WorldWideScience

Sample records for preventing ischaemic events

  1. Drug treatments in the secondary prevention of ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Ursula G

    2013-11-01

    Stroke is an important cause of death and disability. However, about two thirds of cerebrovascular events are initially minor. They carry a high risk of potentially severe recurrent events, but they also offer an opportunity for secondary prevention to avoid such recurrences. As most recurrent events occur within a short time after the initial presentation, secondary prevention has to be started as soon as possible. Dramatic risk reduction can be achieved with well-established drugs if used in a timely manner. A standard secondary preventive regimen will address multiple vascular risk factors and will usually consist of an antiplatelet agent, a lipid lowering drug, and an antihypertensive agent. Depending on the risk factor profile of each patient, this will have to be adjusted individually, for example, taking into account the presence of cardioembolism or of stenotic disease of the brain-supplying arteries. In recent years, the approach to treating these risk factors has evolved. In addition to absolute blood pressure, blood pressure variability has emerged as an important contributing factor to stroke risk, which is affected differently by different antihypertensive agents. New oral anticoagulants reduce the risk of cerebral haemorrhage and the need for regular blood checks. The best antiplatelet regimen for stroke prevention is still uncertain, and treatment of dyslipidaemia may change if trials with cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors, which increase levels of HDL-cholesterol, are successful. This article reviews the current evidence for drug treatments in the secondary prevention of ischaemic stroke. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Predicting the effect of prevention of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Priority setting in public health policy must be based on information on the effectiveness of alternative preventive and therapeutic interventions. The purpose of this study is to predict the effect on mortality from ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in Denmark of reduced exposure to the risk factors...

  3. Lifestyle interventions for secondary disease prevention in stroke and transient ischaemic attack: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Olive; Galvin, Rose; Smith, Kathryn; Doody, Catherine; Blake, Catherine

    2014-08-01

    Secondary prevention in ischaemic stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA) is dominated by pharmacological interventions with evidence for non-pharmacological interventions being less robust. This systematic review and meta-analysis examines the impact of lifestyle interventions on secondary prevention in stroke or TIA. A systematic literature search was performed. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effectiveness of intervention packages incorporating any key component of health education/promotion/counselling on lifestyle and/or aerobic exercise compared to usual care ± a sham intervention in participants with ischaemic stroke or TIA were included. Outcomes of interest were mortality, cardiovascular disease (CVD) event rates, cardiovascular risk factors including blood pressure, lipid profiles and physical activity participation. Methodological quality was assessed. Statistical analyses determining treatment effect were conducted using Cochrane Review Manager Software. Seventeen RCTs were included. Data pooled from eight studies with a total of 2478 patients, demonstrated no effect in favour of lifestyle interventions compared to routine or sham interventions on mortality (risk ratio (RR) = 1.13 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.85-1.52), I(2) = 0%). Data relating to CVD events were pooled from four studies (1013 patients), demonstrated non-significant findings (RR = 1.16 (95% CI, 0.80--1.71), I(2) = 0%). Similar results were reported for total cholesterol. Physical activity participation demonstrated significant improvement [SMD 0.24 (95% CI, 0.08-0.41), l (2) = 47%]. Blood pressure reductions were noted but were non-significant when corrected for multimodal packages including enhanced pharmacotherapy compliance. There is currently insufficient high quality research to support lifestyle interventions post-stroke or TIA on mortality, CVD event rates and cardio-metabolic risk factor profiles. Promising blood pressure reductions were noted in

  4. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques promotes platelet activation. Correlation with ischaemic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenti, Massimo; Falcinelli, Emanuela; Pompili, Marcella; de Rango, Paola; Conti, Valentina; Guglielmini, Giuseppe; Momi, Stefania; Corazzi, Teresa; Giordano, Giuseppe; Gresele, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    Purified active matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is able to promote platelet aggregation. We aimed to assess the role of MMP-2 expressed in atherosclerotic plaques in the platelet-activating potential of human carotid plaques and its correlation with ischaemic events. Carotid plaques from 81 patients undergoing endarterectomy were tested for pro-MMP-2 and TIMP-2 content by zymography and ELISA. Plaque extracts were incubated with gel-filtered platelets from healthy volunteers for 2 minutes before the addition of a subthreshold concentration of thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 (TRAP-6) and aggregation was assessed. Moreover, platelet deposition on plaque extracts immobilised on plastic coverslips under high shear-rate flow conditions was measured. Forty-three plaque extracts (53%) potentiated platelet aggregation (+233 ± 26.8%), an effect prevented by three different specific MMP-2 inhibitors (inhibitor II, TIMP-2, moAb anti-MMP-2). The pro-MMP-2/TIMP-2 ratio of plaques potentiating platelet aggregation was significantly higher than that of plaques not potentiating it (3.67 ± 1.21 vs 1.01 ± 0.43, p<0.05). Moreover, the platelet aggregation-potentiating effect, the active-MMP-2 content and the active MMP-2/pro-MMP-2 ratio of plaque extracts were significantly higher in plaques from patients who developed a subsequent major cardiovascular event. In conclusion, atherosclerotic plaques exert a prothrombotic effect by potentiating platelet activation due to their content of MMP-2; an elevated MMP-2 activity in plaques is associated with a higher rate of subsequent ischaemic cerebrovascular events.

  5. Association of ischaemic stroke subtype with long-term cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntaios, G; Papavasileiou, V; Makaritsis, K; Milionis, H; Michel, P; Vemmos, K

    2014-08-01

    There is no strong evidence that all ischaemic stroke types are associated with high cardiovascular risk. Our aim was to investigate whether all ischaemic stroke types are associated with high cardiovascular risk. All consecutive patients with ischaemic stroke registered in the Athens Stroke Registry between 1 January 1993 and 31 December 2010 were categorized according to the TOAST classification and were followed up for up to 10 years. Outcomes assessed were cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke recurrence, and a composite cardiovascular outcome consisting of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, acute heart failure, sudden cardiac death, stroke recurrence and aortic aneurysm rupture. The Kaplan-Meier product limit method was used to estimate the probability of each end-point in each patient group. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the independent covariates of each end-point. Two thousand seven hundred and thirty patients were followed up for 48.1 ± 41.9 months. The cumulative probabilities of 10-year cardiovascular mortality in patients with cardioembolic stroke [46.6%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 40.6-52.8], lacunar stroke (22.1%, 95% CI 16.2-28.0) or undetermined stroke (35.2%, 95% CI 27.8-42.6) were either similar to or higher than those of patients with large-artery atherosclerotic stroke (LAA) (28.7%, 95% CI 22.4-35.0). Compared with LAA, all other TOAST types had a higher probability of 10-year stroke recurrence. In Cox proportional hazards analysis, compared with patients with LAA, patients with any other stroke type were associated with similar or higher risk for the outcomes of overall mortality, cardiovascular mortality, stroke recurrence and composite cardiovascular outcome. Large-artery atherosclerotic stroke and cardioembolic stroke are associated with the highest risk for future cardiovascular events, with the latter carrying at least as high a risk as LAA stroke. © 2014 The Author

  6. Guidelines for the preventive treatment of ischaemic stroke and TIA (I). Update on risk factors and life style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, B; Gállego, J; Gil-Nuñez, A; Morales, A; Purroy, F; Roquer, J; Segura, T; Tejada, J; Lago, A; Díez-Tejedor, E; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Alvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Casado, I; Castellanos, M; Castillo, J; Dávalos, A; Díaz-Otero, F; Egido, J A; López-Fernández, J C; Freijo, M; García Pastor, A; Gilo, F; Irimia, P; Maestre, J; Masjuan, J; Martí-Fábregas, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Martínez-Vila, E; Molina, C; Nombela, F; Ribó, M; Rodríguez-Yañez, M; Rubio, F; Serena, J; Simal, P; Vivancos, J

    2012-01-01

    To update the ad hoc Committee of the Cerebrovascular Diseases Study Group of The Spanish Neurological Society guidelines on prevention of ischaemic stroke (IS) and transient ischaemic attack (TIA). We reviewed available evidence on risk factors and means of modifying them to prevent ischaemic stroke and TIA. Levels of evidence and recommendation grades are based on the classification of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. This first section summarises the recommendations for action on the following factors: blood pressure, diabetes, lipids, tobacco and alcohol consumption, diet and physical activity, cardio-embolic diseases, asymptomatic carotid stenosis, hormone replacement therapy and contraceptives, hyperhomocysteinemia, prothrombotic states and sleep apnea syndrome. Changes in lifestyle and pharmacological treatment for hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia, according to criteria of primary and secondary prevention, are recommended for preventing ischemic stroke. © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of the polypill for secondary prevention in ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellano, José M; Fuster, Valentín; Jennings, Catriona

    2017-01-01

    transition. At the same time, the increase in cardiovascular risk factors, together with a decline in mortality in high-income countries in the past two decades, has led to a significant upsurge in the prevalence of secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease. With this, the effect that non...... therapeutic approach for improving medication adherence in cardiovascular disease. In the current paper, we aim to review the need for a polypill strategy in the present scenario of cardiovascular disease, the available data that support such a strategy and the various clinical trials that are in progress...

  8. Impact of social characteristics on the treatment of patients with ischaemic events and patent foramen ovale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurter, David; Braun, Julia; Jenni, Rolf; Van Der Loo, Bernd

    2012-02-01

    Percutaneous closure of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a technically simple and safe procedure. PFO is a common finding present in up to one third of the population. Although several conditions such as stroke, migraine, and sleep apnoea have been associated with a PFO, as underlined by observational studies, no causal relationship has been documented so far. As this setting may potentially leave more space for the involved physicians for the choice of treatment, we hypothesized that social characteristics of the patient with a PFO might play a role. We retrospectively analysed the data of 153 patients with a cerebrovascular and/or peripheral ischaemic event with the diagnosis of a PFO as documented in echocardiography from 2000 until 2005 at the University Hospital in Zurich, Switzerland. Forty-four patients (= 23%) underwent catheter-based PFO closure. There was no significant difference with respect to age ( or =60 years: P= 0.234, ns), gender (P = 0.356, ns) and insurance status (<40 years: P= 0.15, ns; 40-59 years: P= 0.37, ns; 60 years: P = 0.26, ns) between those who underwent percutaneous PFO closure and those who did not. We conclude from this single-centre experience that social characteristics of patients only have a marginal impact on the indication of percutaneous closure of a PFO, if at all.

  9. [Pathogenetic justification of statin use in ischaemic stroke prevention according to inflammatory theory in development of atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlęga, Dariusz; Ciećwież, Sylwester; Turowska-Kowalska, Jolanta; Nowacki, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    There is an inflammatory component in the pathogenesis of ischaemic stroke, which plays an important role in inducing atherothrombotic and embolic stroke. Statins, HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase inhibitors are widely used in the primary and secondary prevention of ischaemic stroke. It has been proved that beyond their main effect on inhibition of endogenous cholesterol, they also modify the inflammatory process. Additional benefits from the use of statins result from their effect on the immune system. Increased risk of recurrent vascular episodes and risk of death after statin withdrawal in patients with vascular disorders is connected with termination of the anti-inflammatory effect of these drugs. The authors highlight that because of the anti-inflammatory effect of statins it is reasonable to use them in all patients at risk of ischaemic stroke, including those with atrial fibrillation.

  10. [Adverse events prevention ability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparo, Ugo Luigi; Aparo, Andrea

    2007-03-01

    The issue of how to address medical errors is the key to improve the health care system performances. Operational evidence collected in the last five years shows that the solution is only partially linked to future technological developments. Cultural and organisational changes are mandatory to help to manage and drastically reduce the adverse events in health care organisations. Classical management, merely based on coordination and control, is inadequate. Proactive, self-organising network based structures must be put in place and managed using adaptive, fast evolving management tools.

  11. Role of the polypill for secondary prevention in ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, José M; Fuster, Valentín; Jennings, Catriona; Prescott, Eva; Bueno, Héctor

    2017-06-01

    In 2011, for the first time in the history of humankind, non-communicable diseases became the leading cause of death worldwide. This change in trend is obviously multifactorial and very complex, as it is the paradoxical result of social, economic and health system growth worldwide. Vaccination and infectious diseases control, changing dietary habits worldwide, sedentary behaviour, globalisation, industrialisation (resulting in a shift from manual to sedentary labour), tobacco and sugary beverage surges in low- and middle-income countries and rapid urbanisation have all played a role in this epidemic transition. At the same time, the increase in cardiovascular risk factors, together with a decline in mortality in high-income countries in the past two decades, has led to a significant upsurge in the prevalence of secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease. With this, the effect that non-adherence to cardioprotective drugs is having has become progressively clear, both in terms of clinical outcomes and as a driver of increased healthcare expenditure. The cardiovascular polypill, which was originally proposed as a strategy to improve accessibility to cardioprotective drugs worldwide, has proven to be a mainstay therapeutic approach for improving medication adherence in cardiovascular disease. In the current paper, we aim to review the need for a polypill strategy in the present scenario of cardiovascular disease, the available data that support such a strategy and the various clinical trials that are in progress that will help further shape future indications for the cardiovascular polypill.

  12.  Psychosocial working environment for patients with ischaemic heart disease and association to adverse cardiac events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering, Karin; Lund, Thomas; Hviid Andersen, Johan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: During the last decades a possible association between the psychosocial working environment and increased risk of Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) has been debated. A systematic review from 2009 found moderate evidence that high psychological demands, lack of social support and iso....... However, tendencies of a lower risk of cardiac event were present for employees reporting the worst psychosocial environment. This unexpected finding may be explained by vulnerable persons not returning to work.......-strain was associated with IHD. Whether the psychosocial working environment plays a role for patients with existing cardiovascular disease on the risk of new cardiac events and readmissions is unknown METHOD: A cohort of patients under 65 years and treated with Percutaneous Coronary Intervention was established...

  13. Metabolomics and ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmiena, Aliki A; Ng, Theodore W; Meikle, Peter J

    2013-03-01

    Ischaemic heart disease accounts for nearly half of the global cardiovascular disease burden. Aetiologies relating to heart disease are complex, but dyslipidaemia, oxidative stress and inflammation are cardinal features. Despite preventative measures and advancements in treatment regimens with lipid-lowering agents, the high prevalence of heart disease and the residual risk of recurrent events continue to be a significant burden to the health sector and to the affected individuals and their families. The development of improved risk models for the early detection and prevention of cardiovascular events in addition to new therapeutic strategies to address this residual risk are required if we are to continue to make inroads into this most prevalent of diseases. Metabolomics and lipidomics are modern disciplines that characterize the metabolite and lipid complement respectively, of a given system. Their application to ischaemic heart disease has demonstrated utilities in population profiling, identification of multivariate biomarkers and in monitoring of therapeutic response, as well as in basic mechanistic studies. Although advances in magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry technologies have given rise to the fields of metabolomics and lipidomics, the plethora of data generated presents challenges requiring specific statistical and bioinformatics applications, together with appropriate study designs. Nonetheless, the predictive and re-classification capacity of individuals with various degrees of risk by the plasma lipidome has recently been demonstrated. In the present review, we summarize evidence derived exclusively by metabolomic and lipidomic studies in the context of ischaemic heart disease. We consider the potential role of plasma lipid profiling in assessing heart disease risk and therapeutic responses, and explore the potential mechanisms. Finally, we highlight where metabolomic studies together with complementary -omic disciplines may make further

  14. Clopidogrel plus aspirin versus aspirin alone for preventing cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squizzato, Alessandro; Bellesini, Marta; Takeda, Andrea; Middeldorp, Saskia; Donadini, Marco Paolo

    2017-12-14

    Aspirin is the prophylactic antiplatelet drug of choice for people with cardiovascular disease. Adding a second antiplatelet drug to aspirin may produce additional benefit for people at high risk and people with established cardiovascular disease. This is an update to a previously published review from 2011. To review the benefit and harm of adding clopidogrel to aspirin therapy for preventing cardiovascular events in people who have coronary disease, ischaemic cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease, or were at high risk of atherothrombotic disease, but did not have a coronary stent. We updated the searches of CENTRAL (2017, Issue 6), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 4 July 2017) and Embase (Ovid, 1947 to 3 July 2017) on 4 July 2017. We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP portal, and handsearched reference lists. We applied no language restrictions. We included all randomised controlled trials comparing over 30 days use of aspirin plus clopidogrel with aspirin plus placebo or aspirin alone in people with coronary disease, ischaemic cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease, or at high risk of atherothrombotic disease. We excluded studies including only people with coronary drug-eluting stent (DES) or non-DES, or both. We collected data on mortality from cardiovascular causes, all-cause mortality, fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction, fatal and non-fatal ischaemic stroke, major and minor bleeding. The overall treatment effect was estimated by the pooled risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI), using a fixed-effect model (Mantel-Haenszel); we used a random-effects model in cases of moderate or severe heterogeneity (I 2 ≥ 30%). We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We used GRADE profiler (GRADE Pro) to import data from Review Manager to create a 'Summary of findings' table. The search identified 13 studies in addition to the two studies in the previous version of our systematic review. Overall

  15. The clinical profile of women with stable ischaemic heart disease in Spain. More effort is needed in secondary prevention. SIRENA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez, J M; Ripoll, T; Barrios, V; Anguita, M; Pedreira, M; Madariaga, I

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death for women, especially ischaemic heart disease, which is still considered a man's disease. In Spain, there are various registries on ischaemic heart disease, although none are exclusively for women. The objectives of the SIRENA study were to describe the clinical profile of women with ischaemic heart disease treated in cardiology consultations, to estimate its prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and understand its clinical management. A multicentre observational study was conducted with a sample of 631 women with stable ischaemic heart disease, consecutively included during cardiology consultations. Forty-one researchers from all over Spain participated in the study. The mean age was 68.5 years. The clinical presentation was in the form of acute coronary syndrome in up to 67.2% of the patients. The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors was high (77.7% of the patients had hypertension, 40.7% had diabetes and 68% had dyslipidaemia), with 30.7% having uncontrolled hypertension, 78.4% having LDL-cholesterol levels higher than 70mg/dL and 49.2% having HbA1c levels greater than 7%. The considerable majority of the patients underwent optimal medical treatment with antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockers and hypolipidaemic agents. Coronary angiography was performed for 88.3% of the patients, and 63.4% underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. Women with stable ischaemic heart disease in Spain initially present some form of acute coronary syndrome and a high prevalence of inadequately controlled cardiovascular risk factors, despite undergoing optimal medical therapy. A high percentage of these women undergo coronary revascularisation. Increased efforts are required for secondary prevention in women with stable ischaemic heart disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  16. Permanent work disability before and after ischaemic heart disease or stroke event: a nationwide population-based cohort study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervasti, Jenni; Virtanen, Marianna; Lallukka, Tea; Friberg, Emilie; Mittendorfer-Rutz, Ellenor; Lundström, Erik; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2017-09-29

    We examined the risk of disability pension before and after ischaemic heart disease (IHD) or stroke event, the burden of stroke compared with IHD and which factors predicted disability pension after either event. A population-based cohort study with follow-up 5 years before and after the event. Register data were analysed with general linear modelling with binary and Poisson distributions including interaction tests for event type (IHD/stroke). All people living in Sweden, aged 25‒60 years at the first event year, who had been living in Sweden for 5 years before the event and had no indication of IHD or stroke prior to the index event in 2006‒2008 were included, except for cases in which death occurred within 30 days of the event. People with both IHD and stroke were excluded, resulting in 18 480 cases of IHD (65%) and 9750 stroke cases (35%). Disability pension. Of those going to suffer IHD or stroke event, 25% were already on disability pension a year before the event. The adjusted OR for disability pension at first postevent year was 2.64-fold (95% CI 2.25 to 3.11) for people with stroke compared with IHD. Economic inactivity predicted disability pension regardless of event type (OR=3.40; 95% CI 2.85 to 4.04). Comorbid mental disorder was associated with the greatest risk (OR=3.60; 95% CI 2.69 to 4.83) after an IHD event. Regarding stroke, medical procedure, a proxy for event severity, was the largest contributor (OR=2.27, 95% CI 1.43 to 3.60). While IHD event was more common, stroke involved more permanent work disability. Demographic, socioeconomic and comorbidity-related factors were associated with disability pension both before and after the event. The results help occupational and other healthcare professionals to identify vulnerable groups at risk for permanent labour market exclusion after such an event. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial

  17. A systematic review of published interventions for primary and secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in rural populations of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Laura V; Peterson, Karen L; Jacobs, Jane P; Allender, Steven; Nichols, Melanie

    2016-08-27

    Rural Australians are known to experience a higher burden of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) than their metropolitan counterparts and the reasons for this appear to be highly complex and not well understood. It is not clear what interventions and prevention efforts have occurred specifically in rural Australia in terms of IHD. A summary of this evidence could have implications for future action and research in improving the health of rural communities. The aim of this study was to review all published interventions conducted in rural Australia that were aimed at the primary and/or secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in adults. Systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature published between January 1990 and December 2015. Search terms were derived from four major topics: (1) rural; (2) ischaemic heart disease; (3) Australia and; (4) intervention/prevention. Terms were adapted for six databases and three independent researchers screened results. Studies were included if the published work described an intervention focussed on the prevention or reduction of IHD or risk factors, specifically in a rural population of Australia, with outcomes specific to participants including, but not limited to, changes in diet, exercise, cholesterol or blood pressure levels. Of 791 papers identified in the search, seven studies met the inclusion criteria, and one further study was retrieved from searching reference lists of screened abstracts. Typically, excluded studies focused on cardiovascular diseases without specific reference to IHD, or presented intervention results without stratification by rurality. Larger trials that included metropolitan residents without stratification were excluded due to differences in the specific needs, characteristics and health service access challenges of rural populations. Six interventions were primary prevention studies, one was secondary prevention only and one included both primary and secondary intervention strategies. Two

  18. A systematic review of published interventions for primary and secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD in rural populations of Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura V. Alston

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rural Australians are known to experience a higher burden of ischaemic heart disease (IHD than their metropolitan counterparts and the reasons for this appear to be highly complex and not well understood. It is not clear what interventions and prevention efforts have occurred specifically in rural Australia in terms of IHD. A summary of this evidence could have implications for future action and research in improving the health of rural communities. The aim of this study was to review all published interventions conducted in rural Australia that were aimed at the primary and/or secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD in adults. Methods Systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature published between January 1990 and December 2015. Search terms were derived from four major topics: (1 rural; (2 ischaemic heart disease; (3 Australia and; (4 intervention/prevention. Terms were adapted for six databases and three independent researchers screened results. Studies were included if the published work described an intervention focussed on the prevention or reduction of IHD or risk factors, specifically in a rural population of Australia, with outcomes specific to participants including, but not limited to, changes in diet, exercise, cholesterol or blood pressure levels. Results Of 791 papers identified in the search, seven studies met the inclusion criteria, and one further study was retrieved from searching reference lists of screened abstracts. Typically, excluded studies focused on cardiovascular diseases without specific reference to IHD, or presented intervention results without stratification by rurality. Larger trials that included metropolitan residents without stratification were excluded due to differences in the specific needs, characteristics and health service access challenges of rural populations. Six interventions were primary prevention studies, one was secondary prevention only and one included both

  19. Seamless prevention of adverse events from tattooing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    The boom in tattooing has been paralleled by more frequent adverse events, which may be localised in the skin or systemic and manifested clinically or latent. Infections, allergic reactions from red-coloured tattoos and papulo-nodular reactions from black tattoos dominate. Mild complaints are very...... common, with 1/5 of all tattooed individuals having acquired sensitivity to sunlight in the tattooed skin. The potential risk of cancer due to potential carcinogens in some tattoo inks has hitherto not manifested in clinical reports, despite the millions of people who have been tattooed over many decades....... A risk of death from tattooing remains associated with severe infection, i.e. sepsis. Preventive strategies may rely on focused preventions, and sterility and preservation of ink is essential, rational and knowledge-based. The chemical and particle contents of ink nanoparticles cannot be unrestricted...

  20. B vitamins in patients with recent transient ischaemic attack or stroke in the VITAmins TO Prevent Stroke (VITATOPS) trial: a randomised, double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that raised plasma concentrations of total homocysteine might be a risk factor for major vascular events. Whether lowering total homocysteine with B vitamins prevents major vascular events in patients with previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack is unknown. We aimed to assess whether the addition of once-daily supplements of B vitamins to usual medical care would lower total homocysteine and reduce the combined incidence of non-fatal stroke, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and death attributable to vascular causes in patients with recent stroke or transient ischaemic attack of the brain or eye. In this randomised, double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled trial, we assigned patients with recent stroke or transient ischaemic attack (within the past 7 months) from 123 medical centres in 20 countries to receive one tablet daily of placebo or B vitamins (2 mg folic acid, 25 mg vitamin B6, and 0.5 mg vitamin B12). Patients were randomly allocated by means of a central 24-h telephone service or an interactive website, and allocation was by use of random permuted blocks stratified by hospital. Participants, clinicians, carers, and investigators who assessed outcomes were masked to the assigned intervention. The primary endpoint was the composite of stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death. All patients randomly allocated to a group were included in the analysis of the primary endpoint. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00097669, and Current Controlled Trials, ISRCTN74743444. Between Nov 19, 1998, and Dec 31, 2008, 8164 patients were randomly assigned to receive B vitamins (n=4089) or placebo (n=4075). Patients were followed up for a median duration of 3.4 years (IQR 2.0-5.5). 616 (15%) patients assigned to B vitamins and 678 (17%) assigned to placebo reached the primary endpoint (risk ratio [RR] 0.91, 95% CI 0.82 to 1.00, p=0.05; absolute risk reduction 1.56%, -0.01 to 3.16). There were no unexpected

  1. Epidemiology and risk factors for chronic kidney disease in patients with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yu-Shi; Song, Li-Ting; Zhong, Di; Song, A-Xia; Jia, Xi-Bei; Liu, Rui-Chan; Xie, Ru-Juan; Na, Shi-Ping

    2013-08-01

    There is growing evidence for an association between chronic renal disease (CKD) and adverse cerebrovascular events because of the overlap of several risk factors. The purpose of this study is to examine the epidemiology of CKD and the characteristics of risk factors for CKD in the population with ischaemic stroke. This retrospective study included 571 patients with ischaemic stroke. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study equation. Renal function was assessed according to the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI)-CKD classification. Study demonstrated that the major factors associated with CKD in the ischaemic stroke patients were age, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, systolic blood pressure, LDL cholesterol and serum uric acid. Diabetes mellitus (OR 4·146, 95% CI 1·047-16·418, P = 0·043), hypertension and diabetes mellitus (OR 3·574, 95% CI 1·248-10·234, P = 0·018), serum uric acid (OR 1·010, 95% CI 1·006-1·013, P ischaemic stroke. The patients with ischaemic stroke may be considered as a high-risk population for CKD and be aggressively managed for CKD prevention. The high prevalence of CKD in population with ischaemic stroke prompts the need for greater public awareness about risks of CKD. © 2013 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A randomized multifactorial intervention study for prevention of ischaemic heart disease (Inter99): The long-term effect on physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, L.V.H.; Ladelund, S.; Borch-Johnsen, K.

    2008-01-01

    on the development in physical activity when compared with group C. This was regardless of baseline physical activity level. At 36-month follow-up there was no significant difference between groups A and B. There was no intervention effect among women. CONCLUSIONS: Only men seemed to benefit from the intervention.......AIM: To examine the effect of a randomized multiple risk factor intervention study for prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) on the development in physical activity over a 36-month period. METHODS: Two random samples (high intensity intervention, group A, n=11,708; low intensity intervention......, group B, n=1,308) were invited for a health examination, an assessment of absolute risk of developing IHD, and an individualized lifestyle intervention. The participation rate was 52.5%. High-risk persons in group A were also offered diet/physical activity and/or smoking cessation group counselling...

  3. A randomized multifactorial intervention study for prevention of ischaemic heart disease (Inter99): the long-term effect on physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Huth Smith, Lisa; Ladelund, Steen; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of a randomized multiple risk factor intervention study for prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) on the development in physical activity over a 36-month period. METHODS: Two random samples (high intensity intervention, group A, n=11,708; low intensity intervention....... High-risk persons in group B were referred to their GP. High-risk persons were re-counselled after 12 and 36 months. The control group (group C, n=5,264, response rate=61.3%) answered a mailed questionnaire. Data were analysed using longitudinal linear regression models with random effects. MAIN...... OUTCOME: Change in physical activity from baseline to 12-and 36-month follow-up. RESULTS: In men, the high-intensity (group A) intervention had a beneficial effect at 12-month follow-up, whereas after 36 months both the high-intensity and the low-intensity (group B) intervention had a beneficial effect...

  4. Diaphragms of the carotid and vertebral arteries: an under-diagnosed cause of ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenck, S; Labeyrie, M-A; Saint-Maurice, J-P; Tarlov, N; Houdart, E

    2014-04-01

    Diaphragms of the internal carotid and vertebral arteries as a cause of ischaemic stroke are reported and stenting of diaphragms as a therapeutic option in stroke secondary prevention is described. Five patients were cared for in our institution from 2000 to 2011 for recurrent ischaemic strokes which were classified to be of undetermined aetiology after completion of the usual investigations. Because the patients had already had ischaemic strokes in the territory of the same artery, a conventional digital subtracted angiography was performed. A diaphragm was identified on the artery that supplied the territory in which the stroke occurred. The stroke was therefore attributed to the diaphragm. Clinical and radiological data, treatment and the clinical course of the patients was retrospectively reviewed. The diaphragm was located in the vertebral artery in three cases and in the bulb of the internal carotid artery in two. In all cases cerebral MR showed ischaemic strokes of different ages downstream of the diaphragm. Stenting was performed in four cases. No patient had a symptomatic recurrent ischaemic event after stenting. Diaphragms are a rare cause of recurrent embolic strokes which are often not detected with non-invasive imaging. Stenting appears to be a therapeutic option in stroke secondary prevention. These observations suggest that conventional angiography should be performed in cases of recurrent ischaemic strokes in the territory of a single artery and in cases of ischaemic stroke of undetermined aetiology in young adults when the usual investigations are negative. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EFNS.

  5. Ischaemic cardiac events and use of strontium ranelate in postmenopausal osteoporosis: a nested case-control study in the CPRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C; Fox, K M; Borer, J S

    2014-02-01

    We explored the cardiac safety of the osteoporosis treatment strontium ranelate in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. While known cardiovascular risk factors like obesity and smoking were associated with increased cardiac risk, use of strontium ranelate was not associated with any increase in myocardial infarction or cardiovascular death. It has been suggested that strontium ranelate may increase risk for cardiac events in postmenopausal osteoporosis. We set out to explore the cardiac safety of strontium ranelate in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) and linked datasets. We performed a nested case-control study. Primary outcomes were first definite myocardial infarction, hospitalisation with myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular death. Cases and matched controls were nested in a cohort of women treated for osteoporosis. The association with exposure to strontium ranelate was analysed by multivariate conditional logistic regression. Of the 112,445 women with treated postmenopausal osteoporosis, 6,487 received strontium ranelate. Annual incidence rates for first definite myocardial infarction (1,352 cases), myocardial infarction with hospitalisation (1,465 cases), and cardiovascular death (3,619 cases) were 3.24, 6.13, and 14.66 per 1,000 patient-years, respectively. Obesity, smoking, and cardiovascular treatments were associated with significant increases in risk for cardiac events. Current or past use of strontium ranelate was not associated with increased risk for first definite myocardial infarction (odds ratio [OR] 1.05, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.68-1.61 and OR 1.12, 95 % CI 0.79-1.58, respectively), hospitalisation with myocardial infarction (OR 0.84, 95 % CI 0.54-1.30 and OR 1.17, 95 % CI 0.83-1.66), or cardiovascular death (OR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.76-1.21 and OR 1.16, 95 % CI 0.94-1.43) versus patients who had never used strontium ranelate. Analysis in the CPRD did not find evidence for a higher risk for cardiac events associated

  6. Ischaemic stroke in HIV-infected patients: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Pinto, A; Costa, A; Serrão, R; Sarmento, A; Abreu, P

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to provide insights into the contributions of HIV infection stage, antiretroviral therapy (ART) and vascular risk factors to the occurrence of ischaemic stroke in HIV-infected patients. We performed a case-control study of HIV-infected patients followed in our clinic. We compared patients hospitalized between January 2006 and June 2014 with an ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack to age- and gender-matched controls without stroke. Of 2146 patients followed in our clinic, we included 23 cases (20 men and three women; mean age 51.3 years) and 23 controls. Eighty-three per cent of cases had had a stroke and 17% a transient ischaemic attack. According to the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification, small-vessel occlusion was the most frequent aetiology, followed by large-artery atherosclerosis and cardioembolism. Compared with controls, stroke was statistically significantly associated with diabetes, smoking and low concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Illegal drug use, a low CD4 count and a high viral load were also associated with ischaemic cerebral events. There were no statistically significant differences between cases and controls in Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) HIV stage, CD4 count nadir and HIV infection time-to-event. No statistically significant differences were found concerning ART or treatment compliance. In our single centre study, we found associations of illegal drug use, HIV replication and some traditional vascular risk factors with the occurrence of ischaemic cerebral events. The paradigm of the care of HIV-infected patients is changing. Concomitant diseases in the ageing patient with HIV infection, including cerebrovascular disease, must also be addressed in view of their impacts on morbidity and mortality. Apart from controlling the HIV infection and immunosuppression with ART, vascular risk factors must also be addressed. © 2016 British HIV

  7. Top event prevention in complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngblood, R.W.; Worrell, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    A key step in formulating a regulatory basis for licensing complex and potentially hazardous facilities is identification of a collection of design elements that is necessary and sufficient to achieve the desired level of protection of the public, the workers, and the environment. Here, such a collection of design elements will be called a ''prevention set.'' At the design stage, identifying a prevention set helps to determine what elements to include in the final design. Separately, a prevention-set argument could be used to limit the scope of regulatory oversight to a subset of design elements. This step can be taken during initial review of a design, or later as part of an effort to justify relief from regulatory requirements that are burdensome but provide little risk reduction. This paper presents a systematic approach to the problem of optimally choosing a prevention set

  8. Teen Drinking Prevention Program. Event Action Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    Underage drinking presents a serious health risk not only to young people themselves but to entire communities. This program guide is designed to help communities establish their own underage drinking prevention programs. Community norms, actions, and attitudes toward alcohol affect young people, as do the ways in which alcohol is promoted.…

  9. Triple antiplatelet therapy for preventing vascular events: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bath Philip MW

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dual antiplatelet therapy is usually superior to mono therapy in preventing recurrent vascular events (VEs. This systematic review assesses the safety and efficacy of triple antiplatelet therapy in comparison with dual therapy in reducing recurrent vascular events. Methods Completed randomized controlled trials investigating the effect of triple versus dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with ischaemic heart disease (IHD, cerebrovascular disease or peripheral vascular disease were identified using electronic bibliographic searches. Data were extracted on composite VEs, myocardial infarction (MI, stroke, death and bleeding and analysed with Cochrane Review Manager software. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated using random effects models. Results Twenty-five completed randomized trials (17,383 patients with IHD were included which involving the use of intravenous (iv GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors (abciximab, eptifibatide, tirofiban, aspirin, clopidogrel and/or cilostazol. In comparison with aspirin-based therapy, triple therapy using an intravenous GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor significantly reduced composite VEs and MI in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS (VE: OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.55-0.86; MI: OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.56-0.88 and ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI (VE: OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.30-0.51; MI: OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.17-0.38. A significant reduction in death was also noted in STEMI patients treated with GP IIb/IIIa based triple therapy (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.49-0.99. Increased minor bleeding was noted in STEMI and elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI patients treated with GP IIb/IIIa based triple therapy. Stroke events were too infrequent for us to be able to identify meaningful trends and no data were available for patients recruited into trials on the basis of stroke or peripheral vascular disease. Conclusions Triple antiplatelet therapy based on iv GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors

  10. The risk of ischaemic stroke in primary antiphospholipid syndrome patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radin, M; Schreiber, K; Cecchi, I

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The most common neurological manifestation of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is ischaemic stroke. Identifying patients with APS at high risk for developing any thrombotic event remains a major challenge. In this study, the aim was to identify predictive factors of ischaemic...

  11. Optimizing the risk estimation after a transient ischaemic attack - the ABCDE⊕ score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelter, S T; Amort, M; Jax, F; Weisskopf, F; Katan, M; Burow, A; Bonati, L H; Hatz, F; Wetzel, S G; Fluri, F; Lyrer, P A

    2012-01-01

    The risk of stroke after a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) can be predicted by scores incorporating age, blood pressure, clinical features, duration (ABCD-score), and diabetes (ABCD2-score). However, some patients have strokes despite a low predicted risk according to these scores. We designed the ABCDE+ score by adding the variables 'etiology' and ischaemic lesion visible on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) -'DWI-positivity'- to the ABCD-score. We hypothesized that this refinement increases the predictability of recurrent ischaemic events. We performed a prospective cohort study amongst all consecutive TIA patients in a university hospital emergency department. Area under the computed receiver-operating curves (AUCs) were used to compare the predictive values of the scores with regard to the outcome stroke or recurrent TIA within 90 days. Amongst 248 patients, 33 (13.3%, 95%-CI 9.3-18.2%) had a stroke (n = 13) or a recurrent TIA (n = 20). Patients with recurrent ischaemic events more often had large-artery atherosclerosis as the cause for TIA (46% vs. 14%, P < 0.001) and positive DWI (61% vs. 35%; P = 0.01) compared with patients without recurrent events. Patients with and those without events did not differ with regard to age, clinical symptoms, duration, blood pressure, risk factors, and stroke preventive treatment. The comparison of AUCs [95%CI] showed superiority of the ABCDE+ score (0.67[0.55-0.75]) compared to the ABCD(2) -score (0.48[0.37-0.58]; P = 0.04) and a trend toward superiority compared to the ABCD-score (0.50[0.40-0.61]; P = 0.07). In TIA patients, the addition of the variables 'etiology' and 'DWI-positivity' to the ABCD-score seems to enhance the predictability of subsequent cerebral ischaemic events. © 2011 The Author(s). European Journal of Neurology © 2011 EFNS.

  12. Management of Ischaemic Stroke: The Role of the Neurosurgeon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss the role of neurosurgeons in the management of ischaemic stroke. METHODS: We looked at the contributions that a neurosurgeon may be able to make in the care of the patient with an ischaemic stroke. The emphasis was on preventive and curative interventions in the surgical armamentarium of ...

  13. Colchicine for prevention of cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemkens, Lars G; Ewald, Hannah; Gloy, Viktoria L; Arpagaus, Armon; Olu, Kelechi K; Nidorf, Mark; Glinz, Dominik; Nordmann, Alain J; Briel, Matthias

    2016-01-27

    Colchicine is an anti-inflammatory drug that is used for a wide range of inflammatory diseases. Cardiovascular disease also has an inflammatory component but the effects of colchicine on cardiovascular outcomes remain unclear. Previous safety analyses were restricted to specific patient populations. To evaluate potential cardiovascular benefits and harms of a continuous long-term treatment with colchicine in any population, and specifically in people with high cardiovascular risk. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, ClinicalTrials.gov, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry, citations of key papers, and study references in January 2015. We also contacted investigators to gain unpublished data. Randomised controlled trials (parallel-group or cluster design or first phases of cross-over studies) comparing colchicine over at least six months versus any control in any adult population. Primary outcomes were all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, and adverse events. Secondary outcomes were cardiovascular mortality, stroke, heart failure, non-scheduled hospitalisations, and non-scheduled cardiovascular interventions. We conducted predefined subgroup analyses, in particular for participants with high cardiovascular risk. . We included 39 randomised parallel-group trials with 4992 participants. Colchicine had no effect on all-cause mortality (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.82 to 1.09; participants = 4174; studies = 30; I² = 27%; moderate quality of evidence). There is uncertainty surrounding the effect of colchicine in reducing cardiovascular mortality (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.09 to 1.21, I² = 9%; participants = 1132; studies = 7; moderate quality of evidence). Colchicine reduced the risk for total myocardial infarction (RR 0.20, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.57; participants = 652; studies = 2; moderate quality of evidence). There was no effect on total adverse events (RR 1.52, 95% CI 0.93 to 2.46; participants = 1313; studies = 11; I

  14. Preventing Medication Error Based on Knowledge Management Against Adverse Event

    OpenAIRE

    Hastuti, Apriyani Puji; Nursalam, Nursalam; Triharini, Mira

    2017-01-01

    Introductions: Medication error is one of many types of errors that could decrease the quality and safety of healthcare. Increasing number of adverse events (AE) reflects the number of medication errors. This study aimed to develop a model of medication error prevention based on knowledge management. This model is expected to improve knowledge and skill of nurses to prevent medication error which is characterized by the decrease of adverse events (AE). Methods: This study consisted of two sta...

  15. Adverse Drug Event Prevention: 2014 Action Plan Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducoffe, Aaron R; Baehr, Avi; Peña, Juliet C; Rider, Briana B; Yang, Sandra; Hu, Dale J

    2016-09-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) have been highlighted as a national patient safety and public health challenge by the National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention (ADE Action Plan), which was released by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in August 2014. The following October, the ADE Prevention: 2014 Action Plan Conference provided an opportunity for federal agencies, national experts, and stakeholders to coordinate and collaborate in the initiative to reduce preventable ADEs. The single-day conference included morning plenary sessions focused on the surveillance, evidence-based prevention, incentives and oversights, and additional research needs of the drug classes highlighted in the ADE Action Plan: anticoagulants, diabetes agents, and opioids. Afternoon breakout sessions allowed for facilitated discussions on measures for tracking national progress in ADE prevention and the identification of opportunities to ensure safe and high-quality health care and medication use. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Pandora's Box: mitochondrial defects in ischaemic heart disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andalib, Sasan; Divani, Afshin A; Michel, Tanja M; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul F; Vafaee, Manouchehr S; Gjedde, Albert

    2017-04-05

    Ischaemic heart disease and stroke are vascular events with serious health consequences worldwide. Recent genetic and epigenetic techniques have revealed many genetic determinants of these vascular events and simplified the approaches to research focused on ischaemic heart disease and stroke. The pathogenetic mechanisms of ischaemic heart disease and stroke are complex, with mitochondrial involvement (partially or entirely) recently gaining substantial support. Not only can mitochondrial reactive oxygen species give rise to ischaemic heart disease and stroke by production of oxidised low-density lipoprotein and induction of apoptosis, but the impact on pericytes contributes directly to the pathogenesis. Over the past two decades, publications implicate the causative role of nuclear genes in the development of ischaemic heart disease and stroke, in contrast to the potential role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the pathophysiology of the disorders, which is much less understood, although recent studies do demonstrate that the involvement of mitochondria and mtDNA in the development of ischaemic heart disease and stroke is likely to be larger than originally thought, with the novel discovery of links among mitochondria, mtDNA and vascular events. Here we explore the molecular events and mtDNA alterations in relation to the role of mitochondria in ischaemic heart disease and stroke.

  17. Geophysical Hazards and Preventive Disaster Management of Extreme Natural Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.; Takeuchi, K.

    2007-12-01

    Geophysical hazard is potentially damaging natural event and/or phenomenon, which may cause the loss of life or injury, property damage, social and economic disruption, or environmental degradation. Extreme natural hazards are a key manifestation of the complex hierarchical nonlinear Earth system. An understanding, accurate modeling and forecasting of the extreme hazards are most important scientific challenges. Several recent extreme natural events (e.g., 2004 Great Indian Ocean Earthquake and Tsunami and the 2005 violent Katrina hurricane) demonstrated strong coupling between solid Earth and ocean, and ocean and atmosphere. These events resulted in great humanitarian tragedies because of a weak preventive disaster management. The less often natural events occur (and the extreme events are rare by definition), the more often the disaster managers postpone the preparedness to the events. The tendency to reduce the funding for preventive disaster management of natural catastrophes is seldom follows the rules of responsible stewardship for future generations neither in developing countries nor in highly developed economies where it must be considered next to malfeasance. Protecting human life and property against earthquake disasters requires an uninterrupted chain of tasks: from (i) understanding of physics of the events, analysis and monitoring, through (ii) interpretation, modeling, hazard assessment, and prediction, to (iii) public awareness, preparedness, and preventive disaster management.

  18. The combination of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyridamole is more effective in secondary prevention following transient ischaemic attack or cerebral infarction: The debate is closed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijckx, G.J.; De Keyser, J.H.A.

    2006-01-01

    The European/Australasian stroke prevention in reversible ischaemia trial (ESPRIT) confirms that long-term administration of the combination acetylsalicylic acid and dipyridamole is more effective than acetylsalicylic acid in reducing the risk of vascular events after cerebral ischaemia of arterial

  19. Ischaemic colitis associated with carcinoma of the colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeders, J.W.A.; Rosenbusch, B.; Tytgat, G.N.J.

    1982-01-01

    In a retrospective study of one hundred and seventy patients with ischaemic colitis, we found eight patients with partially obstructive carcinoma of the colon located distally, seven located in the sigmoid and one in the splenic flexure. The frequency of this association (1-4.7% in the literature and 5.3% in our series) requires careful examination by radiologist and surgeon. The radiologist should be alert to the association of ischaemic damage proximal to an obstructive colorectal cancer. The surgeon must examine any colonic segment removed for carcinoma in order to exclude an ischaemic process in the area of the anastomosis and prevent leakage at the anastomosis or stricture formation. (orig.)

  20. Ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg Hansen, Louise; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Correct prehospital diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) may accelerate and improve the treatment. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prehospital diagnoses of ischemic heart diseases assigned by physicians. Methods. The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark...

  1. beta-blockade with nebivolol for prevention of acute ischaemic events in elderly patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Flather, Marcus D.; Boehm, Michael; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Murrone, Adriano; Mascagni, Flavio; Spinucci, Giulio; Conti, Maria Giovanna; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Tavazzi, Luigi; Coats, Andrew J. S.

    Objectives This subanalysis of the Study of the Effects of Nebivolol Intervention on Outcomes and Hospitalisation in Seniors with Heart Failure (SENIORS) investigates whether treatment with nebivolol, a beta-blocker with nitric oxide-releasing properties, can provide additional benefits besides its

  2. beta-blockade with nebivolol for prevention of acute ischaemic events in elderly patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambrosio, G.; Flather, M. D.; Boehm, M.; Cohen-Solal, A.; Murrone, A.; Mascagni, F.; Spinucci, G.; Conti, M. G.; van Veldhuisen, D. J.; Tavazzi, L.; Coats, A. J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Aim. This subanalysis of the Study of the Effects of Nebivolol Intervention on Outcomes and Hospitalisation in Seniors with Heart Failure (SENIORS) investigates whether treatment with nebivolol, a p-blocker with nitric oxide-releasing properties, can provide additional benefits besides its effects

  3. Canagliflozin for Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Bruce; Perkovic, Vlado; de Zeeuw, Dick; Fulcher, Greg; Erondu, Ngozi; Shaw, Wayne; Fabbrini, Elisa; Sun, Tao; Li, Qiang; Desai, Mehul; Matthews, David R.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Canagliflozin is a sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor that significantly reduces the composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and elevated cardiovascular risk. The comparative effects among participants with and without a history of cardiovascular disease (secondary versus primary prevention) were prespecified for evaluation. Methods: The CANVAS Program (Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment Study) randomly assigned 10 142 participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus to canagliflozin or placebo. The primary prevention cohort comprised individuals ≥50 years of age with ≥2 risk factors for cardiovascular events but with no prior cardiovascular event, and the secondary prevention cohort comprised individuals ≥30 years of age with a prior cardiovascular event. The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. Secondary outcomes included heart failure hospitalization and a renal composite (40% reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate, renal replacement therapy, or renal death). Results: Primary prevention participants (N=3486; 34%) were younger (63 versus 64 years of age), were more often female (45% versus 31%), and had a longer duration of diabetes mellitus (14 versus 13 years) compared with secondary prevention participants (N=6656; 66%). The primary end point event rate was higher in the secondary prevention group compared with the primary prevention group (36.9 versus 15.7/1000 patient-years, P<0.001). In the total cohort, the primary end point was reduced with canagliflozin compared with placebo (26.9 versus 31.5/1000 patient-years; hazard ratio [HR], 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75–0.97; P<0.001 for noninferiority, P=0.02 for superiority) with no statistical evidence of heterogeneity (interaction P value=0.18) between the primary (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.74–1.30) and

  4. The prevalence of peripheral arteriopathy is higher in ischaemic stroke as compared with transient ischaemic attack and intracerebral haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttner, Hagen B; Köhrmann, Martin; Mauer, Christoph; Lücking, Hannes; Kloska, Stephan; Doerfler, Arnd; Schwab, Stefan; Schellinger, Peter D

    2010-08-01

    There is little data on the association of peripheral arterial disease and stroke. We aimed to assess the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in acute stroke and to identify the predisposing factors for peripheral arterial disease in a stroke cohort. We enrolled all consecutive patients who were admitted to our stroke- and neurocritical care units with the diagnosis of a transient ischaemic attack, ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke over a period of 5 months. As controls, we analysed 50 nonvascular neurological patients who were matched to age. Upon admission, assessment of the ankle brachial index was performed in all patients. The only exclusion criteria was decompensated congestive heart failure. Altogether, we compared 374 stroke patients (95 transient ischaemic attack, 231 ischaemic, and 48 haemorrhagic strokes) and 50 nonstroke controls. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in the control group was 14%. There was a trend towards a higher prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in stroke patients (chi(2)-test: P=0.051; prevalence peripheral arterial disease in transient ischaemic attack: 16.8%, ischaemic stroke: 32%, and haemorrhagic stroke: 20.8%). A higher proportion of ischaemic stroke patients were peripheral arterial disease-positive, compared with transient ischaemic attack patients (P=0.005) and controls (P=0.011), respectively. Multivariate regression analyses identified the parameters age, arterial hypertension, current or former smokers and a history of cardiovascular events to be predisposing factors of peripheral arterial disease. This study represents the first systematic investigation of the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in stroke. By now, it is clear that: * peripheral arterial disease is more commonly found in stroke than in nonstroke patients * ischaemic stroke patients show the highest prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, and * peripheral arterial disease in stroke is related to common vascular risk factors.

  5. Effects of aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel and telmisartan on disability and cognitive function after recurrent stroke in patients with ischaemic stroke in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L; Yusuf, Salim

    2008-01-01

    telmisartan were investigated in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial. METHODS: Patients who had had an ischaemic stroke were randomly assigned in a two by two factorial design to receive either 25 mg aspirin (ASA) and 200 mg extended-release dipyridamole (ER......-DP) twice a day or 75 mg clopidogrel once a day, and either 80 mg telmisartan or placebo once per day. The predefined endpoints for this substudy were disability after a recurrent stroke, assessed with the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and Barthel index at 3 months, and cognitive function, assessed...... of 2.4 years. Recurrent strokes occurred in 916 (9%) patients randomly assigned to ASA with ER-DP and 898 (9%) patients randomly assigned to clopidogrel; 880 (9%) patients randomly assigned to telmisartan and 934 (9%) patients given placebo had recurrent strokes. mRS scores were not statistically...

  6. The imaging of ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoggard, Nigel; Wilkinson, Iain D.; Griffiths, Paul D.

    2001-01-01

    Stroke is a clinical syndrome of a rapidly developing focal neurological deficit that may be classified for practical purposes into ischaemic and haemorrhagic. The role of imaging is to exclude mimics of ischaemic stroke or intracranial haemorrhage and confirm the presence of an ischaemic stroke. Computed tomography (CT) remains the investigation of choice to exclude acute intracranial haemorrhage but diffusion weighted magnetic resonance (MR) has proved to be a sensitive method of detecting early ischaemic infarction. Perfusion weighted MR allows further assessment at the same examination that could help guide the clinician in the risk/benefit analysis of treatment with thrombolytics or neuroprotective agents under evaluation. This can also be achieved with CT. This review article discusses the imaging of ischaemic stroke, relating the pathophysiology of stroke to it. It deals separately in more detail with these newer MR techniques. Hoggard, N. et al. (2001)

  7. A systematic review and economic evaluation of statins for the prevention of coronary events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, S; Lloyd Jones, M; Pandor, A; Holmes, M; Ara, R; Ryan, A; Yeo, W; Payne, N

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of statins for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in adults with, or at risk of, coronary heart disease (CHD). Electronic databases were searched between November 2003 and April 2004. A review was undertaken to identify and evaluate all literature relating to the clinical and cost effectiveness of statins in the primary and secondary prevention of CHD and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the UK. A Markov model was developed to explore the costs and health outcomes associated with a lifetime of statin treatment using a UK NHS perspective. Thirty-one randomised studies were identified that compared a statin with placebo or with another statin, and reported clinical outcomes. Meta-analysis of the available data from the placebo-controlled studies indicates that, in patients with, or at risk of, CVD, statin therapy is associated with a reduced relative risk of all cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, CHD mortality and fatal myocardial infarction (MI), but not of fatal stroke. It is also associated with a reduced relative risk of morbidity [non-fatal stroke, non-fatal MI, transient ischaemic attack (TIA), unstable angina] and of coronary revascularisation. It is hardly possible, on the evidence available from the placebo-controlled trials, to differentiate between the clinical efficacy of atorvastatin, fluvastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin. However, there is some evidence from direct comparisons between statins to suggest that atorvastatin may be more effective than pravastatin in patients with symptomatic CHD. There is limited evidence for the effectiveness of statins in different subgroups. Statins are generally considered to be well tolerated and to have a good safety profile. This view is generally supported both by the evidence of the trials included in this review and by postmarketing surveillance data. Increases in creatine kinase and myopathy have been reported, but

  8. Impact of design of coronary stents and length of dual antiplatelet therapies on ischaemic and bleeding events: a network meta-analysis of 64 randomized controlled trials and 102 735 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Iannaccone, Mario; Saint-Hilary, Gaelle; Bertaina, Maurizio; Schulz-Schüpke, Stefanie; Wahn Lee, Cheol; Chieffo, Alaide; Helft, Gerard; Gili, Sebastiano; Barbero, Umberto; Biondi Zoccai, Giuseppe; Moretti, Claudio; Ugo, Fabrizio; D'Amico, Maurizio; Garbo, Roberto; Stone, Gregg; Rettegno, Sara; Omedè, Pierluigi; Conrotto, Federico; Templin, Christian; Colombo, Antonio; Park, Seung-Jung; Kastrati, Adnan; Hildick-Smith, David; Gasparini, Mauro; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2017-11-07

    The differential impact on ischaemic and bleeding events of the type of drug-eluting stent [durable polymer stents [DES] vs. biodegradable polymer stents vs. bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS)] and length of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) remains to be defined. Randomized controlled trials comparing different types of DES and/or DAPT durations were selected. The primary endpoint was Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events (MACE) [a composite of death, myocardial infarction (MI), and target vessel revascularization]. Definite stent thrombosis (ST) and single components of MACE were secondary endpoints. The arms of interest were: BRS with 12 months of DAPT (12mDAPT), biodegradable polymer stent with 12mDAPT, durable polymer stent [everolimus-eluting (EES), zotarolimus-eluting (ZES)] with 12mDAPT, EES/ZES with 12 months of DAPT (DAPT > 12 m). Sixty-four studies with 150 arms and 102 735 patients were included. After a median follow-up of 20 months, MACE rates were similar in the different arms of interest. EES/ZES with DAPT > 12 m reported a lower incidence of MI than the other groups, while BRS showed a higher rate of ST when compared to EES/ZES, irrespective of DAPT length. A higher risk of major bleedings was observed for DAPT > 12 m as compared to shorter DAPT. Durable and biodegradable polymer stents along with BRS report a similar rate of MACE irrespective of DAPT length. Fewer MI are observed with EES/ZES with DAPT > 12 m, while a higher rate of ST is reported for BRS when compared to EES/ZES, independently from DAPT length. Stent type may partially affect the outcome together with DAPT length. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Anticoagulation in ischaemic heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    De Cristofaro, R

    2006-01-01

    Although treatments with oral anti‐vitamin K agents have become more refined and safer over the years, physicians are reluctant to prescribe these agents for fear they will cause bleeding, particular in patients with ischaemic heart disease

  10. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, Hanne Birgit; Skerritt, G. C.; Gideon, P.

    2013-01-01

    Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms.......Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms....

  11. Influence of cognitive impairment on the management of ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murao, K; Bombois, S; Cordonnier, C; Hénon, H; Bordet, R; Pasquier, F; Leys, D

    2014-03-01

    Because of ageing of the population, it is more and more frequent to treat ischaemic stroke patients with pre-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI). Currently, there is no specific recommendation on ischaemic stroke management in these patients, both at the acute stage and in secondary prevention. However, these patients are less likely to receive treatments proven effective in randomised controlled trials, even in the absence of contra-indication. To review the literature to assess efficacy and safety of validated therapies for acute ischaemic stroke and secondary prevention in PSCI patients. Most randomised trials did not take into account the pre-stroke cognitive status. The few observational studies conducted at the acute stage or in secondary prevention, did not provide any information that the benefit could be either lost or replaced by harm in the presence of PSCI. There is no reason not to treat ischaemic stroke patients with PSCI according to the currently available recommendations for acute management and secondary prevention. Further observational studies are needed and pre-stroke cognition should be taken into account in future stroke trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Quality indicators of preventable adverse drug events in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard

    interventions against medication errors. Methods: A systematic literature review of the available literature on preventable adverse A systematic literature review of the available literature on preventable adverse drug events was conducted to describe the incidence and characteristics of preventable adverse......Summary Background: Preventable adverse drug events are caused by errors in the medication use Preventable adverse drug events are caused by errors in the medication use process, and are of particular interest when designing interventions to improve the quality of medication therapy. Type 2...... diabetes became the case because a large proportion of patients are undertreated and not monitored as recommended; yet, the epidemiology of preventable adverse drug events in type 2 diabetes is largely unknown. The aims of the studies were to develop quality indicators for preventable adverse drug events...

  13. Ischaemic stroke in children secondary to post varicella angiopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, B

    2007-01-01

    Varicella in childhood is a self-limiting disease, which usually follows a benign course. However, complications, although rare, may have serious consequences. Ischaemic stroke secondary to post varicella angiopathy is a well-described complication and is estimated to account for up to a third of all strokes in infants. We present three previously healthy children who presented to our centre with ischaemic cerebrovascular infarction due to varicella angiopathy. All three children first presented within six weeks after onset of varicella infection and had MRI changes characteristic of ischaemic stroke secondary to post varicella angiopathy. While one child made an excellent recovery being left with only a minor deficit, the remaining two children were left with considerable morbidity severely affecting quality of life. The varicella vaccine has been proven to be well tolerated, safe and effective. We conclude that varicella vaccination should be considered for inclusion in the vaccination schedule to prevent serious complications which while rare may have devastating consequences.

  14. Y-90 microsphere therapy: prevention of adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Cheryl C; Campbell, Janice; Bakalyar, Donovan; Beauvais, Michele; Feng, Wenzheng; Savin, Michael

    2009-08-01

    Thirty-three (33) events that were inconsistent with intended treatment for 471 Y-90 microsphere deliveries were analyzed from 2001 to 2007. Each occurrence was categorized, based on root-cause analysis, as a device/product defect and/or operator error event. Events were further categorized, if there was an adverse outcome, as spill/leak, termination, recatheterization, dose deviation, and/or a regulatory medical event. Of 264 Y-90 Therasphere (MDS Nordion, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) treatments, 15 events were reported (5.7%). Of 207 Y-90 SIR-Spheres (Sirtex, Wilmington, MA) treatments, 18 events were reported (8.7%). Twenty-five (25) of 33 events (76%) were device/product defects: 73% for Therasphere (11 of 15) and 78% for SIR-Spheres (14 of 18). There were 31 adverse outcomes associated with 33 events: 15 were leaks and/or spills, 9 resulted in termination of the dose administration, 3 resulted in recatheterization for dose compensation, 2 were dose deviations (doses differing from the prescribed between 10% and 20%), and 2 were reported as regulatory medical events. Fifty-five (55) corrective actions were taken: 39 (71%) were related to the manufacturer and 16 (29%) were hospital based. This process of analyzing each event and measuring our outcomes has been effective at minimizing adverse events and improving patient safety.

  15. Mechanisms of ischaemic protection in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Okorie, M.

    2012-01-01

    Reperfusion limits ischaemic tissue damage. Paradoxically, reperfusion can cause additional tissue injury and contribute to a composite phenomenon known as ischaemia reperfusion (IR) injury. Therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing IR injury have the potential to improve outcomes in the management of ischaemic conditions. Protective procedures such as ischaemic preconditioning (IPC), ischaemic postconditioning (PostC), remote preconditioning (RIPC) and remote postconditioning (RPostC) have...

  16. Event-Specific Prevention: Addressing College Student Drinking During Known Windows of Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Neighbors, Clayton; Walters, Scott T.; Lee, Christine M.; Vader, Amanda M.; Vehige, Tamara; Szigethy, Thomas; DeJong, William

    2007-01-01

    The unique drinking patterns of college students call for Event-Specific Prevention (ESP) strategies that address college student drinking associated with peak times and events. Despite limited research evaluating ESP, many college campuses are currently implementing programming for specific events. The present paper provides a review of existing literature related to ESP and offers practical guidance for research and practice. The prevention typology proposed by DeJong and Langford (2002) pr...

  17. Top event prevention analysis - a deterministic use of PRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, D.P.; Worrell, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    Risk importance measures are popular for many applications of probabilistic analysis. Inherent in the derivation of risk importance measures are implicit assumptions that those using these numerical results should be aware of in their decision making. These assumptions and potential limitations include the following: (1) The risk importance measures are derived for a single event at a time and are therefore valid only if all other event probabilities are unchanged at their current values. (2) The results for which risk importance measures are derived may not be complete for reasons such as truncation

  18. Aetiological blood biomarkers of ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonderer, Julian; Katan Kahles, Mira

    2015-01-01

    Each year, over 5 million people die worldwide from stroke, and at least every sixth patient who survives will experience another stroke within five years [1]. We are therefore eager to advance early and rapid diagnosis, prognosis and optimal risk stratification, as well as secondary prevention. In this context, blood biomarkers may improve patient care, as they have already done in other fields in the past, for example, troponin T/I in patients with heart attacks, natriuretic peptides in patients with heart failure or PCT (procalcitonin) [2] in patients with pneumonia. In the setting of acute stroke, a blood biomarker can be any quantifiable entity that reflects the manifestation of a stroke-related process. The most fruitful implementation of stroke biomarkers is in areas where information from traditional clinical sources is limited. There may be markers, for example, to guide risk stratification, reveal stroke aetiology, identify patients who may benefit most from interventions, monitor treatment efficacy, and recognise the risk of short-term complications or unfavourable long-term outcomes. For this review we focus on blood biomarkers that could help distinguish the underlying aetiology of an ischaemic stroke. Stroke tends to be a much more heterogeneous condition than ischaemic heart disease, which is caused by atherosclerosis in the vast majority of cases. Causes of stroke include small and large vessel disease, cardioembolism, dissections, and rare vasculo- and coagulopathies, among others. Because of this heterogeneity among stroke patients, it is clear that a monolithic approach to stroke prevention or secondary prevention is not warranted. Aetiological classification is important specifically because prognosis, risk of recurrence and management options differ greatly between aetiological subtypes. Considering that today up to 30% of stroke patients still cannot be classified into a specific subtype [3], the ability to improve aetiological classification

