WorldWideScience

Sample records for preventing infant deaths

  1. AN AUDIT OF THE SUDDEN-INFANT-DEATH-SYNDROME PREVENTION PROGRAM IN THE AUCKLAND REGION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obdeijn, M. C.; Tonkin, S.; Mitchell, E. A.

    1995-01-01

    Aim. An audit of the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) prevention programme in the Auckland region. Methods. 107 health professionals working in antenatal classes, postnatal wards, domiciliary midwifery and the Plunket Society were interviewed. Results. Maternal smoking and infant sleeping

  2. Should pacifiers be recommended to prevent sudden infant death syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, E A; Blair, P S; L'Hoir, M P

    2006-05-01

    Our aim was to review the evidence for a reduction in the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) with pacifier ("dummy" or "soother") use, to discuss possible mechanisms for the reduction in SIDS risk, and to review other possible health effects of pacifiers. There is a remarkably consistent reduction of SIDS with pacifier use. The mechanism by which pacifiers might reduce the risk of SIDS is unknown, but several mechanisms have been postulated. Pacifiers might reduce breastfeeding duration, but the studies are conflicting. It seems appropriate to stop discouraging the use of pacifiers. Whether it is appropriate to recommend pacifier use in infants is open to debate.

  3. Agreement between underlying cause and preventability of infant deaths before and after the investigation in Recife, Pernambuco State, Brazil, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Lays Janaina Prazeres; Pimentel, Dayane da Rocha; Oliveira, Conceição Maria de; Vilela, Mirella Bezerra Rodrigues; Frias, Paulo Germano; Bonfim, Cristine Vieira do

    2018-01-01

    to assess the agreement and describe the causes and preventability of infant deaths before and after the investigation. investigation files and death certificates of infants under one year, of mothers living in Recife, Brazil, in 2014 were used; the Cohen kappa index was adopted for agreement analysis of the underlying causes of death; the list of preventable causes of deaths by interventions of the Brazilian National Health System was also adopted. 183 infant deaths were analyzed, of which 117 (63.9%) had the underlying cause revised; before the investigation, 170 (92.2%) deaths were considered preventable, and after investigation, 178 (97.3%); there was reasonable agreement (0.338) regarding the underlying causes of death, and moderate (0.439) for preventability. infant mortality surveillance enabled the improvement of vital events information, contributing to the progress in the specification of underlying causes of death and in the preventability of infant death.

  4. Sudden infant death syndrome and cardiac channelopathies: from mechanisms to prevention of avoidable tragedies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Schwartz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS, with the load of mystery surrounding its causes and with the devastating impact on the affected families, remains the greatest contributor to post-neonatal mortality during the first year of life. Following a succinct review of the non-cardiac genetic factors, which have been associated with SIDS, we focus on the cardiac hypothesis for SIDS and specifically on those diseases produced by cardiac ion channel mutations, the so-called channelopathies. Special attention is devoted to the fact that these causes of SIDS, and especially the long QT syndrome, are preventable if diagnosed in time. This highlights the importance of neonatal ECG screening and carries a number of practical implications, including medico-legal considerations.

  5. A Context-Aware Indoor Air Quality System for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. De La Iglesia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Context-aware monitoring systems designed for e-Health solutions and ambient assisted living (AAL play an important role in today’s personalized health-care services. The majority of these systems are intended for the monitoring of patients’ vital signs by means of bio-sensors. At present, there are very few systems that monitor environmental conditions and air quality in the homes of users. A home’s environmental conditions can have a significant influence on the state of the health of its residents. Monitoring the environment is the key to preventing possible diseases caused by conditions that do not favor health. This paper presents a context-aware system that monitors air quality to prevent a specific health problem at home. The aim of this system is to reduce the incidence of the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, which is triggered mainly by environmental factors. In the conducted case study, the system monitored the state of the neonate and the quality of air while it was asleep. The designed proposal is characterized by its low cost and non-intrusive nature. The results are promising.

  6. A Context-Aware Indoor Air Quality System for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Iglesia, Daniel H; De Paz, Juan F; Villarrubia González, Gabriel; Barriuso, Alberto L; Bajo, Javier

    2018-03-02

    Context-aware monitoring systems designed for e-Health solutions and ambient assisted living (AAL) play an important role in today's personalized health-care services. The majority of these systems are intended for the monitoring of patients' vital signs by means of bio-sensors. At present, there are very few systems that monitor environmental conditions and air quality in the homes of users. A home's environmental conditions can have a significant influence on the state of the health of its residents. Monitoring the environment is the key to preventing possible diseases caused by conditions that do not favor health. This paper presents a context-aware system that monitors air quality to prevent a specific health problem at home. The aim of this system is to reduce the incidence of the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, which is triggered mainly by environmental factors. In the conducted case study, the system monitored the state of the neonate and the quality of air while it was asleep. The designed proposal is characterized by its low cost and non-intrusive nature. The results are promising.

  7. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Infant Deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mortality - Infant Deaths (from Linked Birth / Infant Death Records) online databases on CDC WONDER provide counts and rates for deaths of children under 1 year...

  8. Reproductive justice & preventable deaths: State funding, family planning, abortion, and infant mortality, US 1980–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Krieger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little current research examines associations between infant mortality and US states’ funding for family planning services and for abortion, despite growing efforts to restrict reproductive rights and services and documented associations between unintended pregnancy and infant mortality. Material and methods: We obtained publicly available data on state-only public funding for family planning and abortion services (years available: 1980, 1987, 1994, 2001, 2006, and 2010 and corresponding annual data on US county infant death rates. We modeled the funding as both fraction of state expenditures and per capita spending (per woman, age 15–44. State-level covariates comprised: Title X and Medicaid per capita funding, fertility rate, and percent of counties with no abortion services; county-level covariates were: median family income, and percent: black infants, adults without a high school education, urban, and female labor force participation. We used Possion log-linear models for: (1 repeat cross-sectional analyses, with random state and county effects; and (2 panel analysis, with fixed state effects. Results: Four findings were robust to analytic approach. First, since 2000, the rate ratio for infant death comparing states in the top funding quartile vs. no funding for abortion services ranged (in models including all covariates between 0.94 and 0.98 (95% confidence intervals excluding 1, except for the 2001 cross-sectional analysis, whose upper bound equaled 1, yielding an average 15% reduction in risk (range: 8–22%. Second, a similar risk reduction for state per capita funding for family planning services occurred in 1994. Third, the excess risk associated with lower county income increased over time, and fourth, remained persistently high for counties with a high percent of black infants. Conclusions: Insofar as reducing infant mortality is a government priority, our data underscore the need, despite heightened contention

  9. [Mothers' behavior regarding infant sleep position: effects of the last public campaign to prevent sudden infant death syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaivre-Douret, L; Dos Santos, C; Richard, A; Jarjanette, V; Paniel, B J; Cabrol, D

    2000-12-01

    To define infant care practices in maternity units and those subsequently adopted at home. Using these data, we evaluated the acceptance and application of recommendations issued by the previous public education campaign on infant sleeping position as related to sudden infant death syndrome. A survey was carried out in two maternity units (Port-Royal and Créteil) and in one pediatric consultation unit (affiliated with Port-Royal maternity). The mixed position (side or back) is used equally with, respectively, 47% at Port-Royal and 45% at Créteil. The supine sleeping position (French public health recommendations) is used by 12% of the mothers at Port-Royal and by 40% at Créteil. It appears that hospital nurseries play an important role in determining the mother's preference for the sleeping position (64% at Port-Royal and 54% at Créteil), but it does not adequately explain all mothers' responses. However, as the infants mature (> two months old), the more spontaneously they changed their sleeping position. All the infants placed in a side sleeping position moved to a supine sleeping position during the night. Upon awakening, infants were found mostly in the supine position (in contrast to the national public education campaign). Our results show that mothers and hospital nurseries were distressed in terms of ensuring the supine sleeping position of the infant. New choices of sleeping positions were initiated by mothers. For example, they used the side position after feedings essentially in the case of reflux or during the daytime. The supine position was used when the mothers were assured that any problems had been avoided or only during the night.

  10. Parents bereaved by infant death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Dorte M.; Elklit, Ask; Olff, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Losing an infant or fetus late in pregnancy, during birth or in the first year of life is a potentially traumatic event for parents. However, little is known about the factors contributing to chronic posttraumatic stress reactions in this population. The present study examined chronic posttraumatic...... stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and potential correlates in 634 mothers and fathers up to 18 years (M=3.4 years) after the death of their infant. Members of a private national support organization for parents bereaved by infant death were contacted and asked to participate in the study. Participants...

  11. Parents Bereaved by Infant Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Dorte Mølgaard; Elklit, Ask; Olff, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Losing an infant or fetus late in pregnancy, during birth or in the first year of life is a potentiallytraumatic event for parents. However, little is known about the factors contributing to chronic posttraumatic stress reactions in this population. The present study examined chronic...... posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)´symptoms and potential correlates in 634 mothers and fathers up to 18 years (M=3.4 years) after the death of their infant. Methods: Members of a private national support organization for parents bereaved by infant death were contacted and asked to participate in the study...

  12. Otolaryngological aspects of sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Tal; Cinamon, Udi; Castellanos, Paul F; Cohen, Marta C

    2012-03-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is characterized by the sudden death of an apparently otherwise healthy infant, typically during sleep, and with no obvious case after a thorough post-mortem and scene death examination. To address the problem from the otolaryngologist's perspective, describe relevant pathologies, discuss controversies and suggest preventive measures in high-risk populations. A MEDLINE search and hand search were conducted to identify reports published between 1969 and 2011 in the English language on the pathophysiology of SIDS related to the head and neck organs. Search terms included SIDS (MeSH term), SIDS and pathophysiology (text words), and SIDS and autopsy (text words). A growing number of reports suggested head and neck organs involvement in SIDS autopsies. Laryngeal, oropharyngeal, maxillofacial, otologic, cervical vascular abnormalities and infectious etiologies, were recognized and discussed. Otolaryngologists should be aware of relevant pathologies, as some are treatable, if identified early enough in infancy. A proactive risk-management approach is warranted in infants presenting with certain abnormalities reviewed here. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Preventing the White Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Casper Worm; Jensen, Peter S.; Madsen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause of death worldwide and, while treatable by antibiotics since the 1940s, drug resistant strains have emerged. This paper estimates the effects of the establishment of a pre-antibiotic era public health institution, known as a TB dispensary, designed to prevent...... of the dispensaries on productivity as measured by annual income per taxpayer at the city level, digitized from historical tax-assessment records. Overall, the evidence highlights the provision of personalized information on infectious diseases as a cost-effective cause of the historical mortality decline....

  14. Cardiac channelopathies and sudden infant death syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Grunnet, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is always a devastating and unexpected occurrence. SIDS is the leading cause of death in the first 6 months after birth in the industrialized world. Since the discovery in 1998 of long QT syndrome as an underlying substrate for SIDS, around 10-20% of SIDS cases...

  15. Sudden infant death syndrome and other sleep-related infant deaths (case study of the Republic of Komi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya N. Korableva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS, accidental asphyxia and suffocation in bed are the most significant part of the conditions united by the term “sudden unexpected death in infants” (SUDI. A high level of SUDI and a significant proportion in infant mortality are typical for countries with low rates of infant and babies mortality. The aim of the research is to study the epidemiological characteristics and risk factors of the sudden infant death syndrome in the Komi Republic from 1997 to 2015, to assess the contribution of SIDS, occasional asphyxia and suffocation in bed to the mortality of infants to determine the optimization of approaches to the prevention of these conditions. Materials and Methods: The retrospective data analysis of the death of infants has been performed according to medical records, protocols of pathoanatomical studies, and the conclusions of the infant mortality commission of the Ministry of Health of the Komi Republic from 1997 to 2015. Risk factors were assessed retrospectively on the scale of life-threatening conditions (Tsinserling A.V. and co-authors, 1987. Results: The cumulative infant mortality rate from SIDS was 0.63 ± 0.33 ‰ (median – 0.55 ‰. Within the past 5 years, when the infant mortality rate in the region has not changed significantly, averaging 5.22 ± 0.73 ‰, the infant mortality rate from SIDS was 0.40 ± 0.25 ‰ (median 0.43. This compares with the level registered in the USA (0,4‰ in 2013 and in Western Europe with a similar level of infant mortality. In infant mortality of in the post-neonatal period, SIDS occurred in 13.8 ± 6.3 % (median – 12.2 %. Generally recognized data on the significant contribution of social and biological factors to decreasing the risk of sudden death syndrome were confirmed. The scale of life-threatening conditions showed the high sensitivity to death from SIDS. An examination of the place accident and assess of death circumstances is

  16. Tritium releases, birth defects and infant deaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The AECB has published a report 'Tritium releases from the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station and Birth Defects and Infant Mortality in Nearby Communities 1971-1988' (report number INFO-0401). This presents the results of a detailed analysis of deaths and birth defects occurring in infants born to mothers living in the area (25 Km radius) of the Pickering nuclear power plant, over an 18-year period. The analysis looked at the frequency of these defects and deaths in comparison to the general rate for Ontario, and also in relation to airborne and waterborne releases of tritium from the power plant. The overall conclusion was that the rates of infant death and birth defects were generally not higher in the study population than in all of Ontario. There was no prevalent relationship between these deaths and defects and tritium releases measured either at the power plant or by ground monitoring stations t some distance from the facility

  17. Preventing Stroke Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... die within minutes. Strokes happen more in some populations and geographic areas. Stroke death declines have stalled in 3 out of every 4 states. Blacks have the highest stroke death rates among all ...

  18. Histological findings in unclassified sudden infant death, including sudden infant death syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Liebrechts-Akkerman (Germaine); J.V.M.G. Bovée (Judith); L.C.D. Wijnaendts (Liliane); A. Maes (Ann); P.G.J. Nikkels (Peter); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractOur objective was to study histological variations and abnormalities in unclassified sudden infant death (USID), including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), in The Netherlands. Two hundred Dutch USID cases between 1984 and 2005 were identified. The histology slides and autopsy reports

  19. [Impact of screening and treatment of low systemic blood flow in the prevention of severe intraventricular haemorrhage and/or death in pre-term infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulego Erroz, Ignacio; Alonso Quintela, Paula; Jiménez Gonzalez, Aquilina; Terroba Seara, Sandra; Rodríguez Blanco, Silvia; Rosón Varas, María; Castañón López, Leticia

    2018-04-02

    To assess the effect of a protocolised intervention for low systemic blood flow (SBF) in the occurrence of severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) or death in pre-term infants. A study with a quasi-experimental design with retrospective controls was conducted on pre-term infants of less than 30weeks of gestational age, born between January 2016 and July 2017, who were consecutively included in the intervention period. The control cohort included pre-term infants (born between January 2013 and December 2015) matched by gestational age, birth weight, and gender (two controls for each case). The cases of low SBF diagnosed according to functional echocardiography during the study period received dobutamine (5-10μg/kg/min) for 48hours. The study included 29 cases (intervention period) and 54 controls (pre-intervention period). Ten out of 29 (34.5%) infants received dobutamine for low SBF during the intervention period, with 3/29 (10.3%) cases of severe IVH and/or death compared to 17/54 (31.5%) in the control cohort (p=.032). There was an independent association between the intervention and a decreased occurrence of severe IVH/death after adjusting for confounding factors both in the logistic regression model [OR 0.11 (95%CI: 0.01-0.65), p=.015], as well as in the sensitivity analysis using inverse probability of treatment weighting [OR 0.23 (95%CI: 0.09-0.56); p=.001]. In this study with retrospective controls, a protocolised screening, and treatment for low SBF was associated with a decreased occurrence of severe IVH or death in preterm infants. Large, adequately powered trials, are needed in order to determine whether postnatal interventions directed at low SBF can improve neurological outcomes. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  20. Febrile convulsions and sudden infant death syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Basso, Olga; Henriksen, Tine Brink

    2002-01-01

    It has been suggested that sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and febrile convulsions are related aetiologically. We compared the risk of SIDS in 9877 siblings of children who had had febrile convulsions with that of 20.177 siblings of children who had never had febrile convulsions. We found...

  1. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)--standardised investigations and classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajanowski, Thomas; Vege, Ashild; Byard, Roger W

    2007-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) still accounts for considerable numbers of unexpected infant deaths in many countries. While numerous theories have been advanced to explain these events, it is increasingly clear that this group of infant deaths results from the complex interaction of a variety...

  2. Early postnatal additional high-dose oral vitamin A supplementation versus placebo for 28 days for preventing bronchopulmonary dysplasia or death in extremely low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sascha; Gortner, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    Prematurity and the associated risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) remain a significant threat to extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. Vitamin A has been considered a therapeutic alternative in reducing the rate of BPD and mortality. To investigate whether early postnatal, additional high-dose oral vitamin A supplementation for 28 days is more efficient in reducing BPD or death in ELBW infants than placebo treatment. This is a multicenter, double-blind RCT comparing postnatal high-dose oral vitamin A supplementation (5,000 IU vitamin A/kg/day vs. placebo) for 28 days in ELBW neonates requiring mechanical ventilation, noninvasive ventilatory support or supplemental oxygen at 24 h of age. The primary end point is the proportion of children who died before 36 weeks' gestational age or developed moderate or severe BPD. BPD is defined as the need for supplemental oxygen to maintain SaO2 of ≥92% at rest at 36 weeks' postmenstrual age (PMA). Clinical secondary end points include the following: BPD (including mild form), intraventricular hemorrhage, periventricular leukomalacia, retinopathy of prematurity, necrotizing enterocolitis, total number of days of mechanical ventilation and oxygen supplementation, and safety and tolerability of high-dose vitamin A supplementation. The results of the NeoVitaA trial will provide robust data with regard to the efficacy of high-dose oral vitamin A supplementation in reducing the incidence of BPD or death at 36 weeks' PMA in ELBW infants. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Fathers and grieving: coping with infant death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordell, A S; Thomas, N

    1990-03-01

    As we have listened to parents who have come to our parent support group during the past 10 years, we have become increasingly aware of the differences in the way fathers and mothers grieve. These differences can lead to misunderstanding and to further hurt and confusion for both parents who are grieving the loss of an infant. Role expectations seem to account for many of these differences. Fathers' responses to infant loss tend to coincide with how they believe they should act as men, rather than how they need to act to confront and resolve grief. We conducted a pilot study of parents' experiences following infant death, and sought more detailed insight from several fathers into their experiences. In this article, we explore some of the differences in the way fathers and mothers grieve and the constraints men experience in resolving grief because of their role expectations.

  4. A randomised controlled trial of the probiotic Bifidobacterium breve BBG-001 in preterm babies to prevent sepsis, necrotising enterocolitis and death: the Probiotics in Preterm infantS (PiPS) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costeloe, Kate; Bowler, Ursula; Brocklehurst, Peter; Hardy, Pollyanna; Heal, Paul; Juszczak, Edmund; King, Andy; Panton, Nicola; Stacey, Fiona; Whiley, Angela; Wilks, Mark; Millar, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) and late-onset sepsis remain important causes of death and morbidity in preterm babies. Probiotic administration might strengthen intestinal barrier function and provide protection; this is supported by published meta-analyses, but there is a lack of large well-designed trials. To test the use of the probiotic Bifidobacterium breve strain BBG-001 to prevent NEC, late-onset sepsis and death in preterm babies while monitoring probiotic colonisation of participants. Double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Recruitment was carried out in 24 hospitals, and the randomisation programme used a minimisation algorithm. Parents, clinicians and outcome assessors were blinded to the allocation. Babies born between 23 and 30 weeks' gestation and randomised within 48 hours of birth. Exclusions included life-threatening or any gastrointestinal malformation detected within 48 hours of birth and no realistic chance of survival. Active intervention: 1 ml of B. breve BBG-001 in one-eighth-strength infant formula Neocate(®) (Nutricia Ltd, Trowbridge, UK), (6.7 × 10(7) to 6.7 × 10(9) colony-forming units) per dose administered enterally. Placebo: 1 ml of one-eighth-strength infant formula Neocate. Started as soon as practicable and continued daily until 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. Primary outcomes were an episode of bloodstream infection, with any organism other than a skin commensal, in any baby between 72 hours and 46 weeks' postmenstrual age; an episode of NEC Bell stage ≥ 2 in any baby; and death before discharge from hospital. Secondary outcomes included stool colonisation with B. breve. In total, 654 babies were allocated to receive probiotic and 661 to receive placebo over 37 months from July 2010. Five babies were withdrawn; 650 babies from the probiotic group and 660 from the placebo group were included in the primary analysis. Baseline characteristics were well balanced. There was no evidence of benefit for the primary

  5. Sudden infant death syndrome and weather temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, E A; Stewart, A W; Cowan, S F

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between the days on which sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) occurred and the daily minimum temperature was examined in Auckland (1979-1984) and Christchurch (1979-1987). There was a marked winter excess of deaths in both regions. There was a significant negative correlation between the monthly mean minimum temperature and SIDS rate for both regions (r = -0.43, n = 347, P less than 0.0001). The monthly mean minimum temperature describes SIDS mortality equally as well as the three variables of daily minimum temperature, season and geographical location. There was a significant association of SIDS with minimum temperature 4 and 5 days prior to the death after adjusting for the effect of monthly mean minimum temperature. The days preceding death were on average colder than the other days, but the effect was small, especially when compared with the magnitude of the temperature differences between consecutive months.

  6. Suffocation, recurrent apnea, and sudden infant death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadow, R

    1990-09-01

    We reviewed the cases of 27 young children from 27 different families who were suffocated by their mothers. The certainty, or near certainty, of suffocation was based on reliable observation or recording of the suffocation, maternal confession, or successful prosecution in a criminal court. Eighteen of the children are alive, although one has severe brain damage; nine are dead. Twenty-four were reported to have had previous episodes of apnea, cyanosis, or seizure, and 11 had had 10 or more such episodes that were either invented or caused by the mother. Repetitive suffocation usually began between the ages of 1 and 3 months and continued until it was discovered, or the child died, 6 to 12 months later. The 27 children had 15 live elder siblings and 18 who had died suddenly and unexpectedly in early life; 13 of the dead siblings had had recurrent apnea, cyanosis, or seizures, and, although most of them at the time of death were certified as having sudden infant death syndrome, it is probable that some were suffocated. Repetitive suffocation has a characteristic clinical presentation that should allow identification before brain damage or death occurs. The characteristics should also allow the cause of death of some cases of sudden infant death to be established more accurately.

  7. Using a pacifier to decrease sudden infant death syndrome: an emergency department educational intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Paul; Vieth, Teri; Rodriguez, Carolina; Lona, Nicole; Molina, Rogelio; Habebo, Emnet; Caldera, Enrique; Garcia, Cynthia; Veazey, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pacifier use decreases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). An emergency department (ED) visit may provide an opportunistic ‘teachable moment’ for parents. Objectives. To test the hypotheses (1) that caregivers were less familiar with the role of pacifiers in sudden infant death (SIDS) prevention than other recommendations, and (2) that an ED educational intervention would increase pacifier use in infants younger than six months, and (3) that otitis media would not occ...

  8. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or cot death: A review | Ogbu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sudden death of an infant is not an uncommon event and when there is no adequate cause to explain the death it poses a diagnostic dilemma for the clinician, and makes discussion of the cause of death with parents quite difficult and unsatisfactory. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or cot death is a diagnostic entity ...

  9. Infant pacifiers for reduction in risk of sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaila, Kim; Foster, Jann P; Pulbrook, Neil; Jeffery, Heather E

    2017-04-05

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has been most recently defined as the sudden unexpected death of an infant less than one year of age, with onset of the fatal episode apparently occurring during sleep, that remains unexplained after a thorough investigation, including the performance of a complete autopsy and a review of the circumstances of death and clinical history. Despite the success of several prevention campaigns, SIDS remains a leading cause of infant mortality. In 1994, a 'triple risk model' for SIDS was proposed that described SIDS as an event that results from the intersection of three factors: a vulnerable infant; a critical development period in homeostatic control (age related); and an exogenous stressor. The association between pacifier (dummy) use and reduced incidence of SIDS has been shown in epidemiological studies since the early 1990s. Pacifier use, given its low cost, might be a cost-effective intervention for SIDS prevention if it is confirmed effective in randomised controlled trials. To determine whether the use of pacifiers during sleep versus no pacifier during sleep reduces the risk of SIDS. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 2), MEDLINE via PubMed, Embase, and CINAHL to 16 March 2016. We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. Published and unpublished controlled trials using random and quasi-random allocations of infants born at term and at preterm (less than 37 weeks' gestation) or with low birth weight (pacifiers for reduction in risk of SIDS. We found no randomised control trial evidence on which to support or refute the use of pacifiers for the prevention of SIDS.

  10. Cardiac ion channelopathies and the sudden infant death syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilders, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) causes the sudden death of an apparently healthy infant, which remains unexplained despite a thorough investigation, including the performance of a complete autopsy. The triple risk model for the pathogenesis of SIDS points to the coincidence of a vulnerable

  11. Sudden infant death syndrome in child care settings in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, G.A. de; Lanting, C.I.; Brand, R.; Ruys, J.H.; Semmekrot, B.A.; Wouwe, J.P. van

    2004-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, there is a very low incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) due to effective preventive campaigns. Methods: During the period September 1996 to August 2002, nationwide 161 deaths from SIDS (about 85% of all cases of SIDS during that time) were investigated by

  12. Death Scene Investigation and Autopsy Practices in Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erck Lambert, Alexa B.; Parks, Sharyn E.; Camperlengo, Lena; Cottengim, Carri; Anderson, Rebecca L.; Covington, Theresa M.; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe and compare sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) investigations among states participating in the SUID Case Registry from 2010 through 2012. Study design We analyzed observational data from 770 SUID cases identified and entered into the National Child Death Review Case Reporting System. We examined data on autopsy and death scene investigation (DSI) components, including key information about the infant sleep environment. We calculated the percentage of components that were complete, incomplete, and missing/unknown. Results Most cases (98%) had a DSI. The DSI components most frequently reported as done were the narrative description of the circumstances (90%; range, 85%–99%), and witness interviews (88%, range, 85%–98%). Critical information about 10 infant sleep environment components was available for 85% of cases for all states combined. All 770 cases had an autopsy performed. The autopsy components most frequently reported as done were histology, microbiology, and other pathology (98%; range, 94%–100%) and toxicology (97%; range, 94%–100%). Conclusions This study serves as a baseline to understand the scope of infant death investigations in selected states. Standardized and comprehensive DSI and autopsy practices across jurisdictions and states may increase knowledge about SUID etiology and also lead to an improved understanding of the cause-specific SUID risk and protective factors. Additionally, these results demonstrate practices in the field showing what is feasible in these select states. We encourage pediatricians, forensic pathologists, and other medicolegal experts to use these findings to inform system changes and improvements in DSI and autopsy practices and SUID prevention efforts. PMID:27113380

  13. Exclusive breastfeeding reduces acute respiratory infection and diarrhea deaths among infants in Dhaka slums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifeen, S; Black, R E; Antelman, G; Baqui, A; Caulfield, L; Becker, S

    2001-10-01

    To describe breastfeeding practices and investigate the influence of exclusive breastfeeding in early infancy on the risk of infant deaths, especially those attributable to respiratory infections (ARI) and diarrhea. A prospective observational study was conducted on a birth cohort of 1677 infants who were born in slum areas of Dhaka in Bangladesh and followed from birth to 12 months of age. After enrollment at birth, the infants were visited 5 more times by 12 months of age. Verbal autopsy, based on a structured questionnaire, was used to assign a cause to the 180 reported deaths. Proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the effect of breastfeeding practices, introduced as a time-varying variable, after accounting for other variables, including birth weight. Overall neonatal, postneonatal and infant mortality, and mortality attributable to ARI and diarrhea were measured. The proportion of infants who were breastfed exclusively was only 6% at enrollment, increasing to 53% at 1 month and then gradually declining to 5% at 6 months of age. Predominant breastfeeding declined from 66% at enrollment to 4% at 12 months of age. Very few infants were not breastfed, whereas the proportion of partially breastfed infants increased with age. Breastfeeding practices did not differ between low and normal birth weight infants at any age. The overall infant mortality rate was 114 deaths per 1000 live births. Compared with exclusive breastfeeding in the first few months of life, partial or no breastfeeding was associated with a 2.23-fold higher risk of infant deaths resulting from all causes and 2.40- and 3.94-fold higher risk of deaths attributable to ARI and diarrhea, respectively. The important role of appropriate breastfeeding practices in the survival of infants is clear from this analysis. The reduction of ARI deaths underscores the broad-based beneficial effect of exclusive breastfeeding in prevention of infectious diseases beyond its role in reducing

  14. Sudden infant death syndrome: are we any closer to identifying which infants will be affected?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramirez TL

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tara L Ramirez, Michael H MalloyDepartment of Pediatrics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USAAbstract: Sudden infant death syndrome is a complex and multifactoral process. The classification and definition of the syndrome has changed over time. As knowledge in the genetics of this complex syndrome continues to advance, additional causes of vulnerability have been found, but no single cause has yet been discovered. Over the last 40 years there have also been many advances in the identification of risk factors that make a given infant more vulnerable to succumbing to sudden infant death. There have also been great strides made in decreasing the number of infant deaths from this syndrome by modification of these risk factors, most notably with the initiation of the Back to Sleep campaign. With the initiation of the Safe to Sleep campaign there is hope that sudden infant death syndrome as a component of all sudden unexpected infant deaths can be further reduced.Keywords: sudden infant death syndrome, sudden unexpected death of infancy, risk factors, sleep-related infant death, crib death, cot death

  15. Posttraumatic stress disorder in parents following infant death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Dorte M.

    2017-01-01

    Parents who have lost an infant prior to, during, or following birth often interpret the event as highly traumatic. The present systematic review included 46 articles based on 31 different studies of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in parents bereaved by infant death. The PTSD prevalence in ......-experiencing, avoidance, and arousal can elicit a DSM-5 PTSD diagnosis....

  16. Sudden infant death syndrome: an unrecognized killer in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndu IK

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ikenna Kingsley Ndu Department of Paediatrics, Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria Abstract: Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS is defined as the sudden unexpected death of an infant <1 year of age, with onset of the fatal episode apparently occurring during sleep, that remains unexplained after a thorough investigation including performance of a complete autopsy and review of the circumstances of death and the clinical history. SIDS contributes to infant mortality and resulted in ~15,000 deaths globally in 2013. Most of the risk factors of SIDS are common in developing countries; yet, there has been little interest in SIDS by researchers in Africa. This review looks at the extent of the attention given to SIDS in a developing country like Nigeria, and factors responsible for the scarce data concerning this significant cause of mortality. Keywords: SIDS, mortality, Nigeria

  17. PREventing Maternal And Neonatal Deaths (PREMAND): a study protocol for examining social and cultural factors contributing to infant and maternal deaths and near-misses in rural northern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Cheryl A; Aborigo, Raymond A; Kaselitz, Elizabeth B; Gupta, Mira L; Oduro, Abraham; Williams, John

    2016-03-09

    While Ghana is a leader in some health indicators among West African nations, it still struggles with high maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality rates, especially in the northern areas. The clinical causes of mortality and morbidity are relatively well understood in Ghana, but little is known about the impact of social and cultural factors on maternal and neonatal outcomes. Less still is understood about how such factors may vary by geographic location, and how such variability may inform locally-tailored solutions. Preventing Maternal And Neonatal Deaths (PREMAND) is a three-year, three-phase project that takes place in four districts in the Upper East, Upper West, and Northern Regions of Ghana. PREMAND will prospectively identify all maternal and neonatal deaths and 'near-misses', or those mothers and babies who survive a life threatening complication, in the project districts. Each event will be followed by either a social autopsy (in the case of deaths) or a sociocultural audit (in the case of near-misses). Geospatial technology will be used to visualize the variability in outcomes as well as the social, cultural, and clinical predictors of those outcomes. Data from PREMAND will be used to generate maps for local leaders, community members and Government of Ghana to identify priority areas for intervention. PREMAND is an effort of the Navrongo Health Research Centre and the University of Michigan Medical School. PREMAND uses an innovative, multifaceted approach to better understand and address neonatal and maternal morbidity and mortality in northern Ghana. It will provide unprecedented access to information on the social and cultural factors that contribute to deaths and near-misses in the project regions, and will allow such causal factors to be situated geographically. PREMAND will create the opportunity for local, regional, and national stakeholders to see how these events cluster, and place them relative to traditional healer compounds, health

  18. Infant dreaming and fetal memory: a possible explanation of sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christos, G A

    1995-04-01

    During rapid-eye-movement sleep, when we dream, the brain is thought to be processing stored memory. The memory of a newborn infant is dominated by its fetal experience, and the infant is likely to dream about its life in the womb. Research with lucid (or conscious) dreaming has shown that dream images are supported by the corresponding body actions, using those muscles which remain active during rapid-eye-movement sleep. We suggest that sudden infant death syndrome or cot death may be a result of an infant dreaming about its life (or memory) as a fetus. In the course of that dream, since a fetus does not breathe (in the usual sense) the infant may cease to breathe and may die. This simple hypothesis is consistent with all of the known facts about sudden infant death syndrome (pathological and epidemiological), such as the age at death curve (the observed exponential decay and possibly the peak at 2-3 months), the higher risk with the prone sleeping position (but not excluding the supine position), and the observed climatic variation (seasonal and regional) in the incidence of sudden infant death syndrome. Many of these well-established facts have no other known explanation and other theories can generally only account for a few of the known facts about sudden infant death syndrome. Our hypothesis is also supported by recent findings that, as a group, sudden infant death syndrome infants have a higher proportion of rapid-eye-movement sleep, and also that they have an average higher heart rate (corresponding to possible fetal dreams) but only during rapid-eye-movement sleep.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. [Analysis on the adverse events following immunization of 10 infants death after hepatitis B vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu-Zhen; Cui, Fu-Qiang; Liu, Da-Wei

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the safety of Hepatitis B vaccine by analyzing the 10 infants death after Hepatitis B vaccination. Collect the reporting data from the public health emergencies report system of China Disease Prevention and Control System. In the 10 death cases after hepatitis B vaccination, 2 cases would be acute anaphylactic shock caused by the vaccination, and the other 8 death cases were not related to vaccination. The hepatitis B vaccine of China were safety, there were very few death cases of allergic reactions following hepatitis B vaccination. We should standardize the vaccination in order to reduce the adverse events following immunization.

  20. A possible explanation of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christos, G A; Christos, J A

    1993-09-01

    Research into (lucid) dreaming has shown that the images of a dream are supported by the corresponding body actions, utilizing those muscles which remain active during dreaming. We suggest that Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) or Cot Death may be a result of an infant dreaming about its life as a fetus. In the course of that dream, since a fetus does not breathe in the usual sense, the infant may cease to breathe and die. Our hypothesis is consistent with the known facts about SIDS, including social factors such as sleeping position and climatic variation. We suggest that the risk of SIDS can be reduced by making the environment of the infant, as much as possible, unlike that of the womb.

  1. Preventing Stroke Deaths PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-09-06

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.  Created: 9/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/6/2017.

  2. Sudden infant death syndrome in Brazil: fact or fancy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Maia Woida

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The true incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS in Brazil is unknown. The aim here was to identify SIDS cases in the city of Ribeirão Preto, State of São Paulo, between 2000 and 2005, in order to estimate its incidence. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective analysis of data on live births and infant deaths in Ribeirão Preto and from autopsies of infants performed at the Death Verification Service of the Interior (SVOI between 2000 and 2005. RESULTS: There were 47,356 live births and 537 deaths, with infant mortality rates ranging from 12.9‰ to 10.9‰ of live births. Among the 24 infants who died possibly due to SIDS and who were autopsied at the SVOI, six were from families living in the municipality (0.13‰ of live births: three (50% were diagnosed as SIDS, and one each (16.66% as indeterminate cause, bronchoaspiration and cerebral edema. Two deaths occurred in the first month of life (33.33% and one each (16.66% at two, four, six and eight months. Two deaths each (33.33% occurred in the months of February and December, one each in August and October (16.66%. Four cases (66.7% occurred in the summer and one each (16.66% in winter and spring. There was 5:1 predominance of males over females. CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of SIDS was lower than what has been reported worldwide and in the Brazilian literature, thus suggesting underdiagnosis, indicating the lack of any specific postmortem protocol for SIDS identification and showing the need to implement this.

  3. Sudden infant death syndrome in Brazil: fact or fancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woida, Francesca Maia; Saggioro, Fabiano Pinto; Ferro, Maria Alice Rossato; Peres, Luiz Cesar

    2008-01-02

    The true incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in Brazil is unknown. The aim here was to identify SIDS cases in the city of Ribeirão Preto, State of São Paulo, between 2000 and 2005, in order to estimate its incidence. Retrospective analysis of data on live births and infant deaths in Ribeirão Preto and from autopsies of infants performed at the Death Verification Service of the Interior (SVOI) between 2000 and 2005. There were 47,356 live births and 537 deaths, with infant mortality rates ranging from 12.9 to 10.9 of live births. Among the 24 infants who died possibly due to SIDS and who were autopsied at the SVOI, six were from families living in the municipality (0.13 of live births): three (50%) were diagnosed as SIDS, and one each (16.66%) as indeterminate cause, bronchoaspiration and cerebral edema. Two deaths occurred in the first month of life (33.33%) and one each (16.66%) at two, four, six and eight months. Two deaths each (33.33%) occurred in the months of February and December, one each in August and October (16.66%). Four cases (66.7%) occurred in the summer and one each (16.66%) in winter and spring. There was 5:1 predominance of males over females. The frequency of SIDS was lower than what has been reported worldwide and in the Brazilian literature, thus suggesting underdiagnosis, indicating the lack of any specific postmortem protocol for SIDS identification and showing the need to implement this.

  4. Maternal vaccination to prevent pertussis in infants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-09

    Sep 9, 2016 ... that maternal immunisation with the Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis) vaccine is safe. Indeed, maternal vaccination is now recommended to prevent pertussis infection in vulnerable young infants. In the USA and UK, the immunisation of pregnant women with a Tdap or dTaP/IPV (diphtheria, ...

  5. Infant and child deaths: Parent concerns about subsequent pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooten, Dorothy; Youngblut, JoAnne M; Hannan, Jean; Caicedo, Carmen; Roche, Rosa; Malkawi, Fatima

    2015-12-01

    Examine parents' concerns about subsequent pregnancies after experiencing an infant or child death (newborn to 18 years). Thirty-nine semistructured parent (white, black, Hispanic) interviews 7 and 13 months post infant/child death conducted in English and/or Spanish, audio-recorded, transcribed, and content analyzed. Mothers' mean age was 31.8 years, fathers' was 39 years; 11 parents were white, 16 black, and 12 Hispanic. Themes common at 7 and 13 months: wanting more children; fear, anxiety, scared; praying to God/God's will; thinking about/keeping the infant's/child's memory and at 7 months importance of becoming pregnant for family members; and at 13 months happy about a new baby. Parents who lost a child in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) commented more than those who lost a child in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Black and Hispanic parents commented more on praying to God and subsequent pregnancies being God's will than white parents. Loss of an infant/child is a significant stressor on parents with documented negative physical and mental health outcomes. Assessing parents' subsequent pregnancy plans, recognizing the legitimacy of their fears about another pregnancy, discussing a plan should they encounter problems, and carefully monitoring the health of all parents who lost an infant/child is an essential practitioner role. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  6. Epidemiology of infant death among black and white non-Hispanic populations in Hampton Roads, Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emuren, Leonard; Chauhan, Suneet; Vroman, Richard; Beydoun, Hind

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the presence of racial disparities in infant mortality rates and assess risk factors for infant death among black and white populations in Hampton Roads, Virginia. A retrospective study with secondary analyses of linked birth/death certificate data was conducted using a sample of 201,610 live-born infants and 1659 infant deaths identified between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2008 in Hampton Roads. Infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates were significantly (P black compared with white populations. Racial disparities were noted whereby black infants were significantly (P black infants dying in the first year of life than white infants. Among blacks, the odds of infant death were inversely related to maternal education. Among whites, the odds of infant death declined with increasing parity. Among black and white populations, history of child death, presence of maternal morbidities and the Kotelchuck Maternal Utilization of Prenatal Care Index were key determinants of infant death. Black infants are at higher odds of dying compared with white infants in Hampton Roads, Virginia. Continued efforts should target prenatal care, preterm delivery, and low-birth-weight infants and neonates to reduce infant mortality rates.

  7. Phrenic nerves and diaphragms in sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, J; Weber, U; Schröder, J M; Lemke, R; Althoff, H

    1998-01-30

    Disturbances of the respiratory system may be an important factor in the cascade of events leading to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Even though the diaphragm is the major respiratory muscle in infants, little is known about alterations of this muscle and of the phrenic nerve in SIDS. In the present study, diaphragms and phrenic nerves of 24 SIDS infants and seven controls were analyzed. Morphometric analysis revealed only slightly larger cross sectional areas of phrenic nerve axons but no increase in myelin sheath thickness in SIDS cases. However, in one SIDS case, myelinated nerve fibre density was severely reduced. Using electron microscopy, several nerve fibres of SIDS infants showed focal accumulations of neurofilaments. Muscle fibre diameters in SIDS diaphragms were significantly larger compared to controls (P fibre ruptures and contracture bands were found. These prominent nonspecific ultrastructural alterations should advise caution in the interpretation of morphometric data. Thus, in some cases exemplified by one case of the present series, decreased density of phrenic nerve myelinated axons might contribute to SIDS. Still, the present results indicate that development of phrenic nerves and diaphragms is not delayed in most SIDS infants.

  8. Leptomeningeal neurons are a common finding in infants and are increased in sudden infant death syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rickert, Christian H.; Gross, Oliver; Nolte, Kay W.; Vennemann, Mechtild; Bajanowski, Thomas; Brinkmann, Bernd

    Developmental abnormalities of the brain, in particular, the brainstem potentially affecting centers for breathing, circulation and sleep regulation, are thought to be involved in the etiology of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). In order to investigate whether leptomeningeal neurons could serve

  9. VSRR - Provisional monthly and 12-month ending number of live births, deaths and infant deaths: United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/vsrr/provisional-tables.htm Monthly and 12 month-ending provisional counts of births, deaths and infant deaths are provided for the...

  10. Sudden infant death syndrome, childhood thrombosis, and presence of genetic risk factors for thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T B; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Banner, Jytte

    2000-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome or "cot death" has until the late eighties been a significant cause of death in children between the ages of 1 month and 1 year. Approximately two per 1000 children born alive dies of sudden infant death syndrome each year in Western Europe, North America, and Austral...

  11. Using a pacifier to decrease sudden infant death syndrome: an emergency department educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Paul; Vieth, Teri; Rodriguez, Carolina; Lona, Nicole; Molina, Rogelio; Habebo, Emnet; Caldera, Enrique; Garcia, Cynthia; Veazey, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pacifier use decreases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). An emergency department (ED) visit may provide an opportunistic 'teachable moment' for parents. Objectives. To test the hypotheses (1) that caregivers were less familiar with the role of pacifiers in sudden infant death (SIDS) prevention than other recommendations, and (2) that an ED educational intervention would increase pacifier use in infants younger than six months, and (3) that otitis media would not occur more frequently in pacifier users. Methods. We did an intervention-group-only longitudinal study in a county hospital ED. We measured pacifier use infants and baseline knowledge of SIDs prevention recommendations in caregivers. We followed up three months later to determine pacifier use, and 12 months later to determine episodes of otitis media. Results. We analyzed data for 780 infants. Parents knew of advice against co-sleeping in 469/780 (60%), smoking in 660/776 (85%), and prone sleeping in 613/780 (79%). Only 268/777 (35%) knew the recommendation to offer a pacifier at bedtime. At enrollment 449/780 (58%) did not use a pacifier. Of 210/338 infants aged less than 6 months followed up 41/112 (37%) non-users had started using a pacifier at bedtime (NNT 3). Over the same period, 37/98 (38%) users had discontinued their pacifier. Otitis media did not differ between users and non-users at 12 months. Conclusion. Caregiver knowledge of the role of pacifiers in SIDS prevention was less than for other recommendations. Our educational intervention appeared to increase pacifier use. Pacifier use was not associated with increased otitis media.

  12. Using a pacifier to decrease sudden infant death syndrome: an emergency department educational intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Walsh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pacifier use decreases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS. An emergency department (ED visit may provide an opportunistic ‘teachable moment’ for parents.Objectives. To test the hypotheses (1 that caregivers were less familiar with the role of pacifiers in sudden infant death (SIDS prevention than other recommendations, and (2 that an ED educational intervention would increase pacifier use in infants younger than six months, and (3 that otitis media would not occur more frequently in pacifier users.Methods. We did an intervention-group-only longitudinal study in a county hospital ED. We measured pacifier use infants and baseline knowledge of SIDs prevention recommendations in caregivers. We followed up three months later to determine pacifier use, and 12 months later to determine episodes of otitis media.Results. We analyzed data for 780 infants. Parents knew of advice against co-sleeping in 469/780 (60%, smoking in 660/776 (85%, and prone sleeping in 613/780 (79%. Only 268/777 (35% knew the recommendation to offer a pacifier at bedtime. At enrollment 449/780 (58% did not use a pacifier. Of 210/338 infants aged less than 6 months followed up 41/112 (37% non-users had started using a pacifier at bedtime (NNT 3. Over the same period, 37/98 (38% users had discontinued their pacifier. Otitis media did not differ between users and non-users at 12 months.Conclusion. Caregiver knowledge of the role of pacifiers in SIDS prevention was less than for other recommendations. Our educational intervention appeared to increase pacifier use. Pacifier use was not associated with increased otitis media.

  13. Deaths of infants subject to forensic autopsy in Estonia from 2001 to 2005: what can we learn from additional information?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grjibovski Andrej M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deaths from childhood injury are a public health problem worldwide. A relatively high proportion of child deaths of undetermined manner in Estonia raises concerns about potential underestimation of intentional deaths, especially in infants. This suggests that more information on the circumstances surrounding death is needed to establish the manner of death correctly and, more importantly, to prevent these deaths. The objective of this study was to detect, describe, and analyze the circumstances around deaths of infants subject to forensic autopsy in Estonia to reveal hidden cases of child abuse and more accurately determine causes of death. Methods Study cases included all infant deaths in Estonia from 2001 to 2005 subject to forensic autopsy at the Estonian Bureau of Forensic Medicine. Additional information was obtained from a series of visits to general practitioners, including characteristics of infant health, family composition, parents' education and employment, living conditions, and circumstances around death as perceived by medical staff in charge of outpatient services for these families. Results The total number of infant deaths in Estonia between 2001 and 2005 subject to forensic autopsy was 98, with 40 (40.8% deaths attributed to a disease and 58 deaths (59.2% resulting from injury. Elements of child abuse were involved in as many as 57.7% (95% CI 46.9-68.1 of the deaths for which medical records were available (n = 90. At death, the majority of these cases were registered as diseases or deaths from unintentional injury. Average annual mortality from external causes in Estonian infants, 2001-2005, previously reported by us as 88.1 per 100,000 (95% CI 68.1-113.6 would decrease to 41.0 (95% CI 26.9-57.8. Many infants in the studied group had faced multiple threats and were living in poor hygienic conditions. In a number of cases, they were left alone or looked after by older siblings. Parents' alcohol abuse played

  14. Sudden infant death following hexavalent vaccination: a neuropathologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matturri, L; Del Corno, G; Lavezzi, A M

    2014-03-01

    We examined a large number of sudden infant death syndrome victims in order to point out a possible causal relationship between a previous hexavalent vaccination and the sudden infant death. We selected 110 cases submitted to in-depth histological examination of the autonomic nervous system and provided with detailed clinical and environmental information. In 13 cases (11.8%) the death occurred in temporal association with administration of the hexavalent vaccine (from 1 to 7 days). In none of these victims congenital developmental alterations of the main nervous structures regulating the vital functions were observed. Only the hypoplasia of the arcuate nucleus was present in 5 cases. In one case in particular an acquired hyperacute encephalitis of the tractus solitarii nucleus was diagnosed in the brainstem. This study does not prove a causal relationship between the hexavalent vaccination and SIDS. However, we hypothesize that vaccine components could have a direct role in sparking off a lethal outcome in vulnerable babies. In conclusion, we sustain the need that deaths occurring in a short space of time after hexavalent vaccination are appropriately investigated and submitted to a post-mortem examination particularly of the autonomic nervous system by an expert pathologist to objectively evaluate the possible causative role of the vaccine in SIDS.

  15. Dummy (pacifier) use and sudden infant death syndrome: potential advantages and disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Rosemary S C; Hauck, Fern R; Moon, Rachel Y; L'hoir, Monique P; Blair, Peter S

    2014-03-01

    The large decline in deaths due to the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in the last 20 years in many countries is largely due to risk-reduction advice resulting from observational studies that examined the relationship between infant care practices and SIDS. Most of this advice remains largely uncontroversial and educators and researchers in this field are in agreement as to the specific recommendations that should be given to parents and health professionals. However, advice surrounding the apparent protective effect of dummies (also known as pacifiers) has been controversial. Several systematic reviews have demonstrated a strong association between the lack of a pacifier being used by the infant for the final sleep and SIDS, but it is not clear how pacifiers confer protection or if this is a marker for something as yet unmeasured. The Epidemiology and Physiology Working Groups of the International Society for the Study and Prevention of Perinatal and Infant Death (ISPID) are comprised of leading SIDS researchers with an objective to provide evidence-based position statements surrounding the factors associated with SIDS (http://www.ispid.org/) and risk-reduction strategies. The evidence, discussion and conclusions from these working groups regarding dummies (pacifiers) are described below to help inform this debate and describe the future evidence required so that we might find a common recommendation about dummies (pacifiers) and SIDS. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  16. Presentation and survival of prehospital apparent sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew P; Kaji, Amy; Young, Kelly D; Gausche-Hill, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    Prehospital providers are often involved in the resuscitation of apparent sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) victims; however, data are few on the presentation and outcome of these patients. To describe the presentation and determine the survival rate of infants who have an unwitnessed, prehospital arrest consistent with SIDS (apparent SIDS), and to compare the presentation of infants with a final diagnosis of SIDS with those who presented as apparent SIDS but had a different final diagnosis. This was a secondary analysis of data from a controlled trial whose methodology has been previously described. The setting was two large, urban emergency medical services (EMS) systems of Los Angeles and Orange Counties, California. The population included 113 apparent SIDS victims from the original interventional study who had a prehospital, unwitnessed arrest consistent with SIDS, defined by the scenario of an infant aged =12 months being placed to sleep and later found in full arrest (pulseless and apneic). Data collected included ethnicity, gender, arrest etiology, signs of death (lividity, rigor mortis), prehospital interventions, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), arrest rhythm, code 3 transport (lights and sirens), and survival to hospital discharge. One hundred ten of 113 apparent SIDS patients had survival data; 0 of 110 (95% CI 0% to 3.3%) survived, although ROSC was achieved in 5%; for three patients data on survival were missing. Arrest rhythms were determined in 94% of the subjects: asystole 87%, pulseless electrical activity (PEA) 8%, and ventricular fibrillation 4%. Only 50 of 113 (44%) of the EMS records documented code 3 transport; the remainder of the records were ambiguous. SIDS was the final coroner's diagnosis for 79 of 113 (70%) of the cases. Other causes of death in these apparent SIDS victims included respiratory causes (12%), asphyxiation (3%), abuse (2%), congenital heart disease (2%), sepsis (2%), other (4%), and unknown (5%). Apparent SIDS

  17. Sudden infant death syndrome, childhood thrombosis, and presence of genetic risk factors for thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T B; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Banner, Jytte

    2000-01-01

    in the child. This prompted us to investigate these genetic markers of thromboembolic disease in 121 cases of sudden infant death syndrome and in relevant controls, in the expectation of a more frequent occurrence of these markers if thrombosis is an etiological factor in sudden infant death syndrome......Sudden infant death syndrome or "cot death" has until the late eighties been a significant cause of death in children between the ages of 1 month and 1 year. Approximately two per 1000 children born alive dies of sudden infant death syndrome each year in Western Europe, North America, and Australia....... The vulnerability of the infant brain stem to ischemia has been suggested to be a conceivable cause of sudden infant death syndrome. This is compatible with a hypothesis that genetic risk factors for cerebral thrombosis could cause microinfarction in the brain stem during the first month of life, affecting vital...

  18. Sudden cardiac death in children and adolescents (excluding Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajewski Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden death in the young is rare. About 25% of cases occur during sports. Most young people with sudden cardiac death (SCD have underlying heart disease, with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and coronary artery anomalies being commonest in most series. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and long QT syndrome are the most common primary arrhythmic causes of SCD. It is estimated that early cardiopulmonary resuscitation and widespread availability of automatic external defibrillators could prevent about a quarter of pediatric sudden deaths.

  19. Provincial differences in infant deaths in South Africa – an effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has previously been demonstrated that a peak in registered infant deaths, at 2 - 3 months of age at death, developed between 1997 and 2002 in South Africa, ... age distribution of post-neonatal infant deaths in South Africa by province, and relate the observed distributions to HIV and intervention characteristics. Design.

  20. Cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression in sudden infant death syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Livolsi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS remains the leading cause of death among infants less than 1 year of age. Disturbed expression of some neurotransmitters and their receptors has been shown in the central nervous system of SIDS victims but no biological abnormality of the peripheral vago-cardiac system has been demonstrated to date. The present study aimed to seek vago-cardiac abnormalities in SIDS victims. The cardiac level of expression of muscarinic receptors, as well as acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity were investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Left ventricular samples and blood samples were obtained from autopsies of SIDS and children deceased from non cardiac causes. Binding experiments performed with [(3H]NMS, a selective muscarinic ligand, in cardiac membrane preparations showed that the density of cardiac muscarinic receptors was increased as shown by a more than doubled B(max value in SIDS (n = 9 SIDS versus 8 controls. On average, the erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity was also significantly increased (n = 9 SIDS versus 11 controls. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, it has been shown for the first time that cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression is associated with SIDS. The increase of acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity appears as a possible regulatory mechanism.

  1. Caffeine Administration to Prevent Apnea in Very Premature Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Armanian, Amir-Mohammad; Iranpour, Ramin; Faghihian, Eiman; Salehimehr, Nima

    2016-01-01

    Apnea intervals frequently occur in premature infants. Periods of apnea occur more often with decreases in gestational age. Periods of apnea can cause damage to the infant's developing brain and other organs. This study was designed to investigate the preventive effects of caffeine on apnea incidence in higher-risk neonates. Methods: In this single-center randomized control trial study, premature infants with a birth weight of ≤1200 g were eligible for enrollment. Twenty-six infants were r...

  2. Síndrome de muerte súbita del lactante Sudden infant death syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Marlen Avalos González

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available En nuestra área de salud se presentó un caso de muerte súbita del lactante, en un paciente de 7 meses de edad, masculino, con antecedentes de salud anterior y antecedentes patológicos familiares negativos. Fue inexplicable su muerte, aun después de realizada una necropsia completa, la investigación de la escena de la muerte y la evaluación de la historia clínica del niño y su familia. El síndrome de muerte súbita del lactante es de causa desconocida, lo más probable es que sea de etiología multifactorial, se debe de estar alerta para evitar los factores que se asocian con mayor frecuencia a estos niños y así prevenir la aparición de este síndrome.In our health area, there was a case of sudden infant death, in a patient aged 7 months, male, with previous health backgrounds and negative family pathologic backgrounds. Its death was inexplicable, even after a complete necropsy, the research of death scene, and the medical record assessment of child and its family. Sudden infant death syndrome is an unknown cause, probably of multifactor origin. We must to be on the alert to avoid the more frequent factors associating with these children, and thus to prevent appearance of this syndrome.

  3. Differences in African-American Maternal Self-Efficacy Regarding Practices Impacting Risk for Sudden Infant Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Anita; Oden, Rosalind; Joyner, Brandi; He, Jianping; McCarter, Robert; Moon, Rachel Y

    2016-04-01

    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and other sleep-related deaths, including accidental suffocation, account for ~4000 US deaths annually. Parents may have higher self-efficacy with regards to preventing accidental suffocation than SIDS. The objective of this study was to assess self-efficacy in African-American mothers with regards to safe sleep practices and risk for SIDS and accidental suffocation. As part of randomized clinical trial in African-American mothers of newborn infants, mothers completed a baseline survey about knowledge of and attitudes towards safe sleep recommendations, current intent, self-efficacy, and demographics. Tabular and adjusted, regression-based analyses of these cross-sectional data evaluated the impact of the message target (SIDS risk reduction vs. suffocation prevention) on perceived self-efficacy. 1194 mothers were interviewed. Mean infant age was 1.5 days. 90.8 % of mothers planned to place their infant supine, 96.7 % stated that their infant would sleep in the same room, 3.6 % planned to bedshare with the infant, and 72.9 % intended to have soft bedding in the crib. Mothers were more likely to believe that prone placement (70.9 vs. 50.5 %, p self-efficacy, viz. increased confidence that their actions could keep their infant safe, with regards to suffocation than SIDS (88.0 vs. 79.4 %, p self-efficacy is higher with regards to prevention of accidental suffocation in African-Americans, regardless of sociodemographics. Healthcare professionals should discuss both SIDS risk reduction and prevention of accidental suffocation when advising African-American parents about safe sleep practices.

  4. Brainstem serotonergic deficiency in sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Jhodie R; Paterson, David S; Hoffman, Jill M; Mokler, David J; Borenstein, Natalia S; Belliveau, Richard A; Krous, Henry F; Haas, Elisabeth A; Stanley, Christina; Nattie, Eugene E; Trachtenberg, Felicia L; Kinney, Hannah C

    2010-02-03

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is postulated to result from abnormalities in brainstem control of autonomic function and breathing during a critical developmental period. Abnormalities of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) receptor binding in regions of the medulla oblongata involved in this control have been reported in infants dying from SIDS. To test the hypothesis that 5-HT receptor abnormalities in infants dying from SIDS are associated with decreased tissue levels of 5-HT, its key biosynthetic enzyme (tryptophan hydroxylase [TPH2]), or both. Autopsy study conducted to analyze levels of 5-HT and its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA); levels of TPH2; and 5-HT(1A) receptor binding. The data set was accrued between 2004 and 2008 and consisted of 41 infants dying from SIDS (cases), 7 infants with acute death from known causes (controls), and 5 hospitalized infants with chronic hypoxia-ischemia. Serotonin and metabolite tissue levels in the raphé obscurus and paragigantocellularis lateralis (PGCL); TPH2 levels in the raphé obscurus; and 5-HT(1A) binding density in 5 medullary nuclei that contain 5-HT neurons and 5 medullary nuclei that receive 5-HT projections. Serotonin levels were 26% lower in SIDS cases (n = 35) compared with age-adjusted controls (n = 5) in the raphé obscurus (55.4 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 47.2-63.6] vs 75.5 [95% CI, 54.2-96.8] pmol/mg protein, P = .05) and the PGCL (31.4 [95% CI, 23.7-39.0] vs 40.0 [95% CI, 20.1-60.0] pmol/mg protein, P = .04). There was no evidence of excessive 5-HT degradation assessed by 5-HIAA levels, 5-HIAA:5-HT ratio, or both. In the raphé obscurus, TPH2 levels were 22% lower in the SIDS cases (n = 34) compared with controls (n = 5) (151.2% of standard [95% CI, 137.5%-165.0%] vs 193.9% [95% CI, 158.6%-229.2%], P = .03). 5-HT(1A) receptor binding was 29% to 55% lower in 3 medullary nuclei that receive 5-HT projections. In 4 nuclei, 3 of which contain 5-HT neurons, there was a decrease with

  5. Does β-APP staining of the brain in infant bed-sharing deaths differentiate these cases from sudden infant death syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisbeth Lund; Banner, Jytte; Byard, Roger W

    2014-01-01

    Archival cerebral tissue from infants whose deaths were attributed to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) from South Australia and Western Denmark were stained for β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) and graded according to a simple scoring chart. The resulting APP scores were correlated with sle......Archival cerebral tissue from infants whose deaths were attributed to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) from South Australia and Western Denmark were stained for β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) and graded according to a simple scoring chart. The resulting APP scores were correlated...... with sleeping situation (shared vs. alone) showing a significantly higher amount of β-APP staining in the non-bed-sharing, than in the bed-sharing infants (Mann-Whitney, Australia: p = 0.0128, Denmark: p = 0.0014, Combined: p = 0.0031). There was also a marked but non-significant difference in sex distribution...... of β-APP staining was significantly higher in infants who were sleeping alone compared to those who were bed-sharing with one or more adults, in both an Australian and Danish cohort of SIDS infants. Whether this results from differences in the speed with which these infants die, differences in lethal...

  6. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and the Genetics of Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Linda; Opdal, Siri Hauge

    2015-01-01

    Several studies report signs of slight infection prior to death in cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Based on this, a hypothesis of an altered immunological homeostasis has been postulated. The cytokines are important cellular mediators that are crucial for infant health by regulating cell activity during the inflammatory process. The pro-inflammatory cytokines favor inflammation; the most important of these are IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IL-18, TNF-α, and IFN-γ. These cytokines are controlled by the anti-inflammatory cytokines. This is accomplished by reducing the pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and thus counteracts their biological effect. The major anti-inflammatory cytokines are interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), IL-4, IL-10, IL-11, and IL-13. The last decade there has been focused on genetic studies within genes that are important for the immune system, for SIDS with a special interest of the genes encoding the cytokines. This is because the cytokine genes are considered to be the genes most likely to explain the vulnerability to infection, and several studies have investigated these genes in an attempt to uncover associations between SIDS and different genetic variants. So far, the genes encoding IL-1, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α are the most investigated within SIDS research, and several studies indicate associations between specific variants of these genes and SIDS. Taken together, this may indicate that in at least a subset of SIDS predisposing genetic variants of the immune genes are involved. However, the immune system and the cytokine network are complex, and more studies are needed in order to better understand the interplay between different genetic variations and how this may contribute to an unfavorable immunological response. PMID:25750641

  7. Sudden infant death syndrome and the genetics of inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eFerrante

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Several studies report signs of slight infection prior to death in cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS. Based on this, a hypothesis of an altered immunological homeostasis has been postulated. The cytokines are important cellular mediators that are crucial for infant health by regulating cell activity during the inflammatory process. The pro-inflammatory cytokines favor inflammation; the most important of these are IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IL-18, TNF-α and IFN-γ. These cytokines are controlled by the anti-inflammatory cytokines. This is accomplished by reducing the pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and thus counteracts their biological effect. The major anti-inflammatory cytokines are interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra, IL-4, IL-10, IL-11, and IL-13. The last decade there has been focus on genetic studies within genes that are important for the immune system, for SIDS with a special interest of the genes encoding the cytokines. This is because the cytokine genes are considered to be the genes most likely to explain the vulnerability to infection, and several studies have investigated these genes in an attempt to uncover associations between SIDS and different genetic variants. So far the genes encoding IL-1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α are the most investigated within SIDS research, and several studies indicates associations between specific variants of these genes and SIDS. Taken together this may indicate that in at least a subset of SIDS predisposing genetic variants of the immune genes are involved. However, the immune system and the cytokine network are complex, and more studies are needed in order to better understand the interplay between different genetic variations and how this may contribute to an unfavorable immunological response.

  8. Do pacifiers reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Fern R; Omojokun, Olanrewaju O; Siadaty, Mir S

    2005-11-01

    Pacifier use has been reported to be associated with a reduced risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), but most countries around the world, including the United States, have been reluctant to recommend the use of pacifiers because of concerns about possible adverse effects. This meta-analysis was undertaken to quantify and evaluate the protective effect of pacifiers against SIDS and to make a recommendation on the use of pacifiers to prevent SIDS. We searched the Medline database (January 1966 to May 2004) to collect data on pacifier use and its association with SIDS, morbidity, or other adverse effects. The search strategy included published articles in English with the Medical Subject Headings terms "sudden infant death syndrome" and "pacifier" and the keywords "dummy" and "soother." Combining searches resulted in 384 abstracts, which were all read and evaluated for inclusion. For the meta-analysis, articles with data on the relationship between pacifier use and SIDS risk were limited to published original case-control studies, because no prospective observational reports were found; 9 articles met these criteria. Two independent reviewers evaluated each study on the basis of the 6 criteria developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics Task Force on Infant Positioning and SIDS; in cases of disagreement, a third reviewer evaluated the study, and a consensus opinion was reached. We developed a script to calculate the summary odds ratio (SOR) by using the reported ORs and respective confidence intervals (CI) to weight the ORs. We then pooled them together to compute the SOR. We performed the Breslow-Day test for homogeneity of ORs, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test for the null hypothesis of no effect (OR = 1), and the Mantel-Haenszel common OR estimate. The consistency of findings was evaluated and the overall potential benefits of pacifier use were weighed against the potential risks. Our recommendation is based on the taxonomy of the 5-point (A-E) scale adopted

  9. Risk Factors of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and Risk Factors for Sleep Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2011-01-01

    Relationship between major risk factors of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and sleep disorders in the infants is the subject of review and discussion. Improper micro-environmental characteristics (especially poor environmental organisation and lack of developmental stimulation), pre-term delivery and/or infant low birth weight, prone sleep…

  10. Heart failure: preventing disease and death worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D; AlHabib, Khalid F; Cowie, Martin R; Force, Thomas L; Hu, Shengshou; Jaarsma, Tiny; Krum, Henry; Rastogi, Vishal; Rohde, Luis E; Samal, Umesh C; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Budi Siswanto, Bambang; Sliwa, Karen; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure is a life-threatening disease and addressing it should be considered a global health priority. At present, approximately 26 million people worldwide are living with heart failure. The outlook for such patients is poor, with survival rates worse than those for bowel, breast or prostate cancer. Furthermore, heart failure places great stresses on patients, caregivers and healthcare systems. Demands on healthcare services, in particular, are predicted to increase dramatically over the next decade as patient numbers rise owing to ageing populations, detrimental lifestyle changes and improved survival of those who go on to develop heart failure as the final stage of another disease. It is time to ease the strain on healthcare systems through clear policy initiatives that prioritize heart failure prevention and champion equity of care for all. Despite the burdens that heart failure imposes on society, awareness of the disease is poor. As a result, many premature deaths occur. This is in spite of the fact that most types of heart failure are preventable and that a healthy lifestyle can reduce risk. Even after heart failure has developed, premature deaths could be prevented if people were taught to recognize the symptoms and seek immediate medical attention. Public awareness campaigns focusing on these messages have great potential to improve outcomes for patients with heart failure and ultimately to save lives. Compliance with clinical practice guidelines is also associated with improved outcomes for patients with heart failure. However, in many countries, there is considerable variation in how closely physicians follow guideline recommendations. To promote equity of care, improvements should be encouraged through the use of hospital performance measures and incentives appropriate to the locality. To this end, policies should promote the research required to establish an evidence base for performance measures that reflect improved outcomes for patients

  11. Seasonal Timing of Infant Bronchiolitis, Apnea and Sudden Unexplained Infant Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantel D Sloan

    Full Text Available Rates of Sudden Unexplained Infant Death (SUID, bronchiolitis, and central apnea increase in winter in temperate climates. Though associations between these three conditions are suggested, more work is required to establish if there is a causal pathway linking bronchiolitis to SUID through inducing central apnea. Utilizing a large population-based cohort of infants studied over a 20-year period (n = 834,595, from birth years 1989-2009, we analyzed ecological associations between timing of SUID cases, bronchiolitis, and apnea healthcare visits. Data were analyzed between 2013 and 2015. We used a Cox Proportional Hazards model to analyze possible interactions between maternal smoking and maternal asthma with infant bronchiolitis on time to SUID. SUID and bronchiolitis both occurred more frequently in winter. An increase in bronchiolitis clinical visits occurred within a few days prior to apnea visits. We found a temporal relationship between infant bronchiolitis and apnea. In contrast, no peak in SUID cases was seen during peaks of bronchiolitis. Among those without any bronchiolitis visits, maternal smoking was associated with an increased risk of SUID: Hazard Ratio (HR of 2.38 (95% CI: 2.11, 2.67, p-value <0.001. Maternal asthma was associated with an increased risk of SUID among infants with at least one bronchiolitis visit: HR of 2.40 (95% CI: 1.04, 5.54, p-value = 0.04. Consistent trends between bronchiolitis, apnea, and SUID were not established due to small numbers of SUID cases. However, interaction analysis revealed potential differential associations of bronchiolitis and SUID by maternal smoking, maternal asthma status.

