WorldWideScience

Sample records for preventing inadvertent peri-operative

  1. Peri-operative glycaemic control regimens for preventing surgical site infections in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Lillian S; Meeks, Derek; Moyer, Virginia A; Lally, Kevin P

    2009-07-08

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and resource utilization and are potentially preventable. Peri-operative hyperglycaemia has been associated with increased SSIs and previous recommendations have been to treat glucose levels above 200 mg/dL. However, recent studies have questioned the optimal glycaemic control regimen to prevent SSIs. Whether the benefits of strict or intensive glycaemic control with insulin infusion as compared to conventional management outweigh the risks remains controversial. To summarise the evidence for the impact of glycaemic control in the peri-operative period on the incidence of surgical site infections, hypoglycaemia, level of glycaemic control, all-cause and infection-related mortality, and hospital length of stay and to investigate for differences of effect between different levels of glycaemic control. A search strategy was developed to search the following databases: Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 25 March 2009), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1; Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to March Week 2 2009); Ovid EMBASE (1980 to 2009 Week 12) and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to March Week 3 2009). The search was not limited by language or publication status. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible for inclusion if they evaluated two (or more) glycaemic control regimens in the peri-operative period (within one week pre-, intra-, and/or post-operative) and reported surgical site infections as an outcome. The standard method for conducting a systematic review in accordance with the Cochrane Wounds Group was used. Two review authors independently reviewed the results from the database searches and identified relevant studies. Two review authors extracted study data and outcomes from each study and reviewed each study for methodological quality. Any disagreement was resolved by discussion or by referral to a third review author. Five

  2. Peri-operative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baston, Helen

    2004-05-01

    This is the third 'midwifery basics' series aimed at student midwives, and focuses on midwifery care during labour. This article provides a summary of peri-operative care for women who experience caesarean birth. Students are encouraged to seek further information through a series of activities, and to link theory with practice by considering the issues relating to the care of the woman described in the short vignette.

  3. Preventing Inadvertent Placement of Foley Catheter into Prostatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Percutaneous suprapubic trocar cystostomy (SPC) is often needed to drain the bladder when urethral catheterization either fails or is not advisable.[1] It is ... vertical or slightly tilting its tip toward umbilicus during foley placement, prevents the inadvertent migration of catheter into prostatic urethra and further complications.

  4. Peri-operative oral caffeine does not prevent postoperative atrial fibrillation after heart valve surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: A randomised controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagier, David; Nee, Laetitia; Guieu, Régis; Kerbaul, François; Fenouillet, Emmanuel; Roux, Nicolas; Giorgi, Roch; Theron, Alexis; Grisoli, Dominique; Gariboldi, Vlad; Collart, Frederic; Bruder, Nicolas; Velly, Lionel; Guidon, Catherine

    2018-04-26

    Raised plasma levels of endogenous adenosine after cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) have been related to the incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF). We wished to assess if caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist could have a beneficial effect on the incidence of POAF. A randomised controlled study. Single University Hospital. One hundred and ten patients scheduled for heart valve surgery with CPB. We randomly assigned patients to receive peri-operative oral caffeine (400 mg every 8 h for 2 days) or placebo. Adenosine plasma concentrations and caffeine pharmacokinetic profile were evaluated in a subgroup of 50 patients. The primary endpoint was the rate of atrial fibrillation during postoperative hospital stay. The current study was stopped for futility by the data monitoring board after an interim analysis. The incidence of atrial fibrillation was similar in the caffeine and in the placebo group during hospital stay (33 vs. 29%, P = 0.67) and the first 3 postoperative days (18 vs. 15%; P = 0.60). Basal and postoperative adenosine plasma levels were significantly associated with the primary outcome. Adenosine plasma levels were similar in the two treatment groups. Caffeine administration was associated with a higher incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (27 vs. 7%, P = 0.005). Oral caffeine does not prevent POAF after heart valve surgery with CPB but increased the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. ClinicalTrials.gov, no.: NCT01999829.

  5. Impact of the Antibiotic Stewardship Program on Prevention and Control of Surgical Site Infection during Peri-Operative Clean Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juyuan; Li, Na; Hao, Jinjuan; Li, Yanming; Liu, Anlei; Wu, Yinghong; Cai, Meng

    2018-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections and are associated with substantial healthcare costs, with increased morbidity and mortality. To investigate the effects of the antibiotic stewardship program on prevention and control of SSI during clean surgery, we investigated this situation in our institution. We performed a quasi-experimental study to compare the effect before and after the antibiotic stewardship program intervention. During the pre-intervention stage (January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2011), comprehensive surveillance was performed to determine the SSI baseline data. In the second stage (January 1, 2012 through December 31, 2016), an infectious diseases physician and an infection control practitioner identified the surgical patients daily and followed up on the duration of antimicrobial prophylaxis. From January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2016, 41,426 patients underwent clean surgeries in a grade III, class A hospital. The rate of prophylactic antibiotic use in the 41,426 clean surgeries was reduced from 82.9% to 28.0% after the interventions. The rate of antibiotic agents administered within 120 minutes of the first incision increased from 20.8% to 85.1%. The rate at which prophylactic antimicrobial agents were discontinued in the first 24 hours after surgery increased from 22.1% to 60.4%. Appropriate antibiotic selection increased from 37.0% to 93.6%. Prophylactic antibiotic re-dosing increased from 3.8% to 64.8%. The SSI rate decreased from 0.7% to 0.5% (p < 0.05). The pathogen detection rate increased from 16.7% up to 41.8% after intervention. The intensity of antibiotic consumption reduced from 74.9 defined daily doses (DDDs) per 100 bed-days to 34.2 DDDs per 100 bed-days after the interventions. Long-term and continuous antibiotic stewardship programs have important effects on the prevention and control of SSI during clean surgery.

  6. Use and Effectiveness of Peri-Operative Cefotetan versus Cefazolin Plus Metronidazole for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Abdominal Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danan, Eleanor; Smith, Janessa; Kruer, Rachel M; Avdic, Edina; Lipsett, Pamela; Curless, Melanie S; Jarrell, Andrew S

    2018-04-24

    Current practice guidelines for antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery recommend a cephamycin or cefazolin plus metronidazole for various abdominal surgeries. In February 2016, cephamycin drug shortages resulted in a change in The Johns Hopkins Hospital's (JHH) recommendation for peri-operative antibiotic prophylaxis in abdominal surgeries from cefotetan to cefazolin plus metronidazole. The primary objective of this study was to quantify the percentage of abdominal surgeries adherent to JHH peri-operative antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines. A sub-group analysis investigated whether prophylaxis with cefazolin plus metronidazole was associated with a lower rate of surgical site infections (SSIs) versus cefotetan. This retrospective cohort study included adult inpatients who underwent an abdominal surgery at JHH in September 2015 (Study Period I: cefotetan) or February to March 2016 (Study Period II: cefazolin plus metronidazole). Two hundred abdominal surgery cases were included in the primary analysis. A subset of 156 surgical cases were included in the sub-group analysis. The overall adherence rate to JHH guidelines was 75% in Study Period I versus 17% in Study Period II (p operative administration time (87% vs. 23%, p site infections occurred in 14% (12/83) of surgeries with cefotetan versus 8.2% (6/73) with cefazolin plus metronidazole for prophylaxis (p = 0.19). Adherence to an institution-specific peri-operative antibiotic prophylaxis guideline for abdominal surgeries was limited primarily by the longer infusion time required for pre-operative metronidazole. A higher percentage of SSIs occurred among abdominal surgeries with cefotetan versus cefazolin plus metronidazole for prophylaxis.

  7. Prevention of the inadvertent movement and illicit trafficking of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-05-01

    By international agreements, the movement of all radioactive materials within and between States should be subject to high standards of regulatory, administrative, safety and engineering controls to ensure that such movements are conducted in a safe and secure manner. In the case of nuclear materials, there are additional requirements for physical protection and accountability to ensure against threats of nuclear proliferation and to safeguard against any attempts at diversion. The results of the terrorist attacks of September 2001 emphasized the requirement for enhanced control and security of nuclear and radioactive materials. In this regard, measures are being taken to increase the global levels of physical protection and security for nuclear materials. Experience in many parts of the world continues to prove that movements of radioactive materials outside of the regulatory and legal frameworks continue to occur. Such movements may be either deliberate or inadvertent. Deliberate, illegal movements of radioactive materials, including nuclear material, for terrorist, political or illegal profit is generally understood to be illicit trafficking. The more common movements outside of regulatory control are inadvertent in nature. An example of an inadvertent movement might be the transport of steel contaminated by a melted radioactive source that was lost from proper controls. Such a shipment may present health and safety threats to the personnel involved as well as to the general public. States have the responsibility for combating illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements of radioactive materials. The IAEA co-operates with Member States and other international organizations in joint efforts to prevent incidents of illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements and to harmonize policies and measures by the provision of relevant advice through technical assistance and documents. As an example, the IAEA and the World Customs Organization (WCO) maintain a Memorandum

  8. Prevention of the inadvertent movement and illicit trafficking of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-12-01

    By international agreements, the movement of all radioactive materials within and between States should be subject to high standards of regulatory, administrative, safety and engineering controls to ensure that such movements are conducted in a safe and secure manner. In the case of nuclear materials, there are additional requirements for physical protection and accountability to ensure against threats of nuclear proliferation and to safeguard against any attempts at diversion. The results of the terrorist attacks of September 2001 emphasized the requirement for enhanced control and security of nuclear and radioactive materials. In this regard, measures are being taken to increase the global levels of physical protection and security for nuclear materials. Experience in many parts of the world continues to prove that movements of radioactive materials outside of the regulatory and legal frameworks continue to occur. Such movements may be either deliberate or inadvertent. Deliberate, illegal movements of radioactive materials, including nuclear material, for terrorist, political or illegal profit is generally understood to be illicit trafficking. The more common movements outside of regulatory control are inadvertent in nature. An example of an inadvertent movement might be the transport of steel contaminated by a melted radioactive source that was lost from proper controls. Such a shipment may present health and safety threats to the personnel involved as well as to the general public. States have the responsibility for combating illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements of radioactive materials. The IAEA co-operates with Member States and other international organizations in joint efforts to prevent incidents of illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements and to harmonize policies and measures by the provision of relevant advice through technical assistance and documents. As an example, the IAEA and the World Customs Organization (WCO) maintain a Memorandum

  9. Prevention of the inadvertent movement and illicit trafficking of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    By international agreements, the movement of all radioactive materials within and between States should be subject to high standards of regulatory, administrative, safety and engineering controls to ensure that such movements are conducted in a safe and secure manner. In the case of nuclear materials, there are additional requirements for physical protection and accountability to ensure against threats of nuclear proliferation and to safeguard against any attempts at diversion. The results of the terrorist attacks of September 2001 emphasized the requirement for enhanced control and security of nuclear and radioactive materials. In this regard, measures are being taken to increase the global levels of physical protection and security for nuclear materials. Experience in many parts of the world continues to prove that movements of radioactive materials outside of the regulatory and legal frameworks continue to occur. Such movements may be either deliberate or inadvertent. Deliberate, illegal movements of radioactive materials, including nuclear material, for terrorist, political or illegal profit is generally understood to be illicit trafficking. The more common movements outside of regulatory control are inadvertent in nature. An example of an inadvertent movement might be the transport of steel contaminated by a melted radioactive source that was lost from proper controls. Such a shipment may present health and safety threats to the personnel involved as well as to the general public. States have the responsibility for combating illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements of radioactive materials. The IAEA co-operates with Member States and other international organizations in joint efforts to prevent incidents of illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements and to harmonize policies and measures by the provision of relevant advice through technical assistance and documents. As an example, the IAEA and the World Customs Organization (WCO) maintain a Memorandum

  10. Prevention of the inadvertent movement and illicit trafficking of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-05-01

    By international agreements, the movement of all radioactive materials within and between States should be subject to high standards of regulatory, administrative, safety and engineering controls to ensure that such movements are conducted in a safe and secure manner. In the case of nuclear materials, there are additional requirements for physical protection and accountability to ensure against threats of nuclear proliferation and to safeguard against any attempts at diversion. The results of the terrorist attacks of September 2001 emphasized the requirement for enhanced control and security of nuclear and radioactive materials. In this regard, measures are being taken to increase the global levels of physical protection and security for nuclear materials. Experience in many parts of the world continues to prove that movements of radioactive materials outside of the regulatory and legal frameworks continue to occur. Such movements may be either deliberate or inadvertent. Deliberate, illegal movements of radioactive materials, including nuclear material, for terrorist, political or illegal profit is generally understood to be illicit trafficking. The more common movements outside of regulatory control are inadvertent in nature. An example of an inadvertent movement might be the transport of steel contaminated by a melted radioactive source that was lost from proper controls. Such a shipment may present health and safety threats to the personnel involved as well as to the general public. States have the responsibility for combating illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements of radioactive materials. The IAEA co-operates with Member States and other international organizations in joint efforts to prevent incidents of illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements and to harmonize policies and measures by the provision of relevant advice through technical assistance and documents. As an example, the IAEA and the World Customs Organization (WCO) maintain a Memorandum

  11. Prevention of the inadvertent movement and illicit trafficking of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    By international agreements, the movement of all radioactive materials within and between States should be subject to high standards of regulatory, administrative, safety and engineering controls to ensure that such movements are conducted in a safe and secure manner. In the case of nuclear materials, there are additional requirements for physical protection and accountability to ensure against threats of nuclear proliferation and to safeguard against any attempts at diversion. The results of the terrorist attacks of September 2001 emphasized the requirement for enhanced control and security of nuclear and radioactive materials. In this regard, measures are being taken to increase the global levels of physical protection and security for nuclear materials. Experience in many parts of the world continues to prove that movements of radioactive materials outside of the regulatory and legal frameworks continue to occur. Such movements may be either deliberate or inadvertent. Deliberate, illegal movements of radioactive materials, including nuclear material, for terrorist, political or illegal profit is generally understood to be illicit trafficking. The more common movements outside of regulatory control are inadvertent in nature. An example of an inadvertent movement might be the transport of steel contaminated by a melted radioactive source that was lost from proper controls. Such a shipment may present health and safety threats to the personnel involved as well as to the general public. States have the responsibility for combating illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements of radioactive materials. The IAEA co-operates with Member States and other international organizations in joint efforts to prevent incidents of illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements and to harmonize policies and measures by the provision of relevant advice through technical assistance and documents. As an example, the IAEA and the World Customs Organization (WCO) maintain a Memorandum

  12. Prevention of the inadvertent movement and illicit trafficking of radioactive and nuclear materials in Argentine border

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonet Duran, Stella M.; Canibano, Javier A.; Menossi, Sergio A.; Rodriguez, Carlos E.

    2004-01-01

    The inadvertent and illegal movements of radioactive and nuclear materials are issues of increased national and international awareness. States are progressively becoming more conscious of the need to adequately respond to these events. As regards the States' regulatory infrastructure, the design and enforcement of control and verification measures to maintain the continuity of knowledge about possession, use and movements of radioactive and nuclear materials is of critical importance. The existence of an appropriate legislative framework and a regulatory authority empowered to establish effective safety and security measures are essential to prevent inadvertent and illegal movements of nuclear materials and other radioactive materials. The events of Sep. 11, 2001 in the US have increased the States' awareness on the need to review their national infrastructure to identify additional measures against inadvertent and illegal movements of radioactive and nuclear materials as well as against sabotage of nuclear facilities. Argentina has more than a half- century- old tradition regarding the control and supervision of all activities involving the use of nuclear and radioactive materials. The Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of Argentina is the organization with federal competence in radiation protection, nuclear safety, safeguards and physical protection. It is responsible for issuing licenses and permits to any activity involving radioactive materials and for controlling and verifying that these activities are performed in full compliance with ARN standards and requirements. In the region, Argentina has been playing an important role in the prevention of illicit traffic of nuclear and radioactive materials for the last years within the framework of Security Commission of MERCOSUR. The last goals of this initiative are to define and coordinate actions and to establish a set of common operational procedures in the countries participating in the mentioned multilateral

  13. Peri-operative cognitive dysfunction and protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, J; Rasmussen, L S

    2016-01-01

    Cognition may decline after surgery. Postoperative delirium, especially when hyperactive, may be easily recognised, whereas cognitive dysfunction is subtle and can only be detected using neuropsychological tests. The causes for these two conditions are largely unknown, although they share risk...... factors, the predominant one being age. Ignorance of the causes for postoperative cognitive dysfunction contributes to the difficulty of conducting interventional studies. Postoperative cognitive disorders are associated with increased mortality and permanent disability. Peri-operative interventions can...... reduce the rate of delirium in the elderly, but in spite of promising findings in animal experiments, no intervention reduces postoperative cognitive dysfunction in humans....

  14. A systematic review of peri-operative melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L P H; Werner, M U; Rosenberg, J

    2014-01-01

    We systematically reviewed randomised controlled trials of peri-operative melatonin. We included 24 studies of 1794 participants that reported eight peri-operative outcomes: anxiety; analgesia; sleep quality; oxidative stress; emergence behaviour; anaesthetic requirements; steal induction......%, respectively. Qualitative reviews suggested the melatonin improved sleep quality and emergence behaviour, and might be capable of reducing oxidative stress and anaesthetic requirements....