  19. Darapladib for preventing ischemic events in stable coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, Harvey D.; Held, Claes; Stewart, Ralph; Tarka, Elizabeth; Brown, Rebekkah; Davies, Richard Y.; Budaj, Andrzej; Harrington, Robert A.; Steg, P. Gabriel; Ardissino, Diego; Armstrong, Paul W.; Avezum, Alvaro; Aylward, Philip E.; Bryce, Alfonso; Chen, Hong; Chen, Ming-Fong; Corbalan, Ramon; Dalby, Anthony J.; Danchin, Nicolas; de Winter, Robbert J.; Denchev, Stefan; Diaz, Rafael; Elisaf, Moses; Flather, Marcus D.; Goudev, Assen R.; Granger, Christopher B.; Grinfeld, Liliana; Hochman, Judith S.; Husted, Steen; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Koenig, Wolfgang; Linhart, Ales; Lonn, Eva; López-Sendón, José; Manolis, Athanasios J.; Mohler, Emile R.; Nicolau, José C.; Pais, Prem; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Pedersen, Terje R.; Pella, Daniel; Ramos-Corrales, Marco A.; Ruda, Mikhail; Sereg, Mátyás; Siddique, Saulat; Sinnaeve, Peter; Smith, Peter; Sritara, Piyamitr; Swart, Henk P.; Sy, Rody G.; Teramoto, Tamio; Tse, Hung-Fat; Watson, David; Weaver, W. Douglas; Weiss, Robert; Viigimaa, Margus; Vinereanu, Dragos; Zhu, Junren; Cannon, Christopher P.; Wallentin, Lars; Steg, Ph Gabriel; Bucan, Olga; Elfström, Charlotta; Hegg, Lisa; Jarosz, Marie; Krug-Gourley, Sue; Rudman, Jerry; Collins, Rory; Anderson, Jeffrey; DeMets, David; Ganz, Peter; Sandercock, Peter; Weber, Michael; Fisher, Marian; Buhr, Kevin; Diegel, Scott; Schultz, Melissa; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Alexander, John H.; Al-Khatib, Sana; Baron, Tomasz; Bergström, Olle; Bushnell, Cheryl; Christersson, Christina; Eggers, Kai; Fredlund, Bengt-Olov; Hagström, Emil; Hijazi, Ziad; Örndahl, Lovisa Holm; James, Stefan K.; Jernberg, Tomas; Johnston, Nina; Lopez, Renato D.; Mehta, Rajendra H.; Newby, Kristin L.; Nordmark, Örjan; Oldgren, Jonas; Roe, Matthew T.; Saldéen, Katarina; Stenborg, Anna; Szummer, Karolina; Varenhorst, Christoph; Åkerblom, Axel; Bodén, Ulrika; Holmgren, Pernilla; Alm, Cristina; Hallberg, Theresa; Forsman, Margareta; Ljung, Hanna; Svanberg, Camilla; Loebs, Patrick F.; Atwater, Karen; Baldwin, Robert; Butts, Maria; Chan, Tuan; Connolly, Patricia; Esposito, Gerry; Hillier, Jacalyn B.; Jordan, Marla; Lane, Kathleen; Eckart, Debra; O'Malia, Kimberly; Ryan, Grace; Smitheran, Patsy; Tait, Maunette; Vyas, Sachin; Frazilus, Jessy; Douglas, Sarah; Alsweiler, Caroline; Ball, Lorinda; Bucan, Ana; Mackay, Laura; Wiviott, Stephen; Gignac, Gretchen; Goessling, Wolfram; Hochberg, Ephraim; Lane, Andrew; Rosenberg, Carol; Wagner, Andrew; Wolpin, Brian M.; Lowe, Cheryl; Mills, Kristen; Alkhalil, Maria; Ruvido, Jessica; Rehman, Mian Qasim; Shimmer, Margarita; Stebletsova, Irina; Barnes, Allison; Chiswell, Karen; Stebbins, Amanda; Bustamante Labarta, Miguel; Cartasegna, Luis R.; Chekherdemian, Sergio; Cuello, Jose L.; Elías, Pedro; Giordano, Jorge; Hirschson, Alfredo; Hominal, Miguel Angel; Ibañez, Julio O.; Jure, Horacio O.; Litvak, Marcos; Macin, Stella M.; MacKinnon, Ignacio Jorge; Maffei, Laura Elena; Montaña, Oscar R.; Prado, Aldo D.; Sala, Jorgelina M.; Sanchez, Ramiro A.; Brieger, David; Chew, Derek; Cross, David; de Looze, Ferdinandus J.; Farshid, Ahmad; Hall, Stephen; Krum, Henry; Lane, Geoff K.; Oqueli Flores, Ernesto; Stickland, John; Purnell, Peter W.; Szto, Gregory Y. F.; Thompson, Peter L.; Waites, Jonathan; William, Maged; Beauloye, Christophe; Boland, Jean; Charlier, Filip; de Raedt, Herbert J. L. P.; Dens, Joseph A. Y.; Dujardin, Karl; Friart, Alain; Scheen, André; Schröder, Erwin; Sinnaeve, Peter R.; Verheye, Stefan; Vranckx, Pascal; Abrantes, José A. M.; Albuquerque, Denilson; Ardito, Wilma Roberta; Baracioli, Luciano M.; Bertolami, Marcelo C.; Bodanese, Luiz C.; Dos Santos Filho, Raul D.; Maia, Lilia N.; Manenti, Euler R. F.; Marino, Roberto L.; Ogawa Indio do Brasil, Clarisse K.; Paiva, Maria Sanali de Oliveira; Rabelo Alves Junior, Álvaro; Rassi, Salvador; Reis, Gilmar; Rossi, Paulo R. F.; Saraiva, José Francisco K.; Benov, Haralambi; Chompalova, Boryana; Goudev, Assen; Grigorova, Valentina; Mihov, Atanas; Mincheva, Valentina; Petrova, Sylvia; Staneva, Angelina; Raev, Dimitar; Tisheva, Snezhanka; Aronson, Ronnie; Bedard, Jacques; Bhargava, Rakesh K.; Borts, David; Constance, Christian; Cusson, Jean; Davies, Richard F.; Ducas, John; Ferguson, Murdo E. R.; Goldenberg, Ronald M.; Grondin, Francois; Gyenes, Gabor; Halperin, Frank; Kornder, Jan; Kouz, Simon; Lainesse, Andre Y.; Leader, Rolland; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Lonn, Eva M.; Milot, Alain; Pearce, Murray E.; Pliamm, Lew; Powell, Calvin N.; Rose, Barry F.; Rupka, Dennis W.; Siega, Anthony J. D.; Klinke, Peter W.; St-Amour, Eric; Talbot, Paul; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tishler, Steven J.; Title, Lawrence; Wong, Graham C.; Buller, Christopher E.; Acevedo Blanco, Monica Andrea; Albornoz Alarcon, Francisco Javier; Escobar, Edgardo; Florenzano Urzua, Fernando; Pedemonte Villablanca, Oneglio Antonio; Prieto Dominguez, Juan Carlos; Sanhueza Cardemil, Patricio; Varleta Olivares, Paola Elena; Chen, Jiyan; Dong, Yugang; Ge, Junbo; He, Ben; Huo, Yong; Li, Weimin; Li, Xin-li; Liao, Yuhua; Wei, Meng; Yan, Xiaowei; Ye, Ping; Yuan, Zuyi; Zhang, Yun; Zhu, Jianhua; Cermak, Ondrej; Dedek, Vratislav; Francek, Lumir; Grunfeldova, Hana; Hubac, Jan; Franc, Pavel; Kellnerova, Ivana; Klimsa, Zdenek; Kroupa, Josef; Kuchar, Ladislav; Malecha, Jan; Povolny, Jiri; Velimsky, Tomas; Volf, Roman; Jirka, Vladimir; Bang, Lia; Grande, Peer; Frost, Lars; Husted, Steen E.; Laursen, Rikke V.; Nielsen, Tonny; Hedman, Anu; Muda, Piibe; Planken, Ulle; Barnay, Claude; Bauters, Christophe; Bayet, Gilles; Bonnet, Jacques; Bruckert, Eric; Cottin, Yves; Courreges, Jean-Pierre; Decoulx, Eric; Demarcq, Jean-Michel; Dubois-Rande, Jean-Luc; Elbaz, Meyer; Khalife, Khalifé; Krempf, Michel; Maupas, Eric; Ovize, Michel; Roul, José Gérald; Schiele, François; Bassand, Jean-Pierre; Steg, Gabriel; Vaisse, Bernard; Aigner, Ulrich Michael; Bavendiek, Udo; Fischer, Dieter; Benedix, Gisela; Boeneke, Hilmar; Bott, Jochen; Brado, Bernadett; Buhr, Marianne; Butter, Christian; Fischer, Steffen; Foerster, Andreas P. D.; Grad, Marc Oliver; Grosskopf, Josef; Hanefeld, Markolf; Hoeltz, Susanne; Frick, Horst-Michael; Illies, Gabriele; Jung, Thomas W. G. E.; Kademann, Barbara; Kahrmann, Gert; Bourrat, Alexandra; Horacek, Thomas; Reusch, Regina; Klausmann, Gerhard; Klein, Christiane; Krause, Karl Heinz; Kuesters, Detlev; Mellwig, Klaus-Peter; Menke, Thomas; Mueller, Steve; Neumann, Gerhard; Nischik, Ruth; Preusche, Andreas; Prohaska, Martin; Regner, Stefan Franz; Rein, Wilfried; Rummel, Reinhard; Samer, Holger; Schaefer, Thomas; Schenkenberger, Isabelle; Schmidt, Ekkehard; Schoen, Norbert; Schreckenberg, Andreas; Schulze, Uwe; Wunderlich, Joachim; Sohn, Hae-Young; Klauss, Volker; Toursarkissian, Nicole; Voigt, Jan-Gerrit; Weber, Dirk; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Zuechner, Dirk; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Anastasiou-Nana, Maria; Kremastinos, Dimitrios; Geleris, Parashos; Kallikazaros, Ioannis; Kranidis, Athanasios; Manolis, Athanasios; Mantas, Ioannis; Olympios, Christoforos; Tziakas, Dimitrios; Voudris, Vassilis; Lam, Yat Yin Homer; Yip, Wai Kwok Gabriel; Siu, Chung Wah David; Benczúr, Béla; Hornyik, Andrea; László, Zoltán; Papp, András; Papp, Anikó; Plés, Zsolt; Piros, Annamária; Szakál, Imre; Túri, Tibor; Vértes, András; Abraham, Sunitha; Banker, Darshan N.; Chandwani, Prakash; Gupta, Rajeev; Hiremath, Jagdish; Jayadev, Santhosh; Joseph, Stigimon; Menon, Jaideep; Keshavamurth, C.; Srinivas, Arun; Parikh, Keyur; Pothineni, Ramesh B.; Sathe, Shireesh P.; Sawhney, Jitendra P.; Sethi, Sumeet; Chandra, Praveen Kumar; Varma, Sudhir; Bobbio, Marco; Bongo, Angelo S.; Cipollone, Francesco; Mezzetti, Andrea; Colivicchi, Furio; Santini, Massimo; Esposito, Giovanni; Chiariello, Massimo; Marzilli, Mario; Merlini, Piera; Moretti, Luciano; Olivari, Zoran; Patrizi, Giampiero; Valgimigli, Marco; Amemiya, Hiroshi; Ando, Kenji; Iwabuchi, Masashi; Endo, Masahiro; Nagashima, Hirotaka; Kametani, Ryosuke; Koike, Akihiro; Kuramochi, Takehiko; Nakamura, Yuichiro; Oku, Koji; Okutsu, Masaaki; Sueyoshi, Atsushi; Takahashi, Wataru; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Tanabe, Jun; Tanaka, Hideki; Kashima, Katsuro; Tanaka, Yutaka; Takeshita, Satoshi; Teranishi, Junichi; Betsuyaku, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yamazaki, Seiji; Yano, Shoji; Yoshida, Kazuro; Chae, Jei-Keon; Chae, Shung-Chull; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Choi, Dong-Hoon; Choi, Dong-Ju; Hong, Taek-Jong; Jeon, Hui-Kyung; Jeong, MyungHo; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Ryu, Kyu-Hyung; Kim, Woo-Shik; Kim, Kwon-Sam; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lim, Do-Sun; Park, Seong-Wook; Seung, Ki-Bae; Cervantes-Escárcega, Jose-Luis; Hernández-Santamaría, Ismael; Sánchez-Díaz, Carlos Jerjes; Uribe-Rios, Marittza-Arasely; Alvarado-Ruiz, Ricardo; Dijkgraaf, René; Jansen, Rutger M. G.; Knufman, Nicole M. J.; Frederiks, Joost; Kuijper, Adrianus; Post, Johannes C.; Michels, Herman R.; Roeters van Lennep, Hendrik W. O.; Liem, Anho; Smits, Pieter C.; Swart, Hendrik P.; van Boven, Adrianus J.; van Daele, Marc E. R. M.; van der Zwaan, Coenraad; von Birgelen, Clemens; Westendorp, Iris C. D.; Davidson, Laura; Devlin, Gerard P.; Elliott, John M.; Hamer, Andrew W.; Harrison, Nigel A.; Rankin, Richard J.; Hart, Hamish H.; Hills, Matthew J.; O'Meeghan, Timothy J.; Scott, Douglas S.; Stewart, Ralph A. H.; Tisch, Jonathan G.; Williams, Michael J. A.; Chen, Victor H. T.; Berge, Christ; Istad, Helge; Sirnes, Per Anton; Hanif, Bashir; Ishaq, Riaz; Kayani, Azhar Mahmood; Qureshi, Muhammad Bilal Ahsan; Yaqub, Zia; Doig, Rafael; Britto, Frank; Yanac, Pedro; Horna, Manuel; Valdivia, José; Zubiate, Mario Cesar; Abelardo, Nelson S.; Abola, Maria Teresa B.; Añonuevo, John C.; Atilano, Alberto A.; Cheng, Federick C.; Gaspar-Trinidad, Emma Y.; Sison, Jorge A.; Sulit, Dennis Jose V.; Uy, Norbert Lingling; Chmielinski, Arkadiusz; Czepiel, Aleksandra; Guzniczak, Ewa M.; Siminiak, Tomasz; Kania, Grzegorz; Kincel, Krzysztof; Kopaczewski, Jerzy; Kubica, Jacek; Lysek, Roman; Miekus, Pawel; Mlodziankowski, Adam; Napora, Piotr; Prochaczek, Fryderyk; Ruscika, Teresa; Tarchalski, Janusz; Tracz, Wieslawa; Wrzosek, Bozena; Basarab, Gheorghe V.; Benedek, Imre; Cinteza, Mircea; Cristea, Madalina I.; Dimulescu, Doina R.; Dragusin, Daniela; Gabor, Iulia; Ginghina, Carmen D.; Macarie, Cezar E.; Sinescu, Crina; Tatu-Chitoiu, Gabriel; Andryushina, Natalya A.; Baum, Svetlana R.; Arkhipov, Mikhail V.; Barbarash, Olga L.; Boldueva, Svetlana; Boyarkin, Mikhail V.; Demko, Arkady P.; Freydlin, Marina S.; Golitsyn, Sergei P.; Gordeev, Ivan; Gratsiansky, Nikolay; Karpov, Yuri A.; Kobalava, Zhanna; Konstantinov, Vladimir; Kuimov, Andrey D.; Kukharchuk, Valery V.; Panov, Alexey; Ruda, Mikhail Y.; Sayganov, Sergey A.; Simanenkov, Vladimir; Smolenskaya, Olga G.; Tsyba, Larisa P.; Vishnevsky, Alexander Y.; Yakhontova, Polina K.; Yakushin, Sergey S.; Zateyshchikov, Dmitry A.; Gaspar, Ludovit; Hranai, Marian; Kokles, Martin; Badat, Aysha; Sliwa-Hahnle, Karen; Blignaut, Suzanne; Burgess, Lesley; Dalby, Anthony; Dawood, Saleem Y.; Gray, Thomas; Horak, Adrian R.; Mabin, Thomas; Manga, Pravin; Moodley, Rajendran; Pretorius, Maria M.; Hough, Frans S.; Roodt, Andre; Saaiman, Jan; Theron, Hendrik D.; Alonso Karlezi, Rodrigo; Mata López, Pedro; Aranda Granados, Pedro; Berrazueta Fernández, José Ramón; Carnevali Ruiz, Daniel; Castro Conde, Almudena; Cruz Fernández, José Ma; de Teresa Galván, Eduardo; de Teresa Parreño, Luis; Díaz Buschmann, Isabel; Domínguez Escribano, José Ramón; Garcia Puig, Juan; Gil Extremera, Blas; Gómez Cerezo, Jorge; Macaya, Carlos Miguel; Mostaza Prieto, José Ma; Muñoz Aguilera, Roberto; Pérez Muñoz, Carlos; Querejeta Iraola, Ramón; Romero Hinojosa, José Antonio; Ruilope Urioste, Luis Miguel; Sabán Ruiz, José; Sobrino Martínez, Javier; Suárez Suárez, Enma Concepción; Lozano Martínez-Luengas, Iñigo; Al-Khalili, Faris; Bandh, Stellan; Bennermo, Marie; Dellborg, Mikael; Herlitz, Johan; Johanson, Per; Hjelmaeus, Lars; Landergren, Karl; Linderfalk, Carina; Lindholm, Carl-Johan; Lindmark, Krister; Mooe, Thomas; Nilsson, Jan; Wodlin, Peter; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Hou, Charles; Hsia, Chien-Hsun; Lin, Shing-Jong; Tsai, Liang-Miin; Wang, Kuo-Yang; Chotinaiwattarakul, Chunhakasem; Kuanprasert, Srun; Sansanayudh, Nakarin; Suithichaiyakul, Taworn; Andriyevska, Svitlana; Basylevych, Andriy Y.; Denesiuk, Vitaliy I.; Kononenko, Lyudmyla G.; Korzh, Oleksii M.; Kovalenko, Volodymyr M.; Kraiz, Igor G.; Lishnevska, Viktoriia Y.; Lutay, Mykhaylo I.; Parkhomenko, Oleksandr M.; Rudenko, Leonid V.; Telyatnikova, Zinaida Y.; Tseluyko, Vira Y.; Vatutin, Mykola T.; Vizir, Vadym A.; Bakhai, Ameet; Bijral, Harbal S.; Stewart, Edmund; Dargie, Henry; Barlow, Marion G.; Dutka, David P.; Findlay, Iain N.; Fisher, Michael; Gorog, Diana A.; Jacques, Adam M.; Beeton, Ian; Logie, Brian; Pepper, John R.; Purcell, Ian F.; Scullion, William; Thompson, James F.; Senior, Roxy; Simpson, David A.; Thackray, Simon D. R.; Alamgir, Mohammed F.; Wilding, John P. H.; Wong, Yuk-ki; Ahmed, Abdel M.; Antonishen, Mark C.; Atassi, Keith; Azocar, Jose; Ball, Eric M.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Bays, Harold E.; Beavins, Jill E.; Benjamin, Sabrina A.; Benson, Mark R.; Berger, Peter B.; Buckley, Jeremy W.; Betz, William R.; Biederman, Robert W. W.; Bisher, Edward W.; Bittner, Vera A.; Breton, Cristian F.; Buttaci, Salvatore; Changlani, Mahesh; Patterson, John B.; Byrd, Leroy J.; Canaday, Donald B.; Cashion, William R.; Chandna, Harish; Chang, Anna R.; Chin, John; Claybrook, Harry P.; Martin, Frederick A.; Cohen, Kenneth R.; Colan, David R.; Coodley, Gregg O.; Corson, Marshall A.; Knopp, Robert H.; Paramsothy, Pathmaja; Cottiero, Richard A.; Dandona, Paresh; Davidson, Michael H.; Kamaradt, Kent T.; Davuluri, Ashwini K.; Desai, Vikas S.; Garson, Glen D.; East, Cara; Ebrahimi, Ramin; Ellison, Howard S.; Erickson, Bernard R.; Fernandes, Valerian L.; Flores, Angel R.; Folkerth, Steven D.; Foster, Robert E.; Gaona, Raul E.; Gardner, Timothy J.; George, William H.; Gessler, Carl J.; Gill, Santosh K.; Go, Alan S.; Goldberg, Anne C.; Goldschmidt, Marc E.; Gorman, Timothy A.; Brautigam, Donald F.; Guyton, John R.; Haffey, Thomas; Henry, Sheldon D.; Hermany, Paul R.; Hoekstra, John A.; Hudson, Michael; Iteld, Bruce J.; Jack, David B.; Johnson, Frank P.; Joswig, Bill C.; Kaissar, Amy J.; Karns, Adam D.; Karns, Robert M.; Kaster, Steven R.; Kerzner, Boris; Khan, Mohammed S.; Ahmed, Ismail S.; Kieval, Joshua; Kim, Edward; Klaff, Leslie J.; Klein, Eric J.; Koren, Michael J.; Kosinski, Edward J.; Krumian, Razmig; Portnoy, Edward B.; Kuvin, Jeffrey T.; Langer, Michael M.; Letts, Dustin P.; Lipetz, Robert S.; Long, William J.; Thomas, Ignatius; Lopes-Virella, Maria; Lubin, Barry C.; Martin, Richard A.; Masri, Bassem; Matthews, George; Corbelli, John C.; McCullum, Kevin; Meholick, Alan W.; Mitchell, Jerry R.; Modares, Fariba; Mohler, Emile; Morcos, Charle N.; Murdock, David K.; Narayan, Puneet; Oberoi, Mandeep S.; O'Connor, Thomas; Schnecker, Robert J.; O'Donnell, Philip J.; Ong, Stephen T.; Parang, Pirouz; Pasquini, John A.; Patel, Rajesh J.; Patlola, Raghotham; Penny, William; Pepine, Carl J.; Pierce, Charles H.; Stein, Evan A.; Popeil, Larry R.; Pratt, Stephen E.; Price, Robert W.; Raikhel, Marina; Ravi, Ram C.; Cho, Donald; Rhyne, James M.; Richards, Mary K.; Rivera, Ernesto; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Roth, Eli M.; Rubenstein, Carl J.; Sandoval, Jaime D.; Sangrigoli, Renee A.; Schramm, Erichn L.; Schwartzbard, Arthur; Serfer, Gregory T.; Shah, Dhiren H.; Shalek, Marc S.; Shanes, Jeffrey G.; Sharma, Marigene S.; Bretton, Elizabeth M.; Sheikh, Zafar; Sklaver, Neal L.; Solano, Maria Del Pilar; Goldberg, Ronald B.; Srivastava, Nalin K.; Staniloae, Cezar S.; Staub, Jonathan S.; Stillabower, Michael E.; Suresh, Damodhar P.; Szulawski, Ireneusz; Thompson, Paul; Polk, Donna M.; Tinkel, Jodi L.; Pandya, Utpal H.; Toth, Phillip T.; Traboulssi, Mourhaf; Tuohy, Edward R.; Uusinarkaus, Kari T.; Vijay, Nampalli K.; Voyce, Stephen; Wainwright, William; Rhancock, Holly; Walder, James S.; Wang, Tracy Yu-Ping; Watkins, Stanley P.; Weiss, Robert J.; Whitney, Edwin J.; Wickemeyer, William J.; Willis, John G.; Wilson, Dennis F.; Abrams, Cyril; Wiseman, Alan; Wolfson, Eric; Wright, David; Zawada, Edward T.; Verma, Suneet

    2014-01-01

    Elevated lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity promotes the development of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, and elevated plasma levels of this enzyme are associated with an increased risk of coronary events. Darapladib is a selective oral inhibitor of lipoprotein-associated

  20. Telmisartan to prevent recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yusuf, Salim; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L.; Cotton, Daniel; Ounpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A.; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Renee H.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P. L.; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlof, Bjorn; de Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2008-01-01

    Background: Prolonged lowering of blood pressure after a stroke reduces the risk of recurrent stroke. In addition, inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system in high-risk patients reduces the rate of subsequent cardiovascular events, including stroke. However, the effect of lowering of blood

  1. Nutritional Science Meetings and Events | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Quality indicators of preventable adverse drug events in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard

    population receiving oral antihyperglycaemic treatment (9,791 persons) was set up, and indicator positives identified (Articles no. 2 and 3). The third step in the model consisted of a risk assessment of preventable adverse drug events, including an assessment of clinical areas that need quality improvement...... events are common in primary care, with many resulting in hospitalisation. Projected to a Danish setting, 216,000 patients will experience a preventable adverse drug event each year, and 162,000 of these patients will need hospital admission. Quality improvement interventions should target errors......Summary Background: Preventable adverse drug events are caused by errors in the medication use Preventable adverse drug events are caused by errors in the medication use process, and are of particular interest when designing interventions to improve the quality of medication therapy. Type 2...

  3. Robot traders can prevent extreme events in complex stock markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhadolnik, Nicolas; Galimberti, Jaqueson; Da Silva, Sergio

    2010-11-01

    If stock markets are complex, monetary policy and even financial regulation may be useless to prevent bubbles and crashes. Here, we suggest the use of robot traders as an anti-bubble decoy. To make our case, we put forward a new stochastic cellular automata model that generates an emergent stock price dynamics as a result of the interaction between traders. After introducing socially integrated robot traders, the stock price dynamics can be controlled, so as to make the market more Gaussian.

  4. Platelet function testing in transient ischaemic attack and ischaemic stroke: A comprehensive systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soon Tjin; Coughlan, Catherine A; Murphy, Stephen J X; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; Montaner, Joan; Thijs, Vincent; Marquardt, Lars; McCabe, Dominick J H

    2015-01-01

    with pharmacogenetic data, improves our ability to predict the risk of recurrent vascular events in CVD patients, and thus enhance secondary prevention following TIA or ischaemic stroke.

  5. Telmisartan to prevent recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Salim; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L

    2008-01-01

    pressure with a renin-angiotensin system inhibitor soon after a stroke has not been clearly established. We evaluated the effects of therapy with an angiotensin-receptor blocker, telmisartan, initiated early after a stroke. METHODS: In a multicenter trial involving 20,332 patients who recently had...... an ischemic stroke, we randomly assigned 10,146 to receive telmisartan (80 mg daily) and 10,186 to receive placebo. The primary outcome was recurrent stroke. Secondary outcomes were major cardiovascular events (death from cardiovascular causes, recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, or new or worsening...... heart failure) and new-onset diabetes. RESULTS: The median interval from stroke to randomization was 15 days. During a mean follow-up of 2.5 years, the mean blood pressure was 3.8/2.0 mm Hg lower in the telmisartan group than in the placebo group. A total of 880 patients (8.7%) in the telmisartan group...

  6. Incidence, outcome, risk factors, and long-term prognosis of cryptogenic transient ischaemic attack and ischaemic stroke: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linxin; Yiin, Gabriel S; Geraghty, Olivia C; Schulz, Ursula G; Kuker, Wilhelm; Mehta, Ziyah; Rothwell, Peter M

    2015-09-01

    A third of transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) and ischaemic strokes are of undetermined cause (ie, cryptogenic), potentially undermining secondary prevention. If these events are due to occult atheroma, the risk-factor profile and coronary prognosis should resemble that of overt large artery events. If they have a cardioembolic cause, the risk of future cardioembolic events should be increased. We aimed to assess the burden, outcome, risk factors, and long-term prognosis of cryptogenic TIA and stroke. In a population-based study in Oxfordshire, UK, among patients with a first TIA or ischaemic stroke from April 1, 2002, to March 31, 2014, we compared cryptogenic events versus other causative subtypes according to the TOAST classification. We compared markers of atherosclerosis (ie, risk factors, coronary and peripheral arterial disease, asymptomatic carotid stenosis, and 10-year risk of acute coronary events) and of cardioembolism (ie, risk of cardioembolic stroke, systemic emboli, and new atrial fibrillation [AF] during follow-up, and minor-risk echocardiographic abnormalities and subclinical paroxysmal AF at baseline in patients with index events between 2010 and 2014). Among 2555 patients, 812 (32%) had cryptogenic events (incidence of cryptogenic stroke 0·36 per 1000 population per year, 95% CI 0·23-0·49). Death or dependency at 6 months was similar after cryptogenic stroke compared with non-cardioembolic stroke (23% vs 27% for large artery and small vessel subtypes combined; p=0·26) as was the 10-year risk of recurrence (32% vs 27%; p=0·91). However, the cryptogenic group had fewer atherosclerotic risk factors than the large artery disease (pdisease (p=0·001), and cardioembolic (p=0·008) groups. Compared with patients with large artery events, those with cryptogenic events had less hypertension (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0·41, 95% CI 0·30-0·56; pdisease (0·27, 0·17-0·45; pdisease (adjusted OR 0·64, 95% CI 0·37-1·11; p=0·11) or acute coronary

  7. Effect of screening and lifestyle counselling on incidence of ischaemic heart disease in general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Torben; Jacobsen, Rikke Kart; Toft, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    to four times over a five year period. All participants with an unhealthy lifestyle had individually tailored lifestyle counselling at all visits (at baseline and after one and three years); those at high risk of ischaemic heart disease, according to predefined criteria, were furthermore offered six....... MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was incidence of ischaemic heart disease in the intervention group compared with the control group. Secondary outcome measures were stroke, combined events (ischaemic heart disease, stroke, or both), and mortality. RESULTS: 6091 (52.4%) people...... disease. Among 58,940 without a history of stroke at baseline, 1726 developed stroke. No significant difference was seen between the intervention and control groups in the primary end point (hazard ratio for ischaemic heart disease 1.03, 95% confidence interval 0.94 to 1.13) or in the secondary endpoints...

  8. Survival and clinical outcome of dogs with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredal, H; Toft, N; Westrup, U; Motta, L; Gideon, P; Arlien-Søborg, P; Skerritt, G C; Berendt, M

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate survival time, possible predictors of survival and clinical outcome in dogs with ischaemic stroke. A retrospective study of dogs with a previous diagnosis of ischaemic stroke diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. The association between survival and the hypothesised risk factors was examined using univariable exact logistic regression. Survival was examined using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression. Twenty-two dogs were identified. Five dogs (23%) died within the first 30days of the stroke event. Median survival in 30-day survivors was 505days. Four dogs (18%) were still alive by the end of the study. Right-sided lesions posed a significantly increased risk of mortality with a median survival time in dogs with right-sided lesions of 24days vs. 602days in dogs with left sided lesions (P=0.006). Clinical outcome was considered excellent in seven of 17 (41%) 30-day survivors. Another seven 30-day survivors experienced new acute neurological signs within 6-17months of the initial stroke event; in two of those cases a new ischaemic stroke was confirmed by MRI. In conclusion, dogs with ischaemic stroke have a fair to good prognosis in terms of survival and clinical outcome. However, owners should be informed of the risk of acute death within 30days and of the possibility of new neurological events in survivors. Mortality was increased in dogs with right-sided lesions in this study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Survival and clinical outcome of dogs with ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, Hanne Birgit; Toft, Nils; Westrup, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate survival time, possible predictors of survival and clinical outcome in dogs with ischaemic stroke. A retrospective study of dogs with a previous diagnosis of ischaemic stroke diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed....... The association between survival and the hypothesised risk factors was examined using univariable exact logistic regression. Survival was examined using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression. Twenty-two dogs were identified. Five dogs (23%) died within the first 30days of the stroke event. Median survival in 30-day...... survivors was 505days. Four dogs (18%) were still alive by the end of the study. Right-sided lesions posed a significantly increased risk of mortality with a median survival time in dogs with right-sided lesions of 24days vs. 602days in dogs with left sided lesions (P=0.006). Clinical outcome was considered...

  10. Incidence and preventability of adverse events requiring intensive care admission: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlayen, Annemie; Verelst, Sandra; Bekkering, Geertruida E; Schrooten, Ward; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Neree

    2012-04-01

    Adverse events are unintended patient injuries or complications that arise from health care management resulting in death, disability or prolonged hospital stay. Adverse events that require critical care are a considerable financial burden to the health care system, but also their global impact on patients and society is probably underestimated. The objectives of this systematic review were to synthesize the best available evidence regarding the estimates of the incidence and preventability of adverse events that necessitate intensive care admission, to determine the type and consequences [mortality, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay and costs] of these adverse events. MEDLINE (from 1966 to present), EMBASE (from 1974 to present) and CENTRAL (version 1-2010) were searched for studies reporting on unplanned admissions on ICUs. Several other sources were searched for additional studies. Only quantitative studies that used chart review for the detection of adverse events requiring intensive care admission were considered for eligibility. For the purposes of this systematic review, ICUs were defined as specialized hospital facilities which provide continuous monitoring and intensive care for acutely ill patients. Studies that were published in the English, Dutch, German, French or Spanish language were eligible for inclusion. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. A total of 27 studies were reviewed. Meta-analysis of the data was not appropriate because of methodological and statistical heterogeneity between studies; therefore, results are presented in a descriptive way. The percentage of surgical and medical adverse events that required ICU admission ranged from 1.1% to 37.2%. ICU readmissions varied from 0% to 18.3%. Preventability of the adverse events varied from 17% to 76.5%. Preventable adverse events are further synthesized by type of event. Consequences of the adverse events included a

  11. Reduced fatalism and increased prevention behavior after two high-profile lung cancer events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoy, David B; Leach, Corinne R; Kaufman, Annette R; Moser, Richard P; Alfano, Catherine M

    2014-01-01

    The positive impact of media coverage of high-profile cancer events on cancer prevention behaviors is well-established. However, less work has focused on potential adverse psychological reactions to such events, such as fatalism. Conducting 3 studies, the authors explored how the lung cancer death of Peter Jennings and diagnosis of Dana Reeve in 2005 related to fatalism. Analysis of a national media sample in Study 1 found that media coverage of these events often focused on reiterating the typical profile of those diagnosed with lung cancer; 38% of the media mentioned at least 1 known risk factor for lung cancer, most often smoking. Data from a nationally representative survey in Study 2 found that respondents reported lower lung cancer fatalism, after, compared with before, the events (OR = 0.16, 95% CI [0.03, 0.93]). A sustained increase in call volume to the national tobacco Quitline after these events was found in Study 3. These results suggest that there is a temporal association between high-profile cancer events, the subsequent media coverage, psychological outcomes, and cancer prevention behaviors. These results suggest that high-profile cancer events could be leveraged as an opportunity for large-scale public heath communication campaigns through the dissemination of cancer prevention messages and services.

  12. Specific cardiac disorders in 402 consecutive patients with ischaemic cardioembolic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujadas Capmany, Ramón; Arboix, Adrià; Casañas-Muñoz, Roser; Anguera-Ferrando, Nuria

    2004-06-01

    To determine the cardiological substrate in acute stroke patients presenting with a cardioembolic stroke subtype. Data of 402 consecutive patients with cardioembolic stroke (cerebral infarction, n=347; transient ischaemic attack, n=55) were collected from a prospective hospital-based stroke registry in which data on 2000 stroke patients over a 10-year period were included. In all patients, specific cardiac disorders were identified by physical examination and results of electrocardiography and transthoracic echocardiography. Holter monitoring and more sensitive techniques of cardiac imaging were used in selected cases. Cardioembolic cerebral ischaemia accounted for 20% of all acute strokes (25% of ischaemic cerebrovascular events). Cardiac sources of embolism included the following: (a) structural cardiac disorders associated with arrhythmia (n=232), the most frequent being left ventricular hypertrophic hypertensive disease (n=120) and rheumatic mitral valve disease (n=49); (b) structural cardiac disease with sustained sinus rhythm (n=81), the most frequent being systolic left ventricular dysfunction of both ischaemic (n=35) or non-ischaemic (n=24) aetiology; and (c) isolated atrial dysrhythmia (atrial fibrillation, n=88 and atrial flutter, n=1). Hypertrophic hypertensive cardiac disease complicated with atrial fibrillation was the most frequent cardiac source of emboli in cardioembolic stroke. Other important cardiac sources were isolated atrial fibrillation, rheumatic mitral valve disease, and systolic left ventricular dysfunction of ischaemic and non-ischaemic cause. The incidence of traditional emboligenous-prone cardiac disorders, such as mitral valve prolapse and mitral annular calcification was low.

  13. A qualitative study exploring patients' experiences of standard care or cardiac rehabilitation post minor stroke and transient ischaemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillsdon, Kaye M; Kersten, Paula; Kirk, Hayden J S

    2013-09-01

    To explore individuals' experiences of receiving either standard care or comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation post minor stroke or transient ischaemic attack. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews, alongside a randomized controlled trial, exploring the effectiveness of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation compared with standard care. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic analysis. Individuals' homes. People who have experienced a minor stroke or transient ischaemic attack and who were partaking in a secondary prevention randomized controlled trial (6-7 months post the event, 17 males, five females; mean age 67 years). Not relevant. Not relevant. Four themes were identified: information delivery, comparing oneself with others, psychological impact, attitudes and actions regarding risk factor reduction. Participants indicated a need for improved information delivery, specific to their own risk factors and lifestyle changes. Many experienced psychological impact as a result of their minor stroke. Participants were found to make two types of social comparison; the comparison of self to another affected by stroke, and the comparison of self to cardiac patients. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation was reported to have positive effects on people's motivation to exercise. Following a minor stroke, many individuals do not recall information given or risk factors specific to them. Downward comparison with individuals who have had a cardiovascular event led to some underplaying the significance of their minor stroke.

  14. Yield of CT perfusion for the evaluation of transient ischaemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Jonathan T; Mlynash, Michael; Zaharchuk, Greg; Ogdie, Alyshia A; Straka, Matus; Lansberg, Maarten G; Schwartz, Neil E; Singh, Paul; Kemp, Stephanie; Bammer, Roland; Albers, Gregory W; Olivot, Jean-Marc

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging are able to identify ischaemic 'footprints' in transient ischaemic attack. Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) may be useful for patient triage and subsequent management. To date, less than 100 cases have been reported, and none have compared computed tomography perfusion to perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI). We sought to define the yield of computed tomography perfusion for the evaluation of transient ischaemic attack. Consecutive patients with a discharge diagnosis of possible or definite transient ischaemic event who underwent computed tomography perfusion were included in this study. The presence of an ischaemic lesion was assessed on noncontrast computed tomography, automatically deconvolved CTPTMax (Time till the residue function reaches its maximum), and when available on diffusion-weighted imaging and PWITMax maps. Thirty-four patients were included and 17 underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Median delay between onset and computed tomography perfusion was 4·4 h (Interquartile range [IQR]: 1·9-9·6), and between computed tomography perfusion and magnetic resonance imaging was 11 h (Interquartile range: 3·8-22). Noncontrast computed tomography was negative in all cases, while CTPTMax identified an ischaemic lesion in 12/34 patients (35%). In the subgroup of patients with multimodal magnetic resonance imaging, an ischaemic lesion was found in six (35%) patients using CTPTMax versus nine (53%) on magnetic resonance imaging (five diffusion-weighted imaging, nine perfusion-weighted imaging). The additional yield of CTPTMax over computed tomography angiography was significant in the evaluation of transient ischaemic attack (12 vs. 3, McNemar, P = 0·004). CTPTMax found an ischaemic lesion in one-third of acute transient ischaemic attack patients. Computed tomography perfusion may be an acceptable substitute when magnetic resonance imaging is unavailable or contraindicated, and

  15. Proceedings of the workshop on how to prevent recurring events more effectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for presentations and open discussion on the subject of recurring events at nuclear power plants with all professional parties involved, that is, nuclear power plant staff, regulators and technical support organizations. The meeting discussed insights on recurring events from the operating experience collection, analysis, and use points of view. The workshop provided a forum to explore and map the problem of recurring events and specifically to discuss means to reduce the likelihood of recurrence of events at nuclear power plants both on national and international level. Another objective of the workshop was to provide input for updating the OECD report 'Recurring Events'. A fundamental part of preventing recurring events is finding a commonly agreed definition of what they are. Prior to the workshop, the programme committee proposed the following definition: An event with actual or potential safety significance, that is the same or is very similar to important aspects of a previous nuclear industry event(s), and has the same or similar cause(s) as the previous event(s). Additionally, for an event to be considered as 'recurring' there should exist prior operating experience with corrective actions either: not specified or not adequately specified or not implemented in a timely manner by the responsible organisation. Note that Generic Events (one failure affects many similar plants), Common Cause Failure (nature of failure affects more than one redundant train), and Ageing (if the ageing-process is within that expected) would normally not be considered as recurring events within the definition provided above. This definition was further discussed during breakout sessions at the workshop, and suggestions were sought from all workshop attendees. Many helpful suggestions were offered by attendees. These suggestions will be taken under advisement by the CSNI Working Group on Operating Experience (WGOE). A total of 14

  16. An electronic trigger based on care escalation to identify preventable adverse events in hospitalised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhise, Viraj; Sittig, Dean F; Vaghani, Viralkumar; Wei, Li; Baldwin, Jessica; Singh, Hardeep

    2018-03-01

    Methods to identify preventable adverse events typically have low yield and efficiency. We refined the methods of Institute of Healthcare Improvement's Global Trigger Tool (GTT) application and leveraged electronic health record (EHR) data to improve detection of preventable adverse events, including diagnostic errors. We queried the EHR data repository of a large health system to identify an 'index hospitalization' associated with care escalation (defined as transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU) or initiation of rapid response team (RRT) within 15 days of admission) between March 2010 and August 2015. To enrich the record review sample with unexpected events, we used EHR clinical data to modify the GTT algorithm and limited eligible patients to those at lower risk for care escalation based on younger age and presence of minimal comorbid conditions. We modified the GTT review methodology; two physicians independently reviewed eligible 'e-trigger' positive records to identify preventable diagnostic and care management events. Of 88 428 hospitalisations, 887 were associated with care escalation (712 ICU transfers and 175 RRTs), of which 92 were flagged as trigger-positive and reviewed. Preventable adverse events were detected in 41 cases, yielding a trigger positive predictive value of 44.6% (reviewer agreement 79.35%; Cohen's kappa 0.573). We identified 7 (7.6%) diagnostic errors and 34 (37.0%) care management-related events: 24 (26.1%) adverse drug events, 4 (4.3%) patient falls, 4 (4.3%) procedure-related complications and 2 (2.2%) hospital-associated infections. In most events (73.1%), there was potential for temporary harm. We developed an approach using an EHR data-based trigger and modified review process to efficiently identify hospitalised patients with preventable adverse events, including diagnostic errors. Such e-triggers can help overcome limitations of currently available methods to detect preventable harm in hospitalised patients. © Article

  17. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke lesions in a dog brain: neuropathological characterisation and comparison to human ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Barbara Blicher; Gredal, Hanne; Wirenfeldt, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background Dogs develop spontaneous ischaemic stroke with a clinical picture closely resembling human ischaemic stroke patients. Animal stroke models have been developed, but it has proved difficult to translate results obtained from such models into successful therapeutic strategies in human....../macrophages and astrocytes. Conclusions The neuropathological changes reported in the present study were similar to findings in human patients with ischaemic stroke. The dog with spontaneous ischaemic stroke is of interest as a complementary spontaneous animal model for further neuropathological studies....... stroke patients. In order to face this apparent translational gap within stroke research, dogs with ischaemic stroke constitute an opportunity to study the neuropathology of ischaemic stroke in an animal species. Case presentation A 7 years and 8 months old female neutered Rottweiler dog suffered...

  18. Sex differences in ischaemic stroke: potential cellular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Anjali; Moser, Hope; McCullough, Louise D

    2017-04-01

    Stroke remains a leading cause of mortality and disability worldwide. More women than men have strokes each year, in part because women live longer. Women have poorer functional outcomes, are more likely to need nursing home care and have higher rates of recurrent stroke compared with men. Despite continued advancements in primary prevention, innovative acute therapies and ongoing developments in neurorehabilitation, stroke incidence and mortality continue to increase due to the aging of the U.S. Sex chromosomes (XX compared with XY), sex hormones (oestrogen and androgen), epigenetic regulation and environmental factors all contribute to sex differences. Ischaemic sensitivity varies over the lifespan, with females having an "ischaemia resistant" phenotype that wanes after menopause, which has recently been modelled in the laboratory. Pharmacological therapies for acute ischaemic stroke are limited. The only pharmacological treatment for stroke approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), which must be used within hours of stroke onset and has a number of contraindications. Pre-clinical studies have identified a number of potentially efficacious neuroprotective agents; however, nothing has been effectively translated into therapy in clinical practice. This may be due, in part, to the overwhelming use of young male rodents in pre-clinical research, as well as lack of sex-specific design and analysis in clinical trials. The review will summarize the current clinical evidence for sex differences in ischaemic stroke, and will discuss sex differences in the cellular mechanisms of acute ischaemic injury, highlighting cell death and immune/inflammatory pathways that may contribute to these clinical differences. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  19. Feasibility of progesterone treatment for ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Claire L; Bath, Philip M

    2016-03-01

    Two multi-centre phase III clinical trials examining the protective potential of progesterone following traumatic brain injury have recently failed to demonstrate any improvement in outcome. Thus, it is timely to consider how this impacts on the translational potential of progesterone treatment for ischaemic stroke. A wealth of experimental evidence supports the neuroprotective properties of progesterone, and associated metabolites, following various types of central nervous system injury. In particular, for ischaemic stroke, studies have also begun to reveal possible mechanisms of such neuroprotection. However, the results in traumatic brain injury now question whether further clinical development of progesterone for ischaemic stroke is relevant. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Acupuncture treatment for ischaemic stroke in young adults: protocol for a randomised, sham-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lifang; Fang, Jianqiao; Jin, Xiaoming; Keeler, Crystal Lynn; Gao, Hong; Fang, Zhen; Chen, Qin

    2016-01-06

    Stroke in young adults is not uncommon. Although the overall incidence of stroke has been recently declining, the incidence of stroke in young adults is increasing. Traditional vascular risk factors are the main cause of young ischaemic stroke. Acupuncture has been shown to benefit stroke rehabilitation and ameliorate the risk factors for stroke. The aims of this study were to determine whether acupuncture treatment will be effective in improving the activities of daily living (ADL), motor function and quality of life (QOL) in patients of young ischaemic stroke, and in preventing stroke recurrence by controlling blood pressure, lipids and body weight. In this randomised, sham-controlled, participant-blinded and assessor-blinded clinical trial, 120 patients between 18 and 45 years of age with a recent (within 1 month) ischaemic stroke will be randomised for an 8-week acupuncture or sham acupuncture treatment. The primary outcome will be the Barthel Index for ADL. The secondary outcomes will include the Fugl-Meyer Assessment for motor function; the World Health Organization Quality of Life BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) for QOL; and risk factors that are measured by ambulatory blood pressure, the fasting serum lipid, body mass index and waist circumference. Incidence of adverse events and long-term mortality and recurrence rate during a 10-year and 30-year follow-up will also be investigated. Ethics approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee of The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University. Protocol V.3 was approved in June 2013. The results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international congresses. The results will also be disseminated to patients by telephone during follow-up calls enquiring on the patient's post-study health status. ChiCTR-TRC- 13003317; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Cost-effectiveness of workplace wellness to prevent cardiovascular events among U.S. firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P Daniel; Smith, Kenneth J; Hostler, David

    2016-11-21

    The leading cause of death among firefighters in the United States (U.S.) is cardiovascular events (CVEs) such as sudden cardiac arrest and myocardial infarction. This study compared the cost-effectiveness of three strategies to prevent CVEs among firefighters. We used a cost-effectiveness analysis model with published observational and clinical data, and cost quotes for physiologic monitoring devices to determine the cost-effectiveness of three CVE prevention strategies. We adopted the fire department administrator perspective and varied parameter estimates in one-way and two-way sensitivity analyses. A wellness-fitness program prevented 10% of CVEs, for an event rate of 0.9% at $1440 over 10-years, or an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $1.44 million per CVE prevented compared to no program. In one-way sensitivity analyses, monitoring was favored if costs were wellness-fitness program was not favored if its preventive relative risk was >0.928. Wellness-fitness programs may be a cost-effective solution to preventing CVE among firefighters compared to real-time physiologic monitoring or doing nothing.

  2. National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention: Recommendations for Safer Outpatient Opioid Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducoffe, Aaron R; York, Andrew; Hu, Dale J; Perfetto, Deborah; Kerns, Robert D

    2016-12-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) have been highlighted as a major patient safety and public health challenge by the National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention (ADE Action Plan), which was released by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) in August 2014. The ADE Action Plan focuses on surveillance, evidence-based prevention, incentives, and oversights, additional research needs as well as possible measures and metrics to track progress of ADE prevention within three drug classes: anticoagulants, diabetes agents, and opioids.Objectives and Recommendations. With outpatient opioid prescriptions being a great concern among many healthcare providers, this article focuses on recommendations from the ADE Action Plan to help guide safer opioid use in healthcare delivery settings. Its aim is to discuss current federal methods in place to prevent opioid ADEs while also providing evidence to encourage providers and hospitals to innovate new systems and practices to increase prevention. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  3. Characteristics of workplace violence prevention training and violent events among home health and hospice care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladutiu, Catherine J; Casteel, Carri; Nocera, Maryalice; Harrison, Robert; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    In the rapidly growing home health and hospice industry, little is known about workplace violence prevention (WVP) training and violent events. We examined the characteristics of WVP training and estimated violent event rates among 191 home health and hospice care providers from six agencies in California. Training characteristics were identified from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines. Rates were estimated as the number of violent events divided by the total number of home visit hours. Between 2008 and 2009, 66.5% (n = 127) of providers reported receiving WVP training when newly hired or as recurrent training. On average, providers rated the quality of their training as 5.7 (1 = poor to 10 = excellent). Among all providers, there was an overall rate of 17.1 violent events per 1,000 visit-hours. Efforts to increase the number of home health care workers who receive WVP training and to improve training quality are needed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Is it important to classify ischaemic stroke?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Iqbal, M

    2012-02-01

    Thirty-five percent of all ischemic events remain classified as cryptogenic. This study was conducted to ascertain the accuracy of diagnosis of ischaemic stroke based on information given in the medical notes. It was tested by applying the clinical information to the (TOAST) criteria. Hundred and five patients presented with acute stroke between Jan-Jun 2007. Data was collected on 90 patients. Male to female ratio was 39:51 with age range of 47-93 years. Sixty (67%) patients had total\\/partial anterior circulation stroke; 5 (5.6%) had a lacunar stroke and in 25 (28%) the mechanism of stroke could not be identified. Four (4.4%) patients with small vessel disease were anticoagulated; 5 (5.6%) with atrial fibrillation received antiplatelet therapy and 2 (2.2%) patients with atrial fibrillation underwent CEA. This study revealed deficiencies in the clinical assessment of patients and treatment was not tailored to the mechanism of stroke in some patients.

  5. Esomeprazole and aspirin fixed combination for the prevention of cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, Katelyn W; Cheng, Judy Wm; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2013-01-01

    Low dose aspirin therapy plays a fundamental role in both the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. Although the evidence using low dose aspirin for secondary prevention is well-established, the decision to use aspirin for primary prevention is based on an evaluation of the patient's risk of cardiovascular events compared to their risk of adverse events, such as bleeding. In addition to the risk of bleeding associated with long term aspirin administration, upper gastrointestinal side effects, such as dyspepsia often lead to discontinuation of therapy, which places patients at an increased risk for cardiovascular events. One option to mitigate adverse events and increase adherence is the addition of esomeprazole to the medication regimen. This review article provides an evaluation of the literature on the concomitant use of aspirin and esomeprazole available through February 2013. The efficacy, safety, tolerability, cost effectiveness, and patient quality of life of this regimen is discussed. A summary of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between aspirin and esomeprazole, as well as other commonly used cardiovascular medications are also reviewed. The addition of esomeprazole to low dose aspirin therapy in patients at high risk of developing gastric ulcers for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, significantly reduced their risk of ulcer development. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies suggested that esomeprazole did not affect the pharmacokinetic parameters or the antiplatelet effects of aspirin. Therefore, for those patients who are at a high risk of developing a gastrointestinal ulcer, the benefit of adding esomeprazole likely outweighs the risks of longer term proton pump inhibitor use, and the combination can be recommended. Administering the two agents separately may also be more economical. On the other hand, for those patients at lower risk of developing a gastrointestinal ulcer, both the additional risk

  6. Acute Ischaemic Colitis- A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Basra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute ischaemic colitis (AIC is being increasingly recognised as an uncommon cause of abdominal pain associated with fresh bleeding per rectum. It is paramount to maintain a high index of suspicion and adopt appropriate management strategies to avoid complications and inappropriate interventions. In this paper, we describe a case of AIC and review literature pertinent to the management of this condition. Keywords: Ischaemic colitis, acute abdomen, management.

  7. A Quantitative Index to Support Recurrence Prevention Plans of Human-Related Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yochan; Park, Jinkyun; Jung, Wondea [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Sam; Lee, Durk Hun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In Korea, HuRAM+ (Human related event Root cause Analysis Method plus) was developed to scrutinize the causes of the human-related events. The information of the human-related events investigated by the HuRAM+ method has been also managed by a database management system, R-tracer. It is obvious that accumulating data of human error causes aims to support plans that reduce recurrences of similar events. However, in spite of the efforts for the development of the human error database, it was indicated that the database does not provide useful empirical basis for establishment of the recurrence prevention plans, because the framework to interpret the collected data and apply the insights from the data into the prevention plants has not been developed yet. In this paper, in order to support establishment of the recurrence prevention plans, a quantitative index, Human Error Repeat Interval (HERI), was proposed and its applications to human error prevention were introduced. In this paper, a quantitative index, the HERI was proposed and the statistics of HERIs were introduced. These estimations can be employed to evaluate effects of recurrence prevention plans to human errors. If a mean HERI score is low and the linear trend is not positive, it can be suspected that the recurrence prevention plans applied every human-related event has not been effectively propagated. For reducing repetitive error causes, the system design or operational culture can be reviewed. If there is a strong and negative trend, systematic investigation of the root causes behind these trends is required. Likewise, we expect that the HERI index will provide significant basis for establishing or adjusting prevention plans of human errors. The accurate estimation and application of HERI scores is expected to be done after accumulating more data. When a scatter plot of HERIs is fitted by two or more models, a statistical model selection method can be employed. Some criteria have been introduced by

  8. A Quantitative Index to Support Recurrence Prevention Plans of Human-Related Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yochan; Park, Jinkyun; Jung, Wondea; Kim, Do Sam; Lee, Durk Hun

    2015-01-01

    In Korea, HuRAM+ (Human related event Root cause Analysis Method plus) was developed to scrutinize the causes of the human-related events. The information of the human-related events investigated by the HuRAM+ method has been also managed by a database management system, R-tracer. It is obvious that accumulating data of human error causes aims to support plans that reduce recurrences of similar events. However, in spite of the efforts for the development of the human error database, it was indicated that the database does not provide useful empirical basis for establishment of the recurrence prevention plans, because the framework to interpret the collected data and apply the insights from the data into the prevention plants has not been developed yet. In this paper, in order to support establishment of the recurrence prevention plans, a quantitative index, Human Error Repeat Interval (HERI), was proposed and its applications to human error prevention were introduced. In this paper, a quantitative index, the HERI was proposed and the statistics of HERIs were introduced. These estimations can be employed to evaluate effects of recurrence prevention plans to human errors. If a mean HERI score is low and the linear trend is not positive, it can be suspected that the recurrence prevention plans applied every human-related event has not been effectively propagated. For reducing repetitive error causes, the system design or operational culture can be reviewed. If there is a strong and negative trend, systematic investigation of the root causes behind these trends is required. Likewise, we expect that the HERI index will provide significant basis for establishing or adjusting prevention plans of human errors. The accurate estimation and application of HERI scores is expected to be done after accumulating more data. When a scatter plot of HERIs is fitted by two or more models, a statistical model selection method can be employed. Some criteria have been introduced by

  9. Prevention and mitigation of steam generator water hammer events in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, J.T.; Anderson, N.

    1983-01-01

    Water hammer in nuclear power plants is an unresolved safety issue under study by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This article summarizes (1) the causes of steam generator water hammer (SGWH) events in pressurized-water reactors (PWRs), (2) various methods used to prevent or mitigate SGWH events, and (3) modifications that have been made at each operating PWR. The NRC staff considers the issue of SGWH in top feedring designs to be technically resolved. This article does not address technical findings relevant to water hammer in preheat-type steam generators

  10. Effects of aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel and telmisartan on disability and cognitive function after recurrent stroke in patients with ischaemic stroke in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial: a double-blind, active and placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L; Yusuf, Salim; Cotton, Daniel; Ounpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Reneé H; Albers, Gregory W; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P L; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlöf, Björn; De Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2008-10-01

    The treatment of ischaemic stroke with neuroprotective drugs has been unsuccessful, and whether these compounds can be used to reduce disability after recurrent stroke is unknown. The putative neuroprotective effects of antiplatelet compounds and the angiotensin II receptor antagonist telmisartan were investigated in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial. Patients who had had an ischaemic stroke were randomly assigned in a two by two factorial design to receive either 25 mg aspirin (ASA) and 200 mg extended-release dipyridamole (ER-DP) twice a day or 75 mg clopidogrel once a day, and either 80 mg telmisartan or placebo once per day. The predefined endpoints for this substudy were disability after a recurrent stroke, assessed with the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and Barthel index at 3 months, and cognitive function, assessed with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) score at 4 weeks after randomisation and at the penultimate visit. Analysis was by intention to treat. The study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00153062. 20,332 patients (mean age 66 years) were randomised and followed-up for a median of 2.4 years. Recurrent strokes occurred in 916 (9%) patients randomly assigned to ASA with ER-DP and 898 (9%) patients randomly assigned to clopidogrel; 880 (9%) patients randomly assigned to telmisartan and 934 (9%) patients given placebo had recurrent strokes. mRS scores were not statistically different in patients with recurrent stroke who were treated with ASA and ER-DP versus clopidogrel (p=0.38), or with telmisartan versus placebo (p=0.61). There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients with recurrent stroke with a good outcome, as measured with the Barthel index, across all treatment groups. Additionally, there was no significant difference in the median MMSE scores, the percentage of patients with an MMSE score of 24 points or less, the percentage of patients with a drop in MMSE

  11. Telomere shortening and telomerase activity in ischaemic cardiomyopathy patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawhney, V; Campbell, N G; Brouilette, S W

    2016-01-01

    associated with incidence of ICD therapy (p=0.02, p=0.02). ROC analyses demonstrated that the sensitivity and specificity of these telomere dynamics in predicting potentially-fatal VA was higher than the current gold-standard - left ventricular ejection fraction (AUC 0.82 versus 0.47). CONCLUSION: The load......-of-short telomeres and telomerase activity had a significant association with ICD therapy (for VA) in ischaemic cardiomyopathy patients. These biomarkers should be tested in prospective studies to assess their clinical utility in predicting VA after myocardial infarction and guiding primary prevention ICD...

  12. Prioritizing strategies for preventing medication errors and adverse drug events in pediatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortescue, Elizabeth B; Kaushal, Rainu; Landrigan, Christopher P; McKenna, Kathryn J; Clapp, Margaret D; Federico, Frank; Goldmann, Donald A; Bates, David W

    2003-04-01

    Medication errors in pediatric inpatients occur at similar rates as in adults but have 3 times the potential to cause harm. Error prevention strategies in this setting remain largely untested. The objective of this study was to classify the major types of medication errors in pediatric inpatients and to determine which strategies might most effectively prevent them. A prospective cohort study was conducted of 1020 patients who were admitted to 2 academic medical centers during a 6-week period in April and May 1999. Medication errors were characterized by subtype. Physician raters evaluated error prevention strategies and identified those that might be most effective in preventing errors. Of 10 778 medication orders reviewed, 616 contained errors. Of these, 120 (19.5%) were classified as potentially harmful, including 115 potential adverse drug events (18.7%) and 5 preventable adverse drug events (0.8%). Most errors occurred at the ordering stage (74%) and involved errors in dosing (28%), route (18%), or frequency (9%). Three interventions might have prevented most potentially harmful errors: 1) computerized physician order entry with clinical decision support systems (76%); 2) ward-based clinical pharmacists (81%); and 3) improved communication among physicians, nurses, and pharmacists (86%). Interrater reliability of error prevention strategy assignment was good (agreement: 0.92; kappa: 0.82). Of the assessed interventions, computerized physician order entry with clinical decision support systems; ward-based clinical pharmacists; and improved communication among physicians, nurses, and pharmacists had the greatest potential to reduce medication errors in pediatric inpatients. Development, implementation, and assessment of such interventions in the pediatric inpatient setting are needed.

  13. Effect of screening and lifestyle counselling on incidence of ischaemic heart disease in general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Torben; Jacobsen, Rikke Kart; Toft, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    of Copenhagen, Denmark PARTICIPANTS: 59 616 people aged 30-60 years randomised with different age and sex randomisation ratios to an intervention group (n=11 629) and a control group (n=47 987). INTERVENTION: The intervention group was invited for screening, risk assessment, and lifestyle counselling up to four...... OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was incidence of ischaemic heart disease in the intervention group compared with the control group. Secondary outcome measures were stroke, combined events (ischaemic heart disease, stroke, or both), and mortality. RESULTS: 6091 (52.4%) people...... disease. Among 58 940 without a history of stroke at baseline, 1726 developed stroke. No significant difference was seen between the intervention and control groups in the primary end point (hazard ratio for ischaemic heart disease 1.03, 95% confidence interval 0.94 to 1.13) or in the secondary endpoints...

  14. Event-Specific Prevention: addressing college student drinking during known windows of risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neighbors, Clayton; Walters, Scott T; Lee, Christine M; Vader, Amanda M; Vehige, Tamara; Szigethy, Thomas; DeJong, William

    2007-11-01

    The unique drinking patterns of college students call for Event-Specific Prevention (ESP) strategies that address college student drinking associated with peak times and events. Despite limited research evaluating ESP, many college campuses are currently implementing programming for specific events. The present paper provides a review of existing literature related to ESP and offers practical guidance for research and practice. The prevention typology proposed by DeJong and Langford [DeJong, W. & Langford, L. M. (2002). A typology for campus-based alcohol prevention: Moving toward environmental management strategies. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 140-147.] provides a framework for strategic planning, suggesting that programs and policies should address problems at the individual, group, institution, community, state, and society level, and that these interventions should focus on knowledge change, environmental change, health protection, and intervention and treatment services. From this typology, specific examples are provided for comprehensive program planning related to orientation/beginning of school year, homecoming, 21st birthday celebrations, spring break, and graduation. In addition, the University of Connecticut's efforts to address problems resulting from its annual Spring Weekend are described as an illustration of how advance planning by campus and community partners can produce a successful ESP effort.

  15. Changes in total death rate and in ischaemic heart disease death ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in total death rate and in ischaemic heart disease death rate in interethnic South African populations, 1978 - 1989. ... While knowledge of the reasons for the rises and falls in IHD rates reInains incomplete, whites have none the less taken some preventive action, although Asians and coloureds apparently little.

  16. Clinical impact of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in primary prevention of total mortality in non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy: results from a meta-analysis of prospective randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jorge; Díaz, Juan Carlos; Grushko, Michael; Quispe, Renato; Briceno, David; Avendano, Ricardo; Golive, Anjani; Pina, Ileana; Natale, Andrea; Garcia, Mario J; Jorde, Ulrich P; Di Biase, Luigi

    2017-11-17

    Primary prophylactic implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) have demonstrated a clear all-cause mortality benefit in patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy, with less compelling evidence supporting its use in patients with non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy (NICM). We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the role of ICD for reduction in total mortality in NICM patients. An electronic search on PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and EMBASE databases was performed to identify the RCTs evaluating the role of prophylactic ICD placement in NICM patients. Mantel-Haenszel risk ratio (RR) fixed-effects model was used to summarize data across treatment arms. Random-effects model was used if heterogeneity (I2) ≥ 25. Patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy pacemaker (CRT-P) were included in the control group. Six RCTs, with a total of 3128 patients and a mean follow-up period of 48 ± 22 months comparing ICD with medical therapy in NICM were included in this analysis. There was a significant reduction in all-cause mortality in the ICD group compared with the medical therapy group [RR 0.79, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.68-0.92; P = 0.002]. No publication bias was noted. Currently available evidence demonstrates that the use of ICD provides a clear and significant reduction in all-cause mortality among patients with NICM. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. [Description of contributing factors in adverse events related to patient safety and their preventability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-García, María Mercedes; Campos-Rivas, Beatriz; Sanmarful-Schwarz, Alexandra; Vírseda-Sacristán, Alicia; Dorrego-López, M Aránzazu; Charle-Crespo, Ángeles

    2017-11-25

    To assess the extent of healthcare related adverse events (AEs), their effect on patients, and their seriousness. To analyse the factors leading to the development of AEs, their relationship with the damage caused, and their degree of preventability. Retrospective descriptive study. Porriño, Pontevedra, Spain, Primary Care Service, from January-2014 to April-2016. Reported AEs were entered into the Patient Safety Reporting and Learning System (SiNASP). The variables measured were: Near Incident (NI) an occurrence with no effect or harm on the patient; Adverse Event (AE) an occurrence that affects or harms a patient. The level of harm is classified as minimal, minor, moderate, critical, and catastrophic. Preventability was classified as little evidence of being preventable, 50% preventable, and sound evidence of being preventable. percentages and Chi-squared test for qualitative variables; P<.05 with SPSS.15. SiNASP. Ethical considerations: approved by the Research Ethics Committee (2016/344). There were 166 recorded AEs (50.6% in males, and 46.4% in women. The mean age was 60.80years). Almost two-thirds 62.7% of AEs affected the patient, with 45.8% causing minimal damage, while 2.4% caused critical damages. Healthcare professionals were a contributing factor in 71.7% of the AEs, with the trend showing that poor communication and lack of protocols were related to the damage caused. Degree of preventability: 96.4%. Most AEs affected the patient, and were related to medication, diagnostic tests, and laboratory errors. The level of harm was related to communication problems, lack of, or deficient, protocols and a poor safety culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Cognitive performance after ischaemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gabriela R. Ferreira

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment after stroke affects the patient recovery process. Therefore, the identification of factors associated with cognitive outcomes is important since it allows risk profiles of stroke survivors to be determined. OBJECTIVE: To assess cognitive outcome of stroke outpatients and investigate associations among clinical and demographic variables, vascular risk factors, depression symptoms and functional ability; and to describe the neuropsychological profile of these patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional design study was conducted. Subjects who suffered a first-ever ischaemic stroke 6 to 10 months prior to data collection underwent neuropsychological assessment and screening for depressive symptoms and functional ability. The outcome "cognitive performance" was analyzed considering two groups: "cognitive impairment" and "no cognitive impairment". RESULTS: There was a statistically significant association between cognitive impairment and female gender, age, stroke severity and functional ability. Regarding neuropsychological profile, the cognitive impairment group exhibited more generalized deficits in attention, visuospatial organization, verbal functions and verbal memory domains compared to the community control group. CONCLUSION: The occurrence of cognitive impairment among patients was high, especially in women, older participants, individuals with more severe stroke, and greater impairment in functional ability. Multiple cognitive domains are affected and this may hamper recovery and negatively impact independence and quality of life after stroke.

  19. Herding interactions as an opportunity to prevent extreme events in financial markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononovicius, Aleksejus; Gontis, Vygintas

    2015-07-01

    A characteristic feature of complex systems in general is a tight coupling between their constituent parts. In complex socio-economic systems this kind of behavior leads to self-organization, which may be both desirable (e.g. social cooperation) and undesirable (e.g. mass panic, financial "bubbles" or "crashes"). Abundance of the empirical data as well as general insights into the trading behavior enables the creation of simple agent-based models reproducing sophisticated statistical features of the financial markets. In this contribution we consider a possibility to prevent self-organized extreme events in financial market modeling its behavior using agent-based herding model, which reproduces main stylized facts of the financial markets. We show that introduction of agents with predefined fundamentalist trading behavior helps to significantly reduce the probability of the extreme price fluctuations events. We also investigate random trading, which was previously found to be promising extreme event prevention strategy, and find that its impact on the market has to be considered among other opportunities to stabilize the markets.

  20. Control of main risk factors after ischaemic stroke across Europe: data from the stroke-specific module of the EUROASPIRE III survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuschmann, Peter U; Kircher, Julia; Nowe, Tim; Dittrich, Ralf; Reiner, Zeljko; Cifkova, Renata; Malojcic, Branko; Mayer, Otto; Bruthans, Jan; Wloch-Kopec, Dorota; Prugger, Christof; Heidrich, Jan; Keil, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Previous cross-sectional surveys in different European countries within the EUROASPIRE programme demonstrated a high prevalence of modifiable risk factors, unhealthy lifestyles and inadequate drug treatment in coronary heart disease patients. Comparable data for ischaemic stroke patients is lacking. A stroke-specific study module was added to the EUROASPIRE III core survey. This cross-sectional multicentre survey included consecutive patients with first-ever ischaemic stroke from four European countries. Data were obtained from medical records, patient interviews and patient examinations within 6-36 months after the stroke event. Control of modifiable risk factors after stroke was evaluated against contemporary European guidelines. A total of 881 patients was recruited. Median age was 66 years, 37.5% were female; average time from the stroke event to interview was 550 days. At the time of the interview, 17.6% of stroke patients smoked cigarettes, 35.5% had a body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2), 62.4% showed elevated blood pressure and 75.7% exhibited elevated LDL cholesterol levels. Antiplatelet drugs or oral anticoagulants were used by 87.2%, antihypertensive medication by 84.4% and statins by 56.8% of stroke patients. Among patients using antihypertensive drugs and lipid-lowering medication at the time of the interview, 34.3% and 34.4%, respectively, achieved target blood pressure and total cholesterol values according to current European guidelines. The EUROASPIRE III stroke-specific module shows that secondary prevention and risk factor control in patients after ischaemic stroke need to be improved in four European centres at the time of the study since about half of patients are not achieving risk factor targets defined in European guidelines. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  1. Piracetam for acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Stefano; Celani, Maria Grazia; Cantisani, Teresa Anna; Righetti, Enrico

    2012-09-12

    Piracetam has neuroprotective and antithrombotic effects that may help to reduce death and disability in people with acute stroke. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 1999, and previously updated in 2006 and 2009. To assess the effects of piracetam in acute, presumed ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 15 May 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to May 2011), EMBASE (1980 to May 2011), and ISI Science Citation Index (1981 to May 2011). We also contacted the manufacturer of piracetam to identify further published and unpublished studies. Randomised trials comparing piracetam with control, with at least mortality reported and entry to the trial within three days of stroke onset. Two review authors extracted data and assessed trial quality and this was checked by the other two review authors. We contacted study authors for missing information. We included three trials involving 1002 patients, with one trial contributing 93% of the data. Participants' ages ranged from 40 to 85 years, and both sexes were equally represented. Piracetam was associated with a statistically non-significant increase in death at one month (approximately 31% increase, 95% confidence interval 81% increase to 5% reduction). This trend was no longer apparent in the large trial after correction for imbalance in stroke severity. Limited data showed no difference between the treatment and control groups for functional outcome, dependence or proportion of patients dead or dependent. Adverse effects were not reported. There is some suggestion (but no statistically significant result) of an unfavourable effect of piracetam on early death, but this may have been caused by baseline differences in stroke severity in the trials. There is not enough evidence to assess the effect of piracetam on dependence.

  2. Demographics, socio-economic characteristics, and risk factor prevalence in patients with non-cardioembolic ischaemic stroke in low- and middle-income countries: the OPTIC registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Halim; Labreuche, Julien; Arauz, Antonio; Bryer, Alan; Lavados, Pablo G; Massaro, Ayrton; Munoz Collazos, Mario; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Yamout, Bassem I; Vicaut, Eric; Amarenco, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    There is a paucity of data on patients with stroke/transient ischaemic attack in low- and middle-income countries. We sought to describe the characteristics and management of patients with an ischaemic stroke and recent transient ischaemic attack or minor ischaemic strokes in low- or middle-income countries. The Outcomes in Patients with TIA and Cerebrovascular disease registry is an international, prospective study. Patients ≥ 45 years who required secondary prevention of stroke (either following an acute transient ischaemic attack or minor ischaemic strokes (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ischaemic stroke) were enrolled in 17 countries in Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa. The main measures of interest were risk factors, comorbidities, and socio-economic variables. Between January 2007 and December 2008, 3635 patients were enrolled in Latin America (n = 1543), the Middle East (n = 1041), North Africa (n = 834), and South Africa (n = 217). Of these, 63% had a stable, first-ever ischaemic stroke (median delay from symptom onset to inclusion, 25 days interquartile range, 7-77); 37% had an acute transient ischaemic attack or minor ischaemic stroke (median delay, two-days; interquartile range, 0-6). Prevalence of diabetes was 46% in the Middle East, 29% in Latin America, 35% in South Africa, and 38% in North Africa; 72% had abdominal obesity (range, 65-78%; adjusted P disease in 7.6%, and coronary artery disease in 13%. Overall, 24% of patients had no health insurance and 27% had a low educational level. In this study, patients in low- and middle-income countries had a high burden of modifiable risk factors. High rates of low educational level and lack of health insurance in certain regions are potential obstacles to risk factor control. The Outcomes in Patients with TIA and Cerebrovascular disease registry is supported by Sanofi-Aventis, Paris, France. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  3. [Preventive measures against human error based on the classification of the adverse events].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    It is impossible to entirely eliminate human error; however, systematic attempts have been made to comprehensively minimize accidents originating in human error. It appears that the "work classification" we proposed previously is not able to reduce adverse events, fifty percent of which were duty confirmation failures. We have therefore reviewed and classified the causes of human error from the perspective of working conditions to create a simpler and more preventative strategy. Text-mining analysis was applied to speech part classification to reveal areas with room for improvement. In an objective approach, a conduct code was created and put into practice, based on the common features revealed from a classification of human error in the examples investigated. The average number of accidents per year was reduced from 36 to 24, and those due to human error per year were reduced from 17.6 to 11. This objective approach appears to achieve a reduction of adverse events, including those caused by human error. However, these results were obtained over only one year, in a single-center analysis, and thus, widespread and continuous enforcement would be needed to demonstrate the validity of this objective approach to the prevention of human error.

  4. Radiodosimetry and preventive measures in the event of a nuclear accident. Proceedings of an international symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    An international symposium on Radiodosimetry and Preventive Measures in the Event of a Nuclear Accident was held in Cracow, Poland, from 26 to 28 May 1994. The symposium was organized by the Polish Society for Nuclear Medicine, and co-sponsored by the IAEA. Over 40 experts from Belarus, Latvia, Lithuania, Germany, Poland, the Russian Federation, Sweden and Switzerland participated. The aim of the Symposium was to review models of iodine kinetics used in the calculation of internal radiation doses to the thyroid after the Chernobyl accident, to discuss internal and external radiation dose to the thyroid in terms or risk of thyroid cancer, and to present data on the incidence rate of thyroid cancer in the selected iodine deficient area in Poland. A part of the symposium was dedicated to the physiological basis of iodine prophylaxis and emergency planning for a nuclear accident. Recommendations of the IAEA on preventive measures in the event of a nuclear accident were also addressed. These proceedings contain the full text of the eight invited papers presented at the symposium. Refs, figs, tabs

  5. Jazzin' Healthy: Interdisciplinary Health Outreach Events Focused on Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Diana; Riley, Angela C; Prasad-Reddy, Lalita; Castner, Rebecca; Fields, Heather; Harper-Brown, Deborah; Hussein, Sabah; Johnson, Charisse L; Mangum, Traiana; Srivastava, Sneha

    2017-04-01

    Health-related disparities are a significant public health concern. In conjunction with a university concert series, healthcare professionals and students provided education, clinical services, and preventive care using an interdisciplinary approach to a primarily African American cohort. The objective was to assess cardiovascular risk factors and readiness to change health-related behaviors. Six outreach events were conducted over 3 years by an interdisciplinary team including pharmacy, medicine, nursing, nutrition, occupational therapy, public health, optometry, and health information technology. Clinical services, such as health screenings for glucose, blood pressure, cholesterol, and body fat along with counseling on the results and smoking cessation behavioral counseling, were provided. Education initiatives addressed bone health, heart disease, HIV risk, nutrition, and access to physician care. Preventative care included vaccinations and eye exams. There were 285 participants that were predominantly African American (95.8 %), female (71.5 %), and age within 55-64 years (45.1 %). Hypertension (50.8 %) and obesity (65.1 %) were the most common cardiovascular risk factors. Of those advised to make health behavior changes, 76.4 % reported they planned to make changes within 1 month. These interdisciplinary outreach events provided health information and access to care in a novel setting and led to a high rate of planned health behavior changes.

  6. Plasticity in the Neonatal Brain following Hypoxic-Ischaemic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eridan Rocha-Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischaemic damage to the developing brain is a leading cause of child death, with high mortality and morbidity, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive disabilities. The developmental stage of the brain and the severity of the insult influence the selective regional vulnerability and the subsequent clinical manifestations. The increased susceptibility to hypoxia-ischaemia (HI of periventricular white matter in preterm infants predisposes the immature brain to motor, cognitive, and sensory deficits, with cognitive impairment associated with earlier gestational age. In term infants HI causes selective damage to sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. Even though the immature brain is more malleable to external stimuli compared to the adult one, a hypoxic-ischaemic event to the neonate interrupts the shaping of central motor pathways and can affect normal developmental plasticity through altering neurotransmission, changes in cellular signalling, neural connectivity and function, wrong targeted innervation, and interruption of developmental apoptosis. Models of neonatal HI demonstrate three morphologically different types of cell death, that is, apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy, which crosstalk and can exist as a continuum in the same cell. In the present review we discuss the mechanisms of HI injury to the immature brain and the way they affect plasticity.

  7. Epigenetic events associated with breast cancer and their prevention by dietary components targeting the epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shabana I; Aumsuwan, Pranapda; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A; Dasmahapatra, Asok K

    2012-01-13

    Aberrant epigenetic alterations in the genome such as DNA methylation and chromatin remodeling play a significant role in breast cancer development. Since epigenetic alterations are considered to be more easily reversible compared to genetic changes, epigenetic therapy is potentially very useful in reversing some of these defects. Methylation of CpG islands is an important component of the epigenetic code, and a number of genes become abnormally methylated in breast cancer patients. Currently, several epigenetic-based synthetic drugs that can reduce DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation are undergoing preclinical and clinical trials. However, these chemicals are generally very toxic and do not have gene specificity. Epidemiological studies have shown that Asian women are less prone to breast cancer due to their high consumption of soy food than the Caucasian women of western countries. Moreover, complementary/and or alternative medicines are commonly used by Asian populations which are rich in bioactive ingredients known to be chemopreventive against tumorigenesis in general. Examples of such agents include dietary polyphenols, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) from green tea, genistein from soybean, isothiocyanates from plant foods, curcumin from turmeric, resveratrol from grapes, and sulforaphane from cruciferous vegetables. These bioactive components are able to modulate epigenetic events, and their epigenetic targets are known to be associated with breast cancer prevention and therapy. This approach could facilitate the discovery and development of novel drugs for the treatment of breast cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the epigenetic events associated with breast cancer and the potential of some of these bioactive dietary components to modulate these events and thus afford new therapeutic or preventive approaches.

  8. Semi-automatic software based detection of atrial fibrillation in acute ischaemic stroke and transient ischaemic attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, M N; Snoer, A; Ali, A M

    2017-01-01

    continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring. Extended monitoring detects more PAF but is limited by costs due to manual analysis. Interpretive software might be a reasonable screening tool. The aim was to validate the performance and utility of Pathfinder SL software compared to manual analysis. METHODS: In all......, 135 ischaemic stroke patients with no prior history of PAF or atrial fibrillation and who had done a 7-day continuous electrocardiogram monitoring (Holter) were included. Manual analysis was compared with Pathfinder SL software including a systematic control of registered events. RESULTS: Seventeen...... (12.6%) patients were diagnosed with PAF (atrial fibrillation > 30 s). Pathfinder SL software including a systematic control of events registered 16 (94.1%) patients with PAF. Manually 15 (88.2%) patients were detected with PAF. Pathfinder SL had a negative predictive value of 99% and sensitivity...

  9. Risk of myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke in adults with polymyositis and dermatomyositis: a general population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Sharan K; Choi, Hyon K; Sayre, Eric C; Aviña-Zubieta, J Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Limited data are available on the risk of cardiovascular disease in DM and PM. The purpose of this study was to estimate the risk of incident myocardial infarction (MI) and ischaemic stroke in adults with incident PM/DM at the general population level. We assembled a retrospective cohort of all adults with incident PM/DM in British Columbia, and we matched up to 10 adults randomly selected from the general population. We estimated the incidence rates (IRs) per 1000 person-years for MI and stroke. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs), adjusting for potential confounders. Among 774 new cases of inflammatory myopathies, 424 had PM (59% female, mean age 60 years) and 350 had DM (65% female, mean age 56 years). IRs for MI and stroke in PM were 22.52 and 10.15 events per 1000 person-years, respectively, vs 5.50 and 5.58 events in the comparison cohort, respectively. Fully adjusted HRs (95% CI) were 3.89 (95% CI: 2.28, 6.65) for MI and 1.76 (95% CI: 0.91, 3.40) for stroke. The age-, sex- and entry time-matched HRs for MI and stroke were highest in the first year after PM diagnosis (6.51, [95% CI: 3.15, 13.47] and 3.48 [95% CI: 1.26, 9.62], respectively). Similar trends were seen for DM. Our study demonstrates that PM and DM are both associated with an increased risk of MI but not ischaemic stroke. Our findings support increased vigilance in cardiovascular prevention, surveillance and risk modification in adults with PM and DM. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Ischaemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation with chronic kidney disease undergoing peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Pak-Hei; Huang, Duo; Yip, Pok-Siu; Hai, Jojo; Tse, Hung-Fat; Chan, Tak-Mao; Lip, Gregory Y H; Lo, Wai-Kei; Siu, Chung-Wah

    2016-05-01

    Little is known about the ischaemic stroke risk and benefit of warfarin therapy for stroke prevention in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) with concomitant atrial fibrillation (AF). Our objective was to determine the risk of ischaemic stroke in a 'real-world' cohort of PD patients with AF, and clinical benefit or harm of aspirin and warfarin. This is a single-centred observational study of Chinese patients with non-valvular AF. Hospitalizations with ischaemic stroke and intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) were recorded. Of 9810 patients from a hospital-based AF registry, 271 CKD patients on PD with AF (76.8 ± 12.5 years, CHA2DS2-VASc: 3.69 ± 1.83, and HAS-BLED: 2.07 ± 0.97) were identified. Amongst these PD patients, 24.7% received warfarin; 31.7% received aspirin; and 43.5% received no antithrombotic therapy. Amongst patients with no antithrombotic therapy, annual incidence of ischaemic stroke in PD patients was comparable with those non-CKD counterparts (9.32 vs. 9.30%/year). Similar to non-CKD patients, annual incidence of ischaemic stroke increased with increasing CHA2DS2-VASc score (CHA2DS2-VASc = 0-1: 5.76 vs. 5.70%/year, P = 1.00; and CHA2DS2-VASc ≥ 2: 10.80 vs. 9.94%/year, P = 0.78). Amongst PD patients, warfarin therapy was associated with lower risk of ischaemic stroke compared with aspirin [Hazard ratio (HR): 0.16, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.04-0.66, P = 0.01] and no therapy (HR: 0.19, 95% CI: 0.06-0.65, P = 0.01), but not associated with a higher risk of ICH. In CKD patients on PD with AF, who had similar ischaemic stroke risk as non-CKD counterparts, warfarin therapy is associated with reduction in risk of ischaemic stroke without a higher risk of ICH. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Hypoxic Ischaemic Encephalopathy among Asphyxiated Nigeran ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To compare the clinical presentation and immediate outcome of Hypoxic Ischaemic Encephalopathy among hospitalized asphyxiated newborns. Babies hospitalised with birth asphyxia in a Nigerian tertiary hospital were prospectively studied uding bivariate analysis. of 114 babies hospitalized with birth asphyxia, ...

  12. The cause of ischaemic nocturnal rest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Rolf; Bülow, J; Tønnesen, K H

    1988-01-01

    of symptomatology. In two limbs, with a normal peripheral circulation, blood flow decreased by 8 +/- 7%. In five limbs with arterial insufficiency, but no rest pain, blood flow decreased by 16 +/- 8% and in eight limbs with ischaemic nocturnal rest pain blood flow was reduced by 32 +/- 12% during sleep...