  12. Dummy (pacifier) use and sudden infant death syndrome: Potential advantages and disadvantages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horne, R.S.C.; Moon, R.Y; L'Hoir, M.P.; Blair, P.S.

    2014-01-01

    The large decline in deaths due to the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in the last 20 years in many countries is largely due to risk-reduction advice resulting from observational studies that examined the relationship between infant care practices and SIDS. Most of this advice remains largely

  13. Preventing newborn deaths due to prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Kishwar; Mathews, Jiji

    2016-10-01

    Preterm births (PTBs), defined as births before 37 weeks of gestation account for the majority of deaths in the newborn period. Prediction and prevention of PTB is challenging. A history of preterm labour or second trimester losses and accurate measurement of cervical length help to identify women who would benefit from progesterone and cerclage. Fibronectin estimation in the cervicovaginal secretions of a symptomatic woman with an undilated cervix can predict PTB within 10 days of testing. Antibiotics should be given to women with preterm prelabour rupture of membranes but tocolysis has a limited role in the management of preterm labour. Antenatal corticosteroids to prevent complications in the neonate should be given only when gestational age assessment is accurate PTB is considered imminent, maternal infection and the preterm newborn can receive adequate care. Magnesium sulphate for fetal neuroprotection should be given when delivery is imminent. After birth, most babies respond to simple interventions essential newborn care, basic care for feeding support, infections and breathing difficulties. Newborns weighing 2000 g or less, benefit from KMC. Babies, who are clinically unstable or cannot be given KMC may be nursed in an incubator or under a radiant warmer. Treatment modalities include oxygen therapy, CPAP, surfactant and assisted ventilation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Safe Sleep for Your Baby: Reduce the Risk of SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Causes of Infant Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Other Sleep-Related Causes of Infant Death Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute ... of age that doesn’t have a known cause even after a complete investigation. Each year in ...

  15. Preventing the premature death of relationship marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, S; Dobscha, S; Mick, D G

    1998-01-01

    Relationship marketing is in vogue. And why not? The new, increasingly efficient ways that companies have of understanding and responding to customers' needs and preferences seemingly allow them to build more meaningful connections with consumers than ever before. These connections promise to benefit the bottom line by reducing costs and increasing revenue. Unfortunately, a close look suggests that the relationships between companies and customers are troubled ones, at best. Companies may delight in learning more about their customers and in being able to provide features and services to please every possible palate. But customers delight in neither. In fact, customer satisfaction rates in the United States are at an all-time low, while complaints, boycotts, and other expressions of consumer discontent are on the rise. This mounting wave of unhappiness has yet to reach the bottom line. Sooner or later, however, corporate performance will suffer unless relationship marketing becomes what it is supposed to be--the epitome of customer orientation. Ironically, the very things that marketers are doing to build relationships with customers are often the things that are destroying those relationships. Relationship marketing is powerful in theory but troubled in practice. To prevent its premature death, marketers need to take the time to figure out how and why they are undermining their own best efforts, as well as how they can get things back on track.

  16. Caffeine Administration to Prevent Apnea in Very Premature Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanian, Amir-Mohammad; Iranpour, Ramin; Faghihian, Eiman; Salehimehr, Nima

    2016-10-01

    Apnea intervals frequently occur in premature infants. Periods of apnea occur more often with decreases in gestational age. Periods of apnea can cause damage to the infant's developing brain and other organs. This study was designed to investigate the preventive effects of caffeine on apnea incidence in higher-risk neonates. In this single-center randomized control trial study, premature infants with a birth weight of ≤1200 g were eligible for enrollment. Twenty-six infants were randomly assigned to receive 20 mg/kg caffeine, as the loading dose, which was followed by 5 mg/kg daily as the maintenance dose until the 10 th day of life; these infants were compared with 26 infants in the control group. Primary outcomes were incidence of apnea, bradycardia, and cyanosis. Fifty-two infants were enrolled (26 in the caffeine group and 26 in the control group). The preventive effect of caffeine on apnea was significant in these infants. The relative risk for incidence of apnea in preterm neonates with a birth weight of apnea, compared with 16 (61.5%) in the control group (p = 0.001). It seems that preventative effects of caffeine on apnea become apparent by using the drug in very premature infants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Óbitos infantis investigados pelo Comitê de Prevenção da Mortalidade Infantil em região do Estado do Paraná Muertes de infantes investigadas por el Comité de Prevención en Mortalidad Infantil del estado de Paraná Infant deaths investigated by the Prevention Committee of Infant Mortality in region of Paraná state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Aidar de Freitas Mathias

    2008-09-01

    2500g de peso, parto normal, raza/color negra, parda e indígena, así como aquellas madres que no tuvieron consulta prenatal. Análisis como estos, deben ser realizados de forma más visible para los equipos de salud de la familia, quienes conocen a las gestantes, de esta forma será posible mejorar la forma del trabajo y la calidad en las discusiones dentro del Comité.This study had the purpose to analyze infant deaths in the 15th Regional Health Center of Paraná State, using the result of the investigations of the Committee for the Prevention of Infant Mortality. It is a descriptive exploratory study based on the System of Investigation of Infant Mortality and on the Information System of Live Births in the period of 2000-2006. The infant mortality coefficient decreased from 13.2% to 11.6%. Of the 799 deaths, the Committee investigated 74.5%; 56.5% of which were in the early neonatal period. The diseases originated in the perinatal period and the congenital malformations were the main causes of death. Among them, 70.1% were considered reducible. The reducibility of death was greater among adolescent mothers' babies, newborns of ≥ 2500g, normal childbirth, black, mulatto and indigenous races, and on mothers without prenatal care. The analyses of the deaths should be performed together with the family health teams, who know the pregnant women best, in order to improve the work and the quality of the analyses from the Committee.

  18. Book Review The origins, prevention and treatment of infant crying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review The origins, prevention and treatment of infant crying and sleeping problems: An evidence based guide for healthcare professionals and the families they support By Ian St James-Roberts (2012)

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of infant feeding strategies to prevent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cost-effectiveness analysis of infant feeding strategies to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV in South Africa. Mandy Maredza, Melanie Y Bertram, Haroon Saloojee, Matthew F Chersich, Stephen M Tollman, Karen J Hofman ...

  20. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and Left Ventricular Hypertrabeculation-Hidden Arrhythmogenic Entity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Saayman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular noncompaction/hypertrabeculation is a condition which is characterized by a highly trabeculated, “spongy” myocardium. It can present at any age with heart failure, arrhythmia and/or thromboembolic events. A wide variety of mutations have been found to be a cause of hypertrabeculation and it is possible that there is a continuum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy and hypertrabeculation/noncompaction. We present a case of left ventricular hypertrabeculation which presented as sudden infant death syndrome and we propose that this entity may be a hidden cause of arrhythmic death in some infants presenting as sudden infant death syndrome.

  1. Multiple serotonergic brainstem abnormalities in sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, David S; Trachtenberg, Felicia L; Thompson, Eric G; Belliveau, Richard A; Beggs, Alan H; Darnall, Ryan; Chadwick, Amy E; Krous, Henry F; Kinney, Hannah C

    2006-11-01

    The serotonergic (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) neurons in the medulla oblongata project extensively to autonomic and respiratory nuclei in the brainstem and spinal cord and help regulate homeostatic function. Previously, abnormalities in 5-HT receptor binding in the medullae of infants dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) were identified, suggesting that medullary 5-HT dysfunction may be responsible for a subset of SIDS cases. To investigate cellular defects associated with altered 5-HT receptor binding in the 5-HT pathways of the medulla in SIDS cases. Frozen medullae from infants dying from SIDS (cases) or from causes other than SIDS (controls) were obtained from the San Diego Medical Examiner's office between 1997 and 2005. Markers of 5-HT function were compared between SIDS cases and controls, adjusted for postconceptional age and postmortem interval. The number of samples available for each analysis ranged from 16 to 31 for SIDS cases and 6 to 10 for controls. An exploratory analysis of the correlation between markers and 6 recognized risk factors for SIDS was performed. 5-HT neuron count and density, 5-HT(1A) receptor binding density, and 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) binding density in the medullary 5-HT system; correlation between these markers and 6 recognized risk factors for SIDS. Compared with controls, SIDS cases had a significantly higher 5-HT neuron count (mean [SD], 148.04 [51.96] vs 72.56 [52.36] cells, respectively; P<.001) and 5-HT neuron density (P<.001), as well as a significantly lower density of 5-HT(1A) receptor binding sites (P

  2. Microglia modulate brainstem serotonergic expression following neonatal sustained hypoxia exposure: implications for sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, P M; Mayer, C A; Litvin, D G

    2016-06-01

    Neonatal sustained hypoxia exposure modifies brainstem microglia and serotonin expression. The altered brainstem neurochemistry is associated with impaired ventilatory responses to acute hypoxia and mortality. The deleterious effects of sustained hypoxia exposure can be prevented by an inhibitor of activated microglia. These observations demonstrate a potential cause of the brainstem serotonin abnormalities thought to be involved in sudden infant death syndrome. We showed previously that the end of the second postnatal week (days P11-15) represents a period of development during which the respiratory neural control system exhibits a heightened vulnerability to sustained hypoxia (SH, 11% O2 , 5 days) exposure. In the current study, we investigated whether the vulnerability to SH during the same developmental time period is associated with changes in brainstem serotonin (5-HT) expression and whether it can be prevented by the microglia inhibitor minocycline. Using whole-body plethysmography, SH attenuated the acute (5 min) hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and caused a high incidence of mortality compared to normoxia rats. SH also increased microglia cell numbers and decreased 5-HT immunoreactivity in the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV). The attenuated HVR, mortality, and changes in nTS and DMNV immunoreactivity was prevented by minocycline (25 mg kg(-1) /2 days during SH). These data demonstrate that the 5-HT abnormalities in distinct respiratory neural control regions can be initiated by prolonged hypoxia exposure and may be modulated by microglia activity. These observations share several commonalities with the risk factors thought to underlie the aetiology of sudden infant death syndrome, including: (1) a vulnerable neonate; (2) a critical period of development; (3) evidence of hypoxia; (4) brainstem gliosis (particularly the nTS and DMNV); and (5) 5-HT abnormalities. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of

  3. B-Amyloid Precursor Protein Staining of the Brain in Sudden Infant and Early Childhood Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisbeth Lund; Banner, Jytte; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm

    2013-01-01

    To develop and validate a scoring method for assessing β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) staining in cerebral white matter and to investigate the occurrence, amount and deposition pattern based on the cause of death in infants and young children....

  4. Influence of gestational age on death and neurodevelopmental outcome in premature infants with severe intracranial hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, R F; Cotten, C M; Shankaran, S; Gantz, M G; Poole, W K

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether death and/or neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) after severe intracranial hemorrhage (ICH; grade 3 or 4) differs by gestational age (GA) at birth in extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. Demographic, perinatal and neonatal factors potentially contributing to NDI for ELBW infants (23 to 28 weeks gestation) were obtained retrospectively; outcome data came from the ELBW Follow-up Study. NDI was defined at 18 to 22 months corrected age as moderate/severe cerebral palsy, Bayley Scales of Infant Development II cognitive or motor score blindness or deafness. Characteristics of younger versus older infants with no versus severe ICH associated with death or NDI were compared. Generalized linear mixed models predicted death or NDI in each GA cohort. Of the 6638 infants, 61.8% had no ICH and 13.6% had severe ICH; 39% of survivors had NDI. Risk-adjusted odds of death or NDI and death were higher in the lower GA group. Lower GA increased the odds of death before 30 days for infants with severe ICH. Necrotizing enterocolitis (particularly surgical NEC), late onset infection, cystic periventricular leukomalacia and post-natal steroids contributed to mortality risk. NDI differed by GA in infants without ICH and grade 3, but not grade 4 ICH. Contributors to NDI in infants with severe ICH included male gender, surgical NEC and post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus requiring a shunt. GA contributes to the risk of death in ELBW infants, but not NDI among survivors with severe ICH. Male gender, surgical NEC and need for a shunt add additional risk for NDI.

  5. Swaddling and the Risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: A Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pease, A.S.; Fleming, P.J.; Hauck, F.R.; Moon, R.Y.; Horne, R.S.; Hoir, M.P. L; Ponsonby, A.L.; Blair, P.S.

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Swaddling is a traditional practice of wrapping infants to promote calming and sleep. Although the benefits and risks of swaddling in general have been studied, the practice in relation to sudden infant death syndrome remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to conduct an

  6. The contribution of very low birth weight death to infant mortality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Infant mortality remains high in many developing countries in which the contribution of deaths among infants born very low birth weight (VLBW) may be considerable. This contribution has however not been quantified in most such countries. This paper explores a model that can be used in this respect.

  7. Sudden infant death syndrome, childhood thrombosis, and presence of genetic risk factors for thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, TB; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Lundemose, JB

    2000-01-01

    . The vulnerability of the infant brain stem to ischemia has been suggested to be a conceivable cause of sudden infant death syndrome. This is compatible with a hypothesis that genetic risk factors for cerebral thrombosis could cause microinfarction in the brain stem during the first month of life, affecting vital...

  8. Association Between Intermittent Hypoxemia or Bradycardia and Late Death or Disability in Extremely Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poets, Christian F; Roberts, Robin S; Schmidt, Barbara; Whyte, Robin K; Asztalos, Elizabeth V; Bader, David; Bairam, Aida; Moddemann, Diane; Peliowski, Abraham; Rabi, Yacov; Solimano, Alfonso; Nelson, Harvey

    2015-08-11

    Extremely preterm infants may experience intermittent hypoxemia or bradycardia for many weeks after birth. The prognosis of these events is uncertain. To determine the association between intermittent hypoxemia or bradycardia and late death or disability. Post hoc analysis of data from the inception cohort assembled for the Canadian Oxygen Trial in 25 hospitals in Canada, the United States, Argentina, Finland, Germany, and Israel, including 1019 infants with gestational ages of 23 weeks 0 days through 27 weeks 6 days who were born between December 2006 and August 2010 and survived to a postmenstrual age of 36 weeks. Follow-up assessments occurred between October 2008 and August 2012. Episodes of hypoxemia (pulse oximeter oxygen saturation impairment, cognitive or language delay, severe hearing loss, or bilateral blindness at 18 months' corrected age. Secondary outcomes were motor impairment, cognitive or language delay, and severe retinopathy of prematurity. Downloaded saturation and pulse rate data were available for a median of 68.3 days (interquartile range, 56.8-86.0 days). Mean percentages of recorded time with hypoxemia for the least and most affected 10% of infants were 0.4% and 13.5%, respectively. Corresponding values for bradycardia were 0.1% and 0.3%. The primary outcome was ascertained for 972 infants and present in 414 (42.6%). Hypoxemic episodes were associated with an estimated increased risk of late death or disability at 18 months of 56.5% in the highest decile of hypoxemic exposure vs 36.9% in the lowest decile (modeled relative risk, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.21-1.94). This association was significant only for prolonged hypoxemic episodes lasting at least 1 minute (relative risk, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.35-2.05 vs for shorter episodes, relative risk, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.77-1.32). Relative risks for all secondary outcomes were similarly increased after prolonged hypoxemia. Bradycardia did not alter the prognostic value of hypoxemia. Among extremely preterm infants who

  9. Prediction and Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Daniel P; Homoud, Munther K; Estes, N A Mark

    2017-12-01

    Sudden death is a major problem, with significant impact on public health. Many conditions predispose to sudden cardiac death and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), foremost among them coronary artery disease, and an effective therapy exists in the form of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Risk stratification for SCA remains imperfect, especially for patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Ongoing trials may make it easier to identify those at high risk, and potentially those at very low risk, in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Usage and impact of an online education tool for preventing sudden unexpected death in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Stephanie; Pease, Anna; Bennett, Sharon

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the usage, impact and reach of an online education tool for preventing sudden infant death. A 24-slide presentation was formatted for online access. Content was designed for mainstream audiences to align current knowledge, attitudes and actions for a blitz approach to preventing sudden infant death in New Zealand (NZ). The tool was promoted through a network of 'safe sleep' champions across the country and collected basic information on usage, reach and impact. From 3286 completed online sessions between 18 November 2009 and 31 December 2011, there were 2683 (81.7%) with complete data. Average usage was 24.4 completed sessions/week, over a 2-year period, at a cost of NZD1.11 per completed session. Usage reached across regions, ethnic groups and roles. On completion of the course, most rated highly (7-9/9) (68.8%) their 'increased confidence' to discuss infant sleep safety with others. A high increased confidence rating was significantly influenced by spending more time per slide (P effective impact on increasing confidence to discuss infant sleep safety with others. e-Learning modes should be considered where there is a need to align large numbers of people in a short time with understandings and actions for addressing a specific health issue. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  11. A Neonate with Susceptibility to Long QT Syndrome Type 6 who Presented with Ventricular Fibrillation and Sudden Unexpected Infant Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Charles W.; Marc-Aurele, Krishelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 19-day Final Diagnosis: 19 day old neonate with susceptibility to Long QT syndrome • ventricular fibrillation Symptoms: Cardiac arrest • cardiac arrhythmia • encephalopathy Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cardioversion Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Rare disease Background: This is a case of a neonate with susceptibility to long QT syndrome (LQTS) who presented with a sudden unexpected infant death. Experts continue to debate whether universal electrocardiogram (ECG) screening of all newborns is feasible, practical, and cost-effective. Case Report: A 19-day-old neonate was found unresponsive by her mother. ECG showed ventricular fibrillation and a combination of a lidocaine drip plus multiple defibrillations converted the rhythm to normal sinus. Unfortunately, MRI brain imaging showed multiple infarcts and EEG showed burst suppression pattern with frequent seizures; life supportive treatment was stopped and the infant died. Genetic testing revealed two mutations in the KCNE2 gene consistent with susceptibility to LQTS type 6. Conclusions: We believe this case is the first to demonstrate both a precipitating electrocardiographic and genetic cause of death for an infant with LQTS, showing a cause-and-effect relationship between LQTS mutation, ventricular arrhythmia, and death. We wonder whether universal ECG newborn screening to prevent LQTS death could have saved this baby. PMID:27465075

  12. Regional Deprivation Index and Socioeconomic Inequalities Related to Infant Deaths in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jae-Won; Kim, Young-Ju; Son, Mia

    2016-04-01

    Deprivation indices have been widely used to evaluate neighborhood socioeconomic status and therefore examine individuals within their regional context. Although some studies on the development of deprivation indices were conducted in Korea, additional research is needed to construct a more valid and reliable deprivation index. Therefore, a new deprivation index, named the K index, was constructed using principal component analysis. This index was compared with the Carstairs, Townsend and Choi indices. A possible association between infant death and deprivation was explored using the K index. The K index had a higher correlation with the infant mortality rate than did the other three indices. The regional deprivation quintiles were unequally distributed throughout the country. Despite the overall trend of gradually decreasing infant mortality rates, inequalities in infant deaths according to the deprivation quintiles persisted and widened. Despite its significance, the regional deprivation variable had a smaller effect on infant deaths than did individual variables. The K index functions as a deprivation index, and we may use this index to estimate the regional socioeconomic status in Korea. We found that inequalities in infant deaths according to the time trend persisted. To reduce the health inequalities among infants in Korea, regional deprivation should be considered.

  13. On the Question of the Diagnosis of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Nisevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS is one of the leading causes of postneonatal mortality of infants in most developed countries. This paper presents data on terminology and on the study of SIDS in developed countries, and also examines problems of SIDS diagnostic inRussia in comparison with the results of own researches, analyzes risk factors, which are universal as for SIDS, and also for perinatal and infant death in general. The large variability of SIDS diagnosis in Russia suggests that this diagnosis often does not comply with international standard: post-mortem examination of community-acquired sudden death cases is often carried out by a forensic expert, but not by a children's pathologist, and they do not use virological and microbiological methods of investigation. In some cases, there is no infant's record or case record from children's polyclinic.

  14. Sudden infant death syndrome in mice with an inherited mutation in RyR2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathur, Nitin; Sood, Subeena; Wang, Sufen; van Oort, Ralph J.; Sarma, Satyam; Li, Na; Skapura, Darlene G.; Bayle, J. Henri; Valderrábano, Miguel; Wehrens, Xander H. T.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor gene (RyR2) have been recently identified in victims of sudden infant death syndrome. The aim of this study was to determine whether a gain-of-function mutation in RyR2 increases the propensity to cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death in young

  15. Preventing Heat-Related Illness or Death of Outdoor Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preventing Heat-related Illness or Death of Outdoor Workers Summary Outdoor workers in agricul- ture, construction, and other industries ... a great deal of exertional and environ- mental heat stress that may lead to severe illness or ...

  16. The Interpretation of Cause of Death 53 Among Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengtsson, Magdalena

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Earlier studies on mortality in 18th and 19th century Sweden have discussed the validity of cause of death information. The fact that the Swedish clergy historically were responsible for the stipulation and reporting of causes of death has initiated a discussion on the medical competence of the clergy. Other issues concern the level of accomplishment in medical science and the effects of instructions and regulations on cause of death registration. This paper argues that cause of death analyses are quite useful for the understanding of mortality transitions if cause of death information is placed in its proper context and are combined with other kinds of mortality analyses. An awareness of 1 the conditions under which causes of death were stipulated, 2 what regulations were in effect at the particular time, and 3 the environmental and epidemiological changes provides good prerequisites for successful use of cause of death information.

  17. Exploring Drivers of Infant Deaths in Rural Rwanda Through Verbal Social Autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navale, Shalini; Habumugisha, Lameck; Amoroso, Cheryl; Sayinzoga, Felix; Gupta, Neil; Hirschhorn, Lisa R

    Rwanda has been a leader in the global effort to reduce infant mortality, particularly in regions of sub-Saharan Africa. Although rates have dropped, deaths still occur. To explore the care pathways and barriers taken by infant caregivers before the death of their infant through a verbal social autopsy study in 2 districts in eastern Rwanda. We adapted the World Health Organization verbal socialautopsy tools to reflect local context and priorities. Caregivers of infants in the 2 districts were interviewed using the adapted quantitative survey and semistructured interview guide. Interviews were recorded and thematic analysis employed on a subsample (n = 133) to extract the content relevant to understanding the drivers of infant death and inform results of the quantitative data until saturation was reached (66). Results were interpreted through a driver diagram framework to explore caregiver-reported challenges in knowledge and experiences with care access and delivery. Most study participants (82%) reported accessing the formal health system at some point before the infant's death. The primary caregiver-reported drivers for infant death included challenges in accessing care in a timely manner, concerns about the technical quality of care received, and poor responsiveness of the system and providers. The 2 most commonly discussed drivers were gaps in communication between providers and patients and challenges obtaining and using the community-based health insurance. The framework of the driver diagram was modified to identify the factors where change was needed to further reduce mortality. This study provides important information on the experiential quality of care received by infants and their caregivers within the current health care space in rural Rwanda. By listening to the individual stories of so many caregivers regarding the gaps and challenges they faced, appropriate action may be taken to bolster the existing health care system. Copyright © 2017 The

  18. Increased mast cell tryptase in sudden infant death - anaphylaxis, hypoxia or artefact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edston, E; Gidlund, E; Wickman, M; Ribbing, H; Van Hage-Hamsten, M

    1999-12-01

    Increased concentrations of mast cell tryptase in post mortem blood have frequently been observed in sudden infant deaths but the cause of this has not yet been clarified. The aim was to evaluate factors (immunological, morphological and anamnestic data) behind the observed increase in mast cell tryptase in sudden infant deaths with elevated tryptase. Mast cell tryptase and total immunoglobulin (Ig) E were measured in post mortem sera from 44 infants younger than 1.5 years. Radioallergosorbent tests were performed for possible allergens (mixture for relevant food allergens, Phadiatop and latex). IgG subclasses, IgM, and complement factors (C3, C4 and factor B) were measured with radial immunodiffusion. Mast cells, labelled with antibodies against mast cell tryptase, were counted in the lungs and heart. The circumstances of death and medical history of the deceased infant and family were obtained through police and hospital records. In 40% of the SIDS cases tryptase was elevated (>10 microg/L). Total IgE in serum was increased in 33% compared with clinical reference values but showed no association with mast cell tryptase. RAST tests were positive in three cases. In one of these cases both tryptase and total IgE were elevated. The only variable that was associated with high tryptase values was prone position at death (P Children with elevated total IgE also displayed high concentrations of IgG1 and IgG2. Infants who died in the spring had significantly higher IgE than the others (P < or = 0.05). The results do not support the hypothesis that the elevated tryptase concentrations in sudden infant death are caused by allergy. The association between prone position at death and elevated tryptase could hypothetically be explained by mast cell degranulation due to, for example, a hypoxic stimulus in these infants.

  19. Preventable Trauma Deaths in Ibadan: A Comparison of Revised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: The proportion of preventable trauma-related deaths may be a reflection of the quality of trauma care in a health institution. OBJECTIVE: To classify mortality in trauma patients in the emergency room and to determine the proportion of preventable trauma related mortality in a teaching hospital. METHODS: ...

  20. A mouse model to study the link between hypoxia, long QT interval and sudden infant death syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, Marianne T.; Mohun, Timothy J.; Breckenridge, Ross A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The pathology of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is poorly understood. Many risk factors, including hypoxia, have been identified. Prolongation of the ECG QTc interval is associated with elevated risk of SIDS but its aetiology in most cases remains unknown. We have characterised ECG changes in the newborn mouse in the hours and days following birth. There was a steady increase in heart rate alongside significant decreases in QTc interval, QRS duration and QTc dispersion over the first 10 postnatal days. Birth into hypoxia (10% FiO2) prevented electrocardiac maturation, downregulated cardiac ion-channel expression and led to neonatal death. We found that risk of death decreased with increasing age of exposure to hypoxia. Genetic elevation of cardiac hypoxia-signalling after birth in αMHC-Cre::VHLfl/fl mice also prevented electrocardiographic maturation, leading to arrhythmia and death before weaning. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting revealed internalisation and dephosphorylation of Connexin43. We conclude that increased ambient oxygen concentration after birth drives maturation of the cardiac electrical conduction system, failure of which leads to aberrant ion channel and Connexin43 expression and predisposes to arrhythmia and sudden death. This is consistent with known risk factors of SIDS and provides a link between neonatal hypoxia, ECG abnormalities and sudden death. PMID:22977222

  1. A mouse model to study the link between hypoxia, long QT interval and sudden infant death syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne T. Neary

    2013-03-01

    The pathology of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS is poorly understood. Many risk factors, including hypoxia, have been identified. Prolongation of the ECG QTc interval is associated with elevated risk of SIDS but its aetiology in most cases remains unknown. We have characterised ECG changes in the newborn mouse in the hours and days following birth. There was a steady increase in heart rate alongside significant decreases in QTc interval, QRS duration and QTc dispersion over the first 10 postnatal days. Birth into hypoxia (10% FiO2 prevented electrocardiac maturation, downregulated cardiac ion-channel expression and led to neonatal death. We found that risk of death decreased with increasing age of exposure to hypoxia. Genetic elevation of cardiac hypoxia-signalling after birth in αMHC-Cre::VHLfl/fl mice also prevented electrocardiographic maturation, leading to arrhythmia and death before weaning. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting revealed internalisation and dephosphorylation of Connexin43. We conclude that increased ambient oxygen concentration after birth drives maturation of the cardiac electrical conduction system, failure of which leads to aberrant ion channel and Connexin43 expression and predisposes to arrhythmia and sudden death. This is consistent with known risk factors of SIDS and provides a link between neonatal hypoxia, ECG abnormalities and sudden death.

  2. Preventable deaths following emergency medical dispatch - an audit study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel S; Johnsen, Søren; Hansen, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    an ambulance with lights and sirens by the Emergency Medical Communication Centre (EMCC).MethodsAn audit was performed by an external panel of experienced prehospital consultant anaesthesiologists. The panel focused exclusively on the role of the EMCC, assessing whether same-day deaths among 112 callers could...... have been prevented if the EMCC had assessed the situations as highly urgent. The panels¿ assessments were based on review of patient charts and voice-log recordings of 112 calls. All patient related material was reviewed by the audit panel and all cases where then scored as preventable, potentially......¿100 years) and 45.4% were female. The audit panel found no definitively preventable deaths; however, 18 (11.8%) of the analysed same-day deaths (0.02% of all non-high-acuity callers) were found to be potentially preventable. In 13 of these 18 cases, the dispatch protocol was either not used or not used...

  3. Exploring caregiver behavior and knowledge about unsafe sleep surfaces in infant injury death cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tracy; Hackett, Martine; Kaur, Navpreet

    2015-06-01

    In the United States, infant deaths due to sleep-related injuries have quadrupled over the past two decades. One of the major risk factors is the placement of an infant to sleep on a surface other than a crib or bassinet. This study examines contextual circumstances and knowledge and behaviors that may contribute to the placement of infants on an unsafe sleep surface in infant injury death cases. This study employed a retrospective review of 255 sleep-related injury death cases in New York City from 2004 to 2010 where an infant was found sleeping on an unsafe sleep surface. Mixed-methods analyses, employing both quantitative analysis of vital statistics data and risk variables extracted from the medical examiner files and qualitative analysis of the narrative content of the files, were conducted. In 48% of cases, a crib or bassinet was identified in the home. Quantitative analysis revealed no significant differences in demographic or risk factor characteristics between infants who had a crib or bassinet and those who did not. Qualitative analysis highlighted factors in caregivers' decision making related to situational convenience, preference, and misconceptions concerning safe infant sleep. The health belief model (HBM), specifically the constructs of perceived susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers, was used as a lens to understand factors associated with caregiver behavior. This study provides evidence that infants are at risk of sleep-related injury death even when a crib or bassinet is present. Understanding the factors that may influence safe sleep behaviors can help produce more appropriate interventions. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  4. Preventing Hypothermia in Preterm Infants: A Program of Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using plastic bags or wrap is a low cost way to prevent neonatal hypothermia. This practice is being used in under resourced countries when environmental tem- peratures cannot be controlled, even in larger, term infants (Lester, Kimani, & Cartledge, 2014). Body temperature and stabilization in the. NICU. After completing ...

  5. Prevention of nosocomial bloodstream infections in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Helder MScN (Onno)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractProtecting patients from harm is the overarching theme of the studies presented here. More precisely, this thesis places a focus on the prevention of nosocomial or hospitalacquired bloodstream infections in preterm infants, thus saving them from further harm. A nosocomial infection is an

  6. Dietary prevention of allergic diseases in infants and small children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Arne; Halken, Susanne; Muraro, Antonella

    2008-01-01

    Because of scientific fraud four trials have been excluded from the original Cochrane meta-analysis on formulas containing hydrolyzed protein for prevention of allergy and food intolerance in infants. Unlike the conclusions of the revised Cochrane review the export group set up by the Section...

  7. Probability of coincident vaccination in the 24 or 48 hours preceding sudden infant death syndrome death in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, Julia M L; Hull, Brynley P; Hayen, Andrew; Gidding, Heather F; Burgess, Margaret A

    2005-06-01

    Vaccination does not cause sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). However, SIDS peaks at 2 months of age, when vaccination encounters are frequent. There are no published estimates using population data on age of death and immunization coverage to indicate to practitioners how often coincident vaccination may occur by chance. This study aimed to determine the probability that an Australian infant who has died of SIDS was vaccinated in the days before death. An analytical study of population death data and immunization coverage was conducted for Australian children who were born between April 1, 2002, and March 31, 2003. Also evaluated were Australian children who were registered as dying of SIDS between 1997 and 2001. The main outcomes measured were distribution of SIDS deaths by age and distribution of immunization coverage by age. The probability of recent vaccination and SIDS coinciding varied by age and day of the week of death. The overall estimated probability of vaccination within the last 24 hours for a child who has died of SIDS in Australia is estimated as 1.3%. In the last 48 hours, it is 2.6%. With the average number of SIDS deaths for the period 1997-2001 equal to 130 cases per year, we estimated that a case of SIDS will occur when vaccination was given in the last 24 hours in 1.7 cases per year and within 48 hours in 3.5 cases. Although coincident vaccination and SIDS should not be a frequent problem, it can be expected to occur at least annually in Australia by chance alone. The probabilities of vaccination by age estimated in this study can also be applied to estimate the probability of a vaccination encounter for children who have experienced any unusual medical condition or death, when these occurrences are known to be unrelated to vaccination.

  8. Sleeping position for infants and cot death in The Netherlands 1985-91.

    OpenAIRE

    de Jonge, G A; Burgmeijer, R J; Engelberts, A C; Hoogenboezem, J; Kostense, P J; Sprij, A J

    1993-01-01

    Until the early 1970s the traditional sleeping position for Dutch infants was not prone. After a much publicised lecture in October 1987 on the possible relation between sleeping prone and cot death, the fairly new habit of placing infants prone is being replaced by more traditional positions. The decrease in the prevalence of the prone sleeping position has been documented in six studies. Since 1987 the incidence of registered cot deaths has decreased from 1.04/1000 live births in 1986 to 0....

  9. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome — the overview of the problem from XXI century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Kravtsova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS is sudden non-violent death of apparently healthy infant with absence of adequate reasons of the death according to the medical history and pathomorphological examination. At the present times SIDS is one of the most significant causes of postneonatal infants’ mortality in most developed countries in the world. The main and stable characteristics of SIDS are: death during the sleep and, mainly, in prone position; the peak of SIDS cases is in 2–4 months old; it frequently occurs in premature children and infants with low inborn body weight and in boys (60%; symptoms of mild respiratory infection precede SIDS. Clinical data, analysis of heart rate and breathing in children dead by SIDS afterwards, and experiments with animal models show that the leading pathologic mechanism of SIDS are cardio-respiratory disorders. The program of prophylaxis of ominous states and SIDS includes definition of risk groups with typical clinical and instrumental criteria and observation of children from risk groups.Key words: sudden infant death syndrome, mechanisms, prophylaxis.

  10. [Effect of maternal death on family dynamics and infant survival].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Frausto, S; Bobadilla Fernández, J L; Karchmer Krivitzky, S; Martínez González, L

    1998-10-01

    Family adjustments, which are generated by a maternal death, have been analysed previously in Mexico by using a reduced number of cases in rural areas. This study was design in order to establish changes in family dynamic generated b y a maternal death and to analyse child surviving after one year of birth. Family members of maternal deaths cases, which occurred during 1988-89 in the Federal District, were interviewed by first time in order to know information related to family dynamic and women's characteristics. A second interview was made after one year of birth for cases in which the newborn survived hospital discharge. Simple frequencies were calculated and using X2 test compared groups. Main consequences were family disintegration, child acquiring new roles and economic problems when woman was the main or the only one support of the family. Child surviving was higher than we expected considering other national or international reports. Children were mainly integrated to their grandparent's family.

  11. Prevention of invasive Cronobacter infections in young infants fed powdered infant formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Janine

    2012-11-01

    Invasive Cronobacter infection is rare, devastating, and epidemiologically/microbiologically linked to powdered infant formulas (PIFs). In 2002-2004, the US Food and Drug Administration advised health care professionals to minimize PIF and powdered human milk fortifier (HMF)'s preparation, feeding, and storage times and avoid feeding them to hospitalized premature or immunocompromised neonates. Labels for PIF used at home imply PIF is safe for healthy, term infants if label instructions are followed. 1) Medical, public health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Food and Drug Administration, and World Health Organization records, publications, and personal communications were used to compare 68 (1958-2003) and 30 (2004-2010) cases of invasive Cronobacter disease in children without underlying disorders. 2) The costs of PIFs and ready-to-feed formulas (RTFs) were compared. Ninety-nine percent (95/96) of all infected infants were ounces of milk-based RTF cost $0.84 more than milk-based PIF; 24 ounces of soy-based RTF cost $0.24 less than soy-based PIF. Cronobacter can infect healthy, term (not just hospitalized preterm) young infants. Invasive Cronobacter infection is extremely unusual in infants not fed PIF/HMF. RTFs are commercially sterile, require minimal preparation, and are competitively priced. The exclusive use of BM and/or RTF for infants <2 months old should be encouraged.

  12. Optimality of the birth population reduces learning and behaviour disorders and sudden infant death after the first month.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugstad, L F

    1999-05-01

    CNS signs and learning and behaviour problems. The male predominance accords with males more than 500 g higher optimal birthweight than females and susceptibility to a depressed weight at birth. In order to prevent postneonatal dying, SIDS and reduce learning/behaviour disorders it is necessary to raise the proportion of heavy newborns by promoting foetal growth rate equal to the maternal intrinsic rate by eating to one's appetite a balanced diet, favouring a diet high in marine fat, especially in third trimester, in order to ensure maturation of the CNS and prolong gestation, thereby increasing birthweight. Although the increased survival of some very low birthweight neonates confounds the issue, a division between SIDS in neonatal and postneonatal death is recommended in order to assess the proportion of "avoidable infant death" as opposed to persistent classical neonatal SIDS.

  13. Sudden infant death syndrome: The risk of infants in Bogotá, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Latorre-Castro

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: The results reflect the risk to which infants are exposed because of wrong practices associated with poor knowledge, and recommendations given, in many cases, by health professionals. Likewise, risk is higher among the poorest population.

  14. A comparison of early neonatal deaths among preterm infants with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    multivariate logistic regression model to identify obstetric determinants amongst deaths in neonates that were ... multivariate regression analysis, poor Apgar score was associated with six-fold odds of RDS. More preterm ... remains a significant perinatal challenge, with pre- term babies accounting for 5-25% of all deliveries.

  15. Infant care practices related to sudden infant death syndrome in South Asian and White British families in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Helen L; Moya, Eduardo; Fairley, Lesley; Westman, Janette; Oddie, Sam; Wright, John

    2012-01-01

    In the UK, infants of South Asian parents have a lower rate of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) than White British infants. Infant care and life style behaviours are strongly associated with SIDS risk. This paper describes and explores variability in infant care between White British and South Asian families (of Bangladeshi, Indian or Pakistani origin) in Bradford, UK (the vast majority of which were Pakistani) and identifies areas for targeted SIDS intervention. A cross-sectional telephone interview study was conducted involving 2560 families with 2- to 4-month-old singleton infants enrolled in the Born in Bradford cohort study. Outcome measures were prevalence of self-reported practices in infant sleeping environment, sharing sleep surfaces, breast feeding, use of dummy or pacifier, and life style behaviours. We found that, compared with White British infants, Pakistani infants were more likely to: sleep in an adult bed (OR = 8.48 [95% CI 2.92, 24.63]); be positioned on their side for sleep (OR = 4.42 [2.85, 6.86]); have a pillow in their sleep environment (OR = 9.85 [6.39, 15.19]); sleep under a duvet (OR = 3.24 [2.39, 4.40]); be swaddled for sleep (OR = 1.49 [1.13, 1.97]); ever bed-share (OR = 2.13 [1.59, 2.86]); regularly bed-share (OR = 3.57 [2.23, 5.72]); ever been breast-fed (OR = 2.00 [1.58, 2.53]); and breast-fed for 8+ weeks (OR = 1.65 [1.31, 2.07]). Additionally, Pakistani infants were less likely to: sleep in a room alone (OR = 0.05 [0.03, 0.09]); use feet-to-foot position (OR = 0.36 [0.26, 0.50]); sleep with a soft toy (OR = 0.52 [0.40, 0.68]); use an infant sleeping bag (OR = 0.20 [0.16, 0.26]); ever sofa-share (OR = 0.22 [0.15, 0.34]); be receiving solid foods (OR = 0.22 [0.17, 0.30]); or use a dummy at night (OR = 0.40 [0.33, 0.50]). Pakistani infants were also less likely to be exposed to maternal smoking (OR = 0.07 [0.04, 0.12]) and to alcohol consumption by either parent. No difference was found in the prevalence of prone sleeping (OR = 1

  16. Is It Time for a Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Awareness Campaign? Community Stakeholders' Perceptions of SIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollenberg, Audra; Fendley, Kim

    2018-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) remains a leading cause of infant death in the United States, and in Virginia. We sought to gauge the perceptions among community-identified stakeholders regarding community resource needs to reduce SIDS. Snowball sampling identified important community stakeholders to be interviewed as key informants. A…

  17. Does maternal birth outcome differentially influence the occurrence of infant death among African Americans and European Americans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masho, Saba W; Archer, Phillip W

    2011-11-01

    The United States continues to have one of the highest infant mortality rates (IMR). Although studies have examined the association between maternal and infant birth outcomes, few studies have examined the impact of maternal birth outcome on infant mortality. This study was designed to examine the influence of maternal low birth weight and preterm birth on infant mortality. The 1997-2007 Virginia birth and infant death registry was analyzed. The infant birth and death data was linked to maternal birth registry data using the mother's maiden name and date of birth. From the mother's birth registry data, the grandmother's demographic and pregnancy history was obtained. Logistic regression modeling was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals. There was a statistically significant association between maternal birth outcome and subsequent infant mortality. Infants born from a mother who was low birth weight were 2.3 times more likely to have an infant die within the first year of life. Similarly, infants born from a mother born preterm were 2.2 times more likely to have an infant die. Stratification by race showed that there was no statistical association between maternal birth weight and infant death among Whites. However, a strong association was observed among Blacks. Maternal birth outcomes may be an important indicator for infant mortality. Future longitudinal studies are needed to understand the underlying cause of these associations.

  18. Pedestrian deaths in children--potential for prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hamilton, K

    2015-01-01

    The National Paediatric Mortality Database was reviewed for the six year period 1st January 2006 to 31st December 2011 and all pedestrian deaths extracted, after review of available data the deaths were categorized as either traffic or non-traffic related. There were 45 child pedestrian fatalities in the period examined. Traffic related deaths accounted for 26 (58%) vs. 19 (42%) non-traffic related. Analysis of the deaths showed there was a male preponderance 28 (62%), weekend trend 22 (49%) with an evening 16 (35%) and summer peak 20 (44%). The highest proportion of deaths occurred in the 1-4 year age group 24 (53%), with 13 (28%) due to low speed vehicle rollovers, mainly occurring in residential driveways 8 (61%). Child pedestrian fatalities are highly preventable through the modification of risk factors including behavioural, social and environmental. Preventative action needs to be addressed, particularly in relation to non-traffic related deaths i.e, low speed vehicle rollovers.

  19. The role of Coxsackievirus A16 in a case of sudden unexplained death in an infant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, B. S.; Johnsen, I. B. G.; Engsbro, Anne Line

    2016-01-01

    infants, two young children and an elderly man. Post mortem, pre-autopsy CT-scan and C-reactive protein analysis allowed for an autopsy procedure targeted at a microbiological cause of death. The case illustrates the usefulness of supplementary testing during autopsy. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd....

  20. Wernicke's encephalopathy: a preventable cause of maternal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedisinghe, Lilantha; Jayakody, Kaushadh; Arambage, Kirana

    2011-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare cause of maternal death. It is a difficult diagnosis to make but prevention and treatment is straightforward. Severe thiamine deficiency causes Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Correct diagnosis and treatment with thiamine will decrease the case fatality rate.

  1. Minimizing Preventable Deaths: The Should Be Focus In Ethiopian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The health sector is one of the recipients of the investment with aim of minimizing preventable morbidities and ... Hospital leaders need to accurately identify the possible causes of death while patients are on care. (type, phase of ... system between the referring and recipient institution must be designed and implemented.

  2. The Role of Respiratory Infection in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mage David T.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS is not likely to be explained by a currently measureable presence in all cases and absence in controls, as otherwise it would have been solved already. Indeed, any proposed physiological model for SIDS causation must explain the constant mathematical and statistical properties of SIDS age and gender. We have shown previously that SIDS are characterized by a common 4-parameter lognormal age distribution sparing neonatal infants, by a nominal 50% male excess, and by a higher rate in winter than summer. We test now whether SIDS is closely related to a fulminating prodromal Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI by a common increasing rate with the infants increasing Live Birth Order (LBO, all remaining the same, independent of the change in preferred sleeping positions of the infants, prone or supine.

  3. [Sport-related sudden death and its prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brion, Richard

    2010-10-01

    Sudden death of sportspersons is frequently in the news but is relatively uncommon when the total number of sudden deaths is taken into account (1500 vs 40 000 per year in France for example). Sport-related sudden death is often due to an unrecognized or underestimated cardiovascular disorder. The immediate causes of this dramatic event are age-dependent. Before 35, the most frequent causes are hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, while complications of coronary atheroma predominate later. Prevention begins with screening, which remains imperfect. Patients with cardiovascular disorders at risk of sudden death must adapt their sports activities accordingly. Knowledge of life-saving first-aid procedures by those supervising sports activities can improve the prognosis.

  4. Probiotics to prevent necrotising enterocolitis in very preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambæk, Irina Dobychina; Fonnest, Gert; Gormsen, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    (bifidobacillus and lactobacillus) once daily by nasogastric tube from the third day of life. The main outcome: NEC grades 2 and 3 were assessed in a blinded fashion from a clinical abstract and available X-rays. RESULTS: A total of 381 infants treated before the change of policy were compared with 333 infants...... treated after the policy change had been introduced. There was no statistically significant change in NEC (odds ratio (OR) = 0.75, p = 0.34, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.43-1.30). The OR for death was 0.92 (p = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.62-1.40). Unexpectedly, symptoms of NEC appeared earlier in the latter...

  5. Early neonatal deaths associated with perinatal asphyxia in infants ≥2500g in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Maria Fernanda Branco de; Kawakami, Mandira Daripa; Moreira, Lícia Maria Oliveira; Santos, Rosa Maria Vaz Dos; Anchieta, Lêni Márcia; Guinsburg, Ruth

    To assess the annual burden of early neonatal deaths associated with perinatal asphyxia in infants weighing ≥2500g in Brazil from 2005 to 2010. The population study enrolled all live births of infants with birth weight ≥2500g and without malformations who died up to six days after birth with perinatal asphyxia, defined as intrauterine hypoxia, asphyxia at birth, or meconium aspiration syndrome. The cause of death was written in any field of the death certificate, according to International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (P20.0, P21.0, and P24.0). An active search was performed in 27 Brazilian federative units. The chi-squared test for trend was applied to analyze early neonatal mortality ratios associated with perinatal asphyxia by study year. A total of 10,675 infants weighing ≥2500g without malformations died within six days after birth with perinatal asphyxia. Deaths occurred in the first 24h after birth in 71% of the infants. Meconium aspiration syndrome was reported in 4076 (38%) of these deaths. The asphyxia-specific early neonatal mortality ratio decreased from 0.81 in 2005 to 0.65 per 1000 live births in 2010 in Brazil (pneonatal mortality ratio remained between 0.20 and 0.29 per 1000 live births during the study period. Despite the decreasing rates in Brazil from 2005 to 2010, early neonatal mortality rates associated with perinatal asphyxia in infants in the better spectrum of birth weight and without congenital malformations are still high, and meconium aspiration syndrome plays a major role. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Early neonatal deaths associated with perinatal asphyxia in infants ≥2500 g in Brazil,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Branco de Almeida

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To assess the annual burden of early neonatal deaths associated with perinatal asphyxia in infants weighing ≥2500 g in Brazil from 2005 to 2010. Methods: The population study enrolled all live births of infants with birth weight ≥2500 g and without malformations who died up to six days after birth with perinatal asphyxia, defined as intrauterine hypoxia, asphyxia at birth, or meconium aspiration syndrome. The cause of death was written in any field of the death certificate, according to International Classification of Diseases,10th Revision (P20.0, P21.0, and P24.0. An active search was performed in 27 Brazilian federative units. The chi-squared test for trend was applied to analyze early neonatal mortality ratios associated with perinatal asphyxia by study year. Results: A total of 10,675 infants weighing ≥2500 g without malformations died within six days after birth with perinatal asphyxia. Deaths occurred in the first 24 h after birth in 71% of the infants. Meconium aspiration syndrome was reported in 4076 (38% of these deaths. The asphyxia-specific early neonatal mortality ratio decreased from 0.81 in 2005 to 0.65 per 1000 live births in 2010 in Brazil (p < 0.001; the meconium aspiration syndrome-specific early neonatal mortality ratio remained between 0.20 and 0.29 per 1000 live births during the study period. Conclusions: Despite the decreasing rates in Brazil from 2005 to 2010, early neonatal mortality rates associated with perinatal asphyxia in infants in the better spectrum of birth weight and without congenital malformations are still high, and meconium aspiration syndrome plays a major role.

  7. Strategies for the prevention of sudden cardiac death during sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, Domenico; Drezner, Jonathan; Basso, Cristina; Pelliccia, Antonio; Thiene, Gaetano

    2011-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death of a young athlete is the most tragic event in sports and devastates the family, the sports medicine team, and the local community. Such a fatality represents the first manifestation of cardiac disease in up to 80% of young athletes who remain asymptomatic before sudden cardiac arrest occurs; this explains the limited power of screening modalities based solely on history and physical examination. The long-running Italian experience showed that electrocardiogram (ECG) screening definitively improves the sensitivity of pre-participation evaluation for heart diseases and substantially reduces the risk of death in the athletic field (primary prevention). However, some cardiac conditions, such as coronary artery diseases, present no abnormalities on 12-lead ECG. Moreover, cardiac arrest due to non-penetrating chest injury (commotio cordis) cannot be prevented by screening. This justifies the efforts for implementing programmes of early external defibrillation of unpredictable arrhythmic cardiac arrest. This article reviews the epidemiology of sudden cardiac arrest in the athlete in terms of incidence, sport-related risk, underlying causes, and the currently available prevention programmes such as pre-participation screening and early external defibrillation by using automated external defibrillators. The best strategy is to combine synergistically primary prevention of sudden cardiac death by pre-participation identification of athletes affected by at-risk cardiomyopathies and secondary prevention with back-up defibrillation of unpredictable sudden cardiac arrest on the athletic field.

  8. Climate change is associated with male:female ratios of fetal deaths and newborn infants in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Misao; Fukuda, Kiyomi; Shimizu, Takashi; Nobunaga, Miho; Mamsen, Linn Salto; Yding Andersen, Claus

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate whether climate change is associated with male:female ratios (sex ratios) of fetal deaths and births in Japan. A population-based cohort study. Not applicable. Newborn infants and fetuses spontaneously aborted after 12 weeks of gestation. None. Yearly sex ratios of fetal deaths and newborn infants and monthly fetal death rates and sex ratios of newborn infants. A statistically significant positive association was found between yearly temperature differences and sex ratios of fetal deaths; a statistically significant negative association was found between temperature differences and sex ratios of newborn infants from 1968 to 2012, and between sex ratios of births and of fetal deaths. The sex ratios of fetal deaths have been increasing steadily along with temperature differences, whereas the sex ratios of newborn infants have been decreasing since the 1970s. Two climate extremes, a very hot summer in 2010 and a very cold winter in January 2011, showed not only statistically significant declines in sex ratios of newborn infants 9 months later in June 2011 and October 2011 but also statistically significant increases of fetal death rates immediately, in September 2010 and January 2011. The recent temperature fluctuations in Japan seem to be linked to a lower male:female sex ratio of newborn infants, partly via increased male fetal deaths. Male concepti seem to be especially vulnerable to external stress factors, including climate changes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Arousal responses in babies at risk of sudden infant death syndrome at different postnatal ages.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunne, K P

    1992-03-01

    Hypercarbic and hypoxic arousal responses during sleep were measured in healthy term infants, infants where a previous sibling died from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and infants suffering a clearly defined apparent life threatening event (ALTE) requiring vigorous or mouth to mouth resuscitation. Groups of infants were tested at approximately one, six and 13 weeks postnatally. Arousal was defined as gross body movement with eyes opening and moving or crying. Hypercarbic arousal was by step increases in F1 Co2 until arousal occurred or until endtidal (PETCO2) reached 8.7 KpA (65 mm Hg) Hypoxic arousal was by step decreases in FIO2 until arousal occurred or until an FIO2 of 0.15 had been maintained for 20 minutes. There was no difference in hypercaribic arousal threshold with age in any group. Hypercarbic arousal threshold was significantly higher in siblings (mean 53.4, 53.6, 54.7 mmHg. [7.12, 7.14, 7.29 KPA] at 0, 6, 13 postnatal weeks) compared to controls (mean 50.9, 52.3, 53.0mm Hg. [6.78, 6.97, 7.29 KPS respectively). ALTE infants differed only at 12 weeks having a significantly lower threshold (51.0mmHg. [6.80 KPA] V 53.0mm Hg. (7.06 KPA]) compared to controls. There was no difference in hypoxic arousal response with age in any group. An arousal response to hypoxia occurred in only 22% of ALTE infants and 40% of siblings compared to 67% of normal infants. Deficient sleep arousal, especially to hypoxia, is common in infants and especially those considered at increased risk from SIDS. This deficiency is present in the first postnatal week and did not vary overy the first three months of postnatal life.

  10. Early neonatal deaths with perinatal asphyxia in very low birth weight Brazilian infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, M F B; Moreira, L M O; Vaz dos Santos, R M; Kawakami, M D; Anchieta, L M; Guinsburg, R

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the frequency of early deaths associated with birth asphyxia of very low birth weight infants between 2005 and 2010, in Brazil. This population study enrolled all live births with birth weight from 400 to 1499 g, gestational age ⩾ 22 weeks, without malformations that died up to 6 days after birth with perinatal asphyxia. Asphyxia was defined if intrauterine hypoxia, asphyxia at birth or meconium aspiration syndrome were written in any line of the death certificate. Active search was carried out in 27 Brazilian federative units. For every 1000 live births of very low birth weight infants without congenital malformations, 40.25 and 32.38 died with birth asphyxia in the first week after birth, respectively, in 2005 and 2010 (Pasphyxia to early neonatal death of these infants was approximately 10 to 12% all study years. Reduction of birth asphyxia in very low birth weight infants is essential to reducing neonatal mortality in Brazil.

  11. Death among geladas (Theropithecus gelada): a broader perspective on mummified infants and primate thanatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fashing, Peter J; Nguyen, Nga; Barry, Tyler S; Goodale, C Barret; Burke, Ryan J; Jones, Sorrel C Z; Kerby, Jeffrey T; Lee, Laura M; Nurmi, Niina O; Venkataraman, Vivek V

    2011-05-01

    Despite intensive study in humans, responses to dying and death have been a neglected area of research in other social mammals, including nonhuman primates. Two recent reports [Anderson JR, Gillies A, Lock LC. 2010. Pan thanatology. Current Biology 20:R349-R351; Biro D, Humle T, Koops K, Souse C, Hayashi M, Matsuzawa T. 2010. Chimpanzee mothers at Bossou, Guinea carry the mummified remains of their dead infants. Current Biology 20:R351-R352] offered exciting new insights into behavior toward dying and dead conspecifics in our closest living relatives-chimpanzees. Here, we provide a comparative perspective on primate thanatology using observations from a more distant human relative-gelada monkeys (Theropithecus gelada)-and discuss how gelada reactions to dead and dying groupmates differ from those recently reported for chimpanzees. Over a 3.75-year study period, we observed 14 female geladas at Guassa, Ethiopia carrying dead infants from 1 hr to ≥48 days after death. Dead infants were carried by their mothers, other females in their group, and even by females belonging to other groups. Like other primate populations in which extended (>10 days) infant carrying after death has been reported, geladas at Guassa experience an extreme climate for primates, creating conditions which may favor slower rates of decomposition of dead individuals. We also witnessed the events leading up to the deaths of two individuals and the responses by groupmates to these dying individuals. Our results suggest that while chimpanzee mothers are not unique among primates in carrying their dead infants for long periods, seemingly "compassionate" caretaking behavior toward dying groupmates may be unique to chimpanzees among nonhuman primates (though it remains unknown whether such "compassionate" behavior occurs outside captivity). © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. How reliable is reported sleeping position in cases of unexpected infant death?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byard, Roger W; Jensen, Lisbeth L

    2008-09-01

    Examination of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) deaths in South Australia over a 7-year period from 2000 to 2006 was undertaken. There were 32 out of 35 cases where details of position when found were known. The data confirmed a marked decline in deaths in the prone position over the past decade, but showed no significant decline in cases reportedly found dead in the supine position. Posterior lividity was present in most cases (n = 30), 10 of whom also had anterior lividity. Posterior lividity was attributable either to the position of the body after death or to the effect of supine postmortem storage. In six cases, however, fixed anterior lividity indicated that death had occurred in the prone position despite statements that the infants had been found on the side (n = 1) and in the supine position (n = 5). This contradiction indicates that caregivers' descriptions of terminal sleeping positions may not be supported by autopsy findings. The numbers of SIDS deaths reported in the supine position in South Australia may not, therefore, represent a genuine tally, but instead may be a function of inaccurate reporting. This may act as a confounding factor in studies attempting to link sleeping position with other risk factors.

  13. Studies on the prevention of respiratory distress syndrome of infants due to hyaline membrane disease with plasminogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrus, C M; Choi, T S; Weintraub, D H; Eisenberg, B; Staub, H P; Courey, N G; Foote, R J; Goplerud, D; Moesch, R V; Ray, M; Bross, I D; Jung, O S; Mink, I B; Ambrus, J L

    1975-07-01

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD) is leading single cause of death of newborn, premature infants. The "hyaline membranes" consist chiefly of fibrin. The clinical manifestation of HMD is the respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Infants with RDS were treated with urokinase-activated human plasmin in a previous clinical trial. Survival rate was increased in the plasmin treated group as compared to the placebo recipients. However, cost and difficulty in the preparation of the enzyme made this treatment impractical. We, as well as others, have shown the premature infants lack serum plasminogen; thus they are unable to develop effective fibrinolysis and are defenseless against pulmonary fibrin deposition. Therefore, plamsinogen was tested as a possible preventive agent in RDS due to HMD. In a double blind, randomized study, infants between 1 and 2.5 kg birth weight received plasminogen or placebo shortly after birth, and were then followed for development of RDS. After 100 infants were entered into the study, the code was broken and results were evaluated to assure safety of the procedure. Among the 100 infants, 51 received placebo, 49 received plasminogen. Among the infants who received placebo, seven developed mild, and ten developed severe respiratory distress; of these ten, five died with histopathologically documented HMD. Two infants died from causes other than HMD. Among the 49 infants treated with plasminogen, 13 developed mild and three developed severe respiratory distress. There was no death due to HMD. Two deaths were due to other causes. Factors placing the infant at risk from HMD (degree of prematurity, sex, cesarean section, bleeding episodes during pregnancy, maternal diabetes) were found to be evenly distributed between control and treated groups. Since completing the first phase of the study, data of an additional 277 infants has become available. Although the code was not broken in this series, a preliminary look at mortality data in comparison with

  14. Effects of targeting lower versus higher arterial oxygen saturations on death or disability in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askie, Lisa M; Darlow, Brian A; Davis, Peter G; Finer, Neil; Stenson, Ben; Vento, Maximo; Whyte, Robin

    2017-04-11

    The use of supplemental oxygen in the care of extremely preterm infants has been common practice since the 1940s. Despite this, there is little agreement regarding which oxygen saturation (SpO₂) ranges to target to maximise short- or long-term growth and development, while minimising harms. There are two opposing concerns. Lower oxygen levels (targeting SpO₂ at 90% or less) may impair neurodevelopment or result in death. Higher oxygen levels (targeting SpO₂ greater than 90%) may increase severe retinopathy of prematurity or chronic lung disease.The use of pulse oximetry to non-invasively assess neonatal SpO₂ levels has been widespread since the 1990s. Until recently there were no randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that had assessed whether it is better to target higher or lower oxygen saturation levels in extremely preterm infants, from birth or soon thereafter. As a result, there is significant international practice variation and uncertainty remains as to the most appropriate range to target oxygen saturation levels in preterm and low birth weight infants. 1. What are the effects of targeting lower versus higher oxygen saturation ranges on death or major neonatal and infant morbidities, or both, in extremely preterm infants?2. Do these effects differ in different types of infants, including those born at a very early gestational age, or in those who are outborn, without antenatal corticosteroid coverage, of male sex, small for gestational age or of multiple birth, or by mode of delivery? We used the standard search strategy of Cochrane Neonatal to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 4), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 11 April 2016), Embase (1980 to 11 April 2016) and CINAHL (1982 to 11 April 2016). We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials. Randomised controlled trials that enrolled babies born at less than 28

  15. Post-mortem analysis for two prevalent beta-oxidation mutations in sudden infant death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi; Lantz, Patrick E; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2007-12-01

    Fatty acid oxidation disorders may cause sudden and unexpected infant death and are associated with the histological hallmark of hepatic steatosis. The goal of the present study was to assess the value of post-mortem molecular analysis for medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (MCAD) and mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP) defects in unexplained sudden infant death (SID) associated with fatty infiltration of the liver. MCAD catalyzes the first step of medium-chain fatty acid oxidation while MTP catalyzes the last three steps of long-chain fatty acid oxidation. In a retrospective study, 220 consecutive cases of sudden and unexplained infant death certified by medical examiners at Wake Forest University Medical Center were assessed for hepatic steatosis. Subjects with evidence of hepatic steatosis were screened for mutations in MCAD and MTPalpha-subunit using DNA isolated from paraffin-embedded liver tissue, single-strand conformation variance, and nucleotide sequence analyses. Sixteen cases (7.3%) were associated with diffuse micro-vesicular or mixed micro- and macro-vesicular hepatic steatosis. Two of these 16 cases (12.5%) had disease-causing mutations. One was homozygous for the prevalent MCAD A985G mutation. The second was a compound heterozygous for the prevalent MTP G1528C mutation and a novel 1 bp deletion in exon 18 of the MTPalpha-subunit gene. A significant proportion (7.3%) of SID is associated with hepatic steatosis. The present data support post-mortem molecular analysis for the MCAD A985G and MTP G1528C prevalent mutations in cases of sudden and unexplained infant death associated with hepatic steatosis.

  16. Fatty acid oxidation disorders as primary cause of sudden and unexpected death in infants and young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, Jytte; Kølvraa, S; Gregersen, N

    1997-01-01

    Disorders of fatty acid metabolism are known to be responsible for cases of sudden and unexpected death in infancy. At least 14 disorders are known at present. 120 cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) had been examined for a prevalent mutation (G985) causing medium chain acyl CoA dehydrog......Disorders of fatty acid metabolism are known to be responsible for cases of sudden and unexpected death in infancy. At least 14 disorders are known at present. 120 cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) had been examined for a prevalent mutation (G985) causing medium chain acyl Co...

  17. Preventing deaths from cryptococcal meningitis: from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Monika; Chiller, Tom

    2011-09-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis (CM), a fungal disease caused by Cryptococcus spp., is the most common form of meningitis and a leading cause of death among persons with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. Detection of cryptococcal antigen, which is present several weeks before overt signs of meningitis develop, provides an opportunity to detect infection early. Screening persons with HIV for cryptococcal infection when they access healthcare can identify asymptomatic infected patients allowing for prompt treatment and prevention of death. A newly developed point-of-care assay for cryptococcal antigen, as well as growing evidence supporting the utility and cost-effectiveness of screening, are further reasons to consider broad implementation of cryptococcal screening in countries with a high burden of cryptococcal disease.

  18. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) shortly after hexavalent vaccination: another pathology in suspected SIDS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Giulia; Lavezzi, Anna Maria; Matturri, Luigi

    2006-01-01

    Experts from panels of the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medical Products have investigated whether there might be a link between hexavalent vaccines and some cases of deaths that occurred. Participants included pathologists with experience in the field of vaccines and sudden infant death syndrome who conducted autopsies. However, to the best of our knowledge, little, if any, attention was paid to examination of the brainstem and the cardiac conduction systems on serial sections, nor was the possibility of a triggering role of the vaccine in these deaths considered. Herein we report the case of a 3-month-old female infant dying suddenly and unexpectedly shortly after being given a hexavalent vaccination. Examination of the brainstem on serial sections revealed bilateral hypoplasia of the arcuate nucleus. The cardiac conduction system presented persistent fetal dispersion and resorptive degeneration. This case offers a unique insight into the possible role of hexavalent vaccine in triggering a lethal outcome in a vulnerable baby. Any case of sudden unexpected death occurring perinatally and in infancy, especially soon after a vaccination, should always undergo a full necropsy study according to our guidelines.

  19. Investigation into a cluster of infant deaths following immunization: evidence for methanol intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, A; Roth, C E; Duclos, P; Ohn, S A; Nassar, A; Mahoney, F; Vogt, R; Arthur, R R

    2002-10-04

    A cluster of infant deaths due to severe metabolic acidosis following immunization was reported in a prosperous farming village in Egypt. Fears that more deaths might occur, and of a deleterious effect on national immunization programs prompted an urgent investigation by national and international partners. The deaths, and other previously unrecognized illness following immunization, were associated with excessive topical application of methanol. Methanol was employed as an anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory agent following injections. Fear of adverse reactions to vaccine had encouraged increasing use of methanol for these purposes. Local physicians and nurses were unaware of the toxicity of methanol and did not consider it in the differential diagnosis, and thus did not offer appropriate life-saving therapy. The interaction of traditional practices and modern medical interventions can have clinically important consequences, and should be considered when programs are introduced and as they are monitored.