  15. Comparison of resistive heating and forced-air warming to prevent inadvertent perioperative hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, M; Crook, D; Dasari, K; Eljelani, F; El-Haboby, A; Harper, C M

    2016-02-01

    Forced-air warming is a commonly used warming modality, which has been shown to reduce the incidence of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia (heating mattresses offer a potentially cheaper alternative, however, and one of the research recommendations from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence was to evaluate such devices formally. We conducted a randomized single-blinded study comparing perioperative hypothermia in patients receiving resistive heating or forced-air warming. A total of 160 patients undergoing non-emergency surgery were recruited and randomly allocated to receive either forced-air warming (n=78) or resistive heating (n=82) in the perioperative period. Patient core temperatures were monitored after induction of anaesthesia until the end of surgery and in the recovery room. Our primary outcome measures included the final intraoperative temperature and incidence of hypothermia at the end of surgery. There was a significantly higher rate of hypothermia at the end of surgery in the resistive heating group compared with the forced-air warming group (P=0.017). Final intraoperative temperatures were also significantly lower in the resistive heating group (35.9 compared with 36.1°C, P=0.029). Hypothermia at the end of surgery in both warming groups was common (36% forced air warming, 54% resistive heating). Our results suggest that forced-air warming is more effective than resistive heating in preventing postoperative hypothermia. NCT01056991. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Active body surface warming systems for preventing complications caused by inadvertent perioperative hypothermia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, Eva; Urrútia, Gerard; Roqué i Figuls, Marta; Pardo-Hernandez, Hector; Campos, Juan Manuel; Paniagua, Pilar; Maestre, Luz; Alonso-Coello, Pablo

    2016-04-21

    Inadvertent perioperative hypothermia is a phenomenon that can occur as a result of the suppression of the central mechanisms of temperature regulation due to anaesthesia, and of prolonged exposure of large surfaces of skin to cold temperatures in operating rooms. Inadvertent perioperative hypothermia has been associated with clinical complications such as surgical site infection and wound-healing delay, increased bleeding or cardiovascular events. One of the most frequently used techniques to prevent inadvertent perioperative hypothermia is active body surface warming systems (ABSW), which generate heat mechanically (heating of air, water or gels) that is transferred to the patient via skin contact. To assess the effectiveness of pre- or intraoperative active body surface warming systems (ABSW), or both, to prevent perioperative complications from unintended hypothermia during surgery in adults. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Issue 9, 2015); MEDLINE (PubMed) (1964 to October 2015), EMBASE (Ovid) (1980 to October 2015), and CINAHL (Ovid) (1982 to October 2015). We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared an ABSW system aimed at maintaining normothermia perioperatively against a control or against any other ABSW system. Eligible studies also had to include relevant clinical outcomes other than measuring temperature alone. Several authors, by pairs, screened references and determined eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risks of bias. We resolved disagreements by discussion and consensus, with the collaboration of a third author. We included 67 trials with 5438 participants that comprised 79 comparisons. Forty-five RCTs compared ABSW versus control, whereas 18 compared two different types of ABSW, and 10 compared two different techniques to administer the same type of ABSW. Forced-air warming (FAW) was by far the most studied intervention.Trials varied widely regarding whether the interventions were

  17. Warming of intravenous and irrigation fluids for preventing inadvertent perioperative hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Gillian; Alderson, Phil; Smith, Andrew F; Warttig, Sheryl

    2015-04-13

    Inadvertent perioperative hypothermia (a drop in core temperature to below 36°C) occurs because of interference with normal temperature regulation by anaesthetic drugs, exposure of skin for prolonged periods and receipt of large volumes of intravenous and irrigation fluids. If the temperature of these fluids is below core body temperature, they can cause significant heat loss. Warming intravenous and irrigation fluids to core body temperature or above might prevent some of this heat loss and subsequent hypothermia. To estimate the effectiveness of preoperative or intraoperative warming, or both, of intravenous and irrigation fluids in preventing perioperative hypothermia and its complications during surgery in adults. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Issue 2), MEDLINE Ovid SP (1956 to 4 February 2014), EMBASE Ovid SP (1982 to 4 February 2014), the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science (1950 to 4 February 2014), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) EBSCOhost (1980 to 4 February 2014) and reference lists of identified articles. We also searched the Current Controlled Trials website and ClinicalTrials.gov. We included randomized controlled trials or quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing fluid warming methods versus standard care or versus other warming methods used to maintain normothermia. Two review authors independently extracted data from eligible trials and settled disputes with a third review author. We contacted study authors to ask for additional details when needed. We collected data on adverse events only if they were reported in the trials. We included in this review 24 studies with a total of 1250 participants. The trials included various numbers and types of participants. Investigators used a range of methods to warm fluids to temperatures between 37°C and 41°C. We found that evidence was of moderate quality because descriptions of trial design were

  18. Method and apparatus for preventing inadvertent criticality in a nuclear fueled electric power generating unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuley, C.R.; Bauman, D.A.; Neuner, J.A.; Feilchenfeld, M.M.; Greenberg, L.

    1984-01-01

    An inadvertent approach to criticality in a nuclear fueled electric power generating unit is detected and an alarm is generated through on-line monitoring of the neutron flux. The difficulties of accurately measuring the low levels of neutron flux in a subcritical reactor are overcome by the use of a microcomputer which continuously generates average flux count rate signals for incremental time periods from thousands of samples taken during each such period and which serially stores the average flux count rate signals for a preselected time interval. At the end of each incremental time period, the microcomputer compares the latest average flux count rate signal with the oldest, and preferably each of the intervening stored values, and if it exceeds any of them by at least a preselected multiplication factor, an alarm is generated. (author)

  19. Optimization of peri-operative care in colorectal surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornmann, V.N.N.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is an important health issue, and colorectal surgery is increasingly being performed. During the last years, quality and safety of care, new surgical techniques and attention for peri-operative risks resulted in reduction of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Despite these

  20. The need for peri-operative supplemental oxygen | Chikungwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The need for peri-operative supplemental oxygen. M. T. Chikungwa, K. Jonsson. Abstract. (Central African Journal of Medicine: 2002 48 (5-6): 72-73). AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use ...

  1. Nutrition in peri-operative esophageal cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenhagen, Elles; van Vulpen, Jonna K; van Hillegersberg, Richard; May, Anne M; Siersema, Peter D

    2017-07-01

    Nutritional status and dietary intake are increasingly recognized as essential areas in esophageal cancer management. Nutritional management of esophageal cancer is a continuously evolving field and comprises an interesting area for scientific research. Areas covered: This review encompasses the current literature on nutrition in the pre-operative, peri-operative, and post-operative phases of esophageal cancer. Both established interventions and potential novel targets for nutritional management are discussed. Expert commentary: To ensure an optimal pre-operative status and to reduce peri-operative complications, it is key to assess nutritional status in all pre-operative esophageal cancer patients and to apply nutritional interventions accordingly. Since esophagectomy results in a permanent anatomical change, a special focus on nutritional strategies is needed in the post-operative phase, including early initiation of enteral feeding, nutritional interventions for post-operative complications, and attention to long-term nutritional intake and status. Nutritional aspects of pre-optimization and peri-operative management should be incorporated in novel Enhanced Recovery After Surgery programs for esophageal cancer.

  2. Selective use of peri-operative steroids in pituitary tumor surgery: escape from dogma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Marie Regan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Traditional neurosurgical practice calls for administration of peri-operative stress-dose steroids for sellar-suprasellar masses undergoing operative treatment. This practice is considered critical to prevent peri-operative complications associated with hypoadrenalism, such as hypotension and circulatory collapse. However, stress-dose steroids complicate the management of these patients. It has been our routine practice to use stress steroids during surgery only if the patient has clinical or biochemical evidence of hypocortisolism pre-operatively. We wanted to be certain that this practice was safe.Methods: We present our retrospective analysis from a consecutive series of 114 operations in 109 patients with sellar and/or suprasellar tumors, the majority of whom were managed without empirical stress-dose steroid coverage. Only patients who were hypoadrenal pre-operatively or who had suffered apoplexy were given stress dose coverage during surgery. We screened for biochemical evidence of hypoadrenalism as a result of surgery by measuring immediate post-operative AM serum cortisol levels.Results: There were no adverse events related to the selective use of cortisol replacement in this patient population. Conclusions: Our experience demonstrates that selective use of corticosteroid replacement is safe; it simplifies the management of the patients, and has advantages over empiric dogmatic steroid coverage.

  3. Fast-track surgery: Toward comprehensive peri-operative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanavati, Aditya J; Prabhakar, S

    2014-01-01

    Fast-track surgery is a multimodal approach to patient care using a combination of several evidence-based peri-operative interventions to expedite recovery after surgery. It is an extension of the critical pathway that integrates modalities in surgery, anesthesia, and nutrition, enforces early mobilization and feeding, and emphasizes reduction of the surgical stress response. It entails a great partnership between a surgeon and an anesthesiologist with several other specialists to form a multi-disciplinary team, which may then engage in patient care. The practice of fast-track surgery has yielded excellent results and there has been a significant reduction in hospital stay without a rise in complications or re-admissions. The effective implementation begins with the formulation of a protocol, carrying out each intervention and gathering outcome data. The care of a patient is divided into three phases: Before, during, and after surgery. Each stage needs active participation of few or all the members of the multi-disciplinary team. Other than surgical technique, anesthetic drugs, and techniques form the cornerstone in the ability of the surgeon to carry out a fast-track surgery safely. It is also the role of this team to keep abreast with the latest development in fast-track methodology and make appropriate changes to policy. In the Indian healthcare system, there is a huge benefit that may be achieved by the successful implementation of a fast-track surgery program at an institutional level. The lack of awareness regarding this concept, fear and apprehension regarding its implementation are the main barriers that need to be overcome.

  4. The peri-operative management of anti-platelet therapy in elective, non-cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, Richard F; Naoum, Chris; Aliprandi-Costa, Bernadette; Hillis, Graham S; Brieger, David B

    2013-07-31

    Cardiovascular complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing elective non-cardiac surgery, with adverse cardiac outcomes estimated to occur in approximately 4% of all patients. Anti-platelet therapy withdrawal may precede up to 10% of acute cardiovascular syndromes, with withdrawal in the peri-operative setting incompletely appraised. The aims of our study were to determine the proportion of patients undergoing elective non-cardiac surgery currently prescribed anti-platelet therapy, and identify current practice in peri-operative management. In addition, the relationship between management of anti-platelet therapy and peri-operative cardiac risk was assessed. We evaluated consecutive patients attending elective non-cardiac surgery at a major tertiary referral centre. Clinical and biochemical data were collected and analysed on patients currently prescribed anti-platelet therapy. Peri-operative management of anti-platelet therapy was compared with estimated peri-operative cardiac risk. Included were 2950 consecutive patients, with 516 (17%) prescribed anti-platelet therapy, primarily for ischaemic heart disease. Two hundred and eighty nine (56%) patients had all anti-platelet therapy ceased in the peri-operative period, including 49% of patients with ischaemic heart disease and 46% of patients with previous coronary stenting. Peri-operative cardiac risk score did not influence anti-platelet therapy management. Approximately 17% of patients undergoing elective non-cardiac surgery are prescribed anti-platelet therapy, the predominant indication being for ischaemic heart disease. Almost half of all patients with previous coronary stenting had no anti-platelet therapy during the peri-operative period. The decision to cease anti-platelet therapy, which occurred commonly, did not appear to be guided by peri-operative cardiac risk stratification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Automated Inadvertent Intruder Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koffman, Larry D.; Lee, Patricia L.; Cook, James R.; Wilhite, Elmer L.

    2008-01-01

    The Environmental Analysis and Performance Modeling group of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducts performance assessments of the Savannah River Site (SRS) low-level waste facilities to meet the requirements of DOE Order 435.1. These performance assessments, which result in limits on the amounts of radiological substances that can be placed in the waste disposal facilities, consider numerous potential exposure pathways that could occur in the future. One set of exposure scenarios, known as inadvertent intruder analysis, considers the impact on hypothetical individuals who are assumed to inadvertently intrude onto the waste disposal site. Inadvertent intruder analysis considers three distinct scenarios for exposure referred to as the agriculture scenario, the resident scenario, and the post-drilling scenario. Each of these scenarios has specific exposure pathways that contribute to the overall dose for the scenario. For the inadvertent intruder analysis, the calculation of dose for the exposure pathways is a relatively straightforward algebraic calculation that utilizes dose conversion factors. Prior to 2004, these calculations were performed using an Excel spreadsheet. However, design checks of the spreadsheet calculations revealed that errors could be introduced inadvertently when copying spreadsheet formulas cell by cell and finding these errors was tedious and time consuming. This weakness led to the specification of functional requirements to create a software application that would automate the calculations for inadvertent intruder analysis using a controlled source of input parameters. This software application, named the Automated Inadvertent Intruder Application, has undergone rigorous testing of the internal calculations and meets software QA requirements. The Automated Inadvertent Intruder Application was intended to replace the previous spreadsheet analyses with an automated application that was verified to produce the same calculations and

  6. Effects of intra-operative fluoroscopic 3D-imaging on peri-operative imaging strategy in calcaneal fracture surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerekamp, M S H; Backes, M; Schep, N W L; Ubbink, D T; Luitse, J S; Schepers, T; Goslings, J C

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that intra-operative fluoroscopic 3D-imaging (3D-imaging) in calcaneal fracture surgery is promising to prevent revision surgery and save costs. However, these studies limited their focus to corrections performed after 3D-imaging, thereby neglecting corrections after intra-operative fluoroscopic 2D-imaging (2D-imaging). The aim of this study was to assess the effects of additional 3D-imaging on intra-operative corrections, peri-operative imaging used, and patient-relevant outcomes compared to 2D-imaging alone. In this before-after study, data of adult patients who underwent open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of a calcaneal fracture between 2000 and 2014 in our level-I Trauma center were collected. 3D-imaging (BV Pulsera with 3D-RX, Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) was available as of 2007 at the surgeons' discretion. Patient and fracture characteristics, peri-operative imaging, intra-operative corrections and patient-relevant outcomes were collected from the hospital databases. Patients in whom additional 3D-imaging was applied were compared to those undergoing 2D-imaging alone. A total of 231 patients were included of whom 107 (46%) were operated with the use of 3D-imaging. No significant differences were found in baseline characteristics. The median duration of surgery was significantly longer when using 3D-imaging (2:08 vs. 1:54 h; p = 0.002). Corrections after additional 3D-imaging were performed in 53% of the patients. However, significantly fewer corrections were made after 2D-imaging when 3D-imaging was available (Risk difference (RD) -15%; 95% Confidence interval (CI) -29 to -2). Peri-operative imaging, besides intra-operative 3D-imaging, and patient-relevant outcomes were similar between groups. Intra-operative 3D-imaging provides additional information resulting in additional corrections. Moreover, 3D-imaging probably changed the surgeons' attitude to rely more on 3D-imaging, hence a 15%-decrease of

  7. AUTOMATED INADVERTENT INTRUDER APPLICATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koffman, L; Patricia Lee, P; Jim Cook, J; Elmer Wilhite, E

    2007-01-01

    The Environmental Analysis and Performance Modeling group of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducts performance assessments of the Savannah River Site (SRS) low-level waste facilities to meet the requirements of DOE Order 435.1. These performance assessments, which result in limits on the amounts of radiological substances that can be placed in the waste disposal facilities, consider numerous potential exposure pathways that could occur in the future. One set of exposure scenarios, known as inadvertent intruder analysis, considers the impact on hypothetical individuals who are assumed to inadvertently intrude onto the waste disposal site. Inadvertent intruder analysis considers three distinct scenarios for exposure referred to as the agriculture scenario, the resident scenario, and the post-drilling scenario. Each of these scenarios has specific exposure pathways that contribute to the overall dose for the scenario. For the inadvertent intruder analysis, the calculation of dose for the exposure pathways is a relatively straightforward algebraic calculation that utilizes dose conversion factors. Prior to 2004, these calculations were performed using an Excel spreadsheet. However, design checks of the spreadsheet calculations revealed that errors could be introduced inadvertently when copying spreadsheet formulas cell by cell and finding these errors was tedious and time consuming. This weakness led to the specification of functional requirements to create a software application that would automate the calculations for inadvertent intruder analysis using a controlled source of input parameters. This software application, named the Automated Inadvertent Intruder Application, has undergone rigorous testing of the internal calculations and meets software QA requirements. The Automated Inadvertent Intruder Application was intended to replace the previous spreadsheet analyses with an automated application that was verified to produce the same calculations and

  8. Peri-operative chemotherapy in the management of resectable colorectal cancer pulmonary metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkes Eliza A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgery is often advocated in patients with resectable pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC. Our study aims to evaluate peri-operative chemotherapy in patients with metastastic CRC undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy. Methods Patients treated for CRC who underwent pulmonary metastasectomy by a single surgeon were identified. Outcome measures included survival, peri-operative complications, radiological and histological evidence of chemotherapy-induced lung toxicities. Results Between 1997 and 2009, 51 eligible patients were identified undergoing a total of 72 pulmonary resections. Thirty-eight patients received peri-operative chemotherapy, of whom 9 received an additional biological agent. Five-year overall survival rate was 72% in the whole cohort - 74% and 68% in those who received peri-operative chemotherapy (CS and those who underwent surgery alone (S respectively. Five-year relapse free survival rate was 31% in the whole cohort - 38% and ≤18% in CS and S groups respectively. Only 8% had disease progression during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. There were no post-operative deaths. Surgical complications occurred in only 4% of patients who received pre-operative chemotherapy. There was neither radiological nor histological evidence of lung toxicity in resected surgical specimens. Conclusions Peri-operative chemotherapy can be safely delivered to CRC patients undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy. Survival in this selected group of patients was favourable.

  9. Does training of fellows affect peri-operative outcomes of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khene, Zine-Eddine; Peyronnet, Benoit; Bosquet, Elise; Pradère, Benjamin; Robert, Corentin; Fardoun, Tarek; Kammerer-Jacquet, Solène-Florence; Verhoest, Grégory; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Mathieu, Romain; Bensalah, Karim

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of fellows' involvement on the peri-operative outcomes of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN). We analysed 216 patients who underwent RAPN for a small renal tumour. We stratified our cohort into two groups according to the involvement of a fellow surgeon during the procedure: expert surgeon operating alone (expert group) and fellow operating under the supervision of the expert surgeon (fellow group). Peri-operative data were compared between the two groups. Linear and logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the impact of fellows' involvement on peri-operative and postoperative outcomes. Trifecta and margins ischaemia complications (MIC) score achievement rates were used to assess the quality of surgery in both the expert and fellow groups. Trifecta was defined as a combination of warm ischaemia time negative surgical margins and no peri-operative complications. MIC score was defined as negative surgical margins, ischaemia time Training fellows to perform RAPN is associated with longer operating time and WIT but does not appear to compromise other peri-operative outcomes. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. International consensus statement on the peri-operative management of anaemia and iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, M.; Acheson, A. G.; Auerbach, M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite current recommendations on the management of pre-operative anaemia, there is no pragmatic guidance for the diagnosis and management of anaemia and iron deficiency in surgical patients. A number of experienced researchers and clinicians took part in an expert workshop and developed...... in the peri-operative period. These statements include: a diagnostic approach for anaemia and iron deficiency in surgical patients; identification of patients appropriate for treatment; and advice on practical management and follow-up. We urge anaesthetists and peri-operative physicians to embrace...

  11. Prevention of and response to inadvertent exposure of embryo/fetus to ionizing radiation, due to medical exposure of the mother. The Greek regulatory authority initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economides, Sotirios; Boziari, Argiro; Vogiatzi, Stavroula; Hourdakis, Konstantinos J; Kamenopoulou, Vassiliki; Dimitriou, Panagiotis

    2014-03-01

    Embryo/fetus (E/F) irradiation as a result of medical exposure of the mother should be avoided, unless there are strong clinical indications. Medical practitioners are assigned the primary task and obligation of ensuring overall patient protection and safety in the prescription of and during the delivery of medical exposure. In cases of unintended exposure of embryo/fetus (E/F), the risk analysis and communication is conducted by or under the supervision of medical physicists at local level. National competent authorities can contribute to the prevention, risk analysis and communication of inadvertent E/F exposure to ionizing radiation by recording, analyzing and disseminating the relevant information. Since 2001, Greek Atomic Energy Commission has established a committee with the mandate to provide advice, to keep records, to analyze and disseminate the experience gained in cases of unintended E/F exposure. During the period 2001-2011, the committee was consulted by 269 pregnant women undergone medical exposures. The conclusions from the relevant data analysis, as well as the experience gained are herein presented and discussed. Copyright © 2013 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A review of the peri-operative management of paediatric burns ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reasons include peri-operative sepsis, bleeding, issues around thermoregulation, the hypermetabolic state, nutritional and electrolyte issues, inhalation injuries and the amount of movement during procedures to wash patients, change drapes and access different anatomical sites. The appropriate execution of surgery is ...

  13. Monitoring of peri-operative fluid administration by individualized goal-directed therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, M; Holte, Kathrine; Secher, N H

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In order to avoid peri-operative hypovolaemia or fluid overload, goal-directed therapy with individual maximization of flow-related haemodynamic parameters has been introduced. The objectives of this review are to update research in the area, evaluate the effects on outcome and assess...

