend a pretreatment ultrasound in viable pregnancies when feasible. The only recommended treatment during pregnancy is benzathine penicillin G and it should be administered according to maternal stage of infection per Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. Women with a penicillin allergy should be desensitized and then treated with penicillin appropriate for their stage of syphilis. The Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction occurs in up to 44% of gravidas and can cause contractions, fetal heart rate abnormalities, and even stillbirth in the most severely affected pregnancies. We recommend all viable pregnancies receive the first

  5. Gaps in the evidence for prevention and treatment of maternal anaemia: a review of systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Jacqui A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaemia, in particular due to iron deficiency, is common in pregnancy with associated negative outcomes for mother and infant. However, there is evidence of significant variation in management. The objectives of this review of systematic reviews were to analyse and summarise the evidence base, identify gaps in the evidence and develop a research agenda for this important component of maternity care. Methods Multiple databases were searched, including MEDLINE, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library. All systematic reviews relating to interventions to prevent and treat anaemia in the antenatal and postnatal period were eligible. Two reviewers independently assessed data inclusion, extraction and quality of methodology. Results 27 reviews were included, all reporting on the prevention and treatment of anaemia in the antenatal (n = 24 and postnatal periods (n = 3. Using AMSTAR as the assessment tool for methodological quality, only 12 of the 27 were rated as high quality reviews. The greatest number of reviews covered antenatal nutritional supplementation for the prevention of anaemia (n = 19. Iron supplementation was the most extensively researched, but with ongoing uncertainty about optimal dose and regimen. Few identified reviews addressed anaemia management post-partum or correlations between laboratory and clinical outcomes, and no reviews reported on clinical symptoms of anaemia. Conclusions The review highlights evidence gaps including the management of anaemia in the postnatal period, screening for anaemia, and optimal interventions for treatment. Research priorities include developing standardised approaches to reporting of laboratory outcomes, and information on clinical outcomes relevant to the experiences of pregnant women.

  6. Deep brain stimulation during early adolescence prevents microglial alterations in a model of maternal immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadar, Ravit; Dong, Le; Del-Valle-Anton, Lucia; Guneykaya, Dilansu; Voget, Mareike; Edemann-Callesen, Henriette; Schweibold, Regina; Djodari-Irani, Anais; Goetz, Thomas; Ewing, Samuel; Kettenmann, Helmut; Wolf, Susanne A; Winter, Christine

    2017-07-01

    In recent years schizophrenia has been recognized as a neurodevelopmental disorder likely involving a perinatal insult progressively affecting brain development. The poly I:C maternal immune activation (MIA) rodent model is considered as a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. Using this model we and others demonstrated the association between neuroinflammation in the form of altered microglia and a schizophrenia-like endophenotype. Therapeutic intervention using the anti-inflammatory drug minocycline affected altered microglia activation and was successful in the adult offspring. However, less is known about the effect of preventive therapeutic strategies on microglia properties. Previously we found that deep brain stimulation of the medial prefrontal cortex applied pre-symptomatically to adolescence MIA rats prevented the manifestation of behavioral and structural deficits in adult rats. We here studied the effects of deep brain stimulation during adolescence on microglia properties in adulthood. We found that in the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens, but not in the medial prefrontal cortex, microglial density and soma size were increased in MIA rats. Pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA was unchanged in all brain areas before and after implantation and stimulation. Stimulation of either the medial prefrontal cortex or the nucleus accumbens normalized microglia density and soma size in main projection areas including the hippocampus and in the area around the electrode implantation. We conclude that in parallel to an alleviation of the symptoms in the rat MIA model, deep brain stimulation has the potential to prevent the neuroinflammatory component in this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Maternal antioxidant supplementation prevents adiposity in the offspring of Western diet-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sarbattama; Simmons, Rebecca A

    2010-12-01

    Obesity in pregnancy significantly increases the risk of the offspring developing obesity after birth. The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that maternal obesity increases oxidative stress during fetal development, and to determine whether administration of an antioxidant supplement to pregnant Western diet-fed rats would prevent the development of adiposity in the offspring. Female Sprague Dawley rats were started on the designated diet at 4 weeks of age. Four groups of animals were studied: control chow (control); control + antioxidants (control+Aox); Western diet (Western); and Western diet + antioxidants (Western+Aox). The rats were mated at 12 to 14 weeks of age, and all pups were weaned onto control diet. Offspring from dams fed the Western diet had significantly increased adiposity as early as 2 weeks of age as well as impaired glucose tolerance compared with offspring of dams fed a control diet. Inflammation and oxidative stress were increased in preimplantation embryos, fetuses, and newborns of Western diet-fed rats. Gene expression of proadipogenic and lipogenic genes was altered in fat tissue of rats at 2 weeks and 2 months of age. The addition of an antioxidant supplement decreased adiposity and normalized glucose tolerance. CONCLUSIONS; Inflammation and oxidative stress appear to play a key role in the development of increased adiposity in the offspring of Western diet-fed pregnant dams. Restoration of the antioxidant balance during pregnancy in the Western diet-fed dam is associated with decreased adiposity in offspring.

  8. Aquatic Activities During Pregnancy Prevent Excessive Maternal Weight Gain and Preserve Birth Weight: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Mariano; Mottola, Michelle F; Perales, Maria; Refoyo, Ignacio; Barakat, Ruben

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of a supervised and regular program of aquatic activities throughout gestation on maternal weight gain and birth weight. A randomized clinical trial. Instituto de Obstetricia, Ginecología y Fertilidad Ghisoni (Buenos Aires, Argentina). One hundred eleven pregnant women were analyzed (31.6 ± 3.8 years). All women had uncomplicated and singleton pregnancies; 49 were allocated to the exercise group (EG) and 62 to the control group (CG). The intervention program consisted of 3 weekly sessions of aerobic and resistance aquatic activities from weeks 10 to 12 until weeks 38 to 39 of gestation. Maternal weight gain, birth weight, and other maternal and fetal outcomes were obtained by hospital records. Student unpaired t test and χ 2 test were used; P values ≤.05 indicated statistical significance. Cohen's d was used to determinate the effect size. There was a higher percentage of women with excessive maternal weight gain in the CG (45.2%; n = 28) than in the EG (24.5%; n = 12; odds ratio = 0.39; 95% confidence interval: 0.17-0.89; P = .02). Birth weight and other pregnancy outcomes showed no differences between groups. Three weekly sessions of water activities throughout pregnancy prevents excessive maternal weight gain and preserves birth weight. The clinicaltrial.gov identifier: NCT 02602106.

  9. Assessment of Severity of Malnutrition in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients via Malnutrition: Infl ammatory Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsoon Emami Naeeni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regarding to the complications of malnutrition in dialysis patients, using an easy and reliable method for evaluating of malnutrition is important in patients with the end-stage renal disease. Based on the effect of inflammatory factors in malnutrition, A new scale has been designed which is called malnutrition–inflammatory scale (MIS. We designed current study to assess the severity of malnutrition in peritoneal dialysis patients in Isfahan via MIS. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional MIS was used for evaluation of malnutrition. MIS includes 10 components: dry weight changes, dietary intake, functional capacity, comorbidity, muscle wasting and loss of subcutaneous fat as well as body mass index (BMI, serum albumin level and total iron binding capacity (TIBC. Each component has four levels of severity from 0 (normal to 3 (severely abnormal. All analyses were performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20 (SPSS 20 and P < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Results showed no significant difference in MIS between male and female participants. Mean of minimum inhibitory concentration in this study was calculated about 4.1 (MIS <9 which means no or mild malnutrition. Significant correlation between MIS and weight (P < 0.001, BMI (P < 0.001, TIBC (P < 0.001, triglyseride (P = 0.04 and arm circumference (P < 0.001 was seen. Conclusion: We suggest That MIS is being used as a valuable tool for prevention of fatal outcomes in chronic dialysis patients.

  10. Low birth weight in relation to maternal age and multiple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vihar

    Low socio-economic status is the underlying cause of low birth weight. Other causes include maternal malnutrition; maternal diseases like antepartum hemorrhage, anaemia, cervical incompetence; adolescent pregnancies; short birth intervals; intrauterine infections; multiple pregnancy; congenital malformations; placental.

  11. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic evaluations of maternal and child health nutrition to help prevent stunting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Nearly 200 million young children in developing countries around the world are stunted due to in great extent to malnutrition during infancy. Even though breast feeding is the best nourishment a mother can provide to her baby, after about six months of age, complementary foods, also called as weaning foods, are needed to meet the infant's nutritional recommendations. On the other hand, complementary feeding sometimes reduces breast milk intake and can introduce a potential source of contamination leading to a number of gastrointestinal infections, which can substantially impair growth. Thus, it is very important to accurately measure the amount of breast milk consumed and also to assess the amount and quality of complementary foods introduced to the infant's diet. An isotopic method for measuring breast milk intake based on deuterium dilution and kinetics has been validated using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Recently, a more economical infrared spectroscopy (IS) method has also been used and validated against IRMS. The objectives of this CRP were i) to develop stable isotope methods for measuring breast milk intake using regionally available equipment, ii) use isotopic methods to evaluate nutrient reserves, namely vitamin A, iron and zinc, and energy expenditure in mothers to determine the relative needs for nutritional supplements of mothers in the region, and iii) to use isotopic techniques to compare the nutrient density of milk with nutrient levels in the mother to learn for which nutrients breast milk is a reliable indicator of maternal nutrient reserves in marginally nourished women

  12. Child malnutrition in Tigray, northern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulugeta, A; Hagos, F; Kruseman, G; Linderhof, V; Stoecker, B; Abraha, Z; Yohannes, M; Samuel, G G

    2010-06-01

    Estimate levels of and identify factors contributing to child malnutrition in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia. Cross-sectional survey. Rural communities from four zones of Tigray. Three hundred and eighteen under five children representing 587 randomly selected households were included. Among the children surveyed, 46.9%, 33.0% and 11.6% were stunted,underweight and wasted, respectively. Older children were more likely to be undernourished. Stunting increases from 16% in the second half of the first year to 53% in children 24 months and older. Similarly, underweight increases from 10% in the first six months to 36.5% in children aged 24 months and older. A very high proportion of the mothers (80%) initiated feeding of newborns with pre-lacteal feeds primarily butter or water. Family foods and cereal-based porridge were the main complementary foods after six months. Child age, maternal anthropometric characteristics, inadequate complementary foods, the use of prelacteal feeds and area of residence were the main contributing factors to child undernutrition. Undernutrition gets worse as the children grow older. The energy and nutrient density of the complementary foods are low as the foods were prepared from a limited number of local staple cereals without the addition of sugar, fat/oil or animal products. More importantly, these foods are diluted with water to reduce their viscosity. This makes the quality and quantity of the foods insufficient to prevent stunting and underweight. Promotion of traditional household technologies such as germination and fermentation may be affordable measures to improve the quality of the complementary foods. Thus, sustained nutrition education programmes focusing on appropriate complementary feeding practices are recommended.

  13. [Maternal filicide in Japan: analyses of 96 cases and future directions for prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Hisako

    2007-01-01

    Maternal filicide is not an isolated phenomenon. When a mother kills her child, she may be affected by many factors and confronted with different problems based on the child's developmental stage. In this study in Japan, a judicial sample of 96 adult women, convicted in their first trial for the murder or attempted murder of their children, was divided into four groups of mothers according to the age of the victim (25 women killed neonates, 22 women infants, 27 women preschool children, and 22 women schoolchildren and/or teenagers) in order to identify the factors that have a major impact on filicide in each group. The socio-demographic, clinical, forensic, circumstantial, and offense characteristics, and legal disposition of 96 cases drawn from judicial records were compared among the four groups using the Kruskal-Wallis test; comparison of two groups was conducted using the Mann-Whitney test. Neonaticide cases were distinguished from the other three groups by marked differences: a significantly higher rate of unmarried mothers, financial difficulties, absence of mental illness, and admission of not wanting an illegitimate child. In the other groups, mental disorders were frequent; in particular, post-partum depression was the primary cause of infanticide. For the two groups of cases involving a child older than one year, filicidal mothers were more affected by circumstantial factors such as health problems of the child or severe marital discord. These problems may then have caused a reactive mental disorder among these mothers. The risk of fatal abuse or neglect was higher for handicapped preschool children. Filicide-suicide was most frequently seen among school-aged children and/or teenagers who had serious behavioral problems, and these children often had a mental disorder. The classification of maternal filicide by age of the child demonstrated that there are specific issues for each group. Based on these findings, future directions for prevention include

  14. Integration of prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission into maternal health services in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisse, C

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the level of integration of prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) in facilities providing services for maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) and reproductive health (RH) in Senegal. The survey, conducted from August through November, 2014, comprised five parts : a literature review to assess the place of this integration in the health policies, standards, and protocols in effect in Senegal; an analysis by direct observation of attitudes and practices of 25 healthcare providers at 5 randomly-selected obstetrics and gynecology departments representative of different levels of the health pyramid; a questionnaire evaluating knowledge and attitudes of 10 providers about the integration of PMTCT services into MNCH/RH facilities; interviews to collect the opinions of 70 clients, including 16 HIV-positive, about the quality of PMTCT services they received; and a questionnaire evaluating knowledge and opinions of 14 policy-makers/managers of health programs focusing on mothers and children about this integration. The literature review revealed several constraints impeding this integration : the policy documents, standards, and protocols of each of the programs involved do not clearly indicate the modalities of this integration; the programs are housed in two different divisions while the national Program against the Human Immunodeficiency Virus reports directly to the Prime Minister; program operations remains generally vertical; the resources for the different programs are not sufficiently shared; there is no integrated training module covering integrated management of pregnancy and delivery; and supervision for each of the different programs is organized separately.The observation of the providers supporting women during pregnancy, during childbirth, and in the postpartum period, showed an effort to integrate PMTCT into the MNCH/RH services delivered daily to clients. But this desire is hampered by many

  15. Child malnutrition in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia | Mulugeta | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Estimate levels of and identify factors contributing to child malnutrition in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: Rural ... Child age, maternal anthropometric characteristics, inadequate complementary foods, the use of prelacteal feeds and area of residence were the main contributing

  16. The intrauterine metabolic environment modulates the gene expression pattern in fetal rat islets: prevention by maternal taurine supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reusens, B; Sparre, T; Kalbe, L

    2008-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis  Events during fetal life may in critical time windows programme tissue development leading to organ dysfunction with potentially harmful consequences in adulthood such as diabetes. In rats, the beta cell mass of progeny from dams fed with a low-protein (LP) diet during gestation...... is decreased at birth and metabolic perturbation lasts through adulthood even though a normal diet is given after birth or after weaning. Maternal and fetal plasma taurine levels are suboptimal. Maternal taurine supplementation prevents these induced abnormalities. In this study, we aimed to reveal changes...... in gene expression in fetal islets affected by the LP diet and how taurine may prevent these changes. Methods  Pregnant Wistar rats were fed an LP diet (8% [wt/wt] protein) supplemented or not with taurine in the drinking water or a control diet (20% [wt/wt] protein). At 21.5 days of gestation, fetal...

  17. Prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of tuberculosis in children and mothers: evidence for action for maternal, neonatal, and child health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getahun, Haileyesus; Sculier, Delphine; Sismanidis, Charalambos; Grzemska, Malgorzata; Raviglione, Mario

    2012-05-15

    Tuberculosis affected an estimated 8.8 million people and caused 1.4 million deaths globally in 2010, including a half-million women and at least 64 000 children. It also results in nearly 10 million cumulative orphans due to parental deaths. Moreover, it causes 6%-15% of all maternal mortality, which increases to 15%-34% if only indirect causes are considered. Increasingly, more women with tuberculosis are notified than men in settings with a high prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and maternal tuberculosis increases the vertical transmission of HIV. Tuberculosis prevention, diagnosis, and treatment services should be included as key interventions in the integrated management of pregnancy and child health. Tuberculosis screening using a simple clinical algorithm that relies on the absence of current cough, fever, weight loss, and night sweats should be used to identify eligible pregnant women living with HIV for isoniazid preventive therapy or for further investigation for tuberculosis disease as part of services for prevention of vertical HIV transmission. While implementing these simple, low-cost, effective interventions as part of maternal, neonatal, and child health services, the unmet basic and operational tuberculosis research needs of children, pregnant, and breastfeeding women should be addressed. National policy makers, program managers, and international stakeholders (eg, United Nations bodies, donors, and implementers) working on maternal, neonatal, and child health, especially in HIV-prevalent settings, should give due attention and include tuberculosis prevention, diagnosis, and treatment services as part of their core functions and address the public health impacts of tuberculosis in their programs and services.

  18. Survey of HBsAg-positive pregnant women and their infants regarding measures to prevent maternal-infantile transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meina Hu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intrauterine infection is the main contributor to maternal-infantile transmission of HBV. This is a retrospective study of 158 HBsAg-positive pregnant women who delivered children from Jan 1st, 2004 to Dec.31th, 2006 in Wuhan City, China. We investigated the measures taken to prevent maternal-infantile transmission of hepatitis B virus and the infection status of children. Methods HBsAg-positive pregnant women were selected by a random sampling method when they accepted prenatal care in district-level Maternal and Child Health Hospitals. On a voluntary basis, these women completed questionnaires by face-to-face or phone interviews. The collected data were used to evaluate the immunization programs that pregnant women had received for preventing hepatitis B maternal-infantile transmission. Results Among the 158 women, 143(90.5% received Hepatitis B immune globulin during pregnancy, and 86.0% of their children were given Hepatitis B immune globulin and Hepatitis B vaccine. The rate of cesarean section was 82.3%, and 28.5% of these were aimed at preventing HBV infection. The rate of bottle feeding was 51.9%, and 89.0% of bottle feeding cases were for the purpose of preventing HBV infection. There were 71 cases of participants who were HBeAg-positive. Compared with the HBsAg+ HBeAg- group (only HBsAg-positive, the HBsAg + HBeAg+ group (HBsAg-positive and HBeAg-positive had significantly higher rates of the caesarean section and bottle feeding resulting from hepatitis B (P Conclusion Most HBsAg positive pregnant women have a growing awareness of maternal-infantile transmission of Hepatitis B virus and are receiving some form of preventative treatment, like combined immunization. Caesarean and bottle feeding are very common, often primarily to prevent transmission. Relatively few intrauterine infections were identified in this sample, but many infants did not appear to seroconvert after vaccination.

  19. Hunger and Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because they don't eat properly. People with anorexia, bulimia, or another eating disorder are also not eating properly and are at risk of malnutrition. If you're on a special diet, you need to be careful about eating balanced ...

  20. Polypharmacy and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadak, Zdenek; Hyspler, Radomir; Ticha, Alena; Vlcek, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition and polypharmacy increase with age and polymorbidity and their relationship is based on a number of mechanisms. The occurrence of malnutrition in both in-patients and out-patients and its dependence on polymorbidity and age are well known, but the interrelation of polypharmacy and malnutrition has been far less investigated. The countries with the highest occurrence of polypharmacy in Europe include the Czech Republic and Finland, whereas the lowest prevalence of polypharmacy is found in Norway and the Netherlands. The occurrence, consequences and mutual relationship of malnutrition and polypharmacy are described. Up-to-date knowledge regarding the influence of drugs on nutritional status is summarized. The effect of polypharmacy on nutrition is suggested from the observations that problems with nutrition occur mostly in elderly patients, and that such patients are more frequently subject to polypharmacy. It is known that about 65% of hospitalized patients have a worse nutritional status than their healthy contemporaries. A worsened nutritional status may adversely influence the process of treatment.

  1. [Maternal phenylketonuria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bókay, János; Kiss, Erika; Simon, Erika; Szőnyi, László

    2013-05-05

    Elevated maternal phenylalanine levels during pregnancy are teratogenic, and may result in embryo-foetopathy, which could lead to stillbirth, significant psychomotor handicaps and birth defects. This foetal damage is known as maternal phenylketonuria. Women of childbearing age with all forms of phenylketonuria, including mild variants such as hyperphenylalaninaemia, should receive detailed counselling regarding their risks for adverse foetal effects, optimally before contemplating pregnancy. The most assured way to prevent maternal phenylketonuria is to maintain the maternal phenylalanine levels within the optimal range already before conception and throughout the whole pregnancy. Authors review the comprehensive programme for prevention of maternal phenylketonuria at the Metabolic Center of Budapest, they survey the practical approach of the continuous maternal metabolic control and delineate the outcome of pregnancies of mothers with phenylketonuria from the introduction of newborn screening until most recently.

  2. Empowering members of a rural southern community in Nigeria to plan to take action to prevent maternal mortality: A participatory action research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esienumoh, Ekpoanwan E; Allotey, Janette; Waterman, Heather

    2018-03-01

    To facilitate the empowerment of members of a rural community to plan to take action to prevent maternal mortality. Globally, about 300,000 maternal deaths occur yearly. Sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia regions account for almost all the deaths. Within those regions, India and Nigeria account for over a third of the global maternal deaths. Problem of maternal mortality in Nigeria is multifaceted. About 80% of maternal deaths are avoidable, given strategies which include skilled attendants, emergency obstetric care and community mobilization. In this article, a strategy of community empowerment to plan to take action to prevent maternal mortality is discussed. Participatory action research was utilized. Twelve volunteers were recruited as co-researchers into the study through purposive and snowball sampling who, following an orientation workshop, undertook participatory qualitative data collection with an additional 29 community members. Participatory thematic analysis of the data was undertaken which formed the basis of the plan of action. Community members attributed maternal morbidities and deaths to superstitious causes, delayed referrals by traditional birth attendants, poor transportation and poor resourcing of health facilities. Following critical reflection, actions were planned to empower the people to prevent maternal deaths through: community education and advocacy meetings with stakeholders to improve health and transportation infrastructures; training of existing traditional birth attendants in the interim and initiating their collaboration with skilled birth attendants. The community is a resource which if mobilized through the process of participatory action research, can be empowered to plan to take action in collaboration with skilled birth attendants to prevent maternal mortality. Interventions to prevent maternal deaths should include community empowerment to have better understanding of their circumstances as well as their collaboration with

  3. Maternal education, dental visits and age of pacifier withdrawal: pediatric dentist role in malocclusion prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Suárez, V; Carrillo-Diaz, M; Crego, A; Romero, M

    2013-01-01

    Although discouraged, pacifier usage is widespread and often practiced beyond two years of age. The current study explored the effects of maternal education and dental visits on the age of pacifier withdrawal. The dental histories of 213 children (53.1% male) attending a primary school in Madrid were obtained along with maternal education level and age at pacifier withdrawal. Data were analyzed by using independent samples t-test, one-way ANOVA two-way ANOVA and a complementary non-parametric approach was also used. There was a significant effect of maternal education on the age of pacifier withdrawal; the higher the maternal education, the younger the age of withdrawal. The frequency of dental visits influenced the relationship between maternal education and the age of pacifier withdrawal. Dental visits considerably shortened pacifier use among children with low- and medium-educated mothers. Pediatric dentists play a critical role in the correction of unhealthy oral habits such as prolonged pacifier use. The educational component of pediatric dentistry could reverse the lack of knowledge or misinformation among high-risk groups (e.g. low maternal education). As a consequence, we recommend that children start dental visits at an early age and maintain visits with a high frequency.

  4. Gaining Insight into the Prevention of Maternal Death Using Narrative Analysis: An Experience from Kerman, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Eftekhar-Vaghefi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Reduction in maternal mortality requires an in-depth knowledge of the causes of death. This study was conducted to explore the circumstances and events leading to maternal mortality through a holistic approach. Using narrative text analysis, all documents related to maternal deaths occurred from 2007 to 2011 in Kerman province/Iran were reviewed thoroughly by an expert panel. A 93-item chart abstraction instrument was developed according to the expert panel and literature. The instrument consisted of demographic and pregnancy related variables, underlying and contributing causes of death, and type of delays regarding public health aspects, medical and system performance issues. A total of 64 maternal deaths were examined. One third of deaths occurred in women less than 18 or higher than 35 years. Nearly 95% of them lived in a low or mid socioeconomic status. In half of the cases, inappropriate or nonuse of contraceptives was seen. Delay in the provision of any adequate treatment after arrival at the health facility was seen in 59% of cases. The most common medical causes of death were preeclampsia/eclampsia (15.6%, postpartum hemorrhage (12.5% and deep phlebothrombosis (10.9%, respectively. Negligence was accounted for 95% of maternal deaths. To overcome the root causes of maternal death, more emphasis should be devoted to system failures and patient safety rather than the underlying causes of death and medical issues solely.

  5. Behavioral counseling to prevent childhood obesity--study protocol of a pragmatic trial in maternity and child health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustila, Taina; Keskinen, Päivi; Luoto, Riitta

    2012-07-03

    Prevention is considered effective in combating the obesity epidemic. Prenatal environment may increase offspring's risk for obesity. A child starts to adopt food preferences and other behavioral habits affecting weight gain during preschool years. We report the study protocol of a pragmatic lifestyle intervention aiming at primary prevention of childhood obesity. A non-randomized controlled pragmatic trial in maternity and child health care clinics. The control group was recruited among families who visited the same clinics one year earlier. Eligibility criteria was mother at risk for gestational diabetes: body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2, macrosomic newborn in any previous pregnancy, immediate family history of diabetes and/or age ≥ 40 years. All maternity clinics in town involved in recruitment. The gestational intervention consisted of individual counseling on diet and physical activity by a public health nurse, and of two group counseling sessions. Intervention continues until offspring's age of five years. An option to participate a group counseling at child's age 1 to 2 years was offered. The intervention includes advice on healthy diet, physical activity, sedentary behavior and sleeping pattern. The main outcome measure is offspring BMI z-score and its changes by the age of six years. Early childhood is a critical time period for prevention of obesity. Pragmatic trials targeting this period are necessary in order to find effective obesity prevention programs feasible in normal health care practice.

  6. Scaling-up Community-Based Program for Management of Child Malnutrition in Rural Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winichagoon, Pattanee

    2014-01-01

    monitored quarterly and provided with nutrition education and other nutritional supports as determined by the community. Nutrition education included breast feeding promotion, complementary feeding guidelines, and maternal and child nutrition. Maternal nutrition focused on promoting supplementary nutritious foods and iron/multivitamin-mineral supplementation during pregnancy to prevent low birthweight and iron deficiency anemia. Subsequently, nutrition in primary health care evolved to become an integral part of the basic minimum need (BMN) approach, which provided a holistic development framework for the community. Thirty two simple indicators were developed and tested for various components (e.g., nutrition, food production, income, community participation) aiming at improved quality of life of individual, family and community. Child anthropometry was included in the BMN indicators. In terms of process, community was empowered to identify their problems, take initiatives and participate in integrated actions as relevant to a specific community. Technical and financial inputs were obtained or facilitated by frontline government personnel. BMN is an iterative process which helped to facilitate the bottom-up planning and indicators were used for monitoring progress. Within the first five years, child malnutrition declined significantly, and severe malnutrition was practically eradicated. Moderate and mild undernutrition continued to decline and from 1990s, stunting/underweight was about 12-14%; wasting 5-7%, despite social and economic challenges in subsequent years. (author)

  7. Choline prevents fetal overgrowth and normalizes placental fatty acid and glucose metabolism in a mouse model of maternal obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Juha; Greenwald, Esther; Jack-Roberts, Chauntelle; Ajeeb, Tamara T; Malysheva, Olga V; Caudill, Marie A; Axen, Kathleen; Saxena, Anjana; Semernina, Ekaterina; Nanobashvili, Khatia; Jiang, Xinyin

    2017-11-01

    Maternal obesity increases placental transport of macronutrients, resulting in fetal overgrowth and obesity later in life. Choline participates in fatty acid metabolism, serves as a methyl donor and influences growth signaling, which may modify placental macronutrient homeostasis and affect fetal growth. Using a mouse model of maternal obesity, we assessed the effect of maternal choline supplementation on preventing fetal overgrowth and restoring placental macronutrient homeostasis. C57BL/6J mice were fed either a high-fat (HF, 60% kcal from fat) diet or a normal (NF, 10% kcal from fat) diet with a drinking supply of either 25 mM choline chloride or control purified water, respectively, beginning 4 weeks prior to mating until gestational day 12.5. Fetal and placental weight, metabolites and gene expression were measured. HF feeding significantly (P<.05) increased placental and fetal weight in the HF-control (HFCO) versus NF-control (NFCO) animals, whereas the HF choline-supplemented (HFCS) group effectively normalized placental and fetal weight to the levels of the NFCO group. Compared to HFCO, the HFCS group had lower (P<.05) glucose transporter 1 and fatty acid transport protein 1 expression as well as lower accumulation of glycogen in the placenta. The HFCS group also had lower (P<.05) placental 4E-binding protein 1 and ribosomal protein s6 phosphorylation, which are indicators of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 activation favoring macronutrient anabolism. In summary, our results suggest that maternal choline supplementation prevented fetal overgrowth in obese mice at midgestation and improved biomarkers of placental macronutrient homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Malnutrition in South Asia-A Critical Reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Saeed

    2016-10-25

    Malnutrition continues to be a major public health challenge especially in South Asian developing countries. The aim of the present review is to spotlight the magnitude of the prevalence of malnutrition and its dynamics in South Asian region and to suggest potential approaches for the prevention and control of this issue of public health significance. An extensive review of literature, covering malnutrition and its determinants, health and economic consequences and pragmatic preventive strategies was performed on computer based bibliographic databases (PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, Medline and Sciencedirect.com ) to retrieve abstracts and full texts for India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal. All relevant titles and abstracts were examined and evaluated for malnutrition and its prevalence in South Asia. The results revealed malnutrition to be a major public health problem and a potential cause of high disease burden and mortality in South Asia. Compelling evidence suggests malnutrition to be the leading cause of stunting, wasting and underweight with drastic economic consequences among vulnerable populations. Reduced cognitive performance and low productivity have also been associated with micronutrients malnutrition. Suboptimal breastfeeding, inadequate food supply, micronutrient deficiencies, low household income, poor health care system, increased healthcare costs, illiteracy, unhygienic and substandard living, inappropriate child's care and the caregiver, food insecurity and on top of that vicious cycle of poverty, have been recognized as principal indicators for growing malnutrition prevalence in South Asia. Global organizations, local governments, program managers, NGOs, academia, industry in particular and the society at large need to take up the challenge to completely confiscate malnutrition from the region for economic prosperity and a healthier future.

  9. Preventing postnatal maternal mental health problems using a psychoeducational intervention: the cost-effectiveness of What Were We Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ride, Jemimah; Lorgelly, Paula; Tran, Thach; Wynter, Karen; Rowe, Heather; Fisher, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Postnatal maternal mental health problems, including depression and anxiety, entail a significant burden globally, and finding cost-effective preventive solutions is a public policy priority. This paper presents a cost-effectiveness analysis of the intervention, What Were We Thinking (WWWT), for the prevention of postnatal maternal mental health problems. Design The economic evaluation, including cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses, was conducted alongside a cluster-randomised trial. Setting 48 Maternal and Child Health Centres in Victoria, Australia. Participants Participants were English-speaking first-time mothers attending participating Maternal and Child Health Centres. Full data were collected for 175 participants in the control arm and 184 in the intervention arm. Intervention WWWT is a psychoeducational intervention targeted at the partner relationship, management of infant behaviour and parental fatigue. Outcome measures The evaluation considered public sector plus participant out-of-pocket costs, while outcomes were expressed in the 30-day prevalence of depression, anxiety and adjustment disorders, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Incremental costs and outcomes were estimated using regression analyses to account for relevant sociodemographic, prognostic and clinical characteristics. Results The intervention was estimated to cost $A118.16 per participant. The analysis showed no statistically significant difference between the intervention and control groups in costs or outcomes. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were $A36 451 per QALY gained and $A152 per percentage-point reduction in 30-day prevalence of depression, anxiety and adjustment disorders. The estimate lies under the unofficial cost-effectiveness threshold of $A55 000 per QALY; however, there was considerable uncertainty surrounding the results, with a 55% probability that WWWT would be considered cost-effective at that threshold. Conclusions The results

  10. Preventing postnatal maternal mental health problems using a psychoeducational intervention: the cost-effectiveness of What Were We Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ride, Jemimah; Lorgelly, Paula; Tran, Thach; Wynter, Karen; Rowe, Heather; Fisher, Jane

    2016-11-18

    Postnatal maternal mental health problems, including depression and anxiety, entail a significant burden globally, and finding cost-effective preventive solutions is a public policy priority. This paper presents a cost-effectiveness analysis of the intervention, What Were We Thinking (WWWT), for the prevention of postnatal maternal mental health problems. The economic evaluation, including cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses, was conducted alongside a cluster-randomised trial. 48 Maternal and Child Health Centres in Victoria, Australia. Participants were English-speaking first-time mothers attending participating Maternal and Child Health Centres. Full data were collected for 175 participants in the control arm and 184 in the intervention arm. WWWT is a psychoeducational intervention targeted at the partner relationship, management of infant behaviour and parental fatigue. The evaluation considered public sector plus participant out-of-pocket costs, while outcomes were expressed in the 30-day prevalence of depression, anxiety and adjustment disorders, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Incremental costs and outcomes were estimated using regression analyses to account for relevant sociodemographic, prognostic and clinical characteristics. The intervention was estimated to cost $A118.16 per participant. The analysis showed no statistically significant difference between the intervention and control groups in costs or outcomes. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were $A36 451 per QALY gained and $A152 per percentage-point reduction in 30-day prevalence of depression, anxiety and adjustment disorders. The estimate lies under the unofficial cost-effectiveness threshold of $A55 000 per QALY; however, there was considerable uncertainty surrounding the results, with a 55% probability that WWWT would be considered cost-effective at that threshold. The results suggest that, although WWWT shows promise as a preventive intervention for postnatal

  11. Prevention of influenza-related illness in young infants by maternal vaccination during pregnancy [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta C Nunes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The influenza virus circulates yearly and causes global epidemics. Influenza infection affects all age groups and causes mild to severe illness, and young infants are at particular risk for serious disease. The most effective measure to prevent influenza disease is vaccination; however, no vaccine is licensed for use in infants younger than 6 months old. Thus, there is a crucial need for other preventive strategies in this high-risk age group. Influenza vaccination during pregnancy protects both the mothers and the young infants against influenza infection. Vaccination during pregnancy boosts the maternal antibodies and increases the transfer of immunoglobulin G from the mother to the fetus through the placenta, which confers protection against infection in infants too young to be vaccinated. Data from clinical trials and observational studies did not demonstrate adverse effects to the mother, the fetus, or the infant after maternal influenza vaccination. We present the current data on the effectiveness and safety of influenza vaccination during pregnancy in preventing disease in the young infant.

  12. Alcoholic Liver Disease and Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Craig J.; Barve, Shirish S.; Barve, Ashutosh; Marsano, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition, both protein energy malnutrition (PEM) and deficiencies in individual nutrients, is a frequent complication of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Severity of malnutrition correlates with severity of ALD. Malnutrition also occurs in patients with cirrhosis due to etiologies other than alcohol. The mechanisms for malnutrition are multifactorial, and malnutrition frequently worsens in the hospital due to fasting for procedures and metabolic complications of liver disease, such as hepatic encephalopathy. Aggressive nutritional support is indicated in inpatients with ALD, and patients often need to be fed through an enteral feeding tube to achieve protein and calorie goals. Enteral nutritional support clearly improves nutrition status and may improve clinical outcome. Moreover, late-night snacks in outpatient cirrhotics improve nutritional status and lean body mass. Thus, with no FDA-approved therapy for ALD, careful nutritional intervention should be considered as frontline therapy. PMID:21284673

  13. Estimating the costs associated with malnutrition in Dutch nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, Judith M M; Halfens, Ruud J G; Wilson, Lisa; Schols, Jos M G A

    2012-02-01

    Malnutrition in western health care involves a tremendous burden of illness. In this study the economic implications of malnutrition in Dutch nursing homes are investigated as part of the Health and Economic Impact of Malnutrition in Europe Study from the European Nutrition for Health Alliance. A questionnaire was developed, focussing on the additional time and resources spent to execute all relevant nutritional activities in nursing home patients with at risk of malnutrition or malnourished. Results were extrapolated on national level, based on the prevalence rates gathered within the national Prevalence Measurement of Care Problems 2009. The normal nutritional costs are 319 million Euro per year. The total additional costs of managing the problem of malnutrition in Dutch nursing homes involve 279 million Euro per year and are related to extra efforts in nutritional screening, monitoring and treatment. The extra costs for managing nursing home residents at risk of malnutrition are 8000 euro per patient and 10000 euro for malnourished patients. The extra costs related to malnutrition are a considerable burden for the nursing home sector and urge for preventive measures. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Economic impact of chronic, acute and global malnutrition in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcázar, Lorena; Ocampo, Diego; Huamán-Espino, Lucio; Pablo Aparco, Juan

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the economic impact of chronic, acute and global malnutrition in Peru. This study, through an econometric model, estimated the economic impact of child malnutrition in two time horizons (incidental retrospective and prospective) during 2011, considering malnutrition-associated costs of health, education and productivity for the Peruvian economy. Information collected is a combination of data coming from the Demographic Survey of Family Health, the National Survey of Homes, the 2007 Census of Population and Housing, and public budget information, as well as estimates of risks a child is exposed to due to malnutrition during their first years of life. Nationwide it was found that in the perspective retrospective, the cost of child malnutrition in 2011 was 10,999 million soles, which was equal to 2.2% of GDP for that same year. Prospective costs nationwide, of those who by 2011 were 0 to 59 months, reached 4,505 million soles and represented 0.9% of GDP in 2011. Most cases stem from losses of productivity in both cases. Moreover, malnutrition affects much more both the Andes and jungle regions. The economic impact of child malnutrition represents a significant percentage of GDP, reason for which it is necessary to continue investing equitably in its prevention through participation with proven efficiency.

  15. Protein-energy malnutrition during early gestation in sheep blunts fetal renal vascular and nephron development and compromises adult renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Louise J; Foster, Thomas; Rhodes, Phillip; Rhind, Stewart M; Gardner, David S

    2012-01-15

    A nutritionally poor maternal diet can reduce nephron endowment and pre-empt premature expression of markers for chronic renal disease in the offspring. A mechanistic pathway from variation in maternal diet through altered fetal renal development to compromised adult kidney structure and function with adult-onset obesity has not been described. We show that maternal protein-energy malnutrition in sheep blunts nephrogenic potential in the 0.44 gestation (65 days gestation, term ∼147 days) fetus by increasing apoptosis and decreasing angiogenesis in the nephrogenic zone, effects that were more marked in male fetuses. As adults, the low-protein-exposed sheep had reduced glomerular number and microvascular rarefaction in their kidneys compensated for, respectively, by glomerular hypertrophy and increased angiogenic support. In this study, the long-term mild anatomical deficits in the kidney would have remained asymptomatic in the lean state, but when superimposed on the broad metabolic challenge that obesity represents then microalbuminuria and blunted bilateral renal function revealed a long-term physiological compromise, that is only predicted to worsen with age. In conclusion, maternal protein-energy malnutrition specifically impacts fetal kidney vascular development and prevents full functionality of the adult kidney being achieved; these residual deficits are predicted to significantly increase the expected incidence of chronic kidney disease in prenatally undernourished individuals especially when coupled with a Western obesogenic environment.

  16. Maternal L-glutamine supplementation prevents prenatal alcohol exposure-induced fetal growth restriction in an ovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Onkar B; Wu, Guoyao; Washburn, Shannon E

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure is known to cause fetal growth restriction and disturbances in amino acid bioavailability. Alterations in these parameters can persist into adulthood and low birth weight can lead to altered fetal programming. Glutamine has been associated with the synthesis of other amino acids, an increase in protein synthesis and it is used clinically as a nutrient supplement for low birth weight infants. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of repeated maternal alcohol exposure and L-glutamine supplementation on fetal growth and amino acid bioavailability during the third trimester-equivalent period in an ovine model. Pregnant sheep were randomly assigned to four groups, saline control, alcohol (1.75-2.5 g/kg), glutamine (100 mg/kg, three times daily) or alcohol + glutamine. In this study, a weekend binge drinking model was followed where treatment was done 3 days per week in succession from gestational day (GD) 109-132 (normal term ~147). Maternal alcohol exposure significantly reduced fetal body weight, height, length, thoracic girth and brain weight, and resulted in decreased amino acid bioavailability in fetal plasma and placental fluids. Maternal glutamine supplementation successfully mitigated alcohol-induced fetal growth restriction and improved the bioavailability of glutamine and glutamine-related amino acids such as glycine, arginine, and asparagine in the fetal compartment. All together, these findings show that L-glutamine supplementation enhances amino acid availability in the fetus and prevents alcohol-induced fetal growth restriction.

  17. Maternal Medication and Herbal Use and Risk for Hypospadias: Data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, 1997--2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Jennifer N.; Tinker, Sarah C.; Broussard, Cheryl S.; Reefhuis, Jennita; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Honein, Margaret A.; Olney, Richard S.; Parker, Samantha E.; Werler, Martha M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Investigate associations between maternal use of common medications and herbals during early pregnancy and risk for hypospadias in male infants. Methods We used data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a multi-site, population-based, case-control study. We analyzed data from 1,537 infants with second-or third-degree isolated hypospadias and 4,314 liveborn male control infants without major birth defects, with estimated dates of delivery from 1997–2007. Exposure was reported use of prescription or over-the-counter medications or herbal products, from 1 month before to 4 months after conception. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for maternal age, race/ethnicity, education, pre-pregnancy BMI, previous live births, maternal sub-fertility, study site, and year. Results We assessed 64 medication and 24 herbal components. Maternal uses of most components were not associated with an increased risk of hypospadias. Two new associations were observed for venlafaxine (aOR 2.4; 95% CI 1.0, 6.0) and progestin only oral contraceptives (aOR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1, 3.2). The previously reported association for clomiphene citrate was confirmed (aOR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2, 3.0). Numbers were relatively small for exposure to other specific patterns of fertility agents, but elevated aORs were observed for the most common of them. Conclusions Overall, findings were reassuring that hypospadias is not associated with most medication components examined in this analysis. New associations will need to be confirmed in other studies. Increased risks for hypospadias associated with various fertility agents raises the possibility of confounding by underlying subfertility. PMID:23620412

  18. Maternal occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and craniosynostosis among offspring in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jacqueline L; Langlois, Peter H; Lawson, Christina C; Scheuerle, Angela; Rocheleau, Carissa M; Waters, Martha A; Symanski, Elaine; Romitti, Paul A; Agopian, A J; Lupo, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    Evidence in animal models and humans suggests that exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may lead to birth defects. To our knowledge, this relationship has not been evaluated for craniosynostosis, a birth defect characterized by the premature closure of sutures in the skull. We conducted a case-control study to examine associations between maternal occupational exposure to PAHs and craniosynostosis. We used data from craniosynostosis cases and control infants in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS) with estimated delivery dates from 1997 to 2002. Industrial hygienists reviewed occupational data from the computer-assisted telephone interview and assigned a yes/no rating of probable occupational PAH exposure for each job from 1 month before conception through delivery. We used logistic regression to assess the association between occupational exposure to PAHs and craniosynostosis. The prevalence of exposure was 5.3% in case mothers (16/300) and 3.7% in control mothers (107/2,886). We observed a positive association between exposure to PAHs during the 1 month before conception through the third month of pregnancy and craniosynostosis (odds ratio [OR] = 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-3.05) after adjusting for maternal age and maternal education. The number of cases for each craniosynostosis subtype limited subtype analyses to sagittal craniosynostosis; the odds ratio remained similar (OR = 1.76, 95% CI, 0.82-3.75), but was not significant. Our findings support a moderate association between maternal occupational exposure to PAHs and craniosynostosis. Additional work is needed to better characterize susceptibility and the role PAHs may play on specific craniosynostosis subtypes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Muscle glycogen metabolism changes in rats fed early postnatal a fructose-rich diet after maternal protein malnutrition: effects of acute physical exercise at the maximal lactate steady-state intensity

    OpenAIRE

    Cambri, Lucieli Teresa [UNESP; Ribeiro, Carla [UNESP; Botezelli, Jose Diego [UNESP; Ghezzi, Ana Carolina [UNESP; Mello, Maria Alice Rostom de [UNESP

    2014-01-01

    Background: The objective was to evaluate the muscle glucose metabolism in rats fed a fructose-rich diet after fetal protein malnutrition, at rest and after acute physical exercise at maximal lactate steady-state intensity.Methods: The male offspring born of mothers fed on a balanced or low-protein diet were split in four groups until 60 days: Balanced (B): balanced diet during the whole period; Balanced/Fructose (BF): balanced diet in utero and fructose-rich diet after birth; Low protein/Bal...