  20. Agreement on underlying causes of infant death between original records and after investigation: analysis of two biennia in the years 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellen Geremias dos Santos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the agreement between underlying causes of infant deaths obtained from Death Certificates (DC with those defined after investigation by the Municipal Committee for the Prevention of Maternal and Infant Mortality (CMPMMI, in Londrina, Paraná State, in the biennia 2000-2001 and 2007-2008. Methods: DC of infants and records of investigations were obtained from the CMPMMI. The causes of death registered in both sources were coded according to the International Classification of Diseases, tenth revision (ICD-10, and the underlying causes of deaths were selected. Agreement between underlying causes of deaths was verified by Kappa's (k test and analyzed according to ICD-10 chapters and blocks of categories in both biennia. Results: In 2000/2001, according to ICD-10 chapters, high agreement rates were observed for conditions originated in the perinatal period (k = 0.85 and for external causes (k = 0.84, while, for congenital malformations, there was a substantial agreement (k = 0.71. In 2007/2008, agreement was considered poor for all analyzed chapters. For blocks of categories, high or substantial agreement rates were observed only in the first biennium for "congenital malformations of the circulatory system" (k = 0.78 and for "other external causes of accidental injury" (k = 0.91. Conclusions: A decrease in agreement between the sources during the study period indicates either an improvement in the process of investigation of infant death by the CMPMMI and/or a worsening in the quality of the DC information.

  1. Decreased orexin (hypocretin) immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus and pontine nuclei in sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Nicholas J; Waters, Karen A; Rodriguez, Michael L; Machaalani, Rita

    2015-08-01

    Infants at risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) have been shown to have dysfunctional sleep and poor arousal thresholds. In animal studies, both these attributes have been linked to impaired signalling of the neuropeptide orexin. This study examined the immunoreactivity of orexin (OxA and OxB) in the tuberal hypothalamus (n = 27) and the pons (n = 15) of infants (1-10 months) who died from SIDS compared to age-matched non-SIDS infants. The percentage of orexin immunoreactive neurons and the total number of neurons were quantified in the dorsomedial, perifornical and lateral hypothalamus at three levels of the tuberal hypothalamus. In the pons, the area of orexin immunoreactive fibres were quantified in the locus coeruleus (LC), dorsal raphe (DR), laterodorsal tegmental (LDT), medial parabrachial, dorsal tegmental (DTg) and pontine nuclei (Pn) using automated methods. OxA and OxB were co-expressed in all hypothalamic and pontine nuclei examined. In SIDS infants, orexin immunoreactivity was decreased by up to 21 % within each of the three levels of the hypothalamus compared to non-SIDS (p ≤ 0.050). In the pons, a 40-50 % decrease in OxA occurred in the all pontine nuclei, while a similar decrease in OxB immunoreactivity was observed in the LC, LDT, DTg and Pn (p ≤ 0.025). No correlations were found between the decreased orexin immunoreactivity and previously identified risk factors for SIDS, including prone sleeping position and cigarette smoke exposure. This finding of reduced orexin immunoreactivity in SIDS infants may be associated with sleep dysfunction and impaired arousal.

  2. Pooled individual data analysis of 5 randomized trials of infant nevirapine prophylaxis to prevent breast-milk HIV-1 transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgens, Michael G; Taha, Taha E; Omer, Saad B; Jamieson, Denise J; Lee, Hana; Mofenson, Lynne M; Chasela, Charles; Kourtis, Athena P; Kumwenda, Newton; Ruff, Andrea; Bedri, Abubaker; Jackson, J Brooks; Musoke, Philippa; Bollinger, Robert C; Gupte, Nikhil; Thigpen, Michael C; Taylor, Allan; van der Horst, Charles

    2013-01-01

    In resource-limited settings, mothers infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) face a difficult choice: breastfeed their infants but risk transmitting HIV-1 or not breastfeed their infants and risk the infants dying of other infectious diseases or malnutrition. Recent results from observational studies and randomized clinical trials indicate daily administration of nevirapine to the infant can prevent breast-milk HIV-1 transmission. Data from 5396 mother-infant pairs who participated in 5 randomized trials where the infant was HIV-1 negative at birth were pooled to estimate the efficacy of infant nevirapine prophylaxis to prevent breast-milk HIV-1 transmission. Four daily regimens were compared: nevirapine for 6 weeks, 14 weeks, or 28 weeks, or nevirapine plus zidovudine for 14 weeks. The estimated 28-week risk of HIV-1 transmission was 5.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.3%-7.9%) for the 6-week nevirapine regimen, 3.7% (95% CI, 2.5%-5.4%) for the 14-week nevirapine regimen, 4.8% (95% CI, 3.5%-6.7%) for the 14-week nevirapine plus zidovudine regimen, and 1.8% (95% CI, 1.0%-3.1%) for the 28-week nevirapine regimen (log-rank test for trend, P < .001). Cox regression models with nevirapine as a time-varying covariate, stratified by trial site and adjusted for maternal CD4 cell count and infant birth weight, indicated that nevirapine reduces the rate of HIV-1 infection by 71% (95% CI, 58%-80%; P < .001) and reduces the rate of HIV infection or death by 58% (95% CI, 45%-69%; P < .001). Extended prophylaxis with nevirapine or with nevirapine and zidovudine significantly reduces postnatal HIV-1 infection. Longer duration of prophylaxis results in a greater reduction in the risk of infection.

  3. Systemic Hydrocortisone To Prevent Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in preterm infants (the SToP-BPD study): statistical analysis plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onland, Wes; Merkus, Maruschka P; Nuytemans, Debbie H; Jansen-van der Weide, Marijke C; Holman, Rebecca; van Kaam, Anton H

    2018-03-09

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common complication of preterm birth with short-term and long-term adverse consequences. Although the glucocorticoid dexamethasone has been proven to be beneficial for the prevention of BPD, there are concerns about an increased risk of adverse neurodevelopmental outcome. Hydrocortisone has been suggested as an alternative therapy. The aim of the Systemic Hydrocortisone To Prevent Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in preterm infants (SToP-BPD) trial is to assess the efficacy and safety of postnatal hydrocortisone administration for the reduction of death or BPD in ventilator-dependent preterm infants. The SToP-BPD study is a multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled hydrocortisone trial in preterm infants at risk for BPD. After parental informed consent is obtained, ventilator-dependent infants are randomly allocated to hydrocortisone or placebo treatment during a 22-day period. The primary outcome measure is the composite outcome of death or BPD at 36 weeks postmenstrual age. Secondary outcomes are short-term effects on pulmonary condition and long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae assessed at 2 years corrected age. Complications of treatment, other serious adverse events and suspected unexpected serious adverse reactions are reported as safety outcomes. This pre-specified statistical analysis plan was written and submitted without knowledge of the unblinded data. Netherlands Trial Register, NTR2768 . Registered on 17 February 2011. EudraCT, 2010-023777-19. Registered on 2 November 2010.

  4. A common single nucleotide polymorphism can exacerbate long-QT type 2 syndrome leading to sudden infant death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nof, Eyal; Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Pérez, Guillermo J

    2010-01-01

    and mutation expressed singly and in combination in Chinese ovary (CHO-K1) and COS-1 cells. An asymptomatic woman presenting after the death of her 2-day-old infant and spontaneous abortion of a second baby in the first trimester was referred for genetic analysis. The newborn infant had nearly incessant...... suggest that a common polymorphism (K897T) can markedly accentuate the loss of function of mildly defective HERG channels, leading to long-QT syndrome-mediated arrhythmias and sudden infant death....

  5. A Case of Sudden Infant Death Due to Incomplete Kawasaki Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Daisuke; Shimizu, Keiko; Oka, Kumiko; Asari, Masaru; Maseda, Chikatoshi; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Shiono, Hiroshi; Ohtani, Seiji; Ogawa, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Although Kawasaki disease (KD) is a self-limiting disease, it may cause sudden cardiac death. Diagnosis of KD is principally based on clinical signs; however, some infant cases do not meet the criteria. Such cases are identified as incomplete KD. The sudden death risk in incomplete KD cases is similar to conventional KD. In our 5-month-old case, he had been admitted to a hospital for a fever and suppuration at the site of Bacille de Calmette et Guerin (BCG) vaccination. However, after discharge from the hospital, his C-reactive protein (CRP) levels declined, he got indisposed and died suddenly. A medico-legal autopsy revealed myocarditis, coronaritis, platelet-aggregated emboli in coronary arteries, and myocardial degeneration, suggesting that the fatal myocardial infarction was due to thrombus emboli in the coronary arteries. Forensic pathologists therefore should pay attention to the cardiac pathology originated from incomplete KD as a potential cause in cases of sudden infant death. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  6. [Sudden infant death. Family and socio-cultural state and psycho-affective balance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bethmann, O; Relier, J P

    1987-01-01

    This analysis presents 400 cases of children at risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) who were followed at the Port-Royal SIDS-clinic from 1981 to 1984. The 400 cases included: 107 children seen after a severe accident ("near-miss"), 20 twins from pairs stricken by 1 SIDS and 9 twins from near-miss pairs, 264 SIDS-siblings. The following risk factors were searched for: a) low socioeconomical level, b) marital difficulties, c) psychological or psychiatric disturbances in mother and/or father, d) pathological gynecologic and/or obstetric history (sterility, gestational and/or delivery accidents), e) unwanted pregnancy, f) perinatal morbidity. In deaths from SIDS or near-miss infants, 34% cumulated 2 factors, 26% 3 factors, 8% 4 factors; only 2% had no known factor. In addition, a few deaths or severe accidents occurred within a short delay after a travel or a change in daycare; the role of these coincidences should be studied; meanwhile, the authors emphasize the need for a special attention to the quality of the child's environment, as a basic factor for a harmonious development.

  7. Interleukin-6 and the serotonergic system of the medulla oblongata in the sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognum, Ingvar Jon; Haynes, Robin L; Vege, Ashild; Yang, May; Rognum, Torleiv O; Kinney, Hannah C

    2009-10-01

    Mild infection may trigger sudden death in the vulnerable infant by cytokine interactions with a compromised medullary serotonergic (5-HT) system, leading to disrupted cardiorespiratory regulation and sleep-related sudden death. The cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 is elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid in SIDS. We tested the hypothesis that the expression of IL-6 receptors (IL-6R) and/or gp130 (involved in IL-6R signaling) is altered in the medullary 5-HT system in SIDS. Immunohistochemistry of IL-6R and gp130 was performed on medullae from 25 SIDS infants, 20 infectious deaths, and 14 controls using a semi-quantitative grading system. In the SIDS cases, mean IL-6R intensity grade in the arcuate nucleus (major component of medullary 5-HT system) was significantly higher than in the control group (2.00 +/- 0.07 vs. 1.77 +/- 0.08, P = 0.04), with no other differences in IL-6R or gp130 expression at any other site. Arcuate 5-HT neurons expressed IL-6R, indicating a site of IL-6/5-HT interaction. In SIDS, IL-6R expression is abnormal in the arcuate nucleus, the putative human homolog of rodent ventral medullary chemosensitivity sites involving 5-HT. Aberrant interactions between IL-6 and the arcuate nucleus may contribute to impaired responses to hypercapnia generated by infection (hyper-metabolism) combined with rebreathing.

  8. Fatty acid oxidation disorders as primary cause of sudden and unexpected death in infants and young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, Jytte; Kølvraa, S; Gregersen, N

    1997-01-01

    Disorders of fatty acid metabolism are known to be responsible for cases of sudden and unexpected death in infancy. At least 14 disorders are known at present. 120 cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) had been examined for a prevalent mutation (G985) causing medium chain acyl CoA dehydrog...

  9. Definition of Sudden Infant Death and Sudden Intrauterine Unexpected Death Syndromes (SIDS and SIUDS with Regard to the Anatomo-Pathological Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Ottaviani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crib death, or sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS, is the most frequent form of death in the first year of life, striking one baby in every 1,700–2,000. Yet despite advances in maternal-infant care, sudden intrauterine unexplained/unexpected death syndrome (SIUDS, has a six-eightfold greater incidence than that of SIDS. Frequent congenital abnormalities, likely morphological substrates for SIDS-SIUDS, were detected, mainly represented by alterations of the cardiac conduction system, such as accessory pathways and abnormal resorptive degeneration, and hypoplasia/agenesis of the vital brainstem structures. On the basis of these considerations, the new common definition of the SIDS-SIUDS complex is The sudden death of a fetus after the 25th gestational week or infant under one year of age which is unexpected by history and remains unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including examination of the death scene, performance of a general autopsy and examination of the fetal adnexa. Therefore, given that the general autopsy does not disclose any cause of death, a more in-depth histopathological analysis of the cardiac conduction system and autonomic nervous system by specialized pathologists will become necessary.

  10. Maternal consumption of coffee during pregnancy and stillbirth and infant death in first year of life: prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisborg, Kirsten; Kesmodel, Ulrik; Bech, Bodil Hammer

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the association between coffee consumption during pregnancy and the risk of stillbirth and infant death in the first year of life. Design Prospective follow up study. Setting Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, 1989-96. Participants 18 478 singleton pregnancies in women...... with valid information about coffee consumption during pregnancy. Main outcome measures Stillbirth (delivery of a dead fetus at >28 weeks’ gestation) and infant death (death of a liveborn infant during the first year of life). Results Pregnant women who drank eight or more cups of coffee per day during......, marital status, years of education, occupational status, and body mass index did not substantially change the estimates of association. There was no significant association between coffee consumption and death in the first year of life after adjustment for smoking habits during pregnancy. Conclusion...

  11. Examining the preventable but predictable death of Ashley Smith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Nicole; Kilty, Jennifer M; Frigon, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the fusion of psy-correctional discourse with the dominant risk logic to consider the implication this nexus can have on how self-injurious behaviour committed by women in prison is interpreted and responded to by the Correctional Service Canada (CSC). The central focus of the study is an in-depth case analysis of the carceral death of Ashley Smith, a 19-year-old woman who committed suicide in her segregation cell in 2007 after enduring four years of excessively punitive treatment aimed at controlling her self-injurious behaviour. Findings illustrate how the fusion of these logics creates a kind of "therapeutic-risk cloak" that reframes the behaviour as "abnormal" and "risky", which masks the punitivity of strip search and segregation interventions in the name of safety, security and treatment. Given that correctional officials knowingly failed to intervene when Smith tied the fatal ligature around her neck, a federal inquiry judged her death to be a homicide. By attempting to unveil the "therapeutic-risk cloak" the authors hope to challenge the underlying logic of CSC's governance and management framework, which not only denies the oppressive gendered carceral reality that is linked to self-injurious behaviour amongst women prisoners, but is also used to justify intervention responses that exacerbate the very behaviour this framework aims to control. Until systemic transformation is achieved that eradicates CSC's contradictory governance framework, there is no doubt that the authors will continue to see similar preventable deaths take place in prison.

  12. The importance of a forensics investigation of sudden infant death syndrome: recommendations for developing, low and middle income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. Koehler

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Sudden infant deaths syndrome (SIDS, the sudden and unexpected death of a normal and healthy infant, has remained a medical and forensic mystery. Despite years of research all attempts to ascertain the exact cause and manner of death have failed. The information collected during the course of the comprehensive investigation by the various investigation agencies and analysis of the data has not been in vain. The epidemiological, demographic, and pathological data have identified distinctive features and risk factors associated with infants that died from SIDS. Epidemiological data has provided the unique characteristics of infants that died of SIDS that differentiates them from non-SIDS infants. Analysis of information from the death scene investigation has identified key risk factor behaviour associated with SIDS, namely the prone sleeping position. Pathological examination of the internal organs, specifically the brain, has shown some differences between SIDS and non-SIDS infants. However, to gain a complete picture of SIDS data, all countries around the world must provide information, even basic information, to understand this syndrome better. Developing countries must understand their role and importance in developing plans to investigate, collect, and disseminate SIDS data to the rest of the world. This paper provides general guidelines for the investigation of SIDS in developing countries.

  13. Decreased GABAA receptor binding in the medullary serotonergic system in the sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbelt, Kevin G; Paterson, David S; Belliveau, Richard A; Trachtenberg, Felicia L; Haas, Elisabeth A; Stanley, Christina; Krous, Henry F; Kinney, Hannah C

    2011-09-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons in the medulla oblongata help regulate homeostasis, in part through interactions with the medullary serotonergic (5-HT) system. Previously, we reported abnormalities in multiple 5-HT markers in the medullary 5-HT system of infants dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), suggesting that 5-HT dysfunction is involved in its pathogenesis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that markers of GABAA receptors are decreased in the medullary 5-HT system in SIDS cases compared with controls. Using tissue receptor autoradiography with the radioligand H-GABA, we found 25% to 52% reductions in GABAA receptor binding density in 7 of 10 key nuclei sampled of the medullary 5-HT system in the SIDS cases (postconceptional age [PCA] = 51.7 ± 8.3, n = 28) versus age-adjusted controls (PCA = 55.3 ± 13.5, n = 8) (p ≤ 0.04). By Western blotting, there was 46.2% reduction in GABAAα3 subunit levels in the gigantocellularis (component of the medullary 5-HT system) of SIDS cases (PCA = 53.9 ± 8.4, n = 24) versus controls (PCA = 55.3 ± 8.3, n = 8) (56.8% standard in SIDS cases vs 99.35% in controls; p = 0.026). These data suggest that medullary GABAA receptors are abnormal in SIDS infants and that SIDS is a complex disorder of a homeostatic network in the medulla that involves deficits of the GABAergic and 5-HT systems.

  14. A new theory to explain the underlying pathogenetic mechanism of sudden infant death syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Lavezzi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Author, on the basis of her long experience on the neuropathology of SIDS, acquired through the study of a very wide set of cases, firstly identifies the neuronal centers of the human brainstem involved in the breathing control in perinatal life, with the pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus as main coordinator. What emerges from this analysis is that the prenatal respiratory movements differ from those post-natally in two respects: 1 they are episodic, only aimed at the lung development, and 2 they are abolished by hypoxia, not being of vital importance in utero, mainly to limit the consumption of oxygen. Then, as this fetal inhibitory reflex represents an important defense expedient, the Author proposes a new original interpretation of the pathogenetic mechanism leading to SIDS. Infants, in a critical moment of the autonomic control development, in hypoxic conditions could awaken the reflex left over from fetal life and arrest breathing, as he did in similar situations in prenatal life, rather than promote the hyperventilation usually occurring to restore the normal concentration of oxygen, with obviously a devastating outcome. This hypothesis is supported by immunohistochemical results showing in high percentage of SIDS victims, and not in age-matched infant controls, neurochemical alterations of the Kölliker-Fuse neurons, potentially indicative of inactivation. The new explanation of SIDS blames a sort of auto-inhibition of the KFN functionality, wrongly arisen with the same protective purpose to preserve life in utero, as trigger of the sudden infant death.

  15. Over-the-counter cold medications-postmortem findings in infants and the relationship to cause of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinetti, Laureen; Lehman, Lee; Casto, Brian; Harshbarger, Kent; Kubiczek, Piotr; Davis, James

    2005-10-01

    The Montgomery County Coroner's Office has encountered a series of 10 infant deaths over an 8-month period in infants under 12 months old with toxicology findings that include a variety of drugs commonly found in over-the-counter (OTC) cold medications. The drugs detected were ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, dextromethorphan, diphenhydramine, chlorpheniramine, brompheniramine, ethanol, carbinoxamine, levorphanol, acetaminophen, and the anti-emetic metoclopramide. Toxicology findings were confirmed in 2 different matrices in 9 of the 10 cases and by 2 different analytical methods. The blood concentrations of the drugs and the case histories, as well as the cause of death for each infant, if available, will be given. The majority of these deaths were either toxicity from the OTC cold medications directly or as a contributory factor in the cause of death. Only two of the cases were the result of possible child abuse. Caregivers may be under the mistaken notion that OTC cold medications formulated for children are also safe for use in infants. These cases demonstrate that not only is administration of some OTC cold medications not safe, but use of OTC cold medications in infants can result in toxicity that can lead to death.

  16. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS - The role of trigemino-cardiac reflex: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyaninder Pal Singh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS is an unexplained death in infants that usually occurs during sleep. The cause of SIDS remains unknown and multifactorial. In this regard, the diving reflex (DR, a peripheral subtype of trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR is also hypothesized as one of the possible mechanisms for this condition. The TCR is a well-established neurogenic reflex which manifests as bradycardia, hypotension, apnea, and gastric hyper motility. The TCR shares many similarities with the DR which is a significant physiological adaptation to withstand hypoxia during apnea in many animal species including humans in clinical manifestation and mechanism of action. The DR is characterized by breath-holding (apnea, bradycardia and vasoconstriction leading to rising in blood pressure. Several studies have described congenital anomalies of autonomic nervous system in the pathogenesis of SIDS such as hypoplasia, delayed neuronal maturation or decreased neuronal density of arcuate nucleus, hypoplasia and neuronal immaturity of the hypoglossal nucleus. The abnormalities of autonomic nervous system in SIDS may explain the role of TCR in this syndrome involving sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system. We reviewed the available literature to identify the role of TCR in the etiopathogenesis of SIDS and the pathways and cellular mechanism involved in it. This synthesis will help to update our knowledge and improve our understanding about this mysterious, yet common condition and will open the door for further research in this field.

  17. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome in Mice with an Inherited Mutation in RyR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Nitin; Sood, Subeena; Wang, Sufen; van Oort, Ralph J.; Sarma, Satyam; Li, Na; Skapura, Darlene G.; Bayle, J. Henri; Valderrábano, Miguel; Wehrens, Xander H.T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor gene (RYR2) have been recently identified in victims of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The aim of this study was to determine whether a gain-of-function mutation in RYR2 increases the propensity to cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death in young mice. Methods and Results Incidence of sudden death was monitored prospectively in heterozygous knock-in mice with mutation R176Q in Ryr2 (R176Q/+). Young R176Q/+ mice exhibited a higher incidence of sudden death compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. Optical mapping of membrane potentials and calcium levels in 1-7 day-old R176Q/+ and WT mice revealed an increased incidence of ventricular ectopy and spontaneous calcium releases in neonatal R176Q/+ mice. Surface ECGs in 3-10 day-old mice showed that R176Q/+ mice developed more ventricular arrhythmias following provocation with epinephrine and caffeine. Intracardiac pacing studies in 12-18 day-old mice revealed the presence of an arrhythmogenic substrate in R176Q/+ compared with WT mice. RT-PCR and Western blotting showed that expression levels of other calcium handling proteins were unaltered suggesting that calcium leak through mutant RyR2 underlies arrhythmogenesis and sudden death in young R176Q/+ mice. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that a gain-of-function mutation in RyR2 confers an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death in young mice, and that young R176Q/+ mice may be used as a model for elucidating the complex interplay between genetic and environmental risk factors associated with SIDS. PMID:20009080

  18. Trial of labour after caesarean section and the risk of neonatal and infant death: a nationwide cohort study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Sinéad M

    2017-02-27

    Caesarean section (CS) rates are increasing worldwide and as a result repeat CS is common. The optimal mode of delivery in women with one previous CS is widely debated and the risks to the infant are understudied. The aim of the current study was to evaluate if women with a trial of labour after caesarean (TOLAC) had an increased odds of neonatal and infant death compared to women with an elective repeat CS (ERCS).

  19. Blueberry polyphenols prevent cardiomyocyte death by preventing calpain activation and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Xavier Lieben; Thandapilly, Sijo Joseph; Kalt, Wilhelmina; Vinqvist-Tymchuk, Melinda; Aloud, Basma Milad; Raj, Pema; Yu, Liping; Le, Hoa; Netticadan, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of an aqueous wild blueberry extract and five wild blueberry polyphenol fractions on an in vitro model of heart disease. Adult rat cardiomyocytes were pretreated with extract and fractions, and then exposed to norepinephrine (NE). Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, cell death, oxidative stress, apoptosis and cardiomyocyte contractile function as well as the activities of calpain, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were measured in cardiomyocytes treated with and without NE and blueberry fraction (BF). Four of five blueberry fractions prevented cell death and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by NE. Total phenolic fraction was used for all further analysis. The NE-induced increase in oxidative stress, nuclear condensation, calpain activity and lowering of SOD and CAT activities were prevented upon pretreatment with BF. Reduced contractile function was also significantly improved with BF pretreatment. Blueberry polyphenols prevent NE-induced adult cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cell death. The protective effects of BF may be in part attributed to a reduction in calpain activity and oxidative stress.

  20. [Causes of deaths in Portugal and challenges in prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    In Portugal, the hope of living, in terms of probability, either at birth or at 65 years old, has reached levels that represent huge gains and certainly reflect the successful initiatives developed in many sectors in the last 30 years. In 2008-2010, the average life expectancy at birth was 79.20 years for men and women. By contrast, in 1980, the average life expectancy at birth was 71.78 years. Furthermore, premature mortality, defined as occurring before 70 years of age, expressed as rate, represents the likelihood of dying before this age, which is presently of 24.3%, meaning that one in four dies Portuguese citizen before reaching the age of 70. Main cause of deaths and the number of years in the Portuguese population that theoretically stops living when you die before the age of 70 (potential years lost), for both sexes, includes the following: traffic accidents with motor vehicles - 22,550 years; malignant tumor of trachea, bronchus and lung - 19,768 years, vascular brain diseases - 16,070 years, self-injury caused intentionally - 14,753 years. It's important to analyze these figures and its evolution in order to allow an understanding of their impact and implement effective corrective measures. The contribution of actions and programs to prevent some of the above causes of deaths and potential years lost is still to be objectively interpreted but it is well known the importance of reducing risks factors as tobacco and alcohol consumption, encouraging balanced nutrition in calories and composition, promoting regular physical exercise and improving information and health education on the reduction of many chronic non-communicable diseases, what in turn, reflects in the decline of premature mortality. It is essential to analyze the causes that anticipate the death of the Portuguese population and the cause of these causes, that is, their risk factors and design programs that reduce the exposure of citizens to avoidable risks, which is the essence of all public

  1. Comparison of Military and Civilian Methods for Determining Potentially Preventable Deaths: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janak, Jud C; Sosnov, Jonathan A; Bares, Joan M; Stockinger, Zsolt T; Montgomery, Harold R; Kotwal, Russ S; Butler, Frank K; Shackelford, Stacy A; Gurney, Jennifer M; Spott, Mary Ann; Finelli, Louis N; Mazuchowski, Edward L; Smith, David J

    2018-02-21

    Military and civilian trauma experts initiated a collaborative effort to develop an integrated learning trauma system to reduce preventable morbidity and mortality. Because the Department of Defense does not currently have recommended guidelines and standard operating procedures to perform military preventable death reviews in a consistent manner, these performance improvement processes must be developed. To compare military and civilian preventable death determination methods to understand the existing best practices for evaluating preventable death. This systematic review followed the PRISMA reporting guidelines. English-language articles were searched from inception to February 15, 2017, using the following databases: MEDLINE (Ovid), Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews (Ovid), PubMed, CINAHL, and Google Scholar. Articles were initially screened for eligibility and excluded based on predetermined criteria. Articles reviewing only prehospital deaths, only inhospital deaths, or both were eligible for inclusion. Information on study characteristics was independently abstracted by 2 investigators. Reported are methodological factors affecting the reliability of preventable death studies and the preventable death rate, defined as the number of potentially preventable deaths divided by the total number of deaths within a specific patient population. Fifty studies (8 military and 42 civilian) met the inclusion criteria. In total, 1598 of 6500 military deaths reviewed and 3346 of 19 108 civilian deaths reviewed were classified as potentially preventable. Among military studies, the preventable death rate ranged from 3.1% to 51.4%. Among civilian studies, the preventable death rate ranged from 2.5% to 85.3%. The high level of methodological heterogeneity regarding factors, such as preventable death definitions, review process, and determination criteria, hinders a meaningful quantitative comparison of preventable death rates. The reliability of military and civilian

  2. Effectiveness of Synchronized Noninvasive Ventilation to Prevent Intubation in Preterm Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-Navarro, Cristina; Sanchez-Luna, Manuel; Sanz-L?pez, Ester; Maderuelo-Rodriguez, Elena; Zamora-Flores, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Background?Noninvasive ventilation is being increasingly used on preterm infants to reduce ventilator lung injury and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of synchronized nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (SNIPPV) to prevent intubation in premature infants. Methods?Prospective observational study of SNIPPV use on preterm infants of less than 32 weeks' gestation. All patients were managed using a prospective protocol intended to red...

  3. Egyptian FGM policy fails to prevent girl's death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-06

    The form of female genital mutilation (FGM) predominantly practiced throughout Egypt consists of the surgical removal of the clitoris and often the inner labia. The practice reduces the level of a woman's sexual sensation and causes pain, psychological trauma, and the risk of infection and hemorrhage. An estimated 80% of Egyptian girls undergo the procedure. Egypt's Ministry of Health in 1994 decided to permit only doctors in government hospitals to perform FGM. This policy was adopted in an effort to make safer what was considered to be an inevitable practice. However, the policy was revoked in October 1995 after women's rights and health advocates criticized it as a government endorsement of FGM. An 11-year-old Nile Delta girl died July 12, 1996, as a result of FGM. The Health Ministry subsequently banned all registered health professionals from performing FGM. Two months later, on August 24, a 14-year-old girl died from hemorrhaging shortly after undergoing FGM. These recent deaths challenge the effectiveness of Egypt's new attempts to prevent FGM. Barbers and midwives in Egypt perform thousands of mutilations annually. While they are theoretically subject to criminal penalties for performing surgery without a license, the laws are rarely enforced. Furthermore, despite existing regulations, no provision in the Egyptian penal code criminalizes FGM.

  4. Average age at death in infancy and infant mortality level: Reconsidering the Coale-Demeny formulas at current levels of low mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny M. Andreev

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The long-term historical decline in infant mortality has been accompanied by increasing concentration of infant deaths at the earliest stages of infancy. In the mid-1960s Coale and Demeny developed formulas describing the dependency of the average age of death in infancy on the level of infant mortality, based on data obtained up to that time. Objective: In the more developed countries a steady rise in average age of infant death began in the mid-1960s. This paper documents this phenomenon and offers alternative formulas for calculation of the average age of death, taking into account the new mortality trends. Methods: Standard statistical methodologies and a specially developed method are applied to the linked individual birth and infant death datasets available from the US National Center for Health Statistics and the initial (raw numbers of deaths from the Human Mortality Database. Results: It is demonstrated that the trend of decline in the average age of infant death becomes interrupted when the infant mortality rate attains a level around 10 per 1000, and modifications of the Coale-Demeny formulas for practical application to contemporary low levels of mortality are offered. Conclusions: The average age of death in infancy is an important characteristic of infant mortality, although it does not influence the magnitude of life expectancy. That the increase in average age of death in infancy is connected with medical advances is proposed as a possible explanation.

  5. Maternal cigarette smoking is associated with increased inner airway wall thickness in children who die from sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, J; Vullermin, P; Robinson, P

    1998-09-01

    The harmful effects of passive cigarette smoke exposure to infants include an increased frequency of asthma exacerbations, lower respiratory viral infections, and the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Because of a difficulty in obtaining airway tissue from infants, little information is available on the effects of passive cigarette smoke exposure on the structure of the infant airway wall. We examined airway dimensions in 19 children who died from SIDS whose mothers smoked more than 20 cigarettes a day prenatally and postnatally, and compared these data with those from 19 infants who died from SIDS and had nonsmoking mothers. Total inner and outer wall areas were calculated for each airway and expressed in terms of the basement membrane perimeter (Pbm). Inner airway wall thickness was greater in the larger airways of those infants whose mothers had smoked more than 20 cigarettes a day. These findings suggest that infants exposed to a high level of passive cigarette smoke develop significant structural changes in their airways. Increased airway wall thickness may contribute to exaggerated airway narrowing and may help explain the previously observed abnormalities in neonatal lung function that have been described in infants of smoking mothers.

  6. Preventing Hypothermia in Preterm Infants: A Program of Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neonatal hypothermia is a worldwide problem and leads to increased morbidity and mortality in newborn infants. This paper describes a program of research to examine thermoregulation in premature infants and to decrease neonatal hypothermia. Our studies include 1) examining an intervention to reduce heat loss in ...

  7. Probiotics to prevent necrotising enterocolitis in very preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambæk, Irina Dobychina; Fonnest, Gert; Gormsen, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    (bifidobacillus and lactobacillus) once daily by nasogastric tube from the third day of life. The main outcome: NEC grades 2 and 3 were assessed in a blinded fashion from a clinical abstract and available X-rays. RESULTS: A total of 381 infants treated before the change of policy were compared with 333 infants...

  8. Ependymal alterations in sudden intrauterine unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome: possible primary consequence of prenatal exposure to cigarette smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matturri Luigi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ependyma, the lining providing a protective barrier and filtration system separating brain parenchyma from cerebrospinal fluid, is still inadequately understood in humans. In this study we aimed to define, by morphological and immunohistochemical methods, the sequence of developmental steps of the human ependyma in the brainstem (ventricular ependyma and thoracic spinal cord (central canal ependyma of a large sample of fetal and infant death victims, aged from 17 gestational weeks to 8 postnatal months. Additionally, we investigated a possible link between alterations of this structure, sudden unexplained fetal and infant death and maternal smoking. Results Our results demonstrate that in early fetal life the human ependyma shows a pseudostratified cytoarchitecture including many tanycytes and ciliated cells together with numerous apoptotic and reactive astrocytes in the subependymal layer. The ependyma is fully differentiated, with a monolayer of uniform cells, after 32 to 34 gestational weeks. We observed a wide spectrum of ependymal pathological changes in sudden death victims, such as desquamation, clusters of ependymal cells in the subventricular zone, radial glial cells, and the unusual presence of neurons within and over the ependymal lining. These alterations were significantly related to maternal smoking in pregnancy. Conclusions We conclude that in smoking mothers, nicotine and its derivatives easily reach the cerebrospinal fluid in the fetus, immediately causing ependymal damage. Consequently, we suggest that the ependyma should be examined in-depth first in victims of sudden fetal or infant death with mothers who smoke.

  9. A study of infant deaths in tribal area of Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ushashree Garikipati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study aimed to determine the prevalence of neonatal deaths and its underlying correlates in tribal area of Andhra Pradesh, India Methods We conducted a two phase cross-sectional study (N=230. Semi- structured questionnaire schedules (in the vernacular-Telugu were used in the initial qualitative phase, to obtain specific information from mothers who delivered in a one year period prior to the study. Information from the analysed qualitative data was used to construct a questionnaire-schedule for the 2nd phase which used quantitative survey techniques. Results It was observed that Infant Mortality ratio (IMR in Vizianagaram district was 239 per 1000 live births in the tribal areas under study. This was ten times higher than that reported by the district (22/1000 and 4-5 times higher than SRS data of 2011 for AP. It was observed that 28% of infants died within first day, 68% within first week (including the first day and 81% within first month. Conclusions The high IMR observed in the within first month of life in tribal areas, interventions to tackle them should be prioritized in this ‘golden period’. The health workers should be re-trained to identify and manage the early warning signs of neonatal complications.

  10. A study of infant deaths in tribal area of Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ushashree Garikipati

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study aimed to determine the prevalence of neonatal deaths and its underlying correlates in tribal area of Andhra Pradesh, India Methods We conducted a two phase cross-sectional study (N=230. Semi-structured questionnaire schedules (in the vernacular-Telugu were used in the initial qualitative phase, to obtain specific information from mothers who delivered in a one year period prior to the study. Information from the analysed qualitative data was used to construct a questionnaire-schedule for the 2nd phase which used quantitative survey techniques. Results It was observed that Infant Mortality ratio (IMR in Vizianagaram district was 239 per 1000 live births in the tribal areas under study. This was ten times higher than that reported by the district (22/1000 and 4-5 times higher than SRS data of 2011 for AP. It was observed that 28% of infants died within first day, 68% within first week (including the first day and 81% within first month. Conclusions The high IMR observed in the within first month of life in tribal areas, interventions to tackle them should be prioritized in this ‘golden period’. The health workers should be re-trained to identify and manage the early warning signs of neonatal complications.

  11. Risk of stillbirth and infant deaths after assisted reproductive technology: a Nordic study from the CoNARTaS group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, A A; Wennerholm, U B; Gissler, M; Romundstad, L B; Nygren, K G; Tiitinen, A; Skjaerven, R; Nyboe Andersen, A; Lidegaard, Ø; Forman, J L; Pinborg, A

    2014-05-01

    Is the risk of stillbirth and perinatal deaths increased after assisted reproductive technology (ART) compared with pregnancies established by spontaneous conception (SC)? A significantly increased risk of stillbirth in ART singletons was only observed before 28 + 0 gestational weeks. The current literature indicates that children born after ART have an increased risk of perinatal death. The knowledge on stillbirth in ART pregnancies is limited. A population based case-control study. A total of 62 485 singletons and 29 793 twins born after ART in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, from 1982 to 2007, were compared with 362 798 spontaneously conceived (SC) singletons and 132 181 twins. The adjusted rate ratio for stillbirth at gestational weeks 22 + 0 to 27 + 6 was 2.08 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.55-2.78] for ART versus SC singletons. After 28 + 0 gestational weeks there was no significant difference in the risk of stillbirth between ART and SC singletons. ART twins had a lower risk of stillbirth compared with SC twins, but when restricting the analysis to opposite-sex twins and excluding all monozygotic twins, there was no significant difference between the groups. Singletons conceived by ART had an overall increased risk of early neonatal death (adjusted odds ratio 1.54, 95% CI 1.28-1.85) and death within the first year after birth (1.45, 1.26-1.68). No difference regarding these two parameters was found when further adjusting for the gestational age [(0.97, 0.80-1.18) and (0.99, 0.85-1.16), respectively]. ART twins had a lower risk of early neonatal and infant deaths than SC twins, but no difference was found when restricting the analyses to opposite-sex twins. We were not able to adjust for potential confounders, such as a prior history of stillbirth, induction of labour, body mass index or smoking. The risk of stillbirth in ART versus SC singletons was only increased for very early gestational ages (before 28 weeks). This might indicate that the current

  12. Multiplicity of Plasmodium falciparum infection following intermittent preventive treatment in infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchholz, Ulrike; Kobbe, Robin; Danquah, Ina; Zanger, Philipp; Reither, Klaus; Abruquah, Harry H.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Ziniel, Peter; May, Jürgen; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.

    2010-01-01

    Intermittent preventive treatment in infants with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTi-SP) reduces malaria morbidity by 20% to 33%. Potentially, however, this intervention may compromise the acquisition of immunity, including the tolerance towards multiple infections with Plasmodium falciparum.

  13. Multiplicity of Plasmodium falciparum infection following intermittent preventive treatment in infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchholz, U.; Kobbe, R.; Danquah, I.; Zanger, P.; Reither, K.; Abruquah, H.H.; Grobusch, M.P.; Ziniel, P.; May, J.; Mockenhaupt, F.P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Intermittent preventive treatment in infants with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTi-SP) reduces malaria morbidity by 20% to 33%. Potentially, however, this intervention may compromise the acquisition of immunity, including the tolerance towards multiple infections with Plasmodium

  14. Gender inequities in curative and preventive health care use among infants in Bihar, India

    OpenAIRE

    Vilms, Rohan J; McDougal, Lotus; Atmavilas, Yamini; Hay, Katherine; Triplett, Daniel P; Silverman, Jay; Raj, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Background India has the highest rate of excess female infant deaths in the world. Studies with decade-old data suggest gender inequities in infant health care seeking, but little new large-scale research has examined this issue. We assessed differences in health care utilization by sex of the child, using 2014 data for Bihar, India. Methods This was a cross-sectional analysis of statewide representative survey data collected for a non-blinded maternal and child health evaluation study. Parti...

  15. Climate change is associated with male:female ratios of fetal deaths and newborn infants in Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukuda, Misao; Fukuda, Kiyomi; Shimizu, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether climate change is associated with male:female ratios (sex ratios) of fetal deaths and births in Japan. DESIGN: A population-based cohort study. SETTING: Not applicable. PATIENT(S): Newborn infants and fetuses spontaneously aborted after 12 weeks of gestation...... to external stress factors, including climate changes....

  16. Inborn Errors of Metabolism That Cause Sudden Infant Death : A Systematic Review with Implications for Population Neonatal Screening Programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijt, Willemijn J.; Koolhaas, Geneviève D.; Bekhof, Jolita; Heiner Fokkema, M. Rebecca; de Koning, Tom J.; Visser, Gepke; Schielen, Peter C J I; van Spronsen, Francjan J.; Derks, Terry G J

    Background: Many inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) may present as sudden infant death (SID). Nowadays, increasing numbers of patients with IEMs are identified pre-symptomatically by population neonatal bloodspot screening (NBS) programmes. However, some patients escape early detection because their

  17. Inborn Errors of Metabolism That Cause Sudden Infant Death : A Systematic Review with Implications for Population Neonatal Screening Programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijt, Willemijn J.; Koolhaas, Genevieve D.; Bekhof, Jolita; Fokkema, M. Rebecca Heiner; de Koning, Tom J.; Visser, Gepke; Schielen, Peter C. J. I.; Spronsen, van FrancJan; Derks, Terry G. J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) may present as sudden infant death (SID). Nowadays, increasing numbers of patients with IEMs are identified pre-symptomatically by population neonatal bloodspot screening (NBS) programmes. However, some patients escape early detection because their

  18. Radiography after unexpected death in infants and children compared to autopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Charlotte de; Stake, Gunnar; Vege, Aashild

    2007-01-01

    Postmortem radiography may reveal skeletal and soft-tissue abnormalities of importance for the diagnosis of cause of death. To review the radiographs of children under 3 years of age who had died suddenly and unexpectedly. To compare the radiological and autopsy findings evaluating possible differences in children dying of SIDS and of an explainable cause. A total of 110 consecutive skeletal surveys performed between 1998 and 2002 were reviewed. All but one were performed before autopsy and comprised AP views of the appendicular and axial skeleton and thorax/abdomen, lateral views of the axial skeleton and thorax, and two oblique views of the ribs. Radiography and autopsy findings were compared. Causes of death were classified as SIDS/borderline SIDS (n = 52) and non-SIDS (n = 58), with one case of abuse. In 102 infants there were 150 pathological findings, 88 involving the chest, 24 skeletal, and 38 miscellaneous findings. The radiological-pathological agreement was poor concerning pulmonary findings. Skeletal findings were sometimes important for the final diagnosis. Radiography revealed many skeletal and soft-tissue findings. Pulmonary pathology was most frequently found, but showed poor agreement with autopsy findings. Recognizing skeletal findings related to abuse is important, as these may escape recognition at autopsy. (orig.)

  19. Neuroanatomical dysmorphology of the medial superior olivary nucleus in sudden fetal and infant death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Lavezzi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study expands our understanding of the organization of the human caudal pons, providing a morphologic characterization of the medial superior olivary nucleus, component of the superior olivary complex, that plays an important role in the processing of acoustic information.We examined victims of sudden unexplained fetal and infant death and controls (n=75, from 25 gestational weeks to 8 months of postnatal age, by complete autopsy and in-depth autonomic nervous system histological examination, particularly of the medial superior olivary nucleus, the focus of this study. Peculiar cytoarchitectural features of the medial superior olivary nucleus were found in sudden death cases, such as hypoplasia/agenesis and immature hypercellularity, frequently related to dysgenesis of contiguous structures involved in respiratory rhythm-generating circuit, in particular to hypoplasia of the retrotrapezoid and the facial nuclei. We propose the involvement of this nucleus in more important functions than those related to hearing, as breathing and, more extensively, all the vital activities. Besides, we highlight the fundamental role of the maternal smoking in pregnancy as etiological factor in the dysmorphic neuroanatomical development of the medial superior olivary nucleus.

  20. Mothers' and Clinicians' Priorities for Obesity Prevention Among Black, High-Risk Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virudachalam, Senbagam; Gruver, Rachel S; Gerdes, Marsha; Power, Thomas J; Magge, Sheela N; Shults, Justine; Faerber, Jennifer A; Kalra, Gurpreet K; Bishop-Gilyard, Chanelle T; Suh, Andrew W; Berkowitz, Robert I; Fiks, Alexander G

    2016-07-01

    Despite many recommended strategies for obesity prevention during infancy, effectively delivering recommendations to parents in clinical settings is challenging, especially among high-risk populations. This study describes and compares mothers' and clinicians' priorities for obesity prevention during infancy, to facilitate more-effective obesity prevention messaging. A discrete choice experiment using maximum difference scaling was administered in 2013 and analyzed in 2013-2014. Twenty-nine low-income, obese mothers of infants and 30 pediatric clinicians from three urban primary care practices rated the relative importance of 16 items relevant to obesity prevention during infancy, in response to this question: Which topic would be most helpful [for new mothers] to learn about to prevent your [their] child from becoming overweight? Response options encompassed the domains of feeding, sleep, parenting (including physical activity and screen time), and maternal self-care. Mothers (all Medicaid-enrolled and black; mean age, 27 years; mean BMI, 35 kg/m(2)) and clinicians (97% female, 87% pediatricians, 13% nurse practitioners) both highly prioritized recognizing infant satiety and hunger cues, and appropriate feeding volume. Mothers rated infant physical activity and maintaining regular routines as 3.5 times more important than clinicians did (pobese, black mothers of infants highly prioritized learning about many effective obesity prevention strategies, including recognizing hunger and satiety cues, promoting infant activity, and maintaining regular routines. Clinicians may frame preventive guidance to be responsive to these priorities. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sports and Marfan Syndrome: Awareness and Early Diagnosis Can Prevent Sudden Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Mubadda A.; Alpert, Bruce S.

    2001-01-01

    Physicians who work with athletes play an important role in preventing sudden death related to physical activity in people who have Marfan syndrome. Flagging those who have the physical stigmata and listening for certain cardiac auscultation sounds are early diagnostic keys that can help prevent deaths. People with Marfan syndrome should be…

  2. Effectiveness of Vaccination During Pregnancy to Prevent Infant Pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Roger; Bartlett, Joan; Fireman, Bruce; Lewis, Edwin; Klein, Nicola P

    2017-05-01

    Vaccination against pertussis during pregnancy is recommended to protect newborns, yet there is limited information about the effectiveness of maternal tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine before the first infant dose of diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine and during the first year of life in infants who have received DTaP. In a retrospective cohort study of infants born at Kaiser Permanente Northern California from 2010 to 2015, we estimated the effectiveness of maternal pertussis vaccination for protecting newborns against pertussis in the first 2 months of life and in the first year of life accounting for each infant DTaP dose. Among 148 981 newborns, the vaccine effectiveness of maternal Tdap was 91.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 19.5 to 99.1) during the first 2 months of life and 69.0% (95% CI, 43.6 to 82.9) during the entire first year of life. The vaccine effectiveness was 87.9% (95% CI, 41.4 to 97.5) before infants had any DTaP vaccine doses, 81.4% (95% CI, 42.5 to 94.0) between doses 1 and 2, 6.4% (95% CI, -165.1 to 66.9) between doses 2 and 3, and 65.9% (95% CI, 4.5 to 87.8) after infants had 3 DTaP doses. Maternal Tdap vaccination was highly protective against infant pertussis, especially in the first 2 months of life. Even after infant DTaP dosing, there was evidence of additional protection from maternal Tdap vaccination for the first year of life. This study strongly supports the United States' current recommendation to administer Tdap during each pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Gender inequities in curative and preventive health care use among infants in Bihar, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilms, Rohan J; McDougal, Lotus; Atmavilas, Yamini; Hay, Katherine; Triplett, Daniel P; Silverman, Jay; Raj, Anita

    2017-12-01

    India has the highest rate of excess female infant deaths in the world. Studies with decade-old data suggest gender inequities in infant health care seeking, but little new large-scale research has examined this issue. We assessed differences in health care utilization by sex of the child, using 2014 data for Bihar, India. This was a cross-sectional analysis of statewide representative survey data collected for a non-blinded maternal and child health evaluation study. Participants included mothers of living singleton infants (n = 11 570). Sex was the main exposure. Outcomes included neonatal illness, care seeking for neonatal illness, hospitalization, facility-based postnatal visits, immunizations, and postnatal home visits by frontline workers. Analyses were conducted via multiple logistic regression with survey weights. The estimated infant sex ratio was 863 females per 1000 males. Females had lower rates of reported neonatal illness (odds ratio (OR) = 0.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.6-0.9) and hospitalization during infancy (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.3-0.6). Girl neonates had a significantly lower odds of receiving care if ill (80.6% vs 89.1%; OR = 0.5; 95% CI = 0.3-0.8) and lower odds of having a postnatal checkup visit within one month of birth (5.4% vs 7.3%; OR = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.6-0.9). The gender inequity in care seeking was more profound at lower wealth and higher numbers of siblings. Gender differences in immunization and frontline worker visits were not seen. Girls in Bihar have lower odds than boys of receiving facility-based curative and preventive care, and this inequity may partially explain the persistent sex ratio imbalance and excess female mortality. Frontline worker home visits may offer a means of helping better support care for girls.

  4. National athletic trainers' association position statement: preventing sudden death in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casa, Douglas J; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Anderson, Scott A; Courson, Ronald W; Heck, Jonathan F; Jimenez, Carolyn C; McDermott, Brendon P; Miller, Michael G; Stearns, Rebecca L; Swartz, Erik E; Walsh, Katie M

    2012-01-01

    To present recommendations for the prevention and screening, recognition, and treatment of the most common conditions resulting in sudden death in organized sports. Cardiac conditions, head injuries, neck injuries, exertional heat stroke, exertional sickling, asthma, and other factors (eg, lightning, diabetes) are the most common causes of death in athletes. These guidelines are intended to provide relevant information on preventing sudden death in sports and to give specific recommendations for certified athletic trainers and others participating in athletic health care.

  5. Association of US State Implementation of Newborn Screening Policies for Critical Congenital Heart Disease With Early Infant Cardiac Deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouk, Rahi; Grosse, Scott D; Ailes, Elizabeth C; Oster, Matthew E

    2017-12-05

    In 2011, critical congenital heart disease was added to the US Recommended Uniform Screening Panel for newborns, but whether state implementation of screening policies has been associated with infant death rates is unknown. To assess whether there was an association between implementation of state newborn screening policies for critical congenital heart disease and infant death rates. Observational study with group-level analyses. A difference-in-differences analysis was conducted using the National Center for Health Statistics' period linked birth/infant death data set files for 2007-2013 for 26 546 503 US births through June 30, 2013, aggregated by month and state of birth. State policies were classified as mandatory or nonmandatory (including voluntary policies and mandates that were not yet implemented). As of June 1, 2013, 8 states had implemented mandatory screening policies, 5 states had voluntary screening policies, and 9 states had adopted but not yet implemented mandates. Numbers of early infant deaths (between 24 hours and 6 months of age) coded for critical congenital heart disease or other/unspecified congenital cardiac causes for each state-month birth cohort. Between 2007 and 2013, there were 2734 deaths due to critical congenital heart disease and 3967 deaths due to other/unspecified causes. Critical congenital heart disease death rates in states with mandatory screening policies were 8.0 (95% CI, 5.4-10.6) per 100 000 births (n = 37) in 2007 and 6.4 (95% CI, 2.9-9.9) per 100 000 births (n = 13) in 2013 (for births by the end of July); for other/unspecified cardiac causes, death rates were 11.7 (95% CI, 8.6-14.8) per 100 000 births in 2007 (n = 54) and 10.3 (95% CI, 5.9-14.8) per 100 000 births (n = 21) in 2013. Early infant deaths from critical congenital heart disease through December 31, 2013, decreased by 33.4% (95% CI, 10.6%-50.3%), with an absolute decline of 3.9 (95% CI, 3.6-4.1) deaths per 100 000 births after

  6. Low cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin levels during sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) risk period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancien, Marion; Inocente, Clara Odilia; Dauvilliers, Yves; Kugener, Beatrice; Scholz, Sabine; Raverot, Veronique; Lin, Jian-Sheng; Guyon, Aurore; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Franco, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    The temporal association between sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and sleep suggests that the arousability from sleep provides a protective mechanism for survival. Recently, the hypocretin system, which promotes wakefulness, has been implicated in SIDS, since it has been reported that SIDS victims have fewer hypocretin neurons than infants who have died from other causes. To understand the role of hypocretin in SIDS, it is essential to better understand how this system matures. The present study compared cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin in children aged 2-6 months, which is the age of peak incidence for SIDS, to both younger and older children. Hypocretin levels were measured in CSF samples from 101 children who underwent a clinically relevant lumbar puncture. Children were separated into five age groups: 0-2 months, 2-6 months, 1-5 years, 5-10 years, and 10-18 years. Hypocretin levels were not significantly different between 1-5 years, 5-10 years, and 10-18 years. Therefore, these three groups were pooled into a single one (1-18 years) for further analysis. Between the 0-2 month, 2-6 month, and 1-18 year groups, a significant difference in CSF hypocretin levels existed (p = 0.001). Simple comparisons showed that CSF hypocretin levels in the 2-6 month age group were significantly lower than hypocretin levels in both the 0-2 month and 1-18 year group (p hypocretin levels were lower at the age of peak incidence for SIDS. This could underlie an increased vulnerability to SIDS at this specific age. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Unnatural death: a major but largely preventable cause-of-death among homeless people?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slockers, Marcel T; Nusselder, Wilma J; Rietjens, Judith; van Beeck, Ed F

    2018-04-01

    We aimed to assess the contribution of specific causes-of-death to excess mortality of homeless persons and to identify differences in cause-specific mortality rates after vs. before implementing social policy measures. We conducted a register based 10-year follow-up study of homeless adults in Rotterdam and calculated the proportion of deaths by cause-of-death in this cohort in the period 2001-2010. We estimated cause-specific mortality among the homeless compared to the general population with Standardized Mortality Ratios. We calculated Hazard Ratios adjusted for age and sex to compare mortality rates by cause-of-death among the homeless in the period after (2006-2010) vs. before (2001-2005) implementing social policy measures. Our cohort consisted of 2130 homeless persons with a mean age of 40, 3 years. Unnatural death, cardiovascular disease and cancer were the main causes of death. Compared to the general population of Rotterdam, the homeless had an excess risk of death for all causes. The largest mortality differences with Rotterdam citizens were observed for unnatural death (SMR 14.8, CI 11.5-18.7), infectious diseases (SMR 10.0, CI 5.2-17.5) and psychiatric disorders (SMR 7.7, CI 4.0-13.5). Mortality due to intentional injuries (suicide and homicide) differed significantly between the two study periods (HR 0.45, CI 0.20-0.97). Reducing unnatural death should be a target in social policies aimed at improving the health of the homeless. We generated the hypothesis that social policies aimed at housing, work and improved contact with health care could be accompanied by less suicides and homicides within this vulnerable group.

  8. Moderately early (7-14 days) postnatal corticosteroids for preventing chronic lung disease in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, H L; Ehrenkranz, R A; Doyle, L W

    2003-01-01

    Corticosteroids have been used late in the neonatal period to treat chronic lung disease (CLD) in preterm babies, and early to try to prevent it. CLD is likely to be the result of persisting inflammation in the lung and the use of powerful anti-inflammatory drugs like dexamethasone has some rationale. Early use tends to be associated with increased adverse effects so that studies of moderately early treatment (7-14 days postnatal) might have the dual benefits of fewer side effects and onset of action before chronic inflammation is established. To determine if moderately early (7-14 days) postnatal corticosteroid treatment vs control (placebo or nothing) is of benefit in the prevention and/or treatment of early chronic lung disease in the preterm infant. Randomised controlled trials of postnatal corticosteroid therapy were sought from the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, Cochrane Database of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE (1966 - October 2002), hand searching paediatric and perinatal journals, examining previous review articles and information received from practicing neonatologists. Authors of all studies were contacted, where possible, to confirm details of reported follow-up studies, or to obtain any information about long-term follow-up where none had been reported. Randomised controlled trials of postnatal corticosteroid treatment from 7-14 days of birth in high risk preterm infants were selected for this review. Data regarding clinical outcomes including mortality, CLD (including late rescue with corticosteroids, or need for home oxygen therapy), death or CLD, failure to extubate, complications during the primary hospitalisation (including infection, hyperglycaemia, hypertension, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, pneumothorax, severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), gastrointestinal bleeding, and severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP)), and long term outcome (including blindness, deafness, cerebral palsy and major neurosensory

  9. Premature Cardiac Disease and Death in Women Whose Infant Was Preterm and Small for Gestational Age: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Orli; Park, Alison L; Cohen, Eyal; Fell, Deshayne B; Ray, Joel G

    2018-03-01

    Women with an infant with preterm birth (PTB) or who was severely small for gestational age (SGA) are at higher future risk of premature cardiovascular disease and related death. To determine the risk of cardiac disease or death among women with an infant with both PTB and SGA. This population-based cohort study used electronic health records from the province of Ontario, Canada, where health care is universally available, between April 1, 2002, and March 31, 2016. All singleton live births between 23 to 42 weeks' gestation among 710 501 nulliparous women aged 16 to 50 years without prepregnancy cardiac disease were analyzed. Risk of a composite outcome of heart failure, atrial or ventricular dysrhythmia, or all-cause mortality, starting 30 days after the index birth. Hazard ratios were adjusted for maternal age, income quintile, and preeclampsia/eclampsia (each at the index birth), as well as diabetes, chronic hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, drug dependence or smoking, and kidney disease (each within 24 months before the index birth date and time-varying from the birth date onward). Of 710 501 singleton live births, 15 082 mothers (2.1%) were older than age 40 years. Relative to having an infant without PTB or severe SGA (4.1 per 10 000 person-years), the incidence rate of the composite outcome of heart failure, dysrhythmia, or death was 11.3 per 10 000 person-years among mothers with an infant with PTB-SGA (crude hazard ratio, 2.79; 95% CI, 1.85-4.21) (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.09-2.52). Women who had an infant with PTB-SGA may be at higher future risk of premature cardiac disease or death.

  10. Postoperative hyperthermia, rhabdomyolysis, critical temperature, and death in a former premature infant after his ninth general anesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Aparna; Broadman, Lynn M; Brandom, Barbara W; Ozolek, John; Davis, Peter J

    2007-10-01

    An 8-mo-old infant born at 24-wk of gestation died unexpectedly 12 h after his ninth uneventful general anesthetic. Preoperatively, he required low-flow nasal oxygen due to bronchopulmonary dysplasia, chronic diuretic therapy, and IV alimentation. As planned preoperatively, the infant remained tracheally intubated after his elective surgery and went to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in stable condition. However, over the next 6 h, he developed fever. The diagnosis of postoperative sepsis was considered. One hour before his death his temperature reached 43 degrees C. Autopsy documented Duchenne's muscular dystrophy and renal tubules containing myoglobin.

  11. The effect of sociodemographic factors on infant mortality according to cause of death: a birth cohort in Seoul, Korea, 1999-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ji-Young; Lee, Jong-Tae

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of socioeconomic status and demographic factors on infant mortality, classified by cause of death, in a group of children born in Seoul, Korea during 1999-2003. Linked infant birth and death data were collected from the Korea National Statistical Office. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the effect of socioeconomic and demographic factors on infant mortality. The results were adjusted to take into account the infants' length of gestation and birth weight. Infant death rates from all causes tended to decrease as the parents' educational level increased. We observed a similar pattern for deaths from other specific causes. We also found higher mortality rates for mothers less than 20 years of age and over 35. Our analysis shows that socioeconomic and demographic factors affect infant mortality. In the case of postneonatal infant death, we confirmed that adequate follow-up care can reduce the risks of death from these acquired factors. This suggests that these are important factors to consider in reducing infant mortality.

  12. Child death reviews: a gold mine for injury prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwuachi-Saunders, C; Forjuoh, S N; West, P; Brooks, C

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how child death review teams can be used to prevent future deaths through retrospective, multiagency case analysis and recommendations for educational programs and policy change. A listing of all deaths to persons ages 21 years and younger in Philadelphia that occurred in 1995 was compiled by the Philadelphia Interdisciplinary Youth Fatality Review Team (PIYFRT), a multiagency, multidisciplinary, community based group created in 1993 with the mission to prevent future deaths through review, analysis, and initiation of corrective actions. Data were collected on demographic variables, as well as the circumstantial variables on injuries such as weapon type, alcohol and drug use, and contact with the criminal justice system, among others. Each case was reviewed thoroughly to determine whether or not the death was preventable. Selected injury related death cases were analyzed further by demographic and circumstantial variables. In 1995, 607 children ages 21 years and younger died in Philadelphia from natural causes (61.6%), unintentional injuries (16.3%), homicide (18.6%), suicide (2.3%), and undetermined causes (1.2%). More than a third (37.2%) of all deaths were considered preventable. Of the injury deaths (n=224), 95% were judged to be preventable. Preventable fire/burn injury deaths (n=29) were associated with lack of a smoke detector, nonsupervision of children, and faulty home appliances. Violent deaths were associated with substance abuse, gang involvement, chronic truancy, academic failure, and access to weapons. Relevant policies for these preventable or intervenable deaths are discussed such as use of non-battery powered smoke detectors.

  13. Animal models for assessment of infection and inflammation: contributions to elucidating the pathophysiology of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane eBlood-Siegfried

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS is still not well understood. It is a diagnosis of exclusion following the sudden and unexpected death of an infant. There are numerous theories about the etiology of SIDS but the exact cause or causes have never been pinpointed.Examination of theoretical pathologies might only be possible in animal models. Development of these models requires consideration of the genetic, developmental and environmental risk factors associated with SIDS, as they need to explain how the risk factors could contribute to the cause of death. These models were initially developed in common laboratory animals to test various hypotheses to explain these infant deaths - guinea pig, piglet, mouse, neonatal rabbit and neonatal rat. Currently there are growing numbers of researchers using genetically altered animals to examine specific areas of interest. This review describes the different systems and models developed to examine the diverse hypotheses for the cause of SIDS and their potential for defining a causal mechanism or mechanisms.

  14. CDC Vital Signs–Preventing Stroke Deaths

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-09-06

    This podcast is based on the September 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Each year, more than 140,000 people die and many survivors face disability. Eighty percent of strokes are preventable. Learn the signs of stroke and how to prevent them.  Created: 9/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/6/2017.

  15. Formulas containing hydrolysed protein for prevention of allergy and food intolerance in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, D A; Sinn, J

    2006-10-18

    Allergies and food reactions are common and may be associated with foods including adapted cow's milk formula. Formulas containing hydrolysed proteins have been used to treat infants with allergy or food intolerance. However, it is unclear whether hydrolysed formula can be advocated for prevention of allergy and food intolerance in infants without evidence of allergy or food intolerance. To determine the effect of feeding hydrolysed formulas on allergy and food intolerance in infants and children compared to adapted cow's milk or human breast milk. If hydrolysed formulas are effective, to determine what type of hydrolysed formula is most effective including extensively and partially hydrolysed formulas. To determine which infants benefit, including infants at low or high risk of allergy and infants receiving early, short term or prolonged formula feeding. The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. The review was updated with searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2006), MEDLINE (1966-March 2006), EMBASE (1980-March 2006) and CINAHL (1982-March 2006) and previous reviews including cross references. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials that compare the use of a hydrolysed infant formula to human milk or cow's milk formula. Trials with >80% follow up of participants were eligible for inclusion. Eligibility of studies for inclusion, methodological quality and data extraction were assessed independently by each review author. Primary outcomes included clinical allergy, specific allergies and food intolerance. Meta-analysis was conducted using a fixed effects model. Two trials compared early, short term hydrolysed formula to human milk feeding. No significant difference in infant allergy or childhood cow's milk allergy (CMA) were reported. No eligible trial compared prolonged hydrolysed formula to human milk feeding. Two trials compared early, short term hydrolysed

  16. Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Infants: Long-Tern Consequences and Modern Approaches for Prevention and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya G. Makarova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses modern ideas about the genesis of the most common variants of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID in infants, and their ability to lead to long-term negative consequences for the health of the child. The article provides data on role of intestinal microbiota in development of FGID in infants and current approaches to prevention and correction using probiotics with proven effectiveness. 

  17. Incidência da síndrome da morte súbita em coorte de lactentes The incidence of sudden death syndrome in a cohort of infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena T. C. Geib

    2006-02-01

    process of being adopted or had died before data collection. 2,411 children were included from the total of 2,634 live births and 2,285 (94.8% of these were followed-up. Data were obtained from the Live Births Information System (Sistema de Informações Sobre Nascidos Vivos, death registers, records of the Committee on Infant Mortality and from interviews with the social mother during home visits. Data collection instruments were adapted from previously validated forms. Data were analyzed on Epi-Info with descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Ten deaths were registered (0.4%. Four deaths of unknown causes could be included in sudden infant death syndrome category III. These deaths took place at home, between 4 and 6 months of age.The children slept on their sides, sharing a bed with adults, and had soft mattresses, pillows and diapers on the surface. They were the children of young mothers, smokers, with incomplete prenatal care and previous births from underprivileged economic classes. The incidence of suspicion of this syndrome was 1.75/ 1000. CONCLUSION: The incidence rate of suspected sudden infant death syndrome in Passo Fundo is comparable with the highest international coefficients, which suggests the need for vigilance and risk prevention measures.

  18. Effectiveness of Prenatal Versus Postpartum Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Acellular Pertussis Vaccination in Preventing Infant Pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Kathleen; Nickell, Steve; Powell, Michael; Harriman, Kathleen

    2017-01-01

     Most severe and fatal cases of pertussis occur in infants vaccine series. Women are recommended to receive tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine at the start of the third trimester of each pregnancy to optimize transplacental transfer of antibodies to the fetus. This recommendation was made by the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices based on immunogenicity data, and no studies in the United States have yet evaluated the effectiveness of this strategy in reducing pertussis incidence in infants.  We evaluated a cohort of mothers with documented Tdap vaccination histories in the California Immunization Registry to determine whether infants whose mothers received Tdap vaccine at 27-36 weeks gestation had a lower risk of pertussis at vaccine within 14 days post partum.  Tdap vaccination received at 27-36 weeks gestation was found to be 85% (95% confidence interval, 33%-98%) more effective than postpartum Tdap vaccination at preventing pertussis in infants Vaccination at 27-36 weeks gestation was more effective at preventing pertussis in infant than vaccination during the second trimester.  Tdap vaccination at 27-36 weeks gestation was 85% more effective than postpartum vaccination at preventing pertussis in infants vaccine to pregnant women during routine prenatal visits at the earliest opportunity between 27 and 36 weeks gestation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Association between early postnatal weight loss and death or BPD in small and appropriate for gestational age extremely low-birth-weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhawan, R; Oh, W; Perritt, R; Laptook, A R; Poole, K; Wright, L L; Fanaroff, A A; Duara, S; Stoll, B J; Goldberg, R

    2007-06-01

    To examine the association between weight loss during the first 10 days of life and the incidence of death or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in small for gestational age (SGA) and appropriate for gestational age (AGA) extremely low-birth-weight infants. This is a retrospective analysis of a cohort of ELBW (birth weight BPD, within each birth weight/gestation category (SGA or AGA). BPD and death were also analyzed separately in relation to EPWL. Logistic regression analysis was done to evaluate the risk of death or BPD in SGA and AGA groups, controlling for maternal and neonatal demographic and clinical factors found to be significant by univariate analysis. SGA ELBW infants had a lower prevalence of EPWL as compared with AGA ELBW infants (81.2 vs 93.7%, respectively, PBPD rate was lower in the group of infants with EPWL compared with infants without EPWL (53.4 vs 74.3%, respectively, PBPD (47.2 vs 64%, PBPD (OR 0.47, 95% CI: 0.37-0.60). In SGA infants, on univariate analysis, a similar association between EPWL and outcomes was seen as shown in AGA infants: death or BPD (55.9 vs 75.2%, PBPD rate (48.3 vs 62.1%, P=0.002) and rate death (19 vs 40.8%, PBPD (OR 0.60, 95% CI: 0.41-0.89) among SGA infants. SGA infants experienced less EPWL when compared with their AGA counterparts. EPWL was associated with a lower risk of death or BPD in both ELBW AGA and SGA infants. These data suggest that clinicians who consider the association between EPWL and risk of death or BPD should do so independent of gestation/birth weight status.