  14. Effect of peri-operative chemotherapy on the quality of life of patients with early breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiebert, G. M.; Hanneke, J.; de Haes, J. Hanneke C. J. M.; Kievit, J.; van de Velde, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    Since chemotherapy is assumed to have a negative impact on quality of life, the impact of peri-operative chemotherapy on physical, psychological and social well-being and on the activity level of patients with early stage breast cancer was investigated. 24 women received peri-operative chemotherapy

  15. Peri-operative deaths in Singapore: a forensic perspective in a study of 132 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, G

    1994-05-01

    A study of 132, largely non-traumatic, peri-operative deaths out of 6605 Coroner's autopsies, conducted over a three-year period from 1989 to 1991, showed a preponderance of males (M:F ratio = 1.36), with almost half (46.3%) being middle-aged subjects between 40 to 59 years, while infants (negligence was made in any of the Coroner's inquiries into these cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Peri-operative communication patterns and media usage--implications for systems design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Ero S; Toussaint, Pieter Jelle

    2010-01-01

    Inter-hospital communication amounts for a great deal of clinicians' work time. While communication is essential to coordinate care, it can also be time consuming and interruptive, and breakdown in communication is an important source of medical errors. One contributor to the interruptive nature of communication is the use of synchronous media, and there is clearly a potential for novel technologies. To assess communication patterns and media usage we performed an ethnographic field study in the peri-operative environment at a Norwegian hospital, as well as interviews with nurses. We analyze the results with regards to choice of media, characteristics of the conversations taking place and meta-messages, and account for addressing, obtrusiveness and information richness in the message exchanges. We find a relative high degree of interruptiveness in communication, and ascribe it to 1) a lack of situational awareness between locations in the peri-operative domain, as well as 2) use of synchronous media. This suggests that design of novel technology for intra-hospital communication should aim at supporting sender-receiver awareness and signaling of availability.

  17. [Recommendations for the peri-operative management of bariatric surgery patients: results of a national survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Joaquin; Cassinello, Norberto; Baltasar, Aniceto; Torres, Antonio J

    2012-01-01

    To standardise possible peri-operative bariatric surgery protocols, a survey was prepared to be filled in by members of the Spanish Society for Obesity (Sociedad Española de Cirugía de la Obesidad) (SECO), and to approve it at the XII National Congress. A total of 47 members of SECO from 14 autonomous communities responded, and it unanimously approved by the Congress. As highly recommended peri-operative procedures, were proposed: full laboratory analysis (98%) with an endocrine study (90%), ECG (96%), chest x-ray (98%), an oesophageal-gastric imaging test (endoscopy or gastro-duodenal transit study (98%), antibiotic prophylaxis (92%) and use of low molecular weight heparins pre-operatively (96%), and for 2 weeks (83%). Pre-surgical, abdominal ultrasound (86%), spirometry (80%), diet (88%) and psychological study (76%), and during surgery, use of elastic stockings (76%), leak tests (92%) and drainages (90%), were established as advisable procedures. Copyright © 2011 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Best practices in peri-operative management of patients with skeletal dysplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Klane K; Bompadre, Viviana; Goldberg, Michael J; Bober, Michael B; Cho, Tae-Joon; Hoover-Fong, Julie E; Irving, Melita; Mackenzie, William G; Kamps, Shawn E; Raggio, Cathleen; Redding, Gregory J; Spencer, Samantha S; Savarirayan, Ravi; Theroux, Mary C

    2017-10-01

    Patients with skeletal dysplasia frequently require surgery. This patient population has an increased risk for peri-operative complications related to the anatomy of their upper airway, abnormalities of tracheal-bronchial morphology and function; deformity of their chest wall; abnormal mobility of their upper cervical spine; and associated issues with general health and body habitus. Utilizing evidence analysis and expert opinion, this study aims to describe best practices regarding the peri-operative management of patients with skeletal dysplasia. A panel of 13 multidisciplinary international experts participated in a Delphi process that included a thorough literature review; a list of 22 possible care recommendations; two rounds of anonymous voting; and a face to face meeting. Those recommendations with more than 80% agreement were considered as consensual. Consensus was reached to support 19 recommendations for best pre-operative management of patients with skeletal dysplasia. These recommendations include pre-operative pulmonary, polysomnography; cardiac, and neurological evaluations; imaging of the cervical spine; and anesthetic management of patients with a difficult airway for intubation and extubation. The goals of this consensus based best practice guideline are to provide a minimum of standardized care, reduce perioperative complications, and improve clinical outcomes for patients with skeletal dysplasia. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Firewater system inadvertent actuation frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, J.A.; Eide, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some recommended generic values for fire protection system inadvertent actuation frequencies. The frequencies are based on actual data from Department of Energy and commercial reactor plant facilities

  20. The peri-operative cytokine response in infants and young children following major surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine; Andersen, J B

    1998-01-01

    The peri-operative cytokine response was studied in 13 infants and young children undergoing major surgery. All children were anaesthetized with a combined general and epidural anaesthetic technique, followed by post-operative epidural analgesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl. Blood samples were...... taken before and after surgery, 24 h post-operatively, and finally, when the children were mobilized and had regained gastrointestinal function. Plasma samples were analysed for tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 alpha, interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, interferon-gamma, interleukin-10...... and the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. The cytokine responses were highly variable. Overall, no significant changes between pre- and post-operative plasma concentrations were found. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha and the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist were detectable in all children, and a trend towards an early...

  1. Intensification of anxiety and depression, and personal resources among women during the peri-operative period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Lewicka

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Surgical treatment of women due to gynaecological disorders is the cause of stress and may lead to psychological changes. Studies concerning human response to stress emphasize the importance of the effect of the level of the sense of coherence, anxiety, depression, dispositional optimism and skills of expressing emotions on the quality of feelings and experiences in difficult situations. Materials and methods. The study covered 232 women who had undergone gynaecological surgery due to various causes. Permission to conduct the research was obtained from the Bioethical Commission at the Medical University in Lublin. The study was carried out with the use of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, the Beck Depression Inventory, Courtauld Emotional Control Scale (CECS, and Life Orientation Test – Revised (LOT-R. Results and conclusions. The study showed that investigations of the sense of coherence, level of anxiety and depression, and personal resources allow determination of the characteristics of patients who should be covered with special psychoprophylactic care during the peri-operative period. In addition, the results of own studies obtained may be used for the development of adequate principles of psycho-prophylactic management in the course of the diagnostic-treatment proces with respect to women who had undergone surgical treatment due to gynaecological disorders.

  2. Nutrition for the pediatric surgical patient: approach in the peri-operative period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falcão Mário Cícero

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition is essential for maintenance of physiologic homeostasis and growth. Hypermetabolic states lead to a depletion of body stores, with decreased immunocompetence and increased morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this paper is to provide an update regarding the provision of appropriate nutrition for the pediatric surgical patient, emphasizing the preoperative and postoperative periods. Modern nutritional support for the surgical patient comprises numerous stages, including assessment of nutritional status, nutritional requirements, and nutritional therapy. Nutritional assessment is performed utilizing the clinical history, clinical examination, anthropometry, and biochemical evaluation. Anthropometric parameters include body weight, height, arm and head circumference, and skinfold thickness measurements. The biochemical evaluation is conducted using determinations of plasma levels of proteins, including album, pre-albumin, transferrin, and retinol-binding protein. These parameters are subject to error and are influenced by the rapid changes in body composition in the peri-operative period. Nutritional therapy includes enteral and/or parenteral nutrition. Enteral feeding is the first choice for nutritional therapy. If enteral feeding is not indicated, parenteral nutrition must be utilized. In all cases, an individualized, adequate diet (enteral formula or parenteral solution is obligatory to decrease the occurrence of overfeeding and its undesirable consequences.

  3. Regional Differences in Case Mix and Peri-operative Outcome After Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in the Vascunet Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, K; Venermo, M; Beiles, B; Menyhei, G; Altreuther, M; Loftus, I; Björck, M

    2015-06-01

    National differences exist in the outcome of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. The role of case mix variation was assessed based on an international vascular registry collaboration. All elective AAA repairs with aneurysm size data in the Vascunet database in the period 2005-09 were included. AAA size and peri-operative outcome (crude and age adjusted mortality) were analysed overall and in risk cohorts, as well as per country. Glasgow Aneurysm Score (GAS) was calculated as risk score, and patients were stratified in three equal sized risk cohorts based on GAS. Predictors of peri-operative mortality were analysed with multiple regression. Missing data were handled with multiple imputation. Patients from Australia, Finland, Hungary, Norway, Sweden and the UK (n = 5,895) were analysed; mean age was 72.7 years and 54% had endovascular repair (EVAR). There were significant variations in GAS (lowest = Finland [75.7], highest = UK [79.4], p for comparison of all regions 82. Of those with a GAS >82, 8.4% of men and 20.8% of women had an AAA case selection for elective AAA repair, including variations in AAA size and patient risk profile. These differences partly explain the variations in peri-operative mortality. Further audit is warranted to assess the underlying reasons for the regional variation in case-mix. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Platelet-rich-plasmapheresis for minimising peri-operative allogeneic blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carless, Paul A; Rubens, Fraser D; Anthony, Danielle M; O'Connell, Dianne; Henry, David A

    2011-03-16

    Concerns regarding the safety of transfused blood have generated considerable enthusiasm for the use of technologies intended to reduce the use of allogeneic blood (blood from an unrelated donor). Platelet-rich plasmapheresis (PRP) offers an alternative approach to blood conservation. To examine the evidence for the efficacy of PRP in reducing peri-operative allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and the evidence for any effect on clinical outcomes such as mortality and re-operation rates. We identified studies by searching MEDLINE (1950 to 2009), EMBASE (1980 to 2009), The Cochrane Library (Issue 1, 2009), the Internet (to March 2009) and the reference lists of published articles, reports, and reviews. Controlled parallel group trials in which adult patients, scheduled for non-urgent surgery, were randomised to PRP, or to a control group which did not receive the intervention. Primary outcomes measured were: the number of patients exposed to allogeneic RBC transfusion, and the amount of RBC transfused. Other outcomes measured were: the number of patients exposed to allogeneic platelet transfusions, fresh frozen plasma, and cryoprecipitate, blood loss, re-operation for bleeding, post-operative complications (thrombosis), mortality, and length of hospital stay. Treatment effects were pooled using a random-effects model. Trial quality was assessed using criteria proposed by Schulz et al (Schulz 1995). Twenty-two trials of PRP were identified that reported data for the number of patients exposed to allogeneic RBC transfusion. These trials evaluated a total of 1589 patients. The relative risk (RR) of exposure to allogeneic blood transfusion in those patients randomised to PRP was 0.73 (95%CI 0.59 to 0.90), equating to a relative risk reduction (RRR) of 27% and a risk difference (RD) of 19% (95%CI 10% to 29%). However, significant heterogeneity of treatment effect was observed (p transfused (weighted mean difference [WMD] -0.69, 95%CI -1.93 to 0.56 units). Trials

  5. Patterns in current anaesthesiological peri-operative practice for colonic resections: a survey in five northern-European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannemann, P; Lassen, K; Hausel, J

    2006-01-01

    -acting anaesthetic medication may be beneficial. We examined whether these strategies have been adopted in five northern-European countries. METHODS: In 2003, a questionnaire concerning peri-operative anaesthetic routines in elective, open colonic cancer resection was sent to the chief anaesthesiologist in 258......-operative fasting, thoracic epidurals and short-acting anaesthetics. However, premedication with longer-acting agents is still common. Avoidance of fluid overload has not yet found its way into daily practice. This may leave patients undergoing elective colonic surgery at risk of oversedation and excessive fluid...

  6. Pulsed-dose-rate peri-operative brachytherapy as an interstitial boost in organ-sparing treatment of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Serkies

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate peri-operative multicatheter interstitial pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR-BT with an intra-operative catheter placement to boost the tumor excision site in breast cancer patients treated conservatively. Material and methods: Between May 2002 and October 2008, 96 consecutive T1-3N0-2M0 breast cancer patients underwent breast-conserving therapy (BCT including peri-operative PDR-BT boost, followed by whole breast external beam radiotherapy (WBRT. The BT dose of 15 Gy (1 Gy/pulse/h was given on the following day after surgery. Results: No increased bleeding or delayed wound healing related to the implants were observed. The only side effects included one case of temporary peri-operative breast infection and 3 cases of fat necrosis, both early and late. In 11 patients (11.4%, subsequent WBRT was omitted owing to the final pathology findings. These included eight patients who underwent mastectomy due to multiple adverse prognostic pathological features, one case of lobular carcinoma in situ, and two cases with no malignant tumor. With a median follow-up of 12 years (range: 7-14 years, among 85 patients who completed BCT, there was one ipsilateral breast tumor and one locoregional nodal recurrence. Six patients developed distant metastases and one was diagnosed with angiosarcoma within irradiated breast. The actuarial 5- and 10-year disease free survival was 90% (95% CI: 84-96% and 87% (95% CI: 80-94%, respectively, for the patients with invasive breast cancer, and 91% (95% CI: 84-97% and 89% (95% CI: 82-96%, respectively, for patients who completed BCT. Good cosmetic outcome by self-assessment was achieved in 58 out of 64 (91% evaluable patients. Conclusions : Peri-operative PDR-BT boost with intra-operative tube placement followed by EBRT is feasible and devoid of considerable toxicity, and provides excellent long-term local control. However, this strategy necessitates careful patient selection and histological confirmation

  7. Peri-operative blood transfusion for resected colon cancer: Practice patterns and outcomes in a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunil V; Brennan, Kelly E; Nanji, Sulaiman; Karim, Safiya; Merchant, Shaila; Booth, Christopher M

    2017-12-01

    Literature suggests that peri-operative blood transfusion among patients with resected colon cancer may be associated with inferior long-term survival. The study objective was to characterize this association in our population. This is a retrospective cohort study using the population-based Ontario Cancer Registry (2002-2008). Pathology reports were obtained for a 25% random sample of all cases and constituted the study population. Log binomial regression was used to identify factors associated with transfusion. Cox proportional hazards model explored the association between transfusion and cancer specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS). The study population included 7198 patients: 18% stage I, 36% stage II, 40% stage III, and 6% stage IV. Twenty-eight percent of patients were transfused. Factors independently associated with transfusion included advanced age (pTransfusion was associated with inferior CSS (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.38-1.65) and OS (HR 1.52, 95% CI 1.41-1.63), after adjusting for important confounders. Peri-operative transfusion rates among patients with colon cancer have decreased over time. Transfusion is associated with inferior long-term CSS and OS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Free tissue transfer in patients with sickle cell disease: Considerations for multi-disciplinary peri-operative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lilli; Seth, Rohit; Rhodes, Elizabeth; Alousi, Mohammed; Sivakumar, Bran

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an increasingly common condition in the UK. The safety of free tissue transfer in these patients is controversial, and no specific guidelines exist. The aim of this paper is to create recommendations for the plastic surgical multidisciplinary team for use in the assessment and management of SCD patients undergoing free tissue transfer and reconstruction. A literature review was performed in PubMed of 'sickle [TiAb] AND plast* adj3 surg*. Sickle cell disease is explained, as is the relative peri-operative risk in different genotypes of SCD. Acute and chronic manifestations of SCD are described by system, for consideration at pre-operative assessment and post-operative review. The evidence surrounding free tissue transfer and SCD is discussed and the outcomes in published cases summarised. An algorithm for peri-operative multi-disciplinary management is outlined and justified. Free tissue transfer theoretically carries a high risk of a crisis, due not only to long anaesthetic times, but the potential requirement for tourniquet use, and the relatively hypoxic state of the transferred tissue. This paper outlines a useful, practical algorithm to optimise the safety of free tissue transfer in patients with SCD. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of spinal anaesthesia on peri-operative lung volumes in obese and morbidly obese female patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regli, A; von Ungern-Sternberg, B S; Reber, A; Schneider, M C

    2006-03-01

    Although obesity predisposes to postoperative pulmonary complications, data on the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and peri-operative respiratory performance are limited. We prospectively studied the impact of spinal anaesthesia, obesity and vaginal surgery on lung volumes measured by spirometry in 28 patients with BMI 30-40 kg.m(-2) and in 13 patients with BMI > or = 40 kg.m(-2). Vital capacity, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, mid-expiratory and peak expiratory flows were measured during the pre-operative visit (baseline), after effective spinal anaesthesia with premedication, and after the operation at 20 min, 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h (after mobilisation). Spinal anaesthesia and premedication were associated with a significant decrease in spirometric parameters. Spinal anaesthesia and premedication were associated with a significant decrease in spirometric parameters; mean (SD) vital capacities were - 19% (6.4) in patients with BMI 30-40 kg.m(-2) and - 33% (9.0) in patients with BMI > 40 kg.m(-2). The decrease of lung volumes remained constant for 2 h, whereas 3 h after the operation and after mobilisation, spirometric parameters significantly improved in all patients. This study showed that both spinal anaesthesia and obesity significantly impaired peri-operative respiratory function.