  20. Hospital Admissions for Malnutrition and Dehydration in Patients With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Katherine A; Burson, Rosanne; Gall, Kristyn; Saunders, Mitzi M

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration and malnutrition are commonly experienced by patients with dementia and can result in hospitalizations and decreased quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe retrospectively, the incidence and correlations of variables that may precede hospitalizations for dehydration/malnutrition in the community-dwelling patient with dementia. Data from the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) Start of Care (SOC) on 44 patients served by a Michigan home care agency were retrieved for analysis. This study did not reveal any single or collection of variables that would predict risk for hospitalization for dehydration/malnutrition. With the lack of specific predictors of hospitalization related to dehydration and malnutrition, clinicians need to place high priority on risk-lowering strategies and preventive education for patients, family, and caregivers.

  1. Muscle glycogen metabolism changes in rats fed early postnatal a fructose-rich diet after maternal protein malnutrition: effects of acute physical exercise at the maximal lactate steady-state intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambri, Lucieli T; Ribeiro, Carla; Botezelli, José D; Ghezzi, Ana C; Mello, Maria Ar

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the muscle glucose metabolism in rats fed a fructose-rich diet after fetal protein malnutrition, at rest and after acute physical exercise at maximal lactate steady-state intensity. The male offspring born of mothers fed on a balanced or low-protein diet were split in four groups until 60 days: Balanced (B): balanced diet during the whole period; Balanced/Fructose (BF): balanced diet in utero and fructose-rich diet after birth; Low protein/Balanced (LB): low-protein diet in utero and balanced diet after birth; Low protein/Fructose (LF): low protein diet in utero and fructose-rich diet after birth. Acute physical exercise reduced the muscle glycogen concentrations in all groups, although the LF group showed higher concentrations at rest. There was no difference among the groups in the glucose uptake and oxidation rates in the isolated soleus muscle neither at rest nor after acute exercise. However, glycogen synthesis was higher in the LF muscle than in the others at rest. Acute physical exercise increased glycogen synthesis in all groups, and the LF group showed the highest values. The fructose-rich diet administered in rats after fetal protein malnutrition alters muscle glycogen concentrations and glycogen synthesis in the rest and after acute exercise at maximal lactate steady-state intensity.

  2. Gaps in the evidence for prevention and treatment of maternal anaemia: a review of systematic reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Parker Jacqui A; Barroso Filipa; Stanworth Simon J; Spiby Helen; Hopewell Sally; Doree Carolyn J; Renfrew Mary J; Allard Shubha

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Anaemia, in particular due to iron deficiency, is common in pregnancy with associated negative outcomes for mother and infant. However, there is evidence of significant variation in management. The objectives of this review of systematic reviews were to analyse and summarise the evidence base, identify gaps in the evidence and develop a research agenda for this important component of maternity care. Methods Multiple databases were searched, including MEDLINE, EMBASE and Th...

  3. Pediatric Obesity: It's Time for Prevention before Conception Can Maternal Obesity Program Pediatric Obesity?

    OpenAIRE

    Zach Ferraro; Kristi B. Adamo

    2008-01-01

    Global increases in obesity have led public health experts to declare this disease a pandemic. Although prevalent in all ages, the dire consequences associated with maternal obesity have a pronounced impact on the long-term health of their children as a result of the intergenerational effects of developmental programming. Previously, fetal under-nutrition has been linked to the predisposition to pediatric obesity explained by the adiposity rebound and ‘catch-up’ growth that occurs when a chil...

  4. Preventable infant mortality and quality of health care: maternal perception of the child's illness and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salime Hadad

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This study used a qualitative methodology to analyze the discourse of mothers from Greater Metropolitan Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, whose infant children had died from what were considered avoidable causes (diarrhea, malnutrition, and pneumonia, seeking to elucidate the factors associated with utilization of health care services. Identification of the illness by the mother was related to perception of specific alterations in the child's state of health. Analysis of the alterations helped identify the principal characteristics ascribed to each alteration and their relationship to the search for treatment. The authors also studied the mother's assessment of treatment received at health care facilities; 43.0% of the cases involved problems related to the structure of health care services or the attending health care professionals. In 46.0% of the cases, mothers associated the child's death with flaws in the health care service. The study group showed a variety of interpretations of illness, often distinct from the corresponding biomedical concepts. The fact that attending health care personnel overlooked or underrated the mother's perception of the illness and the lack of communications between health care personnel and the child's family had an influence on the child's evolution and subsequent death.

  5. Treating malnutrition in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dera, Merceline; Woodham, Diane

    2016-11-02

    Malnutrition is a clinical and public health problem. It has adverse effects on the physical and psycho-social wellbeing of individuals by predisposing to disease, negatively affecting its outcome and reducing the likelihood of independence. An estimated 3 million people in the UK are affected by malnutrition, most of whom live in the community ( BAPEN, 2011 ). Despite the scale of this problem, it remains under-detected, under-treated, underresourced and often overlooked by those involved in the care of at risks individuals such as the elderly. In most cases malnutrition is a treatable condition that can be managed by optimising food intake and using oral nutritional supplements (ONS) where necessary. The main focus of this article is on the dangers of malnutrition for older people in the community and the use of ONS in the treatment and management of malnutrition.

  6. Maternal Serologic Screening to Prevent Congenital Toxoplasmosis: A Decision-Analytic Economic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillwaggon, Eileen; Carrier, Christopher S.; Sautter, Mari; McLeod, Rima

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine a cost-minimizing option for congenital toxoplasmosis in the United States. Methodology/Principal Findings A decision-analytic and cost-minimization model was constructed to compare monthly maternal serological screening, prenatal treatment, and post-natal follow-up and treatment according to the current French (Paris) protocol, versus no systematic screening or perinatal treatment. Costs are based on published estimates of lifetime societal costs of developmental disabilities and current diagnostic and treatment costs. Probabilities are based on published results and clinical practice in the United States and France. One- and two-way sensitivity analyses are used to evaluate robustness of results. Universal monthly maternal screening for congenital toxoplasmosis with follow-up and treatment, following the French protocol, is found to be cost-saving, with savings of $620 per child screened. Results are robust to changes in test costs, value of statistical life, seroprevalence in women of childbearing age, fetal loss due to amniocentesis, and to bivariate analysis of test costs and incidence of primary T. gondii infection in pregnancy. Given the parameters in this model and a maternal screening test cost of $12, screening is cost-saving for rates of congenital infection above 1 per 10,000 live births. If universal testing generates economies of scale in diagnostic tools—lowering test costs to about $2 per test—universal screening is cost-saving at rates of congenital infection well below the lowest reported rates in the United States of 1 per 10,000 live births. Conclusion/Significance Universal screening according to the French protocol is cost saving for the US population within broad parameters for costs and probabilities. PMID:21980546

  7. Maternal serologic screening to prevent congenital toxoplasmosis: a decision-analytic economic model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Stillwaggon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available To determine a cost-minimizing option for congenital toxoplasmosis in the United States.A decision-analytic and cost-minimization model was constructed to compare monthly maternal serological screening, prenatal treatment, and post-natal follow-up and treatment according to the current French (Paris protocol, versus no systematic screening or perinatal treatment. Costs are based on published estimates of lifetime societal costs of developmental disabilities and current diagnostic and treatment costs. Probabilities are based on published results and clinical practice in the United States and France. One- and two-way sensitivity analyses are used to evaluate robustness of results. Universal monthly maternal screening for congenital toxoplasmosis with follow-up and treatment, following the French protocol, is found to be cost-saving, with savings of $620 per child screened. Results are robust to changes in test costs, value of statistical life, seroprevalence in women of childbearing age, fetal loss due to amniocentesis, and to bivariate analysis of test costs and incidence of primary T. gondii infection in pregnancy. Given the parameters in this model and a maternal screening test cost of $12, screening is cost-saving for rates of congenital infection above 1 per 10,000 live births. If universal testing generates economies of scale in diagnostic tools-lowering test costs to about $2 per test-universal screening is cost-saving at rates of congenital infection well below the lowest reported rates in the United States of 1 per 10,000 live births.Universal screening according to the French protocol is cost saving for the US population within broad parameters for costs and probabilities.

  8. Beneficiaries’ perceptions and reported use of unconditional cash transfers intended to prevent acute malnutrition in children in poor rural communities in Burkina Faso: qualitative results from the MAM’Out randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Tonguet-Papucci

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute malnutrition is a public health issue worldwide, and particularly in the Eastern region of Burkina Faso. Following a needs assessment, unconditional seasonal, multiannual cash transfers were implemented as a safety net to prevent childhood undernutrition. The objectives of this study were to explore the types of purchases made by beneficiaries of this cash transfer program and to understand the perceived effects of and changes induced by regular cash transfers in the daily lives of women, and at the household and community level. Methods The design of this study was a two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial. Qualitative data were collected each month during the cash transfer period for two years, leading to a total of more than 300 interviews and focus group discussions with various participants: beneficiary mothers, heads of households, mothers-in-law, co-wives, key members of the community, and participants of the control group. Results The two main types of expenses reported were food and health care for the child and the whole family. The program was also associated with positive perceived changes at the household level, mainly related to gender equality and improvement of women’s status, and has promoted an increase in dignity and social integration of the poorest at the community level through cash sharing. Unexpected effects of this program included some women planning new pregnancies and some individuals not expecting the transfers to end. Conclusion Although the transfers were unconditional, the cash was mainly used to improve the children’s and households’ food security and health, which correspond to two main underlying causes of undernutrition. Therefore, spending mainly in these areas can help to prevent undernutrition in children. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov , identifier: NCT01866124 , registered May 7, 2013.

  9. Effectiveness of physical activity interventions on preventing gestational diabetes mellitus and excessive maternal weight gain: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria-Martínez, G; García-Hermoso, A; Poyatos-León, R; Álvarez-Bueno, C; Sánchez-López, M; Martínez-Vizcaíno, V

    2015-08-01

    It is commonly accepted that pregnancy-related physiological changes (circulatory, respiratory, and locomotor) negatively influence the daily physical activity of pregnant women. The aim of this study is to conduct a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) for assessing the effectiveness of physical exercise interventions during pregnancy to prevent gestational diabetes mellitus and excessive maternal weight gain. Keywords were used to conduct a computerised search in six databases: Cochrane Library Plus, Science Direct, EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, and ClinicalTrials.gov. Healthy pregnant women who were sedentary or had low levels of physical activity were selected for RCTs that included an exercise programme. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed the quality of the included studies. Of 4225 articles retrieved, 13 RCTs (2873 pregnant women) met the inclusion criteria. Pooled relative risk (RR) or weighted mean differences (WMDs) (depending on the outcome measure) were calculated using a random-effects model. Overall, physical exercise programmes during pregnancy decreased the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (RR = 0.69; P = 0.009), particularly when the exercise programme was performed throughout pregnancy (RR = 0.64; P = 0.038). Furthermore, decreases were also observed in maternal weight (WMD = -1.14 kg; 95% CI -1.50 to -0.78; P physical exercise programmes during pregnancy decrease the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus and diminish maternal weight gain, and seem to be safe for the mother and the neonate; however, further studies are needed to establish recommendations. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  10. A risk reduction strategy to prevent maternal deaths associated with unsafe abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briozzo, L; Vidiella, G; Rodríguez, F; Gorgoroso, M; Faúndes, A; Pons, J E

    2006-11-01

    Worldwide, 13% of maternal deaths are caused by complications of spontaneous or induced abortion, 29% in Uruguay and nearly half (48%) in the Pereira Rossell Hospital. This paper describes a risk reduction strategy for unsafe abortions in Montevideo, Uruguay, where over one-fourth of maternal deaths are caused by unsafe abortion. Although abortion is not legal in Uruguay, women desiring abortions can be counseled before and immediately after to reduce the risk of injury. Women contemplating abortion were invited to attend a "before-abortion" and an "after-abortion" visit at a reproductive health polyclinic. At the "before-abortion" visit, gestational age, condition of the fetus and pathologies were diagnosed and the risks associated with the use of different abortion methods (based on the best available scientific evidence) were described. The "after-abortion" visit allowed for checking for possible complications and offering contraception. From March 2004 through June 2005, 675 women attended the "before-abortion" and 495 the "after-abortion" visit, the number increasing over time. Some women (3.5%) decided not to abort, others were either not pregnant, the fetus/embryo was dead or the woman had a condition that permitted legal termination of pregnancy in the hospital (7.5%). Most women, however, aborted. All women used vaginal misoprostol in the doses recommended in the medical literature. There were no serious complications (one mild infection and two hemorrhages not requiring transfusion). The strategy is effective in reducing unsafe abortions and their health consequences.

  11. Backsliding against malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Gail G; Tirado, M Christina; Galal, Osman M

    2010-07-01

    The Millennium Development Goals stated an ambition to cut severe poverty and hunger in half by the year 2015. The recent rise in staple food prices and global economic crisis make it clear that these goals will not be met and that recent gains in mitigating malnutrition are being erased. The number of malnourished people has increased to more than 1 billion, from approximately 800 million a few years ago. National responses have included restrictions on food exports and a rise in the practice of foreign investment in agriculture to ensure food security on the part of countries with limited land and/or water to feed their own populations. There are critical needs to increase production yet again and to protect the interests of the poor. The world's population will stabilize by mid-century but the quality of that half-century depends on political will, technological capacity, and commitment.

  12. The dual burden of malnutrition in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Olga L; Parra, Diana C; González, Silvia A; González-Casanova, Inés; Forero, Ana Y; Garcia, Johnattan

    2014-12-01

    Almost all nutrition policies in Colombia currently focus on either undernutrition or obesity, with the predominant emphasis on undernutrition. It is crucial to assess the prevalence of the dual burden of malnutrition in Colombia to better target programs and policies. The aim was to estimate the national prevalence of the dual burden of malnutrition in Colombia at the individual and household levels in children aged Colombia, low to high prevalences of overweight and obesity (3.4-51.2%) coexist with moderate to high prevalences of anemia (8.1-27.5%) and stunting (13.2%). The observed prevalence of the dual burden was lower than expected. Approximately 5% of households had at least one stunted child aged Colombia are lower than expected. Despite the independence of the occurrence of these conditions, the fact that the dual burden coexists at the national, household, and intraindividual levels suggests that public policies should address both conditions through multiple strategies. It is imperative to evaluate the current nutrition policies to inform malnutrition prevention efforts in Colombia and to share lessons with other countries at a similar stage of nutritional transition. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Mapping of nutrition and sectoral policies addressing malnutrition in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Tirado

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To map existing policies addressing malnutrition in all its forms in Latin America and identify gaps in enabling environments supporting the five priority lines of action outlined in the World Health Organization Comprehensive Implementation Plan on Maternal, Infant and Young Child Nutrition (CIP approved in 2014. Methods This descriptive study consisted of a systematic Internet search for and mapping of publicly available nutrition-related and sectoral policies already in place to address malnutrition in all its forms in 18 Latin American countries (Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay. The policies were described in documents retrieved from the websites of ministries of health, education, agriculture, labor, and development; the national congress; and other government agencies. Results All 18 countries had relevant policies to address malnutrition, especially undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies, but only a few had policies to address overweight and obesity. Nutrition actions were incorporated in food and nutrition security and social protection policies in all 18 countries, and were part of education, environment, agricultural, development, and/or employment policies in some countries. Information on human and financial resources assigned to nutrition was not available through the search strategies used in the study. Conclusions All 18 countries included in this review had established enabling environments to support CIP implementation. However, each of the 18 countries needs to develop integrated policies for the promotion of nutrition and prevention of noncommunicable diseases through cross-sector involvement and multi-stakeholder collaboration.

  14. Prevalence of Malnutrition and Associated Factors among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: HIV/AIDS predisposes to malnutrition. Malnutrition exacerbates HIV/AIDS progression resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. The magnitude of malnutrition in HIV/AIDS patients has not been well studied in Ethiopian setup. Our objective was to assess the prevalence of malnutrition and associated ...

  15. Maternal over-nutrition and offspring obesity predisposition: targets for preventative interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, K; Ozanne, S E

    2011-07-01

    Obesity now represents one of the major health care issues of the 21st century. Its prevalence has increased exponentially in both the developed and developing world during the last couple of decades. Such a rapid rise can therefore not be explained by a change in genotype, but must result from environmental factors and their interaction with our genes. There is clear evidence to show that current environmental factors such as current diet and level of physical activity can influence our risk of obesity. However, there is growing evidence to suggest that factors acting during very early life can influence long-term energy balance. One such factor that is emerging as an important player is maternal obesity and/or over-nutrition during pregnancy and lactation. Early life may therefore represent a critical period during which intervention strategies could be developed to reduce the prevalence of obesity.

  16. Maternal subjective well-being and preventive health care system in Japan and Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yoshie; Hakulinen, Tuovi; Sugimoto, Masako; Silventoinen, Karri; Kalland, Mirjam

    2017-12-19

    Maternal well-being is an important issue not only for mothers but also for their offspring and whole families. This study aims to clarify differences in subjective well-being for mothers with infants and associated factors by comparing Japanese and Finnish mothers. In Finland, 101 mothers with infants who received health check-ups at child's age 4 months participated in the study. In Japan, 505 mothers with infants who should receive health check-ups at child's age 4 months and, whose age, age of the infant and number of children matched with the Finnish mothers were selected. The factors associated with maternal subjective well-being were explored by the linear regression analysis. All Finnish mothers had individual infant health check-ups by nurses in Child Health Clinics nearly monthly. The same nurse was responsible for following up the family throughout the years. All Japanese participants received group health check-up once at child's age 3 to 4 months, and a nurse did not cover same child and their mother. Finnish mothers showed significantly better subjective well-being compared with Japanese mothers. Whereas 85% of Finnish mothers responded that they had obtained childcare information from public health nurses, significantly fewer Japanese mothers indicated the same response (8%). Linear regression analyses disclosed that mothers' subjective well-being was associated with country, mothers' stress and age. Finnish mothers had better subjective well-being than Japanese mothers. Our results may indicate that the Finnish health care system supports mothers better than the Japanese health care system does. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  17. Physical exercise prevents short and long-term deficits on aversive and recognition memory and attenuates brain oxidative damage induced by maternal deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Ben-Hur; Menezes, Jefferson; Souza, Mauren Assis; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B

    2015-12-01

    It is known from previous research that physical exercise prevents long-term memory deficits induced by maternal deprivation in rats. But we could not assume similar effects of physical exercise on short-term memory, as short- and long-term memories are known to result from some different memory consolidation processes. Here we demonstrated that, in addition to long-term memory deficit, the short-term memory deficit resultant from maternal deprivation in object recognition and aversive memory tasks is also prevented by physical exercise. Additionally, one of the mechanisms by which the physical exercise influences the memory processes involves its effects attenuating the oxidative damage in the maternal deprived rats' hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

  18. Effects of Healthy Families New York on the promotion of maternal parenting competencies and the prevention of harsh parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M L; Dumont, K; Mitchell-Herzfeld, S D; Walden, N J; Greene, R

    2010-10-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of the Healthy Families New York (HFNY) home visiting program in promoting parenting competencies and preventing maladaptive parenting behaviors in mothers at risk for child abuse and neglect. The study used microlevel observational assessments of mother-child interactions in the third wave of a randomized controlled trial to evaluate whether mothers who received home visiting services were more likely to exhibit positive parenting and less likely to display negative parenting behaviors than those who did not receive these services. Women were randomly assigned during pregnancy or shortly after the birth of the target child to an intervention group that was offered home visiting services or a control group that was given referrals to other services. At Year 3, 522 mother and child pairs were systematically observed while they interacted in semistructured tasks presenting varied parenting challenges. The study also sought to replicate a finding from Year 2, which revealed that program effects on harsh parenting were stronger among young, first-time mothers who were randomly assigned during pregnancy (the High Prevention Opportunity subgroup) than among the other mothers (the Limited Prevention Opportunity subgroup). Results indicate that HFNY was effective in fostering positive parenting, such as maternal responsivity and cognitive engagement. With respect to negative parenting, HFNY mothers in the High Prevention Opportunity subgroup were less likely than their counterparts in the control group to use harsh parenting, while no differences were detected for the Limited Prevention Opportunity subgroup. HFNY was successful in promoting positive parenting among mothers at risk for child abuse and neglect, which may reflect the program's strength-based approach. The replication of the High Prevention Opportunity subgroup as a moderator of program effects on harsh parenting further suggests that HFNY may be more useful for preventing

  19. The German hospital malnutrition study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirlich, Matthias; Schütz, Tatjana; Norman, Kristina; Gastell, Sylvia; Lübke, Heinrich Josef; Bischoff, Stephan C; Bolder, Ulrich; Frieling, Thomas; Güldenzoph, Helge; Hahn, Kristian; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Schindler, Karin; Stein, Jürgen; Volkert, Dorothee; Weimann, Arved; Werner, Hansjörg; Wolf, Christiane; Zürcher, Gudrun; Bauer, Peter; Lochs, Herbert

    2006-08-01

    Malnutrition is frequently observed in chronic and severe diseases and associated with impaired outcome. In Germany general data on prevalence and impact of hospital malnutrition are missing. Nutritional state was assessed by subjective global assessment (SGA) and by anthropometric measurements in 1,886 consecutively admitted patients in 13 hospitals (n=1,073, university hospitals; n=813, community or teaching hospitals). Risk factors for malnutrition and the impact of nutritional status on length of hospital stay were analyzed. Malnutrition was diagnosed in 27.4% of patients according to SGA. A low arm muscle area and arm fat area were observed in 11.3% and 17.1%, respectively. Forty-three % of patients 70 years old were malnourished compared to only 7.8% of patients malnutrition was observed in geriatric (56.2%), oncology (37.6%), and gastroenterology (32.6%) departments. Multivariate analysis revealed three independent risk factors: higher age, polypharmacy, and malignant disease (all PMalnutrition was associated with an 43% increase of hospital stay (PMalnutrition is associated with increased length of hospital stay. Higher age, malignant disease and major comorbidity were found to be the main contributors to malnutrition. Adequate nutritional support should be initiated in order to optimize the clinical outcome of these patients.

  20. Effect of haematinic supplementation and malaria prevention on maternal anaemia and malaria in western Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, Anna M.; Ayisi, John G.; Slutsker, Laurence; ter Kuile, Feiko O.; Rosen, Daniel H.; Otieno, Juliana A.; Shi, Ya-Ping; Kager, Piet A.; Steketee, Richard W.; Nahlen, Bernard L.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of routine antenatal haematinic supplementation programmes and intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) in Kenya. METHODS: Anaemia [haemoglobin (Hb) <11 g/dl), severe anaemia (Hb <8 g/dl) and placental malaria were compared among

  1. Maternal waist circumference as a prediction of children's stunted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-08

    May 8, 2014 ... of children in that maternal malnutrition leads to malnourished children. The seemingly linear relationship of paired mother and child malnutrition has resulted in a public ... and middle-income countries, of which South Africa is one.1 The ... predictor of the mothers' children's metabolic syndrome status, but.

  2. The Relationship Between Maternal Domestic Violence and Infant and Toddlers' Emotional Regulation: Highlighting the Need for Preventive Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Chelsea; Ogbonnaya, Ijeoma Nwabuzor

    2017-11-01

    In an effort to further understand the impact of domestic violence (DV) on infant and toddlers' development, this research utilized data from the second cohort of National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW II) to examine the relationship between maternal DV and infant and toddlers' emotional regulation, and determine whether mothers' receipt of DV services mediated this relationship. The sample was limited to children aged 0 to 3 years and included (a) infants less than 1 year old ( n = 603), (b) infants 1 to less than 2 years old ( n = 310), and (c) toddlers 2 to 3 years old ( n = 268). Infant/toddlers' emotional regulation was measured using mothers' response on the How My Infant/Toddler/Child Usually Acts questionnaire. In addition, data were collected to assess whether (a) active DV was present during the time of the Child Protective Services (CPS) investigation and (b) mothers received DV services during the past year. Study research questions were examined using a series of multiple regression analyses. Mediation was tested based on Baron and Kenny's recommended model for establishing mediation. The mediational model was not found to be significant; however, a positive relationship existed between maternal DV and emotional regulation among infants aged less than 1 year old (β = 1.61, p = .039). There were no statistically significant relationships between DV and emotional regulation in the other age groups. These findings highlight the need to provide CPS-involved families victimized by DV with services that focus on preventing poor infant emotional regulation.

  3. Melatonin prevents maternal fructose intake-induced programmed hypertension in the offspring: roles of nitric oxide and arachidonic acid metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tain, You-Lin; Leu, Steve; Wu, Kay L H; Lee, Wei-Chia; Chan, Julie Y H

    2014-08-01

    Fructose intake has increased globally and is linked to hypertension. Melatonin was reported to prevent hypertension development. In this study, we examined whether maternal high fructose (HF) intake causes programmed hypertension and whether melatonin therapy confers protection against the process, with a focus on the link to epigenetic changes in the kidney using next-generation RNA sequencing (NGS) technology. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received regular chow or chow supplemented with HF (60% diet by weight) alone or with additional 0.01% melatonin in drinking water during the whole period of pregnancy and lactation. Male offspring were assigned to four groups: control, HF, control + melatonin (M), and HF + M. Maternal HF caused increases in blood pressure (BP) in the 12-wk-old offspring. Melatonin therapy blunted the HF-induced programmed hypertension and increased nitric oxide (NO) level in the kidney. The identified differential expressed gene (DEGs) that are related to regulation of BP included Ephx2, Col1a2, Gucy1a3, Npr3, Aqp2, Hba-a2, and Ptgs1. Of which, melatonin therapy inhibited expression and activity of soluble epoxide hydrolase (SEH, Ephx2 gene encoding protein). In addition, we found genes in arachidonic acid metabolism were potentially involved in the HF-induced programmed hypertension and were affected by melatonin therapy. Together, our data suggest that the beneficial effects of melatonin are attributed to its ability to increase NO level in the kidney, epigenetic regulation of genes related to BP control, and inhibition of SEH expression. The roles of DEGs by the NGS in long-term epigenetic changes in the adult offspring kidney require further clarification. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Maternal Occupational Pesticide Exposure and Risk of Congenital Heart Defects in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Carissa M.; Bertke, Stephen J.; Lawson, Christina C.; Romitti, Paul A.; Sanderson, Wayne T.; Malik, Sadia; Lupo, Philip J.; Desrosiers, Tania A.; Bell, Erin; Druschel, Charlotte; Correa, Adolfo; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are common birth defects, affecting approximately 1% of live births. Pesticide exposure has been suggested as an etiologic factor for CHDs, but previous results were inconsistent. METHODS We examined maternal occupational exposure to fungicides, insecticides, and herbicides for 3328 infants with CHDs and 2988 unaffected control infants of employed mothers using data for 1997 through 2002 births from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a population-based multisite case-control study. Potential pesticide exposure from 1 month before conception through the first trimester of pregnancy was assigned by an expert-guided task-exposure matrix and job history details self-reported by mothers. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS Maternal occupational exposure to pesticides was not associated with CHDs overall. In examining specific CHD subtypes compared with controls, some novel associations were observed with higher estimated pesticide exposure: insecticides only and secundum atrial septal defect (OR =1.8; 95% CI, 1.3–2.7, 40 exposed cases); both insecticides and herbicides and hypoplastic left heart syndrome (OR =5.1; 95% CI, 1.7–15.3, 4 exposed cases), as well as pulmonary valve stenosis (OR =3.6; 95% CI, 1.3–10.1, 5 exposed cases); and insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) (OR =2.2; 95% CI, 1.2–4.0, 13 exposed cases). CONCLUSION Broad pesticide exposure categories were not associated with CHDs overall, but examining specific CHD subtypes revealed some increased odds ratios. These results highlight the importance of examining specific CHDs separately. Because of multiple comparisons, additional work is needed to verify these associations. PMID:26033688

  5. Maternal pravastatin prevents altered fetal brain development in a preeclamptic CD-1 mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa R Carver

    Full Text Available Using an animal model, we have previously shown that preeclampsia results in long-term adverse neuromotor outcomes in the offspring, and this phenotype was prevented by antenatal treatment with pravastatin. This study aims to localize the altered neuromotor programming in this animal model and to evaluate the role of pravastatin in its prevention.For the preeclampsia model, pregnant CD-1 mice were randomly allocated to injection of adenovirus carrying sFlt-1 or its control virus carrying mFc into the tail vein. Thereafter they received pravastatin (sFlt-1-pra "experimental group" or water (sFlt-1 "positive control" until weaning. The mFc group ("negative control" received water. Offspring at 6 months of age were sacrificed, and whole brains underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. MRIs were performed using an 11.7 Tesla vertical bore MRI scanner. T2 weighted images were acquired to evaluate the volumes of 28 regions of interest, including areas involved in adaptation and motor, spatial and sensory function. Cytochemistry and cell quantification was performed using neuron-specific Nissl stain. One-way ANOVA with multiple comparison testing was used for statistical analysis.Compared with control offspring, male sFlt-1 offspring have decreased volumes in the fimbria, periaquaductal gray, stria medullaris, and ventricles and increased volumes in the lateral globus pallidus and neocortex; however, female sFlt-1 offspring showed increased volumes in the ventricles, stria medullaris, and fasciculus retroflexus and decreased volumes in the inferior colliculus, thalamus, and lateral globus pallidus. Neuronal quantification via Nissl staining exhibited decreased cell counts in sFlt-1 offspring neocortex, more pronounced in males. Prenatal pravastatin treatment prevented these changes.Preeclampsia alters brain development in sex-specific patterns, and prenatal pravastatin therapy prevents altered neuroanatomic programming in this animal model.

  6. Maternal PUFA omega-3 supplementation prevents hyperoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ying; Catheline, Daniel; Houeijeh, Ali; Sharma, Dyuti; Du, Li-Zhong; Besengez, Capucine; Deruelle, Philippe; Legrand, Philippe; Storme, Laurent

    2018-03-29

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) and right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) affect 16-25% of premature infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), contributing significantly to perinatal morbidity and mortality. Polyunsaturated fatty acids ω-3 (PUFA ω-3) can improve vascular remodeling, angiogenesis, and inflammation under pathophysiological conditions. However, the effects of PUFA ω-3 supplementation in BPD-associated PH are unknown. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of PUFA ω-3 on pulmonary vascular remodeling, angiogenesis, and inflammatory response in a hyperoxia-induced rat model of PH. From embryonic day 15, pregnant Spague-Dawley rats were supplemented daily with PUFA ω-3, PUFA ω-6, or normal saline (0.2 ml/day). After birth, pups were pooled, assigned as 12 per litter, and randomly to either in air or continuous oxygen exposure (FiO2 = 85%) for 20 days, then sacrificed for pulmonary hemodynamic and morphometric analysis. We found that PUFA ω-3 supplementation improved survival, decreased right ventricular systolic pressure and RVH caused by hyperoxia, and significantly improved alveolarization, vascular remodeling, and vascular density. PUFA ω-3 supplementation produced a higher level of total ω-3 in lung tissue and breast milk, and was found reversing the reduced levels of VEGFA, VEGFR-2, ANGPT-1, TIE-2, eNOS, and NO concentrations in lung tissue, and the increased ANGPT-2 levels in hyperoxia-exposed rats. The beneficial effects of PUFA ω-3 in improving lung injuries were also associated with an inhibition of leukocyte infiltration, and reduced expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. These data indicated that maternal PUFA ω-3 supplementation strategies could effectively protect against infant PH induced by hyperoxia.

  7. Maternal stress, nutrition and physical activity: Impact on immune function, CNS development and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise; Teixeira, Antônio L; Silverman, Marni N

    2015-08-18

    Evidence suggests that maternal and fetal immune dysfunction may impact fetal brain development and could play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders, although the definitive pathophysiological mechanisms are still not completely understood. Stress, malnutrition and physical inactivity are three maternal behavioral lifestyle factors that can influence immune and central nervous system (CNS) functions in both the mother and fetus, and may therefore, increase risk for neurodevelopmental/psychiatric disorders. First, we will briefly review some aspects of maternal-fetal immune system interactions and development of immune tolerance. Second, we will discuss the bidirectional communication between the immune system and CNS and the pathways by which immune dysfunction could contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders. Third, we will discuss the effects of prenatal stress and malnutrition (over and undernutrition) on perinatal programming of the CNS and immune system, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. Finally, we will discuss the beneficial impact of physical fitness during pregnancy on the maternal-fetal unit and infant and how regular physical activity and exercise can be an effective buffer against stress- and inflammatory-related disorders. Although regular physical activity has been shown to promote neuroplasticity and an anti-inflammatory state in the adult, there is a paucity of studies evaluating its impact on CNS and immune function during pregnancy. Implementing stress reduction, proper nutrition and ample physical activity during pregnancy and the childbearing period may be an efficient strategy to counteract the impact of maternal stress and malnutrition/obesity on the developing fetus. Such behavioral interventions could have an impact on early development of the CNS and immune system and contribute to the prevention of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Further research is needed to elucidate this relationship and the underlying

  8. Maternal exposure to GOS/inulin mixture prevents food allergies and promotes tolerance in offspring in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchaud, G; Castan, L; Chesné, J; Braza, F; Aubert, P; Neunlist, M; Magnan, A; Bodinier, M

    2016-01-01

    Food allergies affect 4-8% of children and are constantly on the rise, thus making allergies a timely issue. Most importantly, prevention strategies are nonexistent, and current therapeutic strategies have limited efficacy and need to be improved. One alternative to prevent or reduce allergies, particularly during infancy, could consist of modulating maternal immunity and microbiota using nondigestible food ingredients, such as prebiotics. For this purpose, we studied the preventive effects of prebiotics in Balb/c mothers during pregnancy and breastfeeding on food allergy development in offspring mice. After weaning, the offspring from mothers that were exposed to GOS/inulin mixture or fed a control diet were intraperitoneally sensitized to wheat proteins to induce a systemic allergic response and orally exposed to the same allergen. Immunological, physiological, and microbial parameters were analyzed. GOS/inulin mixture diet modified the microbiota of mothers and their offspring. Offspring from mothers that received GOS/inulin prebiotics were protected against food allergies and displayed lower clinical scores, specifically of IgE and histamine levels, compared to offspring from mothers fed a control diet. Moreover, GOS/inulin supplementation for the mother resulted in stronger intestinal permeability in the offspring. Enhancement of the regulatory response to allergic inflammation and changes in the Th2/Th1 balance toward a dampened Th2 response were observed in mice from GOS/inulin mixture-exposed mothers. The treatment of pregnant and lactating mice with nondigestible GOS/inulin prebiotics promotes a long-term protective effect against food allergies in the offspring. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Do structural quality indicators of nutritional care influence malnutrition prevalence in Dutch, German, and Austrian nursing homes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nie, Noémi C; Meijers, Judith M M; Schols, Jos M G A; Lohrmann, Christa; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke; Halfens, Ruud J G

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether structural quality indicators for nutritional care influence malnutrition prevalence in the Netherlands, Germany, and Austria. Furthermore, differences in malnutrition prevalence and structural quality indicators for nutritional care nursing homes in the three countries were examined. This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study using a standardized questionnaire at the patient, ward, and institutional levels. Malnutrition was assessed by low body mass index, undesired weight loss, and reduced intake. Structural quality indicators of nutritional care were measured at the ward and institutional levels. The prevalence of malnutrition differed significantly between the three countries (Netherlands 18%, Germany 20%, and Austria 22.7%). Structural quality indicators related to nutritional care as having a guideline of prevention and treatment of malnutrition were related to malnutrition and explained malnutrition prevalence variance between the Netherlands and Germany. Differences between the Netherlands and Austria in malnutrition prevalence still existed after controlling for these quality structural indicators. Structural quality indicators of nutritional care are important in explaining malnutrition variance between the Netherlands and Germany. However, they did not explain the difference in malnutrition prevalence between the Netherlands and Austria. Investigating the role of process indicators may provide insight in the role of structural quality indicators of nutritional care in explaining the malnutrition prevalence differences between the Netherlands and Austria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Protein Nutrition and Malnutrition in CKD and ESRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Yan; Qian, Qi

    2017-02-27

    Elevated protein catabolism and protein malnutrition are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The underlying etiology includes, but is not limited to, metabolic acidosis intestinal dysbiosis; systemic inflammation with activation of complements, endothelin-1 and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAAS) axis; anabolic hormone resistance; energy expenditure elevation; and uremic toxin accumulation. All of these derangements can further worsen kidney function, leading to poor patient outcomes. Many of these CKD-related derangements can be prevented and substantially reversed, representing an area of great potential to improve CKD and ESRD care. This review integrates known information and recent advances in the area of protein nutrition and malnutrition in CKD and ESRD. Management recommendations are summarized. Thorough understanding the pathogenesis and etiology of protein malnutrition in CKD and ESRD patients will undoubtedly facilitate the design and development of more effective strategies to optimize protein nutrition and improve outcomes.

  11. The effect of childhood malnutrition on externalizing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianghong; Raine, Adrian

    2006-10-01

    Childhood externalizing behavior (aggression, hyperactivity, and conduct disorder) has been increasingly viewed as a public health problem because of its etiology and outcome. The association between malnutrition and externalizing behavior has begun to receive attention. This review summarizes recent empirical findings on malnutrition as a risk factor for the development of externalizing behavior, with an emphasis on micronutrient deficiency, and explores brain dysfunction as a possible mechanism. Externalizing behavior is associated with both macromalnutrition (e.g. protein) and micromalnutrition (e.g. iron and zinc). Both prenatal and postnatal malnutrition is implicated. The long-term effects of malnutrition on behavior could be reversible. The effects of docosahexaenoic acid/omega-3 long-chain essential fatty acid on externalizing behavior are more mixed. From animal and human findings, it is hypothesized that malnutrition impairs neurocognitive functioning by reducing neurons, alternating neurotransmitter functioning, and increasing neurotoxicity, and that such neurocognitive impairments predispose to externalizing behavior. Different lines of evidence support the view that poor nutrition contributes to the development of child behavior problems. More randomized, controlled trials that manipulate nutritional intake and evaluate behavior in children are needed to evaluate the etiological role of nutrition in externalizing behavior in order to inform intervention and prevention efforts.

  12. Impact of maternal education, employment and family size on nutritional status of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftikhar, Aisha; Bari, Attia; Bano, Iqbal; Masood, Qaisar

    2017-01-01

    To determine the impact of maternal education, employment, and family size on nutritional status of children. It was case control study conducted at OPD of children Hospital Lahore, from September 2015 to April 2017. Total 340 children (170 cases and 170 controls) with age range of six months to five years along with their mothers were included. Anthropometric measurements were plotted against WHO growth Charts. 170 wasted (education, employment and family size were compared between the cases and control. Confounding variables noted and dichotomized. Univariate analysis was carried out for factors under consideration i.e.; Maternal Education, employment and family size to study the association of each factor. Logistic regression analysis was applied to study the independent association. Maternal education had significant association with growth parameters; OR of 1.32 with confidence interval of (CI= 1.1 to 1.623). Employment status of mothers had OR of 1.132 with insignificant confidence interval of (CI=0.725 to 1.768). Family size had OR of one with insignificant confidence interval (CI=0.8 -1.21). Association remained same after applying bivariate logistic regression analysis. Maternal education has definite and significant effect on nutritional status of children. This is the key factor to be addressed for prevention or improvement of childhood malnutrition. For this it is imperative to launch sustainable programs at national and regional level to uplift women educational status to combat this ever increasing burden of malnutrition.

  13. Prevention of Malnutrition in Iran: 1. Vitamins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Wise

    1980-08-01

    Full Text Available The over-reliance on bread in the Iranian diet may l ead to relative deficiencies of ribof lavin, vitamin,A , and v i t ami n , C, with housebound persons also suffering from vi t amin D def i cienc y . The increased consumption of ani ma l pr oduc t s , fruit and vegetables should be pr e s c r l - bed . Economic progress could help t o improve die t , and 1S probably already doi ng s o . Increased nutrit ion educatien at all l evels is e s s e nt i a l , especially during teac her trai ning , s o t ha t t h e information would r e a ch schoolchi ldren . Even medical doctors r e ceiv e a ve ry short period of nutrition training so that it i s not surprising that ot he r sections of t he population a re a l so poorly i nformed . In t he me a n t i ~e f vegetable o i l c oul d be v itamini zed, and research could aim at discovering way s to enrich o t he r f oods als o . Patients at risk can be glven periodic i nj e c t i ons o f v i t ami ns A and 0, o r they may take 1 capsule o f "Unicap Hultivitaminll or 1 teaspoonsu l o f IlVi p l e x" daily or eve r y two day s .

  14. Efficacy of a Maternal Depression Prevention Strategy in Head Start: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Michael; Diaz-Linhart, Yaminette; Cabral, Howard; Beardslee, William; Hegel, Mark; Haile, Winta; Sander, Jenna; Patts, Gregory; Feinberg, Emily

    2017-08-01

    Low-income and minority mothers experience a disproportionate incidence of depression and lack access to treatment services. Development of prevention strategies in accessible community-based venues is a potentially important public health strategy. To determine the efficacy of a depression prevention strategy embedded in Head Start. This randomized clinical trial was performed from February 15, 2011, through May 9, 2016, at 6 Head Start agencies serving families at or below the federal poverty level. Participants included mothers with depressed mood, anhedonia, or depression history but who were not in a current major depressive episode. Participants were followed up for 12 months with masked outcome assessments. Final follow-up was completed on May 9, 2016. Participants were randomized to a problem-solving education (PSE) intervention (n = 111) or usual Head Start services (n = 119). Primary outcomes were problem-solving skills and depressive symptoms. To capture the chronicity and intensity of symptoms, the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms was administered bimonthly, and rates of clinically significant symptom elevations were compared across groups. Secondarily, the presence of a major depressive episode was assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders. Among the 230 participants, 152 (66.1%) were Hispanic, with a mean (SD) age of 31.4 (7.3) years. An intention-to-treat analysis among 223 participants contributing follow-up data found no differences in problem-solving skills across groups. The mean (SD) number of depressive symptom elevations among the PSE participants was 0.84 (1.39) compared with 1.12 (1.47) among the usual service participants (adjusted incident rate ratio [aIRR], 0.60; 95% CI, 0.41-0.90). In analyses stratified according to baseline depressive symptoms, PSE exerted a preventive effect among those with lower-level baseline symptoms, with a mean (SD) of 0.39 (0.84) elevations among PSE participants

  15. Prevalence of Congenital Anomalies in an Indian Maternal Cohort: Healthcare, Prevention, and Surveillance Implications.

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    Prajkta Bhide

    Full Text Available India lacks a national birth defects surveillance. Data on the prevalence of congenital anomalies are available mostly from hospital-based, cross-sectional studies. This is the first cohort study from India, where 2107 women were followed till pregnancy outcome, in order to measure the prevalence and types of congenital anomalies, their contribution to neonatal mortality, implications for surveillance, and the health service needs for prevention and management.The study followed a cohort of 2107 pregnant women till outcome which was miscarriage, termination of pregnancy, live or stillbirth, neonatal and post-neonatal mortality. Case ascertainment of congenital anomalies was done through visual examination, followed by various investigations. Rates of congenital anomaly affected births were reported per 10 000 births. Health service needs were described through retrospective analysis of events surrounding the diagnosis of a congenital anomaly.Among 1822 births, the total prevalence of major congenital anomalies was 230.51 (170.99-310.11 per 10 000 births. Congenital heart defects were the most commonly reported anomalies in the cohort with a prevalence of 65.86 (37.72-114.77 per 10 000 births. Although neural tube defects were two and a half times less as compared to congenital heart defects, they were nevertheless significant at a prevalence of 27.44 (11.73-64.08 per 10 000 births. In this cohort, congenital anomalies were the second largest cause of neonatal deaths. The congenital anomaly prenatal diagnosis prevalence was 10.98 per 1000 births and the congenital anomaly termination of pregnancy rate was 4.39 per 1000 births.This first cohort study from India establishes that the congenital anomaly rates were high, affecting one in forty four births in the cohort. The prevalence of congenital anomalies was identical to the stillbirth prevalence in the cohort, highlighting their public health importance. The results of this study identify the

  16. Maternal immunization with ovalbumin prevents neonatal allergy development and up-regulates inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB expression on B cells

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    Duarte Alberto JS

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preconception allergen immunization prevents neonatal allergen sensitization in mice by a complex interaction between regulatory cells/factors and antibodies. The present study assessed the influence of maternal immunization with ovalbumin (OVA on the immune response of 3 day-old and 3 week-old offspring immunized or non-immunized with OVA and evaluated the effect of IgG treatment during fetal development or neonatal period. Results Maternal immunization with OVA showed increased levels of FcγRIIb expression in splenic B cells of neonates, which were maintained for up to 3 weeks and not affected by additional postnatal OVA immunization. Maternal immunization also exerted a down-modulatory effect on both IL-4 and IFN-γ-secreting T cells and IL-4 and IL-12- secreting B cells. Furthermore, immunized neonates from immunized mothers showed a marked inhibition of antigen-specifc IgE Ab production and lowered Th2/Th1 cytokine levels, whereas displaying enhanced FcγRIIb expression on B cells. These offspring also showed reduced antigen-specific proliferative response and lowered B cell responsiveness. Moreover, in vitro evaluation revealed an impairment of B cell activation upon engagement of B cell antigen receptor by IgG from OVA-immunized mice. Finally, in vivo IgG transference during pregnancy or breastfeeding revealed that maternal Ab transference was able to increase regulatory cytokines, such as IL-10, in the prenatal stage; yet only the postnatal treatment prevented neonatal sensitization. None of the IgG treatments induced immunological changes in the offspring, as it was observed for those from OVA-immunized mothers. Conclusion Maternal immunization upregulates the inhibitory FcγRIIb expression on offspring B cells, avoiding skewed Th2 response and development of allergy. These findings contribute to the advancement of prophylactic strategies to prevent allergic diseases in early life.