  20. Interactions of infectious symptoms and modifiable risk factors in sudden infant death syndrome. The Nordic Epidemiological SIDS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, K; Banner, Jytte; Oyen, N

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of infection on sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and to analyse whether modifiable risk factors of SIDS, prone sleeping, covered head and smoking act as effect modifiers. In a consecutive multicentre case-control study of SIDS in Denmark, Norway......, prone sleeping, head covered or parental smoking, was far greater than the sum of each individual factor. These risk factors thus modify the dangerousness of infection in infancy....

  1. Vitamin A supplementation to prevent mortality and short- and long-term morbidity in very low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlow, Brian A; Graham, P J; Rojas-Reyes, Maria Ximena

    2016-08-22

    control and one (120 infants) compared different regimens of vitamin A supplementation. Compared to the control group, vitamin A appeared to have a small benefit in reducing the risk of death or oxygen requirement at one month of age (typical RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.88 to 0.99; typical RD -0.05, 95% CI -0.10 to -0.01; NNTB 20, 95% CI 10 to 100; 6 studies, 1165 infants) and the risk of chronic lung disease (oxygen requirement) at 36 weeks' postmenstrual age (typical RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.77 to 0.99; typical RD -0.07, 95% CI -0.13 to -0.01; NNTB 11, 95% CI 6 to 100; 5 studies, 986 infants) (moderate-quality evidence). There was a marginal reduction of the combined outcome of death or chronic lung disease (typical RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.01; typical RD -0.05, 95% CI -0.11 to 0.01; 4 studies, 1089 infants). Neurodevelopmental assessment of 88% of the surviving infants in the largest trial showed no difference between the groups at 18 to 22 months of age, corrected for prematurity (low-quality evidence). There is no evidence to support different vitamin A dosing regimens. No adverse effects of vitamin A supplementation were reported, but it was noted that intramuscular injections of vitamin A were painful. Whether clinicians decide to utilise repeat intramuscular doses of vitamin A to prevent chronic lung disease may depend upon the local incidence of this outcome and the value attached to achieving a modest reduction in the outcome balanced against the lack of other proven benefits and the acceptability of the treatment. Information on long-term neurodevelopmental status suggests no evidence of either benefit or harm from the intervention.

  2. Umbilical cord antiseptics for preventing sepsis and death among newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imdad, Aamer; Bautista, Resti Ma M; Senen, Kathlynne Anne A; Uy, Ma Esterlita V; Mantaring, Jacinto Blas; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2013-05-31

    The umbilical cord is a structure made of blood vessels and connective tissue that connects the baby and placenta in utero. The umbilical cord is cut after birth, which separates the mother and her baby both physically and symbolically. Omphalitis is defined as infection of the umbilical cord stump. Tracking of bacteria along the umbilical vessels may lead to septicaemia that can result in neonatal morbidity and mortality, especially in developing countries. To determine the effect of application of antimicrobials on newborn's umbilical cord versus routine care for prevention of morbidity and mortality in hospital and community settings. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (1 October 2012). In addition, we also searched LILACS (1982 to 11 October 2012) and HERDIN NeON (October 2012) We included randomized, cluster-randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of topical cord care compared with no topical care, and comparisons between different forms of care. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion, trial quality and subsequently extracted data. Data were checked for accuracy. The search identified 77 trials. We included 34 trials in the review involving 69,338 babies, five studies are awaiting classification and there are two ongoing community trials. Included studies were conducted in both developed and developing countries. Among the 34 included trials, three were large, cluster-randomized trials conducted in community settings in developing countries and 31 studies were conducted in hospital settings mostly in developed countries. Data for community and hospital studies were analyzed separately. The three trials conducted in community settings contributed 78% of the total number of children included in this review. Of the trials conducted in hospital settings, the majority had small sample sizes. There were 22 different interventions studied across the included trials and the most commonly studied

  3. Primary prevention of food allergy in infants who are at risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Arne; Halken, Susanne

    2005-01-01

    on primary prevention of food allergy. RECENT FINDINGS: In prospective observational controlled studies of high quality of birth cohorts, exclusive breastfeeding for at least 4 months combined with introduction of solid foods after 4 months of age is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy and atopic...... dermatitis, particularly in high-risk infants. When breastfeeding for 4-6 months is not possible or insufficient, randomized controlled trials have shown a significant reduction in food allergy and atopic dermatitis in high-risk infants fed a documented hypoallergenic hydrolysed formula. SUMMARY......: Breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented hypoallergenic hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusively breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months. As regards primary prevention of food allergy there is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention during...

  4. Effects of local extrinsic mortality rate, crime and sex ratio on preventable death in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uggla, Caroline; Mace, Ruth

    2015-09-03

    Individual investment in health varies greatly within populations and results in significant differences in the risk of preventable death. Life history theory predicts that individuals should alter their investment in health (somatic maintenance) in response to ecological cues that shift the perceived fitness payoffs to such investments. However, previous research has failed to isolate the effects of different ecological factors on preventable death, and has often relied on macro-level data without individual controls. Here, we test some key predictions concerning the local ecology-that higher extrinsic mortality rate (EMR), crime rate and mate-scarcity (male/female-biased sex ratio) at the ward-level-will be associated with a higher risk of preventable death. We use census-based data from Northern Ireland (n = 927 150) on preventable death during an 8.7-year period from the 2001 Census and run Cox regressions for (i) accident/suicide or alcohol-related death and (ii) deaths from preventable diseases, for men and women separately, controlling for a wide range of individual variables. We find evidence of ward-level EMR and crime rate being positively associated with preventable death among men, particularly men with low socioeconomic position. There was a tentative relationship between male-biased sex ratio and preventable death among women, but not among men. Both behaviours that might lead to 'risky' death and health neglect might be adaptive responses to local ecologies. Efforts to reduce crime might be as effective as those to reduce extrinsic mortality, and both could have positive effects on various health behaviours. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Foundation for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health.

  5. [Prevention of sudden death during sport activity in view of new recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovová, E

    2013-05-01

    The study deals with the prevention of sudden death in sportsmen. It analyzes the influence of ECG examination on reducing the risk of sudden death. It presents new recommendations for ECG assessment in sportsmen and a new algorithm for examination of middle- aged and senior subjects.

  6. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Risk for Sudden Unexpected Infant Death in Children of Adolescent Mothers: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, Michelle; Shimasaki, Suzuho; Johnston, Katherine; Tung, Gregory; Albright, Karen; Halbower, Ann C

    2016-07-01

    To investigate practices, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding infant sleep among adolescent mothers, a demographic at high risk for sudden unexpected infant death, and to identify novel public health interventions targeting the particular reasons of this population. Seven targeted focus groups including 43 adolescent mothers were conducted at high school daycare centers throughout Colorado. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed, validated, and then analyzed in NVivo 10. Validation included coding consistency statistics and expert review. Most mothers knew many of the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations for infant sleep. However, almost all teens reported bedsharing regularly and used loose blankets or soft bedding despite being informed of risks. Reasons for nonadherence to recommendations included beliefs that babies are safest and sleep more/better in bed with them, that bedsharing is a bonding opportunity, and that bedsharing is easier than using a separate sleep space. The most common justifications for blankets were infant comfort and concern that babies were cold. Participants' decision making was often influenced by their own mothers, with whom they often resided. Participants felt that their instincts trumped professional advice, even when in direct contradiction to safe sleep recommendations. Among focus group participants, adherence with safe sleep practices was poor despite awareness of the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations. Many mothers expressed beliefs and instincts that infants were safe in various unsafe sleep environments. Future study should investigate the efficacy of alternative educational strategies, including education of grandmothers, who have significant influence over adolescent mothers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Place of Residence Moderates the Risk of Infant Death in Kenya: Evidence from the Most Recent Census 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruebner, Oliver; Lautenbach, Sven; Khan, M M H; Kipruto, Samuel; Epprecht, Michael; Galea, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in reducing childhood mortality worldwide from 1990-2015 (Millennium Development Goal, target 4). Achieving target goals on this however remains a challenge in Sub-Saharan Africa. Kenya's infant mortality rates are higher than the global average and are more pronounced in urban areas as compared to rural areas. Only limited knowledge exists about the differences in individual level risk factors for infant death among rural, non-slum urban, and slum areas in Kenya. Therefore, this paper aims at 1) assess individual and socio-ecological risk factors for infant death in Kenya, and at 2) identify whether living in rural, non-slum urban, or slum areas moderated individual or socio-ecological risk factors for infant death in Kenya. We used a cross-sectional study design based on the most recent Kenya Population and Housing Census of 2009 and extracted the records of all females who had their last child born in 12 months preceding the survey (N = 1,120,960). Multivariable regression analyses were used to identify risk factors that accounted for the risk of dying before the age of one at the individual level in Kenya. Place of residence (rural, non-slum urban, slum) was used as an interaction term to account for moderating effects in individual and socio-ecological risk factors. Individual characteristics of mothers and children (older age, less previously born children that died, better education, girl infants) and household contexts (better structural quality of housing, improved water and sanitation, married household head) were associated with lower risk for infant death in Kenya. Living in non-slum urban areas was associated with significantly lower infant death as compared to living in rural or slum areas, when all predictors were held at their reference levels. Moreover, place of residence was significantly moderating individual level predictors: As compared to rural areas, living in urban areas was a protective factor for mothers

  8. Place of Residence Moderates the Risk of Infant Death in Kenya: Evidence from the Most Recent Census 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Gruebner

    Full Text Available Substantial progress has been made in reducing childhood mortality worldwide from 1990-2015 (Millennium Development Goal, target 4. Achieving target goals on this however remains a challenge in Sub-Saharan Africa. Kenya's infant mortality rates are higher than the global average and are more pronounced in urban areas as compared to rural areas. Only limited knowledge exists about the differences in individual level risk factors for infant death among rural, non-slum urban, and slum areas in Kenya. Therefore, this paper aims at 1 assess individual and socio-ecological risk factors for infant death in Kenya, and at 2 identify whether living in rural, non-slum urban, or slum areas moderated individual or socio-ecological risk factors for infant death in Kenya.We used a cross-sectional study design based on the most recent Kenya Population and Housing Census of 2009 and extracted the records of all females who had their last child born in 12 months preceding the survey (N = 1,120,960. Multivariable regression analyses were used to identify risk factors that accounted for the risk of dying before the age of one at the individual level in Kenya. Place of residence (rural, non-slum urban, slum was used as an interaction term to account for moderating effects in individual and socio-ecological risk factors.Individual characteristics of mothers and children (older age, less previously born children that died, better education, girl infants and household contexts (better structural quality of housing, improved water and sanitation, married household head were associated with lower risk for infant death in Kenya. Living in non-slum urban areas was associated with significantly lower infant death as compared to living in rural or slum areas, when all predictors were held at their reference levels. Moreover, place of residence was significantly moderating individual level predictors: As compared to rural areas, living in urban areas was a protective factor

  9. Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  10. Finger injuries from infant mittens; a continuing but preventable hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, M D; Seymour, P

    1996-04-01

    During the last 4 years, three infants have presented with finger-tip injuries secondary to entrapment in woollen/synthetic mittens. The accident happened at home in one case but the other two occurred in different neonatal units. Spontaneous amputation of the terminal phalanx of the index finger occurred in two patients but in the other there was complete healing. This problem may be avoided by restricting the use of mittens, by changing their design, and by a greater awareness of this hazard.

  11. Prevention and Management of Cow's Milk Allergy in Non-Exclusively Breastfed Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Yvan

    2017-07-10

    Introduction: The prevention and management of cow milk allergy (CMA) is still debated. Since CMA is much less frequent in breastfed infants, breastfeeding should be stimulated. Method: Literature was searched using databases to find original papers and reviews on this topic. Results: Hydrolysates with a clinical proof of efficacy are recommended in the prevention and treatment of CMA. However, not all meta-analyses conclude that hydrolysates do prevent CMA or other atopic manifestations such as atopic dermatitis. There are pros and cons to consider partially hydrolysed protein as an option for starter infant formula for each non-exclusively breastfed infant. A challenge test is still recommended as the most specific and sensitive diagnostic test, although a positive challenge test does not proof that the immune system is involved. The Cow Milk Symptom Score (CoMiSS™) is an awareness tool that enables healthcare professionals to better recognize symptoms related to the ingestion of cow milk, but it still needs validation as diagnostic tool. The current recommended elimination diet is a cow milk based extensive hydrolysate, although rice hydrolysates or soy infant formula can be considered in some cases. About 10 to 15% of infants allergic to cow milk will also react to soy. Mainly because of the higher cost, amino acid based formula is reserved for severe cases. There is no place for infant formula with intact protein from other animals as cross-over allergenicity is high. During recent years, attention focused also on the bifidogenic effect of prebiotics and more recently also on human milk oligosaccharides. A bifidogenic gastrointestinal microbiome may decrease the risk to develop allergic disease. The addition of probiotics and prebiotics to the elimination diet in treatment may enhance the development of tolerance development. Conclusion: Breastfeeding is the best way to feed infants. Cow milk based extensive hydrolysates remain the first option for the

  12. Brain iron accumulation in unexplained fetal and infant death victims with smoker mothers-The possible involvement of maternal methemoglobinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corna Melissa F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron is involved in important vital functions as an essential component of the oxygen-transporting heme mechanism. In this study we aimed to evaluate whether oxidative metabolites from maternal cigarette smoke could affect iron homeostasis in the brain of victims of sudden unexplained fetal and infant death, maybe through the induction of maternal hemoglobin damage, such as in case of methemoglobinemia. Methods Histochemical investigations by Prussian blue reaction were made on brain nonheme ferric iron deposits, gaining detailed data on their localization in the brainstem and cerebellum of victims of sudden death and controls. The Gless and Marsland's modification of Bielschowsky's was used to identify neuronal cell bodies and neurofilaments. Results Our approach highlighted accumulations of blue granulations, indicative of iron positive reactions, in the brainstem and cerebellum of 33% of victims of sudden death and in none of the control group. The modified Bielschowsky's method confirmed that the cells with iron accumulations were neuronal cells. Conclusions We propose that the free iron deposition in the brain of sudden fetal and infant death victims could be a catabolic product of maternal methemoglobinemia, a biomarker of oxidative stress likely due to nicotine absorption.

  13. Death matters: understanding heroin/opiate overdose risk and testing potential to prevent deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, John

    2015-07-01

    To describe work undertaken over a 20-year period, investigating overdose characteristics among survivors, effects of acute heroin administration, clustering of risk of overdose fatality and potential interventions to reduce this fatal outcome. Privileged-access interviewers obtained data from non-treatment as well as treatment samples; experimental study of drop in oxygen saturation following heroin/opiate injection; investigation of clusterings of death following prison release and treatment termination; and study of target populations as intervention work-force, including family as well as peers, and action research built into pilot implementation. Overdose has been experienced by about half of heroin/opiate misusers, with even higher proportions having witnessed an overdose, and with high levels of willingness to intervene. Heroin/opiates are associated with the majority of drug-related deaths, despite relative scarcity of use. Heroin injection causes a rapid drop in oxygen saturation, recovering only slowly over the next half hour. Deaths from drug overdose are greatly more likely on prison release and post-discharge from detoxification and other in-patient or residential settings. High levels of declared willingness to intervene are matched by active interventions. Both drug-using peers and family members show ability to improve knowledge and gain confidence from training. Audit study of take-home schemes finds approximately 10% of dispensed naloxone is used in real-life emergency situations. Overdose is experienced by most users, with heroin/opiates contributing disproportionately to drug overdose deaths. High-risk times (e.g. after prison release) are now clearly identified. Peers and family are a willing potential intervention work-force, but are rarely trained or given pre-supply of naloxone. Large-scale naloxone provision (e.g. national across Scotland and Wales) is now being delivered, while large-scale randomized trials (e.g. N-ALIVE prison

  14. Community response to intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in infants (IPTi in Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senn Nicolas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Building on previous acceptability research undertaken in sub-Saharan Africa this article aims to investigate the acceptability of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in infants (IPTi in Papua New Guinea (PNG. Methods A questionnaire was administered to mothers whose infants participated in the randomised placebo controlled trial of IPTi. Mothers whose infants participated and who refused to participate in the trial, health workers, community reporters and opinion leaders were interviewed. Men and women from the local community also participated in focus group discussions. Results Respondents viewed IPTi as acceptable in light of wider concern for infant health and the advantages of trial participation. Mothers reported complying with at-home administration of IPTi due to perceived benefits of IPTi and pressure from health workers. In spite of patchy knowledge, respondents also demonstrated a demand for infant vaccinations and considered non-vaccination to be neglect. There is little evidence that IPTi has negative impacts on attitudes to EPI, EPI adherence or existing malaria prevention practices. Conclusion The degree of similarity between findings from the acceptability studies undertaken in sub-Saharan Africa and PNG allows some generalization relating to the implementation of IPTi outside of Africa: IPTi fits well with local health cultures, appears to be accepted easily and has little impact on attitudes towards EPI or malaria prevention. The study adds to the evidence indicating that IPTi could be rolled out in a range of social and cultural contexts.

  15. Evaluation of an infant simulator intervention for teen pregnancy prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrman, Judith W; Waterhouse, Julie K; Chiquoine, Julie

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of simulation as a strategy to influence teens' perceptions of pregnancy and parenting. This pilot study was a preexperimental, one group pre/posttest design. The school-based wellness center of a high school was the setting for the weekly sessions and the pre/posttest administration. Sample members participated in 6 weekly Baby Think it Over (BTIO) classes and an infant simulator experience. The final sample included 79 teens age 14 to 18 years who attended one of eight BTIO sessions. We used the Thoughts on Teen Parenting Survey (TTPS) to assess the perceptions of teens with regard to the costs and rewards associated with teen parenting. The TTPS yields a composite score of the teen attitudes toward the teen parenting experience and eight subscale scores that assess different areas of teen life. No significant differences were found in the mean pre/posttest scores or in correlations of the demographic data and mean scores. Two significant differences in pre/posttest subscale scores were in the areas of friends and personal characteristics. The results of this study suggest that the effectiveness of using infant simulators to influence the perceptions of teens about the reality of teen parenting is minimal. © 2011 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  16. Comparing primary prevention with secondary prevention to explain decreasing coronary heart disease death rates in Ireland, 1985-2000.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kabir, Zubair

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate whether primary prevention might be more favourable than secondary prevention (risk factor reduction in patients with coronary heart disease(CHD)). METHODS: The cell-based IMPACT CHD mortality model was used to integrate data for Ireland describing CHD patient numbers, uptake of specific treatments, trends in major cardiovascular risk factors, and the mortality benefits of these specific risk factor changes in CHD patients and in healthy people without recognised CHD. RESULTS: Between 1985 and 2000, approximately 2,530 fewer deaths were attributable to reductions in the three major risk factors in Ireland. Overall smoking prevalence declined by 14% between 1985 and 2000, resulting in about 685 fewer deaths (minimum estimate 330, maximum estimate 1,285) attributable to smoking cessation: about 275 in healthy people and 410 in known CHD patients. Population total cholesterol concentrations fell by 4.6%, resulting in approximately 1,300 (minimum estimate 1,115, maximum estimate 1,660) fewer deaths attributable to dietary changes(1,185 in healthy people and 115 in CHD patients) plus 305 fewer deaths attributable to statin treatment (45 in people without CHD and 260 in CHD patients). Mean population diastolic blood pressure fell by 7.2%, resulting in approximately 170 (minimum estimate 105, maximum estimate 300) fewer deaths attributable to secular falls in blood pressure (140 in healthy people and 30 in CHD patients), plus approximately 70 fewer deaths attributable to antihypertensive treatments in people without CHD. Of all the deaths attributable to risk factor falls, some 1,715 (68%) occurred in people without recognized CHD and 815(32%) in CHD patients. CONCLUSION: Compared with secondary prevention, primary prevention achieved a two-fold larger reduction in CHD deaths. Future national CHD policies should therefore prioritize nationwide interventions to promote healthy diets and reduce smoking.

  17. Sustainability of the prevention of passive infant smoking within well-baby clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crone, MR; Verlaan, M; Willemsen, MC; van Soelen, P; Reijneveld, SA; Sing, RAH; Paulussen, TGWA

    This study assessed the antecedents of continued use of an education program to prevent passive smoking in infants. It consists of a booklet for parents and a manual for health professionals describing a five-step procedure for discussing passive smoking. A questionnaire was sent to 67 managers, 670

  18. Dietary prevention of allergic diseases in infants and small children. Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muraro, Antonella; Dreborg, Sten; Halken, Susanne

    2004-01-01

    . Sensitization to food allergens occurs in the first year of life and cow's milk allergy is the first food allergy to appear in the susceptible infants. Hypoallergenicity of food formulas to be used is a critical issue both for treatment of cow's milk-allergic children and for prevention. Methods to document...

  19. Sustainability of the prevention of passive infant smoking within well-baby clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crone, M.R.; Verlaan, M.; Willemsen, M.C.; Soelen, P. van; Reijneveld, S.A.; Sing, R.A.H.; Paulussen, T.G.W.M.

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the antecedents of continued use of an education program to prevent passive smoking in infants. It consists of a booklet for parents and a manual for health professionals describing a five-step procedure for discussing passive smoking. Aquestionnairewas sent to 67 managers, 670

  20. Disruption of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF immunoreactivity in the human Kölliker-Fuse nucleus in victims of unexplained fetal and infant death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Lavezzi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies have demonstrated that the neurotrophin brain-derived neutrophic factor (BDNF is required for the appropriate development of the central respiratory network, a neuronal complex in the brainstem of vital importance to sustaining life. The pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KFN is a fundamental component of this circuitry with strong implications in the pre- and postnatal breathing control. This study provides detailed account for the cytoarchitecture, the physiology and the BDNF behaviour of the human KFN in perinatal age. We applied immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded brainstem samples (from 45 fetuses and newborns died of both known and unknown causes, to analyze BDNF, gliosis and apoptosis patterns of manifestation. The KFN showed clear signs of developmental immaturity, prevalently associated to BDNF altered expression, in high percentages of sudden intrauterine unexplained death syndrome (SIUDS and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS victims. Our results indicate that BDNF pathway dysfunctions can derange the normal KFN development so preventing the breathing control in the sudden perinatal death.The data presented here are also relevant to a better understanding of how the BDNF expression in the KFN can be involved in several human respiratory pathologies such as the Rett’s and the congenital central hypoventilation syndromes.

  1. Preventable trauma deaths: from panel review to population based-studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesconi Sergio

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Preventable trauma deaths are defined as deaths which could be avoided if optimal care has been delivered. Studies on preventable trauma deaths have been accomplished initially with panel reviews of pre-hospital and hospital charts. However, several investigators questioned the reliability and validity of this method because of low reproducibility of implicit judgments when they are made by different experts. Nevertheless, number of studies were published all around the world and ultimately gained some credibility, particularly in regions where comparisons were made before and after trauma system implementation with a resultant fall in mortality. During the last decade of century the method of comparing observed survival with probability of survival calculated from large trauma registries has obtained popularity. Preventable trauma deaths were identified as deaths occurred notwithstanding a high calculated probability of survival. In recent years, preventable trauma deaths studies have been replaced by population-based studies, which use databases representative of overall population, therefore with high epidemiologic value. These databases contain readily available information which carry out the advantage of objectivity and large numbers. Nowadays, population-based researches provide the strongest evidence regarding the effectiveness of trauma systems and trauma centers on patient outcomes.

  2. Advice about infant feeding for allergy prevention: A confusing picture for Australian consumers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netting, Merryn J; Allen, Katrina J

    2017-09-01

    Early feeding plays an important role in programming the immune system, particularly the risk of food allergy. There are many infant feeding guides published for consumers available in Australia, with most based on the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) 2012 Infant Feeding Guidelines for Health Workers and the Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA) Infant Feeding Advice for allergy prevention. We sought to compare allergy-specific content of infant feeding educational material written for parents with these two documents. Australian websites of children's hospitals, early child health organisations and consumer groups providing information about diet during pregnancy, breastfeeding and early infancy were compared with NHMRC and ASCIA guidelines. Twenty-five sets of infant feeding information were identified. Food allergy was discussed in 18 resources. Recommended length of exclusive breastfeeding and timing of commencing solid foods was consistently around 6 months, with some variation in wording. Advice regarding to include and not delay introduction of common allergens into babies' diets was generally consistent with NHMRC and ASCIA recommendations, however the audit identified some resources that still recommended delayed introduction of common allergens. As consumers have access to a plethora of health information it is imperative that information about infant feeding from health-care authorities is simple, evidence-based and consistent to avoid confusion. Use of consensus wording related to infant feeding guidelines to prevent allergies will provide clear messages related to the timing of introduction to solid foods and inclusion of allergens in the early diet. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  3. Heat stress and sudden infant death syndrome--stress gene expression after exposure to moderate heat stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Marianne Cathrine; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Hansen, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    time points measured, and may be less related to heat stress. Being found dead in the prone position (a known risk factor for SIDS) was related to a lower HSPA1B up-regulation in SIDS compared to SIDS found on their side or back. The study demonstrates the potential usefulness of gene expression......The aim of the present study was to investigate stress gene expression in cultured primary fibroblasts established from Achilles tendons collected during autopsies from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) cases, and age-matched controls (infants dying in a traumatic event). Expression of 4 stress...... responsive genes, HSPA1B, HSPD1, HMOX1, and SOD2, was studied by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of RNA purified from cells cultured under standard or various thermal stress conditions. The expression of all 4 genes was highly influenced by thermal stress in both SIDS and control cells. High...

  4. Comparison of animal-derived surfactants for the prevention and treatment of respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neetu; Halliday, Henry L; Stevens, Timothy P; Suresh, Gautham; Soll, Roger; Rojas-Reyes, Maria Ximena

    2015-12-21

    lavage surfactant extract to modified bovine minced lung surfactant extract. The meta-analysis did not demonstrate any significant differences in death or chronic lung disease in the prevention trials (typical RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.17; typical RD 0.01, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.06; 2 studies and 1123 infants; high quality evidence) or treatment trials (typical RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.06; typical RD -0.02 , 95% CI -0.06 to 0.02; 3 studies and 2009 infants; high quality evidence) Modified bovine minced lung surfactant extract compared with porcine minced lung surfactant extract: Nine treatment studies compared modified bovine minced lung surfactant extract to porcine minced lung surfactant extract. Meta-analysis of these trials demonstrate a significant increase in the risk of mortality prior to hospital discharge (typical RR 1.44, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.00; typical RD 0.05, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.10; NNTH 20, 95% CI 10 to 100; 9 studies and 901 infants; moderate quality evidence), death or oxygen requirement at 36 weeks' postmenstrual age (typical RR 1.30, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.64; typical RD 0.11, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.20; NNTH 9, 95% CI 5 to 50; 3 studies and 448 infants; moderate quality evidence), receiving more than one dose of surfactant (typical RR 1.57, 95% CI 1.29 to 1.92; typical RD 0.14, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.20; NNTH 7, 95% CI 5 to 13; 6 studies and 786 infants), and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) requiring treatment (typical RR 1.86, 95% CI 1.28 to 2.70; typical RD 0.28, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.43; NNTH 4, 95% CI 2 to 8; 3 studies and 137 infants) in infants treated with modified bovine minced lung surfactant extract compared with porcine minced lung surfactant extract. In the subgroup analysis based on initial dose of surfactant, improvement in mortality prior to discharge (typical RR 1.62, 95% CI 1.11 to 2.38; typical RD 0.06, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.11; NNTH 16, 95% CI 9 to 100) and risk of death or oxygen requirement at 36 weeks' postmenstrual age (typical RR 1.39, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.79; typical RD

  5. Mutations in Genes Encoding Cardiac Ion Channels Previously Associated With Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Are Present With High Frequency in New Exome Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Charlotte Hartig; Refsgaard, Lena; Nielsen, Jonas B

    2013-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death in the first 6 months after birth in the industrialized world. The genetic contribution to SIDS has been investigated intensively and to date, 14 cardiac channelopathy genes have been associated with SIDS. Newly published data from...

  6. Prospects for preventing infant invasive GBS disease through maternal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhi, Shabir A; Dangor, Ziyaad

    2017-08-16

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal sepsis, with the highest incidence (1.3 per 1000 live births) reported from Africa. Although the incidence of invasive GBS disease is reportedly low in South Asia, there is disconnect between prevalence of maternal recto-vaginal colonization and the incidence of early-onset disease (EOD). This is possibly due to case-ascertainment biases that omit investigation of newborns dying on day-0 of life, which accounts for >90% of EOD. Furthermore, GBS is associated with approximately 15% of all infection related stillbirths. Vaccination of pregnant women with a serotype-specific polysaccharide epitope vaccine could possibly protect against EOD and late-onset disease (LOD) in their infants through transplacental transfer of serotype-specific capsular antibody. Furthermore, vaccination of pregnant women might also protect against impaired neurodevelopment following GBS associated neonatal sepsis, and fetal loss/stillbirths. Licensure of a GBS vaccine might be feasible based on safety evaluation and a sero-correlate of protection, with vaccine effectiveness subsequently being demonstrated in phase IV studies. A randomized-controlled trial would, however, be best suited as a vaccine-probe to fully characterize the contribution of GBS to neonatal sepsis associated morbidity and mortality and adverse fetal outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. VITAMIN DEFICIENCY IN CHILDREN: MAIN CAUSES, FORMS, AND MEANS OF PREVENTION IN INFANTS AND PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.Yu. Volkova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture deals with the main causes of development of hypo vitaminoses in infants and preschool children, with the emphasis made on the lack of pathognomonic signs of vitamin in sufficiency, showing the demands for the essential vitamins, and describing the natural sources of their entering the human body. The authors compare the composition of various multivitamin preparations registered in Russian the liquid dosage form convenient for use in 1ctoc7cyearcold children.Key words: avitaminosis, hypovitaminosis, prevention, infants, children.

  8. Post-mortem whole-exome analysis in a large sudden infant death syndrome cohort with a focus on cardiovascular and metabolic genetic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Jacqueline; Lecca, Maria Rita; Russo, Giancarlo; Bartsch, Christine; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Berger, Wolfgang; Haas, Cordula

    2017-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is described as the sudden and unexplained death of an apparently healthy infant younger than one year of age. Genetic studies indicate that up to 35% of SIDS cases might be explained by familial or genetic diseases such as cardiomyopathies, ion channelopathies or metabolic disorders that remained undetected during conventional forensic autopsy procedures. Post-mortem genetic testing by using massive parallel sequencing (MPS) approaches represents an efficient and rapid tool to further investigate unexplained death cases and might help to elucidate pathogenic genetic variants and mechanisms in cases without a conclusive cause of death. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in 161 European SIDS infants with focus on 192 genes associated with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Potentially causative variants were detected in 20% of the SIDS cases. The majority of infants had variants with likely functional effects in genes associated with channelopathies (9%), followed by cardiomyopathies (7%) and metabolic diseases (1%). Although lethal arrhythmia represents the most plausible and likely cause of death, the majority of SIDS cases still remains elusive and might be explained by a multifactorial etiology, triggered by a combination of different genetic and environmental risk factors. As WES is not substantially more expensive than a targeted sequencing approach, it represents an unbiased screening of the exome, which could help to investigate different pathogenic mechanisms within the genetically heterogeneous SIDS cohort. Additionally, re-analysis of the datasets provides the basis to identify new candidate genes in sudden infant death. PMID:28074886

  9. Proteomic MALDI-TOF/TOF-IMS examination of peptide expression in the formalin fixed brainstem and changes in sudden infant death syndrome infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Nicholas J; Phillips, Leo; Waters, Karen A; Machaalani, Rita

    2016-04-14

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) has not previously been utilised to examine sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). This study aimed to optimise MALDI IMS for use on archived formalin-fixed-paraffin-embedded human infant medulla tissue (n=6, controls; n=6, SIDS) to evaluate differences between multiple nuclei of the medulla by using high resolution IMS. Profiles were compared between SIDS and age/sex matched controls. LC-MALDI identified 55 proteins based on 321 peptides across all samples; 286 peaks were found using IMS, corresponding to these 55 proteins that were directly compared between controls and SIDS. Control samples were used to identify common peptides for neuronal/non-neuronal structures allowing identification of medullary regions. In SIDS, abnormal expression patterns of 41 peptides (p≤0.05) corresponding to 9 proteins were observed; these changes were confirmed with immunohistochemistry. The protein abnormalities varied amongst nuclei, with the majority of variations in the raphe nuclei, hypoglossal and pyramids. The abnormal proteins are not related to a previously identified neurological disease pathway but consist of developmental neuronal/glial/axonal growth, cell metabolism, cyto-architecture and apoptosis components. This suggests that SIDS infants have abnormal neurological development in the raphe nuclei, hypoglossal and pyramids of the brainstem, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of SIDS. This study is the first to perform an imaging mass spectrometry investigation in the human brainstem and also within sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). LC MALDI and MALDI IMS identified 55 proteins based on 285 peptides in both control and SIDS tissue; with abnormal expression patterns present for 41/285 and 9/55 proteins in SIDS using IMS. The abnormal proteins are critical for neurological development; with the impairment supporting the hypothesis that SIDS may be due to delayed neurological

  10. The Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (INFANT an early intervention to prevent childhood obesity: Cluster-randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Karen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple factors combine to support a compelling case for interventions that target the development of obesity-promoting behaviours (poor diet, low physical activity and high sedentary behaviour from their inception. These factors include the rapidly increasing prevalence of fatness throughout childhood, the instigation of obesity-promoting behaviours in infancy, and the tracking of these behaviours from childhood through to adolescence and adulthood. The Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (INFANT aims to determine the effectiveness of an early childhood obesity prevention intervention delivered to first-time parents. The intervention, conducted with parents over the infant's first 18 months of life, will use existing social networks (first-time parent's groups and an anticipatory guidance framework focusing on parenting skills which support the development of positive diet and physical activity behaviours, and reduced sedentary behaviours in infancy. Methods/Design This cluster-randomised controlled trial, with first-time parent groups as the unit of randomisation, will be conducted with a sample of 600 first-time parents and their newborn children who attend the first-time parents' group at Maternal and Child Health Centres. Using a two-stage sampling process, local government areas in Victoria, Australia will be randomly selected at the first stage. At the second stage, a proportional sample of first-time parent groups within selected local government areas will be randomly selected and invited to participate. Informed consent will be obtained and groups will then be randomly allocated to the intervention or control group. Discussion The early years hold promise as a time in which obesity prevention may be most effective. To our knowledge this will be the first randomised trial internationally to demonstrate whether an early health promotion program delivered to first-time parents in their existing social groups

  11. The politics of preventable deaths: local spending, income inequality, and premature mortality in US cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzio, C R; Pamuk, E; Squires, G D

    2004-03-01

    To examine the association between (1) local political party, (2) urban policies, measured by spending on local programmes, and (3) income inequality with premature mortality in large US cities. Cross sectional ecological study. All cause death rates and death rates attributable to preventable or immediate causes for people under age 75. PREDICTOR MEASURES: Income inequality, city spending, and social factors. All central cities in the US with population equal to or greater than 100 000. Income inequality is the most significant social variable associated with preventable or immediate death rates, and the relation is very strong: a unit increase in the Gini coefficient is associated with 37% higher death rates. Spending on police is associated with 23% higher preventable death rates compared with 14% lower death rates in cities with high spending on roads. Cities with high income inequality and poverty are so far unable to reduce their mortality through local expenditures on public goods, regardless of the mayoral party. Longitudinal data are necessary to determine if city spending on social programmes reduces mortality over time.

  12. [Role of donor human milk feeding in preventing nosocomial infection in very low birth weight infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hong-Juan; Xu, Jing; Wei, Qiu-Fen

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the role of donor human milk in the prevention of nosocomial infection in very low birth weight infants. MeETHODS: A total of 105 hospitalized preterm infants with a very low birth weight were enrolled. They were classified into mother's own milk feeding group, donor human milk feeding group, and preterm formula feeding group, with 35 infants in each group. The three groups were compared in terms of incidence rates of nosocomial infection, necrotizing enterocolitis, and feeding intolerance, time to full enteral feeding, and early growth indices. Compared with the preterm formula feeding group, the donor human milk feeding group and the mother's own milk feeding group had significantly lower incidence rates of nosocomial infection and necrotizing enterocolitis and shorter time to full enteral feeding (Pgroups. Donor human milk can be used in case of a lack of mother's own milk and may help to reduce nosocomial infection.

  13. Human Connexin43E42K mutation from a sudden infant death victim leads to impaired ventricular activation and neonatal death in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübkemeier, Indra; Bosen, Felicitas; Kim, Jung-Sun; Sasse, Philipp; Malan, Daniela; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Willecke, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) describes the sudden, unexplained death of a baby during its first year of age and is the third leading cause of infant mortality. It is assumed that ≤20% of all SIDS cases are because of cardiac arrhythmias resulting from mutations in ion channel proteins. Besides ion channels also cardiac gap junction channels are important for proper conduction of cardiac electric activation. In the mammalian heart Connexin43 (Cx43) is the major gap junction protein expressed in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Recently, a novel Connexin43 loss-of-function mutation (Cx43E42K) was identified in a 2-month-old SIDS victim. We have generated Cx43E42K-expressing mice as a model for SIDS. Heterozygous cardiac-restricted Cx43E42K-mutated mice die neonatally without major cardiac morphological defects. Electrocardiographic recordings of embryonic Cx43+/E42K mice reveal severely disturbed ventricular activation, whereas immunohistochemical analyses show normal localization and expression patterns of gap junctional Connexin43 protein in the Cx43E42K-mutated newborn mouse heart. Because we did not find heterogeneous gap junction loss in Cx43E42K mouse hearts, we conclude that the Cx43E42K gap junction channel creates an arrhythmogenic substrate leading to lethal ventricular arrhythmias. The strong cardiac phenotype of Cx43E42K expressing mice supports the association between the human Cx43E42K mutation and SIDS and indicates that Connexin43 mutations should be considered in future studies when SIDS cases are to be molecularly explained. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Antenatal steroids in preterm labour for the prevention of neonatal deaths due to complications of preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwansa-Kambafwile, Judith; Cousens, Simon; Hansen, Thomas; Lawn, Joy E

    2010-04-01

    In high-income countries, administration of antenatal steroids is standard care for women with anticipated preterm labour. However, although >1 million deaths due to preterm birth occur annually, antenatal steroids are not routine practice in low-income countries where most of these deaths occur. To review the evidence for and estimate the effect on cause-specific neonatal mortality of administration of antenatal steroids to women with anticipated preterm labour, with additional analysis for the effect in low- and middle-income countries. We conducted systematic reviews using standardized abstraction forms. Quality of evidence was assessed using an adapted GRADE approach. Existing meta-analyses were reviewed for relevance to low/middle-income countries, and new meta-analysis was performed. We identified 44 studies, including 18 randomised control trials (RCTs) (14 in high-income countries) in a Cochrane meta-analysis, which suggested that antenatal steroids decrease neonatal mortality among preterm infants (preterm babies currently receive little or no medical care. It is plausible that antenatal steroids may be of even greater effect when tested in these settings. Based on high-grade evidence, antenatal steroid therapy is very effective in preventing neonatal mortality and morbidity, yet remains at low coverage in low/middle-income countries. If fully scaled up, this intervention could save up to 500 000 neonatal lives annually.

  15. Cardiomyopathies as a Cause of Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD in Egypt: Recognition and Preventive Strategies Needed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Fnon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the epidemiological characteristics and pathological features of different types of cardiomyopathies in Egypt, highlighting the role of the forensic pathologist in identifying cases of cardiomyopathies and initiating for their families a possible genetic study aiming at prevention of sudden death. All cases with sudden cardiac death (SCD due to cardiomyopathies during the period from the beginning of January 2010 until the end of December 2014 (5 years were included in this study. All hearts underwent detailed gross and histological examination. Circumstances of death, medical history, and post-mortem pathological findings were thoroughly  investigated. Out of 535 cases of sudden cardiac death, there were 22 cases (4.1% diagnosed as having cardiomyopathies; sudden death was their first presentation. Eighteen cases (81.8% were male, with the 4th decade (11 cases, 50% being the most affected age; severe physical activity and exertion were evident in death circumstances of 14 cases (63.6%; pathological evaluation revealed that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was the most frequent type, being diagnosed in 10 cases (45%. Cardiomyopathies are an infrequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Most deaths are in children and adults, so cases are of high social impact that demands multidisciplinary research and resources. In all cases of SCD, forensic autopsy should be done. Forensic study is the key to identifying an affected family and the starting point regarding assessing them.

  16. Radiological findings at a South African forensic pathology laboratory in cases of sudden unexpected death in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Fenton-Muir

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The work serves as a preliminary evaluation of the utility of the full-body radiography in examining cases of SUDI. Setting This paper reviews findings from full-body digital radiography in cases of sudden unexpected death in infants (SUDI in 2008 at the Salt River Forensic Pathology Laboratory in Cape Town. Subjects Cases of SUDI referred to the mortuary and undergoing full-body digital radiography were reviewed (192 cases. Design Imaging reports were cross-referenced with death registry data. Manner of death, cause of death, whether an autopsy had taken place, and radiological findings, were recorded and analysed. Results The absence of bony fractures was recorded as an imaging finding in 40% of cases. The most common type of imaging pathology was lung disease. In cases where autopsies were performed and pathology was found on imaging, the findings of the two methods of examination were consistent. Conclusions Imaging may have served to assist CoD determination based on case history, and therefore full-body radiography may improve the workflow in busy forensic pathology laboratories. More detailed and consistent recording of imaging findings is required before stronger conclusions may be drawn regarding the utility of full body digital imaging of paediatric cases in forensic pathology laboratories.

  17. Difficulties in interpretation of post-mortem microbiology results in unexpected infant death: evidence from a multidisciplinary survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryce, Jeremy W; Weber, Martin A; Hartley, John C; Ashworth, Michael T; Malone, Marian; Sebire, Neil J

    2011-08-01

    Post-mortem (PM) microbiological investigations are recommended in cases of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI), and infection is a recognised cause of such deaths, but no current evidence-based guidelines exist for the appropriate interpretation of results. To assess interpretive difficulties using a targeted cross-specialty questionnaire. 109 consultant specialists involved in infant death management were given a questionnaire providing information on five hypothetical standardised SUDI cases, which differed only in their PM microbiology findings. Participants classified each case into categories: definite bacterial infection, probable bacterial infection, bacterial growth of uncertain significance and PM contamination. 63 (57%) specialists responded. There was no clinical scenario in which complete concordance in interpretation of PM microbiology results was established among participants. In cases with pure growth of Group 2 pathogens such as Group B β-haemolytic Streptococcus, 96% of respondents agreed upon probable or definite bacterial infection. With mixed growth of Group 2 pathogens, 83% reported probable or definite bacterial infection. Growth of organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus caused the most difficulty, with almost equal numbers of participants interpreting the finding as significant or non-significant. There were no consistent differences in interpretation between different specialist groups. While there is general agreement in interpretation of PM microbiology findings in some SUDI scenarios, no consensus was achieved for any clinical setting, and variation in the presumed significance between specialists was apparent. In the absence of appropriate evidence-based guidelines, this has practical implications for the management of such deaths in a multidisciplinary setting.

  18. Reanalyses of case-control studies examining the temporal association between sudden infant death syndrome and vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnert, Ronny; Schlaud, Martin; Poethko-Müller, Christina; Vennemann, Mechtild; Fleming, Peter; Blair, Peter S; Mitchell, Ed; Thompson, John; Hecker, Hartmut

    2012-03-16

    In this paper we examine different time periods after vaccinations and investigate whether the risk of sudden infant death is different during the post-vaccination period than at other times. Three already published case-control studies are re-examined in this context. Several evaluation approaches are presented. The recently developed self-controled case series (SCCS) method for terminal events, which only takes the cases into account, is used in addition. There is no increased or reduced risk of sudden infant death during the period after the vaccination. The previously reported protective effect seen in case contol studies is based on the inclusion of unvaccinated cases. The results of the case-control analysis of one study is affected by two confounders. The SCCS method for terminal events, in which all time-independent confounders are eliminated, is an alternative to case-control analysis when it comes to the temporal association between exposed time periods and SIDS after vaccination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Exploring the Experience of Life Stress Among Black Women with a History of Fetal or Infant Death: a Phenomenological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyrah K; Lewis, Rhonda K; Baumgartner, Elizabeth; Schunn, Christy; Maryman, J'Vonnah; LoCurto, Jamie

    2017-06-01

    Disparate birth outcomes among Black women continue to be a major public health problem. Whereas prior research has investigated the influence of stress on Black women's birth outcomes, few studies have explored how stress is experienced among Black women across the life course. The objectives of this study were to describe the experience of stress across the life course among Black women who reported a history of fetal or infant death and to identify stressful life events (SLE) that may not be represented in the widely used SLE inventory. Using phenomenological, qualitative research design, in-depth interviews were conducted with six Black women in Kansas who experienced a fetal or infant death. Analyses revealed that participants experienced multiple, co-occurring stressors over the course of their lives and experienced a proliferation of stress emerging in early life and persisting into adulthood. Among the types of stressors cited by participants, history of sexual assault (trauma-related stressor) was a key stressful life event that is not currently reflected in the SLE inventory. Our findings highlight the importance of using a life-course perspective to gain a contextual understanding of the experiences of stress among Black women, particularly those with a history of adverse birth outcomes. Further research investigating Black women's experiences of stress and the mechanisms by which stress impacts their health could inform efforts to reduce disparities in birth outcomes. An additional focus on the experience and impact of trauma-related stress on Black women's birth outcomes may also be warranted.

  20. Soy formula for prevention of allergy and food intolerance in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, D A; Sinn, J

    2006-10-18

    Allergies and food reactions in infants and children are common and may be associated with a variety of foods including adapted cow's milk formula. Soy based formulas have been used to treat infants with allergy or food intolerance. However, it is unclear whether they can help prevent allergy and food intolerance in infants without clinical evidence of allergy or food intolerance. To determine the effect of feeding adapted soy formula compared to human milk, cow's milk formula or a hydrolysed protein formula on preventing allergy or food intolerance in infants without clinical evidence of allergy or food intolerance. The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. Updated searches were performed of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2006), MEDLINE (1966-March 2006), EMBASE (1980-March 2006), CINAHL (1982-March 2006) and previous reviews including cross references. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials that compare the use of an adapted soy formula to human milk, an adapted cow's milk or a hydrolysed protein formula for feeding infants without clinical allergy or food intolerance in the first six months of life. Only trials with > 80% follow up of participants and reported in group of assignment were eligible for inclusion. Eligibility of studies for inclusion, methodological quality and data extraction were assessed independently by each review author. Primary outcomes included clinical allergy, specific allergies and food intolerance. Where no heterogeneity of treatment effect was found, the fixed effect model was used for meta-analysis. Where significant or apparent heterogeneity was found, results were reported using the random effects model and potential causes of the heterogeneity were sought. Three eligible studies enrolling high risk infants with a history of allergy in a first degree relative were included. No eligible study enrolled infants fed human milk. No study

  1. Is it Time for a Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Awareness Campaign? Community Stakeholders' Perceptions of SIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollenberg, Audra; Fendley, Kim

    2018-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) remains a leading cause of infant death in the United States and in Virginia, the SIDS rate is higher than the national average. We sought to gauge the perceptions among community-identified stakeholders as to community resource needs to reduce SIDS. We used snowball sampling to identify important community stakeholders to be interviewed as key informants. A semi-structured interview lasting 45 min-2 hours was delivered to determine resource needs to reduce SIDS, and whether high-risk community members were aware of SIDS risk factors among stakeholders representing a variety of disciplines. Interviews were conducted in two geographic areas with higher than average rates of infant mortality, an urban district, Winchester City, VA and a rural district, Page County, VA. A total of 74 interviews were completed with stakeholders in healthcare, health departments, social services, law enforcement, education/childcare, faith-based institutions, non-profit agencies and non-affiliated community members. The majority of respondents perceive that high-risk community members are not aware of factors that can lead to SIDS (50%). Participants suggested that more "education" is needed to further reduce the rates of SIDS in their communities (73%). Respondents detailed that more pervasive, strategic, and multi-channeled education is necessary to reduce cases of SIDS. Community leaders perceive that high-risk community members are not fully aware of risk factors that can lead to SIDS. Maternal/child health stakeholders in these Virginia locales suggested more community-based education as a potential solution to SIDS.

  2. Early neonatal deaths associated with perinatal asphyxia in infants ≥2500 g in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Branco de Almeida

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: Despite the decreasing rates in Brazil from 2005 to 2010, early neonatal mortality rates associated with perinatal asphyxia in infants in the better spectrum of birth weight and without congenital malformations are still high, and meconium aspiration syndrome plays a major role.

  3. Nutritional management of breastfeeding infants for the prevention of common nutrient deficiencies and excesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Soo Moon

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Breastfeeding is the best source of nutrition for every infant, and exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months is usually optimal in the common clinical situation. However, inappropriate complementary feeding could lead to a nutrient-deficient status, such as iron deficiency anemia, vitamin D deficiency, and growth faltering. The recent epidemic outbreak of obesity in Korean children emphasizes the need for us to control children’s daily sedentary life style and their intakes of high caloric foods in order to prevent obesity. Recent assessment of breastfeeding in Korea has shown that the rate is between 63% and 89%; thus, up-to-dated evidence-based nutritional management of breastfeeding infants to prevent common nutrient deficiencies or excesses should be taught to all clinicians and health care providers.

  4. Risk factors for diarrhea-associated infant mortality in the United States, 2005-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehal, Jason M; Esposito, Douglas H; Holman, Robert C; Tate, Jacqueline E; Callinan, Laura S; Parashar, Umesh D

    2012-07-01

    Diarrhea-associated deaths among US children increased from the mid-1980s through 2006, particularly among infants. Understanding risk factors for diarrhea-associated death could improve prevention strategies. Records of singleton infants with diarrhea listed anywhere on the death certificate were selected from the US Linked Birth/Infant Death data for the period, 2005 to 2007; characteristics of these infants were compared with those of infants who survived their first year. During 2005 to 2007, 1087 diarrhea-associated infant deaths were reported; 86% occurred among low birth weight (LBW, risk ratio: 91.9, 95% confidence interval: 77.4-109.0) and younger median age at death (7 versus 15 weeks, Pdiarrhea-associated death among LBW and NBW infants were sepsis (26%) and volume depletion (20%), respectively. Among LBW infants, 97% of diarrhea-associated deaths occurred in inpatient settings, whereas 27% of NBW infant deaths occurred in outpatient settings and 5.3% in the decedent's home. Male sex, black race, unmarried status and low 5-minute Apgar score (diarrhea-associated morality should focus on understanding and improving management of diarrhea in vulnerable LBW infants. For prevention of diarrhea-associated deaths in NBW infants, educating mothers who fit the high-risk profile regarding home hydration therapy and timely access to medical treatment is important.

  5. Nearly 800,000 deaths prevented due to declines in smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twentieth-century tobacco control programs and policies were responsible for preventing more than 795,000 lung cancer deaths in the United States from 1975 through 2000. If all cigarette smoking in this country had ceased following the release of the firs

  6. Top 10 Research Questions Related to Preventing Sudden Death in Sport and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katch, Rachel K.; Scarneo, Samantha E.; Adams, William M.; Armstrong, Lawrence E.; Belval, Luke N.; Stamm, Julie M.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2017-01-01

    Participation in organized sport and recreational activities presents an innate risk for serious morbidity and mortality. Although death during sport or physical activity has many causes, advancements in sports medicine and evidence-based standards of care have allowed clinicians to prevent, recognize, and treat potentially fatal injuries more…

  7. [Early postnatal application of glucocorticoids for preventing bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants: a Meta analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Feng-Juan; Yin, Yong; Xu, Juan; Zhao, Li-Xia; Zhou, Ya-Juan; Zhu, Lei

    2017-06-01

    To study the clinical effect and safety of early postnatal application of glucocorticoids in the prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants. The databases including PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, CNKI, Wanfang Data, and VIP were comprehensively searched for articles on early postnatal application of glucocorticoids in the prevention of BPD in preterm infants published up to June 2016. Review Manager 5.3 was used for the Meta analysis of 16 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that met the inclusion criteria. A total of 2 962 participants were enrolled in the 16 RCTs, with 1 486 patients in the trial group and 1 476 in the control group. The Meta analysis showed that early postnatal application of glucocorticoids reduced the incidence rate of BPD at a corrected gestational age of 36 weeks (OR=0.73, 95%CI: 0.61-0.87, P=0.0004), but there was an increase in the risk of hyperglycemia (OR=1.61, 95%CI: 1.24-2.09, P=0.0003), hypertension (OR=1.63, 95%CI: 1.11-2.38, P=0.01), and intestinal perforation (OR=1.51, 95%CI: 1.12-2.04, P=0.007). At present, it is not recommended to use glucocorticoids to prevent BPD in preterm infants. Its advantages and disadvantages need further studies, with special focuses on the adverse effects of hyperglycemia, hypertension, and intestinal perforation.

  8. High-protein diet in lactation leads to a sudden infant death-like syndrome in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Walther

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is well accepted that reduced foetal growth and development resulting from maternal malnutrition are associated with a number of chronic conditions in later life. On the other hand such generation-transcending effects of over-nutrition and of high-protein consumption in pregnancy and lactation, a proven fact in all developed societies, are widely unknown. Thus, we intended to describe the generation-transcending effects of a high-protein diet, covering most relevant topics of human life like embryonic mortality, infant death, and physical health in later life. METHODS: Female mice received control food (21% protein or were fed a high protein diet (42% protein during mating. After fertilisation, females stayed on their respective diet until weaning. At birth, pups were put to foster mothers who were fed with standard food or with HP diet. After weaning, control diet was fed to all mice. All offspring were monitored up to 360 days after birth. We determined glucose-tolerance and measured cardiovascular parameters using a tip-catheter. Finally, abdominal fat amount was measured. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: We identified a worried impact of high-protein diet during pregnancy on dams' body weight gain, body weight of newborns, number of offspring, and also survival in later life. Even more important is the discovery that high-protein diet during lactation caused a more than eight-fold increase in offspring mortality. The observed higher newborn mortality during lactation is a hitherto non-described, unique link to the still incompletely understood human sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS. Thus, although offspring of lactating mothers on high-protein diet might have the advantage of lower abdominal fat within the second half of life, this benefit seems not to compensate the immense risk of an early sudden death during lactation. Our data may implicate that both pregnant women and lactating mothers should not follow classical high

  9. Effectiveness of maternal pertussis vaccination in preventing infection and disease in infants: The NSW Public Health Network case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, Nathan; Wang, Kevin; Bag, Shopna; Baldwin, Heather; Alexander, Kate; Chandra, Meena; Thomas, Jane; Quinn, Helen; Sheppeard, Vicky; Conaty, Stephen

    2018-02-28

    Infants are at the highest risk of severe complications - including death - as a result of pertussis infection. Controlling pertussis in this group has been challenging, particularly in those too young to be vaccinated. Following revised national recommendations in March 2015, the state of New South Wales, Australia, introduced a funded maternal vaccination campaign at 28 - 32 weeks of gestation using a 3-component tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis vaccine (dTpa; Boostrix, GSK). This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of maternal vaccination and add to the growing body of evidence for this strategy. A 1:1 matched case-control study was conducted between 16 August 2015 and 17 August 2016. Cases were laboratory or doctor notified, laboratory confirmed (nucleic acid testing or culture) and aged case's birthdate. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) was calculated as 1 - OR. In total, 117 cases and 117 controls were recruited. The overall VE estimate was non-significantly protective for infants vaccination with a 3-component acellular vaccine was found to be highly effective at preventing severe disease in infants, but was less effective at preventing disease which did not require hospitalisation. The overall VE reported in this study was lower than in prior studies and suggests that maternal vaccination, while an effective strategy at preventing severe pertussis, is less effective at protecting against infection or mild disease. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Rigour and Rapport: a qualitative study of parents' and professionals' experiences of joint agency infant death investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garstang, Joanna; Griffiths, Frances; Sidebotham, Peter

    2017-02-07

    In many countries there are now detailed Child Death Review (CDR) processes following unexpected child deaths. CDR can lead to a fuller understanding of the causes for each child's death but this potentially intrusive process may increase the distress of bereaved families. In England, a joint agency approach (JAA) is used where police, healthcare and social services investigate sudden child deaths together and a key part of this is the joint home visit (JHV) where specialist police and paediatricians visit the home with the parents to view the scene of death. This study aimed to learn of bereaved parents' experiences of JAA investigation following Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy (SUDI). This was a qualitative study of joint agency investigation of SUDI by specialist police, healthcare and social services including case note analysis, parental questionnaires, and in-depth interviews with parents and professionals. Families were recruited at the conclusion of the JAA. Data were analysed using a Framework Approach. 21/113 eligible families and 26 professionals participated giving theoretical saturation of data. There was an inherent conflict for professionals trying to both investigate deaths thoroughly as well as support families. Bereaved parents appreciated the JAA especially for the information it provided about the cause of death but were frustrated with long delays waiting to obtain this. Many parents wanted more emotional support to be routinely provided. Most parents found the JHV helpful but a small minority of mothers found this intensely distressing. In comparison to JHVs, when police visited death scenes without paediatricians, information was missed and parents found these visits more upsetting. There were issues with uniformed non-specialist police traumatising parents by starting criminal investigations and preventing parents from accessing their home or collecting vital possessions. Overall most parents feel supported by professionals during the JAA

  11. Prevention of vitamin K deficiency bleeding in breastfed infants: lessons from the Dutch and Danish biliary atresia registries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselt, P.M. van; Koning, T.J. de; Vries, E. de

    2008-01-01

    in infants with biliary atresia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From Dutch and Danish national biliary atresia registries, we retrieved infants who were either breastfed and received 1 mg of oral vitamin K at birth followed by 25 microg of daily oral vitamin K prophylaxis (Netherlands, 1991-2003), 2 mg of oral......: A daily dose of 25 microg of vitamin K fails to prevent bleedings in apparently healthy infants with unrecognized cholestasis because of biliary atresia. One milligram of weekly oral prophylaxis offers significantly higher protection to these infants and is of similar efficacy as 2 mg of intramuscular...

  12. Parents' beliefs about appropriate infant size, growth and feeding behaviour: implications for the prevention of childhood obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swift Judy A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of risk factors are associated with the development of childhood obesity which can be identified during infancy. These include infant feeding practices, parental response to infant temperament and parental perception of infant growth and appetite. Parental beliefs and understanding are crucial determinants of infant feeding behaviour; therefore any intervention would need to take account of their views. This study aimed to explore UK parents' beliefs concerning their infant's size, growth and feeding behaviour and parental receptiveness to early intervention aimed at reducing the risk of childhood obesity. Method Six focus groups were undertaken in a range of different demographic localities, with parents of infants less than one year of age. The focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis applied using an interpretative, inductive approach. Results 38 parents (n = 36 female, n = 2 male, age range 19-45 years (mean 30.1 years, SD 6.28 participated in the focus groups. 12/38 were overweight (BMI 25-29.99 and 8/38 obese (BMI >30. Five main themes were identified. These were a parental concern about breast milk, infant contentment and growth; b the belief that the main cause of infant distress is hunger is widespread and drives inappropriate feeding; c rationalisation for infants' larger size; d parental uncertainty about identifying and managing infants at risk of obesity and e intentions and behaviour in relation to a healthy lifestyle. Conclusions There are a number of barriers to early intervention with parents of infants at risk of developing obesity. Parents are receptive to prevention prior to weaning and need better support with best practice in infant feeding. In particular, this should focus on helping them understand the physiology of breast feeding, how to differentiate between infant distress caused by hunger and other causes and the timing of weaning. Some parents also need

  13. HIV drug resistance in infants increases with changing prevention of mother-to-child transmission regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Lisa K; Chunda-Liyoka, Catherine; Kwon, Eun H; Gondwe, Clement; West, John T; Kankasa, Chipepo; Ndongmo, Clement B; Wood, Charles

    2017-08-24

    The objectives of this study were to determine HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) prevalence in Zambian infants upon diagnosis, and to determine how changing prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) drug regimens affect drug resistance. Dried blood spot (DBS) samples from infants in the Lusaka District of Zambia, obtained during routine diagnostic screening, were collected during four different years representing three different PMTCT drug treatment regimens. DNA extracted from dried blood spot samples was used to sequence a 1493 bp region of the reverse transcriptase gene. Sequences were analyzed via the Stanford HIVDRdatabase (http://hivdb.standford.edu) to screen for resistance mutations. HIVDR in infants increased from 21.5 in 2007/2009 to 40.2% in 2014. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance increased steadily over the sampling period, whereas nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance and dual class resistance both increased more than threefold in 2014. Analysis of drug resistance scores in each group revealed increasing strength of resistance over time. In 2014, children with reported PMTCT exposure, defined as infant prophylaxis and/or maternal treatment, showed a higher prevalence and strength of resistance compared to those with no reported exposure. HIVDR is on the rise in Zambia and presents a serious problem for the successful lifelong treatment of HIV-infected children. PMTCT affects both the prevalence and strength of resistance and further research is needed to determine how to mitigate its role leading to resistance.

  14. Circulatory Management Focusing on Preventing Intraventricular Hemorrhage and Pulmonary Hemorrhage in Preterm Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai-Horng Su

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of modern neonatal care of extremely preterm infants is to reduce mortality and long-term neurological impairments. Preterm infants frequently experience cerebral intraventricular or pulmonary hemorrhage, which usually occurs within 72 hours after birth and can lead to long-term neurological sequelae and mortality. These serious hemorrhagic complications are closely related to perinatal hemodynamic changes, including an increase in the afterload on the left ventricle of the heart after the infant is separated from the placenta, and an increased preload from a left-to-right shunt caused by a hemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus (PDA. The left ventricle of a preterm myocardium has limited ability to respond to such an increase in afterload and preload, and this can result in cardiac dysfunction and hemodynamic deterioration. We suggest that delayed umbilical cord clamping or umbilical cord milking to maintain optimal blood pressure and systemic blood flow (SBF, careful assessment to keep the afterload at an acceptable level, and a strategy of early targeted treatment of significant PDA to improve perfusion during this critical time period may reduce or prevent these serious complications in preterm infants.

  15. Imeglimin prevents human endothelial cell death by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detaille, D; Vial, G; Borel, A-L; Cottet-Rouselle, C; Hallakou-Bozec, S; Bolze, S; Fouqueray, P; Fontaine, E

    2016-01-01

    Imeglimin is the first in a new class of oral glucose-lowering agents, having recently completed its phase 2b trial. As Imeglimin did show a full prevention of β-cell apoptosis, and since angiopathy represents a major complication of diabetes, we studied Imeglimin protective effects on hyperglycemia-induced death of human endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These cells were incubated in several oxidative stress environments (exposure to high glucose and oxidizing agent tert-butylhydroperoxide) which led to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, cytochrome c release and cell death. These events were fully prevented by Imeglimin treatment. This protective effect on cell death occurred without any effect on oxygen consumption rate, on lactate production and on cytosolic redox or phosphate potentials. Imeglimin also dramatically decreased reactive oxygen species production, inhibiting specifically reverse electron transfer through complex I. We conclude that Imeglimin prevents hyperglycemia-induced cell death in HMEC-1 through inhibition of PTP opening without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration nor affecting cellular energy status. Considering the high prevalence of macrovascular and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetic subjects, these results together suggest a potential benefit of Imeglimin in diabetic angiopathy.

  16. Primary prevention of food allergy in infants who are at risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Arne; Halken, Susanne

    2005-01-01

    on primary prevention of food allergy. RECENT FINDINGS: In prospective observational controlled studies of high quality of birth cohorts, exclusive breastfeeding for at least 4 months combined with introduction of solid foods after 4 months of age is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy and atopic......: Breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented hypoallergenic hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusively breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months. As regards primary prevention of food allergy there is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention during......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Allergic diseases represent a major burden of health problems in industrialized countries. Though several studies have focused on possible preventive measure and strategies much controversy still exists on this topic. The aim of this review is to discuss the recent literature...

  17. Causes of death in very preterm infants cared for in neonatal intensive care units: a population-based retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Tim; Koller-Smith, Louise; Lui, Kei; Bajuk, Barbara; Bolisetty, Srinivas

    2017-02-21

    While there are good data to describe changing trends in mortality and morbidity rates for preterm populations, there is very little information on the specific causes and pattern of death in terms of age of vulnerability. It is well established that mortality increases with decreasing gestational age but there are limited data on the specific causes that account for this increased mortality. The aim of this study was to establish the common causes of hospital mortality in a regional preterm population admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of the Neonatal Intensive Care Units' (NICUS) Data Collection of all 10 NICUs in the region. Infants cause of death. There were 345 (7.7%) deaths out of 4454 infants. The most common cause of death across all gestational groups was major IVH (cause-specific mortality rate [CMR] 22 per 1000 infants), followed by acute respiratory illnesses [ARI] (CMR 21 per 1000 infants) and sepsis (CMR 12 per 1000 infants). The most common cause of death was different in each gestational group (22-25 weeks [ARI], 26-28 weeks [IVH] and 29-31 weeks [perinatal asphyxia]). Pregnancy induced hypertension, antenatal steroids and chorioamnionitis were all associated with changes in CMRs. Deaths due to ARI or major IVH were more likely to occur at an earlier age (median [quartiles] 1.4 [0.3-4.4] and 3.6 [1.9-6.6] days respectively) in comparison to NEC and miscellaneous causes (25.2 [15.4-37.3] and 25.8 [3.2-68.9] days respectively). Major IVH and ARI were the most common causes of hospital mortality in this extreme to very preterm population. Perinatal factors have a significant impact on cause-specific mortality. The varying timing of death provides insight into the prolonged vulnerability for diseases such as necrotising enterocolitis in our preterm population.