  10. Nurse managers' decision-making in daily unit operation in peri-operative settings: a cross-sectional descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siirala, Eriikka; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Lundgrén-Laine, Heljä; Salanterä, Sanna; Junttila, Kristiina

    2016-09-01

    To describe the tactical and the operational decisions made by nurse managers when managing the daily unit operation in peri-operative settings. Management is challenging as situations change rapidly and decisions are constantly made. Understanding decision-making in this complex environment helps to develop decision support systems to support nurse managers' operative and tactical decision-making. Descriptive cross-sectional design. Data were collected from 20 nurse managers with the think-aloud method during the busiest working hours and analysed using thematic content analysis. Nurse managers made over 700 decisions; either ad hoc (n = 289), near future (n = 268) or long-term (n = 187) by nature. Decisions were often made simultaneously with many interruptions. Ad hoc decisions covered staff allocation, ensuring adequate staff, rescheduling surgical procedures, confirmation tangible resources and following-up the daily unit operation. Decisions in the near future were: planning of surgical procedures and tangible resources, and planning staff allocation. Long-term decisions were: human recourses, nursing development, supplies and equipment, and finances in the unit. Decision-making was vulnerable to interruptions, which sometimes complicated the managing tasks. The results can be used when planning decision support systems and when defining the nurse managers' tasks in peri-operative settings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. [Injury to the Scapholunate Ligament in Distal Radius Fractures: Peri-Operative Diagnosis and Treatment Results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdoš, R; Pilný, J; Pokorná, A

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Injury to the scapholunate ligament is frequently associated with a fracture of the distal radius. At present neither a unified concept of treatment nor a standard method of diagnosis in these concomitant injuries is available. The aim of the study was to evaluate a group of surgically treated patients with distal radius fractures in order to assess a contribution of combined conventional X-ray and intra-operative fluoroscopic examinations to the diagnosis of associated lesions and to compare short-term functional outcomes of sugically treated patients with those of patients treated conservatively. MATERIAL AND METHODS A group of patients undergoiong surgery for distal radius fractures using plate osteosynthesis was evaluated retrospectively. The peri-operative diagnosis of associated injury to the scapholunate ligament was based on pre-operative standard X-ray views and intra-operative fluoroscopy. The latter consisted of images of maximum radial and ulnar deviation as well as an image of the forearm in traction exerted manually along the long axis. All views were in postero-anterior projection. Results were read directly on the monitor of a fluoroscopic device after its calibration or were obtained by comparing the thickness of an attached Kirschner wire with the distance to be measured. Subsequently, pixels were converted to millimetres. When a scapholunate ligament injury was found and confirmed by examination of the contralateral wrist, the finding was verified by open reduction or arthroscopy. Both static and dynamic instabilities were treated together with the distal radius fracture at one-stage surgery. After surgery, the patients without ligament injury had the wrist immobilised for 4 weeks, then rehabilitation followed. In the patients with a damaged ligament, immobilisation in a short brace lasted until transarticular wires were removed. All patients were followed up for a year at least. At follow-up, the injured wrist was examined

  12. Effect of different anesthesia methods on plasma neuropeptides levels during the peri-operative period in surgical patients with hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong; He Haomin; Tian Xiaoping

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of different anesthesia methods on the levels of plasma neuropeptides during the peri-operative period in patients with hypertension. Methods: Ninety hypertensive patients undergoing upper abdominal operations were randomly allocated to equal divided epidural anesthesia, general anesthesia and combined Groups. Plasma neuropeptide Y(NPY) concentrations were measured before anesthesia, at 15 min after anesthesia, 20 min after operation and 10 min after completion of the operation. Results: BP, HR and NPY were significantly changed in both E group and G group after anesthesia and operation (compared vs before anesthesia, p<0.01). BP, HR and NPY were significantly changed in C group after operation compared with those in both E and G group (p<0.05) . Conclusion: The combined anesthesia method is effective in inhibits the stress response during upper abdominal operation in the hypertensive patients

  13. Use of peri-operative anti-epileptic drugs in patients with newly diagnosed high grade malignant glioma: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwu, Shelly; Hamilton, Mark G; Forsyth, Peter A; Cairncross, J Gregory; Parney, Ian F

    2010-02-01

    An American Academy of Neurology practice parameter recommends that long-term prophylactic anti-epileptic drugs (AED) should not be routine in patients with newly diagnosed brain tumors. However, prospective multi-center North American data shows that most newly diagnosed glioma patients receive prophylactic AED. We examined our own peri-operative AED practice patterns in newly-diagnosed patients with malignant glioma to determine if we deviate from published guidelines. A retrospective chart review was performed in adult patients with newly diagnosed malignant gliomas undergoing surgery in southern Alberta between January 2003 and December 2005. Demographic information, AED use, seizure incidence, adverse effects, tumor size, and tumor location were recorded. Of 164 eligible patients, 54 (33%) presented with seizures and all received AED. Prophylactic AED were given to 44 patients (27%). Peri-operative seizures (within 1 week) occurred in two patients without (3%) and no patients with seizure prophylaxis. Adverse AED reactions and adverse effects attributable to seizures were both rare. Prophylactic AED were continued >1 week post-op in 30 patients (18%). Patients receiving prophylactic AED were more likely to have had tumors involving the temporal lobe than those who did not (50 vs. 20%; P < 0.01). Patients receiving peri-operative AED prophylaxis were common, had a trend to reduced peri-operative seizures, and had few adverse effects. However, most of these patients were maintained on prophylactic AED continued beyond the first peri-operative week, contradicting published guidelines. Increased awareness of practice guidelines may help modify AED prescription patterns in malignant glioma patients.

  14. Determinants of peri-operative blood transfusion in a contemporary series of open prostatectomy for benign prostate hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyei, Mathew Y; Klufio, George O; Mensah, James E; Gepi-Attee, Samuel; Ampadu, Kwabena; Toboh, Bernard; Yeboah, Edward D

    2016-03-28

    The objective of this study was to determine the factors responsible for peri-operative blood transfusion in a contemporary series of open prostatectomy for benign prostate hyperplasia and thus offer a guide for blood product management for the procedure. This was a prospective study of 200 consecutive patients who underwent open prostatectomy for BPH from January 2010 to September 2013 at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra. The data analyzed included the pre-operative blood haemoglobin level (Hb), presence of co-morbidities, the case type, indication for the surgery, ASA score, anaesthetic method used, systolic blood pressure, status of the operating surgeon, duration of surgery and the operative prostate weight. The transfusion of blood peri-operatively was also documented. The mean age of the patients was 69.1 years. Elective cases formed 83.5 % with refractory retention of urine being the commonest indication for surgery (68.0 %). The mean pre-operative Hb was 12.1 g/dl. Consultants performed 56.0 % of the prostatectomies. Transvesical approach was used in 90.0 % of the cases. The mean operative time was 101.3mins (range 35.0-240.0) with a mean operative prostate weight of 110.8 g (range 15-550 g). Most of the patients (82.0 %) had spinal anaesthesia. The blood transfusion rate was 23.5 %. The transfusion rate was significantly higher in patients with anaemia (p = .000), emergency cases (p = .000), the use of general anaesthesia (p = .002), a resident as the operating surgeons (p = .034), prostate weight >100 g (p = .000) and duration of surgery (p = .011). In a multivariable logistic regression analysis however only the pre-operative Hb (p = .000. OR 0.95, 95 % CI [0.035-0.257]) and the duration of surgery (p = .025, OR 1.021, 95 % CI [1.003-1.039]) could predict blood transfusion in open prostatectomy for BPH in this series. A 'group and save' policy should be the preferred blood ordering procedure for patients

  15. Revascularization surgery for pediatric moyamoya disease. Significance of peri-operative management to avoid surgical complication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Miki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2011-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a chronic occlusive cerebrovascular disease with unknown etiology, which is one of the most common causes of child-onset stroke in Japan. Surgical revascularizations, both direct and indirect procedures, prevent cerebral ischemic attack by improving cerebral blood flow, while neurological deterioration during the acute stage after revascularization is not rare. The objective of this study was to clarify the concept of revascularization surgery for pediatric moyamoya disease while considering the risk of surgical complications in the acute stage. The present study includes 19 consecutive patients with moyamoya disease aged from 2 to 14 years old (mean 8.5), who underwent superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis with indirect pial synangiosis for 32 affected hemispheres. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed 1 and 7 days after surgery in all cases to evaluate hemodynamic alteration after surgery. Long-term outcome was evaluated by the neurological status 3 months after surgery, and the underlying pathology of surgical complications in the acute stage was diagnosed based on SPECT and magnetic resonance findings. In 28 of 32 hemispheres (87.5%), patients showed a complete disappearance of ischemic attack, 4 of 32 hemispheres (12.5%) showed a reduction of ischemic attack, while none showed deterioration of their symptoms (0%). Transient focal neurologic deterioration due to cerebral hyperperfusion was evident in 2 patients (6.3%), and was resolved by blood pressure lowering. One patient developed pseudo-laminar necrosis probably due to a thrombosis one week after surgery (3.1%), which did not affect his long-term outcome. STA-MCA anastomosis with pial synangiosis is a safe and effective treatment for pediatric moyamoya disease. Routine cerebral blood flow measurement in the acute stage is essential to avoid surgical complications including both cerebral ischemia and hyperperfusion. (author)

  16. Discontinuation of peri-operative gentamicin use for indwelling urinary catheter manipulation in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Stuart E; Boutlis, Craig S; Jansen, Stuart G; Miyakis, Spiros

    2017-11-01

    Gentamicin has historically been used prior to insertion and removal of indwelling urinary catheters (IDCs) around elective joint replacement surgery to prevent infection; however, this indication is not recognized in the Australian Therapeutic Guidelines: Antibiotic and the paradigm for safe use of gentamicin has shifted. The antimicrobial stewardship team of a 500 bed tertiary regional hospital performed a retrospective clinical study of gentamicin IDC prophylaxis around total hip and knee arthroplasties. Results were presented to the orthopaedic surgeons. A literature review identified no guidelines to support gentamicin prophylaxis and only a very low risk of bacteraemia associated with IDC insertion/removal in patients with established bacteriuria. Consensus was reached with the surgeons to discontinue this practice. Subsequent prospective data collection was commenced to determine effectiveness, with weekly feedback to the Department Head of Orthopaedics. Data from 137 operations pre-intervention (6 months) were compared with 205 operations post-intervention (12 months). The median patient age was 72 years in both groups. Following the intervention, reductions in gentamicin use were demonstrated for IDC insertion (59/137 (42%) to 4/205 (2%), P < 0.01) and removal (39/137 (28%) to 6/205 (3%), P < 0.01). No gentamicin use was observed during the final 40 weeks of the post-intervention period. There were no significant differences between the groups for pre-operative bacteriuria, surgical site infections or acute kidney injury. A collaborative approach using quality improvement methodology can lead to an evidence-based reappraisal of established practice. Regular rolling audits and timely feedback were useful in sustaining change. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  17. Differences between patients' and clinicians' research priorities from the Anaesthesia and Peri-operative Care Priority Setting Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boney, O; Nathanson, M H; Grocott, M P W; Metcalf, L

    2017-09-01

    The James Lind Alliance Anaesthesia and Peri-operative Care Priority Setting Partnership was a recent collaborative venture bringing approximately 2000 patients, carers and clinicians together to agree priorities for future research into anaesthesia and critical care. This secondary analysis compares the research priorities of 303 service users, 1068 clinicians and 325 clinicians with experience as service users. All three groups prioritised research to improve patient safety. Service users prioritised research about improving patient experience, whereas clinicians prioritised research about clinical effectiveness. Clinicians who had experience as service users consistently prioritised research more like clinicians than like service users. Individual research questions about patient experience were more popular with patients and carers than with clinicians in all but one case. We conclude that patients, carers and clinicians prioritise research questions differently. All groups prioritise research into patient safety, but service users also favour research into patient experience, whereas clinicians favour research into clinical effectiveness. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  18. Preliminary audiologic and peri-operative outcomes of the Sophono™ transcutaneous bone conduction device: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezdjian, Aren; Bruijnzeel, Hanneke; Daniel, Sam J; Grolman, Wilko; Thomeer, Hans G X M

    2017-10-01

    To delineate the auditory functional improvement and peri-operative outcomes of the Sophono™ transcutaneous bone conduction device. Eligible articles presenting patients implanted with the Sophono™ were identified through a comprehensive search of PubMed and Embase electronic databases. All relevant articles were reviewed to justify inclusion independently by 2 authors. Studies that successfully passed critical appraisal for directness of evidence and risk of bias were included. From a total of 125 articles, 8 studies encompassing 86 patients using 99 implants were selected. Most patients (79.1%) were children. Ear atresia (67.5%) was the most frequently reported indication for Sophono™ implantation. Overall pure tone average auditory improvement was 31.10 (±8.29) decibel. During a mean follow-up time of 12.48 months, 25 patients (29%) presented with post-operative complications from which 3 were deemed as serious implant-related adverse events (3.5%). The Sophono™ transcutaneous bone conduction device shows promising functional improvement, no intra-operative complications and minor post-operative skin related complications. If suitable, the device could be a proposed solution for the rehabilitation of hearing in children meeting eligibility criteria. A wearing schedule must be implemented in order to reduce magnet-related skin complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The adverse effects of inadvertent intraoperative intravenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inadvertent intravenous injection of 1% phenylephrine (10 mg) induced severe hypertension and tachycardia in a previously healthy female patient undergoing elective gynaecological surgery. This medical error was investigated using the criticalincident technique that is available in our department. This case report ...

  20. Peri-operative antibiotic treatment of bacteriuria reduces early deep surgical site infections in geriatric patients with proximal femur fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenhan, Ronny; Bushuven, Stefanie; Reimers, Niklas; Probst, Axel

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a re-evaluation of current strategies for peri-operative prophylaxis of infections in orthopaedic surgery of geriatric patients (≥65 years) with proximal femoral fractures (PFF). Between 01/2010 and 08/2014 all post-operative infections after stabilization of PFF of 1,089 geriatric patients were recorded retrospectively. All patients pre-operatively received a single dose of 1.5 g cefuroxime (group 1). These were compared to prospectively determined post-operative rates of surgical site infection (SSI) of 441 geriatric patients, which were operated on between 09/2014 and 03/2017 due to PFF. In this second group we investigated the urinary tract on admission. Bacteriuria was treated with the pre-operative single dose of 1.5 g cefuroxime along with ciprofloxacin for five days, beginning on admission. Level of significance was set to p infection. Multi-resistant pathogens were found in 15 patients and pathogens were cefuroxime-resistant in 37. The differences of SSI after at least three months were 2.1% in group 1 and 0.45% in group 2 for all patients with surgery of PFF (p < 0.02) and for those with arthroplasty (p < 0.037) significant. The immediate antibiotic therapy of a prevalent bacteriuria for five days decreases the risk of SSI after surgery of PFF. Our single-centre study can only point out the problem of prevalent reservoirs of pathogens and the need for treatment. Evidence-based therapy concepts (indications of antibiotics, classes, duration) have to be developed in multi-centric and prospective studies.

  1. Mitigating Inadvertent Insider Threats with Incentives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Debin; Wang, Xiaofeng; Camp, L. Jean

    Inadvertent insiders are trusted insiders who do not have malicious intent (as with malicious insiders) but do not responsibly managing security. The result is often enabling a malicious outsider to use the privileges of the inattentive insider to implement an insider attack. This risk is as old as conversion of a weak user password into root access, but the term inadvertent insider is recently coined to identify the link between the behavior and the vulnerability. In this paper, we propose to mitigate this threat using a novel risk budget mechanism that offers incentives to an insider to behave according to the risk posture set by the organization. We propose assigning an insider a risk budget, which is a specific allocation of risk points, allowing employees to take a finite number of risk-seeking choice. In this way, the employee can complete her tasks without subverting the security system, as with absolute prohibitions. In the end, the organization penalizes the insider if she fails to accomplish her task within the budget while rewards her in the presence of a surplus. Most importantly. the risk budget requires that the user make conscious visible choices to take electronic risks. We describe the theory behind the system, including specific work on the insider threats. We evaluated this approach using human-subject experiments, which demonstrate the effectiveness of our risk budget mechanism. We also present a game theoretic analysis of the mechanism.

  2. Inadvertent pump start with gas expansion modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, L.R.; Harris, R.A.; Heard, F.J.; Dautel, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    Previous testing demonstrated the effectiveness of gas expansion modules (GEMs) in mitigating the consequences of a loss-of-flow-without-scram transient in Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF)-sized sodium cooled cores. As a result, GEMs have been included in the advance liquid-metal reactor (PRISM) design project sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The PRISM design is under review at the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for licensability. In the unlikely event that the reactor does not scram during a loss of low, the GEMs quickly insert sufficient negative reactivity to limit fuel and cladding temperatures to acceptable values. This is the positive benefit of the GEMs; however, the reverse situation must be considered. A primary pump could be inadvertently started from near-critical conditions resulting in a positive reactivity insertion and a power transient. One mitigating aspect of this event is that as the reactivity associated with the GEMs is inserted, the increasing flow increases core cooling. A test was conducted in the FFTF to demonstrate that the GEM and feedback reactivity are well predicted following pump start, and the reactivity transient is benign

  3. Interaction between peri-operative blood transfusion, tidal volume, airway pressure and postoperative ARDS: an individual patient data meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpa Neto, Ary; Juffermans, Nicole P; Hemmes, Sabrine N T; Barbas, Carmen S V; Beiderlinden, Martin; Biehl, Michelle; Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Futier, Emmanuel; Gajic, Ognjen; Jaber, Samir; Kozian, Alf; Licker, Marc; Lin, Wen-Qian; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Miranda, Dinis Reis; Moine, Pierre; Paparella, Domenico; Ranieri, Marco; Scavonetto, Federica; Schilling, Thomas; Selmo, Gabriele; Severgnini, Paolo; Sprung, Juraj; Sundar, Sugantha; Talmor, Daniel; Treschan, Tanja; Unzueta, Carmen; Weingarten, Toby N; Wolthuis, Esther K; Wrigge, Hermann; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Pelosi, Paolo; Schultz, Marcus J

    2018-01-01

    Transfusion of blood products and mechanical ventilation with injurious settings are considered risk factors for postoperative lung injury in surgical Patients. A systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis was done to determine the independent effects of peri-operative transfusion of blood products, intra-operative tidal volume and airway pressure in adult patients undergoing mechanical ventilation for general surgery, as well as their interactions on the occurrence of postoperative acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Observational studies and randomized trials were identified by a systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and CENTRAL and screened for inclusion into a meta-analysis. Individual patient data were obtained from the corresponding authors. Patients were stratified according to whether they received transfusion in the peri-operative period [red blood cell concentrates (RBC) and/or fresh frozen plasma (FFP)], tidal volume size [≤7 mL/kg predicted body weight (PBW), 7-10 and >10 mL/kg PBW] and airway pressure level used during surgery (≤15, 15-20 and >20 cmH 2 O). The primary outcome was development of postoperative ARDS. Seventeen investigations were included (3,659 patients). Postoperative ARDS occurred in 40 (7.2%) patients who received at least one blood product compared to 40 patients (2.5%) who did not [adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 2.32; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-4.33; P=0.008]. Incidence of postoperative ARDS was highest in patients ventilated with tidal volumes of >10 mL/kg PBW and having airway pressures of >20 cmH 2 O receiving both RBC and FFP, and lowest in patients ventilated with tidal volume of ≤7 mL/kg PBW and having airway pressures of ≤15 cmH 2 O with no transfusion. There was a significant interaction between transfusion and airway pressure level (P=0.002) on the risk of postoperative ARDS. Peri-operative transfusion of blood products is associated with an increased risk of

  4. Changes of serum cortisol and plasma angiotensin-II (AT-II) levels in patients with open chest surgery during peri-operative stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yunyun; Tian Runhua; Zhao Huiyuan; Li Xiaoqin; Wang Ling

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the systemic stress reaction in patients with open chest surgery through measurement of the changes of serum cortisol and plasma AT-II levels during peri-operative stage. Methods: Serum cortisol and plasma AT-II levels were measured with RIA in 35 patients underwent open chest surgery both before and after the operative procedure. Results: The serum level of cortisol and plasma levels of AT-II were significantly higher after operation than those before operation ( P < 0.05 ). Also, the systolic pressure and heart rate were increased significantly (P<0.05). The post-operative heart rate was significantly positively correlated with both cortisol and AT-II levels (P<0.05). Conclusion: Stress reaction is evident in patients after open chest surgery with increase of serum cortisol and plasma AT-II levels. The stress reaction, if excessive, should be properly dealt with. (authors)

  5. Interventions for treating inadvertent postoperative hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warttig, Sheryl; Alderson, Phil; Campbell, Gillian; Smith, Andrew F

    2014-11-20

    Inadvertent postoperative hypothermia (a drop in core body temperature to below 36°C) occurs as an effect of surgery when anaesthetic drugs and exposure of the skin for long periods of time during surgery result in interference with normal temperature regulation. Once hypothermia has occurred, it is important that patients are rewarmed promptly to minimise potential complications. Several different interventions are available for rewarming patients. To estimate the effectiveness of treating inadvertent perioperative hypothermia through postoperative interventions to decrease heat loss and apply passive and active warming systems in adult patients who have undergone surgery. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Issue 2), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) (1956 to 21 February 2014), EMBASE (Ovid SP) (1982 to 21 February 2014), the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science (1950 to 21 February 2014) and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), EBSCO host (1980 to 21 February 2014), as well as reference lists of articles. We also searched www.controlled-trials.com and www.clincialtrials.gov. Randomized controlled trials of postoperative warming interventions aiming to reverse hypothermia compared with control or with each other. Three review authors identified studies for inclusion in this review. One review author extracted data and completed risk of bias assessments; two review authors checked the details. Meta-analysis was conducted when appropriate by using standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 11 trials with 699 participants. Ten trials provided data for analysis. Trials varied in the numbers and types of participants included and in the types of surgery performed. Most trials were at high or unclear risk of bias because of inappropriate or unclear randomization procedures, and because blinding of assessors and participants generally was