  13. Thrombin Generation in Acute Ischaemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim O. Balogun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Stroke remains a global leading cause of death and disability. Traditional description of plasma biology in the aftermath of acute ischaemic stroke favours development of hypercoagulability, resulting from complex interplay between plasma and endothelial factors. However, no single assay measures the overall global coagulation process. We postulate that thrombin generation would assist in identifying coagulation abnormalities after acute stroke. Aim. To investigate the coagulation abnormalities after acute ischaemic stroke using thrombin generation. Methods. We evaluated thrombin generation, measured with calibrated automated thrombography in stroke of different aetiological types (n=170 within 48 hours of symptoms onset (baseline and in the second week (time 2 and in normal healthy volunteers (n=71. Results. Two-point thrombin generation assays showed prolonged lag time and time to peak at baseline (3.3 (2.9, 4.0 versus 3.6 (3.2, 4.7; p=0.005 and (3.3 (2.9, 4.0 versus 3.6 (3.2, 4.7; p=0.002, respectively, and at time 2 (3.5 (2.9, 4.2 versus 4.0 (3.1, 4.9; p=0.004 and (5.9 (5.3, 6.6 versus 6.8 (5.8, 7.7 p=0.05, respectively, in cardioembolic stroke (n=39, when compared to noncardioembolic stroke (n=117. The result was reproduced in multiple comparisons between acute ischaemic stroke subgroups and normal healthy volunteers. Endogenous thrombin potential and peak thrombin did not indicate hypercoagulability after acute ischaemic stroke, and thrombolytic therapy did not affect thrombin generation assays. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that thrombin generation in platelet poor plasma is not useful in defining hypercoagulability in acute ischaemic stroke. This is similar to observed trend in coronary artery disease and contrary to other hypercoagulable states.

  14. Alcohol prevention at sporting events: study protocol for a quasi-experimental control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbeej, Natalie; Elgán, Tobias H; Jalling, Camilla; Gripenberg, Johanna

    2016-06-06

    Alcohol intoxication and overserving of alcohol at sporting events are of great concern, given the relationships between alcohol consumption, public disturbances, and violence. During recent years this matter has been on the agenda for Swedish policymakers, authorities and key stakeholders, with demands that actions be taken. There is promising potential for utilizing an environmental approach to alcohol prevention as a strategy to reduce the level of alcohol intoxication among spectators at sporting events. Examples of prevention strategies may be community mobilization, Responsible Beverage Service training, policy work, and improved controls and sanctions. This paper describes the design of a quasi-experimental control group study to examine the effects of a multi-component community-based alcohol intervention at matches in the Swedish Premier Football League. A baseline assessment was conducted during 2015 and at least two follow-up assessments will be conducted in 2016 and 2017. The two largest cities in Sweden are included in the study, with Stockholm as the intervention area and Gothenburg as the control area. The setting is Licensed Premises (LP) inside and outside Swedish football arenas, in addition to arena entrances. Spectators are randomly selected and invited to participate in the study by providing a breath alcohol sample as a proxy for Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC). Actors are hired and trained by an expert panel to act out a standardized scene of severe pseudo-intoxication. Four types of cross-sectional data are generated: (i) BAC levels among ≥ 4 200 spectators, frequency of alcohol service to pseudo-intoxicated patrons attempting to purchase alcohol at LP (ii) outside the arenas (≥200 attempts) and (iii) inside the arenas (≥ 200 attempts), and (iv) frequency of security staff interventions towards pseudo-intoxicated patrons attempting to enter the arenas (≥ 200 attempts). There is an urgent need nationally and internationally to

  15. Previous infection and the risk of ischaemic stroke in Italy: the IN2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consoli, D; Vidale, S; Aguglia, U; Bassi, P; Cavallini, A; Galati, F; Guidetti, D; Marcello, N; Micieli, G; Pracucci, G; Rasura, M; Siniscalchi, A; Sterzi, R; Toni, D; Inzitari, D

    2015-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in new risk factors for ischaemic stroke. Acute and chronic infections could contribute to different aetiological mechanisms of atherosclerosis that lead to cerebrovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that previous infections and Chlamydia pneumoniae in particular increase the risk of ischaemic stroke in the population. This was a prospective case-control study involving 11 Italian stroke units. Controls were age- and sex-matched with cases, represented by patients admitted to hospital for acute ischaemic stroke. For each participant classical vascular risk factors and previous inflammatory and infectious events up to 1 month before were registered. Blood samples were collected to analyse inflammatory markers and titres of antibodies against C. pneumoniae. A total of 1002 participants were included (mean age 69 years) with 749 ischaemic stroke patients. Infections occurred within 1 month previously in 12% of the entire sample with a higher prevalence in the case group (14.4% vs. 3.9%). At multivariate analysis of the seropositivity of IgA antibodies against C. pneumoniae increased the risk of stroke significantly (relative risk 2.121; 95% confidence interval 1.255-3.584) and an early previous infection (up to 7 days before the event) contributed to a rise in probability of acute cerebral ischaemia (relative risk 3.692; 95% confidence interval 1.134-6.875). Early previous infections and persistent chronic infection of C. pneumoniae could contribute to increase the risk of ischaemic stroke significantly, in the elderly especially. © 2014 EAN.

  16. Ischaemic memory imaging using metabolic radiopharmaceuticals: overview of clinical settings and ongoing investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Naya, Masanao; Shiga, Tohru; Suzuki, Eriko; Tamaki, Nagara

    2014-01-01

    ''Ischaemic memory'' is defined as a prolonged functional and/or biochemical alteration remaining after a particular episode of severe myocardial ischaemia. The biochemical alteration has been reported as metabolic stunning. Metabolic imaging has been used to detect the footprint left by previous ischaemic episodes evident due to delayed recovery of myocardial metabolism (persistent dominant glucose utilization with suppression of fatty acid oxidation). β-Methyl-p-[ 123 I]iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) is a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracer widely used for metabolic imaging in clinical settings in Japan. In patients with suspected coronary artery disease but no previous myocardial infarction, BMIPP has shown acceptable diagnostic accuracy. In particular, BMIPP plays an important role in the identification of prior ischaemic insult in patients arriving at emergency departments with acute chest pain syndrome. Recent data also show the usefulness of 123 I-BMIPP SPECT for predicting cardiovascular events in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Similarly, SPECT or PET imaging with 18 F-FDG injected during peak exercise or after exercise under fasting conditions shows an increase in FDG uptake in postischaemic areas. This article will overview the roles of ischaemic memory imaging both under established indications and in ongoing investigations. (orig.)

  17. Ischaemic memory imaging using metabolic radiopharmaceuticals: overview of clinical settings and ongoing investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Imaging, Sapporo (Japan); Naya, Masanao [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Sapporo (Japan); Shiga, Tohru; Suzuki, Eriko; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    ''Ischaemic memory'' is defined as a prolonged functional and/or biochemical alteration remaining after a particular episode of severe myocardial ischaemia. The biochemical alteration has been reported as metabolic stunning. Metabolic imaging has been used to detect the footprint left by previous ischaemic episodes evident due to delayed recovery of myocardial metabolism (persistent dominant glucose utilization with suppression of fatty acid oxidation). β-Methyl-p-[{sup 123}I]iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) is a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracer widely used for metabolic imaging in clinical settings in Japan. In patients with suspected coronary artery disease but no previous myocardial infarction, BMIPP has shown acceptable diagnostic accuracy. In particular, BMIPP plays an important role in the identification of prior ischaemic insult in patients arriving at emergency departments with acute chest pain syndrome. Recent data also show the usefulness of {sup 123}I-BMIPP SPECT for predicting cardiovascular events in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Similarly, SPECT or PET imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG injected during peak exercise or after exercise under fasting conditions shows an increase in FDG uptake in postischaemic areas. This article will overview the roles of ischaemic memory imaging both under established indications and in ongoing investigations. (orig.)

  18. Systematic review of the incidence and characteristics of preventable adverse drug events in ambulatory care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard; Winterstein, Almut G; Søndergaard, Birthe

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the incidence and describe characteristics of preventable adverse drug events (pADEs) in ambulatory care. DATA SOURCES: Studies were searched in PubMed (1966-March 2007), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-December 2006), the Cochrane database of systematic reviews...... (1993-March 2007), EMBASE (1980-February 2007), and Web of Science (1945-March 2007). Key words included medication error, adverse drug reaction, iatrogenic disease, outpatient, ambulatory care, primary health care, general practice, patient admission, hospitalization, observational study, retrospective....../pADE incidence, (2) clinical outcomes, (3) associated drug groups, and/or (4) underlying medication errors were included. Study country, year and design, sample size, follow-up time, ADE/pADE identification method, proportion of ADEs/pADEs and ADEs/pADEs requiring hospital admission, and frequency distribution...

  19. Pharmacotherapy prior to and in acute ischaemic stroke. The use of pharmacotherapy and drug-associated outcomes in real world practice - findings from the Polish Hospital Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewada, Maciej; Sarzyńska-Długosz, Iwona Marta; Skowrońska, Marta; Kamiński, Bogumił; Kobayashi, Adam; Członkowska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a preventable disease and acute ischaemic stroke can be effectively treated. Specific pharmacotherapy is recommended in either prevention or acute ischemic stroke treatment. We aimed to evaluate the use and the early and late outcomes impact of drugs administered before and in acute ischaemic stroke in a real world practice. Ischaemic stroke patients hospitalized between 1st March 2007 and 29th February 2008 and reported in Polish Hospital Stroke Registry were analysed. Fully anonymous data were collected with standardized, web-based questionnaire with authorized access. Multivariate regression models were used to adjust for case-mix and evaluate the impact of drugs used prior to or in acute ischaemic stroke on outcomes. The early outcomes were defined as in-hospital mortality or poor outcome (death or dependency - modified Rankin Scale  3) at hospital discharge, while late outcomes covered one-year survival. A total number of 26 153 ischaemic stroke patients (mean age: 71.8 years; females: 51.6%) was reported. The ana-lysis of pharmacotherapy showed that preventive use of hypo-tensive agents, anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation, antiplatelets and statins is inadequate. Regression models confirmed some expected drug benefits and additionally revealed that antihypertensive drugs or aspirin used prior to stroke and oral anticoagulants or statins used in hospital were associated with better stroke outcome. The prevention of ischaemic stroke needs to be monitored and improved. Evidence-based treatment of acute ischaemic stroke requires further promotion. The benefits of acute ischaemic stroke treatment with statins require to be confirmed in randomized controlled settings.

  20. A trend analysis of human error events for proactive prevention of accidents. Methodology development and effective utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Yuko; Ebisu, Mitsuhiro; Aikawa, Takeshi; Matsubara, Katsuyuki

    2006-01-01

    This paper described methods for analyzing human error events that has been accumulated in the individual plant and for utilizing the result to prevent accidents proactively. Firstly, a categorization framework of trigger action and causal factors of human error events were reexamined, and the procedure to analyze human error events was reviewed based on the framework. Secondly, a method for identifying the common characteristics of trigger action data and of causal factor data accumulated by analyzing human error events was clarified. In addition, to utilize the results of trend analysis effectively, methods to develop teaching material for safety education, to develop the checkpoints for the error prevention and to introduce an error management process for strategic error prevention were proposed. (author)

  1. Trend analysis of human error events and assessment of their proactive prevention measure at Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Satoru; Tanaka, Izumi; Wakabayashi, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    A trend analysis of human error events is important for preventing the recurrence of human error events. We propose a new method for identifying the common characteristics from results of trend analysis, such as the latent weakness of organization, and a management process for strategic error prevention. In this paper, we describe a trend analysis method for human error events that have been accumulated in the organization and the utilization of the results of trend analysis to prevent accidents proactively. Although the systematic analysis of human error events, the monitoring of their overall trend, and the utilization of the analyzed results have been examined for the plant operation, such information has never been utilized completely. Sharing information on human error events and analyzing their causes lead to the clarification of problems in the management and human factors. This new method was applied to the human error events that occurred in the Rokkasho reprocessing plant from 2010 October. Results revealed that the output of this method is effective in judging the error prevention plan and that the number of human error events is reduced to about 50% those observed in 2009 and 2010. (author)

  2. Renal Function Predicts Outcomes in Patients with Ischaemic Stroke and Haemorrhagic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snarska, Katarzyna; Kapica-Topczewska, Katarzyna; Bachórzewska-Gajewska, Hanna; Małyszko, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated renal function and the impact of renal function on in-hospital outcomes in patients with ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. We collected data from 766 patients with stroke; 637 (83.2 %) with ischaemic and 129 with haemorrhagic one. The mean serum creatinine on admission in patients with both types of stroke, who died, was significantly higher than in those who survived. Multivariate analysis showed that independent predictors of mortality in patients with ischaemic stroke were: ischemic heart disease or prior myocardial infarction, diabetes, admission glucose and eGFR on admission. Also, multivariate analysis showed that independent predictors of mortality in patients with haemorrhagic stroke were: age and admission glucose. Patients with haemorrhagic stroke, in particular with acute kidney injury during hospitalisation had significantly worse outcomes than patients with ischaemic stroke. Assessment of kidney function is prerequisite to employ the necessary measures to decrease the risk of in-hospital mortality among patients with acute stroke. Appropriate approach to patients with renal dysfunction (adequate hydration, avoidance of nephrotoxic drugs, drug dose adjustment etc) should be considered as preventive and therapeutic strategies in the management of acute stroke. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: a new tool to identify cardioaortic sources in ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghi, Shadi; Liberman, Ava L; Atalay, Michael; Song, Christopher; Furie, Karen L; Kamel, Hooman; Bernstein, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Stroke of undetermined aetiology or 'cryptogenic' stroke accounts for 30-40% of ischaemic strokes despite extensive diagnostic evaluation. The role and yield of cardiac imaging is controversial. Cardiac MRI (CMR) has been used for cardiac disorders, but its use in cryptogenic stroke is not well established. We reviewed the literature (randomised trials, exploratory comparative studies and case series) on the use of CMR in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with ischaemic stroke. The literature on the use of CMR in the diagnostic evaluation of ischaemic stroke is sparse. However, studies have demonstrated a potential role for CMR in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with cryptogenic stroke to identify potential aetiologies such as cardiac thrombi, cardiac tumours, aortic arch disease and other rare cardiac anomalies. CMR can also provide data on certain functional and structural parameters of the left atrium and the left atrial appendage which have been shown to be associated with ischaemic stroke risk. CMR is a non-invasive modality that can help identify potential mechanisms in cryptogenic stroke and patients who may be targeted for enrolment into clinical trials comparing anticoagulation to antiplatelet therapy in secondary stroke prevention. Prospective studies are needed to compare the value of CMR as compared to transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography in the diagnostic evaluation of cryptogenic stroke. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. How study patients who receive fluo pyrimidines to prevent ischemic events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldombide, L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Ischemic heart disease is the main cause of death in Uruguay and cancer is the second. The pillar of the systemic treatment of colorectal cancer are fluo pyrimidines and cause acute ischemic events in 3-8% of t rated patients. The 5 fluorouracil is the third anticancer drug most used Objective: Due to the high incidence of the two diseases and the risk of death caused by the ischemic treatment complications, the literature is analyzed to define how to study patients who receive fluo pyrimidines as a medium of preventing the same. Development: fluo pyrimidines cardio-toxicity can occur by myocardial toxicity, vasospasm, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency, autoimmune phenomena, platelet hyper aggregability, etc. The clinic is varied and underestimated: angina, abnormal ST silent and reversible, arrhythmias, heart failure, hypertension and heart failure. It is the most common complication with continuous infusion of 5 Fu and its equivalent capecitabine with bolus f lou pyrimidines. It is common that ischemic heart disease prioritises the risk increase of complications, but their absence does not exist. Without ischemic heart disease it is difficult to prevent ischemic events, however proposes that the older higher risk. Results: No uniform guidelines is advised: detailed history, determine if risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia and They are present electrocardiogram and cardiac evaluation. Warn the patient about angina l pain as early symptom and monitor symptoms during chemotherapy including cardio-vascular hypotension. Discontinue the medication and perform classic anti-angina l symptoms and / or signs of ischemia. Not reintroduce unless it is the only therapeutic option, since mortality may exceed

  5. e-Prescription: An e-Health System for Preventing Adverse Drug Events in Community Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma M. Puspitasari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes development activities of an e-health system for community health center (Puskesmas with integrated adverse drug events e-prescription module, consist of system design and development, human resource development, e-health system realization, laboratory and implementation test of e-health system. Some e-readiness evaluations were conducted, through a number of field visits and questionnaires. The results had been used in the e-health system design and development, installation of the internet access infrastructure, and implementation of the education and hands-on training for the medical and administrative staff of the healthcare units. After completing the e-health system design and development as well as system realization and laboratory tests stages, a series of field implementation and experiments have been successfully conducted at Puskesmas Babakansari in Bandung. A number of users feed back have been obtained and used for further improvements on both of the software and hardware modules. The e-health system with integrated e-prescription module has successfully developed and shown its expected functions in: patient registration, medical record, paperless prescription, producing the required reports and preventing possible adverse drug events.

  6. Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V. Karyakin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The 9th ARRCN Symposium 2015 was held during 21st–25th October 2015 at the Novotel Hotel, Chumphon, Thailand, one of the most favored travel destinations in Asia. The 10th ARRCN Symposium 2017 will be held during October 2017 in the Davao, Philippines. International Symposium on the Montagu's Harrier (Circus pygargus «The Montagu's Harrier in Europe. Status. Threats. Protection», organized by the environmental organization «Landesbund für Vogelschutz in Bayern e.V.» (LBV was held on November 20-22, 2015 in Germany. The location of this event was the city of Wurzburg in Bavaria.

  7. Impact of regionalized care on concordance of plan and preventable adverse events on general medicine services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Stephanie K; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Giannelli, Kyla; Roy, Christopher L; Boxer, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Dispersion of inpatient care teams across different medical units impedes effective team communication, potentially leading to adverse events (AEs). To regionalize 3 inpatient general medical teams to nursing units and examine the association with communication and preventable AEs. Pre-post cohort analysis. A 700-bed academic medical center. General medicine patients on any of the participating nursing units before and after implementation of regionalized care. Regionalizing 3 general medical physician teams to 3 corresponding nursing units. Concordance of patient care plan between nurse and intern, and adjusted odds of preventable AEs. Of the 414 included nurse and intern paired surveys, there were no significant differences pre- versus postregionalization in total mean concordance scores (0.65 vs 0.67, P = 0.26), but there was significant improvement in agreement on expected discharge date (0.56 vs 0.68, P = 0.003), knowledge of the other provider's name (0.56 vs 0.86,P communication and lead to patient safety improvements. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:620-627. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  8. Effects of aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel and telmisartan on disability and cognitive function after recurrent stroke in patients with ischaemic stroke in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial : a double-blind, active and placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dienert, Hans-Christoph; Saccot, Ralph L.; Yusuft, Salim; Cotton, Daniel; Ounpuu, Stephanie; Lawton, William A.; Palesch, Yuko; Martin, Renee H.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bath, Philip; Bornstein, Natan; Chan, Bernard P. L.; Chen, Sien-Tsong; Cunha, Luis; Dahlof, Bjorn; De Keyser, Jacques; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Estol, Conrado; Gorelick, Philip; Gu, Vivian; Hermansson, Karin; Hilbrich, Lutz; Kaste, Markku; Lu, Chuanzhen; Machnig, Thomas; Pais, Prem; Roberts, Robin; Skvortsova, Veronika; Teal, Philip; Toni, Danilo; VanderMaelen, Cam; Voigt, Thor; Weber, Michael; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2008-01-01

    Background The treatment of ischaemic stroke with neuroprotective drugs has been unsuccessful, and whether these compounds can be used to reduce disability after recurrent stroke is unknown. The putative neuroprotective effects of antiplatelet compounds and the angiotensin II receptor antagonist

  9. Haemoglobin sickle D disease: A presentation with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Hasnain; Umair, Syed Farrukh

    2016-03-01

    Haemoglobin-D, Los Angeles or Haemoglobin D-Punjab is not a rare variant of haemoglobin worldwide especially in Punjab, North western India, and South Asian continent. It can be inherited rarely as homozygous causing no symptoms or heterozygous with Haemoglobin A, commonly not related to clinical symptomatology. However, these variants can co-exist rarely with other haemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia or haemoglobin-S. We describe the case of doubly heterozygous Hb-SD Punjab in a 8 year old girl who presented with ischaemic stroke. Before this case, only one case has been reported but it was with reversible hyperbilirubinaemia in Hb-SD from Rawalpindi, Pakistan. This case images the propensity for occurrence of rare phenotype within our population and underlines the importance of genotyping to avoid erroneous management and poor counseling hence preventing life altering complications which our case developed.

  10. [Fatal incidents by crowd crush during mass events. (Un)preventable phenomenon?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, U; Fälker, A; Wenzel, V

    2013-01-01

    Crowd crushes with dozens or even hundreds of casualties have occurred several times at the Hajj in Saudi Arabia and also in soccer stadiums in Western Europe. As fatal accidents after human stampedes during mass events occur very rarely and are usually accompanied by many years of criminal court proceedings in order to identify underlying responsible mechanisms and culprits, it is very difficult to draw conclusions and formulate precautions from an emergency medical point of view. This study analyzed a fatal crowd crush which occurred on 4 December 1999 following the "Air & Style" snowboard contest with approximately 22,000 people attending in the Bergisel stadium in Innsbruck, Austria. Firstly, focused interviews were conducted with professional rescuers, police and physicians and secondly publicly available court records dealing with this incident in the district court of Innsbruck, Austria were analyzed. During the snowboard contest 87 emergency medical technicians, 6 emergency physicians, 1 leading emergency physician, 21 policemen and 140 security personnel were present. Following the accident additionally some 100 emergency medical technicians, 36 emergency medical service vehicles and 4 physician-staffed emergency medical service vehicles responded to the scene. The deadly crowd crush resulting in 6 fatalities, 4 patients still in a vegetative state and 38 injured, was due to a severe crowd accumulation at one stadium exit, which was not recognized and dispersed in time. Construction of the exit in line with darkness, steep slope and slippery surface contributed adversely to this dangerous situation, although panic did not occur at any time. Unfortunately, there is no patent remedy to completely prevent fatal accidents by a crowd crush at mass events. If planning is initiated early, sufficient material and personnel reserves are kept in reserve and despite conflicting interests of the organizers, the host community, security, police and emergency medical

  11. Characterization of patients with recurrent ischaemic stroke using the ASCO classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, M E; Sauer, T; Hennerici, M G; Chatzikonstantinou, A

    2013-05-01

    The ASCO score has the advantage of allowing a more comprehensive characterization of ischaemic stroke patients and their risk factors, as reflected in different grades of evidence of atherosclerotic changes (A), small vessel disease (S), potential cardiac (C) or other (O) sources. It might also help to characterize patients with recurrent ischaemic stroke and document the etiology of stroke recurrence as well as the further development of risk factor constellations. We prospectively screened our stroke database for patients with recurrent ischaemic stroke between 2004 and 2011, and classified each stroke using ASCO. The distribution of etiologies was analysed, and changes in the ASCO score were documented for each patient. We identified 131 patients with recurrence of ischaemic stroke. At the first event, the distribution of etiologies and their grade of evidence was 97 grade 1 (A = 18/S = 32/C = 44/O = 3), six grade 2 (A = 2/S = 1/C = 3/O = 0), 199 grade 3 (A = 85/S = 83/C = 23/O = 8), 204 grade 0 (A = 26/S = 14/C = 44/O = 120) and 18 grade 9 (A = 0/S = 1/C = 17/O = 0). At stroke recurrence, 98 grade 1 (A = 16/S = 24/C = 55/O = 3), 11 grade 2 (A = 2/S = 5/C = 4/O = 0), 210 grade 3 (A = 94/S = 92/C = 13/O = 11), 171 grade 0 (A = 16/S = 9/C = 26/O = 117) and 34 grade 9 (A = 0/S = 1/C = 33/O = 0) were identified. Analysis of each individual showed a modification of the score in 85 patients (64.9%). Recurrent ischaemic stroke does not always have the same etiology as the previous one(s). Among variable changes of grade 1 etiologies, an increasing prevalence of cardioembolism--often insufficiently treated--at stroke recurrence was a major finding. ASCO proved to be highly useful to monitor risk factor constellations. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  12. Rivaroxaban for Preventing Atherothrombotic Events in People with Acute Coronary Syndrome and Elevated Cardiac Biomarkers: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandor, Abdullah; Pollard, Daniel; Chico, Tim; Henderson, Robert; Stevenson, Matt

    2016-05-01

    As part of its Single Technology Appraisal process, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the company that manufactures rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Bayer) to submit evidence of the clinical and cost effectiveness of rivaroxaban for the prevention of adverse outcomes in patients after the acute management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). The ERG produced a critical review of the evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology, based upon the company's submission to NICE. The evidence was derived mainly from a randomised, double-blind, phase III, placebo-controlled trial of rivaroxaban (either 2.5 or 5 mg twice daily) in patients with recent ACS [unstable angina, non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)]. In addition, all patients received antiplatelet therapy [aspirin alone or aspirin and a thienopyridine either as clopidogrel (approximately 99 %) or ticlopidine (approximately 1 %) according to national or local guidelines]. The higher dose of rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily) did not form part of the marketing authorisation. A post hoc subgroup analysis of the licensed patients who had ACS with elevated cardiac biomarkers (that is, patients with STEMI and NSTEMI) without prior stroke or transient ischaemic stroke showed that compared with standard care, the addition of rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) to existing antiplatelet therapy reduced the composite endpoint of cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction or stroke, but increased the risk of major bleeding and intracranial haemorrhage. However, there were a number of limitations in the evidence base that warrant caution in its interpretation. In particular, the evidence may be confounded because of the post hoc subgroup

  13. ISCHAEMIC STROKE IN A 38-YEAR-YOUNG AS A PRESENTING FEATURE OF POLYCYTHAEMIA VERA: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaraf Hussain

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is rare as a presenting feature of polycythaemia. Here, we report a case of polycythaemia whose presenting feature was ischaemic stroke. Recurrence of stroke may occur if polycythaemia is not treated in these patients. Therefore, identifying this cause of stroke timely may prevent recurrence.

  14. VA Suicide Prevention Applications Network: A National Health Care System-Based Suicide Event Tracking System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmire, Claire; Stephens, Brady; Morley, Sybil; Thompson, Caitlin; Kemp, Janet; Bossarte, Robert M

    2016-11-01

    The US Department of Veterans Affairs' Suicide Prevention Applications Network (SPAN) is a national system for suicide event tracking and case management. The objective of this study was to assess data on suicide attempts among people using Veterans Health Administration (VHA) services. We assessed the degree of data overlap on suicide attempters reported in SPAN and the VHA's medical records from October 1, 2010, to September 30, 2014-overall, by year, and by region. Data on suicide attempters in the VHA's medical records consisted of diagnoses documented with E95 codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision . Of 50 518 VHA patients who attempted suicide during the 4-year study period, data on fewer than half (41%) were reported in both SPAN and the medical records; nearly 65% of patients whose suicide attempt was recorded in SPAN had no data on attempted suicide in the VHA's medical records. Evaluation of administrative data suggests that use of SPAN substantially increases the collection of data on suicide attempters as compared with the use of medical records alone, but neither SPAN nor the VHA's medical records identify all suicide attempters. Further research is needed to better understand the strengths and limitations of both systems and how to best combine information across systems.

  15. Is clopidogrel superior to aspirin in secondary prevention of vascular disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algra Ale

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cornerstone in clinical evidence of the relative efficacy of thienopyridines (clopidogrel, ticlopidine versus aspirin in the secondary prevention of vascular disease is the Clopidogrel versus Aspirin in Patients at Risk of Ischaemic Events trial. This trial showed a modest benefit in the reduction of vascular events by clopidogrel. The results differed according to qualifying disorder: myocardial infarction, -3.7%; ischaemic stroke, +7.3%; and peripheral arterial disease, +23.8% (P = 0.042. Similar results were found for ticlopidine after brain ischaemia. The safety of clopidogrel appears to be similar to that of aspirin and better than that of ticlopidine. However, the recent report of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in association with clopidogrel causes concern.

  16. Ischaemic stroke in patients treated with oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, L M; Cardona, P; Quesada, H; Lara, B; Rubio, F

    2016-01-01

    Cardioembolic stroke is associated with poorer outcomes. Prevention is based on oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy. Haemorrhage is the main complication of OACs, which are sometimes ineffective. We retrospectively reviewed 1014 consecutive patients who suffered an ischaemic stroke between 2011 and 2013, analysing those who were receiving OAC treatment at stroke onset (107 patients in total) with special attention to aetiology, outcomes, and INR value in the acute phase. The mean age (SD) was 71.9 (10) years. Patients had been treated with OACs for 5.9 (5.5) years; 98.1% of them were being treated for heart disease. INR was strokes were cardioembolic and 1.9% were atherothrombotic. Anticoagulation therapy was discontinued in 48 patients (44.9%) due to haemorrhagic transformation (24 patients), extensive infarction (23), or endarterectomy (1). Therapy was resumed in 24 patients (50%) after a mean lapse of 36 days. This was not possible in the remaining patients because of death or severe sequelae. New OACs (NOACs) were prescribed to 9 patients (18.7% of all potential candidates). At 3 months, patients with INR>1.7 in the acute phase exhibited better outcomes than patients with INR≤1.7 (mRS 0-2 in 62% vs 30.8%; death in 10% vs 38.4%; P=.0004). Some patients taking OACs suffer ischaemic strokes that are usually cardioembolic, especially if INR is below the therapeutic range. OACs can be resumed without complications, and NOACs are still underused. Despite cases in which treatment is ineffective, outcomes are better when INR is above 1.7 at stroke onset. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Guidelines for the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso de Leciñana, M; Egido, J A; Casado, I; Ribó, M; Dávalos, A; Masjuan, J; Caniego, J L; Martínez Vila, E; Díez Tejedor, E; Fuentes, B; Álvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Castellanos, M; Castillo, J; Díaz-Otero, F; López-Fernández, J C; Freijo, M; Gállego, J; García-Pastor, A; Gil-Núñez, A; Gilo, F; Irimia, P; Lago, A; Maestre, J; Martí-Fábregas, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Molina, C; Morales, A; Nombela, F; Purroy, F; Rodríguez-Yañez, M; Roquer, J; Rubio, F; Segura, T; Serena, J; Simal, P; Tejada, J; Vivancos, J

    2014-03-01

    Update of Acute Ischaemic Stroke Treatment Guidelines of the Spanish Neurological Society based on a critical review of the literature. Recommendations are made based on levels of evidence from published data and studies. Organized systems of care should be implemented to ensure access to the optimal management of all acute stroke patients in stroke units. Standard of care should include treatment of blood pressure (should only be treated if values are over 185/105 mmHg), treatment of hyperglycaemia over 155 mg/dl, and treatment of body temperature with antipyretic drugs if it rises above 37.5 °C. Neurological and systemic complications must be prevented and promptly treated. Decompressive hemicraniectomy should be considered in cases of malignant cerebral oedema. Intravenous thrombolysis with rtPA should be administered within 4.5 hours from symptom onset, except when there are contraindications. Intra-arterial pharmacological thrombolysis can be considered within 6 hours, and mechanical thrombectomy within 8 hours from onset, for anterior circulation strokes, while a wider window of opportunity up to 12-24 hours is feasible for posterior strokes. There is not enough evidence to recommend routine use of the so called neuroprotective drugs. Anticoagulation should be administered to patients with cerebral vein thrombosis. Rehabilitation should be started as early as possible. Treatment of acute ischaemic stroke includes management of patients in stroke units. Systemic thrombolysis should be considered within 4.5 hours from symptom onset. Intra-arterial approaches with a wider window of opportunity can be an option in certain cases. Protective and restorative therapies are being investigated. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Primary prevention of major cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events with statins in diabetic patients : a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Folgerdiena M.; Denig, Petra; Pouwels, Koen B.; Postma, Maarten J.; Hak, Eelko

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients with diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Controlling lipid levels has a preventive effect on the occurrence of major cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Individual trials have shown varying data on the efficacy of treatment with

  19. Cost-Effectiveness Comparison of Breast Cancer Screening and Vascular Event Primary Prevention with Aspirin in Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gareth

    2011-01-01

    Aim: For the first time, this article presents a cost-effectiveness comparison of a breast cancer screening programme with a possible health education programme with aspirin for vascular event primary prevention. Background: Breast cancer screening is a well established part of cancer control programmes yet recent evidence on this intervention has…

  20. Can long-term antibiotic treatment prevent progression of peripheral arterial occlusive disease? A large, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, J B; Juul, Svend; Henneberg, E

    2007-01-01

    history. Follow-up was performed every 6 months. Primary events were defined as death, peripheral revascularization and major lower limb amputation. Secondary events were thrombosis, stroke, transient cerebral ischaemic attack and myocardial infarction. Change in ABPI was also investigated. Data were......, no significant differences were found. CONCLUSION: Long-term treatment with roxithromycin is ineffective in preventing death, amputation, peripheral revascularization, myocardial infarction, stroke, transient cerebral ischaemic attack, thrombosis and decline in ABPI in patients with an established diagnosis......PURPOSE: The purpose was to investigate in a large, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, whether antibiotic treatment can prevent progression of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five hundred and seven patients were included; all patients had an established...

  1. Risk factors, aetiology and outcome of ischaemic stroke in young adults: the Swiss Young Stroke Study (SYSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeggel Simonetti, Barbara; Mono, Marie-Luise; Huynh-Do, Uyen; Michel, Patrik; Odier, Celine; Sztajzel, Roman; Lyrer, Philippe; Engelter, Stefan T; Bonati, Leo; Gensicke, Henrik; Traenka, Christopher; Tettenborn, Barbara; Weder, Bruno; Fischer, Urs; Galimanis, Aekaterini; Jung, Simon; Luedi, Rudolf; De Marchis, Gian Marco; Weck, Anja; Cereda, Carlo W; Baumgartner, Ralf; Bassetti, Claudio L; Mattle, Heinrich P; Nedeltchev, Krassen; Arnold, Marcel

    2015-09-01

    Ischaemic stroke (IS) in young adults has been increasingly recognized as a serious health condition. Stroke aetiology is different in young adults than in the older population. This study aimed to investigate aetiology and risk factors, and to search for predictors of outcome and recurrence in young IS patients. We conducted a prospective multicentre study of consecutive IS patients aged 16-55 years. Baseline demographic data, risk factors, stroke aetiology including systematic genetic screening for Fabry disease and severity were assessed and related to functional neurological outcome (modified Rankin Scale, mRS), case fatality, employment status, place of residence, and recurrent cerebrovascular events at 3 months. In 624 IS patients (60% men), median age was 46 (IQR 39-51) years and median NIHSS on admission 3 (IQR 1-8). Modifiable vascular risk factors were found in 73%. Stroke aetiology was mostly cardioembolism (32%) and of other defined origin (24%), including cervicocerebral artery dissection (17%). Fabry disease was diagnosed in 2 patients (0.3%). Aetiology remained unknown in 20%. Outcome at 3 months was favourable (mRS 0-1) in 61% and fatal in 2.9%. Stroke severity (p young adults with IS had modifiable vascular risk factors, emphasizing the importance of prevention strategies. Outcome was unfavourable in more than a third of patients and was associated with initial stroke severity and diabetes mellitus. Previous cerebrovascular events predicted recurrent ones.

  2. Role of the renal sympathetic nervous system in mediating renal ischaemic injury-induced reductions in renal haemodynamic and excretory functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Ibrahim M; Ameer, Omar Z; Sattar, Munavvar A; Abdullah, Nor A; Yam, Mun F; Najim, Hafsa S; Khan, Abdul Hye; Johns, Edward J

    2010-04-01

    We investigated the role of renal sympathetic innervation in the deterioration of renal haemodynamic and excretory functions during the early post-ischaemic phase of renal ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Anaesthetised male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to unilateral renal ischaemia by clamping the left renal artery for 30 min followed by reperfusion. Following acute renal denervation clearance experiments were performed. In a different set of experiments, the renal nerves were electrically stimulated at increasing frequencies and responses in renal blood flow and renal vascular resistance were recorded. Denervated post-ischaemic acute renal failure (ARF) rats showed higher urine flow rate, absolute and fractional sodium excretions, urinary sodium to urinary potassium, glomerular filtration rate and basal renal blood flow but lower basal renal vascular resistance (all p 0.05 vs innervated ARF rats). The rise in mean arterial pressure and renal vasoconstrictor response to renal nerve stimulation were blunted in denervated ischaemic ARF rats (all p < 0.05 vs innervated ARF rats). Renal histopathology in denervated ARF rats manifested a significantly lower medullary congestion, inflammation and tubular injury compared to innervated counterparts (p < 0.05 vs innervated ARF rats). The findings strongly suggest the involvement of renal sympathetic tone in the post-ischaemic events of ischaemic ARF, as the removal of its action to a degree ameliorated the post-ischaemic renal dysfunctions.

  3. Antiplatelet therapy and the effects of B vitamins in patients with previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack: a post-hoc subanalysis of VITATOPS, a randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, Graeme J; Eikelboom, John W; Yi, Qilong; Lees, Kennedy R; Chen, Christopher; Xavier, Denis; Navarro, Jose C; Ranawaka, Udaya K; Uddin, Wasim; Ricci, Stefano; Gommans, John; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that any benefits of folic acid-based therapy to lower serum homocysteine in prevention of cardiovascular events might be offset by concomitant use of antiplatelet therapy. We aimed to establish whether there is an interaction between antiplatelet therapy and the effects of folic acid-based homocysteine-lowering therapy on major vascular events in patients with stroke or transient ischaemic attack enrolled in the vitamins to prevent stroke (VITATOPS) trial. In the VITATOPS trial, 8164 patients with recent stroke or transient ischaemic attack were randomly allocated to double-blind treatment with one tablet daily of placebo or B vitamins (2 mg folic acid, 25 mg vitamin B(6), and 500 μg vitamin B(12)) and followed up for a median 3·4 years (IQR 2·0-5·5) for the primary composite outcome of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death from vascular causes. In our post-hoc analysis of the interaction between antiplatelet therapy and the effects of treatment with B vitamins on the primary outcome, we used Cox proportional hazards regression before and after adjusting for imbalances in baseline prognostic factors in participants who were and were not taking antiplatelet drugs at baseline and in participants assigned to receive B vitamins or placebo. We also assessed the interaction in different subgroups of patients and different secondary outcomes. The VITATOPS trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00097669, and Current Controlled Trials, number ISRCTN74743444. At baseline, 6609 patients were taking antiplatelet therapy and 1463 were not. Patients not receiving antiplatelet therapy were more likely to be younger, east Asian, and disabled, to have a haemorrhagic stroke or cardioembolic ischaemic stroke, and to have a history of hypertension or atrial fibrillation. They were less likely to be smokers and to have a history of peripheral artery disease, hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes, ischaemic heart disease, and a

  4. An integrative literature review to examine the provision of self-management support following transient ischaemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Dorothy; Liddy, Clare

    2017-11-01

    To identify the types of self-management support that have been provided to persons with transient ischaemic attack and the evidence for the effectiveness of these programmes. Self-management is a key element for the effective management of chronic conditions. For persons with transient ischaemic attack, secondary stroke prevention is a recognised standard of care. Best practice guidelines indicate that persons who have experienced transient ischaemic attack should be supported to develop self-management skills. However, it is not clear how best to support the development of these skills. An integrative literature review was conducted. A search was conducted using Medline, Embase, HealthSTAR, CINAHL and PsycINFO. Published quantitative and qualitative studies, abstracts or dissertations describing the provision, experience or outcomes of self-management interventions for people with transient ischaemic attack, and published in English before March 2016, were included. Articles were selected and rated separately by two reviewers. The American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine Level of Evidence and Conduct Rating tools were used for rating. Interventions were described and compared, and evidence was presented using the traffic lighting system. Sixteen interventions representing a variety of group- and individual-based interventions were identified. Interventions differed in target population, content, structure, duration and outcomes. Only four interventions were specifically designed for persons with transient ischaemic attack. While evidence to support self-management interventions is promising, there is limited evidence to support any one intervention. However, one good-quality randomised controlled trial supports the provision of a group self-management programme for improving blood pressure control. There are numerous interventions to support self-management by persons with transient ischaemic attack. More research is needed to determine

  5. Primary prevention of cardiovascular events with low-dose aspirin and vitamin E in type 2 diabetic patients: results of the Primary Prevention Project (PPP) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Michele; Pellegrini, Fabio; Roncaglioni, Maria C; Avanzini, Fausto; Tognoni, Gianni; Nicolucci, Antonio

    2003-12-01

    We investigated in general practice the efficacy of antiplatelets and antioxidants in primary prevention of cardiovascular events in people with type 2 diabetes. The Primary Prevention Project (PPP) is a randomized, open trial with a two-by-two factorial design aimed to investigate low-dose aspirin (100 mg/day) and vitamin E (300 mg/day) in the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with one or more cardiovascular risk factors. The primary end point was a composite end point of cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction. A total of 1,031 people with diabetes in the PPP, aged >/=50 years, without a previous cardiovascular event were enrolled by 316 general practitioners and 14 diabetes outpatient clinics. The PPP trial was prematurely stopped (after a median of 3.7 years) by the independent data safety and monitoring board because of a consistent benefit of aspirin compared with the control group in a population of 4,495 patients with one or more major cardiovascular risk factors. In diabetic patients, aspirin treatment was associated with a nonsignificant reduction in the main end point (relative risk [RR] = 0.90, 95% CI 0.50-1.62) and in total cardiovascular events (0.89, 0.62-1.26) and with a nonsignificant increase in cardiovascular deaths (1.23, 0.69-2.19). In nondiabetic subjects, RRs for the main end point, total cardiovascular events, and cardiovascular deaths were 0.59 (0.37-0.94), 0.69 (0.53-0.90), and 0.32 (0.14-0.72), respectively. No significant reduction in any of the end points considered could be found with vitamin E in either diabetic or nondiabetic subjects. Our data suggest a lower effect of primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) with low-dose aspirin in diabetic patients as opposed to subjects with other cardiovascular risk factors. If confirmed, these findings might indicate that the antiplatelet effects of aspirin in diabetic patients are overwhelmed by aspirin-insensitive mechanisms of platelet activation and

  6. Investigation of Lab Fire Prevention Management System of Combining Root Cause Analysis and Analytic Hierarchy Process with Event Tree Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chan Shih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a new approach, combining root cause analysis (RCA, analytic hierarchy process (AHP, and event tree analysis (ETA in a loop to systematically evaluate various laboratory safety prevention strategies. First, 139 fire accidents were reviewed to identify the root causes and draw out prevention strategies. Most fires were caused due to runaway reactions, operation error and equipment failure, and flammable material release. These mostly occurred in working places of no prompt fire protection. We also used AHP to evaluate the priority of these strategies and found that chemical fire prevention strategy is the most important control element, and strengthening maintenance and safety inspection intensity is the most important action. Also together with our surveys results, we proposed that equipment design is also critical for fire prevention. Therefore a technical improvement was propounded: installing fire detector, automatic sprinkler, and manual extinguisher in the lab hood as proactive fire protections. ETA was then used as a tool to evaluate laboratory fire risks. The results indicated that the total risk of a fire occurring decreases from 0.0351 to 0.0042 without/with equipment taking actions. Establishing such system can make Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S office not only analyze and prioritize fire prevention policies more practically, but also demonstrate how effective protective equipment improvement can achieve and the probabilities of the initiating event developing into a serious accident or controlled by the existing safety system.

  7. Protein supplementation may enhance the spontaneous recovery of neurological alterations in patients with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilani, Roberto; Scocchi, Marco; Iadarola, Paolo; Franciscone, Piero; Verri, Manuela; Boschi, Federica; Pasini, Evasio; Viglio, Simona

    2008-12-01

    To determine whether protein supplementation could enhance neurological recovery in subacute patients with ischaemic stroke. Alimentation-independent patients with ischaemic stroke were randomly allocated to either 21 days of protein supplementation (protein-supplemented group; n=20) or to a spontaneous diet only (control group; n=21) in order to investigate the recovery of neurological changes (measured using the National Institute of Health (NIH) Stroke Scale). Tertiary care rehabilitation in Italy. Forty-two patients (27 male and 15 female; 66.4 +/- 11 years) 16 +/-2 days after the acute event. Supplementation with a hyperproteic nutritional formula (10% protein). NIH Stroke Scale and protein intake. At admission to rehabilitation, both groups of patients were homogeneous for demographic, clinical and functional characteristics. After 21 days from the start of the protocol, the NIH Stroke Scale was found to be enhanced in the group with supplemental proteins (-4.4 +/- 1.5 score versus -3 +/- 1.4 of control group; Pneurological recovery in subacute patients with ischaemic stroke.

  8. Collateral circulation is an independent radiological predictor of outcome after thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucinski, T.; Koch, C.; Eckert, B.; Grzyska, U.; Freitag, H.J.; Zeumer, H.; Becker, V.; Kroemer, H.; Heesen, C.; Roether, J.

    2003-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the type of vascular occlusion, recanalisation and collateralisation are predictive of outcome after thrombolytic therapy in acute ischaemic stroke. We carried out angiography and local intra-arterial (97) or systemic (14) thrombolysis within 6 h of the onset in patients with an ischaemic stroke in the territory of the internal carotid artery. Early ischaemic signs (EIS) on pretreatment CT and angiographic findings were classified and analysed in relation to clinical outcome at 3 months. A favourable outcome (Barthel index [BI]≥ 90) was found in 40% of patients with an occlusion of the middle cerebral artery trunk whereas intracranial occlusion of the internal carotid artery (''carotid T occlusion'') was followed by death or severe disability (BI<50) in 87%. Significant univariate predictors of favourable outcome were occlusion type (P<0.01), recanalisation (P<0.01) and collateralisation (P<0.01). However, multivariate analysis revealed a significant relationship only between collateralisation and favourable outcome (odds ratio 5.9, 95% confidence interval 1.3-26.7, P=0.02). EIS were not predictive in either case. Occlusion type and recanalisation, are related to outcome only if adequate collateralisation prevents infarction until recanalisation occurs. (orig.)

  9. AN ULTRASONOGRAPHIC STUDY OF CAROTID ARTERY PATHOLOGY IN ISCHAEMIC STROKE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puthiya Maliyakkal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Majority of ischaemic strokes are due to extracranial carotid artery disease. Ultrasonography of the carotid arteries is easily available, cost-effective noninvasive method of evaluation in preventing ischaemic strokes. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the carotid artery pathology, and grade the stenotic lesions by ultrasonography in ischaemic stroke patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS In 25 patients of clinically diagnosed cerebrovascular insufficiency, carotid and vertebral arteries on both sides were examined. The site, size, echogenicity, luminal narrowing and velocity changes at the site of atherosclerotic plaque was recorded. The observations in percentages were compared and analysed. RESULTS Hemiparesis was the commonest presenting complaint. Among these 25 patients, 58% of them had atheromatous plaque. Smoking had a strong association with the development of plaque. 64% of these patients with atheromatous plaque were males with a sex ratio of 1.8:1, 57% of plaques were found at carotid bifurcation predominantly on left side, 57% of these plaques had significant stenosis and one had complete occlusion. Predominant type of these plaque were strongly echogenic with calcification (52%, 35% of these patients had a PSV ratio of 2-4 and 14% >4. CONCLUSION The study showed atheromatous plaque changes with significant stenosis among cerebrovascular insufficiency patients. The findings were consistent with the other studies.

  10. Canagliflozin for Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events: Results From the CANVAS Program (Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Neal, Bruce; Perkovic, Vlado; de Zeeuw, Dick; Fulcher, Greg; Erondu, Ngozi; Shaw, Wayne; Fabbrini, Elisa; Sun, Tao; Li, Qiang; Desai, Mehul; Matthews, David R

    2018-01-23

    Canagliflozin is a sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor that significantly reduces the composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and elevated cardiovascular risk. The comparative effects among participants with and without a history of cardiovascular disease (secondary versus primary prevention) were prespecified for evaluation. The CANVAS Program (Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment Study) randomly assigned 10 142 participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus to canagliflozin or placebo. The primary prevention cohort comprised individuals ≥50 years of age with ≥2 risk factors for cardiovascular events but with no prior cardiovascular event, and the secondary prevention cohort comprised individuals ≥30 years of age with a prior cardiovascular event. The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. Secondary outcomes included heart failure hospitalization and a renal composite (40% reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate, renal replacement therapy, or renal death). Primary prevention participants (N=3486; 34%) were younger (63 versus 64 years of age), were more often female (45% versus 31%), and had a longer duration of diabetes mellitus (14 versus 13 years) compared with secondary prevention participants (N=6656; 66%). The primary end point event rate was higher in the secondary prevention group compared with the primary prevention group (36.9 versus 15.7/1000 patient-years, P <0.001). In the total cohort, the primary end point was reduced with canagliflozin compared with placebo (26.9 versus 31.5/1000 patient-years; hazard ratio [HR], 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75-0.97; P <0.001 for noninferiority, P =0.02 for superiority) with no statistical evidence of heterogeneity (interaction P value=0.18) between the primary (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.74-1.30) and secondary prevention (HR, 0.82; 95

  11. Perceived social support as a moderator between negative life events and depression in adolescence: implications for prediction and targeted prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Miloseva, Lence; Vukosavljevic-Gvozden, Tatjana; Richter, Kneginja; Milosev, Vladimir; Niklewski, Günter

    2017-01-01

    Aim and Background: The role of the perceived social support in prevention of depression in adolescence still remains an insufficiently explored problem. By integrating the results of the previous studies of moderator role of perceived social support between negative life events and depression in adolescence we set up two goals. One is to determine whether perceived social support has moderator role in the sample consisted of clinical, subclinical and control respondents. Another goal is to i...

  12. Treatment of asymptomatic hyperuricemia for the prevention of gouty arthritis, renal disease, and cardiovascular events: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinik, Ophir; Wechalekar, Mihir D; Falzon, Louise; Buchbinder, Rachelle; van der Heijde, Désirée M; Bombardier, Claire

    2014-09-01

    To systematically review available literature on treatment of hyperuricemia (HU) as a measure of preventing gouty arthritis, renal disease, or cardiovascular events in asymptomatic patients. A systematic literature search was conducted in the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, clinical trials registries of the World Health Organization and the US National Institutes of Health, and abstracts from American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism meetings, for interventional studies involving adults with no history of gouty arthritis, who were treated for HU. Outcomes of interest included gouty arthritis, renal disease (i.e., renal insufficiency, urate nephropathy, nephrolithiasis), and cardiovascular events (i.e., myocardial infarction, heart failure, ischemic stroke). A total of 3 studies met the inclusion criteria, 2 studies assessing the prevention of renal disease and 1 study evaluating the potential for delaying progression of preexisting renal disease. In hyperuricemic patients without renal disease, treatment resulted in increased estimated glomerular filtration rate. In hyperuricemic patients with preexisting renal disease, treatment resulted in no significant elevation of serum creatinine over a 1-year followup. However, differences in renal function between the treatment and no-treatment groups were not statistically significant in any of the identified studies. Very limited data are available on the treatment of HU in asymptomatic patients. There is currently insufficient empiric evidence to suggest that lowering serum uric acid level in asymptomatic patients with HU can prevent gouty arthritis, renal disease, or cardiovascular events.

  13. Prevention through policy: Urban macroplastic leakages to the marine environment during extreme rainfall events

    OpenAIRE

    Axelsson, Charles; van Sebille, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The leakage of large plastic litter (macroplastics) into the ocean is a major environmental problem. A significant fraction of this leakage originates from coastal cities, particularly during extreme rainfall events. As coastal cities continue to grow, finding ways to reduce this macroplastic leakage is extremely pertinent. Here, we explore why and how coastal cities can reduce macroplastic leakages during extreme rainfall events. Using nine global cities as a basis, we establish that while c...

  14. Animal models of ischaemic stroke and characterisation of the ischaemic penumbra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Christopher; Arroja, Mariana M; Reid, Emma; Macrae, I Mhairi

    2017-09-18

    Over the past forty years, animal models of focal cerebral ischaemia have allowed us to identify the critical cerebral blood flow thresholds responsible for irreversible cell death, electrical failure, inhibition of protein synthesis, energy depletion and thereby the lifespan of the potentially salvageable penumbra. They have allowed us to understand the intricate biochemical and molecular mechanisms within the 'ischaemic cascade' that initiate cell death in the first minutes, hours and days following stroke. Models of permanent, transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and embolic stroke have been developed each with advantages and limitations when trying to model the complex heterogeneous nature of stroke in humans. Yet despite these advances in understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of stroke-induced cell death with numerous targets identified and drugs tested, a lack of translation to the clinic has hampered pre-clinical stroke research. With recent positive clinical trials of endovascular thrombectomy in acute ischaemic stroke the stroke community has been reinvigorated, opening up the potential for future translation of adjunctive treatments that can be given alongside thrombectomy/thrombolysis. This review discusses the major animal models of focal cerebral ischaemia highlighting their advantages and limitations. Acute imaging is crucial in longitudinal pre-clinical stroke studies in order to identify the influence of acute therapies on tissue salvage over time. Therefore, the methods of identifying potentially salvageable ischaemic penumbra are discussed. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Perceived social support as a moderator between negative life events and depression in adolescence: implications for prediction and targeted prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloseva, Lence; Vukosavljevic-Gvozden, Tatjana; Richter, Kneginja; Milosev, Vladimir; Niklewski, Günter

    2017-09-01

    The role of the perceived social support in prevention of depression in adolescence still remains an insufficiently explored problem. By integrating the results of the previous studies of moderator role of perceived social support between negative life events and depression in adolescence we set up two goals. One is to determine whether perceived social support has moderator role in the sample consisted of clinical, subclinical, and control respondents. Another goal is to identify in which group the interaction effect is significant, i.e. the perceived social support acts as moderator. The sample consisted of 412 adolescents (61.7% female and 38.3% male) aged 13-17 years (mean = 15.70, SD = 1.22). We applied: Data sheet for all respondents; Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview; Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support; Adolescent Life Events Questionnaire; Centre for Epidemiological Depression Scale. We have shown that the association between levels of depressive symptoms and negative life events changes as the value of the moderator variable perceived social support changes. The finding that the moderating interaction effect was significant only in the subclinical group is particularly interesting. Taking into account that perceived social support moderates the association between negative stress events and levels of depression, we can propose a model for the prevention of depression, which will include perceived social support. However, future research with longitudinal design is required to verify the results.

  16. Examining Wrong Eye Implant Adverse Events in the Veterans Health Administration With a Focus on Prevention: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neily, Julia; Chomsky, Amy; Orcutt, James; Paull, Douglas E; Mills, Peter D; Gilbert, Christina; Hemphill, Robin R; Gunnar, William

    2018-03-01

    The study goals were to examine wrong intraocular lens (IOL) implant adverse events in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), identify root causes and contributing factors, and describe system changes that have been implemented to address this challenge. This study represents collaboration between the VHA's National Center for Patient Safety (NCPS) and the National Surgery Office (NSO). This report includes 45 wrong IOL implant surgery adverse events reported to established VHA NCPS and NSO databases between July 1, 2006, and June 31, 2014. There are approximately 50,000 eye implant procedures performed each year in the VHA. Wrong IOL implant surgery adverse events are reported by VHA facilities to the NCPS and the NSO. Two authors (A.C. and J.N.) coded the reports for event type (wrong lens or expired lens) and identified the primary contributing factor (coefficient κ = 0.837). A descriptive analysis was conducted, which included the reported yearly event rate. The main outcome measure was the reported wrong IOL implant surgery adverse events. There were 45 reported wrong IOL implant surgery adverse events. Between 2011 and June 30, 2014, there was a significant downward trend (P = 0.02, R = 99.7%) at a pace of -0.08 (per 10,000 cases) every year. The most frequently coded primary contributing factor was incomplete preprocedure time-out (n = 12) followed by failure to perform double check of preprocedural calculations based upon original data and implant read-back at the time the surgical eye implant was performed (n = 10). Preventing wrong IOL implant adverse events requires diligence beyond performance of the preprocedural time-out. In 2013, the VHA has modified policy to ensure double check of preprocedural calculations and implant read-back with positive impact. Continued analysis of contributing human factors and improved surgical team communication are warranted.

  17. Prevention through policy: Urban macroplastic leakages to the marine environment during extreme rainfall events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Charles; van Sebille, Erik

    2017-11-15

    The leakage of large plastic litter (macroplastics) into the ocean is a major environmental problem. A significant fraction of this leakage originates from coastal cities, particularly during extreme rainfall events. As coastal cities continue to grow, finding ways to reduce this macroplastic leakage is extremely pertinent. Here, we explore why and how coastal cities can reduce macroplastic leakages during extreme rainfall events. Using nine global cities as a basis, we establish that while cities actively create policies that reduce plastic leakages, more needs to be done. Nonetheless, these policies are economically, socially and environmentally cobeneficial to the city environment. While the lack of political engagement and economic concerns limit these policies, lacking social motivation and engagement is the largest limitation towards implementing policy. We recommend cities to incentivize citizen and municipal engagement with responsible usage of plastics, cleaning the environment and preparing for future extreme rainfall events. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Osteoprotegerin concentrations and prognosis in acute ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Khédri; Ueland, T; Gullestad, L

    2010-01-01

    .1365-2796.2009.02163.x.Aim. Concentrations of osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been associated with the presence of vascular and cardiovascular diseases, but the knowledge of this marker in the setting of ischaemic stroke is limited. Methods and results. In 244 patients with acute ischaemic stroke (age: 69......Abstract. Jensen JK, Ueland T, Atar D, Gullestad L, Mickley H, Aukrust P, Januzzi JL (Odense University Hospital, Denmark; Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway; Massachusetts General Hospital, USA). Osteoprotegerin concentrations and prognosis in acute ischaemic stroke. J Intern Med 2009; doi: 10.1111/j...... +/- 13 years), samples of OPG were obtained serially from presentation to day 5. Patients with overt ischaemic heart disease and atrial fibrillation were excluded. The patients were followed for 47 months, with all-cause mortality as the sole end-point. Multivariable predictors of OPG values...

  19. Genetically elevated bilirubin and risk of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Frikke-Schmidt, R; Nordestgaard, B G

    2013-01-01

    Elevated plasma levels of bilirubin, an endogenous antioxidant, have been associated with reduced risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). Whether this is a causal relationship remains unclear....

  20. Prevention through policy : Urban macroplastic leakages to the marine environment during extreme rainfall events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Axelsson, Charles; van Sebille, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The leakage of large plastic litter (macroplastics) into the ocean is a major environmental problem. A significant fraction of this leakage originates from coastal cities, particularly during extreme rainfall events. As coastal cities continue to grow, finding ways to reduce this macroplastic

  1. Rosuvastatin to prevent vascular events in men and women with elevated C-reactive protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridker, Paul M.; Danielson, Eleanor; Fonseca, Francisco A. H.; Genest, Jacques; Gotto, Antonio M.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Libby, Peter; Lorenzatti, Alberto J.; Macfadyen, Jean G.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Shepherd, James; Willerson, James T.; Glynn, Robert J.; Ridker, P. M.; Fonseca, F. A. H.; Genest, J.; Gotto, A. M.; Koenig, W.; Libby, P.; Lorenzatti, A. J.; Nordestgaard, B. G.; Shepherd, J.; Willerson, J. T.; Danielson, E.; Glynn, R. J.; MacFadyen, J. G.; Mora, S.; Collins, R.; Bailey, K.; Gersh, B.; Lamas, G.; Smith, S.; Vaughan, D.; Mahaffey, K.; Brown, P.; Montgomery, D.; Wilson, M.; Wood, F.; Altamirano, J.; Boskis, P.; Colombo, H.; Cuneo, C.; Diaz, M.; Esper, R.; Fernandez, A.; Foye, R.; Hershson, A.; Kuschnir, E.; La Greca, R.; Lorenzatti, A.; Lozada, A.; Luciardi, H.; Luquez, H.; Maffei, L.; Majul, C.; Marin, M.; Muntaner, J.; Nul, D.; Paolasso, E.; Rey, R.; Rodenas, P.; Rodriguez, P.; Rojas, C.; Telsolin, P.; Vita, N.; Adrianes, G.; Argento, O.; Bacart, P.; Baeck, L.; Baguet, J.; Balthazar, Y.; Battello, G.; Behets, J.; Beke, P.; Berwouts, P.; Boermans, P.; Bolly, F.; Borms, J.; Boulad, M.; Boulanger, L.; Bous, J.; van Boxstael, R.; Brands, Y.; Buyse, L.; Calozet, Y.; Camps, K.; Capiau, L.; Celis, H.; Coucke, F.; D'Argent, F.; Op de Beeck, G.; de Meulemeester, M.; de Praeter, K.; de Rouck, S.; Delcourt, A.; Delvaux, J.; Demanet, E.; Dendale, P.; Derijcke, M.; Deruyck, C.; Devaux, J.; Dupont, C.; van Duyse, J.; Erpicum, L.; Gilio, C.; Gillet, A.; Grosjean, J.; Heeren, J.; Henry, G.; Heyvaert, F.; Hollanders, G.; Hutsebaut, A.; Janssens, P.; Lannoy, H.; Ledoux, C.; Legros, P.; Leliaert, R.; Martens, R.; Maury, O.; Mehuys, G.; Michaux, J.; Migeotte, A.; Mortelmans, J.; van Mulders, N.; van Parijs, P.; van Peer, W.; Pieters, E.; Reynders, P.; van Riet, D.; Robert, P.; van Stee, J.; Teheux, J.; Teuwen, J.; Thoeng, J.; Timmermans, B.; Tshinkulu, M.; Vanden Bemden, S.; Vantroyen, D.; Veevaete, M.; Vercruysse, K.; Vereecken, G.; Vermeersch, L.; Vernijns, J.; Verspecht, E.; Vinck, G.; Vrancken, F.; Watté, G.; Weymans, J.; Windmolders, S.; Albuquerque, D. C.; Barbosa, E. C. D.; Bertolami, M. C.; Blacher, C.; Brasileiro, A. L. S.; Costa e Forti, A.; Eliaschewitz, F. G.; Esteves, J. P.; Feitosa, G. S.; Francischetti, E. A.; Franco, R. J. S.; Gomes, M. A.; Gross, J. L.; Jardim, P. C.; Kohlmann, O.; Loures-Vale, A. A.; Magalhães, M. E. C.; Maia, L. N.; Moriguchi, E. H.; Nogueira, P. R.; Oigman, W.; Repetto, G.; Santos, R. D.; Saraiva, J. F. K.; Xavier, H. T.; Benov, H.; Chompalova, B.; Donova, T.; Gocheva, N.; Goudev, A.; Grigorov, M.; Gruev, T.; Hergeldjieva, V.; Marchev, S.; Mihov, A.; Pasheva, V.; Penev, A.; Popov, A.; Raev, D.; Sirakova, V.; Slavcheva, A.; Stoikov, A.; Stoilov, R.; Tisheva, S.; Todorov, G.; Torbova, S.; Uzunangelov, J.; Achyuthan, G.; Akhras, R.; Barriere, G.; Bartlett, J.; Behiels, S.; Bell, A.; Bergeron, J.; Berlingieri, J.; Bhamjee, H.; Bodok-Nutzati, R.; Booth, W.; Boyd, C.; Brault, S.; Bruckswaiger, D.; Bukovy, B.; Campbell, G.; Carlson, B.; Cha, J.; Chehayeb, R.; Cheng, W.; Chilvers, M.; Chouinard, G.; Chow, W.; Conter, H.; Conway, J.; Craig, B.; Craig, D.; Dattani, I.; del Grande, R.; Dharamshi, S.; Dickson, M.; Dion, D.; Dowell, A.; Drexler, J.; Dube, S.; Dupont, A.; Dworkin, B.; Fields, L.; Filteau, P.; Gardiner, E.; Gervais, B.; Gillis, G.; Girard, R.; Goldman, H.; Gorfinkel, I.; Goulet, S.; Greenspoon, A.; Gritter, R.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M.; Habib, N.; Harding, R.; Hart, R.; Henein, S.; Henry, D.; Hirsch, Axxx; Ho, K.; Hoag, G.; Houde, D.; Howlett, E.; Ing, G.; Jadd, J.; Janes, J.; Jardine, F.; Johnston, T.; Kanani, S.; Kazimirski, M.; Kelly, A.; Klajner, F.; Kooy, J.; Lalani, A.; Lam, S.; Laranjeiro, J.; LaRose, D.; Leiter, L.; Leung, W.; Li, J.; Lowe, D.; Luces, K.; Ma, P.; MacKinnon, R.; Martinho, V.; Matangi, M.; McCrossin, M.; McIsaac, H.; McMullen, W.; Mehta, P.; Meunier, M.; Misik, K.; Nayar, A.; Ng, A.; Nigro, F.; Noronha, L.; O'Mahony, W.; Pandey, S.; Papp, E.; Patel, V.; Patrick, L.; Peddle, C.; Pinsky, N.; Poirier, P.; Powell, C.; Price, J.; Rolfe, A.; Saliba, N.; Sawkiw, R.; Senior, R.; Shu, D.; Smith, R.; Somani, R.; Soowamber, M.; Stakiw, K.; Talbot, P.; Taliano, J.; Tan, K.; Teitelbaum, I.; Threoux, P.; Tremblay, G.; Turcotte, C.; Tytus, R.; Walsh, P.; Webb, G.; Willoughby, P.; Woo, V.; Woodland, R.; Yee, G.; Acevedo, M.; Caorsi, C.; Cardenas, N.; Gonzalez, B.; Gutierrez, M.; Prieto, J.; Stockins, B.; Valerta, P.; Vejar, M.; Ardila, W.; Aschner, P.; Botero, J.; Botero, R.; Calderon, C.; Casas, L.; Castellanos, R.; Cure, C.; Escobar, I.; Fortich, A.; Garcia, L.; Hernandez, E.; Isaza, D.; Jaramillo, N.; Jiménez, C.; Kattah, W.; Luengas, C.; Matiz, C.; Perez, M.; Quintero, A.; Rizcala, A.; Ruiz, A.; Urina, M.; Valenzuela, A.; Cob-Sanchez, A.; Gutreiman-Golberg, M.; Lainez-Ventosilla, A.; Ramirez-Zamora, L.; Slon-Hitti, C.; Speranza-Sánchez, M.; Vinocour-Fornieri, M.; Hansen, H.; Nordestgaard, B.; Steffensen, R.; Stender, S.; Alvarado-Renderos, J.; Rivera-Ochoa, L.; Villarroel-Abrego, H.; Eha, J.; Jaanson, E.; Kaasik, U.; Keba, E.; Mäeots, E.; Petersen, M.; Reinmets, S.; Roostalu, U.; Vahula, V.; Veidrik, K.; Bellmann, R.; Hanefeld, M.; Horacek, T.; Klein, C.; Knels, R.; Laus, S.; Meissner, G.; Mondrof, C.; Schell, E.; Schuster, H.; Sehnert, W.; Stahl, H.; Szelazek, G.; Winkelmann, B.; Witczak, E.; Elis, A.; Gavish, A.; Grossman, E.; Harats, D.; Keidar, S.; Levy, Y.; Osamah, H.; Shapiro, I.; Shveydel, E.; Wolfovitz, E.; Yogev, R.; Zeltser, D.; Arenas, J. L.; Cardona-Muñoz, E.; Cervantes, J. L.; Flores-Lozano, F.; Gonzalez, Clicerio; Gonzalez-Galvez, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gutierrez-Fajardo, P.; Morales, E.; de los Rios, M.; Romero-Zazueta, A.; Talavera, J. O.; Velasco-Sanchez, R.; Vergara-Takahashi, H.; Zúñiga-Guajardo, S.; Agous, I.; Bak, A.; Bartels, G.; Basart, D.; Cornel, J.; de Schipper, L.; Holwerda, N.; Jonker, J.; Köse, V.; Lok, D.; Lokhorst, B.; Mosterd, A.; Nierop, P.; Oude Ophuis, A.; Somer, S.; Tiebesl, J.; Trip, M.; van Hessen, M.; van Kempen, W.; Andersen, M.; Berz, A.; Bjurstrom, M.; Bo, P.; Brunstad, O.; Daae-Johansen, T.; Elle, S.; Fauske, J.; Fossdal, B.; Gjefsen, O.; Hallaraker, A.; Haugen, J.; Helberg, S.; Holm-Johnsen, S.; Istad, H.; Jacobsen, T.; Johansen, R.; Jorstad, T.; Jorum, I.; Kjorlaug, K.; Kontny, F.; Langaker, K.; Larsen, B.; Lonning, S.; Loraas, A.; Mansilla-Tinoco, R.; Medhus, R.; Meyer, I.; Nasrala, S.; Ofjord, E.; Ose, L.; Palmas, J.; Risberg, K.; Sandberg, A.; Sirnes, P.; Skjegstad, E.; Skjelvan, G.; Solnor, L.; Storm-Larsen, A.; Tandberg, A.; Tomala, T.; Torkelsen, A.; Ursin, A.; Valnes, K.; Walaas, K.; Binns-Halman, R.; Delgado-Paredes, A.; Lombana-Vasquez, B.; Noriega-Aguirre, L.; Trujillo-Sagel, R.; Kowalczyk-Kram, M.; Artemiuk, E.; Asankowicz-Bargiel, B.; Banas, I.; Baranska, E.; Baranski, M.; Bijata-Bronisz, R.; Sikorska, A.; Blaszczyk, B.; Bolanowski, J.; Brokl-Stolarczyk, B.; Brzecki, K.; Buczkowski, K.; Chmielewski, T.; Chojnowska-Jezierska, J.; Chwist-Novak, A.; Cygan, W.; Czajkowska-Kaczmarek, E.; Dargiewicz, A.; Dluzniewski, M.; Dudka, C.; Fares, I.; Flasinska, J.; Gadzinski, W.; Gaszczyk, G.; Golebiowski, G.; Gozdur, W.; Grudzien, K.; Sobieska, E.; Kalamarz, J.; Kalinowska, A.; Kornacewicz-Jach, Z.; Korol, M.; Korycka, W.; Kostka, T.; Kostrzewska, A.; Kot, A.; Kowalska-Werbowy, B.; Krupinska, G.; Lotocka, E.; Luberda-Heynar, Z.; Lukas, W.; Lysek, R.; Machyna-Dybala, A.; Mlynarczyk-Jeremicz, K.; Mocarska-Gorna, B.; Niedbal-Yahfouf, I.; Pasternak, D.; Potakowska, I.; Ramian, U.; Roleder, M.; Rosinska-Migda, J.; Sidorowicz-Bialynicka, A.; Skierkowska, J.; Skorinko, I.; Slaboszewska, J.; Sleziak-Barglik, K.; Stachlewski, P.; Superson-Byra, E.; Tissler-Nahorska, G.; Turbak, R.; Uzunow, A.; Wasowicz, D.; Wodniecki, J.; Wojnowski, L.; Wrzol, A.; Zdrojewska, J.; Zurakowska-Krzywonos, A.; Zurowska-Gebala, M.; Ablachim, T.; Abobului, M.; Balanescu, S.; Bobescu, E.; Bojinca, M.; Cristea, M.; Gaita, D.; Stoicovici, R.; Tataru, R.; Tudose, A.; Ardashev, V.; Arutyunov, G.; Azarin, O.; Barbarash, O.; Bondarev, S.; Borisov, M.; Boyarkin, M.; Burova, N.; Chazova, I.; Dovgalevsky, P.; Duplyakov, D.; Egorova, L.; Goloshchekin, B.; Gratsianskiy, N.; Ivleva, A.; Karpov, R.; Karpov, Y. A.; Karpov, Y. B.; Khokhlov, A.; Khokhlov, R.; Khrustalev, O.; Konyakhin, A.; Kostenko, V.; Libov, I.; Lukyanov, Y.; Mezentseva, N.; Panov, A.; Repin, M.; Shabalin, A.; Shalaev, S.; Shilkina, N.; Shulman, V.; Sidorenko, B.; Smolenskaya, O.; Starodubtsev, A.; Talibov, O.; Titkov, Y.; Tsyba, L.; Uspenskiy, Y.; Vishnevsky, A.; Yarokhno, N.; Ahmed, S.; Ashtiker, H.; Bester, A.; Bhorat, Q.; Biermann, E.; Boyd, W.; Burgess, L.; Dindar, F.; Dulabh, R.; Engelbrecht, I.; Erasmus, E.; Fouche, L.; Furman, S.; Govind, U.; Herbst, L.; Jacovides, A.; Kahanovitz, C.; Kruger, C.; Lakha, D.; Lombaard, J.; Macleod, A.; Makan, H.; Manuel, E.; McDonald, M.; Mitha, E.; Mitha, I.; Moola, S.; Nell, H.; Nieuwoudt, G.; Olivier, P.; Padayachee, T.; Pillai, P.; Pillay, S.; Ranjith, N.; Reyneke, S.; Sandell, R.; Sandell, P.; Sebastian, P.; Skriker, M.; Smit, J.; van Rensburg, D.; van Zyl, L.; Vawda, Z.; Wellman, H.; Miserez, A.; Adbulhakim, E.; Angus, M.; Balmer, F.; Balmer, J.; Barrat, R.; Blair, D.; Blyth, A.; Brodie, R.; Brydie, D.; Campbell, C.; Campbell, I.; Church, M.; Clark, C.; Clements, R.; Donnachie, A. N.; Fitpatrick, P.; Godley, C.; Hill, J.; Jarvie, F.; Kieran, W.; Langridge, S.; Leslie, R.; Liddell, A.; MacKenzie, J.; MacKintosh, C.; Mair, R.; Marshall, G.; Martin, R.; McCann, C.; McKibbin, C.; Mclachlan, B.; McLean, F.; Murray, S.; Norris, A.; Pawa, R.; Pexton, N.; Ramage, A.; Reid, S.; Robertson, A.; Rourke, E.; Sarmiento, R.; Shaw, H.; Shaw, R.; Sheil, L.; Spence, G.; Stewart, E.; Thomas, H.; Thomson, J.; Thomson, W.; Travers, J.; Ward, R.; Williams, L.; Wooff, D.; Young, W.; Belzarena, C.; Huarte, A.; Kuster, F.; Lluberas, R.; Abarikwu, C.; Abate, L.; Abbott, R.; Ackley, C.; Adams, G.; Adkins, S.; Albakri, E.; Albarracin, C.; Allison, J.; Alvarado, O.; Alwine, L.; Amin, K.; Amin, M.; Anderson, J.; Anderson, M.; Anderson, W.; Andrawis, N.; Andrews, C.; Angles, L.; Aquino, N.; Ariani, M.; Armstrong, C.; Aronoff, S.; Arora, N.; Atri, P.; Baker, J.; Baker, K.; Balli, E.; Banish, D.; Bardenheier, J.; Barnett, G.; Bartkowiak, A.; Basista, M.; Beliveau, W.; Bell, G.; Benchimol, G.; Bennett, B.; Bennett, N.; Bermudez, Y.; Bernstein, J.; Berroya, A.; Bhargava, M.; Biaggioni, I.; Bimson, S.; Bittar, N.; Bleser, S.; Blumberg, M.; Bobson, C.; Boeren, J.; Bogan, R.; Boling, E.; Booras, C.; Borge, A.; Bradlau, C.; Brady, J.; Brandon, D.; Brideau, D.; Brobyn, T.; Brodowski, M.; Broker, R.; Broussard, C.; Brown, C.; Browning, D.; Brusco, O.; Bryant, J.; Buchanan, P.; Bueso, G.; Burgess, G.; Burke, B.; Buynak, R.; Byrd, L.; Camilo-Vazquez, E.; Campbell, J.; Cannon, L.; Capo, J.; Carmouche, D.; Castaldo, R.; Castilleja, J.; Caudill, T.; Caulin-Glaser, T.; Champlin, J.; Chardon-Feliciano, D.; Cheng, T.; Cherlin, R.; Cheung, D.; Chodock, A.; Christensen, J.; Christian, D.; Christiansen, L.; Ciemiega, R.; Clark, J.; Coble, S.; Cohen, K.; Colan, D.; Cole, F.; Cole, R.; Colleran, K.; Collins, G.; Conard, S.; Cook, J.; Cooperman, M.; Cooze, D.; Copeland, T.; Corder, C.; Courtney, D.; Cox, W.; Crump, W.; Cruz, L.; Cuellar, J.; Cunningham, T.; Daboul, N.; Dailey, R.; Dallas, A.; Dansinger, M.; Dao, L.; Darwin, C.; Dauber, I.; Davidson, M.; Davis, P.; Degarmo, R.; Degoma, R.; Dempsey, M.; Denny, D.; Denyer, G.; Desai, V.; Despot, J.; Dewan, M.; Dickert, J.; Diederich, C.; Doben, S.; Dobratz, D.; Douglas, B.; Drehobl, M.; Dresner, J.; Dreyfus, J.; Drummond, W.; Dunbar, W.; Dunlap, J.; Dunmyer, S.; Eaton, C.; Ecker, A.; Edris, M.; Egbujiobi, L.; Elkind, A.; Ellis, J.; Ellison, H.; Engeron, E.; Erdy, G.; Ervin, W.; Eshowsky, S.; Estock, D.; Fang, C.; Fanning, J.; Feinberg, B.; Feld, L.; Fenton, I.; Fernandez, E.; Ferrera, R.; Fiacco, P.; Fierer, R.; Finneran, M.; Fintel, D.; Fischer, M.; Flippo, G.; Flores, A.; Folkherth, S.; Forbes, R.; Fowler, R.; Francis, P.; Franco, M.; Frank, A.; Fraser, N.; Fuchs, R.; Gabriel, J.; Gaddam, S.; Gaffney, M.; Gamponia, M.; Gandhi, D.; Ganzman, H.; Gaona, R.; Garibian, G.; Garofalo, J.; Gatewood, R.; Gazda, S.; Geiger, R.; Geller, M.; Germino, W.; Gibbs, R.; Gifford, C.; Gilhooley, N.; Gill, S.; Gillespie, E.; Godwin, D.; Goldberg, M.; Goldberg, R.; Goldstein, M.; Gonzalez-Ortiz, E.; Goodman, D.; Gordon, G.; Gordon, M.; Goswami, A.; Gottlieb, D.; Gottschlich, G.; Graham, D.; Gray, J.; Gray, W.; Green, S.; Greenberg, R.; Greenspan, M.; Greenwald, M.; Grover, D.; Gupta, R.; Gupta-Bala, S.; Guthrie, R.; Gutmann, J.; Gvora, T.; Habib, G.; Hack, T.; Haidar, A.; Hamdy, O.; Hansen, M.; Hanshaw, C.; Hargrove, J.; Harris, H.; Harrison, B.; Hart, T.; Heacock, J.; Head, D.; Headley, D.; Henderson, D.; Herman, L.; Herrera, C.; Hershberger, V.; Hershon, K.; Heym, H.; Hill, G.; Hippert, R.; Hnatiuk, G.; Hoekstra, J.; Holt, W.; Homan, J.; Honsinger, R.; Howard, J.; Howard, V.; Howard, W.; Huling, R.; Imburgia, M.; Isajiw, G.; Ison, R.; Iverson, W.; Jacks, R.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, K.; Jacobs, J.; Jacobson, E.; James, A.; Jayanty, V.; Johary, A.; Johnson, G.; Jones, P.; Jones, T.; Joseph, J.; Julien, C.; Kahn, Z.; Kalvaria, I.; Kang, J.; Kaplan, I.; Karns, R.; Kashi, K.; Kaster, S.; Kaufman, A.; Kawley, F.; Keller, R.; Kenton, D.; Kerlin, J.; Kern, J.; Kerwin, E.; Kerzner, B.; Ketchum, J.; Khan, J.; Khan, S.; Khawar, M.; Khera, A.; Kinstrey, T.; Klein, B.; Klein, E.; Klein, S.; Klein, T.; Kleinsteuber, K.; Klementowicz, P.; Knopp, R.; Knutson, T.; Koch, S.; Kramer, M.; Krause, R.; Krisciunas, V.; Krueger, C.; Kruszewski, D.; Kumar, R.; Kunst, E.; Kuo, D.; Kuritsky, L.; Kushner, P.; Kutner, M.; Kwiterovich, P.; Kwong, S.; Lanese, J.; Lang, B.; Lary, J.; Lasalle, J.; Lasater, S.; Lasser, N.; Laughlin, D.; Lawless, J.; Lawlor, D.; Ledbetter, J.; Ledesma, G.; Lee, D.; Lemanski, P.; Levinson, G.; Levinson, L.; Lewis, D.; Lewis, L.; Lewis, S.; Linden, D.; Loh, I.; Look, M.; Lopez, D.; Loskovitz, L.; Lubin, B.; Lucas, M.; MacAdams, M.; Madden, B.; Magee, P.; Maggiacomo, F.; Magier, D.; Magnuson, S.; Mahaffey, R.; Makowski, D.; Maletz, L.; Mally, A.; Maloney, R.; Mancha, V.; Manolukas, P.; Marple, R.; Masri, A.; Masri, B.; Mattingly, G.; Mayer, N.; McCain, A.; McCall Bundy, J.; McCartney, M.; Mcclain, D.; McConn, M.; Mccullum, K.; Mcdavid, R.; McGettigan, J.; McIvor, M.; McNeff, J.; Mendolla, M.; Mercado, A.; Mersey, J.; Milam, J.; Milko, T.; Miller, M.; Miller, R.; Miller, S.; Mobley, D.; Modi, T.; Modiano, M.; Mollen, M.; Montgomery, R.; Moran, J.; Morelli, J.; Morin, D.; Moskow, H.; Moursi, M.; Mueller, N.; Mullins, M.; Myers, E.; Nadar, V.; Naiser, J.; Nash, S.; Natarajan, S.; Neft, M.; Neuman, D.; Nevins, B.; Newman, J.; Newman, R.; Newman, S.; Nolen, T.; Nwasuruba, C.; Oberoi, M.; Odom, A.; Ong, Y.; Oppy, J.; Owen, S.; Pampe, E.; Pangtay, D.; Parker, R.; Patel, B.; Patel, J.; Patel, M.; Patel, R.; Paul, A.; Pearlstein, R.; Penepent, P.; Peniston, J.; Perlman, M.; Persson, D.; Peters, P.; Peterson, G.; Peterson, J.; Pettyjohn, F.; Phillips, A.; Phillips, D.; Piel, M.; Pillai, T.; Pi-Sunyer, F.; Pollack, A.; Pond, M.; Pongonis, J.; Porras, C.; Portnoy, E.; Potos, W.; Powers, J.; Prasad, J.; Pritchett, K.; Pudi, K.; Pullman, J.; Purdy, A.; Quinones, Y.; Raad, G.; Radbill, M.; Radin, D.; Rai, K.; Raikhel, M.; Raine, C.; Ramanujan, R.; Ramirez, G.; Ramos-Santana, Z.; Rapo, S.; Ravin, S.; Rawtani, P.; Reeves, R.; Reeves, W.; Reiter, W.; Rendell, M.; Resnick, H.; Reynolds, W.; Rhudy, J.; Rice, L.; Rictor, K.; Ringrose, R.; Riser, J.; Rizvi, M.; Rizzo, W.; Robinson, J.; Robison, W.; Rogers, W.; Rohlf, J.; Rosen, R.; Ross, E.; Roth, E.; Rovner, S.; Rucki, P.; Runde, M.; Ryan, W.; Rybicki, J.; Saleem, T.; Salvato, P.; Santram, D.; Scharf, B.; Schear, M.; Schectman, G.; Schmidt, J.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, P.; Schneider, R.; Schoenfelder, S.; Schussheim, A.; Schwartz, R.; Schwartz, S.; Schwarze, M.; Scott, C.; Segal, S.; Settipane, R.; Shah, M.; Shamim, T.; Shanes, J.; Shapero, P.; Shapiro, J.; Shealy, N.; Shepard, M.; Shepherd, A.; Sheta, M.; Shrivastava, R.; Shusman, R.; Siddiqui, M.; Sidney, A.; Silvers, D.; Simek, C.; Simpson, C.; Sinatra, L.; Singh, S.; Singson, D.; Slabic, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, K.; Smith, T.; Snell, P.; Specter, J.; Speer, J.; Spees, R.; Sperling, M.; Spuhler, W.; Staab, P.; Stafford, J.; Stanton, D.; Stein, E.; Stern, S.; Stocks, T.; Stone, A.; Strader, W.; Strout, C.; Strzinek, R.; Subich, D.; Suen, J.; Sugimoto, D.; Sulman, S.; Suresh, D.; Sweeney, G.; Szatkowski, A.; Szeto, J.; Szewczak, S.; Szulawski, I.; Taber, L.; Taghizadeh, B.; Tague, R.; Tambunan, D.; Tannoury, G.; Tavaez Valle, J.; Thieneman, A.; Thigpen, D.; Thompson, P.; Tidman, R.; Tilton, G.; Tokatlian, E.; Topkis, R.; Torelli, M.; Tortorice, F.; Toth, P.; Touger, M.; Treat, S.; Trevino, M.; Trupin, S.; Turner, A.; Turner, M.; Tweel, C.; Ugarte, J.; Ulmer, E.; Urbach, D.; Vacker, M.; Vallecillo, J.; van de Beek, M.; Vargas, L.; Vazquez Tanus, J.; Verma, A.; Vijayaraghavan, K.; Wade, P.; Wade, T.; Wagner, S.; Wahle, J.; Walker, J.; Walker, M.; Weinstein, R.; Weisbrot, A.; Weiss, R.; West, P.; White, A.; Wickemeyer, W.; Wieskopf, B.; Wiggins, M.; Williams, H.; Wiseman, J.; Yataco, A.; Yates, S.; Zamarra, J.; Zamora, B.; Zawada, E.; Zemel, L.; Zigrang, W.; Zusman, R.; Aguiton, M.; Arroyo-Parejo, M.; Beaujon Sierralta, J.; Berrizbeitia, M.; Carrizales de Marlin, Y.; Colan Parraga, J.; Fernandez, C.; Fuenmayor, N.; Giesen, G.; Gonzalez Gomez, C.; Guaipo, A.; Herrera Rivera, C.; Jaua, L.; Lopez, N.; Lopez Nouel, R.; Marulanda, M.; Morr, I.; Nass, A.; Palmucci, G.; Perez, L.; Ponte, C.; Rivas, I.; de Roa, E.; Figarella Salazar, G.; Sanchez, F.; Siriti, U.; Viloria, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased levels of the inflammatory biomarker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein predict cardiovascular events. Since statins lower levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as well as cholesterol, we hypothesized that people with elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels

  2. Simulation aided hardening of N-channel power MOSFETs to prevent single event burnout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dachs, C.; Palau, J.M.; Bruguier, G.; Gasiot, J.; Roubaud, F.; Tastet, P.; Calvet, M.C.; Calvel, P.

    1995-01-01

    2D MEDICI simulator is used to investigate hardening solutions to single-event burnout (SEB). SEB parametric dependencies such as carrier lifetime reduction, base enlargement, and emitter doping decrease have been verified and a p + plug modification approach for SEB hardening of power MOSFETs is validated with simulations on actual device structures

  3. An Educational Program to Prevent Adverse Events in Neonates : a Randomised Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-20

    Intensive Care Units, Neonatal; Misadventures to Patients During Surgical and Medical Care; Catheter-related Bloodstream Infection (CRBSI) Nos; Quality of Healthcare; Ventilator Adverse Event; Nosocomial Pneumonia; Immature Newborn; Skin Lesion; Extravasation Injury; Nasal Injury; Intubation Complication; Medication Administered in Error; IV Catheter Nos Deep Venous Thrombosis

  4. CHA2DS2-VASc score for ischaemic stroke risk stratification in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with and without atrial fibrillation: a nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei-Syun; Lin, Cheng-Li

    2018-04-01

    We conducted this nationwide cohort study to identify the performance of CHA2DS2-VASc score for ischaemic stroke risk stratification in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients whether they had comorbid atrial fibrillation (AF) or not. Using the longitudinal health insurance database 2000, patients aged ≥20 years with newly diagnosed COPD from 2000 to 2011 with at least three claims for outpatient and/or hospitalization visits were identified. A total of 1492 COPD patients with AF and 50 343 COPD patients without AF were included in this study. We calculated the CHA2DS2-VASc score-specific incidence density rates of ischaemic stroke with person-years in each cohort. Cox models were conducted to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of ischaemic stroke risk in COPD patients with and without concomitant AF. The predictive performance of CHA2DS2-VASc score with regard to ischaemic stroke events was assessed using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (C-statistic). COPD patients with a higher CHA2DS2-VASc score were more likely to develop ischaemic stroke whether or not AF was present. Moreover, the C-statistics of CHA2DS2-VASc score in predicting ischaemic stroke in COPD patients with and without AF were 0.58 (95% CI = 0.55-0.62) and 0.71(95% CI = 0.70-0.72), respectively. Our study is the first to show that the performance of CHA2DS2-VASc score in predicting ischaemic stroke is better for COPD patients without AF than for COPD patients with AF.

  5. Therapeutic strategies utilizing SDF-1α in ischaemic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziff, Oliver J; Bromage, Daniel I; Yellon, Derek M; Davidson, Sean M

    2018-03-01

    Heart failure is rapidly increasing in prevalence and will redraw the global landscape for cardiovascular health. Alleviating and repairing cardiac injury associated with myocardial infarction (MI) is key to improving this burden. Homing signals mobilize and recruit stem cells to the ischaemic myocardium where they exert beneficial paracrine effects. The chemoattractant cytokine SDF-1α and its associated receptor CXCR4 are upregulated after MI and appear to be important in this context. Activation of CXCR4 promotes both cardiomyocyte survival and stem cell migration towards the infarcted myocardium. These effects have beneficial effects on infarct size, and left ventricular remodelling and function. However, the timing of endogenous SDF-1α release and CXCR4 upregulation may not be optimal. Furthermore, current ELISA-based assays cannot distinguish between active SDF-1α, and SDF-1α inactivated by dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). Current therapeutic approaches aim to recruit the SDF-1α-CXCR4 pathway or prolong SDF-1α life-time by preventing its cleavage by DPP4. This review assesses the evidence supporting these approaches and proposes SDF-1α as an important confounder in recent studies of DPP4 inhibitors.

  6. High frequency of intracranial arterial stenosis and cannabis use in ischaemic stroke in the young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Valérie; Armspach, Jean-Paul; Beaujeux, Rémy; Manisor, Monica; Rouyer, Olivier; Lauer, Valérie; Meyer, Nicolas; Marescaux, Christian; Geny, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    foramen ovale in 21 (13%); in 19 patients (12%), ischaemic stroke was related to an undetermined aetiology. Comparing risk factors between patients with intracranial arterial stenosis and those with other definite causes showed that there were only two significant differences: a lower age and a higher frequency of vasoactive substances (especially cannabis) in patients with intracranial arterial stenosis. All intracranial arterial stenosis in patients who used vasoactive substances were located in several intracranial vessels. Intracranial arterial stenosis may be an important mechanism of stroke in young patients and it should be systematically investigated using vascular imaging. Strong questioning about illicit drug consumption (including cannabis) or vasoactive medication use should also be performed. It should be emphasized for health prevention in young adults that cannabis use might be associated with critical consequences such as stroke. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Self-reported health-related quality of life predicts 5-year mortality and hospital readmissions in patients with ischaemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Tina Birgitte; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe; Helmark, Lotte; Hoogwegt, Madelein; Versteeg, Henneke; Höfer, Stefan; Oldridge, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient health-related quality of life (HRQL) is an important health outcome with lower HRQL associated with adverse events in patients with ischaemic heart disease (IHD). Design Baseline health-related quality of life was investigated as a predictor of 5-year all-cause mortality and

  8. Wide Area Protection Scheme Preventing Cascading Events Caused by Load Flow Transferring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou; Chen, Zhe; Sun, Haishun

    2013-01-01

    Load flow transferring after an initial contingency is regarded as one of the main reasons of causing unexpected cascading trips. A multi agent system (MAS) based wide area protection strategy is proposed in this paper to predict the load flow transferring from the point of view of impedance relays...... strategy. The simulation results indicate this strategy can successfully predict and prevent the unexpected relay operation caused by load flow transferring....

  9. Efficacy and safety of ticagrelor versus aspirin in acute stroke or transient ischaemic attack of atherosclerotic origin: a subgroup analysis of SOCRATES, a randomised, double-blind, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Albers, Gregory W; Denison, Hans; Easton, J Donald; Evans, Scott R; Held, Peter; Hill, Michael D; Jonasson, Jenny; Kasner, Scott E; Ladenvall, Per; Minematsu, Kazuo; Molina, Carlos A; Wang, Yongjun; Wong, K S Lawrence; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2017-04-01

    Ticagrelor is an effective antiplatelet therapy for patients with coronary atherosclerotic disease and might be more effective than aspirin in preventing recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events in patients with acute cerebral ischaemia of atherosclerotic origin. Our aim was to test for a treatment-by-ipsilateral atherosclerotic stenosis interaction in a subgroup analysis of patients in the Acute Stroke or Transient Ischaemic Attack Treated with Aspirin or Ticagrelor and Patient Outcomes (SOCRATES) trial. SOCRATES was a randomised, double-blind, controlled trial of ticagrelor versus aspirin in patients aged 40 years or older with a non-cardioembolic, non-severe acute ischaemic stroke, or high-risk transient ischaemic attack from 674 hospitals in 33 countries. We randomly allocated patients (1:1) to ticagrelor (180 mg loading dose on day 1 followed by 90 mg twice daily for days 2-90, given orally) or aspirin (300 mg on day 1 followed by 100 mg daily for days 2-90, given orally) within 24 h of symptom onset. Investigators classified all patients into atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic groups for the prespecified, exploratory analysis reported in this study. The primary endpoint was the time to occurrence of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death within 90 days. Efficacy analysis was by intention to treat. The SOCRATES trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01994720. Between Jan 7, 2014, and Oct 29, 2015, we randomly allocated 13 199 patients (6589 [50%] to ticagrelor and 6610 [50%] to aspirin). Potentially symptomatic ipsilateral atherosclerotic stenosis was reported in 3081 (23%) of 13 199 patients. We found a treatment-by-atherosclerotic stenosis interaction (p=0·017). 103 (6·7%) of 1542 patients with ipsilateral stenosis in the ticagrelor group and 147 (9·6%) of 1539 patients with ipsilateral stenosis in the aspirin group had an occurrence of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death within 90 days (hazard ratio 0·68 [95% CI 0·53-0

  10. Coffee prevents early events in tamoxifen-treated breast cancer patients and modulates hormone receptor status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsson, Maria; Söderlind, Viktoria; Henningson, Maria; Hjertberg, Maria; Rose, Carsten; Ingvar, Christian; Jernström, Helena

    2013-05-01

    Whether coffee modulates response to endocrine therapy in breast cancer patients is currently unknown. The CYP1A2 and CYP2C8 enzymes contribute to tamoxifen and caffeine metabolism. The purpose was to investigate the impact of coffee consumption on tumor characteristics and risk for early events in relation to breast cancer treatment and CYP1A2 and CYP2C8 genotypes. Questionnaires regarding lifestyle were completed preoperatively by 634 patients in southern Sweden. CYP1A2*1F and CYP2C8*3 were genotyped. Clinical data and tumor characteristics were obtained from patients' charts, population registries, and pathology reports. Coffee consumption was categorized as low (0-1 cups/day), moderate (2-4 cups/day), or high (5+ cups/day). The proportion of estrogen receptor negative (ER-) tumors increased with increasing coffee consumption (p trend = 0.042). Moderate to high consumption was associated with lower frequency of discordant receptor status (ER + PgR-) OR 0.38 (0.23-0.63) compared to low consumption. Median follow-up time was 4.92 (IQR 3.01-6.42) years. Tamoxifen-treated patients with ER+ tumors (n = 310) who consumed two or more cups/day had significantly decreased risk for early events compared to patients with low consumption, adjusted HR 0.40 (0.19-0.83). Low consumption combined with at least one CYP1A2*1F C-allele (n = 35) or CYP2C8*3 (n = 13) was associated with a high risk for early events in tamoxifen-treated patients compared to other tamoxifen-treated patients, adjusted HRs 3.49 (1.54-7.91) and 6.15 (2.46-15.36), respectively. Moderate to high coffee consumption was associated with significantly decreased risk for early events in tamoxifen-treated patients and modified hormone receptor status. If confirmed, new recommendations regarding coffee consumption during tamoxifen treatment may be warranted.

  11. Traumatic events involving elderly patients treated with anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation: the downside of stroke prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Riccardi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A group of oral anticoagulant-treated patients affected by permanent atrial fibrillation was evaluated after their access to the emergency room as a result of a traumatic accident. In these patients, the re-evaluation of their risk of thromboembolism and bleeding was performed together with the evaluation of their risk of falling and institutionalization. Results show that the emergency department identifies a cohort of very elderly frail patients, who should be carefully reconsidered for anticoagulant therapy after a traumatic event.

  12. Immunotherapy for arterial ischaemic stroke in childhood: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Hannah B; Mallick, Andrew A; O'Callaghan, Finbar J K

    2017-05-01

    There is little evidence about either prevention or treatment of childhood arterial ischaemic stroke (AIS). However, drugs that regulate the immune and inflammatory response could theoretically prevent occurrence or recurrence of AIS. Additionally, as an acute treatment, they may limit the neurological damage caused by AIS. Here, we systematically review the evidence on the use of immunotherapy in childhood AIS. A systematic review of publications in databases Embase and Medline from inception. All types of evidence were included from trials, cohorts, case-control and cross-sectional studies and case reports. 34 reports were included: 32 observational studies and 2 trials. Immunotherapy was used in two key patient groups: arteriopathy and acute infection. The majority were cases of varicella and primary angiitis of the central nervous system. All three cohorts and 80% of the case studies were treated with steroids. Recurrence rates were low. Analytical studies weakly associated steroids with lower odds of new stroke and neurological deficits, and better cognitive outcomes in the context of Moyamoya disease and tuberculosis. Immunotherapies are used in children with AIS, mainly as steroids for children with arteriopathy. However, there is currently little robust evidence to either encourage or discourage this practice. There is weak evidence consistent with the hypothesis that in certain children at risk, steroids may both reduce the risk of occurrent/recurrent stroke and enhance neurological outcomes. As the potential benefit is still uncertain, this indicates that a trial of steroids in childhood AIS may be justified. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Prevention and mitigation of steam-generator water-hammer events in PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, J.T.; Anderson, N.

    1982-11-01

    Water hammer in nuclear power plants is an unresolved safety issue under study at the NRC (USI A-1). One of the identified safety concerns is steam generator water hammer (SGWH) in pressurized-water reactor (PWR) plants. This report presents a summary of: (1) the causes of SGWH; (2) various fixes employed to prevent or mitigate SGWH; and (3) the nature and status of modifications that have been made at each operating PWR plant. The NRC staff considers that the issue of SGWH in top feedring designs has been technically resolved. This report does not address technical findings relevant to water hammer in preheat type steam generators. 10 figures, 2 tables

  14. Preventing drug-related adverse events following hospital discharge: the role of the pharmacist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholls J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Justine Nicholls,1 Craig MacKenzie,1 Rhiannon Braund2 1Dunedin Hospital Pharmacy, 2School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand Abstract: Transition of care (ToC points, and in particular hospital admission and discharge, can be associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs and other drug-related problems (DRPs. The growing recognition of the pharmacist as an expert in medication management, patient education and communication makes them well placed to intervene. There is evidence to indicate that the inclusion of pharmacists in the health care team at ToC points reduces ADEs and DRPs and improves patient outcomes. The objectives of this paper are to outline the following using current literature: 1 the increased risk of medication-related problems at ToC points; 2 to highlight some strategies that have been successful in reducing these problems; and 3 to illustrate how the role of the pharmacist across all facets of care can contribute to the reduction of ADEs, particularly for patients at ToC points. Keywords: pharmacist, adverse drug events, drug-related problems, transitions of care, hospital discharge

  15. Persistent Q fever and ischaemic stroke in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Quijada, S; Salazar-Thieroldt, E; Mora-Simón, M J

    2015-04-01

    Whether persistent or chronic Q fever may act as a risk factor for stroke is unknown. A case-control study was conducted in the Hospital Universitario de Burgos (Spain) between February 2011 and December 2012. A total of 803 samples from 634 consecutive hospitalized patients ≥65 years old were tested, of whom 111 were cases (patients with prevalent or incident ischaemic stroke and/or transient ischaemic attack) and 523 were controls (patients without ischaemic stroke and/or transient ischaemic attack). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titres phase I and II against Q fever, and IgG antibodies levels against Chlamydia pneumoniae and cytomegalovirus (CMV), were determined using immunofluorescence assay and ELISA methods, respectively. Phase I IgG titres against Coxiella burnetii ≥1:256 (compatible with chronic or persistent Q fever) were detected in 16 of 110 (14.5%) cases and in 32 of 524 (6.1%) controls; P = .004, odds ratio (OR) 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3 to 4.9. This ratio was maintained after adjusting for age, sex, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, cardioembolic focus, smoking, diabetes, other cardiovascular diseases, C-reactive protein, and leukocyte count (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.3 to 5.3). High-titre IgG antibodies (top quartile) against CMV (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3 to 3.5), but not against C. pneumoniae (OR 0.9, 95% CI 0.5 to 1.6), also were associated with ischaemic stroke after adjustment for risk factors. In conclusion, serology compatible with persistent or chronic Q fever is associated with ischaemic stroke in elderly patients. High levels of IgG antibodies against CMV, but not against C. pneumoniae, also are associated with ischaemic stroke in these patients. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Individual Motivational Interventions after Alcohol-Related Event Treated in Hospital - Effective Option for Secondary Prevention in Adolescence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marcus O; Hammerich, Sünje; Eggert, Paul; Ankermann, Tobias

    2018-04-09

    Individual Motivational Interventions after alcohol-related event treated in Hospital - Effective Option for Secondary Prevention in Adolescence? In a prospective, randomized, single-blind study 48 adolescents between 13 and 17 years answered a standardized questionnaire about their behavior of alcohol-consumption after an alcohol-related event with hospitalization. They were divided in 2 groups by randomization: Group A (n=28) took part in an individual motivational intervention (HaLT-Präventionsprojekt), Group B (n=20) did not get any intervention. Six and 12 weeks after the hospitalization the same questionnaire was answered again by telephone-based interviews. The interviewer did not know to which group the interview-partner belonged. 58% (n=28) of all adolescents drank less alcohol or in a lower frequency than before the alcohol-related event. 17% (n=8) did not drink any alcohol in that period of 12 weeks. 54% (n=26) explained, that they had no events of drunkenness in that period. 38% (n=18) did not change their behavior in consumption of alcohol. 6% (n=3) drank more or in higher frequency than before. We could not find any significant difference in the behavior of alcohol-consumption of both groups: 58% (A) resp. 65% (B) drank less than the time before the alcohol-related event (χ²=0,6269; p=0,4285). An influence of the individual motivational intervention could not be shown. Further studies should include interventions for parents and peers. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Gastrointestinal events with clopidogrel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Würtz, Morten; Schwarz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Clopidogrel prevents cardiovascular events, but has been linked with adverse gastrointestinal (GI) complications, particularly bleeding events.......Clopidogrel prevents cardiovascular events, but has been linked with adverse gastrointestinal (GI) complications, particularly bleeding events....

  18. Factor and prevention method of landslide event at FELCRA Semungkis, Hulu Langat, Selangor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manap, N.; Jeyaramah, N.; Syahrom, N.

    2017-12-01

    Landslide is known as one of the powerful geological events that happens unpredictably due to natural or human factors. A study was carried out at FELCRA Semungkis, Hulu Langat which is known as one of the areas that has been affected by landslide that involving 16 causalities. The purpose of this study is to identify the main factor that causes the landslide at FELCRA Semungkis, Hulu Langat and to identify the protection method. Data was collected from three respondents working under government bodies through interview sessions. The data collected were analysed by using the content analysis method. From the results, it can be concluded that the main factors that caused the landslide to happened are the human factor and nature factor. The protection method that can be applied to stabilize the FELCRA Semungkis, Hulu Langat is by using the soil nailing method with the support of soil create system.

  19. Apixaban: Effective and Safe in Preventing Thromboembolic Events in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Renal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Francesca; Scicchitano, Pietro; Gesualdo, Michele; Ricci, Gabriella; Carbonara, Santa; Franchini, Carlo; Pia Schiavone, Brigida Immacolata; Corbo, Filomena; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

    2017-11-17

    Thromboembolic events, principally stroke, represent one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among subjects with atrial fibrillation. Chronic kidney disease determines a further increase of thromboembolic events, bleeding and mortality and complicates the pharmacological management of patients with atrial fibrillation, mainly due to the side effects of antiarrhythmic and anticoagulant drugs with renal excretion. Apixaban is a new oral anticoagulant characterized by good bioavailability and renal elimination accounting for only 25%, showing a safety profile and effectiveness in patients with renal impairment. In this manuscript, we reviewed literature data on the use of apixaban in the management of non-valvular atrial fibrillation in patients with renal failure, in order to clarify an often-debated topic in clinical practice. A PubMed search was performed on the terms atrial fibrillation, apixaban and renal failure with the aim of identifying relevant manuscripts, large randomized clinical trials, meta-analyses, and current guidelines. Literature data show that apixaban could represent an interesting alternative to warfarin and other selective antagonists of coagulation factors in patients with impaired renal function. About the risk of major bleeding, apixaban appears to be safer than warfarin in the presence of any degree of renal failure. Apixaban show to be an effective anticoagulant in patients with atrial fibrillation, even superior to warfarin in reducing the risk of stroke and systemic embolism regardless of the presence of renal insufficiency. Moreover, Food and Drug Administration allows the use of apixaban in patients with end stage renal disease on hemodialysis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Development of a 'ready-to-use' tool that includes preventability, for the assessment of adverse drug events in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Guillaume; Netzer, Florence; Kouakou, Sylvain Landry; Lemare, François; Minvielle, Etienne

    2018-02-14

    Background Adverse drug events (ADEs) occur frequently in oncology and justify continuous assessment and monitoring. There are several methods for detecting them, but the trigger tool method seems the most appropriate. Although a generic tool exists, its use for ADEs in oncology has not been convincing. The development of a focused version is therefore necessary. Objective To provide an oncology-focused trigger tool that evaluates the prevalence, harm, and preventability in a standardised method for pragmatic use in ADE surveillance. Setting Hospitals with cancer care in France. Method The tool has been constructed in two steps: (1) constitution of an oncology-centred list of ADEs; 30 pharmacists/practitioners in cancer care from nine hospitals selected a list of ADEs using a method of agreement adapted from the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method; and (2) construction of three standardised dimensions for the characterisation of each ADE (including causality, severity, and preventability). Main outcome measure The main outcome measure was validation of the tool, including preventability criteria. Results The tool is composed of a final list of 15 ADEs. For each ADE, a 'reviewer form' has been designed and validated by the panel. It comprises (1) the trigger(s), (2) flowcharts to guide the reviewer, (3) criteria for grading harm, and (4) a standardised assessment of preventability with 6-14 closed sentences for each ADE in terms of therapeutic management and/or prevention of side-effects. Conclusion A complete 'ready-to-use' tool for ADE monitoring in oncology has been developed that allows the assessment of three standardised dimensions.

  1. Screening for Hypertension and Lowering Blood Pressure for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viera, Anthony J

    2017-07-01

    Hypertension affects 1 in 3 American adults. Blood pressure (BP)-lowering therapy reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends all adults be screened for hypertension. Most patients whose office BP is elevated should have out-of-office monitoring to confirm the diagnosis. Ambulatory BP monitoring is preferred for out-of-office measurement, but home BP monitoring is a reasonable alternative. Guidelines for treatment are stratified by age (60 years) and include cutoffs for recommended treatment BPs and target BP goals. Quality of hypertension care is improved by incorporating population health management using registries and medication titration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Asphyxia in newborn--risk, prevention and identification of a hypoxic event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucknerová, Ingrid; Ujházy, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present the summarisation of the knowledge about biochemical and clinical changes that occur under the influence of asphyxia as well as about the treatment. Results of experimental works in animal models bring us the explanation about many postasphyxiated changes and help us to understand the pathophysiological changes and consequences of asphyxia. The authors present the most prominent consequences of neonatal asphyxia in clinical and experimental conditions. Asphyxia significantly contributes to neonatal morbidity and mortality and determines the prognosis of future development. New insights into the pathophysiology of birth asphyxia provide the opportunity how to prevent permanent damage by the activation of the fundamental molecular processes. Care of newborn asphyxia requires teamwork. Prognosis of the asphyxiated newborn is still dependent on developmental stage (gestational age), the length and intensity of asphyxia, on the level of medical care.

  3. Areas for US-India civilian nuclear cooperation to prevent/mitigate radiological events.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balachandran, Gopalan; Forden, Geoffrey Ethan

    2013-01-01

    Over the decades, India and the United States have had very little formal collaboration on nuclear issues. Partly this was because neither country needed collaboration to make progress in the nuclear field. But it was also due, in part, to the concerns both countries had about the others intentions. Now that the U.S.-India Deal on nuclear collaboration has been signed and the Hyde Act passed in the United States, it is possible to recognize that both countries can benefit from such nuclear collaboration, especially if it starts with issues important to both countries that do not touch on strategic systems. Fortunately, there are many noncontroversial areas for collaboration. This study, funded by the U.S. State Department, has identified a number of areas in the prevention of and response to radiological incidents where such collaboration could take place.

  4. Profound retinal ischaemia after ranibizumab administration in an eye with ocular ischaemic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Peter Kristian; Munch, Inger Christine; Larsen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. Purpose: To report the result of ranibizumab administration in an eye with ocular ischaemic syndrome. Methods: Fluorescein angiography, ocular pneumoplethysmography and retinal vessel calibre measurement. Results: An 85-year-old man with ocular ischaemic syndrome demonstrated vision los...

  5. Cholesterol and prevention of atherosclerotic events: limits of a new frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Luís Eduardo Teixeira de; E, Faerstein

    2017-01-12

    Control of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease - a highly prevalent condition and one of the main causes of mortality in Brazil and worldwide - is a recurrent subject of great interest for public health. Recently, three new guidelines on dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis prevention have been published. The close release of these important publications is a good opportunity for comparison: the Brazilian model has greater sensitivity, the English model does not work with risk stratification, and the American model may be overestimating the risk. This will allow reflection on current progress and identification of controversial aspects which still require further research and debate. It is also an opportunity to discuss issues related to early diagnosis and its efficiency as a preventive strategy for atherosclerotic disease: the transformation of risk into disease, the gradual reduction of cut-off points, the limitations of the screening strategy, and the problem of overdiagnosis. RESUMO O controle da doença cardiovascular aterosclerótica - morbidade de alta prevalência e uma das principais causas de mortalidade no Brasil e no mundo - continua sendo tema de grande interesse para a Saúde Pública. Recentemente, três novas diretrizes sobre dislipidemia e prevenção da aterosclerose foram divulgadas. A convergência no tempo dessas importantes publicações constitui boa oportunidade para sua comparação: o modelo brasileiro tem maior sensibilidade, o inglês não trabalha com risco estratificado e o norte-americano parece estar superestimando o risco.Isso permitirá reflexões acerca dos avanços que já foram alcançados e identificação de aspectos ainda controversos, que seguem exigindo novas pesquisas e debates. É também uma oportunidade para discutir questões relacionadas ao diagnóstico precoce e sua eficiência como estratégia preventiva da doença aterosclerótica: as transformações do risco em doença, a diminuição progressiva de pontos de

  6. The incidence, root-causes, and outcomes of adverse events in surgical units: implication for potential prevention strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenewegen Peter P

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We need to know the scale and underlying causes of surgical adverse events (AEs in order to improve the safety of care in surgical units. However, there is little recent data. Previous record review studies that reported on surgical AEs in detail are now more than ten years old. Since then surgical technology and quality assurance have changed rapidly. The objective of this study was to provide more recent data on the incidence, consequences, preventability, causes and potential strategies to prevent AEs among hospitalized patients in surgical units. Methods A structured record review study of 7,926 patient records was carried out by trained nurses and medical specialist reviewers in 21 Dutch hospitals. The aim was to determine the presence of AEs during hospitalizations in 2004 and to consider how far they could be prevented. Of all AEs, the consequences, responsible medical specialty, causes and potential prevention strategies were identified. Surgical AEs were defined as AEs attributable to surgical treatment and care processes and were selected for analysis in detail. Results Surgical AEs occurred in 3.6% of hospital admissions and represented 65% of all AEs. Forty-one percent of the surgical AEs was considered to be preventable. The consequences of surgical AEs were more severe than for other types of AEs, resulting in more permanent disability, extra treatment, prolonged hospital stay, unplanned readmissions and extra outpatient visits. Almost 40% of the surgical AEs were infections, 23% bleeding, and 22% injury by mechanical, physical or chemical cause. Human factors were involved in the causation of 65% of surgical AEs and were considered to be preventable through quality assurance and training. Conclusions Surgical AEs occur more often than other types of AEs, are more often preventable and their consequences are more severe. Therefore, surgical AEs have a major impact on the burden of AEs during hospitalizations

  7. The impact of diabetes on coronary heart disease differs from that on ischaemic stroke with regard to the gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderberg Stefan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the diabetes related CVD risk between men and women of different ages. Methods Hazards ratios (HRs (95%CI for acute CHD and ischaemic stroke events were estimated based on data of Finnish and Swedish cohorts of 5111 women and 4167 men. Results 182 (3.6% women and 348 (8.4% men had CHD and 129 (2.5% women and 137 (3.3% men ischaemic stroke events. The multivariate adjusted HRs for acute CHD at age groups of 40–49, 50–59 and 60–69 years were 1.00 (1.94, 1.78 (4.23, 3.75 (8.40 in women (men without diabetes and 4.35 (5.40, 5.49 (9.54 and 8.84 (13.76 in women (men with diabetes. The corresponding HRs for ischaemic stroke were 1.00 (1.26, 2.48 (2.83 and 5.17 (5.11 in women (men without diabetes and 4.14 (4.91, 3.32 (6.75 and 13.91 (18.06 in women (men with diabetes, respectively. Conclusion CHD risk was higher in men than in women but difference reduced in diabetic population. Diabetes, however, increased stroke risk more in men than in women.

  8. Adverse events during and after per-oral endoscopic myotomy: prevention, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Zaheer; Reddy, D Nageshwar; Ramchandani, Mohan

    2018-01-01

    Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has surfaced as an effective endoscopic treatment modality for achalasia cardia (AC). Promising results in short- and mid-term follow-up studies have increased the use of POEM for the management of AC. POEM can be safely performed in an endoscopy suit, and major adverse events (AEs) are uncommon. AEs encountered during POEM or during the perioperative period principally include insufflation-related AEs, mucosal injuries, bleeding, pain, and aspiration pneumonia. Most insufflation-related AEs do not require an active intervention and therefore should not be considered as AEs in the true sense. When management of AEs is required, most intraoperative AEs can be managed at the same time without untoward consequences. Occurrences of AEs lessen after completion of the learning curve. However, experience alone does not ensure "zero" incidence of AEs, and early recognition remains essential. Postoperative AEs, like leaks, delayed bleeding, and delayed mucosal perforations, may pose special challenges for diagnosis and management. There is no standardized classification system for grading the severity of AEs associated with POEM, resulting in wide variation in their reported occurrences. Uniform reporting of AEs is not only crucial to comprehensively analyze the safety of POEM but also for comparison with other established treatment modalities like Heller's myotomy. GERD is an important long-term AE after POEM. Unlike the perioperative AEs, little is known regarding the intraoperative or patient-related factors that influence the occurrence of post-POEM GERD. Large prospective studies with long-term follow-up are required to determine the procedural factors associated with GERD after POEM. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Tea consumption and risk of ischaemic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Yu, Canqing; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Si, Jiahui; Yang, Ling; Chen, Yiping; Ren, Xiaolan; Jiang, Ge; Chen, Junshi; Chen, Zhengming; Lv, Jun; Li, Liming

    2017-01-01

    Objective To prospectively examine the association between tea consumption and the risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). Methods Prospective study using the China Kadoorie Biobank; participants from 10 areas across China were enrolled during 2004–2008 and followed up until 31 December 2013. After excluding participants with cancer, heart disease and stroke at baseline, the present study included 199 293 men and 288 082 women aged 30–79 years at baseline. Information on IHD incidence was collected through disease registries and the new national health insurance databases. Results During a median follow-up of 7.2 years, we documented 24 665 (7.19 cases/1000 person-years) incident IHD cases and 3959 (1.13 cases/1000 person-years) major coronary events (MCEs). Tea consumption was associated with reduced risk of IHD and MCE. In the whole cohort, compared with participants who never consumed tea during the past 12 months, the multivariable-adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for less than daily and daily tea consumers were 0.97 (0.94 to 1.00) and 0.92 (0.88 to 0.95) for IHD, 0.92 (0.85 to 1.00) and 0.90 (0.82 to 0.99) for MCE. No linear trends in the HRs across the amount of tea were observed in daily consumers for IHD and MCE (PLinear >0.05). The inverse association between tea consumption and IHD was stronger in rural (PInteraction 0.006 for IHD, tea consumption was associated with a reduced risk of IHD. PMID:28077466

  10. Use and perceived benefits of mobile devices by physicians in preventing adverse drug events in the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Steven M; Boyce, Richard D; Ligons, Frank M; Perera, Subashan; Nace, David A; Hochheiser, Harry

    2013-12-01

    Although mobile devices equipped with drug reference software may help prevent adverse drug events (ADEs) in the nursing home (NH) by providing medication information at the point of care, little is known about their use and perceived benefits. The goal of this study was to conduct a survey of a nationally representative sample of NH physicians to quantify the use and perceived benefits of mobile devices in preventing ADEs in the NH setting. We surveyed physicians who attended the 2010 American Medical Directors Association Annual Symposium about their use of mobile devices, and beliefs about the effectiveness of drug reference software in preventing ADEs. The overall net valid response rate was 70% (558/800) with 42% (236/558) using mobile devices to assist with prescribing in the NH. Physicians with 15 or fewer years of clinical experience were 67% more likely to be mobile device users, compared with those with more than 15 years of clinical experience (odds ratio = 1.68; 95% confidence interval = 1.17-2.41; P = .005). For those who used a mobile device to assist with prescribing, almost all (98%) reported performing an average of 1 or more drug look-ups per day, performed an average of 1 to 2 lookups per day for potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and most (88%) believed that drug reference software had helped to prevent at least 1 potential ADE in the preceding 4-week period. The proportion of NH physicians who use mobile devices with drug reference software, although significant, is lower than in other clinical environments. Our results suggest that NH physicians who use mobile devices equipped with drug reference software believe they are helpful for reducing ADEs. Further research is needed to better characterize the facilitators and barriers to adoption of the technology in the NH and its precise impact on NH ADEs. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Retinal oximetry in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rilvén, Sandra; Torp, Thomas Lee; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. We used PubMed and Embase to search for retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. Three separate searches identified a total of 79 publications. After two levels of manual screening, 10 studies were included: six about diabetic...... retinopathy (DR) and four about retinal vein occlusion. No studies about retinal artery occlusion were included. In diabetes, all studies found that increases in retinal venous oxygen saturation (rvSatO2 ) were associated with present as well as increasing levels of DR. Four of six studies also found...... whether retinal oximetry could be a potential tool for screening or a biomarker of treatment outcome in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases....

  12. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mediates cardioprotection by remote ischaemic conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basalay, Marina V; Mastitskaya, Svetlana; Mrochek, Aleksander; Ackland, Gareth L; Del Arroyo, Ana Gutierrez; Sanchez, Jenifer; Sjoquist, Per-Ove; Pernow, John; Gourine, Alexander V; Gourine, Andrey

    2016-12-01

    Although the nature of the humoral factor which mediates cardioprotection established by remote ischaemic conditioning (RIc) remains unknown, parasympathetic (vagal) mechanisms appear to play a critical role. As the production and release of many gut hormones is modulated by the vagus nerve, here we tested the hypothesis that RIc cardioprotection is mediated by the actions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). A rat model of myocardial infarction (coronary artery occlusion followed by reperfusion) was used. Remote ischaemic pre- (RIPre) or perconditioning (RIPer) was induced by 15 min occlusion of femoral arteries applied prior to or during the myocardial ischaemia. The degree of RIPre and RIPer cardioprotection was determined in conditions of cervical or subdiaphragmatic vagotomy, or following blockade of GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) using specific antagonist Exendin(9-39). Phosphorylation of PI3K/AKT and STAT3 was assessed. RIPre and RIPer reduced infarct size by ∼50%. In conditions of bilateral cervical or subdiaphragmatic vagotomy RIPer failed to establish cardioprotection. GLP-1R blockade abolished cardioprotection induced by either RIPre or RIPer. Exendin(9-39) also prevented RIPre-induced AKT phosphorylation. Cardioprotection induced by GLP-1R agonist Exendin-4 was preserved following cervical vagotomy, but was abolished in conditions of M3 muscarinic receptor blockade. These data strongly suggest that GLP-1 functions as a humoral factor of remote ischaemic conditioning cardioprotection. This phenomenon requires intact vagal innervation of the visceral organs and recruitment of GLP-1R-mediated signalling. Cardioprotection induced by GLP-1R activation is mediated by a mechanism involving M3 muscarinic receptors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  13. Fluoxetine for motor recovery after acute ischaemic stroke (FLAME): a randomised placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet, François; Tardy, Jean; Albucher, Jean-François; Thalamas, Claire; Berard, Emilie; Lamy, Catherine; Bejot, Yannick; Deltour, Sandrine; Jaillard, Assia; Niclot, Philippe; Guillon, Benoit; Moulin, Thierry; Marque, Philippe; Pariente, Jérémie; Arnaud, Catherine; Loubinoux, Isabelle

    2011-02-01

    Hemiplegia and hemiparesis are the most common deficits caused by stroke. A few small clinical trials suggest that fluoxetine enhances motor recovery but its clinical efficacy is unknown. We therefore aimed to investigate whether fluoxetine would enhance motor recovery if given soon after an ischaemic stroke to patients who have motor deficits. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, patients from nine stroke centres in France who had ischaemic stroke and hemiplegia or hemiparesis, had Fugl-Meyer motor scale (FMMS) scores of 55 or less, and were aged between 18 years and 85 years were eligible for inclusion. Patients were randomly assigned, using a computer random-number generator, in a 1:1 ratio to fluoxetine (20 mg once per day, orally) or placebo for 3 months starting 5-10 days after the onset of stroke. All patients had physiotherapy. The primary outcome measure was the change on the FMMS between day 0 and day 90 after the start of the study drug. Participants, carers, and physicians assessing the outcome were masked to group assignment. Analysis was of all patients for whom data were available (full analysis set). This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00657163. 118 patients were randomly assigned to fluoxetine (n=59) or placebo (n=59), and 113 were included in the analysis (57 in the fluoxetine group and 56 in the placebo group). Two patients died before day 90 and three withdrew from the study. FMMS improvement at day 90 was significantly greater in the fluoxetine group (adjusted mean 34·0 points [95% CI 29·7-38·4]) than in the placebo group (24·3 points [19·9-28·7]; p=0·003). The main adverse events in the fluoxetine and placebo groups were hyponatraemia (two [4%] vs two [4%]), transient digestive disorders including nausea, diarrhoea, and abdominal pain (14 [25%] vs six [11%]), hepatic enzyme disorders (five [9%] vs ten [18%]), psychiatric disorders (three [5%] vs four [7%]), insomnia (19 [33%] vs 20 [36%]), and partial

  14. Analysing Time to Event Data in Dementia Prevention Trials: The Example of the GuidAge Study of EGb761.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, B; Andrieu, S; Ousset, P J; Berrut, G; Dartigues, J F; Dubois, B; Pasquier, F; Piette, F; Robert, P; Touchon, J; Garnier, P; Mathiex-Fortunet, H; Vellas, B

    2015-12-01

    Time-to-event analysis is frequently used in medical research to investigate potential disease-modifying treatments in neurodegenerative diseases. Potential treatment effects are generally evaluated using the logrank test, which has optimal power and sensitivity when the treatment effect (hazard ratio) is constant over time. However, there is generally no prior information as to how the hazard ratio for the event of interest actually evolves. In these cases, the logrank test is not necessarily the most appropriate to use. When the hazard ratio is expected to decrease or increase over time, alternative statistical tests such as the Fleming-Harrington test, provide a better sensitivity. An example of this comes from a large, five-year randomised, placebo-controlled prevention trial (GuidAge) in 2854 community-based subjects making spontaneous memory complaints to their family physicians, which evaluated whether treatment with EGb761 can modify the risk of developing AD. The primary outcome measure was the time to conversion from memory complaint to Alzheimer's type dementia. Although there was no significant difference in the hazard function of conversion between the two treatment groups according to the preplanned logrank test, a significant treatment-by-time interaction for the incidence of AD was observed in a protocol-specified subgroup analysis, suggesting that the hazard ratio is not constant over time. For this reason, additional post hoc analyses were performed using the Fleming-Harrington test to evaluate whether there was a signal of a late effect of EGb761. Applying the Fleming-Harrington test, the hazard function for conversion to dementia in the placebo group was significantly different from that in the EGb761 treatment group (p = 0.0054), suggesting a late effect of EGb761. Since this was a post hoc analysis, no definitive conclusions can be drawn as to the effectiveness of the treatment. This post hoc analysis illustrates the interest of performing

  15. Recurrent stroke after transient ischaemic attack or minor ischaemic stroke: does the distinction between small and large vessel disease remain true to type? Dutch TIA Trial Study Group.

    OpenAIRE

    Kappelle, L J; van Latum, J C; van Swieten, J C; Algra, A; Koudstaal, P J; van Gijn, J

    1995-01-01

    The incidence and vascular type of recurrent ischaemic stroke was studied in patients with supratentorial transient ischaemic attacks or non-disabling ischaemic strokes, who were treated with aspirin (30 or 283 mg). Patients were divided into groups with small vessel disease (SVD) (n = 1216) or large vessel disease (LVD) (n = 1221) on the grounds of their clinical features and CT at baseline. Patients with evidence of both SVD and LVD (n = 180) were excluded from further analyses. During foll...

  16. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  17. Correlation between homocysteine and dyslipidemia in ischaemic stroke patients with and without hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aria Arina, Cut; Amir, Darwin; Siregar, Yahwardiah; Sembiring, Rosita J.

    2018-03-01

    Almost 80% of strokes are ischaemic and stroke is the third most common cause of death in developed countries, . The treatment of stroke still limited, the best approach to reduce mortality and morbidity is primary prevention through modification of acquired risk factors. Hypertension and dyslipidemia are one of the major risk factor for stroke while homocysteine is a less well-documented risk factor. The purpose of this study was to know the correlation between homocysteine and dyslipidemia in ischaemic stroke patients with and without hypertension. This study is a cross sectional study; the sample were taken consecutively. All sample matched with inclusion and exclusion criteria, demography data and blood sample were taken. Demography data was analyzed using descriptive statistic, to analyze the relation, we used Chi-Square test. p value value = 0,009. A significant correlation between homocysteine and dyslipidemia might be because both of them have an important role in the acceleration of the atherosclerotic formation by activation platelet and thrombus, but we still need further study to get more explanation about the relation.

  18. Patterns of neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, Linda S. de; Groenendaal, Floris

    2010-01-01

    Enormous progress has been made in assessing the neonatal brain, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this review, we will describe the use of MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in detecting different patterns of brain injury in (full-term) human neonates following hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and indicate the relevance of these findings in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome. (orig.)

  19. Carotid endarterectomy after intravenous thrombolysis for acute cerebral ischaemic attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathenborg, Lisbet Knudsen; Jensen, L P; Baekgaard, N

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) has proven effective in the treatment of acute cerebral ischaemic attack in selected cases. In the presence of a carotid artery stenosis, such patients may be candidates for carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Few studies have been made on the safety of CEA performed after...

  20. Intrapartum asphyxia and hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the incidence of asphyxia and hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) and predictors of poor outcome in a hospital in a developing country. Methods: Neonates of birth weight ≥2 000 g who required bag-and-mask ventilation and were admitted with a primary diagnosis of asphyxia from January to ...

  1. Effect of lidocaine on ischaemic preconditioning in isolated rat heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthel, H.; Ebel, D.; Müllenheim, J.; Obal, D.; Preckel, B.; Schlack, W.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lidocaine is frequently used as an agent to treat ventricular arrhythmias associated with acute myocardial ischaemia. Lidocaine is a potent blocker not only of sodium channels, but also of ATP-sensitive potassium channels. The opening of these channels is a key mechanism of ischaemic

  2. Ischaemic heart disease in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ischaemic heart disease in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria: a 5 year review. ... Forty six patients were diagnosed to have IHD giving it a prevalence of 0.9% of medical conditions and 3.4% of all cardiovascular cases. There were 33 males and 13 females (M: F = 2.5:1). Twenty two patients (47.8%) had ...

  3. Ischaemic stroke in hyperthyroidism without cardiac arrhythmia - A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: The relationship between hyperthyroidism and stroke is well established in the setting of atrial fibrillation. However there is limited literature for ischaemic stroke occurring in hyperthyroidism without cardiac arrhythmia. No such case had been described in South East Nigeria. METHOD: This report highlights ...

  4. Patterns of neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, Linda S. de [University Medical Centre, Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Centre, Department of Neonatology, KE 04.123.1, P.O. Box 85090, Utrecht (Netherlands); Groenendaal, Floris [University Medical Centre, Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-06-15

    Enormous progress has been made in assessing the neonatal brain, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this review, we will describe the use of MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in detecting different patterns of brain injury in (full-term) human neonates following hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and indicate the relevance of these findings in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome. (orig.)

  5. Radial optic neurotomy for ischaemic central vein occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Jardón, C S; Meza-de Regil, A; Dalma-Weiszhausz, J; Leizaola-Fernández, C; Morales-Cantón, V; Guerrero-Naranjo, J L; Quiroz-Mercado, H

    2005-01-01

    Background/aims: Ischaemic central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) accounts for 20–50% of all CRVO. No treatment has been proved to be effective. The efficacy of radial optic neurotomy (RON) was evaluated in eyes with ischaemic CRVO. Methods: 10 patients with ischaemic CRVO underwent RON. After pars plana vitrectomy, a microvitreoretinal blade was used to incise the scleral ring, cribriform plate, and adjacent sclera at the nasal edge of the optic disc. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), fluorescein angiography (FA), multifocal electroretinography (mfERG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were measured preoperatively and at 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Results: No visual improvement was noted in the eyes that underwent RON. FA and mfERG showed no increase in retinal perfusion or retinal function postoperatively. Mean macular central thickness changed from 841 (SD 170) μm preoperatively to 162 (SD 34) μm at the sixth postoperative month. One patient had retinal central artery perforation intraoperatively. One patient developed neovascular glaucoma. Conclusion: RON in ischaemic CRVO did not improve visual function (by mfERG) or visual acuity although macular thickness did improve. This technique may be associated with potential risks. Randomised studies are needed to corroborate these results. PMID:15834084

  6. SPET brain imaging with 201 diethyldithiocarbamate in acute ischaemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruïne, J. F.; Limburg, M.; van Royen, E. A.; Hijdra, A.; Hill, T. C.; van der Schoot, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with acute ischaemic stroke were studied within 24 h after hospital admission with thallium 201 diethyldithiocarbamate single photon emission tomography (201Tl-DDC SPET) and X-ray computed tomography (CT). 201Tl-DDC is a non-redistributing agent that allows postponed imaging

  7. Trends in the incidence of ischaemic stroke in young adults between 1985 and 2011: the Dijon Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béjot, Yannick; Daubail, Benoit; Jacquin, Agnès; Durier, Jérôme; Osseby, Guy-Victor; Rouaud, Olivier; Giroud, Maurice

    2014-05-01

    Recent data have suggested that stroke incidence in young people may be rising. In this population-based study, we aimed to determine whether the incidence of stroke in people aged stroke (ischaemic stroke, spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage, and undetermined stroke) occurring in Dijon, France, from 1985 to 2011 were prospectively collected from a population-based registry. Incidence rates were calculated and temporal trends were analysed by age groups and stroke subtypes using a Poisson regression to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR). Risk factors and premorbid treatments were analysed. Over the 27-year study period, 4506 patients were recorded (53% women, mean age 74.6±14.4, 10.1% aged stroke incidence was noted, as was a rise in ischaemic stroke in individuals aged ischaemic stroke in people aged disease and treatment options in the population and among practitioners leading to more frequent referrals for specialised care, and improvements in stroke diagnosis. Stroke prevention must be encouraged even in young adults.

  8. Comparison of serum lipid profile in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, A.; Sharif, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    To compare serum lipid profile between patients of ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes. Study Design: Cross sectional, comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from August 2004 to February 2005. Methodology: Patients with diagnosis of stroke comprising 100 consecutive patients each of ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes were included in the study while patients on lipid lowering therapy were excluded from study. To determine the subtype of stroke, clinical examination followed by CT scan of brain was done. A serum sample after 8 hours of overnight fasting was taken on the next day of admission for both groups of patients. Total serum cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, VLDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol was determined, using enzymatic colorimetric method. Statistical analysis was done by comparison of lipid profile in two subgroups, using proportion test for any significant difference. Results: The mean age at presentation of patients with stroke was 64.2+-12 years with a male to female ratio of 3.6:1. In 100 ischaemic stroke patients, raised serum total cholesterol was seen in 42, triglyceride in 04, LDL-cholesterol in 05 and VLDL-cholesterol in 07 patients. Serum HDL-cholesterol was below the normal reference in 31 cases. On the other hand, serum total cholesterol and triglycerides was raised in 05 patients each, LDL-cholesterol in 09 and VLDL-cholesterol in 03 patients of haemorrhagic stroke. Serum HDL-cholesterol was below normal in 04 patients of haemorrhagic stroke. On comparison, there were significantly greater number of patients with raised serum cholesterol and low HDL-cholesterol in ischaemic stroke than haemorrhagic stroke (p < 0.05). No statistical significance was found on comparing serum values of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke for triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol and VLDL-cholesterol. Conclusion: Ischaemic stroke patients had high serum total cholesterol and lower HDL-cholesterol levels as compared to

  9. Clinical outcomes and a high prevalence of abnormalities on comprehensive arterial and venous thrombophilia screening in TIA or ischaemic stroke patients with a patent foramen ovale, an inter-atrial septal aneurysm or both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soon Tjin; Murphy, Stephen J X; Smith, Deirdre R; Williams, Jennifer; Navarro, Silvia Gil; McCabe, John; Moore, David P; McHugh, Johnny; McCabe, Dominick J H

    2017-06-15

    Data are limited on the optimal management of cryptogenic TIA/stroke patients with a patent foramen ovale (PFO)±inter-atrial septal aneurysm (IASA), especially with an inherited thrombophilia. Prospectively-collected data on TIA/ischaemic stroke patients with PFO, IASA or both who received 'goal-directed secondary-prevention medical treatment' were analysed. All patients had trans-oesophageal echocardiography, anti-nuclear, anti-cardiolipin, anti-beta 2 glycoprotein I antibodies, rheumatoid factor, lupus anticoagulant, protein C&S, anti-thrombin, factor VIII activity, activated protein C resistance, Factor V Leiden, prothrombin gene and MTHFR-c.677C>T mutation screening. ENA and homocysteine were assessed in the latter study period. Eighty-three patients were recruited. Mean follow-up: 48.1months. Forty-seven patients (56.6%) had an isolated PFO, 32 (38.6%) a PFO and an IASA, and 4 (4.8%) an IASA alone. Eighteen (21.7%) had ≥1 abnormality on thrombophilia screening. The most important abnormalities which lead to treatment changes in 11 patients (13.3%) were primary anti-phospholipid syndrome (N=3; 3.6%), protein S deficiency (N=2; 2.4%) hyper-homocysteinaemia (N=6/72 screened, 8.3%). Four patients (4.8%) opted for PFO closure: two with protein S deficiency, and two with no identified thrombophilia. Seven (8.4%) had recurrent TIA/ischaemic stroke during follow-up (overall annualised incidence: 2.1%), of whom five had a PFO alone and two a PFO and IASA. Comprehensive arterial and venous thrombophilia screening is warranted in TIA/ischaemic stroke patients with a PFO±IASA, is conclusively abnormal in over a fifth, and informed important decision-making regarding individualised therapy in 13.3% of patients. The incidence of recurrent vascular events in this population is low on optimal, personalised secondary-prevention treatment, even with an underlying thrombophilia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Randomized assessment of imatinib in patients with acute ischaemic stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, N; Thorén, M; Höjeberg, B; Käll, T-B; Laska, A-C; Sjöstrand, C; Höijer, J; Almqvist, H; Holmin, S; Lilja, A; Fredriksson, L; Lawrence, D; Eriksson, U; Ahmed, N

    2017-03-01

    Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been shown to restore blood-brain barrier integrity and reduce infarct size, haemorrhagic transformation and cerebral oedema in stroke models treated with tissue plasminogen activator. We evaluated the safety of imatinib, based on clinical and neuroradiological data, and its potential influence on neurological and functional outcomes. A phase II randomized trial was performed in patients with acute ischaemic stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis. A total of 60 patients were randomly assigned to four groups [3 (active): 1 (control)]; the active treatment groups received oral imatinib for 6 days at three dose levels (400, 600 and 800 mg). Primary outcome was any adverse event; secondary outcomes were haemorrhagic transformation, cerebral oedema, neurological severity on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at 7 days and at 3 months and functional outcomes on the modified Rankin scale (mRS). Four serious adverse events were reported, which resulted in three deaths (one in the control group and two in the 400-mg dose group; one patient in the latter group did not receive active treatment and the other received two doses). Nonserious adverse events were mostly mild, resulting in full recovery. Imatinib ameliorated neurological outcomes with an improvement of 0.6 NIHSS points per 100 mg imatinib (P = 0.02). For the 800-mg group, the mean unadjusted and adjusted NIHSS improvements were 4 (P = 0.037) and 5 points (P = 0.012), respectively, versus controls. Functional independence (mRS 0-2) increased by 18% versus controls (61 vs. 79; P = 0.296). This phase II study showed that imatinib is safe and tolerable and may reduce neurological disability in patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis after ischaemic stroke. A confirmatory randomized trial is currently underway. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Internal Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Publication of The

  11. Income inequality and ischaemic heart disease in Danish men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Christensen, Ulla; Due, Pernille

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that areas with an unequal income distribution are less likely to invest in health and more likely to have a social environment that influences the development of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) METHODS: We used pooled data from two cohort studies conducted...... in Copenhagen to analyse the association between area income inequality and first admission to hospital or death from IHD in women and men while controlling for individual income and other IHD risk factors. A total of 11 685 women and 10 036 men, with initial health examinations between 1964 and 1992, were...... followed for a median of 13.8 years. Information on median income share at parish and municipality levels was obtained from population registers. RESULTS: During follow-up 1700 men and 1204 women experienced an IHD event. At parish level income share was inversely associated with an increased risk of IHD...

  12. Anabolic steroids abuse-induced cardiomyopathy and ischaemic stroke in a young male patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloul, Reham Mohammed; Aborayah, Ahmed Fathy; Hashad, Assem; Abd-Allah, Foad

    2014-02-26

    We report a case of a 37-year-old man presented with acute stroke and hepatorenal impairment which were associated with anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) abuse over 2 years. Despite the absence of apparent symptoms and signs of congestive heart failure at presentation, an AAS-induced dilated cardiomyopathy with multiple thrombi in the left ventricle was attributed to be the underlying cause of his condition. Awareness of the complications of AAS led to the prompt treatment of the initially unrecognised dilated cardiomyopathy, and improved the liver and kidney functions. However, the patient was exposed to a second severe ischaemic event, which led to his death. This unique and complex presentation of AAS complications opens for better recognition and treatment of their potentially fatal effects.

  13. Dealing with School Violence: The Effect of School Violence Prevention Training on Teachers' Perceived Self-Efficacy in Dealing with Violent Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela-Shayovitz, Revital

    2009-01-01

    This study deals with the relationship between school violence prevention training and teachers' perceived self-efficacy in handling violent events. Three indicators were used to examine teachers' self-efficacy: personal teaching efficacy (PTE), teachers' efficacy in the school as an organisation (TESO), and teachers' outcome efficacy (TOE). Data…

  14. Intermittent pneumatic compression in combination with low-molecular weight heparin in the prevention of venous thromboembolic events in esophageal cancer surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parry, Kevin; Sadeghi, Amir Hossein; van der Horst, Sylvia; Westerink, Jan; Ruurda, Jelle P.; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Aim of this study was to evaluate the use of Intermittent Pneumatic Compression (IPC) in the prevention of symptomatic venous thromboembolic events (VTE) in patients undergoing esophagectomy for cancer. Methods: From a prospective database, all patients operated between 2010 and 2014

  15. Cost-effectiveness of aspirin treatment in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease events in subgroups based on age, gender, and varying cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greving, J.P.; Buskens, E.; Koffijberg, H.; Algra, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background-Aspirin is effective for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, but it remains unclear for which subgroups of individuals aspirin is beneficial. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of aspirin separately for men and women of different ages with various levels of cardiovascular

  16. Cost-effectiveness of aspirin treatment in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease events in subgroups based on age, gender, and varying cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greving, Jacoba P.; Buskens, Erik; Koffijberg, Hendrik; Algra, Ale

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND - Aspirin is effective for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, but it remains unclear for which subgroups of individuals aspirin is beneficial. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of aspirin separately for men and women of different ages with various levels of cardiovascular

  17. Clinical applications of remote ischaemic preconditioning in native and transplant acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veighey, Kristin; MacAllister, Raymond

    2015-10-01

    Ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a composite of the injury sustained during a period of reduced or absent blood flow to a tissue or organ and the additional insult sustained upon reperfusion that limits the amount of tissue that can be salvaged. IR injury plays a central role in both native and transplant acute kidney injury (AKI). Native AKI is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in hospital inpatients, and transplant AKI contributes to graft dysfunction, ultimately limiting graft longevity. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic benefits of a cost-effective and low-risk intervention, remote ischaemic preconditioning (RIPC), and its applicability in the prevention and reduction of AKI.

  18. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... Prevention Hearing Loss Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Nutrition Osteoporosis Shingles Skin Cancer Related News Quitting Smoking, ...

  19. Obesity intervention on the healthy lifestyle in childhood: results of the PRESTO (PrEvention STudy of Obesity Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Dietrich

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Due to increasing problems with childhood and adolescent obesity in Austria PRESTO (PrEvention STudy of Obesity created a school based intervention program for promoting a healthy lifestyle in Austrian youth.

    Methods: PRESTO was carried out by a multi-disciplinary team including a physician, a psychologist, a nutritionist and an exercise physiologist. The study was carried out in 12 first grade school classes in Austria (2002-2004, mainly in Vienna (N=260. The control group consisted of 231 subjects. Medical examinations were performed and the participantsf knowledge on good nutrition and dietary habits were collected. Twelve nutrition sessions, one hour per week in each class, were conducted. Teachers were advised to discuss health issues in their classes and specific exercise physiologists were informed about how to integrate appropriate exercises into their lessons.

    Results: In comparison with control group, classes who performed PRESTO showed a significant knowledge of nutrition, consuming less unhealthy foods. These effects could be observed in the short term (14 weeks and at follow up (10 months. 24% subjects could be classified as being overweight (BMI .90.Perc..

    Conclusions: School-oriented intervention programs/studies, like PRESTO, are a potential way to demonstrate positive effect on nutrition, physical activity and healthy behaviours in youth, especially if carried out on a long-term basis. Ultimately PRESTO has proven to be a suitable programme to be disseminated onto schools throughout Austria.

  20. Relation of EEG and computerized tomography in transient ischaemic attacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladurner, G.; Enge, S.; Sager, W.D.; Logar, C.; Lechner, H.; Landeskrankenhaus Graz; Graz Univ.

    1981-01-01

    80 patients with transient ischaemic attack (TIA) were examined via computer tomogram (CT) and electronencephalogram (EEG). 53 patients were found to have a normal CT and 32 a normal EEG. In the patients with pathological CT findings (27) a significantly lower number of normal EEG's (22) was seen. Further subdivision of the 27 pathological CT findings revealed 12 patients with hypodense areas (infarctions) and 15 patients with an atrophy only. A normal EEG was significantly rarer in patients with a hypodense lesion (2) and in those with atrophy (3), focal EEG changes being significantly more frequent. Hence EEG findings facilitate the aetiological linking of an atrophy to an ischaemic stroke, especially when EEG follow-up examinations are included in the diagnostic procedure. (orig.) [de

  1. Plasma renin activity in patients with ischaemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanek, J.; Hofman, O.; Reisenauer, R.; Slaby, A.

    1977-01-01

    Plasma renin activity (PRA) stimulated by upright posture was measured in 300 men aged 45-64 years using a radioimmunoassay of angiotensin-I. The examined subjects were normotensive or patients with benign essential hypertension and were divided into 6 groups according to the absence of manifest atherosclerosis, the presence of definite angina pectoris or a history of myocardial infarction. Each group contained 50 unselected subjects, with a comparable mean age. Significant differences in mean PRA were found between corresponding groups of hypertensives and normotensives, the values in hypertensives being lower. The percentage of low renin values was higher in hypertensives with ischaemic heart disease than in other groups. It is suggested that this finding might be explained by functional disturbances in the kidneys in hypertensives with ischaemic heart disease. (orig.) [de

  2. C-reactive protein gene polymorphisms and gene-environment interactions in ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongyun; Yu, Dan; Xu, Zhi-Wei; Li, Shan-Shan; Li, Xiao-Feng; Li, Jing; Yang, Xu

    2015-11-01

    Ischaemic stroke is a heterogeneous, multifactorial disease caused by the combination of certain risk factors and genetic factors. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been reported to be associated with serum CRP levels. However, genetic association studies have produced conflicting results regarding the association between these SNPs and ischaemic stroke. In this paper, we conducted a population-based case-control study to determine whether two SNPs of CRP (rs1800947 and rs3093059) are associated with ischaemic stroke in Chinese Han population and to evaluate their interaction with environmental risk factors. We found that the rs1800947 GC genotype is significantly associated with the risk of ischaemic stroke, particularly the small-vessel disease and its subtype. Crossover analysis revealed that patients with the rs1800947 GC genotype and habits of smoking or drinking were more susceptible to ischaemic stroke. No association was found between the rs3093059 and ischaemic stroke.

  3. management of ischaemic stroke — recent advances

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    insulin therapy for hyperglycaemia as well as use of free radical scavengers. Hypertension is the commonest .... therapist, speech therapist, nursing staff and social worker. It has been the proven singular .... Prevent recurrence Recurrence Control weight, D.M; Hypertension; regular exercise; discourage smoking, alcohol.