  18. Cell and gene therapy for genetic diseases: inherited disorders affecting the lung and those mimicking sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Allison M; Flotte, Terence R

    2012-06-01

    Some of the first human gene therapy trials targeted diseases of the lung and provided important information that will continue to help shape future trials. Here we describe both cell and gene therapies for lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin disorder as well as fatty acid oxidation disorders that mimic sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Human clinical gene therapy trials for cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin have been performed using a variety of vectors including adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and nonviral vectors. No human clinical gene therapy trials have been performed for disorders of fatty acid oxidation; however, important proof-of-principle studies have been completed for multiple fatty acid oxidation disorders. Important achievements have been made and have yet to come for cell and gene therapies for disorders of the lung and those mimicking SIDS.

  19. An Assessment of the Cocooning Strategy for Preventing Infant Pertussis—United States, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Amy E.; Lewis, Melissa; Banerjee, Emily; Kudish, Kathy; Liko, Juventila; McGuire, Suzanne; Selvage, David; Watt, James; Martin, Stacey W.; Skoff, Tami H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Infants are at greatest risk for severe pertussis. In 2006, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended that adolescents and adults, especially those with infant contact, receive a single dose of Tdap (tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccine). To assess the effectiveness of cocooning, we conducted a case-control evaluation of infant close contacts. Methods Pertussis cases aged <2 months with onset between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2011 were identified in Emerging Infections Program Network sites. For each case, we recruited 3 controls from birth certificates and interviewed identified adult close contacts (CCs) or parents of CCs aged <18 years. Pertussis vaccination was verified through medical providers and/or immunization registries. Results Forty-two cases were enrolled, with 154 matched controls. Around enrolled infants, 859 CCs were identified (600 adult and 259 nonadult). An average of 5.4 CCs was identified per case and 4.1 CCs per control. Five hundred fifty-four (64.5%) CCs were enrolled (371 adult and 183 non-adult CCs); 119 (32.1% of enrolled) adult CCs had received Tdap. The proportion of Tdap-vaccinated adult CCs was similar between cases and controls (P = .89). The 600 identified adult CCs comprised 172 potential cocoons; 71 (41.3%) potential cocoons had all identified adult CCs enrolled. Of these, 9 were fully vaccinated and 43.7% contained no Tdap-vaccinated adults. The proportion of fully vaccinated case (4.8%) and control (10.0%) cocoons was similar (P = .43). Conclusions Low Tdap coverage among adult CCs reinforces the difficulty of implementing the cocooning strategy and the importance of vaccination during pregnancy to prevent infant pertussis. PMID:27838676

  20. Oral immunoglobulin for the prevention of rotavirus infection in low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pammi, Mohan; Haque, Khalid N

    2011-11-09

    Rotavirus is a common neonatal nosocomial viral infection and epidemics with the newer P(6)G9 strains have been reported. Local mucosal immunity in the intestine to rotavirus is important in the resolution of infection and protection against subsequent infections. Oral administration of anti-rotaviral immunoglobulin preparations might be a useful strategy in preventing rotaviral infections, especially in low birth weight babies. To determine the effectiveness and safety of oral immunoglobulin preparations for the prevention of rotavirus infection in hospitalized low birthweight infants (birthweight rotavirus infection compared to placebo OR no intervention; 4) at least one of the following outcomes were reported: all cause mortality during hospital stay, mortality due to rotavirus infection during hospital stay, rotavirus infection , duration of diarrhea, need for rehydration, duration of viral excretion, duration of infection control measures, length of hospital stay in days, recurrent diarrhea or chronic diarrhea. The two review authors independently abstracted data from the included trials. One published study (Barnes 1982) was eligible for inclusion in this review. Barnes 1982 found no significant difference in the rates of rotavirus infection after oral gammaglobulin versus placebo in hospitalized low birthweight babies [RR 1.27 (95% CI 0.65 to 2.37)]. In the subset of infants who became infected with rotavirus after receiving gammaglobulin or placebo for prevention of rotavirus infection, there was no significant difference in the duration of rotavirus excretion between the group who had gammaglobulin (mean 2 days, range 1 to 4 days) and the group who had placebo (mean 3 days, range 1 to 6 days). Barnes 1982 reported no adverse effects after administration of oral immunoglobulin preparations. Current evidence does not support the use of oral immunoglobulin preparations to prevent rotavirus infection in low birthweight infants. Researchers are encouraged to

  1. A health strategy to reduce eclampsia and maternal and infant death ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... are recognized and treated. This requires trained birth attendants and appropriate equipment for early and accurate detection. This project aims to test interventions that improve monitoring of pregnant women for pre-eclampsia and eclampsia - conditions that, if left untreated, can result in maternal and neonatal deaths.

  2. Maternal smoking and alcohol consumption during pregnancy as risk factors for sudden infant death.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell-Naughton, M

    2012-04-01

    A population based case control study was conducted to examine alcohol consumption and maternal smoking during pregnancy and the risk of SIDS in an Irish population. Each SIDS case (n = 287) was compared with control infants (n = 832) matched for date and place of birth for infants born from 1994 to 2001. Conditional logistic regression was used to investigate differences between Cases and Controls establishing Odds Ratio\\'s (OR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI). Mothers who smoked were 3 times more likely to have a SIDS Case, and a dose response effect was apparent, with mothers smoking 1-10 cigarettes\\/day OR 2.93 (CI 1.50-5.71), and those smoking > 10 cigarettes\\/day OR 4.36 (CI 2.50-7.61). More Case mothers consumed alcohol during pregnancy than Control mothers and, within drinkers, the amount of alcohol consumed was also greater (p < 0.05). A dose response with frequency of drinking was apparent. The adjusted odds ratio for those consuming alcohol in all three trimesters was 3.59 (CI:1.40-9.20). Both of these risk factors are modifiable and need to be incorporated into antenatal education from a SIDS point of view.

  3. Identifying preventable trauma death: does autopsy serve a role in the peer review process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantling, Dane; Teichman, Amanda; Kucejko, Robert; McCracken, Brendan; Eakins, James; Burns, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Missing life-threatening injuries is a persistent concern in any trauma program. Autopsy is a tool routinely utilized to determine an otherwise occult cause of death in many fields of medicine. It has been adopted as a required component of the trauma peer review (PR) process by both the American College of Surgeons and the Pennsylvania Trauma Foundation. We hypothesized that autopsy would not identify preventable deaths for augmentation of the PR process. A retrospective chart review using our institutional trauma registry of all trauma deaths between January 2012 and December 2015 was performed. Per the protocol of our level 1 center, all trauma deaths are referred to the medical examiner (ME) and reviewed as part of the trauma PR process. All autopsy results are evaluated with relation to injury severity score (ISS), trauma injury severity score (TRISS), nature of death, and injuries added by autopsy. ME reports are reviewed by the trauma medical director and referred back to the trauma PR committee if warranted. Trauma injury severity score methodology determines the probability of survival (Ps) given injuries identified. A patient with Ps of ≥0.5 is expected to survive their injuries. Cohorts were created based on when in the hospitalization death occurred: 48 h, or late death. A comparison was conducted between the ISS and Ps calculated during trauma workup and on autopsy using chi-square and Fischer's exact tests. A total of 173 patient deaths were referred to the ME with 123 responses received. Average length of stay was 2.61 d. Twenty-six patients had autopsy declined by the ME, 25 received an external examination only, and 72 received a full autopsy. Autopsy identified one case that was reconsidered in PR (P = 0.603) and added diagnoses, but not injuries, to one patient in the early death group (P = 1) and two in the late death group (P = 0.4921). No preventable cause of death was uncovered, and educational use was minimal. Autopsy did identify

  4. Sudden cardiac death in athletes and its preventive strategies: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Halabchi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death in sport, although rare, but is a tragic event, attracting the media and public attention. Sport and exercise may act as a trigger for sudden cardiac death. Risk of sudden death in young athletes with cardiovascular disease is 2.5 times more frequent than non-athlete individuals. More than 90% of cases of sudden death occur during or immediately after training or competition. Incidence of sudden cardiac death in any population, including athletes, is related to multiple factors such as gender, age, race, nationality, diagnostic screening methods and preventive measures for sudden cardiac death. Otherwise, incidence rate of sudden cardiac death is linked to the used definition and method of diagnosis. Different cardiovascular disorders may result in death of young athletes and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congenital coronary anomalies, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and aortic rupture are among the most common causes. Marfan syndrome, dilated cardiomyopathy, viral myocarditis, Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome, congenital long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome and commotio cordis are reported as other etiologies. In older athletes (more than 35 years, ischemic coronary heart disease is responsible for majority of the cases similar to the general population. Because the outcome of sudden cardiac arrest in sports is very poor except in few cases, proper national strategies are needed to diminish the burden of sudden death in young athletes. It seems that there are two main strategies to achieve this goal: A Primary prevention with use of purposeful pre-participation evaluation programs. This evaluation should focuss on the proper history and physical examination. Nevertheless, there is significant debate between American and European countries regarding the use of paraclinical investigations (especially ECG. American heart association does not recommend ECG as an essential part of evaluation. In contrast, European

  5. Sulforaphane Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Testicular Cell Death via Activation of NRF2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although angiotensin II (Ang II was reported to facilitate sperm motility and intratesticular sperm transport, recent findings shed light on the efficacy of Ang II in stimulating inflammatory events in testicular peritubular cells, effect of which may play a role in male infertility. It is still unknown whether Ang II can induce testicular apoptotic cell death, which may be a more direct action of Ang II in male infertility. Therefore, the present study aims to determine whether Ang II can induce testicular apoptotic cell death and whether this action can be prevented by sulforaphane (SFN via activating nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (NRF2, the governor of antioxidant-redox signalling. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6J wild type (WT and Nrf2 gene knockout mice were treated with Ang II, in the presence or absence of SFN. In WT mice, SFN activated testicular NRF2 expression and function, along with a marked attenuation in Ang II-induced testicular oxidative stress, inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptotic cell death. Deletion of the Nrf2 gene led to a complete abolishment of these efficacies of SFN. The present study indicated that Ang II may result in testicular apoptotic cell death, which can be prevented by SFN via the activation of NRF2.

  6. Imeglimin prevents human endothelial cell death by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Detaille, D; Vial, G; Borel, A-L; Cottet-Rouselle, C; Hallakou-Bozec, S; Bolze, S; Fouqueray, P; Fontaine, E

    2016-01-01

    Imeglimin is the first in a new class of oral glucose-lowering agents, having recently completed its phase 2b trial. As Imeglimin did show a full prevention of ?-cell apoptosis, and since angiopathy represents a major complication of diabetes, we studied Imeglimin protective effects on hyperglycemia-induced death of human endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These cells were incubated in several oxidative stress environments (exposure to high glucose and oxidizing agent tert-butylhydroperoxide) which ...

  7. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Various Methods of Iron Deficiency Prevention in Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.А. Bielykh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the effectiveness of various methods of iron deficiency prevention in infants. Materials and Methods. Within 30-cluster regional epidemiological study on the prevalence of iodine and iron deficiency in children, we have analyzed the results of screening for anemia in 948 children, carried out questioning of mothers, determined the concentration of iron in breast milk. The effectiveness of preventive measures was assessed by indicators of iron supplementation of the body in 96 children depending on the existing method of iron prophylaxis. Results of the Study. It was found that the use by mother during lactation of iron-containing vitamin-mineral complexes had no effect on the iron content in breast milk. It is proved that administration of iron (III hydroxide polymaltose complex 1 mg/kg/day for 2 months is the most effective way to prevent iron deficiency in children who are exclusively breastfed.

  8. [Primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death in the ICD Registry-Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Jose L; Muratore, Claudio; Pachón Mateos, José C; Rodríguez, Angel; González Hermosillo, Antonio; Asenjo, René; Rodríguez, Diego; Galvao, Silas; Duque, Mauricio; Escudero, Jaime; Reyes Caorsi, Walter; Cuvillier, Erick; Maloney, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The ICD Registry is an observational study conducted in Latin America to collect data on indications and follow-up care for primary or secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death patients. The objective of this study is to compare and evaluate the characteristics of primary versus secondary prevention in the patient population enrolled in the registry. Demographic data, indication, etiology, NYHA functional class and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), pharmacological treatment at implant and the type of ICD implanted were also collected. During the follow-up period the ICD therapies delivered, patient hospitalizations and mortality were evaluated. 507 patients were evaluated. Average age 60 +/- 14 years old, 78% male. Coronary heart disease was the most common etiology (43.6%). NYHA Functional Class I/II at the time of implant (73.6%). Average LVEF was 34 +/- 16%. Out of 507 patients, 189 received an ICD for primary prevention; 318 for secondary prevention. Primary prevention patients were older, predominantly male and had a lower EF. The rate of mortality and hospitalizations were similar between both groups with a higher rate of appropriate therapies in secondary prevention patients. This is the first study to demonstrate clinical characteristics of primary prevention patients in Latin America. There were no significant statistically differences in a short follow-up period in mortality or hospitalization as compared to the secondary prevention patient population in the Registry.

  9. Dementia before death in ageing societies--the promise of prevention and the reality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Brayne

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Dementia and severe cognitive impairment are very closely linked to ageing. The longer we live the more likely we are to suffer from these conditions. Given population increases in longevity it is important to understand not only risk and protective factors for dementia and severe cognitive impairment at given ages but also whether protection affects cumulative risk. This can be explored by examining the effect on cumulative risk by time of death of factors found consistently to reduce risk at particular ages, such as education and social status.In this analysis we report the prevalence of dementia and severe cognitive impairment in the year before death in a large population sample. In the Medical Research Council Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (a 10-y population-based cohort study of individuals 65 and over in England and Wales, these prevalences have been estimated by age, sex, social class, and education. Differences have been explored using logistic regression. The overall prevalence of dementia at death was 30%. There was a strong increasing trend for dementia with age from 6% for those aged 65-69 y at time of death to 58% for those aged 95 y and above at time of death. Higher prevalences were seen for severe cognitive impairment, with similar patterns. People with higher education and social class had significantly reduced dementia and severe cognitive impairment before death, but the absolute difference was small (under 10%.Reducing risk for dementia at a given age will lead to further extension of life, thus cumulative risk (even in populations at lower risk for given ages remains high. Ageing of populations is likely to result in an increase in the number of people dying with dementia and severe cognitive impairment even in the presence of preventative programmes. Policy development and research for dementia must address the needs of individuals who will continue to experience these conditions before death.

  10. Parents bereaved by infant death: Sex differences and moderation in PTSD, attachment, coping, and social support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Dorte M.; Olff, Miranda; Elklit, Ask

    2014-01-01

    lost an infant either late in pregnancy, during birth or in the first year of life. Participants filled out questionnaires between 1.2 months and 18 years after the loss (M=3.4 years). Results: Mothers reported significantly more PTSD symptoms, attachment anxiety, emotion-focused coping and feeling let...... down, but significantly lower levels of attachment avoidance than fathers. Attachment anxiety, attachment avoidance and emotion-focused coping were significantly more strongly associated with PTSD severity in mothers than fathers, but only when examined alone. When all variables and time since the loss...... identified for attachment and emotion-focused coping. Overall, more similarities than differences were found between mothers and fathers in the associations between PTSD and covariates. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  11. Effects of hepatitis B immunization on prevention of mother-to-infant transmission of hepatitis B virus and on the immune response of infants towards hepatitis B vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Gui, Xi-en; Teter, Caroline; Zhong, Hairong; Pang, Zhiyong; Ding, Lixiong; Li, Fengliang; Zhou, Yun; Zhang, Ling

    2014-10-21

    Combined immunization with hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) plus hepatitis B vaccine (HB vaccine) can effectively prevent perinatal transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV). With the universal administration of HB vaccine, anti-HBs conferred by HB vaccine can be found increasingly in pregnant women, and maternal anti-HBs can be passed through the placenta. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of hepatitis B immunization on preventing mother-to-infant transmission of HBV and on the immune response of infants towards HB vaccine. From 2008 to 2013, a prospective study was conducted in 15 centers in China. HBsAg-positive pregnant women and their infants aged 8-12 months who completed immunoprophylaxis were enrolled in the study and tested for HBV markers (HBsAg, anti-HBs, HBeAg, anti-HBe and anti-HBc). Antepartum administration of HBIG to HBsAg-positive women was based on individual preference. HBsAg-negative pregnant women and their infants of 7-24 months old who received HB vaccines series were enrolled and tests of their HBV markers were performed. 1202 HBsAg-positive mothers and their infants aged 8-12 months were studied and 40 infants were found to be HBsAg positive with the immunoprophylaxis failure rate of 3.3%. Infants with immunoprophylaxis failure were all born to HBeAg-positive mothers of HBV-DNA ≥6 log₁₀copies/ml. Among infants of HBeAg-positive mothers, immunoprophylaxis failure rate in vaccine plus HBIG group, 7.9% (29/367), was significantly lower than the vaccine-only group, 16.9% (11/65), p=0.021; there was no significant difference in the immunoprophylaxis failure rate whether or not antepartum HBIG was given to the pregnant woman, 10.3% (10/97) vs 9.0% (30/335), p=0.685. Anti-HBs positive rate was 56.3% (3883/6899) among HBsAg-negative pregnant women and anti-HBs positive rate was 94.2% in cord blood of anti-HBs-positive mothers. After completing the HB vaccine series, anti-HBs positive rate among infants with maternal anti

  12. [Cultural strategies for coping with infant death in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Gil, T

    2008-01-01

    To analyze what is the conceptualization the nurses have of child death in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) and identify sociocultural strategies for coping with it. qualitative methodology. Etnography. PICU University Hospital Gregorio Marañón. Madrid. nurses and nursing assistants who work in the PICU. Observation participant and semi-structured in-depth interview. Organization and analysis of the data: the analytic procedure posed from the Established Theory. SOFTWARE OF SUPPORT: Atlas-ti. Child death acquires specific meanings in the PICU context. Cognitive classifications and symbols give meaning to a reality to which the nursing professionals adapt through the creation of cultural coping strategies. Based on the data, 5 strategies could be identified: redefinition of the death concept, delay in identity assignment of the children, (funeral rituals), discharge metaphor, and avoidable condensed symbols. Hidden behind the indifferent aspects of our daily life, difficult social and cultural constructs support our living and working efforts. Through daily life Anthropology we can know and understand our relationship with all our surroundings. When we are aware of them, we can develop new resources and strategies to adapt to the difficult circumstances they cause, in this case, within the context of critical ill child care.

  13. Colonoscopic polypectomy and long-term prevention of colorectal-cancer deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauber, Ann G; Winawer, Sidney J; O'Brien, Michael J; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Hankey, Benjamin F; Shi, Weiji; Bond, John H; Schapiro, Melvin; Panish, Joel F; Stewart, Edward T; Waye, Jerome D

    2012-02-23

    In the National Polyp Study (NPS), colorectal cancer was prevented by colonoscopic removal of adenomatous polyps. We evaluated the long-term effect of colonoscopic polypectomy in a study on mortality from colorectal cancer. We included in this analysis all patients prospectively referred for initial colonoscopy (between 1980 and 1990) at NPS clinical centers who had polyps (adenomas and nonadenomas). The National Death Index was used to identify deaths and to determine the cause of death; follow-up time was as long as 23 years. Mortality from colorectal cancer among patients with adenomas removed was compared with the expected incidence-based mortality from colorectal cancer in the general population, as estimated from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program, and with the observed mortality from colorectal cancer among patients with nonadenomatous polyps (internal control group). Among 2602 patients who had adenomas removed during participation in the study, after a median of 15.8 years, 1246 patients had died from any cause and 12 had died from colorectal cancer. Given an estimated 25.4 expected deaths from colorectal cancer in the general population, the standardized incidence-based mortality ratio was 0.47 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26 to 0.80) with colonoscopic polypectomy, suggesting a 53% reduction in mortality. Mortality from colorectal cancer was similar among patients with adenomas and those with nonadenomatous polyps during the first 10 years after polypectomy (relative risk, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.1 to 10.6). These findings support the hypothesis that colonoscopic removal of adenomatous polyps prevents death from colorectal cancer. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute and others.).

  14. Family planning, part of maternal health care, spurring record low infant, mother death rates in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-09-01

    Cuba has the lowest infant morality rate, 1 of the lowest maternal mortality rates, and 1 of the lowest birthrates of any Latin American or Caribbean country, largely because of its comprehensive maternal health care. Family planning is an integral part. All conventional contraceptives and sterilization are provided in the same manner as other ambulatory medical services through clinics, rural hospitals, or medical posts. Cuba has begun manufacturing its own nylon version of the Zipper ring and had imported a variety of other IUDs with the assistance of the Population Council and International Planned Parenthood Federation. IUDs are the leading method, condoms and the diaphragm are of 2nd order use, and oral contraceptives are less widely used although low-does combination pills are gaining acceptance. First trimester abortion is common and virtually all are done by suction evacuation in hospitals. Only a samll number of second trimester procedures are done, only on strictly medical grounds. Sterilization is done in hospitals, usually as a postpartum procedure. Prenatal care is universally available, leave with pay is given for childbirth, and the planned revision of the family law contemplates elimination of illegitimacy as a civil status.

  15. Death by hanging: implications for prevention of an important method of youth suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosky, R J; Dundas, P

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with deaths by hanging among young people in Queensland, Australia. An examination of coroner's reports for all deaths by hanging of people under 25 years of age that occurred in Queensland in the years 1995 and 1996. All cases were recorded as suicides. Most were males and a quarter were indigenous persons. Half the deaths occurred in regional or rural areas. Unemployment, the experience of personal loss, psychiatric illness and alcohol use were possible precipitating agents. Early warning signs were the onset of uncharacteristic behaviours and threats of suicide. The private nature of hanging means that there are rarely opportunities to prevent it in the period immediately before the fatal event. Earlier interventions will have to be considered. To prevent hanging as a means of suicide, we need to understand more about the difficulties experienced by some young men who are living in rural areas. We need more information about the cultural problems experienced by indigenous youths in their teenage years. Young people in the justice system may need personal support. There is a pressing need to determine if young people, especially in rural areas, have adequate access to the professional expertise needed to diagnose and treat mental disorders.

  16. 75 FR 40845 - Preventing Deaths and Injuries of Fire Fighters Using Risk Management Principles at Structure Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [Docket Number NIOSH 141-A] Preventing Deaths and Injuries of Fire Fighters Using Risk Management Principles at... Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice of...

  17. MicroRNA-195 prevents dendritic degeneration and neuron death in rats following chronic brain hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Jiang, Xue-Mei; Zhao, Lin-Jing; Sun, Lin-Lin; Yan, Mei-Ling; Tian, You; Zhang, Shuai; Duan, Ming-Jing; Zhao, Hong-Mei; Li, Wen-Rui; Hao, Yang-Yang; Wang, Li-Bo; Xiong, Qiao-Jie; Ai, Jing

    2017-06-01

    Impaired synaptic plasticity and neuron loss are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Here, we found that chronic brain hypoperfusion (CBH) by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (2VO) decreased the total length, numbers and crossings of dendrites and caused neuron death in rat hippocampi and cortices. It also led to increase in N-terminal β-amyloid precursor protein (N-APP) and death receptor-6 (DR6) protein levels and in the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-6. Further study showed that DR6 protein was downregulated by miR-195 overexpression, upregulated by miR-195 inhibition, and unchanged by binding-site mutation and miR-masks. Knockdown of endogenous miR-195 by lentiviral vector-mediated overexpression of its antisense molecule (lenti-pre-AMO-miR-195) decreased the total length, numbers and crossings of dendrites and neuron death, upregulated N-APP and DR6 levels, and elevated cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-6 levels. Overexpression of miR-195 using lenti-pre-miR-195 prevented these changes triggered by 2VO. We conclude that miR-195 is involved in CBH-induced dendritic degeneration and neuron death through activation of the N-APP/DR6/caspase pathway.

  18. Prevention of influenza-related illness in young infants by maternal vaccination during pregnancy [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta C Nunes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The influenza virus circulates yearly and causes global epidemics. Influenza infection affects all age groups and causes mild to severe illness, and young infants are at particular risk for serious disease. The most effective measure to prevent influenza disease is vaccination; however, no vaccine is licensed for use in infants younger than 6 months old. Thus, there is a crucial need for other preventive strategies in this high-risk age group. Influenza vaccination during pregnancy protects both the mothers and the young infants against influenza infection. Vaccination during pregnancy boosts the maternal antibodies and increases the transfer of immunoglobulin G from the mother to the fetus through the placenta, which confers protection against infection in infants too young to be vaccinated. Data from clinical trials and observational studies did not demonstrate adverse effects to the mother, the fetus, or the infant after maternal influenza vaccination. We present the current data on the effectiveness and safety of influenza vaccination during pregnancy in preventing disease in the young infant.

  19. Preventative effect of massage on gastric volvulus in infants with gastroesophageal reflux-induced pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Suqi; Xiong, Xiaoli; Wan, Qi; Liu, Fan; Tang, Jianqiao; Jiang, Zhixia; Zhou, Lishan; Yuan, Kai; Xie, Dong

    2015-10-01

    To study the preventative effects of massage on gastric volvulus (GV) in infants with gastroesophageal reflux (GER)-induced pneumonia. One-hundred and eighty GV with GER-induced pneumonia inpatients were divided randomly into four groups: basic treatment 1 (n = 60), basic treatment 2 (n = 30), massage treatment 1 (n = 60) and massage treatment 2 (n = 30). Clinical examinations selected between groups 1 and 2 were different. Radiography of the upper gastrointestinal tract using iodine-containing contrast was assessed in group 1 before and after treatment, whereas 24-h pH monitoring of the distal esophagus was assessed in group 2 before and after treatment. Symptom scores and chest radiography were assessed in all groups upon hospital admission and after procedures. Clinical effects were estimated after procedures in all groups. The prevalence of severe pneumonia among the four groups was compared. Massage treatment groups showed a significantly higher percentage of cure and total effect (P 0.05) than basic treatment groups. Furthermore, massage treatment groups had remarkably lower scores for symptoms and signs (P massage treatment groups compared with those in basic treatment groups. Finally, massage treatment groups demonstrated a lower prevalence of severe pneumonia than basic treatment groups (P Massage treatment can prevent GV with GER-induced pneumonia in infants by timely correction of stomach rotation and subsequent attenuation of GER.

  20. Backcasting to identify food waste prevention and mitigation opportunities for infant feeding in maternity services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan-Fogarty, Yvonne; Becker, Genevieve; Moles, Richard; O'Regan, Bernadette

    2017-03-01

    Food waste in hospitals is of major concern for two reasons: one, healthcare needs to move toward preventative and demand led models for sustainability and two, food system sustainability needs to seek preventative measures such as diet adaptation and waste prevention. The impact of breast-milk substitute use on health services are well established in literature in terms of healthcare implications, cost and resourcing, however as a food demand and waste management issue little has been published to date. This paper presents the use of a desk based backcasting method to analyse food waste prevention, mitigation and management options within the Irish Maternity Service. Best practice in healthcare provision and waste management regulations are used to frame solutions. Strategic problem orientation revealed that 61% of the volume of ready to use breast-milk substitutes purchased by maternity services remains unconsumed and ends up as waste. Thirteen viable strategies to prevent and manage this waste were identified. Significant opportunities exist to prevent waste and also decrease food demand leading to both positive health and environmental outcomes. Backcasting methods display great promise in delivering food waste management strategies in healthcare settings, especially where evidenced best practice policies exist to inform solution forming processes. In terms of food waste prevention and management, difficulties arise in distinguishing between demand reduction, waste prevention and waste reduction measures under the current Waste Management Hierarchy definitions. Ultimately demand reduction at source requires prioritisation, a strategy which is complimentary to health policy on infant feeding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Preventing tomorrow's sudden cardiac death in epilepsy today: what should physicians know about this?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio A. Scorza

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1% of the population has epilepsy, the most common neurological disorder. Moreover, people with epilepsy are more likely to die prematurely than those without epilepsy, and the most common epilepsy-related category of death is sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP. Information concerning risk factors for SUDEP is conflicting, but potential risk factors include: age, early onset of epilepsy, duration of epilepsy, uncontrolled seizures, seizure frequency, number of antiepileptic drugs and winter temperatures. Additionally, the cause of SUDEP is still unknown; however, the most commonly suggested mechanisms are cardiac abnormalities during and between seizures. This review discusses the epidemiology, risk factors, etiology, and preventative measures in the management of SUDEP.

  2. Anticipatory guidance to prevent infant sleep problems within a randomised controlled trial: infant, maternal and partner outcomes at 6 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Barbara C; Sayers, Rachel M; Cameron, Sonya L; Gray, Andrew R; Heath, Anne-Louise M; Lawrence, Julie A; Newlands, Alana; Taylor, Barry J; Taylor, Rachael W

    2017-06-02

    To evaluate the effectiveness of sleep education delivered antenatally and at 3 weeks postpartum to prevent infant sleep problems at 6 months of age. Sleep intervention within a randomised controlled trial for the Prevention of Overweight in Infancy (POI) study. 802 families were randomly allocated to one of four groups: usual care (control), sleep intervention (sleep), food, activity and breastfeeding intervention (FAB), and combined group receiving both interventions (combination). All groups received standard Well Child care. The sleep intervention groups (sleep and combination) received an antenatal group education session (all mothers and most partners) emphasising infant self-settling and safe sleeping, and a home visit at 3 weeks reinforcing the antenatal sleep education. FAB and combination groups received four contacts providing education and support on breast feeding, food and activity up to 4 months postpartum. Here we report secondary sleep outcomes from the POI study: the prevalence of parent-reported infant sleep problems and night waking, and differences in sleep duration. Additional outcomes reported include differences in infant self-settling, safe sleep practices, and maternal and partner reports of their own sleep, fatigue and depression symptoms. Linear or mixed linear regression models found no significant intervention effects on sleep outcomes, with 19.1% of mothers and 16.6% of partners reporting their infant's sleep a problem at 6 months. Actigraphy estimated the number of night wakings to be significantly reduced (8%) and the duration of daytime sleep increased (6 min) in those groups receiving the sleep intervention compared with those who did not. However, these small differences were not clinically significant and not observed in 24 hours infant sleep diary data. No other differences were observed. A strategy delivering infant sleep education antenatally and at 3 weeks postpartum was not effective in preventing the development

  3. N-Methyl-d-Aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Blockade Prevents Neuronal Death Induced by Zika Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Vivian V; Del Sarto, Juliana L; Rocha, Rebeca F; Silva, Flavia R; Doria, Juliana G; Olmo, Isabella G; Marques, Rafael E; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Foureaux, Giselle; Araújo, Julia Maria S; Cramer, Allysson; Real, Ana Luíza C V; Ribeiro, Lucas S; Sardi, Silvia I; Ferreira, Anderson J; Machado, Fabiana S; de Oliveira, Antônio C; Teixeira, Antônio L; Nakaya, Helder I; Souza, Danielle G; Ribeiro, Fabiola M; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2017-04-25

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is a global health emergency that causes significant neurodegeneration. Neurodegenerative processes may be exacerbated by N -methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent neuronal excitoxicity. Here, we have exploited the hypothesis that ZIKV-induced neurodegeneration can be rescued by blocking NMDA overstimulation with memantine. Our results show that ZIKV actively replicates in primary neurons and that virus replication is directly associated with massive neuronal cell death. Interestingly, treatment with memantine or other NMDAR blockers, including dizocilpine (MK-801), agmatine sulfate, or ifenprodil, prevents neuronal death without interfering with the ability of ZIKV to replicate in these cells. Moreover, in vivo experiments demonstrate that therapeutic memantine treatment prevents the increase of intraocular pressure (IOP) induced by infection and massively reduces neurodegeneration and microgliosis in the brain of infected mice. Our results indicate that the blockade of NMDARs by memantine provides potent neuroprotective effects against ZIKV-induced neuronal damage, suggesting it could be a viable treatment for patients at risk for ZIKV infection-induced neurodegeneration. IMPORTANCE Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is a global health emergency associated with serious neurological complications, including microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Infection of experimental animals with ZIKV causes significant neuronal damage and microgliosis. Treatment with drugs that block NMDARs prevented neuronal damage both in vitro and in vivo These results suggest that overactivation of NMDARs contributes significantly to the neuronal damage induced by ZIKV infection, and this is amenable to inhibition by drug treatment. Copyright © 2017 Costa et al.

  4. Time trends and risk factor associated with premature birth and infants deaths due to prematurity in Hubei Province, China from 2001 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiqing; Dai, Qiong; Xu, Yusong; Gong, Zhengtao; Dai, Guohong; Ding, Ming; Duggan, Christopher; Hu, Zubin; Hu, Frank B

    2015-12-10

    The nutrition and epidemiologic transition has been associated with an increasing incidence of preterm birth in developing countries, but data from large observational studies in China have been limited. Our study was to describe the trends and factors associated with the incidence of preterm birth and infant mortality due to prematurity in Hubei Province, China. We conducted a population-based survey through the Maternal and Child Health Care Network in Hubei Province from January 2001 to December 2012. We used data from 16 monitoring sites to examine the trend and risk factors for premature birth as well as infant mortality associated with prematurity. A total of 818,481 live births were documented, including 76,923 preterm infants (94 preterm infants per 1,000 live births) and 2,248 deaths due to prematurity (2.75 preterm deaths per 1,000 live births). From 2001 to 2012, the incidence of preterm birth increased from 56.7 to 105.2 per 1,000 live births (P for trend infant mortality rate due to prematurity declined from 95.0 to 13.4 per 1,000 live births (P for trend infant male sex were independently associated with a higher incidence of preterm birth (all p values mortality rate, while use of newborn emergency transport services (NETS) was associated with a lower preterm mortality rate (all p values infant mortality due to prematurity were observed in Hubei Province from 2001 to 2012. Our results provide important information for areas of improvements in reducing incidence and mortality of premature birth.

  5. Prospective evaluation of a multi-factorial prevention strategy on the impact of nosocomial infection in very-low-birthweight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, C; Hart, J; Vemgal, P; Harrison, C

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of a multi-factorial intervention on nosocomial infection in very-low-birthweight infants. Consecutive infants with a birth weight less than 1500 g, born between February 2002 and February 2003, were included in this prospective study. The first six-month period (control) included surveillance of current practice. The intervention began in the seventh month and included: (i) changes to handwashing solutions with hand hygiene education; (ii) standardization of intravascular device (IV) insertion with specialized packs; (iii) changes to skin antiseptic solutions (2% aqueous chlorhexidine and 1% chlorhexidine in ethanol); and (iv) mandatory removal or replacement of peripheral IV after 48 hours and removal once enteral intake was > 120 mL/kg/day. Demographic data and details of every device were collected prospectively. Bloodstream infections (BSIs), length of stay (LOS), length of ventilation (LOV) and death were recorded and the rate of nosocomial BSI was calculated. Overall, 174 newborns required 1359 devices. The two cohorts were similar for birth weight and gestation. There was a reduction in nosocomial BSIs from 21% to 9% (control vs. intervention) (P = 0.05, confidence intervals 0.19-1.0). There was no significant difference in LOS, LOV, or mortality. Four infants had complications from 2% chlorhexidine. In conclusion, implementation of the multi-factorial prevention strategy reduced nosocomial BSIs. Alternative antiseptic solutions are needed to reduce the complications caused by 2% aqueous chlorhexidine.

  6. Preventable infant mortality and quality of health care: maternal perception of the child's illness and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salime Hadad

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This study used a qualitative methodology to analyze the discourse of mothers from Greater Metropolitan Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, whose infant children had died from what were considered avoidable causes (diarrhea, malnutrition, and pneumonia, seeking to elucidate the factors associated with utilization of health care services. Identification of the illness by the mother was related to perception of specific alterations in the child's state of health. Analysis of the alterations helped identify the principal characteristics ascribed to each alteration and their relationship to the search for treatment. The authors also studied the mother's assessment of treatment received at health care facilities; 43.0% of the cases involved problems related to the structure of health care services or the attending health care professionals. In 46.0% of the cases, mothers associated the child's death with flaws in the health care service. The study group showed a variety of interpretations of illness, often distinct from the corresponding biomedical concepts. The fact that attending health care personnel overlooked or underrated the mother's perception of the illness and the lack of communications between health care personnel and the child's family had an influence on the child's evolution and subsequent death.

  7. The role of immunonutrients in the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm very low birth weight infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Ping; Li, Yanqi; Ma, Li-Ya

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a critical intestinal emergency condition, which mainly occurs in preterm very low birth weight (PVLBW) infants. Despite remarkable advances in the care of PVLBW infants, with considerable improvement of the survival rate in recent decades, the incidence of NEC...... and NEC-related mortality have not declined accordingly. The fast progression from nonspecific signs to extensive necrosis also makes primary prevention the first priority. Recently, increasing evidence has indicated the important role of several nutrients in primary prevention of NEC. Therefore, the aim...

  8. What kind of milk can prevent infant's sideropenic anemia--comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milankov, Olgica; Bjelica, Milena; Savić, Radojica

    2014-01-01

    The most common cause of sideropenic anemia in infants, during the period of their fast growth and development, is inadequate nutrition or insufficient intake of food rich in iron. The aim of this paper is to provide the insight into the problem of anemia and to emphasize nutrition as an important etiologic factor in the onset and prevention of anemia in infants. Two retrospective studies were conducted at the Institute for Child and Youth Healthcare of Vojvodina. Department for Infant and Small Children's Pathology. The first study covered the period of eight years (1988-1995), and it included a total of 507 children, aged 1-24 months. The second study covered the period of two years (2010-2011) and a total of 290 children aged 1-12 months were included. The diagnosis of anemia was made according to clinical examination or after taking routine laboratory tests. According to the criteria of the World Health Organization, all children were divided into those with severe, moderate or mild anemia. Out of 507 children examined in the first study, 333 (65.68%) were breastfed, while 174 (34.32%) had never been breastfed. In the second study, 206 (71.03%) out of 290 children were breastfed, while 56 (19.31%) had never been breastfed. In both studies the highest percentage of children breastfed for the longest period was among children with mild form of anemia, while the children who were breastfed for the shortest period had severe anemia. In addition, the highest percentage of anemic children was supplementary fed with cow's milk in both studies. Short natural diet, early introduction of supplementation and choice of milk could be determining factors in the development and manifestation of anemia.

  9. Advances in sudden death prevention: the emerging role of a fully subcutaneous defibrillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majithia, Arjun; Estes, N A Mark; Weinstock, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    Randomized clinical trials support the use of implantable defibrillators for mortality reduction in specific populations at high risk for sudden cardiac death. Conventional transvenous defibrillator systems are limited by implantation-associated complications, infection, and lead failure, which may lead to delivery of inappropriate shocks and diminish survival. The development of a fully subcutaneous defibrillator may represent a valuable addition to therapies targeted at sudden death prevention. The PubMed database was searched to identify all clinical reports of the subcutaneous defibrillator from 2000 to the present. We reviewed all case series, cohort analyses, and randomized trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of subcutaneous defibrillators. The subcutaneous defibrillator is a feasible development in sudden cardiac death therapy and may be useful particularly to extend defibrillator therapy to patients with complicated anatomy, limited vascular access, and congenital disease. The subcutaneous defibrillator should not be considered in patients with an indication for cardiac pacing or who have ventricular tachycardia responsive to antitachycardia pacing. Further investigation is needed to compare long-term, head-to-head performance of subcutaneous defibrillators and conventional transvenous defibrillator systems. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Quality of life and time to death: have the health gains of preventive interventions been underestimated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Maria; Brouwer, Werner B F; van Baal, Pieter H M

    2015-04-01

    This article explores the implications of the relation between quality of life (QoL) and time to death (TTD) for economic evaluations of preventive interventions. By using health survey data on QoL for the general Dutch population linked to the mortality registry, we quantify the magnitude of this relationship. For addressing specific features of the nonstandard QoL distribution such as boundness, skewness, and heteroscedasticity, we modeled QoL using a generalized additive model for location, scale, and shape (GAMLSS) with a β inflated outcome distribution. Our empirical results indicate that QoL decreases when approaching death, suggesting that there is a strong relationship between TTD and QoL. Predictions of different regression models revealed that ignoring this relationship results in an underestimation of the quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gains for preventive interventions. The underestimation ranged between 3% and 7% and depended on age, the number of years gained from the intervention, and the discount rate used. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Inhibition of gingipains prevents Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced preterm birth and fetal death in pregnant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takii, Ryosuke; Kadowaki, Tomoko; Tsukuba, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2018-04-05

    Accumulating epidemiological evidence indicates that infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis which is a major periodontal pathogen, causes preterm birth and low birth weight. However, virulence factors of P. gingivalis responsible for preterm birth/low birth weight remain to be elucidated. In this study, using P. gingivalis-infected pregnant mice as an in vivo model, we investigated whether gingipains-cysteine proteinases produced by P. gingivalis-affect preterm birth and low birth weight. We found that intravenous infection of pregnant mice with P. gingivalis induced higher accumulation of the bacterium in the placenta than that in other organs. Compared to infection with P. gingivalis wild-type, infection with a gingipain-deficient P. gingivalis mutant KDP136 led to significant reduction in preterm birth and pregnancy loss. Although repetitive low-level infections of P. gingivalis failed to induce preterm birth and fetal death, it induced suppressive effects on IFN-γ production. Therapeutically, treatment with ginginpain inhibitors prevented fetal death and preterm birth caused by P. gingivalis infection and resulted in recovery of IFN-γ suppression caused by repetitive chronic P. gingivalis infection. These results indicate that gingipains are major virulence factors of P. gingivalis responsible for preterm birth/low birth, and gingipain inhibitors may be useful not only as a therapeutic agent for periodontal diseases, but also as a preventive medicine for preterm birth/low birth weight. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Systemic Hydrocortisone To Prevent Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in preterm infants (the SToP-BPD study); a multicenter randomized placebo controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onland, Wes; Offringa, Martin; Cools, Filip; De Jaegere, Anne P.; Rademaker, Karin; Blom, Henry; Cavatorta, Eric; Dijk, Peter H.; van Heijst, Arno F.; Kramer, Boris W.; Kroon, Andre A.; Mohns, Thilo; van Straaten, Henrica L.; te Pas, Arjan B.; Theyskens, Claire; van Weissenbruch, Mirjam M.; van Kaam, Anton H.; Beer de, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Randomized controlled trials have shown that treatment of chronically ventilated preterm infants after the first week of life with dexamethasone reduces the incidence of the combined outcome death or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). However, there are concerns that dexamethasone may

  13. The role of respiratory failure caused by congenital central nervous system abnormalities and the effect of β-casomorphins in sudden infant death syndrome pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Sumińska-Ziemann; Tomasz Gos; Zbigniew Jankowski

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to discuss the role of respiratory failure caused by endogenous (both structural and functional) abnormalities in the central nervous system and exogenous food-derived opioid-like peptides in the pathogenesis of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). By stimulating μ-opioid receptors, opioid-like peptides may suppress the tonic activity of the respiratory centre in the brain stem.

  14. The role of respiratory failure caused by congenital central nervous system abnormalities and the effect of β-casomorphins in sudden infant death syndrome pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumińska-Ziemann, B; Gos, T; Jankowski, Z

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to discuss the role of respiratory failure caused by endogenous (both structural and functional) abnormalities in the central nervous system and exogenous food-derived opioid-like peptides in the pathogenesis of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). By stimulating μ-opioid receptors, opioid-like peptides may suppress the tonic activity of the respiratory centre in the brain stem.

  15. The unique impact of abolition of Jim Crow laws on reducing inequities in infant death rates and implications for choice of comparison groups in analyzing societal determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Nancy; Chen, Jarvis T; Coull, Brent; Waterman, Pamela D; Beckfield, Jason

    2013-12-01

    We explored associations between the abolition of Jim Crow laws (i.e., state laws legalizing racial discrimination overturned by the 1964 US Civil Rights Act) and birth cohort trends in infant death rates. We analyzed 1959 to 2006 US Black and White infant death rates within and across sets of states (polities) with and without Jim Crow laws. Between 1965 and 1969, a unique convergence of Black infant death rates occurred across polities; in 1960 to 1964, the Black infant death rate was 1.19 times higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.18, 1.20) in the Jim Crow polity than in the non-Jim Crow polity, whereas in 1970 to 1974 the rate ratio shrank to and remained at approximately 1 (with the 95% CI including 1) until 2000, when it rose to 1.10 (95% CI = 1.08, 1.12). No such convergence occurred for Black-White differences in infant death rates or for White infants. Our results suggest that abolition of Jim Crow laws affected US Black infant death rates and that valid analysis of societal determinants of health requires appropriate comparison groups.

  16. Treatments for the prevention of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Melissa J; Jackson, Cerian F; Marson, Anthony G; Nolan, Sarah J

    2016-07-19

    Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) is defined as sudden, unexpected, witnessed or unwitnessed, non-traumatic or non-drowning death of people with epilepsy, with or without evidence of a seizure, excluding documented status epilepticus and in whom postmortem examination does not reveal a structural or toxicological cause for death. SUDEP has a reported incidence of 1 to 2 per 1000 patient years and represents the most common epilepsy-related cause of death. The presence and frequency of generalised tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS), male sex, early age of seizure onset, duration of epilepsy, and polytherapy are all predictors of risk of SUDEP. The exact pathophysiology of SUDEP is currently unknown, although GTCS-induced cardiac, respiratory, and brainstem dysfunction appears likely. Appropriately chosen antiepileptic drug treatment can render around 70% of patients free of all seizures. However, around one-third will remain drug refractory despite polytherapy. Continuing seizures place patients at risk of SUDEP, depression, and reduced quality of life. Preventative strategies for SUDEP include reducing the occurrence of GTCS by timely referral for presurgical evaluation in people with lesional epilepsy and advice on lifestyle measures; detecting cardiorespiratory distress through clinical observation and seizure, respiratory, and heart rate monitoring devices; preventing airway obstruction through nocturnal supervision and safety pillows; reducing central hypoventilation through physical stimulation and enhancing serotonergic mechanisms of respiratory regulation using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs); reducing adenosine and endogenous opioid-induced brain and brainstem depression. To assess the effectiveness of interventions in preventing SUDEP in people with epilepsy by synthesising evidence from randomised controlled trials of interventions and cohort and case-control non-randomised studies. We searched the following databases: Cochrane

  17. [Protocol of Miao medical LIU's infant tuina genre "Tui Wu Jing" in western Hunan province for prevention of asthma recurrence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongzheng; Jia, Yuanbin; Guo, Jing; Wang, Xiaojun; Su, Shaomin; Liu, Yingying; Deng, Yu; Liu, Liangjing; Shi, Weikun; Yang, Renda

    2017-07-12

    The Miao medical LIU 's ( LIU Kaiyun ) infant tuina genre in western Hunan Province is one of the most famous infant tuina genres in China. Based on physiological and pathological characteristics of infants, generation-inhibition theory of five-elements and Miao medical's promotion-inhibition theory of five-meridians, the tuina protocol of " Tui Wu Jing " was flexibly adjusted; according to different constitution types, including lung-deficiency type, spleen-deficiency type, kidney-deficiency type, qi -deficiency type, yin -deficiency type, yang -deficiency type, phlegm-wet type, phlegm-heat type, different protocols were adopted to prevent or reduce the asthma recurrence and reach the aim of regulating constitution and disease prevention.

  18. Permissive hypercapnia for the prevention of morbidity and mortality in mechanically ventilated newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, P G; Davies, M W

    2001-01-01

    combined data was possible for three outcomes. There was no evidence that permissive hypercapnia reduced the incidence of death or chronic lung disease at 36 weeks (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.78, 1.15), intraventricular haemorrhage grade 3 or 4 (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.54, 1.31) or periventricular leukomalacia (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.49, 2.12). There were no differences in any other reported outcomes when the strategy of permissive hypercapnia/minimal ventilation was compared to routine ventilation in newborn infants. Long term neurodevelopmental outcomes were not reported. One trial reported that permissive hypercapnia reduced the incidence of chronic lung disease in the 501 to 750 gram subgroup. This review does not demonstrate any significant overall benefit of a permissive hypercapnia/minimal ventilation strategy compared to a routine ventilation strategy. At present, therefore, these ventilation strategies cannot be recommended to reduce mortality, or pulmonary and neurodevelopmental morbidity. Ventilatory strategies which target high levels of PCO2 (> 55 mmHg) should only be undertaken in the context of well-designed controlled clinical trials. These trials should aim to establish the safe, or ideal, range for CO2 in ventilated newborns, and examine the role of protective ventilatory techniques in achieving this target.

  19. Head midline position for preventing the occurrence or extension of germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romantsik, Olga; Calevo, Maria Grazia; Bruschettini, Matteo

    2017-07-20

    Preterm birth is known to constitute the major risk factor for development of germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (GM-IVH). Head position may affect cerebral hemodynamics and thus may be involved indirectly in development of GM-IVH. Turning the head toward one side may functionally occlude jugular venous drainage on the ipsilateral side while increasing intracranial pressure and cerebral blood volume. Thus, it has been suggested that cerebral venous pressure is reduced and hydrostatic brain drainage improved if the patient is in supine midline position with the bed tilted 30°. The midline position might be achieved in the supine position and, with the use of physical aids, in the lateral position as well. Midline position should be kept, at least when the incidence of GM-IVH is greatest, that is, during the first two to three days of life. Primary objective To assess whether head midline position is more effective than any other head position for preventing or extending germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage in infants born at ≤ 32 weeks' gestational age. Secondary objectives To perform subgroup analyses regarding gestational age, birth weight, intubated versus not intubated, and with or without GM-IVH at trial entry. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 8), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to September 19, 2016), Embase (1980 to September 19,.2016), and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; 1982 to September 19, 2016). We searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and reference lists of retrieved articles for randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials. Randomized clinical controlled trials, quasi-randomized trials, and cluster-randomized controlled trials comparing placing very preterm infants in a head midline position versus placing them in a prone or lateral decubitus

  20. No rebound of morbidity following intermittent preventive sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine treatment of malaria in infants in Gabon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grobusch, Martin P.; Gabor, Julian J.; Aponte, John J.; Schwarz, Norbert G.; Poetschke, Marc; Doernemann, Jenny; Schuster, Katharina; Koester, Kai B.; Profanter, Katharina; Borchert, Lea B.; Kurth, Florian; Pongratz, Peter; Issifou, Saadou; Lell, Bertrand; Kremsner, Peter G.

    2009-01-01

    In the context of a trial studying intermittent preventive sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine treatment of malaria in infants in Lambaréné, Gabon, children aged 18-30 months were followed up after having received their last dose at an age of 15 months. In the intention-to-treat population, the protective

  1. Intermittent preventive treatment against malaria in infants in Gabon--a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grobusch, Martin P.; Lell, Bertrand; Schwarz, Norbert G.; Gabor, Julian; Dornemann, Jenny; Potschke, Marc; Oyakhirome, Sunny; Kiessling, Georg C.; Necek, Magdalena; Langin, Matthias U.; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter; Klopfer, Anna; Naumann, Benjamin; Altun, Handan; Agnandji, Selidji T.; Goesch, Julia; Decker, Marieluise; Salazar, Carmen L. Ospina; Supan, Christian; Kombila, Davy U.; Borchert, Lea; Koster, Kai B.; Pongratz, Peter; Adegnika, Akim A.; Glasenapp, Isabelle von; Issifou, Saadou; Kremsner, Peter G.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intermittent preventive treatment aims to maximize the protective effects of malaria chemoprophylaxis while minimizing the deleterious effects. METHODS: In Gabon, 1189 infants received either sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP; 250 and 12.5 mg, respectively) or placebo at 3, 9, and 15 months

  2. The cost-effectiveness of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in infants in Sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conteh, Lesong; Sicuri, Elisa; Manzi, Fatuma; Hutton, Guy; Obonyo, Benson; Tediosi, Fabrizio; Biao, Prosper; Masika, Paul; Matovu, Fred; Otieno, Peter; Gosling, Roly D.; Hamel, Mary; Odhiambo, Frank O.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Kremsner, Peter G.; Chandramohan, Daniel; Aponte, John J.; Egan, Andrea; Schellenberg, David; Macete, Eusebio; Slutsker, Laurence; Newman, Robert D.; Alonso, Pedro; Menéndez, Clara; Tanner, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intermittent preventive treatment in infants (IPTi) has been shown to decrease clinical malaria by approximately 30% in the first year of life and is a promising malaria control strategy for Sub-Saharan Africa which can be delivered alongside the Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI).

  3. Prevention of vitamin K deficiency bleeding in breastfed infants : Lessons from the Dutch and Danish biliary atresia registries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hasselt, Peter M.; de Koning, Tom J.; Kvist, Nina; de Vries, Elsemieke; Lundin, Christina Rydahl; Berger, Ruud; Kimpen, Jan L. L.; Houwen, Roderick H. J.; Jorgensen, Marianne Horby; Verkade, Henkjan J.

    OBJECTIVE. Newborns routinely receive vitamin K to prevent vitamin K deficiency bleeding. The efficacy of oral vitamin K administration may be compromised in infants with unrecognized cholestasis. We aimed to compare the risk of vitamin K deficiency bleeding under different propylactic regimens in

  4. Protective efficacy of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in infants (IPTi) using sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and parasite resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffin, Jamie T.; Cairns, Matthew; Ghani, Azra C.; Roper, Cally; Schellenberg, David; Carneiro, Ilona; Newman, Robert D.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Greenwood, Brian; Chandramohan, Daniel; Gosling, Roly D.

    2010-01-01

    Intermittent Preventive Treatment of malaria in infants using sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP-IPTi) is recommended by WHO for implementation in settings where resistance to SP is not high. Here we examine the relationship between the protective efficacy of SP-IPTi and measures of SP resistance. We

  5. Caloric restriction suppresses apoptotic cell death in the mammalian cochlea and leads to prevention of presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Weindruch, Richard; Prolla, Tomas A; Tanokura, Masaru

    2007-10-01

    Presbycusis is characterized by an age-related progressive decline of auditory function, and arises mainly from the degeneration of hair cells or spiral ganglion (SG) cells in the cochlea. Here we show that caloric restriction suppresses apoptotic cell death in the mouse cochlea and prevents late onset of presbycusis. Calorie restricted (CR) mice, which maintained body weight at the same level as that of young control (YC) mice, retained normal hearing and showed no cochlear degeneration. CR mice also showed a significant reduction in the number of TUNEL-positive cells and cleaved caspase-3-positive cells relative to middle-age control (MC) mice. Microarray analysis revealed that CR down-regulated the expression of 24 apoptotic genes, including Bak and Bim. Taken together, our findings suggest that loss of critical cells through apoptosis is an important mechanism of presbycusis in mammals, and that CR can retard this process by suppressing apoptosis in the inner ear tissue.

  6. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  7. The Relationship Between Maternal Domestic Violence and Infant and Toddlers' Emotional Regulation: Highlighting the Need for Preventive Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Chelsea; Ogbonnaya, Ijeoma Nwabuzor

    2017-11-01

    In an effort to further understand the impact of domestic violence (DV) on infant and toddlers' development, this research utilized data from the second cohort of National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW II) to examine the relationship between maternal DV and infant and toddlers' emotional regulation, and determine whether mothers' receipt of DV services mediated this relationship. The sample was limited to children aged 0 to 3 years and included (a) infants less than 1 year old ( n = 603), (b) infants 1 to less than 2 years old ( n = 310), and (c) toddlers 2 to 3 years old ( n = 268). Infant/toddlers' emotional regulation was measured using mothers' response on the How My Infant/Toddler/Child Usually Acts questionnaire. In addition, data were collected to assess whether (a) active DV was present during the time of the Child Protective Services (CPS) investigation and (b) mothers received DV services during the past year. Study research questions were examined using a series of multiple regression analyses. Mediation was tested based on Baron and Kenny's recommended model for establishing mediation. The mediational model was not found to be significant; however, a positive relationship existed between maternal DV and emotional regulation among infants aged less than 1 year old (β = 1.61, p = .039). There were no statistically significant relationships between DV and emotional regulation in the other age groups. These findings highlight the need to provide CPS-involved families victimized by DV with services that focus on preventing poor infant emotional regulation.

  8. Reexamining the association between child access prevention gun laws and unintentional shooting deaths of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, D W; Starnes, M

    2000-12-01

    A previous study estimated that child access prevention (CAP) laws, which hold adults criminally liable for unsafe firearm storage in the environment of children, were associated with a 23% decline in unintentional firearm mortality rates among children. To reassess the effects of CAP laws and more fully examine the consistency of the estimated law effects across states. A pooled time-series study of unintentional firearm mortality among children from 1979 through 1997. Setting. The 50 states and the District of Columbia. All children laws enacted before 1998 were aggregated, the laws were associated with a 17% decline unintentional firearm death rates among children. The laws' effects were not equal across states. Florida's CAP law was associated with a 51% decline; however, there were no statistically significant aggregate or state-specific law effects in the other 14 states with CAP laws. Florida's CAP law-1 of only 3 such laws allowing felony prosecution of violators-appears to have significantly reduced unintentional firearm deaths to children. However, there is no evidence of effects in the other 14 states with CAP laws.

  9. Use of a dummy (pacifier) during sleep and risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS): population based case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, De-Kun; Willinger, Marian; Petitti, Diana B; Odouli, Roxana; Liu, Liyan; Hoffman, Howard J

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between use of a dummy (pacifier) during sleep and the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in relation to other risk factors. Design Population based case-control study. Setting Eleven counties in California. Participants Mothers or carers of 185 infants whose deaths were attributed to SIDS and 312 randomly selected controls matched for race or ethnicity and age. Main outcome measure Use of a dummy during sleep determined through interviews. Results The adjusted odds ratio for SIDS associated with using a dummy during the last sleep was 0.08 (95% confidence interval 0.03 to 0.21). Use was associated with a reduction in risk in every category of sociodemographic characteristics and risk factors examined. The reduced risk associated with use seemed to be greater with adverse sleep conditions (such as sleeping prone or on side and sleeping with a mother who smoked), although the observed interactions were not significant. In addition, use of a dummy may reduce the impact of other risk factors for SIDS, especially those related to adverse sleep environment. For example, infants who did not use a dummy and slept prone or on their sides (v on their back) had an increased risk of SIDS (2.61, 1.56 to 4.38). In infants who used dummies, there was no increased risk associated with sleeping position (0.66, 0.12 to 3.59). While cosleeping with a mother who smoked was also associated with increased risk of SIDS among infants who did not use a dummy (4.5, 1.3 to 15.1), there was no such association among those who did (1.1, 0.1 to 13.4). Conclusions Use of a dummy seems to reduce the risk of SIDS and possibly reduces the influence of known risk factors in the sleep environment. PMID:16339767

  10. Prediction of Late Death or Disability at Age 5 Years Using a Count of 3 Neonatal Morbidities in Very Low Birth Weight Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Barbara; Roberts, Robin S; Davis, Peter G; Doyle, Lex W; Asztalos, Elizabeth V; Opie, Gillian; Bairam, Aida; Solimano, Alfonso; Arnon, Shmuel; Sauve, Reginald S

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), serious brain injury, and severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) as predictors of poor long-term outcome in very low birth weight infants. We examined the associations between counts of the 3 morbidities and long-term outcomes in 1514 of 1791 (85%) infants with birth weights of 500-1250 g who were enrolled in the Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity trial from October 1999, to October 2004, had complete morbidity data, and were alive at 36 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA). BPD was defined as use of supplemental oxygen at 36 weeks PMA. Serious brain injury on cranial ultrasound included grade 3 and 4 hemorrhage, cystic periventricular leucomalacia, porencephalic cysts, or ventriculomegaly of any cause. Poor long-term outcome was death after 36 weeks PMA or survival to 5 years with 1 or more of the following disabilities: motor impairment, cognitive impairment, behavior problems, poor general health, deafness, and blindness. BPD, serious brain injury, and severe ROP occurred in 43%, 13%, and 6% of the infants, respectively. Each of the 3 morbidities was similarly and independently correlated with poor 5-year outcome. Rates of death or disability (95% CI) in children with none, any 1, any 2, and all 3 morbidities were 11.2% (9.0%-13.7%), 22.9% (19.6%-26.5%), 43.9% (35.5%-52.6%), and 61.5% (40.6%-79.8%), respectively. In very low birth weight infants who survive to 36 weeks PMA, a count of BPD, serious brain injury, and severe ROP predicts the risk of a late death or survival with disability at 5 years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [The influence of preventive iron supplementation to iron nutritional status in breastfed infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue-jiao; Wu, Qin; Yang, Li-chen; Zhang, Xiao-rui; Zeng, Chao-mei; Yang, Xiao-guang; Liu, Jie

    2012-04-01

    To analyze the effects to iron status who were given preventive iron supplements for two months from when they were breast-fed to four-month-old. A total of 123 infants in four-month-old age who were breast-fed were randomly divided into iron supplementation group (63 cases) and control group (60 cases), iron supplementation group was supplied with low-dose iron (1 mg×kg⁻¹×d⁻¹) for two months with no intervention for control group. Blood samples were collected to test C reactive protein and iron status indicators in six-month-old age group infants, and the growth indices were measured and compared on the gender difference of iron status at and 6 months. After 2 months of low-dose iron supplementation, the hemoglobin of iron supplementation group (26 cases) increased about 5.5 g/L while the control group (34 cases) increases about 0.0 g/L (median), 95% confidence intervals were -7.0 - 13.0 g/L and -9.0 - 15.0 g/L, respectively. The hemoglobin increase of iron supplementation group was higher than the control group, the difference was statistically significant (u = -2.326, P nutritional status and the growth did not show any significant difference between iron supplementation group and control group (P > 0.05). At age 6 month, the MCV of the boys were (75.89 ± 3.34) fl, while the girls were (77.20 ± 3.17) fl. The boys had lower values of MCV than the girls, and the gender difference was statistically significant (t = 4.73, P nutritional status did not show any significant gender difference (P > 0.05). Low-dose iron supplementation of breast-fed infants at 4-month-old can increase the hemoglobin level when they were 6-month-old, and had no measurable side effect on growth.

  12. Sudden infant death syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hot to the touch. Offer the baby a pacifier when going to sleep. Pacifiers at naptime and bedtime can reduce the risk for SIDS. Health care professionals think that a pacifier might allow the airway to open more, or ...

  13. Retrospective cohort study of all deaths among infants born between 22 and 27 completed weeks of gestation in Switzerland over a 3-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, T M; Steurer, M A; Bucher, H U; Fauchère, J C; Adams, M; Pfister, R E; Baumann-Hölzle, R; Bassler, D

    2017-06-15

    The aim of this research is to assess causes and circumstances of deaths in extremely low gestational age neonates (ELGANs) born in Switzerland over a 3-year period. Population-based, retrospective cohort study. All nine level III perinatal centres (neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and affiliated obstetrical services) in Switzerland. ELGANs with a gestational age (GA) Switzerland, most deaths among infants born at less than 24 weeks of gestation occurred in the delivery room. In contrast, most deaths of ELGANs with a GA ≥24 weeks were observed following unrestricted provisional intensive care, end-of-life decision-making and redirection of care in the NICU regardless of the degree of immaturity. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Improving the outcome of infants born at <30 weeks' gestation - a randomized controlled trial of preventative care at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orton Jane

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early developmental interventions to prevent the high rate of neurodevelopmental problems in very preterm children, including cognitive, motor and behavioral impairments, are urgently needed. These interventions should be multi-faceted and include modules for caregivers given their high rates of mental health problems. Methods/Design We have designed a randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a preventative care program delivered at home over the first 12 months of life for infants born very preterm ( Discussion This paper presents the background, study design and protocol for a randomized controlled trial in very preterm infants utilizing a preventative care program in the first year after discharge home designed to improve cognitive, motor and behavioral outcomes of very preterm children and caregiver mental health at two-years' corrected age. Clinical Trial Registration Number ACTRN12605000492651

  15. No evidence for congenital malformations or prenatal death in infants born to women with a high dietary intake of fish contaminated with persistent organochlorines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylander, L; Hagmar, L

    1999-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess whether a high dietary intake of fatty fish from the Baltic Sea, contaminated with persistent organochlorine compounds, might increase the risk for congenital malformations and perinatal death. A cohort of fishermen's wives from the Swedish east coast (at the Baltic Sea) were linked to the Swedish Medical Birth Register (MBR), resulting in the identification of 1501 infants born in the period 1973-1991. A further linkage with the Swedish Registry of Congenital Malformations was performed. Similar linkages were made for a comparison group of fishermen's wives from the Swedish west coast, who gave birth to 3553 infants during the study period. The reproductive end points studied included congenital malformations, stillbirths, and early neonatal deaths. The expected numbers of these end points were calculated from the MBR data for the regional populations. In the east coast cohort, 3.3% of the infants had some malformation diagnosis as compared with 5.0% of the west coast cohort. As compared with the general population, somewhat fewer malformations than expected were diagnosed in the east coast cohort (risk ratio 0.78, 95% CI 0.58-1.04). No specific malformation was overrepresented in the east coast cohort. The risk ratios for stillbirths and early neonatal deaths did not significantly differ from unity in any of the cohorts. The present results exclude in an unequivocal way an association between exposure to persistent organochlorines from fatty Baltic Sea fish and an increased risk for all congenital malformations and perinatal death. The limited power of the study design, however, does not allow the exclusion of slight risk excesses for some specific types of malformation.

  16. Acceptability of early infant male circumcision among chinese parents: strategy implications of HIV prevention for china

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Lianjun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence has confirmed that circumcision can be performed as a preventive strategy for HIV and early infant male circumcision (EIMC is regarded to be safer than circumcision in adulthood; however, limited data are available in the literature about EIMC in China. Therefore, the present study was designed to determine the willingness and attitudes of Chinese parents on newborn male circumcision so as to provide data for exploring the feasibility of implementing EIMC as an HIV prevention strategy in China. Methods Simple random sampling was used to draw participants from parents who had a newborn son delivered at Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital, which is affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, between March and December 2010. A questionnaire was used to determine general medical knowledge or information about circumcision, attitudes about EIMC, and level of decision-making on circumcision for the newborn son. Results Data derived from 558 responses were analyzed and the ratio of respondents was 56.3% for fathers and 43.6% for mothers. Of the respondents, 34.4% agreed to circumcise their newborn son, and the level of agreement was 3.25 ± 1.17 (range, 1–5 with “1” being “reluctantly agree” and “5” being “very strongly agree”. The major reason for EIMC was for health (44.8%, followed by doctor’s advice (31.2%. The major reason not to agree to EIMC was concern about pain (50.5%, followed by the risk of the procedure (23.5%. Conclusion The willingness and acceptability of EIMC in China is low and the parents of newborn sons are usually not very affirmative when making a decision on such a procedure, suggesting that significant effort will be needed if EIMC is to be implemented as an HIV prevention strategy for China.