  6. Response to events involving the inadvertent movement or illicit trafficking of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-08-01

    By international agreements, the movement of all radioactive materials within and between States should be subject to high standards of regulatory, administrative, safety and engineering controls to ensure that such movements are conducted in a safe and secure manner. In the case of nuclear materials, there are additional requirements for physical protection and accountability to ensure against threats of nuclear proliferation and to safeguard against any attempts at diversion. The results of the terrorist attacks of September 2001 emphasized the requirement for enhanced control and security of nuclear and radioactive materials. In this regard, measures are being taken to increase the global levels of physical protection and security for nuclear materials. Experience in many parts of the world continues to prove that movements of radioactive materials outside of the regulatory and legal frameworks continue to occur. Such movements may be either deliberate or inadvertent. Deliberate, illegal movements of radioactive materials, including nuclear material, for terrorist, political or illegal profit is generally understood to be illicit trafficking. The more common movements outside of regulatory control are inadvertent in nature. An example of an inadvertent movement might be the transport of steel contaminated by a melted radioactive source that was lost from proper controls. Such a shipment may present health and safety threats to the personnel involved as well as to the general public. States have the responsibility for combating illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements of radioactive materials. The IAEA co-operates with Member States and other international organizations in joint efforts to prevent incidents of illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements and to harmonize policies and measures by the provision of relevant advice through technical assistance and documents. As an example, the IAEA and the World Customs Organization (WCO) maintain a Memorandum

  7. Response to events involving the inadvertent movement or illicit trafficking of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    By international agreements, the movement of all radioactive materials within and between States should be subject to high standards of regulatory, administrative, safety and engineering controls to ensure that such movements are conducted in a safe and secure manner. In the case of nuclear materials, there are additional requirements for physical protection and accountability to ensure against threats of nuclear proliferation and to safeguard against any attempts at diversion. The results of the terrorist attacks of September 2001 emphasized the requirement for enhanced control and security of nuclear and radioactive materials. In this regard, measures are being taken to increase the global levels of physical protection and security for nuclear materials. Experience in many parts of the world continues to prove that movements of radioactive materials outside of the regulatory and legal frameworks continue to occur. Such movements may be either deliberate or inadvertent. Deliberate, illegal movements of radioactive materials, including nuclear material, for terrorist, political or illegal profit is generally understood to be illicit trafficking. The more common movements outside of regulatory control are inadvertent in nature. An example of an inadvertent movement might be the transport of steel contaminated by a melted radioactive source that was lost from proper controls. Such a shipment may present health and safety threats to the personnel involved as well as to the general public. States have the responsibility for combating illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements of radioactive materials. The IAEA co-operates with Member States and other international organizations in joint efforts to prevent incidents of illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements and to harmonize policies and measures by the provision of relevant advice through technical assistance and documents. As an example, the IAEA and the World Customs Organization (WCO) maintain a Memorandum

  8. Response to events involving the inadvertent movement or illicit trafficking of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    By international agreements, the movement of all radioactive materials within and between States should be subject to high standards of regulatory, administrative, safety and engineering controls to ensure that such movements are conducted in a safe and secure manner. In the case of nuclear materials, there are additional requirements for physical protection and accountability to ensure against threats of nuclear proliferation and to safeguard against any attempts at diversion. The results of the terrorist attacks of September 2001 emphasized the requirement for enhanced control and security of nuclear and radioactive materials. In this regard, measures are being taken to increase the global levels of physical protection and security for nuclear materials. Experience in many parts of the world continues to prove that movements of radioactive materials outside of the regulatory and legal frameworks continue to occur. Such movements may be either deliberate or inadvertent. Deliberate, illegal movements of radioactive materials, including nuclear material, for terrorist, political or illegal profit is generally understood to be illicit trafficking. The more common movements outside of regulatory control are inadvertent in nature. An example of an inadvertent movement might be the transport of steel contaminated by a melted radioactive source that was lost from proper controls. Such a shipment may present health and safety threats to the personnel involved as well as to the general public. States have the responsibility for combating illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements of radioactive materials. The IAEA co-operates with Member States and other international organizations in joint efforts to prevent incidents of illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements and to harmonize policies and measures by the provision of relevant advice through technical assistance and documents. As an example, the IAEA and the World Customs Organization (WCO) maintain a Memorandum

  9. Response to events involving the inadvertent movement or illicit trafficking of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    By international agreements, the movement of all radioactive materials within and between States should be subject to high standards of regulatory, administrative, safety and engineering controls to ensure that such movements are conducted in a safe and secure manner. In the case of nuclear materials, there are additional requirements for physical protection and accountability to ensure against threats of nuclear proliferation and to safeguard against any attempts at diversion. The results of the terrorist attacks of September 2001 emphasized the requirement for enhanced control and security of nuclear and radioactive materials. In this regard, measures are being taken to increase the global levels of physical protection and security for nuclear materials. Experience in many parts of the world continues to prove that movements of radioactive materials outside of the regulatory and legal frameworks continue to occur. Such movements may be either deliberate or inadvertent. Deliberate, illegal movements of radioactive materials, including nuclear material, for terrorist, political or illegal profit is generally understood to be illicit trafficking. The more common movements outside of regulatory control are inadvertent in nature. An example of an inadvertent movement might be the transport of steel contaminated by a melted radioactive source that was lost from proper controls. Such a shipment may present health and safety threats to the personnel involved as well as to the general public. States have the responsibility for combating illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements of radioactive materials. The IAEA co-operates with Member States and other international organizations in joint efforts to prevent incidents of illicit trafficking and inadvertent movements and to harmonize policies and measures by the provision of relevant advice through technical assistance and documents. As an example, the IAEA and the World Customs Organization (WCO) maintain a Memorandum

  10. Preemptive carprofen for peri-operative analgesia in dogs undergoing Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO): a prospective, randomized, blinded, placebo controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufalari, A; Maggio, C; Cerasoli, I; Morath, U; Adami, C

    2012-03-01

    Eighteen client-owned dogs undergoing Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO) were included in this blinded clinical study and randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups. Group C (carprofen) received intravenous (IV) carprofen, 4 mg/kg, prior to anesthesia, whereas group P (placebo) received IV saline. General anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and a constant rate infusion (CRI) of sufentanyl IV. Intra-operatively, assessment of nociception was based on changes in physiological parameters and on the analgesics requirement, whereas in the post-operative period evaluation of pain was performed by using a Hellyer and Gaynor pain score and by comparing the doses of rescue buprenorphine required by the two treatment groups. Although no statistically significant differences in intra-operative sufentanyl doses were found between treatment groups, group C had superior cardiovascular stability, and lower post-operative pain scores and rescue buprenorphine doses than group P. Our results indicate that administration of carprofen prior to surgery was effective in improving peri-operative analgesia in dogs undergoing TPLO.

  11. Changes of plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels during peri-operative period in patients undergoing laser photo-coagulation of greater saphenous varicosities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Taihan; Wang Chunxi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the plasma levels of IL-6 and TNF-α during peri-operative period in patients undergoing laser photocoagulation of greater saphenous varicosities. Methods: Plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels were determined with RIA before operation and 1, 3, 7, 14 days post-operatively in 110 patients with greater saphenous vein varicosity undergoing different forms of treatment (intravascular laser photo-coagulation 43, photo-coagulation combined with venous valve repair 35, high ligation and segmental stripping 32). Skin trophic disturbances were present in 56 of the 110 patients. Plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels were also measured in 33 controls. Results: The plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels in patients with skin trophic disturbances were significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.01), while levels in patients without skin lesions were not much changed. The plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels were increased at first and dropped later to approaching pre-operative value by d14 in all the 110 patients after operation, however, the amount of increase was least and the normalization was also soonest in the simple photo-coagulation group, the reverse was true for the conventional operation group. Conclusion: Laser photo-coagulation is least stressful among the three types of operation and magnitude of changes of plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels correctly reflects the intensity of stress. (authors)

  12. Anabolic agents: recent strategies for their detection and protection from inadvertent doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    According to the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List, anabolic agents consist of exogenous anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), endogenous AAS and other anabolic agents such as clenbuterol and selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Currently employed strategies for their improved detection include the prolongation of the detection windows for exogenous AAS, non-targeted and indirect analytical approaches for the detection of modified steroids (designer steroids), the athlete’s biological passport and isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the detection of the misuse of endogenous AAS, as well as preventive doping research for the detection of SARMs. The recent use of these strategies led to 4–80-fold increases of adverse analytical findings for exogenous AAS, to the detection of the misuse of new designer steroids, to adverse analytical findings of different endogenous AAS and to the first adverse analytical findings of SARMs. The strategies of the antidoping research are not only focused on the development of methods to catch the cheating athlete but also to protect the clean athlete from inadvertent doping. Within the past few years several sources of inadvertent doping with anabolic agents have been identified. Among these are nutritional supplements adulterated with AAS, meat products contaminated with clenbuterol, mycotoxin (zearalenone) contamination leading to zeranol findings, and natural products containing endogenous AAS. The protection strategy consists of further investigations in case of reasonable suspicion of inadvertent doping, publication of the results, education of athletes and development of methods to differentiate between intentional and unintentional doping. PMID:24632537

  13. A survey of contemporary opinions and practices of surgical and intensive care specialists towards peri-operative venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L; Liew, N C; Gee, T

    2012-12-01

    This survey was conducted to determine the opinions and practices of peri-operative venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis among surgical and intensive care specialists in Asia. A set of questionnaire was distributed to surgeons and intensivists from different countries in Asia. The specialties included were general surgery and its sub-specialties, orthopaedic surgery, gynaecological surgery and intensive care unit. This survey involved teaching institutions, general hospitals and private hospitals. To gauge if the respondents were from hospitals that would likely encounter VTE cases, the hospital's bed-strength, intensive care facility and sub-specialty services were recorded. Over a period of six months, questionnaires and feedbacks were collected and analyzed. One hundred and ninety-one responses were received from 8 countries throughout Asia. Fifty-six percent of these were from large hospitals (800 bedded or more) and 62% of these hospitals have large intensive care facility (20 or more beds). Only half of the respondents practice routine thromboprophylaxis in moderate and high risk surgeries. Thirty six percent of them practices selective thromboprophylaxis and only 3% do not believe in any thromboprophylaxis. A third prescribed thromboprophylaxis for 3 to 5 days; another third extended it until patient is mobile. About 48.6% of the respondents do not have VTE guidelines in their institutions. Majority of the respondents agreed that more evidence is needed in the form of multi-centre randomized controlled trials to influence their decision on thromboprophylaxis. Despite the availability of strong epidemiological data, randomized controlled trials and multicentre case-controlled studies, perioperative VTE prophylactic practices are still suboptimal in Asia.

  14. Inadvertent presence of genetically modified elements in maize food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kenya has a biosafety law and has tested genetically modified (GM) maize under confinement and containment, but has neither released nor commercialized any GM crop. This study assessed various maize food products from the Kenyan farms and markets for the inadvertent presence of GMOs. It assessed the possibility ...

  15. Managing Inadvertent Arterial Catheterization During Central Venous Access Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, Tony; Ettles, Duncan; Robinson, Graham

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Approximately 200,000 central venous catheterizations are carried out annually in the National Health Service in the United Kingdom. Inadvertent arterial puncture occurs in up to 3.7%. Significant morbidity and death has been reported. We report on our experience in the endovascular treatment of this iatrogenic complication. Methods: Retrospective analysis was carried out of 9 cases referred for endovascular treatment of inadvertent arterial puncture during central venous catheterization over a 5 year period. Results: It was not possible to obtain accurate figures on the numbers of central venous catheterizations carried out during the time period. Five patients were referred with carotid or subclavian pseudoaneurysms and hemothorax following inadvertent arterial catheter insertion and subsequent removal. These patients all underwent percutaneous balloon tamponade and/or stent-graft insertion. More recently 4 patients were referred with the catheter still in situ and were successfully treated with a percutaneous closure device. Conclusion: If inadvertent arterial catheterization during central venous access procedures is recognized and catheters removed, sequelae can be treated percutaneously. However, once the complication is recognized it is better to leave the catheter in situ and seal the artery percutaneously with a closure device

  16. Closure Using a Surgical Closure Device of Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Punctures During Central Venous Catheter Placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlet, Matthew H.; Steffen, Diana; Shaughness, George; Hanner, James

    2001-01-01

    Severe complications can and do occur when central venous catheters are inadvertently placed into subclavian arteries. Two cases are discussed that describe how these inadvertent arterial punctures can be closed using the Perclose device (Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA, USA)

  17. Analysis of inadvertent containment spray actuation for NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grgic, D.; Spalj, S.; Fancev, T.

    2000-01-01

    Refueling Water Storage Tank (RWST) supplies borated water to the Chemical and Volume Control System, Emergency Core Cooling System and Containment Spray System. In the analyses of the containment external pressure the spray temperature is assumed to be equal to the RWST lower temperature limit. This value ensures that the design negative containment pressure will not be exceeded in the event of inadvertent actuation of the Containment Spray. For NPP Kriko the negative containment pressure has to be kept below 0.1 kp/cm2 to avoid the loss of containment integrity. This paper pursuents the analysis of Inadvertent Containment Spray Actuation in order to check the influence of change in RWST water temperature on containment negative pressure. GOTHIC computer code was used for calculation of containment thermal hydraulic behavior during this accident. (author)

  18. Probability of inadvertent operation of electrical components in harsh environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, A.

    1989-01-01

    Harsh environment, which means humidity and high temperature, may and will affect unsealed electrical components by causing leakage ground currents in ungrounded direct current systems. The concern in a nuclear power plant is that such harsh environment conditions could cause inadvertent operation of normally deenergized components, which may have a safety-related isolation function. Harsh environment is a common cause failure, and one way to approach the problem is to assume that all the unsealed electrical components will simultaneously and inadvertently energize as a result of the environmental common cause failure. This assumption is unrealistically conservative. Test results indicated that insulating resistences of any terminal block in harsh environments have a random distribution in the range of 1 to 270 kΩ, with a mean value ∼59 kΩ. The objective of this paper is to evaluate a realistic conditional failure probability for inadvertent operation of electrical components in harsh environments. This value will be used thereafter in probabilistic safety evaluations of harsh environment events and will replace both the overconservative common cause probability of 1 and the random failure probability used for mild environments

  19. Inadvertent Apical Extrusion of Sodium Hypochlorite with Evaluation by Dental Volumetric Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Delve Başer Can

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the tissue injury caused by inadvertently extruded NaOCl through the apical constriction. A 56-year-old female patient with complaints of pain, swelling, and ecchymosis on the left side of her face was referred to our clinic. The symptoms had emerged following root canal treatment of the maxillary left first premolar, and a soft tissue complication due to apical extrusion of NaOCl was diagnosed. Antibiotics and analgesics were prescribed. DVT images revealed that the buccal root apex had perforated the maxillary bone. The patient was followed up every other day and became asymptomatic on the 10th day. Endodontic therapy was completed with routine procedures. Determining working length precisely and following irrigation protocols meticulously are indispensable to prevent this type of complication. 3D visualization of the affected area may reveal the cause of the incident.

  20. Neonicotinoid insecticides can serve as inadvertent insect contraceptives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamar-Bouza, Laura; Bruckner, Selina; Chantawannakul, Panuwan; Gauthier, Laurent; Khongphinitbunjong, Kitiphong; Retschnig, Gina; Troxler, Aline; Vidondo, Beatriz; Neumann, Peter; Williams, Geoffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    There is clear evidence for sublethal effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on non-target ecosystem service-providing insects. However, their possible impact on male insect reproduction is currently unknown, despite the key role of sex. Here, we show that two neonicotinoids (4.5 ppb thiamethoxam and 1.5 ppb clothianidin) significantly reduce the reproductive capacity of male honeybees (drones), Apis mellifera. Drones were obtained from colonies exposed to the neonicotinoid insecticides or controls, and subsequently maintained in laboratory cages until they reached sexual maturity. While no significant effects were observed for male teneral (newly emerged adult) body mass and sperm quantity, the data clearly showed reduced drone lifespan, as well as reduced sperm viability (percentage living versus dead) and living sperm quantity by 39%. Our results demonstrate for the first time that neonicotinoid insecticides can negatively affect male insect reproductive capacity, and provide a possible mechanistic explanation for managed honeybee queen failure and wild insect pollinator decline. The widespread prophylactic use of neonicotinoids may have previously overlooked inadvertent contraceptive effects on non-target insects, thereby limiting conservation efforts. PMID:27466446

  1. Inadvertent weather modification urban areas - lessons for global climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changnon, S A [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (USA)

    1992-05-01

    Large metropolitan areas in North America, home to 65% of the USA's population, have created major changes in their climates over the past 150 years. The rate and amount of the urban climate change approximate those being predicted globally using climate models. Knowledge of urban weather and climate modification holds lessons for the global climate change issue. First, adjustments to urban climate changes can provide guidance for adjusting to global change. A second lesson relates to the difficulty but underscores the necessity of providing scientifically credible proof of change within the noise of natural climatic variability. The evolution of understanding about how urban conditions influence weather reveals several unexpected outcomes, particularly relating to precipitation changes. These suggest that similar future surprises can be expected in a changed global climate, a third lesson. In-depth studies of how urban climate changes affected the hydrologic cycle, the regional economy, and human activities were difficult because of data problems, lack of impact methodology, and necessity for multidisciplinary investigations. Similar impact studies for global climate change will require diverse scientific talents and funding commitments adequate to measure the complexity of impacts and human adjustments. Understanding the processes whereby urban areas and other human activities have altered the atmosphere and changed clouds and precipitation regionally appears highly relevant to the global climate-change issue. Scientific and governmental policy development needs to recognize an old axiom that became evident in the studies of inadvertent urban and regional climate change and their behavioural implications: Think globally but act locally. Global climate change is an international issue, and the atmosphere must be treated globally. But the impacts and the will to act and adjust will occur regionally.

  2. Inadvertent weather modification urban areas - lessons for global climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changnon, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Large metropolitan areas in North America, home to 65% of the USA's population, have created major changes in their climates over the past 150 years. The rate and amount of the urban climate change approximate those being predicted globally using climate models. Knowledge of urban weather and climate modification holds lessons for the global climate change issue. First, adjustments to urban climate changes can provide guidance for adjusting to global change. A second lesson relates to the difficulty but underscores the necessity of providing scientifically credible proof of change within the noise of natural climatic variability. The evolution of understanding about how urban conditions influence weather reveals several unexpected outcomes, particularly relating to precipitation changes. These suggest that similar future surprises can be expected in a changed global climate, a third lesson. In-depth studies of how urban climate changes affected the hydrologic cycle, the regional economy, and human activities were difficult because of data problems, lack of impact methodology, and necessity for multidisciplinary investigations. Similar impact studies for global climate change will require diverse scientific talents and funding commitments adequate to measure the complexity of impacts and human adjustments. Understanding the processes whereby urban areas and other human activities have altered the atmosphere and changed clouds and precipitation regionally appears highly relevant to the global climate-change issue. Scientific and governmental policy development needs to recognize an old axiom that became evident in the studies of inadvertent urban and regional climate change and their behavioural implications: Think globally but act locally. Global climate change is an international issue, and the atmosphere must be treated globally. But the impacts and the will to act and adjust will occur regionally

  3. Exploring key considerations when determining bona fide inadvertent errors resulting in understatements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrizanne de Villiers

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chapter 16 of the Tax Administration Act (28 of 2011 (the TA Act deals with understatement penalties. In the event of an ‘understatement’, in terms of Section 222 of the TA Act, a taxpayer must pay an understatement penalty, unless the understatement results from a bona fide inadvertent error. The determining of a bona fide inadvertent error on taxpayers’ returns is a totally new concept in the tax fraternity. It is of utmost importance that this section is applied correctly based on sound evaluation principles and not on professional judgement when determining if the error was indeed the result of a bona fide inadvertent error. This research study focuses on exploring key considerations when determining bona fide inadvertent errors resulting in understatements. The role and importance of tax penalty provisions is explored and the meaning of the different components in the term ‘bona fide inadvertent error’ critically analysed with the purpose to find a possible definition for the term ‘bona fide inadvertent error’. The study also compares the provisions of other tax jurisdictions with regards to errors made resulting in tax understatements in order to find possible guidelines on the application of bona fide inadvertent errors as contained in Section 222 of the TA Act. The findings of the research study revealed that the term ‘bona fide inadvertent error’ contained in Section 222 of the TA Act should be defined urgently and that guidelines must be provided by SARS on the application of the new amendment. SARS should also clarify the application of a bona fide inadvertent error in light of the behaviours contained in Section 223 of the TA Act to avoid any confusion.