  17. State of malnutrition in hospitals of Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvia Gallegos Espinosa; Marcelo Nicolalde Cifuentes; Sergio Santana Porbén

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Hospital malnutrition is a global health problem affecting 30-50% of hospitalized patients. There are no estimates of the size of this problem in Ecuadorian hospitals. Hospital malnutrition might influence the quality of medical assistance provided to hospitalized populations. Objectives: To estimate the current frequency of malnutrition among patients admitted to Ecuadorian public hospitals. Materials and methods: The Ecuadorian Hospital Malnutrition Study was conducted between No...

  18. Protein malnutrition and metronidazole induced intestinal bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-17

    Sep 17, 2008 ... Key words: Rats, enteric bacilli translocation, protein malnutrition, antibiotic, mesenteric lymph nodes. INTRODUCTION. Protein malnutrition ... In animal models, malnutrition is associated with villous atrophy and ..... the thoracic duct and the systemic circulation or via vascular channels to reach the portal.

  19. Malnutrition: The Wasting of Human Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Patricia S.

    The paper discusses the prevalence of malnutrition in developing countries and the United States, particularly as it relates to debilitating physical and psychological disorders. Educational, social, and political factors which influence the cycle of malnutrition are described. Research on the relationship between malnutrition and intellectual…

  20. Diarrhoea and malnutrition

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jenny

    The objectives of diarrhoeal disease management are to prevent weight loss, to encourage catch-up growth during recovery, to shorten the duration and to decrease the impact of the diarrhoea on the child's health. Addressing only diarrhoea or only food security is unlikely to be successful in decreasing the prevalence of ...

  1. Child Malnutrition and Antenatal Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Forero-Ramirez; L.F. Gamboa (Luis); A.S. Bedi (Arjun Singh); R.A. Sparrow (Robert)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Objective. To examine the effect of prenatal care (PNC) on the level and distribution of child stunting in three Andean countries—Bolivia, Colombia, and Peru—where expanding access to such care has been an explicit policy intervention to tackle child malnutrition in

  2. Management of severe acute malnutrition

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    should be considered.[4,8,15,17,26]. Provide sensory stimulation, emotional support and follow-up after recovery. In severe malnutrition, there is delayed mental and behavioural development. A cheerful and stimulating environment should be provided for the patient, with provision of structured play therapy for 30 minutes ...

  3. Malnutrition in paediatric oncology patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Children more commonly present with protein energy malnutrition. (PEM) at diagnosis of cancer in developing countries than in developed countries, depending on the type of cancer and extent of the disease.1-3. PEM at cancer diagnosis is associated with delays in treatment, increased infections and a negative outcome.2 ...

  4. Effectiveness of maternal pertussis vaccination in preventing infection and disease in infants: The NSW Public Health Network case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, Nathan; Wang, Kevin; Bag, Shopna; Baldwin, Heather; Alexander, Kate; Chandra, Meena; Thomas, Jane; Quinn, Helen; Sheppeard, Vicky; Conaty, Stephen

    2018-02-28

    Infants are at the highest risk of severe complications - including death - as a result of pertussis infection. Controlling pertussis in this group has been challenging, particularly in those too young to be vaccinated. Following revised national recommendations in March 2015, the state of New South Wales, Australia, introduced a funded maternal vaccination campaign at 28 - 32 weeks of gestation using a 3-component tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis vaccine (dTpa; Boostrix, GSK). This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of maternal vaccination and add to the growing body of evidence for this strategy. A 1:1 matched case-control study was conducted between 16 August 2015 and 17 August 2016. Cases were laboratory or doctor notified, laboratory confirmed (nucleic acid testing or culture) and aged case's birthdate. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) was calculated as 1 - OR. In total, 117 cases and 117 controls were recruited. The overall VE estimate was non-significantly protective for infants vaccination with a 3-component acellular vaccine was found to be highly effective at preventing severe disease in infants, but was less effective at preventing disease which did not require hospitalisation. The overall VE reported in this study was lower than in prior studies and suggests that maternal vaccination, while an effective strategy at preventing severe pertussis, is less effective at protecting against infection or mild disease. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. [Prevalence of malnutrition, interventions and quality indicators in German nursing homes - first results of a nationwide pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomeyczik, S; Reuther, S; Luft, L; van Nie, N; Meijers, J; Schols, J; Halfens, R

    2010-12-01

    The aims of this study were to test the transfer and feasibility of a Dutch annual survey on malnutrition into German nursing homes and to gather first data about the prevalence of malnutrition, treatment and quality indicators in German resident homes. A cross-sectional multicentre study, using a standardised multilevel instrument (observation, questionnaire) developed in the University of Maastricht was applied. Variables are indicators for malnutrition and its risks, quality indicators, care dependency and treatment initiatives. The sample consisted of 32 nursing homes with 2,444 participating residents. 26% of the residents show indicators of malnutrition, a risk of malnutrition can be found in another 28%. Only one quarter of the nursing homes use a standardised nutritional screening instrument. Significantly more people with dementia have indicators of malnutrition. Most facilities provide a protocol or a guideline for the prevention and treatment of malnutrition. Also most are training their staff regularly in questions of malnutrition, half the institutions employ dieticians or nutritionists. Special treatment was initiated in half of all residents having indicators of malnutrition or showing a risk. The Dutch instrument is applicable in German nursing homes. Its utilisation shows that malnutrition is still a problem in German nursing homes. The standardised assessment of nutritional status is the exception; the interventions carried out should be improved.

  6. NutriLive: An Integrated Nutritional Approach as a Sustainable Tool to Prevent Malnutrition in Older People and Promote Active and Healthy Ageing—The EIP-AHA Nutrition Action Group

    OpenAIRE

    Maddalena Illario; Angela Serena Maione; Maria Rosaria Rusciano; Edwig Goossens; Amelia Rauter; Nidia Braz; Harriet Jager-Wittenaar; Carolina Di Somma; Catherine Crola; Maria Soprano; Laura Vuolo; Pietro Campiglia; Guido Iaccarino; Helen Griffiths; Tobias Hartman

    2016-01-01

    The present document describes a nutritional approach that is nested in the European Innovation Partnership for Active and Healthy Aging (EIP-AHA) and aims to provide the first common European program translating an integrated approach to nutritional frailty in terms of a multidimensional and transnational methodology. The document has been developed by the A3 Nutrition Action Area of the EIP-AHA and aims at providing a stepwise approach to malnutrition in older citizens, identifying adequate...

  7. NutriLive: An Integrated Nutritional Approach as a Sustainable Tool to Prevent Malnutrition in Older People and Promote Active and Healthy Ageing—The EIP-AHA Nutrition Action Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Illario

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present document describes a nutritional approach that is nested in the European Innovation Partnership for Active and Healthy Aging (EIP-AHA and aims to provide the first common European program translating an integrated approach to nutritional frailty in terms of a multidimensional and transnational methodology. The document has been developed by the A3 Nutrition Action Area of the EIP-AHA and aims at providing a stepwise approach to malnutrition in older citizens, identifying adequate interventions based on a unified assessment and ICT-supported solutions. “NutriLive” is an integrated nutritional approach, represented by a structured Screening-Assessment-Monitoring-Action-Pyramid-Model (SAM-AP. Its core concept is the stratification of the nutritional needs, considered by the working group as the key for targeted, effective, and sustainable interventions. “NutriLive” tries to close gaps in epidemiological data within an aging population, creating a unified language to deal with the topic of nutrition and malnutrition in Europe. By assembling all the validated screening, assessment, and monitoring tools on malnutrition in a first pyramid, which is interrelated to a second intervention pyramid, the A3 Nutrition WG identifies a common, integrated vision on the nutritional approach to frailty, which applies to the various health care settings.

  8. Chronic malnutrition: a cross-section analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emely Beatriz García González

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: The objective of the study was to determine the main causes of chronic malnutrition worldwide. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was employed to analyze the main determinants of chronic malnutrition in a sample of 86 countries. The variables used are based on the UNICEF conceptual framework of malnutrition. This framework classifies the determinants of malnutrition in three main causes: basic, immediate, and underlying. Findings: Droughts, floods, and extreme temperatures, and GDP per capita are the main basic determinants of malnutrition in the sample of countries. In addition one underlying determinant had a major impact in the prevalence of malnutrition: improved sanitation facilities. Conclusions: The findings of this study demonstrated that the variables within the basic and underlying cause classification are the ones with a greater impact on chronic malnutrition.

  9. Chronic malnutrition: a cross-section analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emely Beatriz García González

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of the study was to determine the main causes of chronic malnutrition worldwide. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was employed to analyze the main determinants of chronic malnutrition in a sample of 86 countries. The variables used are based on the UNICEF conceptual framework of malnutrition. This framework classifies the determinants of malnutrition in three main causes: basic, immediate, and underlying. Findings: Droughts, floods, and extreme temperatures, and GDP per capita are the main basic determinants of malnutrition in the sample of countries. In addition one underlying determinant had a major impact in the prevalence of malnutrition: improved sanitation facilities. Conclusions: The findings of this study demonstrated that the variables within the basic and underlying cause classification are the ones with a greater impact on chronic malnutrition.

  10. Influences of maternal overprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, G; Lipscombe, P

    1981-04-01

    While maternal overprotection appears associated with several neurotic and psychotic disorders, little is known about determinants of such a parental characteristic. Several hypotheses have been tested in a large nonclinical sample. Maternal and cultural factors seemed of greater relevance than characteristics in the child. Overprotective mothers gave evidence of marked maternal preoccupations before having children, of showing a capacity to be overprotective after the active stage of mothering, and of having personality characteristics of high anxiety, obsessionality and a need to control. Maternal overprotection appears associated with low, rather than with high maternal care. This has important primary prevention and treatment implications.

  11. Anemia, malnutrition and their correlations with socio-demographic characteristics and feeding practices among infants aged 0-18 months in rural areas of Shaanxi province in northwestern China: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenfang; Li, Xu; Li, Ying; Zhang, Shuiping; Liu, Liming; Wang, Xiang; Li, Weimin

    2012-12-29

    The first 18 months of life are the most important for long-term childhood well-being. Anemia and malnutrition occurring in this key period have serious implications for individuals and societies, especially in rural areas in developing country. We conducted a cross-sectional study as the baseline survey to provide data for developing a policy-based approach to controlling infant anemia and malnutrition in rural areas of Shaanxi province in northwestern China. We randomly sampled 336 infants aged 0-18 months in 28 rural villages from 2 counties of Shaanxi province. Anthropometric measurements and household interviews were carried out by well-trained researchers. The hemoglobin concentration was measured for 336 infants and serum concentrations of iron, zinc, and retinol (vitamin A) were measured for a stratified subsample of 55 infants. Anemia was defined using World Health Organization (WHO) standards combined with the Chinese standard for infantsanemia with non-anemic group as a reference. We found that 35.12% of infants in rural Shaanxi suffered from anemia, and the malnutrition prevalence rates were 32.14% for underweight, 39.58% for stunting, and 11.31% for wasting. Anemia was significantly associated with malnutrition (underweight, OR: 2.42, 95%CI: 1.50-3.88; stunting, OR: 1.65, 95%CI: 1.05-2.61; wasting, OR: 2.89, 95%CI: 1.45-5.76). Low birth weight, more siblings, less maternal education, low family income, crowded living conditions, and inappropriate complementary food introduction significantly increased the risk for infant anemia. Serum concentrations of iron, zinc, and retinol (vitamin A) were significantly lower in anemic infants compared with non-anemic infants. Specific socio-demographic characteristics and feeding patterns were highly associated with infant anemia in rural areas of Shaanxi province. Health education focusing on feeding practices and nutrition education could be a practical strategy for preventing anemia and malnutrition in young

  12. Anemia, malnutrition and their correlations with socio-demographic characteristics and feeding practices among infants aged 0–18 months in rural areas of Shaanxi province in northwestern China: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The first 18 months of life are the most important for long-term childhood well-being. Anemia and malnutrition occurring in this key period have serious implications for individuals and societies, especially in rural areas in developing country. We conducted a cross-sectional study as the baseline survey to provide data for developing a policy-based approach to controlling infant anemia and malnutrition in rural areas of Shaanxi province in northwestern China. Methods We randomly sampled 336 infants aged 0–18 months in 28 rural villages from 2 counties of Shaanxi province. Anthropometric measurements and household interviews were carried out by well-trained researchers. The hemoglobin concentration was measured for 336 infants and serum concentrations of iron, zinc, and retinol (vitamin A) were measured for a stratified subsample of 55 infants. Anemia was defined using World Health Organization (WHO) standards combined with the Chinese standard for infants anemia with non-anemic group as a reference. Results We found that 35.12% of infants in rural Shaanxi suffered from anemia, and the malnutrition prevalence rates were 32.14% for underweight, 39.58% for stunting, and 11.31% for wasting. Anemia was significantly associated with malnutrition (underweight, OR: 2.42, 95%CI: 1.50-3.88; stunting, OR: 1.65, 95%CI: 1.05-2.61; wasting, OR: 2.89, 95%CI: 1.45-5.76). Low birth weight, more siblings, less maternal education, low family income, crowded living conditions, and inappropriate complementary food introduction significantly increased the risk for infant anemia. Serum concentrations of iron, zinc, and retinol (vitamin A) were significantly lower in anemic infants compared with non-anemic infants. Conclusions Specific socio-demographic characteristics and feeding patterns were highly associated with infant anemia in rural areas of Shaanxi province. Health education focusing on feeding practices and nutrition education could be a practical strategy for

  13. PREventing Maternal And Neonatal Deaths (PREMAND): a study protocol for examining social and cultural factors contributing to infant and maternal deaths and near-misses in rural northern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Cheryl A; Aborigo, Raymond A; Kaselitz, Elizabeth B; Gupta, Mira L; Oduro, Abraham; Williams, John

    2016-03-09

    While Ghana is a leader in some health indicators among West African nations, it still struggles with high maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality rates, especially in the northern areas. The clinical causes of mortality and morbidity are relatively well understood in Ghana, but little is known about the impact of social and cultural factors on maternal and neonatal outcomes. Less still is understood about how such factors may vary by geographic location, and how such variability may inform locally-tailored solutions. Preventing Maternal And Neonatal Deaths (PREMAND) is a three-year, three-phase project that takes place in four districts in the Upper East, Upper West, and Northern Regions of Ghana. PREMAND will prospectively identify all maternal and neonatal deaths and 'near-misses', or those mothers and babies who survive a life threatening complication, in the project districts. Each event will be followed by either a social autopsy (in the case of deaths) or a sociocultural audit (in the case of near-misses). Geospatial technology will be used to visualize the variability in outcomes as well as the social, cultural, and clinical predictors of those outcomes. Data from PREMAND will be used to generate maps for local leaders, community members and Government of Ghana to identify priority areas for intervention. PREMAND is an effort of the Navrongo Health Research Centre and the University of Michigan Medical School. PREMAND uses an innovative, multifaceted approach to better understand and address neonatal and maternal morbidity and mortality in northern Ghana. It will provide unprecedented access to information on the social and cultural factors that contribute to deaths and near-misses in the project regions, and will allow such causal factors to be situated geographically. PREMAND will create the opportunity for local, regional, and national stakeholders to see how these events cluster, and place them relative to traditional healer compounds, health

  14. Social dimension of malnutrition, notes for discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwar Manrique

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes and constructs an argument concerning the social effects of malnutrition, by reviewing reports and articles in the nutritional situation in Colombia and the world, to finally address the nutritional status in Boyacá. The theme is developed considering nutrition as a field in influencing social, cultural, religious, historical, political and economic, that affect populations when there is no adequate scientific and social processes, to ensure access and adequate food resources due to poverty, lack of programs to ensure food security and sovereignty, high unemployment, looking mainly affected children, pregnant women and the elderly, preventing them from developing their full human potential.

  15. Malnutrition in hospital: the clinical and economic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löser, Christian

    2010-12-01

    Undernutrition and malnutrition are common in hospitalized patients. Their combined prevalence on admission is estimated at 25% and is rising. Selective literature review with special consideration of current guidelines and meta-analyses. The nutritional state of every patient should be assessed on admission with simple, established parameters, and patients suffering from under- or malnutrition should be treated with a targeted nutritional intervention based on the established stepwise treatment algorithm. Under- and malnutrition are an independent risk and cost factor with a significant influence on mortality, morbidity, length of hospital stay, and quality of life. Their direct costs alone amount to some 9 billion Euros in Germany each year. Therapeutic trials and meta-analyses have clearly documented the therapeutic benefit and cost-effectiveness of oral nutritional supplements and tube feeds. Targeted nutritional intervention is an integral part of medical treatment and prevention. Undernutrition and malnutrition are common in hospitalized patients and are both medically and economically harmful. If they are detected early by targeted assessment and then treated appropriately according to the established stepwise treatment algorithm, better clinical outcomes and lower costs will result.

  16. Capacity-building in the management of moderate acute malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Alan; Ashworth, Ann

    2015-03-01

    Evidence from low- and middle-income countries indicates that although there is a willingness to prevent and treat malnutrition at scale, there is very limited capacity to achieve this. Three broad areas of concern are human resources and the quality of services; management systems and supplies; and demand side factors. This paper focuses on building human resources in the context of preventing and managing malnutrition. Training should provide several options and approaches suitable for different settings and focus on core competencies. Preservice training should be the main focus of training, while in-service training should be used for continuing medical education and refresher training. Communities of Practice, in which national and international health professionals come together to deepen their knowledge and pool their skills to pursue a common ambition, are seen as one way forward to building the necessary human resources for scaling up training.

  17. Changes in Maternal Nutritional Knowledge and its Relationship ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrition education has been used as a weapon against childhood malnutrition in Ghana, however, there is little evidence concerning its impact on maternal nutritional knowledge and child nutritional status. The purpose of this study was to find out whether changes have occurred in maternal nutritional knowledge during an ...

  18. Mineral malnutrition following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gletsu-Miller, Nana; Wright, Breanne N

    2013-09-01

    Moderate/severe obesity is on the rise in the United States. Weight management includes bariatric surgery, which is effective and can alleviate morbidity and mortality from obesity-associated diseases. However, many individuals are dealing with nutritional complications. Risk factors include: 1) preoperative malnutrition (e.g., vitamin D, iron); 2) decreased food intake (due to reduced hunger and increased satiety, food intolerances, frequent vomiting); 3) inadequate nutrient supplementation (due to poor compliance with multivitamin/multimineral regimen, insufficient amounts of vitamins and/or minerals in supplements); 4) nutrient malabsorption; and 5) inadequate nutritional support (due to lack of follow-up, insufficient monitoring, difficulty in recognizing symptoms of deficiency). For some nutrients (e.g., protein, vitamin B-12, vitamin D), malnutrition issues are reasonably addressed through patient education, routine monitoring, and effective treatment strategies. However, there is little attention paid to other nutrients (e.g., zinc, copper), which if left untreated may have devastating consequences (e.g., hair loss, poor immunity, anemia, defects in neuro-muscular function). This review focuses on malnutrition in essential minerals, including calcium (and vitamin D), iron, zinc, and copper, which commonly occur following popular bariatric procedures. There will be emphasis on the complexities, including confounding factors, related to screening, recognition of symptoms, and, when available, current recommendations for treatment. There is an exceptionally high risk of malnutrition in adolescents and pregnant women and their fetuses, who may be vulnerable to problems in growth and development. More research is required to inform evidence-based recommendations for improving nutritional status following bariatric surgery and optimizing weight loss, metabolic, and nutritional outcomes.

  19. Translating vaccine policy into action: a report from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Consultation on the prevention of maternal and early infant influenza in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Justin R; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Ahonkhai, Vincent I; Gellin, Bruce G; Salisbury, David M; Read, Jennifer S; Adegbola, Richard A; Abramson, Jon S

    2012-11-26

    Immunization of pregnant women against influenza is a promising strategy to protect the mother, fetus, and young infant from influenza-related diseases. The burden of influenza during pregnancy, the vaccine immunogenicity during this period, and the robust influenza vaccine safety database underpin recommendations that all pregnant women receive the vaccine to decrease complications of influenza disease during their pregnancies. Recent data also support maternal immunization for the additional purpose of preventing disease in the infant during the first six months of life. In April 2012, the WHO Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on Immunization recommended revisions to the WHO position paper on influenza vaccines. For the first time, SAGE recommended pregnant women should be made the highest priority for inactivated seasonal influenza vaccination. However, the variable maternal influenza vaccination coverage in countries with pre-existing maternal influenza vaccine recommendations underscores the need to understand and to address the discrepancy between recommendations and implementation success. We present the outcome of a multi-stakeholder expert consultation on inactivated influenza vaccination in pregnancy. The creation and implementation of vaccine policies and regulations require substantial resources and capacity. As with all public health interventions, the existence of perceived and real risks of vaccination will necessitate effective and transparent risk communication. Potential risk allocation and sharing mechanisms should be addressed by governments, vaccine manufacturers, and other stakeholders. In resource-limited settings, vaccine-related issues concerning supply, formulation, regulation, evidence evaluation, distribution, cost-utility, and post-marketing safety surveillance need to be addressed. Lessons can be learned from the Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative as well as efforts to increase vaccine coverage among pregnant

  20. State of malnutrition in hospitals of Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos Espinosa, Sylvia; Nicolalde Cifuentes, Marcelo; Santana Porbén, Sergio

    2014-08-01

    Hospital malnutrition is a global health problem affecting 30-50% of hospitalized patients. There are no estimates of the size of this problem in Ecuadorian hospitals. Hospital malnutrition might influence the quality of medical assistance provided to hospitalized populations. To estimate the current frequency of malnutrition among patients admitted to Ecuadorian public hospitals. The Ecuadorian Hospital Malnutrition Study was conducted between November 2011 and June 2012 with 5,355 patients (Women: 37.5%; Ages ≥ 60 years: 35.1%; Length of stay ≤ 15 days: 91.2%) admitted to 36 public hospitals located in the prominent cities of 22 out of the 24 provinces of the country. Malnutrition frequency was estimated by means of the Subjective Global Assessment survey. Malnutrition affected 37.1% of the surveyed patients. Malnutrition was dependent upon patient's age and education level; as well as the presence of cancer, sepsis, and chronic organic failure. Hospital areas showed different frequencies of hospital malnutrition. Health condition leading to hospital admission influenced negatively upon nutritional status. Malnutrition frequency increased as length of stay prolonged. Malnutrition currently affects an important proportion of patients hospitalized in public health institutions of Ecuador. Policies and actions are urgently required in order to successfully deal with this health problem and thus to ameliorate its negative impact upon quality of medical care. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  1. Cross-fostering to prevent maternal cell transfer did not prevent vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease that occurred following heterologous influenza challenge of pigs vaccinated in the presence of maternal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loving, Crystal L; Brockmeier, Susan L; Vincent, Amy L; Gauger, Phillip C; Zanella, Eraldo L; Lager, Kelly M; Kehrli, Marcus E

    2014-09-01

    Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines for influenza A virus (IAV) provide limited cross-protection to diverse antigenic strains that are circulating or may emerge in a population. Maternal vaccination is used to protect neonatal animals from disease through passive transfer of immunity. It is desirable to vaccinate at a young age to induce active immunity that provides protection against infection before maternal immunity wanes. However, maternal-derived immunity (MDI; antibody or cells) can interfere with vaccine priming. Previous work indicates that vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) occurs in pigs following heterologous IAV challenge if pigs were previously vaccinated with WIV vaccine in the presence of matched MDI. However, the component of MDI (antibody or cells) that is required for the mispriming of piglet immunity has not been determined. While antibody from colostrum is absorbed into piglet circulation regardless of the sow from which it receives colostrum, transfer of maternal cells requires colostrum from the biological dam. We used cross-fostering (CF) as a tool to determine if maternal cells are required for the mispriming of piglet immunity upon WIV vaccination in the presence of MDI. Piglets vaccinated in the presence of MDI, regardless of CF, displayed characteristics of VAERD following heterologous challenge. MDI alone (no piglet vaccination) did not provide cross-protection against the antigenic variant. However, it did not induce VAERD. WIV vaccination provided complete protection against homologous challenge when delivered to piglets without MDI. Vaccination in the presence of MDI inhibited an increase in hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibody titers to vaccine antigen, but did not alter development of total immunoglobulin levels to vaccine virus. Taken together, the cellular component of MDI did not contribute to the mispriming of piglet immunity to WIV vaccine, but maternal-derived antibody (MDA) alone was sufficient

  2. Maternal and early onset neonatal bacterial sepsis: burden and strategies for prevention in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Anna C; Mwaniki, Michael; Newton, Charles R J C; Berkley, James A

    2009-07-01

    Maternal and child health are high priorities for international development. Through a Review of published work, we show substantial gaps in current knowledge on incidence (cases per live births), aetiology, and risk factors for both maternal and early onset neonatal bacterial sepsis in sub-Saharan Africa. Although existing published data suggest that sepsis causes about 10% of all maternal deaths and 26% of neonatal deaths, these are likely to be considerable underestimates because of methodological limitations. Successful intervention strategies in resource-rich settings and early studies in sub-Saharan Africa suggest that the burden of maternal and early onset neonatal bacterial sepsis could be reduced through simple interventions, including antiseptic and antibiotic treatment. An effective way to expedite evidence to guide interventions and determine the incidence, aetiology, and risk factors for sepsis in sub-Saharan Africa would be through a multiarmed factorial intervention trial aimed at reducing both maternal and early onset neonatal bacterial sepsis in sub-Saharan Africa.

  3. Correction of nutrition test errors for more accurate quantification of the link between dental health and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Nathalie; Cotart, Jean-Louis; Rabilloud, Muriel

    2007-04-01

    We quantified the link between tooth deterioration and malnutrition in institutionalized elderly subjects, taking into account the major risk factors for malnutrition and adjusting for the measurement error made in using the Mini Nutritional Assessment questionnaire. Data stem from a survey conducted in 2005 in 1094 subjects >or=60 y of age from a large sample of 100 institutions of the Rhône-Alpes region of France. A Bayesian approach was used to quantify the effect of tooth deterioration on malnutrition through a two-level logistic regression. This approach allowed taking into account the uncertainty on sensitivity and specificity of the Mini Nutritional Assessment questionnaire to adjust for the measurement error of that test. After adjustment for other risk factors, the risk of malnutrition increased significantly and continuously 1.15 times (odds ratio 1.15, 95% credibility interval 1.06-1.25) whenever the masticatory percentage decreased by 10 points, which is equivalent to the loss of two molars. The strongest factors that augmented the probability of malnutrition were deglutition disorders, depression, and verbal inconsistency. Dependency was also an important factor; the odds of malnutrition nearly doubled for each additional grade of dependency (graded 6 to 1). Diabetes, central neurodegenerative disease, and carcinoma tended to increase the probability of malnutrition but their effect was not statistically significant. Dental status should be considered a serious risk factor for malnutrition. Regular dental examination and care should preserve functional dental integrity to prevent malnutrition in institutionalized elderly people.

  4. New paradigm old thinking: the case for emergency obstetric care in the prevention of maternal mortality in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esimai Olapeju A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The continuing burden of maternal mortality, especially in developing countries has prompted a shift in paradigm from the traditional risk assessment approach to the provision of access to emergency obstetric care services for all women who are pregnant. This study assessed the knowledge of maternity unit operatives at the primary and secondary levels of care about the concept of emergency obstetric care (EmOC and investigated the contents of antenatal care (ANC counseling services they delivered to clients. It also described the operatives' preferred strategies and practices for promoting safe motherhood and averting maternal mortality in South-west Nigeria. Methods The study population included all the 152 health workers (doctors, midwives, nurses and community health extension workers employed in the maternity units of all the public health facilities (n = 22 offering maternity care in five cities of 2 states. Data were collected with the aid of a self-administered, semi-structured questionnaire and non-participant observation checklist. Results were presented using descriptive statistics. Results Ninety one percent of the maternity unit staff had poor knowledge concerning the concept of EmOC, with no difference in knowledge of respondents across age groups. While consistently more than 60% of staff reported the inclusion of specific client-centered messages such as birth preparedness and warning/danger signs of pregnancy and delivery in the (ANC delivered to clients, structured observations revealed that less than a quarter of staff actually did this. Furthermore, only 40% of staff reported counseling clients on complication readiness, but structured observations revealed that no staff did. Only 9% of staff had ever been trained in lifesaving skills (LSS. Concerning strategies for averting maternal deaths, 70% of respondents still preferred the strengthening of routine ANC services in the health facilities to the

  5. New paradigm old thinking: The case for emergency obstetric care in the prevention of maternal mortality in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijadunola, Kayode T; Ijadunola, Macellina Y; Esimai, Olapeju A; Abiona, Titilayo C

    2010-02-17

    The continuing burden of maternal mortality, especially in developing countries has prompted a shift in paradigm from the traditional risk assessment approach to the provision of access to emergency obstetric care services for all women who are pregnant. This study assessed the knowledge of maternity unit operatives at the primary and secondary levels of care about the concept of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) and investigated the contents of antenatal care (ANC) counseling services they delivered to clients. It also described the operatives' preferred strategies and practices for promoting safe motherhood and averting maternal mortality in South-west Nigeria. The study population included all the 152 health workers (doctors, midwives, nurses and community health extension workers) employed in the maternity units of all the public health facilities (n = 22) offering maternity care in five cities of 2 states. Data were collected with the aid of a self-administered, semi-structured questionnaire and non-participant observation checklist. Results were presented using descriptive statistics. Ninety one percent of the maternity unit staff had poor knowledge concerning the concept of EmOC, with no difference in knowledge of respondents across age groups. While consistently more than 60% of staff reported the inclusion of specific client-centered messages such as birth preparedness and warning/danger signs of pregnancy and delivery in the (ANC) delivered to clients, structured observations revealed that less than a quarter of staff actually did this. Furthermore, only 40% of staff reported counseling clients on complication readiness, but structured observations revealed that no staff did. Only 9% of staff had ever been trained in lifesaving skills (LSS). Concerning strategies for averting maternal deaths, 70% of respondents still preferred the strengthening of routine ANC services in the health facilities to the provision of access to EmOC services for all pregnant

  6. [Protein-energy malnutrition in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necheva, G I; Druk, I V; Lialiukova, E A

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the reasons and mechanisms of development of an protein-energy malnutrition, communication of fetal pathology and development of an protein-energy malnutrition at mature age is submitted. Systemic character of a syndrome is marked out. Importance of a problem of an protein-energy malnutrition at patients with a dysplasia of a connecting tissue is bound to high prevalence of a syndrome at this pathology.

  7. [Malnutrition and social isolation among elderly residents of city public housing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Kiyomi; Sakakibara, Hisataka

    2015-01-01

    75 years of age who live alone were also at risk for malnutrition. This study revealed that malnutrition of elderly individuals was associated with social isolation and poor economic conditions as well as age over 75 and living alone. Malnutrition and social isolation can be prevalent in elderly residents of city public housing facilities. Measures of social isolation as well as nutritional support are necessary for health promotion and preventive care of the elderly.

  8. Why Is Diagnosing Pediatric Malnutrition Important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkins, Mark R

    2017-02-01

    The literature indicates that pediatric malnutrition is more common than the number of times it is actually diagnosed. A new pediatric malnutrition definition is now available with criteria to make the diagnosis. If pediatric malnutrition is present, it should be diagnosed for financial, educational, and research purposes as well as the effects on patient development and mortality. These reasons extend beyond the health of an individual patient to potential impacts on society as a whole. When all of these reasons are examined and added, making the diagnosis of pediatric malnutrition becomes an obligation of the pediatric caregiver.

  9. Application of ordinal logistic regression analysis in determining risk factors of child malnutrition in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Sumonkanti

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study attempts to develop an ordinal logistic regression (OLR model to identify the determinants of child malnutrition instead of developing traditional binary logistic regression (BLR model using the data of Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2004. Methods Based on weight-for-age anthropometric index (Z-score child nutrition status is categorized into three groups-severely undernourished ( Results All the models determine that age of child, birth interval, mothers' education, maternal nutrition, household wealth status, child feeding index, and incidence of fever, ARI & diarrhoea were the significant predictors of child malnutrition; however, results of PPOM were more precise than those of other models. Conclusion These findings clearly justify that OLR models (POM and PPOM are appropriate to find predictors of malnutrition instead of BLR models.

  10. Maternal occupation and the risk of birth defects: an overview from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herdt-Losavio, M.L.; Lin, S.; Chapman, B.R.; Hooiveld, M.; Olshan, A.; Liu, X.; DePersis, R.D.; Zhu, J.; Druschel, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between a spectrum of 24 maternal occupations and 45 birth defects for hypothesis generating purposes. METHODS: Cases of isolated and multiple birth defects (n = 8977) and all non-malformed live-born control births (n = 3833) included in the National Birth

  11. Effectiveness of community health workers delivering preventive interventions for maternal and child health in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Brynne; McAuliffe, Eilish

    2013-09-13

    Community Health Workers are widely utilised in low- and middle-income countries and may be an important tool in reducing maternal and child mortality; however, evidence is lacking on their effectiveness for specific types of programmes, specifically programmes of a preventive nature. This review reports findings on a systematic review analysing effectiveness of preventive interventions delivered by Community Health Workers for Maternal and Child Health in low- and middle-income countries. A search strategy was developed according to the Evidence for Policy and Practice Information and Co-ordinating Centre's (EPPI-Centre) guidelines and systematic searching of the following databases occurred between June 8-11th, 2012: CINAHL, Embase, Ovid Nursing Database, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and POPLINE. Google, Google Scholar and WHO search engines, as well as relevant systematic reviews and reference lists from included articles were also searched. Inclusion criteria were: i) Target beneficiaries should be pregnant or recently pregnant women and/or children under-5 and/or caregivers of children under-5; ii) Interventions were required to be preventive and delivered by Community Health Workers at the household level. No exclusion criteria were stipulated for comparisons/controls or outcomes. Study characteristics of included articles were extracted using a data sheet and a peer tested quality assessment. A narrative synthesis of included studies was compiled with articles being coded descriptively to synthesise results and draw conclusions. A total of 10,281 studies were initially identified and through the screening process a total of 17 articles detailing 19 studies were included in the review. Studies came from ten different countries and consisted of randomized controlled trials, cluster randomized controlled trials, before and after, case control and cross sectional studies. Overall quality of evidence was found to be moderate. Five main preventive intervention

  12. Fetal Sex Modulates Developmental Response to Maternal Malnutrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Gonzalez-Bulnes

    Full Text Available The incidence of obesity and metabolic diseases is dramatically high in rapidly developing countries. Causes have been related to intrinsic ethnic features with development of a thrifty genotype for adapting to food scarcity, prenatal programming by undernutrition, and postnatal exposure to obesogenic lifestyle. Observational studies in humans and experimental studies in animal models evidence that the adaptive responses of the offspring may be modulated by their sex. In the contemporary context of world globalization, the new question arising is the existence and extent of sex-related differences in developmental and metabolic traits in case of mixed-race. Hence, in the current study, using a swine model, we compared male and female fetuses that were crossbred from mothers with thrifty genotype and fathers without thrifty genotype. Female conceptuses evidence stronger protective strategies for their adequate growth and postnatal survival. In brief, both male and female fetuses developed a brain-sparing effect but female fetuses were still able to maintain the development of other viscerae than the brain (mainly liver, intestine and kidneys at the expense of carcass development. Furthermore, these morphometric differences were reinforced by differences in nutrient availability (glucose and cholesterol favoring female fetuses with severe developmental predicament. These findings set the basis for further studies aiming to increase the knowledge on the interaction between genetic and environmental factors in the determination of adult phenotype.

  13. Association between depression in carers and malnutrition in children aged 6 months to 5 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keneilwe Motlhatlhedi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Childhood malnutrition is an important risk factor for child mortality and underlies close to 50% of child deaths worldwide. Previous studies have found an association between maternal depression and child malnutrition, but it is not known whether this association exists in Botswana. In addition, previous studies excluded non-maternal primary caregivers (PCGs. It is unclear whether the association between primary caregiver depression and child malnutrition remains when non-maternal PCGs are included.Aim: The aim of this study was to determine if there is an association between PCG depression and malnutrition in children aged between 6 months and 5 years in Mahalapye, Botswana.Setting: The study was conducted in the child welfare clinics of Xhosa and Airstrip clinics, two primary health care facilities in Mahalapye, Botswana.Methods: This was a case control study. Cases were malnourished children aged between 6 months and 5 years, and controls were non-malnourished children matched for age and gender. The outcome of interest was depression in the PCGs of the cases and controls, which was assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ 9, a depression screening tool.Results: From a sample of 171 children, 84 of whom were malnourished, we found that the malnourished children were significantly more likely to have depressed PCGs (odds ratio = 4.33; 95% CI: 1.89, 9.89 than non-malnourished children in the 6-month to 5-year age group; the PCGs of malnourished children also had lower educational status.Conclusion: This study found a significant association between PCG depression and child malnutrition.

  14. Risk factors for childhood malnutrition in Roma settlements in Serbia

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    Janevic Teresa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children living in Roma settlements in Central and Eastern Europe face extreme levels of social exclusion and poverty, but their health status has not been well studied. The objective of this study was to elucidate risk factors for malnutrition in children in Roma settlements in Serbia. Methods Anthropometric and sociodemographic measures were obtained for 1192 Roma children under five living in Roma settlements from the 2005 Serbia Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey. Multiple logistic regression was used to relate family and child characteristics to the odds of stunting, wasting, and underweight. Results The prevalence of stunting, wasting, and underweight was 20.1%, 4.3%, and 8.0%, respectively. Nearly all of the children studied fell into the lowest quintile of wealth for the overall population of Serbia. Children in the lowest quintile of wealth were four times more likely to be stunted compared to those in the highest quintile, followed by those in the second lowest quintile (AOR = 2.1 and lastly by those in the middle quintile (AOR = 1.6. Children who were ever left in the care of an older child were almost twice as likely to stunted as those were not. Children living in urban settlements showed a clear disadvantage with close to three times the likelihood of being wasted compared to those living in rural areas. There was a suggestion that maternal, but not paternal, education was associated with stunting, and maternal literacy was significantly associated with wasting. Whether children were ever breastfed, immunized or had diarrhoeal episodes in the past two weeks did not show strong correlations to children malnutrition status in this Roma population. Conclusions There exists a gradient relationship between household wealth and stunting even within impoverished settlements, indicating that among poor and marginalized populations socioeconomic inequities in child health should be addressed. Other areas on which to focus

  15. Coenzyme Q10 prevents hepatic fibrosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in a male rat model of poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Hargreaves, Iain P; Neergheen, Viruna; Aiken, Catherine E; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S; McConnell, Josie M; Ozanne, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is well established that low birth weight and accelerated postnatal growth increase the risk of liver dysfunction in later life. However, molecular mechanisms underlying such developmental programming are not well characterized, and potential intervention strategies are poorly defined. Objectives: We tested the hypotheses that poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth would lead to increased hepatic fibrosis (a pathological marker of liver dysfunction) and that postnatal supplementation with the antioxidant coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) would prevent this programmed phenotype. Design: A rat model of maternal protein restriction was used to generate low-birth-weight offspring that underwent accelerated postnatal growth (termed “recuperated”). These were compared with control rats. Offspring were weaned onto standard feed pellets with or without dietary CoQ10 (1 mg/kg body weight per day) supplementation. At 12 mo, hepatic fibrosis, indexes of inflammation, oxidative stress, and insulin signaling were measured by histology, Western blot, ELISA, and reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Results: Hepatic collagen deposition (diameter of deposit) was greater in recuperated offspring (mean ± SEM: 12 ± 2 μm) than in controls (5 ± 0.5 μm) (P supplementation increased (P adulthood, which was associated with higher indexes of oxidative stress and inflammation and hyperinsulinemia. CoQ10 supplementation prevented liver fibrosis accompanied by downregulation of oxidative stress, inflammation, and hyperinsulinemia. PMID:26718412

  16. Coenzyme Q10 prevents hepatic fibrosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in a male rat model of poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Hargreaves, Iain P; Neergheen, Viruna; Aiken, Catherine E; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S; McConnell, Josie M; Ozanne, Susan E

    2016-02-01

    It is well established that low birth weight and accelerated postnatal growth increase the risk of liver dysfunction in later life. However, molecular mechanisms underlying such developmental programming are not well characterized, and potential intervention strategies are poorly defined. We tested the hypotheses that poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth would lead to increased hepatic fibrosis (a pathological marker of liver dysfunction) and that postnatal supplementation with the antioxidant coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) would prevent this programmed phenotype. A rat model of maternal protein restriction was used to generate low-birth-weight offspring that underwent accelerated postnatal growth (termed "recuperated"). These were compared with control rats. Offspring were weaned onto standard feed pellets with or without dietary CoQ10 (1 mg/kg body weight per day) supplementation. At 12 mo, hepatic fibrosis, indexes of inflammation, oxidative stress, and insulin signaling were measured by histology, Western blot, ELISA, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Hepatic collagen deposition (diameter of deposit) was greater in recuperated offspring (mean ± SEM: 12 ± 2 μm) than in controls (5 ± 0.5 μm) (P supplementation increased (P adulthood, which was associated with higher indexes of oxidative stress and inflammation and hyperinsulinemia. CoQ10 supplementation prevented liver fibrosis accompanied by downregulation of oxidative stress, inflammation, and hyperinsulinemia.

  17. Risk factors of malnutrition among preschool children in Terengganu, Malaysia: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hui Jie; Moy, Foong Ming; Nair, Sulochana

    2014-08-03

    Childhood malnutrition is a multi-dimensional problem. An increase in household income is not sufficient to reduce childhood malnutrition if children are deprived of food security, education, access to water, sanitation and health services. The aim of this study is to identify the characteristics of malnourished children below five years of age and to ascertain the risk factors of childhood malnutrition in a state in Malaysia. A case control study was conducted in the maternal and child health clinics in five districts of Terengganu, Malaysia from April to August 2012. Case was a child with moderate to severe malnutrition with z-scores history of worm infection (aOR: 3.48, 95% CI: 1.25, 9.70). Lower socio-economic status, household food insecurity, and poor child caring practices were associated with childhood malnutrition. Besides implementation of programmes focusing on poverty reduction, community based nutrition and hygiene education with extensive family planning and de-worming programmes should be intensified to improve both mother and children's nutritional status.

  18. Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Deficiency - Vitamin B1 (thiamine) Deficiency - Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) Deficiency - Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) Deficiency - Vitamin B9 (folacin) ... Nutrition - inadequate Images myPlate References Ashworth A. Nutrition, food security, and health. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, ...

  19. Malnutrition 'costs NHS more than obesity'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    Although commonly seen as an issue that affects the developing world, malnutrition is a major problem in the UK, warns a national charity. Research from the British Association for Parental and Enteral Nutrition (BAPEN) estimates that two to three million people in the UK suffer from malnutrition and older people are particularly at risk.

  20. Malnutrition: Missed opportunities for diagnosis | Antwi | Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Malnutrition is a serious public health problem particularly in developing countries where it is responsible for 54% of under 5s mortality. Anthropometric measurements are key tools for the assessment of nutritional status and diagnosis of malnutrition. Height and weight measurements are not routinely done in ...