  17. Inter-society consensus document on treatment and prevention of bronchiolitis in newborns and infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraldi, Eugenio; Lanari, Marcello; Manzoni, Paolo; Rossi, Giovanni A; Vandini, Silvia; Rimini, Alessandro; Romagnoli, Costantino; Colonna, Pierluigi; Biondi, Andrea; Biban, Paolo; Chiamenti, Giampietro; Bernardini, Roberto; Picca, Marina; Cappa, Marco; Magazzù, Giuseppe; Catassi, Carlo; Urbino, Antonio Francesco; Memo, Luigi; Donzelli, Gianpaolo; Minetti, Carlo; Paravati, Francesco; Di Mauro, Giuseppe; Festini, Filippo; Esposito, Susanna; Corsello, Giovanni

    2014-10-24

    Acute bronchiolitis is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection and hospitalization in children less than 1 year of age worldwide. It is usually a mild disease, but some children may develop severe symptoms, requiring hospital admission and ventilatory support in the ICU. Infants with pre-existing risk factors (prematurity, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, congenital heart diseases and immunodeficiency) may be predisposed to a severe form of the disease. Clinical diagnosis of bronchiolitis is manly based on medical history and physical examination (rhinorrhea, cough, crackles, wheezing and signs of respiratory distress). Etiological diagnosis, with antigen or genome detection to identify viruses involved, may have a role in reducing hospital transmission of the infection. Criteria for hospitalization include low oxygen saturation (bronchiolitis, and the mainstay of therapy is supportive care. This consists of nasal suctioning and nebulized 3% hypertonic saline, assisted feeding and hydration, humidified O2 delivery. The possible role of any pharmacological approach is still debated, and till now there is no evidence to support the use of bronchodilators, corticosteroids, chest physiotherapy, antibiotics or antivirals. Nebulized adrenaline may be sometimes useful in the emergency room. Nebulized adrenaline can be useful in the hospital setting for treatment as needed. Lacking a specific etiological treatment, prophylaxis and prevention, especially in children at high risk of severe infection, have a fundamental role. Environmental preventive measures minimize viral transmission in hospital, in the outpatient setting and at home. Pharmacological prophylaxis with palivizumab for RSV bronchiolitis is indicated in specific categories of children at risk during the epidemic period. Viral bronchiolitis, especially in the case of severe form, may correlate with an increased incidence of recurrent wheezing in pre-schooled children and with asthma at school age

  18. Arthroscopic Anatomy of the Dislocated Hip in Infants and Obstacles Preventing Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Oliver; Wirth, Thomas; Fernandez, Francisco F

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the anatomy as seen arthroscopically, the role of the labrum and its relevance in luxation and reduction procedures, and secondary changes to the cartilaginous acetabular roof and to determine the main obstacles preventing reduction of dislocated hips in infants and young children. A specialized pediatric medial approach to hip arthroscopy was performed on 25 hip joints in 21 patients younger than 4 years of age. The arthroscopic procedure was conducted using a 2.7-mm cannulated instrument. A subadductor portal was used for the 70° arthroscope, and a high anterolateral portal served as a working portal. The anatomic findings of the individual hip joints were recorded. We examined the femoral head, the teres ligament, the transverse ligament, the acetabulum, and the acetabular labrum. The obstacles preventing reduction were successively resected. An arthroscopic investigation of all major structures and arthroscopic reduction was possible in 25 hip joints. A hypertrophic teres ligament was present in 23 of the 25 hips. Capsular constriction prevented reduction in 22 of the 25 hips. The acetabular labrum was not inverted in any of the examined hip joints and was also never an obstacle to reduction. Secondary changes to the cartilaginous preformed acetabular roof were present in 10 hips. We have shown that arthroscopy of a developmentally dislocated hip can be safely performed using the subadductor portal. Through this arthroscopic approach, we were able to identify the previously described pathologic structures-the limbus, neolimbus, pulvinar, hypertrophic teres ligament, and capsular constriction. The capsule was the most common block to reduction, followed by the teres ligament. Successful reduction can be achieved by removal of intra-articular tissues, the pulvinar, and the teres ligament, and nearly always a capsular release. The limbus and neolimbus were not factors in achieving reduction in our series. Level IV, case

  19. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imène Achour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE, the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA. We also investigated OLE’s ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model.

  20. Synaptogenesis and Myelination in the Nucleus/Tractus Solitarius: Potential Role in Apnea of Prematurity, Congenital Central Hypoventilation, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnat, Harvey B; Flores-Sarnat, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Fetuses as early as 15 weeks' gestation exhibit rhythmical respiratory movements shown by real-time ultrasonography. The nucleus/tractus solitarius is the principal brainstem respiratory center; other medullary nuclei also participate. The purpose was to determine temporal maturation of synaptogenesis. Delayed synaptic maturation may explain neurogenic apnea or hypoventilation of prematurity and some cases of sudden infant death syndrome. Sections of medulla oblongata were studied from 30 human fetal and neonatal brains 9 to 41 weeks' gestation. Synaptophysin demonstrated the immunocytochemical sequence of synaptogenesis. Other neuronal markers and myelin stain also were applied. The nucleus/tractus solitarius was similarly studied in fetuses with chromosomopathies, metabolic encephalopathies, and brain malformations. Synapse formation in the nucleus solitarius begins at about 12 weeks' gestation and matures by 15 weeks; myelination initiated at 33 weeks. Synaptogenesis was delayed in 3 fetuses with different conditions, but was not specific for only nucleus solitarius. Delayed synaptogenesis or myelination in the nucleus solitarius may play a role in neonatal hypoventilation, especially in preterm infants and in some sudden infant death syndrome cases. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. 24-hour tape recordings of ECG and respiration in the newborn infant with findings related to sudden death and unexplained brain damage in infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southall, D P; Richards, Jean; Brown, D J; Johnston, P G B; De Swiet, M; Shinebourne, E A

    1980-01-01

    A system for simultaneous 24-hour tape recording of ECG and respiration has been developed and used in the study of 4 groups of newborn infants. In 50 randomly selected, healthy term infants, the mean lowest heart rate (>9 beats' duration; was 88 ± 13. 14 (28%) infants had junctional escape rhythms, 5 had supraventricular, and 2 ventricular premature beats. 34 (68%) subjects had apnoeic episodes ≥10 seconds' duration; the 95th centile for maximum duration of apnoea was 18 seconds, the longest episode being 28 seconds. Episodes of bradycardia 40 seconds, or extreme bradycardia arrhythmias on a standard ECG were studied. Of these, 6 with premature beats and 3 of 5 with episodes of bradycardia did not exhibit apnoea during arrhythmias. Two of the 5 babies with bradycardia however, demonstrated associated apnoea of 10-14 seconds. There may be a relationship between latent episodes of prolonged apnoea and bradycardia and hypoxaemic brain damage or sudden infant death. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:7377822

  2. Mass awareness regarding snake bite induced early morning neuroparalysis can prevent many deaths in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rupinder; Dogra, Varundeep; Sharma, Gurudutt; Chauhan, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    In North India snake bite deaths are predominantly seen with neurotoxic envenomations (NEs) whereas in South India the hemotoxic envenomation (HE) is more common. Krait is responsible for most deaths in North India. It bites people sleeping on the floors, mostly at night. We describe the profile of venomous snake bites over 1 year in 2013. The study was conducted in a rural tertiary care hospital in North India. Demographics, circumstances of bite, envenomation, first aid, delay, consultation, treatment, anti-venom, and outcomes were recorded for all victims of snake bite. We included all consecutive adult (>18 years) venomous snake bite victims admitted from January to December 2013. A total of 91 patients with venomous snake bites were included in the study. Pure NEs were 41 (45.1%), pure HE in 31 (34.1%), 7 (7.7%) had mixed NE + HE, and 12 (13.2%) had only local swelling. Forty patients (44%) were bitten during sleep presenting as NE (92.5%), NE + HE (5%), and HE (2.5%). Findings in the 51 patients (56%) bitten during activity were HE (58.8%), local swelling (23.5%), NE + HE (9.8%), and NE (7.8%) ( P NE patients out of which 23 (96%) went to alternate practitioners or religious healers. Almost all (97.5%) bites during sleep resulted in NE in our study. About 96% of NE sought first aid from alternate practitioners or religious healers in hope of some magical treatment. Thus, a deadly combination of krait bite during sleep and wrong health seeking behavior is responsible for high mortality krait bites in this region. Mass public awareness regarding krait bites can prevent mortality in many such cases.

  3. Parent Spirituality, Grief, and Mental Health at 1 and 3 Months After Their Infant's/Child's Death in an Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Dawn M; Youngblut, JoAnne M; Brooten, Dorothy

    2016-01-01

    The death of an infant/child is one of the most devastating experiences for parents and immediately throws them into crisis. Research on the use of spiritual/religious coping strategies is limited, especially with Black and Hispanic parents after a neonatal (NICU) or pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) death. The purpose of this longitudinal study was to test the relationships between spiritual/religious coping strategies and grief, mental health (depression and post-traumatic stress disorder) and personal growth for mothers and fathers at 1 (T1) and 3 (T2) months after the infant's/child's death in the NICU/PICU, with and without control for race/ethnicity and religion. Bereaved parents' greater use of spiritual activities was associated with lower symptoms of grief, mental health (depression and post-traumatic stress), but not post-traumatic stress in fathers. Use of religious activities was significantly related to greater personal growth for mothers, but not fathers. Spiritual strategies and activities helped parents cope with their grief and helped bereaved mothers maintain their mental health and experience personal growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Age spectrometry of infant death rates as a probe of immunity: Identification of two peaks due to viral and bacterial diseases respectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrut, Sylvie; Richmond, Peter; Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2017-11-01

    After birth, setting up an effective immune system is a major challenge for all living organisms. In this paper we show that this process can be explored by using the age-specific infant death rate as a kind of sensor. This is made possible because, as shown by the authors in Berrut et al. (2016), between birth and a critical age tc, for all mammals the death rate decreases with age as a smooth hyperbolic function. For humans tc is equal to 10 years. It turns out that for some causes of deaths and specific ages the hyperbolic fall displays temporary spikes which, it is assumed, correspond to specific events in the organism's response to exogenous factors. One of these spikes occurs 10 days after birth and there is another at the age of 300 days. It is shown that the first spike is related to viral infections whereas the second is related to bacterial diseases. By going back to former time periods during which infant mortality was much higher than it is currently, one gets a magnified view of these peaks. They give us useful information about how an organism adapts to new conditions. Apart from the reaction to pathogens, the same methodology can be used to study the response to changes in other external conditions, e.g. temperature or oxygen level.

  5. Intravenous indomethacin therapy in premature infants with patent ductus arteriosus. Causes of death and one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, T F; Goldbarg, H R; Henek, T; Thalji, A; Pildes, R S

    1982-09-01

    Fifty-five infants participated in a double-blind study of indomethacin therapy for the closure of patent ductus arteriosus. Seventeen infants died. There was no significant difference in autopsy findings between the groups with respect to pneumonia, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis, intraventricular hemorrhage, hydrocephalus, kernicterus, brain softening, and renal damage. For those infants who survived and returned for follow-up at approximately 1 year of age, there was no significant difference between the control (n = 17) and indomethacin (n = 13) groups with respect to physical growth, Bayley scores, respiratory infection, abnormal eye ground, neurological defects, and abnormal EEG. Four in the control group (24%) and three in the indomethacin group (23%) had moderate to severe neurological defects and/or scored less than 80 on the Bayley Mental Development Index or Psychomotor Development Index. It appeared that indomethacin therapy did not have a long-term adverse effect on premature infants.

  6. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in hospitalized infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornik, Christoph P; Graham, Eric M; Hill, Kevin; Li, Jennifer S; Ofori-Amanfo, George; Clark, Reese H; Smith, P Brian

    2016-10-01

    Hospitalized infants requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) represent a high-risk group. Recent data on risk factors for mortality following CPR in this population are lacking. We hypothesized that infant demographic characteristics, diagnoses, and levels of cardiopulmonary support at the time of CPR requirement would be associated with survival to hospital discharge following CPR. Retrospective cohort study. All infants receiving CPR on day of life 2 to 120 admitted to 348 Pediatrix Medical Group neonatal intensive care units from 1997 to 2012. We collected data on demographics, interventions, center volume, and death prior to NICU discharge. We evaluated predictors of death after CPR using multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equations to account for clustering of the data by center. Our cohort consisted of 2231 infants receiving CPR. Of these, 1127 (51%) survived to hospital discharge. Lower gestational age, postnatal age, 5-min APGAR, congenital anomaly, and markers of severity of illness were associated with higher mortality. Mortality after CPR did not change significantly over time (Cochran-Armitage test for trend p=0.35). Mortality following CPR in infants is high, particularly for less mature, younger infants with congenital anomalies and those requiring cardiopulmonary support prior to CPR. Continued focus on at risk infants may identify targets for CPR prevention and improve outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Comparison of Early Ibuprofen and Indomethacin Administration to Prevent Intraventricular Hemorrhage Among Preterm Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Kalani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraventricularhemorrhage (IVH is one of thecommon morbidities among preterm neonates. In thepresentstudy, we set out to evaluate the efficacy of two prophylactic modalities (ibuprofen and indomethacin prophylaxis for prevention of IVH in our local setting. A prospective study was carried out in Akbar-Abadi Hospital, Tehran-Iran (2013-2014. Ninety-six preterm neonates who cared in closed incubator entered the study. Neonates randomly assigned into 3 groups; control, oral indomethacin (0.2 mg/kg indomethacin daily for 3 days and oral ibuprofen (10,5,5 mg/kg ibuprofen every 24 hours during 3 administration. For all subjects brain sonography examination was performed in 3rd day, first, 2nd week of life and when infants reached to 36 and 42 weeks of postmenstrual age. The IVH prevalence and the effectiveness of the drugs among groups were statistically assessed. Of all 93 subjects; 14 cases had IVH (15.1%. IVH was significantly more frequent in the controls than in other groups (P=0.049. Prophylactic treatment could significantly decrease the incidence of grade 3 or 4 IVH in experimental groups (P=0.008. There were no significant differences between the three experimental groups with respect to theincidence of GI bleeding, Oliguria, renal dysfunction or NEC (P.value>.05. This study demonstrates that low-dose prophylactic indomethacin and ibuprofen are equally associated with a reduction of IVH without any significant side effects like renal dysfunction, GI bleeding or NEC.

  8. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV type 1: the role of neonatal and infant prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Stacey A; Appelgren, Kristie E; Kourtis, Athena P

    2015-02-01

    The prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV is one of the great public health successes of the past 20 years. Much concerted research efforts and dedicated work have led to the achievement of very low rates of PMTCT of HIV in settings that can implement optimal prophylaxis. Though several implementation challenges remain, global elimination of pediatric HIV infection seems now more than ever to be an attainable goal. Often overlooked, the role of prophylaxis of the newborn is nevertheless a very important component of PMTCT. In this paper, we focus on the role of neonatal and infant prophylaxis, discuss mechanisms of protection, and present the clinical trial-generated evidence that led to the current recommendations for preventing infections in breastfed and non-breastfed infants. PMTCT of HIV should not end at birth; a continuum of care extending postpartum and postnatally is required to minimize the risk of new pediatric HIV infections.

  9. Primary Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death With Device Therapy in Urban and Rural Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, Ratika; Wightman, Howard; Miles, Graham; Sapp, John L; Gardner, Martin; Gray, Chris; Brownell, Brenda; Giddens, Karen; Rajda, Miroslaw

    2017-04-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) have shown benefit in reducing mortality in patients with heart failure, after myocardial infarction, and those with reduced ejection fraction. We sought to explore the use of this therapy in specialized heart function clinics, in rural and urban locations. This was a retrospective cohort study performed in 3 specialized heart function clinics in Nova Scotia, 2 of which were in rural locations. All patients with an initial left ventricular ejection fraction ≤ 35% were included from 2006 to 2011. Rates of referral, ICD implantation, and mortality were compared between urban and rural groups. There were 922 patients included in the study; 636 patients in the urban clinic, 286 in the rural locations. Referral rates were higher in the urban clinic compared with the rural locations (80.4% vs 68.3%; P = 0.024). Refusal rates for referral were higher in the rural locations (13.7% vs 2.1%; P < 0.0001). Higher referral rates were associated with urban location (odds ratio [OR], 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-3.26; P = 0.047), and younger age (OR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.93-0.99; P = 0.003); lower referral rates for women was observed (OR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.13-4.63; P = 0.021). Mortality was significantly associated with older age, lack of referral, presence of comorbidities (renal failure, diabetes, peripheral vascular disease) and a rural location. Specialized heart function clinics have a high rate of appropriate referral for primary prevention ICDs, but referral rates for this life-saving therapy remain lower in rural jurisdictions. This disparity in access to care is associated with increased mortality and might require particular attention to prevent unnecessary deaths. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Proposed reductions of preventable deaths in rural Indonesia through stormwater harvesting and wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Elson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, what is responsible for killing the most children each year? AcuteRespiratory Infection (2 million children. What is second? Diarrhoea (1.8 million children. Thisstatistic does not include the additional 300,000 adults who also die from this preventable condition.Diarrhoea kills more children that malaria, HIV and measles combined (UNDP, 2006. “In most ofthe developing world, unclean water is a greater threat to human lives than violent conflict. Rightnow almost half the population of the developing world suffer from diseases because of dirty waterand inadequate sanitation” (Peace Child International, 2006. While the Millennial DevelopmentGoals (MDG and the United Nations provide an overarching view of the existing situations bycountry, the initial goal of this project is to investigating the specific existing conditions in ruralIndonesia, especially Southern Kalimantan, and how they relate to the MDG (UNDP, 2003.This will in turn allow site specific proposals in partnership with the local communities that areculturally and financially feasible. They will then be designed and constructed in conjunctionwith community education. The preliminary proposal is to use stormwater harvesting to providea clean water source in replacement of their current sources; seasonal wells, contaminated riversand swamps. In conjunction is the proposal to eliminate their exposure to open sewage throughsimple septic systems. Through these processes, the goal is to decrease the preventable cases ofsickness through increased access to clean up and decreased exposure to open sewage. This in turnwill reduce the associated deaths due to diarrhoea (WHO/UNICEF, 2009. The project is still inthe initial research and development stages as of March 2012 with the first project hoping to beundertaken by the end of 2012.

  11. A Course on Death Education and Suicide Prevention: Implications for Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviton, Dan

    1971-01-01

    The author feels that personal concerns about death, natural or otherwise, cause anxieties which often color and mask additional personality problems. The course outlined deals with student obsession and depression about death, and seeks to encourage other health educators to include the study of death in their own classes. (CJ)

  12. Efficacy and safety of intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine for malaria in African infants: a pooled analysis of six randomised, placebo-controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aponte, John J.; Schellenberg, David; Egan, Andrea; Breckenridge, Alasdair; Carneiro, Ilona; Critchley, Julia; Danquah, Ina; Dodoo, Alexander; Kobbe, Robin; Lell, Bertrand; May, Jürgen; Premji, Zul; Sanz, Sergi; Sevene, Esperanza; Soulaymani-Becheikh, Rachida; Winstanley, Peter; Adjei, Samuel; Anemana, Sylvester; Chandramohan, Daniel; Issifou, Saadou; Mockenhaupt, Frank; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Greenwood, Brian; Grobusch, Martin P.; Kremsner, Peter G.; Macete, Eusebio; Mshinda, Hassan; Newman, Robert D.; Slutsker, Laurence; Tanner, Marcel; Alonso, Pedro; Menendez, Clara

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) is a promising strategy for malaria control in infants. We undertook a pooled analysis of the safety and efficacy of IPT in infants (IPTi) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in Africa. METHODS: We pooled data from six double-blind, randomised,

  13. cGMP-Phosphodiesterase Inhibition Prevents Hypoxia-Induced Cell Death Activation in Porcine Retinal Explants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Olivares-González

    Full Text Available Retinal hypoxia and oxidative stress are involved in several retinal degenerations including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, central retinal artery occlusion, or retinopathy of prematurity. The second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP has been reported to be protective for neuronal cells under several pathological conditions including ischemia/hypoxia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the accumulation of cGMP through the pharmacological inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE with Zaprinast prevented retinal degeneration induced by mild hypoxia in cultures of porcine retina. Exposure to mild hypoxia (5% O2 for 24h reduced cGMP content and induced retinal degeneration by caspase dependent and independent (PARP activation mechanisms. Hypoxia also produced a redox imbalance reducing antioxidant response (superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and increasing superoxide free radical release. Zaprinast reduced mild hypoxia-induced cell death through inhibition of caspase-3 or PARP activation depending on the cell layer. PDE inhibition also ameliorated the effects of mild hypoxia on antioxidant response and the release of superoxide radical in the photoreceptor layer. The use of a PKG inhibitor, KT5823, suggested that cGMP-PKG pathway is involved in cell survival and antioxidant response. The inhibition of PDE, therefore, could be useful for reducing retinal degeneration under hypoxic/ischemic conditions.

  14. The Prevention of Prematurity: A Strategy to Reduce Infant Mortality in the District of Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Joan

    The infant mortality rate in the District of Columbia is higher than that for any other state. This high rate stems from the great number of infants born seriously underweight and reflects the area's high percentage of births to impoverished black women. Efforts to reduce the mortality rate have centered around the medical treatment approach,…

  15. Cost-effectiveness analysis of infant feeding strategies to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maredza, Mandy; Bertram, Melanie Y; Saloojee, Haroon; Chersich, Matthew F; Tollman, Stephen M; Hofman, Karen J

    2013-09-01

    Despite increasing availability of perinatal interventions to prevent mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV in South Africa, MTCT remains high due to breastfeeding. To inform policy decisions in the country, cost-effectiveness of alternative infant-feeding interventions was conducted. Mathematical modelling was used to simulate post-natal transmission and mortality due to infant feeding in a hypothetical cohort of 1 000 HIV-exposed infants. Lifetime costs to the health system were calculated for each strategy. Interventions compared with current practice were: increasing coverage of extended nevirapine prophylaxis (ENP) to infants from 30% (base case) to 60% without changing current feeding practices; actively supporting breastfeeding with ENP to infants for 12 months; and actively supporting exclusive formula (replacement) feeding for 6 months. HIV-free survival at 24 months and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted were estimated for typical rural and certain urban settings. Base-case analysis revealed that expanding coverage of nevirapine prophylaxis with breastfeeding is cost-saving and improves HIV-free survival. Changing feeding practices is beneficial, depending on context. Breastfeeding is dominant (less costly, more effective) in rural settings, whilst formula feeding is a dominant strategy in urban settings. Cost-effectiveness was most sensitive to proportion of women on lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) and infant mortality rate (IMR). When >55% of women are on ART, breastfeeding dominates in the urban settings modelled, whilst formula feeding is cost-effective in rural settings when IMR ≤ 45/1000. The study concludes that strategies to support breastfeeding are essential. Strengthening health systems is critical to ensure optimal nevirapine delivery during breastfeeding. A case can be made for formula feeding or breastfeeding in HIV-infected women in specific contexts.

  16. The frequency of a disease-causing point mutation in the gene coding for medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in sudden infant death syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, Jytte; Gregersen, N; Kølvraa, S

    1993-01-01

    syndrome is still a matter of controversy. The present study investigated 120 well-defined cases of sudden infant death syndrome in order to detect the frequency of the most common disease-causing point mutation in the gene coding for medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (G985) compared with the frequency...... in the general population. A highly specific polymerase chain reaction assay was applied on dried blood spots. No over-representation of homo- or heterozygosity for G985 appears to exist in such a strictly defined population, for which reason it may be more relevant to look at a broader spectrum of clinical...... presentations of inherited metabolic disorders and examine a wider range of sudden death in infancy....

  17. Effect of an allergy prevention programme on incidence of atopic symptoms in infancy. A prospective study of 159 "high-risk" infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A; Hansen, L G

    1992-01-01

    A total of 105 "high-risk" infants born in 1988 were studied prospectively from birth to 18 months of age. The infants were recommended breastfeeding and/or hypoallergenic formula (Nutramigen or Profylac) combined with avoidance of solid foods during the first 6 months of life. All mothers had...... unrestricted diet. Avoidance of daily exposure to tobacco smoke, furred pets and dust-collecting materials in the bedroom were advised. This prevention group was compared with a control group consisting of 54 identically defined "high-risk" infants born in 1985 in the same area. All infants had either severe......%) (p food allergy was significantly lower...

  18. THE EFFICACY OF THE COSTS ON SEVERE RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL INFECTION PREVENTION WITH PALIVIZUMAB IN PRETERM INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Rudakova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus plays a significant role in etiology of respiratory infections in infants, and preterm children have muchhigher risk of severe course of the disease, than common population of children at the age less than 2 years old. Palivizumab is usedefficiently to prevent this infection. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of the costs on palivizumab in preterm childrenin the Russian Federation. The assessment was based on meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. According to the World Health organization recommendations, the acceptable value of the variable «costs/efficacy» must not be higher than threefold of the gross domestic product per person. On the assumption of this fact, the coefficient «costs/efficacy» for the Russian Federation according to the 2011 year results must not be higher than 1140 thousand rubles per 1 extra year of life. Analysis from the position of health care system shows, that coefficient «costs/efficacy» with palivazumab usage in children with gestation age from 28 to 32 weeks rangesfrom 594,4 to 1030,4 thousand roubles per 1 extra year of life when starting the prophylaxis during first 6 month of life. Under the social perspective of the study (accounting for direct and indirect costs the coefficient «costs/efficacy» decreases to 515,8–951,8 thousands roubles per 1 extra year of life. Thereby, nowadays the prophylaxis of severe respiratory cyncytial infection with palivazumab is acceptable according to the economical point of view in preterm children with the gestation age 32 weeks and less when starting during first 6 months of life.

  19. Modelling the epidemiological impact of intermittent preventive treatment against malaria in infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Ross

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trials of intermittent preventive treatment against malaria in infants (IPTi using sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP have shown a positive, albeit variable, protective efficacy against clinical malaria episodes. The impact of IPTi in different epidemiological settings and over time is unknown and predictions are hampered by the lack of knowledge about how IPTi works. We investigated mechanisms proposed for the action of IPTi and made predictions of the likely impact on morbidity and mortality. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a comprehensive, individual-based, stochastic model of malaria epidemiology to simulate recently published trials of IPTi using SP with site-specific characteristics as inputs. This baseline model was then modified to represent hypotheses concerning the duration of action of SP, the temporal pattern of fevers caused by individual infections, potential benefits of avoiding fevers on immunity and the effect of sub-therapeutic levels of SP on parasite dynamics. The baseline model reproduced the pattern of results reasonably well. None of the models based on alternative hypotheses improved the fit between the model predictions and observed data. Predictions suggest that IPTi would have a beneficial effect across a range of transmission intensities. IPTi was predicted to avert a greater number of episodes where IPTi coverage was higher, the health system treatment coverage lower, and for drugs which were more efficacious and had longer prophylactic periods. The predicted cumulative benefits were proportionately slightly greater for severe malaria episodes and malaria-attributable mortality than for acute episodes in the settings modelled. Modest increased susceptibility was predicted between doses and following the last dose, but these were outweighed by the cumulative benefits. The impact on transmission intensity was negligible. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of trial results can be accounted for by differences between

  20. Acceptability of early infant male circumcision as an HIV prevention intervention in Zimbabwe: a qualitative perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster Mavhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early infant male circumcision (EIMC is simpler, safer and more cost-effective than adult circumcision. In sub-Saharan Africa, there are concerns about acceptability of EIMC which could affect uptake. In 2009 a quantitative survey of 2,746 rural Zimbabweans (aged 18-44 indicated that 60% of women and 58% of men would be willing to have their newborn son circumcised. Willingness was associated with knowledge of HIV and male circumcision. This qualitative study was conducted to better understand this issue. METHODS: In 2010, 24 group discussions were held across Zimbabwe with participants from seven ethnic groups. Additionally, key informant interviews were held with private paediatricians who offer EIMC (n = 2 plus one traditional leader. Discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed, translated into English (where necessary, coded using NVivo 8 and analysed using grounded theory principles. RESULTS: Knowledge of the procedure was poor. Despite this, acceptability of EIMC was high among parents from most ethnic groups. Discussions suggested that fathers would make the ultimate decision regarding EIMC although mothers and extended family can have (often covert influence. Participants' concerns centred on: safety, motive behind free service provision plus handling and disposal of the discarded foreskin. Older men from the dominant traditionally circumcising population strongly opposed EIMC, arguing that it separates circumcision from adolescent initiation, as well as allowing women (mothers to nurse the wound, considered taboo. CONCLUSIONS: EIMC is likely to be an acceptable HIV prevention intervention for most populations in Zimbabwe, if barriers to uptake are appropriately addressed and fathers are specifically targeted by the programme.

  1. [The preventive and health promotion services for infants, children and youth. What is problematic for clients of the CLSCs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Lucie; D'Amour, Danielle; Labadie, Jean-François; Brodeur, Jean-Marc; Pineault, Raynald; Séguin, Louise; Latour, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This article presents the results of a survey on preventive and health promotion (PHP) services provided by Quebec CLSCs for infants, children and youth. Two dimensions of services are examined: the diversity of PHP issues addressed and the type of clientele targeted by the CLSC team. Questionnaire survey. Although identified a priori as public health priorities, many PHP issues remain less often addressed by CLSCs. This is particularly the case for activities aimed at children and youth as compared to infants. In addition, the data show that CLSC teams are less inclined to target specific clienteles; when they do so, it is more often in the context of services for infants. This study is important in that it constitutes one of the first efforts to systematically document PHP services for infants, children, and youth. In shedding new light on intervention sectors that need to be reinforced, these results should help managers and policymakers as they reflect on the role of PHP services in CLSCs within the context of health reform.

  2. Vitamin A supplementation for prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in very-low-birth-weight premature Thai infants: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiatchoosakun, Pakaphan; Jirapradittha, Junya; Panthongviriyakul, M Charnchai; Khampitak, Tueanjit; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Boonsiri, Patcharee

    2014-10-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is one ofthe most significant complications among very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) premature infants. Vitamin A deficiency increases the risk of BPD in VLBWinfants. To assess the effect of vitamin A supplementation for prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in VLBW premature Thai infants. Randomized control trial. Eighty premature infants weighing supplementation at 24 hours ofage-admitted to Neonatal units ofSrinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand-were assigned to receive either intramuscular vitaminA 5, 000 IU3 times/week (treatment group) or sham procedure (control group) for four weeks. Serum vitamin A levels were measured before and after administration of the vitamin A. The baseline of mean serum vitamin A levels were similar in both groups. The mean serum level of vitamin A was significantly higher in the vitamin A supplemented infants than in the control infants on day 7 (1.41 +/- 0.48 vs. 0.92+0.38 pmol/ L, psupplementation. None of the infants in the vitamin A supplemented group, compared to 5% of the infants in the control group, had vitamin A level supplemented group required oxygen supplementation at 36 weeks postmenstrual age than in the control group albeit not statistically significant (22.5 vs. 35% relative risk 0.71; 95% CI 0.40 +/- 1.26; p = 0.21). Supplementation with vitamin A was also associated with a significant reduction in the duration ofintubation (10.8 +/- 3.1 days vitamin A supplemented group vs. 26.1 +/- 6.4 days control group, p = 0.03), days on oxygen therapy (29.8 +/- 5.1 days vitamin A supplemented group vs. 58.2 +/- 9.1 days control group, p = 0.01) and length of hospital stay (61.9 +/- 4.2 days vitamin A supplemented group vs. 88.3 +/- 7.2 days control group, p = 0.002). The dose of vitamin A used in this study reduced biochemical evidence of vitamin A deficiency and, without complications, resulted in reducing duration of intubation, days of oxygen therapy, and length of

  3. Cigarette Tax Increase and Infant Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Stephen W; Warner, Kenneth E; Pordes, Elisabeth; Davis, Matthew M

    2016-01-01

    Maternal smoking increases the risk for preterm birth, low birth weight, and sudden infant death syndrome, which are all causes of infant mortality. Our objective was to evaluate if changes in cigarette taxes and prices over time in the United States were associated with a decrease in infant mortality. We compiled data for all states from 1999 to 2010. Time-series models were constructed by infant race for cigarette tax and price with infant mortality as the outcome, controlling for state per-capita income, educational attainment, time trend, and state random effects. From 1999 through 2010, the mean overall state infant mortality rate in the United States decreased from 7.3 to 6.2 per 1000 live births, with decreases of 6.0 to 5.3 for non-Hispanic white and 14.3 to 11.3 for non-Hispanic African American infants (P increased from $0.84 to $2.37 per pack (P increase per pack in cigarette tax was associated with a change in infant deaths of -0.19 (95% confidence interval -0.33 to -0.05) per 1000 live births overall, including changes of -0.21 (-0.33 to -0.08) for non-Hispanic white infants and -0.46 (-0.90 to -0.01) for non-Hispanic African American infants. Models for cigarette price yielded similar findings. Increases in cigarette taxes and prices are associated with decreases in infant mortality rates, with stronger impact for African American infants. Federal and state policymakers may consider increases in cigarette taxes as a primary prevention strategy for infant mortality. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Gaining Insight into the Prevention of Maternal Death Using Narrative Analysis: An Experience from Kerman, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Eftekhar-Vaghefi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Reduction in maternal mortality requires an in-depth knowledge of the causes of death. This study was conducted to explore the circumstances and events leading to maternal mortality through a holistic approach. Using narrative text analysis, all documents related to maternal deaths occurred from 2007 to 2011 in Kerman province/Iran were reviewed thoroughly by an expert panel. A 93-item chart abstraction instrument was developed according to the expert panel and literature. The instrument consisted of demographic and pregnancy related variables, underlying and contributing causes of death, and type of delays regarding public health aspects, medical and system performance issues. A total of 64 maternal deaths were examined. One third of deaths occurred in women less than 18 or higher than 35 years. Nearly 95% of them lived in a low or mid socioeconomic status. In half of the cases, inappropriate or nonuse of contraceptives was seen. Delay in the provision of any adequate treatment after arrival at the health facility was seen in 59% of cases. The most common medical causes of death were preeclampsia/eclampsia (15.6%, postpartum hemorrhage (12.5% and deep phlebothrombosis (10.9%, respectively. Negligence was accounted for 95% of maternal deaths. To overcome the root causes of maternal death, more emphasis should be devoted to system failures and patient safety rather than the underlying causes of death and medical issues solely.

  5. Evaluation of a sudden unexpected death in infancy intervention programme aimed at improving parental awareness of risk factors and protective infant care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Christine; Trenholme, Adrian; Stewart, Joanna; Vogel, Alison

    2018-04-01

    Sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) rates for Māori and Pacific infants remain higher than for other ethnic groups in New Zealand and bed-sharing is a major risk factor when there is smoking exposure in pregnancy. Sleep space programmes of education and Pēpi-Pod baby beds require evaluation. Two hundred and forty Māori and Pacific women and infants were randomised 1:1, to the Pēpi-Pod sleep space programme, or to a control group with 'usual care'. When infants were under 2 weeks of age, baseline interviews occurred, followed up by interviews at 2 and 4 months of age to assess safe sleep knowledge, infant care practices and Pēpi-Pod use and acceptability. All participants were offered a New Zealand Standard approved portable cot. At baseline, 25% of babies did not have a baby bed. Knowledge of smoking and bed-sharing as SUDI risks improved at follow-up in both groups. One quarter regularly bed-shared at follow-up in both groups. Intention to bed-share was a strong predictor of subsequent behaviour. Pēpi-Pods were regularly used by 46% at 2 months and 16% at 4 months follow-up. Bed-sharing and knowledge improvement were similar irrespective of group. It is likely that the impact of the intervention was reduced because the control group received better support than 'usual care' and all participants had a baby bed. New Zealand SUDI rates have declined since sleep space programmes have been available. Sleep space programmes should be prioritised for those with modifiable SUDI risk. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  6. Intervention by the mental health specialist nurse for preventing sleep disorders due to incorrect habits in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Cámara Conde

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The sleep disorders are among the most common behaviour problems in infancy and early childhood, not only affect children, but parents also suffer from lack of sleep which creates problems of anxiety and communication in the partner by exhaustion. One way to prevent insomnia in children is that parents know how to create the habit of sleeping with their children.The main aims of the protocol are: - To train parents to establish healthy habits for proper sleep hygiene.- Preventing sleep disorders caused by bad habits in the infant. - To prevent symptoms of anxiety due to lack of sleep in the parents.The program will consist of 6 sessions of 90 minutes long, 3 pre-natal where they thrive knowledge and 3 sessions after to exposure doubts and search for solutions. We think that cooperation between the mental health nurse specialist with the midwife it is necessary to create a program that establish a healthy dream pattern in both infants and their parents, will prevent the sleep disorders by incorrect habits and their effects

  7. 0.2% chlorhexidine acetate as skin disinfectant prevents skin lesions in extremely preterm infants: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Lisanne M A; Tostmann, Alma; Hopman, Joost; Liem, Kian D

    2018-03-01

    The skin disinfectant '0.5% chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% alcohol' (0.5% CHG-70% alc) may cause skin lesions in extremely preterm infants (gestational age chlorhexidine gluconate solution in acetate (0.2% CHG-acetate) was introduced as skin disinfectant for extremely preterm infants in our neonatal intensive care units. We aimed to compare the incidence of skin lesions and central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) among extremely preterm infants when using 0.5% CHG-70% alc and 0.2% CHG-acetate. Retrospective pre-post comparison cohort study. All electronic patient records of extremely preterm infants born between January 2011-March 2013 ('0.5% CHG-70% alc' cohort) and April 2013-October 2015 ('0.2% CHG-acetate' cohort) were reviewed. The incidence of skin lesions and CLABSI. Skin lesions were defined as the presence of erythema, blisters, excoriation, oedema or induration. CLABSI was defined according to the definition of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The incidence of skin lesions was 22% (95% CI 11% to 37%) in the '0.5% CHG-70% alc' cohort (n=41) and 5% (95% CI 1% to 15%; p=0.02) in the '0.2% CHG-acetate' cohort (n=41). The incidence of CLABSI was the same in both groups (28%; 95% CI 14% to 46% in '0.5% CHG-70% alc' vs 27%; 95% CI 14% to 44% in '0.2% CHG-acetate'; p=0.98). Using 0.2% CHG-acetate as skin disinfectant in extremely preterm infants resulted in statistically significant reduction of skin lesions, without increasing the risk of CLABSI as compared with 0.5% CHG-70% alc. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Oropharyngeal administration of mother's milk to prevent necrotizing enterocolitis in extremely low-birth-weight infants: theoretical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Nancy A; Caplan, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    The oropharyngeal administration of mother's milk-placing drops of milk onto the infant's oral mucosa-may serve as a preventative strategy against necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) for extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW: birth weight pneumonia, an earlier attainment of full enteral feeds, enhanced maturation of oral feeding skills, improved growth, and enhanced breast-feeding outcomes. While more research is needed to definitively establish safety and efficacy of this intervention, this article will examine biological plausibility and will describe the theoretical mechanisms of protection against NEC for ELBW infants who receive this intervention. Nurses play a key role in advancing the science and practice of this intervention. Future directions for research and implications for nursing practice will also be presented.

  9. Control of pertussis in infants: time has finally come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safadi, Marco Aurelio P

    2015-06-01

    Despite the success of routine immunization programs against pertussis worldwide, control of the disease in young infants has never been achieved. The greatest risk of disease, hospitalization and death occur in infants, who are too young to have received the primary pertussis immunization course. Different interventions to provide indirect protection to infants were recommended, including vaccination programs with Tdap for adolescents, adults, postpartum women and household contacts of infants, but all of them failed to effectively control the disease in infants. Based on the successful experience of maternal tetanus vaccination, and more recently influenza vaccination, maternal Tdap vaccine has been universally recommended since 2011/2012 in several countries to prevent pertussis in infants. The recent publication of data on the uptake, safety and effectiveness of these programs, as well as impact on disease rates in infants is encouraging, anticipating the possibility to at last control pertussis in this vulnerable age group.

  10. Determinants of the cost-effectiveness of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in infants and children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Ross

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Trials of intermittent preventive treatment in infants (IPTi and children (IPTc have shown promising results in reducing malaria episodes but with varying efficacy and cost-effectiveness. The effects of different intervention and setting characteristics are not well known. We simulate the effects of the different target age groups and delivery channels, seasonal or year-round delivery, transmission intensity, seasonality, proportions of malaria fevers treated and drug characteristics.We use a dynamic, individual-based simulation model of Plasmodium falciparum malaria epidemiology, antimalarial drug action and case management to simulate DALYs averted and the cost per DALY averted by IPTi and IPTc. IPT cost components were estimated from economic studies alongside trials.IPTi and IPTc were predicted to be cost-effective in most of the scenarios modelled. The cost-effectiveness is driven by the impact on DALYs, particularly for IPTc, and the low costs, particularly for IPTi which uses the existing delivery strategy, EPI. Cost-effectiveness was predicted to decrease with low transmission, badly timed seasonal delivery in a seasonal setting, short-acting and more expensive drugs, high frequencies of drug resistance and high levels of treatment of malaria fevers. Seasonal delivery was more cost-effective in seasonal settings, and year-round in constant transmission settings. The difference was more pronounced for IPTc than IPTi due to the different proportions of fixed costs and also different assumed drug spacing during the transmission season. The number of DALYs averted was predicted to decrease as a target five-year age-band for IPTc was shifted from children under 5 years into older ages, except at low transmission intensities.Modelling can extend the information available by predicting impact and cost-effectiveness for scenarios, for outcomes and for multiple strategies where, for practical reasons, trials cannot be carried out. Both IPTi and

  11. Prevention of sudden cardiac death beyond the ICD: Have we reached the boundary or are we just burning the surface?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyada Naksuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Preventing sudden cardiac death (SCD remains a major unsolved problem in contemporary medical practice. As the most common cause of SCD, treatment for ventricular arrhythmias is the target area of interest in research field. While implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD effectively decreases death from ventricular arrhythmias in highly selected patients, risk of inappropriate shocks, mortality from frequent therapy, chance of failing in abortion of arrhythmias despite having a defibrillator, and our inability to recognize which of several hundreds of thousands of patients at risk for sudden death but do not meet current criteria for defibrillator, limit ICD effectiveness. In this article, a brief review of mechanism leading to SCD, the existing evidence for a defibrillator and the lacunae in present guidelines for patients clearly at risk for sudden death but without proven benefit from a defibrillator are presented in Section I. Following this, interventional approaches, both catheter-based and general measures that may serve as adjuncts to a defibrillator in preventing this all too common catastrophic end event, are summarized in Section II.

  12. Changing conclusions on secondhand smoke in a sudden infant death syndrome review funded by the tobacco industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Elisa K; England, Lucinda; Glantz, Stanton A

    2005-03-01

    Prenatal and postnatal exposure to tobacco smoke adversely affects maternal and child health. Secondhand smoke (SHS) has been linked causally with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in major health reports. In 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) first noted an association between SHS and SIDS, and both prenatal exposure and postnatal SHS exposure were listed as independent risk factors for SIDS in a 1997 California EPA report (republished in 1999 by the National Cancer Institute) and a 2004 US Surgeon General report. The tobacco industry has used scientific consultants to attack the evidence that SHS causes disease, most often lung cancer. Little is known about the industry's strategies to contest the evidence on maternal and child health. In 2001, a review was published on SIDS that acknowledged funding from the Philip Morris (PM) tobacco company. Tobacco industry documents related to this review were examined to identify the company's influence on the content and conclusions of this review. Tobacco industry documents include 40 million pages of internal memos and reports made available to the public as a result of litigation settlements against the tobacco industry in the United States. Between November 2003 and January 2004, we searched tobacco industry document Internet sites from the University of California Legacy Tobacco Documents Library and the Tobacco Documents Online website. Key terms included "SIDS" and names of key persons. Two authors conducted independent searches with similar key terms, reviewed the documents, and agreed on relevancy through consensus. Thirty documents were identified as relevant. Two drafts (an early version and a final version) of an industry-funded review article on SIDS were identified, and 2 authors independently compared these drafts with the final publication. Formal comments by PM executives made in response to the first draft were also reviewed. We used Science Citation Index in July 2004 to determine

  13. Symptomatic acquired zinc deficiency in at-risk premature infants: high dose preventive supplementation is necessary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarot, Sébastien; Chantier, Emilie; Kuster, Alice; Hello, Muriel; Roze, Jean-Christophe; Blouin, Eric; Stalder, Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    Zinc is a cofactor for several enzymes involved in many metabolisms. Zinc deficiency induces various disorders such as acrodermatitis enteropathica, either inherited or acquired. We report three cases of premature infants (24-31 wks gestational age) with low birthweight (650 to 940 g) and enteropathy, two of whom presented with necrotizing enterocolitis. All infants were fed by total parenteral nutrition. At a chronological age ranging from 73 to 80 days, all infants developed a periorificial dermatitis. Before the onset of the first signs, they had received zinc supplementation ranging from 146% to 195% of the recommended dose (400 microg/kg/day). Increased zinc supplementation over a course of 6-18 days induced a complete resolution of symptoms in all cases. No abnormality in the neurologic examination and no recurrence were observed at the end of the zinc treatment. Low birthweight premature infants with enteropathy on total parenteral nutrition are at risk of developing zinc deficiency. The usual recommended zinc supplementation is probably insufficient for those infants. A delay in the diagnosis of zinc deficiency may lead to severe complications.

  14. Mass awareness regarding snake bite induced early morning neuroparalysis can prevent many deaths in North India

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Rupinder; Dogra, Varundeep; Sharma, Gurudutt; Chauhan, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In North India snake bite deaths are predominantly seen with neurotoxic envenomations (NEs) whereas in South India the hemotoxic envenomation (HE) is more common. Krait is responsible for most deaths in North India. It bites people sleeping on the floors, mostly at night. We describe the profile of venomous snake bites over 1 year in 2013. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a rural tertiary care hospital in North India. Demographics, circumstances of bite, envenom...

  15. Managing acute malnutrition in infants aged less than six months: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality management of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in infants < 6 months of age is a key strategy within the “1000 days window of opportunity”. It prevents early child death, secures optimal growth and forms a foundation for full adulthood potentials. Most studies to date on management of SAM in infants relied on ...

  16. Intraurethral knot in a very-low-birth-weight infant: radiological recognition, surgical management and prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodha, Abhay; Ly, Linh; McNamara, Patrick J.; Brindle, Mary; Daneman, Alan

    2005-01-01

    We report a case where a knot developed in a urinary catheter and became lodged within the urethra of a very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) preterm infant. The catheter was removed with the assistance of a urologist. We recommend using caution when placing urinary catheters in VLBW infants and question the appropriateness of feeding tubes as catheters. Recognition on radiographs of malpositioned bladder catheters is vital to the care of these patients. All staff involved in the insertion, maintenance or removal of these catheters should be suitably trained to minimize the risk of knots and related complications. (orig.)

  17. Intraurethral knot in a very-low-birth-weight infant: radiological recognition, surgical management and prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lodha, Abhay; Ly, Linh; McNamara, Patrick J. [Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Neonatology, Toronto (Canada); Brindle, Mary [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Surgery, Toronto (Canada); Daneman, Alan [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Radiology, Toronto (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    We report a case where a knot developed in a urinary catheter and became lodged within the urethra of a very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) preterm infant. The catheter was removed with the assistance of a urologist. We recommend using caution when placing urinary catheters in VLBW infants and question the appropriateness of feeding tubes as catheters. Recognition on radiographs of malpositioned bladder catheters is vital to the care of these patients. All staff involved in the insertion, maintenance or removal of these catheters should be suitably trained to minimize the risk of knots and related complications. (orig.)

  18. Selection of antimalarial drug resistance after intermittent preventive treatment of infants and children (IPTi/c) in Senegal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndiaye, Magatte; Tine, Roger; Faye, Babacar

    2013-01-01

    Senegal has since 2003 used sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPT) of malaria in risk groups. However, the large-scale IPT strategy may result in increasing drug resistance. Our study investigated the possible impact of SP-IPT given to infants and children...... on IPTi/c and one without IPTi/c intervention) located in the southern part of Senegal. The prevalence of SP-resistance-related haplotypes in Pfdhfr and Pfdhps was determined by nested PCR followed by sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe (SSOP)-ELISA. The prevalence of the Pfdhfr double mutant...

  19. Infant mortality rates declining, but still high.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, M

    1992-10-01

    Family planning can improve infant survival. Specifically, use of family planning methods can minimize family size, increase birth spacing, and reduce the likelihood of pregnancy for teenagers and women aged 40 or older. Immunizations and oral rehydration are responsible for the falling infant mortality rats since 1977 in developing countries, especially among 1-12 month old infants. Yet, neonatal mortality in developing countries had not changed. WHO intends to step up efforts to improve newborn survival. Accurate data are needed, however. Even in developed countries which keep good statistics, infant mortality bias exists. For example, in Japan, some infant deaths are called fetal deaths. In developing countries, much of the data come from hospitals, yet most birth do not occur in hospitals. Even in surveys, bias exists, such as problems with recall. Many researchers use traditional birth attendants (TBAs) to follow up on all births in an area which may eliminate some biases. Such a prospective and longitudinal study in Trairi county in northeastern Brazil shows the infant mortality rate to be less than half of the official rate (65 vs. 142). The major causes of infant death in developed countries, which tends to occur in the neonatal period, are low birth weight, prematurity, birth complications, and congenital defects; developing countries; they are vaccine preventable infectious diseases, diarrhea and dehydration, and respiratory illnesses, all complicated by malnutrition. To make further strides in reducing infant mortality, public health workers must concentrate on the neonatal period. Training TBAs in sterile techniques, appropriate technology, resuscitation of infants, and identification of potential problems is a positive step. Yet, unpredictable conditions (e.g., AIDS) exist and/or will arise which erode improvements. For example, in Nicaragua, within 1 year after the new government introduced health budget cuts which resulted in the poor paying for

  20. Systemic hydrocortisone to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants (the SToP-BPD study; a multicenter randomized placebo controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onland Wes

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomized controlled trials have shown that treatment of chronically ventilated preterm infants after the first week of life with dexamethasone reduces the incidence of the combined outcome death or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD. However, there are concerns that dexamethasone may increase the risk of adverse neurodevelopmental outcome. Hydrocortisone has been suggested as an alternative therapy. So far no randomized controlled trial has investigated its efficacy when administered after the first week of life to ventilated preterm infants. Methods/Design The SToP-BPD trial is a randomized double blind placebo controlled multicenter study including 400 very low birth weight infants (gestational age Discussion This trial will determine the efficacy and safety of postnatal hydrocortisone administration at a moderately early postnatal onset compared to placebo for the reduction of the combined outcome mortality and BPD at 36 weeks postmenstrual age in ventilator dependent preterm infants. Trial registration number Netherlands Trial Register (NTR: NTR2768

  1. Prevention of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Infants and Children of Preschool Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomon, Samuel J.

    Iron-deficiency anemia is almost certainly the most prevalent nutritional disorder among infants and young children in the United States. Anemia is frequently seen among children of low socioeconomic status but is probably also the most frequent nutritional deficiency disease seen among children cared for by private doctors. Possible reasons for…

  2. effect of a mother-to-child hiv prevention programme on infant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MTCf and breast-feeding-related HIV transrrusslOn ISsues, impact of knowledge of the HIV epidemic on current breast- feeding and complementary feeding practices, perceptions in the community about women who do not breast-feed, and options on the feasibility and appropriateness of current infant feeding guidelines ...

  3. A current approach to using additional foods for the early prevention of deficiency states in infants during the first year of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Levchuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers how to organize properly balanced feeding in infants during the first year of life, by using additional foods. It highlights current approaches to using the latter in the babies and provides a rationale for the tune of giving additional foods, by taking into account the readiness of an infant to eat new foods and the need to incorporate micronutrients for the prevention of anemia, rickets, and food allergy. The benefits of using commercial products are discussed.

  4. Baby Business: a randomised controlled trial of a universal parenting program that aims to prevent early infant sleep and cry problems and associated parental depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook Fallon

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infant crying and sleep problems (e.g. frequent night waking, difficulties settling to sleep each affect up to 30% of infants and often co-exist. They are costly to manage and associated with adverse outcomes including postnatal depression symptoms, early weaning from breast milk, and later child behaviour problems. Preventing such problems could improve these adverse outcomes and reduce costs to families and the health care system. Anticipatory guidance-i.e. providing parents with information about normal infant sleep and cry patterns, ways to encourage self-settling in infants, and ways to develop feeding and settling routines before the onset of problems-could prevent such problems. This paper outlines the protocol for our study which aims to test an anticipatory guidance approach. Methods/Design 750 families from four Local Government Areas in Melbourne, Australia have been randomised to receive the Baby Business program (intervention group or usual care (control group offered by health services. The Baby Business program provides parents with information about infant sleep and crying via a DVD and booklet (mailed soon after birth, telephone consultation (at infant age 6-8 weeks and parent group session (at infant age 12 weeks. All English speaking parents of healthy newborn infants born at > 32 weeks gestation and referred by their maternal and child health nurse at their first post partum home visit (day 7-10 postpartum, are eligible. The primary outcome is parent report of infant night time sleep as a problem at four months of age and secondary outcomes include parent report of infant daytime sleep or crying as a problem, mean duration of infant sleep and crying/24 hours, parental depression symptoms, parent sleep quality and quantity and health service use. Data will be collected at two weeks (baseline, four months and six months of age. An economic evaluation using a cost-consequences approach will, from a societal

  5. Effect of ureteral reimplantation on prevention of urinary tract infection and renal growth in infants with primary vesicoureteral reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Fumi; Tohda, Akira; Shimada, Kenji

    2004-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the results of ureteral reimplantation in infants with primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) to evaluate the effect on prevention of urinary tract infection (UTI) and renal growth. From July 1991 to December 2001, a total of 205 infants (180 boys and 25 girls) with primary VUR underwent ureteral reimplantation at the Department of Urology, Osaka Medical Center and Research Institute for Maternal and Child Health, Osaka, Japan. Indications for surgery were high-grade reflux (grade IV-V), breakthrough UTI and non-compliance of medical treatment. Age at surgery raged from 1 to 11 months (mean, 6.4 months). Ureteral reimplantation was performed according to Cohen's method. Only two of 336 refluxing ureters required ureteral tailoring. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 110 months (mean, 64 months). Surgical outcome, frequency of UTI and individual renal growth measured by 99m Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy was evaluated. Postoperative ultrasound and voiding cystourethrography showed neither residual reflux nor ureterovesical obstruction. Contralateral low grade reflux occurred in six of 74 patients (8.1%) who had unilateral reflux preoperatively. After reimplantation, 10 patients documented 13 febrile UTI. Eleven of the 13 episodes occurred early in the postoperative period (<6 months). Frequency of febrile UTI reduced from 0.23538 before surgery to 0.00894 and 0.00081 per patient per month at 6 and 12 months after surgery, respectively. No development of renal scarring was seen in postoperative DMSA scan. Changes of differential renal function was <0.05 in all patients. The present results show ureteral reimplantation in infants is safe and very effective for the prevention of UTI. After surgical treatment in infancy, individual renal growth of children with primary VUR is stable. (authors)

  6. mTOR pathway inhibition prevents neuroinflammation and neuronal death in a mouse model of cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Isha N; Shperdheja, Jona; Baybis, Marianna; Ferguson, Tanya; Crino, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway signaling governs cellular responses to hypoxia and inflammation including induction of autophagy and cell survival. Cerebral palsy (CP) is a neurodevelopmental disorder linked to hypoxic and inflammatory brain injury however, a role for mTOR modulation in CP has not been investigated. We hypothesized that mTOR pathway inhibition would diminish inflammation and prevent neuronal death in a mouse model of CP. Mouse pups (P6) were subjected to hypoxia-ischemia and lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation (HIL), a model of CP causing neuronal injury within the hippocampus, periventricular white matter, and neocortex. mTOR pathway inhibition was achieved with rapamycin (an mTOR inhibitor; 5mg/kg) or PF-4708671 (an inhibitor of the downstream p70S6kinase, S6K, 75 mg/kg) immediately following HIL, and then for 3 subsequent days. Phospho-activation of the mTOR effectors p70S6kinase and ribosomal S6 protein and expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) were assayed. Neuronal cell death was defined with Fluoro-Jade C (FJC) and autophagy was measured using Beclin-1 and LC3II expression. Iba-1 labeled, activated microglia were quantified. Neuronal death, enhanced HIF-1α expression, and numerous Iba-1 labeled, activated microglia were evident at 24 and 48 h following HIL. Basal mTOR signaling, as evidenced by phosphorylated-S6 and -S6K levels, was unchanged by HIL. Rapamycin or PF-4,708,671 treatment significantly reduced mTOR signaling, neuronal death, HIF-1α expression, and microglial activation, coincident with enhanced expression of Beclin-1 and LC3II, markers of autophagy induction. mTOR pathway inhibition prevented neuronal death and diminished neuroinflammation in this model of CP. Persistent mTOR signaling following HIL suggests a failure of autophagy induction, which may contribute to neuronal death in CP. These results suggest that mTOR signaling may be a novel therapeutic target to reduce neuronal cell death in

  7. Bed-sharing in the absence of hazardous circumstances: is there a risk of sudden infant death syndrome? An analysis from two case-control studies conducted in the UK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter S Blair

    Full Text Available The risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS among infants who co-sleep in the absence of hazardous circumstances is unclear and needs to be quantified.Combined individual-analysis of two population-based case-control studies of SIDS infants and controls comparable for age and time of last sleep.Parents of 400 SIDS infants and 1386 controls provided information from five English health regions between 1993-6 (population: 17.7 million and one of these regions between 2003-6 (population:4.9 million.Over a third of SIDS infants (36% were found co-sleeping with an adult at the time of death compared to 15% of control infants after the reference sleep (multivariate OR = 3.9 [95% CI: 2.7-5.6]. The multivariable risk associated with co-sleeping on a sofa (OR = 18.3 [95% CI: 7.1-47.4] or next to a parent who drank more than two units of alcohol (OR = 18.3 [95% CI: 7.7-43.5] was very high and significant for infants of all ages. The risk associated with co-sleeping next to someone who smoked was significant for infants under 3 months old (OR = 8.9 [95% CI: 5.3-15.1] but not for older infants (OR = 1.4 [95% CI: 0.7-2.8]. The multivariable risk associated with bed-sharing in the absence of these hazards was not significant overall (OR = 1.1 [95% CI: 0.6-2.0], for infants less than 3 months old (OR = 1.6 [95% CI: 0.96-2.7], and was in the direction of protection for older infants (OR = 0.1 [95% CI: 0.01-0.5]. Dummy use was associated with a lower risk of SIDS only among co-sleepers and prone sleeping was a higher risk only among infants sleeping alone.These findings support a public health strategy that underlines specific hazardous co-sleeping environments parents should avoid. Sofa-sharing is not a safe alternative to bed-sharing and bed-sharing should be avoided if parents consume alcohol, smoke or take drugs or if the infant is pre-term.

  8. Problem-solving education to prevent depression among low-income mothers of preterm infants: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Michael; Feinberg, Emily; Cabral, Howard; Sauder, Sara; Egbert, Lucia; Schainker, Elisabeth; Kamholz, Karen; Hegel, Mark; Beardslee, William

    2011-08-01

    We sought to assess the feasibility and document key study processes of a problem-solving intervention to prevent depression among low-income mothers of preterm infants. A randomized controlled pilot trial (n = 50) of problem-solving education (PSE) was conducted. We assessed intervention provider training and fidelity; recruitment and retention of subjects; intervention acceptability; and investigators' ability to conduct monthly outcome assessments, from which we could obtain empirical estimates of depression symptoms, stress, and functioning over 6 months. Four of four bachelor-level providers were able to deliver PSE appropriately with standardized subjects within 4 weeks of training. Of 12 randomly audited PSE sessions with actual subjects, all met treatment fidelity criteria. Nineteen of 25 PSE subjects (76%) received full four-session courses; no subjects reported negative experiences with PSE. Eighty-eight percent of scheduled follow-up assessments were completed. Forty-four percent of control group mothers experienced an episode of moderately severe depression symptoms over the follow-up period, compared to 24% of PSE mothers. Control mothers experienced an average 1.19 symptomatic episodes over the 6 months of follow-up, compared to 0.52 among PSE mothers. PSE appears feasible and may be a promising strategy to prevent depression among mothers of preterm infants.

  9. Effectiveness of Lactobacillus reuteri for prevention and treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders in infants, children and adolescents (Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Orel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs with their extremely high prevalence and important influence on patients’ quality of life and health costs represent a major problem. Their etiopathogenesis is multifactorial and disturbances in a composition of intestinal microbiota as well as specific potentially pathogenic microorganisms seem to have crucial role in it. Probiotics with their broad spectrum of actions, including strengthening of colonisatiton resistance against pathogens, enhancement of barrier function, regulation of intestinal immune response, alleviation of inflammation, and both direct and indirect influence on gut motility or sensitivity, represent one of the most promising therapeutic strategies for these disorders. Numerous clinical studies revealed their efficacy in different FGIDs. However, the pathogenesis of different types of disorders is not similar, and neither are mechanisms of action of different probiotic strains. Several Lactobacillus reuteri strains exhibit various characteristics such as secretion of antimicrobial reuterin, production of short-chain fatty acids, down-regulation of inflammatory immune response, and direct influence on enteric nervous system among the others, which render them good candidates for prevention and treatment of various FGIDs. This paper reviews clinical studies on the effectiveness of Lactobacillus reuteri in the therapy of FGIDs in infants, children and adolescents. Results of multiple studies support its use for prevention and treatment of infant colic and improvement of delayed gastric emptying and regurgitation. In addition, individual studies suggest potential usefulness of specific Lactobacillus reuteri strains for the alleviation of constipation and functional abdominal pain.

  10. Serpins prevent granzyme-induced death in a species-specific manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bots, Michael; van Bostelen, Liesbeth; Rademaker, Mirjam Tga; Offringa, Rienk; Medema, Jan Paul

    2006-01-01

    Expression of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) is one of the mechanisms used by tumour cells to escape immune surveillance. Previously, we have shown that expression of serpins SPI-6 and SPI-CI, respectively, renders tumour cells resistant to granzyme B (GrB)-mediated death and granzyme M

  11. Prevention of postpartum smoking relapse in mothers of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, R M; Merritt, T A; Goldstein, M R; Deming, D D; Slater, L E; Angeles, D M

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Approximately 40% of women who smoke tobacco quit smoking during pregnancy, yet up to 85% relapse after delivery. Those who resume smoking often do so by 2 to 8 weeks postpartum. Smoking mothers are more than twice as likely to quit breastfeeding by 10 weeks postpartum. The hospitalization of a newborn, while stressful, is an opportunity to emphasize the importance of a smoke-free environment for babies. Supporting maternal-infant bonding may reduce maternal stress and motivate mot...

  12. Modern forms of organization of medical and preventive support of premature infants in Russian Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Keshishyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The high frequency of injuries to immature internal organs and body systems of premature infants in the postnatal period contributes to the formation of chronic pathology and the violation of neurocognitive development, making a significant contribution to the global problem of the growth of non-infectious diseases and programming the future health of the population. The main goal of health care system modern reform in the Russian Federation and around the world is to find the most effective and economical way of providing medical care, to increase significance of outpatient service and to give attention to prophylaxis. The most functional and cost-effective structure of medical care for premature infants is specialized center with a three-level support system. It consists of ambulatory counselling, the oneday hospital for medical abilitation, and full-day hospital for treatment and complex diagnostic procedures, on the system of telemedicine. The organization of the center requires a clear definition of the structure, standards of staffing and methodology of approach to the organization of support for premature infants after discharge from the neonatal hospital, taking into account the specifics of the planned and regulatory and financial indicators of medical care and the complexity of setting a clinical diagnosis in the modern conditions in the Russian Federation. In accordance to stable tendency of increasing in the survial rate of premature infants, the uniform register would be created – in base of major medical scientific and practical centre as a logistic regression model, that will make possibilities for randomize clinical studies of evidence-based nature.

  13. Inter-society consensus document on treatment and prevention of bronchiolitis in newborns and infants

    OpenAIRE

    Baraldi, Eugenio; Lanari, Marcello; Manzoni, Paolo; Rossi, Giovanni A; Vandini, Silvia; Rimini, Alessandro; Romagnoli, Costantino; Colonna, Pierluigi; Biondi, Andrea; Biban, Paolo; Chiamenti, Giampietro; Bernardini, Roberto; Picca, Marina; Cappa, Marco; Magazz?, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Acute bronchiolitis is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection and hospitalization in children less than 1?year of age worldwide. It is usually a mild disease, but some children may develop severe symptoms, requiring hospital admission and ventilatory support in the ICU. Infants with pre-existing risk factors (prematurity, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, congenital heart diseases and immunodeficiency) may be predisposed to a severe form of the disease. Clinical diagnosis of bronchi...

  14. In-utero exposure to nicotine alters the development of the rabbit cardiac conduction system and provides a potential mechanism for sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ton, Anh Tuan; Biet, Michael; Delabre, Jean-Francois; Morin, Nathalie; Dumaine, Robert

    2017-12-01

    In-utero exposure to tobacco smoke remains the highest risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). To alleviate the risks, nicotine replacement therapies are often prescribed to women who wish to quit smoking during their pregnancy. Cardiac arrhythmias is considered the final outcome leading to sudden death. Our goal in this study was to determine if exposing rabbit fetus to nicotine altered the cardiac conduction system of newborn kittens in a manner susceptible to cause SIDS. Using neuronal markers and a series of immunohistological and electrophysiological techniques we found that nicotine delayed the development of the cardiac pacemaker center (sinoatrial node) and decreased its innervation. At the molecular level, nicotine favored the expression of cardiac sodium channels with biophysical properties that will tend to slow heart rate and diminish electrical conduction. Our results show that alterations of the cardiac sodium current may contribute to the bradycardia, conduction disturbances and other cardiac arrhythmias often associated to SIDS and raise awareness on the use of replacement therapy during pregnancy.

  15. Infant crying and abuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, S.A.; Wal, M.F.V.D.; Brugman, E.; Sing, R.A.H.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    Child abuse and neglect are important causes of child morbidity and death. We assessed potentially detrimental parental actions induced by infant crying in 3259 infants aged 1-6 months, in the Netherlands. In infants aged 6 months, 5·6% (95% CI 4·2-7·0) of parents reported having smothered, slapped,

  16. Post-irradiation treatment with OK432 can prevent radiation-induced bone marrow death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurishita, A.; Uehara, Y.; Tohoku Univ., Sendai; Katoh, H.; Hirose, S.; Uchida, A.; Mizutani, Y.; Okada, S.; Ono, T.