  4. Ureteroscopic holmium laser cutting for inadvertently sutured drainage tube (report of five cases).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xu; Lu, Xin; Ren, Shancheng; Xu, Chuanliang; Sun, Yinghao

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to report a simple solution for inadvertently sutured drainage tube after urological surgery and discuss the different managements according to different types of this embarrassing complication. From September 2001 to January 2007, five inadvertently sutured drainage tubes were treated with ureteroscopic holmium laser cutting for the suture. All drainage tubes were removed after the operation without other complications. Holmium laser cutting via ureteroscope is a simple solution for the embarrassing problem of inadvertently sutured drainage tube. It can save the patient from undergoing another open surgery.

  5. Sinus anatomy associated with inadvertent cerebrospinal fluid leak during functional endoscopic sinus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Chase M; Goldberg, Andrew N; Pletcher, Steven D; Glastonbury, Christine M

    2012-07-01

    Anatomic variations in skull base anatomy may predispose the surgeon to inadvertent skull base injury with resultant cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak during functional endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). Our objective was to compare preoperative sinus imaging of patients who underwent FESS with and without CSF leak to elucidate these variations. In this retrospective case-control study, 18 patients with CSF leak following FESS for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) from 2000 to 2011 were compared to 18 randomly selected patients who underwent preoperative imaging for FESS for CRS. Measurements were obtained from preoperative computed tomography images with specific attention to anatomic differences in cribriform plate and ethmoid roof heights in the coronal plane, and the skull base angle in the sagittal plane. Mean values of measured variables were compared using a nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. When compared to controls, patients with CSF leak demonstrated a greater angle of the skull base in the sagittal plane (P variations may help to prevent iatrogenic CSF leak. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Cyclodialysis cleft with late hypotony maculopathy after inadvertent cannula detachment during cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahawita, Shyalle; Cugati, Sudha; Casson, Robert

    2015-05-01

    We present the case of a 69-year-old woman who presented with hypotony several years after an inadvertent cannula detachment presumably formed a cyclodialysis cleft during phacoemulsification cataract extraction and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation in her right eye. To our knowledge, this is the first report of late hypotony maculopathy as a result of inadvertent cannula release. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Supplemental Peri-Operative Oxygen and Incision Site Infection after Surgery for Perforated Peptic Ulcer: A Randomized, Double-Blind Monocentric Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schietroma, Mario; Cecilia, Emanuela Marina; De Santis, Giuseppe; Carlei, Francesco; Pessia, Beatrice; Amicucci, Gianfranco

    2016-02-01

    The clinical role of hyperoxia for preventing surgical site infection (SSI) remains uncertain because randomized controlled trials on this topic have reported disparate results. One of the principal reasons for this outcome may be that prior trials have entered heterogeneous populations of patients and a variety of procedures. The aim of our study was to assess the influence of hyperoxygenation on SSI using a homogeneous study population. From January 2004 to April 2013, we studied, in a randomized trial, 239 patients, who underwent open surgery for perforated peptic ulcer (PPU). The surgical procedure was performed through an upper abdominal midline incision, and closure of PPU was achieved by suture alone or in combination with an omental patch. Patients were assigned randomly to an oxygen/air mixture with a fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) of 30% (n = 120) or 80% (n = 119). Administration was commenced after induction of anesthesia and maintained for 6 hours after surgery. The overall incision infection rate was 38.4% (92 of 239): 61 patients (50.8%) had an infection in the 30% FiO2 group and 31 (26%) in the 80% FiO2 group (p operative SSI, should be considered part of ongoing quality improvement activities related to surgical care, with few risks to the patient and little associated cost.

  8. Local anaesthetic infiltration for peri-operative pain control in total hip and knee replacement: systematic review and meta-analyses of short- and long-term effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Elsa M R; Jones, Hayley E; Elvers, Karen T; Pyke, Mark; Blom, Ashley W; Beswick, Andrew D

    2014-07-05

    anaesthetic infiltration is effective in reducing short-term pain and hospital stay in patients receiving THR and TKR. Studies should assess whether local anaesthetic infiltration can prevent long-term pain. Enhanced pain control with additional analgesia through a catheter should be weighed against a possible infection risk.

  9. Experience during the monitoring of inactive scrap for the detection of inadvertent presence of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Ranjit; Kumar, Anoj; Vikas; Patra, R.P.; Kumar, Vikas; Singh, Rajvir; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2012-01-01

    The inspection and certification of scrap material from nuclear facilities is a regulatory requirement to ensure that radioactive material will not reach public domain. Around the world, cases involving radioactive contamination of metallic components have occurred due to radioactive sources/contaminated metal scrap reaching the public domain. Radiological monitoring of inactive scrap material is essential as it may get into various usages in public domain where controls cannot be implemented. The method of detection is measurement of gamma dose rates due to any loose/fixed radioactive contamination in the scrap or presence of any radioactive material/source. In addition prevention of any inadvertent/malicious act leading to radioactive material reaching the public domain through scrap being essential, this monitoring gains further importance. This paper describes the methodology and experience in detection of presence of radioactivity at inactive Scrap monitoring facility. Even though radioactive sources of high strength with potential for serious environmental hazard have not been detected, few cases of contaminated material (MS plate/equipments etc with extremely low level of 137 Cs and Uranium contamination) have been detected and identified using portable gamma spectrometer. If proper monitoring is not carried out the dispersal of radioactivity to the environment can be a matter of concern due to metal scrap reaching recycling industry resulting in huge cost of decontamination and waste disposal. These events may also have negative impact on the export from the country resulting in economic losses. The impact of such events can be ruled out by effective scrap monitoring techniques which ensure that even small quantity of radioactivity escaping into public domain can be prevented. The methodology followed for monitoring of inactive scrap is found to be effective even for detection of presence of very low level of radioactivity

  10. Inadvertent destruction of the spinal cord by radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhavilai, D.

    1974-01-01

    A case of radiation myelopathy following cobalt therapy of a carcinoma of the esophagus is presented. A permanent quadriplegia resulted. Radiation myelopathy can result from treatment with x-rays or radioactive cobalt regardless of whether the condition being treated involves the spinal cord. No effective treatment is known. Prevention requires keeping the radiation at low level

  11. A common-sense probabilistic approach to assessing inadvertent human intrusion into low-level radioactive waste at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, P.; Hooten, M.; Black, K.; Moore, B.; Rawlinson, S.; Barker, L.

    1997-01-01

    Each site disposing of low-level radioactive waste is required to prepare and maintain a site-specific performance assessment (1) to determine potential risks posed by waste management systems to the public, and the environment, and (2) to compare these risks to established performance objectives. The DOE Nevada Operations Office, Waste Management Program recently completed a one-year study of site-specific scenarios for inadvertent human intrusion by drilling into buried low-level radioactive waste sites, as part of ongoing performance assessment studies. Intrusion scenarios focus on possible penetration of buried waste through drilling for sources of groundwater. The probability of drilling penetration into waste was judged to be driven primarily by two settlement scenarios: (1) scattered individual homesteaders, and (2) a community scenario consisting of a cluster of settlers that share drilling and distribution systems for groundwater. Management control factors include institutional control, site knowledge, placards and markers, surface barriers, and subsurface barriers. The Subject Matter Experts concluded that institutional control and site knowledge may be important factors for the first few centuries, but are not significant over the evaluation period of 10,000 years. Surface barriers can be designed that would deter the siting of a drill rig over the waste site to an effectiveness of 95%. Subsurface barriers and placards and markers will not as effectively prevent inadvertent human intrusion. Homestead and community scenarios were considered by the panel to render a site-specific probability of around 10% for inadvertent human intrusion. If management controls are designed and implemented effectively, then the probability of inadvertent human intrusion can be reduced to less than 1%

  12. Inadvertent intrathecal injection of labetalol in a patient undergoing post-partum tubal ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrieri, P J; Hamza, M S; Ting, P H; Blank, R S; Grubb, C T

    2005-10-01

    After receiving a continuous spinal anesthetic for labor following an inadvertent dural puncture with a 17-gauge epidural needle, a morbidly obese parturient underwent post-partum tubal ligation 12 h after vaginal delivery. The patient received a total of 2 mL of 0.75% hyperbaric bupivacaine for the surgery. In response to moderate hypertension the patient received intravenous labetalol hydrochloride 20 mg. She subsequently was inadvertently administered approximately 15 mg of labetalol through the spinal catheter. The spinal catheter was removed immediately after the procedure. She suffered no apparent adverse neurologic effects.

  13. Beverage can stay-tabs: still a source for inadvertently ingested foreign bodies in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Lane F. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MLC 5031, Cincinnati, OH (United States); University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine, Departments of Radiology and Pediatrics, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2010-09-15

    In the 1970s in part to avoid inadvertent ingestion, the beverage-can industry changed can construction from pull-tabs to the stay-tabs (remain attached to can after opening) used today. Our purpose is to identify the number of inadvertent ingestions of beverage-can stay-tabs by children recognized at our institution. The medical information system of a children's hospital was searched with key terms to identify cases in which a witnessed or self-reported inadvertent ingestion of a beverage-can stay-tab resulted in a radiograph to rule out presence of a foreign body. Demographics, identification of stay-tab on radiographs, associated abnormalities, and patient management were reviewed. Nineteen cases of stay-tab ingestion were identified over 16 years. Mean age of ingesters was 8.5 years with the majority being teenagers and 15 (79%) >5 years of age. The stay-tab could be seen radiographically only in 4 (21%) cases - all with the stay-tab identified in the stomach. The identification of 19 children who inadvertently ingested beverage-can stay-tabs at a single children's hospital suggests that such ingestions still occur. Radiologists should be aware that stay-tabs are radiographically visible in the minority (21%) of cases. (orig.)

  14. Late-Onset Inadvertent Bleb Formation following Pars Plana M3 Molteno Implant Tube Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anmar M. Abdul-Rahman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of inadvertent bleb formation presenting 18 months after pars plana M3 Molteno implant tube obstruction in a patient with mixed mechanism glaucoma. Materials and Methods: An 84-year-old Caucasian male with mixed mechanism glaucoma underwent slit-lamp examination, gonioscopy, colour anterior segment photography and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT. Results: An inadvertent bleb developed 18 months after pars plana implant tube re-positioning with a 6/0 Vicryl tie ligature. The bleb was located in the area anterior to the implant plate; it was characterised by a thin, transparent, avascular and multi-cystic wall, with a visible stoma at the posterior edge of the bleb. The bleb was functioning as demonstrated by an intraocular pressure of 6 mm Hg at presentation and a punctate fluorescein uptake pattern of the bleb wall. The bleb over the plate of the Molteno implant was non-functioning, likely secondary to tube obstruction by vitreous in the early postoperative period. AS-OCT showed a tract from the anterior chamber commencing at an entry wound through a corneal tunnel to the posterior stoma at the base of the inadvertent bleb. Conclusions: We hypothesise that the pathophysiologic factors resulting in an inadvertent bleb are a result of a combination of apoptosis, late-onset wound dehiscence and internal gaping of a centrally placed corneal wound. In addition, aqueous hydrodynamic factors may play a role.

  15. Beverage can stay-tabs: still a source for inadvertently ingested foreign bodies in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, Lane F.

    2010-01-01

    In the 1970s in part to avoid inadvertent ingestion, the beverage-can industry changed can construction from pull-tabs to the stay-tabs (remain attached to can after opening) used today. Our purpose is to identify the number of inadvertent ingestions of beverage-can stay-tabs by children recognized at our institution. The medical information system of a children's hospital was searched with key terms to identify cases in which a witnessed or self-reported inadvertent ingestion of a beverage-can stay-tab resulted in a radiograph to rule out presence of a foreign body. Demographics, identification of stay-tab on radiographs, associated abnormalities, and patient management were reviewed. Nineteen cases of stay-tab ingestion were identified over 16 years. Mean age of ingesters was 8.5 years with the majority being teenagers and 15 (79%) >5 years of age. The stay-tab could be seen radiographically only in 4 (21%) cases - all with the stay-tab identified in the stomach. The identification of 19 children who inadvertently ingested beverage-can stay-tabs at a single children's hospital suggests that such ingestions still occur. Radiologists should be aware that stay-tabs are radiographically visible in the minority (21%) of cases. (orig.)

  16. Attention and Facilitation: Converging Information Versus Inadvertent Reading in Stroop Task Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, A.P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Disagreement exists about whether color-word Stroop facilitation is caused by converging information (e.g.. Cohen et al.. 1990: Roelofs, 2003) or inadvertent reading (MacLeod & MacDonald, 2000). Four experiments tested between these hypotheses by examining Stroop effects oil response time (RT) both

  17. Attention and Facilitation: Converging Information versus Inadvertent Reading in Stroop Task Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Ardi

    2010-01-01

    Disagreement exists about whether color-word Stroop facilitation is caused by converging information (e.g., Cohen et al., 1990; Roelofs, 2003) or inadvertent reading (MacLeod & MacDonald, 2000). Four experiments tested between these hypotheses by examining Stroop effects on response time (RT) both within and between languages. Words cannot be…

  18. Inadvertent Intruder Analysis For The Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Frank G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Phifer, Mark A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-22

    The inadvertent intruder analysis considers the radiological impacts to hypothetical persons who are assumed to inadvertently intrude on the Portsmouth OSWDF site after institutional control ceases 100 years after site closure. For the purposes of this analysis, we assume that the waste disposal in the OSWDF occurs at time zero, the site is under institutional control for the next 100 years, and inadvertent intrusion can occur over the following 1,000 year time period. Disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the OSWDF must meet a requirement to assess impacts on such individuals, and demonstrate that the effective dose equivalent to an intruder would not likely exceed 100 mrem per year for scenarios involving continuous exposure (i.e. chronic) or 500 mrem for scenarios involving a single acute exposure. The focus in development of exposure scenarios for inadvertent intruders was on selecting reasonable events that may occur, giving consideration to regional customs and construction practices. An important assumption in all scenarios is that an intruder has no prior knowledge of the existence of a waste disposal facility at the site. Results of the analysis show that a hypothetical inadvertent intruder at the OSWDF who, in the worst case scenario, resides on the site and consumes vegetables from a garden established on the site using contaminated soil (chronic agriculture scenario) would receive a maximum chronic dose of approximately 7.0 mrem/yr during the 1000 year period of assessment. This dose falls well below the DOE chronic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr. Results of the analysis also showed that a hypothetical inadvertent intruder at the OSWDF who, in the worst case scenario, excavates a basement in the soil that reaches the waste (acute basement construction scenario) would receive a maximum acute dose of approximately 0.25 mrem/yr during the 1000 year period of assessment. This dose falls well below the DOE acute dose limit of 500 mrem/yr. Disposal inventory

  19. Human intrusion into geologic repositories for high-level radioactive waste: potential and prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, F X [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    1981-12-01

    Isolation of high-level radioactive waste over long periods of time requires protection not only from natural events and processes, but also from the deliberate or inadvertent activities of future societies. This paper evaluates the likelihood of inadvertent human intrusion due to the loss of societal memory of the repository site. In addition measures to prevent inadvertent intrusion, and to guide future societies in any decision to deliberately intrude into the repository are suggested.

  20. Intentional and inadvertent non-adherence in adult coeliac disease. A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Nicola J; Rubin, Gregory P; Charnock, Anne

    2013-09-01

    Adherence to a gluten-free diet is the mainstay of treatment for coeliac disease. Non-adherence is common as the diet is restrictive and can be difficult to follow. This study aimed to determine the rates of intentional and inadvertent non-adherence in adult coeliac disease and to examine the factors associated with both. A self-completion questionnaire was mailed to adult coeliac patients identified from the computer records of 31 family practices within the North East of England. We received 287 responses after one reminder. Intentional gluten consumption was reported by 115 (40%) of respondents. 155 (54%) had made at least one known mistaken lapse over the same period and 82 (29%) reported neither intentional nor mistaken gluten consumption. Using logistic regression analysis, low self-efficacy, perceptions of tolerance to gluten and intention were found to be independently predictive of intentional gluten consumption. A statistical model predicted 71.8% of cases reporting intentional lapses. Intentional non-adherence to the GFD was found to be common but not as frequent as inadvertent lapses. Distinguishing the factors influencing both intentional and inadvertent non-adherence is useful in understanding dietary self-management in coeliac disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evidence utilisation project: Management of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia. The challenges of implementing best practice recommendations in the perioperative environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Judy; Hines, Sonia Jane; Chang, Anne M

    2013-12-01

    The prevention of inadvertent perioperative hypothermia (IPH) remains an important issue in perioperative healthcare. The aims of this project were to: (i) assess current clinical practice in the management of IPH and (ii) promote best practice in the management of IPH in adult operating theatres. This project from August 2010 to March 2012 utilised a system of audit and feedback to implement best practice recommendations. Data were collected via chart audits against criteria developed from best practice recommendations for managing IPH. Evidence-based best practices, such as consistent temperature monitoring and patient warming, were implemented using multifaceted interventions. Perioperative records for 73 patients (baseline) and 72 patients (post-implementation) were audited. Post-implementation audit showed an increase in patients with temperatures >36°C admitted to the post-anaesthetic care unit (PACU) (8%) and discharged from PACU (28%). The percentage of patients receiving preoperative temperature monitoring increased (38%); however, low levels of intraoperative monitoring remained (31% of patients with surgery of 30 min or longer duration). Small increases were found in patient warming of 5% intraoperatively and 8% postoperatively. Preoperative warming was not successfully implemented during this phase of the project. Temperature monitoring, warming and rates of normothermia improved; however, barriers to best practice of IPH management were experienced, which negatively impacted on the project. Further stages of implementation and audit were added to further address IPH management in this department. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare © 2013 The Joanna Briggs Institute.