  1. Identifying Protein-Calorie Malnutrition Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Susan S.; Barker, Ellen M.

    Instructional materials are provided for a workshop to enable participants to assist in identifying patients at risk with protein-calorie malnutrition and in corrrecting this nutritional deficiency. Representative topics are nutrients; protein, mineral, and vitamin sources, functions, and deficiency symptoms; malnutrition; nutritional deficiency…

  2. Malnutrition: more than the eye can see

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leth, F. C.; Koeleman, J. M.; Manya, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    To assess the magnitude of malnutrition in a hospital setting and to relate anthropometric measures to the clinical diagnosis of malnutrition. A descriptive study whereby anthropometric measures (length and weight) were taken of every child under the age of five years who was admitted to the

  3. Socioeconomic inequality in malnutrition in developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Van de Poel (Ellen); A.R. Hosseinpoor (Ahmad); N. Speybroeck (Niko); T.G.M. van Ourti (Tom); J. Vega (Jeanette)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjective: The objectives of this study were to report on socioeconomic inequality in childhood malnutrition in the developing world, to provide evidence for an association between socioeconomic inequality and the average level of malnutrition, and to draw attention to different patterns

  4. Complications associated with malnutrition in elective surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To identify the level of malnutrition and complications observed in Malaysia. Methods: A prospective, observational study was conducted with the objectives of identifying the degree of malnutrition, complications and the need for nutritional support in elective surgical patients. Collection of data was performed in ...

  5. Computed tomography in severe protein energy malnutrition.

    OpenAIRE

    Househam, K C; de Villiers, J F

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomography of the brain was performed on eight children aged 1 to 4 years with severe protein energy malnutrition. Clinical features typical of kwashiorkor were present in all the children studied. Severe cerebral atrophy or brain shrinkage according to standard radiological criteria was present in every case. The findings of this study suggest considerable cerebral insult associated with severe protein energy malnutrition.

  6. Prevalence of hematological abnormalities and malnutrition in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-10-11

    clinical stage 3). Children who were malnourished were 15 (22.4%). Conclusion: Hematological abnormalities and malnutrition occur in HIV positive children. Key words: Haematological, malnutrition, anaemia, children.

  7. UMANG – AN EMERGENCY CAMPAIGN TO ADDRESS MALNUTRITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grana Pu Selvi Gnanaraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: World Vision India with its existence in across the country implemented the emergency feeding program for the children with underweight in 53 area development sites spread across 15 states of the country. Rationale: Since more than 40% of the children were found to be underweight through our assessment process, we implemented this community based feeding program as an emergency response to children with malnutrition. Objective: To rehabilitate the malnourished children and sensitise the community on feeding, caring and health seeking practices. Material and Methods: Considering the high prevalence of underweight children, we initiated the program ‘UMANG’ (Urgent Management and Action for Nutritional growth on a campaign mode with the involvement of various stakeholders. Malnourished children for this program were selected through a community based screening program. This was a 90 day community based feeding program for the malnourished children conducted either in the anganwadi center or a common place. Underweight children (moderate and severe and their mothers/care takers attended this program with their contribution from backyard nutrition garden or local market and were taught to prepare a nutritious menu using locally available low cost food materials. Mothers were also sensitised on health seeking, caring and feeding practices to prevent future incidence of malnutrition. The families of the malnourished children were also supported with nutrition (backyard garden, economic development assistance to improve food diversity at the household level. Results: About 50858 malnourished children (54 per cent moderate and 46 per cent severe were enrolled in UMANG[1]. On comparing the baseline (1st day and endline figures (90th day 38.5 per cent of the children have graduated to normal from moderate and severe underweight. In addition UMANG had spin off benefits such as increase in anganwadi attendance, community based growth

  8. Severe acute malnutrition and infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with increased severity of common infectious diseases, and death amongst children with SAM is almost always as a result of infection. The diagnosis and management of infection are often different in malnourished versus well-nourished children. The objectives of this brief are to outline the evidence underpinning important practical questions relating to the management of infectious diseases in children with SAM and to highlight research gaps. Overall, the evidence base for many aspects covered in this brief is very poor. The brief addresses antimicrobials; antipyretics; tuberculosis; HIV; malaria; pneumonia; diarrhoea; sepsis; measles; urinary tract infection; nosocomial Infections; soil transmitted helminths; skin infections and pharmacology in the context of SAM. The brief is structured into sets of clinical questions, which we hope will maximise the relevance to contemporary practice. PMID:25475887

  9. Transition of maternal and child nutrition in Asia: implications for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winichagoon, Pattanee

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the maternal and child nutrition situation in Asia in transition and its public health implications. Countries in Asia are facing a double burden of malnutrition. Accessibility to high energy, less nutrient-dense foods or processed foods affects current dietary patterns, whereas industrialization is leading to more sedentary lifestyles both in rural and urban areas. Stunting and wasting among young children persist but have declined in severity, whereas overweight and obesity have risen rapidly. Growth faltering in height during the first 2 years of life has affected muscle mass accretion, but rapid weight gain after 2 years of age has led to more fat accretion, imposing risks of childhood obesity and consequent metabolic disorders. The number of women entering pregnancy with low BMI has decreased, but increasing BMI is noticeable. Prepregnancy BMI and gestational weight gain are important determinants of maternal nutrition during pregnancy, the risk of gestational diabetes and postpartum weight retention, as well as obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases in later adulthood. Asia in transition is faced with persistent undernutrition and increasing trends of obesity and metabolic disorders among children and women. The first 1000 days from conception is a critical period, but it is also a window of opportunity for preventing double burden of malnutrition in Asian countries characterized by a nutrition transition.

  10. Impact of maternal under nutrition on obstetric outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triunfo, S; Lanzone, A

    2015-01-01

    Maternal malnutrition, ranging from under nutrition to over dietary intake before and in the pregnant state, is worldwide problem with significant consequences, not only for survival and increased risk for acute and chronic diseases both in mother and child, but also for economic productivity of individuals in the societies and additional costs on health system. Inter alia, pre-pregnancy underweight and insufficient gestational weight gain are considered as individual risk factors for the occurrence of spontaneous interruption, preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, and hypertensive disorders, strongly associated with poorer perinatal outcome. In a portion of this population, major eating disorders (anorexia and bulimia nervosa), once thought to be rare, but nowadays enlarged due to cultural pressure on the drive for thinness, have been identified as the etiology of an abnormal nutritional condition in developed countries, in contrast to long standing food deprivation in developing countries. Actually, even if without a complete weight management guidance for these selected pregnant women, an appropriate weight gain is recommended during pregnancy. Mainly, therapeutic approach is prevention using specific programs of improving weight before pregnant status. In this article, a review of the literature on selected obstetrical risks associated with maternal underweight has been performed and both the target prevention and management strategies have been described.

  11. SUPPLEMENTATION WITH VITAMINS C AND E DURING PREGNANCY FOR THE PREVENTION OF PREECLAMPSIA AND OTHER ADVERSE MATERNAL AND PERINATAL OUTCOMES: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND METAANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    CONDE-AGUDELO, Agustín; ROMERO, Roberto; KUSANOVIC, Juan Pedro; HASSAN, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether supplementation with vitamins C and E during pregnancy reduces the risk of preeclampsia and other adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes. STUDY DESIGN Systematic review and metaanalysis of randomized controlled trials. RESULTS Nine trials involving a total of 19,810 women were included. Overall, there were no significant differences between the vitamin and placebo groups in the risk of preeclampsia (9.6% versus 9.6%; relative risk 1.00, 95% confidence interval 0.92–1.09). Similar results were obtained when subgroup analyses were restricted to women at high risk or low/moderate risk for preeclampsia. Women supplemented with vitamins C and E were at increased risk of developing gestational hypertension and premature rupture of membranes, and a decreased risk of abruptio placentae. There were no significant differences between the vitamin and placebo groups in the risk of other adverse maternal or fetal/perinatal outcomes. CONCLUSION Supplementation with vitamins C and E during pregnancy does not prevent preeclampsia. PMID:21529757

  12. Co-ordinated research project on isotopic evaluations of maternal and child health nutrition to help prevent stunting. Report on the 1. research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The concept for the Co-ordinated Research Programme on isotopic evaluations of maternal and child nutrition to help prevent stunting was a consequence of discussions held between IAEA staff and participants in a regional training course on 'Isotope Techniques in Human Nutrition' held in Lima, Peru in June 1996. The intention then was to develop research on factors influencing the success of lactation and the consequent effects on the breast-fed child. The project would have Latin American participants to promote regional exchange of expertise and ideas. Initial participation was from Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela. Brazil and Pakistan have now been added to these. There are three Specific Research Objectives: (1) To develop stable isotope methods for measuring breast-milk intake using regionally available equipment. (2) To apply the methodology in the assessment of milk intake in infants in relation to maternal nutrition, socio-economic status and education, and infant nutrition and intake of macro- and micro-nutrients. (3) To use information gathered at 2) to determine the need for supplementation programmes for mothers and/or infants, and educational programmes for the mothers

  13. Child malnutrition in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulugeta, A.; Hagos, F.; Kruseman, G.; Linderhof, V.G.M.; Stroecker, B.; Abraha, Z.; Yohannes, M.; Samuel, G.G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Estimate levels of and identify factors contributing to child malnutrition in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: Rural communities from four zones of Tigray. Subjects: Three hundred and eighteen under five children representing 587 randomly selected

  14. Hospital Malnutrition Related to Fasting and Underfeeding: Is It an Ethical Issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas Moya, Diego; Plascencia Gaitán, Alejandra; Ornelas Camacho, Denisse; Arenas Márquez, Humberto

    2016-06-01

    Hospital malnutrition is a relevant clinical issue present in about 50% of patients that is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and cost of care. Because of the relation of malnutrition with chronic and acute inflammatory processes secondary to disease, nutrition therapy is considered an important medical treatment. However, there is little discussion about the impact of another critical issue related to hospital malnutrition, that is, lack of appropriate food or nutrition therapy given to the patients. Unnecessary fasting practices and the use of inappropriate nutrition prescriptions result in underfeeding that can be a related or direct cause of hospital malnutrition, independent of disease or inflammatory state. Suboptimal prescription of oral, enteral, and parenteral nutrition should be analyzed and discussed from an ethical perspective since this practice has the potential to harm patients. In addition, absence or inadequate provision of nutrition may present barriers for improved patient outcomes and could be prevented by simply recognizing lack of knowledge, skills, or experience in nutrition and entrusting nutrition prescription to interdisciplinary teams with clinicians well prepared in nutrition sciences. This article reviews potential barriers to the prevention or treatment of hospital malnutrition and proposes specific actions that can help clinicians to overcome and implement optimal nutrition not just as medical therapy but also as a basic comfort care that may help patients nutritionally, clinically, physically, and emotionally. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  15. Maternal immunisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, Marcel; Lambach, Philipp; Ortiz, Justin R.; Reis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    There has been increased interest in the potential of maternal immunisation to protect maternal, fetal, and infant health. Maternal tetanus vaccination is part of routine antenatal care and immunisation campaigns in many countries, and it has played an important part in the reduction of maternal

  16. Malnutrition and disability: unexplored opportunities for collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Groce, N.; Challenger, E.; Berman-Bieler, R.; Farkas, A.; Yilmaz, N.; Schultink, W.; Clark, D.; Kaplan, C.; Kerac, M.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing international interest in the links between malnutrition and disability: both are major global public health problems, both are key human rights concerns, and both are currently prominent within the global health agenda. In this review, interactions between the two fields are explored and it is argued that strengthening links would lead to important mutual benefits and synergies. At numerous points throughout the life-cycle, malnutrition can cause or contribute to an indiv...

  17. Prevalence of malnutrition among gynaecological cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hölscher, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Whereas there is a growing awareness of obesity in the population in Germany and other industrialized countries, the problem of malnutrition goes largely unnoticed among the public. Malnutrition is a common problem in gynaecological oncology patients, but only a few studies cover this topic. The present study documented the nutritional status of 274 consecutively admitted breast, ovarian and cervical carcinoma patients using five different measurement parameters. These included the SGA, the M...

  18. GBS public awareness, advocacy, and prevention--what's working, what's not and why we need a maternal GBS vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Gina; Plumb, Jane

    2013-08-28

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the most common cause of severe early-onset (0-6 days) infection and a significant cause of serious late-onset (7-90 days) infection in infants. While most babies recover from their GBS infection, some are stillborn, more die in the first weeks of life and others suffer lifelong disability. Despite efforts in many developed countries to prevent these infections, the burden of GBS disease remains significant, particularly among the late onset infections, which are not preventable using current risk-based or screening strategies. Vaccination, once available, could prevent more cases of GBS infection than any other strategy, including preventing preterm labor and stillbirths caused by GBS infection, post-delivery GBS infection in the mother and late-onset GBS infection in the baby. Vaccination would also avoid allergic reactions to antibiotics and concern about the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria. We consider the history of the two largest group B Strep parent organizations (Group B Strep Association USA and Group B Strep Support UK) and the history of GBS prevention in their respective countries. We look at what is needed before a vaccine can be introduced and consider how acceptable a GBS vaccine would be from families' perspective. We also summarize what a perfect GBS vaccine would look like and what we should all strive to achieve. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Strengthening integration of clinical and public health systems to prevent maternal-child obesity in the First 1,000Days: A Collective Impact approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake-Lamb, Tiffany; Boudreau, Alexy Arauz; Matathia, Sarah; Tiburcio, Etna; Perkins, Meghan E; Roche, Brianna; Kotelchuck, Milton; Shtasel, Derri; Price, Sarah N; Taveras, Elsie M

    2018-02-01

    Obesity interventions may be most effective if they begin in the earliest stages of life, support changes across family, clinical, and public health systems, and address socio-contextual factors. The First 1000Days is a systematic program starting in early pregnancy lasting through the first 24months of infancy to prevent obesity among low-income mother-infant pairs in three community health centers in Massachusetts. The program uses a Collective Impact approach to create the infrastructure for sustained, system-wide changes for obesity prevention across early life clinical and public health services, including Obstetrics, Pediatrics, Adult Medicine, Behavioral Health, Nutrition, Community Health, the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) program, and the Maternal, Infant and Childhood Home Visiting program. Program components include 1) staff and provider training; 2) enhanced gestational weight gain and infant overweight tracking; 3) universal screening of adverse health behaviors and socio-contextual factors; 4) universal patient navigation to support individual behavior change and social needs, while strengthening integration of clinical and public health services; 5) individualized health coaching for mother-infant pairs at high risk of obesity; and 6) educational materials to support behavior change. A quasi-experimental evaluation design will examine changes, between 2015 and 2019, in gestational weight gain and prevalence of infant overweight from 0 to 24months of age. The First 1000Days program will examine the effectiveness of an early life obesity prevention program for mother-infant pairs. If successful, the program could provide a model for chronic disease prevention and health promotion among vulnerable families starting in early life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Healthy Families New York on the Promotion of Maternal Parenting Competencies and the Prevention of Harsh Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M. L.; Dumont, K.; Mitchell-Herzfeld, S. D.; Walden, N. J.; Greene, R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This paper examines the effectiveness of the Healthy Families New York (HFNY) home visiting program in promoting parenting competencies and preventing maladaptive parenting behaviors in mothers at risk for child abuse and neglect. Methods: The study used microlevel observational assessments of mother-child interactions in the third…

  1. Managing acute malnutrition in infants aged less than six months: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality management of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in infants < 6 months of age is a key strategy within the “1000 days window of opportunity”. It prevents early child death, secures optimal growth and forms a foundation for full adulthood potentials. Most studies to date on management of SAM in infants relied on ...

  2. Gut microbiota alterations and dietary modulation in childhood malnutrition - The role of short chain fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pekmez, Ceyda Tugba; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Brahe, Lena Kirchner

    2018-01-01

    and metabolism through enteroendocrine cell signaling, adipogenesis and insulin-like growth factor-1 production. Elucidating these mechanisms may lead to development of new modulation practices of the gut microbiota as a potential prevention and treatment strategy for childhood malnutrition. The present overview...

  3. High Burden of Protein–Energy Malnutrition in Nigeria: Beyond the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is still a high burden of protein–energy malnutrition in Nigeria. The severe forms of the disease are usually associated with high level of mortality even in the tertiary health facilities. To review the cost-effective health promotional strategies at community levels that could aid prevention, early detection, and prompt ...

  4. Maternal Fetal Attachment, Locus of Control and Adherence to STI/HIV Prevention and Prenatal Care Promotion Behaviors in Urban Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfield, Sara L; Geller, Pamela A; Epperson, C Neill

    Young women of childbearing age are disproportionately affected by sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV. In particular, young women have more frequent and more serious health problems from STI or HIV infection than men, and among women, African American women have especially high rates of infection. Pregnancy is an important time for beginning or continued STI and HIV prevention behaviors as discontinuing condom use when the contraceptive motivation is gone puts women and their fetuses at risk for contraction of STIs and HIV if they remain sexually active. There are many personal attributes that predict adherence to STI risk reduction behaviors including health related locus of control. The current study surveyed a group of 100 low-income, urban dwelling minority women during their pregnancies to determine whether maternal-fetal attachment, a characteristic specific to pregnancy, favorably influences pregnant women's health related locus of control such that women might be more inclined to engage in preventative STI/HIV risk reduction behaviors. Our findings revealed that while our sample has very high levels of MFA despite the high rate of unplanned pregnancy, condom use is not the method used to reduce the risk of contracting STIs/HIV. Rather, women are more likely to limit their number of sexual partners during pregnancy. While this is beneficial, pregnant women in non-monogamous relationships may discount the importance of condom use during pregnancy. Prenatal care providers can provide education about condom use as a beneficial prenatal care behavior similar to taking prenatal vitamins.

  5. AN AUDIT OF MATERNAL DEATHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavana Gowda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: A study of maternal death conducted to evaluate various factors responsible for maternal deaths. To identify complications in pregnancy, a childbirth which result in maternal death, and to identify opportunities for preventive intervention and understand the events leading to death; so that improving maternal health and reducing maternal mortality rate significantly. To analyze the causes and epidemiological amounts maternal mortality e.g. age parity, socioeconomic status and literacy. In order to reduce maternal mortality and to implement safe motherhood program and complications of pregnancy and to find out safe motherhood program. METHODS: The data collected was a retrograde by a proforma containing particulars of the diseased, detailed history and relatives were interviewed for additional information. The data collected was analysed. RESULTS: Maternal mortality rate in our own institution is 200/ 100,000 live births. Among 30 maternal deaths, 56% deaths (17 were among low socio - economic status, groups 60% deaths among unbooked 53.5% deaths more along illiterates evidenced by direct and indirect deaths about 25% of deaths were preventable. CONCLUSION: Maternal death is a great tragedy in the family life. It is crusade to know not just the medical cause of the death but the circumstances what makes these continued tragic death even more unacceptable is that deaths are largely preventable

  6. A CLINICAL STUDY OF MATERNAL DEATHS DUE TO PPH

    OpenAIRE

    Basavana Gowda; Jyotsna

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A study of maternal death conducted to evaluate various factors responsible for maternal deaths. To identify complications in pregnancy, a childbirth which result in maternal death, and to identify opportunities for preventive intervention and understand the events leading to death; so that improving maternal health and reducing maternal ...

  7. Maternal personality traits associated with patterns of prenatal smoking and exposure: Implications for etiologic and prevention research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Suena H; Reiss, David; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Leve, Leslie D; Shaw, Daniel S; Ganiban, Jody M

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the characteristics of women who smoke during pregnancy beyond demographic factors. We examined the relationship between novelty seeking, harm avoidance, and self-directedness and (a) abstinence from smoking during pregnancy and (b) average daily cigarette consumption during pregnancy. Participants were 826 birth mothers who made adoption placements in the Early Growth and Development Study and completed the Temperament and Character Inventory - Short Form, and interview-based smoking assessments 3-6 months postpartum. Never smokers (n=199), pregnancy abstainers (n=277), pregnancy light smokers (n=184), and pregnancy heavy smokers (n=166) were compared on personality dimensions and smoking-related processes. Using regression analyses we examined relationships between personality and (a) abstinence versus smoking during pregnancy; and (b) average daily cigarette consumption among lifetime smokers, controlling for nicotine dependence, birth father substance dependence, maternal antisocial behavior, and depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Smokers with higher self-directedness and lower harm avoidance were more likely to abstain during pregnancy [O.R. 1.380; 95% C.I. (1.065-1.787); B(SE)=.322(.132); p=.015] and [O.R. .713; 95% C.I. (.543-.935); B(SE)=-.339(.138); p=.014], respectively. Novelty seeking differentiated never smokers from lifetime smokers (t=-3.487; p=.001), but was not significant in multivariate models. Lifetime smokers who abstained during pregnancy reported fewer depressive symptoms relative to never smokers. Personality dimensions associated with abstinence from smoking and cigarettes per day during pregnancy may be important to consider in etiologic and intervention research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  9. Mind the Hunger Gap: a review of malnutrition in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaikley, Catherine

    2012-05-01

    Malnutrition is known to affect over three million people in the UK, with 93% of these people living in the community setting. This is leading to escalating costs of over pound 13 billion to the NHS annually, which could simply be reduced by ensuring adequate nutritional screening followed by the provision of good nutrition and diet. As well as reducing costs this will improve quality of life for such patients. The British Dietetic Association has launched a campaign entitled 'Mind the Hunger Gap' to highlight the growing issue of malnutrition and to help address the problem. Community nurses have an important role to play in the prevention and treatment of malnutrition, and this article sets out some of the tools and strategies at their disposal.

  10. Program Responses to Acute and Chronic Malnutrition: Divergences and Convergences123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Gilles; Castleman, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Program approaches for addressing acute malnutrition and those for addressing chronic malnutrition have grown in different directions. Their specialization has led to productive advances in the efficacy of specific interventions but has also created divergences in implementation. Greater convergence and integration between the 2 sets of approaches would help programs respond to the diversity of conditions faced in the field and enable a more comprehensive continuum of care from prevention to treatment. After reviewing the causes of the differences in approach, this paper examines programmatic and scientific challenges to greater convergence and suggests steps to promote effective integration of acute and chronic malnutrition services. Steps include strengthening community linkages between program platforms, assessing the degree and type of integration needed in various situations, identifying cost efficiencies, and developing joint tools where possible. PMID:22516735

  11. Addressing Disease-Related Malnutrition in Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Maria Isabel; Hegazi, Refaat A.; Diaz-Pizarro Graf, José Ignacio; Gomez-Morales, Gabriel; Fuentes Gutiérrez, Catalina; Goldin, Maria Fernanda; Navas, Angela; Pinzón Espitia, Olga Lucia; Tavares, Gilmária Millere

    2015-01-01

    Alarmingly high rates of disease-related malnutrition have persisted in hospitals of both emerging and industrialized nations over the past 2 decades, despite marked advances in medical care over this same interval. In Latin American hospitals, the numbers are particularly striking; disease-related malnutrition has been reported in nearly 50% of adult patients in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, and Uruguay. The tolls of disease-related malnutrition are high in both human and financial terms—increased infectious complications, higher incidence of pressure ulcers, longer hospital stays, more frequent readmissions, greater costs of care, and increased risk of death. In an effort to draw attention to malnutrition in Latin American healthcare, a feedM.E. Latin American Study Group was formed to extend the reach and support the educational efforts of the feedM.E. Global Study Group. In this article, the feedM.E. Latin American Study Group shows that malnutrition incurs excessive costs to the healthcare systems, and the study group also presents evidence of how appropriate nutrition care can improve patients’ clinical outcomes and lower healthcare costs. To achieve the benefits of nutrition for health throughout Latin America, the article presents feedM.E.’s simple and effective Nutrition Care Pathway in English and Spanish as a way to facilitate its use. PMID:25883116

  12. Malnutrition in elderly: social and economic determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, L M; Scardella, P; Piombo, L; Neri, B; Asprino, R; Proietti, A R; Carcaterra, S; Cava, E; Cataldi, S; Cucinotta, D; Di Bella, G; Barbagallo, M; Morrone, A

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition occurs frequently in the frailest groups of the population, especially in people who are on a low income and elderly subjects, overall if they are institutionalized. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of malnutrition in a sample of elderly people living in different settings and to identify the determinants of malnutrition. A total of 718 subjects, 472 females (F) and 246 males (M), were recruited from nursing homes or were free living in three different regions in Italy. Nutritional status, depression, social, functional and cognitive status, were evaluated. According to the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), a high prevalence of malnutrition was found out in both genders: 26% of F and 16.3% of M were classified as being malnourished (MNAshop, prepare and cook meals because of a low income, distance from markets or supermarkets as well as impossibility to drive the car or to use public transportation. This study confirms the necessity to routinely perform nutritional status evaluation in elderly subjects, to carry out training courses for health workers (doctors, nurses, psychologists, dietitians), to implement nutritional education of the geriatric population, to develop tools and guidelines for health workers and caregivers, to identify and reduce clinical, functional, social or economic risk factors for malnutrition.

  13. Malnutrition among HIV- infected Children by Anthropometric Measures in Poor Outreach Area of a Developing Country and its Relationship with CD4 Counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Rakholia

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Malnutrition is rampant in children with HIV/AIDS in hilly poor Outreach areas of India. Chronic malnutrition or stunting was the most common abnormality seen in three fourth of all the children. Hence sensitizing health care workers for timely recognition and prompt remedial measures (ART, nutritional interventions are need of the hour to reduce mortality and prevent growth failure. It also provides baseline data of efficacy of single dose nevirapine to compare efficacy of newer regimes in prevention of PPTCT.

  14. Campaign for the prevention of maternal mortality and morbidity. Abortion: we shall no longer be silent about it] Sixth call for action, International Day of Action for Women's Health, May 28, 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The annual Campaign for the Prevention of Maternal Mortality and Morbidity to be held on May 28 will focus upon abortion-related maternal mortality with the goal of mobilizing women to discuss abortion and turn it into an issue of public debate. First, however, people must stop blaming women for abortion. People say women are responsible for abortion because they failed to use contraception, they had sexual intercourse outside of marriage, they were behaving immorally, and/or they violated religious precepts. However, blaming women for abortion simply denies reality. This paper explains what is known and not known about abortion and its related maternal morbidity and mortality, and counters some myths about the criminalization and legalization of abortion, religious prohibition of abortion, who has abortions, whether women will always be traumatized by an abortion, the health risks of induced abortion, and the need for abortion services. The history of the campaign is also described.

  15. Malnutrition or frailty? Overlap and evidence gaps in the diagnosis and treatment of frailty and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laur, Celia V; McNicholl, Tara; Valaitis, Renata; Keller, Heather H

    2017-05-01

    There is increasing awareness of the detrimental health impact of frailty on older adults and of the high prevalence of malnutrition in this segment of the population. Experts in these 2 arenas need to be cognizant of the overlap in constructs, diagnosis, and treatment of frailty and malnutrition. There is a lack of consensus regarding the definition of malnutrition and how it should be assessed. While there is consensus on the definition of frailty, there is no agreement on how it should be measured. Separate assessment tools exist for both malnutrition and frailty; however, there is intersection between concepts and measures. This narrative review highlights some of the intersections within these screening/assessment tools, including weight loss/decreased body mass, functional capacity, and weakness (handgrip strength). The potential for identification of a minimal set of objective measures to identify, or at least consider risk for both conditions, is proposed. Frailty and malnutrition have also been shown to result in similar negative health outcomes and consequently common treatment strategies have been studied, including oral nutritional supplements. While many of the outcomes of treatment relate to both concepts of frailty and malnutrition, research questions are typically focused on the frailty concept, leading to possible gaps or missed opportunities in understanding the effect of complementary interventions on malnutrition. A better understanding of how these conditions overlap may improve treatment strategies for frail, malnourished, older adults.

  16. Most children who took part in a comprehensive malnutrition programme in Madagascar reached and maintained the recovery threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnin, Margot; Stoll, Beat; Voahangy, Rajaobelina; Jeannot, Emilien

    2017-06-01

    The benefits of including nutritional education in programmes that tackle moderate and severe acute malnutrition remain poorly documented. This study in Madagascar evaluated the nutritional status of children who took part in an innovative programme that included maternal education, on completion and after a year. Each year, this outpatient programme admits 2400 malnourished children from six months to 59 months in the lower districts of Antananarivo, Madagascar. Children were drawn by lots, and their anthropometric data were measured. A descriptive retrospective longitudinal study was conducted on 573 children who took part between 2010 and 2013. The programme lasted an average of 38 days and, on completion, 82.2% had reached the recovery threshold, and 16.2% had moved up to mild malnutrition. This was achieved with food supplements of 720 kcal per day, despite the Malagasy Public Health recommendation of 1000-1500 kcal per day. After one year, 79.1% were still above the recovery threshold, and 15% had mild malnutrition. The recovery rate was higher for children under 24 months of age (odds ratio 2.9, 95% confidence interval 1.93-4.59). Most children who attended this malnutrition programme with maternal education in Madagascar reached the recovery threshold on completion and had maintained it after one year. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Malnutrition and Its Determinants Are Associated with Suboptimal Cognitive, Communication, and Motor Development in Tanzanian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudfeld, Christopher R; McCoy, Dana Charles; Fink, Günther; Muhihi, Alfa; Bellinger, David C; Masanja, Honorati; Smith, Emily R; Danaei, Goodarz; Ezzati, Majid; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2015-12-01

    A large volume of literature has shown negative associations between stunting and child development; however, there is limited evidence for associations with milder forms of linear growth faltering and determinants of malnutrition in developing countries. The objective of this study was to assess the association between anthropometric growth indicators across their distribution and determinants of malnutrition with development of Tanzanian children. We used the Bayley Scales of Infant Development III to assess a cohort of 1036 Tanzanian children between 18 and 36 mo of age who were previously enrolled in a neonatal vitamin A trial. Linear regression models were used to assess standardized mean differences in child development for anthropometry z scores, along with pregnancy, delivery, and early childhood factors. Height-for-age z score (HAZ) was linearly associated with cognitive, communication, and motor development z scores across the observed range in this population (all P values for linear relation development z scores, respectively. The relation of weight-for-height z score (WHZ) was nonlinear with only wasted children (WHZ development z scores, respectively, relative to nonwasted children. Maternal stature and flush toilet use were associated with higher cognitive and motor z scores, whereas being born small for gestational age (SGA) was associated with a -0.16 (95% CI: -0.30, -0.01) z score deficit in cognition. Mild to severe chronic malnutrition was associated with increasing developmental deficits in Tanzanian children, whereas only wasted children exhibited developmental delays during acute malnutrition. Interventions to reduce SGA, improve sanitation, and increase maternal stature may have positive effects on child development. This trial was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry as ACTRN12610000636055. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. Protein energy malnutrition (PEM), brain and various facets of child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, P M

    1992-01-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) is a global problem. Nearly 150 million children under 5 years in the world and 70-80 million in India suffer from PEM, nearly 20 million in the world and 4 million in India suffer from severe forms of PEM, viz., marasmus, kwashiorkor and marasmic kwashiorkor. The studies in experimental animals in the west and children in developing countries have revealed the adverse effects of PEM on the biochemistry of developing brain which leads to tissue damage and tissue contents, growth arrest, developmental differentiation, myelination, reduction of synapses, synaptic transmitters and overall development of dendritic activity. Many of these adverse effects have been described in children in clinical data, biochemical studies, reduction in brain size, histology of the spinal cord, quantitative studies and electron microscopy of sural nerve, neuro -CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and morphological changes in the cerebellar cells. Longer the PEM, younger the child, poorer the maternal health and literacy, more adverse are the effects of PEM on the nervous system. Just like the importance of nutrients on the developing brain, so are the adverse effects on the child development of lack of environmental stimulation, emotional support and love and affection to the child. When both the adverse factors are combined, the impact is severe. Hence prevention of PEM in pregnant and lactating mothers, breast feeding, adequate home based supplements, family support and love will improve the physical growth, mental development, social competence and academic performance of the child. Hence nutritional rehabilitation, psychosocial and psychomotor development of the child should begin in infancy and continue throughout. It should be at all levels, most important being in family, school, community and various intervention programmes, local, regional and national. Moreover medical students, health personnel, all medical disciplines concerned with

  19. Chronic Malnutrition Among Infants of Varanasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda S

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: What is the nutritional status of infants in Varanasi? Objectives: To find out the magnitude of PEM among infants of Varanasi district. Study design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Urban slum and rural areas. Participants: 360 infants. Study variables: Age, height (length, weight. Outcome variables: Protein Energy Malnutrition. Statistical analysis: Simple proportions; Chi- square test. Results: As per the height for age criteria; only 10.56% of infants were stunted (<90% of reference standard and according to Seoane Latham classification; 44.96%, 6.05% and 4.03% were suffering from acute malnutrition and nutritional dwarfing respectively (90% of reference standard as entry point

  20. Determinants of Growth Hormone Resistance in Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    States of under-nutrition are characterized by growth hormone resistance. Decreased total energy intake, as well as isolated protein-calorie malnutrition and isolated nutrient deficiencies result in elevated growth hormone levels and low levels of IGF-I. We review various states of malnutrition and a disease state characterized by chronic under-nutrition -- anorexia nervosa -- and discuss possible mechanisms contributing to the state of growth hormone resistance, including FGF-21 and SIRT1. We conclude by examining the hypothesis that growth hormone resistance is an adaptive response to states of under-nutrition, in order to maintain euglycemia and preserve energy. PMID:24363451

  1. Maternal administration of melatonin prevents spatial learning and memory deficits induced by developmental ethanol and lead co-exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Elham; Goudarzi, Iran; Abrari, Kataneh; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi

    2017-05-01

    Melatonin is a radical scavenger with the ability to remove reactive oxidant species. There is report that co-exposure to lead and ethanol during developmental stages induces learning and memory deficits and oxidative stress. Here, we studied the effect of melatonin, with strong antioxidant properties, on memory deficits induced by lead and ethanol co-exposure and oxidative stress in hippocampus. Pregnant rats in lead and ethanol co-exposure group received lead acetate of 0.2% in distilled drinking water and ethanol (4g/kg) by oral gavages once daily from the 5th day of gestation until weaning. Rats received 10mg/kg melatonin by oral gavages. On postnatal days (PD) 30, rats trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. On day 37, a probe test was done and oxidative stress markers in the hippocampus were evaluated. Results demonstrated lead and ethanol co-exposed rats exhibited higher escape latency during training trials and reduced time spent in target quadrant, higher escape location latency in probe trial test and had significantly higher malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, significantly lower superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities in the hippocampus. Melatonin treatment could improve memory deficits, antioxidants activity and reduced MDA levels in the hippocampus. We conclude, co-exposure to lead and ethanol impair memory and melatonin can prevent from it by oxidative stress modulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diarrhoea and malnutrition | Nel | South African Journal of Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship between diarrhoea and malnutrition is bidirectional: diarrhoea leads to malnutrition while malnutrition aggravates the course of diarrhoea. Many factors contribute to the detrimental effect of diarrhoea on nutrition. Reduced intake (due to anorexia, vomiting, and withholding of feeds), maldigestion, ...

  3. Malnutrition, Learning and Intellectual Development: Research and Remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciuti, Henry N.

    After a discussion of the problem of malnutrition and its effect on intellectual development, this paper concentrates on the study of protein-calorie malnutrition in infants and children as it occurs in postnatal and subsequent development. An overview and summary of the principal investigations on the relationship of malnutrition to intellectual…

  4. Malnutrition amongst Under-Five Years Children in Swat, Pakistan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... The incidence of malnutrition is about the same for both male and female children. Risk factors for malnutrition in the children include lack of education, teenage pregnancy, lack of immunization, and large family size. Keywords: Malnutrition, Gomezfs classification, Weaning time, Risk factors, Teenage pregnancy, Swat ...

  5. Tackling the increasing problem of malnutrition in older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Marjolein; Volkert, D.; Corish, C.; Geisler, C.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Cruz-Jentoft, A.J.; Lohrmann, C.; O'Connor, E.M.; Schindler, K.; Schueren, van der D.E.

    2017-01-01

    In order to tackle the increasing problem of malnutrition (i.e. protein-energy malnutrition) in the older population, the Joint Action Malnutrition in the Elderly (MaNuEL) Knowledge Hub has been recently launched as part of the Strategic Research Agenda of the Joint Programming Initiative (JPI) A

  6. Prevalence of Malnutrition in Iranian Children with Physical Disability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shariatzadeh, Nastaran; Doustmohammadian, Aazam; Neyestani, Tirang Reza; Abtahi, Mitra

    2014-01-01

    intakes were 75.8% and 58.7% of the corresponding required amounts. Despite absence of significant difference in energy and fat intake, the intakes of protein, calcium and riboflavin were significantly lower in girls than in boys. The high prevalence of underweight in children with disability in accordance with the standard CDC particularly in Tehranian girls is thought. Conclusions: Malnutrition (low weight and stunting) is quite prevalent among Iranian children with motor disabilities. It seems that poor food composition is a more important contributing factor than total low calorie intake. These data warrants further studies. Further prevention programs are necessary to induct. (author)

  7. Profile, knowledge, and work patterns of a cadre of maternal, newborn, and child health CHWs focusing on preventive and promotive services in Morogoro Region, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeFevre, Amnesty E; Mpembeni, Rose; Chitama, Dereck; George, Asha S; Mohan, Diwakar; Urassa, David P; Gupta, Shivam; Feldhaus, Isabelle; Pereira, Audrey; Kilewo, Charles; Chebet, Joy J; Cooper, Chelsea M; Besana, Giulia; Lutale, Harriet; Bishanga, Dunstan; Mtete, Emmanuel; Semu, Helen; Baqui, Abdullah H; Killewo, Japhet; Winch, Peter J

    2015-12-24

    Despite impressive decreases in under-five mortality, progress in reducing maternal and neonatal mortality in Tanzania has been slow. We present an evaluation of a cadre of maternal, newborn, and child health community health worker (MNCH CHW) focused on preventive and promotive services during the antenatal and postpartum periods in Morogoro Region, Tanzania. Study findings review the effect of several critical design elements on knowledge, time allocation, service delivery, satisfaction, and motivation. A quantitative survey on service delivery and knowledge was administered to 228 (of 238 trained) MNCH CHWs. Results are compared against surveys administered to (1) providers in nine health centers (n = 88) and (2) CHWs (n = 53) identified in the same districts prior to the program's start. Service delivery outputs were measured by register data and through a time motion study conducted among a sub-sample of 33 randomly selected MNCH CHWs. Ninety-seven percent of MNCH CHWs (n = 228) were interviewed: 55% male, 58% married, and 52% with secondary school education or higher. MNCH CHWs when compared to earlier CHWs were more likely to be unmarried, younger, and more educated. Mean MNCH CHW knowledge scores were <50% for 8 of 10 MNCH domains assessed and comparable to those observed for health center providers but lower than those for earlier CHWs. MNCH CHWs reported covering a mean of 186 households and were observed to provide MNCH services for 5 h weekly. Attendance of monthly facility-based supervision meetings was nearly universal and focused largely on registers, yet data quality assessments highlighted inconsistencies. Despite program plans to provide financial incentives and bicycles for transport, only 56% of CHWs had received financial incentives and none received bicycles. Initial rollout of MNCH CHWs yields important insights into addressing program challenges. The social profile of CHWs was not significantly associated with knowledge or

  8. Hospital diagnosis of malnutrition: a call for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocock, Mary Ann; Keller, Heather H

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) provides accurate health information needed to establish sound health care policies. The CIHI mandate is to develop and co-ordinate a uniform approach to health care information in Canada. The institute uses the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) system to record the most responsible diagnosis for each hospital admission. This investigation was conducted to determine if six ICD protein-calorie malnutrition (PCM) codes could be used for health care utilization analyses. Aggregate data (1996 to 2000) from the CIHI discharge abstract database were used. The data analyzed were the most responsible diagnoses data for the six PCM codes and a single summary statistic for all other "non-malnutrition" diagnoses for all long-term care facility residents aged 65 or older who were transferred to an acute care facility. In this population, fewer than five hospital admissions per year were assigned a PCM code. There were too few PCM cases to do trend analyses for morbidity or mortality. This study suggests a lack of recognition and documentation of PCM as a specific health condition in older adults. Lack of tracking of this diagnosis prevents documentation that could lead to policy changes to support older adults' nutrition.

  9. Protein-energy malnutrition: a risk factor for various ailments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batool, Rizwana; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Sultan, Muhammad Tauseef; Saeed, Farhan; Naz, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    The wheel of industrialization that spun throughout the last century resulted in urbanization coupled with modifications in lifestyles and dietary habits. However, the communities living in developing economies are facing many problems related to their diet and health. Amongst, the prevalence of nutritional problems especially protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and micronutrients deficiencies are the rising issues. Moreover, the immunity or susceptibility to infect-parasitic diseases is also directly linked with the nutritional status of the host. Likewise, disease-related malnutrition that includes an inflammatory component is commonly observed in clinical practice thus affecting the quality of life. The PEM is treatable but early detection is a key for its appropriate management. However, controlling the menace of PEM requires an aggressive partnership between the physician and the dietitian. This review mainly attempts to describe the pathophysiology, prevalence and consequences of PEM and aims to highlight the importance of this clinical syndrome and the recent growth in our understanding of the processes behind its development. Some management strategies/remedies to overcome PEM are also the limelight of the article. In the nutshell, early recognition, prompt management, and robust follow up are critical for best outcomes in preventing and treating PEM.

  10. Protein metabolism in severe childhood malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    The major clinical syndromes of severe childhood malnutrition (SCM) are marasmus (non-oedematous SCM), kwashiorkor and marasmic-kwashiorkor (oedematous SCM). Whereas treatment of marasmus is straightforward and the associated mortality is low, kwashiorkor and marasmic-kwashiorkor are difficult to tr...

  11. Mobilizing University Resources Against Hunger and Malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David E.

    There are four central issues in mobilizing the resources of American universities to contribute more effectively to alleviating world hunger and malnutrition: (1) To what extent should universities' motivation be original, and to what extent related to government support?; (2) What needs to be done, beyond additional food production?; (3) What…

  12. Soil transmitted helminths infections, malnutrition and anaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) are a major public health problem in many developing countries. Establishment of prevalence and intensity of infections is important in designing, implementating and evaluating control programs. This study aimed at determining the prevalence and intensity of STH infections, malnutrition ...

  13. Factors Associated With Adolescent Malnutrition Among Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the factors associated with malnutrition among adolescents in senior secondary schools in The Abuja Municipal area council. This was a cross-sectional study conducted among adolescents (10-19 years) in secondary schools. A multistage sampling technique was employed to select a total of 1700 ...

  14. Dermatosis in children with oedematous malnutrition (Kwashiorkor)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilskov, S; Rytter, M; Vestergaard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Children with oedematous malnutrition, known as kwashiorkor, may develop a characteristic skin lesion, named 'Dermatosis of Kwashiorkor' (DoK). Only a few studies have been concerned with this condition, and the reason for the development of DoK remains unexplained. This study review the existing...

  15. Protein malnutrition and metronidazole induced intestinal bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to assess the effects of protein malnutrition (PM) associated with antibiotic on growth weight, cecal bacterial overgrowth and enterobacteria translocation. Eighteen Gnotobiotic young Wistar rats (135 ± 2.35 g) were treated orally with antibiotic and submitted to dietary restriction based on maize diet ...

  16. Socioeconomic Inequality in Malnutrition in Developing Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Van de Poel (Ellen); A.R. Hosseinpoor (Ahmad); N. Speybroeck (Niko); T.G.M. van Ourti (Tom); J. Vega (Jeanette)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractEpidemiological evidence points to a small set of primary causes of child mortality that are the main killers of children aged less than 5 years: pneumonia, diarrhoea, low birth weight, asphyxia and, in some parts of the world, HIV and malaria. Malnutrition is the underlying cause of one

  17. Spirulina: The Alga That Can End Malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ripley D.

    1985-01-01

    One approach to eliminating malnutrition worldwide is to grow spirulina in recycled village wastes. Spirulina is a blue-green alga and a natural concentrated food. Spirulina can give poor villages a nutritional food supplement they can grow themselves and can reduce infectious disease at the same time. (Author/RM)

  18. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... Prevention Hearing Loss Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Nutrition Osteoporosis Shingles Skin Cancer Related News Quitting Smoking, ...