  4. The difference between acute coronary heart disease and ischaemic stroke risk with regard to gender and age in Finnish and Swedish populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyvärinen, Marjukka; Qiao, Qing; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Söderberg, Stefan; Eliasson, Mats; Stehouwer, Coen D A

    2010-06-01

    We studied the age and gender difference between acute coronary heart disease and ischaemic stroke risk and examined the extent to which such a difference may be explained by known risk factors. Data from Finnish and Swedish population-based cohorts including 9278 individuals were collaboratively analysed. Hazards ratios (95% confidence intervals) for coronary heart disease and stroke incidence were estimated using the Cox-proportional hazards model. The incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke was higher in all age groups in men than in women, and the gender difference was more marked for coronary heart disease than for ischaemic stroke. There was a 10-year lag in the development of coronary heart disease and stroke in women compared with men. The multivariable adjusted hazard ratios for the incidence of coronary heart disease in men and women were 3.87 (2.49-6.02) and 1.71 (1.07-2.74) at age 50-59 years, and 7.22 (4.59-11.36) and 3.49 (2.18-5.57) at age 60-69 years compared with women aged 40-49 years. For ischaemic stroke, they were 2.64 (1.45-4.82) and 2.17 (1.18-3.97) at age 50-59 years, and 5.19 (2.81-9.58) and 4.89 (2.67-8.97) at age 60-69 years, respectively. Acute coronary heart disease and ischaemic stroke events appeared approximately 10 years earlier in men than in women, and these rates remained higher in men than in women in all age groups. The gender difference was more marked for coronary heart disease than for ischaemic stroke. This may be taken into account when developing interventions and treatment strategies.

  5. The prognosis of acute symptomatic seizures after ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Thomas; Leung, Howan; Soo, Yannie O Y; Mok, Vincent C T; Wong, K S

    2017-01-01

    Acute symptomatic seizure (AS) after ischaemic stroke is defined as a seizure occurring ≤7 days of the stroke. There remains a lack of information on the prognosis of AS after ischaemic stroke and how it should be treated. We prospectively recruited patients after their incidents of ischaemic stroke from a population-based stroke registry. Stroke aetiology was defined according to Trial-of-ORG-10172 in acute-stroke treatment (TOAST). Patients were examined for any transient complete-occlusion with recanalisation (TCOR) and haemorrhagic transformation. The seizure outcomes were (1) acute clustering of seizures ≤7 days, (2) seizure recurrence associated with stroke recurrence beyond the 7-day period and (3) unprovoked seizure (US) >7 days. 104 patients (mean age 65 years/55% female) with AS after ischaemic stroke were identified (mean follow-up 6.17 years). Comparison of the group of patients with AS and those without seizures showed that patients with AS had significantly less large-vessel and small-vessel disease but more cardioembolisms (pstroke beyond 7 days was 13.5% at 2 years, 16.4% at 4 years and 18% at 8 years. Presence of >2 cardiovascular risk factors (pischaemic stroke may appear as acute clustering. Afterwards, seizures may occur as often with a recurrent stroke as without one within 4.2 years. We recommend the use of antiepileptic agents for up to 4 years if the underlying stroke aetiology cannot be fully treated. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Prognostic criteria on cranial CT for ischaemic cerebral infarcts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buettner, T.; Hornig, C.R.; Busse, O.; Hoffmann, O.; Akengin, Z.; Giessen Univ.

    1984-01-01

    Two hundred and eighty-three cranial computer tomograms in 214 patients with supratentorial ischaemic infarcts were analysed with reference to the prognosis. Patients with large infarcts often have a poor prognosis. Contrast accumulation indicates a poor prognosis only in the first week. Enhancement in the second and third week was more common and more intense. Diapedesis from necrotic capillaries is thought to be responsible for early enhancement and increased pinocytosis in regenerated endothelium for late enhancement. (orig.) [de

  7. Current endovascular management of the ischaemic diabetic foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerassimidis, T; Karkos, CD; Karamanos, D; Kamparoudis, A

    2008-01-01

    Ischaemic diabetic foot ulcers pose a significant problem which is associated with a high likelihood of amputation. With the advent of endovascular surgery, the management of lower limb arterial lesions in the diabetic population has become more appealing. Coronary 0.014 monorail guide wires, appropriate sized angioplasty balloons and stents, and subintimal recanalisation, are all useful adjuncts and techniques to achieve revascularization. This article reviews the modern endovascular management of the diabetic foot. PMID:18923656

  8. Current endovascular management of the ischaemic diabetic foot

    OpenAIRE

    Gerassimidis, T; Karkos, CD; Karamanos, D; Kamparoudis, A

    2008-01-01

    Ischaemic diabetic foot ulcers pose a significant problem which is associated with a high likelihood of amputation. With the advent of endovascular surgery, the management of lower limb arterial lesions in the diabetic population has become more appealing. Coronary 0.014 monorail guide wires, appropriate sized angioplasty balloons and stents, and subintimal recanalisation, are all useful adjuncts and techniques to achieve revascularization. This article reviews the modern endovascular mana...

  9. Ginkgo biloba extract improved cognitive and neurological functions of acute ischaemic stroke: a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanshan; Zhang, Xinjiang; Fang, Qi; Zhou, Junshan; Zhang, Meijuan; Wang, Hui; Chen, Yan; Xu, Biyun; Wu, Yanfeng; Qian, Lai

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) in acute ischaemic stroke and its impact on the recurrence of vascular events. Methods We conducted a multicentre, prospective, randomised, open label, blinded, controlled clinical trial enrollingpatients with an onset of acute stroke within 7 days from five hospitals in China Jiangsu Province. Participants were assigned to the GBE group (450 mg GBE with 100 mg aspirin daily) or the control group (100 mg aspirin daily) for 6 months. The primary outcome was the decline in the Montreal Cognitive Assessment score at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were other neuropsychological tests of cognitive and neurological function, the the incidence of adverse events and vascular events. Results 348 patients were enrolled: 179 in the GBE group and 169 in the control group. With 18 patients lost to follow-up, the dropout rate was 5.17%. Admission data between two groups were similar, but in the GBE group there was a marked slow down in the decline in the Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores (−2.77±0.21 vs −1.99±0.23, P=0.0116 (30 days); −3.34±0.24 vs −2.48±0.26, P=0.0165 (90 days); −4.00±0.26 vs −2.71±0.26, P=0.0004 (180 days)) compared with controls. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores at 12 and 30 days, the modified Rankin Scale scores for independent rate at 30, 90 and 180 days, and the Barthel Index scores at 30, 90 and 180 days in the GBE group were significantly improved compared with controls. Improvements were also observedin GBE groups for Mini-Metal State Examination scores of 30, 90 and 180 days, Webster’s digit symbol test scores at 30 days and Executive Dysfunction Index scores at 30 and 180 days. No significant differences were seen in the incidence of adverse events or vascular events. Conclusions We conclude that GBE in combination with aspirin treatment alleviated cognitive and neurological deficits after acute ischaemic stroke without increasing

  10. ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC CHANGES OBSERVED IN HAEMORRHAGIC AND ISCHAEMIC CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channappa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Cardiac abnormalities are relatively common after acute neurologic injury. Disturbances can vary in severity from transient ECG abnormalities to profound myocardial injury and dysfunction. CNS is involved in the generation of cardiac arrhythmias and dysfunction even in an otherwise normal myocardium. AIM To find out proportion of ECG changes observed in ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS The Electrocardiographs of 100 patients with acute stroke were studied to find out the types of ECG abnormalities among different types of stroke. RESULTS In our study, the most common ECG abnormalities associated with stroke were prolonged QTc interval, ST-T segment abnormalities, prominent U wave and arrhythmias. Trop-I was positive in 12.8% patients with ECG changes. Statistical significance was found in association with Trop-I positivity and ST depression. CONCLUSION Usually patients with heart disease present with arrhythmias and Ischaemic like ECG changes. But these changes are also seen most often in the patients with presenting with stroke who didn’t have any past history of heart disease. This shows that arrhythmias and ischaemic ECG abnormalities are primarily evolved due to central nervous system disorders.

  11. Heritability of young- and old-onset ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluher, A; Devan, W J; Holliday, E G; Nalls, M; Parolo, S; Bione, S; Giese, A K; Boncoraglio, G B; Maguire, J M; Müller-Nurasyid, M; Gieger, C; Meschia, J F; Rosand, J; Rolfs, A; Kittner, S J; Mitchell, B D; O'Connell, J R; Cheng, Y C

    2015-11-01

    Although the genetic contribution to stroke risk is well known, it remains unclear if young-onset stroke has a stronger genetic contribution than old-onset stroke. This study aims to compare the heritability of ischaemic stroke risk between young and old, using common genetic variants from whole-genome array data in population-based samples. This analysis included 4050 ischaemic stroke cases and 5765 controls from six study populations of European ancestry; 47% of cases were young-onset stroke (age stroke risk in these unrelated individuals, the pairwise genetic relatedness was estimated between individuals based on their whole-genome array data using a mixed linear model. Heritability was estimated separately for young-onset stroke and old-onset stroke (age ≥ 55 years). Heritabilities for young-onset stroke and old-onset stroke were estimated at 42% (±8%, P genetic contribution to the risk of stroke may be higher in young-onset ischaemic stroke, although the difference was not statistically significant. © 2015 EAN.

  12. ICARUSS, the Integrated Care for the Reduction of Secondary Stroke trial: rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial of a multimodal intervention to prevent recurrent stroke in patients with a recent cerebrovascular event, ACTRN = 12611000264987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, J; Davis, S M; Hankey, G J; Levi, C; Olver, J; Gonzales, G; Donnan, G A

    2015-07-01

    The majority of strokes, both ischaemic and haemorrhagic, are attributable to a relatively small number of risk factors which are readily manageable in primary care setting. Implementation of best-practice recommendations for risk factor management is calculated to reduce stroke recurrence by around 80%. However, risk factor management in stroke survivors has generally been poor at primary care level. A model of care that supports long-term effective risk factor management is needed. To determine whether the model of Integrated Care for the Reduction of Recurrent Stroke (ICARUSS) will, through promotion of implementation of best-practice recommendations for risk factor management reduce the combined incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction and vascular death in patients with recent stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) of the brain or eye. A prospective, Australian, multicentre, randomized controlled trial. Academic stroke units in Melbourne, Perth and the John Hunter Hospital, New South Wales. 1000 stroke survivors recruited as from March 2007 with a recent (system (IVRS). Exposure to the ICARUSS model of integrated care or usual care. The composite of stroke, MI or death from any vascular cause, whichever occurs first. Risk factor management in the community, depression, quality of life, disability and dementia. With 1000 patients followed up for a median of one-year, with a recurrence rate of 7-10% per year in patients exposed to usual care, the study will have at least 80% power to detect a significant reduction in primary end-points The ICARUSS study aims to recruit and follow up patients between 2007 and 2013 and demonstrate the effectiveness of exposure to the ICARUSS model in stroke survivors to reduce recurrent stroke or vascular events and promote the implementation of best practice risk factor management at primary care level. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  13. Association of sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor gene polymorphisms with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X; Zeng, F; Zhang, N; Huang, T; Meng, Q; Liu, Y

    2012-01-01

    To explore the association between polymorphisms of the sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor (SREBF) gene and ischaemic stroke. The SREBF1c 54G>C and SREBPF2 1784G>C genotypes were assessed using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in 446 Han Chinese ischaemic stroke patients and 355 Han Chinese control subjects without cerebrovascular disease. The frequencies of the SREBF2 1784G>C CC genotype and the C allele were significantly higher in the ischaemic stroke group than in controls. Patients with ischaemic stroke who had the SREBF2 1784G>C CC genotype had significantly lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, compared with ischaemic stroke patients and control subjects with the GC or GG genotypes. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed a significant positive association between SREBF2 1784G>C and ischaemic stroke; an inverse association was observed between HDL level and risk of ischaemic stroke. The CC genotype of the SREBF2 1784G>C polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of ischaemic stroke, possibly through decreasing the HDL level, which was inversely associated with the risk of ischaemic stroke.

  14. Relation between hormone replacement therapy and ischaemic heart disease in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, E; Pedersen, A T; Heitmann, B L

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the risk of ischaemic heart disease and myocardial infarction among women using hormone replacement therapy, especially the potential modifying effect of cardiovascular risk factors....

  15. Event Investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korosec, D.

    2000-01-01

    The events in the nuclear industry are investigated from the license point of view and from the regulatory side too. It is well known the importance of the event investigation. One of the main goals of such investigation is to prevent the circumstances leading to the event and the consequences of the event. The protection of the nuclear workers against nuclear hazard, and the protection of general public against dangerous effects of an event could be achieved by systematic approach to the event investigation. Both, the nuclear safety regulatory body and the licensee shall ensure that operational significant events are investigated in a systematic and technically sound manner to gather information pertaining to the probable causes of the event. One of the results should be appropriate feedback regarding the lessons of the experience to the regulatory body, nuclear industry and general public. In the present paper a general description of systematic approach to the event investigation is presented. The systematic approach to the event investigation works best where cooperation is present among the different divisions of the nuclear facility or regulatory body. By involving management and supervisors the safety office can usually improve their efforts in the whole process. The end result shall be a program which serves to prevent events and reduce the time and efforts solving the root cause which initiated each event. Selection of the proper method for the investigation and an adequate review of the findings and conclusions lead to the higher level of the overall nuclear safety. (author)

  16. The budget impact of using enteric-coated aspirin 325 mg + immediate-release omeprazole 40 mg to prevent recurrent cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjie; Han, Yi; Fort, John G; Schofield, David; Tursi, James P

    2017-06-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid; ASA) is commonly used for secondary prevention of cardiovascular (CV) events, but may be associated with gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events, which can reduce adherence. Use of ASA co-therapy with proton pump inhibitors in patients at risk may be suboptimal. PA32540 (Yosprala™) is a coordinated-delivery tablet combining EC-ASA 325 mg and immediate-release omeprazole 40 mg. The objective of this flexible budget impact model was to project the financial consequences of introducing PA32540 325 mg/40 mg to prevent recurrent CV events, while reducing ASA-associated GI events in US adults. A Markov Model was employed to estimate health state transitions associated with ASA 75-325 mg, ASA 75-325 mg + generic delayed-release omeprazole 40 mg, PA32540, or clopidogrel 75 mg to prevent recurrent CV events. Health states included ulcers, GI bleeding, CV events, and death. Model inputs included demographics, treatment dosages, treatment costs, adverse GI and CV events, and premature death. Data from peer-reviewed literature and censuses enabled appropriate allocation of CV and GI disease prevalence and mortality. The PA32540 non-adherence rate was conservatively set at 20%. PA32540 market share was set to 50%. The model projected annual savings of $81.0 million to $190.9 million within 1-5 years after PA32540 introduction to the plan, which included 134,558 members at risk for recurrent CV events. These values translate into savings of $602 (year 5) to $1,419 (year 1) per patient per year, and $81 (year 5) to $191 (year 1) per member per year. These values were robust to variations in parameters under a deterministic sensitivity analysis. PA32540 use to prevent recurrent CV events was associated with cost reductions in each year examined with the model. From a health plan perspective, PA32540 is likely to have a net overall effect, resulting in significant cost savings.

  17. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  18. Incidence of New Ischaemic Brain Lesions After Carotid Artery Stenting with the Micromesh Roadsaver Carotid Artery Stent: A Prospective Single-Centre Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffino, Maria Antonella, E-mail: mruffino@cittadellasalute.to.it [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria- Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Vascular Radiology Unit, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiotherapy (Italy); Faletti, Riccardo [University of Torino, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria- Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Radiology Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences (Italy); Bergamasco, Laura [University of Torino, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria- Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Department of Surgical Sciences (Italy); Fonio, Paolo [University of Torino, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria- Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Radiology Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences (Italy); Righi, Dorico [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria- Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Vascular Radiology Unit, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiotherapy (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    AimsSeveral randomized trials of patients with carotid stenosis show increased adverse neurological events with stenting versus endarterectomy in the 30-day post-procedure. This study examines the incidence of new ischaemic lesions in patients treated in our centre using the new Roadsaver stent.Methods and resultsBetween September 2015 and January 2016, 23 consecutive patients (age 74.3 ± 7.3 years, 17.4 % female) underwent carotid artery stenting with the Roadsaver stent, a nitinol double-layer micromesh device. A distal protection device was used in all cases. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed 24 h before, and 24 h and 30 days after the procedure. The 24-h post-procedure imaging showed 15 new ipsilateral ischaemic lesions in 7 (30.4 %) patients: median volume 0.076 cm{sup 3} (interquartile range 0.065–0.146 cm{sup 3}). All lesions were asymptomatic. The 30-day imaging showed complete resolution of all lesions and no new ischaemic lesions. Follow-up clinical and ultrasound examinations at 30 days and 6 months recorded no adverse cardiac or cerebrovascular events.ConclusionsProtected stenting with micromesh Roadsaver stent showed good safety and efficacy in the treatment of carotid stenosis, with a low incidence of delayed embolic events and new ipsilateral ischaemic brain lesions. These preliminary results are encouraging, but need to be confirmed with larger populations.

  19. Declining stroke and vascular event recurrence rates in secondary prevention trials over the past 50 years and consequences for current trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Yegiaian, Sharon; Lee, Meng; Lee, Juneyoung; Saver, Jeffrey L

    2011-05-17

    It is widely supposed, but not well-demonstrated, that cumulative advances in standard care have reduced recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events in secondary prevention trials. Systematic search identified all randomized, controlled trials of medical secondary stroke prevention therapies published from 1960 to 2009. Randomized, controlled trials narrowly focused on single stroke mechanisms, including atrial fibrillation, cervical carotid stenosis, and intracranial stenosis, were excluded. From control arms of individual trials, we extracted data for baseline characteristics and annual event rates for recurrent stroke, fatal stroke, and major vascular events and analyzed trends over time. Fifty-nine randomized controlled trials were identified, enrolling 66 157 patients in control arms. Over the 5 decade periods, annual event rates declined, per decade, for recurrent stroke by 0.996% (P=0.001), fatal stroke by 0.282% (P=0.003), and major vascular events by 1.331% (P=0.001). Multiple regression analyses identified increasing antithrombotic use and lower blood pressures as major contributors to the decline in recurrent stroke. For recurrent stroke, annual rates fell from 8.71% in trials launched in the 1960s to 6.10% in the 1970s, 5.41% in the 1980s, 4.04% in the 1990s, and 4.98% in the 2000s. The sample size required for a trial to have adequate power to detect a 20% reduction in recurrent stroke increased 2.2-fold during this period. Recurrent stroke and vascular event rates have declined substantially over the last 5 decades, with improved blood pressure control and more frequent use of antiplatelet therapy as the leading causes. Considerably larger sample sizes are now needed to demonstrate incremental improvements in medical secondary prevention.

  20. Delphi-consensus weights for ischemic and bleeding events to be included in a composite outcome for RCTs in thrombosis prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Dechartres

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available To weight ischemic and bleeding events according to their severity to be used in a composite outcome in RCTs in the field of thrombosis prevention.Using a Delphi consensus method, a panel of anaesthesiology and cardiology experts rated the severity of thrombotic and bleeding clinical events. The ratings were expressed on a 10-point scale. The median and quartiles of the ratings of each item were returned to the experts. Then, the panel members evaluated the events a second time with knowledge of the group responses from the first round. Cronbach's a was used as a measure of homogeneity for the ratings. The final rating for each event corresponded to the median rating obtained at the last Delphi round.Of 70 experts invited, 32 (46% accepted to participate. Consensus was reached at the second round as indicated by Cronbach's a value (0.99 (95% CI 0.98-1.00 so the Delphi was stopped. Severity ranged from under-popliteal venous thrombosis (median = 3, Q1 = 2; Q3 = 3 to ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage with severe disability at 7 days and massive pulmonary embolism (median = 9, Q1 = 9; Q3 = 9. Ratings did not differ according to the medical specialty of experts.These ratings could be used to weight ischemic and bleeding events of various severity comprising a composite outcome in the field of thrombosis prevention.

  1. Impact of eight weeks of repeated ischaemic preconditioning on brachial artery and cutaneous microcirculatory function in healthy males.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, H.; Nyakayiru, J.; Bailey, T.G.; Green, D.J.; Cable, N.T.; Sprung, V.S.; Hopkins, N.D.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ischaemic preconditioning has well-established cardiac and vascular protective effects. Short interventions (one week) of daily ischaemic preconditioning episodes improve conduit and microcirculatory function. This study examined whether a longer (eight weeks) and less frequent (three

  2. Global and regional burden of first-ever ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke during 1990-2010: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthi, Rita V; Feigin, Valery L; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H; Mensah, George A; Connor, Myles; Bennett, Derrick A; Moran, Andrew E; Sacco, Ralph L; Anderson, Laurie M; Truelsen, Thomas; O'Donnell, Martin; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Lawes, Carlene M M; Wang, Wenzhi; Shinohara, Yukito; Witt, Emma; Ezzati, Majid; Naghavi, Mohsen; Murray, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    The burden of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke varies between regions and over time. With differences in prognosis, prevalence of risk factors, and treatment strategies, knowledge of stroke pathological type is important for targeted region-specific health-care planning for stroke and could inform priorities for type-specific prevention strategies. We used data from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 (GBD 2010) to estimate the global and regional burden of first-ever ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke during 1990-2010. We searched Medline, Embase, LILACS, Scopus, PubMed, Science Direct, Global Health Database, the WHO library, and regional databases from 1990 to 2012 to identify relevant studies published between 1990 and 2010. We applied the GBD 2010 analytical technique (DisMod-MR) to calculate regional and country-specific estimates for ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke incidence, mortality, mortality-to-incidence ratio, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) lost, by age group (aged ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke increased significantly between 1990 and 2010 in terms of the absolute number of people with incident ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke (37% and 47% increase, respectively), number of deaths (21% and 20% increase), and DALYs lost (18% and 14% increase). In the past two decades in high-income countries, incidence of ischaemic stroke reduced significantly by 13% (95% CI 6-18), mortality by 37% (19-39), DALYs lost by 34% (16-36), and mortality-to-incidence ratios by 21% (10-27). For haemorrhagic stroke, incidence reduced significantly by 19% (1-15), mortality by 38% (32-43), DALYs lost by 39% (32-44), and mortality-to-incidence ratios by 27% (19-35). By contrast, in low-income and middle-income countries, we noted a significant increase of 22% (5-30) in incidence of haemorrhagic stroke and a 6% (-7 to 18) non-significant increase in the incidence of ischaemic stroke. Mortality rates for ischaemic stroke fell by 14

  3. Global and regional burden of first-ever ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke during 1990–2010: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthi, Rita V; Feigin, Valery L; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H; Mensah, George A; Connor, Myles; Bennett, Derrick A; Moran, Andrew E; Sacco, Ralph L; Anderson, Laurie M; Truelsen, Thomas; O’Donnell, Martin; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Lawes, Carlene M M; Wang, Wenzhi; Shinohara, Yukito; Witt, Emma; Ezzati, Majid; Naghavi, Mohsen; Murray, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The burden of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke varies between regions and over time. With differences in prognosis, prevalence of risk factors, and treatment strategies, knowledge of stroke pathological type is important for targeted region-specific health-care planning for stroke and could inform priorities for type-specific prevention strategies. We used data from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 (GBD 2010) to estimate the global and regional burden of first-ever ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke during 1990–2010. Methods We searched Medline, Embase, LILACS, Scopus, PubMed, Science Direct, Global Health Database, the WHO library, and regional databases from 1990 to 2012 to identify relevant studies published between 1990 and 2010. We applied the GBD 2010 analytical technique (DisMod-MR) to calculate regional and country-specific estimates for ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke incidence, mortality, mortality-to-incidence ratio, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) lost, by age group (aged ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke increased significantly between 1990 and 2010 in terms of the absolute number of people with incident ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke (37% and 47% increase, respectively), number of deaths (21% and 20% increase), and DALYs lost (18% and 14% increase). In the past two decades in high-income countries, incidence of ischaemic stroke reduced significantly by 13% (95% CI 6–18), mortality by 37% (19–39), DALYs lost by 34% (16–36), and mortality-to-incidence ratios by 21% (10–27). For haemorrhagic stroke, incidence reduced significantly by 19% (1–15), mortality by 38% (32–43), DALYs lost by 39% (32–44), and mortality-to-incidence ratios by 27% (19–35). By contrast, in low-income and middle-income countries, we noted a significant increase of 22% (5–30) in incidence of haemorrhagic stroke and a 6% (–7 to 18) non-significant increase in the incidence of ischaemic stroke

  4. Ischaemic and bleeding outcomes in elderly patients undergoing a prolonged versus shortened duration of dual antiplatelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention: insights from the PRODIGY randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, Raffaele; Magnani, Giulia; Ariotti, Sara; Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Marino, Marcello; Santucci, Andrea; Franzone, Anna; Tebaldi, Matteo; Heg, Dik; Windecker, Stephan; Valgimigli, Marco

    2017-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 24-month vs. six-month dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) among elderly (≥75 years) and non-elderly patients (PRODIGY trial was the composite of death, myocardial infarction, or cerebrovascular accident at 24-month follow-up. The key safety endpoint was type 2, 3 or 5 bleeding according to the BARC criteria. Of 1,970 participants, 587 (29.8%) were elderly and had a higher risk of adverse events compared with younger patients. The risk of the primary endpoint was not significantly reduced with 24-month compared to six-month DAPT among both elderly (HR 0.80, 95% CI: 0.55-1.16, p=0.24) and non-elderly patients (HR 1.48, 95% CI: 0.95-2.30, p=0.08), although interaction testing was significant (p=0.036). A 24-month versus six-month DAPT significantly increased the risk of BARC type 2, 3 or 5 bleeding in both older (HR 1.90, 95% CI: 1.06-3.38, p=0.03) and younger patients (HR 2.54, 95% CI: 1.43-4.53, p=0.002, p-interaction=0.48). However, measures of absolute risk difference indicated a less favourable safety profile of prolonged DAPT for older rather than younger patients. In the PRODIGY trial, prolonging clopidogrel-based DAPT beyond six months in elderly patients increased the risk of bleeding, without affording a significant prevention of ischaemic events.

  5. Association of plasma uric acid with ischaemic heart disease and blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Tom M; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Benn, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    To assess the associations between both uric acid levels and hyperuricaemia, with ischaemic heart disease and blood pressure, and to explore the potentially confounding role of body mass index.......To assess the associations between both uric acid levels and hyperuricaemia, with ischaemic heart disease and blood pressure, and to explore the potentially confounding role of body mass index....

  6. Influence of transoesophageal echocardiography on therapy and prognosis in young patients with TIA or ischaemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rettig, T. C. D.; Bouma, B. J.; van den Brink, R. B. A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To determine the influence of transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) on therapy and prognosis in patients with cryptogenic transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or ischaemic stroke under the age of 50 years.Methods and results. We evaluated all patients aged 50 and under who were referred to

  7. Evaluation of the modifying effects of unfavourable genotypes on classical clinical risk factors for ischaemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Szolnoki, Z; Somogyvari, F; Kondacs, A; Szabo, M; Fodor, L; Bene, J; Melegh, B

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Ischaemic stroke is a frequent heterogeneous multifactorial disease that is affected by a number of genetic mutations and environmental factors. We hypothesised the clinical importance of the interactions between common, unfavourable genetic mutations and clinical risk factors in the development of ischaemic stroke.

  8. Xanthelasmata, arcus corneae, and ischaemic vascular disease and death in general population: prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Schnohr, Peter

    2011-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that xanthelasmata and arcus corneae, individually and combined, predict risk of ischaemic vascular disease and death in the general population.......To test the hypothesis that xanthelasmata and arcus corneae, individually and combined, predict risk of ischaemic vascular disease and death in the general population....

  9. The association between early menopause and risk of ischaemic heart disease: Influence of Hormone Therapy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, E; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Heitmann, B L

    2006-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials find no protection against development of ischaemic heart disease by use of Hormone Therapy (HT) after the age of 50 years. Observational studies suggest that early menopause is a risk factor for ischaemic heart disease. Yet, a clinical very relevant question is whether...... HT reduces this risk associated with early menopause....

  10. Statin Use and Functional Outcome after Tissue Plasminogen Activator Treatment in Acute Ischaemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, I; Uyttenboogaart, M; Koopman, K; De Keyser, J; Luijckx, G J

    Background: Preliminary findings suggest that statins may have a neuroprotective effect in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. This study investigated whether patients prior on statin therapy and treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for acute ischaemic stroke have a better functional

  11. Hypoxic-ischaemic injury — the 'white cerebellum sign' versus the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    ischaemic injury develop reversal of the normal density relationship of ... peripheral cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces (Fig. 1). The density of ... Low density changes appear in the areas most vulnerable to hypoperfusion.5. CASE REPORT. Hypoxic-ischaemic injury — the 'white cerebellum sign' versus the true. 'reversal sign'.

  12. Quantifying the risk of heart disease following acute ischaemic stroke: a meta-analysis of over 50 000 participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnoo, Trishna; Hasan, Nazeeha; Khan, Muhammad Saleem; Slark, Julia; Bentley, Paul; Sharma, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Objective Following an acute stroke, there is a high risk of recurrence. However, the leading cause of mortality following a stroke is due to coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI) but that risk has not been robustly quantified. We sought to reliably quantify the risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in patients presenting with acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) in the absence of a known cardiac history. Setting A meta-analysis study. PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Google Scholar were searched for potential studies up to October 2015. Included studies reported an acute cerebral ischaemic event and followed for CAD or MI within 1 year in patients without known IHD. Using arcsine transformed proportions for meta-analysis, studies were combined using a generic inverse variance random-effects model to calculate the pooled standardised mean difference and 95% CIs. These were interpreted as the percentage prevalence of CAD or incidence of MI following AIS. Results 17 studies with 4869 patients with AIS demonstrated a mean average of asymptomatic CAD in 52%. Anatomical methods of CAD detection revealed a prevalence of asymptomatic ≥50% coronary stenosis in 32% (95% CI 19% to 47%; pischaemic stroke revealed an overall risk of MI in the year following stroke of 3% (95% CI 1% to 5%; pischaemic stroke with no cardiac history have more than 50% coronary stenosis and 3% are at risk of developing MI within a year. Our findings provide a reliable quantitative measure of the risk of IHD following AIS in patients with no cardiac history. PMID:26792217

  13. Quantifying the risk of heart disease following acute ischaemic stroke: a meta-analysis of over 50,000 participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnoo, Trishna; Hasan, Nazeeha; Khan, Muhammad Saleem; Slark, Julia; Bentley, Paul; Sharma, Pankaj

    2016-01-20

    Following an acute stroke, there is a high risk of recurrence. However, the leading cause of mortality following a stroke is due to coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI) but that risk has not been robustly quantified. We sought to reliably quantify the risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in patients presenting with acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) in the absence of a known cardiac history. A meta-analysis study. PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Google Scholar were searched for potential studies up to October 2015. Included studies reported an acute cerebral ischaemic event and followed for CAD or MI within 1 year in patients without known IHD. Using arcsine transformed proportions for meta-analysis, studies were combined using a generic inverse variance random-effects model to calculate the pooled standardised mean difference and 95% CIs. These were interpreted as the percentage prevalence of CAD or incidence of MI following AIS. 17 studies with 4869 patients with AIS demonstrated a mean average of asymptomatic CAD in 52%. Anatomical methods of CAD detection revealed a prevalence of asymptomatic ≥ 50% coronary stenosis in 32% (95% CI 19% to 47%; pischaemic stroke revealed an overall risk of MI in the year following stroke of 3% (95% CI 1% to 5%; pischaemic stroke with no cardiac history have more than 50% coronary stenosis and 3% are at risk of developing MI within a year. Our findings provide a reliable quantitative measure of the risk of IHD following AIS in patients with no cardiac history. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Dramatic response to levetiracetam in post-ischaemic Holmes’ tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, P; Elefante, Andrea; Coppola, Antonietta; Tortora, Fabio; Zara, Federico; Minetti, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Holmes’ tremor refers to an unusual combination of rest, postural and kinetic tremor of extremities. Common causes of Holmes’ tremor include stroke, trauma, vascular malformations and multiple sclerosis, with lesions involving the thalamus, brain stem or cerebellum. Although some drugs (eg, levodopa and dopaminergic drugs, clonazepam and propranolol) have been occasionally reported to give some benefit, medical treatment of Holmes’ tremor is unsatisfactory, and many patients require thalamic surgery to achieve satisfactory control. We report a patient in whom post-ischaemic Holmes’ tremor dramatically responded to levetiracetam treatment. PMID:21686707

  15. Intentional Weight Loss Improved Performance in Obese Ischaemic Heart Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Nina; Myint, Khin Swe; Heck, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The risk of heart failure (HF) increases with BMI, but paradoxically obesity has been associated with reduced mortality in patients with HF. The effect of intentional or therapeutic weight loss on HF is not well known. We examined the effect of weight loss induced by low energy diet (LED......) on physical performance and cardiovascular risk factors in obese patients with moderate-to-severe HF and/or ischaemic heart disease (IHD). Methods and Results: Results from two weight loss interventions at two centres, one in Denmark (DK - 12 week intervention in 21 subjects (14 LED, 7 controls)) and one...... improvement in physical performance and cardiovascular risk markers....

  16. Risks for cardiovascular disease, stroke, ischaemic heart disease, and diabetes mellitus associated with the metabolic syndrome using the new harmonised definition: findings from nationally representative longitudinal data from an Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khang, Young-Ho; Cho, Sung-Il; Kim, Hye-Ryun

    2010-12-01

    We examined the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, ischaemic heart disease, and diabetes with the metabolic syndrome according to the new harmonised definition and its components using a national longitudinal data set from an Asian population. Data of 9791 men and women aged 20+ from 1998 and 2001 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were individually linked to national hospitalisation and mortality data using unique personal identification numbers. During a 5.8-year follow-up through 2005, 288 incident cardiovascular events (184 strokes and 122 cases of ischaemic heart disease) and 85 new diabetes cases have been detected. Men and women with the metabolic syndrome had 48%, 39%, 64%, and 127% greater risks of cardiovascular disease, stroke, ischaemic heart disease, and diabetes, respectively, than those without the metabolic syndrome. The increased risks of cardiovascular disease, ischaemic heart disease, and diabetes remained significant after adjusting for health behaviours, bio-clinical factors, family history, and socio-demographic factors. Analysis results on population attributable risks showed that about a quarter of total diabetes occurrence and more than 10% of cardiovascular disease was attributable to the metabolic syndrome. The number of metabolic syndrome components was linearly associated with risks of outcomes. High blood pressure was significantly associated with all four outcomes while hypertriglyceridemia and hyperglycemia were also important for ischaemic heart disease and diabetes, respectively. Reduction of metabolic risk factors is necessary in South Korea to lower the burden of associated diseases, especially ever-increasing ischaemic heart disease and diabetes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Report of the ASSET (Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team) mission to the Khmelnitsky nuclear power plant in Ukraine 8-19 March 1993. Root cause analysis of operational events with a view to enhancing the prevention of accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This IAEA Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team (ASSET) Report presents the result of an ASSET team's assessment of their investigation of the effectiveness of the plant policy for prevention of incidents since 1988 at Khmelnitsky nuclear power plant. The plant's one WWER 1000 MW(e) type unit has been in commercial operation since 1987. The results, conclusions and suggestions presented herein reflect the views of the ASSET experts. They are provided for consideration by the responsible authorities in Ukraine. The ASSET team's views presented in this report are based on visits to the plant, on review of documentation made available by the operating organization and on discussion with utility personnel. The report is intended to enhance operational safety at Khmelnitsky by proposing improvements to the policy for the prevention of incidents at the plant. The report includes, as a usual practices, the official responses of the regulatory body operating organization to the ASSET recommendations. Figs, tabs

  18. Acute post-stroke blood pressure relative to premorbid levels in intracerebral haemorrhage versus major ischaemic stroke: a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Urs; Cooney, Marie Therese; Bull, Linda M; Silver, Louise E; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S; Mehta, Ziyah; Rothwell, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background It is often assumed that blood pressure increases acutely after major stroke, resulting in so-called post-stroke hypertension. In view of evidence that the risks and benefits of blood pressure-lowering treatment in acute stroke might differ between patients with major ischaemic stroke and those with primary intracerebral haemorrhage, we compared acute-phase and premorbid blood pressure levels in these two disorders. Methods In a population-based study in Oxfordshire, UK, we recruited all patients presenting with stroke between April 1, 2002, and March 31, 2012. We compared all acute-phase post-event blood pressure readings with premorbid readings from 10-year primary care records in all patients with acute major ischaemic stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale >3) versus those with acute intracerebral haemorrhage. Findings Of 653 consecutive eligible patients, premorbid and acute-phase blood pressure readings were available for 636 (97%) individuals. Premorbid blood pressure (total readings 13 244) had been measured on a median of 17 separate occasions per patient (IQR 8–31). In patients with ischaemic stroke, the first acute-phase systolic blood pressure was much lower than after intracerebral haemorrhage (158·5 mm Hg [SD 30·1] vs 189·8 mm Hg [38·5], pblood pressure after intracerebral haemorrhage was substantially higher than premorbid levels (mean increase of 40·7 mm Hg, pblood pressure also increased steeply in the days and weeks before intracerebral haemorrhage (regression pblood pressure reading after primary intracerebral haemorrhage was more likely than after ischaemic stroke to be the highest ever recorded (OR 3·4, 95% CI 2·3–5·2, pblood pressure within 3 h of onset was 50 mm Hg higher, on average, than the maximum premorbid level whereas that after ischaemic stroke was 5·2 mm Hg lower (pblood pressure is substantially raised compared with usual premorbid levels after intracerebral haemorrhage, whereas acute

  19. Prevalence of renal dysfunction in ischaemic stroke and transient ischaemic attack patients with or without atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, M; Horstmann, S; Rizos, T; Rauch, G; Zorn, M; Veltkamp, R

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with a higher risk of stroke and atrial fibrillation (AF). There are limited data on the comorbidity of renal dysfunction and AF in stroke patients. Our aim was to determine the frequency of kidney dysfunction in ischaemic stroke patients with and without AF. In a prospectively collected, single center cohort of acute ischaemic stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA) patients, glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was estimated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation on admission. Renal function was graded into five categories (cat.): cat. 1, eGRF ≥90 ml/min/1.73 m(2); cat. 2, 60-89; cat. 3, 30-59; cat. 4, 15-29; cat. 5, stroke, 547 TIA; median age 71.0) were included. Median eGFR was 78.6 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (interquartile range 61/95); 21.1% were in cat. 3, 2.1% in cat. 4, 0.7% in cat. 5. In all, 535 patients (23.5%) suffered from AF; 28.0% of these were in cat. 3, 2.6% and 0.8% in cat. 4 and cat. 5, respectively. In multivariable analysis, age [odds ratio (OR) 1.1], diabetes (OR 1.8), heart failure (OR 1.7) and AF (OR 1.4) were independently associated with kidney dysfunction (eGFR stroke patients than in the general population and more common in AF-related stroke. These findings may have implications for the choice of anticoagulants. © 2014 EAN.

  20. PONTIAC (NT-proBNP selected prevention of cardiac events in a population of diabetic patients without a history of cardiac disease): a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsmann, Martin; Neuhold, Stephanie; Resl, Michael; Strunk, Guido; Brath, Helmut; Francesconi, Claudia; Adlbrecht, Christopher; Prager, Rudolf; Luger, Anton; Pacher, Richard; Clodi, Martin

    2013-10-08

    The study sought to assess the primary preventive effect of neurohumoral therapy in high-risk diabetic patients selected by N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Few clinical trials have successfully demonstrated the prevention of cardiac events in patients with diabetes. One reason for this might be an inaccurate selection of patients. NT-proBNP has not been assessed in this context. A total of 300 patients with type 2 diabetes, elevated NT-proBNP (>125 pg/ml) but free of cardiac disease were randomized. The "control" group was cared for at 4 diabetes care units; the "intensified" group was additionally treated at a cardiac outpatient clinic for the up-titration of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) antagonists and beta-blockers. The primary endpoint was hospitalization/death due to cardiac disease after 2 years. At baseline, the mean age of the patients was 67.5 ± 9 years, duration of diabetes was 15 ± 12 years, 37% were male, HbA1c was 7 ± 1.1%, blood pressure was 151 ± 22 mm Hg, heart rate was 72 ± 11 beats/min, median NT-proBNP was 265.5 pg/ml (interquartile range: 180.8 to 401.8 pg/ml). After 12 months there was a significant difference between the number of patients treated with a RAS antagonist/beta-blocker and the dosage reached between groups (p titration of RAS antagonists and beta-blockers to maximum tolerated dosages is an effective and safe intervention for the primary prevention of cardiac events for diabetic patients pre-selected using NT-proBNP. (Nt-proBNP Guided Primary Prevention of CV Events in Diabetic Patients [PONTIAC]; NCT00562952). Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical Inquiries: What are the benefits and risks of daily low-dose aspirin for primary prevention of CV events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, Justin; Grandy, Rebecca; Hulkower, Stephen; Stigleman, Sue

    2018-04-01

    One nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) will be avoided for every 126 to 138 adults who take daily aspirin for 10 years (strength of recommendation [SOR]: A, systematic reviews and meta-analyses of multiple randomized controlled trials [RCTs]). Taking low-dose aspirin for primary prevention shows no clear mortality benefit. A benefit for primary prevention of stroke is less certain. Although no evidence establishes increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke from daily low-dose aspirin, one gastrointestinal hemorrhage will occur for every 72 to 357 adults who take aspirin for longer than 10 years (SOR: A, systematic reviews and meta-analyses of multiple RCTs and cohort studies).

  2. ABO blood group distribution and ischaemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutfullah, A.; Bhatti, T.A.; Hanif, A.; Shaikh, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    To study the association of ABO blood groups with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in our setting. Analytic comparative study. Department of Cardiology, Mayo hospital, Lahore over a period of two years from January 2008 to December 2009. The study group included 907 patients of IHD. The distribution of ABO blood groups in IHD patients was compared with the control group of 907 non-IHD individuals. Data was analyzed using SPSS 16. Chi-square test for significance was used. P-value less than 0.05 was taken as significant. In this study, the following pattern of ABO blood groups was observed in IHD patients and non-IHD patients respectively : Blood group A 251 (27.67%) and 248 (27.34%); Blood group B 329 (36.27%) and 358 (39.47%); Blood group O 235 (25.90%) and 240 (24.46%); Blood group AB 92 (10.14%) and 61 (6.72%), P-value = 0.06. There is no association of ABO blood groups and ischaemic heart disease. (author)

  3. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in transient ischaemic attacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamy, C.; Calvet, D.; Domigo, V.; Mas, J. [de l' Hopital Sainte-Anne, Service de Neurologie, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Oppenheim, C.; Naggara, O.; Meder, J.F. [Hoepital Sainte-Anne, Departement d' Imagere Morphologique et Fonchonnille, Paris (France)

    2006-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine frequency and the characteristics of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) abnormalities in patients with transient ischaemic attack (TIA). We analysed data of 98 consecutive patients (mean age: 60.6{+-}15.4 years, 56 men) admitted between January 2003 and April 2004 for TIA. Age, gender, symptom type and duration, delay from onset to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), probable or possible TIA and cause of TIA were compared in patients with (DWI+) and without (DWI-) lesions on DWI. Volume and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of DWI lesions were computed. DWI revealed ischaemic lesions in 34 patients (34.7%). Lesions were small (mean volume: 1.9 cm{sup 3}{+-}3.3), and ADC was moderately decreased (mean ADC ratio: 79.5%). The diagnosis of TIA was considered as probable in all DWI+ patients. A multiple logistic regression model demonstrated that TIA duration greater than or equal to 60 min (OR, 7.6; 95% CI, 2.3-25.7), aphasia (OR, 9.2; 95% CI, 2.7-31.4) and motor deficit (OR, 5.1; 95% CI, 1.5-17.8) were independent predictors of DWI lesions. Prolonged TIA duration, aphasia and motor deficits are associated with DWI lesions. More than half of TIA patients with symptoms lasting more than 60 min have DWI lesions. (orig.)

  4. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in transient ischaemic attacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamy, C.; Calvet, D.; Domigo, V.; Mas, J.; Oppenheim, C.; Naggara, O.; Meder, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine frequency and the characteristics of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) abnormalities in patients with transient ischaemic attack (TIA). We analysed data of 98 consecutive patients (mean age: 60.6±15.4 years, 56 men) admitted between January 2003 and April 2004 for TIA. Age, gender, symptom type and duration, delay from onset to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), probable or possible TIA and cause of TIA were compared in patients with (DWI+) and without (DWI-) lesions on DWI. Volume and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of DWI lesions were computed. DWI revealed ischaemic lesions in 34 patients (34.7%). Lesions were small (mean volume: 1.9 cm 3 ±3.3), and ADC was moderately decreased (mean ADC ratio: 79.5%). The diagnosis of TIA was considered as probable in all DWI+ patients. A multiple logistic regression model demonstrated that TIA duration greater than or equal to 60 min (OR, 7.6; 95% CI, 2.3-25.7), aphasia (OR, 9.2; 95% CI, 2.7-31.4) and motor deficit (OR, 5.1; 95% CI, 1.5-17.8) were independent predictors of DWI lesions. Prolonged TIA duration, aphasia and motor deficits are associated with DWI lesions. More than half of TIA patients with symptoms lasting more than 60 min have DWI lesions. (orig.)

  5. [Pregnancy in patients with a history of ischaemic heart disease - Case series and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matura-Bedouhene, M; Maatouk, A; Moulin, F; Welter, E; Morel, O; Perdriolle-Galet, E

    2016-04-01

    Heart diseases complicate 1 to 3% of pregnancies and are the leading cause of indirect maternal deaths. Prior ischaemic heart event in pregnant patients is increasing. Most knowledge is based on few reports and there are no French nor international recommendations about the specific management of these patients. The specificity of the management of these patients during pregnancy, delivery and post-partum depends on the severity of the prior cardiac event and its consequences. This will be illustrated by the report of four recent cases managed in our hospital. First patient had myocardial infarction with normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Second patient had a Tako-Tsubo syndrome with LVEF 45%. Third patient had ischemic cardiopathy with LVEF 30%. Fourth patient had myocardial infarction with LVEF 20%. A multidisciplinary follow-up should be required, especially in patients with severe ventricular dysfunction. The risk of fetal growth restriction appears to be increased, suggesting that closer ultrasound monitoring is necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. UPDATE ON THE GLOBAL BURDEN OF ISCHAEMIC AND HAEMORRHAGIC STROKE IN 1990–2013: THE GBD 2013 STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigin, Valery L.; Krishnamurthi, Rita; Parmar, Priya; Norrving, Bo; Mensah, George A.; Bennett, Derrick A.; Barker-Collo, Suzanne; Moran, Andrew; Sacco, Ralph L.; Truelsen, Thomas; Davis, Stephen; Pandian, Jeyaraj Durai; Naghavi, Mohsen; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H.; Nguyen, Grant; Johnson, Catherine O.; Vos, Theo; Meretoja, Atte; Murray, Christopher; Roth, Gregory A.; Thrift, Amanda; Banerjee, Amitava; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Misganaw, Awoke; Kissela, Brett M.; Wolfe, Charles; Yu, Chuanhua; Anderson, Craig; Kim, Daniel; Rojas-Rueda, David; Tanne, David; Tirschwell, David Lawrence; Nand, Devina; Kazi, Dhruv S.; Pourmalek, Farshad; Catalá-López, Ferrán; Abd-Allah, Foad; Gankpé, Fortuné; deVeber, Gabrielle; Donnan, Geoffrey; Hankey, Graeme J.; Christensen, Hanne K.; Campos-Nonato, Ismael; Shiue, Ivy; Fernandes, Jefferson G.; Jonas, Jost B.; Sheth, Kevin; Kim, Yunjin; Dokova, Klara; Stroumpoulis, Konstantinos; Sposato, Luciano A.; Bahit, Maria Cecilia; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Mackay, Mark T.; Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Endres, Matthias; Giroud, Maurice; Brainin, Michael; Kravchenko, Michael; Piradov, Michael; Soljak, Michael; Liu, Ming; Connor, Myles; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Bornstein, Natan; Shamalov, Nikolay; Roy, Nobhojit; Cabral, Norberto; Beauchamp, Norman J.; Lavados, Pablo M.; Jeemon, Panniyammakal; Lotufo, Paulo A.; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Sahathevan, Ramesh; Hamadeh, Randah R.; Malekzadeh, Reza; Gillium, Richard; Westerman, Ronny; Akinyemi, Rufus Olusola; Salman, Rustam Al-Shahi; Dharmaratne, Samath D.; Basu, Sanjay; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Kosen, Soewarta; Sampson, Uchechukwu K. A.; Caso, Valeria; Vlassov, Vasiliy; Melaku, Yohannes Adama; Kokubo, Yoshiohiro; Shinohara, Yukito; Varakin, Yuri; Wang, Wenzhi

    2015-01-01

    Background Global stroke epidemiology is changing rapidly. Although age-standardised rates of stroke mortality have decreased worldwide in the past two decades, the absolute numbers of people who have a stroke every year, live with the consequences of stroke, and die from their stroke are increasing. Regular updates on the current level of stroke burden are important for advancing our knowledge on stroke epidemiology and facilitate organization and planning of evidence-based stroke care. Objectives To estimate incidence, prevalence, mortality, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLDs), and their trends for ischaemic stroke (IS) and haemorrhagic stroke (HS) for 188 countries from 1990–2013. Methodology Stroke incidence, prevalence, mortality, DALYs and YLDs were estimated using all available data on mortality and stroke incidence, prevalence and excess mortality. Statistical models and country-level covariate data were employed and all rates were age-standardised to a global population. All estimated were produced with 95% uncertainty intervals (UI). Results In 2013, there were globally almost 25.7 million stroke survivors (71% with IS), 6.5 million deaths from stroke (51% died from IS), 113 million DALYs due to stroke (58% due to IS), and 10.3 million new strokes (67% IS). Over the 1990–2013 period, there was a significant increase in the absolute number of DALYs due to IS, and of deaths from IS and HS, survivors and incident events for both IS and HS. The preponderance of the burden of stroke continued to reside in developing countries, comprising 75.2% of deaths from stroke and 81.0% of stroke-related DALYs. Globally, the proportional contribution of stroke-related DALYs and deaths due to stroke compared to all diseases increased from 1990 (3.54% [95% UI 3.11–4.00%] and 9.66% [95% UI 8.47–10.70%]) to 2013 (4.62% [95% UI 4.01–5.30%] and 11.75% [95% UI 10.45–13.31%], respectively), but there was a diverging trend in

  7. Effective components of nurse-coordinated care to prevent recurrent coronary events: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snaterse, Marjolein; Dobber, Jos; Jepma, Patricia; Peters, Ron J G; ter Riet, Gerben; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Buurman, Bianca M; Scholte op Reimer, Wilma J M

    2016-01-01

    Current guidelines on secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease recommend nurse-coordinated care (NCC) as an effective intervention. However, NCC programmes differ widely and the efficacy of NCC components has not been studied. To investigate the efficacy of NCC and its components in secondary

  8. The cardiac model of rehabilitation for reducing cardiovascular risk factors post transient ischaemic attack and stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Hayden; Kersten, Paula; Crawford, Pamela; Keens, Angela; Ashburn, Ann; Conway, Joy

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a standard National Health Service cardiac rehabilitation programme on risk factor reduction for patients after a minor stroke and transient ischaemic attack. Single-blind randomized controlled trial. Cardiac rehabilitation classes. Twenty-four patients. All participants received standard care. In addition, the intervention group undertook an eight-week cardiac rehabilitation programme consisting of weekly exercise and education classes. Cardiovascular disease risk score; lipid profiles; resting blood pressure; C-reactive protein (measured with a high sensitive assay) and fibrinogen levels; blood glucose; obesity; physical activity levels; subjective health status (SF-36); Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Group comparison with independent t-tests showed a significantly greater improvement in the cardiovascular disease risk score for participants in the intervention group compared to standard care (intervention 25.7 ± 22.8 to 23.15 ± 18.3, control 25.03 ± 15.4 to 27.12 ± 16.1, t = -1.81, P rehabilitation programmes are a feasible and effective means of reducing the risk of future cardiovascular events for patients after minor stroke and transient ischaemic attack.

  9. SENTINEL EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Robida

    2004-09-01

    the surveyed persons agreed to disclosure of the event to a patient but this was the case in less than half of the occasions.Conclusions. The small number of reports of sentinel events, late or incomplete reporting of conducted analyses of root causes and plans for future prevention of these events and survey data showed the state of culture in the majority of hospitals. Fear of reporting and therefore, hiding of errors or ascribing errors to the »usual« complications of a disease or procedures, the reaction of leadership to quickly find a culprit for the event, disregarding a serious approach to analyze the event and taking measures for their future prevention leads to the culture of silence. Root cause analysis of the events showed that the reason frequently lies in systems and processes and not in individuals. Health care will never be without risks for patients. However, with an open approach without the blaming and shaming of individuals, implementation of reporting the events in hospitals and other health care facilities with clear goals of patient safety, standardization of equipment, materials, and processes and education on patient safety many sentinel events and medical errors could and should be prevented.

  10. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF)-mediated ganglion cell survival in a rodent model of non-arteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy (NAION).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Michaela K; Guo, Yan; Langenberg, Patricia; Bernstein, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been shown to protect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in traumatic optic nerve injury. We sought to evaluate this neuroprotective effect of CNTF after an ischaemic event using rodent anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy (rAION), a mouse model of non-arteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy (NAION). We induced rAION in Thy1-cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) transgenic mice by exposing the optic nerve to frequency doubled neodymium yttrium aluminium garnet laser pulses following intravenous rose bengal injection. One day after rAION induction, an intravitreal injection of 0.75 μg CNTF or vehicle (sham injection) was given. Animals were euthanised on day 15 after induction, tissues isolated and CFP cells in the RGC layer were counted using stereology in flat-mounted retina. The average number of CFP-positive (CFP+) cells was determined for each study group and the percentages of RGC loss were compared between the different groups. Two weeks after rAION induction, significantly more (CFP+) cells were preserved in CNTF-treated eyes than in sham-injected controls. Sham-treated animals showed a 58% loss of CFP+ cells. In contrast, CFP+ cell density in CNTF-treated eyes decreased by only 10%, when compared with untreated control eyes. This increased survival was statistically significant (pCNTF exerts a neuroprotective effect in ischaemic optic nerve injury and promotes RGC survival, suggesting that CNTF may be effective in the clinical treatment of human NAION. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of High, Moderate and Low-Dose Statins in the Prevention of Vascular Events in the Brazilian Public Health System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Rodrigo Antonini, E-mail: rodrigo.ribeiro@htanalyze.com [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Epidemiologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Avaliação de Tecnologia em Saúde, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Duncan, Bruce Bartholow [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Epidemiologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Avaliação de Tecnologia em Saúde, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Cardiologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Ziegelmann, Patricia Klarmann [Instituto de Avaliação de Tecnologia em Saúde, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Departamento de Estatística da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Stella, Steffan Frosi [Instituto de Avaliação de Tecnologia em Saúde, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Cardiologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vieira, Jose Luiz da Costa [Instituto de Cardiologia / Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Restelatto, Luciane Maria Fabian [Serviço de Medicina Interna do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Polanczyk, Carisi Anne [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Epidemiologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Avaliação de Tecnologia em Saúde, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Cardiologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Statins have proven efficacy in the reduction of cardiovascular events, but the financial impact of its widespread use can be substantial. To conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis of three statin dosing schemes in the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS) perspective. We developed a Markov model to evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) of low, intermediate and high intensity dose regimens in secondary and four primary scenarios (5%, 10%, 15% and 20% ten-year risk) of prevention of cardiovascular events. Regimens with expected low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction below 30% (e.g. simvastatin 10mg) were considered as low dose; between 30-40%, (atorvastatin 10mg, simvastatin 40mg), intermediate dose; and above 40% (atorvastatin 20-80mg, rosuvastatin 20mg), high-dose statins. Effectiveness data were obtained from a systematic review with 136,000 patients. National data were used to estimate utilities and costs (expressed as International Dollars - Int$). A willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold equal to the Brazilian gross domestic product per capita (circa Int$11,770) was applied. Low dose was dominated by extension in the primary prevention scenarios. In the five scenarios, the ICER of intermediate dose was below Int$10,000 per QALY. The ICER of the high versus intermediate dose comparison was above Int$27,000 per QALY in all scenarios. In the cost-effectiveness acceptability curves, intermediate dose had a probability above 50% of being cost-effective with ICERs between Int$ 9,000-20,000 per QALY in all scenarios. Considering a reasonable WTP threshold, intermediate dose statin therapy is economically attractive, and should be a priority intervention in prevention of cardiovascular events in Brazil.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of High, Moderate and Low-Dose Statins in the Prevention of Vascular Events in the Brazilian Public Health System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Rodrigo Antonini; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow; Ziegelmann, Patricia Klarmann; Stella, Steffan Frosi; Vieira, Jose Luiz da Costa; Restelatto, Luciane Maria Fabian; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne

    2015-01-01

    Statins have proven efficacy in the reduction of cardiovascular events, but the financial impact of its widespread use can be substantial. To conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis of three statin dosing schemes in the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS) perspective. We developed a Markov model to evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) of low, intermediate and high intensity dose regimens in secondary and four primary scenarios (5%, 10%, 15% and 20% ten-year risk) of prevention of cardiovascular events. Regimens with expected low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction below 30% (e.g. simvastatin 10mg) were considered as low dose; between 30-40%, (atorvastatin 10mg, simvastatin 40mg), intermediate dose; and above 40% (atorvastatin 20-80mg, rosuvastatin 20mg), high-dose statins. Effectiveness data were obtained from a systematic review with 136,000 patients. National data were used to estimate utilities and costs (expressed as International Dollars - Int$). A willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold equal to the Brazilian gross domestic product per capita (circa Int$11,770) was applied. Low dose was dominated by extension in the primary prevention scenarios. In the five scenarios, the ICER of intermediate dose was below Int$10,000 per QALY. The ICER of the high versus intermediate dose comparison was above Int$27,000 per QALY in all scenarios. In the cost-effectiveness acceptability curves, intermediate dose had a probability above 50% of being cost-effective with ICERs between Int$ 9,000-20,000 per QALY in all scenarios. Considering a reasonable WTP threshold, intermediate dose statin therapy is economically attractive, and should be a priority intervention in prevention of cardiovascular events in Brazil

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of High, Moderate and Low-Dose Statins in the Prevention of Vascular Events in the Brazilian Public Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Antonini Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Statins have proven efficacy in the reduction of cardiovascular events, but the financial impact of its widespread use can be substantial. Objective: To conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis of three statin dosing schemes in the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS perspective. Methods: We developed a Markov model to evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs of low, intermediate and high intensity dose regimens in secondary and four primary scenarios (5%, 10%, 15% and 20% ten-year risk of prevention of cardiovascular events. Regimens with expected low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction below 30% (e.g. simvastatin 10mg were considered as low dose; between 30-40%, (atorvastatin 10mg, simvastatin 40mg, intermediate dose; and above 40% (atorvastatin 20-80mg, rosuvastatin 20mg, high-dose statins. Effectiveness data were obtained from a systematic review with 136,000 patients. National data were used to estimate utilities and costs (expressed as International Dollars - Int$. A willingness-to-pay (WTP threshold equal to the Brazilian gross domestic product per capita (circa Int$11,770 was applied. Results: Low dose was dominated by extension in the primary prevention scenarios. In the five scenarios, the ICER of intermediate dose was below Int$10,000 per QALY. The ICER of the high versus intermediate dose comparison was above Int$27,000 per QALY in all scenarios. In the cost-effectiveness acceptability curves, intermediate dose had a probability above 50% of being cost-effective with ICERs between Int$ 9,000-20,000 per QALY in all scenarios. Conclusions: Considering a reasonable WTP threshold, intermediate dose statin therapy is economically attractive, and should be a priority intervention in prevention of cardiovascular events in Brazil.

  14. Risk factors between intracranial-extracranial atherosclerosis and anterior-posterior circulation stroke in ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Cai, Yefeng; Zhao, Min; Sun, Jingbo

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an important cause of stroke and remains a challenge for stroke prevention. Risk factors involved in atherosclerotic stroke and anterior and posterior circulation strokes (ACS and PCS, respectively) are different. The purpose of this study is to investigate differences in risk factors between intracranial and extracranial atherosclerosis (ICAS and ECAS), ACS and PCS, and ICAS/ECAS with ACS/PCS in a Chinese acute ischaemic stroke population. We analysed 551 ischaemic stroke patients who had been enrolled between August 2005 and July 2008. First, risk factors were compared between non-atherosclerosis, ICAS, ECAS, and combined ICAS and ECAS groups. ICAS and ECAS were assessed with transcranial Doppler and carotid colour Doppler ultrasound, respectively. Second, risk factors were compared between ACS and PCS groups. Stroke lesion was assessed with magnetic resonance imaging. Third, risk factors were compared in ICAS/ECAS associated with ACS/PCS. The risk factor for ICAS was high diastolic blood pressure (OR, 1.075; 95% CI, 1.016-1.138; p = 0.013), and the risk factors for ECAS were age (OR, 1.113; 95% CI, 1.046-1.183; p = 0.001) and low density lipoprotein (OR, 1.450; 95% CI, 1.087-1.935; p = 0.012). Hypertension (OR, 1.090; 95% CI, 1.001-1.109; p = 0.027) was associated with PCS. Age (OR, 1.026; 95% CI, 1.011-1.128; p = 0.003), male gender (OR, 2.278; 95% CI, 1.481-3.258; p = 0.003) and age (OR, 1.067; 95% CI, 1.013-1.123; p = 0.014), scores of NIHSS (OR, 1.069; 95% CI, 1.012-1.130; p = 0.018) were risk factors for ICAS and ECAS with ACS, respectively. Risk factors are different between ICAS and ECAS, ACS and PCS, and ICAS/ECAS with ACS/PCS. Thus, targeted strategies are needed to consider these differences to prevent, treat and manage these diseases.

  15. Design and Rationale of the Intima-Medial Thickness Sub-Study of the PreventIon of CArdiovascular Events in iSchemic Stroke Patients with High Risk of Cerebral hemOrrhage (PICASSO-IMT) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Woo-Keun; Kim, Yong Jae; Lee, Juneyoung; Kwon, Sun U

    2017-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the main mechanisms of stroke and cardiovascular diseases and is associated with increased risk of recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events. Intima-medial thickness (IMT) is a well-known surrogate marker of atherosclerosis and has been used to predict stroke and cardiovascular events. However, the clinical significance of IMT and IMT change in stroke has not been investigated in well-designed studies. The PreventIon of CArdiovascular events in iSchemic Stroke patients with high risk of cerebral hemOrrhage-Intima-Media Thickness (PICASSO-IMT) sub-study is designed to investigate the effects of cilostazol, probucol, or both on IMT in patients with stroke. PICASSO-IMT is a prospective sub-study of the PICASSO study designed to measure IMT and plaque score at 1, 13, 25, 37, and 49 months after randomization. The primary outcome is the change in mean carotid IMT, which is defined as the mean of the far-wall IMTs of the right and left common carotid arteries, between baseline and 13 months after randomization. PICASSO-IMT will provide the largest IMT data set in a stroke population and will provide valuable information about the clinical significance of IMT in patients with ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Atorvastatin reduces the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with carotid atherosclerosis: a secondary analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H.; Amarenco, P.; Hennerici, M.G.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial found that treatment with atorvastatin 80 mg per day reduced the risk of stroke and cardiovascular events in patients with a recent transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke. We hypothesized...... this benefit would be greatest in the subgroup of patients with carotid stenosis. METHODS: The SPARCL trial randomized patients with TIA or stroke within 1 to 6 months without known coronary heart disease (CHD) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol 100 to 190 mg/dL to treatment with atorvastatin 80 mg per...

  17. Atrial fibrillation, ischaemic heart disease, and the risk of death in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Dyg; Søndergaard, Peter; Nielsen, Tonny

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a risk factor for death in patients with a myocardial infarction, but highly variable results are reported in patients with heart failure. We studied the prognostic impact of AF in heart failure patients with and without ischaemic heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS...... and without ischaemic heart disease, HR was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.88-1.16) and P=0.88. CONCLUSION: AF is associated with increased risk of death only in patients with ischaemic heart disease. This finding may explain the variable results of studies of the prognosis associated with AF in heart failure....

  18. Loci associated with ischaemic stroke and its subtypes (SiGN): a genome-wide association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    [OR] 1·21, 95% CI 1·13-1·30, p=4·50 × 10 -8 ; joint OR 1·19, 1·12-1·26, p=1·30 × 10 -9 ). Our results also supported robust associations with ischaemic stroke for four other loci that have been reported in previous studies, including PITX2 (first stage OR 1·39, 1·29-1·49, p=3·26 × 10 -19 ; joint OR 1·37, 1·30-1·45, p=2·79 × 10 -32 ) and ZFHX3 (first stage OR 1·19, 1·11-1·27, p=2·93 × 10 -7 ; joint OR 1·17, 1·11-1·23, p=2·29 × 10 -10 ) for cardioembolic stroke, and HDAC9 (first stage OR 1·29, 1·18-1·42, p=3·50 × 10 -8 ; joint OR 1·24, 1·15-1·33, p=4·52 × 10 -9 ) for large artery atherosclerosis stroke. The 12q24 locus near ALDH2, which has previously been associated with all ischaemic stroke but not with any specific subtype, exceeded genome-wide significance in the meta-analysis of small artery stroke (first stage OR 1·20, 1·12-1·28, p=6·82 × 10 -8 ; joint OR 1·17, 1·11-1·23, p=2·92 × 10 -9 ). Other loci associated with stroke in previous studies, including NINJ2, were not confirmed. Our results suggest that all ischaemic stroke-related loci previously implicated by GWAS are subtype specific. We identified a novel gene associated with large artery atherosclerosis stroke susceptibility. Follow-up studies will be necessary to establish whether the locus near TSPAN2 can be a target for a novel therapeutic approach to stroke prevention. In view of the subtype-specificity of the associations detected, the rich phenotyping data available in the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN) are likely to be crucial for further genetic discoveries related to ischaemic stroke. US National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Health care in patients 1 year post-stroke in general practice: research on the utilisation of the Dutch Transmural Protocol transient ischaemic attack/cerebrovascular accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Weerd, L; Rutgers, A W F; Groenier, K H; van der Meer, K

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the kind of aftercare that ischaemic stroke patients receive and the extent that aftercare fulfils the criteria of the 'Dutch Transmural Protocol transient ischaemic attack/cerebrovascular accident'. Fifty-seven patients were interviewed 1 year post-stroke about secondary prevention and aftercare. Forty general practitioners (GPs) completed a questionnaire about guidance and secondary prevention (concerning medication and lifestyle advice). Most patients would like to see their GP more regularly. More aftercare was required than was planned. The use of aspirin remained the same, fewer patients used statins and more used antihypertensives. Of the 40 GPs who participated, 12% did not apply prevention. Blood pressure, glucose and cholesterol were measured in 84%, 28% and 40% of patients. All of these measures were often elevated, but treatment was not given. Lifestyle advice was offered to one-quarter of patients. Considering all of the advice given in the Dutch Protocol, several aspects can be improved in relation to secondary prevention. Too little attention is paid to giving lifestyle advice, stricter medical checkups by GPs are necessary and there is a decrease in use of preventive medication, partly because GPs monitors use of medication inadequately. The use of the Dutch Protocol in aftercare can be improved by a more detailed description of advice.

  20. August, 2002 - floods events, affected areas revitalisation and prevention for the future in the central Bohemian region, Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bina, L.; Vacha, F.; Vodova, J.

    2003-04-01

    Central Bohemian Region is located in a shape of a ring surrounding the capitol of Prague. Its total territorial area is 11.014 sq.km and population of 1 130.000 inhabitants. According to EU nomenclature of regional statistical units, the Central Bohemian Region is classified as an independent NUTS II. Bohemia's biggest rivers, Vltava and Labe form the region's backbone dividing it along a north-south line, besides that there are Sazava and Berounka, the two big headwaters of Vltava, which flow through the region and there also are some cascade man made lakes and 2 important big dams - Orlik and Slapy on the Vltava River in the area of the region. Overflowing of these rivers and their feeders including cracking of high-water dams during the floods in August 2002 caused total or partial destruction or damage of more than 200 towns and villages and total losses to the extend of 450 mil. EUR. The worst impact was on damaged or destroyed human dwellings, social infrastructure (schools, kindergartens, humanitarian facilities) and technical infrastructure (roads, waterworks, power distribution). Also businesses were considerably damaged including transport terminals in the area of river ports. Flowage of Spolana Neratovice chemical works caused critical environmental havoc. Regional crisis staff with regional Governor in the lead worked continuously during the floods and a regional integrated rescue system was subordinated to it. Due to the huge extent of the floods the crisis staff coordinated its work with central bodies of state including the Government and single "power" resorts (army, interior, transport). Immediately after floods a regional - controlled management was set up including an executive body for regional revitalisation which is connected to state coordinating resort - Ministry for Local Development, EU sources and humanitarian aid. In addition to a program of regional revitalisation additional preventive flood control programs are being developed

  1. A national survey of interventions and practices in the prevention of blood culture contamination and associated adverse health care events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Robert A; Spitzer, Eric D; Kranz, Barbara; Barnes, Sue

    2018-01-17

    The scientific literature indicates that blood culture contamination often leads to inappropriate antimicrobial treatment, adverse patient occurrences, and potential reporting of false-positive central line-associated bloodstream infections. The findings of a national infection prevention survey of blood culture practices and related interventions in hospitals support the need for infection preventionists to expand their participation in the review of topics related to the ordering and collection of blood for culture. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Differentiation of density of ischaemic brain tissue in computed tomography with respect to neurological deficit in acute and subacute period of ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobotko-Waszczeniuk, O.; Lukasiewicz, A.; Janica, J.; Lebkowska, U.; Pyd, E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The detection of ischaemic brain tissue by a CT depends on degree and time of hypoperfusion. The aim of the present study was to establish interrelation between morphologic changes in CT scans and clinical classification of focal neurological deficit. Material/Methods: We analyzed data from 139 consecutive patients enrolled in a prospective cohort study at Clinic of Neurology University Hospital in Bialystok, at which emergency CT for patients suspected of having acute (>6 h) ischaemic stroke was performed. Next follow up nonenhanced CT scans were obtained between 7 and 10 day after admission. Results: In general, the presence of an ischaemic hypo density in a patient with signs and symptoms of acute stroke signifies irreversible infarction. In hyper acute and acute stage of ischaemic stroke focal decreased attenuation was about 10-20 HU. In subacute stage focal parenchymal hypo density further decreased to 20-30 HU. Patients with mild neurological deficit and quick recovery had smaller focal areas of infarct with slight density changes compared to larger territory of infarct extent in patients with severe neurologic symptoms. Conclusions: In subacute stage of ischaemic stroke extent of parenchymal changes and degree of hypo density correlates with stroke severity and may have some prognostic significance. (authors)

  3. Results of brain perfusion Temp in acute ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darcourt, J.; Migneco, O.; Mahagne, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    Perfusion SPECT allows immediate evaluation of cerebral ischaemia during the acute phase of stroke. Its prognostic value has been demonstrated by several studies. This prognostic value increases in comparison to clinical evaluation alone when injection is performed early after the first neurological signs. The classical three patterns fist described on PET studies by Marchal and Baron are also seen using SPECT: (pattern I) severe irreversible ischaemia with poor prognosis, (pattern III) normal study due to spontaneous reperfusion with complete clinical recovery and (pattern II) ischaemic penumbra with unpredictable prognosis. Two recent studies prove that SPECT can identify with high accuracy the extreme hemodynamic situations which are on one hand spontaneous re-perfusions (100 % sensitivity and specificity) and on the other hand the 'malignant middle cerebral artery infarctions' (82 % sensitivity and 98 % specificity). Therefore early SPECT is a valid tool to select stroke patients for thrombolytic therapy. (author)

  4. Novel cardiovascular risk markers in women with ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Dana; Dădârlat, Alexandra; Zdrenghea, D

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of coronary heart disease in premenopausal women is lower than in men because of their hormonal protection. Angina pectoris occurs in women about 10 years later than in men. However, mortality from ischaemic heart disease remains higher in women than in men. Current studies are focusing on novel cardiovascular risk biomarkers because it seems that traditional cardiovascular risk factors and their assessment scores underestimate the risk in females. Increased plasma levels of these newly established biomarkers of risk have been found to worsen endothelial dysfunction and inflammation, both of which play a key role in the pathogenesis of microvascular angina, which is very common in women. These novel cardiovascular risk markers can be classified into three categories: inflammatory markers, markers of haemostasis, and other biomarkers.

  5. Lipid profile in ischaemic hearth disease in patients at Larkana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirzado, Z.A.; Memon, A.R.; Sangi, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    The liquid profile levels in ninety six (83 males for 13 females) ischaemic heart disease (IHD) patients aged 22 to 60 years divided into elder and younger age groups with upper and low income division along with 45 control subjects matched for age and socioeconomic status were studied. Significantly elevated serum cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids and total lipids as well as significantly decreased HDL-Cholesterol levels were found in IHD patients compared with control subjects. It was found that in spite of increased lipid profile with decreased HD in IHD, there was no significant difference between the upper income and low income social classes, particularly in elder patients, but the difference was significant in upper and lower social classes in normal subjects. (author)

  6. The Role of Substance P in Ischaemic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Vink

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of death, disability and dementia worldwide. Despite extensive pre-clinical investigation, few therapeutic treatment options are available to patients, meaning that death, severe disability and the requirement for long-term rehabilitation are common outcomes. Cell loss and tissue injury following stroke occurs through a number of diverse secondary injury pathways, whose delayed nature provides an opportunity for pharmacological intervention. Amongst these secondary injury factors, increased blood-brain barrier permeability and cerebral oedema are well-documented complications of cerebral ischaemia, whose severity has been shown to be associated with final outcome. Whilst the mechanisms of increased blood-brain barrier permeability and cerebral oedema are largely unknown, recent evidence suggests that the neuropeptide substance P (SP plays a central role. The aim of this review is to examine the role of SP in ischaemic stroke and report on the potential utility of NK1 tachykinin receptor antagonists as therapeutic agents.