    1991-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of OK432, a Streptocuccus haemolyticus preparation, on bone marrow death was examined in mice. The LD 50 value was increased from 7.55 Gy in controls to 8.45 Gy in mice treated once with OK432 immediately after irradiation. Multiple administration of the agent further elevated the LD 50 value to 9.56 Gy. The radioprotective effect was also apparent when multiple treatments were commenced as late as 72 h after irradiation. (author)

  17. Albumin administration prevents neurological damage and death in a mouse model of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vodret, Simone; Bortolussi, Giulia; Schreuder, Andrea B.; Jasprova, Jana; Vitek, Libor; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Muro, Andres F.

    2015-01-01

    Therapies to prevent severe neonatal unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia and kernicterus are phototherapy and, in unresponsive cases, exchange transfusion, which has significant morbidity and mortality risks. Neurotoxicity is caused by the fraction of unconjugated bilirubin not bound to albumin (free

  18. Syncope and the risk of sudden cardiac death: Evaluation, management, and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J. Koene, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is a clinical syndrome defined as a relatively brief self-limited transient loss of consciousness (TLOC caused by a period of inadequate cerebral nutrient flow. Most often the trigger is an abrupt drop of systemic blood pressure. True syncope must be distinguished from other common non-syncope conditions in which real or apparent TLOC may occur such as seizures, concussions, or accidental falls. The causes of syncope are diverse, but in most instances, are relatively benign (e.g., reflex and orthostatic faints with the main risks being accidents and/or injury. However, in some instances, syncope may be due to more worrisome conditions (particularly those associated with cardiac structural disease or channelopathies; in such circumstances, syncope may be an indicator of increased morbidity and mortality risk, including sudden cardiac death (SCD. Establishing an accurate basis for the etiology of syncope is crucial in order to initiate effective therapy. In this review, we focus primarily on the causes of syncope that are associated with increased SCD risk (i.e., sudden arrhythmic cardiac death, and the management of these patients. In addition, we discuss the limitations of our understanding of SCD in relation to syncope, and propose future studies that may ultimately address how to improve outcomes of syncope patients and reduce SCD risk. Keywords: Syncope, Sudden cardiac death, Risk assessment

  19. Apricot melanoidins prevent oxidative endothelial cell death by counteracting mitochondrial oxidation and membrane depolarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Cossu

    Full Text Available The cardiovascular benefits associated with diets rich in fruit and vegetables are thought to be due to phytochemicals contained in fresh plant material. However, whether processed plant foods provide the same benefits as unprocessed ones is an open question. Melanoidins from heat-processed apricots were isolated and their presence confirmed by colorimetric analysis and browning index. Oxidative injury of endothelial cells (ECs is the key step for the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases (CVD, therefore the potential protective effect of apricot melanoidins on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative mitochondrial damage and cell death was explored in human ECs. The redox state of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial compartments was detected by using the redox-sensitive, fluorescent protein (roGFP, while the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP was assessed with the fluorescent dye, JC-1. ECs exposure to hydrogen peroxide, dose-dependently induced mitochondrial and cytoplasmic oxidation. Additionally detected hydrogen peroxide-induced phenomena were MMP dissipation and ECs death. Pretreatment of ECs with apricot melanoidins, significantly counteracted and ultimately abolished hydrogen peroxide-induced intracellular oxidation, mitochondrial depolarization and cell death. In this regard, our current results clearly indicate that melanoidins derived from heat-processed apricots, protect human ECs against oxidative stress.

  20. Dual chamber stent prevents organ malperfusion in a model of donation after cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Bryan W; Chun, Youngjae; Cho, Sung Kwon; Chen, Yanfei; Liang, Nathan; Maul, Timothy; Demetris, Anthony; Gu, Xinzhu; Wagner, William R; Tevar, Amit D

    2016-10-01

    The paradigm for donation after cardiac death subjects donor organs to ischemic injury. A dual-chamber organ perfusion stent would maintain organ perfusion without affecting natural cardiac death. A center lumen allows uninterrupted cardiac blood flow, while an external chamber delivers oxygenated blood to the visceral vessels. A prototype organ perfusion stent was constructed from commercial stents. In a porcine model, the organ perfusion stent was deployed, followed by a simulated agonal period. Oxygenated blood perfused the external stent chamber. Organ perfusion was compared between controls (n = 3) and organ perfusion stent (n = 6). Finally, a custom, nitinol, dual chamber organ perfusion stent was fabricated using a retrievable "petal and stem" design. Endovascular organ perfusion stent deployment achieved visceral isolation without adverse impact on cardiac parameters. Visceral oxygen delivery was 4.8-fold greater compared with controls. During the agonal period, organs in organ perfusion stent-treated animals appeared well perfused in contrast with the malperfused controls. A custom nitinol and polyurethane organ perfusion stent was recaptured easily with simple sheath advancement. An organ perfusion stent maintained organ perfusion during the agonal phase in a porcine model of donation after cardiac death organ donation without adversely affecting cardiac function. Ultimately, the custom retrievable design of this study may help resolve the critical shortage of donor organs for transplant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Comparison of Willingness to Pay to Prevent Child Maltreatment Deaths in Ecuador and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Phaedra S.; Ingels, Justin B.; Roldos, M. Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the benefits of preventing child maltreatment (CM) is essential for policy makers to determine whether there are significant returns on investment from interventions to prevent CM. The aim of this study was to estimate the benefits of preventing CM deaths in an Ecuadorian population, and to compare the results to a similar study in a US population. The study used the contingent valuation method to elicit respondents’ willingness to pay (WTP) for a 1 in 100,000 reduction in the risk of CM mortality. After adjusting for differences in purchasing power, the WTP to prevent the CM mortality risk reduction in the Ecuador population was $237 and the WTP for the same risk reduction in the US population was $175. In the pooled analysis, WTP for a reduction in CM mortality was significantly impacted by country (p = 0.03), history of CM (p = 0.007), payment mechanism (p Ecuador, may be better served by developing their own benefits estimates for use in future benefit-cost analyses of interventions designed to prevent CM. PMID:23538730

  2. Infant Mortality in Novo Hamburgo: Associated Factors and Cardiovascular Causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brum, Camila de Andrade [Instituto de Cardiologia/Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia (IC/FUC), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Stein, Airton Tetelbom [Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Grupo Hospitalar Conceição (GHC), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Universidade Luterana do Brasil (ULBRA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pellanda, Lucia Campos, E-mail: luciapell.pesquisa@cardiologia.org.br [Instituto de Cardiologia/Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia (IC/FUC), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    Infant mortality has decreased in Brazil, but remains high as compared to that of other developing countries. In 2010, the Rio Grande do Sul state had the lowest infant mortality rate in Brazil. However, the municipality of Novo Hamburgo had the highest infant mortality rate in the Porto Alegre metropolitan region. To describe the causes of infant mortality in the municipality of Novo Hamburgo from 2007 to 2010, identifying which causes were related to heart diseases and if they were diagnosed in the prenatal period, and to assess the access to healthcare services. This study assessed infants of the municipality of Novo Hamburgo, who died, and whose data were collected from the infant death investigation records. Of the 157 deaths in that period, 35.3% were reducible through diagnosis and early treatment, 25% were reducible through partnership with other sectors, 19.2% were non-preventable, 11.5% were reducible by means of appropriate pregnancy monitoring, 5.1% were reducible through appropriate delivery care, and 3.8% were ill defined. The major cause of death related to heart disease (13.4%), which was significantly associated with the variables ‘age at death’, ‘gestational age’ and ‘birth weight’. Regarding access to healthcare services, 60.9% of the pregnant women had a maximum of six prenatal visits. It is mandatory to enhance prenatal care and newborn care at hospitals and basic healthcare units to prevent infant mortality.

  3. Infant Mortality in Novo Hamburgo: Associated Factors and Cardiovascular Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Andrade Brum

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infant mortality has decreased in Brazil, but remains high as compared to that of other developing countries. In 2010, the Rio Grande do Sul state had the lowest infant mortality rate in Brazil. However, the municipality of Novo Hamburgo had the highest infant mortality rate in the Porto Alegre metropolitan region. Objective: To describe the causes of infant mortality in the municipality of Novo Hamburgo from 2007 to 2010, identifying which causes were related to heart diseases and if they were diagnosed in the prenatal period, and to assess the access to healthcare services. Methods: This study assessed infants of the municipality of Novo Hamburgo, who died, and whose data were collected from the infant death investigation records. Results: Of the 157 deaths in that period, 35.3% were reducible through diagnosis and early treatment, 25% were reducible through partnership with other sectors, 19.2% were non-preventable, 11.5% were reducible by means of appropriate pregnancy monitoring, 5.1% were reducible through appropriate delivery care, and 3.8% were ill defined. The major cause of death related to heart disease (13.4%, which was significantly associated with the variables ‘age at death’, ‘gestational age’ and ‘birth weight’. Regarding access to healthcare services, 60.9% of the pregnant women had a maximum of six prenatal visits. Conclusion: It is mandatory to enhance prenatal care and newborn care at hospitals and basic healthcare units to prevent infant mortality.

  4. Infant Mortality in Novo Hamburgo: Associated Factors and Cardiovascular Causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brum, Camila de Andrade; Stein, Airton Tetelbom; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2015-01-01

    Infant mortality has decreased in Brazil, but remains high as compared to that of other developing countries. In 2010, the Rio Grande do Sul state had the lowest infant mortality rate in Brazil. However, the municipality of Novo Hamburgo had the highest infant mortality rate in the Porto Alegre metropolitan region. To describe the causes of infant mortality in the municipality of Novo Hamburgo from 2007 to 2010, identifying which causes were related to heart diseases and if they were diagnosed in the prenatal period, and to assess the access to healthcare services. This study assessed infants of the municipality of Novo Hamburgo, who died, and whose data were collected from the infant death investigation records. Of the 157 deaths in that period, 35.3% were reducible through diagnosis and early treatment, 25% were reducible through partnership with other sectors, 19.2% were non-preventable, 11.5% were reducible by means of appropriate pregnancy monitoring, 5.1% were reducible through appropriate delivery care, and 3.8% were ill defined. The major cause of death related to heart disease (13.4%), which was significantly associated with the variables ‘age at death’, ‘gestational age’ and ‘birth weight’. Regarding access to healthcare services, 60.9% of the pregnant women had a maximum of six prenatal visits. It is mandatory to enhance prenatal care and newborn care at hospitals and basic healthcare units to prevent infant mortality

  5. Validation, Optimal Threshold Determination, and Clinical Utility of the Infant Risk of Overweight Checklist for Early Prevention of Child Overweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redsell, Sarah A; Weng, Stephen; Swift, Judy A; Nathan, Dilip; Glazebrook, Cris

    2016-06-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the predictive validity of the Infant Risk of Overweight Checklist (IROC). This study further establishes the predictive accuracy of the IROC using data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and examines the optimal threshold for determining high risk of childhood overweight. Using the IROC algorithm, we calculated the risk of being overweight, based on International Obesity Task Force criteria, in the first year of life for 980 children in the ALSPAC cohort at 5 years. Discrimination was assessed by the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC c-statistic). Net reclassification index (NRI) was calculated for risk thresholds ranging from 2.5% to 30%, which determine cutoffs for identifying infants at risk of becoming overweight. At 5 years of age, 12.3% of boys and 19.6% of girls were categorized overweight. Discrimination (AUC c-statistic) ranged from 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62-0.72) when risk scores were calculated directly to 0.93 (95% CI, 0.88-0.98) when the algorithm was recalibrated and missing values of the risk factor algorithm were imputed. The NRI showed that there were positive gains in reclassification using risk thresholds from 5% to 20%, with the maximum NRI being at 10%. This study confirms that the IROC has moderately good validity for assessing overweight risk in infants and offers an optimal threshold for determining high risk. The IROC algorithm has been imbedded into a computer program for Proactive Assessment of Obesity Risk during Infancy, which facilitates early overweight prevention through communication of risk to parents.

  6. Impact of isoniazid preventive therapy on the evaluation of long-term effectiveness of infant MVA85A vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyasi, E W; Luabeya, A K K; Tameris, M; Geldenhuys, H; Mulenga, H; Landry, B S; Scriba, T J; Schmidt, B-M; Hanekom, W A; Mahomed, H; McShane, H; Hatherill, M

    2017-07-01

    South Africa. To evaluate the long-term effectiveness of infant modified vaccinia Ankara virus-expressing antigen 85A (MVA85A) vaccination against tuberculosis (TB). We analysed data from a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled Phase 2b MVA85A infant TB vaccine trial (2009-2012), with extended post-trial follow-up (2012-2014). Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) was provided by public health services according to national guidelines. The primary outcome was curative treatment for TB disease. Survival analysis and Poisson regression were used for study analysis. Total follow-up was 10 351 person-years of observation (pyo). Median follow-up age was 4.8 years (interquartile range 4.4-5.2). There were 328 (12%) TB cases. TB disease incidence was 3.2/100 pyo (95%CI 2.8-3.5) overall, and respectively 3.3 (95%CI 2.9-3.9) and 3.0 (95%CI 2.6-3.5)/100 pyo in the MVA85A vaccine and placebo arms. A total of 304 children (11%) received IPT, with respectively 880 and 9471 pyo among IPT and non-IPT recipients. There were 23 (7.6%) TB cases among 304 IPT recipients vs. 305 (12.9%) among 2374 non-IPT recipients (P = 0.008). IPT effectiveness was 85% (95%CI 76-91). Extended follow-up confirms no long-term effectiveness of infant MVA85A vaccination, but a six-fold reduction in TB risk can be attributed to IPT. National TB programmes in high TB burden countries should ensure optimal implementation of IPT for eligible children.

  7. Cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy monitoring for prevention of brain injury in very preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Greisen, Gorm; Als-Nielsen, Bodil

    2017-01-01

    or air leaks. The quality of evidence for all comparisons discussed above was assessed as very low apart from all-cause mortality and adverse events: these were assessed as low and moderate, respectively. The validity of all comparisons is hampered by a small sample of randomised infants, risk of bias...... due to lack of blinding, and indirectness of outcomes. Authors' conclusions: The only eligible randomised clinical trial did not demonstrate any consistent effects of NIRS plus a guideline on the assessed clinical outcomes. The trial was, however, only powered to detect difference in cerebral...

  8. Aged garlic extract and S-allylcysteine prevent apoptotic cell death in a chemical hypoxia model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Orozco-Ibarra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aged garlic extract (AGE and its main constituent S-allylcysteine (SAC are natural antioxidants with protective effects against cerebral ischemia or cancer, events that involve hypoxia stress. Cobalt chloride (CoCl2 has been used to mimic hypoxic conditions through the stabilization of the α subunit of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-Ια and up-regulation of HIF-1a-dependent genes as well as activation of hypoxic conditions such as reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis. The present study was designed to assess the effect of AGE and SAC on the CoCl2-chemical hypoxia model in PC12 cells RESULTS: We found that CoCl2 induced the stabilization of HIF-1a and its nuclear localization. CoCl2 produced ROS and apoptotic cell death that depended on hypoxia extent. The treatment with AGE and SAC decreased ROS and protected against CoCl2-induced apoptotic cell death which depended on the CoCl2 concentration and incubation time. SAC or AGE decreased the number of cells in the early and late stages of apoptosis. Interestingly, this protective effect was associated with attenuation in HIF-1a stabilization, activity not previously reported for AGE and SAC CONCLUSIONS: Obtained results show that AGE and SAC decreased apoptotic CoCl2-induced cell death. This protection occurs by affecting the activity of HIF-1a and supports the use of these natural compounds as a therapeutic alternative for hypoxic conditions

  9. N-Acetylcysteine Prevents Retrograde Motor Neuron Death after Neonatal Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Joseph; Zhang, Jennifer; Scholl, David; Chiang, Cameron; Gordon, Tessa; Borschel, Gregory H

    2017-05-01

    Neuronal death may be an overlooked and unaddressed component of disability following neonatal nerve injuries, such as obstetric brachial plexus injury. N-acetylcysteine and acetyl-L-carnitine improve survival of neurons after adult nerve injury, but it is unknown whether they improve survival after neonatal injury, when neurons are most susceptible to retrograde neuronal death. The authors' objective was to examine whether N-acetylcysteine or acetyl-L-carnitine treatment improves survival of neonatal motor or sensory neurons in a rat model of neonatal nerve injury. Rat pups received either a sciatic nerve crush or transection injury at postnatal day 3 and were then randomized to receive either intraperitoneal vehicle (5% dextrose), N-acetylcysteine (750 mg/kg), or acetyl-L-carnitine (300 mg/kg) once or twice daily. Four weeks after injury, surviving neurons were retrograde-labeled with 4% Fluoro-Gold. The lumbar spinal cord and L4/L5 dorsal root ganglia were then harvested and sectioned to count surviving motor and sensory neurons. Transection and crush injuries resulted in significant motor and sensory neuron loss, with transection injury resulting in significantly less neuron survival. High-dose N-acetylcysteine (750 mg/kg twice daily) significantly increased motor neuron survival after neonatal sciatic nerve crush and transection injury. Neither N-acetylcysteine nor acetyl-L-carnitine treatment improved sensory neuron survival. Proximal neonatal nerve injuries, such as obstetric brachial plexus injury, produce significant retrograde neuronal death after injury. High-dose N-acetylcysteine significantly increases motor neuron survival, which may improve functional outcomes after obstetrical brachial plexus injury.

  10. Inhibition of serotonergic neurons in the nucleus paragigantocellularis lateralis fragments sleep and decreases rapid eye movement sleep in the piglet: implications for sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnall, Robert A; Harris, Michael B; Gill, W Hugh; Hoffman, Jill M; Brown, Justin W; Niblock, Mary M

    2005-09-07

    Serotonergic receptor binding is altered in the medullary serotonergic nuclei, including the paragigantocellularis lateralis (PGCL), in many infants who die of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The PGCL receives inputs from many sites in the caudal brainstem and projects to the spinal cord and to more rostral areas important for arousal and vigilance. We have shown previously that local unilateral nonspecific neuronal inhibition in this region with GABA(A) agonists disrupts sleep architecture. We hypothesized that specifically inhibiting serotonergic activity in the PGCL would result in less sleep and heightened vigilance. We analyzed sleep before and after unilaterally dialyzing the 5-HT1A agonist (+/-)-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) into the juxtafacial PGCL in conscious newborn piglets. 8-OH-DPAT dialysis resulted in fragmented sleep with an increase in the number and a decrease in the duration of bouts of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and a marked decrease in amount of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. After 8-OH-DPAT dialysis, there were decreases in body movements, including shivering, during NREM sleep; body temperature and heart rate also decreased. The effects of 8-OH-DPAT were blocked by local pretreatment with N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-2-pyridinylcyclohexane-carboxamide, a selective 5-HT1A antagonist. Destruction of serotonergic neurons with 5,7-DHT resulted in fragmented sleep and eliminated the effects of subsequent 8-OH-DPAT dialysis on REM but not the effects on body temperature or heart rate. We conclude that neurons expressing 5-HT1A autoreceptors in the juxtafacial PGCL are involved in regulating or modulating sleep. Abnormalities in the function of these neurons may alter sleep homeostasis and contribute to the etiology of SIDS.

  11. State-Level Implementation of Health and Safety Policies to Prevent Sudden Death and Catastrophic Injuries Within Secondary School Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, William M; Scarneo, Samantha E; Casa, Douglas J

    2017-09-01

    Sudden death and catastrophic injuries during sport can be attenuated with the implementation of evidence-based health and safety policies. However, the extent of the implementation of these policies within secondary school athletics is unknown. To provide an assessment of the implementation of health and safety policies pertaining to the leading causes of sudden death and catastrophic injuries in sport within secondary school athletics in the United States. Descriptive epidemiology study. A rubric for evidence-based practices for preventing the leading causes of death and catastrophic injuries in sport was created. The rubric comprised 5 equally weighted sections for sudden cardiac arrest, head injuries, exertional heat stroke, appropriate medical coverage, and emergency preparedness. State high school athletic association (SHSAA) policies, enacted legislation, and Department of Education policies were extensively reviewed for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. States meeting the specific criteria in the rubric, which required policies to be mandated for all SHSAA member schools, were awarded credit; the weighted scores were tabulated to calculate an aggregate score. States were then ranked from 1 (best) to 51 (worst) based on the aggregate score achieved. The median score on the rubric was 47.1% (range, 23.00%-78.75%). States ranked 1 through 10 (from 78.75% to 56.98%) were North Carolina, Kentucky, Massachusetts, New Jersey, South Dakota, Missouri, Washington, Hawaii, Wisconsin, and Georgia, respectively. States ranked 11 through 20 (from 56.03% to 50.55%) were Arkansas, New York, Mississippi, West Virginia, Oregon, Illinois, Tennessee, Arizona, Texas, and District of Columbia, respectively. States ranked 21 through 30 (from 49.40% to 44.00%) were Virginia, Pennsylvania, Florida, New Mexico, Alabama, Maine, Rhode Island, Indiana, Nevada, and Utah, respectively. States ranked 31 through 40 (from 43.93% to 39.80%) were Ohio, Delaware, Alaska, Vermont

  12. A Dual Chamber Stent Prevents Organ Malperfusion in a Model of Donation after Cardiac Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Bryan W.; Chun, Youngjae; Cho, Sung Kwon; Chen, Yanfei; Liang, Nathan; Maul, Timothy; Demetris, Anthony; Gu, Xinzhu; Wagner, William R.; Tevar, Amit D.

    2016-01-01

    Background The paradigm for Donation after Cardiac Death (DCD) subjects donor organs to significant ischemic injury. A dual-chamber Organ Perfusion Stent (OPS) would maintain organ perfusion without impacting natural cardiac death. A center lumen allows uninterrupted cardiac blood flow, while an external chamber delivers oxygenated blood to the visceral vessels. Methods A prototype OPS was constructed from commercial stents. In a porcine model, the OPS was deployed, followed by a simulated agonal period. Oxygenated blood perfused the external stent chamber. Organ perfusion was compared between controls (n=3) and OPS (n=6). Finally, a custom nitinol dual chamber OPS was fabricated using a retrievable “petal and stem” design. Results Endovascular OPS deployment achieved visceral isolation without adverse impact on cardiac parameters. Visceral oxygen delivery was 4.8 fold higher as compared to controls. During the agonal period, organs in OPS treated animals appeared well perfused, contrasting to malperfused controls. A custom nitinol and polyurethane OPS was easily recaptured with simple sheath advancement. Conclusions An OPS maintained organ perfusion during the agonal phase in a model of DCD organ donation without adversely impacting cardiac function. Ultimately, the custom retrievable design of this study may help resolve the critical shortage of donor organs for transplant. PMID:27524434

  13. A risk reduction strategy to prevent maternal deaths associated with unsafe abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briozzo, L; Vidiella, G; Rodríguez, F; Gorgoroso, M; Faúndes, A; Pons, J E

    2006-11-01

    Worldwide, 13% of maternal deaths are caused by complications of spontaneous or induced abortion, 29% in Uruguay and nearly half (48%) in the Pereira Rossell Hospital. This paper describes a risk reduction strategy for unsafe abortions in Montevideo, Uruguay, where over one-fourth of maternal deaths are caused by unsafe abortion. Although abortion is not legal in Uruguay, women desiring abortions can be counseled before and immediately after to reduce the risk of injury. Women contemplating abortion were invited to attend a "before-abortion" and an "after-abortion" visit at a reproductive health polyclinic. At the "before-abortion" visit, gestational age, condition of the fetus and pathologies were diagnosed and the risks associated with the use of different abortion methods (based on the best available scientific evidence) were described. The "after-abortion" visit allowed for checking for possible complications and offering contraception. From March 2004 through June 2005, 675 women attended the "before-abortion" and 495 the "after-abortion" visit, the number increasing over time. Some women (3.5%) decided not to abort, others were either not pregnant, the fetus/embryo was dead or the woman had a condition that permitted legal termination of pregnancy in the hospital (7.5%). Most women, however, aborted. All women used vaginal misoprostol in the doses recommended in the medical literature. There were no serious complications (one mild infection and two hemorrhages not requiring transfusion). The strategy is effective in reducing unsafe abortions and their health consequences.

  14. Prevention of postpartum smoking relapse in mothers of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R M; Merritt, T A; Goldstein, M R; Deming, D D; Slater, L E; Angeles, D M

    2012-05-01

    Approximately 40% of women who smoke tobacco quit smoking during pregnancy, yet up to 85% relapse after delivery. Those who resume smoking often do so by 2 to 8 weeks postpartum. Smoking mothers are more than twice as likely to quit breastfeeding by 10 weeks postpartum. The hospitalization of a newborn, while stressful, is an opportunity to emphasize the importance of a smoke-free environment for babies. Supporting maternal-infant bonding may reduce maternal stress and motivate mothers to remain smoke free and continue breastfeeding. The objective of this study was to reduce postpartum smoking relapse and prolong breastfeeding duration during the first 8 weeks postpartum in mothers who quit smoking just before or during pregnancy and have newborns admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). This study was an Institutional Review Board-approved prospective randomized clinical trial. After informed consent, mothers of newborns admitted to the NICU were randomized to a control or intervention group. Both groups received weekly encouragement to remain smoke free and routine breastfeeding support. Mothers in the intervention group were also given enhanced support for maternal-infant bonding including information about newborn behaviors, and were encouraged to frequently hold their babies skin-to-skin. More mothers were smoke free (81 vs 46%, Pbreastfeeding (86 vs 21%, Pprolonged duration of breastfeeding during the first 8 weeks postpartum.

  15. Probiotics Prevent Late-Onset Sepsis in Human Milk-Fed, Very Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Aceti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence supports the role of probiotics in reducing the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, time to achieve full enteral feeding, and late-onset sepsis (LOS in preterm infants. As reported for several neonatal clinical outcomes, recent data have suggested that nutrition might affect probiotics’ efficacy. Nevertheless, the currently available literature does not explore the relationship between LOS prevention and type of feeding in preterm infants receiving probiotics. Thus, the aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of probiotics for LOS prevention in preterm infants according to type of feeding (exclusive human milk (HM vs. exclusive formula or mixed feeding. Randomized-controlled trials involving preterm infants receiving probiotics and reporting on LOS were included in the systematic review. Only trials reporting on outcome according to feeding type were included in the meta-analysis. Fixed-effects models were used and random-effects models were used when significant heterogeneity was found. The results were expressed as risk ratio (RR with 95% confidence interval (CI. Twenty-five studies were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, probiotic supplementation resulted in a significantly lower incidence of LOS (RR 0.79 (95% CI 0.71–0.88, p < 0.0001. According to feeding type, the beneficial effect of probiotics was confirmed only in exclusively HM-fed preterm infants (RR 0.75 (95% CI 0.65–0.86, p < 0.0001. Among HM-fed infants, only probiotic mixtures, and not single-strain products, were effective in reducing LOS incidence (RR 0.68 (95% CI 0.57–0.80 p < 0.00001. The results of the present meta-analysis show that probiotics reduce LOS incidence in exclusively HM-fed preterm infants. Further efforts are required to clarify the relationship between probiotics supplementation, HM, and feeding practices in preterm infants.

  16. Ending preventable child deaths in South Africa: What role can ward ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa (SA) has emerged from the Millennium Development Goal era with a mixture of success and failure. The successful national scale-up of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV services with increasingly efficacious antiretroviral regimens has reduced the mother-to-child transmission rate dramatically; ...

  17. Vital Signs – Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    This podcast is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  18. Influence of Hepatitis B immunization to prevent vertical transmission of Hep-B virus in infants bam from Hep-B positive mother

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza Fitria

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Hepatitis B is one of the most common infectious diseases worldv.ide. Indonesia has moderate-high endemicity for hepatitis B infection. Perinatal transmission increases the risk for chronic hepatitis B. Infants from HBsAg-positive mothers should receive hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG and vaccination within 12 hours of birth, but this practice is not routinely done in Indonesia due to financial constraints. Objectives To detennine the influence of Hep-B immunization on preventing Hepatitis B vertical transmission. Methods A descriptive cohort study was conducted from May 2009 - January 2010. Subjects were term infants born from HBsAg-positive mothers v.ith no history of HBIG administration. They had received complete hepatitis B immunization and 1 month after the last dose were evaluated for HBsAg and anti-HBs. Cord blood was also taken during labor to measure HBsAg. Results There were 22 infants born from HBsAg-positive mother who met the inclusion criteria. HBsAgwas positive in 6 of22 cord blood specimens. There were 15 infants who completed this study. One of 15 infants had positive HBsAg after completed hepatitis B immunization and 12 of 15 infants had protective level of anti-HBs. Effectiveness of hepatitis B immunization to prevent vertical transmission in this study was 70-90%. Conclusion Hepatitis B immunization can prevent vertical transmission of hepatitis B in infants born to mothers who are HBsAg-positive even without administration of HBIG.

  19. Prevention of sudden cardiac death in athletes, sportspersons and marathoners in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Vora

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The annual incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD in athletes is significantly lower than the general population. However, when SCD occurs in an athlete during sporting event or training, it sends shockwaves in the society and raises questions about cardiovascular effects of sports and exercise. This document reviews the causes and mechanism of SCD in sports and exercise in young and older athletes. In the Indian context, we suggest a ‘pre-participation screening’ of young and older athletes and consider a ‘supervised, graded exercise regime’ for the uninitiated, older sports participant. Finally, the document proposes medical infrastructure required to successfully revive a victim of sudden cardiac arrest during a sporting event.

  20. Sitagliptin Prevents Inflammation and Apoptotic Cell Death in the Kidney of Type 2 Diabetic Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Marques

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV inhibitor, in preventing the deleterious effects of diabetes on the kidney in an animal model of type 2 diabetes mellitus; the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rat: 20-week-old rats were treated with sitagliptin (10 mg/kg bw/day during 6 weeks. Glycaemia and blood HbA1c levels were monitored, as well as kidney function and lesions. Kidney mRNA and/or protein content/distribution of DPP-IV, GLP-1, GLP-1R, TNF-α, IL-1β, BAX, Bcl-2, and Bid were evaluated by RT-PCR and/or western blotting/immunohistochemistry. Sitagliptin treatment improved glycaemic control, as reflected by the significantly reduced levels of glycaemia and HbA1c (by about 22.5% and 1.2%, resp. and ameliorated tubulointerstitial and glomerular lesions. Sitagliptin prevented the diabetes-induced increase in DPP-IV levels and the decrease in GLP-1 levels in kidney. Sitagliptin increased colocalization of GLP-1 and GLP-1R in the diabetic kidney. Sitagliptin also decreased IL-1β and TNF-α levels, as well as, prevented the increase of BAX/Bcl-2 ratio, Bid protein levels, and TUNEL-positive cells which indicates protective effects against inflammation and proapoptotic state in the kidney of diabetic rats, respectively. In conclusion, sitagliptin might have a major role in preventing diabetic nephropathy evolution due to anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic properties.

  1. Sitagliptin prevents inflammation and apoptotic cell death in the kidney of type 2 diabetic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Catarina; Mega, Cristina; Gonçalves, Andreia; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Teixeira-Lemos, Edite; Teixeira, Frederico; Fontes-Ribeiro, Carlos; Reis, Flávio; Fernandes, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitor, in preventing the deleterious effects of diabetes on the kidney in an animal model of type 2 diabetes mellitus; the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat: 20-week-old rats were treated with sitagliptin (10 mg/kg bw/day) during 6 weeks. Glycaemia and blood HbA1c levels were monitored, as well as kidney function and lesions. Kidney mRNA and/or protein content/distribution of DPP-IV, GLP-1, GLP-1R, TNF-α, IL-1β, BAX, Bcl-2, and Bid were evaluated by RT-PCR and/or western blotting/immunohistochemistry. Sitagliptin treatment improved glycaemic control, as reflected by the significantly reduced levels of glycaemia and HbA1c (by about 22.5% and 1.2%, resp.) and ameliorated tubulointerstitial and glomerular lesions. Sitagliptin prevented the diabetes-induced increase in DPP-IV levels and the decrease in GLP-1 levels in kidney. Sitagliptin increased colocalization of GLP-1 and GLP-1R in the diabetic kidney. Sitagliptin also decreased IL-1β and TNF-α levels, as well as, prevented the increase of BAX/Bcl-2 ratio, Bid protein levels, and TUNEL-positive cells which indicates protective effects against inflammation and proapoptotic state in the kidney of diabetic rats, respectively. In conclusion, sitagliptin might have a major role in preventing diabetic nephropathy evolution due to anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic properties.

  2. Infant feeding practice and associated factors of HIV positive mothers attending prevention of mother to child transmission and antiretroviral therapy clinics in Gondar Town health institutions, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muluye Dagnachew

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been estimated that 430,000 children under 15 years of age were newly infected with HIV in 2008, and more than 71% are living in sub-Saharan Africa. In the absence of intervention to prevent mother-to-child transmission, 30-45% of infants born to HIV-positive mothers in developing countries become infected during pregnancy, delivery and breastfeeding. The aim of this study was to assess infant feeding practice and associated factors of HIV positive mothers attending prevention of mother to child transmission and antiretroviral therapy clinics of Northwest Ethiopia. Methods Institution based cross sectional study was conducted from January to May 2011 among all HIV positive mothers with less than two years old child attending prevention of mother to child transmission and antiretroviral therapy clinics in Gondar Town health institutions. A structured pre-tested questionnaire using interview technique was used for data collection. The data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 16 statistical package. Results A total of 209 HIV positive mothers were included in the study. Of these, 187 (89.5% had followed the recommended way of infant feeding practice while significant percentage (10.5% had practiced mixed breast feeding. In multivariate analysis, disclosure of HIV status with their spouse, insufficient breast milk and occupational status were found to be independently associated (p-value of Conclusions Higher proportion of respondents used the recommended way of infant feeding practice by WHO as well as by Ethiopian Ministry of Health. However, mixed feeding in the first 6 months of age, an undesirable practice in infant feeding, were reported in this study. Infant feeding education that is aligned to national policy should be strengthened in primary health care, particularly in situations where prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV is prioritized.

  3. Use of spiritual coping strategies by gender, race/ethnicity, and religion at 1 and 3 months after infant's/child's intensive care unit death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Dawn M; Youngblut, JoAnne M; Brooten, Dorothy

    2017-10-01

    In the United States, 57,000 children (newborn to 18 years) die annually. Bereaved parents may rely on religious or spiritual beliefs in their grief. The study's purpose was to examine differences in parents' use of spiritual and religious coping practices by gender, race/ethnicity, and religion at 1 and 3 months after infant/ICU death. The sample consisted of 165 bereaved parents, 78% minority. The Spiritual Coping Strategies Scale was used to measure religious and spiritual coping practices, separately. One-way ANOVAs indicated that Black non-Hispanic mothers used significantly more religious coping practices at 3 months than White non-Hispanic mothers. Protestant and Catholic parents used more religious coping practices than the "no" and "other" religion groups at 1 and 3 months. Within the 30 mother-father dyads (paired t-tests), mothers reported significantly greater use of religious coping practices at 1 and 3 months and spiritual coping practices at 3 months than fathers. Religious coping practices were most commonly used by Black mothers and Protestant and Catholic parents. Within dyads, mothers used more spiritual and religious coping practices than fathers. These findings are beneficial for healthcare personnel in providing support to bereaved parents of diverse races/ethnicities and religions. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  4. Muertes por enfermedades cardiacas y accidentes cerebrovasculares prevenibles - (Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    Este podcast se basa en la edición de septiembre del 2013 del informe Signos Vitales de los CDC. Más de 800,000 personas en los Estados Unidos mueren cada año a causa de enfermedades cardiacas y accidentes cerebrovasculares. Aprenda cómo controlar todos los principales factores de riesgo.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  5. Polyphenols of virgin coconut oil prevent pro-oxidant mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illam, Soorya Parathodi; Narayanankutty, Arunaksharan; Raghavamenon, Achuthan C

    2017-07-01

    Virgin coconut oil (VCO), extracted from the fresh coconut kernel, is a food supplement enriched with medium chain saturated fatty acids and polyphenolic antioxidants. It is reported to have several health benefits including lipid lowering, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The pharmacological benefits of VCO have been attributed to its polyphenol content (VCOP), the mechanistic basis of which is less explored. Liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy (LC/MS) analysis of VCOP documented the presence of gallic acid, ferulic acid (FA), quercetin, methyl catechin, dihydrokaempferol and myricetin glycoside. Pre-treatment of VCOP at different concentrations (25-100 μg/mL) significantly reduced the H 2 O 2 and 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) induced cell death in HCT-15 cells. Giving further insight to its mechanistic basis, oxidative stress induced alterations in glutathione (GSH) levels and activities of GR (Glutathione-Reductase), GPx (Glutathione-Peroxidase), GST (Glutathione-S-Transferase) and catalase (CAT) were restored to near-normal by VCOP, concomitantly reducing lipid peroxidation. The efficacy of VCOP was similar to that of Trolox and FA added in culture. The study thus suggests that VCOP protects cells from pro-oxidant insults by modulating cellular antioxidant status.

  6. The Consideration of Socioeconomic Determinants in Prevention of Traditional Male Circumcision Deaths and Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Mbuyiselo; Hongoro, Charles

    2018-05-01

    The responsiveness to socioeconomic determinants is perceived as highly crucial in preventing the high mortality and morbidity rates of traditional male circumcision initiates in the Eastern Cape, a province in South Africa. The study sought to describe social determinants and explore economic determinants related to traditional circumcision of boys from 12 to 18 years of age in Libode rural communities in Eastern Cape Province. From the results of a descriptive cross-sectional survey ( n = 1,036), 956 (92.2%) boys preferred traditional male circumcision because of associated social determinants which included the variables for the attainment of social manhood values and benefits; 403 (38.9%) wanted to attain community respect; 347 (33.5%) wanted the accepted traditional male circumcision for hygienic purposes. The findings from the exploratory focus group discussions were revolving around variables associated with poverty, unemployment, and illegal actions to gain money. The three negative economic determinants were yielded as themes: (a) commercialization and profitmaking, (b) poverty and unemployment, (c) taking health risk for cheaper practices, and the last theme was the (d) actions suggested to prevent the problem. The study concluded with discussion and recommendations based on a developed strategic circumcision health promotion program which is considerate of socioeconomic determinants.

  7. Mortality, Morbidity, and Developmental Outcomes in Infants Born to Women Who Received Either Mefloquine or Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine as Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria in Pregnancy: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupérez, María; González, Raquel; Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Kabanywanyi, Abdunoor M; Sevene, Esperança; Ouédraogo, Smaïla; Kakolwa, Mwaka A; Vala, Anifa; Accrombessi, Manfred; Briand, Valérie; Aponte, John J; Manego Zoleko, Rella; Adegnika, Ayôla A; Cot, Michel; Kremsner, Peter G; Massougbodji, Achille; Abdulla, Salim; Ramharter, Michael; Macete, Eusébio; Menéndez, Clara

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about the effects of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) on the health of sub-Saharan African infants. We have evaluated the safety of IPTp with mefloquine (MQ) compared to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for important infant health and developmental outcomes. In the context of a multicenter randomized controlled trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of IPTp with MQ compared to SP in pregnancy carried out in four sub-Saharan countries (Mozambique, Benin, Gabon, and Tanzania), 4,247 newborns, 2,815 born to women who received MQ and 1,432 born to women who received SP for IPTp, were followed up until 12 mo of age. Anthropometric parameters and psychomotor development were assessed at 1, 9, and 12 mo of age, and the incidence of malaria, anemia, hospital admissions, outpatient visits, and mortality were determined until 12 mo of age. No significant differences were found in the proportion of infants with stunting, underweight, wasting, and severe acute malnutrition at 1, 9, and 12 mo of age between infants born to women who were on IPTp with MQ versus SP. Except for three items evaluated at 9 mo of age, no significant differences were observed in the psychomotor development milestones assessed. Incidence of malaria, anemia, hospital admissions, outpatient visits, and mortality were similar between the two groups. Information on the outcomes at 12 mo of age was unavailable in 26% of the infants, 761 (27%) from the MQ group and 377 (26%) from the SP group. Reasons for not completing the study were death (4% of total study population), study withdrawal (6%), migration (8%), and loss to follow-up (9%). No significant differences were found between IPTp with MQ and SP administered in pregnancy on infant mortality, morbidity, and nutritional outcomes. The poorer performance on certain psychomotor development milestones at 9 mo of age in children born to women in the MQ group compared to those in the SP group may deserve further

  8. Prevention of chronic disease in the 21st century: elimination of the leading preventable causes of premature death and disability in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Ursula E; Briss, Peter A; Goodman, Richard A; Bowman, Barbara A

    2014-07-05

    With non-communicable conditions accounting for nearly two-thirds of deaths worldwide, the emergence of chronic diseases as the predominant challenge to global health is undisputed. In the USA, chronic diseases are the main causes of poor health, disability, and death, and account for most of health-care expenditures. The chronic disease burden in the USA largely results from a short list of risk factors--including tobacco use, poor diet and physical inactivity (both strongly associated with obesity), excessive alcohol consumption, uncontrolled high blood pressure, and hyperlipidaemia--that can be effectively addressed for individuals and populations. Increases in the burden of chronic diseases are attributable to incidence and prevalence of leading chronic conditions and risk factors (which occur individually and in combination), and population demographics, including ageing and health disparities. To effectively and equitably address the chronic disease burden, public health and health-care systems need to deploy integrated approaches that bundle strategies and interventions, address many risk factors and conditions simultaneously, create population-wide changes, help the population subgroups most affected, and rely on implementation by many sectors, including public-private partnerships and involvement from all stakeholders. To help to meet the chronic disease burden, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) uses four cross-cutting strategies: (1) epidemiology and surveillance to monitor trends and inform programmes; (2) environmental approaches that promote health and support healthy behaviours; (3) health system interventions to improve the effective use of clinical and other preventive services; and (4) community resources linked to clinical services that sustain improved management of chronic conditions. Establishment of community conditions to support healthy behaviours and promote effective management of chronic conditions will deliver

  9. Interferon-γ Prevents Death of Bystander Neurons during CD8 T Cell Responses in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Kirsten; Hausmann, Jürgen; Staeheli, Peter

    2009-01-01

    T cells restricted to neurotropic viruses are potentially harmful as their activity may result in the destruction of neurons. In the Borna disease virus (BDV) model, antiviral CD8 T cells entering the brain of infected mice cause neurological disease but no substantial loss of neurons unless the animals lack interferon-γ (IFN-γ). We show here that glutamate receptor antagonists failed to prevent BDV-induced neuronal loss in IFN-γ-deficient mice, suggesting that excitotoxicity resulting from glutamate receptor overstimulation is an unlikely explanation for the neuronal damage. Experiments with IFN-γ-deficient mice lacking eosinophils indicated that these cells, which specifically accumulate in the infected brains of IFN-γ-deficient mice, are not responsible for CA1 neuronal death. Interestingly, BDV-induced damage of CA1 neurons was reduced significantly in IFN-γ-deficient mice lacking perforin, suggesting a key role for CD8 T cells in this pathological process. Specific death of hippocampal CA1 neurons could be triggered by adoptive transfer of BDV-specific CD8 T cells from IFN-γ-deficient mice into uninfected mice that express transgene-encoded BDV antigen at high level in astrocytes. These results indicate that attack by CD8 T cells that cause the death of CA1 neurons might be directed toward regional astrocytes and that IFN-γ protects vulnerable CA1 neurons from collateral damage resulting from exposure to potentially toxic substances generated as a result of CD8 T cell-mediated impairment of astrocyte function. PMID:19359516

  10. Activation of liver X receptors prevents statin-induced death of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lise; Petersen, Rasmus K; Steffensen, Knut R

    2008-01-01

    The biological functions of liver X receptors (LXRs) alpha and beta have primarily been linked to pathways involved in fatty acid and cholesterol homeostasis. Here we report a novel role of LXR activation in protecting cells from statin-induced death. When 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were induced...... of LXRalpha, we demonstrate that the response to LXR agonists is LXR-dependent. Interestingly, LXR-mediated rescue of statin-induced apoptosis was not related to up-regulation of genes previously shown to be involved in the antiapoptotic action of LXR. Furthermore, forced expression of Bcl-2 did not prevent...... statin-induced apoptosis; nor did LXR action depend on protein kinase B, whose activation by insulin was impaired in statin-treated cells. Rather, LXR-dependent rescue of statin-induced apoptosis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes required NF-kappaB activity, since expression of a dominant negative version...

  11. Dietary prevention of allergic diseases in infants and small children. Part III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muraro, Antonella; Dreborg, Sten; Halken, Susanne

    2004-01-01

    diseases in high-risk children. In these patients breastfeeding combined with avoidance of solid food and cow's milk for at least 4-6 months is the most effective preventive regimen. In the absence of breast milk, formulas with documented reduced allergenicity for at least 4-6 months should be used....

  12. Effect of a mother-to-child HIV prevention programme on infant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seventy randomly selected caregivers with young children in the survey; m-depth structured interviews with 11 nutrition counsellors and 11 mothers enrolled in the programme. Results. Caregivers have good knowledge of the spread and prevention of HIV. A majority knew that breast-feeding can transmit lllV but 90% stated ...

  13. Survey of HBsAg-positive pregnant women and their infants regarding measures to prevent maternal-infantile transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meina Hu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intrauterine infection is the main contributor to maternal-infantile transmission of HBV. This is a retrospective study of 158 HBsAg-positive pregnant women who delivered children from Jan 1st, 2004 to Dec.31th, 2006 in Wuhan City, China. We investigated the measures taken to prevent maternal-infantile transmission of hepatitis B virus and the infection status of children. Methods HBsAg-positive pregnant women were selected by a random sampling method when they accepted prenatal care in district-level Maternal and Child Health Hospitals. On a voluntary basis, these women completed questionnaires by face-to-face or phone interviews. The collected data were used to evaluate the immunization programs that pregnant women had received for preventing hepatitis B maternal-infantile transmission. Results Among the 158 women, 143(90.5% received Hepatitis B immune globulin during pregnancy, and 86.0% of their children were given Hepatitis B immune globulin and Hepatitis B vaccine. The rate of cesarean section was 82.3%, and 28.5% of these were aimed at preventing HBV infection. The rate of bottle feeding was 51.9%, and 89.0% of bottle feeding cases were for the purpose of preventing HBV infection. There were 71 cases of participants who were HBeAg-positive. Compared with the HBsAg+ HBeAg- group (only HBsAg-positive, the HBsAg + HBeAg+ group (HBsAg-positive and HBeAg-positive had significantly higher rates of the caesarean section and bottle feeding resulting from hepatitis B (P Conclusion Most HBsAg positive pregnant women have a growing awareness of maternal-infantile transmission of Hepatitis B virus and are receiving some form of preventative treatment, like combined immunization. Caesarean and bottle feeding are very common, often primarily to prevent transmission. Relatively few intrauterine infections were identified in this sample, but many infants did not appear to seroconvert after vaccination.

  14. Family History of Early Infant Death Correlates with Earlier Age at Diagnosis But Not Shorter Time to Diagnosis for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Anderson Dik Wai; Lee, Pamela P; Mao, Huawei; Chan, Koon-Wing; Chen, Xiang Yuan; Chen, Tong-Xin; He, Jian Xin; Kechout, Nadia; Suri, Deepti; Tao, Yin Bo; Xu, Yong Bin; Jiang, Li Ping; Liew, Woei Kang; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Daengsuwan, Tassalapa; Gupta, Anju; Singh, Surjit; Rawat, Amit; Abdul Latiff, Amir Hamzah; Lee, Anselm Chi Wai; Shek, Lynette P; Nguyen, Thi Van Anh; Chin, Tek Jee; Chien, Yin Hsiu; Latiff, Zarina Abdul; Le, Thi Minh Huong; Le, Nguyen Ngoc Quynh; Lee, Bee Wah; Li, Qiang; Raj, Dinesh; Barbouche, Mohamed-Ridha; Thong, Meow-Keong; Ang, Maria Carmen D; Wang, Xiao Chuan; Xu, Chen Guang; Yu, Hai Guo; Yu, Hsin-Hui; Lee, Tsz Leung; Yau, Felix Yat Sun; Wong, Wilfred Hing-Sang; Tu, Wenwei; Yang, Wangling; Chong, Patrick Chun Yin; Ho, Marco Hok Kung; Lau, Yu Lung

    2017-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is fatal unless treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Delay in diagnosis is common without newborn screening. Family history of infant death due to infection or known SCID (FH) has been associated with earlier diagnosis. The aim of this study was to identify the clinical features that affect age at diagnosis (AD) and time to the diagnosis of SCID. From 2005 to 2016, 147 SCID patients were referred to the Asian Primary Immunodeficiency Network. Patients with genetic diagnosis, age at presentation (AP), and AD were selected for study. A total of 88 different SCID gene mutations were identified in 94 patients, including 49 IL2RG mutations, 12 RAG1 mutations, 8 RAG2 mutations, 7 JAK3 mutations, 4 DCLRE1C mutations, 4 IL7R mutations, 2 RFXANK mutations, and 2 ADA mutations. A total of 29 mutations were previously unreported. Eighty-three of the 94 patients fulfilled the selection criteria. Their median AD was 4 months, and the time to diagnosis was 2 months. The commonest SCID was X-linked ( n  = 57). A total of 29 patients had a positive FH. Candidiasis ( n  = 27) and bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine infection ( n  = 19) were the commonest infections. The median age for candidiasis and BCG infection documented were 3 months and 4 months, respectively. The median absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) was 1.05 × 10 9 /L with over 88% patients below 3 × 10 9 /L. Positive FH was associated with earlier AP by 1 month ( p  = 0.002) and diagnosis by 2 months ( p  = 0.008), but not shorter time to diagnosis ( p  = 0.494). Candidiasis was associated with later AD by 2 months ( p  = 0.008) and longer time to diagnosis by 0.55 months ( p  = 0.003). BCG infections were not associated with age or time to diagnosis. FH was useful to aid earlier diagnosis but was overlooked by clinicians and not by parents. Similarly, typical clinical features of SCID were not recognized by

  15. Family History of Early Infant Death Correlates with Earlier Age at Diagnosis But Not Shorter Time to Diagnosis for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Dik Wai Luk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSevere combined immunodeficiency (SCID is fatal unless treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Delay in diagnosis is common without newborn screening. Family history of infant death due to infection or known SCID (FH has been associated with earlier diagnosis.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to identify the clinical features that affect age at diagnosis (AD and time to the diagnosis of SCID.MethodsFrom 2005 to 2016, 147 SCID patients were referred to the Asian Primary Immunodeficiency Network. Patients with genetic diagnosis, age at presentation (AP, and AD were selected for study.ResultsA total of 88 different SCID gene mutations were identified in 94 patients, including 49 IL2RG mutations, 12 RAG1 mutations, 8 RAG2 mutations, 7 JAK3 mutations, 4 DCLRE1C mutations, 4 IL7R mutations, 2 RFXANK mutations, and 2 ADA mutations. A total of 29 mutations were previously unreported. Eighty-three of the 94 patients fulfilled the selection criteria. Their median AD was 4 months, and the time to diagnosis was 2 months. The commonest SCID was X-linked (n = 57. A total of 29 patients had a positive FH. Candidiasis (n = 27 and bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG vaccine infection (n = 19 were the commonest infections. The median age for candidiasis and BCG infection documented were 3 months and 4 months, respectively. The median absolute lymphocyte count (ALC was 1.05 × 109/L with over 88% patients below 3 × 109/L. Positive FH was associated with earlier AP by 1 month (p = 0.002 and diagnosis by 2 months (p = 0.008, but not shorter time to diagnosis (p = 0.494. Candidiasis was associated with later AD by 2 months (p = 0.008 and longer time to diagnosis by 0.55 months (p = 0.003. BCG infections were not associated with age or time to diagnosis.ConclusionFH was useful to aid earlier diagnosis but was overlooked by clinicians and not by parents. Similarly, typical clinical features of

  16. Antenatal interventions for preventing the transmission of cytomegalovirus (CMV) from the mother to fetus during pregnancy and adverse outcomes in the congenitally infected infant.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Fergus P

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a herpesvirus and the most common cause of congenital infection in developed countries. Congenital CMV infection can have devastating consequences to the fetus. The high incidence and the serious morbidity associated with congenital CMV infection emphasise the need for effective interventions to prevent the antenatal transmission of CMV infection. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review was to assess the benefits and harms of interventions used during pregnancy to prevent mother to fetus transmission of CMV infection. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group\\'s Trials Register (31 December 2010). SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi RCTs investigating antenatal interventions for preventing the transmission of CMV from the mother to fetus during pregnancy and adverse outcomes in the congenitally infected infant. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion. MAIN RESULTS: We identified six studies from the search. None of these studies met the pre-defined criteria for inclusion in this review. AUTHORS\\' CONCLUSIONS: To date, no RCTs are available that examine antenatal interventions for preventing the transmission of CMV from the infected mother to fetus during pregnancy and adverse outcomes in the congenitally infected infant. Further research is needed to assess the efficacy of interventions aimed at preventing the transmission of CMV from the mother to fetus during pregnancy including a long-term follow-up of exposed infants and a cost effective analysis.

  17. Mortalidade infantil por causas evitáveis no Brasil: um estudo ecológico no período 2000-2002 Infant mortality from preventable causes in Brazil: an ecological study in 2000-2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fernando Boing

    2008-02-01

    bathrooms and indoor plumbing, total health expenditures per inhabitant, and physicians per 1,000 inhabitants, and an increase in the Gini coefficient. Improved socioeconomic conditions and public health investments are strongly associated with reduction of infant mortality from preventable causes. This knowledge should permeate actions aimed at minimizing the number and unequal distribution of such deaths.

  18. The role of infant nutrition in the prevention of future disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron eShaoul

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that nutrition is part of the environmental factors affecting the incidence of various diseases. The effect starts in the prenatal life and affects fetal growth and continues in early life and throughout childhood. The effect has been shown on various disease states such as allergic diseases, hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular diseases, obesity, type II diabetes and metabolic syndrome and immunologic diseases such as celiac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus. It seems that the recommendations of exclusive breastfeeding until the age of 4 months and subsequently exposure to various solid foods has beneficial effect in terms of allergic, immune and cardiovascular diseases prevention. Will these recommendations change the natural course of these diseases is unknown yet, but there is an accumulating evidence that indeed this is the case. In this review we review the evidence of early nutritional intervention and future disease prevention.

  19. Use of prenatal phenobarbital in the prevention of subependymal/intraventricular hemorrhage in premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Cabrales, L M; Garza-Morales, S; Hernández-Peláez, G

    1998-01-01

    Subependymal/intraventricular hemorrhage (SE/IVH) is a frequent cause of disability and mortality. This is a prospective, randomized, double-blind study which included 100 pregnant Mexican women who need to interrupt their pregnancy within 28-32 weeks of gestation. One group was given a single dose of intravenous (IV) phenobarbital 10 micrograms/kg (phenobarbital group, n = 50), and the other was provided with diluted distilled water (control group). Measurements of phenobarbital serum concentrations were taken by both mother and newborn, and head sonograms were applied during the first 24 hours, at the 3rd and 7th days of life. The sample was made up of 42 newborns in the phenobarbital group, and 46 in the control group; the newborns had phenobarbital levels of 11.5 5.7 g/microliter at birth, and of 9.5 +/- 5.9 g/microliter 24 hours later. SE/IVH was found in 12 patients from the phenobarbital group and in 29 from the control group (p < 0.005), the first group were 11 mild SE/IVH (2 grade I, and 9 grade II), and 26 in the control group (4 grade I, and 22 grade II), p < 0.005. Severe hemorrhages were similar between groups. A larger frequency of SE/IVH was found in the newborn group which received mechanical ventilation (p = 0.0008). Prenatal phenobarbital can reduce the SE/IVH frequency in premature infants younger than 32 weeks at birth. Its main effect could be shown in patients with mechanical ventilation.

  20. Deciphering Suicide and Other Manners of Death Associated with Drug Intoxication: A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Consultation Meeting Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Deborah M; Holland, Kristin M; Bartholow, Brad; E Logan, Joseph; LiKamWa McIntosh, Wendy; Trudeau, Aimee; Rockett, Ian R H

    2017-08-01

    Manner of death (MOD) classification (i.e., natural, accident, suicide, homicide, or undetermined cause) affects mortality surveillance and public health research, policy, and practice. Determination of MOD in deaths caused by drug intoxication is challenging, with marked variability across states. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hosted a multidisciplinary meeting to discuss drug intoxication deaths as they relate to suicide and other MOD. The meeting objectives were to identify individual-level, system-level, and place-based factors affecting MOD classification and identify potential solutions to classification barriers. Suggested strategies included improved standardization in death scene investigation, toxicology, and autopsy practice; greater accountability; and creation of job aids for investigators. Continued collaboration and coordination of activities are needed among stakeholders to affect prevention efforts.

  1. Sudden death in the first 2 years of life following immunization in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Young June; Kim, Jong-Hee; Son, Hyun Jin; Bae, Geun-Ryang; Lee, Duk-hyoung

    2012-12-01

    Because the peak age for incidence of sudden deaths in infancy temporally coincides with the age of infant primary immunization, some have raised the question as to whether immunization is a risk factor for sudden death in infancy. Recent occurrence of two sudden deaths in infants in Korea has renewed concerns about the causal association between immunization and sudden deaths in infants. We carried out a retrospective review of data from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Adverse Events Following Immunization Surveillance System and Vaccine Compensation programs. From 1994 to 2011, a total of 45 cases of sudden deaths in the first 2 years of life following immunization were reported in Korea. The causes of death were classified as follows: infectious diseases (n= 13); accidental injuries (n= 7); congenital abnormalities (n= 2); and malignancy (n= 1). Of 20 sudden deaths in infancy, nine deaths met Brighton Collaboration case definition level I and II, and therefore were classified as possible sudden infant death syndrome cases. Hepatitis B vaccine (n= 13) was the most frequent vaccine with temporal association with sudden deaths in the first 2 years of life. Few sudden deaths in the first 2 years of life following immunization have been reported, despite the use of universal immunization in Korea. The majority of deaths in infancy did not meet case definition for sudden infant death syndrome. Encouraging investigators to perform thorough investigation, including postmortem autopsy and death scene examination, may promote data comparability and provide guidance on decision-making in the vaccine-safety monitoring and response system in Korea. © 2012 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2012 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. Infant feeding and allergy prevention: a review of current knowledge and recommendations. A EuroPrevall state of the art paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, K.E.C.; Allen, K.; Edwards, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    of firm evidence the recommendations differ widely. This review has been developed as part of EuroPrevall, a European multicentre research project funded by the European Union, to document the differing feeding recommendations made across Europe, to investigate the current evidence base for any allergy......The relationship between infant feeding patterns and the later development of food allergies has been the focus of much debate and research over the last decade. National recommendations have been made by many countries on how to feed infants to reduce the risk of food allergy but due to the lack...... prevention feeding recommendations and to identify areas where further research is needed. This review will also provide information which, when combined with the infant feeding data collected as part of EuroPrevall, will give an indication of compliance to national feeding guidelines which can be utilised...

  3. Infant feeding and allergy prevention: a review of current knowledge and recommendations. A EuroPrevall state of the art paper.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grimshaw, K E C

    2009-10-01

    The relationship between infant feeding patterns and the later development of food allergies has been the focus of much debate and research over the last decade. National recommendations have been made by many countries on how to feed infants to reduce the risk of food allergy but due to the lack of firm evidence the recommendations differ widely. This review has been developed as part of EuroPrevall, a European multicentre research project funded by the European Union, to document the differing feeding recommendations made across Europe, to investigate the current evidence base for any allergy prevention feeding recommendations and to identify areas where further research is needed. This review will also provide information which, when combined with the infant feeding data collected as part of EuroPrevall, will give an indication of compliance to national feeding guidelines which can be utilised to assess the effectiveness of current dissemination and implementation strategies.

  4. Altered Toll-Like Receptor-4 Response to Lipopolysaccharides in Infants Exposed to HIV-1 and Its Preventive Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anicet Christel Maloupazoa Siawaya

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pathogen sensing and recognition through pattern recognition receptors, and subsequent production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, is the cornerstone of the innate immune system. Despite the fact that HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU infants are prone to serious bacterial infections, no study has focused on the functionality of their bacteria recognition system. This is the first study to investigate baseline levels of three critically important immune response molecules in this population: complement component (C-3, toll-like receptor (TLR-4, and C-reactive protein (CRP. We enrolled 16 HEU and 6 HIV-unexposed (HU infants. TLR4 function was investigated by stimulating whole blood with increasing concentrations of TLR4-agonist ultrapure lipopolysaccharides. TLR4/TLR4-agonist dose response were assessed by measuring IL-6 secretion. Complement C3 and CRP were measured by photo spectrometry. Data showed no significant differences in baseline concentration of CRP between HEU and HU infants. Complement C3 was significantly higher in HEU infants than HU infants. TLR4 anergy was observed in 7 of 12 HEU infants, whereas the rest of HEU infants (n = 4 and the control HU infants tested (n = 3 showed responsive TLR4. None of the HEU infants investigated in this study had severe infections in the year after their birth. In conclusion, TLR4 anergy can occur in HEU infants without necessarily translating to increased vulnerability to infectious diseases.

  5. Slower clearance of nevirapine resistant virus in infants failing extended nevirapine prophylaxis for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Deborah; Bedri, Abubaker; Ziemniak, Carrie; Moorthy, Anitha; Gudetta, Berhanu; Abashawl, Aida; Mengistu, Yohannes; Omer, Saad B; Isehak, Abdulhamid; Kumbi, Solomon; Adamu, Rahel; Lulseged, Sileshi; Ashworth, Roxann; Hassen, Elham; Ruff, Andrea

    2011-08-01

    Nevirapine resistance mutations arise commonly following single or extended-dose nevirapine (ED-NVP) prophylaxis to prevent mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but decay within 6-12 months of single-dose exposure. Use of ED-NVP prophylaxis in infants is expected to rise, but data on decay of nevirapine resistance mutations in infants in whom ED-NVP failed remain limited. We assessed, in Ethiopian infants participating in the Six-Week Extended Nevirapine (SWEN) Trial, the prevalence and persistence of nevirapine resistance mutations at 6 and 12 months following single-dose or up to 6 weeks of ED-NVP, and correlated their presence with the timing of infection and the type of resistance mutations. Standard population genotyping followed by high-throughput cloning were done on dried blood spot samples collected during the trial. More infants who received ED-NVP had nevirapine resistance detected by standard population genotyping (high frequencies) at age 6 months compared with those who received single-dose nevirapine (SD-NVP) (58% of 24 vs. 26% of 19, respectively; p = 0.06). Moreover, 56% of ED-NVP-exposed infants with nevirapine resistance at age 6 months still had nevirapine resistance mutations present at high frequencies at age 1 year. Infants infected before 6 weeks of age who received either SD- or ED-NVP were more likely to have Y181C or K103N; these mutations were also more likely to persist at high frequencies through 1 year of age. HIV-infected infants in whom ED-NVP prophylaxis fails are likely to experience delayed clearance of nevirapine-resistant virus in the first year of life, which in turn places them at risk for early selection of multidrug-resistant HIV after initial therapy with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based regimens.

  6. Analysis of Pre-participation Screening Protocols for Football Players in Europe, USA, and Libya: Possible Implications for Preventing Sudden Cardiac Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salaheddin Sharif

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death is the leading cause of death in sport participants and may result from undiagnosed cardiac diseases. It has been universally agreed upon that pre-participation screening can identify those athletes at risk of sudden cardiac death, and yet, there is no commonly accepted protocol to screen athletes. Although the European Society of Cardiology (ESC and the American Heart Association (AHA recommend the routine screening of athletes to prevent sudden death, there is significant disagreement regarding the guidelines of the protocols. The American Heart Association protocol includes a detailed medical history and a physical examination, whereas the European Society of Cardiology protocol includes 12-lead electrocardiography with a detailed medical history and a physical examination. The cost benefit of using electrocardiography is debatable, particularly if the screening is used to prevent sudden death associated with uncommon diseases. The Libyan Football Federation established a new seasonal pre-competition medical assessment protocol for Libyan football athletes during the 2013-2014 season, which includes a medical history, physical examination, 12 lead electrocardiography, echocardiography, and blood test. Regardless of cost and differences in protocol, there is a significant value in pre-participation screening for athletes in order to decrease the incidence of sudden cardiac death, and this report examines some of these different protocols as well as their potential for identifying athletes at risk for sudden cardiac death.

  7. Cardioprotective activity of urocortin by preventing caspase-independent, non-apoptotic death in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes exposed to ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka, E-mail: nakase@mukogawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Mukogawa Women' s University, 11-68, Koshien, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8179 (Japan); Takahashi, Koichi, E-mail: koichi@mukogawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Mukogawa Women' s University, 11-68, Koshien, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8179 (Japan)

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} Ischemia induces high level of iPLA{sub 2} resulting in caspase-independent myocyte death. {yields} Urocortin causes iPLA{sub 2} down-regulation leading to avoidance of non-apoptotic death. {yields} The survival-promoting effect of urocortin is abrogated by CRH receptor antagonist. -- Abstract: Caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death in ischemic heart disease is considered to be one of the important therapeutic targets, however, the detailed mechanisms of this cell death process are not clear. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of non-apoptotic cell death in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes during ischemia, and the cardioprotection by preventing the mechanisms. We found that ischemia caused elevation of the phospholipase A{sub 2} (iPLA{sub 2}) expression in the myocytes, leading to distinctive non-apoptotic nuclear shrinkage, and cell death. Moreover, we investigated whether the potent cardioprotective corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), urocortin, which had been less focused on non-apoptotic cell death, inhibits the ischemic myocyte death. Ischemia-augmented nuclear shrinkage of the myocytes was suppressed by the pretreatment of {approx}10 nM urocortin before the cells were exposed to ischemia. Urocortin could significantly suppress the expression and activity of iPLA{sub 2}, resulting in preventing the ischemia-induced cell death. The survival-promoting effect of urocortin was abrogated by the CRH receptor antagonist astressin. These findings provide the first evidence linking the targets of the urocortin-mediated cardioprotection to the suppression of the caspase-independent, non-apoptotic death in cardiac myocytes exposed to ischemia.

  8. Prenatal to early postnatal nicotine exposure impairs central chemoreception and modifies breathing pattern in mouse neonates: a probable link to sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenín, Jaime; Otárola, Marcelo; Bravo, Eduardo; Coddou, Claudio; Cerpa, Verónica; Reyes-Parada, Miguel; Llona, Isabel; von Bernhardi, Rommy

    2008-12-17

    Nicotine is a neuroteratogen and is the likely link between maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Osmotic minipumps were implanted in 5-7 d CF1 pregnant mice to deliver nicotine bitartrate (60 mg Kg(-1) day(-1)) or saline (control) solutions for up to 28 d. Prenatal to early postnatal nicotine exposure did not modify the number of newborns per litter or their postnatal growth; however, nicotine-exposed neonates hypoventilated and had reduced responses to hypercarbia (inhalation of air enriched with 10% CO(2) for 20 min) and hypoxia (inhalation of 100% N(2) for 20 s) at postnatal days 0-3 (P0-P3). In contrast, at postnatal day 8, nicotine-exposed neonates were indistinguishable from controls. Isolated brainstem-spinal cord preparations obtained from P0 to P3 nicotine-exposed neonates showed fictive respiration with respiratory cycles longer and more irregular than those of controls, as indicated by high short- and long-term variability in Poincaré plots. In addition, their responses to acidification were reduced, indicating compromise of central chemoreception. Furthermore, the cholinergic contribution to central chemosensory responses switched from muscarinic receptor to nicotinic receptor-based mechanisms. No significant astrogliosis was detectable in the ventral respiratory group of neurons with glial fibrillary acidic protein immunohistochemistry. These results indicate that nicotine exposure affects the respiratory rhythm pattern generator and causes a decline in central chemoreception during early postnatal life. Consequently, breathing would become highly vulnerable, failing to respond to chemosensory demands. Such impairment could be related to the ventilatory abnormalities observed in SIDS.