  19. Anticipatory guidance to prevent infant sleep problems within a randomised controlled trial: infant, maternal and partner outcomes at 6 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Barbara C; Sayers, Rachel M; Cameron, Sonya L; Gray, Andrew R; Heath, Anne-Louise M; Lawrence, Julie A; Newlands, Alana; Taylor, Barry J; Taylor, Rachael W

    2017-06-02

    To evaluate the effectiveness of sleep education delivered antenatally and at 3 weeks postpartum to prevent infant sleep problems at 6 months of age. Sleep intervention within a randomised controlled trial for the Prevention of Overweight in Infancy (POI) study. 802 families were randomly allocated to one of four groups: usual care (control), sleep intervention (sleep), food, activity and breastfeeding intervention (FAB), and combined group receiving both interventions (combination). All groups received standard Well Child care. The sleep intervention groups (sleep and combination) received an antenatal group education session (all mothers and most partners) emphasising infant self-settling and safe sleeping, and a home visit at 3 weeks reinforcing the antenatal sleep education. FAB and combination groups received four contacts providing education and support on breast feeding, food and activity up to 4 months postpartum. Here we report secondary sleep outcomes from the POI study: the prevalence of parent-reported infant sleep problems and night waking, and differences in sleep duration. Additional outcomes reported include differences in infant self-settling, safe sleep practices, and maternal and partner reports of their own sleep, fatigue and depression symptoms. Linear or mixed linear regression models found no significant intervention effects on sleep outcomes, with 19.1% of mothers and 16.6% of partners reporting their infant's sleep a problem at 6 months. Actigraphy estimated the number of night wakings to be significantly reduced (8%) and the duration of daytime sleep increased (6 min) in those groups receiving the sleep intervention compared with those who did not. However, these small differences were not clinically significant and not observed in 24 hours infant sleep diary data. No other differences were observed. A strategy delivering infant sleep education antenatally and at 3 weeks postpartum was not effective in preventing the development

  20. Taking action against malnutrition in Asian healthcare settings: an initiative of a Northeast Asia Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi, Takashi; Arai, Hidenori; Claytor, Ling Hui; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Kotani, Joji; Lee, Shyh-Dye; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Nogami, Tetsushi; Peng, Nanhai

    2017-03-01

    Malnutrition is common in Asia, especially among people who are critically ill and/or older. Study results from China, Japan, and Taiwan show that malnutrition or risk of malnutrition is found in up to 30% of communitydwelling people and as much as 50% of patients admitted to hospitals-with prevalence even higher among those older than 70 years. In Asia, malnutrition takes substantial tolls on health, physical function, and wellbeing of people affected, and it adds huge financial burdens to healthcare systems. Attention to nutrition, including protein intake, can help prevent or delay disease- and age-related disabilities and can speed recovery from illness or surgery. Despite compelling evidence and professional guidelines on appropriate nutrition care in hospital and community settings, patients' malnutrition is often overlooked and under-treated in Asian healthcare, as it is worldwide. Since the problem of malnutrition continues to grow as many Asian populations become increasingly "gray", it is important to take action now. A medical education (feedM.E.) Global Study Group developed a strategy to facilitate best-practice hospital nutrition care: screen-intervene-supervene. As members of a newly formed feedM.E. Northeast Asia Study Group, we endorse this care strategy, guiding clinicians to screen each patient's nutritional status upon hospital admission or at initiation of care, intervene promptly when nutrition care is needed, and supervene or follow-up routinely with adjustment and reinforcement of nutrition care plans, including post-discharge. To encourage best-practice nutrition in Asian patient care settings, our paper includes a simple, stepwise Nutrition Care Pathway (NCP) in multiple languages.

  1. Maternal obesity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devlieger, Roland; Benhalima, Katrien; Damm, Peter

    2016-01-01

    , the prevalence of maternal obesity varies from 7 to 25% and seems strongly related to social and educational inequalities. Obesity during pregnancy represents an important preventable risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes and is associated with negative long-term health outcomes for both mothers...

  2. Defining malnutrition: A plea to rethink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeters, P; Bozzetti, F; Cynober, L; Forbes, A; Shenkin, A; Sobotka, L

    2017-06-01

    In a recent consensus report in Clinical Nutrition the undernourished category of malnutrition was proposed to be defined and diagnosed on the basis of a low BMI or unintentional weight loss combined with low BMI or FFMI with certain cut off points. The definition was endorsed by ESPEN despite recent endorsement of a very different definition. The approach aims to assess whether nutritional intake is sufficient but is imprecise because a low BMI does not always indicate malnutrition and individuals with increasing BMI's may have decreasing FFM's. The pathophysiology of individuals, considered to be malnourished in rich countries and in areas with endemic malnutrition, results predominantly from deficient nutrition combined with infection/inflammation. Both elements jointly determine body composition and function and consequently outcome of disease, trauma or treatment. When following the consensus statement only an imprecise estimate is acquired of nutritional intake without knowing the impact of inflammation. Most importantly, functional abilities are not assessed. Consequently it will remain uncertain how well the individual can overcome stressful events, what the causes are of dysfunction, how to set priorities for treatment and how to predict the effect of nutritional support. We therefore advise to consider the pathophysiology of malnourished individuals leading to inclusion of the following elements in the definition of malnutrition: a disordered nutritional state resulting from a combination of inflammation and a negative nutrient balance, leading to changes in body composition, function and outcome. A precise diagnosis of malnutrition should be based on assessment of these elements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of fetal and neonatal malnutrition on the onset of puberty and associated noncommunicable disease risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas E Connor

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas E ConnorChild Health Research Foundation Dhaka Shishu Hospital, Dhaka, BangladeshBackground: Fetal and neonatal malnutrition impacts the timing of the onset of puberty. The timing of puberty onset has been shown to be a rough indicator of noncommunicable disease (NCD risk. Recent advances in understanding the various inter-related neurochemical and genetic controls underpinning puberty onset have shed new light on these interesting and important phenomena. These studies have suggested that developmental trajectory is set very early by epigenetic mechanisms that serve to adjust phenotype to environment.Objective: The aims of this article are to review the most recent research into the proximate mechanisms that initiate puberty; to explore how the activation of those mechanisms could be affected by nutritional cues received during fetal and neonatal life; and, finally, to briefly explore the ramifications for public health.Methods: An extensive literature review was performed using PubMed (1950 to September 2010 and Google Scholar (1980 to September 2010 using the search terms “puberty onset”, “perinatal”, and “neonatal malnutrition”. English language, original research, and review articles were examined; pertinent citations from these articles were also assessed.Results: Literature detailing biochemical pathways and evolutionary explanations of human puberty itself led quickly to a noteworthy connection between neonatal malnutrition, puberty onset, and NCD risk. A strong connection was found between maternal malnutrition during critical windows (followed by catch-up growth in childhood and an accelerated onset of puberty. Children subject to early nutritional insult not only are likely to undergo puberty earlier but also show an increase in their risk of developing NCDs in later life. Several authors have suggested that this relationship may show potential as an early proxy indicator of susceptibility to these types of

  4. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  5. Scale up use of family planning services to prevent maternal transmission of HIV among discordant couples: a cross-sectional study within a resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuete M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Martin Kuete,1,2 HongFang Yuan,1 Aude Laure Tchoua Kemayou,2 Emmanuel Ancel Songo,2 Fan Yang,1 XiuLan Ma,1 ChengLiang Xiong,1 HuiPing Zhang1 1Obstetrics and Gynecology, Reproductive Center, Family Planning and Research Institute, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China; 2Main Maternity of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yaounde Central Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Yaounde, Cameroon Background: Integration of family planning services (FPS into human immunodeficiency virus (HIV care for HIV-infected women is an important aspect of the global prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT strategy. We assessed the integration of FPS into routine care of HIV-infected mothers by evaluating the uptake and barriers of contraception and PMTCT services. Methods: We conducted an interventional study using the interrupted time series approach in the health care facilities located in Yaounde, Cameroon. First, structured questionnaires related to family planning use, PMTCT services use, and infection risk of the sexual partner were administered to the first trimester pregnant women who were HIV infected and living with uninfected partners. Second, 2 weeks before the delivery date, the women were interviewed according to the prior counseling interventions received, in order to assess their behavior on FPS, antiretroviral therapy (ART use, delivery option, and infant nourishment to be adopted. P-values below 0.05 were considered statistically significant in the statistical analyses. Results: Of 94 HIV-infected women, 69% were stable couples. Only 13% of women had attended FPS before conception. Although the vast majority were knowledgeable about modern and traditional contraception methods, only 19% had experienced effective contraceptive methods. However, 66% preferred condom use, 45% having three children still expressed a desire to conceive, while 44% reported

  6. Hearings Before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate, Ninety-Third Congress, First Session. Maternal, Fetal, and Infant Nutrition--1973. Part 1--Consequences of Malnutrition; Part 2--Government Responses. Hearings Held Washington, D.C., June 5, 6, and 7, 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs.

    Part One of these hearings before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate includes the testimony of scientists and doctors engaged in research regarding the relationship between maternal, fetal, and infant nutrition and optimum mental and physical development of the child. In testimony it was shown that the…

  7. [Maternal death: unequal risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defossez, A C; Fassin, D

    1989-01-01

    rates include political, geographic, and economic mechanisms of exclusion which affect the vast majority of the population in developing countries. Political power is concentrated in the hands of relatively small groups whose decisions about such expenditures as health care are usually more favorable to the privileged. A consequence of the very unequal regional development in most Third World countries is that health, educational, and most other resources are concentrated in large cities and perhaps 1 or 2 strategic regions, leaving most of the population underserved. The low social position of women leaves them doubly vulnerable. The social factors adding to risks of maternal mortality should be considered in programs of prevention if the causes and not just the consequences are to be addressed.

  8. Fetal malnutrition and long-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Caroline H D

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that lower birthweight is associated with a wide range of adverse outcomes in later life, including poorer 'human capital' (shorter stature, lower cognitive performance), increased risk factors for later disease (higher blood pressure and reduced glucose tolerance, and lung, kidney and immune function), clinical disease (diabetes, coronary heart disease, chronic lung and kidney disease), and increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Higher birthweight is associated with an increased risk of cancer and (if caused by gestational diabetes) obesity and diabetes. The 'developmental origins of health and disease' hypothesis proposes that fetal nutrition has permanent effects on growth, structure and metabolism ('programming'). This is supported by studies in animals showing that maternal under- and overnutrition during pregnancy can produce similar abnormalities in the adult offspring. Common chronic diseases could potentially be prevented by achieving optimal fetal nutrition, and this could have additional benefits for survival and human capital. Recent follow-up of children born after randomized nutritional interventions in pregnancy provides weak evidence of beneficial effects on growth, vascular function, lipid concentrations, glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Animal studies indicate that epigenetic phenomena may be an important mechanism underlying programming, and that nutritional interventions may need to start preconceptionally. Copyright © 2013 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Micronutrients in the treatment of stunting and moderate malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, Mary Edith

    2012-01-01

    Linear growth retardation or stunting may occur with or without low weight-for-age, but in both cases stunted or moderately malnourished children are deficient in micronutrients. Pregnancy and the first 2 years are critical periods. Dietary deficiency of zinc, iron, calcium, and vitamin A are especially common and often occur together. Zinc is essential for adequate growth, and supplements have been shown to increase intrauterine femur length and to prevent stunting. However, in general, supplements which provide a mixture of micronutrients have been more successful in preventing stunting and are simpler to take and distribute. Multiple micronutrients together with energy and macronutrients are also needed for the management of moderate malnutrition. Multiple micronutrients may be delivered as medicinal-like supplements, but may also be combined with food, for instance in milk drinks, in fortified dried cereal mixes used to supplement complementary foods or in lipid nutrition supplements. The latter also provide essential fats necessary for growth. Micronutrient powders for home fortification are effective in preventing anemia, but present combinations do not prevent stunting. Improving the diets of infant and young children is also possible, and increased intake of animal source foods can improve growth. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Economic and social factors are some of the most common barriers preventing women from accessing maternal and newborn child health (MNCH) and prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) services: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    hIarlaithe, Micheal O; Grede, Nils; de Pee, Saskia; Bloem, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Support to health programming has increasingly placed an emphasis on health systems strengthening. Integration of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and maternal and newborn child health (MNCH) services has been one of the areas where there has been a shift from a siloed to a more integrated approach. The scale-up of anti-retroviral therapy has made services increasingly available while also bringing them closer to those in need. However, addressing supply side issues around the availability and quality of care at the health centre level alone cannot guarantee better results without a more explicit focus on access issues. Access to PMTCT care and treatment services is affected by a number of barriers which influence decisions of women to seek care. This paper reviews published qualitative and quantitative studies that look at demand side barriers to PMTCT services and proposes a categorisation of these barriers. It notes that access to PMTCT services as well as eventual uptake and retention in PMTCT care starts with access to MNCH in general. While poverty often prevents women, regardless of HIV status, from accessing MNCH services, women living with HIV who are in need of PMTCT services face an additional set of PMTCT barriers. This review proposes four categories of barriers to accessing PMTCT: social norms and knowledge, socioeconomic status, physiological status and psychological conditions. Social norms and knowledge and socioeconomic status stand out. Transport is the most frequently mentioned socioeconomic barrier. With regard to social norms and knowledge, non-disclosure, stigma and partner relations are the most commonly cited barriers. Some studies also cite physiological barriers. Barriers related to social norms and knowledge, socioeconomic status and physiology can all be affected by the mental and psychological state of the individual to create a psychological barrier to access. Increased coverage and uptake of PMTCT services can be

  11. Severe protein-calorie malnutrition in two brothers due to abuse by starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Marcela Montenegro Braga; Salvador, Luiza Martins; Fagundes Neto, Ulysses

    2016-12-01

    To describe the case of two siblings with severe protein-calorie malnutrition due to abuse by starvation. The two patients were simultaneously referred from the Municipal Hospital, where they were admitted to the Pediatric Gastroenterology clinic of a university hospital for diagnostic investigation of the cause of severe malnutrition and screening tests for Celiac Disease, Cystic Fibrosis and Environmental enteropathy among others. The exams were all normal, and after detailed research on the interactions of this family, we reached the conclusion that the malnutrition was due to abuse by starvation. The children spent approximately two months in the hospital, receiving a high-protein and high-calorie diet, with significant nutritional recovery. Abuse by starvation, although rare, should always be considered of as one of the causes of child malnutrition and pediatrician should be aware of the child's development, as well as the family interactions, to prevent more severe nutritional and emotional consequences in the future. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  12. Growth hormone secretion in protein energy malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günöz, H; Neyzł, O; Sencer, E; Molvalilar, S; Argun, A

    1981-07-01

    Plasma hGH levels were assessed in 15 infants with protein energy malnutrition following insulin induced hypoglycemia, arginine and L-Dopa provocation tests and intravenous glucose tolerance test. Fasting hGH levels were high in 85.7% of the cases. An adequate hGH response to stimulation was obtained in only 42.8% of the cases with insulin induced hypoglycemia; in 52.5% with arginine; in 30.8% with L-Dopa. Response to at least one type of provocation was obtained in all 5 cases to which all three tests were applied. Exaggerated or delayed response to provocative stimuli was also encountered in a number of the cases. Intravenous glucose tolerance test did not lead to suppression in hGH secretion or to increase in insulin secretion in these subjects. The results indicate that marasmic protein energy malnutrition may lead to defects in the hGH secretory function of the hypothalamopituitary axis.

  13. IAEA Nobel Peace fund schools for nutrition. Combating child malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Dhaka, Bangladesh - Malnutrition remains the world's most serious health problem and the single biggest contributor to child deaths in the developing world, according to the World Bank. Now, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is using its Nobel Peace Prize earnings to promote the use of nuclear techniques to combat malnutrition during the earliest years of life. 'One out of every ten children born in developing countries will die before his or her fifth birthday,' explains IAEA nutrition expert Lena Davidsson. 'That's more than 10 million dead children each year. And the vast majority of these child deaths in developing countries are preventable with a combination of good care, adequate nutrition and appropriate medical treatment,' explains Dr. Davidsson. 'This brings us hope that unacceptably high childhood mortality can be substantially reduced with effective and well-targeted nutritional interventions.' Undernutrition is an important factor in more than half of all child deaths worldwide. The high prevalence of infants born with low birth weight and undernutrition among Asian children, especially in South Asia, emphasizes the urgent need to develop effective nutrition interventions within 'the window of opportunity', i.e., to target young women before pregnancy as well as infants and young children during the first 2 years of life. The IAEA Nobel Peace Prize Fund School for Nutrition for Asia will be held in Dhaka, Bangladesh, April 22-26, 2007. It will focus on Interventions to combat undernutrition during early life and seeks to disseminate information about the usefulness of stable isotope techniques in intervention programs that reduce malnutrition, in particular in infants and children. The event is hosted by the Government of Bangladesh through the International Centre for Health and Population Research (ICDDR, B) and the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC). The IAEA is assisting some of the world's poorest countries in their

  14. Malnutrition risk questionnaire combined with body composition measurement in malnutrition screening in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csontos, Ágnes Anna; Molnár, Andrea; Piri, Zsolt; Pálfi, Erzsébet; Miheller, Pál

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of malnutrition screening is to predict the probability of a worse outcome due to nutritional factors. The Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) can be used for screening in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, it does not provide details about body composition. Our aim was to assess the body composition and combine this with the MUST method to screen risk of malnutrition and sarcopenia. A total of 173 IBD outpatients were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. The MUST scale indicated 21.4% of IBD patients to be at risk of malnutrition. A risk of sarcopenia was detected in 27.7%. However, one third of these patients were not considered to be at risk by their MUST score. Furthermore, Crohn's disease (CD) patients had a strongly unfavorable fat-free mass index (FFMI) value compared to ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, and these differences were significant among men (FFMI: 18.62 ± 2.16 vs 19.85 ± 2.22, p = 0.02, in CD and UC males, respectively). As sarcopenia is a relevant prognostic factor, the MUST method should be expanded to include body composition analysis to detect more IBD patients at risk of malnutrition and sarcopenia in order to start their nutritional therapy immediately.

  15. Mineral Malnutrition Following Bariatric Surgery12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gletsu-Miller, Nana; Wright, Breanne N.

    2013-01-01

    Moderate/severe obesity is on the rise in the United States. Weight management includes bariatric surgery, which is effective and can alleviate morbidity and mortality from obesity-associated diseases. However, many individuals are dealing with nutritional complications. Risk factors include: 1) preoperative malnutrition (e.g., vitamin D, iron); 2) decreased food intake (due to reduced hunger and increased satiety, food intolerances, frequent vomiting); 3) inadequate nutrient supplementation (due to poor compliance with multivitamin/multimineral regimen, insufficient amounts of vitamins and/or minerals in supplements); 4) nutrient malabsorption; and 5) inadequate nutritional support (due to lack of follow-up, insufficient monitoring, difficulty in recognizing symptoms of deficiency). For some nutrients (e.g., protein, vitamin B-12, vitamin D), malnutrition issues are reasonably addressed through patient education, routine monitoring, and effective treatment strategies. However, there is little attention paid to other nutrients (e.g., zinc, copper), which if left untreated may have devastating consequences (e.g., hair loss, poor immunity, anemia, defects in neuro-muscular function). This review focuses on malnutrition in essential minerals, including calcium (and vitamin D), iron, zinc, and copper, which commonly occur following popular bariatric procedures. There will be emphasis on the complexities, including confounding factors, related to screening, recognition of symptoms, and, when available, current recommendations for treatment. There is an exceptionally high risk of malnutrition in adolescents and pregnant women and their fetuses, who may be vulnerable to problems in growth and development. More research is required to inform evidence-based recommendations for improving nutritional status following bariatric surgery and optimizing weight loss, metabolic, and nutritional outcomes. PMID:24038242

  16. State of malnutrition in Cuban hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto Penié, Jesús

    2005-04-01

    We assessed the current state of undernutrition as observed in 1905 patients hospitalized in 12 Cuban health care institutions, as part of a Latin American, multinational survey similar in design and goals. We surveyed 1905 randomly selected patients from 12 Cuban hospitals in a two-phase study. Patients' clinical charts were audited in phase 1, the Subjective Global Assessment was used to assess patients' nutritional status in phase 2. The study was locally conducted by a properly trained team. The frequency of undernutrition in Cuban hospitals was 41.2% (95% confidence interval = 38.9 to 43.4), and 11.1% of patients were considered severely undernourished. Statistically significant (P hospital services/specialties were identified: geriatrics (56.3%), critical care (54.8%), nephrology (54.3%), internal medicine (48.6%), gastroenterology (46.5%), and cardiovascular surgery (44.8%). Malnutrition rates increased progressively with prolonged length of stay. A high malnutrition rate was observed among participating hospitals. The design and inception of policies that foster intervention programs focusing on early identification of hospital malnutrition and its timely management is suggested to decrease its deleterious effects on outcomes of health care in the participating hospitals.

  17. Micronutrient supplementation affects maternal-infant feeding interactions and maternal distress in Bangladesh123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Amy L; Naved, Ruchira T; Ekström, Eva-Charlotte; Rasmussen, Kathleen M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Good maternal-infant interaction is essential for optimal infant growth, health, and development. Although micronutrient malnutrition has been associated with poorer interaction, the effects of maternal micronutrient supplementation on interaction are unknown. Objectives: We examined differences in maternal-infant feeding interaction between 3 maternal pre- and postpartum micronutrient supplementation groups that differed in iron dose and inclusion of multiple micronutrients and determined whether any differences observed were mediated by maternal distress. Design: A cohort of 180 pregnant women was selected from 3300 women in the randomized controlled trial Maternal Infant Nutritional Interventions Matlab, which was conducted in Matlab, Bangladesh. At 8 wk of gestation, women were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups to receive a daily supplement of micronutrients (14 wk gestation to 12 wk postpartum): 60 or 30 mg Fe each with 400 μg folic acid or multiple micronutrients (MuMS; 30 mg Fe, 400 μg folic acid, and other micronutrients). A maternal-infant feeding interaction was observed in the home when infants were 3.4–4.0 mo of age, and maternal distress was assessed. Results: Compared with 30 mg Fe, 60 mg Fe decreased the quality of maternal-infant feeding interaction by ≈10%. Compared with 30 mg Fe, MuMS did not improve interaction but reduced maternal early postpartum distress. Distress did not mediate the effects of micronutrient supplementation on interaction. Conclusion: For pregnant and postpartum women, micronutrient supplementation should be based on both nutritional variables (eg, iron status) and functional outcomes (eg, maternal-infant interaction and maternal distress). PMID:19439457

  18. Maternal and neonatal tetanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwaites, C Louise; Beeching, Nicholas J; Newton, Charles R

    2017-01-01

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus is still a substantial but preventable cause of mortality in many developing countries. Case fatality from these diseases remains high and treatment is limited by scarcity of resources and effective drug treatments. The Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative, launched by WHO and its partners, has made substantial progress in eliminating maternal and neonatal tetanus. Sustained emphasis on improvement of vaccination coverage, birth hygiene, and surveillance, with specific approaches in high-risk areas, has meant that the incidence of the disease continues to fall. Despite this progress, an estimated 58 000 neonates and an unknown number of mothers die every year from tetanus. As of June, 2014, 24 countries are still to eliminate the disease. Maintenance of elimination needs ongoing vaccination programmes and improved public health infrastructure. PMID:25149223

  19. The Importance of Nutritional Education in Preventing Obesity and Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Noriko; Kinoshita, Yukiko

    2009-01-01

    Japan once was a country suffering from undernourishment due to the shortage of food supply during and right after World War. Within a half century, however, Japan became one of the most developed industrial counties and, during the process of the economic development, adopted Western life style and eating habit: the Japanese have, with sufficient…

  20. Preventing cognitive decline, sedentariness and malnutrition: the DOREMI approach

    OpenAIRE

    Parodi, Oberdan; Vozzi, Federico; Ferro, Erina; Fortunati, Luigi; Micheli, Alessio; Bacciu, Davide; Gallicchio, Claudio; Chessa, Stefano; Ascolese, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    All countries in Europe are experiencing an ageing of their populations, with a decrease in the number of people of working age per retiree. Health trends among the elderly are mixed: severe disability is declining in some countries but increasing in others, while mild disability and chronic disease are generally increasing. As a consequence, long-term care costs are certain to increase with the ageing of the population, unless appropriate measures are implemented and elderly people empowered...

  1. Nutritional Supplementation of Children with Moderate Acute Malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, Christian

    Background Moderate acute malnutrition (MAM), defined as moderate wasting or low mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC), is widespread among children in low-income countries. Children with MAM are at immediate risk of mortality and morbidity or deterioration into severe acute malnutrition. Children...... presented in this thesis may have immediate relevance for malnutrition programs. First, it is recommended to use LNS supplements in children with MAM. Secondly, it is recommended to admit children

  2. The magnitude of the problem of malnutrition in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrup, Jens; Sorensen, Janice M

    2009-01-01

    A review of the publications on hospital malnutrition in Europe over the last 5 years shows that the incidence and prevalence of malnutrition are still very high: 21 and 37%, respectively. The process of structured nutrition support is still far from being generally implemented, as based on the few studies available. As a result, malnutrition diagnosed on admission to hospital is still associated with adverse clinical outcome (increased length of stay and higher rates of complications). Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Disease-related malnutrition: influence on body composition and prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pirlich, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Disease-related malnutrition is a frequent clincal problem with severe medical and economic impact. This work summarizes studies on body composition analysis, risk factors, prevalence and prognostic impact of malnutrition. The diagnosis of malnutrition in patients with chronic liver disease is hampered by hyperhydration and requires body composition analysis. Using four different methods for body composition analysis (total body potassium counting, anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance analy...

  4. Inflammation and nutritional status assessment by malnutrition inflammation score and its outcome in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeswaran, D; Indhumathi, E; Hemamalini, A J; Sivakumar, V; Soundararajan, P; Jayakumar, M

    2018-01-09

    Malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome (MICS), hyperhomocysteinemia, calcium and phosphate levels derangement have been predicted as important contributing factors for the progression of cardiovascular burden. Among patients with earlier stage of CKD, hypoalbuminaemia and inflammation deliberated as non-traditional cardiovascular risk factors, which add more burden to circulatory disease, mortality and rapid advancement to CKD stage 5. The aim of the study is to evaluate inflammation and nutritional status of CKD patients not on dialysis using Malnutrition inflammation score (MIS) and to verify the association with mortality in the follow-up period. In this prospective cohort study 129 (66 males, 63 females) pre-dialysis CKD patients enrolled between June 2013 to August 2014 and censored until March 2017. Malnutrition and Inflammation assessed using Malnutrition inflammation score. Blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, albumin, Interleukin - 6, highly sensitive C reactive protein (hsCRP), total cholesterol and anthropometric data were analyzed. The Malnutrition inflammation score in pre-dialysis CKD patients ranged from 0 to 18 with the median score of two. During 36 or more months of follow-up, there were 30 (23.2%) deaths, 35 (27%) patients initiated on hemodialysis, one (0.7%) patient was initiated on peritoneal dialysis, two (1.4%) patients underwent renal transplantation and two (1.4%) patients were lost for follow-up. In this study, 33% had varying degree of malnutrition and inflammation. Patients who had MIS ≥7 had significant increase in IL-6 (p = 0.003) and HsCRP levels (p nutritional status and inflammation using MIS regularly to prevent malnutrition and its associated complications through appropriate medical and nutritional intervention. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  5. Determinants of protein-energy malnutrition in community-dwelling older adults: a systematic review of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pols-Vijlbrief, Rachel; Wijnhoven, Hanneke A H; Schaap, Laura A; Terwee, Caroline B; Visser, Marjolein

    2014-11-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition is associated with numerous poor health outcomes, including high health care costs, mortality rates and poor physical functioning in older adults. This systematic literature review aims to identify and provide an evidence based overview of potential determinants of protein-energy malnutrition in community-dwelling older adults. A systematic search was conducted in PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL and COCHRANE from the earliest possible date through January 2013. Observational studies that examined determinants of protein-energy malnutrition were selected and a best evidence synthesis was performed to summarize the results. In total 28 studies were included in this review from which 122 unique potential determinants were derived. Thirty-seven determinants were examined in sufficient number of studies and were included in a best evidence synthesis. The best evidence score comprised design (cross-sectional, longitudinal) and quality of the study (high, moderate) to grade the evidence level. Strong evidence for an association with protein-energy malnutrition was found for poor appetite, and moderate evidence for edentulousness, having no diabetes, hospitalization and poor self-reported health. Strong evidence for no association was found for anxiety, chewing difficulty, few friends, living alone, feeling lonely, death of spouse, high number of diseases, heart failure and coronary failure, stroke (CVA) and the use of anti-inflammatory medications. This review shows that protein-energy malnutrition is a multifactorial problem and that different domains likely play a role in the pathway of developing protein-energy malnutrition. These results provide important knowledge for the development of targeted, multifactorial interventions that aim to prevent the development of protein-energy malnutrition in community-dwelling older adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Identification and treatment of malnutrition in a hospital patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orell-Kotikangas, Helena; Antikainen, Anne; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition associated with a disease remains often undiagnosed despite of having a frequency 20 to 60% in the developed countries. Malnutrition delays the recovery from diseases and operations, and increases complications and mortality. In Europe, the costs caused by malnutrition are two times higher than those due to overweight. Good clinical nutritional therapy requires immediate identification of patients having or being at risk of malnutrition. Approximately one out of three hospital patients is a high-risk patient. Attempts should be made to start the clinical nutritional therapy for these patients as early as possible.

  7. Prevalence and sociodemographic factors of malnutrition among children in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambalia, Amina Z; Lim, Siew S; Gill, Tim; Bulgiba, Awang M

    2012-03-01

    For many developing countries undergoing rapid economic growth and urbanization, trends in nutritional status indicate a decrease in malnutrition with an associated rise in the prevalence of obesity. An understanding of the situation among children in Malaysia is lacking. To examine the prevalence, trends and sociodemographic factors described for underweight and overweight children in Malaysia. The literature from January 1996 to November 2010 on the prevalence of underweight and overweight among children in Malaysia was reviewed. Twelve studies were identified that reported on both underweight and overweight among children in Malaysia, of which only one was a nationally representative survey. Based on the National Health and Morbidity Survey in 2006, 13.2% (95% CI, 12.6 to 13.9) of children aged 0 to 18 years were underweight (weight-for-age +2SD). Both underweight and overweight were more prevalent in males than females. Children in rural areas were more likely to be underweight and less likely to be overweight than urban children. Ethnic differences between Malays, Chinese, and Indians were inconsistent across studies and less clear. Aborigines were more likely to be underweight and less likely to be overweight than the general population. The available evidence, although limited and sparse, suggests that over the past decade the prevalence of both underweight and overweight among children in Malaysia has been stable or has shown an increasing trend. Long-term national monitoring and longitudinal cohort studies will be critical for understanding, preventing, and managing the double burden of malnutrition among children in Malaysia.

  8. Risk Factors for Child Malnutrition in Bangladesh: A Multilevel Analysis of a Nationwide Population-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mohammad Rocky Khan; Rahman, Mohammad Shafiur; Khan, Mohammad Mubarak Hossain; Mondal, Mohammad Nazrul Islam; Rahman, Mohammad Mosiur; Billah, Baki

    2016-05-01

    To identify the prevalence and risk factors of child malnutrition in Bangladesh. Data was extracted from the Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey (2011). The outcome measures were stunting, wasting, and underweight. χ(2) analysis was performed to find the association of outcome variables with selected factors. Multilevel logistic regression models with a random intercept at each of the household and community levels were used to identify the risk factors of stunting, wasting, and underweight. From the 2011 survey, 7568 children less than 5 years of age were included in the current analysis. The overall prevalence of stunting, wasting, and underweight was 41.3% (95% CI 39.0-42.9). The χ(2) test and multilevel logistic regression analysis showed that the variables age, sex, mother's body mass index, mother's educational status, father's educational status, place of residence, socioeconomic status, community status, religion, region of residence, and food security are significant factors of child malnutrition. Children with poor socioeconomic and community status were at higher risk of malnutrition. Children from food insecure families were more likely to be malnourished. Significant community- and household-level variations were found. The prevalence of child malnutrition is still high in Bangladesh, and the risk was assessed at several multilevel factors. Therefore, prevention of malnutrition should be given top priority as a major public health intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intellectual abilities and protein-energy malnutrition : acute malnutrition VS. chronic undernutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorweg, J.C.; Stanfield, J.P.; Brozek, J.

    1979-01-01

    Three groups of Ugandan children (20 in each group) and one comparison group of 20 children were examined between 11 and 17 years of age. The children in the first three groups had suffered from energy-protein malnutrition 10 to 16 years previously when they were hospitalised at different ages

  10. Content validity across methods of malnutrition assessment in patients with cancer is limited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sealy, Martine J.; Nijholt, Willemke; Stuiver, Martijn M.; van der Berg, Marit M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.; Schans, van der Cees P.; Ottery, Faith D.; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet

    Objective: To identify malnutrition assessment methods in cancer patients and assess their content validity based on internationally accepted definitions for malnutrition. Study Design and Setting: Systematic review of studies in cancer patients that operationalized malnutrition as a variable,

  11. The Relation Between Malnutrition and the Exocrine Pancreas: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Rosalie H.; van den Brink, Deborah A.; Bandsma, Robert H.; Boele van Hensbroek, Michael; Tabbers, Merit M.; Voskuijl, Wieger P.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The relation between malnutrition and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) has been described previously, but it is unclear if malnutrition leads to EPI or vice versa. We systematically synthesized current evidence evaluating the association between malnutrition and EPI in children.

  12. To the limit of extreme malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Jacob; Buskbjerg, Camilla Viola; Støving, Rene K

    2016-01-01

    , corresponding to BMI 12 to 13 kg/m(2) in adults. Thus, many years of adaptation in adolescent-onset anorexia nervosa, supported by supplements of vitamins and treatment of intercurrent diseases, may allow survival at a much lower BMI. However, in the literature only a few cases of survival in patients with BMI......Extreme malnutrition with body mass index (BMI) as low as 10 kg/m(2) is not uncommon in anorexia nervosa, with survival enabled through complex metabolic adaptations. In contrast, outcomes from hunger strikes and famines are usually fatal after weight loss to about 40% below expected body weight...

  13. Reverse triiodothyronine in protein energy malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafiez, A.A.; Abdel-Salam, E.; Abbas, E.Z.; Halawa, F.A.; El-Hefnawy, N.

    1984-01-01

    Serum levels of thyroxine (T 4 ), triiodothyronine (T 3 ), reverse triiodothyronine (rT 3 ) and thyrotropin (TSH) were determined in cases of kwashiorkor and marasmus. Decreased levels of T 4 and T 3 , and increased levels of rT 3 with no change in TSH were obtained. Thus in infants suffering from protein energy malnutrition there is a state of thyroid dysfunction as well as a shift in the peripheral T 4 metabolism being converted to the inert rT 3 rather than to the physiologically active T 3 . (author)

  14. Factors Associated with Acute Malnutrition among Children Admitted to a Diarrhoea Treatment Facility in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connor Fuchs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the risk factors for acute malnutrition (weight-for-height z-score (WHZ 1 year (adjusted OR (AOR: 3.1, P=0.004; have an undernourished mother (body mass index < 18.5, (AOR: 2.8, P=0.017; have a father with no or a low-paying job (AOR: 5.8, P<0.001; come from a family having a monthly income of <10,000 taka, (1 US$ = 80 taka (AOR: 2.9, P=0.008; and often have stopped predominant breastfeeding before 4 months of age (AOR: 2.7, P=0.013. Improved understanding of these characteristics enables the design and targeting of preventive-intervention programs of childhood acute malnutrition.

  15. Malaria, malnutrition, and birthweight: A meta-analysis using individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Jordan E; Unger, Holger W; Briand, Valerie; Fievet, Nadine; Valea, Innocent; Tinto, Halidou; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Landis, Sarah H; Adu-Afarwuah, Seth; Dewey, Kathryn G; Ter Kuile, Feiko O; Desai, Meghna; Dellicour, Stephanie; Ouma, Peter; Gutman, Julie; Oneko, Martina; Slutsker, Laurence; Terlouw, Dianne J; Kariuki, Simon; Ayisi, John; Madanitsa, Mwayiwawo; Mwapasa, Victor; Ashorn, Per; Maleta, Kenneth; Mueller, Ivo; Stanisic, Danielle; Schmiegelow, Christentze; Lusingu, John P A; van Eijk, Anna Maria; Bauserman, Melissa; Adair, Linda; Cole, Stephen R; Westreich, Daniel; Meshnick, Steven; Rogerson, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    Four studies previously indicated that the effect of malaria infection during pregnancy on the risk of low birthweight (LBW; malaria infection and maternal anthropometric status on the risk of LBW using pooled data from 14,633 pregnancies from 13 studies (6 cohort studies and 7 randomized controlled trials) conducted in Africa and the Western Pacific from 1996-2015. Studies were identified by the Maternal Malaria and Malnutrition (M3) initiative using a convenience sampling approach and were eligible for pooling given adequate ethical approval and availability of essential variables. Study-specific adjusted effect estimates were calculated using inverse probability of treatment-weighted linear and log-binomial regression models and pooled using a random-effects model. The adjusted risk of delivering a baby with LBW was 8.8% among women with malaria infection at antenatal enrollment compared to 7.7% among uninfected women (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] 1.14 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.91, 1.42]; N = 13,613), 10.5% among women with malaria infection at delivery compared to 7.9% among uninfected women (aRR 1.32 [95% CI: 1.08, 1.62]; N = 11,826), and 15.3% among women with low mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC malaria infection and low MUAC at enrollment compared to 8.4% among uninfected women with MUAC ≥ 23 cm (joint aRR 2.13 [95% CI: 1.21, 3.73]; N = 8,152). There was no evidence of synergism (i.e., excess risk due to interaction) between malaria infection and MUAC on the multiplicative (p = 0.5) or additive scale (p = 0.9). Results were similar using body mass index (BMI) as an anthropometric indicator of nutritional status. Meta-regression results indicated that there may be multiplicative interaction between malaria infection at enrollment and low MUAC within studies conducted in Africa; however, this finding was not consistent on the additive scale, when accounting for multiple comparisons, or when using other definitions of malaria and malnutrition. The major

  16. Serum zinc level in children with malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, T.M.; Mahmood, M.T.; Baluch, G.R.; Bhatti, M.T.

    2000-01-01

    Serum zinc level amongst children with protein energy malnutrition (PEM) was evaluated in a control study conducted in the Department of Paediatrics, Allama Iqbal Medical College and Jinnah Hospital, Lahore. Twenty-five children with PEM and 25 healthy children as control from the community were screened. Mean serum zinc level was found to be 54.48 -+ 18.91 mg/dl in children with PEM while it was 72.72 -+ 8.21 mg/dl in control group (P < 0.001). No significant difference in zinc level was noted between both sexes in each group. Marasmic 16 children revealed mean serum zinc level of 57.55 -+ 18.16 mg/dl while in Kwashiorkor it was 44.57 -+ 13.66 mg/dl. Serum zinc was significantly low in Kwashiorkor than in marasmus (P < 0.001). It was also significantly low in children with acute or chronic diarrhea associated with malnutrition (44.66 -+ 16.0 mg/dl). Acute respiratory infections in these children were not associated with low serum zinc level (71.66 -+ 16.51 mg/dl). (author)

  17. In-Patient Treatment of Severe Acute Malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Maren Johanne Heilskov

    during their in-hospital treatment of severe acute malnutrition at Mwanamugimu Nutrition Unit in Kampala, Uganda. We assessed how malnutrition affected the children’s immune system, by measuring the size of their thymus gland with ultrasound. We examined characteristics of children with the serious form...

  18. Malnutrition among children in Southern Ethiopia: Levels and risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using data collected in the Community and Family Survey of the Southern Nations Nationalities and Peoples Region, this study estimates the level of child malnutrition and identifies the factors associated with chronic malnutrition among children in the five densely populated zones of the Region. A total of 850 children aged ...

  19. Poverty and malnutrition in Cameroon | Fambon | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Over the past decades, child malnutrition has persisted at high rates in many developing countries including Cameroon. This research attempts to evaluate the levels and characteristics of the malnutrition affecting children in Cameroon by using the anthropometrics data gathered during the 1998 Demographic Health ...

  20. Malnutrition-modulated diabetes mellitus (MMDM): a state of review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since malnutrition and undernutrition with cassava consumption and cyanide intoxication have been thought to be the major cause of diabetes in tropical countries, WHO Expert Committee on Diabetes suggested, in its report, that the relationship between Malnutrition-Modulated Diabetes Mellitus (MMDM) and high cassava ...

  1. Impact of Childhood Malnutrition on Host Defense and Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Marwa K; Zambruni, Mara; Melby, Christopher L; Melby, Peter C

    2017-10-01

    The global impact of childhood malnutrition is staggering. The synergism between malnutrition and infection contributes substantially to childhood morbidity and mortality. Anthropometric indicators of malnutrition are associated with the increased risk and severity of infections caused by many pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, protozoa, and helminths. Since childhood malnutrition commonly involves the inadequate intake of protein and calories, with superimposed micronutrient deficiencies, the causal factors involved in impaired host defense are usually not defined. This review focuses on literature related to impaired host defense and the risk of infection in primary childhood malnutrition. Particular attention is given to longitudinal and prospective cohort human studies and studies of experimental animal models that address causal, mechanistic relationships between malnutrition and host defense. Protein and micronutrient deficiencies impact the hematopoietic and lymphoid organs and compromise both innate and adaptive immune functions. Malnutrition-related changes in intestinal microbiota contribute to growth faltering and dysregulated inflammation and immune function. Although substantial progress has been made in understanding the malnutrition-infection synergism, critical gaps in our understanding remain. We highlight the need for mechanistic studies that can lead to targeted interventions to improve host defense and reduce the morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases in this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Protein energy malnutrition: analysis of admission and outcome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) is a common condition in our environment. The morbidity and mortality is still high. Method: A retrospective study of 136 children with PEM, aimed at evaluating the outcome of management of children with severe protein energy malnutrition in Ahmadu Bello University ...

  3. Assessment and Management of Severe Malnutrition in Children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Severe malnutrition is a common cause of morbidity and mortality among children less than five years of age. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has developed two manuals for the in-patient treatment of severe malnutrition. However, these manuals are not widely distributed with the result that most ...

  4. Can wheat bran mitigate malnutrition and enteric pathogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child malnutrition is a complex global problem, of which lack of food is only one component. Enteric pathogens and malnutrition work in a cyclic manner to depress a child’s intestinal immunity, while decreasing nutrient absorption. This cycle leads to stunting, wasting, and death. Often malnourished...

  5. Moderate malnutrition: do we know how to manage it?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Angel_D

    There are no recent international guidelines for the management of moderate malnutrition in spite of the fact that it: ▫ Increases the risk of death from common diseases and may result in severe acute malnutrition and/or severe stunting (both life- threatening conditions). ▫ Is likely to be associated with more nutrition-.

  6. Malnutrition among Preschool-Aged Autistic Children in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Farsi, Yahya M.; Al-Sharbati, Marwan M.; Waly, Mostafa I.; Al-Farsi, Omar A.; Al Shafaee, Mohammed A.; Deth, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    To assess prevalence of malnutrition indicators among preschool children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) a cross-sectional study was conducted among 128 Omani autistic children 3-5 years of age. Based on standardized z-scores, the overall prevalence of malnutrition was 9.2 per 100 preschool ASD children (95% CI 4.1, 11.6). The most common type…

  7. Malnutrition amidst plenty: An assessment of factors responsible for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In spite of favourable natural and human resource capacity, malnutrition remains an important health and welfare problem in Uganda especially among children below 5 years. Western Uganda has persistently registered highest levels of childhood malnutrition despite being referred to as gthe food basketh of the country.

  8. The prevalence of malnutrition in children admitted to a general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The prevalence of malnutrition, an important contributor to childhood mortality, is poorly described in hospitalised South African (SA) children, many of whom are HIV-exposed or HIV-infected. Objectives. To describe the prevalence of malnutrition in infants and children <14 years of age admitted to a general ...

  9. Children with severe acute malnutrition : New diagnostic and treatment strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, R.H.

    2018-01-01

    Forty-five percent of worldwide deaths in children under-5 years of age is directly or indirectly attributable to poor nutrition. Tackling the global problem of malnutrition and of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in particular, to increase health, quality of life, and to reduce under-5 mortality, is

  10. Hospital malnutrition in children: what are the challenges?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-20

    Oct 20, 2016 ... and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) to establish new diagnostic guidelines for the diagnosis of paediatric malnutrition.9. The working group defined paediatric malnutrition as “an imbalance between nutrient requirement and intake, resulting in cumulative deficits of energy, protein, or micronutrients that.