  7. Does ageism affect the management of ischaemic heart disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Matthew; Bowling, Ann; McKee, Dorothy; Kennelly, Marian; Banning, Adrian P; Dudley, Nigel; Elder, Andrew; Martin, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    To analyse access by age to exercise testing, coronary angiography, revascularisation (percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty/stent insertion and coronary artery bypass graft surgery) and receipt of thrombolysis, where indicated, for hospital patients with diagnosed cardiovascular disease. Retrospective case note analysis, tracking each case backwards and forwards by 12 months from the patient's date of entry to the study. The setting was a district hospital in the eastern part of outer London. The case notes eligible for inclusion were those of elective and emergency in-patients with an in-patient ICD-10 code of ischaemic heart disease, angina pectoris or acute myocardial infarction and a consecutive 20% sample of new cardiac outpatients with these diagnoses. Analysis of 712 case notes showed that older hospital patients with ischaemic heart disease, and with indications for further investigation, were less likely than younger people to be referred for exercise tolerance tests and cardiac catheterisation and angiography. This was independent of both gender and severity of condition. Older patients did not appear to be discriminated against in relation to receipt of indicated treatments (revascularisation or thrombolysis), although, in the case of revascularisation, older patients were more likely to have been filtered out at the investigation stage (catheterisation and angiography), so selection bias partly explains this finding. The current findings from a single hospital are comparable with the results from a broader study of equity of access by age to cardiological interventions in another district hospital in the same region. Although only two hospitals were analysed, the similarity of findings enhances the generalisability of the results presented here. It appears that age per se causes older cardiac hospital patients to be treated differently.

  8. Neutralization of IL-8 prevents the induction of dermatologic adverse events associated with the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Houtkamp, Mischa; Schuurhuis, Danita H

    2012-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors are widely used in the treatment of cancer. EGFR-targeted treatment is known to be associated with a high incidence of dermatological adverse reactions, including papulopustular rash, which can be dose-limiting and may affect compliance to treatm......Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors are widely used in the treatment of cancer. EGFR-targeted treatment is known to be associated with a high incidence of dermatological adverse reactions, including papulopustular rash, which can be dose-limiting and may affect compliance...... repeat dose treatment with HuMab-10F8, a neutralizing human antibody against IL-8, reduced the rash. Inhibition of IL-8 can therefore ameliorate dermatological adverse events induced by treatment with EGFR inhibitors....

  9. l-arginine and l-NMMA for assessing cerebral endothelial dysfunction in ischaemic cerebrovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, William K; Sørensen, Caspar G; Kruuse, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction (ED), in particular cerebral ED, may be an essential biomarker for ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. However, there is no consensus on methods to best estimate cerebral ED. In this systematic review, we evaluate the use of l-arginine and NG -monomethyl-l-arginine (l......-NMMA) for assessment of cerebral ED. A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library was done. We included studies investigating cerebrovascular response to l-arginine or l-NMMA in human subjects with vascular risk factors or ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. Seven studies (315 subjects) were eligible...... according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Studies investigated the effect of age (n=2), type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) (n=1), cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) (n=1), leukoaraiosis (n=1), and prior ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic...

  10. Prevalence of symptomatic intracranial aneurysm and ischaemic stroke in pseudoxanthoma elasticum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, J. S.; Hennekam, R. C.; Cruysberg, J. R.; Steijlen, P. M.; Swart, J.; Tijmes, N.; Limburg, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is an heritable connective tissue disorder with clinical manifestations of the ocular, dermal, and cardiovascular system. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of symptomatic intracranial aneurysms (IAs) and ischaemic stroke (IS) in

  11. Neurological signs in 23 dogs with suspected rostral cerebellar ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Barbara Blicher; Garosi, Laurent; Skerritt, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    Background: In dogs with ischaemic stroke, a very common site of infarction is the cerebellum. The aim of this study was to characterise neurological signs in relation to infarct topography in dogs with suspected cerebellar ischaemic stroke and to report short-term outcome confined...... to the hospitalisation period. A retrospective multicentre study of dogs with suspected cerebellar ischaemic stroke examined from 2010–2015 at five veterinary referral hospitals was performed. Findings from clinical, neurological, and paraclinical investigations including magnetic resonance imaging were assessed....... Results: Twenty-three dogs, 13 females and 10 males with a median age of 8 years and 8 months, were included in the study. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (n = 9) was a commonly represented breed. All ischaemic strokes were located to the vascular territory of the rostral cerebellar artery including...

  12. Theophylline as an add-on to thrombolytic therapy in acute ischaemic stroke (TEA-Stroke)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modrau, Boris; Hjort, Niels; Østergaard, Leif

    2016-01-01

    IntroductionEarly reperfusion of brain tissue at risk of injury (penumbra salvage) is crucial in treating acute ischaemic stroke. Neuroprotective agents may extend the time window for the reperfusion. The vasoactive agent theophylline redistributes the perfusion to ischaemic brain tissue and thus...... the collateral supply in acute ischaemic brain tissue and thus facilitate reperfusion despite proximal vessel occlusion. The primary study objective is to evaluate whether theophylline is safe and efficient in acute ischaemic stroke patients as an add-on to thrombolytic therapy.MethodsThe TEA-Stroke Trial...... theophylline as an add-on to standard thrombolytic therapy improves penumbra salvage with a reduced risk of reperfusion damage, reduced final infarct size, and improved clinical outcome....

  13. EEG in ischaemic stroke: Quantitative EEG can uniquely inform (sub-)acute prognoses and clinical management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnigan, Simon; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2013-01-01

    Investigations of (sub-)acute ischaemic stroke (IS) employing quantitative electroencephalographic (QEEG) methods, in concert with other assessments, are reviewed. Numerous outcomes from hundreds of patients collectively indicate that (sub-)acute QEEG indices from standard systems can uniquely

  14. Prevention of adverse events of interferon γ gene therapy by gene delivery of interferon γ-heparin-binding domain fusion protein in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru Ando

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustained gene delivery of interferon (IFN γ can be an effective treatment, but our previous study showed high levels of IFNγ-induced adverse events, including the loss of body weight. These unwanted events could be reduced by target-specific delivery of IFNγ after in vivo gene transfer. To achieve this, we selected the heparin-binding domain (HBD of extracellular superoxide dismutase as a molecule to anchor IFNγ to the cell surface. We designed three IFNγ derivatives, IFNγ-HBD1, IFNγ-HBD2, and IFNγ-HBD3, each of which had 1, 2, or 3 HBDs, respectively. Each plasmid-encoding fusion proteins was delivered to the liver, a model target in this study, by hydrodynamic tail vein injection. The serum concentration of IFNγ-HBD2 and IFNγ-HBD3 after gene delivery was lower than that of IFNγ or IFNγ-HBD1. Gene delivery of IFNγ-HBD2, but not of IFNγ-HBD3, effectively increased the mRNA expression of IFNγ-inducible genes in the liver, suggesting liver-specific distribution of IFNγ-HBD2. Gene delivery of IFNγ-HBD2-suppressed tumor growth in the liver as efficiently as that of IFNγ with much less symptoms of adverse effects. These results indicate that the adverse events of IFNγ gene transfer can be prevented by gene delivery of IFNγ-HBD2, a fusion protein with high cell surface affinity.

  15. Ischaemic cardiac outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation treated with vitamin K antagonism or factor Xa inhibition: results from the ROCKET AF trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Stevens, Susanna R.; White, Harvey D.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Goodman, Shaun G.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Patel, Manesh R.; Becker, Richard C.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Hacke, Werner; Singer, Daniel E.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Califf, Robert M.; Fox, Keith A.A.; Breithardt, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Aims We investigated the prevalence of prior myocardial infarction (MI) and incidence of ischaemic cardiovascular (CV) events among atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Methods and results In ROCKET AF, 14 264 patients with nonvalvular AF were randomized to rivaroxaban or warfarin. The key efficacy outcome for these analyses was CV death, MI, and unstable angina (UA). This pre-specified analysis was performed on patients while on treatment. Rates are per 100 patient-years. Overall, 2468 (17%) patients had prior MI at enrollment. Compared with patients without prior MI, these patients were more likely to be male (75 vs. 57%), on aspirin at baseline (47 vs. 34%), have prior congestive heart failure (78 vs. 59%), diabetes (47 vs. 39%), hypertension (94 vs. 90%), higher mean CHADS2 score (3.64 vs. 3.43), and fewer prior strokes or transient ischaemic attacks (46 vs. 54%). CV death, MI, or UA rates tended to be lower in patients assigned rivaroxaban compared with warfarin [2.70 vs. 3.15; hazard ratio (HR) 0.86, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73–1.00; P = 0.0509]. CV death, MI, or UA rates were higher in those with prior MI compared with no prior MI (6.68 vs. 2.19; HR 3.04, 95% CI 2.59–3.56) with consistent results for CV death, MI, or UA for rivaroxaban compared with warfarin in prior MI compared with no prior MI (P interaction = 0.10). Conclusion Prior MI was common and associated with substantial risk for subsequent cardiac events. Patients with prior MI assigned rivaroxaban compared with warfarin had a non-significant 14% reduction of ischaemic cardiac events. PMID:24132190

  16. Ischaemic cardiac outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation treated with vitamin K antagonism or factor Xa inhibition: results from the ROCKET AF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Stevens, Susanna R; White, Harvey D; Nessel, Christopher C; Goodman, Shaun G; Piccini, Jonathan P; Patel, Manesh R; Becker, Richard C; Halperin, Jonathan L; Hacke, Werner; Singer, Daniel E; Hankey, Graeme J; Califf, Robert M; Fox, Keith A A; Breithardt, Günter

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence of prior myocardial infarction (MI) and incidence of ischaemic cardiovascular (CV) events among atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. In ROCKET AF, 14 264 patients with nonvalvular AF were randomized to rivaroxaban or warfarin. The key efficacy outcome for these analyses was CV death, MI, and unstable angina (UA). This pre-specified analysis was performed on patients while on treatment. Rates are per 100 patient-years. Overall, 2468 (17%) patients had prior MI at enrollment. Compared with patients without prior MI, these patients were more likely to be male (75 vs. 57%), on aspirin at baseline (47 vs. 34%), have prior congestive heart failure (78 vs. 59%), diabetes (47 vs. 39%), hypertension (94 vs. 90%), higher mean CHADS2 score (3.64 vs. 3.43), and fewer prior strokes or transient ischaemic attacks (46 vs. 54%). CV death, MI, or UA rates tended to be lower in patients assigned rivaroxaban compared with warfarin [2.70 vs. 3.15; hazard ratio (HR) 0.86, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73-1.00; P = 0.0509]. CV death, MI, or UA rates were higher in those with prior MI compared with no prior MI (6.68 vs. 2.19; HR 3.04, 95% CI 2.59-3.56) with consistent results for CV death, MI, or UA for rivaroxaban compared with warfarin in prior MI compared with no prior MI (P interaction = 0.10). Prior MI was common and associated with substantial risk for subsequent cardiac events. Patients with prior MI assigned rivaroxaban compared with warfarin had a non-significant 14% reduction of ischaemic cardiac events.

  17. Haemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in patients after reversible ischaemic attack or minor ischaemic stroke assessed with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, M.; Hatazawa, J.; Abe, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Kubota, K.; Yamaguchi, K.; Sato, T.; Matsuzawa, T.; Fukuda, H.; Ido, T.; Pozzilli, C.

    1987-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV) and oxygen metabolic rate (CMRO2) were evaluated and compared among normals, patients with recent reversible ischaemic attacks (RIAs) and patients with chronic minor infarction using positron emission tomography. Average CBF together with CMRO2 significantly decreased in the infarction group in the middle cerebral artery territory of the affected hemisphere while the mean values for RIAs were intermediate between the other two groups. CBV also reduced, however it was more preserved compared to flow as seen in decreased CBF/CBV values. Significant interhemispheric difference was found in CBF/CBV ratio, but it did not clearly correlate with OEF changes. Higher OEF was noted only in the restricted brain regions of RIAs where CBF showed large hemispheric asymmetry. However, in other regions, the coupled decline of blood flow and metabolism was found which suggests tissue damage or neuronal cell loss in the brain with previous RIA symptoms. (orig.)

  18. Xanthelasmata, arcus corneae, and ischaemic vascular disease and death in general population: prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Christoffersen, Mette; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Schnohr, Peter; Jensen, Gorm B; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that xanthelasmata and arcus corneae, individually and combined, predict risk of ischaemic vascular disease and death in the general population. Design Prospective population based cohort study. Setting The Copenhagen City Heart Study. Participants 12 745 people aged 20-93 years free of ischaemic vascular disease at baseline and followed from 1976-8 until May 2009 with 100% complete follow-up. Main outcome measures Hazard ratios for myocardial infarction, isch...

  19. Snoring as a risk factor for ischaemic heart disease and stroke in men.

    OpenAIRE

    Koskenvuo, M; Kaprio, J; Telakivi, T; Partinen, M; Heikkilä, K; Sarna, S

    1987-01-01

    The association of snoring with ischaemic heart disease and stroke was studied prospectively in 4388 men aged 40-69. The men were asked, in a questionnaire sent to them, whether they snored habitually, frequently, occasionally, or never. Hospital records and death certificates were checked for the next three years to establish how many of the men developed ischaemic heart disease or stroke: the numbers were 149 and 42, respectively. Three categories of snoring were used for analysis: habitual...

  20. Determinants and Time Trends for Ischaemic and Haemorrhagic Stroke in a Large Chinese Population

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yutao; Wang, Hao; Tao, Tao; Tian, Yingchun; Wang, Yutang; Chen, Yundai; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The clinical epidemiology of stroke has been widely investigated in Caucasian populations, but the changes over time in the proportion of ischaemic to haemorrhagic strokes is less clear, especially in the Chinese population. Aims Our objective was to study the determinants and time trends for ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke, in relation to age, in a large Chinese population cohort. Methods Using a medical insurance database in the southwest of China from 2001 to 2012, time trends...

  1. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell treatment in patients with severe ischaemic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Jørgensen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Regenerative treatment with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been promising in patients with ischaemic heart failure but needs confirmation in larger randomized trials. We aimed to study effects of intra-myocardial autologous bone marrow-derived MSC treatment in patients with severe...... identified. CONCLUSION: Intra-myocardial injections of autologous culture expanded MSCs were safe and improved myocardial function in patients with severe ischaemic heart failure. STUDY REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT00644410 (ClinicalTrials.gov)....

  2. More than meets the eye: infant presenting with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Kuntal; Agarwal, Rajkumar

    2018-04-05

    We report a newborn infant who presented with poor Apgar scores and umbilical artery acidosis leading to the diagnosis of hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. During the course of the infant's hospitalisation, subsequent workup revealed an underlying genetic cause that masqueraded as hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Cardiac rehabilitation adapted to transient ischaemic attack and stroke (CRAFTS: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Catherine

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary Heart Disease and Cerebrovascular Disease share many predisposing, modifiable risk factors (hypertension, abnormal blood lipids and lipoproteins, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, obesity and diabetes mellitus. Lifestyle interventions and pharmacological therapy are recognised as the cornerstones of secondary prevention. Cochrane review has proven the benefits of programmes incorporating exercise and lifestyle counselling in the cardiac disease population. A Cochrane review highlighted as priority, the need to establish feasibility and efficacy of exercise based interventions for Cerebrovascular Disease. Methods A single blind randomised controlled trial is proposed to examine a primary care cardiac rehabilitation programme for adults post transient ischemic attack (TIA and stroke in effecting a positive change in the primary outcome measures of cardiac risk scores derived from Blood Pressure, lipid profile, smoking and diabetic status and lifestyle factors of habitual smoking, exercise and healthy eating participation. Secondary outcomes of interest include health related quality of life as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Stroke Specific Quality of Life scale and WONCA COOP Functional Health Status charts and cardiovascular fitness as measured by a sub-maximal fitness test. A total of 144 patients, over 18 years of age with confirmed diagnosis of ischaemic stroke or TIA, will be recruited from Dublin community stroke services and two tertiary T.I.A clinics. Exclusion criteria will include oxygen dependence, unstable cardiac conditions, uncontrolled diabetes, major medical conditions, claudication, febrile illness, pregnancy or cognitive impairment. Participants will be block-statified, randomly allocated to one of two groups using a pre-prepared computer generated randomisation schedule. Both groups will receive a two hour education class on risk reduction post stroke. The

  4. A technical review of subvalvular techniques for repair of ischaemic mitral regurgitation and their associated echocardiographic and survival outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasopoulos, Leonidas V; Casula, Roberto P; Punjabi, Prakash P; Abdullahi, Yusuf S; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2017-12-01

    Subvalvular techniques are gaining ground as adjunct procedures for addressing ischaemic mitral regurgitation. The aim of this study was to describe the different techniques and assess their results. A systematic review of the literature was performed. The end points of interest were recurrence of mitral regurgitation, cardiac events and early and late echocardiographic measurements. After initial screening, 450 articles were identified, of which 24 provided the best available evidence on the topic. The different subvalvular techniques had similar mortality rates when compared with the standard restrictive annuloplasty. Recurrence of mitral regurgitation was of lower degree and the remodelling process was better for these techniques. Reoperation rates were also quite low. The subvalvular techniques showed superiority, addressing more successfully the leaflet tethering. However, larger randomized studies are needed to confirm these early positive results. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. Household income losses associated with ischaemic heart disease for US employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrin, J; Cangialose, C B; Boccuzzi, S J; Weintraub, W S; Ballard, D J

    2000-03-01

    To estimate the cost of lost work days due to ischaemic heart disease (IHD), and the cost of this reduced productivity using reduction in household income. Using 2 years of nationally representative observational data, this study examined the effect on household income of IHD. This effect was estimated after accounting for unemployment, days lost to illness and other effects of illness on the income of workers aged 18 to 64 years. Previous measures of indirect costs of disease have typically not included the loss in productivity due to suboptimal work performance. Among workers in this age group, IHD was associated with a reduction of $US3013 in annual household income; this reduction was independent of occupational class, age, size of household and educational level. Such a reduction may be because of reduced on-the-job performance, employer perception of this, or unrelated lifestyle choices. It represents an estimated $US6.05 billion annual loss in productivity in 1992 dollars (or $US6.45 billion in 1996 dollars). Estimates of the indirect costs of chronic disease that do not account fully for the lost income of employees may significantly underestimate the benefits to employers and society of treatment and prevention.

  6. Cerebral small vessel disease, medial temporal lobe atrophy and cognitive status in patients with ischaemic stroke and transient ischaemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arba, F; Quinn, T; Hankey, G J; Ali, M; Lees, K R; Inzitari, D

    2017-02-01

    Small vessel disease (SVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are two common causes of cognitive impairment and dementia, traditionally considered as distinct processes. The relationship between radiological features suggestive of AD and SVD was explored, and the association of each of these features with cognitive status at 1 year was investigated in patients with stroke or transient ischaemic attack. Anonymized data were accessed from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (VISTA). Medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA; a marker of AD) and markers of SVD were rated using validated ordinal visual scales. Cognitive status was evaluated with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) 1 year after the index stroke. Logistic regression models were used to investigate independent associations between (i) baseline SVD features and MTA and (ii) all baseline neuroimaging features and cognitive status 1 year post-stroke. In all, 234 patients were included, mean (±SD) age 65.7 ± 13.1 years, 145 (62%) male. Moderate to severe MTA was present in 104 (44%) patients. SVD features were independently associated with MTA (P stroke, hypertension and diabetes mellitus, MTA was the only radiological feature independently associated with cognitive impairment, defined using thresholds of MMSE ≤ 26 (odds ratio 1.94; 95% confidence interval 1.28-2.94) and MMSE ≤ 23 (odds ratio 2.31; 95% confidence interval 1.48-3.62). In patients with ischaemic cerebrovascular disease, SVD features are associated with MTA, which is a common finding in stroke survivors. SVD and AD type neurodegeneration coexist, but the AD marker MTA, rather than SVD markers, is associated with post-stroke cognitive impairment. © 2016 EAN.

  7. [New technology for prevention of embolic events in atrial fibrillation: a systematic review on percutaneous endovascular left atrial appendage closure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danna, Paolo; Sagone, Antonio; Proietti, Riccardo; Arensi, Andrea; Viecca, Maurizio; Santangeli, Pasquale; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2012-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. The mortality rate of patients with AF is doubled as compared to non-fibrillating controls. The most relevant complication of AF is a major increase in the risk of stroke. The gold standard in reducing cerebrovascular events in AF is warfarin therapy, which is not free from contraindications and limitations. The left atrial appendage (LAA) is the main source of emboli causing stroke in AF. LAA closure is a seducing approach to stroke risk reduction in AF without anticoagulation. Since 1949, heart surgeons have performed LAA closure or amputation in patients with AF. Percutaneous endovascular LAA closure is a new, less invasive, technique to reach the goal. Several devices have been used to perform this intervention, and the results of published trials are encouraging in terms of effectiveness and relative safety of this attractive technique. In this review we examine the published trials and data on percutaneous LAA closure, with particular attention to the risks and benefits of this procedure.

  8. Platelet degranulation and monocyte-platelet complex formation are increased in the acute and convalescent phases after ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCabe, Dominick J H

    2004-06-01

    Flow cytometric studies suggest that platelets are activated in ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). However, few studies have measured circulating leucocyte-platelet complexes in this patient population. Whole blood flow cytometry was used to quantify the expression of CD62P-, CD63-, and PAC1-binding, and the percentages of leucocyte-platelet complexes in acute (1-27 d, n = 79) and convalescent (79-725 d, n = 70) ischaemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) patients compared with controls without CVD (n = 27). We performed a full blood count, and measured plasma levels of soluble P-selectin, soluble E-selectin, and von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag) as additional markers of platelet and\\/or endothelial cell activation. The median percentage CD62P expression and the median percentage monocyte-platelet complexes were higher in both acute and convalescent CVD patients than controls (P <\\/= 0.02). The mean white cell count and mean VWF:Ag levels were significantly elevated in the acute and convalescent phases after ischaemic stroke or TIA (P <\\/= 0.02). Otherwise, there was no significant increase in any other marker of platelet or endothelial activation in CVD patients. There was a positive correlation between the percentage expression of CD62P and the percentages of both neutrophil-platelet and monocyte-platelet complexes in the acute phase, and the percentages of all leucocyte-platelet complexes in the convalescent phase after ischaemic CVD. This study provides evidence for ongoing excessive platelet and\\/or endothelial activation in ischaemic CVD patients despite treatment with antithrombotic therapy.

  9. Co-morbidities and mortality associated with intracranial bleeds and ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Jason; Natalwala, Ammar; Mann, Jake; Uppal, Hardeep; Mummadi, Sangha Mitra; Haque, Amirul; Aziz, Amir; Potluri, Rahul

    2015-04-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and acquired disability; however, there has been no comprehensive comparison of co-morbid risk factors between different stroke subtypes. The aim of this study was to compare risk factors and mortality for subdural haematoma (SDH), subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. We compiled a database of all patients admitted with these conditions to a large teaching hospital in Birmingham, United Kingdom during the period 2000-2007 using the International Classification of Disease (ICD) 10th revision codes. Generalised linear models were constructed to calculate relative risks (RRs) associated with co-morbidities. In total, 4804 patients were admitted with diagnoses of SDH (1004), SAH (807), ischaemic stroke (2579) and haemorrhagic stroke (414). Patients with SDH were less likely to have pneumonia (0.492, 95% CI, 0.330-0.734; p ischaemic heart disease (0.56, 95% CI, 0.40-0.79; p ischaemic stroke. Epilepsy was positively associated with ischaemic stroke (1.94, 95% CI, 1.36-2.76; p ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes (41% and 40% respectively, vs. 73% in SDH and 64% in SAH; p < 0.001). These findings may guide clinical risk stratification, and improve the prognostic information given to patients.

  10. Quantification of structural changes in the corpus callosumin children with profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivaros, Stavros M. [Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Academic Unit of Paediatric Radiology, Royal Manchester Children' s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Centre for Imaging Sciences, Institute of Population Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Radon, Mark R. [The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neuroradiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mileva, Reneta; Gledson, Ann; Keane, John A. [University of Manchester, School of Computer Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); Connolly, Daniel J.A.; Batty, Ruth [Sheffield Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neuroradiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Cowell, Patricia E. [University of Sheffield, Department of Human Communication Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hoggard, Nigel; Griffiths, Paul D. [University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Wright, Neville B.; Tang, Vivian [Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Academic Unit of Paediatric Radiology, Royal Manchester Children' s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    Birth-related acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury has specific patterns of damage including the paracentral lobules. To test the hypothesis that there is anatomically coherent regional volume loss of the corpus callosum as a result of this hemispheric abnormality. Study subjects included 13 children with proven acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and 13 children with developmental delay but no brain abnormalities. A computerised system divided the corpus callosum into 100 segments, measuring each width. Principal component analysis grouped the widths into contiguous anatomical regions. We conducted analysis of variance of corpus callosum widths as well as support vector machine stratification into patient groups. There was statistically significant narrowing of the mid-posterior body and genu of the corpus callosum in children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. Support vector machine analysis yielded over 95% accuracy in patient group stratification using the corpus callosum centile widths. Focal volume loss is seen in the corpus callosum of children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury secondary to loss of commissural fibres arising in the paracentral lobules. Support vector machine stratification into the hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury group or the control group on the basis of corpus callosum width is highly accurate and points towards rapid clinical translation of this technique as a potential biomarker of hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. (orig.)

  11. The association of albuminuria and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein with the efficacy of HMG-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors for cardiovascular event prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özyilmaz, Akin; Boersma, Cornelis; Visser, Sipke T; Postma, Maarten J; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje Tw; Lambers-Heerspink, Hiddo J; de Jong, Paul E; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2016-05-01

    It is not clear which hypercholesterolemic patients benefit most from β-hydroxy-β-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors with respect to the prevention of cardiovascular events. Early signs of atherosclerotic vascular damage may identify high-risk patients. We studied whether subjects with hypercholesterolemia will benefit more from starting statin treatment in the case of high albuminuria and/or high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Included were subjects who had hypercholesterolemia at baseline, a negative cardiovascular disease history and who were not treated with statins. In total, 2011 subjects were analysed, of whom 695 started with a statin during a follow-up of 7.0 ± 1.7 years. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for cardiovascular events were calculated in subjects who started versus those who did not start a statin stratified for albuminuria less than or ≥ 15 mg/day and/or hsCRP less than or ≥ 3 mg/L. The start of a statin was associated with a beneficial effect on cardiovascular risk in subjects with high albuminuria (HR 0.38 (0.23-0.60)), while the effect of starting a statin was non-significant in subjects with low albuminuria (HR 0.74 (0.44-1.24), P for interaction albuminuria and hsCRP subgroups, the start of statin treatment was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular events dependent on albuminuria and not on the hsCRP level. The start of statin treatment is associated with a significantly lower absolute as well as relative risk of cardiovascular events in subjects with hypercholesterolemia and elevated albuminuria, whereas these drugs had less effect in subjects with normal albuminuria. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  12. The design of the SAFE or SORRY? study : A cluster randomised trial on the development and testing of an evidence based inpatient safety program for the prevention of adverse events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Betsie van Gaal; Theo van Achterberg; Marlies Hulscher; George F Borm; Joke Mintjes; Raymond TCM Koopmans; Lisette Schoonhoven

    2009-01-01

    Patients in hospitals and nursing homes are at risk of the development of, often preventable, adverse events (AEs), which threaten patient safety. Guidelines for prevention of many types of AEs are available, however, compliance with these guidelines appears to be lacking. Besides general barriers

  13. The design of the SAFE or SORRY? study: a cluster randomised trial on the development and testing of an evidence based inpatient safety program for the prevention of adverse events.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaal, H.G.I. van; Schoonhoven, L.; Hulscher, M.E.J.L.; Mintjes, J.A.; Borm, G.F.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Achterberg, T. van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients in hospitals and nursing homes are at risk of the development of, often preventable, adverse events (AEs), which threaten patient safety. Guidelines for prevention of many types of AEs are available, however, compliance with these guidelines appears to be lacking. Besides

  14. Calcium Channel Blockers in Secondary Cardiovascular Prevention and Risk of Acute Events: Real-World Evidence from Nested Case-Control Studies on Italian Hypertensive Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettiol, Alessandra; Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Vannacci, Alfredo; Lombardi, Niccolò; Onder, Graziano; Agabiti, Nera; Vitale, Cristiana; Trifirò, Gianluca; Corrao, Giovanni; Roberto, Giuseppe; Mugelli, Alessandro; Chinellato, Alessandro

    2017-12-01

    Antihypertensive treatment with calcium channel blockers (CCBs) is consolidated in clinical practice; however, different studies observed increased risks of acute events for short-acting CCBs. This study aimed to provide real-world evidence on risks of acute cardiovascular (CV) events, hospitalizations and mortality among users of different CCB classes in secondary CV prevention. Three case-control studies were nested in a cohort of Italian elderly hypertensive CV-compromised CCBs users. Cases were subjects with CV events (n = 25,204), all-cause hospitalizations (n = 19,237), or all-cause mortality (n = 17,996) during the follow-up. Up to four controls were matched for each case. Current or past exposition to CCBs at index date was defined based on molecule, formulation and daily doses of the last CCB delivery. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using conditional logistic regression models. Compared to past users, current CCB users had significant reductions in risks of CV events [OR 0.88 (95% CI: 0.84-0.91)], hospitalization [0.90 (0.88-0.93)] and mortality [0.48 (0.47-0.49)]. Current users of long-acting dihydropyridines (DHPs) had the lowest risk [OR 0.87 (0.84-0.90), 0.86 (0.83-0.90), 0.55 (0.54-0.56) for acute CV events, hospitalizations and mortality], whereas current users of short-acting CCBs had an increased risk of acute CV events [OR 1.77 (1.13-2.78) for short-acting DHPs; 1.19 (1.07-1.31) for short-acting non-DHPs] and hospitalizations [OR 1.84 (0.96-3.51) and 1.23 (1.08-1.42)]. The already-existing warning on short-acting CCBs should be potentiated, addressing clinicians towards the choice of long-acting formulations.

  15. Impact of metabolic disorders on the relation between overweight/obesity and incident myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke in fertile women: a nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, S S; Andersson, C; Berger, S M; Jensen, T B; Torp-Pedersen, C T; Gislason, G H; Køber, L; Schmiegelow, M D

    2015-06-01

    Whether overweight is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in the absence of metabolic disorders remains under debate and is largely unexamined in young women. We evaluated the risk of myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke in fertile women conditional on time-dependent presence of metabolic disorders. From nationwide registers we identified all normal weight (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 18.5 to fertile women. Targeting prevention of metabolic disorders might be beneficial to reduce cardiovascular disease in overweight/obese young women. © 2015 World Obesity.

  16. Estrategia para la prevención de eventos adversos en el anciano hospitalizado Strategy for the prevention of adverse events in the hospitalized elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M��. Antonia Muñoz Mella

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available La hospitalización deriva frecuentemente en una declinación irreversible del estado funcional, pudiendo dar como resultado complicaciones no relacionadas con el problema de admisión y producir una cascada de eventos adversos (EA que pueden culminar con la disminución de la calidad de vida. Las causas en los pacientes mayores son múltiples y acumulativas. Nuestro objetivo general fue diseñar un programa específico para la prevención de eventos adversos relacionados con la hospitalización del paciente anciano frágil, determinando para ello los factores de riesgo, tanto intrínsecos como extrínsecos, para establecer estrategias de seguridad que incluyan acciones que minimicen o eliminen los EA según la prioridad de riesgo establecida. Se trata de un estudio prospectivo de los pacientes ingresados en el hospital que cumplen el criterio de edad mayor o igual a 80 años. Las evaluaciones fueron realizadas durante 3 días consecutivos en 3 meses diferentes. La muestra total analizada fue de 133 pacientes, que representa el 20% de los pacientes ingresados en nuestro hospital durante el período de estudio. Como resultado hemos obtenido una valoración de los EA de la población anciana hospitalizada para realizar un plan de prevención de riesgos que desarrolle cuidados específicos para estos pacientes.There are multiple and cumulative causes of functional decline among hospitalized elderly patients Hospitalization itself may frequently cause a state of irreversible functional decline, leading to complications not related to the initial reasons for the hospital admission. Moreover, this lower functional status may carry risks of adverse events, potentially reducing quality of life. Our general goal was to design a specific program to prevent adverse events relating to hospitalized frail elderly patients. We determined intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors within our security strategies, including actions to minimize or even mitigate adverse

  17. Aspirin for Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials and Subgroup Analysis by Sex and Diabetes Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Chen, Sijing; Yang, Wei; Bao, Wei; Rong, Ying; Yu, Xuefeng; Hu, Frank B.; Liu, Liegang

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the benefits and harms of aspirin for the primary prevention of CVD and determine whether the effects vary by sex and diabetes status. Methods We searched Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases for randomized controlled trials comparing the effects of aspirin with placebo or control in people with no pre-existing CVD. Two investigators independently extracted data and assessed the study quality. Analyses were performed using Stata version 12. Results Fourteen trials (107,686 participants) were eligible. Aspirin was associated with reductions in major cardiovascular events (risk ratio, 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.85–0.95), myocardial infarction (0.86; 0.75–0.93), ischemic stroke (0.86; 0.75–0.98) and all-cause mortality (0.94; 0.89–0.99). There were also increases in hemorrhagic stroke (1.34; 1.01–1.79) and major bleeding (1.55; 1.35–1.78) with aspirin. The number needed to treat to prevent 1 major cardiovascular event over a mean follow-up of 6.8 years was 284. By comparison, the numbers needed to harm to cause 1 major bleeding is 299. In subgroup analyses, pooled results demonstrated a reduction in myocardial infarction among men (0.71; 0.59–0.85) and ischemic stroke among women (0.77; 0.63–0.93). Aspirin use was associated with a reduction (0.65; 0.51–0.82) in myocardial infarction among diabetic men. In meta-regression analyses, the results suggested that aspirin therapy might be associated with a decrease in stroke among diabetic women and a decrease in MI among diabetic men and risk reductions achieved with low doses (75 mg/day) were as large as those obtained with higher doses (650 mg/day). Conclusions The use of low-dose aspirin was beneficial for primary prevention of CVD and the decision regarding an aspirin regimen should be made on an individual patient basis. The effects of aspirin therapy varied by sex and diabetes status. A clear benefit of aspirin in the primary prevention of CVD in people with diabetes

  18. Mean platelet volume as a risk stratification tool in the Emergency Department for evaluating patients with ischaemic stroke and TIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogan, N.O.; Karakurt, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the variations of mean platelet volume in patients with ischaemic cerebrovascular complaints, and to find out its diagnostic utility in an acute setting to help risk stratification in patients with ischaemic stroke and transient ischaemic attacks. Methods: The prospective cross-sectional study was conducted at the Gazi University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, from November 2009 to June 2010. It comprised 143 consecutive patients of acute ischaemic stroke, 39 patients of transient ischaemic attacks and 60 healthy volunteers. SPSS 13 was used for statistical analysis, and so were t-test, one-way analysis of variance test and correlation analysis. Statistical significance was accepted at p <0.05. Results: Mean platelet volume results were significantly higher in patients with cortical infarction and transient ischaemic attack compared to the control group (p <0.001 and p <0.002). A statistically significant increase was also noted in hospitalised patients when compared with discharged patients from the emergency department (p <0.036). A weak positive correlation was identified between the National Institute of Health Stroke Scores and mean platelet volume levels (r=0.207; p <0.001). A significant relationship was identified between mean platelet volume levels and previous stroke (p <0.005). Conclusion: The measurement of mean platelet volume levels may provide useful diagnostic and prognostic information to emergency physicians caring for patients with transient ischaemic attack and ischaemic stroke. In patients with suspected neurological ischaemic symptoms, high levels may be considered as an atherosclerotic risk factor. (author)

  19. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (CEBPA) polymorphisms and mutations in healthy individuals and in patients with peripheral artery disease, ischaemic heart disease and hyperlipidaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, O; Kostecka, A; Provazníková, D; Krásná, B; Kotlín, R; Stanková, M; Kobylka, P; Dostálová, G; Zeman, M; Chochola, M

    2010-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha, encoded by the intronless CEBPA gene, is a transcription factor that induces expression of genes involved in differentiation of granulocytes, monocytes, adipocytes and hepatocytes. Both mono- and bi-allelic CEBPA mutations were detected in acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. In this study we also identified CEBPA mutations in healthy individuals and in patients with peripheral artery disease, ischaemic heart disease and hyperlipidaemia. We found 16 various deletions with the presence of two direct repeats in CEBPA by analysis of 431 individuals. Three most frequent repeats included in these deletions in CEBPA gene are CGCGAG (493- 498_865-870), GG (486-487_885-886), and GCCAAGCAGC (508-517_907-916), all according to GenBank Accession No. NM_004364.2. In one case we identified that a father with ischaemic heart disease and his healthy son had two identical deletions (493_864del and 508_906del, both according to GenBank Accession No. NM_004364.2) in CEBPA. The occurrence of deletions between two repetitive sequences may be caused by recombination events in the repair process. A double-stranded cut in DNA may initiate these recombination events in adjacent DNA sequences. Four types of polymorphisms in the CEBPA gene were also detected in the screened individuals. Polymorphism in CEBPA gene 690 G>T according to GenBank Accession No. NM_004364.2 is the most frequent type in our analysis. Statistical analysis did not find significant differences in the frequency of polymorphisms in CEBPA in patients and in healthy individuals with the exception of P4 polymorphism (580_585dup according to GenBank Accesion No. NM_004364.2). P4 polymorphism was significantly increased in ischaemic heart disease patients.

  20. High cardiovascular event rates in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis: the REACH Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aichner, F T; Topakian, R; Alberts, M J

    2009-01-01

    /absence of ACAS at the time of inclusion. RESULTS: Compared with patients without ACAS (n = 30 329), patients with ACAS (n = 3164) had higher age- and sex-adjusted 1-year rates of transient ischaemic attack (3.51% vs. 1.61%, P stroke (2.65% vs. 1.75%, P = 0.0009), fatal stroke (0.49% vs. 0...... ischaemic events as most important predictor of future stroke (HR 3.21, 95% CI 1.82-5.65, P ischaemic events. Stroke was powerfully predicted by prior cerebrovascular...... with or at risk of atherothrombosis. METHODS: The Reduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health Registry enrolled patients with either > or =3 atherothrombotic risk factors or established atherothrombotic disease. We investigated the 1-year follow-up data of patients for whom physicians reported presence...

  1. Citicoline in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke: an international, randomised, multicentre, placebo-controlled study (ICTUS trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávalos, Antoni; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Castillo, José; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Ferro, Jose; Martínez-Vila, Eduardo; Serena, Joaquín; Segura, Tomás; Cruz, Vitor T; Masjuan, Jaime; Cobo, Erik; Secades, Julio J

    2012-07-28

    Citicoline is approved in some countries for the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke. The drug has shown some evidence of efficacy in a pooled analysis. We sought to confirm the efficacy of citicoline in a larger trial. We undertook a randomised, placebo-controlled, sequential trial in patients with moderate-to-severe acute ischaemic stroke admitted at university hospitals in Germany, Portugal, and Spain. Using a centralised minimisation process, patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive citicoline or placebo within 24 h after the onset of symptoms (1000 mg every 12 h intravenously during the first 3 days and orally thereafter for a total of 6 weeks [2×500 mg oral tablets given every 12 h]). All study participants were masked. The primary outcome was recovery at 90 days measured by a global test combining three measures of success: National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≤1, modified Rankin score ≤1, and Barthel Index ≥95. Safety endpoints included symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage in patients treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, neurological deterioration, and mortality. This trial is registered, NCT00331890. 2298 patients were enrolled into the study from Nov 26, 2006, to Oct 27, 2011. 37 centres in Spain, 11 in Portugal, and 11 in Germany recruited patients. Of the 2298 patients who gave informed consent and underwent randomisation, 1148 were assigned to citicoline and 1150 to placebo. The trial was stopped for futility at the third interim analysis on the basis of complete data from 2078 patients. The final randomised analysis was based on data for 2298 patients: 1148 in citicoline group and 1150 in placebo group. Global recovery was similar in both groups (odds ratio 1·03, 95% CI 0·86-1·25; p=0·364). No significant differences were reported in the safety variables nor in the rate of adverse events. Under the circumstances of the ICTUS trial, citicoline is not efficacious in the treatment of moderate

  2. Telomere length and ischaemic stroke in women: a nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürks, M; Prescott, J; Dushkes, R; De Vivo, I; Rexrode, K M

    2013-07-01

    Telomere shortening has been implicated in cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, prospective data on the association between relative telomere length (RTL) and ischaemic stroke are scarce and inconclusive. We used a nested case-control design among women participating in the prospective Nurses' Health Study. Participants provided blood samples in 1990 and were followed till 2006. Women with confirmed incident ischaemic stroke were matched to controls by age, smoking, postmenopausal status and postmenopausal hormone use. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine RTL in genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine the risk of ischaemic stroke associated with RTL, using RTL quartiles and as dichotomous according to the median. Data on RTL were available from 504 case-control pairs. Results did not suggest an association between RTL and ischaemic stroke. The odds ratio (OR) for ischaemic stroke was 0.82 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52-1.32] comparing lowest with the highest RTL quartile and 0.90 (95% CI 0.65-1.24) comparing RTL below the median with RTL above the median. Associations were unchanged after additional adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. Further analyses suggested an association between RTL and fatal ischaemic stroke (54 case-control pairs; lowest versus highest quartile OR = 1.99, 95%CI 0.26-14.9); however, results were statistically insignificant. In this large nested case-control study among women RTL was not associated with ischaemic stroke. In light of the varying study results in the literature on the association between telomere length and stroke, additional research is warranted. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  3. Major life events and the risk of ischaemic heart disease: does accumulation increase the risk?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingelise; Diderichsen, Finn; Kornerup, Henriette

    2011-01-01

    a dose-response association with psychological risk factors with highest estimates for those exposed to MLE in all three life domains: VE [odds ratio (OR)¿=¿15.07; 95% CI 8.97-25.31] and use of tranquillizers (OR¿=¿4.41; 95% CI 3.10-6.26). CONCLUSION: This prospective study finds no associations between......, there were no associations between MLE and incidence of IHD. However, being placed in care during childhood was associated with a higher risk of IHD among women [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.36; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.97-1.89], but a lower risk of IHD among men (HR¿=¿0.72; 95% CI 0.51-1.03). MLE showed...

  4. Contemporary stroke prevention strategies in 11 096 European patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boriani, Giuseppe; Proietti, Marco; Laroche, Cécile

    2017-01-01

    % of patients, while no antithrombotic treatment was prescribed in 6.4%. On multivariable analysis, age, hypertension, previous ischaemic stroke, symptomatic AF and planned cardioversion or ablation were independent predictors of OAC use, whereas lone AF, previous haemorrhagic events, chronic kidney disease......Aims: Contemporary data regarding atrial fibrillation (AF) management and current use of oral anticoagulants (OACs) for stroke prevention are needed. Methods and results: The EURObservational Research Programme on AF (EORP-AF) Long-Term General Registry analysed consecutive AF patients presenting...... and admission for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or non-cardiovascular causes independently predicted OAC non-use. Regarding the OAC type, coronary artery disease, history of heart failure, or valvular heart disease, planned cardioversion and non-AF reasons for admission independently predicted the use...

  5. Clinical review: Therapy for refractory intracranial hypertension in ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jüttler, Eric; Schellinger, Peter D; Aschoff, Alfred; Zweckberger, Klaus; Unterberg, Andreas; Hacke, Werner

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of patients with large hemispheric ischaemic stroke accompanied by massive space-occupying oedema represents one of the major unsolved problems in neurocritical care medicine. Despite maximum intensive care, the prognosis of these patients is poor, with case fatality rates as high as 80%. Therefore, the term 'malignant brain infarction' was coined. Because conservative treatment strategies to limit brain tissue shift almost consistently fail, these massive infarctions often are regarded as an untreatable disease. The introduction of decompressive surgery (hemicraniectomy) has completely changed this point of view, suggesting that mortality rates may be reduced to approximately 20%. However, critics have always argued that the reduction in mortality may be outweighed by an accompanying increase in severe disability. Due to the lack of conclusive evidence of efficacy from randomised trials, controversy over the benefit of these treatment strategies remained, leading to large regional differences in the application of this procedure. Meanwhile, data from randomised trials confirm the results of former observational studies, demonstrating that hemicraniectomy not only significantly reduces mortality but also significantly improves clinical outcome without increasing the number of completely dependent patients. Hypothermia is another promising treatment option but still needs evidence of efficacy from randomised controlled trials before it may be recommended for clinical routine use. This review gives the reader an integrated view of the current status of treatment options in massive hemispheric brain infarction, based on the available data of clinical trials, including the most recent data from randomised trials published in 2007.

  6. [Oxidative stress in perinatal asphyxia and hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, Antonio; Benavente, Isabel; Blanco, Dorotea; Boix, Héctor; Cabañas, Fernando; Chaffanel, Mercedes; Fernández-Colomer, Belén; Fernández-Lorenzo, José Ramón; Loureiro, Begoña; Moral, María Teresa; Pavón, Antonio; Tofé, Inés; Valverde, Eva; Vento, Máximo

    2017-06-23

    Birth asphyxia is one of the principal causes of early neonatal death. In survivors it may evolve to hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and major long-term neurological morbidity. Prolonged and intense asphyxia will lead to energy exhaustion in tissues exclusively dependent on aerobic metabolism, such as the central nervous system. Energy deficit leads to ATP-dependent pumps blockage, with the subsequent loss of neuronal transmembrane potential. The most sensitive areas of the brain will die due to necrosis. In more resistant areas, neuronal hyper-excitability, massive entrance of ionic calcium, activation of NO-synthase, free radical generation, and alteration in mitochondrial metabolism will lead to a secondary energy failure and programmed neuronal death by means of the activation of the caspase pathways. A third phase has recently been described that includes persistent inflammation and epigenetic changes that would lead to a blockage of oligodendrocyte maturation, alteration of neurogenesis, axonal maturation, and synaptogenesis. In this scenario, oxidative stress plays a critical role causing direct damage to the central nervous system and activating metabolic cascades leading to apoptosis and inflammation. Moderate whole body hypothermia to preserve energy stores and to reduce the formation of oxygen reactive species attenuates the mechanisms that lead to the amplification of cerebral damage upon resuscitation. The combination of hypothermia with coadjuvant therapies may contribute to improve the prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Hyperuricaemia as a prognostic factor for acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Naranjo, F H; Saavedra Santana, P; González Hernández, A; Fabre Pi, O; Sosa-Henríquez, M

    2018-03-08

    Recent studies on uric acid as a biomarker for the prognosis of acute stroke have found conflicting results. We collected blood samples from 600 consecutively admitted patients at our tertiary hospital and analysed the relationship between uric acid levels and functional prognosis (measured using the modified Rankin Scale [mRS]). Patients who had received reperfusion therapy were excluded since this may have influenced uric acid levels. A total of 73% of patients had mRS scores ≤2; the mean uric acid level was 5.22mg/dL. We found a nonlinear relationship between functional prognosis at discharge and serum uric acid levels at admission when the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was excluded from the analysis. Serum uric acid levels in patients with acute ischaemic stroke are significantly associated with functional prognosis at discharge, although this relationship is nonlinear. In fact, poorer prognosis is associated both with very low and with very high concentrations of uric acid. This suggests a dual role of uric acid in relation to stroke: on the one hand, as an associated risk factor, and on the other, as a possible neuroprotective factor due to its antioxidant effect. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Intentional Weight Loss Improved Performance in Obese Ischaemic Heart Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Nina; Myint, Khin Swe; Heck, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The risk of heart failure (HF) increases with BMI, but paradoxically obesity has been associated with reduced mortality in patients with HF. The effect of intentional or therapeutic weight loss on HF is not well known. We examined the effect of weight loss induced by low energy diet (LED......) on physical performance and cardiovascular risk factors in obese patients with moderate-to-severe HF and/or ischaemic heart disease (IHD). Methods and Results: Results from two weight loss interventions at two centres, one in Denmark (DK - 12 week intervention in 21 subjects (14 LED, 7 controls)) and one...... in UK, (16 week intervention in 11 subjects (all LED, no controls) were combined for a total of 32 subjects with HF or IHD and median BMI 36.2 kg/m2 (range 30-50). Weight loss was initiated with LED (800 kcal/day) followed by energy restricted and protein-rich diet (1200 kcal/day). Physical performance...

  9. Warning and prevention based on estimates with large uncertainties: the case of low-frequency and large-impact events like tsunamis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinti, Stefano; Armigliato, Alberto; Pagnoni, Gianluca; Zaniboni, Filippo

    2013-04-01

    Geoscientists deal often with hazardous processes like earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, hurricanes, etc., and their research is aimed not only to a better understanding of the physical processes, but also to provide assessment of the space and temporal evolution of a given individual event (i.e. to provide short-term prediction) and of the expected evolution of a group of events (i.e. to provide statistical estimates referred to a given return period, and a given geographical area). One of the main issues of any scientific method is how to cope with measurement errors, a topic which in case of forecast of ongoing or of future events translates into how to deal with forecast uncertainties. In general, the more data are available and processed to make a prediction, the more accurate the prediction is expected to be if the scientific approach is sound, and the smaller the associated uncertainties are. However, there are several important cases where assessment is to be made with insufficient data or insufficient time for processing, which leads to large uncertainties. Two examples can be given taken from tsunami science, since tsunamis are rare events that may have destructive power and very large impact. One example is the case of warning for a tsunami generated by a near-coast earthquake, which is an issue at the focus of the European funded project NearToWarn. Warning has to be launched before tsunami hits the coast, that is in a few minutes after its generation. This may imply that data collected in such a short time are not yet enough for an accurate evaluation, also because the implemented monitoring system (if any) could be inadequate (f.i. one reason of inadequacy could be that implementing a dense instrumental network could be judged too expensive for rare events) The second case is the long term prevention from tsunami strikes. Tsunami infrequency may imply that the historical record for a given piece of coast is too short to capture a statistical

  10. Program of rehabilitative exercise and education to avert vascular events after non-disabling stroke or transient ischemic attack (PREVENT Trial: a multi-centred, randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Kara

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite lack of outward signs, most individuals after non-disabling stroke (NDS and transient ischemic attack (TIA have significant cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease and are at high risk of a major stroke, hospitalization for other vascular events, or death. Most have multiple modifiable risk factors (e.g., hypertension, physical inactivity, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, tobacco consumption, psychological stress. In addition, accelerated rates of depression, cognitive decline, and poor quality of sleep have been reported following TIA, which correlate with poor functional outcomes and reduced quality of life. Thus, NSD and TIA are important warning signs that should not be overlooked. The challenge is not unlike that facing other 'silent' conditions - to identify a model of care that is effective in changing people's current behaviors in order to avert further morbidity. Methods/Design A single blind, randomized controlled trial will be conducted at two sites to compare the effectiveness of a program of rehabilitative exercise and education versus usual care in modifying vascular risk factors in adults after NDS/TIA. 250 adults within 90 days of being diagnosed with NDS/TIA will be randomly allocated to a 12-week program of exercise and education (PREVENT or to an outpatient clinic assessment and discussion of secondary prevention recommendations with return clinic visits as indicated (USUAL CARE. Primary outcome measures will include blood pressure, waist circumference, 12-hour fasting lipid profile, and 12-hour fasting glucose/hemoglobin A1c. Secondary measures will include exercise capacity, walking endurance, physical activity, cognitive function, depression, goal attainment and health-related quality of life. Outcome assessment will be conducted at baseline, post-intervention, and 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Direct health care costs incurred over one year by PREVENT versus USUAL CARE participants will also be

  11. Diagnosis of acute ischaemic stroke with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppenheim, C.; Dormont, D.; Lehericy, S.; Marsault, C.; Logak, M.; Manai, R.; Samson, Y.; Rancurel, G.

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and use of diffusion-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery pulse sequences performed as an emergency for patients with acute ischaemic stroke. A 5-min MRI session was designed as an emergency diagnostic procedure for patients admitted with suspected acute ischaemic stroke. We reviewed routine clinical implementation of the procedure, and its sensitivity and specificity for acute ischaemic stroke over the first 8 months. We imaged 91 patients (80 min to 48 h following the onset of stroke). Clinical deficit had resolved in less than 3 h in 15 patients, and the remaining 76 were classified as stroke (59) or stroke-like (17) after hospital discharge. Sensitivity of MRI for acute ischaemic stroke was 98 %, specificity 100 %. MRI provided an immediate and accurate picture of the number, site, size and age of ischaemic lesions in stroke and simplified diagnosis in stroke-like episodes. The feasibility and high diagnostic accuracy of emergency MRI in acute stroke strongly support its routine use in a stroke centre. (orig.)

  12. Gender association of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markoula, Sofia; Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Kostoulas, Charilaos; Tatsioni, Athina; Bouba, Ioanna; Maranis, Sotirios; Georgiou, Ioannis; Kyritsis, Athanassios P

    2011-12-01

    We examined the association of the NG011648 polymorphism (insertion/deletion) of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene with ischaemic stroke occurrence, subtype of ischaemic stroke and ischaemic stroke patients' gender. Patients with first ever ischaemic stroke were recruited prospectively in a period of 18 months. Controls were matched with the patients for age, gender, and known risk factors for stroke. Demographic data, medical history, and vascular risk factors were collected. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction enzyme analysis. Stroke and control groups were compared in regard to the prevalence of the NG011648 polymorphism. One hundred and seventy-six patients with ischaemic stroke and 178 controls were recruited and genotyped for NG011648 polymorphism (I/D) of the ACE gene. No significant difference in allele and genotype distributions emerged between control and patient groups, nor in the two subtype groups of lacunars and large artery atherosclerosis. After the data were stratified by gender, a low incidence of II homozygosity in female patients versus female controls (p = 0.05) and male patients (p = 0.013, Z score: -2.49) was found. Our results indicate that I/D polymorphisms may have a role in stroke onset, in respect to gender, with a possible favourable effect of II genotype in females.

  13. Postoperative ileus: a preventable event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Kehlet, H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative ileus has traditionally been accepted as a normal response to tissue injury. No data support any beneficial effect of ileus and indeed it may contribute to delayed recovery and prolonged hospital stay. Efforts should, therefore, be made to reduce such ileus. METHODS: Mat...

  14. Designing an Adverse Drug Event Reporting System to Prevent Unintentional Reexposures to Harmful Drugs: Study Protocol for a Multiple Methods Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddie, David; Small, Serena S; Badke, Katherin; Wickham, Maeve E; Bailey, Chantelle; Chruscicki, Adam; Ackerley, Christine; Balka, Ellen; Hohl, Corinne M

    2016-08-18

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are unintended and harmful events related to medication use. Up to 30% of serious ADEs recur within six months because culprit drugs are unintentionally represcribed and redispensed. Improving the electronic communication of ADE information between care providers, and across care settings, has the potential to reduce recurrent ADEs. We aim to describe the methods used to design Action ADE, a novel electronic ADE reporting system that can be leveraged to prevent unintentional reexposures to harmful drugs in British Columbia, Canada. To develop the new system, our team will use action research and participatory design, approaches that employ social scientific research methods and practitioner participation to generate insights into work settings and problem resolution. We will develop a systematic search strategy to review existing ADE reporting systems identified in academic and grey literature, and analyze the content of these systems to identify core data fields used to communicate ADE information. We will observe care providers in the emergency departments and on the wards of two urban tertiary hospitals and one urban community hospital, in one rural ambulatory care center, and in three community pharmacies in British Columbia, Canada. We will also conduct participatory workshops with providers to understand their needs and priorities related to communicating ADEs and preventing erroneous represcribing or redispensing of culprit medications. These methods will inform the iterative development of a preliminary paper-based reporting form, which we will then pilot test with providers in a real-world setting. This is an ongoing project with results being published as analyses are completed. The systematic review has been completed; field observations, focus groups, and pilot testing of a preliminary paper-based design are ongoing. Results will inform the development of software that will enable clinically useful user-friendly documentation

  15. Impact of eight weeks of repeated ischaemic preconditioning on brachial artery and cutaneous microcirculatory function in healthy males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Helen; Nyakayiru, Jean; Bailey, Tom G; Green, Daniel J; Cable, N Timothy; Sprung, Victoria S; Hopkins, Nicola D; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2015-08-01

    Ischaemic preconditioning has well-established cardiac and vascular protective effects. Short interventions (one week) of daily ischaemic preconditioning episodes improve conduit and microcirculatory function. This study examined whether a longer (eight weeks) and less frequent (three per week) protocol of repeated ischaemic preconditioning improves vascular function. Eighteen males were randomly allocated to either ischaemic preconditioning (22.4 ± 2.3 years, 23.7 ± 3.1 kg/m(2)) or a control intervention (26.0 ± 4.8 years, 26.4 ± 1.9 kg/m(2)). Brachial artery endothelial-dependent (FMD), forearm cutaneous microvascular function and cardiorespiratory fitness were assessed at zero, two and eight weeks. A greater improvement in FMD was evident following ischaemic preconditioning training compared with control at weeks 2 (2.24% (0.40, 4.08); p=0.02) and 8 (1.11% (0.13, 2.10); p=0.03). Repeated ischaemic preconditioning did not change cutaneous microcirculatory function or fitness. These data indicate that a feasible and practical protocol of regular ischaemic preconditioning episodes improves endothelial function in healthy individuals within two weeks, and these effects persist following repeated ischaemic preconditioning for eight weeks. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  16. Interleukin-6 is increased in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of community-dwelling domestic dogs with acute ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, Hanne; Thomsen, Barbara B; Boza-Serrano, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in dogs with acute ischaemic stroke and to search for correlations between infarct volume and cytokine concentrations. Blood and CSF were collected from dogs less than 72 h after a spontaneous ischaemic stroke. Infarct volumes were estimated on MRIs. Interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL...

  17. Only a fraction of patients with ischaemic diseases or diabetes are treated to recommended target values for plasma lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siggaard-Andersen, Niels; Freiberg, Jacob J; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that individuals in the general population with and without ischaemic cardiovascular disease, or with diabetes, are treated to recommended target values for plasma lipids.......We tested the hypothesis that individuals in the general population with and without ischaemic cardiovascular disease, or with diabetes, are treated to recommended target values for plasma lipids....

  18. Systematic review of pharmacological therapies for the management of ischaemic pain in patients with non-reconstructable critical limb ischaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2017-08-23

    Critical limb ischaemia (CLI) is a severe manifestation of peripheral arterial disease, characterised by chronic ischaemic rest pain, ulcers or gangrene. Management of ischaemic pain is challenging in patients with no options for revascularisation and optimal pharmacological therapies have not been established.

  19. ExStroke Pilot Trial of the effect of repeated instructions to improve physical activity after ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Gudrun; Krarup, Lars-Henrik; Zeng, Xianrong

    2009-01-01

    To investigate if repeated verbal instructions about physical activity to patients with ischaemic stroke could increase long term physical activity.......To investigate if repeated verbal instructions about physical activity to patients with ischaemic stroke could increase long term physical activity....

  20. Burden and Prevention of Adverse Cardiac Events in Patients with Concomitant Chronic Heart Failure and Coronary Artery Disease: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Louis; Khoury, Hanane; Welner, Sharon; Briere, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-06-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) or coronary artery disease (CAD) confers risk for thromboembolism and secondary adverse cardiac events (ACEs) (e.g., mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke). When HF and CAD occur concomitantly, ACE risk is reported to be elevated. We investigated ACEs, their epidemiology, and the resulting burden among patients with concomitant HF and CAD through a structured review of recent literature. Antithrombotic treatment for ACE prevention was assessed. Pertinent databases (PubMed, other) were searched for relevant articles published from January 2004 to March 2015. Data collected included ACE incidence, healthcare resource use, costs, change in quality of life attributed to ACEs, and treatment practice for prevention of ACEs in patients with concomitant HF and CAD. Mortality rates for patients with both HF and CAD ranged from 4.9-12.3% at 30 days to 13.7-86% for periods between 9.9 months and 10 years. Incidence of ACEs among HF patients with CAD is, respectively, at least 82% and 15% higher than for patients without HF or without CAD, except for stroke investigated in two studies. All-cause and HF-related hospitalization is the main driver of the economic burden in patients with HF, the majority of whom had CAD origin. Despite high prevalence of ischemic complications, there is limited evidence to support the use of warfarin-type antithrombotics among HF patients. This study confirms that patients with concomitant HF and CAD are at elevated risk for ACEs and suggests the need for effective new antithrombotic treatments to further decrease ischemic complication rates in this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Managing transient ischaemic attacks in Australia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Andrew R; Lasserson, Daniel S; Levi, Christopher R; Magin, Parker J

    2017-09-01

    Stroke risk after transient ischaemic attack (TIA) is highest in the first few days. It is greatly reduced by commencing commonly used medications. Current Australian guidelines recommend that all TIAs be managed urgently by secondary-care specialists (mandatory for high-risk TIAs). The majority of TIAs present to general practice which creates a dilemma when specialist care is not readily accessible. There is a lack of evidence relating to the determinants of general practitioners' (GPs) actions in this situation. To explore GP management of TIA presentations. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews of a maximum variation sample of senior and trainee GPs from New South Wales, Australia. Data collection and thematic analysis were concurrent and iterative, employing constant comparison, co-coding, participant transcript review, reflexivity and continued until thematic saturation was achieved. Management of TIA was heterogeneous and depended upon the GP's engagement with the individual case. The level of engagement was predicated on the GP's predisposition toward managing transient neurological presentations generally, the clinical phenotype of the presentation and logistical or health system factors. Management was categorised as triage, guided collaboration, consultative collaboration and independent management. Collaboration with secondary care increased the GP's capability to diagnose and manage future TIAs. Heterogeneity of TIA management equates with variation from guideline recommendations. However, Australian guidelines may not be practicable due to variability in access to secondary-care specialists. Future models of care should consider systems approaches such as telemedicine to promote collaboration and assist GPs to comply with guidelines. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. [Corrected QT interval during therapeutic hypothermia in hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Laia; Boix, Héctor; Albert, Dimpna; Delgado, Ignacio; Castillo, Félix

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is the standard treatment for hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE), despite not knowing all its effects and complications. Sinus bradycardia is one of the consequences of cooling that has been previously documented in the literature, but little is known about the cardiac electrical activity in these patients. To determine the corrected QT (QTc) interval in newborns treated with therapeutic hypothermia for HIE. A prospective observational study was conducted in all patients treated with hypothermia for HIE that were admitted to our Unit between November 2012 and October 2013. ECGs were performed during hypothermia (every 24h), during the re-warming period (at 34.5°C, 35.5°C, 36.5°C), and on the 7th day of life. A total of 19 patients were included. A prolonged QTc was observed in all patients during hypothermia, and 84% (n=16) had prolonged QTc in all the ECGs during treatment. In 3 patients, one of the ECGs did not have a prolonged QTc. After re-warming, the QTc interval returned to normal in all patients. No statistically significant differences were seen when the degree of HIE (P=.192) or the use of inotropic support (P=.669) were considered. Therapeutic hypothermia applied to asphyxiated newborns with HIE seems to induce a QTc prolongation that resolves when the patient regains physiological temperature. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in patients with ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogen, E.E.; Tmbul, T.; Yildirim, G.; Sayin, R.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the impact of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in ischaemic stroke patients. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Neurology Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, Turkey, and comprised records of ischaemic stroke patients hospitalised between January 2006 and September 2009. SPSS 13 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 404 patients in the study, 69 (17.1%) had atrial fibrilation. The mean age of such patients was 66.78+-12.23 years compared to 61.01+-15.11 years for the rest. Besides 47 (68.1%) of these patients were females. According to the modified Rankin Scale scores, the degree of disability was significantly higher at the time of arrival and discharge, and mortality rates were significantly higher also (p<0.01). Conclusion: Atrial fibrillation affected the prognosis of ischaemic stroke adversely in terms of mortality and morbidity. (author)

  4. Effect of screening and lifestyle counselling on incidence of ischaemic heart disease in general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Torben; Jacobsen, Rikke Kart; Toft, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of systematic screening for risk factors for ischaemic heart disease followed by repeated lifestyle counselling on the 10 year development of ischaemic heart disease at a population level. DESIGN: Randomised controlled community based trial. SETTING: Suburbs...... of Copenhagen, Denmark PARTICIPANTS: 59 616 people aged 30-60 years randomised with different age and sex randomisation ratios to an intervention group (n=11 629) and a control group (n=47 987). INTERVENTION: The intervention group was invited for screening, risk assessment, and lifestyle counselling up to four...... times over a five year period. All participants with an unhealthy lifestyle had individually tailored lifestyle counselling at all visits (at baseline and after one and three years); those at high risk of ischaemic heart disease, according to predefined criteria, were furthermore offered six sessions...

  5. The role of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in patients with ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogen, E.E.; Tombul, T.; Yildirim, G.; Odabas, F.O.; Sayin, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in ischaemic stroke patients. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Neurology Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, Turkey, and comprised records of ischaemic stroke patients hospitalised between January 2006 and September 2009. SPSS 13 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 404 patients in the study, 69 (17.1%) had atrial fibrilation. The mean age of such patients was 66.78+9-12.23 years compared to 61.01+-15.11 years for the rest. Besides 47 (68.1%) of these patients were females. According to the modified Rankin Scale scores, the degree of disability was significantly higher at the time of arrival and discharge, and mortality rates were significantly higher also (p<0.01). Conclusion: Atrial fibrillation affected the prognosis of ischaemic stroke adversely in terms of mortality and morbidity. (author)

  6. Effect of screening and lifestyle counselling on incidence of ischaemic heart disease in general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Torben; Jacobsen, Rikke Kart; Toft, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of systematic screening for risk factors for ischaemic heart disease followed by repeated lifestyle counselling on the 10 year development of ischaemic heart disease at a population level. DESIGN: Randomised controlled community based trial. SETTING: Suburbs...... of Copenhagen, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 59,616 people aged 30-60 years randomised with different age and sex randomisation ratios to an intervention group (n = 11,629) and a control group (n = 47,987). INTERVENTION: The intervention group was invited for screening, risk assessment, and lifestyle counselling up...... to four times over a five year period. All participants with an unhealthy lifestyle had individually tailored lifestyle counselling at all visits (at baseline and after one and three years); those at high risk of ischaemic heart disease, according to predefined criteria, were furthermore offered six...

  7. Lipid profiles of non-diabetic healthy and ischaemic heart disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahzad, F.; Tawwab, S.; Ahsan, U.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To find any difference in the fasting lipid profile in patients with history of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and established atherosclerotic plaques on angiography and in subjects with no known history of IHD. Study Design: Observational, cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Immunology Department of University of Health Sciences, Lahore, from January 2007 to January 2009. Methodology: In this study, 200 male subjects, between 40 and 60 years of age were recruited. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were determined by enzymatic CHOD-PAP and GPO-PAP calorimetric method, HDL-C by accelerator selective detergent method and LDL-C by direct homogeneous enzymatic method. Serum ox-LDL contents were determined by using quantitative sandwich enzyme immuno-assay kits. Results: The total serum cholesterol, triglyceride and LDL-C levels were within the normal range in control and patient groups whereas HDL-C levels were significantly higher in the control group compared to the patient group (p = 0.001). A significant difference (p = 0.001) for HDL-C levels was observed between smokers and non-smokers. Serum ox-LDL levels were higher in patient group as compared to the control group but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The significantly lower HDL levels in patient group with normal cholesterol, LDL and triglyceride levels may suggest low HDL-C has a greater role in IHD. Raising plasma HDL-cholesterol through weight loss, healthy diet, increased physical activity and by proper pharmacotherapy is, therefore, a legitimate therapeutic target for the optimal prevention of CHD in native population. (author)

  8. Who Must We Target Now to Minimize Future Cardiovascular Events and Total Mortality?: Lessons From the Surveillance, Prevention and Management of Diabetes Mellitus (SUPREME-DM) Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Jay R; Vazquez-Benitez, Gabriela; Xu, Zhiyuan; Schroeder, Emily B; Karter, Andrew J; Steiner, John F; Nichols, Gregory A; Reynolds, Kristi; Xu, Stanley; Newton, Katherine; Pathak, Ram D; Waitzfelder, Beth; Lafata, Jennifer Elston; Butler, Melissa G; Kirchner, H Lester; Thomas, Abraham; O'Connor, Patrick J

    2015-09-01

    Examining trends in cardiovascular events and mortality in US health systems can guide the design of targeted clinical and public health strategies to reduce cardiovascular events and mortality rates. We conducted an observational cohort study from 2005 to 2011 among 1.25 million diabetic subjects and 1.25 million nondiabetic subjects from 11 health systems that participate in the Surveillance, Prevention and Management of Diabetes Mellitus (SUPREME-DM) DataLink. Annual rates (per 1000 person-years) of myocardial infarction/acute coronary syndrome (International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision, 410.0–410.91, 411.1–411.8), stroke (International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision, 430–432.9, 433–434.9), heart failure (International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision, 428–428.9), and all-cause mortality were monitored by diabetes mellitus (DM) status, age, sex, race/ethnicity, and a prior cardiovascular history. We observed significant declines in cardiovascular events and mortality rates in subjects with and without DM. However, there was substantial variation by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and prior cardiovascular history. Mortality declined from 44.7 to 27.1 (P<0.0001) for those with DM and cardiovascular disease (CVD), from 11.2 to 10.9 (P=0.03) for those with DM only, and from 18.9 to 13.0 (P<0.0001) for those with CVD only. Yet, in the [almost equal to]85% of subjects with neither DM nor CVD, overall mortality (7.0 to 6.8; P=0.10) and stroke rates (1.6–1.6; P=0.77) did not decline and heart failure rates increased (0.9–1.15; P=0.0005). To sustain improvements in myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, and mortality, health systems that have successfully focused on care improvement in high-risk adults with DM or CVD must broaden their improvement strategies to target lower risk adults who have not yet developed DM or CVD.

  9. 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging factors that predict ischaemic stroke in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jahae; Song, Ho-Chun; Choi, Kang-Ho; Kim, Joon-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Cho, Ki-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    18 F-FDG PET/CT can acquire both anatomical and functional images in a single session. We investigated which factors of 18 F-FDG PET/CT imaging have potential as biomarkers for an increased risk of ischaemic stroke in cancer patients. From among cancer patients presenting with various neurological symptoms and hemiparesis, 134 were selected as eligible for this retrospective analysis. A new infarct lesion on brain MRI within 1 year of FDG PET/CT defined future ischaemic stroke. The target-to-background ratio (TBR) of each arterial segment was used to define arterial inflammation on PET imaging. Abdominal obesity was defined in terms of the area and proportion of visceral adipose tissue (VAT), subcutaneous adipose tissue and total adipose tissue (TAT) on a single CT slice at the umbilical level. Ischaemic stroke confirmed by MRI occurred in 30 patients. Patients with stroke had higher TBRs in the carotid arteries and abdominal aorta (P < 0.001) and a higher VAT proportion (P = 0.021) and TAT proportion (P = 0.041) than patients without stroke. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that TBRs of the carotid arteries and abdominal aorta, VAT and TAT proportions, and the presence of a metabolically active tumour were significantly associated with future ischaemic stroke. Combining PET and CT variables improved the power for predicting future ischaemic stroke. Our findings suggest that arterial FDG uptake and hypermetabolic malignancy on PET and the VAT proportion on CT could be independent predictors of future ischaemic stroke in patients with cancer and could identify those patients who would benefit from medical treatment. (orig.)

  10. Dietary fibre intake and risk of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke in the UK Women's Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threapleton, D E; Burley, V J; Greenwood, D C; Cade, J E

    2015-04-01

    Stroke risk is modifiable through many risk factors, one being healthy dietary habits. Fibre intake was associated with a reduced stroke risk in recent meta-analyses; however, data were contributed by relatively few studies, and few examined different stroke types. A total of 27,373 disease-free women were followed up for 14.4 years. Diet was assessed with a 217-item food frequency questionnaire and stroke cases were identified using English Hospital Episode Statistics and mortality records. Survival analysis was applied to assess the risk of total, ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke in relation to fibre intake. A total of 135 haemorrhagic and 184 ischaemic stroke cases were identified in addition to 138 cases where the stroke type was unknown or not recorded. Greater intake of total fibre, higher fibre density and greater soluble fibre, insoluble fibre and fibre from cereals were associated with a significantly lower risk for total stroke. For total stroke, the hazard ratio per 6 g/day total fibre intake was 0.89 (95% confidence intervals: 0.81-0.99). Different findings were observed for haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke in healthy-weight or overweight women. Total fibre, insoluble fibre and cereal fibre were inversely associated with haemorrhagic stroke risk in overweight/obese participants, and in healthy-weight women greater cereal fibre was associated with a lower ischaemic stroke risk. In non-hypertensive women, higher fibre density was associated with lower ischaemic stroke risk. Greater total fibre and fibre from cereals are associated with a lower stroke risk, and associations were more consistent with ischaemic stroke. The different observations by stroke type, body mass index group or hypertensive status indicates potentially different mechanisms.