  9. Systemic Hydrocortisone To Prevent Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in preterm infants (the SToP-BPD study); a multicenter randomized placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onland, Wes; Offringa, Martin; Cools, Filip; De Jaegere, Anne P; Rademaker, Karin; Blom, Henry; Cavatorta, Eric; Debeer, Anne; Dijk, Peter H; van Heijst, Arno F; Kramer, Boris W; Kroon, Andre A; Mohns, Thilo; van Straaten, Henrica L; te Pas, Arjan B; Theyskens, Claire; van Weissenbruch, Mirjam M; van Kaam, Anton H

    2011-11-09

    Randomized controlled trials have shown that treatment of chronically ventilated preterm infants after the first week of life with dexamethasone reduces the incidence of the combined outcome death or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). However, there are concerns that dexamethasone may increase the risk of adverse neurodevelopmental outcome. Hydrocortisone has been suggested as an alternative therapy. So far no randomized controlled trial has investigated its efficacy when administered after the first week of life to ventilated preterm infants. The SToP-BPD trial is a randomized double blind placebo controlled multicenter study including 400 very low birth weight infants (gestational age BPD at 36 weeks postmenstrual age. Secondary outcomes are short term effects on the pulmonary condition, adverse effects during hospitalization, and long-term neurodevelopmental sequelae assessed at 2 years corrected gestational age. Analysis will be on an intention to treat basis. This trial will determine the efficacy and safety of postnatal hydrocortisone administration at a moderately early postnatal onset compared to placebo for the reduction of the combined outcome mortality and BPD at 36 weeks postmenstrual age in ventilator dependent preterm infants.

  10. Medical Care or Disciplinary Discourses? Preventive Measures against the Black Death in Late Medieval Paris: A Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yong Jin; Park, Sam Hun

    2017-03-01

    This paper examined the political and social implications of the Compendium de epidemia prescription written by the Masters of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Paris in the mid-14th century during the Black Death. This study aimed to examine how the effects of power as a discourse owned by medical knowledge are revealed. This paper outlines the composition of the contents based on the 1888 edition edited and translated by Émile H. Rébouis and notes the features of the prescription examined by the existing study of medical history rather than the causes of diseases. Compendium de epidemia seems to have been written primarily for the royal family and nobles who ordered them when looking at prescription-related technologies. At the same time, under the influence of Islamic-Arabic academia, it clearly distinguishes the world of faith and the world of academia (intelligence), explaining the pathogenesis and infection pathways based on causality. The onset substrate is due to heat and humidity, and the prescription is to prevent the two from overdoing in the body. In particular, issues related to heat are criticized in connection with the value of life of knight-noblesse . This is in response to political criticism of the ineffectual French royal family and nobility at the beginning of the Hundred Years' War and shows why this tract sets the utilitas publica at the forefront as an important purpose. The conclusion has shown how medical knowledge produced on the Black Death pandemic how they function as discourses that have a sort of power effect on the value of life of knight-noblesse. It is necessary to conduct if these phenomena can be found in other contemporary medical writings.

  11. School-age outcomes of very low birth weight infants in the indomethacin intraventricular hemorrhage prevention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohr, Betty R; Allan, Walter C; Westerveld, Michael; Schneider, Karen C; Katz, Karol H; Makuch, Robert W; Ment, Laura R

    2003-04-01

    The cohort consisted of 328 very low birth weight infants (600-1250 g birth weight) who were enrolled in the low-dose prophylactic indomethacin prevention trial and were intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) negative at 6 postnatal hours. The objective was to determine the effects of both IVH and indomethacin on cognitive, language, and achievement performance at 8 years of age. The cohort was divided into 4 subgroups for analysis: indomethacin plus IVH, indomethacin no IVH, saline plus IVH, and saline with no IVH. The children were evaluated prospectively at 8 years of age with a neurologic assessment, history of school performance, and a battery of cognitive, academic, behavioral, and functional assessments. Children in both IVH groups had more cerebral palsy; more hearing impairment; lower daily living skills scores; lower IQ, vocabulary, and reading and mathematics achievement test scores; and greater educational resource needs. With logistic regression analyses grade 3 to 4 IVH, periventricular leukomalacia and/or ventriculomegaly, male gender, maternal education, and language spoken in the home contributed to outcomes. No effects of indomethacin or gestational age were identified. Although biological factors including IVH, ventriculomegaly, and periventricular leukomalacia contribute significantly to school age outcomes among very low birth weight survivors at 8 years of age, social and environmental factors including maternal level of education and primary language spoken in the home are also important contributors to outcome.

  12. Selection of antimalarial drug resistance after intermittent preventive treatment of infants and children (IPTi/c) in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Magatte; Tine, Roger; Faye, Babacar; Ndiaye, Jean L; Diouf, Ibrahima; Lo, Aminata C; Sylla, Khadime; Dieng, Yemou; Hallett, Rachel; Alifrangis, Michael; Gaye, Oumar

    2013-01-01

    Senegal has since 2003 used sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPT) of malaria in risk groups. However, the large-scale IPT strategy may result in increasing drug resistance. Our study investigated the possible impact of SP-IPT given to infants and children on the prevalence of SP-resistant haplotypes in the Plasmodium falciparum genes Pfdhfr and Pfdhps, comparing sites with and without IPTi/c. P. falciparum positives samples (n=352) were collected from children under 5years of age during two cross-sectional surveys in 2010 and 2011 in three health districts (two on IPTi/c and one without IPTi/c intervention) located in the southern part of Senegal. The prevalence of SP-resistance-related haplotypes in Pfdhfr and Pfdhps was determined by nested PCR followed by sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe (SSOP)-ELISA. The prevalence of the Pfdhfr double mutant haplotypes (CNRN and CICN) was stable between years atSenegal according to WHO recommendations. Copyright © 2013 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. The challenges of adherence to infant feeding choices in prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV infections in South East Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawani LO

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lucky O Lawani,1 Azubuike K Onyebuchi,2 Chukwuemeka A Iyoke,3 Robinson C Onoh,2 Peter O Nkwo31School of Postgraduate Studies, Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu State, Nigeria; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Enugu State, NigeriaBackground: Global and national efforts in the 21st century are directed toward the elimination of new pediatric HIV infections through evidence-based infant feeding interventions for the prevention of mother-to-child-transmission, with patient preference, motivation, and adherence identified as key factors for success.Objectives: This study assessed the challenges faced by HIV-infected parturients in adhering to the national infant feeding recommendations and their infant feeding preference for prevention of mother-to-child transmission in South East Nigeria.Methods: This is a cross-sectional, descriptive, questionnaire-based study of 556 parturients infected with HIV/AIDS.Results: The mean age of the participants was 28.0±5.3 years. The infant feeding choices were made jointly by both partners (61.1% in the antepartum period. The HIV status disclosure rate was 89.2%. A large proportion (91.7% practiced exclusive breastfeeding with highly active antiretroviral therapy, and 7.6% practiced mixed feeding because of nonadherence to their choice and national/international recommendations on infant feeding in the context of HIV/AIDS. This was mainly a result of pressure from family members (42.8% and cultural practices (28.5%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicates that adherence was strongly associated with age, marital status, and employment status, but not with residence, educational status, or parity.Conclusion: Exclusive breastfeeding is predominately the infant feeding choice among HIV

  14. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because of ineffectiveness and safety issues. Offer a pacifier. Sucking on a pacifier without a strap or string at naptime and ... you're breast-feeding, wait to offer a pacifier until your baby is 3 to 4 weeks ...

  15. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    have led to what is now commonly referred to as the Apnea. Hypothesis for SIDS, and the resultant current interven- tion method of home apnea monitoring. ... pas au clinicien l'opportunite d'intervention, on a mis l'accent, dans cette communication, sur la possibilite d'identifier au prealable tout enfant predispose a ce deces ...

  16. Diagnostics and prevention of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial diseases in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Nikolaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses recent publications on the clinical manifestations and diagnosis of mitochondrial diseases caused by defects in nuclear genes. A scientific analysis included about 100 genes. According to the encoded protein and its function, the author has identified 9 gene groups that affect the processes of cellular bioenergy. By the time of their manifestation, the diseases were divided into groups: those of early childhood (including neonatality, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Attention is drawn to difficulties to identify some forms of the diseases in view of the clinical polymorphism of manifestations of mutations in individual genes and, at the same tone, many similarities between clinical symptom complexes caused by different enzyme and gene defects. There are additional criteria for the differential diagnosis of the diseases: 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, depletions and multiple depletions of mitochondrial DNA. It is concluded that it is necessary to more extensively introduce the whole-exome sequencing test that can reveal not only common, but also rare gene mutations in nuclear DNA. Gene defect identification permits medical genetic counselling and prevention of the spread of severe pathology in the family.

  17. Duration of protection against clinical malaria provided by three regimens of intermittent preventive treatment in Tanzanian infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Cairns

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent preventive treatment in infants (IPTi is a new malaria control tool. However, it is uncertain whether IPTi works mainly through chemoprophylaxis or treatment of existing infections. Understanding the mechanism is essential for development of replacements for sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP where it is no longer effective. This study investigated how protection against malaria given by SP, chlorproguanil-dapsone (CD and mefloquine (MQ, varied with time since administration of IPTi.A secondary analysis of data from a randomised, placebo-controlled trial in an area of high antifolate resistance in Tanzania was conducted. IPTi using SP, CD, MQ or placebo was given to 1280 infants at 2, 3 and 9 months of age. Poisson regression with random effects to adjust for potential clustering of malaria episodes within children was used to calculate incidence rate ratios for clinical malaria in defined time strata following IPTi. The short-acting antimalarial CD gave no protection against clinical malaria, whereas long-acting MQ gave two months of substantial protection (protective efficacy (PE 73.1% (95% CI: 23.9, 90.5 and 73.3% (95% CI: 0, 92.9 in the first and second month respectively. SP gave some protection in the first month after treatment (PE 64.5% (95% CI: 10.6, 85.9 although it did not reduce the incidence of malaria up to 12 months of age. There was no evidence of either long-term protection or increased risk of malaria for any of the regimens.Post-treatment chemoprophylaxis appears to be the main mechanism by which IPTi protects children against malaria. Long-acting antimalarials are therefore likely to be the most effective drugs for IPTi, but as monotherapies could be vulnerable to development of drug resistance. Due to concerns about tolerability, the mefloquine formulation used in this study is not suitable for IPTi. Further investigation of combinations of long-acting antimalarials for IPTi is needed.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00158574.

  18. CHIP, a carboxy terminus HSP-70 interacting protein, prevents cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe eCabral Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and protein misfolding are associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. ER stress activates Unfolded Protein Response (UPR, an adaptative response. However, severe ER stress can induce cell death. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase and co-chaperone Carboxyl Terminus HSP70/90 Interacting Protein (CHIP prevents neuron death in the hippocampus induced by severe ER stress. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs were exposed to Tunicamycin, a pharmacological ER stress inducer, to trigger cell death. Overexpression of CHIP was achieved with a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV and significantly diminished ER stress-induced cell death, as shown by analysis of propidium iodide (PI uptake, condensed chromatin, TUNEL and cleaved caspase 3 in the CA1 region of OHSCs. In addition, overexpression of CHIP prevented upregulation of both CHOP and p53 both pro-apoptotic pathways induced by ER stress. We also detected an attenuation of eIF2a phosphorylation promoted by ER stress. However, CHIP did not prevent upregulation of BiP/GRP78 induced by UPR. These data indicate that overexpression of CHIP attenuates ER-stress death response while maintain ER stress adaptative response in the central nervous system. These results indicate a neuroprotective role for CHIP upon UPR signalling. CHIP emerge as a candidate for clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases associated with ER stress.

  19. Towards Better Understanding of the Pathogenesis of Neuronal Respiratory Network in Sudden Perinatal Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riffat Mehboob

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sudden perinatal death that includes the victims of sudden infant death syndrome, sudden intrauterine death syndrome, and stillbirth are heartbreaking events in the life of parents. Most of the studies about sudden perinatal death were reported from Italy, highlighting two main etiological factors: prone sleeping position and smoking. Other probable contributory factors are prematurity, male gender, lack of breastfeeding, respiratory tract infections, use of pacifiers, infant botulism, extensive use of pesticides and insecticides, etc. However, extensive studies across the world are required to establish the role of these factors in a different subset of populations. Previous studies confirmed the widely accepted hypothesis that neuropathology of the brainstem is one of the main cause of sudden perinatal death. This study is an effort to summarize the neuropathological evaluation of the brainstems and their association to sudden perinatal death. Brainstem nuclei in vulnerable infants undergo certain changes that may alter the sleep arousal cycle, cardiorespiratory control, and ultimately culminate in death. This review focuses on the roles of different brainstem nuclei, their pathologies, and the established facts in this regard in terms of it’s link to such deaths. This study will also help to understand the role of brainstem nuclei in controlling the cardiorespiratory cycles in sudden perinatal death and may provide a better understanding to resolve the mystery of these deaths in future. It is also found that a global initiative to deal with perinatal death is required to facilitate the diagnosis and prevention in developed and as well as developing countries.

  20. Efficacy of infant simulator programmes to prevent teenage pregnancy: a school-based cluster randomised controlled trial in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Sally A; Johnson, Sarah E; Codde, James P; Hart, Michael B; Straton, Judith A; Mittinty, Murthy N; Silburn, Sven R

    2016-11-05

    Infant simulator-based programmes, which aim to prevent teenage pregnancy, are used in high-income as well as low-income and middle-income countries but, despite growing popularity, no published evidence exists of their long-term effect. The aim of this trial was to investigate the effect of such a programme, the Virtual Infant Parenting (VIP) programme, on pregnancy outcomes of birth and induced abortion in Australia. In this school-based pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial, eligible schools in Perth, Western Australia, were enrolled and randomised 1:1 to the intervention and control groups. Randomisation using a table of random numbers without blocking, stratification, or matching was done by a researcher who was masked to the identity of the schools. Between 2003 and 2006, the VIP programme was administered to girls aged 13-15 years in the intervention schools, while girls of the same age in the control schools received the standard health education curriculum. Participants were followed until they reached 20 years of age via data linkage to hospital medical and abortion clinic records. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of pregnancy during the teenage years. Binomial and Cox proportional hazards regression was used to test for differences in pregnancy rates between study groups. This study is registered as an international randomised controlled trial, number ISRCTN24952438. 57 (86%) of 66 eligible schools were enrolled into the trial and randomly assigned 1:1 to the intervention (28 schools) or the control group (29 schools). Then, between Feb 1, 2003, and May 31, 2006, 1267 girls in the intervention schools received the VIP programme while 1567 girls in the control schools received the standard health education curriculum. Compared with girls in the control group, a higher proportion of girls in the intervention group recorded at least one birth (97 [8%] of 1267 in the intervention group vs 67 [4%] of 1567 in the control group) or at least one

  1. A Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Bax and Bak Oligomerization Prevents Genotoxic Cell Death and Promotes Neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xin; Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Mergenthaler, Philipp; Zhang, Zhi; Sang, Jing; Daude, Michael; Ehlert, Fabian G R; Diederich, Wibke E; Wong, Eve; Zhu, Weijia; Pogmore, Justin; Nandy, Jyoti P; Satyanarayana, Maragani; Jimmidi, Ravi K; Arya, Prabhat; Leber, Brian; Lin, Jialing; Culmsee, Carsten; Yi, Jing; Andrews, David W

    2017-04-20

    Aberrant apoptosis can lead to acute or chronic degenerative diseases. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) triggered by the oligomerization of the Bcl-2 family proteins Bax/Bak is an irreversible step leading to execution of apoptosis. Here, we describe the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of Bax/Bak oligomerization that prevent MOMP. We demonstrate that these molecules disrupt multiple, but not all, interactions between Bax dimer interfaces thereby interfering with the formation of higher-order oligomers in the MOM, but not recruitment of Bax to the MOM. Small-molecule inhibition of Bax/Bak oligomerization allowed cells to evade apoptotic stimuli and rescued neurons from death after excitotoxicity, demonstrating that oligomerization of Bax is essential for MOMP. Our discovery of small-molecule Bax/Bak inhibitors provides novel tools for the investigation of the mechanisms leading to MOMP and will ultimately facilitate development of compounds inhibiting Bax/Bak in acute and chronic degenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sulforaphane prevents doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress and cell death in rat H9c2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Kim, Do Sung; Yadav, Raj Kumar; Kim, Hyung Ryong; Chae, Han Jung

    2015-07-01

    Sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate compound found in cruciferous vegetables, has been shown to exert cardioprotective effects during ischemic heart injury. However, the effects of sulforaphane on cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin are unknown. Thus, in the present study, H9c2 rat myoblasts were pre-treated with sulforaphane and its effects on cardiotoxicity were then examined. The results revealed that the pre-treatment of H9c2 rat myoblasts with sulforaphane decreased the apoptotic cell number (as shown by trypan blue exclusion assay) and the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, caspase-3 and cytochrome c; as shown by western blot analysis and immunostaining), as well as the doxorubicin-induced increase in mitochondrial membrane potential (measured by JC-1 assay). Furthermore, sulforaphane increased the mRNA and protein expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, measured by RT-qPCR), which consequently reduced the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, measured using MitoSOX Red reagent) in the mitochondria which were induced by doxorubicin. The cardioprotective effects of sulforaphane were found to be mediated by the activation of the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1)/NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant-responsive element (ARE) pathway, which in turn mediates the induction of HO-1. Taken together, the findings of this study demonstrate that sulforaphane prevents doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress and cell death in H9c2 cells through the induction of HO-1 expression.

  3. Protective effects of [Gly14]-Humanin on beta-amyloid-induced PC12 cell death by preventing mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hui; Liu, Tao; Wang, Wei-Xi; Xu, Jie-Hua; Yang, Peng-Bo; Lu, Hai-Xia; Sun, Qin-Ru; Hu, Hai-Tao

    2010-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of beta-amyloid (Abeta)-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and is considered as an early event in AD pathology. Humanin (HN) and its derivative, [Gly14]-Humanin (HNG), are known for their ability to suppress neuronal death induced by AD-related insults in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of HNG on Abeta(25-35)-induced toxicity and its potential mechanisms in PC12 cells. Exposure of PC12 cells to 25 microM Abeta(25-35) caused significant viability loss and cell apoptosis. In addition, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased cytochrome c releases from mitochondria were also observed after Abeta(25-35) exposure. All these effects induced by Abeta(25-35) were markedly reversed by HNG. Pretreatment with 100 nM HNG 6h prior to Abeta(25-35) exposure significantly elevated cell viability, reduced Abeta(25-35)-induced cell apoptosis, stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential, and blocked cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Furthermore, HNG also ameliorated the Abeta(25-35)-induced Bcl-2/Bax ratio reduction and decreased caspase-3 activity in PC12 cells. These results demonstrate that HNG could attenuate Abeta(25-35)-induced PC12 cell injury and apoptosis by preventing mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, these data suggest that mitochondria are involved in the protective effect of HNG against Abeta(25-35). Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of kangaroo method on the risk of hypothermia and duration of birth weight regain in low birth weight infants: A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    I G. A. P. Eka Pratiwi; Soetjiningsih Soetjiningsih; I Made Kardana

    2009-01-01

    Background In Indonesia, the infant mortality rate in 2001 was 50 per 1000 live births, with 34.7% due to perinatal death. This perinatal death was associated with low birth weight (LBW) newborn, which was caused by prematurity, infection, birth asphyxia, hypothermia, and inadequate breast feeding. In developing countries, lack of facilities of LBW infant care leads to the utilization of kangaroo method as care to prevent hypothermia in LBW newborn. Objective To evaluate the differences of...

  5. Varying efficacy of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in infants in two similar trials: public health implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz Sergi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment (IPTi with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP in infants resulted in different estimates of clinical malaria protection in two trials that used the same protocol in Ifakara, Tanzania, and Manhiça, Mozambique. Understanding the reasons for the discrepant results will help to elucidate the action mechanism of this intervention, which is essential for rational policy formulation. Methods A comparative analysis of two IPTi trials that used the same study design, follow-up, intervention, procedures and assessment of outcomes, in Tanzania and Mozambique was undertaken. Children were randomised to receive either SP or placebo administered 3 times alongside routine vaccinations delivered through the Expanded Program on Immunisation (EPI. Characteristics of the two areas and efficacy on clinical malaria after each dose were compared. Results The most relevant difference was in ITN's use ; 68% in Ifakara and zero in Manhiça. In Ifakara, IPTi was associated with a 53% (95% CI 14.0; 74.1 reduction in the risk of clinical malaria between the second and the third dose; during the same period there was no significant effect in Manhiça. Similarly, protection against malaria episodes was maintained in Ifakara during 6 months after dose 3, but no effect of IPTi was observed in Manhiça. Conclusion The high ITN coverage in Ifakara is the most likely explanation for the difference in IPTi efficacy on clinical malaria. Combination of IPTi and ITNs may be the most cost-effective tool for malaria control currently available, and needs to be explored in current and future studies. Trial Registration Manhiça study registration number: NCT00209795 Ifakara study registration number: NCT88523834

  6. Social media as a beneficial tool to support preterm infants and parents

    OpenAIRE

    Marjan Ghazisaeedi

    2016-01-01

    Home care, continuous follow-up, and endless post discharge support play vital role in preventing the emergence of mental and physical disabilities and death among preterm infants. Providing necessary care and support for such infants requires huge financial and human resources and exposes heavy costs on hygiene and health system. Internet and information sharing applications, particularly Web 2.0, and social media present innovative techniques to provide a convenient channel to exch...

  7. Childhood death rates declined in Sweden from 2000-2014 but deaths from external causes were not always investigated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterman, Gabriel; Lahne, Klara; Arkema, Elizabeth V; Lucas, Steven; Janson, Staffan; Hellström-Westas, Lena

    2018-03-08

    Countries that conduct systematic child death reviews report a high proportion of modifiable characteristics among deaths from external causes and this study examined the trends in Sweden. We analysed individual level data on external, ill-defined and unknown causes from the Swedish cause of death register from 2000-2014 and mortality rates were estimated for children under the age of one and for those aged 1-14 and 15-17 years. Child deaths from all causes were 7,914 and 2,006 (25%) were from external, ill-defined and unknown causes: 610 (30%) were infants, 692 (34%) were 1-14 and 704 (35%) were 15-17. The annual average was 134 cases (range 99-156) during the study period. Mortality rates from external, ill-defined and unknown causes in children under 18 fell 19%, from 7.4 to 6.0 per 100,000 population. A sizeable number of infant deaths (8.0%) were registered without a death certificate during the study period, but these counts were lower in children aged 1-14 (1.3%) and 15-17 (0.9%). Childhood deaths showed a sustained decline from 2000-2014 in Sweden and a quarter were from external, ill-defined or unknown causes. Systematic, interagency death reviews could yield information that could prevent future deaths. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. VSRR - Quarterly provisional estimates for infant mortality

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Provisional estimates of infant mortality (deaths of infants under 1 year per 1,000 live births), neonatal mortality (deaths of infants aged 0-27 days per 1,000 live...

  9. Hypothermic oxygenated machine perfusion prevents arteriolonecrosis of the peribiliary plexus in pig livers donated after circulatory death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Op den Dries

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Livers derived from donation after circulatory death (DCD are increasingly accepted for transplantation. However, DCD livers suffer additional donor warm ischemia, leading to biliary injury and more biliary complications after transplantation. It is unknown whether oxygenated machine perfusion results in better preservation of biliary epithelium and the peribiliary vasculature. We compared oxygenated hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP with static cold storage (SCS in a porcine DCD model. METHODS: After 30 min of cardiac arrest, livers were perfused in situ with HTK solution (4°C and preserved for 4 h by either SCS (n = 9 or oxygenated HMP (10°C; n = 9, using pressure-controlled arterial and portal venous perfusion. To simulate transplantation, livers were reperfused ex vivo at 37°C with oxygenated autologous blood. Bile duct injury and function were determined by biochemical and molecular markers, and a systematic histological scoring system. RESULTS: After reperfusion, arterial flow was higher in the HMP group, compared to SCS (251±28 vs 166±28 mL/min, respectively, after 1 hour of reperfusion; p = 0.003. Release of hepatocellular enzymes was significantly higher in the SCS group. Markers of biliary epithelial injury (biliary LDH, gamma-GT and function (biliary pH and bicarbonate, and biliary transporter expression were similar in the two groups. However, histology of bile ducts revealed significantly less arteriolonecrosis of the peribiliary vascular plexus in HMP preserved livers (>50% arteriolonecrosis was observed in 7 bile ducts of the SCS preserved livers versus only 1 bile duct of the HMP preserved livers; p = 0.024. CONCLUSIONS: Oxygenated HMP prevents arteriolonecrosis of the peribiliary vascular plexus of the bile ducts of DCD pig livers and results in higher arterial flow after reperfusion. Together this may contribute to better perfusion of the bile ducts, providing a potential advantage in the post

  10. Patients' decision making to accept or decline an implantable cardioverter defibrillator for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Sandra L; Strachan, Patricia H; de Laat, Sonya; Schwartz, Lisa; Arthur, Heather M

    2013-03-01

    Patients are offered implantable defibrillators (ICDs) for the prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD). However, patients' decision-making process (DMP) of whether or not to accept an ICD has not been explored. We asked patients about their decision making when offered an ICD. A grounded theory methodology was employed. Patients were recruited from three ICD centres. Those who received an ICD underwent interviews the first month after implant. Declining patients had interviews at their convenience. In-depth analysis of transcripts was completed. Identified themes were placed along process pathways in a DMP model and tested. Forty-four patients consented to participate (25% women). Thirty-four accepted an ICD and 10 (23%) declined. Ages ranged from 26 to 87 (mean = 65; SD = 12.5). Participants were retired (65%), had ischaemic heart disease (64%) and some post-secondary education (52%). The DMP was triggered when patient's risk for SCD was communicated. The physician's recommendation and a new awareness SCD risk were motivators to accept the ICD. Patient's decision-making approaches fell along a continuum, from active and engaged to passive and indifferent. Patient's approaches were influenced most by the following: (i) trust; (ii) social influences and (iii) health state. Health-care providers need to recognize the DMP pathways in which ICD candidacy and SCD risk are understood. The factors that influence a patient's decision warrant discussion pre-implant. It is imperative that patients comprehend the meaning of ICD candidacy to make an informed decision. Participants did not recall alternatives to receiving ICD therapy. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Valproic acid prevents NMDA-induced retinal ganglion cell death via stimulation of neuronal TrkB receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Atsuko; Namekata, Kazuhiko; Guo, Xiaoli; Noro, Takahiko; Harada, Chikako; Harada, Takayuki

    2015-03-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is widely prescribed for treatment of epilepsy, mood disorders, migraines, and neuropathic pain. It exerts its therapeutic benefits through multiple mechanisms, including enhancement of GABAergic activity, activation of prosurvival protein kinases, and inhibition of histone deacetylase. Increasing evidence suggests that VPA possesses neuroprotective properties. We examined neuroprotective effects of VPA in an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) excitotoxicity model, which mimics some of the pathological features of glaucoma. In vivo retinal imaging using optical coherence tomography revealed that NMDA-induced retinal degeneration was suppressed in the VPA-treated retina, and histological analyses confirmed that VPA reduced retinal ganglion cell death. In vivo electrophysiological analyses demonstrated that visual impairment was prevented in the VPA-treated retina, clearly establishing both histological and functional effects of VPA. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression was up-regulated in Müller glial cells, and neuroprotective effects of VPA on retinal ganglion cells were significantly reduced in a conditional knockout mouse strain with deletion of tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), a receptor for BDNF from retinal ganglion cells. The results show that VPA stimulates BDNF up-regulation in Müller glial cells and provides direct evidence that neuronal TrkB is important in VPA-mediated neuroprotection. Also, VPA suppresses oxidative stress induced by NMDA in the retina. Our findings raise intriguing possibilities that the widely prescribed drug VPA may be useful for treatment of glaucoma. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Patients’ decision making to accept or decline an implantable cardioverter defibrillator for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Sandra L.; Strachan, Patricia H.; de Laat, Sonya; Schwartz, Lisa; Arthur, Heather M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background  Patients are offered implantable defibrillators (ICDs) for the prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD). However, patients’ decision‐making process (DMP) of whether or not to accept an ICD has not been explored. We asked patients about their decision making when offered an ICD. Design/Setting  A grounded theory methodology was employed. Patients were recruited from three ICD centres. Those who received an ICD underwent interviews the first month after implant. Declining patients had interviews at their convenience. In‐depth analysis of transcripts was completed. Identified themes were placed along process pathways in a DMP model and tested. Findings  Forty‐four patients consented to participate (25% women). Thirty‐four accepted an ICD and 10 (23%) declined. Ages ranged from 26 to 87 (mean = 65; SD = 12.5). Participants were retired (65%), had ischaemic heart disease (64%) and some post‐secondary education (52%). The DMP was triggered when patient’s risk for SCD was communicated. The physician’s recommendation and a new awareness SCD risk were motivators to accept the ICD. Patient’s decision‐making approaches fell along a continuum, from active and engaged to passive and indifferent. Patient’s approaches were influenced most by the following: (i) trust; (ii) social influences and (iii) health state. Conclusions  Health‐care providers need to recognize the DMP pathways in which ICD candidacy and SCD risk are understood. The factors that influence a patient’s decision warrant discussion pre‐implant. It is imperative that patients comprehend the meaning of ICD candidacy to make an informed decision. Participants did not recall alternatives to receiving ICD therapy. PMID:21645190

  13. The Effectiveness of Community Health Workers Approach in Preventing Moderate Malnutrition among Infants and Young Children in Bethlehem villages in Palestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Rabadi, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Background and aims: Infant and young child feeding practices are critically important for preventing and managing moderate malnutrition. The Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics report 2011 revealed that malnutrition among children under-five in Palestine is on rise. Between the years 2000 and 2010, prevalence of malnutrition rose by 41.3% on the national level. Currently, 11 out of 100 children under-five suffer malnutrition. An assessment on maternal child health and nutrition conducted by World Vision in the same year in Bethlehem governorate in Palestine ,showed that malnutrition among children are mostly attributed to poor knowledge and practices among caregivers especially mothers in regards to breastfeeding, complementary feeding, feeding during illness and supplementation. The objective of this intervention is to assess the effectiveness of home targeted and timely visits by trained community health workers (CHWs) for increased knowledge and improved practices among caregivers regarding IYCF as a preventive approach to moderate malnutrition. Method: An intervention study was carried out by World Vision in eleven villages surrounding Bethlehem. Mothers (n = 360) of infants born during the year 2011, 2012 were identified by 17 trained CHWs. The CHWs targeted the mothers with key messages and support for positive infant and young child feeding practices during organized home-visits throughout 14 months. Baseline and end-line data were collected through household interviews. Results and discussion: Infant and young child feeding practices were significantly improved after the intervention; exclusive breastfeeding until 6 months increased from 44.7% to 65.7% (P <0.001), duration of breastfeeding above one year increased from 66.8% to 82.5% (P <0.001),timely introduction of the complementary meals increased from 71.5% to 87%,offering the minimum meal diversity increased from 28.5% to 78.9% (P <0.001), meal frequency increased from 4.2%-75.9% (P <0

  14. Minimal intervention dentistry: part 3. Paediatric dental care--prevention and management protocols using caries risk assessment for infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Gomez, F J; Crystal, Y O; Domejean, S; Featherstone, J D B

    2012-11-01

    Recent increases in caries prevalence in young children throughout the world highlight the need for a simple but effective infant oral care programme. This programme needs to include a medical disease prevention management model with an early establishment of a dental home and a treatment approach based on individual patient risk. This article presents an updated approach with practical forms and tools based on the principles of caries management by risk assessment, CAMBRA. This method will aid the general practitioner to develop and maintain a comprehensive protocol adequate for infant and young children oral care visits. Perinatal oral health is vitally important in preventing early childhood caries (ECC) in young children. Providing dental treatment to expectant mothers and their young children in a 'dual parallel track' is an effective innovative strategy and an efficient practice builder. It promotes prevention rather than intervention, and this may be the best way to achieve long-lasting oral health for young patients. General dental practice can adopt easy protocols that will promote early preventive visits and anticipatory guidance/counselling rather than waiting for the need for restorative treatment.

  15. Texting improves testing: a randomized trial of two-way SMS to increase postpartum prevention of mother-to-child transmission retention and infant HIV testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeny, Thomas A; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Cohen, Craig R; Yuhas, Krista; Camlin, Carol S; McClelland, R Scott

    2014-09-24

    Many sub-Saharan African countries report high postpartum loss to follow-up of mother-baby pairs. We aimed to determine whether interactive text messages improved rates of clinic attendance and early infant HIV testing in the Nyanza region of Kenya. Parallel-group, unblinded, randomized controlled trial. HIV-positive pregnant women at least 18 years old and enrolled in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV programme were randomized to receive either text messages (SMS group, n = 195) or usual care (n = 193). Messages were developed using formative focus group research informed by constructs of the Health Belief Model. The SMS group received up to eight text messages before delivery (depending on gestational age), and six messages postpartum. Primary outcomes included maternal postpartum clinic attendance and virological infant HIV testing by 8 weeks postpartum. The primary analyses were intention-to-treat. Of the 388 enrolled women, 381 (98.2%) had final outcome information. In the SMS group, 38 of 194 (19.6%) women attended a maternal postpartum clinic compared to 22 of 187 (11.8%) in the control group (relative risk 1.66, 95% confidence interval 1.02-2.70). HIV testing within 8 weeks was performed in 172 of 187 (92.0%) infants in the SMS group compared to 154 of 181 (85.1%) in the control group (relative risk 1.08, 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.16). Text messaging significantly improved maternal postpartum visit attendance, but overall return rates for these visits remained low. In contrast, high rates of early infant HIV testing were achieved in both arms, with significantly higher testing rates in the SMS compared to the control infants.

  16. Recent Declines in Infant Mortality in the United States, 2005-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading cause of infant death in 2011 was congenital malformations, followed by short gestation/low birthweight, Sudden infant ... 2011, the infant mortality rate declined 6% for congenital malformations. The infant mortality rate declined 9% for short ...

  17. Effects of Bifidobacterial Supplementation to Pregnant Women and Infants in the Prevention of Allergy Development in Infants and on Fecal Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadao Enomoto

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: These data suggest that the prenatal and postnatal supplementation of bifidobacteria is effective in primary preventing allergic diseases. Some limited changes in the composition of fecal microbiota by the bifidobacterial supplementation were observed.

  18. From strategy development to routine implementation: the cost of Intermittent Preventive Treatment in Infants for malaria control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner Marcel

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Achieving the Millennium Development Goals for health requires a massive scaling-up of interventions in Sub Saharan Africa. Intermittent Preventive Treatment in infants (IPTi is a promising new tool for malaria control. Although efficacy information is available for many interventions, there is a dearth of data on the resources required for scaling up of health interventions. Method We worked in partnership with the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MoHSW to develop an IPTi strategy that could be implemented and managed by routine health services. We tracked health system and other costs of (1 developing the strategy and (2 maintaining routine implementation of the strategy in five districts in southern Tanzania. Financial costs were extracted and summarized from a costing template and semi-structured interviews were conducted with key informants to record time and resources spent on IPTi activities. Results The estimated financial cost to start-up and run IPTi in the whole of Tanzania in 2005 was US$1,486,284. Start-up costs of US$36,363 were incurred at the national level, mainly on the development of Behaviour Change Communication (BCC materials, stakeholders' meetings and other consultations. The annual running cost at national level for intervention management and monitoring and drug purchase was estimated at US$459,096. Start-up costs at the district level were US$7,885 per district, mainly expenditure on training. Annual running costs were US$170 per district, mainly for printing of BCC materials. There was no incremental financial expenditure needed to deliver the intervention in health facilities as supplies were delivered alongside routine vaccinations and available health workers performed the activities without working overtime. The economic cost was estimated at 23 US cents per IPTi dose delivered. Conclusion The costs presented here show the order of magnitude of expenditures needed to initiate and to

  19. The Cost-Effectiveness of Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Malaria in Infants in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conteh, Lesong; Sicuri, Elisa; Manzi, Fatuma; Hutton, Guy; Obonyo, Benson; Tediosi, Fabrizio; Biao, Prosper; Masika, Paul; Matovu, Fred; Otieno, Peter; Gosling, Roly D.; Hamel, Mary; Odhiambo, Frank O.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Kremsner, Peter G.; Chandramohan, Daniel; Aponte, John J.; Egan, Andrea; Schellenberg, David; Macete, Eusebio; Slutsker, Laurence; Newman, Robert D.; Alonso, Pedro; Menéndez, Clara; Tanner, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    Background Intermittent preventive treatment in infants (IPTi) has been shown to decrease clinical malaria by approximately 30% in the first year of life and is a promising malaria control strategy for Sub-Saharan Africa which can be delivered alongside the Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI). To date, there have been limited data on the cost-effectiveness of this strategy using sulfadoxine pyrimethamine (SP) and no published data on cost-effectiveness using other antimalarials. Methods We analysed data from 5 countries in sub-Saharan Africa using a total of 5 different IPTi drug regimens; SP, mefloquine (MQ), 3 days of chlorproguanil-dapsone (CD), SP plus 3 days of artesunate (SP-AS3) and 3 days of amodiaquine-artesunate (AQ3-AS3).The cost per malaria episode averted and cost per Disability-Adjusted Life-Year (DALY) averted were modeled using both trial specific protective efficacy (PE) for all IPTi drugs and a pooled PE for IPTi with SP, malaria incidence, an estimated malaria case fatality rate of 1.57%, IPTi delivery costs and country specific provider and household malaria treatment costs. Findings In sites where IPTi had a significant effect on reducing malaria, the cost per episode averted for IPTi-SP was very low, USD 1.36–4.03 based on trial specific data and USD 0.68–2.27 based on the pooled analysis. For IPTi using alternative antimalarials, the lowest cost per case averted was for AQ3-AS3 in western Kenya (USD 4.62) and the highest was for MQ in Korowge, Tanzania (USD 18.56). Where efficacious, based only on intervention costs, IPTi was shown to be cost effective in all the sites and highly cost-effective in all but one of the sites, ranging from USD 2.90 (Ifakara, Tanzania with SP) to USD 39.63 (Korogwe, Tanzania with MQ) per DALY averted. In addition, IPTi reduced health system costs and showed significant savings to households from malaria cases averted. A threshold analysis showed that there is room for the IPTi-efficacy to fall and still

  20. Neonatal resuscitation and immediate newborn assessment and stimulation for the prevention of neonatal deaths: a systematic review, meta-analysis and Delphi estimation of mortality effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    -related and preterm deaths by 10%, facility-based resuscitation would prevent a further 10% of preterm deaths, and community-based resuscitation would prevent further 20% of intrapartum-related and 5% of preterm deaths. Conclusion Neonatal resuscitation training in facilities reduces term intrapartum-related deaths by 30%. Yet, coverage of this intervention remains low in countries where most neonatal deaths occur and is a missed opportunity to save lives. Expert opinion supports smaller effects of neonatal resuscitation on preterm mortality in facilities and of basic resuscitation and newborn assessment and stimulation at community level. Further evaluation is required for impact, cost and implementation strategies in various contexts. Funding This work was supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation through a grant to the US Fund for UNICEF, and to the Saving Newborn Lives program of Save the Children, through Save the Children US. PMID:21501429

  1. Development of a bedside tool to predict time to death after withdrawal of life-sustaining therapies in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Paul M; Huang, Rong; Roy, Lonnie; Darnell, Cindy; Grein, Heather; Robertson, Tammy; Thompson, Lisa

    2012-07-01

    To generate a preliminary bedside predictor of rapid time-to-death after withdrawal of support in children to help identify potential candidates for organ donation after circulatory death. Retrospective chart review. Pediatric intensive care unit of an academic children's hospital. All deaths in the pediatric intensive care unit from May 1996 to April 2007. None. Among 1389 deaths, 634 patients underwent withdrawal of support and 518 with complete data regarding demographics, life-supportive therapies, and end-of-life circumstances were analyzed. Three hundred seventy-three (72%) patients died within 30 mins of withdrawal and 452 (87%) died within 60 mins. Using multiple logistic regression, significant predictors of death within 30 or 60 mins (typical cut-off times for organ donation) were identified and a predictor score was generated. Significant predictors included: age 1 month or younger; norepinephrine, epinephrine, or phenylephrine >0.2 µg/kg/min; extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; and positive end-expiratory pressure >10 cmH2O; and spontaneous ventilation. Possible scores for the 30-min predictor ranged from -17 to 67; a score ≤-9 predicted a 37% probability of death ≤ 30 mins, whereas a score ≥ 38 predicted an 85% probability of death within 30 mins. For the 60-min predictor, scores ranged from -21 to 38; score ≤-10 predicted a 59% probability of death within 60 mins and a score ≥ 16 predicted a 98% probability of death within 60 mins. This tool is a reasonable preliminary predictor for death within 30 or 60 mins after withdrawal of support in terminally ill or injured children and might assist in identifying potential pediatric candidates for donation after circulatory death, although prospective validation is required.

  2. New South Wales annual vaccine-preventable disease report, 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Rosewell; Paula Spokes; Robin Gilmour

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To describe the epidemiology of selected vaccine-preventable diseases in New South Wales, Australia for 2013. Methods: Data from the New South Wales Notifiable Conditions Information Management System were analysed by local health district of residence, age, Aboriginality, vaccination status and organism. Risk factor and vaccination status data were collected by public health units. Results: Pertussis notification rates in infants were low, and no infant pertussis deaths were r...

  3. Effect of isoniazid preventive therapy on tuberculosis or death in persons with HIV : a retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayele, Henok Tadesse; van Mourik, Maaike S M; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) is a recommended strategy for prevention of tuberculosis (TB) in persons with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) although the benefits have not been unequivocally demonstrated in routine clinical practice with widespread ART adoption. Therefore, we

  4. Troponin T, N-terminal pro natriuretic peptide and a patent ductus arteriosus scoring system predict death before discharge or neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years in preterm infants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    El-Khuffash, Afif F

    2011-03-01

    There is little consensus regarding the use of echocardiography in patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) treatment in preterm infants. The use of troponin T (cTnT) and N-terminal Pro-BNP (NTpBNP) in combination with echocardiography assessment may facilitate the development of a superior predictive model.

  5. Prediction of Late Death or Disability at Age 5 Years Using a Count of 3 Neonatal Morbidities in Very Low Birth Weight Infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Barbara; Roberts, Robin S.; Davis, Peter G.; Doyle, Lex W.; Asztalos, Elizabeth V.; Opie, Gillian; Bairam, Aida; Solimano, Alfonso; Arnon, Shmuel; Sauve, Reginald S.; D'Ilario, Judy; Cairnie, Janice; Dix, Joanne; Adams, Beth Anne; Warriner, Erin; Marie Kim, Mee-Hai; Anderson, Peter; Davis, Peter; Doyle, Lex; Argus, Brenda; Callanan, Catherine; Davis, Noni; Duff, Julianne; McDonald, Marion; Asztalos, Elizabeth; Hohn, Denise; Lacy, Maralyn; Haslam, Ross; Barnett, Christopher; Goodchild, Louise; Lontis, Rosslyn Marie; Fraser, Simon; Keng, Julie; Saunders, Kerryn; Kelly, Elaine; Woods, Heather; Marchant, Emma; Turner, Anne-Marie; Magrath, Emma; Williamson, Amanda; Bélanger, Sylvie; Fraser, Annie; Blayney, Marc; Lemyre, Brigitte; Frank, Jane; Synnes, Anne; Grunau, Ruth E.; Hubber-Richard, Philippa; Rogers, Marilyn; Mackay, Margot; Petrie-Thomas, Julianne; Butt, Arsalan; van Wassenaer, Aleid; Nuytemans, Debbie; Houtzager, Bregje; van Sonderen, Loekie; Regev, Rivka; Itzchack, Netter; Chalaf, Adiba; Ohlsson, Arne; O'Brien, Karel; Hamilton, Anne-Marie; Chan, May Lee; Sankaran, Koravangattu; Proctor, Pat; Golan, Agneta; Goldsch-Lerman, Esther; Reynolds, Graham; Dromgool, Barbara; Meskell, Sandra; Parr, Vanessa; Maher, Catherine; Broom, Margaret; Kecskes, Zsuzsoka; Ringland, Cathy; McMillan, Douglas; Spellen, Elizabeth; Christianson, Heather; Anseeuw-Deeks, Deborah; Creighton, Dianne; Heath, Jennifer; Alvaro, Ruben; Chiu, Aaron; Porter, Ceceile; Turner, Gloria; Moddemann, Diane; Granke, Naomi; Penner, Karen; Bow, Jane; Mulder, Antonius; Wassenberg, Renske; van der Hoeven, Markus; Clarke, Maxine; Parfitt, Judy; Parker, Kevin; Nwaesei, Chukwuma; Ryan, Heather; Saunders, Cory; Schulze, Andreas; Wermuth, Inga; Hilgendorff, Anne; Flemmer, Andreas W.; Herlenius, Eric; Legnevall, Lena; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Matthew, Derek; Amos, Wendy; Tulsiani, Suresh; Tan-Dy, Cherrie; Turner, Marilyn; Phelan, Constance; Shinwell, Eric S.; Levine, Michael; Juster-Reicher, Ada; Khairy, May; Grier, Patricia; Vachon, Julie; Perepolkin, Larissa; Barrington, Keith J.; Sinha, Sunil Kumar; Tin, Win; Fritz, Susan; Walti, Herve; Royer, Diane; Halliday, Henry; Millar, David; Mayes, Clifford; McCusker, Christopher; McLaughlin, Olivia; Fahnenstich, Hubert; Tillmann, Bettina; Weber, Peter; Wariyar, Unni; Embleton, Nicholas; Swamy, Ravi; Bucher, Hans U.; Fauchere, Jean-Claude; Dietz, Vera; Harikumar, Chidambara; Anderson, Peter J.; Dewey, Deborah; Gent, Michael; Fraser, William; Hey, Edmund; Perlman, Max; Thorpe, Kevin; Gray, Shari; Chambers, Carole; Costantini, Lorrie; Yacura, Wendy; McGean, Erin; Scapinello, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), serious brain injury, and severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) as predictors of poor long-term outcome in very low birth weight infants. Study design We examined the associations between counts of the 3 morbidities and long-term outcomes in

  6. Both very low- and very high in vitro cytokine responses were associated with infant death in low-birth-weight children from Guinea bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Andreas; Jensen, Kristoffer J; Erikstrup, Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanisms behind heterologous immunity and non-specific effects of vaccines on mortality are not well understood. We examined associations between cytokine responses and subsequent mortality in low-birth-weight infants in Guinea-Bissau. METHODS: A low-birth-weight trial randomize...

  7. Effects of cigarette smoke exposure on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits {alpha}7 and {beta}2 in the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) brainstem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machaalani, Rita, E-mail: rita.machaalani@sydney.edu.au [Department of Medicine, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia); Say, Meichien [Department of Medicine, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Waters, Karen A. [Department of Medicine, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Children' s Hospital at Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    It is postulated that nicotine, as the main neurotoxic constituent of cigarette smoke, influences SIDS risk through effects on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in brainstem nuclei that control respiration and arousal. This study compared {alpha}7 and {beta}2 nAChR subunit expression in eight nuclei of the caudal and rostral medulla and seven nuclei of the pons between SIDS (n = 46) and non-SIDS infants (n = 14). Evaluation for associations with known SIDS risk factors included comparison according to whether infants had a history of exposure to cigarette smoke in the home, and stratification for sleep position and gender. Compared to non-SIDS infants, SIDS infants had significantly decreased {alpha}7 in the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract (cNTS), gracile and cuneate nuclei, with decreased {beta}2 in the cNTS and increased {beta}2 in the facial. When considering only the SIDS cohort: 1-cigarette smoke exposure was associated with increased {alpha}7 in the vestibular nucleus and increased {beta}2 in the rostral dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, rNTS and Cuneate, 2-there was a gender interaction for {alpha}7 in the gracile and cuneate, and {beta}2 in the cNTS and rostral arcuate nucleus, and 3-there was no effect of sleep position on {alpha}7, but prone sleep was associated with decreased {beta}2 in three nuclei of the pons. In conclusion, SIDS infants demonstrate differences in expression of {alpha}7 and {beta}2 nAChRs within brainstem nuclei that control respiration and arousal, which is independent on prior history of cigarette smoke exposure, especially for the NTS, with additional differences for smoke exposure ({beta}2), gender ({alpha}7 and {beta}2) and sleep position ({beta}2) evident. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 'normal' response to smoke exposure is decreased {alpha}7 and {beta}2 in certain nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIDS infants have decreased {alpha}7 in cNTS, Grac and Cun. Black

  8. Effects of cigarette smoke exposure on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits α7 and β2 in the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) brainstem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machaalani, Rita; Say, Meichien; Waters, Karen A.

    2011-01-01

    It is postulated that nicotine, as the main neurotoxic constituent of cigarette smoke, influences SIDS risk through effects on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in brainstem nuclei that control respiration and arousal. This study compared α7 and β2 nAChR subunit expression in eight nuclei of the caudal and rostral medulla and seven nuclei of the pons between SIDS (n = 46) and non-SIDS infants (n = 14). Evaluation for associations with known SIDS risk factors included comparison according to whether infants had a history of exposure to cigarette smoke in the home, and stratification for sleep position and gender. Compared to non-SIDS infants, SIDS infants had significantly decreased α7 in the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract (cNTS), gracile and cuneate nuclei, with decreased β2 in the cNTS and increased β2 in the facial. When considering only the SIDS cohort: 1—cigarette smoke exposure was associated with increased α7 in the vestibular nucleus and increased β2 in the rostral dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, rNTS and Cuneate, 2—there was a gender interaction for α7 in the gracile and cuneate, and β2 in the cNTS and rostral arcuate nucleus, and 3—there was no effect of sleep position on α7, but prone sleep was associated with decreased β2 in three nuclei of the pons. In conclusion, SIDS infants demonstrate differences in expression of α7 and β2 nAChRs within brainstem nuclei that control respiration and arousal, which is independent on prior history of cigarette smoke exposure, especially for the NTS, with additional differences for smoke exposure (β2), gender (α7 and β2) and sleep position (β2) evident. -- Highlights: ► The ‘normal’ response to smoke exposure is decreased α7 and β2 in certain nuclei. ► SIDS infants have decreased α7 in cNTS, Grac and Cun. ► SIDS infants have decreased β2 in cNTS and increased β2 in facial. ► The NTS is more sensitive to both α7 and β2 regulation in SIDS. ► Smoke exposure

  9. Physical examination instead of laboratory tests for most infants born to mothers colonized with group B Streptococcus: support for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2010 recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantoni, Luigi; Ronfani, Luca; Da Riol, Rosalia; Demarini, Sergio

    2013-08-01

    To compare 2 approaches in the management of neonates at risk for group B Streptococcus early-onset sepsis: laboratory tests plus standardized physical examination and standardized physical examination alone. Prospective, sequential study over 2 consecutive 12-month periods, carried out in the maternity hospitals of the region Friuli-Venezia Giulia (north-eastern Italy). All term infants were included (7628 in the first period, 7611 in the second). In the first period, complete blood count and blood culture were required for all infants at risk, followed by a 48-hour period of observation with a standardized physical examination. In the second period, only standardized physical examination was performed. Study outcomes were: (1) number of neonates treated with antibiotics; and (2) time between onset of signs of possible sepsis and beginning of treatment. There was no difference between the 2 periods in the rate of maternal colonization (19.7% vs 19.8%, P = .8), or in other risk factors. The interval between onset of signs of sepsis and starting of antibiotics was not different in the 2 periods. Significantly fewer infants were treated with antibiotics in the second period (0.5% vs 1.2%, P physical examination seem to offer no advantage over standardized physical examination alone; the latter was associated with fewer antibiotic treatments. Our results are in agreement with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's 2010 recommendations. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Recommendations for prevention of iron deficiency. Delay cow's milk intake as a beverage to infants until 10-12 months of age!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, I; Gebre-Medhin, M; Hernell, O; Jakobsonn, I; Michaelsen, K F; Samuelson, G

    1999-05-05

    Breast-feeding is to be encouraged during the first six months of life. Iron deficiency is extremely rare in exclusively breast-fed infants during this period. Any cow-milk based formula used should be iron-fortified. During the second half of infancy, the iron content of weaning foods is important in preventing iron deficiency. Indeed, owing to the low iron content of dairy products, it is hard to compose a weaning diet sufficiently rich in iron to meet the demands of rapidly growing infants, if it is to include substantial amounts of cow milk, sour milk or yoghurt. Accordingly, the Paediatric Committee on Nutrition and Health, of the Swedish Paediatric Association and the National Food Administration, recommend delaying the introduction of cow's milk and cow-milk products until the infant is 10-12 months of age. Until then, breast-feeding, and the use of iron-fortified formula or gruel with modified protein and sodium content are encouraged; iron-fortified porridges of softer consistency can be prepared to circumvent the need of extra fluids, or porridge can be served with breast milk or iron-fortified formula; small amounts of milk may be used for cooking purposes.

  11. Hematological changes in women and infants exposed to an AZT-containing regimen for prevention of mother-to-child-transmission of HIV in Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Ziske

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Tanzanian guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child-transmission of HIV (PMTCT recommend an antiretroviral combination regimen involving zidovudine (AZT during pregnancy, single-dosed nevirapine at labor onset, AZT plus Lamivudine (3TC during delivery, and AZT/3TC for 1-4 weeks postpartum. As drug toxicities are a relevant concern, we assessed hematological alterations in AZT-exposed women and their infants. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A cohort of HIV-positive women, either with AZT intake (n = 82, group 1 or without AZT intake (n = 62, group 2 for PMTCT during pregnancy, was established at Kyela District Hospital, Tanzania. The cohort also included the infants of group 1 with an in-utero AZT exposure ≥4 weeks, receiving AZT for 1 week postpartum (n = 41, and infants of group 2 without in-utero AZT exposure, receiving a prolonged 4-week AZT tail (n = 58. Complete blood counts were evaluated during pregnancy, birth, weeks 4-6 and 12. RESULTS: For women of group 1 with antenatal AZT intake, we found a statistically significant decrease in hemoglobin level, red blood cells, white blood cells, granulocytes, as well as an increase in red cell distribution width and platelet count. At delivery, the median red blood cell count was significantly lower and the median platelet count was significantly higher in women of group 1 compared to group 2. At birth, infants from group 1 showed a lower median hemoglobin level and granulocyte count and a higher frequency of anemia and granulocytopenia. At 4-6 weeks postpartum, the mean neutrophil granulocyte count was significantly lower and neutropenia was significantly more frequent in infants of group 2. CONCLUSIONS: AZT exposure during pregnancy as well as after birth resulted in significant hematological alterations for women and their newborns, although these changes were mostly mild and transient in nature. Research involving larger cohorts is needed to further analyze the impact

  12. Consensus communication on early peanut introduction and the prevention of peanut allergy in high-risk infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleischer, David M; Sicherer, Scott; Greenhawt, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this brief communication is to highlight emerging evidence to existing guidelines regarding potential benefits of supporting early, rather than delayed, peanut introduction during the period of complementary food introduction in infants. This document should be considered as interim...

  13. Prevention of neonatal late-onset sepsis associated with the removal of percutaneously inserted central venous catheters in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemels, Marieke A. C.; van den Hoogen, Agnes; Verboon-Maciolek, Malgorzata A.; Fleer, Andre; Krediet, Tannette G.

    Objectives: Indwelling central venous catheters are the most important risk factors for the development of sepsis attributable to coagulase-negative staphylococci among preterm infants admitted to neonatal intensive care units. In addition, removal of a central venous catheter also may cause

  14. Selection of antimalarial drug resistance after intermittent preventive treatment of infants and children (IPTi/c) in Senegal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndiaye, Magatte; Tine, Roger; Faye, Babacar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Our study investigated the possible impact of SP-IPT given to infants and children on the prevalence of SP-resistant haplotypes in the Plasmodium falciparum genes Pfdhfr and Pfdhps, comparing sites with and without IPTi/c. P. falciparum positive samples (N = 352) collected from children...

  15. Consensus Communication on Early Peanut Introduction and the Prevention of Peanut Allergy in High-risk Infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleischer, David M.; Sicherer, Scott; Greenhawt, Matthew; Campbell, Dianne; Chan, Edmond; Muraro, Antonella; Halken, Susanne; Katz, Yitzhak; Ebisawa, Motohiro; Eichenfield, Lawrence; Sampson, Hugh; Lack, Gideon; Du Toit, George; Roberts, Graham; Bahnson, Henry; Feeney, Mary; Hourihane, Jonathan; Spergel, Jonathan; Young, Michael; As'aad, Amal; Allen, Katrina; Prescott, Susan; Kapur, Sandeep; Saito, Hirohisa; Agache, Ioana; Akdis, Cezmi A.; Arshad, Hasan; Beyer, Kirsten; Dubois, Anthony; Eigenmann, Philippe; Fernandez-Rivas, Monserrat; Grimshaw, Kate; Hoffman-Sommergruber, Karin; Host, Arne; Lau, Susanne; O'Mahony, Liam; Mills, Clare; Papadopoulos, Nikolaus; Venter, Carina; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Kessel, Aaron; Antaya, Richard; Drolet, Beth; Rosenwasser, Lanny

    The purpose of this brief communication is to highlight emerging evidence to existing guidelines regarding potential benefits of supporting early, rather than delayed, peanut introduction during the period of complementary food introduction in infants. This document should be considered as interim

  16. Serum ibuprofen levels of extremely preterm infants treated prophylactically with oral ibuprofen to prevent patent ductus arteriosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanmaz, Gozde; Erdeve, Omer; Canpolat, Fuat Emre; Oguz, Serife Suna; Uras, Nurdan; Altug, Nahide; Greijdanus, Ben; Dilmen, Ugur

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of early oral ibuprofen administration on the incidence of hemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus (hsPDA) and define the association between serum ibuprofen levels and ductal closure. Preterm infants with a gestational age of <28 weeks

  17. Mortes evitáveis em vítimas com traumatismos Muertes evitables en víctimas con traumatismos Preventable trauma deaths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Helena Costanti Settervall

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever métodos e estimativas de mortalidade proporcional por mortes evitáveis e tipos de não conformidades do atendimento relacionadas a esses eventos. MÉTODOS: Revisão sistemática de publicações sobre mortes evitáveis em vítimas com traumatismos entre 2000 e 2009. Foi realizada pesquisa nas bases de dados Lilacs, SciELO e Medline utilizando-se a estratégia de busca com as palavras-chave "trauma", "avoidable", "preventable", "interventions" e "complications", e os descritores em ciências da saúde "death", "cause of death" e "hospitals". RESULTADOS: Identificaram-se 29 artigos publicados no período, com predomínio de estudos retrospectivos (96,5%. Os métodos mais comumente utilizados para definir a evitabilidade do óbito foram painel de especialistas ou pontuação de índices de gravidade, tendo sido empregadas as seguintes categorias: evitável, potencialmente evitável e não evitável. A média da mortalidade proporcional por mortes evitáveis dos estudos foi de 10,7% (dp 11,5%. As não conformidades mais comumente relatadas nas publicações foram sistema inadequado de atendimento ao traumatizado e erro na avaliação e tratamento. CONCLUSÕES: Observaram-se falhas na uniformização dos termos empregados para categorizar as mortes e as não conformidadades encontradas. Portanto, sugere-se a padronização da taxonomia da classificação das mortes e dos tipos de não conformidades observadas.OBJETIVO: Describir métodos y estimativas de mortalidad proporcional por muertes evitables y tipos de no concordancias de la atención relacionadas con tales eventos. MÉTODOS: Revisión sistemática de publicaciones sobre muertes evitables en víctimas con traumatismos entre 2000 y 2009. Se realizó investigación en las bases de datos Lilacs, SciELO y Medline utilizándose la estrategia de búsqueda con las palabras clave "trauma", "avoidable", "preventable", "interventions" y "complications" y los descriptores en

  18. Attitudes and decision-making about early-infant versus early-adolescent male circumcision: Demand-side insights for sustainable HIV prevention strategies in Zambia and Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgaier, Sema K; Sharma, Sunny; Eletskaya, Maria; Prasad, Ram; Mugurungi, Owen; Tambatamba, Bushimbwa; Ncube, Getrude; Xaba, Sinokuthemba; Nanga, Alice; Gumede-Moyo, Sehlulekile; Kretschmer, Steve

    2017-01-01

    As countries approach their scale-up targets for the voluntary medical male circumcision program for HIV prevention, they are strategizing and planning for the sustainability phase to follow. Global guidance recommends circumcising adolescent (below 14 years) and/or early infant boys (aged 0-60 days), and countries need to consider several factors before prioritizing a cohort for their sustainability phase. We provide community and healthcare provider-side insights on attitudes and decision-making process as a key input for this strategic decision in Zambia and Zimbabwe. We studied expectant parents, parents of infant boys (aged 0-60 days), family members and neo-natal and ante-natal healthcare providers in Zambia and Zimbabwe. Our integrated methodology consisted of in-depth qualitative and quantitative one-on-one interviews, and a simulated-decision-making game, to uncover attitudes towards, and the decision-making process for, early adolescent or early infant medical circumcision (EAMC or EIMC). In both countries, parents viewed early infancy and early adolescence as equally ideal ages for circumcision (38% EIMC vs. 37% EAMC in Zambia; 24% vs. 27% in Zimbabwe). If offered for free, about half of Zambian parents and almost 2 in 5 Zimbabwean parents indicated they would likely circumcise their infant boy; however, half of parents in each country perceived that the community would not accept EIMC. Nurses believed their facilities currently could not absorb EIMC services and that they would have limited ability to influence fathers, who were seen as having the primary decision-making authority. Our analysis suggests that EAMC is more accepted by the community than EIMC and is the path of least resistance for the sustainability phase of VMMC. However, parents or community members do not reject EIMC. Should countries choose to prioritize this cohort for their sustainability phase, a number of barriers around information, decision-making by parents, and supply side

  19. Attitudes and decision-making about early-infant versus early-adolescent male circumcision: Demand-side insights for sustainable HIV prevention strategies in Zambia and Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema K Sgaier

    Full Text Available As countries approach their scale-up targets for the voluntary medical male circumcision program for HIV prevention, they are strategizing and planning for the sustainability phase to follow. Global guidance recommends circumcising adolescent (below 14 years and/or early infant boys (aged 0-60 days, and countries need to consider several factors before prioritizing a cohort for their sustainability phase. We provide community and healthcare provider-side insights on attitudes and decision-making process as a key input for this strategic decision in Zambia and Zimbabwe. We studied expectant parents, parents of infant boys (aged 0-60 days, family members and neo-natal and ante-natal healthcare providers in Zambia and Zimbabwe. Our integrated methodology consisted of in-depth qualitative and quantitative one-on-one interviews, and a simulated-decision-making game, to uncover attitudes towards, and the decision-making process for, early adolescent or early infant medical circumcision (EAMC or EIMC. In both countries, parents viewed early infancy and early adolescence as equally ideal ages for circumcision (38% EIMC vs. 37% EAMC in Zambia; 24% vs. 27% in Zimbabwe. If offered for free, about half of Zambian parents and almost 2 in 5 Zimbabwean parents indicated they would likely circumcise their infant boy; however, half of parents in each country perceived that the community would not accept EIMC. Nurses believed their facilities currently could not absorb EIMC services and that they would have limited ability to influence fathers, who were seen as having the primary decision-making authority. Our analysis suggests that EAMC is more accepted by the community than EIMC and is the path of least resistance for the sustainability phase of VMMC. However, parents or community members do not reject EIMC. Should countries choose to prioritize this cohort for their sustainability phase, a number of barriers around information, decision-making by parents, and

  20. HIV-1 Early Infant Diagnosis is an Effective Indicator of the Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission Program Performance: Experience from Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saounde Temgoua, Edith Michele; Nkenfou, Celine Nguefeu; Zoung-Kanyi Bissek, Anne Cecile; Fokam, Joseph; Billong, Serge Clotaire; Sosso, Samuel Martin; Tangipumdu, Charlotte; Elong, Elise Lobe; Domkan, Irenee; Colizzi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvement in HIV prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT), there are still over 1,500 African infants newly infected daily. PMTCT elimination requires antiretroviral therapy (ART) throughout pregnancy and breastfeeding periods, while early infant diagnosis (EID) of HIV implies early treatment for those infected. Our study aimed at assessing the utility of EID program data in evaluating the implementation of PMTCT program in Cameroon, and in identifying the efficacy of existing PMTCT interventions and breastfeeding options on the events of HIV vertical transmission. A study was conducted from 2010-2011 using PMTCT data from EID sites of six regions of Cameroon. PMTCT ARV regimens, breastfeeding options, and the child's HIV DNA-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results were recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using Mann Whitney U and Fisher exact tests, with pvertical transmission, against 31.3% (284/906) among mother-child pairs without exposure to any PMTCT intervention; pvertical transmission was recorded versus 19.9% (48/241) for mother-child pairs without intervention; pTransmission rates were similar across infant age range [2.7% (10/376) for age ≤6 weeks, versus 2.5% (43/1807) for age >6 weeks-6 months]. Interestingly, babies aged 6 weeks receiving FF showed a significantly lower transmission rate (3.2%, 9/277) as compared to their counterparts with EBF (7.7%, 12/156); pHIV MTCT may be achievable through access to ARV (option B+) and adequate infant feeding option (especially FF) in Cameroon. EID programme is therefore an effective routine approach for PMTCT programme evaluation in resource-limited settings.

  1. The preventable causes of death in the United States: comparative risk assessment of dietary, lifestyle, and metabolic risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodarz Danaei

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the number of deaths caused by risk factors is needed for health policy and priority setting. Our aim was to estimate the mortality effects of the following 12 modifiable dietary, lifestyle, and metabolic risk factors in the United States (US using consistent and comparable methods: high blood glucose, low-density lipoprot