  11. Malnutrition in Sub – Saharan Africa: burden, causes and prospects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malnutrition is estimated to contribute to more than one third of all child deaths, although it is rarely listed as the direct cause. Contributing to more than half of deaths in children worldwide; child malnutrition was associated with 54% of deaths in children in developing countries in 2001. Poverty remains the major contributor ...

  12. Gut Bacteria Missing in Severe Acute Malnutrition, Can We Identify Potential Probiotics by Culturomics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Tidjani Alou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute malnutrition is the world-leading cause of children under-five's death. Recent metagenomics studies have established a link between gut microbiota and severe acute malnutrition, describing an immaturity with a striking depletion in oxygen-sensitive prokaryotes. Amoxicillin and therapeutic diet cure most of the children with severe acute malnutrition but an irreversible disruption of the gut microbiota is suspected in the refractory and most severe cases. In these cases, therapeutic diet may be unable to reverse the microbiota alteration leading to persistent impaired development or death. In addition, as enteric sepsis is a major cause of death in this context, identification of missing gut microbes to be tested as probiotics (live bacteria that confer a benefit to the host to restore rapidly the healthy gut microbiota and prevent the gut pathogenic invasion is of foremost importance. In this study, stool samples of malnourished patients with kwashiorkor and healthy children were collected from Niger and Senegal and analyzed by culturomics and metagenomics. We found a globally decreased diversity, a decrease in the hitherto unknown diversity (new species isolation, a depletion in oxygen-sensitive prokaryotes including Methanobrevibacter smithii and an enrichment in potentially pathogenic Proteobacteria, Fusobacteria and Streptococcus gallolyticus. A complex of 12 species identified only in healthy children using culturomics and metagenomics were identified as probiotics candidates, providing a possible, defined, reproducible, safe, and convenient alternative to fecal transplantation to restore a healthy gut microbiota in malnourished children. Microbiotherapy based on selected strains has the potential to improve the current treatment of severe acute malnutrition and prevent relapse and death by reestablishing a healthy gut microbiota.

  13. The Use of Technology in Identifying Hospital Malnutrition: Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trtovac, Dino; Lee, Joon

    2018-01-19

    Malnutrition is a condition most commonly arising from the inadequate consumption of nutrients necessary to maintain physiological health and is associated with the development of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and sarcopenia. Malnutrition occurring in the hospital setting is caused by insufficient monitoring, identification, and assessment efforts. Furthermore, the ability of health care workers to identify and recognize malnourished patients is suboptimal. Therefore, interventions focusing on the identification and treatment of malnutrition are valuable, as they reduce the risks and rates of malnutrition within hospitals. Technology may be a particularly useful ally in identifying malnutrition due to scalability, timeliness, and effectiveness. In an effort to explore the issue, this scoping review synthesized the availability of technological tools to detect and identify hospital malnutrition. Our objective was to conduct a scoping review of the different forms of technology used in addressing malnutrition among adults admitted to hospital to (1) identify the extent of the published literature on this topic, (2) describe key findings, and (3) identify outcomes. We designed and implemented a search strategy in 3 databases (PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL). We completed a descriptive numerical summary and analyzed study characteristics. One reviewer independently extracted data from the databases. We retrieved and reviewed a total of 21 articles. We categorized articles by the computerized tool or app type: malnutrition assessment (n=15), food intake monitoring (n=5), or both (n=1). Within those categories, we subcategorized the different technologies as either hardware (n=4), software (n=13), or both (n=4). An additional subcategory under software was cloud-based apps (n=1). Malnutrition in the acute hospital setting was largely an unrecognized problem, owing to insufficient monitoring, identification, and initial assessments of identifying both patients who are

  14. Preventing the First Cesarean Delivery: Summary of a Joint Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Catherine Y.; Berghella, Vincenzo; Wenstrom, Katharine D.; Mercer, Brian M.; Saade, George R.

    2012-01-01

    With over one-third of pregnancies in the United States being delivered by cesarean and the growing knowledge of morbidities associated with repeat cesarean deliveries, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists convened a workshop to address the concept of preventing the first cesarean. The available information on maternal and fetal factors, labor management and induction, and non-medical factors leading to the first cesarean were reviewed as well as the implications of the first cesarean on future reproductive health. Key points were identified to assist with reduction in cesarean rates including that labor induction should be performed primarily for medical indication; if done for non-medical indications, the gestational age should be at least 39 weeks or more and the cervix should be favorable, especially in the nulliparous patient. Review of the current literature demonstrates the importance of adhering to appropriate definitions for failed induction and arrest of labor progress. The diagnosis of “failed induction” should only be made after an adequate attempt. Adequate time for normal latent and active phases of the first stage, and for the second stage, should be allowed, as long as the maternal and fetal conditions permit. The adequate time for each of these stages appears to be longer than traditionally estimated. Operative vaginal delivery is an acceptable birth method when indicated, and can safely prevent cesarean delivery. Given the progressively declining use, it is critical that training and experience in operative vaginal delivery is facilitated and encouraged. When discussing the first cesarean with a patient, counseling should include its effect on future reproductive health. PMID:23090537

  15. Cardiac dysfunction in a porcine model of pediatric malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, Christian; Lykke, Mikkel; Nielsen, Anne-Louise Hother

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Half a million children die annually of severe acute malnutrition and cardiac dysfunction may contribute to the mortality. However, cardiac function remains poorly examined in cases of severe acute malnutrition. OBJECTIVE: To determine malnutrition-induced echocardiographic disturbances...... and longitudinal changes in plasma pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin-T in a pediatric porcine model. METHODS AND RESULTS: Five-week old piglets (Duroc-x-Danish Landrace-x-Yorkshire) were fed a nutritionally inadequate maize-flour diet to induce malnutrition (MAIZE, n = 12) or a reference diet...... groups. The myocardial performance index was 86% higher in MAIZE vs AGE-REF (pMalnutrition associates with cardiac dysfunction in a pediatric porcine model by increased myocardial performance index and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide...

  16. In-Patient Treatment of Severe Acute Malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Maren Johanne Heilskov

    Severe acute malnutrition is a serious health problem among children in low-income countries. Particularly malnourished children requiring in-hospital treatment are at high risk of dying. This dissertation investigates possible reasons for this high mortality, by following a group of 120 children...... during their in-hospital treatment of severe acute malnutrition at Mwanamugimu Nutrition Unit in Kampala, Uganda. We assessed how malnutrition affected the children’s immune system, by measuring the size of their thymus gland with ultrasound. We examined characteristics of children with the serious form...... of malnutrition, Kwashiorkor, where the children develop oedema. Finally, we explored symptoms, findings or treatments given that were associated with a higher risk of death in the children. Hopefully, these findings may contribute to improving the treatment offered to children with severe acute malnutrition....

  17. Relationship Between the Serum Leptin and Children with Malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jixun

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between the serum leptin and the children with malnutrition, the serum leptin levels in 50 malnourished children and 50 normal children were determined by RIA. The results showed that the serum leptin levels in children with malnutrition were significantly lower than that in control group (P<0.05). The serum leptin levels in children with malnutrition were positively correlated with body mass index values (r= 0.650, P<0.05), and positively correlated with serum albumin values (r= 0.740,P<0.05). The serum leptin levels in female children were higher than that in men children. The leptin may involve in the regulation of the body nutritional status of children. The serum leptin level may be correlated with the degree of child malnutrition and may be used as a laboratory indicator for the diagnosis of child malnutrition. (authors)

  18. Maternity Leave Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Lucy; Broeks, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Over recent years many European Union countries have made changes to the design of the maternity leave provision. These policy developments reflect calls for greater gender equality in the workforce and more equal share of childcare responsibilities. However, while research shows that long period of leave can have negative effects on women's labour market attachment and career advancements, early return to work can be seen as a factor preventing exclusive breastfeeding, and therefore, potentially having negative health impacts for babies. Indeed, the World Health Organisation recommends exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 months of age to provide babies with the nutrition for healthy growth and brain development, protection from life-threatening ailments, obesity and non-communicable diseases such as asthma and diabetes. Therefore, labour market demands on women may be at odds with the health benefits for children gained by longer periods of maternity leave. The aim of this article is to examine the relationship between leave provision and health benefits for children. We examine maternity and parental leave provision across European countries and its potential impact on the breastfeeding of very young babies (up to 6-months of age). We also consider economic factors of potential extension of maternity leave provision to 6 months, such as costs to businesses, effects on the female labour market attachment, and wider consequences (benefits and costs) for individuals, families, employers and the wider society. PMID:28983432

  19. The BRAzil MAGnesium (BRAMAG) trial: a randomized clinical trial of oral magnesium supplementation in pregnancy for the prevention of preterm birth and perinatal and maternal morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Joao Guilherme B; de Araújo, Carla Adriane Fonseca Leal; Pontes, Isabelle E A; Guimarães, Angélica C; Ray, Joel G

    2014-07-08

    Preterm birth is the leading cause of infant mortality globally, including Brazil. We will evaluate whether oral magnesium citrate reduces the risk of placental dysfunction and its negative consequences for both the fetus and mother, which, in turn, should reduce the need for indicated preterm delivery. We will complete a multicenter, randomized double-blind clinical trial comparing oral magnesium citrate 150 mg twice daily (n = 2000 women) to matched placebo (n = 1000 women), starting at 121/7 to 206/7 weeks gestation and continued until delivery. We will include women at higher risk for placental dysfunction, based on clinical factors from a prior pregnancy (e.g., prior preterm delivery, stillbirth or preeclampsia) or the current pregnancy (e.g., chronic hypertension, pre-pregnancy diabetes mellitus, maternal age > 35 years or pre-pregnancy maternal body mass index > 30 kg/m2). The primary perinatal outcome is a composite of preterm birth  20 weeks gestation, neonatal death rates of prematurity and limited resources for acute newborn and maternal care. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT02032186, registered December 19, 2013.

  20. PRC2 Is Required to Maintain Expression of the Maternal Gtl2-Rian-Mirg Locus by Preventing De Novo DNA Methylation in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Pratim Das

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2 function and DNA methylation (DNAme are typically correlated with gene repression. Here, we show that PRC2 is required to maintain expression of maternal microRNAs (miRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs from the Gtl2-Rian-Mirg locus, which is essential for full pluripotency of iPSCs. In the absence of PRC2, the entire locus becomes transcriptionally repressed due to gain of DNAme at the intergenic differentially methylated regions (IG-DMRs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the IG-DMR serves as an enhancer of the maternal Gtl2-Rian-Mirg locus. Further analysis reveals that PRC2 interacts physically with Dnmt3 methyltransferases and reduces recruitment to and subsequent DNAme at the IG-DMR, thereby allowing for proper expression of the maternal Gtl2-Rian-Mirg locus. Our observations are consistent with a mechanism through which PRC2 counteracts the action of Dnmt3 methyltransferases at an imprinted locus required for full pluripotency.

  1. Maternal health: How do we make health systems work for mother ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-04-02

    Apr 2, 2013 ... Global progress on improving maternal and child health has been hard-won and deeply uneven. ... While women commonly die in childbirth and pregnancy from hemorrhage or infection, the underlying causes include malnutrition, domestic violence, and their lack of education and decision-making power.

  2. Albumin synthesis in protein energy malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggan, C.; Hardy, S.; Kleinman, R.E.; Lembcke, J.; Young, V.E.

    1994-01-01

    The dietary treatment of protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) has been designed on an empirical basis, with outcomes for successful management including body weight gain and resolution of apathy. We propose using the measurements of protein synthesis as a more objective measure of renourishment. We will therefore randomize a group of malnourished children (weigh-for-height Z score 13 C-leucine and serial measurements of 13 C-enrichment of albumin. Isotope infusions will be performed on days one and three, following a standard three hour fast. Since albumin synthesis is reduced under the influence of cytokines which mediate the inflammatory response, results will be stratified according to the presence or absence of clinically apparent infections. We hypothesize that the provision of added dietary protein will optimize albumin synthesis rates in PEM as well as attenuate the reduction in albumin synthesis seen in the presence of infections. (author). 20 refs

  3. HIV and Malnutrition: Effects on Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Duggal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV or human immunodeficiency virus infection has assumed worldwide proportions and importance in just a span of 25 years. Continuous research is being done in many parts of the world regarding its treatment and vaccine development, and a lot of money has flown into this. However, fully understanding the mechanisms of immune depletion has still not been possible. The focus has also been on improving the quality of life of people living with HIV/AIDS through education, counselling, and nutritional support. Malnutrition further reduces the capacity of the body to fight this infection by compromising various immune parameters. Knowledge of essential components of nutrition and incorporating them in the management goes a long way in improving quality of life and better survival in HIV-infected patients.

  4. Dietary diversity and child malnutrition in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Boadi Frempong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The health of children in Ghana has improved in recent years. However, the current prevalence rates of malnutrition remain above internationally acceptable levels. This study, therefore, revisits the determinants of child health by using Ghana’s Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey to investigate the effect of infant feeding practices on child health. We used the World Health Organization’s Infant and Young Children Feeding guidelines to measure dietary quality. The econometric analyses show that dietary diversity may cause improvement in children’s health in Ghana. This suggests that educational campaigns on proper infant feeding and complementary dieting could be an effective means of improving the health of children in Ghana.

  5. Obesity as a form of malnutrition: over-nutrition on the Uganda "malnutrition" agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaruiya, Christine; Hayward, Alison; Post, Lori; Mowafi, Hani

    2017-01-01

    The objectives were to highlight the burden of overweight and obesity as an additional area of importance for the malnutrition agenda in Uganda and to provide evidence-based considerations for stakeholders involved. Mirroring other Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs), Uganda is experiencing a "double burden" of over-nutrition related issues - both obesity and overweight, and related non-communicable diseases (NCDs) alongside the under-nutrition that has long plagued the country. Despite the commonplace assumption that under-nutrition is the predominant form of malnutrition in Uganda, we explore recent literature that in fact, challenges this notion. While food insecurity has contributed to the under-nutrition problem, a lack of dietary diversity also has a demonstrated role in increasing over-nutrition. We cannot afford to ignore over-nutrition concomitant with stunting and wasting in the country. Increase in the burden of this less acknowledged form of malnutrition in Uganda is critical to investigate, and yet poorly understood. A move towards increased regionally targeted over-nutrition research, funding, government prioritization and advocacy is needed.

  6. Good maternal nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breda, Joao; Robertson, Aileen

    This publication has three parts: •a summary of the results of a systematic review of the most recent evidence on maternal nutrition, the prevention of obesity and noncommunicable diseases; •a review of existing recommendations for nutrition, physical activity and weight gain during pregnancy...... in European countries; and •lists of possible opportunities for action in European countries. The overview and exploration of the national recommendations for nutrition, physical activity and weight gain during pregnancy are based on the results of a survey in which 51 of the 53 Member States in the WHO....... These are opportunities to promote nutrition and health throughout the life-course, ensure optimal diet-related fetal development and reduce the impact of morbidity and risk factors for noncommunicable diseases by improving maternal nutrition....

  7. Serum Leptin Is a Biomarker of Malnutrition in Decompensated Cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachakonda, Vikrant; Borhani, Amir A.; Dunn, Michael A.; Andrzejewski, Margaret; Martin, Kelly; Behari, Jaideep

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Malnutrition is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cirrhosis. There is no consensus as to the optimal approach for identifying malnutrition in end-stage liver disease. The aim of this study was to measure biochemical, serologic, hormonal, radiographic, and anthropometric features in a cohort of hospitalized cirrhotic patients to characterize biomarkers for identification of malnutrition. Design In this prospective observational cohort study, 52 hospitalized cirrhotic patients were classified as malnourished (42.3%) or nourished (57.7%) based on mid-arm muscle circumference malnutrition. Results Subjects with and without malnutrition differed in several key features of metabolic phenotype including wet and dry BMI, skeletal muscle index, visceral fat index and HOMA-IR. Serum leptin levels were lower and INR was higher in malnourished subjects. Serum leptin was significantly correlated with HOMA-IR, wet and dry BMI, mid-arm muscle circumference, skeletal muscle index, and visceral fat index. Logistic regression analysis revealed that INR and log-transformed leptin were independently associated with malnutrition. Conclusions Low serum leptin and elevated INR are associated with malnutrition in hospitalized patients with end-stage liver disease. PMID:27583675

  8. Protein energy malnutrition predicts complications in liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Ellen J; Trip, Evelien J; Siersema, Peter D; van Hoek, Bart; van Erpecum, Karel J

    2011-11-01

    Protein energy malnutrition frequently occurs in liver cirrhosis. Hand-grip strength according to Jamar is most reliable to predict protein energy malnutrition. We aimed to determine whether protein energy malnutrition affects complication risk. In 84 cirrhotics, baseline nutritional state was determined and subsequent complications prospectively assessed. Influence of potentially relevant factors including malnutrition (by Jamar hand-grip strength) on complication rates were evaluated with univariate analysis. Effect of malnutrition was subsequently evaluated by multivariate logistic regression with adjustment for possible confounders. Underlying causes of cirrhosis were viral hepatitis in 31%, alcohol in 26%, and other in 43%. Baseline Child-Pugh (CP) class was A, B, or C in 58, 35, and 7%, respectively. Energy and protein intake decreased significantly with increasing CP class, with shift from proteins to carbohydrates. At baseline, according to Jamar hand-grip strength, malnutrition occurred in 67% (n=56). Malnutrition was associated with older age and higher CP class (CP class A 57%, B 79%, C 100%) but not with underlying disease or comorbidity. Complications occurred in 18 and 48% in well-nourished and malnourished patients, respectively, (P=0.007) during 13 ± 6 months follow-up. In multivariate analysis, malnutrition was an independent predictor of complications, after correcting for comorbidity, age, and CP score (adjusted odds ratio 4.230; 95% confidence interval 1.090-16.422; P=0.037). In univariate analysis, mortality (4 vs. 18%; P=0.1) tended to be worse in malnourished patients, but this trend was lost in multivariate analysis. Malnutrition is an independent predictor of complications in cirrhosis.

  9. Maternal prenatal and/or postnatal n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) supplementation for preventing allergies in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaratne, Anoja W; Makrides, Maria; Collins, Carmel T

    2015-07-22

    Allergies have become more prevalent globally over the last 20 years. Dietary consumption of n-3 (or omega 3) long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) has declined over the same period of time. This, together with the known role of n-3 LCPUFA in inhibiting inflammation, has resulted in speculation that n-3 LCPUFA may prevent allergy development. Dietary n-3 fatty acids supplements may change the developing immune system of the newborn before allergic responses are established, particularly for those with a genetic predisposition to the production of the immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody. Individuals with IgE-mediated allergies have both the signs and symptoms of the allergic disease and a positive skin prick test (SPT) to the allergen. To assess the effect of n-3 LCPUFA supplementation in pregnant and/or breastfeeding women on allergy outcomes (food allergy, atopic dermatitis (eczema), allergic rhinitis (hay fever) and asthma/wheeze) in their children. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (6 August 2014), PubMed (1966 to 01 August 2014), CINAHL via EBSCOhost (1984 to 01 August 2014), Scopus (1995 to 01 August 2014), Web of Knowledge (1864 to 01 August 2014) and ClinicalTrials.gov (01 August 2014) and reference lists of retrieved studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of n-3 LCPUFA supplementation of pregnant and/or lactating women (compared with placebo or no treatment) on allergy outcomes of the infants or children. Trials using a cross-over design and trials examining biochemical outcomes only were not eligible for inclusion. Two review authors independently assessed eligibility and trial quality and performed data extraction. Where the review authors were also investigators on trials selected, an independent reviewer assessed trial quality and performed data extraction. Eight trials involving 3366 women and their 3175 children were included in the review. In these trials, women

  10. Malnutrition in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients: Assessment, Prevalence, and Association to Adverse Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalou, Efstratia; Galli-Tsinopoulou, Assimina; Karagiozoglou-Lampoudi, Thomais; Augoustides-Savvopoulou, Persefone

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent finding in pediatric health care settings in the form of undernutrition or excess body weight. Its increasing prevalence and impact on overall health status, which is reflected in the adverse outcomes, renders imperative the application of commonly accepted and evidence-based practices and tools by health care providers. Nutrition risk screening on admission and nutrition status evaluation are key points during clinical management of hospitalized pediatric patients, in order to prevent health deterioration that can lead to serious complications and growth consequences. In addition, anthropometric data based on commonly accepted universal growth standards can give accurate results for nutrition status. Both nutrition risk screening and nutrition status assessment are techniques that should be routinely implemented, based on commonly accepted growth standards and methodology, and linked to clinical outcomes. The aim of the present review was to address the issue of hospital malnutrition in pediatric settings in terms of prevalence, outline nutrition status evaluation and nutrition screening process using different criteria and available tools, and present its relationship with outcome measures. Key teaching points • Malnutrition-underweight or excess body weight-is a frequent imbalance in pediatric settings that affects physical growth and results in undesirable clinical outcomes. • Anthropometry interpretation through growth charts and nutrition screening are cornerstones for the assessment of malnutrition.To date no commonly accepted anthropometric criteria or nutrition screening tools are used in hospitalized pediatric patients. • Commonly accepted nutrition status and screening processes based on the World Health Organization's growth standards can contribute to the overall hospital nutrition care of pediatric patients.

  11. [Factors associated with malnutrition in children aged under five years in Lubumbashi (DRC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukatay, Abdon W M; Kalenga, Prosper M K; Dramaix, Michèle; Hennart, Philippe; Schirvel, Carole; Kabamba, Lydia M; Kabyla, Benjamin I; Donnen, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Nutritional status of children is a global indicator of children's well-being and, indirectly, of the community's well-being. The first objective of this work is to assess the nutritional status of children under five years-old living in a suburb of the city of Lubumbashi, DR Congo, at the end of the 1998-2003 armed conflict. The second objective aims to identify some predictors of malnutrition. A multivariate logistic regression was applied to the results of a cross-sectional survey of 1963 children from selected households. In addition to the anthropometric variables, living conditions were also used. We observed 33.5% stunted growth and 3.8% emaciation. After logistic regression, a low maternal educational level (less than 7 years), the absence of a drinking water tap available in the house or yard, male gender, and age of children ( > 11 months) were all significantly associated with increased risk of stunted growth. Moreover, decreased appetite, diarrhea and age of children ( < 12 months) were significant predictors of emaciation. Compared to the classification of the World Health Organization, our results indicate that the prevalence of stunting is high and the prevalence of emaciation is low. Interventions against malnutrition should consider the various predictors discussed in this study in order to reduce mortality and morbidity in children and contribute to their well-being.

  12. [Poverty, malnutrition and obesity: interrelationships among the nutritional status of members of the same family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ignez Salas; Marinho, Sheila Pita; de Oliveira, Denize Cristina; de Araújo, Eutália Aparecida Cândido

    2007-01-01

    Chronic malnutrition in infancy and obesity associated with short stature in adulthood may share common biological and socio-environmental determinants. An analysis of intra-family nutrition status distribution patterns may provide elements for understanding the risk factors common to these physiological conditions. The purpose of this study is to ascertain how the intra-family distribution of nutritional conditions in pauperized families occurs, examining related social, environmental and biological factors. An impoverished population (income less than US$ 70) was studied in two rural areas of São Paulo State, Brazil: Monteiro Lobato and Santo Antônio do Pinhal. The sample consisted of members of these families, with 215 children younger than 71.11 months; mothers (197), fathers (167) and siblings (6 to 18 years of age). A hierarchical logistic regression analysis model was prepared. The mothers' educational levels, the number of rooms in the home, age below 24 months and problems at birth, were all associated with height deficits in children, together with short maternal stature, especially when associated with obesity. Additionally, a marked association was noted between height deficits in these children and chronic malnutrition among their older siblings (6 to 18 years old). Children aged 24 months or less presented more severe risks of delayed growth.

  13. Hypertension in rat offspring subjected to perinatal protein malnutrition is not related to the baroreflex dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino-Silva, K M; Costa-Silva, J H

    2016-11-01

    This study reports on the effects of maternal protein malnutrition on baroreflex (BR) control of the heart rate and sympathetic nerve activity in the hypertensive male offspring of Wistar rat dams. Wistar rat dams were fed a normal protein (NP) control (17% protein) or a low protein (LP; 8% protein) diet during pregnancy and lactation, and their male offspring were studied when 90 days old. In these animals we evaluated spontaneous and induced BR control, the variability of the cardiovascular system and analyzed a direct recording of lumbar sympathetic nervous activity. The 90 day-old LP conscious rats had increased arterial pressure compared to NP, with enhanced low frequency oscillations of the systolic pressure, but no changes in the spontaneous and induced BR control of heart rate. In relation to nerve recordings, we observed similar values in terms of mean, frequency and amplitude between the groups. In addition, we noted that spontaneous and induced BR control of lumbar sympathetic activity in the LP group was similar to the control group. The data indicate that hypertension in the adult rat offspring subjected to perinatal protein malnutrition is not related to baroreflex dysfunction. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Malnutrition upon Hospital Admission in Geriatric Patients: Why Assess It?

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    Paolo Orlandoni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo assess the prevalence of malnutrition according to the new ESPEN definition in a population of geriatric hospital patients and to determine how malnutrition affects the length of hospital stay (LOS and hospital mortality.DesignA retrospective analysis of data gathered during nutritional screening surveys carried out three consecutive years, from 2012 to 2014, in an Italian geriatric research hospital (INRCA, Ancona was performed. On the day of the study, demographic data, data on clinical conditions and the nutritional status of newly admitted patients were collected. Patients were screened for malnutrition risk using the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST. Subsequently, malnutrition was diagnosed, for subjects at high risk, following the criteria suggested by the European Association for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism [body mass index (BMI < 18.5 kg/m2 or different combinations of unintentional weight loss over time and BMI values]. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of MUST compared to ESPEN criteria were assessed. The characteristics of patients with a diagnosis of malnutrition were compared to those of non-malnourished patients. The impact of malnutrition on LOS and hospital mortality was investigated through logistic and linear regression models.SettingThe study was performed in an Italian geriatric research hospital (INRCA, Ancona.SubjectsTwo hundred eighty-four newly hospitalized geriatric patients from acute care wards (mean age 82.8 ± 8.7 years, who gave their written consent to participate in the study, were enrolled.ResultsAccording to the MUST, high risk of malnutrition at hospitalization was found in 28.2% of patients. Malnutrition was diagnosed in 24.6% of subjects. The malnutrition was an independent predictor of both the LOS and hospital mortality. The multivariate analyses—linear and logistic regression—were performed considering different potential

  15. Tackling the increasing problem of malnutrition in older persons

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, Marjolein; Volkert, D.; Corish, C.; Geisler, C.; Groot, de, C.P.G.M.; Cruz-Jentoft, A.J.; Lohrmann, C.; O'Connor, E.M.; Schindler, K.; Schueren, van der, D.E.

    2017-01-01

    In order to tackle the increasing problem of malnutrition (i.e. protein-energy malnutrition) in the older population, the Joint Action Malnutrition in the Elderly (MaNuEL) Knowledge Hub has been recently launched as part of the Strategic Research Agenda of the Joint Programming Initiative (JPI) A Healthy Diet for a Healthy Life (HDHL). This paper introduces this new European initiative and describes its objectives and design. The MaNuEL consortium consists of 22 research groups from seven cou...

  16. Malnutrition, cachexia and nutritional intervention: when much becomes too much

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Rianda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Disease-associated malnutrition, also defined as cachexia, is a complex syndrome characterised by the progressive deterioration of nutritional status resulting from the combined effects of reduced appetite and food intake, and profound changes in host metabolism. Cachexia has been repeatedly demonstrated to represent a negative prognostic factor for patients suffering from acute and chronic diseases, including cancer. In oncology patients, early diagnosis of cachexia and timely nutritional intervention have been demonstrated not only to prevent further deterioration of nutritional status, but also to increase quality of life and survival when integrated in a multiprofessional and multidisciplinary approach. However, nutritional therapy is associated to the possible development of complications, which may be fatal. Therefore, nutritional therapy in severely malnourished patients should be cautiously prescribed by experts in the field, who should develop a monitoring program to early detect complications and to maximise the clinical efficacy.Here we describe a cancer patient affected by refeeding syndrome, who was fortunately early diagnosed and properly treated.

  17. Body mass index is a poor predictor of malnutrition in hospitalized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: 152 patients, of which 48.70 % had malnutrition, moderate malnutrition 34.2 % (group B) and 14.5 % severe malnutrition (group C ) were included.No association between Subjective Global Assessment and Body Mass Index was shown to determine nutritional status. Malnutrition was associated with age over 60 ...

  18. Intervenções benéficas no pré-natal para prevenção da mortalidade materna Beneficial interventions for maternal mortality prevention in the prenatal period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iracema de Mattos Paranhos Calderon

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available A razão de mortalidade materna (MM é indicador da qualidade de saúde, influenciada diretamente pelo grau de desenvolvimento econômico-cultural-tecnológico de um país. Os dados oficiais de MM no Brasil, ainda que subestimados, sinalizam a falta de qualidade dos serviços de assistência à gestação, parto e puerpério. Esta característica é comum entre os países em desenvolvimento, onde estão as gestantes mais necessitadas e com maior dificuldade de acesso a assistência de qualidade. A assistência pré-natal não pode prevenir as principais complicações do parto, causas importantes de MM, mas algumas intervenções no pré-natal poderão favorecer o prognóstico materno e prevenir a MM. Neste contexto, o artigo faz uma atualização, embasada em evidências científicas, sobre intervenções efetivas no pré-natal para prevenção da mortalidade materna. As estratégias mais importantes constituem um tripé, com intervenções específicas relacionadas a promoção da saúde materna, prevenção dos riscos e garantia de suporte nutricional durante a gestação, além de critérios para investigação do risco gestacional e inclusão da gestante no componente básico do modelo de assistência pré-natal. Finaliza com a definição de prioridades na prevenção de MM relacionada à eclâmpsia/pré-eclâmpsia e reforça a importância da normatização dos sistemas de referência para os casos de emergência obstétrica.Maternal mortality rate (MM is a health quality indicator that is directly influenced by the economic, cultural and technological level of a country. Official data of MM in Brazil, although underestimated, point to the lack of quality in pregnancy, childbirth and puerperium care services. This characteristic is common in developing countries, where poorer pregnant women as well as those facing greater difficulty to quality care access are found. Prenatal care cannot prevent major childbirth complications, which are

  19. Malaria, malnutrition, and birthweight: A meta-analysis using individual participant data.

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    Jordan E Cates

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Four studies previously indicated that the effect of malaria infection during pregnancy on the risk of low birthweight (LBW; <2,500 g may depend upon maternal nutritional status. We investigated this dependence further using a large, diverse study population.We evaluated the interaction between maternal malaria infection and maternal anthropometric status on the risk of LBW using pooled data from 14,633 pregnancies from 13 studies (6 cohort studies and 7 randomized controlled trials conducted in Africa and the Western Pacific from 1996-2015. Studies were identified by the Maternal Malaria and Malnutrition (M3 initiative using a convenience sampling approach and were eligible for pooling given adequate ethical approval and availability of essential variables. Study-specific adjusted effect estimates were calculated using inverse probability of treatment-weighted linear and log-binomial regression models and pooled using a random-effects model. The adjusted risk of delivering a baby with LBW was 8.8% among women with malaria infection at antenatal enrollment compared to 7.7% among uninfected women (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] 1.14 [95% confidence interval (CI: 0.91, 1.42]; N = 13,613, 10.5% among women with malaria infection at delivery compared to 7.9% among uninfected women (aRR 1.32 [95% CI: 1.08, 1.62]; N = 11,826, and 15.3% among women with low mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC <23 cm at enrollment compared to 9.5% among women with MUAC ≥ 23 cm (aRR 1.60 [95% CI: 1.36, 1.87]; N = 9,008. The risk of delivering a baby with LBW was 17.8% among women with both malaria infection and low MUAC at enrollment compared to 8.4% among uninfected women with MUAC ≥ 23 cm (joint aRR 2.13 [95% CI: 1.21, 3.73]; N = 8,152. There was no evidence of synergism (i.e., excess risk due to interaction between malaria infection and MUAC on the multiplicative (p = 0.5 or additive scale (p = 0.9. Results were similar using body mass index (BMI as an anthropometric

  20. Maternal phenylketonuria

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    Kristina Štuikienė

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria is a hereditary metabolic disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. Elevated phenylalanine levels in a pregnant woman with phenylketonuria result in phenylalanine embryopathy. Failure to follow special diets during gestation results in neonatal dysplasia. More favorable outcomes are observed when phenylalanine levels remain within normal ranges prior to conception, or at least when they reach normal levels by the 4th-10th weeks of gestation. We report the case of a newborn with maternal phenylketonuria.

  1. Missed opportunities in the diagnosis and management of protein energy malnutrition among children under 5 years in Wakiso district, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akugizibwe, Roselyne; Kasolo, Josephine; Makubuya, Duncan B; Damani, Ali M

    2013-11-30

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) is one of the leading causes of death among children below 5 years in Uganda. It develops after acute childhood illnesses despite children having received treatment from health facilities. This study assessed knowledge and practices of health workers in the diagnosis and management of PEM, which was used to establish missed opportunities to prevent severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in its management. This was a cross sectional descriptive study that used questionnaires and observation of health workers at Health Center IV (HCIV) in Wakiso district, Uganda. The clinical nutrition diagnosis of the children was then obtained. There were 44 health workers that assessed 225 children. Most of the health workers 32 (72.7%) had education in PEM management and over 60% of them knew the forms of PEM, clinical signs of kwashiorkor and marasmus and the factors that predispose to PEM. Health workers did not weigh 56 (24.9%) of the children, 193 (86%) children had no height taken and only 32 (14.2%) had mid upper arm circumference measured. The weight for height of 223 (99.2%) and weight for age of 109 (93%) children was not calculated. Only 38 (16.89%) were examined for edema and 40 (17.78%) for muscle wasting. Health workers diagnosed only 21 (9%) children with malnutrition, while researchers found 94 (31.9%) with malnutrition. Children who missed opportunity to have malnutrition diagnosed at the health facility were 73 (32.9%). The knowledge of health workers on PEM is adequate, but their practice is inadequate. There is missed opportunity to diagnose and manage PEM among children who present with acute illnesses at the health centers, hence missed opportunity to prevent SAM.

  2. A case control study to find out child feeding practices responsible for severe acute malnutrition among under-five children admitted in MTC at a tertiary care centre, Bikaner, Rajasthan

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    Kavita Choudhary

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is no significant difference between NFHS II &III with respect to under- nutrition data but Gross national income has increased many times, so poverty and unavailability of food alone cannot be the only reasons of under- nutrition. Under-nutrition is the result of many interrelated factors such as poverty, insufficient household food security, inadequate health services, poor maternal and child care practices and inadequate water and sanitation. For communities with a high prevalence of under- nutrition, it may take years or even decades before all of these factors can be addressed. Aims and Objectives:  to find out child feeding practices responsible for severe acute malnutrition among Under-five Children and to recommend a Community Action Plan based on Positive Deviance Approach to deal with under-nutrition quickly, affordably and sustainably in a culturally acceptable manner. Materials & Methods: Study design: Matched Case Control study. Sample size: 143 cases and age, socio-economic status matched 143 controls. Study place: MTC and Immunization clinic. Study Duration: May, 2013- May, 2014. Study Tool and Data Collection: Semi-structured pre-tested questionnaire. Data analysis: with help of SPSS16 (Mean, SD, Proportion, odds ratio. Results: Strong positive association was found between duration of exclusive breast feeding(both shorter and longer, prelacteals, diluted milk as weaning food, bottle feeding, giving excess milk and less solid protein diet, not able to recognize cue of hunger by mother, lack of demand feeding, and severe acute malnutrition. Conclusion: Not any nutritional programme can help in preventing SAM unless we motivate the mothers for good child feeding and rearing practices. This can be achieved by identification of the Positive Deviant mothers from the same community and SES, who can motivate the mothers of SAM children and can practically demonstrate positive child feeding practices in a culturally

  3. Poverty Mapping Project: Global Subnational Prevalence of Child Malnutrition

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Subnational Prevalence of Child Malnutrition dataset consists of estimates of the percentage of children with weight-for-age z-scores that are more than...

  4. Factors contributing to malnutrition in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung R; Chung, Sun J; Yoo, Sung-Hee

    2016-04-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the nutritional status and to identify clinical, psychosocial, and nutritional factors contributing to malnutrition in Korean patients with Parkinson's disease. We used a descriptive, cross-sectional study design. Of 102 enrolled patients, 26 (25.5%) were malnourished and 27 (26.5%) were at risk of malnutrition based on Mini-Nutritional Assessment scores. Malnutrition was related to activity of daily living score, Hoehn and Yahr stage, duration of levodopa therapy, Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger's Anxiety Inventory scores, body weight, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and body mass index. On multiple logistic regression analysis, anxiety score, duration of levodopa therapy, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and loss of body weight were significant factors predicting malnutrition in Parkinson's disease patients. Therefore, nutritional assessment, including psychological evaluation, is required for Parkinson's disease patients to facilitate interdisciplinary nutritional intervention for malnourished patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Food Insecurity, Malnutrition and Crude Oil Spillage in a Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , external control group study design, with a semi-structured questionnaire and anthropometry as the study tools. The study ... Keywords: Pipeline oil spill, household food security, malnutrition, rural community, Nigeria. Nigerian Journal of ...

  6. VOLUME OVERLOAD IS ASSOCIATED WITH MALNUTRITION IN PERITONEAL DIALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Joo Cha

    2012-06-01

    Volume overload is associated with malnutrition and seems to be an independent predictor of mortality in PD population. Further study should evaluate the effects of intervention of volume control in PD patients.

  7. Gendered effects of siblings on child malnutrition in South Asia: cross-sectional analysis of demographic and health surveys from Bangladesh, India, and Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Anita; McDougal, Lotus P; Silverman, Jay G

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of number and sex of siblings on malnutrition of boys and girls under-5 in South Asia. Cross-sectional analyses were conducted on Demographic and Health Surveys data on children under-5 in Bangladesh (N = 7,861), India (N = 46,655) and Nepal (N = 2,475). Data were pooled across countries, and multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between number and sex of siblings and malnutrition outcomes (wasting, stunting, underweight; based on anthropometric data), adjusting for country and key social and maternal-child health indicators in sex stratified analyses. Number of brothers increased the odds for severe wasting [1 vs. 0 brothers adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.31, 95 % CI = 1.11, 1.55; 2 vs. 0 brothers AOR = 1.36, 95 % CI = 1.07, 1.73] for girls but not boys. Having more male siblings and more female siblings increased the odds of stunting for boys and girls, but effect of 3+ sisters on severe stunting was significantly stronger for girls than boys (girls- 3+ vs. 0 sisters AOR = 2.25, 95 % CI = 1.88, 2.70; boys- 3+ vs. 0 sisters AOR = 1.37, 95 % CI = 1.13, 1.67). For underweight, three or more sisters increased the odds for severe underweight for girls (AOR = 1.27, 95 % CI = 1.04, 1.57) but not boys. Having brothers heightens girl risk for acute malnutrition (wasting), where having multiple sisters increases girl risk for chronic malnutrition (stunting/underweight). Boy malnutrition is less affected by siblings. Findings suggest that issues of son preference/daughter aversion may affect child malnutrition in South Asia.

  8. Maternal creatine supplementation during pregnancy prevents acute and long-term deficits in skeletal muscle after birth asphyxia: a study of structure and function of hind limb muscle in the spiny mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRosa, Domenic A; Ellery, Stacey J; Snow, Rod J; Walker, David W; Dickinson, Hayley

    2016-12-01

    Maternal antenatal creatine supplementation protects the brain, kidney, and diaphragm against the effects of birth asphyxia in the spiny mouse. In this study, we examined creatine's potential to prevent damage to axial skeletal muscles. Pregnant spiny mice were fed a control or creatine-supplemented diet from mid-pregnancy, and 1 d before term (39 d), fetuses were delivered by c-section with or without 7.5 min of birth asphyxia. At 24 h or 33 ± 2 d after birth, gastrocnemius muscles were obtained for ex-vivo study of twitch-tension, muscle fatigue, and structural and histochemical analysis. Birth asphyxia significantly reduced cross-sectional area of all muscle fiber types (P birth protects the muscle from asphyxia-induced damage at birth.

  9. Risk factors associated with malnutrition in one-year-old children living in the Peruvian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Serene A; Casapía, Martín; Blouin, Brittany; Maheu-Giroux, Mathieu; Rahme, Elham; Gyorkos, Theresa W

    2014-12-01

    Children under two years of age are in the most critical window for growth and development. As mobility increases, this time period also coincides with first exposure to soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections in tropical and sub-tropical environments. The association between malnutrition and STH infection, however, has been understudied in this vulnerable age group. A nested cross-sectional survey was conducted in 12 and 13-month old children participating in a deworming trial in Iquitos, an STH-endemic area of the Peruvian Amazon. An extensive socio-demo-epi questionnaire was administered to the child's parent. Length and weight were measured, and the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development were administered to measure cognition, language, and fine motor development. Stool specimens were collected to determine the presence of STH. The association between malnutrition (i.e. stunting and underweight) and STH infection, and other child, maternal, and household characteristics, was analyzed using multivariable Poisson regression. A total of 1760 children were recruited between September 2011 and June 2012. Baseline data showed a prevalence of stunting and underweight of 24.2% and 8.6%, respectively. In a subgroup of 880 randomly-allocated children whose specimens were analyzed by the Kato-Katz method, the prevalence of any STH infection was 14.5%. Risk factors for stunting in these 880 children included infection with at least one STH species (aRR = 1.37; 95% CI 1.01, 1.86) and a lower development score (aRR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95, 0.99). A lower development score was also a significant risk factor for underweight (aRR = 0.92; 95% CI: 0.89, 0.95). The high prevalence of malnutrition, particularly stunting, and its association with STH infection and lower developmental attainment in early preschool-age children is of concern. Emphasis should be placed on determining the most cost-effective, integrated interventions to reduce disease and

  10. Managing malnutrition for older people in residential care

    OpenAIRE

    Ojo, Omorogieva

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a major concern for those in the care sector. In this article, Omorogieva Ojo discusses how malnutrition can be managed in the care home using oral nutritional supplements (ONS), such as powders, sip feeds and thickened drinks. Residential care provides a unique environment, offering support for older people, in order to help with the activities of daily living, including eating and drinking. With an increase in the aging population in the UK, the number of older people living...

  11. Food insecurity and malnutrition in Chinese elementary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiuhua; Gao, Xiang; Tang, Wenjing; Mao, Xuanxia; Huang, Jingyan; Cai, Wei

    2015-09-28

    It has been shown that food insecurity is associated with poor diet quality and unfavourable health outcomes. However, little is known about the potential effects of food insecurity on the overall malnutrition status among children. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of food insecurity among 1583 elementary school students, aged 6-14 years, living in Chinese rural areas and examined its association with four malnutrition signs, including rickets sequelae, anaemia, stunting and wasting. Information on food security was collected via questionnaires. Rickets sequelae were assessed by an experienced paediatrician during the interview. Anaemia was determined by the WHO Hb thresholds adjusted by the local altitude. Weight and height were measured during the interview. Stunting and wasting were then evaluated according to WHO child growth standards (2007). We examined the association between food insecurity and the number of malnutrition signs (total number = 4), and the likelihood of having severe malnutrition (presence of 3+ signs), after adjusting for potential confounders, such as age, social-economic status and dietary intakes. During the previous 12 months, the overall prevalence of food insecurity was 6.1% in the entire studied population and 16.3% in participants with severe malnutrition. Participants with food insecurity had a slightly higher number of malnutrition signs (1.14 v. 0.96; P=0.043) relative to those who were food secure, after adjusting for potential confounders. Food insecurity was also associated with increased likelihood of having severe malnutrition (adjusted OR 3.08; 95% CI 1.47, 6.46; P=0.003). In conclusion, food insecurity is significantly associated with malnutrition among Chinese children in this community.