  2. Inadvertent raising of levels in the FFTF primary sodium pumps. Final unusual occurrence report, HEDL 79-34 (FFTF-58)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuechle, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The final unusual occurrence report describes the inadvertent raising of the sodium level in the FFTF primary sodium pumps during system testing. This event is now judged to have caused permanent deformation of the primary pump shaft on loop 1 during a period when pump rotation was stopped and sodium level in the pump tank was inadvertently increased. The shaft was subsequently removed, straightened, and returned to service in the spare FFTF pump

  3. Implementation of coordinated global serotype 2 oral poliovirus vaccine cessation: risks of inadvertent trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J; Hampton, Lee M; Thompson, Kimberly M

    2016-06-01

    The endgame for polio eradication includes coordinated global cessation of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), starting with the cessation of vaccine containing OPV serotype 2 (OPV2) by switching all trivalent OPV (tOPV) to bivalent OPV (bOPV). The logistics associated with this global switch represent a significant undertaking, with some possibility of inadvertent tOPV use after the switch. We used a previously developed poliovirus transmission and OPV evolution model to explore the relationships between the extent of inadvertent tOPV use, the time after the switch of the inadvertent tOPV use and corresponding population immunity to serotype 2 poliovirus transmission, and the ability of the inadvertently introduced viruses to cause a serotype 2 circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV2) outbreak in a hypothetical population. We then estimated the minimum time until inadvertent tOPV use in a supplemental immunization activity (SIA) or in routine immunization (RI) can lead to a cVDPV2 outbreak in realistic populations with properties like those of northern India, northern Pakistan and Afghanistan, northern Nigeria, and Ukraine. At low levels of inadvertent tOPV use, the minimum time after the switch for the inadvertent use to cause a cVDPV2 outbreak decreases sharply with increasing proportions of children inadvertently receiving tOPV. The minimum times until inadvertent tOPV use in an SIA or in RI can lead to a cVDPV2 outbreak varies widely among populations, with higher basic reproduction numbers, lower tOPV-induced population immunity to serotype 2 poliovirus transmission prior to the switch, and a lower proportion of transmission occurring via the oropharyngeal route all resulting in shorter times. In populations with the lowest expected immunity to serotype 2 poliovirus transmission after the switch, inadvertent tOPV use in an SIA leads to a cVDPV2 outbreak if it occurs as soon as 9 months after the switch with 0.5 % of children aged 0-4 years inadvertently

  4. Inadvertent puncture of the aortic noncoronary cusp during postoperative left atrial tachycardia ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dursun Aras, MD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transseptal catheterization has become part of the interventional electrophysiologist׳s technical armamentarium since the development of left atrial catheter ablation and percutaneous technologies for treating mitral and aortic valve disease. Although frequently performed, the procedure׳s most feared complication is aortic root penetration. Focal atrial tachycardia has been described as the most common late sequela of surgical valve replacements. We present a complicated case involving the inadvertent delivery of an 8 French sheath across the noncoronary cusp during radiofrequency catheter ablation for left atrial tachycardia originating from the mitral annulus in a patient with prior mitral valve replacement.

  5. Treatment Approach to Small Inadvertent Injury of the Crystalline Lens Anterior Capsule During Iridodialysis Repair Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökçen Gökçe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 22-year-old man presented to our ophthalmology department with photophobia. On ophthalmic examination, iridodialysis secondary to blunt trauma that occurred 5 years ago was diagnosed. During iridodialysis repair surgery, long curved double-armed needle of 10-0 polypropylene suture (PC-9 inserted into the 19 gauge side port turned down inadvertently by its own weight, resulting in crystalline lens anterior capsule perforation. Postoperative clinical observation revealed no lens opacification affecting visual acuity. This case report showed that lens aspiration surgery should be postponed if the capsule injury is small.(Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 61-3

  6. Inadvertent injection of formalin mistaken for local anesthetic agent: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakeri, Gururaj; Brennan, Peter A

    2012-05-01

    Chemical facial cellulitis, while commonly seen in domestic accidents or attempted suicide, is uncommon in the dental office and hence rarely addressed in the dental literature. We present an unusual case of chemical facial cellulitis caused by inadvertent injection of formalin into the soft tissues of the oral cavity, which was mistaken for local anesthesia solution. This report comprises the immediate symptoms, possible root cause, and management of the difficult situation. We also provide some guidelines to avoid such unfortunate events. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving Prevention, Early Recognition and Management of Acute Kidney Injury after Major Surgery: Results of a Planning Meeting with Multidisciplinary Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T James

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of review: Acute kidney injury (AKI is common after major surgery, and is associated with morbidity, mortality, increased length of hospital stay, and high health care costs. Although recent guidelines for AKI provide recommendations for identification of patients at risk, monitoring, diagnosis, and management of AKI, there is lack of understanding to guide successful implementation of these recommendations into clinical practice. Sources of information: We held a planning meeting with multidisciplinary stakeholders to identify barriers, facilitators, and strategies to implement recommendations for prevention, early identification, and management of AKI after major surgery. Barriers and facilitators to knowledge use for peri-operative AKI prevention and care were discussed. Findings: Stakeholders identified barriers in knowledge (how to identify high-risk patients, what criteria to use for diagnosis of AKI, attitudes (self-efficacy in preventive care and management of AKI, and behaviors (common use of diuretics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, withholding of intravenous fluids, and competing time demands in peri-operative care. Educational, informatics, and organizational interventions were identified by stakeholders as potentially useful elements for future interventions for peri-operative AKI. Limitation: Meeting participants were from a single centre. Implications: The information and recommendations obtained from this stakeholder's meeting will be useful to design interventions to improve prevention and early care for AKI after major surgery.

  8. Expert judgement on inadvertent human intrusion into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hora, S.C.; von Winterfeldt, D.; Trauth, K.M.

    1991-12-01

    Four expert-judgment teams have developed analyses delineating possible future societies in the next 10,000 years in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Expert-judgment analysis was used to address the question of future societies because neither experimentation, observation, nor modeling can resolve such uncertainties. Each of the four, four-member teams, comprised of individuals with expertise in the physical, social, or political sciences, developed detailed qualitative assessments of possible future societies. These assessments include detailed discussions of the underlying physical and societal factors that would influence society and the likely modes of human-intrusion at the WIPP, as well as the probabilities of intrusion. Technological development, population growth, economic development, conservation of information, persistence of government control, and mitigation of danger from nuclear waste were the factors the teams believed to be most important. Likely modes of human-intrusion were categorized as excavation, disposal/storage, tunneling, drilling, and offsite activities. Each team also developed quantitative assessments by providing probabilities of various alternative futures, of inadvertent human intrusion, and in some cases, of particular modes of intrusion. The information created throughout this study will be used in conjunction with other types of information, including experimental data, calculations from physical principles and computer models, and perhaps other judgments, as input to ''performance assessment.'' The more qualitative results of this study will be used as input to another expert panel considering markers to deter inadvertent human intrusion at the WIPP

  9. Analyses of natural resources in 10 CFR Part 60 as related to inadvertent human intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miklas, M.P.; Lefevre, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the intent of the regulatory language of the portions of 10 CFR Part 60 which deal with considerations of the natural resources of a proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive wastes as they relate to inadvertent human intrusion. Four Potentially Adverse Conditions (PAC) the requirements of 10 CFR 60.21(c)(13) are shown to be related to natural resources. Groundwater is identified as a natural resource known to be present at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. For economic considerations of natural resources, the open-quotes foreseeable futureclose quotes is thought to be no more than 50 years. Two of the topics addressed by the PACs, subsurface mining and drilling at a proposed repository site, are pre-site-characterization activities which must be evaluated in the context of repository performance criteria set by the US EPA standard, 40 CFR Part 191. An alternative US DOE compliance demonstration to another PAC, 10 CFR 60.122(c)(17), might be to use an open-quotes explorationist perspectiveclose quotes of natural resource assessment. The Commission intends for DOE to evaluate the likelihood and consequence of inadvertent human intrusion into a geologic repository as a result of exploration or exploitation of natural resources within or near a proposed high-level radioactive waste geologic repository

  10. The uptake of radionuclides from inadvertent consumption of soil by grazing animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, N.; Dodd, N.J.

    1988-01-01

    Investigations of the transfer to man of artificially-produced radionuclides through food chains have shown that the inadvertent consumption of soil by grazing animals can give variations in estimates of transfer coefficients, especially for radionuclides that are poorly absorbed by plant roots. Even small masses of soil adhering to herbage or directly ingested can make a significant contribution to the intake inventory in terms of activity. Although the activity concentrations of soil-contaminated herbage are elevated, the radionuclides associated with the soil may not necessarily be in a form which is easily absorbed by the animal. Attempts must be made, therefore, to quantify soil intake and the subsequent radionuclide uptake by this mechanism. A field investigation of the uptake of radionuclides by farm animals grazing near the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant has been pursued. The aims of the study were to estimate the transfer to muscle and other tissues. This paper describes the methods used to estimate both the soil intake and the consequent availability of radionuclides associated with the soil. The measurements were used to evaluate the contribution to tissue content of inadvertent consumption of soil by cows and sheep. 10 refs.; 2 tabs

  11. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  12. Study for on-line system to identify inadvertent control rod drops in PWR reactors using ex-core detector and thermocouple measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Thiago J.; Medeiros, Jose A.C.C.; Goncalves, Alessandro C.

    2015-01-01

    Accidental control rod drops event in PWR reactors leads to an unsafe operating condition. It is important to quickly identify the rod to minimize undesirable effects in such a scenario. In this event, there is a distortion in the power distribution and temperature in the reactor core. The goal of this study is to develop an on-line model to identify the inadvertent control rod dropped in PWR reactor. The proposed model is based on physical correlations and pattern recognition of ex-core detector responses and thermocouples measures. The results of the study demonstrated the feasibility of an on-line system, contributing to safer operation conditions and preventing undesirable effects, as its shutdown. (author)

  13. Study for on-line system to identify inadvertent control rod drops in PWR reactors using ex-core detector and thermocouple measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Thiago J.; Medeiros, Jose A.C.C.; Goncalves, Alessandro C., E-mail: tsouza@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: canedo@lmp.ufrj.br, E-mail: alessandro@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    Accidental control rod drops event in PWR reactors leads to an unsafe operating condition. It is important to quickly identify the rod to minimize undesirable effects in such a scenario. In this event, there is a distortion in the power distribution and temperature in the reactor core. The goal of this study is to develop an on-line model to identify the inadvertent control rod dropped in PWR reactor. The proposed model is based on physical correlations and pattern recognition of ex-core detector responses and thermocouples measures. The results of the study demonstrated the feasibility of an on-line system, contributing to safer operation conditions and preventing undesirable effects, as its shutdown. (author)

  14. Expert judgment on markers to deter inadvertent human intrusion into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trauth, K.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Hawaii Univ., Hilo, HI (United States); Guzowski, R.V. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The expert panel identified basic principles to guide current and future marker development efforts: (1) the site must be marked, (2) message(s) must be truthful and informative, (3) multiple components within a marker system, (4) multiple means of communication (e.g., language, pictographs, scientific diagrams), (5) multiple levels of complexity within individual messages on individual marker system elements, (6) use of materials with little recycle value, and (7) international effort to maintain knowledge of the locations and contents of nuclear waste repositories. The efficacy of the markers in deterring inadvertent human intrusion was estimated to decrease with time, with the probability function varying with the mode of intrusion (who is intruding and for what purpose) and the level of technological development of the society. The development of a permanent, passive marker system capable of surviving and remaining interpretable for 10,000 years will require further study prior to implementation.

  15. Inadvertent yellow fever vaccination of a patient with Crohn's disease treated with infliximab and methotrexate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekenberg, C.; Friis-Møller, N.; Ulstrup, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 56-year-old woman with Crohn's disease, treated with methotrexate and infliximab, who inadvertently received yellow fever vaccination (YFV) prior to a journey to Tanzania. She was not previously vaccinated against YF. YFV contains live-attenuated virus, and is contraindicated...... in patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs. Following vaccination, the patient fell ill with influenza-like illness. Elevated transaminase levels and YF viremia were detected. Despite being immunocompromised, the patient did not develop more severe adverse effects. Neutralising antibodies to YF virus...... were detected on day 14 following vaccination and remained protective at least 10 months after vaccination. Limited data is available on outcomes of YFV in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, including biologics, and we report this case as a reminder of vigilance of vaccine recommendations...

  16. Expert judgment on markers to deter inadvertent human intrusion into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauth, K.M.; Hora, S.C.; Guzowski, R.V.

    1993-11-01

    The expert panel identified basic principles to guide current and future marker development efforts: (1) the site must be marked, (2) message(s) must be truthful and informative, (3) multiple components within a marker system, (4) multiple means of communication (e.g., language, pictographs, scientific diagrams), (5) multiple levels of complexity within individual messages on individual marker system elements, (6) use of materials with little recycle value, and (7) international effort to maintain knowledge of the locations and contents of nuclear waste repositories. The efficacy of the markers in deterring inadvertent human intrusion was estimated to decrease with time, with the probability function varying with the mode of intrusion (who is intruding and for what purpose) and the level of technological development of the society. The development of a permanent, passive marker system capable of surviving and remaining interpretable for 10,000 years will require further study prior to implementation

  17. The availability of soil-associated radionuclides for uptake after inadvertent ingestion by humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, S.; Green, N.

    2002-01-01

    Assessments of the radiological impact of radionuclides released into the environment generally take into account the inadvertent ingestion of radionuclides associated with soil or sediment. Such assessments often assume that gut uptake factors for radionuclides that are biologically incorporated in food are also applicable when the ingested activity is associated with soil. Studies of the availability of soil-associated radionuclides after ingestion have been mainly conducted on ruminant animals and few data exist for humans. The digestive tract of ruminants is totally different from that of a mono-gastric animal and so the availability estimated from the animal studies may not be valid in the case of man. A simple in-vitro enzymolysis procedure was therefore developed to simulate human digestion closely. The measured availability of 137 Cs, 241 Am, 239 PU and 90 Sr associated with loam, sand and peat soils was about 3%, 3%, 10% and 50% respectively. (author)

  18. LWRA analysis of inadvertent closing of the main steam isolation valve in NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feretic, D.; Cavlina, N.; Grgic, D.; Spalj, S.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes the use of system code RELAP5/mod2 and analyzer code LWRA in analysis of inadvertent closing of the main steam isolation valve that happened in NPP Krsko on September, 25 1995. Three cases were calculated in order to address different aspects of the modelled transient. This preliminary calculation showed that, even though the real plant behaviour was not completely reproduced, such kind of analysis can help to better understand plant behaviour and to identify important phenomena in the plant during transient. The results calculated by RELAP5 and LWRA were similar and both codes indicated lack of better understanding of the plant systems status. The LWRA was more than 5 times faster than real time. (author)

  19. Investigations on the inadvertent power increase in a PHWR as ASSET experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    Investigations were carried out using the ASSET methodology to find out the root cause of an incident involving inadvertent increase in reactor power in the Unit 1 of Narora Atomic Power Station (NAPS) in India. NAPS is a twin Unit, 220 MWe PHWR based power station. On December 4, 1992, when NPAS Unit 1 was operating at 130 MWe, the reactor power increased steadily on its own and touched 147 MWe, over a period of 14 minutes. The set (demand) power of the triplicated reactor regulating system had increased on its own and in turn has made the reactor to operated at higher power. The power was brought down to 120 MWe by manual intervention. Since adequate system related data during the incident was not available, laboratory studies were carried out using computer simulations for the various process disturbances which could affect the reactor regulating system, for establishing the causes of the event. 4 figs

  20. Investigations on the inadvertent power increase in a PHWR as ASSET experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S H [Operating Plants Safety Div., Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai (India)

    1997-12-31

    Investigations were carried out using the ASSET methodology to find out the root cause of an incident involving inadvertent increase in reactor power in the Unit 1 of Narora Atomic Power Station (NAPS) in India. NAPS is a twin Unit, 220 MWe PHWR based power station. On December 4, 1992, when NPAS Unit 1 was operating at 130 MWe, the reactor power increased steadily on its own and touched 147 MWe, over a period of 14 minutes. The set (demand) power of the triplicated reactor regulating system had increased on its own and in turn has made the reactor to operated at higher power. The power was brought down to 120 MWe by manual intervention. Since adequate system related data during the incident was not available, laboratory studies were carried out using computer simulations for the various process disturbances which could affect the reactor regulating system, for establishing the causes of the event. 4 figs.

  1. Analysis of inadvertent safety injection incident at Kori unit 3 on september 6, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyun Tae; Chung, Bub Dong; Kim, In Goo; Kim, Hho Jung

    1992-01-01

    The inadvertent safety injection incident occurred at Kori Unit 3 on September 6, 1990 is analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3 code. The event was initiated by a failure of main feedwater control valve in one of three steam generators. The actual sequence of plant transient with the proper estimations of the operator actions is investigated in the present calculation. The calculational results are compared with the plant transient data. It is shown that the results of the plant behaviors are in good agreement with the plant data. The emergency response guidelines is assessed for the time of the SI termination and the establishment of natural circulation. The changes in the time of the SI termination do not significantly affect the overall plant behaviors, and the natural circulation is established

  2. Endovascular repair of inadvertent arterial injury induced by central venous catheterization using a vascular closure device: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Hee; Jang, Woo Jin; Oh, Ju Heyon; Song, Yun Gyu [Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Central venous catheterization can cause various complications. Inadvertent subclavian artery catheterization was performed during insertion of a central venous catheter in a 73-year-old man suffering from panperitonitis due to small-bowel perforation. Endovascular treatment was conducted to treat the injured subclavian artery with a FemoSeal vascular closure device.

  3. 13 CFR 126.308 - What happens if SBA inadvertently omits a qualified HUBZone SBC from the List?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... writing at U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 Third Street, SW., Washington, DC 20416 or via e-mail... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What happens if SBA inadvertently omits a qualified HUBZone SBC from the List? 126.308 Section 126.308 Business Credit and Assistance...

  4. 46 CFR 308.536 - Declaration where failure to comply with Clause 21 was inadvertent, Form MA-314.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Ii-Open Policy War Risk Cargo... Assured that fails inadvertently to maintain a collateral deposit fund or surety bond in an amount..., which may be obtained from the American War Risk Agency or MARAD. III—Facultative War Risk Cargo...