  11. Determinants and Time Trends for Ischaemic and Haemorrhagic Stroke in a Large Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yutao; Wang, Hao; Tao, Tao; Tian, Yingchun; Wang, Yutang; Chen, Yundai; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The clinical epidemiology of stroke has been widely investigated in Caucasian populations, but the changes over time in the proportion of ischaemic to haemorrhagic strokes is less clear, especially in the Chinese population. Aims Our objective was to study the determinants and time trends for ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke, in relation to age, in a large Chinese population cohort. Methods Using a medical insurance database in the southwest of China from 2001 to 2012, time trends in age-adjusted ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke incidence and the contributing risk factors associated with age were investigated. Results Among 425,901 individuals without prior stroke (52.4% male, median age 54), the rate of ischaemic stroke (per 1000 patient-years) decreased between 2002–2007, then remained broadly similar between 2008–2012. The rate of haemorrhagic stroke showed a similar trend, being approximately 1.3–1.9 from 2008–2012. Compared to patients ageischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke incidences (rate, 95% confidential interval, CI) were higher in the elderly population (age ischaemic: 3.64, 3.33–4.00, vs 14.33, 14.01–14.60; haemorrhagic: 1.09, 1.00–1.10 vs 2.52,2.40–2.70, respectively, both pstroke rates between the elderly and the very elderly population. Ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke shared similar risk factors (age, hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD), vascular disease, and diabetes mellitus) (all pstroke (all pdisease (2.24, 1.49–3.37) was an additional major risk factor for haemorrhagic stroke, together with CAD and diabetes mellitus (all pischaemic stroke compared to haemorrhagic stroke with ageing. CAD, vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension were major contributors to the development of hemorrhagic stroke in the very elderly Chinese population. PMID:27685332

  12. Exome array analysis of ischaemic stroke: results from a southern Swedish study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderholm, M; Almgren, P; Jood, K; Stanne, T M; Olsson, M; Ilinca, A; Lorentzen, E; Norrving, B; Engström, G; Melander, O; Jern, C; Lindgren, A

    2016-12-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified a few risk loci for ischaemic stroke, but these variants explain only a small part of the genetic contribution to the disease. Coding variants associated with amino acid substitutions or premature termination of protein synthesis could have a large effect on disease risk. We performed an exome array analysis for ischaemic stroke. Patients with ischaemic stroke (n = 2385) and control subjects (n = 6077) from three Swedish studies were genotyped with the Illumina HumanOmniExpressExome BeadChip. Single-variant association analysis and gene-based tests were performed of exome variants with minor allele frequency of ischaemic stroke after Bonferroni correction (all P > 1.8 × 10 -6 for single-variant and >4.15 × 10 -6 for gene-based analysis). The strongest association in single-variant analysis was found for a missense variant in the DNAH11 gene (rs143362381; P = 5.01 × 10 -6 ). In gene-based tests, the strongest association was for the ZBTB20 gene (P = 7.9 × 10 -5 ). The GWA analysis showed that the sample was homogenous (median genomic inflation factor = 1.006). No genome-wide significant association with overall ischaemic stroke risk was found. However, previously reported associations for the PITX2 and ZFHX3 gene loci with cardioembolic stroke subtype were replicated (P = 7 × 10 -15 and 6 × 10 -3 ). This exome array analysis did not identify any single variants or genes reaching the pre-defined significance level for association with ischaemic stroke. Further studies on exome variants should be performed in even larger, well-defined and subtyped samples. © 2016 EAN.

  13. Knowledge engineering for adverse drug event prevention: on the design and development of a uniform, contextualized and sustainable knowledge-based framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutkias, Vassilis; Kilintzis, Vassilis; Stalidis, George; Lazou, Katerina; Niès, Julie; Durand-Texte, Ludovic; McNair, Peter; Beuscart, Régis; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2012-06-01

    The primary aim of this work was the development of a uniform, contextualized and sustainable knowledge-based framework to support adverse drug event (ADE) prevention via Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSSs). In this regard, the employed methodology involved first the systematic analysis and formalization of the knowledge sources elaborated in the scope of this work, through which an application-specific knowledge model has been defined. The entire framework architecture has been then specified and implemented by adopting Computer Interpretable Guidelines (CIGs) as the knowledge engineering formalism for its construction. The framework integrates diverse and dynamic knowledge sources in the form of rule-based ADE signals, all under a uniform Knowledge Base (KB) structure, according to the defined knowledge model. Equally important, it employs the means to contextualize the encapsulated knowledge, in order to provide appropriate support considering the specific local environment (hospital, medical department, language, etc.), as well as the mechanisms for knowledge querying, inference, sharing, and management. In this paper, we present thoroughly the establishment of the proposed knowledge framework by presenting the employed methodology and the results obtained as regards implementation, performance and validation aspects that highlight its applicability and virtue in medication safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Psoriasis and risk of atrial fibrillation and ischaemic stroke: a Danish Nationwide Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar H; Jørgensen, Casper H

    2011-01-01

    AimsPsoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease and inflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation (AF) and ischaemic stroke. We therefore investigated the risk of these endpoints in patients with psoriasis.Methods and resultsCohort study of the entire Danish population...... followed from 1997 to 2006 by individual-level-linkage of nationwide prospectively recorded registers. Multivariable Poisson's regression and sensitivity analyses were used to assess the psoriasis-related risk of AF and ischaemic stroke. A total of 36 765 patients with mild psoriasis and 2793 with severe...

  15. Ischaemic Stroke as the First Presentation of Occult Squamous Cell Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, H. Z.; Zuberi, B. J.; Zein, T. M.; Mirghani, Z.

    2013-01-01

    A 39 years old female presented with sudden onset of left sided weakness and CT scan brain confirmed an ischaemic stroke. Extensive investigations looking for the underlying cause were un-rewarding. She presented few days later with confusion and fever and was found to have multiple new cerebral infarcts, disseminated intravascular coagulation, rectal mass and liver metastases. Biopsy of metastatic liver lesion identified the primary tumour to be of squamous cell origin. Such a rare presentation as ischaemic stroke of a very rare squamous cell carcinoma of rectum has not been reported before. (author)

  16. Cerebral radionuclide tomography using 123I-isopropyl-amphetamine in cerebral ischaemic pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesaro, P.; Moretti, J.L.; Caron, J.P.; Roualdes, B.; Louarn, F.; N'Guyen, J.P.; Gaston, A.; Degos, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Thirty patients with previous cerebral ischaemic accident were explored by both computerized tomography (CT) and radionuclide tomography after injection of 123 I-labeled N-isopropyl-iodo-amphetamine. All lesions that were visible at CT were also visible at radionuclide tomography. However, in 7 patients with normal CT results the latter method showed areas of cerebral activity anatomically correlated with neurological signs or vascular lesions. Cerebellar diaschisis was observed in 50% of established lesions in the carotid territory. Radionuclide tomography therefore appears as a very sensitive method to be used in ischaemic pathology with transient or regressive accidents [fr

  17. Evolution of DWI signal abnormalities after transient ischemic attack and minor ischaemic stroke

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Merwick, A

    2011-05-01

    Background: Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) signal abnormality after transient ischaemic attack (TIA) predicts early stroke, independently of other risk markers included in the ABCD3-I score. Early stroke recurrence detected on follow-up DWI after the acute-phase DWI may identify patients at high risk for subsequent clinicalstrokesstroke, cognitive impairment, and seizures. We aimed to determine the evolution of acute DWI lesions and rate of new ischaemic lesion (NIL) occurrence on follow-up DWI after TIA and minor stroke.\\r\

  18. [C-reactive protein and risk of ischaemic vascular and cerebrovascular disease--secondary publication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Jensen, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated levels of C reactive protein (CRP) are associated with increased risk of ischaemic vascular disease. We tested whether this is a causal association. CRP > 3 vs cerebrovascular disease of 1.6 and 1.3, respectively. Four...... CRP polymorphisms were associated with a 64% increase in CRP levels, resulting in a theoretically predicted increased risk of 32% and 25% for ischemic heart- and ischemic cerebrovascular disease, respectively. However, these genotype combinations were not associated with an increased risk of ischaemic...... vascular disease Udgivelsesdato: 2009/5/18...

  19. Cerebral radionuclide tomography using /sup 123/I-isopropyl-amphetamine in cerebral ischaemic pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesaro, P.; Moretti, J.L.; Caron, J.P.; Roualdes, B.; Louarn, F.; N' Guyen, J.P.; Gaston, A.; Degos, J.D. (C.H.U. Henri Mondor, Dept. de Neurosciences Medicales, 94 - Creteil (France))

    1985-02-02

    Thirty patients with previous cerebral ischaemic accident were explored by both computerized tomography (CT) and radionuclide tomography after injection of /sup 123/I-labeled N-isopropyl-iodo-amphetamine. All lesions that were visible at CT were also visible at radionuclide tomography. However, in 7 patients with normal CT results the latter method showed areas of cerebral activity anatomically correlated with neurological signs or vascular lesions. Cerebellar diaschisis was observed in 50% of established lesions in the carotid territory. Radionuclide tomography therefore appears as a very sensitive method to be used in ischaemic pathology with transient or regressive accidents.

  20. Low whole-body insulin sensitivity in patients with ischaemic heart disease is associated with impaired myocardial glucose uptake predictive of poor outcome after revascularisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Klaus F; Carstensen, Steen; Hove, Jens D

    2002-01-01

    fluorodeoxyglucose and nitrogen-13 ammonia uptake in addition to quantified glucose uptake, blood flow and hyperaemic blood flow were assessed before CABG in 16 myocardial segments of the left ventricle. Major adverse cardiac events and LVEF were evaluated 7 months after CABG. Glucose uptake in normokinetic PET......-normal myocardium was found to be higher in patients with normal whole-body insulin sensitivity ( P segments displayed a pattern of reduced glucose uptake in normoperfused myocardium (PET-reverse mismatch) ( P ... was impaired in both patient groups. A major cardiac event after CABG could partly be predicted by the LV extent of normoperfused segments with PET-reverse mismatch. We conclude that low whole-body insulin sensitivity in patients with ischaemic heart disease and impaired LV function is associated with impaired...

  1. Age-specific trends of atrial fibrillation-related ischaemic stroke and transient ischaemic attack, anticoagulant use and risk factor profile in Chinese population: a 15-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Yannie; Chan, Nathan; Leung, Kam Tat; Chen, Xiang-Yan; Mok, Vincent; Wong, Lawrence; Leung, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is increasing globally, and the fivefold increase in stroke risk constitutes significant healthcare burden. We aim to evaluate the trends of AF-related stroke and transient ischaemic attack (AF-stroke/TIA), prior anticoagulant use and their risk factors in different age groups in Chinese population. Data were retrieved from the stroke registry at Prince of Wales Hospital. We compared the data at 5-year intervals over a 15-year period (years 1999, 2004, 2009 and 2014). A total of 3894 patients were included, 712 patients had AF-stroke/TIA. Over the 15 years, the total number of ischaemic stroke/TIA fluctuated slightly during the period from year 1999 to 2009, and increased by 21.5% in the year 2014. While AF-stroke/TIA increased continuously with time by 282.1%. Increasing trend of AF-stroke/TIA was observed in all age groups. Absolute growth was highest in patients aged ≥80 years; relative growth was most pronounced in those between 65 and 72 years (>3.5 fold increase). Throughout the 15 years, >70% of AF-stroke/TIA occurred in non-anticoagulated patients, and this proportion increased with age. Increasing trends in both hypertension and ischaemic heart disease were also observed in patients with AF aged ≥73 years. AF-stroke/TIA has increased continuously by >2.5 fold in Chinese population over a 15-year period, with the majority of AF-stroke/TIA occurring in non-anticoagulated patients. Strategic planning is needed to optimise anticoagulant use, particularly non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in elderly patients, low-income group and those with ischaemic heart disease requiring concomitant antiplatelet therapy. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Gender-specific issues in cardiac rehabilitation: do women with ischaemic heart disease need specially tailored programmes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna; Grande, Gesine; Loewel, Hannelore; Völler, Heinz; Mittag, Oskar

    2007-04-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) has changed from a disease of middle-aged men in the late 1970s to a disease of elderly women in the 2000s. Most clinical studies during the past three decades have been conducted with men. Cardiac rehabilitation programmes were also developed with special regard to improving the rate of return to work in middle-aged men. The rehabilitation needs of older patients and women in particular have been largely neglected. The aim of this review is briefly to outline our present knowledge on gender issues in cardiac rehabilitation, and to specify barriers with regard to physical activities especially in (older) women. Coping with a cardiac event, women tend to minimize or play down the impact of their health situation and avoid burdening their social contacts. After a first cardiac event, women report greater psychological distress and lower self-efficacy and self-esteem. In addition, older age, lower exercise levels and reduced functional capacity or co-morbid conditions such as osteoporosis and urinary incontinence are barriers to physical activities in women with IHD. Recent studies on psychosocial intervention revealed less favourable results in women compared with men. These findings have not yet been well explained. This emphasizes our current lack of knowledge about the processes and determinants of successful psychosocial interventions in men and women with IHD. A large (European) trial on gender-specific coping styles, needs, and preferences of older women, and the effects of psychosocial intervention is proposed.

  3. Comparison of the prognostic value of SPECT after nitrate administration and metabolic imaging by PET in patients with ischaemic left ventricular dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorrentino, Anna R.; Acampa, Wanda; Mainolfi, Ciro; Salvatore, Marco; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages of the National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Petretta, Mario [University Federico II, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular and Immunological Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    We compared the prognostic value of {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) after nitrate administration and positron emission tomography (PET) with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in patients with ischaemic left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Eighty-nine patients with previous myocardial infarction and LV dysfunction (LV ejection fraction 33 {+-} 10%) underwent {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin SPECT under control conditions (baseline) and after sublingual administration of 10 mg of isosorbide dinitrate (nitrate). Within 1 week, all patients underwent PET imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG. Four patients were excluded because of inadequate FDG uptake caused by severe diabetes. Follow-up data were obtained by phone contact with patients and by review of hospital or physicians' records. Cardiac death, myocardial infarction and late revascularisation for unstable angina were considered as events. Follow-up data were not available in three patients. Follow-up was 96% complete at a mean period of 29 {+-} 19 months. At baseline SPECT, 59 (72%) patients had evidence of viable myocardium, while 23 did not. Of these latter patients, 12 (52%) demonstrated viable myocardium after nitrate and 13 (56%) had preserved metabolic activity. Cardiac events (cardiac death, myocardial infarction and late revascularisation for unstable angina) occurred in 24 (29%) patients. Event-free survival was similar in patients with and patients without viable myocardium at baseline SPECT (p = 0.8). In contrast, event-free survival was lower in patients with viable myocardium at nitrate SPECT and PET compared to those without viable myocardium (both p<0.05). In patients with ischaemic LV dysfunction, the prognostic value of SPECT imaging after nitrate is comparable to that of PET metabolic imaging. (orig.)

  4. Incidence of stunned, hibernating and scarred myocardium in ischaemic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Pampaloni, Miguel; Morita, Koichi; Dutka, David P.; Camici, Paolo G.; Bax, Jeroen J.

    2005-01-01

    Different criteria to identify residual viability in chronically dysfunctioning myocardium in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) can be derived by the combined assessment of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and glucose utilisation (MRG) using positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of this study was to evaluate, in a large number of patients, the prevalence of these different patterns by purely quantitative means. One hundred and sixteen consecutive patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy (LVEF ≤40%) underwent resting 2D echocardiography to assess regional contractile function (16-segment model). PET with 15 O-labelled water (H 2 15 O) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to quantify MBF and MRG during hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp. Dysfunctional segments with normal MBF (≥0.6 ml min -1 g -1 ) were classified as stunned, and segments with reduced MBF ( -1 g -1 ) as hibernating if MRG was ≥0.25 μmol min -1 g -1 . Segments with reduced MBF and MRG -1 g -1 were classified as transmural scars and segments with reduced MBF and MRG between 0.20 and 0.25 μmol min -1 g -1 as non-transmural scars. Eight hundred and thirty-four (46%) segments were dysfunctional. Of these, 601 (72%) were chronically stunned, with 368 (61%) having normal MRG (0.47±0.20 μmol min -1 g -1 ) and 233 (39%) reduced MRG (0.16±0.05 μmol min -1 g -1 ). Seventy-four (9%) segments with reduced MBF had preserved MRG (0.40±0.18 μmol min -1 g -1 ) and were classified as hibernating myocardium. In addition, 15% of segments were classified as transmural and 4% as non-transmural scar. The mean MBF was highest in stunned myocardium (0.95±0.32 ml min -1 g -1 ), intermediate in hibernating myocardium and non-transmural scars (0.47±0.09 ml min -1 g -1 and 0.48±0.08 ml min -1 g -1 , respectively), and lowest in transmural scars (0.40±0.14 ml min -1 g -1 , P -1 g -1 vs 0.46±0.20 μmol min -1 g -1 , NS), and lowest in stunned myocardium with reduced MRG and transmural scars

  5. Implementing an Electronic Event-Reporting System in a Radiation Oncology Department: The Effect on Safety Culture and Near-Miss Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deraniyagala, Rohan; Liu, Chihray; Mittauer, Kathryn; Greenwalt, Julie; Morris, Christopher G; Yeung, Anamaria R

    2015-11-01

    We implemented an electronic event-reporting system to investigate its effect on quality improvement in our department. We developed an event-reporting program that launched in October 2012; data analysis was performed in January 2014. Events were logged by the radiation oncology staff and reviewed by our quality and safety committee on a biweekly basis. To measure the efficacy of the new program, and change in safety culture, a Likert-scale survey was administered before, and three months after, implementation of the event-reporting system. A total of 194 events were logged into the new system during a 15-month period (approximately 13 events per month), compared with 93 events in an 18-month period (approximately five events per month) before the program was launched. The average number of events reported by radiation therapists increased from 0.9 per month to 8.6 per month. The survey results showed a shift toward stronger agreement by staff members, in postimplementation versus preimplementation responses, when they were asked if they knew how to report an event in the department (P = .042), and if the current event-reporting system would reduce the incidence of future events (P = .032). Results showed a trend toward stronger agreement by staff members when they were asked if they felt more comfortable reporting events that they had observed (P = .093). Multiple safety action plans were implemented as a result of analysis of these events. An electronic event-reporting system streamlines quality and safety in a radiation oncology department by increasing reported events and promoting a safety culture. A program that is widely accessible, easy to use, and can analyze data meaningfully will be the most successful. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cost-effectiveness analysis of different systolic blood pressure targets for people with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack: Economic analysis of the PAST-BP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaloza-Ramos, Maria Cristina; Jowett, Sue; Barton, Pelham; Roalfe, Andrea; Fletcher, Kate; Taylor, Clare J; Hobbs, Fd Richard; McManus, Richard J; Mant, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    The PAST-BP trial found that using a lower systolic blood pressure target (disease was associated with a small additional reduction in blood pressure (2.9 mmHg). To determine the cost effectiveness of an intensive systolic blood pressure target (stroke or transient ischaemic attack on general practice stroke/transient ischaemic attack registers in England. A Markov model with a one-year time cycle and a 30-year time horizon was used to estimate the cost per quality-adjusted life year of an intensive target versus a standard target. Individual patient level data were used from the PAST-BP trial with regard to change in blood pressure and numbers of primary care consultations over a 12-month period. Published sources were used to estimate life expectancy and risks of cardiovascular events and their associated costs and utilities. In the base-case results, aiming for an intensive blood pressure target was dominant, with the incremental lifetime costs being £169 lower per patient than for the standard blood pressure target with a 0.08 quality-adjusted life year gain. This was robust to sensitivity analyses, unless intensive blood pressure lowering reduced quality of life by 2% or more. Aiming for a systolic blood pressure target of stroke/transient ischaemic attack in the community, but it is difficult to separate out the impact of the lower target from the impact of more active management of blood pressure. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  7. Patterns of blood pressure response during intensive BP lowering and clinical events: results from the secondary prevention of small subcortical strokes trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Elaine; Scherzer, Rebecca; Odden, Michelle C; Shlipak, Michael; White, Carole L; Field, Thalia S; Benavente, Oscar; Pergola, Pablo E; Peralta, Carmen A

    2018-04-01

    We applied cluster analysis to identify discrete patterns of concomitant responses of systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and pulse pressure (PP) during intensive BP lowering; and to evaluate their clinical relevance and association with risk of mortality, major vascular events (MVEs), and stroke. We used an unsupervised cluster procedure to identify distinct patterns of BP change during the first 9 months of anti-hypertensive therapy intensification among 1,331 participants in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes Trial who were previously randomized to lower BP target (SBP < 130 mm Hg) after lacunar stroke. The cluster procedure partitioned participants into three groups in the lower SBP target arm, persons with: 1) mildly elevated baseline SBP and minimal visit-to-visit BP variability (mild reducers); 2) moderately elevated baseline SBP and moderate visit-to-visit BP variability (moderate reducers); and 3) very elevated baseline SBP with very large visit-to-visit BP variability during intensification (large reducers). In the lower SBP target group, moderate reducers had a higher risk of death (adjusted HR 1.6 [95% CI 1.0-2.7]), MVE (adjusted HR 2.1 [95% CI 1.4-3.2]), and stroke (adjusted HR 2.6[95% CI 1.7-4.1]) compared to mild reducers. Large reducers had the highest risk of death (adjusted HR 2.3 [95% CI 1.2-4.4]), but risk of MVE (HR = 1.7 [95%CI 0.9-3.1]) and stroke (HR = 1.6 [95%CI: 0.8-3.5]) were not statistically significantly different compared to mild reducers. Among persons with prior lacunar stroke, baseline BP levels, and BP variability in the setting of intensive BP lowering can identify discrete groups of persons at higher risk of adverse outcomes.

  8. Evaluation of the New Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Ventilator-Associated Event Module and Criteria in Critically Ill Children in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosifidis, Elias; Chochliourou, Elpis; Violaki, Asimenia; Chorafa, Elisavet; Psachna, Stavroula; Roumpou, Afroditi; Sdougka, Maria; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the new adult Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ventilator-associated event (VAE) module in critically ill children and compare with the traditionally used CDC definition for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). DESIGN Retrospective observational study of mechanically ventilated children in a pediatric intensive care unit in Greece January 1-December 31, 2011. METHODS Assessment of new adult CDC VAE module including 3 definition tiers: ventilator-associated condition (VAC), infection-related VAC, and possible/probable ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAE-VAP); comparison with traditional CDC criteria for clinically defined pneumonia in mechanically ventilated children (PNEU-VAP). We recorded Pediatric Risk of Mortality score at admission (PRISM III), number of ventilator-days, and outcome. RESULTS Among 119 patients with mechanical ventilation (median [range] number of ventilator-days, 7 [1-183]), 19 patients experienced VAC. Criteria for VAE-VAP were fulfilled in 12 of 19 patients with VAC (63%). Children with either VAC or VAE-VAP were on ventilation more days than patients without these conditions (16.5 vs 5 d, P=.0006 and 18 vs 5 d, PVAC (31.6%), than the patients without new VAE-VAP (14%, P=.007) or VAC (15%, P=.1), respectively. No significant association was found between PNEU-VAP and death. Incidences of PNEU-VAP and VAE-VAP were similar, but the agreement was poor. CONCLUSIONS VAE-VAP and PNEU-VAP found similar prevalence in critically ill children but with poor agreement. However, excess of death was significantly associated only with VAE-VAP. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016:1-5.

  9. MMP-2 and MMP-9 as prognostic factors in ischaemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Zielińska-Turek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: No widely available, adequately sensitive diagnostic test to establish prognosis in stroke patients has been developed thus far. The aim of this study was to analyse changes in plasma levels of MMP-9 and MMP-2 as potential prognostic factors in patients with ischaemic stroke. Methods: The study included 56 patients presenting with the signs of ischaemic stroke for less than 24 hours, and 60 healthy controls without a history of neurological and/or inflammatory disorders. Plasma concentrations of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were determined immunoenzymatically at admission (i.e. within 24 hours of the cerebrovascular episode and on the 7th day of hospital stay. Results: Median concentrations of MMP-9 in stroke patients were significantly lower than in the controls, both at admission and on the 7th day of hospital stay. No significant changes in the concentration of MMP-2 in ischaemic stroke patients were observed during the course of hospital stay. No significant association was found between both MMP concentrations and neurological status of patients with cerebrovascular episodes. Conclusions: The lack of significant associations between plasma concentrations of MMP-2/MMP-9 and clinical status suggests that these metalloproteinases should not be used as prognostic factors in patients with ischaemic cerebral episodes.

  10. Ischaemic heart disease during pregnancy or post-partum: systematic review and case series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lameijer, H.; Kampman, M. A. M.; Oudijk, M. A.; Pieper, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    The risk of manifestations of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in fertile women is elevated during pregnancy and the post-partum period. With increasing maternal age and a higher prevalence of cardiac risk factors, the incidence of IHD during pregnancy is rising. However, information in the literature

  11. Reduced kidney function and outcome in acute ischaemic stroke: relationship to arterial hypertension and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losito, Attilio; Pittavini, Loretta; Ferri, Carla; De Angelis, Luigi

    2012-03-01

    Stroke is a dangerous long-term complication of kidney failure, yet its occurrence early in disease is poorly characterized. Our aim was to investigate the association of reduced kidney function, hypertension and diabetes with acute ischaemic stroke and the outcome thereof. In this prospective cohort study, the association of reduced kidney function, hypertension and diabetes with stroke and 2-year all-cause mortality was investigated. Glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was estimated by the simplified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula in 13 365 consecutive patients (671 with acute ischaemic stroke) admitted to our clinical facility over a 12-month period. Ischaemic stroke, after adjustment for age and gender, was significantly associated with eGFR stroke. Age and gender-adjusted survival analysis by Cox regression showed an association of mortality with reduced eGFR alone (HR = 4.29, 95% CI 1.02-19.60). In patients acutely admitted to hospital, reduced kidney function, hypertension and diabetes are independently associated with ischaemic stroke, but do not exert a synergic effect. After hospital discharge, mortality is strongly associated with reduced eGFR but with neither hypertension nor diabetes.

  12. The Course and Outcome of Unilateral Intracranial Arteriopathy in 79 Children with Ischaemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, K. P. J.; Bulder, M. M. M.; Chabrier, S.; Kirkham, F. J.; Uiterwaal, C. S. P.; Tardieu, M.; Sebire, G.

    2009-01-01

    Arteriopathies are the commonest cause of arterial ischaemic stroke (AIS) in children. Repeated vascular imaging in children with AIS demonstrated the existence of a "transient cerebral arteriopathy" (TCA), characterized by lenticulostriate infarction due to non-progressive unilateral arterial disease affecting the supraclinoid internal…

  13. Repeated ischaemic preconditioning: A novel therapeutic intervention and potential underlying mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Maxwell, J.; Green, D.J.; Cable, N.T.; Jones, H.

    2016-01-01

    Ischaemic preconditioning (IPC) refers to the phenomenon that short periods of cyclical tissue ischaemia confer subsequent protection against ischaemia-induced injury. As a consequence, IPC can ameliorate the myocardial damage following infarction and reduce infarct size. The ability of IPC to

  14. Apixaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation and previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Easton, J Donald; Lopes, Renato D; Bahit, M Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    In the ARISTOTLE trial, the rate of stroke or systemic embolism was reduced by apixaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Patients with AF and previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) have a high risk of stroke. We therefore aimed to assess the efficacy...

  15. Increasing rate of atrial fibrillation from 2003 to 2011 in patients with ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, S F; Christensen, L. M.; Christensen, A

    2015-01-01

    identified. Frequency analysis and linear regression were used to assess trends in atrial fibrillation diagnosis and oral anticoagulation therapy prescription. RESULTS: A total of 17.1% (n = 9482) of ischaemic stroke patients had atrial fibrillation. The relative frequency of atrial fibrillation increased...

  16. Are clinical characteristics associated with upper-extremity hypertonia in severe ischaemic supratentorial stroke?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, A. van; Hendricks, H.T.; Pasman, J.W.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The primary goal of this study was to identify clinical risk factors, in addition to muscle weakness, for upper-extremity hypertonia in patients with severe ischaemic supratentorial stroke. The secondary goal was to investigate the time course of upper-extremity hypertonia in these

  17. The role of chronic kidney disease and atrial fibrillation on outcomes of ischaemic stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Ahsan A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2018-01-01

    and diabetes mellitus lead to impairment of renal function and development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, CKD is increasingly prevalent in the elderly population and is an independent predictor of stroke recurrence, mortality and poor clinical outcomes after acute ischaemic stroke (1). This article...

  18. Genetic risk factors for ischaemic stroke and its subtypes (the METASTROKE collaboration)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traylor, Matthew; Farrall, Martin; Holliday, Elizabeth G

    2012-01-01

    Various genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been done in ischaemic stroke, identifying a few loci associated with the disease, but sample sizes have been 3500 cases or less. We established the METASTROKE collaboration with the aim of validating associations from previous GWAS and identify...

  19. Dehydration is an independent predictor of discharge outcome and admission cost in acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C-H; Lin, S-C; Lin, J-R; Yang, J-T; Chang, Y-J; Chang, C-H; Chang, T-Y; Huang, K-L; Ryu, S-J; Lee, T-H

    2014-09-01

    Our aim was to investigate the influence of admission dehydration on the discharge outcome in acute ischaemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Between January 2009 and December 2011, 4311 ischaemic and 1371 hemorrhagic stroke patients from the stroke registry of Chang Gung healthcare system were analyzed. The eligible patients were identified according to inclusion/exclusion criteria. In total, 2570 acute ischaemic and 573 acute hemorrhagic stroke patients were finally recruited. According to the blood urea nitrogen (BUN) to creatinine (Cr) ratio (BUN/Cr), these patients were divided into dehydrated (BUN/Cr ≥ 15) and non-dehydrated (BUN/Cr dehydration had higher infection rates (P = 0.006), worse discharge BI (62.8 ± 37.4 vs. 73.4 ± 32.4, P dehydration. However, acute hemorrhagic stroke with or without admission dehydration showd no difference in admission costs (P = 0.618) and discharge outcomes (BI, P = 0.058; mRS, P = 0.058). Admission dehydration is associated with worse discharge outcomes and higher admission costs in acute ischaemic stroke but not in hemorrhagic stroke. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  20. Case Report: Hypoxic-ischaemic injury — the 'white cerebellum sign ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A small percentage of patients who suffer a global cerebral hypoxic/ ischaemic injury develop reversal of the normal density relationship of grey and white matter ... this type of injury, one of which demonstrates the 'white cerebellum sign' and the other the true 'reversal sign', in order to demonstrate the imaging differences.

  1. Lidocaine reduces ischaemic but not reperfusion injury in isolated rat heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebel, D.; Lipfert, P.; Frässdorf, J.; Preckel, B.; Müllenheim, J.; Thämer, V.; Schlack, W.

    2001-01-01

    The local anaesthetic lidocaine protects the myocardium in ischaemia-reperfusion situations. It is not known if this is the consequence of an anti-ischaemic effect or an effect on reperfusion injury. Therefore, we investigated the effect of two concentrations of lidocaine on myocardial

  2. Epilepsy in Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy Due to Perinatal Arterial Ischaemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanigasinghe, Jithangi; Reid, Susan M.; Mackay, Mark T.; Reddihough, Dinah S.; Harvey, A. Simon; Freeman, Jeremy L.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the frequency, risk factors, manifestations, and outcome of epilepsy in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) due to perinatal arterial ischaemic stroke (AIS). Method: The study group comprised 63 participants (41 males, 22 females) from a population-based CP register whose brain imaging showed…

  3. Neurone-specific enolase and N-acetyl-aspartate as potential peripheral markers of ischaemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, H; Jakobs, C; de Jager, AEJ; Cunningham, RT; Korf, J

    Background After stroke, brain-specific proteins (including neurone-specific enolase) leak into the blood. The question addressed in the present study was whether N-acetyl-aspartate (amino acid derivative localized in cerebral neurones) could also serve as a peripheral marker of ischaemic damage.

  4. Pre-stroke use of beta-blockers does not affect ischaemic stroke severity and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, S.; Haentjens, P.; De Smedt, A.; Brouns, R.; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Luijckx, G. J.; De Keyser, J.

    Background and purpose: It is unclear whether pre-stroke beta-blockers use may influence stroke outcome. This study evaluates the independent effect of pre-stroke use of beta-blockers on ischaemic stroke severity and 3 months functional outcome. Methods: Pre-stroke use of beta-blockers was

  5. Comparing ischaemic stroke in six European countries. The EuroHOPE register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmivaara, A; Meretoja, A; Peltola, M; Numerato, D; Heijink, R; Engelfriet, P; Wild, S H; Belicza, É; Bereczki, D; Medin, E; Goude, F; Boncoraglio, G; Tatlisumak, T; Seppälä, T; Häkkinen, U

    2015-02-01

    The incidence of hospitalizations, treatment and case fatality of ischaemic stroke were assessed utilizing a comprehensive multinational database to attempt to compare the healthcare systems in six European countries, aiming also to identify the limitations and make suggestions for future improvements in the between-country comparisons. National registers of hospital discharges for ischaemic stroke identified by International Classification of Diseases codes 433-434 (ICD-9) and code I63 (ICD-10), medication purchases and mortality were linked at the patient level in each of the participating countries and regions: Finland, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Scotland and Sweden. Patients with an index admission in 2007 were followed for 1 year. In all, 64,170 patients with a disease code for ischaemic stroke were identified. The number of patients registered per 100,000 European standard population ranged from 77 in Scotland to 407 in Hungary. Large differences were observed in medication use. The age- and sex-adjusted all-cause case fatality amongst hospitalized patients at 1 year from stroke was highest in Hungary at 31.0% (95% confidence interval 30.5-31.5). Regional differences in age- and sex-adjusted 1-year case fatality within countries were largest in Hungary (range 23.6%-37.6%) and smallest in the Netherlands (20.5%-27.3%). It is feasible to link population-wide register data amongst European countries to describe incidence of hospitalizations, treatment patterns and case fatality of ischaemic stroke on a national level. However, the coverage and validity of administrative register data for ischaemic stroke should be developed further, and population-based and clinical stroke registers should be created to allow better control of case mix. © 2014 The Author(s). European Journal of Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Academy of Neurology.

  6. Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone and incident ischaemic stroke in men in the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shores, Molly M; Arnold, Alice M; Biggs, Mary L; Longstreth, W T; Smith, Nicholas L; Kizer, Jorge R; Cappola, Anne R; Hirsch, Calvin H; Marck, Brett T; Matsumoto, Alvin M

    2014-11-01

    Ischaemic stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly men. Our main objective was to examine whether testosterone (T) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) was associated with incident ischaemic stroke in elderly men. Cohort study. Elderly men in the Cardiovascular Health Study who had no history of stroke, heart disease or prostate cancer as of 1994 and were followed until December 2010. Adjudicated ischaemic stroke. Among 1032 men (mean age 76, range 66-97), followed for a median of 10 years, 114 had an incident ischaemic stroke. Total T and free T were not significantly associated with stroke risk, while DHT had a nonlinear association with incident stroke (P = 0·006) in analyses adjusted for stroke risk factors. The lowest risk of stroke was at DHT levels of 50-75 ng/dl, with greater risk of stroke at DHT levels above 75 ng/dl or below 50 ng/dl. Results were unchanged when SHBG was added to the model. Calculated free DHT had an inverse linear association with incident ischaemic stroke with HR 0·77 (95% CI, 0·61, 0·98) per standard deviation in analyses adjusted for stroke risk factors. Dihydrotestosterone had a nonlinear association with stroke risk in which there was an optimal DHT level associated with the lowest stroke risk. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to clarify whether there is an optimal androgen range associated with the least risk of adverse outcomes in elderly men. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Reliability of CT perfusion in the evaluation of the ischaemic penumbra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, José Eduardo; Carneiro, Ângelo; Xavier, João

    2014-02-01

    CT perfusion (CTP) is part of the initial evaluation of stroke patients, allowing differentiation between infarcted tissue and the ischaemic penumbra and helping in the selection of patients for endovascular treatment. This study assessed the reliability of the qualitative evaluation CTP maps in defining the ischemic penumbra and identified potential pitfalls associated with this technique. We reviewed CTP scans of 45 consecutive patients admitted to our institution with anterior circulation acute ischaemic stroke. Two neuroradiologists performed qualitative evaluations of cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) maps, using 24h follow-up non-contrast CT as surrogate marker for the area of definitive infarct. For each slice analyzed, the area of qualitative alteration in the CBV and MTT maps was classified as either being inferior, equal or superior to the area of infarct on the follow-up CT. Three out of 45 (7%) patients had admission CT CBV abnormalities larger than follow-up lesions; 34/45 (76%) patients had infarct areas smaller than initial MTT prolongation. In the group of patients with no recanalization 12/19 (63%) had infarct areas smaller than initial MTT lesion. CBV abnormality is a reliable marker for an irreversible ischaemic lesion, although rarely it may overestimate the ischaemic "core", possibly due to delay in contrast arrival to the brain. In the majority of patients without recanalization, MTT overestimated final infarct areas, probably because it does not differentiate true "at risk" penumbra from benign oligaemia. Qualitative evaluation of CBV and MTT maps may overestimate the real ischaemic penumbra.

  8. Bronchogenic adenocarcinoma presenting as a synchronous solitary lytic skull lesion with ischaemic stroke--case report and literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, David

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a rare case of metastatic bronchogenic adenocarcinoma in a 55-year-old man presenting with concomittant solitary lytic skull lesion and ischaemic stroke. Metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma is known to present as lytic skull lesions. Primary brain tumours are also known to cause ischaemic brain injury. An underlying stroke risk may be exagerated by cranial tumour surgery. Patients with brain tumours are well known to be predisposed to an increased risk of developing thromboembolic disease. It is unusual to see metastatic bronchogenic adenocarcinoma presenting as ischaemic stroke with a background of concomittant cerebral metastasis. The aetio-pathogenesis of this rare occurrence is discussed with a review of literature.

  9. Deteriorating ischaemic stroke. cytokines, soluble cytokine receptors, ferritin, systemic blood pressure, body temperature, blood glucose, diabetes, stroke severity, and CT infarction-volume as predictors of deteriorating ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne; Boysen, Gudrun; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth

    2002-01-01

    Although the causes of neurological deterioration in acute cerebral infarction have not yet been identified, many variables have been associated with deterioration. The aim of this study was to investigate deteriorating ischaemic stroke....

  10. Spinal cord stimulation for chronic pain of neuropathic or ischaemic origin: systematic review and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, E L; Duenas, A; Holmes, M W; Papaioannou, D; Chilcott, J

    2009-03-01

    This report addressed the question 'What is the clinical and cost-effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in the management of chronic neuropathic or ischaemic pain?' Thirteen electronic databases [including MEDLINE (1950-2007), EMBASE (1980-2007) and the Cochrane Library (1991-2007)] were searched from inception; relevant journals were hand-searched; and appropriate websites for specific conditions causing chronic neuropathic/ischaemic pain were browsed. Literature searches were conducted from August 2007 to September 2007. A systematic review of the literature sought clinical and cost-effectiveness data for SCS in adults with chronic neuropathic or ischaemic pain with inadequate response to medical or surgical treatment other than SCS. Economic analyses were performed to model the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of SCS in patients with neuropathic or ischaemic pain. From approximately 6000 citations identified, 11 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the clinical effectiveness review: three of neuropathic pain and eight of ischaemic pain. Trials were available for the neuropathic conditions failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type I, and they suggested that SCS was more effective than conventional medical management (CMM) or reoperation in reducing pain. The ischaemic pain trials had small sample sizes, meaning that most may not have been adequately powered to detect clinically meaningful differences. Trial evidence failed to demonstrate that pain relief in critical limb ischaemia (CLI) was better for SCS than for CMM; however, it suggested that SCS was effective in delaying refractory angina pain onset during exercise at short-term follow-up, although not more so than coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for those patients eligible for that surgery. The results for the neuropathic pain model suggested that the cost-effectiveness estimates for SCS in patients with FBSS who had inadequate

  11. Rivaroxaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation and previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack: a subgroup analysis of ROCKET AF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, Graeme J; Patel, Manesh R; Stevens, Susanna R; Becker, Richard C; Breithardt, Günter; Carolei, Antonio; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Halperin, Jonathan L; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Mas, Jean-Louis; Massaro, Ayrton; Norrving, Bo; Nessel, Christopher C; Paolini, John F; Roine, Risto O; Singer, Daniel E; Wong, Lawrence; Califf, Robert M; Fox, Keith A A; Hacke, Werner

    2012-04-01

    In ROCKET AF, rivaroxaban was non-inferior to adjusted-dose warfarin in preventing stroke or systemic embolism among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We aimed to investigate whether the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban compared with warfarin is consistent among the subgroups of patients with and without previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). In ROCKET AF, patients with AF who were at increased risk of stroke were randomly assigned (1:1) in a double-blind manner to rivaroxaban 20 mg daily or adjusted dose warfarin (international normalised ratio 2·0-3·0). Patients and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. Between Dec 18, 2006, and June 17, 2009, 14 264 patients from 1178 centres in 45 countries were randomly assigned. The primary endpoint was the composite of stroke or non-CNS systemic embolism. In this substudy we assessed the interaction of the treatment effects of rivaroxaban and warfarin among patients with and without previous stroke or TIA. Efficacy analyses were by intention to treat and safety analyses were done in the on-treatment population. ROCKET AF is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00403767. 7468 (52%) patients had a previous stroke (n=4907) or TIA (n=2561) and 6796 (48%) had no previous stroke or TIA. The number of events per 100 person-years for the primary endpoint in patients treated with rivaroxaban compared with warfarin was consistent among patients with previous stroke or TIA (2·79% rivaroxaban vs 2·96% warfarin; hazard ratio [HR] 0·94, 95% CI 0·77-1·16) and those without (1·44%vs 1·88%; 0·77, 0·58-1·01; interaction p=0·23). The number of major and non-major clinically relevant bleeding events per 100 person-years in patients treated with rivaroxaban compared with warfarin was consistent among patients with previous stroke or TIA (13·31% rivaroxaban vs 13·87% warfarin; HR 0·96, 95% CI 0·87-1·07) and those without (16·69%vs 15·19%; 1·10, 0·99-1·21; interaction p=0·08

  12. No Relation between Body Temperature and Arterial Recanalization at Three Days in Patients with Acute Ischaemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Marjolein; van der Worp, HB; Horsch, Alexander D.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Biessels, Geert J.; Velthuis, BK

    2015-01-01

    Background Recanalization of an occluded intracranial artery is influenced by temperature-dependent enzymes, including alteplase. We assessed the relation between body temperature on admission and recanalization. Methods We included 278 patients with acute ischaemic stroke within nine hours after

  13. No relation between body temperature and arterial recanalization at three days in patients with acute ischaemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Geurts (Marjolein); H.B. Van Der Worp (H. Bart); A.D. Horsch (Alexander D.); L.J. Kappelle (Jaap); G.J. Biessels (Geert Jan); B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta); C.B. Majoie (Charles); Y.B.W.E.M. Roos; L.E.M. Duijm (Lucien); K. Keizer (Koos); A. van der Lugt (Aad); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); K.E. Droogh-De Greve; H.P. Bienfait (Henri); M.A.A. van Walderveen (Marianne); M.J.H. Wermer (Marieke); G.J. Lycklama à Nijeholt (Geert); J. Boiten (Jelis); A. Duyndam (Anita); V.I.H. Kwa; F.J. Meijer (F.); E.J. van Dijk (Ewoud); A.M. Kesselring (Anouk); J. Hofmeijer; J.A. Vos (Jan Albert); W.J. Schonewille (Wouter); W.J. van Rooij (W.); P.L.M. de Kort (Paul); C.C. Pleiter (C.); S.L.M. Bakker (Stef); J. Bot (Joseph); M.C. Visser (Marieke); I.C. van der Schaaf (Irene); J.W. Dankbaar (Jan); W.P. Mali (Willem); T. van Seeters (Tom); A.D. Horsch (Alexander D.); J.M. Niesten (Joris); G.J. Biessels; L.J. Kappelle; J.S.K. Luitse; Y. van der Graaf (Yolanda)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Recanalization of an occluded intracranial artery is influenced by temperature-dependent enzymes, including alteplase. We assessed the relation between body temperature on admission and recanalization. Methods: We included 278 patients with acute ischaemic stroke within nine

  14. In vivo bioimpedance measurement of healthy and ischaemic rat brain: implications for stroke imaging using electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowrick, T; Blochet, C; Holder, D

    2015-01-01

    In order to facilitate the imaging of haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke using frequency difference electrical impedance tomography (EIT), impedance measurements of normal and ischaemic brain, and clotted blood during haemorrhage, were gathered using a four-terminal technique in an in vivo animal model, a first for ischaemic measurements. Differences of 5–10% in impedance were seen between the frequency spectrums of healthy and ischaemic brain, over the frequency range 0–3 kHz, while the spectrum of blood was predominately uniform. The implications of imaging blood/ischaemia in the brain using electrical impedance tomography are discussed, supporting the notion that it will be possible to differentiate stroke from haemorrhage. (paper)

  15. In vivo bioimpedance measurement of healthy and ischaemic rat brain: implications for stroke imaging using electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowrick, T; Blochet, C; Holder, D

    2015-06-01

    In order to facilitate the imaging of haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke using frequency difference electrical impedance tomography (EIT), impedance measurements of normal and ischaemic brain, and clotted blood during haemorrhage, were gathered using a four-terminal technique in an in vivo animal model, a first for ischaemic measurements. Differences of 5-10% in impedance were seen between the frequency spectrums of healthy and ischaemic brain, over the frequency range 0-3 kHz, while the spectrum of blood was predominately uniform. The implications of imaging blood/ischaemia in the brain using electrical impedance tomography are discussed, supporting the notion that it will be possible to differentiate stroke from haemorrhage.

  16. Ischaemic colitis and lung infiltrates caused by extramedullary haematopoiesis in a patient with an acute erythroid leukaemia following polycythaemia vera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brada, SJL; de Wolf, JTM; Poppema, S; Vellenga, E

    A patient with 'spent' polycythaemia vera showed extensive extramedullary haematopoiesis (EMH) in non-haematopoietic tissue clinically resulting in an ischaemic colitis and respiratory symptoms due to lung infiltrates. On laboratory investigation, the EMH also included immature erythroblasts due to

  17. INFLAMMATORY MARKERS IN ACUTE ISCHAEMIC STROKE IN RELATION TO CLINICAL SEVERITY AND EARLY OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gopi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Biochemical markers of inflammation could be useful to predict severity of stroke in acute phase. Stroke is the third cause of mortality and the first cause of disability. Recent literature have demonstrated that inflammation contributes to all phases of atherosclerosis. The results of researchers suggest that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease. The aim of the study is to assess the1. Level of peripheral inflammatory markers in acute ischaemic stroke and their relation to severity of acute stroke. 2. Value of inflammatory markers in predicting the short-term outcome and disability at the end of six months. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a prospective case control study for 6 months done from September 2014 to August 2016 in 100 patients of acute ischaemic stroke within first 5 days of symptom onset in comparison >18 years of age with 50 age and sex matched controls. Blood samples for all cases and controls were sent for erythrocyte sedimentation rate, Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR, hs-C-reactive protein, mean platelet volume, serum ferritin, serum albumin and S. gamma-glutamyl transferase at admission. RESULTS The mean values of ESR, NLR, hs-CRP in all the cases are higher when compared to the controls and are statistically significant, whereas the mean values of MPV, S. ferritin, S. albumin and GGT in cases are lower when compared to controls, but are within normal range and difference is statistically significant except ferritin. ESR, hs-CRP has significant correlation with severity of acute ischaemic stroke. The mean values of these markers increased with increase in severity. Serum albumin has significant correlation with severity of acute ischaemic stroke with mean values of these markers decreasing with increase in severity of stroke. There is no significant correlation of the inflammatory markers in present study with the short-term outcome. CONCLUSION Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of non

  18. Effect of a deproteinized blood extract on the recovery of blood circulation in an ischaemic skin lesion.

    OpenAIRE

    Smahel, J.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental model was used to study the revascularization of an ischaemic skin lesion and the effect on this process of the blood extract Solcoseryl. Under the conditions given in the experiment, restoration of the circulation was by 2 modes--re-flow in the original vessels, and neovascularization. Solcoseryl given daily i.p. encouraged the re-flow phenomenon and therefore, by improving the microcirculation and nutrition, the healing of the ischaemic lesions.

  19. Ischaemic manifestations in giant cell arteritis are associated with area level socio-economic deprivation, but not cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Sarah L; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Hordon, Lesley; Gough, Andrew; Green, Michael; Hollywood, Jane; Dutta, Shouma; Bejarano, Victoria; Jarrett, Stephen; Morgan, Ann W; Pease, Colin T

    2011-11-01

    To determine whether ischaemic manifestations of GCA are associated with pre-existing hypertension, atherosclerosis or area-level socio-economic deprivation. We conducted an observational study of rheumatologist/ophthalmologist-diagnosed GCA in eight UK centres. The main outcome measure was ischaemic manifestations observed during active GCA: visual loss/blurring, aura, diplopia, jaw/tongue/limb claudication, cerebral/myocardial ischaemia or scalp necrosis. Out of 271 patients, 222 had ischaemic manifestations. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for the influence of hypertension and atherosclerosis were 1.6 (95% CI 0.8, 3.1) and 1.5 (0.6, 3.5). The most striking finding was an association of ischaemic manifestations with increasing Index of Deprivation 2007 score: OR 4.2 (95% CI 1.3, 13.6) for the most-deprived quartile compared with the least-deprived quartile. Similar effect sizes were seen within each recruitment centre. Deprivation was associated with smoking and negatively associated with previous polymyalgia. However, neither of these variables, nor hypertension or atherosclerosis, appeared responsible for mediating the effect of deprivation on ischaemic complications. Smoking was not associated with ischaemic manifestations. Median symptom duration before treatment was 30 days; after adjusting for symptom duration, the OR for ischaemic complications was 3.2 (95% CI 1.0, 10.8) for the most-deprived quartile compared with the least-deprived quartile. In GCA, area-level socio-economic deprivation was associated with ischaemic manifestations: this was not mediated by traditional cardiovascular risk factors. These findings are novel and require replication. Delay between first symptoms and treatment may play a role. Public awareness campaigns about GCA should aim especially to engage individuals living in more deprived areas to encourage early presentation and prompt treatment.

  20. Determinants of premature familial arterial thrombosis in patients with juvenile ischaemic stroke. The Italian Project on Stroke in Young Adults (IPSYS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzini, Alessandro; Grassi, Mario; Lodigiani, Corrado; Patella, Rosalba; Gandolfo, Carlo; Zini, Andrea; DeLodovici, Maria Luisa; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Del Sette, Massimo; Toriello, Antonella; Musolino, Rossella; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Bovi, Paolo; Adami, Alessandro; Silvestrelli, Giorgio; Sessa, Maria; Cavallini, Anna; Marcheselli, Simona; Bonifati, Domenico Marco; Checcarelli, Nicoletta; Tancredi, Lucia; Chiti, Alberto; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Spalloni, Alessandra; Costa, Paolo; Giacalone, Giacomo; Ferrazzi, Paola; Poli, Loris; Morotti, Andrea; Rasura, Maurizia; Simone, Anna Maria; Gamba, Massimo; Cerrato, Paolo; Micieli, Giuseppe; Melis, Maurizio; Massucco, Davide; De Giuli, Valeria; Pepe, Daniele; Iacoviello, Licia; Padovani, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    Factors predicting family history (FH) of premature arterial thrombosis in young patients with ischaemic stroke (IS) have not been extensively investigated, and whether they might influence the risk of post-stroke recurrence is still unknown. In the present study we analysed 1,881 consecutive first-ever IS patients aged 18-45 years recruited from January 2000 to January 2012 as part of the Italian Project on Stroke in Young Adults (IPSYS). FH of premature arterial thrombosis was any thrombotic event [IS, myocardial infarction or other arterial events event] V gene (OR, 3.64; 95 % CI, 1.31-10.10), and the A20210 mutation in the prothrombin gene (OR, 8.40; 95 % CI 3.35-21.05) were associated with FH of premature stroke (n = 33), while circulating anti-phospholipids to FH of premature myocardial infarction (n = 45; OR, 3.48; 95 % CI, 1.61-7.51). Mean follow-up time was 46.6 ± 38.6 months. Recurrent events occurred more frequently in the subgroup of patients with FH of premature stroke [19.4 %); p = 0.051] compared to patients without such a FH. In conclusion, young IS patients with FH of premature arterial thrombosis exhibit a distinct risk-factor profile, an underlying procoagulant state and have worse vascular prognosis than those with no FH of juvenile thrombotic events.

  1. Impact of proteinuria and glomerular filtration rate on risk of ischaemic and intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke: a result from the Kailuan study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Wang, A; Cai, J; Gao, X; Zhou, Y; Luo, Y; Wu, S; Zhao, X

    2015-02-01

    Persons with chronic kidney disease, defined by a reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria, have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease including stroke. However, data from developing countries are limited. Our aim was to assess the relationship between chronic kidney disease and risk of stroke and its subtypes in a community-based population in China. The study was based on 92,013 participants (18-98 years old; 73,248 men and 18,765 women) of the Kailuan study who at baseline were free from stroke and myocardial infarction and had undergone tests for serum creatinine or proteinuria. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration formula and proteinuria by the urine dipstick result in laboratory databases. The primary outcome was the first occurrence of stroke. Data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for relevant confounders and results are presented as hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). During a follow-up of 4 years, 1575 stroke events (1128 ischaemic, 406 intracerebral hemorrhagic and 41 subarachnoid hemorrhagic strokes) occurred. After adjustment for variable confounders, patients with proteinuria were found to have increased HRs for the total and subtypes of stroke events (HR 1.61; 95% CI 1.35-1.92 for total stroke; HR 1.53; 95% CI 1.24-1.89 for ischaemic stroke; and HR 1.90; 95% CI 1.35-2.67 for hemorrhagic stroke). However, estimated glomerular filtration rate was not associated with incident stroke after adjustment for established cardiovascular risk factors. Proteinuria increased the risk of stroke in a general Chinese population. © 2014 EAN.

  2. Left atrial appendage occlusion for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: multicentre experience with the AMPLATZER Cardiac Plug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzikas, Apostolos; Shakir, Samera; Gafoor, Sameer; Omran, Heyder; Berti, Sergio; Santoro, Gennaro; Kefer, Joelle; Landmesser, Ulf; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Cruz-Gonzalez, Ignacio; Sievert, Horst; Tichelbäcker, Tobias; Kanagaratnam, Prapa; Nietlispach, Fabian; Aminian, Adel; Kasch, Friederike; Freixa, Xavier; Danna, Paolo; Rezzaghi, Marco; Vermeersch, Paul; Stock, Friederike; Stolcova, Miroslava; Costa, Marco; Ibrahim, Reda; Schillinger, Wolfgang; Meier, Bernhard; Park, Jai-Wun

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) with the AMPLATZER Cardiac Plug (ACP) for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Data from consecutive patients treated in 22 centres were collected. A total of 1,047 patients were included in the study. Procedural success was 97.3%. There were 52 (4.97%) periprocedural major adverse events. Follow-up was complete in 1,001/1,019 (98.2%) of successfully implanted patients (average 13 months, total 1,349 patient-years). One-year all-cause mortality was 4.2%. No death at follow-up was reported as device-related. There were nine strokes (0.9%) and nine transient ischaemic attacks (0.9%) during follow-up. The annual rate of systemic thromboembolism was 2.3% (31/1,349 patient-years), which is a 59% risk reduction. There were 15 major bleedings (1.5%) during follow-up. The annual rate of major bleeding was 2.1% (28/1,349 patient-years), which is a 61% risk reduction. Patients with single LAAO on aspirin monotherapy or no therapy and longer follow-up had fewer cerebral and fewer bleeding events. In this multicentre study, LAAO with the ACP showed high procedural success and a favourable outcome for the prevention of AF-related thromboembolism. Modification in antithrombotic therapy after LAAO may result in reduction of bleeding events.

  3. Apparent diffusion coefficient mapping of infarcted tissue and the ischaemic penumbra in acute stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Koussy, M.; Loevblad, K.O.; Kiefer, C.; Zeller, O.; Buerki, M.; Oswald, H.; Schroth, G.; Arnold, M.; Wels, T.

    2002-01-01

    MRI assessment of diffusion changes in acute cerebral ischaemia necessitates analysis of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). We used the concept of relative weighted mean ADC (rwmADC) to obtain an accurate estimate of the extent of infarcted tissue. We studied ten patient with of acute ischaemic stroke, using diffusion- and perfusion- weighted MRI. The rwmADC was used to calculate a corrected ADC-lesion volume (DLVR), which was compared with the diffusion-lesion volume (DLV), initial perfusion lesion volumes and the follow-up infarct volume on T2-weighted images. We looked at correlations between the MRI and clinical findings. DLVR was closest to the final infarct size and had the best clinicoradiological correlation (r=0.77). Weighting the mean ADC within the ischaemic and normal parenchyma can give a more correct estimate of the volume of infarcted brain parenchyma, thus improving the definition of the penumbra. (orig.)

  4. Improved GFR and renal plasma perfusion following remote ischaemic conditioning in a porcine kidney transplantation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soendergaard, Peter; Krogstrup, Nicoline Valentina; Secher, Niels

    2012-01-01

    systemic protection against ischaemic injuries. Using a porcine kidney transplantation model with donor (63 kg) recipient (15 kg) size mismatch, we investigated the effects of recipient rIC on early renal plasma perfusion and GFR. Brain death was induced in donor pigs (n = 8) and kidneys were removed......Delayed graft function (DGF) complicates approximately 25% of kidney allografts donated after brain death (DBD). Remote ischaemic conditioning (rIC) involves brief, repetitive, ischaemia in a distant tissue in connection with ischaemia/reperfusion in the target organ. rIC has been shown to induce...... and kept in cold storage until transplantation. Nephrectomized recipient pigs were randomized to rIC (n = 8) or non-rIC (n = 8) with one kidney from the same donor in each group. rIC consisted of 4 × 5 min clamping of the abdominal aorta. GFR was significantly higher in the rIC group compared with non...

  5. Early blood glucose profile and neurodevelopmental outcome at two years in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nadeem, Montasser

    2011-02-04

    Abstract Background To examine the blood glucose profile and the relationship between blood glucose levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Methods Blood glucose values within 72 hours of birth were collected from 52 term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Hypoglycaemia [< 46.8 mg\\/dL (2.6 mmol\\/L)] and hyperglycaemia [> 150 mg\\/dL (8.3 mmol\\/L)] were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months of age. Results Four fifths of the 468 blood samples were in the normoglycaemic range (392\\/468:83.8%). Of the remaining 76 samples, 51.3% were in the hypoglycaemic range and (48.7%) were hyperglycaemic. A quarter of the hypoglycaemic samples (28.2%:11\\/39) and a third of the hyperglycaemic samples (32.4%:12\\/37) were recorded within the first 30 minutes of life. Mean (SD) blood glucose values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes [4.89(2.28) mmol\\/L and 5.02(2.35) mmol\\/L, p value = 0.15] respectively. In term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, early hypoglycaemia (between 0-6 hours of life) was associated with adverse outcome at 24 months of age [OR = 5.8, CI = 1.04-32)]. On multivariate analysis to adjust for grade of HIE this association was not statistically significant. Late hypoglycaemia (6-72 hours of life) was not associated with abnormal outcome [OR = 0.22, CI (0.04-1.14)]. The occurrence of hyperglycaemia was not associated with adverse outcome. Conclusion During the first 72 hours of life, blood glucose profile in infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy varies widely despite a management protocol. Early hypoglycaemia (0-6 hours of life) was associated with severe HIE, and thereby; adverse outcome.

  6. The evaluation of cerebral oxygenation by oximetry in patients with ischaemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet G

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To evaluate the clinical significance of estimation of the regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2 in the patients with ischaemic stroke by the cerebral oximetry during acute, sub-acute and chronic phases. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: In this prospective study, 24 patients with ischaemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory were included. A detailed clinical examination and appropriate laboratory investigations were carried out. The rSO2 was determined by oximetery (INVOS 3100-SD bilaterally on the first, third, seventh, and fifteenth days. The blood pressure, the peripheral capillary oxygen saturation and the arterial blood gas values were noted too. the changes were evaluated along with Glasgow coma scale (GCS using unpaired student t-test and one way ANOVA test. RESULTS: There were significant differences between the rSO2 values in acute, subacute and chronic phases on the side of the lesion (p value < 0.05. The values of oxygen saturation gradually increased throughout the chronic phase. These values showed a positive correlation with GCS, but the results were not significant statistically. The rSO2 values were also significantly higher on the non-lesional side than those on the lesion side in the acute phase (p= 0.0034, the discrepancy disappeared during the sub-acute and chronic phases. CONCLUSION: Cerebral oximetry can be used as a measure to evaluate the cerebral oxygenation during the various phases of ischaemic stroke. It has a potential to serve as a useful marker for detection of cerebral oxygenation imbalances, to judge the effectiveness of the management and for the follow-up of patients with ischaemic stroke.

  7. Revascularization experience and results in ischaemic cerebrovascular disease: Moyamoya disease and carotid occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Fuat; Rubiera, Marta; Serena, Joaquín; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana; Gándara, Darío; Lorenzo-Bosquet, Carles; Tomasello, Alejandro; Chocrón, Ivette; Quintana-Corvalan, Maximiliano; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2018-03-14

    Cerebral revascularization techniques are an indispensable tool in the current armamentarium of vascular neurosurgeons. We present revascularization surgery experience and results in both moyamoya disease and occlusive cerebral ischaemia. Patients with ischaemic occlusive disease and moyamoya disease who underwent microsurgical revascularization between October 2014 and September 2017 were analysed. In the study period, 23 patients with occlusive ischaemic disease underwent microsurgical revascularization. Three patients presented with serious postoperative complications (2 intraparenchymal haemorrhages in the immediate postoperative period and one thrombosis of the femoral artery). All patients, except one, achieved normalization of the cerebral hemodynamic reserve (CHR) in the SPECT study. Twenty patients had a good neurological result, with no ischaemic recurrence of the revascularized territory. Among patients with moyamoya, 20 had moyamoya disease and 5 had moyamoya syndrome with unilateral involvement. Five patients were treated at paediatric age. Haemorrhagic onset occurred in 2 patients. The CHR study showed hemodynamic compromise in all patients. Cerebral SPECT at one year showed resolution of the hemodynamic failure in all patients. There have been 4 postoperative complications (acute subdural hematoma, two subdural collections and one dehiscence of the surgical wound). No patient presented with neurological worsening at 6 and 12months of follow-up. Cerebral revascularization through end-to-side anastomosis between the superficial temporal artery and a cortical branch of the middle cerebral artery is an indisputable technique in the treatment of moyamoya disease and possibly in a subgroup of patients with symptomatic occlusive ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. A pitfall in the measurement of arterial blood pressure in the ischaemic limb during elevation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J; Jelnes, Rolf

    1987-01-01

    In order to evaluate if elevation of the ischaemic limb above heart level is an alternative to the conventionally applied method with external counterpressure for estimation of skin perfusion pressure, femoral and popliteal artery pressures were measured directly in eight patients with occlusion ...... extremity cannot be determined non-invasively by elevation of the extremity, probably due to collapse of segments of the vascular bed increasing the vascular resistance considerably....

  9. Early blood glucose profile and neurodevelopmental outcome at two years in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nadeem, Montasser

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: To examine the blood glucose profile and the relationship between blood glucose levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. METHODS: Blood glucose values within 72 hours of birth were collected from 52 term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Hypoglycaemia [< 46.8 mg\\/dL (2.6 mmol\\/L)] and hyperglycaemia [> 150 mg\\/dL (8.3 mmol\\/L)] were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months of age. RESULTS: Four fifths of the 468 blood samples were in the normoglycaemic range (392\\/468:83.8%). Of the remaining 76 samples, 51.3% were in the hypoglycaemic range and (48.7%) were hyperglycaemic. A quarter of the hypoglycaemic samples (28.2%:11\\/39) and a third of the hyperglycaemic samples (32.4%:12\\/37) were recorded within the first 30 minutes of life. Mean (SD) blood glucose values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes [4.89(2.28) mmol\\/L and 5.02(2.35) mmol\\/L, p value = 0.15] respectively. In term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, early hypoglycaemia (between 0-6 hours of life) was associated with adverse outcome at 24 months of age [OR = 5.8, CI = 1.04-32)]. On multivariate analysis to adjust for grade of HIE this association was not statistically significant. Late hypoglycaemia (6-72 hours of life) was not associated with abnormal outcome [OR = 0.22, CI (0.04-1.14)]. The occurrence of hyperglycaemia was not associated with adverse outcome. CONCLUSION: During the first 72 hours of life, blood glucose profile in infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy varies widely despite a management protocol. Early hypoglycaemia (0-6 hours of life) was associated with severe HIE, and thereby; adverse outcome.

  10. Randomised clinical trial: escitalopram for the prevention of psychiatric adverse events during treatment with peginterferon-alfa-2a and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Knegt, R. J.; Bezemer, G.; van Gool, A. R.; Drenth, J. P. H.; Hansen, B. E.; Droogleever Fortuyn, H. A.; Weegink, C. J.; Hengeveld, M. W.; Janssen, H. L. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Treatment of hepatitis C with peginterferon and ribavirin is associated with psychiatric side-effects, frequently necessitating dose reduction or therapy cessation. Aim To assess the efficacy of prophylactic escitalopram to prevent psychiatric side-effects during peginterferon and

  11. Diffusion-weighted imaging of brain metastases: their potential to be misinterpreted as focal ischaemic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geijer, B. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Holtaas, S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, King Fahd Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2002-07-01

    Small focal ischaemic brain lesions are said to be easy to identify in the acute stage and to differentiate from older lesions using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Brain metastases are common and the aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of misinterpretation as ischaemic lesions in a standard MRI protocol for clinical stroke. Of 26 patients investigated with MRI for possible metastases, 12 did have metastatic brain lesions, including most of the common tumours. On a 1.5 tesla imager, we obtained DWI, plus T2- and T1-weighted images, the latter before and after triple-dose contrast medium. Well-circumscribed brain lesions with a decreased apparent diffusion coefficient and a slightly or moderately increased signal on T2-weighted images were found in patients with metastases from a small-cell bronchial carcinoma and a pulmonary adenocarcinoma. The same features were also found in metastases from a breast carcinoma but the lesions were surrounded by oedema. With a standard DWI protocol, the features of common brain metastases may overlap with those of small acute and subacute ischaemic lesions. (orig.)

  12. Detectability of cerebral hemisphere ischaemic infarcts by CT within 6 h of stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kummer, R. von; Nolte, P.N.; Schnittger, H.; Thron, A.; Ringelstein, E.B.

    1996-01-01

    To determine how early and how reliably ischaemic brain infarcts can be detected on CT within 6 h of the onset of cerebral hemisphere strokes, 44 such studies were interpreted by an experienced neuroradiologist blinded to clinical signs, but aware that the cohort was a stroke population. He was asked to detect and localise an area of parenchymal low density and/or focal brain swelling. A follow-up study showing the definite infarct served as a reference in each case. In 38 patients areas of slightly low density were seen, and in 36 follow-up CT confirmed infarcts in the locations indicated. In 2 patients the reading was false positive. In 6 patients no low density focus could be detected. In these 8 patients examined by CT within 180 min of the stroke, no low density could be identified, even in retrospect with the knowledge of the findings on follow-up. Thus, 42 readings (95%) were true positive or true negative; 2 were false positive; and none was a false negative. CT within 6 h of the onset of symptoms has a mean sensitivity of 82% (36/44) for ischaemic cerebral hemisphere infarcts. By contrast, its sensitivity to ischaemic parenchymal low density is low during the initial 2 h. The early development of hemispheric infarcts can be detected reliably if the radiologist is familiar with the signs. (orig.)

  13. Frequency of hyper-homocysteinaemia in ischaemic stroke patients of Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To find out the frequency of hyper-homocysteinaemia in ischaemic stroke patients and its relation with other risk factors. Methods: The cross-sectional study based on convenience sampling was conducted at the Civil Hospital, Karachi, from May to July 2012. It comprised ischaemic stroke patients selected from the Out Patient Department and Emergency Department. An overnight 8-hour fasting venous blood sample (4 ml in ethylenediamminetetraacetate) was drawn for analysis. Rest of the data was collected through a structured proforma and was analysed using SPSS 17.0. Results: The mean age of the 96 patients in the study was 64.9+-10.9 years (range: 40-85).Overall, 56(58.3%) cases had hyper-homocysteinemia. The frequency was significantly high in the age 60-79 age group (p<0.007). Conclusion: Hyper-homocysteinaemia, a modifiable risk factor, is associated with a high number of ischaemic stroke patients. Hence, steps should be taken to minimise this risk factor by screening and early intervention. (author)

  14. [Endovascular treatment in acute ischaemic stroke. A stroke care plan for the region of Madrid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso de Leciñana, M; Díaz-Guzmán, J; Egido, J A; García Pastor, A; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Vivancos, J; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2013-09-01

    Endovascular therapies (intra-arterial thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy) after acute ischaemic stroke are being implemented in the clinical setting even as they are still being researched. Since we lack sufficient data to establish accurate evidence-based recommendations for use of these treatments, we must develop clinical protocols based on current knowledge and carefully monitor all procedures. After review of the literature and holding work sessions to reach a consensus among experts, we developed a clinical protocol including indications and contraindications for endovascular therapies use in acute ischaemic stroke. The protocol includes methodology recommendations for diagnosing and selecting patients, performing revascularisation procedures, and for subsequent patient management. Its objective is to increase the likelihood of efficacy and treatment benefit and minimise risk of complications and ineffective recanalisation. Based on an analysis of healthcare needs and available resources, a cooperative inter-hospital care system has been developed. This helps to ensure availability of endovascular therapies to all patients, a fast response time, and a good cost-to-efficacy ratio. It includes also a prospective register which serves to monitor procedures in order to identify any opportunities for improvement. Implementation of endovascular techniques for treating acute ischaemic stroke requires the elaboration of evidence-based clinical protocols and the establishment of appropriate cooperative healthcare networks guaranteeing both the availability and the quality of these actions. Such procedures must be monitored in order to improve methodology. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Postmortem MR quantification of the heart for characterization and differentiation of ischaemic myocardial lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Schwendener, Nicole; Jackowski, Christian [University of Bern, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Bern (Switzerland); Persson, Anders; Warntjes, Marcel J. [University of Linkoeping, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    Recently, an MRI quantification sequence has been developed which can be used to acquire T1- and T2-relaxation times as well as proton density (PD) values. Those three quantitative values can be used to describe soft tissue in an objective manner. The purpose of this study was to investigate the applicability of quantitative cardiac MRI for characterization and differentiation of ischaemic myocardial lesions of different age. Fifty post-mortem short axis cardiac 3 T MR examinations have been quantified using a quantification sequence. Myocardial lesions were identified according to histology and appearance in MRI images. Ischaemic lesions were assessed for mean T1-, T2- and proton density values. Quantitative values were plotted in a 3D-coordinate system to investigate the clustering of ischaemic myocardial lesions. A total of 16 myocardial lesions detected in MRI images were histologically characterized as acute lesions (n = 8) with perifocal oedema (n = 8), subacute lesions (n = 6) and chronic lesions (n = 2). In a 3D plot comprising the combined quantitative values of T1, T2 and PD, the clusters of all investigated lesions could be well differentiated from each other. Post-mortem quantitative cardiac MRI is feasible for characterization and discrimination of different age stages of myocardial infarction. (orig.)

  16. Postmortem MR quantification of the heart for characterization and differentiation of ischaemic myocardial lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Schwendener, Nicole; Jackowski, Christian; Persson, Anders; Warntjes, Marcel J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, an MRI quantification sequence has been developed which can be used to acquire T1- and T2-relaxation times as well as proton density (PD) values. Those three quantitative values can be used to describe soft tissue in an objective manner. The purpose of this study was to investigate the applicability of quantitative cardiac MRI for characterization and differentiation of ischaemic myocardial lesions of different age. Fifty post-mortem short axis cardiac 3 T MR examinations have been quantified using a quantification sequence. Myocardial lesions were identified according to histology and appearance in MRI images. Ischaemic lesions were assessed for mean T1-, T2- and proton density values. Quantitative values were plotted in a 3D-coordinate system to investigate the clustering of ischaemic myocardial lesions. A total of 16 myocardial lesions detected in MRI images were histologically characterized as acute lesions (n = 8) with perifocal oedema (n = 8), subacute lesions (n = 6) and chronic lesions (n = 2). In a 3D plot comprising the combined quantitative values of T1, T2 and PD, the clusters of all investigated lesions could be well differentiated from each other. Post-mortem quantitative cardiac MRI is feasible for characterization and discrimination of different age stages of myocardial infarction. (orig.)

  17. Adding the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator to cardiac resynchronization therapy is associated with improved long-term survival in ischaemic, but not in non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witt, Christoffer Tobias; Kronborg, Mads Brix; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2016-01-01

    , and the multivariate analyses were adjusted for a priori selected variables. We included 917 HF patients, 427 with NICM, and 490 with ICM. Median follow-up was 4.0 years. Adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for all-cause mortality was 0.76 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.60-0.97; P = 0.03] in all patients; 0.96 (95% CI...... to ischaemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) or non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy (NICM) treated with a CRT device with or without defibrillator backup. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this observational study, consecutive patients with an ejection fraction ≤35% and QRS width ≥120 ms receiving a CRT device at Aarhus University......, 0.60-1.51; P = 0.85) in patients with NICM, and 0.74 (95% CI, 0.56-0.97; P = 0.03) in patients with ICM. In patients with NICM, ICD backup seemed to be associated with improved survival among non-responders to CRT (P = 0.08), but not among responders (P = 0.61). CONCLUSION: Adding an ICD backup...

  18. [Creative mathematics with clopidogrel; exaggeration of the preventive effect by manufacturer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algra, A; van Gijn, J; Kappelle, L J; Koudstaal, P J; Stam, J; Vermeulen, M

    1999-12-04

    A number of Dutch medical journals recently carried an advertisement stating that clopidogrel treatment reduced the number of ischaemic complications with 26%, compared with aspirin treatment. This is a miscalculation: the actual reduction is 0.51% in absolute rates, and 8.7% in relative terms. The error by Sanofi-Synthelabo arose by comparison of the event rates for clopidogrel (5.32%) as well as for aspirin (5.83%) with that in an imaginary placebo group (7.77%), yielding a reduction of ischaemic complications of 2.45% and 1.94% respectively; erroneous comparison of these two numbers leads to a difference of 26%.