  12. Prevenção da mortalidade materna: desafio para o enfermeiro Prevención de la mortalidad materna: un desafío para la enfermera Maternal mortality prevention: a challenge for nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Santos Barbastefano

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo analisamos os principais aspectos sobre a mortalidade materna, tendo como objetivo a promoção de ações preventivas para a morte materna evitável. Verifica-se que entidades como a ADVOCACY têm significativa participação nos projetos visando redução das taxas de mortalidade materna e o ajustamento de condutas de proteção aos direitos da mulher. Observa-se ainda que a SES, através das Resoluções nº 1.052/95 e nº 1.642/2001, expressa a política estadual para redução do problema. Conclui-se que há indícios de vontade política nas propostas e projetos para redução das taxas de mortalidade materna evitável, porém não há cobrança da sua efetividade. Profissionais da saúde como o enfermeiro, precisam reunir esforços, conscientização e sensibilização em suas ações preventivas.En este artículo se analizan los aspectos principales sobre mortalidad maternal que tiene como objetivo la promoción de acciones preventivas para la muerte materna evitable. Se verifica que las entidades como la ADVOCACY tienen participación significante en los proyectos que buscan la reducción de la tasa de mortalidad materna y el ajuste de procedimientos de protección de los derechos de la mujer. También se observa que la Secretaria Estatal de Salud, a través de las Resoluciones nº 1.052/95 y nº1.642/2001, expresa las políticas estatales para la reducción del problema. Se concluye que hay indicaciones de voluntad política sobre las propuestas y proyectos para reducir las tasas de mortalidad materna evitables. Sin embargo no hay demandas sobre su efectividad. Los profesionales de salud como enfermeras necesitan recoger los esfuerzos, y también una actitud de comprensión y sensibilidad en sus acciones preventivas.In this article theprincipal aspects about maternal mortality are analyzed, with the objective the promotion of preventive actions for the avoidable maternal death. It is verified that entities as ADVOCACY have

  13. The relationship between mother-child in marasmus type malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Inés Restrepo Vásquez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This reflection aims to describe some theoretical reflections about the features that appear in the mother / son / food relational dynamic. It presents the research projects that are so far on the relationship between malnutrition and psychological aspects that accompany it. The chosen method in order to select the literature used the following search criteria: papers published between 2001 and 2011. It was used word-phrases: (Malnutrition, (marasmus, (marasmus type malnutrition and psychological and (mother / child relationship and malnutrition. As search facilities: Electronic databases (Ebsco, Medline, PubMed, SciELO, Embase. Priority was given to research work at national and local levels. Only those works which explicitly use the concept of malnutrition / stagnation / mother son bond were considerate. Also it was identified the most prominent authors in the field, and it was conducted exchanges with specialists on the field. Results show that so far there is no recent work related to this specific subject, except the work done by the doctor and psychoanalyst Rene Spitz in 1945. Conclusions: In this absence of research papers and given the particular phenomenon of marasmus type malnutrition, unacceptable as a problem that affects children’s mental health; there is the urge to create investigative actions that favor the construction of new intervention mechanisms for this complex reality. © Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Sociales.

  14. Risk factors associated with malnutrition in hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Flores Marquezini FRAGAS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To identify factors associated with malnutrition in patients hospitalized in general public hospitals of the city of Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. Methods This cross-sectional study included 397 patients of both sexes aged more than 18 years, staying at three public hospitals in Manaus, Amazonas. The patients were submitted to anthropometric and subjective global assessments, the latter being the main diagnostic method. For association analyses between malnutrition (dependent variable and other covariates, we used contingency table for variable selection and multiple logistic regression for independent effect test between exposure and outcome. The strength of association between the variables was expressed as odds ratio, with a 95% confidence interval. The analyses were performed by Epi Info 7.0. Results Among the risk factors associated with hospital malnutrition, hospital stays longer than 15 days, when analyzed alone, nearly tripled the odds of malnutrition. However, in the final model, the variables that remained associated were: persistent change in diet, presence of gastrointestinal symptoms, recent weight loss, weight loss in the last six months, cancer, and age higher than 60 years. Conclusion Malnutrition is recurrent in hospitals, and the factors associated with malnutrition can be identified on admission, allowing adequate monitoring during hospital stay. Therefore, a more effective performance of nutritional screening and monitoring programs is critical.

  15. Malnutrition in the UK: policies to address the problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, M; Russell, C A; Stratton, R J

    2010-11-01

    In 2007, the estimated cost of disease-related malnutrition in the UK was in excess of £13×109. At any point in time, only about 2% of over 3 million individuals at risk of malnutrition were in hospital, 5% in care homes and the remainder in the community (2-3% in sheltered housing). Some government statistics (England) grossly underestimated the prevalence of malnutrition on admission and discharge from hospital (1000-3000 annually between 1998 and 2008), which is less than 1% of the prevalence (about 3 million in 2007-2008) established by national surveys using criteria based on the 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool' ('MUST'). The incidence of malnutrition-related deaths in hospitals, according to government statistics (242 deaths in England in 2007), was also policies have reduced the number of hospital and care home beds and encouraged care closer to home. Such policies have raised issues about education and training of the homecare workforce, including 6 million insufficiently supported informal carers (10% of the population), the commissioning process, and difficulties in implementing nutritional policies in a widely distributed population. The four devolved nations in the UK (England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales) have developed their own healthcare polices to deal with malnutrition. These generally aim to span across all care settings and various government departments in a co-ordinated manner, but their effectiveness remains to be properly evaluated.

  16. The Rise and Fall of Protein Malnutrition in Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semba, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    From the 1950s to the mid-1970s, United Nations (UN) agencies were focused on protein malnutrition as the major worldwide nutritional problem. The goal of this review is to examine this era of protein malnutrition, the reasons for its demise, and the aftermath. The UN Protein Advisory Group was established in 1955. International conferences were largely concerned about protein malnutrition in children. By the early 1970s, UN agencies were ringing the alarm about a 'protein gap'. In The Lancet in 1974, Donald McLaren branded these efforts as 'The Great Protein Fiasco', declaring that the 'protein gap' was a fallacy. The following year, John Waterlow, the scientist who led most of the efforts on protein malnutrition, admitted that a 'protein gap' did not exist and that young children in developing countries only needed sufficient energy intake. The emphasis on protein malnutrition waned. It is recently apparent that quality protein and essential amino acids are missing in the diet and may have adverse consequences for child growth and the reduction of child stunting. Key Messages: It may be time to re-include protein and return protein malnutrition in the global health agenda using a balanced approach that includes all protective nutrients. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Knowledge of Parents of a Back-ward Community Regarding Malnutrition in Children

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    C P Mishra

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein energy malnutrition (PEM ia children has been considered as the most important problem in the field of preventive medicine particularly so in the developing countries (WHO, 1974. Vari­ous crash activities and nutrition program­mes in our country could not bring an appreciable change in the over-all magni­tude of the problem (ICSSR and ICMR, 1981. In order to have sustained improve­ment, parents education holds great promise Information education and com­munication (IEC is emerging as an impor­tant tool in the delivery of Primary Health Care (PHC as well as nutrition related services. For proper application of this tool it is imperative to have basal knowle­dge of parents regarding identification, causes and preventability of important nutritional disorders. The specific objec­tives of the present study were to explore-(aThe ability of parents to recog­nise marasmus, kwashiorkor, vitamin A and vitamin B deficinc es with photograph of these disorders and also on description.(bKnowledge of parents regarding causes of marasmus, kwashiorkor, vitamin A and B complex deficien­cies.(cKnowledge of parents regarding prevention of malnutrition dis­orders.The important facets and concepts of a backward community of Banda District, Uttar Pradesh as revealed by the present study may be of immense help in planning a ‘Nutrition Education pro­gramme’.

  18. Assessing childhood malnutrition in Haiti: Meeting the United Nations Millennium Development Goal #4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.L Bush

    2015-01-01

    birth-order may be protective. There was also a significant difference in nutritional status among the 4 communities surveyed with the two that were the furthest (2-hour walk having 10.9% and 12.9% of children malnourished. Conclusion In this cohort, malnutrition is prevalent in this region of rural Haiti. Children of new versus experienced mothers may have children at higher risk perhaps because new mothers are less knowledgeable and skilled at securing proper nutrition for their babies. Alternatively, more experienced mothers may simply have more resources. Additionally, distance from a medical clinic may prevent treatment for endemic parasites and other common illnesses compounding the effects of food shortage. Based on these findings, we can educate community health workers to focus attention and resources toward these at-risk families to prevent malnutrition and decrease child mortality thus progressing towards the UN Millennium Goal #4.

  19. Vitamin D deficiency causes rickets in an urban informal settlement in Kenya and is associated with malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Hachmeister, C Ulrich; Khasira, Maureen; Cox, Lorna; Schoenmakers, Inez; Munyi, Caroline; Nassir, H Samira; Hünten-Kirsch, Barbara; Prentice, Ann; Berkley, James A

    2018-01-01

    The commonest cause of rickets worldwide is vitamin D deficiency, but studies from sub-Saharan Africa describe an endemic vitamin D-independent form that responds to dietary calcium enrichment. The extent to which calcium-deficiency rickets is the dominant form across sub-Saharan Africa and in other low-latitude areas is unknown. We aimed to characterise the clinical and biochemical features of young children with rickets in a densely populated urban informal settlement in Kenya. Because malnutrition may mask the clinical features of rickets, we also looked for biochemical indices of risk in children with varying degrees of acute malnutrition. Twenty one children with rickets, aged 3 to 24 months, were identified on the basis of clinical and radiologic features, along with 22 community controls, and 41 children with either severe or moderate acute malnutrition. Most children with rickets had wrist widening (100%) and rachitic rosary (90%), as opposed to lower limb features (19%). Developmental delay (52%), acute malnutrition (71%), and stunting (62%) were common. Compared to controls, there were no differences in calcium intake, but most (71%) had serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels below 30 nmol/L. These results suggest that rickets in young children in urban Kenya is usually driven by vitamin D deficiency, and vitamin D supplementation is likely to be required for full recovery. Wasting was associated with lower calcium (p = .001), phosphate (p < .001), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (p = .049), and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (p = 0.022) levels, the clinical significance of which remain unclear. © 2017 The Authors Maternal & Child Nutrition Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Immunosuppressive mechanisms in protein-calorie malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmond, H.P.; Shou, J.; Kelly, C.J.; Schreiber, S.; Miller, E.; Leon, P.; Daly, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    Protein-calorie malnutrition (PCM) induces immunosuppression leading to increased mortality rates. Impaired macrophage respiratory burst activity (superoxide anion [O2-] generation) occurs in PCM, but cellular mechanisms are unclear. The major pathway resulting in O2- production involves inositol lipid-dependent signal transduction. This study examined the effect of mild versus severe PCM on macrophage O2- generating signal transduction pathways specific for responses to Candida albicans. Mice (CFW/Swiss Webster: n = 300) were randomized to either control or low protein diets for 3 or 8 weeks. Peritoneal macrophages were harvested for O2- production, mannose-fucose receptor (MFR) expression, membrane phospholipid analysis, arachidonic acid (AA) content, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, and protein kinase C levels. O2- release was impaired in both mild and severe PCM. MFR expression was also decreased at these time points. Inositol lipid content was significantly lower at the 8-week time point only, although PGE2 and AA were significantly higher in the low protein diet group at 3 weeks. Protein kinase C levels were unchanged by PCM. Thus, mild PCM significantly increases macrophage-PGE2 production secondary to increased AA phospholipid content, with subsequent inhibition of O2- and MFR expression. Severe PCM inhibits macrophage (O2-) through depletion of critical membrane phospholipid components with subsequent impairment in signal transduction

  1. Association between order of birth and chronic malnutrition of children: a study of nationally representative Bangladeshi sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mosfequr

    2016-02-01

    This paper examines the net effect of birth order on child nutritional status in Bangladesh using data from the Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey, 2011 (BDHS). Analyses were restricted to 4,120 surviving, lastborn singleton children who were younger than 36 months at the time of the survey. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between birth order and child nutritional status. Results indicate 38.1% children are stunted and 8.2% children are fifth or higher order birth. Order of birth is one of the significant predictors of child being stunted. Third order, fourth order, and fifth or higher order children are 24%, 30%, and 72%, respectively, more likely to be stunted after adjusting for all other variables. Besides birth order, results also indicate that child age, size at birth, birth intention, maternal education, maternal body mass index, wealth index, place of residence and mass media access exert strong influences over child malnutrition. Reducing birth rates which limit number of births and birth order as well may reduce child malnutrition in Bangladesh.

  2. Dialysis Malnutrition and Malnutrition Inflammation Scores: screening tools for prediction of dialysis-related protein-energy wasting in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvinder, Gilcharan Singh; Swee, Winnie Chee Siew; Karupaiah, Tilakavati; Sahathevan, Sharmela; Chinna, Karuthan; Ahmad, Ghazali; Bavanandan, Sunita; Goh, Bak Leong

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is highly prevalent in Malaysian dialysis patients and there is a need for a valid screening tool for early identification and management. This cross-sectional study aims to examine the sensitivity of the Dialysis Malnutrition Score (DMS) and Malnutrition Inflammation Score (MIS) tools in predicting protein-energy wasting (PEW) among Malaysian dialysis patients. A total of 155 haemodialysis (HD) and 90 peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients were screened for risk of malnutrition using DMS and MIS and comparisons were made with established guidelines by International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism (ISRNM) for PEW. MIS cut-off score of >=5 indicated presence of malnutrition in all patients. A total of 59% of HD and 83% of PD patients had PEW by ISRNM criteria. Based on DMS, 73% of HD and 71% of PD patients exhibited moderate malnutrition, whilst using MIS, 88% and 90%, respectively were malnourished. DMS and MIS correlated significantly in HD (r2=0.552, pmalnutrition classification were established (score >=5) for use amongst Malaysian dialysis patients. Both DMS and MIS are valid tools to be used for nutrition screening of dialysis patients especially those undergoing peritoneal dialysis. The DMS may be a more practical and simpler tool to be utilized in the Malaysian dialysis settings as it does not require laboratory markers.

  3. A community-based delivery system of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy and its effect on use of essential maternity care at health units in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Bygbjerg, I C; Magnussen, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    Community delivery of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) is one potential option that could mitigate malaria in pregnancy. However, there is concern that this approach may lead to complacency among women with low access to essential care at health units. A non-random...

  4. A Comparison of Maternal Outcomes from an Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Prevention Program for Mothers Choosing an Intervention versus Being Randomized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Hilary F.; Miller, Brenda A.; Laborde, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Self-determination theory and substantial research findings suggest that more desirable outcomes may occur when participants are able to choose their prevention or treatment interventions, as having a choice may lead to greater motivation and feelings of self-efficacy. The present study examined the influence of having a choice of family-based…

  5. High prevalence of malnutrition and inflammation in undialyzed patients with chronic renal failure in developing countries: a single center experience from eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Jai; Raja, R; Mishra, R N; Vohra, Rubina; Sharma, Naveen; Wani, I A; Parekh, A

    2007-01-01

    Malnutrition is common in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF), and its prevalence before the initiation of dialysis is poorly characterized in these patients in developing countries. There is a paucity of data on the quantification of malnutrition and inflammation in undialyzed patients of CRF from India. This study analyzed the prevalence and causes of malnutrition in patients with CRF before the initiation of dialysis treatment. In the present study, assessments of nutritional and inflammatory status were carried out in patients with CRF. Serum albumin, body mass index (BMI), triceps skin fold thickness (TST), mid-arm muscle circumference (MAMC), and subjective global assessment (SGA) scoring were used for assessment of nutritional parameters. Serum C-reactive protein and serum ferritin level were used to assess the inflammatory state of the patient. Two hundred and three (146 male, 57 female) patients with CRF were included in the study from August 2004 to April 2006. Overall, the prevalence of malnutrition was 65% (131/203). The age of malnourished patients (93 male, 38 female) ranged from 11-82, with mean age of 52 +/- 12.68 years. The mean serum total protein and albumin were also significantly lower in patients with malnutrition in comparison to non malnourished cases (5.50 +/- 0.40 gm/dL vs. 5.74 +/- 0.38 gm/dL; p malnutrition was common in patients with CRF before the commencement of dialysis. These data indicate that an emphasis should be placed on the assessment and prevention or correction of malnutrition in patients with CRF because of its documented adverse effect on the outcome on maintenance dialysis.

  6. Underweight and malnutrition in home care: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmann, Nils A; Tannen, Antje; Suhr, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to provide representative figures about the prevalence of underweight and malnutrition among home care clients, and to determine the associated risk factors and the provided nutritional nursing interventions. In 2012, a multicenter point prevalence study was conducted among 878 randomly selected clients from 100 randomly selected home care services across Germany. Following a standardized study protocol, demographics, nutritional assessments (Body Mass Index, Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), Mini nutritional Assessment - short form (MNA-sf), nurses' clinical judgment on nutritional status) and interventions were assessed. Common nutritional risk factors for underweight and malnutrition were analyzed in a logistic regression model. Malnutrition figures varied between 4.8% (MNA-sf) and 6.8% (MUST), underweight between 8.7% (BMI malnutrition assessments (MNA-sf 48.8%, MUST 39.1%) due to a lack of information on many clients' loss of weight within the past 3-6 months. Regular weighing was performed in 33.6-57.3% of all clients, depending on weight and nutritional status. Mental overload (OR 8.1/4.4), needs help with feeding (OR 5.0/2.8) and loss of appetite (OR 3.6/3.9) were highly associated with malnutrition/underweight. Malnutrition and underweight are important issues in home care clients. Regular weighing should be performed in all home care clients so that a potential weight loss can be detected in time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk Factors for Malnutrition in Older Adults: A Systematic Review of the Literature Based on Longitudinal Data123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, Carine; Vanhauwaert, Erika; Bekkering, Geertruida Elsiena

    2016-01-01

    The present systematic review critically examines the available scientific literature on risk factors for malnutrition in the older population (aged ≥65 y). A systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE, reviewing reference lists from 2000 until March 2015. The 2499 papers identified were subjected to inclusion criteria that evaluated the study quality according to items from validated guidelines. Only papers that provided information on a variable’s effect on the development of malnutrition, which requires longitudinal data, were included. A total of 6 longitudinal studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the systematic review. These studies reported the following significant risk factors for malnutrition: age (OR: 1.038; P = 0.045), frailty in institutionalized persons (β: 0.22; P = 0.036), excessive polypharmacy (β: −0.62; P = 0.001), general health decline including physical function (OR: 1.793; P = 0.008), Parkinson disease (OR: 2.450; P = 0.047), constipation (OR: 2.490; P = 0.015), poor (OR: 3.30; P value not given) or moderate (β: −0.27; P = 0.016) self-reported health status, cognitive decline (OR: 1.844; P = 0.001), dementia (OR: 2.139; P = 0.001), eating dependencies (OR: 2.257; P = 0.001), loss of interest in life (β: −0.58; P = 0.017), poor appetite (β: −1.52; P = 0.000), basal oral dysphagia (OR: 2.72; P = 0.010), signs of impaired efficacy of swallowing (OR: 2.73; P = 0.015), and institutionalization (β: −1.89; P malnutrition in older adults may be considered by health care professionals when developing new integrated assessment instruments to identify older adults’ risk of malnutrition and to support the development of preventive and treatment strategies. PMID:27184278

  8. The Effect of Maternal Nutrition on the Development of the Offspring: An International Symposium. Nutrition Reports International, Special Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, Lois M., Ed.

    1973-01-01

    Contents of this symposium include the following papers: "Effect of Maternal Protein Malnutrition on Neonatal Lung Development and Mitochondrial Function," E. J. Hawrylewicz, J. Q. Kissane, W. H. Blair and C. A. Heppner; "Effect of the Level of Nutrition on Rates of Cell Proliferation and of RNA and Protein Syntheses in the Rat," L. M. Roeder;…

  9. Maternal and child nutrition in rural Bangladesh: special reference to the effect of dietary fat supplementation on vitamin A status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alam, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    The prevalence of maternal and child malnutrition in Bangladesh is one of the highest in the world. It is estimated that 50% of women of childbearing age suffer chronic energy deficiency (BMI<18.5), nearly half of infants are born with a low birth weight (<2.5 kg), and about

  10. Maternal risk factors associated with low birth weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, N.; Jamal, M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association of socio-demographic, maternal, medical and obstetric risk factors with low birth weight. Results: The mean weight of cases was 2.08 kg as compared to 3.1 in controls. Forty-sixty percent of cases were preterm. The factors like maternal malnutrition, young age of the mothers, poverty, close birth spacing, hypertension and antenatal per vagamin (p/v) bleeding during pregnancy have independent effect in causing low birth weight (LBW). Conclusion: Maternal bio social, medical and obstetric factors have strong association with LBW. To overcome this problem, special attention is required to strengthen the mother and child health care services in the community. (author)

  11. Albumin synthesis in protein energy malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duggan, C.; Hardy, S.; Kleinman, R.E.; Harvard Medical School, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA; Lembcke, J.; Young, V.R.

    1996-01-01

    Assessment of protein nutritional status during re-feeding children with protein energy malnutrition (PEM) can be difficult. We hypothesized that the fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of albumin, as measured by stable isotope technology, would serve as an objective measure of changes in protein status, and that increased amounts of dietary protein (15% of calories vs 10%) would lead to higher FSR. Eight (5 M, 3 F) Peruvian children (mean age 15.5 months) with PEM (mean wt/ht Z score = -2.47) were studied twice during the first week of admission by the flooding dose technique. An intravenous dose of 13 C-leucine (57 mg/kg, 99 atom%) was given and serial blood samples were drawn in intervals up to 90 minutes in order to measure isotopic enrichment of serum albumin. Mean FSR for the day one infusion was 6.11% (range 3.07 - 15.37%) (n = 8). Mean FSR for the follow-up infusion was 7.67% (range 3.63 - 12.37%) (n = 5), and FSR was no different between the two dietary groups. FSR on day one was inversely related to age (r = -0.62), and one patient with Shigella dysentery had the highest FSR (15.9%). We conclude that FSR of albumin can be measured successfully in children with PEM using the flooding dose technique, and that assessment of albumin FSR holds promise to help determine protein requirements and status during recovery from PEM. (author). 14 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  12. An energy-saving development initiative increases birth rate and childhood malnutrition in rural Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mhairi A Gibson

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary life history theory predicts that, in the absence of contraception, any enhancement of maternal condition can increase human fertility. Energetic trade-offs are likely to be resolved in favour of maximizing reproductive success rather than health or longevity. Here we find support for the hypothesis that development initiatives designed to improve maternal and child welfare may also incur costs associated with increased family sizes if they do not include a family planning component.Demographic and anthropometric data were collected in a rural Ethiopian community benefiting from a recent labour-saving development technology that reduces women's energetic expenditure (n = 1,976 households. Using logistic hazards models and general linear modelling techniques, we found that whilst infant mortality has declined, the birth rate has increased, causing greater scarcity of resources within households.This study is, to our knowledge, the first to demonstrate a link between a technological development intervention and an increase in both birth rate and childhood malnutrition. Women's nutritional status was not improved by the energy-saving technology, because energy was diverted into higher birth rates. We argue that the contribution of biological processes to increased birth rates in areas of the developing world without access to modern contraception has been overlooked. This highlights the continued need for development programmes to be multisectoral, including access to and promotion of contraception.

  13. Impact of intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy with azithromycin-containing regimens on maternal nasopharyngeal carriage and antibiotic sensitivity of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus: a cross-sectional survey at delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Holger W; Aho, Celestine; Ome-Kaius, Maria; Wangnapi, Regina A; Umbers, Alexandra J; Jack, Wanda; Lafana, Alice; Michael, Audrey; Hanieh, Sarah; Siba, Peter; Mueller, Ivo; Greenhill, Andrew R; Rogerson, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) plus azithromycin (AZ) (SPAZ) has the potential for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp), but its use could increase circulation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria associated with severe pediatric infections. We evaluated the effect of monthly SPAZ-IPTp compared to a single course of SP plus chloroquine (SPCQ) on maternal nasopharyngeal carriage and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus at delivery among 854 women participating in a randomized controlled trial in Papua New Guinea. Serotyping was performed, and antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated by disk diffusion and Etest. Potential risk factors for carriage were examined. Nasopharyngeal carriage at delivery of S. pneumoniae (SPAZ, 7.2% [30/418], versus SPCQ, 19.3% [84/436]; P<0.001) and H. influenzae (2.9% [12/418] versus 6.0% [26/436], P=0.028), but not S. aureus, was significantly reduced among women who had received SPAZ-IPTp. The number of macrolide-resistant pneumococcal isolates was small but increased in the SPAZ group (13.3% [4/30], versus SPCQ, 2.2% [2/91]; P=0.033). The proportions of isolates with serotypes covered by the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine were similar (SPAZ, 10.3% [3/29], versus SPCQ, 17.6% [16/91]; P=0.352). Although macrolide-resistant isolates were rare, they were more commonly detected in women who had received SPAZ-IPTp, despite the significant reduction of maternal carriage of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae observed in this group. Future studies on SPAZ-IPTp should evaluate carriage and persistence of macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae and other pathogenic bacteria in both mothers and infants and assess the clinical significance of their circulation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Determinants of Child Malnutrition and Infant and Young Child Feeding Approaches in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinbott, Anika; Jordan, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    Women's diets often decrease with regard to amounts per meal and day as well as diversity if a household's access to food is limited. The result is a monotonous diet that, in particular, negatively affects women's nutritional status during pregnancy and lactation and, thus, the infant. The infant's diet is of utmost importance, as it needs to meet the nutrient requirements especially during the first 2 years of life, a critical window for the child's healthy development. In Cambodia, infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices are poor. Preparation of a special complementary meal in addition to breast milk feeds for children aged 6-23 months is often not a common habit. Instead, children eat watery, plain rice porridges that do not meet the nutrient requirements at this young age. A lack of adequate caring practices such as responsive feeding exacerbates the risk of malnutrition. Caregivers are often unaware of the importance of nutrition during the first 2 years of life regarding its effects on children's growth. In 2012, a randomized controlled trial (RCT) was started in two provinces of northern Cambodia: Oddar Meanchey and Preah Vihear. To contribute to reducing child mortality by addressing malnutrition among children 6-23 months of age, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) implemented a nutrition-sensitive agriculture project with nutrition-specific actions, i.e. a nutrition education intervention was embedded in a food security project. Wealth, a child's age, and maternal education were identified as determinants of a child's dietary diversity. The older the child and/or the wealthier the household, the more diverse the child's diet. Maternal education was positively associated with the child's dietary diversity. Household dietary diversity was significantly associated with child dietary diversity in a model including group, child's age, maternal education, and wealth as confounders. The RCT also showed that a 2- to 3-month

  15. Nurses needed: Identifying malnutrition in hospitalized older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abby C. Sauer

    Full Text Available The American population is aging with one in every seven Americans over the age of 65. Throughout the healthcare continuum, this segment of the population is faced with the burden of malnutrition brought on by many factors including aging, inadequate food intake, and acute and chronic medical conditions. The loss of lean body mass, strength, and functionality compound malnutrition leading to weakness, hospitalizations, and overall decreased ability to perform activities of daily living. Up to 60% of hospitalized older adults are malnourished but many patients go unrecognized and undertreated. Nurses are in a pivotal position to change this trajectory. Nurses are often the first to identify patients in need of nutrition intervention and are integral to encouraging nutritional intake from admission through discharge. Effective nutrition screening can be conducted by nurses in minimal time as part of the admission process through the use of a screening tool that is simple, fast, reliable, and valid. As part of the collaborative health care team, nurses can effectively communicate nutrition screening results through the use of the electronic health record and when prescribed, ensure that nutrition interventions occur within the targeted timeframe. Nurses can develop procedures to provide patients with meal assistance, reliable access to food and snacks across all shifts, and help bridge nutritional gaps through oral nutritional supplements all in an effort to address malnutrition. Keywords: Malnutrition, Malnutrition risk, Older adults, Nutrition screening, Nurses, Nutrition care

  16. [Social determinants of intestinal parasitism, malnutrition, and anemia: systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona-Arias, Jaiberth Antonio

    2018-02-19

    Characterize the publications on social determinants of intestinal parasitism, malnutrition, and anemia at the global level. A systematic review was conducted of the scientific literature in Pubmed, Science Direct, SciELO, LILACS, and Google Scholar with eight search strategies, guaranteeing completeness and replicability, following the phases of the PRISMA guidelines. The review included 18 studies on malnutrition, three on parasitism, three on anemia, and two on both parasitism and malnutrition; 65.4% of the studies were from South America and 69.2% were carried out among children. The prevalence of intestinal parasitism ranged between 30.6% and 83.3%; anemia, 19.7% to 48.0%; and malnutrition, 0.0% to 67.8%. It was found that biological and psychosocial determinants were most frequently studied; the most frequently studied intermediate determinants were related to housing and income; and structural determinants were least investigated. The social determinants common to the three conditions include: living in homes with poor sanitary conditions, rural areas, inadequate housing, inadequate water supply, access barriers to the medical system, young parents with little schooling, precarious employment, and low income. The majority of publications do not conduct a multilevel analysis for individual, intermediate, or structural determinants. Greater efforts are needed in health policies that address the social determinants of inequality with respect to parasitism, malnutrition, and anemia, mainly in categories as macroeconomic policy, social class, labor market, culture, values, and territory.

  17. How well do nurses recognize malnutrition in elderly patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suominen, M H; Sandelin, E; Soini, H; Pitkala, K H

    2009-02-01

    Malnutrition is a common and underrecognized clinical problem among aged institutionalized patients. The aim of this study was to investigate how well nurses recognize malnutrition in elderly patients in long-term care hospitals in Helsinki. In this descriptive, cross-sectional study, the nutritional status of 1043 elderly patients was assessed with the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), their body mass indices (BMIs) (kg m(-2)) were counted, and factors related to their nutritional care were queried using a structured questionnaire. In addition, we asked the opinions of 53 nurses on whether they considered their patients to suffer from malnutrition. All the long-term care hospitals in Helsinki, Finland participated in this study. The mean age of the patients was 81 years. The nurses considered only 15.2% of the patients to be malnourished, although the MNA showed that 56.7% were malnourished (MNApatients having a BMI24 but MNApatients considered to be malnourished received snacks and nutritional supplements less than the patients that the nurses considered to have normal nutritional status. However, only one in six of the malnourished patients received oral nutritional supplements. The nurses recognized malnutrition in their aged patients poorly. Nutrition education for nurses is urgently needed, as malnutrition and weight loss have been considered significant problems, and the benefits of nutritional care are well established.

  18. [Understanding the pathophysiology of malnutrition for better treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bandt, J-P

    2015-09-01

    Malnutrition results from an imbalance between intake and protein-energy requirements resulting in tissue losses with adverse functional consequences. However, it would be better to speak of "states of malnutrition" rather than "malnutrition". Indeed, the mechanisms involved associate, with varying degrees, intake deficiency and increased needs with different clinical consequences. Adaptation to nutrient deficiency aims at establishing lasting saving conditions by promoting optimization of energy reserve utilization while preserving protein pool. This is achieved by reducing basal metabolism (low T3), by decreasing the secretion of anabolic factors and moderately increasing catabolic hormones. Unlike the previous process, the metabolic response to injury or stress, which will sometime induce major increase in requirements, will have as immediate purpose the defense of the organism. The body will draw sometime substantially in its protein pool to produce the glucose required for example by the immune cells. Stress response stems from both an endocrine response, and an immuno-inflammatory one with the important role of pro-inflammatory cytokines released in response to pathogens and more recently alarmins in response to endogenous stress in the inflammatory phenomena of the stress response and in the resulting malnutrition state. Treatment of these malnutrition conditions will thus differ: promoting anabolism in one case and fighting resistance to anabolism and hypercatabolism in the other. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. What’s new? Investigating risk factors for severe childhood malnutrition in a high HIV prevalence South African setting1

    Science.gov (United States)

    SALOOJEE, HAROON; DE MAAYER, TIM; GARENNE, MICHEL L.; KAHN, KATHLEEN

    2010-01-01

    Aim To identify risk factors for severe childhood malnutrition in a rural South African district with a high HIV/AIDS prevalence. Design Case-control study. Setting Bushbuckridge District, Limpopo Province, South Africa. Participants 100 children with severe malnutrition (marasmus, kwashiorkor, and marasmic kwashiorkor) were compared with 200 better nourished (>−2 SD weight-for-age) controls, matched by age and village of residence. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted on a variety of biological and social risk factors. Results HIV status was known only for a minority of cases (39%), of whom 87% were HIV positive, while 45% of controls were stunted. In multivariate analysis, risk factors for severe malnutrition included suspicion of HIV in the family (parents or children) (OR 217.7, 95% CI 22.7–2091.3), poor weaning practices (OR 3.0, 95% CI 2.0–4.6), parental death (OR 38.0, 95% CI 3.8–385.3), male sex (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2–6.0), and higher birth order (third child or higher) (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.0–5.1). Protective factors included a diverse food intake (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.41–0.67) and receipt of a state child support grant (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.20–0.97). A borderline association existed for family wealth (OR 0.9 per unit, 95% CI 0.83–1.0), father smoking marijuana (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.1–14.5), and history of a pulmonary tuberculosis contact (OR 3.2, 95% CI 0.9–11.0). Conclusions Despite the increasing contribution of HIV to the development of severe malnutrition, traditional risk factors such as poor nutrition, parental disadvantage and illness, poverty, and social inequity remain important contributors to the prevalence of severe malnutrition. Interventions aiming to prevent and reduce severe childhood malnutrition in high HIV prevalence settings need to encompass the various dimensions of the disease: nutritional, economic, and social, and address the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS. PMID:17676510

  20. Six simple questions to detect malnutrition or malnutrition risk in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tranquilina Gutiérrez-Gómez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Of the numerous instruments available to detect nutritional risk, the most widely used is the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA, but it takes 15–20 min to complete and its systematic administration in primary care units is not feasible in practice. We developed a tool to evaluate malnutrition risk that can be completed more rapidly using just clinical variables. Between 2008 and 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 418 women aged ≥60 years from Mexico. Our outcome was positive MNA and our secondary variables included were: physical activity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, educational level, dentition, psychological problems, living arrangements, history of falls, age and the number of tablets taken daily. The sample was divided randomly into two groups: construction and validation. Construction: a risk table was constructed to estimate the likelihood of the outcome, and risk groups were formed. Validation: the area under the ROC curve (AUC was calculated and we compared the expected and the observed outcomes. The following risk factors were identified: physical activity, hypertension, diabetes, dentition, psychological problems and living with the family. The AUC was 0.77 (95% CI [0.68–0.86], p < 0.001. No differences were found between the expected and the observed outcomes (p = 0.902. This study presents a new malnutrition screening test for use in elderly women. The test is based on six very simple, quick and easy-to-evaluate questions, enabling the MNA to be reserved for confirmation. However, it should be used with caution until validation studies have been performed in other geographical areas.

  1. The immune system in children with malnutrition - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Maren Johanne Heilskov; Kolte, Lilian; Briend, André

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malnourished children have increased risk of dying, with most deaths caused by infectious diseases. One mechanism behind this may be impaired immune function. However, this immune deficiency of malnutrition has not previously been systematically reviewed. OBJECTIVES: To review...... the scientific literature about immune function in children with malnutrition. METHODS: A systematic literature search was done in PubMed, and additional articles identified in reference lists and by correspondence with experts in the field. The inclusion criteria were studies investigating immune parameters...... are reduced in severely malnourished children, but intact in moderate malnutrition. Cytokine patterns are skewed towards a Th2-response. Other immune parameters seem intact or elevated: leukocyte and lymphocyte counts are unaffected, and levels of immunoglobulins, particularly immunoglobulin A, are high...

  2. [Conceptual milestones in the history of protein-energy malnutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Franco, L

    1999-01-01

    Although the biblical horsemen of hunger, plague and war have proverbially ridden together, the consequences of these adversities, i.e. malnutrition and death, may have been secularly interpreted as natural as life itself. This may be the reason why the first clinical description of what is now known as protein-energy malnutrition, did not appear until the 19th century, in 1865 to be precise. The limited dissemination of this finding, originally written in Spanish, brought about a rediscovery and successful description of the disease in English in 1933. In 1949, one year after their creation, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) decided to unify their diagnostic criteria of malnutrition, and endorse further research. The present assay describes some of the major conceptual landmarks in the history of the scientific knowledge of this disease.

  3. Behavioral teratogenicity induced by maternal food restriction: maternal cannibalism and poor reflex development in offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Lopes Ricci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2014v27n2p185 Recent studies have attributed the presence of several toxic chemicals during pregnancy to maternal malnutrition. A deficit in maternal nutritional status may be crucial for the development of teratogenicity. However, nowadays, the concept of teratogenesis is not restricted to structural abnormalities, but, also, to functional changes, such as, for instance, those observed in behavior. This study investigated the effects of maternal food restriction (FR during pregnancy on the physical, behavioral, and reflex development of offspring. Pregnant female rats underwent feed restriction at different levels (15, 40, 55, and 70% of the daily feed intake when compared to the control group, starting on gestation day 6 (GD6 until GD17; the control group received food ad libitum. After birth, the physical and neurobehavioral development of offspring were assessed. The results showed that, except for weight reduction, the physical development of offsprings from the FR groups did not differ from that of the control group. However, the experimental groups showed deficits in neurological reflexes, particularly with regard to negative geotaxis and palmar reflex. In general activity, the offspring of the FR group 40% (E40 and E55 showed low frequencies of locomotion and rearing and long periods of immobility. The results show that maternal FR during pregnancy promotes neurological disorders in offspring, but it does not affect physical development, showing the importance of behavioral assessments.

  4. The importance of maternal nutrition for health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Cetin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition plays a major role in maternal and child health and it is widely recognized that optimum nutrition in early life is the foundation for long-term health. A healthy maternal dietary pattern, along with adequate maternal body composition, metabolism and placental nutrient supply, reduces the risk of maternal, fetal and long-term effects in the offspring. While undernutrition is mainly an issue of low-income countries, malnutrition, due to poor quality diet, is becoming a global health problem.Preconceptional counseling of women of childbearing age should spread awareness of the importance of maternal nutrition before and during pregnancy and should promote a cultural lifestyle change, in favor of a healthy weight before conceiving and balanced healthy diet with high-quality foods consumption. Supplementation and/or fortification can make a contribution when recommended micronutrient intakes are difficult to be met through food alone. In industrialized countries, although a balanced diet is generally accessible, a switch to a high-fat and low-quality diet has led to inadequate vitamin and mineral intake during pregnancy. Evidence do not support a routine multiple micronutrient supplementation but highlights the importance of an individualized approach, in order to recognize nutritional deficiencies of individuals, thus leading to healthful dietary practices prior to conception and eventually to tailored supplementation. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  5. Hospital malnutrition in Latin America: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Maria Isabel T D; Perman, Mario Ignacio; Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky

    2017-08-01

    Disease-related malnutrition is a major public health issue in both industrialised and emerging countries. The reported prevalence in hospitalised adults ranges from 20% to 50%. Initial reports from emerging countries suggested a higher prevalence compared with other regions, with limited data on outcomes and costs. We performed a systematic literature search for articles on disease-related malnutrition in Latin American countries published between January 1995 and September 2014. Studies reporting data on the prevalence, clinical outcomes, or economic costs of malnutrition in an adult (≥18 years) inpatient population with a sample size of ≥30 subjects were eligible for inclusion. Methodological quality of the studies was assessed by two independent reviewers using published criteria. We identified 1467 citations; of these, 66 studies including 29 ,474 patients in 12 Latin American countries met the criteria for inclusion. There was considerable variability in methodology and in the reported prevalence of disease-related malnutrition; however, prevalence was consistently in the range of 40%-60% at the time of admission, with several studies reporting an increase in prevalence with increasing duration of hospitalisation. Disease-related malnutrition was associated with an increase in infectious and non-infectious clinical complications, length of hospital stay, and costs. Disease-related malnutrition is a highly prevalent condition that imposes a substantial health and economic burden on the countries of Latin America. Further research is necessary to characterise screening/assessment practices and identify evidence-based solutions to this persistent and costly public health issue. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Child malnutrition in sub-Saharan Africa: A meta-analysis of demographic and health surveys (2006-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akombi, Blessing J; Agho, Kingsley E; Merom, Dafna; Renzaho, Andre M; Hall, John J

    2017-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has one of the highest levels of child malnutrition globally. Therefore, a critical look at the distribution of malnutrition within its sub-regions is required to identify the worst affected areas. This study provides a meta-analysis of the prevalence of malnutrition indicators (stunting, wasting and underweight) within four sub-regions of sub-Saharan Africa. Cross-sectional data from the most recent Demographic and Health Surveys (2006-2016) of 32 countries in sub-Saharan Africa were used. The countries were grouped into four sub-regions (East Africa, West Africa, Southern Africa and Central Africa), and a meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the prevalence of each malnutrition indicator within each of the sub-regions. Significant heterogeneity was detected among the various surveys (I2 >50%), hence a random effect model was used, and sensitivity analysis was performed, to examine the effects of outliers. Stunting was defined as HAZAfrica; Niger (43.9%), Mali (38.3%), Sierra Leone (37.9%) and Nigeria (36.8%) in West Africa; Democratic Republic of Congo (42.7%) and Chad (39.9%) in Central Africa. Wasting was highest in Niger (18.0%), Burkina Faso (15.50%) and Mali (12.7%) in West Africa; Comoros (11.1%) and Ethiopia (8.70%) in East Africa; Namibia (6.2%) in Southern Africa; Chad (13.0%) and Sao Tome & Principle (10.5%) in Central Africa. Underweight was highest in Burundi (28.8%) and Ethiopia (25.2%) in East Africa; Niger (36.4%), Nigeria (28.7%), Burkina Faso (25.7%), Mali (25.0%) in West Africa; and Chad (28.8%) in Central Africa. The prevalence of malnutrition was highest within countries in East Africa and West Africa compared to the WHO Millennium development goals target for 2015. Appropriate nutrition interventions need to be prioritised in East Africa and West Africa if sub-Saharan Africa is to meet the WHO global nutrition target of improving maternal, infant and young child nutrition by 2025.

  7. Child malnutrition in sub-Saharan Africa: A meta-analysis of demographic and health surveys (2006-2016.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blessing J Akombi

    Full Text Available Sub-Saharan Africa has one of the highest levels of child malnutrition globally. Therefore, a critical look at the distribution of malnutrition within its sub-regions is required to identify the worst affected areas. This study provides a meta-analysis of the prevalence of malnutrition indicators (stunting, wasting and underweight within four sub-regions of sub-Saharan Africa.Cross-sectional data from the most recent Demographic and Health Surveys (2006-2016 of 32 countries in sub-Saharan Africa were used. The countries were grouped into four sub-regions (East Africa, West Africa, Southern Africa and Central Africa, and a meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the prevalence of each malnutrition indicator within each of the sub-regions. Significant heterogeneity was detected among the various surveys (I2 >50%, hence a random effect model was used, and sensitivity analysis was performed, to examine the effects of outliers. Stunting was defined as HAZ<-2; wasting as WHZ<-2 and underweight as WAZ<-2.Stunting was highest in Burundi (57.7% and Malawi (47.1% in East Africa; Niger (43.9%, Mali (38.3%, Sierra Leone (37.9% and Nigeria (36.8% in West Africa; Democratic Republic of Congo (42.7% and Chad (39.9% in Central Africa. Wasting was highest in Niger (18.0%, Burkina Faso (15.50% and Mali (12.7% in West Africa; Comoros (11.1% and Ethiopia (8.70% in East Africa; Namibia (6.2% in Southern Africa; Chad (13.0% and Sao Tome & Principle (10.5% in Central Africa. Underweight was highest in Burundi (28.8% and Ethiopia (25.2% in East Africa; Niger (36.4%, Nigeria (28.7%, Burkina Faso (25.7%, Mali (25.0% in West Africa; and Chad (28.8% in Central Africa.The prevalence of malnutrition was highest within countries in East Africa and West Africa compared to the WHO Millennium development goals target for 2015. Appropriate nutrition interventions need to be prioritised in East Africa and West Africa if sub-Saharan Africa is to meet the WHO global nutrition target

  8. STUDY OF SEVERE MALNUTRITION IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN OF MELGHAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Shelgaonkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available i                Introduction:Melghat - tribal block of villages (with 87.5% tribal population in Maharashtra, (India unfortunately is known for malnutrition among children, despite lots of efforts taken by Govt. and NGOs.ii              Rationale: The study was conducted to examine the causes of malnutrition and awareness about consequences of malnutrition as a part of Post-graduate thesis.iii            Objective:Tocompare the status and causes of malnutrition in children below age five in Intervention and Control Villages in Melghat over a period of 2 months.iv             Materials and Methods: A questionnaire based survey method was used by selecting ten villages out of 40 using lottery method where MAHAN, Melghat is already working. Selected ten villages were from Intervention and Control groups (five each. In Intervention villages health and nutritional education awareness programs were conducted while in control group government programs such as 21 day care for severely malnourished children were going on but no health and nutritional education programs. Children’s weight, heights were taken and also general information like mothers educational status was collected in both groups by visiting all families. The data was analyzed for status of malnutrition in preschool children from these families and awareness about nutrition in mothers.v               Results:Status of malnutrition in preschool children was lower in Intervention villages (66.0 % as compared to that of Control villages (73.0 %, while prevalence was higher among the children whose mothers were illiterate. Malnutrition was higher in girls (70.5 %, 77.1 % as compared to that of boys (61.4 %, 68.7 % in both groups.vi             Conclusion: The analysis of study data from tenvillages suggested thatproper health and nutritional education about feeding is lacking in mothers. To reduce this childhood

  9. [Malnutrition in Elderly Trauma Patients - Comparison of Two Assessment Tools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihle, C; Bahrs, C; Freude, T; Bickel, M; Spielhaupter, I; Wintermeyer, E; Stollhof, L; Grünwald, L; Ziegler, P; Pscherer, S; Stöckle, U; Nussler, A

    2017-04-01

    Background: The prevalence of malnutrition in hospitalised patients is reported to be between 16 and 55 % across disciplines. Within hospital care, screening for malnutrition is required. However, in orthopaedics and trauma surgery, there is still no generally accepted recommendation for the methods for such a data survey. In the present study, the following aspects are to be investigated with the help of two established scores: (1) the prevalence of malnutrition in the patient population of geriatric trauma care, and (2) the correlation between methods of data survey. Material and Methods: Between June 2014 and June 2015, a consecutive series of hospitalised trauma patients were studied prospectively with two validated screening instruments to record nutritional status. The study was carried out at a municipal trauma surgery hospital, which is a first level interregional trauma centre as well as a university hospital. The Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS) and the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA Short and Long Form) were used. All patients were divided into three age groups:  80 years. The prevalence of malnutrition in geriatric trauma patients and the correlation between the screening instruments were determined. For a better comparison, prescreening and main assessment were applied to all patients. For statistical evaluation, both quantitative and semi-quantitative parameters were used. Furthermore, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Spearman's correlation analysis and the chi-square test were applied. These tests were two-sided and had a level of significance of 5 %. The present study was partially funded by the Oskar-Helene-Heim Foundation. Results: 521 patients (43.8 % women, 56.2 % men), with a mean age of 53.96 ± 18.13 years, were statistically evaluated within the present study. Depending on the method of the data survey, malnutrition (NRS≥3) in geriatric trauma patients varied from 31.3 % (65-80 years) to 60 % (> 80 years). With MNA, 28

  10. Assessment and treatment of malnutrition in Dutch geriatric practice: consensus through a modified Delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asselt, D.Z.; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M.A.E.; van der Cammen, T.J.; Disselhorst, L.G.; Janse, A.; Lonterman-Monasch, S.; Maas, H.A.; Popescu, M.E.; Scholzel-Dorenbos, C.J.; Sipers, W.M.; Veldhoven, C.M.; Wijnen, H.H.; Rikkert, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: scientific evidence regarding the optimal management of malnutrition in geriatric patients is scarce. Our aim was to develop a consensus statement for geriatric hospital practice concerning six elements: (i) definition of malnutrition, (ii) screening and assessment, (iii) treatment and

  11. Assessment and treatment of malnutrition in Dutch geriatric practice: consensus through a modified Delphi study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselt, D.Z.B. van; Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M.A. van; Cammen, T.J.M. van der; Disselhorst, L.G.; Janse, A.; Lonterman-Monasch, S.; Maas, H.A.; Popescu, M.E.; Scholzel-Dorenbos, C.J.M.; Sipers, W.M.; Veldhoven, C.M.M. van; Wijnen, H.H.M; Olde Rikkert, M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: scientific evidence regarding the optimal management of malnutrition in geriatric patients is scarce. Our aim was to develop a consensus statement for geriatric hospital practice concerning six elements: (i) definition of malnutrition, (ii) screening and assessment, (iii) treatment and

  12. Clinical implications of malnutrition in childhood cancer patients-infections and mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, E. A. H.; Brinksma, A.; Miedema, K. G. E.; de Bock, G. H.; Tissing, W. J. E.

    In childhood cancer patients, malnutrition has been proposed to increase infection rates and reduce survival. We investigated whether malnutrition at diagnosis and during treatment and weight loss during treatment are prognostic factors for infection rates and survival, within a heterogeneous

  13. Malnutrition, eating difficulties and feeding dependence in a stroke rehabilitation centre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poels, Bas; Brinkman-Zijlker, HG; Dijkstra, PU; Postema, K

    Purpose. To analyse prevalence of malnutrition, eating difficulties and feeding dependence in stroke rehabilitation patients because little is known about these prevalence's. Stroke patients have an increased risk for developing eating difficulties, feeding dependence and malnutrition because of

  14. Body Composition Monitor Assessing Malnutrition in the Hemodialysis Population Independently Predicts Mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberger, Jaroslav; Kissova, Viera; Majernikova, Maria; Straussova, Zuzana; Boldizsar, Jan

    Objective: Malnutrition is a known predictor of mortality in the general and hemodialysis populations. However, diagnosing malnutrition in dialysis patients remains problematic. Body composition monitoring (BCM) is currently used mainly for assessing overhydratation in hemodialysis patients, but it

  15. Public health interventions, barriers, and opportunities for improving maternal nutrition in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Usha; Lowe, Alyssa; Vir, Sheila; Kumar, Shuba; Mohanraj, Rani; Chaturvedi, Anuraag; Noznesky, Elizabeth A; Martorell, Reynaldo; Mason, John B

    2012-06-01

    Inadequate nutrient intake, early and multiple pregnancies, poverty, caste discrimination, and gender inequality contribute to poor maternal nutrition in India. While malnutrition is seen throughout the life cycle, it is most acute during childhood, adolescence, pregnancy, and lactation. Although nutrition policies are on the books and interventions are in place, child malnutrition and maternal undernutrition persist as severe public health problems. To evaluate the implementation of maternal nutrition programs in India. The research was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 consisted of a desk review of national and state policies pertinent to maternal nutrition and national-level key informant interviews with respondents who have a working knowledge of relevant organizations and interventions. Phase 2 utilized in-depth interviews and focus group discussions at the state, district, and community levels in eight districts of two states: Tamil Nadu and Uttar Pradesh. All data were analyzed thematically. India has a rich portfolio of programs and policies that address maternal health and nutrition; however, systematic weaknesses, logistical gaps, resource scarcity, and poor utilization continue to hamper progress. Elevating the priority given to maternal nutrition in government health programs and implementing strategies to improve women's status will help to address many of the challenges facing India's nutrition programs. Programs can be strengthened by promoting integration of services, ensuring effective procurement mechanisms for micronutrient and food supplements, establishing regional training facilities for improved program implementation, and strengthening program monitoring and evaluation.

  16. Exploring the paradox: double burden of malnutrition in rural South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth W. Kimani-Murage

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This article is a review of the PhD thesis by Elizabeth Kimani-Murage that explores the double burden of malnutrition in rural South Africa. This is in the context of a worryingly rapid increase in obesity and obesity-related diseases in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs including South Africa, and in the wake of on-going nutrition transition and lifestyle changes in these countries. Objective: To understand the profiles of malnutrition among children and adolescents in a poor, high HIV prevalent, transitional society in a middle-income country. Methods: A cross-sectional growth survey was conducted in 2007 targeting 4,000 children and adolescents aged 1–20 years. In addition, HIV testing was carried out on children aged 1–5 years and Tanner pubertal assessment among adolescents aged 9–20 years. Results: The study shows stunting at an early age and adolescent obesity, particularly among girls, that co-exists in the same socio-geographic population. The study also shows that HIV is an independent modifiable risk factor for poor nutritional outcomes in children and makes a significant contribution to nutritional outcomes at the individual level. Significant predictors of undernutrition at an early age, documented at individual, household, and community levels, include child's HIV status, age and birth weight, maternal age, age of household head, and area of residence. Significant predictors of overweight/obesity and risk for metabolic disease during adolescence, documented at individual and household levels include child's age, sex, and pubertal development, household-level food security, socio-economic status, and household head's highest education level. Conclusions: The combination of early stunting and adolescent obesity raises critical concerns in the wake of the rising public health importance of metabolic diseases in LMICs. This is because, both paediatric obesity and adult short stature are risk factors for

  17. Epidural Labor Analgesia and Maternal Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Emily E; Arendt, Katherine W

    2017-06-01

    Women receiving an epidural for labor analgesia are at increased risk for intrapartum fever. This relationship has been supported by observational, before and after, and randomized controlled trials. The etiology is not well understood but is likely a result of noninfectious inflammation as studies have found women with fever have higher levels of inflammatory markers. Maternal pyrexia may change obstetric management and women are more likely to receive antibiotics or undergo cesarean delivery. Maternal pyrexia is associated with adverse neonatal outcomes. With these consequences, understanding and preventing maternal fever is imperative.

  18. The prevalence of malnutrition according to the new ESPEN definition in four diverse populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rojer, A. G M; Kruizenga, H. M.; Trappenburg, Marijke C.; Reijnierse, E. M.; Sipilä, S.; Narici, Marco V.; Hogrel, J.Y.; Butler-Browne, G.; Mcphee, Jamie S.; Pääsuke, M.; Meskers, Carel G M; Maier, A. B.; de van der Schueren, Marian A E

    2016-01-01

    Background & aims: Consensus on the definition of malnutrition has not yet been reached. Recently, The European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) proposed a consensus definition of malnutrition. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence of malnutrition according

  19. Malnutrition risk in hospitalized children : use of 3 screening tools in a large European population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chourdakis, Michael; Hecht, Christina; Gerasimidis, Konstantinos; Joosten, Koen F. M.; Karagiozoglou-Lainpoudi, Thomais; Koetse, Harma A.; Ksiazyk, Janusz; Lazea, Cecilia; Shamir, Raanan; Szajewska, Hania; Koletzko, Berthold; Hulst, Jessie M.

    Background: Several malnutrition screening tools have been advocated for use in pediatric inpatients. Objective: We evaluated how 3 popular pediatric nutrition screening tools [i.e., the Pediatric Yorkhill Malnutrition Score (PYMS), the Screening Tool for the Assessment of Malnutrition in Pediatrics

  20. Specificity of indexes of malnutrition when applied to apparently healthy people: the effect of age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, T.H.J.; Bree, de A.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Bakkeren, J.; Bör, B.; Wild, de G.; Katan, M.B.

    1997-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition is thought to be widespread in hospitalized patients. However, the specificity of indexes used to assess malnutrition is uncertain. We therefore assessed the rate of false-positive diagnoses of malnutrition when biochemical-anthropometric indexes were applied to healthy

  1. Protein malnutrition and metronidazole induced intestinal bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-17

    Sep 17, 2008 ... The gastrointestinal tract serves as a potent barrier that prevents luminal bacteria from entering the host. This barrier function is maintained by a well-balanced intestinal flora, an unaltered perme- ability of the intestinal mucosa, and a normal functioning immune system. Furthermore, the intestinal mucosa, in.

  2. Malnutrition in older persons: underestimated, underdiagnosed and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The right of older persons to enjoy optimal health and live in a dignified manner is protected in various international ... multi-model interventions that target frail and pre-disabled older persons could prevent or reverse ... to hospital admissions.20 Systematic inspection of the oral cavity is, therefore, crucial as a part of the ...

  3. Malnutrition in remission of childhood cancers as assessed by bioelectric impedance analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Konovalova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of our cross-sectional bioimpedance study of children aged 7–17 years cured of cancer during follow-up (patients’ group, n = 552, remission time range 0–15 years and of age-matched healthy controls (n = 1,500 show significant intergroup differences in body height and body composition parameters. The most pronounced alterations in the patients’ group were observed in standardized values of phase angle reflecting a sharp decrease in the percentage of metabolically active body cell mass in fat-free mass. Malnutrition, judged from the prevalence of obesity and low phase angle, was observed in 52.7 % of our patients reaching a maximum of 76.8 % in a subgroup of children with CNS tumors. In view of known association that exists between malnutrition and reduced tolerance to chemotherapy, increased susceptibility to infections and adverse outcomes rate, we recommend using bioimpedance analysis in remission of childhood cancers in order to monitoring and timely correction of nutritional state as well as for prevention of delayed cardiovascular risks.

  4. Malnutrition in remission of childhood cancers as assessed by bioelectric impedance analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Konovalova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of our cross-sectional bioimpedance study of children aged 7–17 years cured of cancer during follow-up (patients’ group, n = 552, remission time range 0–15 years and of age-matched healthy controls (n = 1,500 show significant intergroup differences in body height and body composition parameters. The most pronounced alterations in the patients’ group were observed in standardized values of phase angle reflecting a sharp decrease in the percentage of metabolically active body cell mass in fat-free mass. Malnutrition, judged from the prevalence of obesity and low phase angle, was observed in 52.7 % of our patients reaching a maximum of 76.8 % in a subgroup of children with CNS tumors. In view of known association that exists between malnutrition and reduced tolerance to chemotherapy, increased susceptibility to infections and adverse outcomes rate, we recommend using bioimpedance analysis in remission of childhood cancers in order to monitoring and timely correction of nutritional state as well as for prevention of delayed cardiovascular risks.

  5. A review of the prevalence and factors responsible for mal-nutrition in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafsa Hina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems occupying special attention identified by the World Health Organization also include Childhood malnutrition (Beagle hole et al., 1993. Development goals are also program by the United Nations to halve the problem of under nutrition (Alderman et al., 2005. Despite of the involvement of international organizations still under nutrition has a main contribution to the high mortality rate of the children in the most part of the world (Caulfield et al., 2004. Poverty plays a main part in the high prevalence of childhood under nutrition. The child is said to be under-weight when its weight is lower than the weight of the reference rage for that age. The weight for height deficiency is known as wasting, while height for age deficiency as stunting. Wasting may be due to acute food shortage while prolonged food deprivation can cause stunting (Cosminsky et al., 1993; de Onis et al., 2000; Fernandez et al., 2002; and Zere & McIntyre, 2003. The factors responsible for the predisposition of children to mal nutrition vary and ranges from political instability to the economical status of the area (de Onis et al., 2000. Therefore protocols developed for the preventive measures of mal-nutrition should be multifaceted. 

  6. A CLINICAL STUDY OF MATERNAL DEATHS DUE TO PPH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavana Gowda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: A study of maternal death conducted to evaluate various factors responsible for maternal deaths. To identify complications in pregnancy, a childbirth which result in maternal death, and to identify opportunities for preventive intervention and understand the events leading to death; so that improving maternal health and reducing maternal mortality rate significantly. To analyze the causes and epidemiological amounts maternal mortality e.g. age parity, socioeconomic status and literacy. In order to reduce maternal mortality and to implement safe motherhood program and complications of pregnancy and to find out safe motherhood program. METHODS: The data collected was a retrograde by a proforma containing particulars of the diseased, detailed history and relatives were interviewed for additional information. The data collected was analysed. RESULTS: Maternal mortality rate in our own institution is 200/ 100,000 live births. Among 30 maternal deaths, 56% deaths (17 were among low socio - economic status, groups 60% deaths among unbooked 53.5% deaths more along illiterates evidenced by direct and indirect deaths about 25% of deaths were preventable. CONCLUSION: Maternal mortality is a global problem, facing every country in the world. Target specific interventions are needed for specific population. Fifth millennium development goal (MDG is to reduce maternal mortality by 75% by the year 2015, worthwhile investment for every case provider, results that investing on mothers

  7. Plasma Renin Activity in Children with Protein Energy Malnutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    renin activity was significantly increased in children with kwashiorkor; and also that the activity was significantly higher in the patients who subsequently died in hospital, than in those who survived. Increased renin activity probably contributes to the retention of water characteris- tic of protein energy malnutrition. 5. Afr. Med.

  8. Moderate malnutrition in children aged five years and younger in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The objective of the study was to describe wasting and stunting in children aged 12-60 months, admitted to targeted supplementary feeding programmes for the treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) in South Africa. Design: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was performed. Subjects and setting: ...

  9. The link between poverty and malnutrition: A South African perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article, a brief review of the nutritional problems in South Africa, as well as the intergenerational, vicious cycle of poverty and malnutrition, are used to argue for the necessity of including a nutrition intervention component in poverty alleviation programmes. It is concluded that this cycle can be broken by improving the ...

  10. Adolescent malnutrition: Prevalence and pattern in Abuja Municipal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence and pattern of malnutrition among adolescents in senior secondary schools in The Abuja Municipal area council. Methods: Study design: this is a cross-sectional study conducted among adolescents (10-19 years) in secondary schools. A multistage sampling technique was employed ...

  11. Treatment outcome of children with severe acute malnutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Inadequate intake of carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins and minerals is one of the causes for malnutrition. It often affects young children and contributes to more than 60% of deaths in children in developing countries. One in four of malnourished children receiving traditional treatment die during or soon after ...

  12. socio-economic risk factors for severe protein energy malnutrition

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-09-01

    Sep 1, 2000 ... impact of mothers' education on nutrition status is through its ability to improve socio-economic status, health facility utilisation and greater involvement of mothers in decisions regarding child care(19,20). In the current study, coming from an urban setting was associated with severe forms of malnutrition ( ...

  13. Maize and the Malnutrition Conundrum in South Africa | BOOYENS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rappaport's theoretical principle of ecological logic and its relationship to culture contingency is used to indicate that the causal factors of malnutrition are to be found in the colonial political-economy of South Africa and in the monetary logic embedded in a racially skewed free market system of production. Currently, the ...

  14. The Double Burden of Malnutrition : A Review of Global Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Rokx, Claudia; Shrimpton, Roger

    2012-01-01

    The Double Burden of Malnutrition (DBM) is the coexistence of both under nutrition and over nutrition in the same population across the life course. 'Across the life course' refers to the phenomenon that under nutrition early in life contributes to an increased propensity for over nutrition in adulthood. The DBM affects all countries, rich and poor, and is a particular concern in countries...

  15. Management of severe acute malnutrition using the World Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of severe acute malnutrition using the World Health Organisation's guidelines at Mogalakwena hospital, Limpopo Province, South Africa. ... In view of this there is still a need for continuous training for the development of healthcare professionals' knowledge, skills and resources that are required to treat this ...

  16. The double burden of malnutrition: obesity and iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cepeda López, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The world faces a “double burden” of malnutrition; this is true especially in transition countries like Mexico. The co-existence of obesity and iron deficiency (ID) within a person has been clearly demonstrated in several studies but the mechanisms linking them remain

  17. Agricultural productivity, malnutrition and human health in sub ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review examined the current state of agricultural productivity, food security, the prevalence of malnutrition and health status in Sub-Saharan Africa. Agriculture is the mainstay of the economy of most countries in this region, and this sector is characterized by gross underperformance. This is because majority of farmers ...

  18. Children with protein energy malnutrition: management and out ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) is a common condition in our environment, and still associated with high morbidity and mortality. Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the outcome and management of children with PEM in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH), Kano, Nigeria. Methods: The ...

  19. The role of physical activity in the relationship between malnutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of physical activity in the relationship between malnutrition and body composition in rural South African children: the Ellisras longitudinal study. MA Monyeki, LLJ Koppes, JWR Twisk, KD Monyeki, HCG Kemper. Abstract. No Abstract. African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance Vol.

  20. Malnutrition and mental development: Is there a sensitive period? A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To examine the possibility that there is an early sensitive period for the effects of malnutrition on cognitive development, three groups of children (N = 197) were recruited from a birth cohort with known growth characteristics in south-west Ethiopia (N = 1563). All had initial weights;: 2500 g. Early growth falterers dropped in ...

  1. Protein-energy malnutrition and malaria antibody profiles in pre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protein-energy malnutrition is a serious clinical condition with high prevalence in areas where Plasmodium falciparum is highly endemic such as western Kenya. There is a major need to determine the relationship between PEM and malaria antibody profiles especially in an area where malaria is endemic. The objective of ...

  2. Factors associated with malnutrition among children in internally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of and describe the risk factors for protein energy malnutrition among under five years old children living in internally displaced persons camps in Omoro county Gulu district. Methods This was a cross sectional study undertaken among internally displaced people\\'s in Omoro county, ...

  3. Treatment outcome of children with severe acute malnutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    Discussion: Our results show that the new management approach implemented in the TFC improved the treatment outcome of malnourished children compared to the minimum international standard set for management of severe acute malnutrition which is cure rate of at least 75% and death rate less than 10%, average ...

  4. The double burden of malnutrition: obesity and iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cepeda López, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The world faces a “double burden” of malnutrition; this is true especially in transition countries like Mexico. The co-existence of obesity and iron deficiency (ID) within a person has been clearly demonstrated in several studies but the mechanisms linking

  5. Prevalence of hematological abnormalities and malnutrition in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-10-11

    Oct 11, 2013 ... case definitions) and malnutrition in HIV‑infected children receiving care at the University of Nigeria Teaching. Hospital, Enugu. ... on highly active antiretroviral therapy treatment and had advanced HIV disease (clinical stage 3). Children who were ..... iron, vitamin B complex, and folic acid deficiencies are.

  6. Alzheimer's Disease in the Danish Malnutrition Period 1999-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre-Sørensen, Maja; Kristensen, Gustav David Westergaard

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies published over the last few years have shown that malnutrition is a risk factor for developing and worsening Alzheimer's disease (AD) and that a balanced diet can delay the onset of the disease. During the period from January 1999 to January 2007, a statistically...

  7. Malnutrition and associated factors among adults starting on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    the prevalence and factors associated with malnutrition among adult PLHIV attending care and treatment centre (CTC) in Temeke .... medications and refusal to sign informed consent form. This study ... A comparison of the younger groups with older people shows that 67% of the participants were aged between 29 and 39 ...

  8. Estimation of zinc levels among children with malnutrition at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimation of zinc levels among children with malnutrition at Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Northwestern Nigeria. Asma'u Adamu, Mohammed N. Jiya, Hamidu Ahmed, Paul K. Ibitoye, Modupe O. Ugege, Usman M. Sani, Tahir Yusuf, Fatima B. Jiya, Khadijat O. Isezuo ...

  9. A Comparative Assessment of the Epidemiology of Malnutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HA Agbo, EA Envuladu, AI Zoakah. Abstract. Background: Majority of school children lack adequate amount of food, thereby inducing malnutrition, which now poses a serious threat to education, particularly in developing countries, including Nigeria. The importance of good nutrition in the proper and optimal development in ...

  10. Child malnutrition and mortality in Swaziland: Situation analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malnutrition is a major confounding factor for child morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In Swaziland, about 31% of the under-five children are stunted in growth, where-as 1% and 6% are wasted and underweight, respectively. Hhohho region has the highest prevalence of underweight children (8.2%) relative to ...

  11. Management of severe malnutrition | Schubl | South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In summary, if the Millenium Development Goals (MDGs) are to be addressed effectively, it is imperative that severe malnutrition be addressed at the international and national level, using strategies that work, and that additional resources are committed to improving hospital treatment and establishing community-based ...

  12. Qualitative Study of Malnutrition in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Janine J. L.; Maaskant, Marian A.; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny M. J.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of underweight status is relatively high in persons with intellectual disabilities. However, it is not clear whether this is due to malnourishment. The authors sought to examine the awareness and knowledge of physicians, dieticians, and direct care staff regarding malnutrition in people with intellectual disabilities. They also…

  13. Malnutrition in hospitalized patients: results from La Rioja.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Palmero, Ángela; Serrano Pérez, Andra; Chinchetru Ranedo, Mª José; Cámara Balda, Alejandro; Martínez de Salinas Santamarí, Mª Ángeles; Villar García, Gonzalo; Marín Lizárraga, Mª Del Mar

    2017-03-30

    There is a high malnutrition prevalence in hospitalized patients. To determine the malnutrition prevalence in hospitalized patients of La Rioja Community (Spain) when evaluated with different screening/ evaluation tools and its relationship with hospital stay and mortality. Cross sectional observational study of hospitalized adult patients (age > 18 years old) from medical and surgical departments that underwent within 72 h of their admission a nutritional screening with Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS) 2002, Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT) y Subjective Global Assessment (SGA). 384 patients (273 medical and 111 surgical) were evaluated. Almost fifty percent of them were considered malnourished independently of the screening/assessment tool used. High concordance was found between SGA and NRS-2002 (k = 0.758). Malnourished patients had a longer hospital stay than those well-nourished (9.29 vs. 7.10 days; p = 0.002), used a greater number of medicines (9.2 vs. 7.4; p = 0.001) and underwent a higher number of diagnostic tests (16.4 vs. 12.5; p = 0,002). Half of the hospitalized patients in the medical and surgical department of La Rioja are malnourished. This is associated with a longer hospital stay, higher use of medicines, diagnostics tests and greater mortality. Malnutrition could be detected with easy screening tools to treat it appropriately.

  14. Challenges of estimating the annual caseload of severe acute malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deconinck, Hedwig; Pesonen, Anaïs; Hallarou, Mahaman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Reliable prospective estimates of annual severe acute malnutrition (SAM) caseloads for treatment are needed for policy decisions and planning of quality services in the context of competing public health priorities and limited resources. This paper compares the reliability of SAM...

  15. Consequences of early malnutrition for subsequent social and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The consequences of mild-to-moderate malnutrition during early childhood for social and emotional status at ages eight to 16 were investigated in this study. Fifty-four Ghanaian children who were malnourished during the first three years of life were compared with 54 of their classmates who were not malnourished.

  16. Prevalence of hematological abnormalities and malnutrition in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hematological abnormalities such as anemia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia occur in children infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These abnormalities are due to myelosuppression caused by the HIV and contribute to the morbidity and mortality of HIV.infected children. Malnutrition is ...

  17. Trends, Patterns and Issues of Child Malnutrition in Bangladesh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... education, knowledge about sound feeding practices and eating habits, growth monitoring and women supportive socio-cultural norms need to be given more emphasis to overcome the present situation. Key words: Child malnutrition, Health, Bangladesh, Child care, Food availability, Poverty, Education, Natural disaster.

  18. Impaired Bile Acid Homeostasis in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Ling; Voskuijl, Wieger; Mouzaki, Marialena; Groen, Albert K.; Alexander, Jennifer; Bourdon, Celine; Wang, Alice; Versloot, Christian J.; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Bandsma, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is a major cause of mortality in children under 5 years and is associated with hepatic steatosis. Bile acids are synthesized in the liver and participate in dietary fat digestion, regulation of energy expenditure, and immune responses. The aim of this work was to

  19. Impaired Bile Acid Homeostasis in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Ling; Voskuijl, Wieger; Mouzaki, Marialena; Groen, Albert K.; Alexander, Jennifer; Bourdon, Celine; Wang, Alice; Versloot, Christian J.; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Bandsma, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objective Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is a major cause of mortality in children under 5 years and is associated with hepatic steatosis. Bile acids are synthesized in the liver and participate in dietary fat digestion, regulation of energy expenditure, and immune responses. The aim of this work

  20. Malnutrition and iron deficiency anaemia in lactating women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the status of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) and malnutrition in lactating women. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Six urban slum communities in Teklehaimanot district, Addis Ababa. Subjects: One thousand and seventeen lactating women were enrolled and assessed for their haemoglobin ...

  1. Chronic malnutrition and its determinants among refugee children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malnutrition remains one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality among children throughout the world, and is an important public health problem affecting preschool children. Refugee children, due to their living condition, are the most vulnerable to suffer from this problem. The magnitude of ...

  2. Effects of early childhood malnutrition on cognitive performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of the socio-economic variables did not reveal any significant difference between the background characteristics of the two groups of children. It was concluded that even mild-to-moderate malnutrition in early childhood has negative effects on cognitive performance. Journal of Psychology in Africa 2004, 14(1): 1–7 ...

  3. Sedentism and malnutrition among nomadic fulani children in south ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to sedentary living is not known, particularly the effects on nutrition and development of their children. ... Fulani children, aged six months to 15 years, living in Kwara, Ogun and Oyo States of ... Using World Health Organization Malnutrition Classification systems, 38.7% of the children were found to be malnourished.

  4. Malnutrition and Common Diseases in Adolescent Girls in Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects and methods: The study was conducted in Ohaji/Egbema Local Government Area of Imo State Nigeria with 283 randomly selected adolescent girls from 229 households. Anthropometric measurements and clinical methods were used to determine prevalence of malnutrition using the National Centre of Health ...

  5. Prevalence of malnutrition in hospital children in federal teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malnutrition is a state of excess or deficiency in energy, protein and or other nutrients which causes measurable adverse effects on body forms and function. A holistic approach is required in the management of hospitalized pediatric patients and includes the assessment and management of nutritional ...

  6. Possible Biochemical Markers in Protein-Energy Malnutrition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine possible biochemical markers in children suffering from Plasmodium falciparum malaria and Protein-Energy Malnutrition in a Hospital setting in Western Kenya. Spectrophotometric assays of selected biochemical parameters namely, albumin, total proteins, glucose, glutamate ...

  7. Prevalence of malnutrition and high blood pressure amongst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Globally, underweight in children is projected to decline except in Sub-Sahara Africa. This study assessed the prevalence of malnutrition and its correlation with high blood pressure among adolescents in a semi-urban Nigerian setting. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted among adolescent school children in ...

  8. Serum transferrin levels in children with protein-energy malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selime Aydoğdu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although the diagnosis of patients with severemalnutrition is easy, it is very difficult to recognize patientswith mild and moderate malnutrition. A variety of methodsattempts to develop for early diagnosis of these cases.In this study, we evaluated the serum transferrin and albuminlevels in children with mild, moderate and severeprotein-energy malnutrition (PEM.Materials and methods: Children admitted to our policlinic,aged between 3 and 25 months, 45 subjects withPEM and 39 healthy subjects (control group were evaluated.According to the Gomez, Waterlow and Kanawatisubjects with PEM were divided in 3 subgroups mild,moderate and severe PEM. Anthropometric measurementsand biochemical results of 4 groups were compared.Results: For albumin levels in mild to moderate PEMgroups, 37.7% sensitivity, and 28.5% specificity, positivepredictive value 54%; negative predictive value 16.6%was found. For severe PEM sensitivity, specificity, positivepredictive value and negative predictive value were71%, 62.5%, 45%, and 83.3% respectively.With respect to the levels of transferrin, a significant differencewas found between mild PEM-control and moderatePEM-control groups (p0.05.Conclusion: Our study results showed that albumin isa weak indicator in mild-moderate PEM. In these cases,serum transferrin level reduces before decreasing of albuminlevel, thus it may be an early sensitive finding thatcan be used as a sensitive parameter in the diagnosis ofearly stages of malnutrition.Key words: Protein energy malnutrition, children, albumin,transferrin

  9. Protein energy malnutrition increases arginase activity in monocytes and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corware, Karina; Yardley, Vanessa; Mack, Christopher; Schuster, Steffen; Al-Hassi, Hafid; Herath, Shanthi; Bergin, Philip; Modolell, Manuel; Munder, Markus; Müller, Ingrid; Kropf, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Protein energy malnutrition is commonly associated with immune dysfunctions and is a major factor in susceptibility to infectious diseases. In this study, we evaluated the impact of protein energy malnutrition on the capacity of monocytes and macrophages to upregulate arginase, an enzyme associated with immunosuppression and increased pathogen replication. Our results show that monocytes and macrophages are significantly increased in the bone marrow and blood of mice fed on a protein low diet. No alteration in the capacity of bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from malnourished mice to phagocytose particles, to produce the microbicidal molecule nitric oxide and to kill intracellular Leishmania parasites was detected. However, macrophages and monocytes from malnourished mice express significantly more arginase both in vitro and in vivo. Using an experimental model of visceral leishmaniasis, we show that following protein energy malnutrition, the increased parasite burden measured in the spleen of these mice coincided with increased arginase activity and that macrophages provide a more permissive environment for parasite growth. Taken together, these results identify a novel mechanism in protein energy malnutrition that might contributes to increased susceptibility to infectious diseases by upregulating arginase activity in myeloid cells.

  10. Socio-demographic determinants of malnutrition among primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Several factors including the parental literacy, illness, socioeconomic status, poor sanitation and hygienic practices affect the physical growth of children. The aim of this study was to determine the socio-demographic determinants of malnutrition among primary school aged children in Enugu, Nigeria. Methods: ...

  11. [Management of malnutrition in geriatric hospital units in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoliner, C; Volkert, D; Wirth, R

    2013-01-01

    Elderly hospitalized patients have a high risk for developing malnutrition. The causes for an impaired nutritional status in old age are various and the impact is far-reaching. Malnutrition is a comorbidity that is well treatable and various studies show the favorable effect of nutrition therapy on nutritional status and prognosis. In the past few years, several guidelines have been developed to improve nutritional management and to ensure standardized procedures to identify patients at nutritional risk who will benefit from nutrition therapy. However, it is still not clear to what extent nutrition management has been implemented in geriatric wards in Germany. This survey is intended to give an overview on the situation of the current diagnosis and therapy of malnutrition and nutritional management in geriatric hospital units for acute and rehabilitative care. In 2011, the task force of the German Geriatric Society ("Deutsche Gesellschaft für Geriatrie", DGG) developed a questionnaire which was sent out to 272 directors of geriatric hospital and rehabilitational units. Included were questions regarding the size and staffing of the hospital and wards, food provision, diagnosis and therapy of malnutrition, as well as communication of malnutrition and nutrition therapy in the doctor's letter. A total of 38% of the questioned units answered. The following information was compiled: 31% of the geriatric facilities employed a doctor with training in clinical nutrition, 42% employ dieticians or nutritional scientists, and 90% speech and language pathologists. In 36% of the wards, a so-called geriatric menu is offered (small portions, rich in energy and/or protein, easy to chew). In 89% of the wards, snacks are available between meals. Diagnosis of malnutrition is mainly done by evaluation of weight and BMI. Validated and established screening tools are only used in 40% of the geriatric wards. Food records are carried out in 64% of the units when needed. Diagnosed

  12. Microbiota is immature in moderate and severe acute malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Globally 19 million under-five children suffer from severe acute malnutrition (SAM) while 51.5 million children have moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). These two conditions, together known as acute malnutrition, are responsible for 14.6% of all under-five deaths. Case fatality rate can be reduced with treatment of SAM, which however, is not readily available everywhere. Even with effective treatment, recovery can be slow and relapse not uncommon. Lack of nutrients is one of the causes of acute malnutrition but other factors including infections, inter- and intra-generational factors are also believed to play important roles in the etiology. The gut microbiota is another factor; however its relationship with nutritional interventions and therapeutic response is poorly understood. We studied the gut microbiota of children suffering from severe and moderate acute malnutrition in Bangladesh. Children with SAM were studied during the acute phase, nutritional rehabilitation and follow up in icddr,b Hospital, Dhaka. During the nutritional rehabilitation phase, the children were randomized to either RUTF or a combination of local diets (khichuri and halwa). Children with MAM were randomly selected from a birth cohort in a slum settlement and so were healthy controls. Gut microbiota were identified using 16S rRNA datasets generated from monthly fecal samples obtained from the healthy control children. ‘Relative microbiota maturity index’ and ‘microbiota-for-age Z-score’ were computed from a model developed from the age-discriminatory bacterial species identified in the healthy and acutely malnourished children. The index and the Z-score compare maturation of an acutely malnourished child’s fecal microbiota relative to healthy children of similar chronological age. Our results indicate that SAM is associated with relative immaturity of the gut microbiota. Moreover, treatment with either RUTF or the local diets is associated with incomplete recovery of

  13. Acute malnutrition among children aged 6-59 months of the nomadic population in Hadaleala district, Afar region, northeast Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizaw, Zemichael; Woldu, Wondwoson; Bitew, Bikes Destaw

    2018-02-07

    Acute malnutrition to be a major health burden in the world, particularly in the developing world. Acute malnutrition is associated with more than one third of the global disease burden for children. Malnourished children are physically, emotionally and intellectually less productive and suffer more from chronic illnesses and disabilities. The nature, magnitude and determinants of acute malnutrition are determined among the general populations; however, there is a lack of evidence in the nomadic communities. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the magnitude and factors associated with acute malnutrition among children aged 6-59 months in Hadaleala district, Afar Region. A total of 591 under-five children were included in this study, and subjects were recruited by the multistage cluster sampling technique. Data were collected by a pre-tested questionnaire and a simple anthropometric index so called mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC). The multivariable binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with acute malnutrition on the basis of adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) and p water sources (AOR = 3.78, p water sources, latrine availability, hand washing practice before food preparation and child feeding, childhood diarrheal disease, and child vaccination were identified as factors affecting the childhood acute malnutrition in the nomadic community. Protecting drinking water sources from possible contaminants, improving hand washing practices, utilization of latrine, preventing diarrheal diseases and vaccinating children integrated with the access of nutrition education is important to improve nutrition of children of the nomadic people.

  14. [Malnutrition and dementia in the elderly in German nursing homes. Results of a prevalence survey from the years 2008 and 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, S; van Nie, N; Meijers, J; Halfens, R; Bartholomeyczik, S

    2013-04-01

    Dementia is one of most challenging problems for the care of older people in Germany. Although malnutrition in nursing homes is also associated with dementia, few systematic studies have described health care structures in German nursing homes for people with dementia and their individual nutritional status. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine dementia-specific differences concerning the nutrition situation for the elderly in German nursing homes. A cross-sectional multicenter study was performed using a standardized multilevel instrument (observation, questionnaire) developed at the University of Maastricht. Variables are indicators for malnutrition and its risks, quality indicators, care dependency and types of interventions. In the 2008 and 2009 surveys, 53% of 4,777 participants (77.9% women, 22.1% men, mean age 82 years) were identified (based on care documentation) as having dementia. More than one third of this population (n = 759, 85.1% women, 14.1% men, mean age 85 years) was probably malnourished; thus, the prevalence rate in the group of people with dementia was 10% higher compared to the group without dementia. People with dementia showed a higher risk in all relevant risk indicators (weight history, body mass index, and food intake) for malnutrition compared to those without dementia. Furthermore, people with dementia had higher care dependency rates and required more assistance for eating and drinking. The study results confirm the relationship between malnutrition and dementia. The use of standardized nutrition screening tools is not common practice in German nursing homes yet. However, the results suggest that with an increasing risk for malnutrition combined with dementia the proportion of nursing interventions also increases, which means that nurses must react adequately. Nevertheless, the interventions concerning malnutrition should be improved especially with respect to preventive measurements.

  15. Epidemiology of Malaria, Schistosomiasis, Geohelminths, Anemia and Malnutrition in the Context of a Demographic Surveillance System in Northern Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Figueiredo, José Carlos; Gamboa, Dina; Pedro, João Mário; Fançony, Cláudia; Langa, António Justino; Soares Magalhães, Ricardo J.; Stothard, J. Russell; Nery, Susana Vaz

    2012-01-01

    Background Malaria, schistosomiasis and geohelminth infection are linked to maternal and child morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Knowing the prevalence levels of these infections is vital to guide governments towards the implementation of successful and cost-effective disease control initiatives. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross-sectional study of 1,237 preschool children (0–5 year olds), 1,142 school-aged children (6–15 year olds) and 960 women (>15 year olds) was conducted to understand the distribution of malnutrition, anemia, malaria, schistosomiasis (intestinal and urinary) and geohelminths in a north-western province of Angola. We used a recent demographic surveillance system (DSS) database to select and recruit suitable households. Malnutrition was common among children (23.3% under-weight, 9.9% wasting and 32.2% stunting), and anemia was found to be a severe public health problem (i.e., >40%). Malaria prevalence was highest among preschool children reaching 20.2%. Micro-hematuria prevalence levels reached 10.0% of preschool children, 16.6% of school-aged children and 21.7% of mothers. Geohelminth infections were common, affecting 22.3% of preschool children, 31.6% of school-aged children and 28.0% of mothers. Conclusions Here we report prevalence levels of malaria, schistosomiasis and geohelminths; all endemic in this poorly described area where a DSS has been recently established. Furthermore we found evidence that the studied infections are associated with the observed levels of anemia and malnutrition, which can justify the implementation of integrated interventions for the control of these diseases and morbidities. PMID:22493664

  16. Tuberculosis caseload in children with severe acute malnutrition related with high hospital based mortality in Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munthali, Tendai; Chabala, Chishala; Chama, Elson; Mugode, Raider; Kapata, Nathan; Musonda, Patrick; Michelo, Charles

    2017-06-12

    Tuberculosis and severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in children pose a major treatment and care challenge in high HIV burden countries in Africa. We investigated the prevalence of Tuberculosis notifications among hospitalised under-five children with severe acute malnutrition. A retrospective review of medical records for all children aged 0-59 months admitted to the University Teaching Hospital from 2009 to 2013 was performed. Descriptive statistics were employed to estimate TB caseload. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of the TB caseload. A total of (n = 9540) under-five children with SAM were admitted over the period reviewed. The median age was 16 months (IQR 11-24) and the proportion diagnosed with TB was 1.58% (95% CI 1.3, 1.8) representing 151 cases. Of these, only 37 (25%) were bacteriologically confirmed cases. The HIV seroprevalence of children with SAM and TB was 46.5%. Children with SAM and TB were 40% more likely to die than children with SAM and without TB. Tuberculosis contributes to mortality among children with SAM in high TB and HIV prevalence settings. The under detection of cases and association of TB with HIV infection in malnutrition opens up opportunities to innovate integrative case finding approaches beyond just HIV counselling and testing within existing mother and child health service areas to include TB screening and prevention interventions, as these are critical primary care elements.

  17. Improving estimates of the burden of severe acute malnutrition and predictions of caseload for programs treating severe acute malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulti, Assaye; Briend, André; Dale, Nancy M

    2017-01-01

    Background: The burden of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is estimated using unadjusted prevalence estimates. SAM is an acute condition and many children with SAM will either recover or die within a few weeks. Estimating SAM burden using unadjusted prevalence estimates results in significant...

  18. Screening malnutrition in hospital outpatients. Can the SNAQ malnutrition screening tool also be applied to this population?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelemaat, F; Kruizenga, H M; de Vet, Henrica C W; Seidell, J C; Butterman, M.; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, Marian A E

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: It is known from earlier studies that only 15% of the malnourished hospital outpatient population is recognized and receives nutritional treatment. To increase this number, a quick and easy malnutrition screening tool would be helpful. Because such a tool is lacking, we developed

  19. Screening malnutrition in hospital outpatients. Can the SNAQ malnutrition screening tool also be applied to this population?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelemaat, F.; Kruizenga, H.M.; de Vet, H.C.W.; Seidell, J.C.; Butterman, M.; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M.A.E.

    2008-01-01

    Background & aims: It is known from earlier studies that only 15% of the malnourished hospital outpatient population is recognized and receives nutritional treatment. To increase this number, a quick and easy malnutrition screening tool would be helpful. Because such a tool is lacking, we developed

  20. A Policy Review on The Distribution of Health Operational Aid Funds in Achieving Maternal and Child Health Program (MDGs 4, 5 in Three Districts/Cities of East Java Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niniek Lely Pratiwi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health Policy Regulation Number 494/Menkes/SK/IV/2010 on the distribution of BOK funds to local government is one of the government’s responsibility for the development of public health in improving health promotion and prevention efforts in order to accelerate the achievement of MDGs in Health. The purpose of the study is to provide policy recommendations regarding to BOK in achieving the goals of maternal and child health programs. Methods: Secondary data review of the district health profile in 2009-2011 and analysis on the primary data collected from focus group discussion (FGD with invited technical implementor from district health office and health centers as well as some of the staffs of the local government that handle BOK. Results: The decline in maternal and infant mortality rates are still slow and cases of malnutrition increased from the three profile data review Sampang, Gresik and Sidoarjo. Local governments pay little commitment in developing priority strategies of maternal and child health programs in the form of a local action and innovation plan. BOK preventive promotive activities are lacking of monitoring and accountability controls, especially in health centers located far from the district center. Financial accountability is less precise to the programs and targetes, having seen the data of maternal and child health outcomes KN1-KN4 coverage which rose in 2010, but then fell back in 2011. Conclusion: Evaluation and monitoring are needed on the utilization of BOK funds, supervising the activities by the district/city health office, as well as by local community leaders. Prioritise monitoring the health centers in the area with high MMR and IMR. Suggestion: Needed routine and periodic mentoring and coaching in the form of technical assistance related to the utilization of BOK.