  19. Effect of repeated intracoronary injection of bone marrow cells in patients with ischaemic heart failure the Danish stem cell study - congestive heart failure trial (DanCell-CHF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, A.C.; Møller, Jacob Eifer; Thayssen, P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that myocardial regeneration may be achieved by a single intracoronary bone marrow derived stem cell infusion in selected patients with ischaemic heart disease. The effect is uncertain in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure and it is not known whether...... repeated infusions would have additional positive effects. AIMS: To assess whether two treatments of intracoronary infusion of bone marrow stem cells, administered 4 months apart, could improve left ventricular (LV) systolic function in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure. METHODS: The study......, NYHA class improved (pstem cell treatment in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  20. Which interventions offer best value for money in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Cobiac

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite many decades of declining mortality rates in the Western world, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. In this research we evaluate the optimal mix of lifestyle, pharmaceutical and population-wide interventions for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a discrete time Markov model we simulate the ischaemic heart disease and stroke outcomes and cost impacts of intervention over the lifetime of all Australian men and women, aged 35 to 84 years, who have never experienced a heart disease or stroke event. Best value for money is achieved by mandating moderate limits on salt in the manufacture of bread, margarine and cereal. A combination of diuretic, calcium channel blocker, ACE inhibitor and low-cost statin, for everyone with at least 5% five-year risk of cardiovascular disease, is also cost-effective, but lifestyle interventions aiming to change risky dietary and exercise behaviours are extremely poor value for money and have little population health benefit. CONCLUSIONS: There is huge potential for improving efficiency in cardiovascular disease prevention in Australia. A tougher approach from Government to mandating limits on salt in processed foods and reducing excessive statin prices, and a shift away from lifestyle counselling to more efficient absolute risk-based prescription of preventive drugs, could cut health care costs while improving population health.

  1. Comparison of the New Adult Ventilator-Associated Event Criteria to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Pediatric Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Definition (PNU2) in a Population of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirulis, Meghan M; Hamele, Mitchell T; Stockmann, Chris R; Bennett, Tellen D; Bratton, Susan L

    2016-02-01

    The new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention paradigm for ventilator-associated events is intended to simplify surveillance of infectious and noninfectious complications of mechanical ventilation in adults. We assessed the ventilator-associated events algorithm in pediatric patients. A retrospective observational cohort study. This single-center study took place in a PICU at an urban academic medical facility. Pediatric (ages 0-18 yr old) trauma patients with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury ventilated for greater than or equal to 2 days. We assessed for pediatric ventilator-associated pneumonia (as defined by current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention PNU2 guidelines), adult ventilator-associated events, and an experimental ventilator-associated events definition modified for pediatric patients. We compared ventilator-associated events to ventilator-associated pneumonia to calculate the test characteristics. Thirty-nine of 119 patients (33%) developed ventilator-associated pneumonia. Sensitivity of the adult ventilator-associated condition definition was 23% (95% CI, 11-39%), which increased to 56% (95% CI, 40-72%) using the modified pediatric ventilator-associated pneumonia criterion. Specificity reached 100% for both original and modified pediatric probable ventilator-associated pneumonia using ventilator-associated events criteria. Children who developed ventilator-associated pneumonia or ventilator-associated condition had similar baseline characteristics: age, mechanism of injury, injury severity scores, and use of an intracranial pressure monitor. Diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia and ventilator-associated condition portended similarly unfavorable outcomes: longer median duration of ventilation, ICU and hospital length of stay, and more discharges to rehabilitation, home health, or nursing care compared with patients with no pulmonary complication. Both current and modified ventilator-associated events criteria have poor

  2. Psychosocial factors during the first year after a coronary heart disease event in cases and referents. Secondary Prevention in Uppsala Primary Health Care Project (SUPRIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toss Henrik

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large number of studies have reported on the psychosocial risk factor pattern prior to coronary heart disease events, but few have investigated the situation during the first year after an event, and none has been controlled. We therefore performed a case-referent study in which the prevalence of a number of psychosocial factors was evaluated. Methods Three hundred and forty-six coronary heart disease male and female cases no more than 75 years of age, discharged from hospital within the past 12 months, and 1038 referents from the general population, matched to the cases by age, sex and place of living, received a postal questionnaire in which information on lifestyle, psychosocial and quality of life measures were sought. Results The cases were, as expected, on sick leave to a larger extent than the referents, reported poorer fitness, poorer perceived health, fewer leisure time activities, but unexpectedly reported better social support, and more optimistic views of the future than the referents. There were no significant case-referent differences in everyday life stress, stressful life events, vital exhaustion, depressive mood, coping or life orientation test. However, women reported less favourable situations than men regarding stressful life events affecting others, vital exhaustion, depressive mood, coping, self-esteem, sleep, and symptom reporting, and female cases reported the most unfavourable situation of all groups. Conclusion In this first controlled study of the situation during the first year after a CHD event disease and gender status both appeared to be determinants of psychological well-being, with gender status apparently the strongest. This may have implications for cardiac rehabilitation programmes.

  3. Randomised clinical trial: escitalopram for the prevention of psychiatric adverse events during treatment with peginterferon-alfa-2a and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knegt, R.J. de; Bezemer, G.; Gool, A.R. van; Drenth, J.P.H.; Hansen, B.E.; Droogleever Fortuyn, H.A.; Weegink, C.J.; Hengeveld, M.W.; Janssen, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2011; 34: 1306-1317 SUMMARY: Background Treatment of hepatitis C with peginterferon and ribavirin is associated with psychiatric side-effects, frequently necessitating dose reduction or therapy cessation. Aim To assess the efficacy of prophylactic escitalopram to prevent

  4. Added prognostic value of ischaemic threshold in radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging: a common-sense integration of exercise tolerance and ischaemia severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Cecilia; Acampa, Wanda; Bauckneht, Matteo; Daniele, Stefania; Capitanio, Selene; Cantoni, Valeria; Fiz, Francesco; Zampella, Emilia; Dib, Bassam; Assante, Roberta; Bruzzi, Paolo; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Reversible ischaemia at radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) accurately predicts risk of cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction (major adverse cardiac events, MACE). This prognostic penetrance might be empowered by accounting for exercise tolerance as an indirect index of ischaemia severity. The present study aimed to verify this hypothesis integrating imaging assessment of ischaemia severity with exercise maximal rate pressure product (RPP) in a large cohort of patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD). We analysed 1,502 consecutive patients (1,014 men aged 59 ± 10 years) submitted to exercise stress/rest MPI. To account for exercise tolerance, the summed difference score (SDS) was divided by RPP at tracer injection providing a clinical prognostic index (CPI). Reversible ischaemia was documented in 357 patients (24 %) and was classified by SDS as mild (SDS 2-4) in 180, moderate (SDS 5-7) in 118 and severe (SDS >7) in 59. CPI values of ischaemic patients were clustered into tertiles with lowest and highest values indicating low and high risk, respectively. CPI modified SDS risk prediction in 119/357 (33 %) patients. During a 60-month follow-up, MACE occurred in 68 patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that CPI significantly improved predictive power for MACE incidence with respect to SDS alone. Multivariate Cox analysis confirmed the additive independent value of CPI-derived information. Integration of ischaemic threshold and ischaemia extension and severity can improve accuracy of exercise MPI in predicting long-term outcome in a large cohort of patients with suspected or known CAD.

  5. Added prognostic value of ischaemic threshold in radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging: a common-sense integration of exercise tolerance and ischaemia severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, Cecilia [IRCCS AOU San Martino-National Institute for Cancer Research, CNR Institute of Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Section of Genoa c/o Nuclear Medicine, Pad. Sommariva, Genoa (Italy); Acampa, Wanda [National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Bauckneht, Matteo; Capitanio, Selene; Fiz, Francesco; Dib, Bassam; Sambuceti, Gianmario [University of Genoa, IRCCS-AOU San Martino-National Institute for Cancer Research, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Health Science, Genoa (Italy); Daniele, Stefania; Cantoni, Valeria; Zampella, Emilia; Assante, Roberta; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Nuclear Medicine, Naples (Italy); Bruzzi, Paolo [IRCCS AOU San Martino-National Institute for Cancer Research, Epidemiology Unit, Genoa (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    Reversible ischaemia at radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) accurately predicts risk of cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction (major adverse cardiac events, MACE). This prognostic penetrance might be empowered by accounting for exercise tolerance as an indirect index of ischaemia severity. The present study aimed to verify this hypothesis integrating imaging assessment of ischaemia severity with exercise maximal rate pressure product (RPP) in a large cohort of patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD). We analysed 1,502 consecutive patients (1,014 men aged 59 ± 10 years) submitted to exercise stress/rest MPI. To account for exercise tolerance, the summed difference score (SDS) was divided by RPP at tracer injection providing a clinical prognostic index (CPI). Reversible ischaemia was documented in 357 patients (24 %) and was classified by SDS as mild (SDS 2-4) in 180, moderate (SDS 5-7) in 118 and severe (SDS >7) in 59. CPI values of ischaemic patients were clustered into tertiles with lowest and highest values indicating low and high risk, respectively. CPI modified SDS risk prediction in 119/357 (33 %) patients. During a 60-month follow-up, MACE occurred in 68 patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that CPI significantly improved predictive power for MACE incidence with respect to SDS alone. Multivariate Cox analysis confirmed the additive independent value of CPI-derived information. Integration of ischaemic threshold and ischaemia extension and severity can improve accuracy of exercise MPI in predicting long-term outcome in a large cohort of patients with suspected or known CAD. (orig.)

  6. Genetic variants associated with myocardial infarction in the PSMA6 gene and Chr9p21 are also associated with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, M G; Soto-Ortolaza, A I; Diehl, N N; Rayaprolu, S; Brott, T G; Wszolek, Z K; Meschia, J F; Ross, O A

    2013-02-01

    Ischaemic stroke shares common traditional risk factors with coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI). This study evaluated whether genetic risk factors for CAD and MI also affect susceptibility to ischaemic stroke in Caucasians and African Americans. Included in the study were a Caucasian series (713 ischaemic stroke patients, 708 controls) and a small African American series (166 ischaemic stroke patients, 117 controls). Twenty single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously shown to be associated with CAD or MI were genotyped and assessed for association with ischaemic stroke and ischaemic stroke subtypes using odds ratios (ORs) from multivariable logistic regression models. In Caucasians, four SNPs on chromosome 9p21 were significantly associated with risk of cardioembolic stroke, the strongest of which was rs1333040 (OR 1.55, P = 0.0007); similar but weaker trends were observed for small vessel stroke, with no associations observed regarding large vessel stroke. Chromosome 9p21 SNPs were also associated with risk of ischaemic stroke in African Americans (rs1333040, OR 0.65, P = 0.023; rs1333042, OR 0.55, P = 0.070; rs2383207, OR 0.55, P = 0.070). The PSMA6 SNP rs1048990 on chromosome 14q13 was associated with overall ischaemic stroke in both Caucasians (OR 0.80, P = 0.036) and African Americans (OR 0.31, P = 0.020). Our results provide evidence that chromosome 9p21 variants are associated with cardioembolic ischaemic stroke in Caucasians and with overall ischaemic stroke in African Americans. The PSMA6 variant rs1048990 also appears to affect susceptibility to ischaemic stroke in both populations. These findings require validation, particularly the preliminary findings regarding African Americans given the small size of that series. © 2012 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  7. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation occurs often in cryptogenic ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, L M; Krieger, D W; Højberg, S

    2014-01-01

    lasting predominantly between 1 and 4 h. Four recurrent strokes were observed, three in patients with PAF; all three patients were on oral anticoagulation (OAC). CONCLUSIONS: One in five patients with CS had PAF, which occurred at low burden and long after stroke. Future studies should determine the role......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk of stroke fourfold and is associated with a poor clinical outcome. Despite work-up in compliance with guidelines, up to one-third of patients have cryptogenic stroke (CS). The prevalence of asymptomatic paroxysmal atrial...... patients (16.1%). In three patients PAF was detected by other methods before or after monitoring and was undiscovered due to device sensitivity in one case. The first event of PAF was documented at a mean of 109 days (SD ±48) after stroke onset. PAF was asymptomatic in all cases and occurred in episodes...

  8. Oral buflomedil in the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease: a randomized, placebo-controlled, 4-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leizorovicz, A; Becker, F

    2008-02-12

    Cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease remain high. We performed an international, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to investigate whether long-term administration of oral buflomedil could reduce the rate of cardiovascular events in patients with intermittent claudication. Patients >40 years of age with documented peripheral arterial obstructive disease, intermittent claudication, and an ankle-brachial index between 0.30 and 0.80 were eligible for inclusion and were randomized to receive orally either buflomedil or placebo for 2 to 4 years. Aspirin was recommended for all patients (unless they were receiving other antithrombotic treatments at inclusion). The primary efficacy outcome was critical cardiovascular events, defined as the composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, symptomatic deterioration of peripheral arterial obstructive disease, or leg amputation. A total of 2078 patients were recruited. Mean treatment duration was 33 months. The rate of critical cardiovascular events was significantly lower in buflomedil-randomized patients than in placebo-randomized patients (9.1% versus 12.4%; hazard ratio, 0.742; 95% confidence interval, 0.603 to 0.915; P=0.0163). Ankle-brachial index increased by 9.2% in buflomedil-randomized patients and decreased by 3.6% in placebo-randomized patients (Pperipheral arterial disease. The use of buflomedil should be considered in addition to an antiplatelet agent in patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease and intermittent claudication.

  9. No evidence that genetically reduced 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with increased risk of ischaemic heart disease or myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Jacobsen, Peter; Benn, Marianne; Afzal, Shoaib

    2015-01-01

    that genetically reduced plasma 25(OH)D is associated with increased risk of ischaemic heart disease and myocardial infarction. METHODS: We used a Mendelian randomization design in the Copenhagen City Heart Study, the Copenhagen General Population Study, and the Copenhagen Ischaemic Heart Disease Study. Two 25(OH......)D reducing genetic variants in the DCHR7 gene (rs7944926 and rs11234027) and two in the CYP2R1 gene (rs10741657 and rs12794714) were genotyped in 92 416 participants of Danish descent, of whom 14 455 developed ischaemic heart disease (ICD-8:410-414; ICD-10:I20-I25) and 7061 myocardial infarction (ICD-8...... (CI): 1.42-2.32] for ischaemic heart disease. Each allele increase in a combined allele score was associated with a 1.9-nmol/l decrease in p-25(OH)D (P = 7 × 10(-55); R(2) = 0.9%). The genetic variants were, however, not associated with increased risk of ischaemic heart disease. In instrumental...

  10. Hyperhomocysteinaemia And Vitamin B12 Deficiency In Ischaemic Strokes In India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadia R S

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperhomocysteinemia is a recognised risk factor for stroke and ischemic heart disease (HID. Vit B12 Folate and pyridoxine deficiency are important causes of raised serum homocysteine. As a vegetarian diet is very poor in Vit B12 we sought to study the incidence of hyperhomocysteinaemia in our stroke populating and to measure Vit B12 and folate in these cases. Consecutive cases of ischaemic stroke, either arterial or venous, admitted over a period of 2 1/2 years were studied. Embolic strokes and those on vitamin supplements were excluded. cases were divided into vegetarian (including those taking milk and / Or eggs, those who took non-vegetarian 4 or less times a month, and frequent non-vegetarians taking 5 or more times a month. Serum total homocysteine, serum B12 and folate levels were studied along with all other routine parameters. For comparison we examined 101 controls without HID, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, rental failure or recent vitamin intake. With the international norm for homocysteine given as 5-15 umol/litre (1we called serum homocysteine 16 umol/litre or more as raised. There were 147 cases of ischcmic stroke :119 arterial and 28 venous infarcts. In the arterial strokes 99 of 119 cases (83.19% had raised serum Homocysteine including 25 of 27 (92.5% of those with arterial stroke before age 45. Of 28 cases with venous infarct 21 (75% had raised homocysteine (HCY. Hyperhomocysteinemia was the commonest risk factor for stroke in our populations. Out of the total 147 cases the exact dietary intake was not known for ten cases., 58 were vegetarians, 54 were occasional non vegetarians (NV and 25 were frequent NV. In the 58 vegetarians, 55 had serum HCY> 16 umol/1 (94.8% and of those vegetarians with HCY> 16, serum B12 <200pg/ml was seen in 44 (75.8% and between 200-300 pg/ml in five (8.6%. Of the 54 occasional NV, 46 had HCY>16umo/1 (85.2% Of those with HCY >16, serum B12 level of <200 pg/ ml was seen in 28 (51.85% occ. NV and

  11. The performance of blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors as screening tests for ischaemic heart disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, M R; Wald, N J; Morris, J K

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarises the main evidence and conclusions relating to using blood pressure measurement as a screening test to identify people who will develop ischaemic heart disease (IHD) or stroke, as recently published in a Health Technology Assessment report. While blood pressure is recognised as an important cause of stroke and IHD, and lowering blood pressure can substantially lower the risk of these diseases, the measurement of blood pressure is a poor screening test. It is not good in distinguishing those who will and will not develop these diseases. The poor screening performance is illustrated by the findings that in the largest cohort study, persons in the top 10% of the distribution of systolic blood pressure experienced only 21% of all IHD events and 28% of all strokes at a given age. Using several cardiovascular risk factors in combination does not add materially to the poor screening performance of blood pressure alone. Among persons in a specified age group, the 5% at highest risk experience 17% of all heart disease deaths with risk computation based on blood pressure alone, 22% when based on blood pressure and apolipoprotein B (or LDL cholesterol) in combination, and only 28% using these two, smoking and three other cardiovascular risk factors all in combination. Identifying patients at the time of hospital discharge following myocardial infarction or stroke is the most effective screening test to identify those who will die of cardiovascular disease. In patients with a history of myocardial infarction or stroke the cardiovascular death rate in the absence of treatment is about 5% per year, a risk that persists for at least 15 years. In the absence of treatment, about half of all deaths from heart disease in a population occur after hospital discharge following the first infarct. Among persons with no history of cardiovascular disease, age is a better screening test than the reversible risk factors, and the best policy is to offer treatment to all

  12. Health care in patients 1 year post-stroke in general practice : research on the utilisation of the Dutch Transmural Protocol transient ischaemic attack/cerebrovascular accident

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weerd, L.; Rutgers, A.W.F.; Groenier, K.H.; van der Meer, K.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the kind of aftercare that ischaemic stroke patients receive and the extent that aftercare fulfils the criteria of the 'Dutch Transmural Protocol transient ischaemic attack/cerebrovascular accident'. Fifty-seven patients were interviewed 1 year post-stroke about secondary

  13. Cost-effectiveness of remote ischaemic conditioning as an adjunct to primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Astrid D; Schmidt, Michael R; Munk, Kim

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Remote ischaemic conditioning seems to improve long-term clinical outcomes in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Remote ischaemic conditioning can be applied with cycles of alternating inflation and deflation of a blood-pressure cuff. We evaluated the cost...

  14. Leukocytes and transfusion related adverse events: the effects of leuko-reduction process in the prevention of adverse reactions resulted from the transfusion of blood components: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehteramolsadat Hosseini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusion is commonly implemented to manage life and health-threatening conditions on a rapid and short-term basis. Over the years, ongoing technical advances have dramatically improved transfusion medicine to provide more safety and effectiveness. However, transfusion is still complicated with different adverse events that mainly induced by the presence of allogeneic leukocytes in the blood products. Several lines of evidence have shown that leukocytes in blood components are involved in the induction of febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs, HLA alloimmunization and platelet refractoriness as well as the increased risk of the infectious diseases transmitted by leukotropic viruses including cytomegalovirus (CMV, human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-I/II and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. During current decades, introducing various leuko-reduction techniques have shown to be associated with less transfusion related adverse events and improved clinical outcomes. The lower incidence and severity of febrile transfusion reactions; reduced risk of transfusion related transmission of CMV or other leukocyte-associated infections, lowered incidence of alloimmune platelet refractoriness in addition to reducing risk of mortality and morbidity in patients are considered as clinical benefits of leuko-reduced products. Currently, by the use of 3rd and 4th generation of filters, the highest levels of leukoreduction in blood components have been achieved. Filtration techniques have also the advantages of being performed shortly after preparation of components (pre-storage or post-storage even at the patient’s bedside. However, it seems that pre-storage depletion of leukocytes provides better protection than post-storage techniques due to the elimination of leukocyte-derived cytokines effects which are increasingly released during storage. Particularly in platelet products, the earlier depletion of leukocyte also favors less platelet

  15. The role of cardiac disease parameters in predicting the results of Holter monitoring in patients with acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmuri, Kiran; Hughes, Andrew; Coles, David; Ahmad, Omar; Neeman, Teresa; Lueck, Christian

    2012-07-01

    There is limited evidence supporting the routine use of Holter monitoring (HM) in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. This study aimed to assess the diagnostic yield of HM and determine whether any cardiac disease parameter(s) would permit more focused targeting of HM. We performed a retrospective evaluation of HM in patients with acute ischaemic stroke admitted to our hospital over a one-year period to assess diagnostic yield and whether certain cardiac disease parameters were correlated with HM results. The diagnostic yield was 9%, the number needed to screen was 11, and the cost to detect one clinically significant case was AUS$1,300. Apart from age, stratifying patients by cardiac disease parameters did not predict HM result. This strengthens the use of HM in all patients presenting with acute ischaemic stroke of unknown aetiology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Association of ABO blood groups and major ischaemic heart disease risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutf-Ullah, L.; Akhtar, B.; Noor-Us-Saba; Hanif, A.; Khan, B.Z.; Bukhshi, I.M.

    2010-01-01

    To study the association of ABO blood groups with major ischaemic heart disease risk factors. Setting: Department of Cardiology, Mayo hospital, Lahore over a period of two years from January 2008 to December 2009. Study Design: Analytic comparative study. Subjects and Methods: The study group included 907 patients of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). The distribution of ABO blood groups in IHD patients was compared for presence or absence of major IHD risk factors. Data was analyzed using SPSS 16. ANOVA and Chi-square tests for significance were used. P-value less than 0.05 was taken as significant. Results: In this study, the following pattern of ABO blood groups was observed in IHD patients : blood group A 251 (27.67%); blood group B 329 (36.27%); blood group O 235 (25.91%); blood group AB 92 (10.14%). We found no relation-ship of ABO blood groups with age (p-value = 0.234), gender (p-value = 0.093), hypertension (p-value = 0.230), diabetes mellitus (p-value = 0.801), family history of IHD (p-value = 0.277), transverse ear lobe crease (p-value = 0.231), total cholesterol (p-value = 0.797), triglycerides (p-value = 0.351), low density lipoprotein (p-value = 0.078), high density lipoprotein (p-value = 0.114). Similarly no relationship was found of smoking, weight, height and body mass index with ABO blood groups, p-values 0.428, 0.528, 0.908 and 0.455 respectively. Conclusion: There is no association of ABO blood groups and major ischaemic heart disease risk factors. (author)

  17. Enhancing cerebral perfusion with external counterpulsation after ischaemic stroke: how long does it last?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Li; Lin, Wenhua; Han, Jinghao; Chen, Xiangyan; Leung, Thomas; Soo, Yannie; Wong, Ka Sing

    2016-05-01

    External counterpulsation (ECP) is a non-invasive method used to augment cerebral perfusion in ischaemic stroke. We aimed to investigate time-course effects on blood pressure elevation and cerebral blood flow augmentation induced by ECP in ischaemic stroke. Patients with acute unilateral ischaemic stroke and large artery occlusive disease were recruited to receive 35 daily 1 h ECP treatment sessions. Serial transcranial Doppler monitoring of bilateral middle cerebral arteries was performed on days 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, 28 and 35 after stroke onset. Flow velocity changes before, during and after ECP and continuous beat-to-beat blood pressure data were recorded. The cerebral augmentation index (CAI) is the increase in the percentage of the middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity during ECP compared with baseline. The CAI in patients with stroke was significantly higher on the ipsilateral side and on the contralateral side on day 3 (ipsilateral CAI, 9.3%; contralateral CAI, 7.2%), day 5 (7.0%; 6.7%), day 7 (6.8%; 6.0%), day 10 (6.0%; 5.1%), day 14 (4.7%; 2.6%) and day 21 (4.1%; 2.2%) after stroke onset than that in controls (-2.0%) (all pstroke. Differences in the percentage increase in the mean blood pressure did not change significantly over time in patients with stroke. Blood pressure elevation persists throughout ECP treatment, which consists of 35 sessions. However, cerebral blood flow augmentation may last at least 3 weeks and then appears to return to baseline 1 month after acute stroke onset. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. The predictive value of CT signs in the early and subacute stages of ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podkowa, J.; Kowalewski, K.; Filarski, J.; Sasiadek, M.; Sokolowska, D.; Podemski, R.; Guranski, K.

    2003-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT), despite the development of new imaging methods like diffusion-weighted MR and perfusion MR, is usually the initial examination procedure in stroke patients. However, the predictive value of early CT signs in ischaemic stroke has not been established yet. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the clinical significance of CT findings in the early and subacute stages of the ischaemic stroke. Thirty-five patients with ischaemic stroke of middle cerebral artery territory had CT studies performed within 18 hours after ictus and on the 5th day. Following CT signs were analyzed: the extent of hypodensity and mass effect (both calculated using our own method), obscuring of the lentiform and caudate nuclei, as well as the insular ribbon, Sylvian fissure and lateral ventricle compression, ventricular displacement, and hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign (HMCAS). The results were compared statistically with clinical scorings at admission and on day 30. Among the early CT signs only lentiform nucleus obscuring was correlated with both early and the late clinical scales. Caudate nucleus obscuring, Sylvian fissure compression and mass effect extent were correlated with early clinical scoring only, while lateral ventricle compression with the late clinical scale. Other findings affected neither early nor late clinical scorings. Most of the follow-up CT symptoms showed a strong correlation with the late clinical scoring, with an exception of Sylvian fissure compression and HMCAS. Early CT has limited predictive value in assessing stroke patients. The only statistically significant signs are lentiform nucleus obscuring and ventricular compression. However, most subacute CT findings have high predictive value. (author)

  19. Vascular risk factors aggravate cognitive impairment in first-ever young ischaemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D; Ren, S; Zhang, J; Sun, D

    2016-05-01

    Young ischaemic stroke patients often suffer from cognitive impairment after stroke. However, the risk factors of cognitive impairment are still unclear. This study examined the impact of vascular risk factors (VRFs) on cognitive impairment in first-ever young ischaemic stroke patients. Subjects were divided into low (0-1 VRF, n = 27), medium (2-3 VRFs, n = 45) and high-risk (≥4 VRFs, n = 12) groups according to their number of VRFs. The following VRFs were collected: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, atrial fibrillation, obesity, smoking, excess alcohol consumption, coronary heart disease and hyperhomocysteinaemia. A battery of cognitive assessments was executed 2 weeks after stroke. Differences of cognitive performances between groups were compared. The correlation between VRFs and cognitive function was investigated with an emphasis on discovering the main VRFs. Eighty-four patients were enrolled in this study eventually. Compared with the low-risk group, the high-risk group had significantly worse performance in most of the cognitive domains. VRFs had a correlation with general cognition, executive function, attention and verbal fluency. After adjusting the covariates, VRFs showed a linear correlation with global cognitive function (R = 0.640, P = 0.000), verbal fluency (R = 0.372, P = 0.000), delayed memory (R = 0.327, P = 0.002), visual attention (R = 0.290, P = 0.007) and executive function (R = 0.266, P = 0.015). Amongst all the VRFs, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, smoking and hyperhomocysteinaemia were the main influencing VRFs. Vascular risk factors aggravate cognitive impairment after young ischaemic stroke. Effective management of VRFs in young adults is urgent and this may reduce the cognitive impairment. © 2016 EAN.

  20. Diffusion-weighted imaging in ischaemic stroke: a follow-up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.; Mattle, H.P.; Heid, O.; Remonda, L.; Schroth, G.

    2000-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted (DWI) echo-planar (EPI) MRI has been used for imaging acute ischaemic stroke. We used DWI and conventional spin-echo (SE) MRI to study the dynamics of ischaemic human stroke. We examined 30 patients (mean age 57.5 years, range 27-82 years, median 57 years) with a diagnosis of stroke. They were examined in the acute (120 min to 47 h, mean 15.3 h), subacute (8 days) and chronic (2-3 months) stages of ischaemia using clinical scores and MRI. Imaging was performed on an 1.5-T imager. Anisotropic DWI with diffusion gradients in all three axes, an isotropic tensor trace pulse DWI sequence and SE MRI were used. In all patients both DWI sequences showed a decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the acute stage, even when SE images did not reveal signal abnormalities. Clinical features correlated with lesion site but not size. The ADC was initially 19.6-43 % less than that of nonischaemic tissue and increased to normal after 7 days in conventionally treated patients and after 2-5 days in patients who underwent intra-arterial fibrinolysis. In the chronic stage the ADC rose by up to 254.4 %. In patients who did not undergo fibrinolysis DWI changes correlated with the final infarct size (P < 0.05). It was possible to differentiate acute from chronic ischaemic lesions. We conclude that DWI is a sensitive and practicable tool for detecting early cerebral ischaemia. It is possible to predict in the acute stage the final size of an infarct. DWI may be helpful for clinical decisions and for monitoring therapy. (orig.)

  1. Direct imaging of viable myocardium by gated SPECT in patients with ischaemic left ventricular dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spadafora, Marco; Varrella, Paola; Spirito, Marco; Miletto, Paolo [A.O.R.N. S.G. Moscati, Department of Imaging, Avellino (Italy); Acampa, Wanda; Nappi, Carmela; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Naples (Italy); SDN Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, Naples (Italy); Mansi, Luigi [Second University, Department of Imaging, Naples (Italy); Rosato, Giuseppe [A.O.R.N. S.G. Moscati, Department of Cardiology and Heart Surgery, Avellino (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate a novel polar map of myocardial viability obtained by gated SPECT imaging to predict functional recovery after revascularization in patients with ischaemic left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. The study group comprised 17 patients (15 men, mean age 58 {+-} 9 years) with ischaemic LV dysfunction (ejection fraction {<=}40%) who underwent nitrate-enhanced gated SPECT before and 6 months after coronary revascularization. A parametric image of viable myocardium (VIA) was obtained using a semiautomated method to subtract the point-to-point motion polar map from the perfusion polar map. A parametric image of segments with functional recovery (REC) was obtained by subtracting the baseline motion polar map from the motion polar map after revascularization. Of the total 340 segments, 248 (73%) were considered viable on the basis of the VIA map. After revascularization, of 248 dysfunctional viable segments 186 (75%) showed an improvement in LV function. An increase in LV ejection fraction (from 30 {+-} 10% to 42 {+-} 11%, p < 0.01) and a decrease in end-diastolic volume (from 207 {+-} 74 ml to 174 {+-} 74 ml, p < 0.01) were observed after revascularization. Overall concordance between the VIA map and the REC map was 85%, with a k value of 0.63. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the VIA map for predicting functional recovery were 89%, 75%, 91% and 71%, respectively. The proposed polar map of myocardial viability obtained by gated SPECT imaging accurately predicts functional recovery after coronary revascularization. Thus, a direct quantitative image of viability obtained from perfusion/function matching may be helpful for clinical decision-making in patients with ischaemic LV dysfunction. (orig.)

  2. Hospital arrival time and functional outcome after acute ischaemic stroke: results from the PREMIER study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Jiménez, C; Ruiz-Sandoval, J L; Chiquete, E; Vega-Arroyo, M; Arauz, A; Murillo-Bonilla, L M; Ochoa-Guzmán, A; Carrillo-Loza, K; Ramos-Moreno, A; Barinagarrementeria, F; Cantú-Brito, C

    2014-05-01

    Information regarding hospital arrival times after acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) has mainly been gathered from countries with specialised stroke units. Little data from emerging nations is available. We aim to identify factors associated with achieving hospital arrival times of less than 1, 3, and 6 hours, and analyse how arrival times are related to functional outcomes after AIS. We analysed data from patients with AIS included in the PREMIER study (Primer Registro Mexicano de Isquemia Cerebral) which defined time from symptom onset to hospital arrival. The functional prognosis at 30 days and at 3, 6, and 12 months was evaluated using the modified Rankin Scale. Among 1096 patients with AIS, 61 (6%) arrived in <1 hour, 250 (23%) in <3 hours, and 464 (42%) in <6 hours. The factors associated with very early (<1 hour) arrival were family history of ischemic heart disease and personal history of migraines; in <3 hours: age 40-69 years, family history of hypertension, personal history of dyslipidaemia and ischaemic heart disease, and care in a private hospital; in <6 hours: migraine, previous stroke, ischaemic heart disease, care in a private hospital, and family history of hypertension. Delayed hospital arrival was associated with lacunar stroke and alcoholism. Only 2.4% of patients underwent thrombolysis. Regardless of whether or not thrombolysis was performed, arrival time in <3 hours was associated with lower mortality at 3 and 6 months, and with fewer in-hospital complications. A high percentage of patients had short hospital arrival times; however, less than 3% underwent thrombolysis. Although many factors were associated with early hospital arrival, it is a priority to identify in-hospital barriers to performing thrombolysis. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Increased risk of ischaemic stroke amongst patients with chronic osteomyelitis: a population-based cohort study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, C-H; Chen, J-H; Muo, C-H; Chang, Y-J; Sung, F-C; Hsu, C Y

    2015-04-01

    Inflammatory processes, which kindle endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, may facilitate the development of cardiovascular disease, including ischaemic stroke. Evident stroke risk factors may not be identified in up to 40% of stroke patients, especially in the younger population. Inflammation remains to be established as a stroke risk factor. In this study, it was assessed whether chronic osteomyelitis (COM), an infectious disease with chronic inflammation, increases stroke risk. A national insurance claim data set of 22 million enrollees in Taiwan was used to identify 18 509 patients with COM and 74 034 randomly selected age- and gender-matched controls for a follow-up period of 11 years starting 1 January 2000 and ending 31 December 2010. Stroke risk was analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Comorbidities known to increase stroke risk, including hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, coronary heart disease and peripheral arterial disease, were more frequently noted in the COM group who had significantly greater stroke risk than the control cohort. Comparing only those without comorbidities, COM carried greater stroke risk than the control group [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22-1.62, P  65, HR = 1.16, 95% CI 1.02-1.31). This is the first report linking COM to an increased risk of developing stroke. Results suggest that COM is a significant stroke risk factor and call for closer attention to this group of patients for more rigorous stroke prevention, especially in the younger age group. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  4. Polyphenolic compounds from Cognac induce vasorelaxation in vitro and decrease post-ischaemic cardiac infarction after an oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralay Ranaivo, H; Diebolt, M; Schott, C; Andriantsitohaina, R

    2004-06-01

    The effects of Cognac polyphenolic compounds (CPC) on aorta and isolated heart, the consequences of oral administration on haemodynamic parameters, vascular reactivity and cardiac recovery after ischaemia were investigated. CPC induced an endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation on rat-isolated aorta. This effect was prevented by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester, but not by the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, suggesting the implication of NO pathway. On isolated rat hearts, CPC induced positive inotropic, chronotropic, and lusitropic effect at 10(-4)-10(-2) g/L while at 10(-1) g/L, it had negative lusitropic effect and other parameters returned to baseline values. Oral administration of 40 mg/kg of CPC for 2 weeks did not modify systolic blood pressure and heart rate of rats throughout the treatment. CPC treatment did not affect ex vivo response of isolated thoracic aorta either to the contractile agent noradrenaline or to the endothelial-relaxant agent, acetylcholine. Isolated hearts from treated rats were submitted to 30-min global ischaemia followed by 120 min of reperfusion. Post-ischaemic recovery of functional cardiac parameters was not modified by treatment with CPC. Infarct size measured after the reperfusion in heart from CPC-treated rats was significantly decreased in comparison with hearts from control group. We conclude that in vitro, CPC had NO-dependent vasorelaxant effects and stimulated cardiac function. Oral treatment with CPC appeared to have no impact in vivo on blood pressure, heart rate of the rats or on cardiac contractility ex vivo; however, it could decrease the infarct size after an ischaemia-reperfusion.

  5. Ischaemic heart disease in the former Soviet Union 1990-2015 according to the Global Burden of Disease 2015 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Adrianna; Johnson, Catherine O; Roth, Gregory A; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H; Naghavi, Mohsen; Ng, Marie; Pogosova, Nana; Vos, Theo; Murray, Christopher J L; Moran, Andrew E

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare ischaemic heart disease (IHD) mortality and risk factor burden across former Soviet Union (fSU) and satellite countries and regions in 1990 and 2015. The fSU and satellite countries were grouped into Central Asian, Central European and Eastern European regions. IHD mortality data for men and women of any age were gathered from national vital registration, and age, sex, country, year-specific IHD mortality rates were estimated in an ensemble model. IHD morbidity and mortality burden attributable to risk factors was estimated by comparative risk assessment using population attributable fractions. In 2015, age-standardised IHD death rates in Eastern European and Central Asian fSU countries were almost two times that of satellite states of Central Europe. Between 1990 and 2015, rates decreased substantially in Central Europe (men -43.5% (95% uncertainty interval -45.0%, -42.0%); women -42.9% (-44.0%, -41.0%)) but less in Eastern Europe (men -5.6% (-9.0, -3.0); women -12.2% (-15.5%, -9.0%)). Age-standardised IHD death rates also varied within regions: within Eastern Europe, rates decreased -51.7% in Estonian men (-54.0, -47.0) but increased +19.4% in Belarusian men (+12.0, +27.0). High blood pressure and cholesterol were leading risk factors for IHD burden, with smoking, body mass index, dietary factors and ambient air pollution also ranking high. Some fSU countries continue to experience a high IHD burden, while others have achieved remarkable reductions in IHD mortality. Control of blood pressure, cholesterol and smoking are IHD prevention priorities. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Ischaemic heart disease in the former Soviet Union 1990–2015 according to the Global Burden of Disease 2015 Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Adrianna; Johnson, Catherine O; Roth, Gregory A; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H; Naghavi, Mohsen; Ng, Marie; Pogosova, Nana; Vos, Theo; Murray, Christopher J L; Moran, Andrew E

    2018-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare ischaemic heart disease (IHD) mortality and risk factor burden across former Soviet Union (fSU) and satellite countries and regions in 1990 and 2015. Methods The fSU and satellite countries were grouped into Central Asian, Central European and Eastern European regions. IHD mortality data for men and women of any age were gathered from national vital registration, and age, sex, country, year-specific IHD mortality rates were estimated in an ensemble model. IHD morbidity and mortality burden attributable to risk factors was estimated by comparative risk assessment using population attributable fractions. Results In 2015, age-standardised IHD death rates in Eastern European and Central Asian fSU countries were almost two times that of satellite states of Central Europe. Between 1990 and 2015, rates decreased substantially in Central Europe (men −43.5% (95% uncertainty interval −45.0%, −42.0%); women −42.9% (−44.0%, −41.0%)) but less in Eastern Europe (men −5.6% (−9.0, –3.0); women −12.2% (−15.5%, −9.0%)). Age-standardised IHD death rates also varied within regions: within Eastern Europe, rates decreased −51.7% in Estonian men (−54.0, −47.0) but increased +19.4% in Belarusian men (+12.0, +27.0). High blood pressure and cholesterol were leading risk factors for IHD burden, with smoking, body mass index, dietary factors and ambient air pollution also ranking high. Conclusions Some fSU countries continue to experience a high IHD burden, while others have achieved remarkable reductions in IHD mortality. Control of blood pressure, cholesterol and smoking are IHD prevention priorities. PMID:28883037

  7. The Brazilian Cardioprotective Nutritional Program to reduce events and risk factors in secondary prevention for cardiovascular disease: study protocol (The BALANCE Program Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bernardete; Bersch-Ferreira, Ângela Cristine; Torreglosa, Camila Ragne; Ross-Fernandes, Maria Beatriz; da Silva, Jacqueline Tereza; Galante, Andrea Polo; Lara, Enilda de Sousa; Costa, Rosana Perim; Soares, Rafael Marques; Cavalcanti, Alexandre Biasi; Moriguchi, Emilio H; Bruscato, Neide M; Kesties; Vivian, Lilian; Schumacher, Marina; de Carli, Waldemar; Backes, Luciano M; Reolão, Bruna R; Rodrigues, Milena P; Baldissera, Dúnnia M B; Tres, Glaucia S; Lisbôa, Hugo R K; Bem, João B J; Reolão, Jose B C; Deucher, Keyla L A L; Cantarelli, Maiara; Lucion, Aline; Rampazzo, Daniela; Bertoni, Vanessa; Torres, Rosileide S; Verríssimo, Adriana O L; Guterres, Aldair S; Cardos, Andrea F R; Coutinho, Dalva B S; Negrão, Mayara G; Alencar, Mônica F A; Pinho, Priscila M; Barbosa, Socorro N A A; Carvalho, Ana P P F; Taboada, Maria I S; Pereira, Sheila A; Heyde, Raul V; Nagano, Francisca E Z; Baumgartner, Rebecca; Resende, Fernanda P; Tabalipa, Ranata; Zanini, Ana C; Machado, Michael J R; Araujo, Hevila; Teixeira, Maria L V; Souza, Gabriela C; Zuchinali, Priccila; Fracasso, Bianca M; Ulliam, Karen; Schumacher, Marina; Pierotto, Moara; Hilário, Thamires; Carlos, Daniele M O; Cordeiro, Cintia G N C; Carvalho, Daniele A; Gonçalves, Marília S; Vasconcelos, Valdiana B; Bosquetti, Rosa; Pagano, Raira; Romano, Marcelo L P; Jardim, César A; de Abreu, Bernardo N A; Marcadenti, Aline; Schmitt, Alessandra R; Tavares, Angela M V; Faria, Christiane C; Silva, Flávia M; Fink, Jaqueline S; El Kik, Raquel M; Prates, Clarice F; Vieira, Cristiane S; Adorne, Elaine F; Magedanz, Ellen H; Chieza, Fernanda L; Silva, Ingrid S; Teixeira, Joise M; Trescastro, Eduardo P; Pellegrini, Lívia A; Pinto, Jéssika C; Telles, Cristina T; Sousa, Antonio C S; Almeida, Andreza S; Costa, Ariane A; Carmo, José A C; Silva, Juliana T; Alves, Luciana V S; Sales, Saulo O C; Ramos, Maria E M; Lucas, Marilia C S; Damiani, Monica; Cardoso, Patricia C; Ramos, Salvador S; Dantas, Clenise F; Lopes, Amanda G; Cabral, Ana M P; Lucena, Ana C A; Medeiros, Auriene L; Terceiro, Bernardino B; Leda, Neuma M F S; Baía, Sandra R D; Pinheiro, Josilene M F; Cassiano, Alexandra N; Melo, Andressa N L; Cavalcanti, Anny K O; Souza, Camila V S; Queiroz, Dayanna J M; Farias, Hercilla N C F; Souza, Larissa C F; Santos, Letícia S; Lima, Luana R M; Hoffmann, Meg S; Ribeiro, Átala S Silva; Vasconcelos, Daniel F; Dutra, Eliane S; Ito, Marina K; Neto, José A F; Santos, Alexsandro F; Sousa, Rosângela M L; Dias, Luciana Pereira P; Lima, Maria T M A; Modanesi, Victor G; Teixeira, Adriana F; Estrada, Luciana C N C D; Modanesi, Paulo V G; Gomes, Adriana B L; Rocha, Bárbara R S; Teti, Cristina; David, Marta M; Palácio, Bruna M; Junior, Délcio G S; Faria, Érica H S; Oliveira, Michelle C F; Uehara, Rose M; Sasso, Sandramara; Moreira, Annie S B; Cadinha, Ana C A H; Pinto, Carla W M; Castilhos, Mariana P; Costa, Mariana; Kovacs, Cristiane; Magnoni, Daniel; Silva, Quênia; Germini, Michele F C A; da Silva, Renata A; Monteiro, Aline S; dos Santos, Karina G; Moreira, Priscila; Amparo, Fernanda C; Paiva, Catharina C J; Poloni, Soraia; Russo, Diana S; Silveira, Izabele V; Moraes, Maria A; Boklis, Mirena; Cardoso, Quinto I; Moreira, Annie S B; Damaceno, Aline M S; Santos, Elisa M; Dias, Glauber M; Pinho, Cláudia P S; Cavalcanti, Adrilene C; Bezerra, Amanda S; Queiroga, Andrey V; Rodrigues, Isa G; Leal, Tallita V; Sahade, Viviane; Amaral, Daniele A; Souza, Diana S; Araújo, Givaldo A; Curvello, Karine; Heine, Manuella; Barretto, Marília M S; Reis, Nailson A; Vasconcelos, Sandra M L; Vieira, Danielly C; Costa, Francisco A; Fontes, Jessica M S; Neto, Juvenal G C; Navarro, Laís N P; Ferreira, Raphaela C; Marinho, Patrícia M; Abib, Renata Torres; Longo, Aline; Bertoldi, Eduardo G; Ferreira, Lauren S; Borges, Lúcia R; Azevedo, Norlai A; Martins, Celma M; Kato, Juliana T; Izar, Maria C O; Asoo, Marina T; de Capitani, Mariana D; Machado, Valéria A; Fonzar, Waléria T; Pinto, Sônia L; Silva, Kellen C; Gratão, Lúcia H A; Machado, Sheila D; de Oliveira, Susane R U; Bressan, Josefina; Caldas, Ana P S; Lima, Hatanne C F M; Hermsdorff, Helen H M; Saldanha, Tânia M; Priore, Sílvia E; Feres, Naoel H; Neves, Adila de Queiroz; Cheim, Loanda M G; Silva, Nilma F; Reis, Silvia R L; Penafort, Andreza M; de Queirós, Ana Paula O; Farias, Geysa M N; de los Santos, Mônica L P; Ambrozio, Cíntia L; Camejo, Cirília N; dos Santos, Cristiano P; Schirmann, Gabriela S; Boemo, Jorge L; Oliveira, Rosane E C; Lima, Súsi M B; Bortolini, Vera M S; Matos, Cristina H; Barretta, Claiza; Specht, Clarice M; de Souza, Simone R; Arruda, Cristina S; Rodrigues, Priscila A; Berwanger, Otávio

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the rationale for the Brazilian Cardioprotective Nutritional Program (BALANCE Program) Trial. This pragmatic, multicenter, nationwide, randomized, concealed, controlled trial was designed to investigate the effects of the BALANCE Program in reducing cardiovascular events. The BALANCE Program consists of a prescribed diet guided by nutritional content recommendations from Brazilian national guidelines using a unique nutritional education strategy, which includes suggestions of affordable foods. In addition, the Program focuses on intensive follow-up through one-on-one visits, group sessions, and phone calls. In this trial, participants 45 years or older with any evidence of established cardiovascular disease will be randomized to the BALANCE or control groups. Those in the BALANCE group will receive the afore mentioned program interventions, while controls will be given generic advice on how to follow a low-fat, low-energy, low-sodium, and low-cholesterol diet, with a view to achieving Brazilian nutritional guideline recommendations. The primary outcome is a composite of death (any cause), cardiac arrest, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, myocardial revascularization, amputation for peripheral arterial disease, or hospitalization for unstable angina. A total of 2468 patients will be enrolled in 34 sites and followed up for up to 48 months. If the BALANCE Program is found to decrease cardiovascular events and reduce risk factors, this may represent an advance in the care of patients with cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Interventions to reduce tourniquet-related ischaemic damage in orthopaedic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halladin, N L; Zahle, F V; Rosenberg, J

    2014-01-01

    -related oxidative damage in adults undergoing orthopaedic surgery, and the possible relationship between biochemical oxidative stress markers and postoperative clinical outcomes. Seventeen randomised controlled studies were included in the qualitative synthesis. Most trials were of low methodological quality...... and postoperative clinical outcomes should be further investigated in the future....... and only two studies reported postoperative clinical outcomes. Nine studies tested anaesthetics (propofol, dexmedetomidine, ketamine, and spinal anaesthesia); four studies tested antioxidants (N-acetyl-cysteine, vitamin C, and mannitol); and four studies tested ischaemic pre-conditioning. Fifteen studies...

  9. Income inequality and ischaemic heart disease in Danish men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Christensen, Ulla; Due, Pernille

    2003-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that areas with an unequal income distribution are less likely to invest in health and more likely to have a social environment that influences the development of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) METHODS: We used pooled data from two cohort studies conducted in Copenhagen...... to analyse the association between area income inequality and first admission to hospital or death from IHD in women and men while controlling for individual income and other IHD risk factors. A total of 11 685 women and 10 036 men, with initial health examinations between 1964 and 1992, were followed...

  10. [Anaemia as a cause of haemodynamic angina in a patient with chronic ischaemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguéns Blanco, I; Bravo Amaro, M

    2014-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity and one of the primary causes of morbidity in Spain. The variability in the clinical presentation of this condition at both primary care and emergency services level requires a careful history and a thorough physical examination. In the case presented, the main symptoms of angina and dyspnea reported in the anamnesis, and the obvious pallor in the physical examination, were the key data to identify anaemia as a cause of angina. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Ischaemic necrosis of the tongue as a rare complication of cardiogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulstaert, E; Roggeman, E; Beeckman, A-S; Moerman, M; Vanderstraeten, E; Rasquin, K; Monsaert, E; Baert, D; Dewint, P; Burvenich, P; Van Steenkiste, C

    2015-12-01

    Ischaemic necrosis of the tongue is an unusual clinical finding. In most cases it is associated with vasculitis, particularly giant cell arteritis (GCA). Other causes include profound cardiogenic shock. We report a case of tongue necrosis in an 81-year-old Caucasian woman. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for cardiogenic shock. Swelling of the tongue was reported before intubation and evolved into tongue ischaemia and necrosis of the tip of the tongue. After surgical debridement the patient recovered. To our knowledge, this is the second report of a patient surviving tongue necrosis resulting from cardiogenic shock.

  12. Case Report: Ischaemic appendicitis post mesenteric biopsy [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Zukiwskyj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A common indication for laparoscopic mesenteric lymph node biopsy is to provide a tissue diagnosis in the absence of palpable peripheral nodes via a minimally invasive approach.  There are no reports to date of ischaemia to the appendix as a complication of this procedure.   We report the case of a 34-year-old lady who underwent a mesenteric biopsy for a lesion found incidentally on CT to investigate longstanding abdominal pain, and 2 days later required an appendicectomy for ischaemic appendicitis.

  13. Leucocyte count in young adults with first-ever ischaemic stroke: associated factors and association on prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikinheimo, Terttu; Putaala, Jukka; Haapaniemi, Elena; Kaste, Markku; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2015-02-01

    Limited data exist on the associated factors and correlation of leucocyte count to outcome in young adults with first-ever ischaemic stroke. Our objectives were to investigate factors associated with elevated leucocyte count and whether there is correlation between leucocyte count and short- and long-term outcomes. Of our database of 1008 consecutive patients aged 15 to 49, we included those with leucocyte count measured within the first two days from stroke onset. Outcomes were three-month and long-term disability, death, and vascular events. Linear regression was used to explore baseline variables associated with leucocyte count. Logistic regression and Cox proportional models studied the association between leucocyte count and clinical outcomes. In our study cohort of 781 patients (61.7% males; mean age 41.4 years), mean leucocyte count was high: 8.8 ± 3.1 × 10(9) cells/L (Reference range: 3.4-8.2 × 10(9) cells/L). Higher leucocyte levels were associated with dyslipidaemia, smoking, peripheral arterial disease, stroke severity, and lesion size. After adjustment for age, gender, relevant risk factors, both continuous leucocyte count and the highest quartile of leucocyte count were independently associated with unfavourable three-month outcome. Regarding events in the long-term (follow-up 8.1 ± 4.2 years in survivors), no association between leucocyte count and the event risks appeared. Among young stroke patients, high leucocyte count was a common finding. It was associated with vascular disease and its risk factors as well as severity of stroke, but it was also independently associated with unfavourable three-month outcome in these patients. There was no association with the long-term outcome. [Correction added on 31 October 2013 after first online publication: In the Results section of the Abstract, the cohort of 797 patients in this study was corrected to 781 patients.]. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  14. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging factors that predict ischaemic stroke in cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jahae; Song, Ho-Chun [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kang-Ho [Chonnam National University Hospital, Cerebrovascular Center, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Department of Neurology, Hwasun-gun, Jeollanam-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joon-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Cho, Ki-Hyun [Chonnam National University Hospital, Cerebrovascular Center, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT can acquire both anatomical and functional images in a single session. We investigated which factors of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging have potential as biomarkers for an increased risk of ischaemic stroke in cancer patients. From among cancer patients presenting with various neurological symptoms and hemiparesis, 134 were selected as eligible for this retrospective analysis. A new infarct lesion on brain MRI within 1 year of FDG PET/CT defined future ischaemic stroke. The target-to-background ratio (TBR) of each arterial segment was used to define arterial inflammation on PET imaging. Abdominal obesity was defined in terms of the area and proportion of visceral adipose tissue (VAT), subcutaneous adipose tissue and total adipose tissue (TAT) on a single CT slice at the umbilical level. Ischaemic stroke confirmed by MRI occurred in 30 patients. Patients with stroke had higher TBRs in the carotid arteries and abdominal aorta (P < 0.001) and a higher VAT proportion (P = 0.021) and TAT proportion (P = 0.041) than patients without stroke. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that TBRs of the carotid arteries and abdominal aorta, VAT and TAT proportions, and the presence of a metabolically active tumour were significantly associated with future ischaemic stroke. Combining PET and CT variables improved the power for predicting future ischaemic stroke. Our findings suggest that arterial FDG uptake and hypermetabolic malignancy on PET and the VAT proportion on CT could be independent predictors of future ischaemic stroke in patients with cancer and could identify those patients who would benefit from medical treatment. (orig.)

  15. l-arginine and l-NMMA for assessing cerebral endothelial dysfunction in ischaemic cerebrovascular disease: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, William K; Sørensen, Caspar G; Kruuse, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction (ED), in particular cerebral ED, may be an essential biomarker for ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. However, there is no consensus on methods to best estimate cerebral ED. In this systematic review, we evaluate the use of l-arginine and N G -monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA) for assessment of cerebral ED. A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library was done. We included studies investigating cerebrovascular response to l-arginine or l-NMMA in human subjects with vascular risk factors or ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. Seven studies (315 subjects) were eligible according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Studies investigated the effect of age (n=2), type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) (n=1), cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) (n=1), leukoaraiosis (n=1), and prior ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) (n=2) on cerebral ED. Most studies applied transcranial Doppler to quantify cerebral ED. Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation (EDV) induced by l-arginine was impaired in elderly and subjects with leukoaraiosis, but enhanced in CADASIL patients. Studies including subjects with prior ischaemic stroke or TIA reported both enhanced and impaired EDV to l-arginine. Responses to l-NMMA deviated between subjects with type 2 DM and the elderly. We found only few studies investigating cerebral endothelial responses to l-arginine and l-NMMA in subjects with vascular risk factors or ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. Inconsistencies in results were most likely due to variations in methods and included subject populations. In order to use cerebral ED as a prognostic marker, further studies are required to evaluate the association to cerebrovascular disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. In a subgroup of high-risk Asians, telmisartan was non-inferior to ramipril and better tolerated in the prevention of cardiovascular events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio L Dans

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of the recently published ONTARGET study (The Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial showed that telmisartan (80 mg/day was non-inferior to ramipril (10 mg/day in reducing cardiovascular events. Clinicians in Asia doubt tolerability of these doses for their patients. We therefore analyzed data from this study and a parallel study TRANSCEND (Telmisartan Randomized Assessment Study in ACE Intolerant Subjects with Cardiovascular Disease. Our objectives were to compare Asians and non-Asians with respect to the following: 1 Effectiveness of telmisartan vs. ramipril in reducing cardiovascular events;2 Proportions who reached the full dose of telmisartan, ramipril or placebo; and3 Proportions of overall discontinuations, and discontinuations due to adverse effects.The ONTARGET study randomized 25,620 patients at risk of cardiovascular events to ramipril, telmisartan, or their combination. The primary composite endpoint was death caused by cardiovascular disease, acute MI, stroke, and hospitalization because of congestive heart failure. TRANSCEND randomized 5926 high-risk patients with a history of intolerance to ACE-inhibitors to telmisartan or placebo. The primary outcome was the same. In this substudy, we compared Asians and non-Asians as to how well they tolerated telmisartan (given in both studies and ramipril (given in ONTARGET.1 Telmisartan was non-inferior to ramipril in lowering the primary endpoint among Asians (RR = 0.92; 95% CI: 0.74, 1.13; 2 more Asians achieved the full dose of either drug; 3 less withdrew (overall; and 4 less withdrew for adverse effects. Furthermore, telmisartan was better tolerated than ramipril. This advantage was greater among Asians.Although Asians had lower BMI than non-Asians, Asians tolerated both drugs better. Regulatory agencies require reporting of safety and effectiveness data by ethnicity, but few comply with this requirement. This study shows that safety data

  17. [Analysis of cost-effectiveness of simvastatin versus atorvastatin in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events within the Brazilian public healthcare system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Denizar Vianna; Ribeiro de Souza, Camila Pepe; Bahia, Luciana Ribeiro; Rey, Helena Cramer Veiga; Dos Santos Junior, Braulio; Tura, Bernardo Rangel; Berwanger, Otavio; Buehler, Anna Maria; Silva, Marcus Tolentino

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to perform an economic evaluation analyzing the treatment with atorvastatin and simvastatin in comparison to placebo treatment, within the Brazilian Public Healthcare System (SUS) scenario, for patients with high risk of cardiovascular disease; analyzing if the additional cost related to statin treatment is justified by the clinical benefits expected, in terms of cardiovascular event and mortality reduction. Cardiovascular event risk and mortality risk were used as outcomes. Statin efficacy at LDL-c and cardiovascular events levels lowering data was obtained from a systematic review of literature. A decision analytic model was developed to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing atorvastatin 10mg/day and simvastatin 40 mg/day to placebo treatment in patients with dyslipidemia in Brazil. The target population of this study was a hypothetic cohort of men and women with a mean age of 50 years old and high risk of cardiovascular disease. The model includes only direct costs obtained from Ambulatory and Hospital Information System and Price Database of Brazilian Ministry of Health. The comparative cost-effectiveness analysis itself was done through Excel spreadsheets covering a 5 -years time horizon. The result shows that atorvastatin 10mg/day in comparison to placebo has higher cost with higher effectiveness in the time horizon of 5 years (Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio of R$ 433.065,05 per life year gained). In this scenario atorvastatin is not cost effective in comparison to placebo. The simvastatin 40 mg/day appears to be a strategy with lower cost and higher effectiveness in comparison to placebo, in the time horizon analyzed (5 years). In the multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analysis, simvastatin showed 53% of the results in the quadrant with greater effectiveness and lower cost. This study is an important tool for public decision makers. The study can be used in the decision process of increasing cardiovascular

  18. Psychosocial stress and major cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagström, E; Norlund, F; Stebbins, A; Armstrong, P W; Chiswell, K; Granger, C B; López-Sendón, J; Pella, D; Soffer, J; Sy, R; Wallentin, L; White, H D; Stewart, R A H; Held, C

    2018-01-01

    Assess the risk of ischaemic events associated with psychosocial stress in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD). Psychosocial stress was assessed by a questionnaire in 14 577 patients (median age 65.0, IQR 59, 71; 81.6% males) with stable CHD on optimal secondary preventive therapy in the prospective randomized STABILITY clinical trial. Adjusted Cox regression models were used to assess associations between individual stressors, baseline cardiovascular risk factors and outcomes. After 3.7 years of follow-up, depressive symptoms, loss of interest and financial stress were associated with increased risk (hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval) of CV death (1.21, 1.09-1.34; 1.15, 1.05-1.27; and 1.19, 1.08-1.30, respectively) and the primary composite end-point of CV death, nonfatal MI or nonfatal stroke (1.21, 1.13-1.30; 1.19, 1.11-1.27; and 1.17, 1.10-1.24, respectively). Living alone was related to higher risk of CV death (1.68, 1.38-2.05) and the primary composite end-point (1.28, 1.11-1.48), whereas being married as compared with being widowed, was associated with lower risk of CV death (0.64, 0.49-0.82) and the primary composite end-point (0.81, 0.67-0.97). Psychosocial stress, such as depressive symptoms, loss of interest, living alone and financial stress, were associated with increased CV mortality in patients with stable CHD despite optimal medical secondary prevention treatment. Secondary prevention of CHD should therefore focus also on psychosocial issues both in clinical management and in future clinical trials. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  19. Effect of prolonged ischaemic time on muscular atrophy and regenerating nerve fibres in transplantation of the rat hind limb

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuji, Naoko; Yamashita, Shuji; Sugawara, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to test the influence of cold ischaemia on replanted limbs, focusing on muscular atrophy and neurological recovery. Inbred wild-type and green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic (Tg) Lewis rats aged 8?10 weeks were used. The amputated limbs were transplanted at several cold ischaemic times (0, 1, 8, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours). An arterial ischaemic model and a denervation model were used as controls. To study nerve regeneration, a GFP limb was transplanted on to the syngenic wild...

  20. CT analysis of the upper end of the femur: the asterisk sign and ischaemic bone necrosis of the femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dihlmann, W

    1982-01-01

    In computed tomography (CT) of the head of the femur, a star-shaped structure can be seen which we refer to as the asterisk or asterisk sign. The asterisk is formed by thickened weight-bearing bone trabeculae. It can be shown by CT that the asterisk exhibits a characteristic change in ischaemic bone necrosis of the femoral head, even when the disease is in an early stage. CT of the hip joint is therefore an important examination for early diagnosis of ischaemic disease of the femoral head.

  1. Effect of a deproteinized blood extract on the recovery of blood circulation in an ischaemic skin lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smahel, J.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental model was used to study the revascularization of an ischaemic skin lesion and the effect on this process of the blood extract Solcoseryl. Under the conditions given in the experiment, restoration of the circulation was by 2 modes--re-flow in the original vessels, and neovascularization. Solcoseryl given daily i.p. encouraged the re-flow phenomenon and therefore, by improving the microcirculation and nutrition, the healing of the ischaemic lesions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:6176254

  2. Early Psychological Preventive Intervention For Workplace Violence: A Randomized Controlled Explorative and Comparative Study Between EMDR-Recent Event and Critical Incident Stress Debriefing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarquinio, Cyril; Rotonda, Christine; Houllé, William A; Montel, Sébastien; Rydberg, Jenny Ann; Minary, Laetitia; Dellucci, Hélène; Tarquinio, Pascale; Fayard, Any; Alla, François

    2016-11-01

    This randomized controlled trial study aims to investigate the efficacy of an early psychological intervention called EMDR-RE compared to Critical Incident Stress Debriefing on 60 victims of workplace violence, which were divided into three groups: 'EMDR-RE' (n = 19), 'CISD' (n = 23), and 'delayed EMDR-RE' (n = 18). EMDR-RE and CISD took place 48 hours after the event, whilst third intervention was delayed by an additional 48 hours. Results showed that after 3 months PCLS and SUDS scores were significantly lower with EMDR-RE and delayed EMDR-RE compared to CISD. After 48 hours and 3 months, none of the EMDR-RE-treated victims showed PTSD symptoms.

  3. NF-κB pathway inhibition by anthrocyclic glycoside aloin is key event in preventing osteoclastogenesis in RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengjam, Yutthana; Madhyastha, Harishkumar; Madhyastha, Radha; Yamaguchi, Yuya; Nakajima, Yuichi; Maruyama, Masugi

    2016-04-15

    Osteoporosis is a bone pathology leading to increased fracture risk and challenging the quality of life. As current treatments can exhibit deleterious side effects, the use of phyto-compounds with therapeutic and preventive activities against orthopaedic related problems represents a promising alternative. We investigated the effect of aloin, an anthrocyclic compound, on inhibition of osteoclastogenesis using receptor of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced RAW264.7 macrophage cells. The inhibitory effect of aloin on in vitro osteoclastogenesis was evaluated by reduction in tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) content and expression levels of osteoclast-specific gene, cathepsin K. Multinuclear formation of osteoclast was assessed with haematoxylin and eosin staining. F4/80 content the marker of the murine monocyte/macrophage cells, was evaluated by immunocytochemistry. The underlining mechanisms were assessed by Western blots and EMSA. Effect of aloin on generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was estimated by dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). Bone degradation effect was evaluated by bone pit assay. The bone pit culture supernatant was studied by Fluorescein assay. We demonstrated that aloin reduced TRAP content and levels of osteoclast-specific gene and protein, cathepsin K. Treatment with aloin (0.75 µM) prevented multinuclear formation (haematoxylin and eosin staining), reduced intracellular TRAP content (TRAP Staining) and increased F4/80 content (F4/80 immunohistochemistry) in RANKL (20 ng/ml) treated RAW cells. Treatment of the RAW cells with aloin suppressed RANKL-induced NF-κB pathway components like IKKα, IKKβ, Phospho.IKK α/β, NF-κB-p65, Phospho NF-κB-p65 and IκBα. EMSA studies showed aloin dose dependently reduced DNA binding activity of NF-κB. Additionally, in vitro bone pit assay revealed that aloin prevented bone degradation and also decreased the fluorescence content in cells, thus

  4. Report of the ASSET (Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team) mission to the Zaporozhe nuclear power plant in Ukraine 13-24 June 1994 Division of Nuclear Safety. Root cause analysis of operational events with a view to enhancing the prevention of incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The IAEA Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team (ASSET) report presents the results of an ASSET team's assessment of their investigation of the effectiveness of the plant for prevention of incidents since 1990 at Zaporozhe nuclear power plant. The results, conclusions and suggestions presented herein reflect the views of the ASSET experts. They are provided for consideration by the responsible authorities in Ukraine. The ASSET team's views presented in this report are based on visits to the plant, on review of documentation made available by the operating organization and on discussions with utility personnel. The report is intended to enhance operational safety at Zaporozhe by proposing improvements to the policy for the prevention of incidents at the plant. The report includes, as a usual practice, the official response of the operating organization as well as of the regulatory body to the ASSET recommendations. Figs

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Direct Oral Anticoagulants Compared to Warfarin in Prevention of Thromboembolic Events Among Elderly Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kailas, Shilpa D; Thambuluru, Sirisha Reddy

    2016-10-18

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), previously also known as novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have increased the therapeutic options for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF). Previous studies comparing their relative efficacy and safety do not address age-related differences, such as comorbidities and physical and social boundaries. This review aimed to summarize and compare the clinical and safety outcomes of DOACs and warfarin for stroke prevention in AF in the elderly population (≥ 65 years). We searched PubMed for randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses that compared DOACs and warfarin in elderly patients with AF. Stroke and systemic embolism (SSE) and major bleeding (MB) were primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes included ischemic stroke, all-cause mortality, intracranial bleeding, and gastrointestinal bleeding. Of 66 studies identified, one randomized control trial (RCT) and one meta-analysis were included. DOACs were at least as effective at reducing the risk of SSE as warfarin. DOACs demonstrated a minimal benefit for ischemic stroke (dabigatran, 110 mg, relative risk (RR) 1.08; edoxaban, 60 mg, RR 1.00; and apixaban, 5 mg, RR 0.99). DOACs associated with decreased risk of MB relative to warfarin include dabigatran, 110 mg; apixaban, 5 mg; and edoxaban, 60 mg (RR 0.80, 0.70, and 0.80, respectively), while dabigatran, 150 mg, and rivaroxaban, 20 mg, increased risk (RR 0.79 - 0.83, respectively). Dabigatran, 110 mg and 150 mg doses, and edoxaban increased the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (RR 1.04, 1.12, and 1.23, respectively). Lower rates of SSE and intracranial bleeding were seen with DOACs compared to warfarin. Dabigatran, 150 mg, and rivaroxaban, 20 mg, were associated with higher MB in older elderly compared to warfarin. DOACs may be attractive alternatives to warfarin, but further studies are needed to make clinical recommendations.

  6. Event Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss conceptual event modeling within a context of information modeling. Traditionally, information modeling has been concerned with the modeling of a universe of discourse in terms of information structures. However, most interesting universes of discourse...... are dynamic and we present a modeling approach that can be used to model such dynamics. We characterize events as both information objects and change agents (Bækgaard 1997). When viewed as information objects events are phenomena that can be observed and described. For example, borrow events in a library can...... be characterized by their occurrence times and the participating books and borrowers. When we characterize events as information objects we focus on concepts like information structures. When viewed as change agents events are phenomena that trigger change. For example, when borrow event occurs books are moved...

  7. SPET brain imaging with thallium 201 diethyldithiocarbamate in acute ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruine, J.F. de; Limburg, M.; Royen, E.A. van; Hijdra, A.; Hill, T.C.; Schoot, J.B. van der; Amsterdam Univ.; New England Deaconess Hospital, Boston, MA

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with acute ischaemic stroke were studied within 24 h after hospital admission with thallium diethyldithiocarbamate Tl 201 single photon emission tomography ( 201 Tl-DDC SPET) and X-ray computed tomography (CT). 201 Tl-DDC is a non-redistributing agent that allows postponed imaging after early administration and early therapeutic intervention. In 16 patients both investigations were performed within 24 h after stroke onset. The sensitivity of SPET was 94% and of CT 81% in the first 24 h, when hypodensity and obliteration of sulci were used as CT reading criteria. When only hypodensity was used as a criterion, the sensitivity of CT was 50% in this group. Sensitivity of CT compared with SPET became increasingly better in patients with older infarcts (1-18 days). In two-thirds of patients, the lesion demonstrated on SPET was larger than that on CT, and this was especially so with older infarcts. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis occurred in 69% of patients. The high sensitivity of 201 Tl-DDC SPET in the first 24 h after ischaemic stroke and the favourable properties of this radiopharmaceutical make it a method of interest in the assessment of initial perfusion defects in early experimental stroke therapies. (orig.)

  8. Hyperintense acute reperfusion marker is associated with higher contrast agent dosage in acute ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Schaefer, Tabea; Villringer, Kersten; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Rozanski, Michal; Ebinger, Martin; Jungehuelsing, Gerhard J.

    2015-01-01

    The hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images is associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability changes. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of contrast agent dosage on HARM incidence in acute ischaemic stroke patients. We prospectively included 529 acute ischaemic stroke patients (204 females, median age 71 years). Patients underwent a first stroke-MRI within 24 hours from symptom onset and had a follow-up on day 2. The contrast agent Gadobutrol was administered to the patients for perfusion imaging or MR angiography. The total dosage was calculated as ml/kg body weight and ranged between 0.04 and 0.31 mmol/kg on the first examination. The incidence of HARM was evaluated on day 2 FLAIR images. HARM was detected in 97 patients (18.3 %). HARM incidence increased significantly with increasing dosages of Gadobutrol. Also, HARM positive patients were significantly older. HARM was not an independent predictor of worse clinical outcome, and we did not find an association with increase risk of haemorrhagic transformation. A higher dosage of Gadobutrol in acute stroke patients on initial MRI is associated with increased HARM incidence on follow-up. MRI studies on BBB should therefore standardize contrast agent dosages. (orig.)

  9. Commentary on a GWAS: HDAC9 and the risk for ischaemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacke Werner

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Modifiable risk factors like obesity, hypertension, smoking, physical inactivity or atrial fibrillation account for a significant proportion of the risk for ischaemic stroke, but genetic variation is also believed to contribute to the risk, although few genetic risk variants were identified to date. Common clinical subtypes of stroke are caused by cardiac embolism, large artery atherosclerosis and small cerebral vessel disease. Each of these underlying pathologies may have a specific genetic architecture. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS showed association of variants near PITX2 and ZFHX3 with atrial fibrillation and stroke. ANRIL (antisense Non-coding RNA in the INK4 Locus (harboring the CDKN2A/B genes variants were related to a variety of vascular diseases (myocardial infarction, aortic and intracranial aneurysm, including ischaemic stroke. Now a recent GWAS published in Nature Genetics confirmed these previous associations, analyzed the specificity of the previous associations with particular stroke subtypes and identified a new association between HDAC9 and large vessel stroke. The findings suggest that well-recognized clinical stroke subtypes correspond to distinct aetiological entities. However, the molecular pathways that are affected by the identified genetic variants are not yet pinpointed, and the observed associations apply only for some, but not all victims of a specific stroke aetiology.

  10. Commentary on a GWAS: HDAC9 and the risk for ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacke, Werner; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar

    2012-07-09

    Modifiable risk factors like obesity, hypertension, smoking, physical inactivity or atrial fibrillation account for a significant proportion of the risk for ischaemic stroke, but genetic variation is also believed to contribute to the risk, although few genetic risk variants were identified to date. Common clinical subtypes of stroke are caused by cardiac embolism, large artery atherosclerosis and small cerebral vessel disease. Each of these underlying pathologies may have a specific genetic architecture.Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) showed association of variants near PITX2 and ZFHX3 with atrial fibrillation and stroke. ANRIL (antisense Non-coding RNA in the INK4 Locus (harboring the CDKN2A/B genes)) variants were related to a variety of vascular diseases (myocardial infarction, aortic and intracranial aneurysm), including ischaemic stroke. Now a recent GWAS published in Nature Genetics confirmed these previous associations, analyzed the specificity of the previous associations with particular stroke subtypes and identified a new association between HDAC9 and large vessel stroke. The findings suggest that well-recognized clinical stroke subtypes correspond to distinct aetiological entities. However, the molecular pathways that are affected by the identified genetic variants are not yet pinpointed, and the observed associations apply only for some, but not all victims of a specific stroke aetiology.

  11. Serial CT and MRI of ischaemic cerebral infarcts: frequency and clinical impact of haemorrhagic transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, T.E.; Brueckmann, H. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G. [Dept. of Radiology/Neuroradiology, University Medical School of Luebeck (Germany); Droste, D.W. [Dept. of Neurology, University Medical School of Luebeck (Germany)

    2000-04-01