  5. Potential impact of DOE's performance objective for protection of inadvertent intruders on low-level waste disposals at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    Performance objectives for disposal of low-level radioactive waste at Department of Energy (DOE) sites include limits on radiation dose to inadvertent intruders. This paper investigates the potential impact of DOE's performance objective for protection of inadvertent intruders on the acceptability of low-level waste disposals at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The analysis is based on waste volumes and radionuclide inventories for recent disposals and estimated doses to an inadvertent intruder for assumed exposure scenarios. The analysis indicates that more than 99% of the total volume of waste in recent disposals meets the performance objective for inadvertent intruders, and the volume of waste found to be unacceptable for disposal is only about 16 m 3 . Therefore, DOE's performance objective for protection of inadvertent intruders probably will not have unreasonably adverse impacts on acceptable waste disposals at ORNL

  6. Passive Barriers to Inadvertent Human Intrusion for Use at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-01-01

    In July1996, BN transmitted Passive Barriers to Inadvertent Human Intrusion for Use at the Nevada Test Site to the United States Department of Energy, under Contract DE-AC08-91NV10833. The 1996 paper had a limited distribution and was not reviewed for public release. In 2007, National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) made minor revisions to conform to current editorial standards of the NNSA/NSO and to meet current security requirements for public release. The primary purpose of this study was to identify types of engineered passive barriers that could deter future intrusion into buried low-level radioactive waste, particularly intrusion by drilling water wells. The study considered drilling technology, many natural and man-made materials, and both underground and above-ground barriers. Based on cost and effectiveness, the report recommended underground barriers consisting of a layer of rubble or tires. An aboveground barrier mound might also prove effective, but would cost more, and may become an attractive nuisance (e.g., might, after their purpose has been forgotten, encourage exploration for the sake of satisfying curiosity). Advances in drilling technology could render any engineered barriers ineffective if there is motivation to penetrate the barriers

  7. Inadvertent recovery in communication deficits following the upper limb mirror therapy in stroke: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Kamal Narayan; Pandian, Shanta

    2014-10-01

    Broca's aphasia is the most challenging communication deficit in stroke. Left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), a key region of the mirror-neuron system, gets lesioned in Broca's aphasia. Mirror therapy (MT), a form of action-observation, may trigger the mirror neurons. The aim of this study was to report a case of poststroke subject with Broca's aphasia, who exhibited an inadvertent and significant improvement in speech after MT for the paretic upper limb. The 20-month old stroke patient underwent MT through goal-directed tasks. He received a total absence of spontaneous speech, writing, and naming. After 45 sessions of task-based MT for the upper limb, he showed tremendous recovery in expressive communication. He had fluent and comprehensive communication; however, with a low pitch and minor pronunciation errors. He showed a substantial change (from 18/100 to 79/100) on the Communicative Effective Index, particularly, on items such as expressing emotions, one-to-one conversation, naming, and spontaneous conversation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical outcome during the peri-operative (thyroidectomy) period of severely hyperthyroid patients with normalized pre-operative free-T4 levels: Importance of I-131 therapy as a part of pre-operative preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siguan-Crisaldo, M.A.L.; Mercado-Asis, L.B.

    2005-01-01

    Thyroidectomy is performed for hyperthyroidism on patients who do not respond to or are not compliant with medical therapy and in patients with very large goiters causing compressive symptoms. All thyrotoxic patients undergoing thyroidectomy usually are first treated with anti-thyroid drugs to normalize free thyroid hormone levels and render them euthyroid before surgery in order to prevent complications particularly thyroid storm and circulatory collapse. In this case series, we describe the clinical outcome during the perioperative (thyroidectomy) period of three severely hyperthyroid patients, two females and one male, with ages ranging from 13 to 38 years. All patients had grade III goiter, and only one had exophthalmos. The mean duration of goiter was 3.6 years. All of them were given preoperative treatment consisting of propylthiouracil (PTU) at 450-600 mg/day; iodone, 3 tablets daily and propranolol at 30-120 mg/day for one month. All of them had normalized preoperative thyroid function tests. In addition to the preoperative medications mentioned above, all three patients received radioactive iodine therapy before surgery. The first two patients received relatively low doses of 8.0 and 7.5 mCi of I-131 respectively. Unfortunately the first patient had supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), post skin cutting and the other one went into thyroid storm. The third patient who received a cumulative dose of 23.5 mCi of I-131 before surgery had an uneventful postoperative course. It is concluded that normalization of thyroid hormone parameters, especially free T4 is not sufficient for an uneventful and uncomplicated peri-thyroidectomy period in severely hyperthyroid patients with large goiters. Effective radioactive iodine therapy might prove to be helpful in inducing thyroid tissue fibrosis, thus leading to true clinical euthyroidism and excellent clinical course postoperatively. (author)

  9. Evaluation of SPACE code for simulation of inadvertent opening of spray valve in Shin Kori unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seyun; Youn, Bumsoo

    2013-01-01

    SPACE code is expected to be applied to the safety analysis for LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) and Non-LOCA scenarios. SPACE code solves two-fluid, three-field governing equations and programmed with C++ computer language using object-oriented concepts. To evaluate the analysis capability for the transient phenomena in the actual nuclear power plant, an inadvertent opening of spray valve in startup test phase of Shin Kori unit 1 was simulated with SPACE code. To evaluate the analysis capability for the transient phenomena in the actual nuclear power plant, an inadvertent opening of spray valve in startup test phase of Shin Kori unit 1 was simulated with SPACE code

  10. Inadvertent Splenectomy During Resection for Colorectal Cancer Does Not Increase Long-term Mortality in a Propensity Score Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lolle, Ida; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Schefte, David F

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest that long-term mortality is increased in patients who undergo splenectomy during surgery for colorectal cancer. The reason for this association remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between inadvertent...... splenectomy attributed to iatrogenic lesion to the spleen during colorectal cancer resections and long-term mortality in a national cohort of unselected patients. DESIGN: This was a retrospective, nationwide cohort study. SETTINGS: Data were collected from the database of the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group...... for patients surviving 30 days after surgery. Secondary outcomes were 30-day mortality and risk factors for inadvertent splenectomy. Multivariable and propensity-score matched Cox regression analyses were used to adjust for potential confounding. RESULTS: In total, 23,727 patients were included, of which 277...

  11. 21 CFR 2.25 - Grain seed treated with poisonous substances; color identification to prevent adulteration of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the natural color of the food seed as to make admixture of treated, denatured seeds with good food... adequately denatured by a suitable color to prevent their subsequent inadvertent use as food for man or feed...

  12. Les femmes et le langage selon Charles Bally: "des moments de décevante inadvertance"?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durrer, Sylvie

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Les problématiques rassemblées parfois sous la désignation de "Language and Gender" figurent également dans les publications du linguiste suisse Charles Bally. Cet axe de réflexion, qui n’a guère été remarqué dans son œuvre, mérite d’être mis en lumière, non pas pour faire de Bally un féministe avant l’heure, mais simplement, parce qu’il nous semble important de documenter l’histoire d’une problématique en plein essor. Cet article a donc pour objectif de montrer que la question du traitement des femmes et du féminin par la langue française suscite de nombreuses réflexions dès la fin du XIXe. Il s’agira de procéder à une histoire critique d’un épisode de la "linguistique générique", afin de voir si les actuelles thématiques de cette orientation sont abordées, sous quels aspects, dans quels contextes, avec quels résultats, etc. On pourrait alors être surpris-e de découvrir que Charles Bally n’était pas un cas isolé, mais qu’un grand nombre de contemporains (Nyrop, Brunot, Vendryès, Damourette & Pichon, Dauzat, etc., se sont eux aussi interrogés, plus ou moins longuement, sur les rapports entre les femmes, le féminin et le langage. Les réflexions "génériques" de Bally et de ses confrères ne sauraient donc être regardées comme de simples "moments décevante inadvertance".

  13. The social image of drinking - mass media campaigns may inadvertently increase binge drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Friederike; Kohlmann, Karoline; Monter, Anne; Ameis, Nina

    2017-10-01

    Mass media campaigns that promote responsible drinking are rarely tested for their usefulness in reducing heavy alcohol consumption. Existing campaigns that appeal to responsible drinking while simultaneously displaying young people in social drinking situations may even have paradoxical effects. To examine such possible effects, we drew on a real-world media campaign, which we systematically modified on the basis of recent prototype research. We pilot tested questionnaires (using n = 41 participants), developed two different sets of posters in the style of an existing campaign (n = 39) and investigated their effectiveness (n = 102). In the main study, young men were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: sociable or unsociable binge drinker prototype condition or a control group. Outcome variables were intention, behavioural willingness, attitude, subjective norm, self-efficacy, prototype evaluation and prototype similarity with respect to binge drinking. Binge drinking as a habit was included to control for the fact that habitual drinking in social situations is hard to overcome and poses a particular challenge to interventions. The manipulation check showed that the experimental variation (sociable vs. unsociable drinker prototype condition) was successful. Results of the main study showed that the sociable drinker prototype condition resulted in a higher willingness and - for those with less of a habit - a higher intention to binge drink the next weekend. The unsociable drinker prototype condition had no effects. The results imply that the social components of mass media campaigns might inadvertently exacerbate binge drinking in young men. We therefore advocate against campaigns including aspects of alcohol consumption that might be positively associated with drinker prototype perception. Finally, we provide suggestions for future research.

  14. Safety significance of inadvertent operation of motor-operated valves in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruger, C.J.; Higgins, J.C.; Carbonaro, J.F.; Hall, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    Concerns about the consequences of valve mispositioning were brought to the forefront following an event at Davis Besse in 1985. The concern related to the ability to reposition open-quotes position-changeableclose quotes motor-operated valves (MOVs) from the control room in the event of their inadvertent operation and was documented in U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) Bulletin 85-03 and Generic Letter (GL) 89-10. The mispositioned MOVs may not be able to be returned to their required position due to high differential pressure or high flow conditions across the valves. The inability to reposition such valves may have significantly safety consequences, as in the Davis Besse event. However, full consideration of such mispositioning in safety analyses and in MOV test programs can be labor intensive and expensive. Industry raised concerns that consideration of position-changeable valves under GL 89-10 would not decrease the probability of core damage to an extent that would justify licensee costs. As a response, Brookhaven National Laboratory has conducted separate scoping studies for both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) using probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques to determine if such valve mispositioning by itself is significant to safety. The approach used internal events PRA models to survey the order of magnitude of the risk-significance of valve mispositioning by considering the failure of selected position-changeable MOVs. The change in core damage frequency was determined for each valve considered, and the results were presented as a risk increase ratio for each of four assumed MOV failure rates. The risk increase ratios resulting from this failure rate sensitivity study can be used as a basis for a determination of the risk-significance of the MOV mispositioning issues for BWRs and PWRs

  15. Potential impact of DOE's performance objective for protection of inadvertent intruders on low-level waste disposals at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Order 5820.2A, Chapter III, specifies performance objectives for disposal of low-level radioactive waste which include limits on effective dose equivalent for inadvertent intruders. This paper investigates the potential impact of the performance objective for protection of inadvertent intruders on the acceptability of waste disposals in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The analysis is based on radionuclide inventories and waste volumes for recent disposals in SWSA 6 and calculated doses to an inadvertent intruder per unit concentration of radionuclides in disposed waste for assumed exposure scenarios

  16. 2016 Survey of State-Level Health Resources for Men and Boys: Identification of an Inadvertent and Remediable Service and Health Disparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadich, Ana; Llamas, Ramon P; Giorgianni, Salvatore; Stephenson, Colin; Nwaiwu, Chimezie

    2018-03-01

    This survey evaluated resources available to men and boys at the state level including state public health departments (SPHDs), other state agencies, and governor's offices. Most of the resources and programs are found in the SPHDs and these administer state-initiated and federally funded health programs to provide services and protection to a broad range of populations; however, many men's health advocates believe that SPHDs have failed to create equivalent services for men and boys, inadvertently creating a health disparity. Men's Health Network conducts a survey of state resources, including those found in SPHDs, every 2 years to identify resources available for men and women, determine the extent of any disparity, and establish a relationship with SPHD officials. Data were obtained from all 50 states and Washington, D.C. An analysis of the 2016 survey data indicates that there are few resources allocated and a lack of readily available information on health and preventive care created specifically for men and boys. The data observed that most health information intended for men and boys was scarce among states or oftentimes included on websites that primarily focused on women's health. A potential result of this is a loss of engagement with appropriate health-care providers due to a lack of information. This study continues to validate the disparity between health outcomes for women and men. It continues to highlight the need for better resource allocation, outreach, and health programs specifically tailored to men and boys in order to improve overall community well-being.

  17. Peri-operative Blood Transfusion in open Suprapubic Transvesical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION: Open simple prostatectomy is the most effective and the most durable method of controlling symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia, especially in sub- Saharan Africa, where TURP set and expertise are unavailable in most health institutions. The risk of perioperative heterologous blood ...

  18. Predictors of peri-operative risk acceptance by South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients must balance the considerations in favour of surgery with those favouring .... Carotid artery disease and peripheral vascular disease. 4 (6.7%). Infra-renal ..... pain? the impact of current pain on decisions about future dental treatments.

  19. A practical approach to managing diabetes in the peri- operative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article focuses on perioperative diabetes management of ... Federation reports that there are currently ~1.8 million adults in ... In South Africa (SA), it is estimated that ... In this review, the authors discuss DM within the SA context. .... glucose; ICU = intensive care unit; VRIII = variable rate intravenous insulin infusion.

  20. Anaesthesia and peri-operative care for laparoscopic donor nephrectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.R.A.M. Mertens Zur Borg (Ingrid)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractA successful renal transplant for patients with kidney failure reduces mortality rate when compared to patients who continue dialysis. Organ donation from living donors has significant better results over organ donation from deceased donors. Traditionally the surgical

  1. Are lipophilic beta-blockers preferable for peri-operative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is therefore doubt whether atenolol is the correct cardioprotective drug in the surgical setting. It is possible that some of the physiochemical properties of atenolol (hydrophilic and cardioselective) may decrease it's efficacy in comparison to its more lipophilic congeners (such as propranolol, metoprolol, bisoprolol and ...

  2. Abnormal peri-operative haemorrhage in asymptomatic patients is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accordingly, we undertook two studies to detertnine whether it could be justified in patients without a history of abnormal bleeding. In the first of these, 45 of 159 patients were excluded because of aspirin ingestion and a further 3 because of positive bleeding history so that prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin ...

  3. Peri-operative management for excision of plexiform ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case report: A 28-year-old female weighing 78 kilograms presented at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH) with a huge left thigh mass, nodules and brownish skin patches (café-au-lait spots) all over her body. Plexiform neurofibromatosis was diagnosed. The mass was subsequently excised under ...

  4. Abnormal peri-operative haemorrhage in asymptomatic patients is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    history so that prothrotnbin titne, activated partial throtnboplastin titne, bleeding .... was used as a screen in 12 000 patients and was unable to identify the ... 1982; 117: 48-51. 2. Barber A, Green D, Galluzzo T, Chung-Hsin T. The bleeding time.

  5. Are lipophilic beta-blockers preferable for peri-operative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    management of hypertension and post myocardial infarction.4-6. Are lipophilic ... studies in hypertensive medical patients showed no difference in cardiovascular ... atenolol and bendroflumethiazide arm.7 In meta-analyses of beta-blocker ...

  6. Control and Management of Radioactive Material Inadvertently Incorporated into Scrap Metal. Proceedings of an International Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive substances can become associated with scrap metal in various ways and if not discovered they can be incorporated into steel and non-ferrous metals through the melting process. This can cause health hazards as well as environmental concerns and there can be serious commercial implications. Numerous incidents have occurred in recent years involving the discovery of radioactive substances in scrap metal and, in some cases, in metal from the melting process. These incidents have proved to be very costly in relation to the recovery and cleanup operations required but also in terms of the potential loss of confidence of the industry in scrap metal as a resource. This has led the scrap metal industry to seek ways of managing the problem. In most countries, shipments of scrap metal are monitored but at different points in the distribution chain and to different extents and efficiencies. As yet, only limited efforts towards unifying and harmonizing monitoring strategies and methods in the context of scrap metal have been made at the international level. The Conference was organized into five sessions: the global perspective, national policies and strategies, compliance with radiological criteria, management of incidents with contaminated scrap metal, and improving confidence and protecting the interests of stakeholders. The aim of the first session was to present the views and perspectives of the different organizations concerned with radioactive material in scrap metal, scrap metal recycling, steel making, radiation source security and safety and international trade and economics. The second session covered some of the national policies and strategies being used to address the control of radioactive material that has been inadvertently incorporated into scrap metal were presented. In addition to the oral presentations, contributions describing the situation in many countries of the world in the form of posters were displayed. The many posters reporting national

  7. Control and Management of Radioactive Material Inadvertently Incorporated into Scrap Metal. Proceedings of an International Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-15

    Radioactive substances can become associated with scrap metal in various ways and if not discovered they can be incorporated into steel and non-ferrous metals through the melting process. This can cause health hazards as well as environmental concerns and there can be serious commercial implications. Numerous incidents have occurred in recent years involving the discovery of radioactive substances in scrap metal and, in some cases, in metal from the melting process. These incidents have proved to be very costly in relation to the recovery and cleanup operations required but also in terms of the potential loss of confidence of the industry in scrap metal as a resource. This has led the scrap metal industry to seek ways of managing the problem. In most countries, shipments of scrap metal are monitored but at different points in the distribution chain and to different extents and efficiencies. As yet, only limited efforts towards unifying and harmonizing monitoring strategies and methods in the context of scrap metal have been made at the international level. The Conference was organized into five sessions: the global perspective, national policies and strategies, compliance with radiological criteria, management of incidents with contaminated scrap metal, and improving confidence and protecting the interests of stakeholders. The aim of the first session was to present the views and perspectives of the different organizations concerned with radioactive material in scrap metal, scrap metal recycling, steel making, radiation source security and safety and international trade and economics. The second session covered some of the national policies and strategies being used to address the control of radioactive material that has been inadvertently incorporated into scrap metal were presented. In addition to the oral presentations, contributions describing the situation in many countries of the world in the form of posters were displayed. The many posters reporting national

  8. A proposed alternative approach for protection of inadvertent human intruders from buried Department of Energy low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The burial of radioactive wastes creates a legacy. To limit the impact of this legacy on future generations, we establish and comply with performance objectives. This paper reviews performance objectives for the long-term isolation of buried radioactive wastes; identifies regulatorly-defined performance objectives for protecting the inadvertent human intruder (IHI) from buried low-level radioactive waste (LLW); (3) discusses a shortcoming of the current approach; and (4) offers an alternative approach for protecting the IHI. This alternative approach is written specifically for the burial of US Department of Energy (DOE) wastes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), although the approach might be applied at other DOE burial sites

  9. Study of 'inadvertent human intrusion or rare natural event scenarios' for sub-surface disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatani, Takayoshi; Ishitoya, Kimihide; Funabashi, Hideyuki; Sugaya, Toshikatsu; Sone, Tomoyuki; Shimada, Hidemitsu; Nakai, Kunihiro

    2010-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is making preparations for the sub-surface disposal of radioactive wastes, in an integrated fashion according to the properties of the waste material regardless of the generators or waste sources. In this study, 'Inadvertent Human Intrusion or Rare Natural Event Scenarios' of 'Three Types scenarios' was considered according to the standard of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) on the sub-surface disposal system that was based on 'Basic Policy for Safety Regulation Concerning Land Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste (Interim Report)' by Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan (NSC). Selection of the assessed scenarios, development of the assessment tool and preliminary exposure dose assessment for general public were conducted. Among the assessed scenarios, the exposure dose of 'well water drinking scenario' was the highest under the very conservative assessment condition. This scenario assumed that the groundwater in Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) was directly used as drinking water without any dilution. Although this was very conservative condition and the result exceeded 10 mSv/y, it stayed under the upper limit of standard dose value for 'Inadvertent Human Intrusion or Rare Natural Event Scenarios' (10 - 100 mSv/y). (author)

  10. Chemical Facial Cellulitis Due to Inadvertent Injection of Formalin into Oral Tissue Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bector, Aditi; Virk, Pawandeep Sandhu; Arakeri, Gururaj

    2015-11-05

    This paper reports the accidental injection of formalin into oral tissue space, in an 8-year old child resulting in chemical facial necrotizing cellulitis and its management. The common practice of keeping formalin in local anesthesia vials should be avoided by dental clinics, to prevent such unfortunate incidents.

  11. Chemical facial cellulitis due to inadvertent injection of formalin into oral tissue space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Bector

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the accidental injection of formalin into oral tissue space, in an 8-year old child resulting in chemical facial necrotizing cellulitis and its management. The common practice of keeping formalin in local anesthesia vials should be avoided by dental clinics, to prevent such unfortunate incidents.

  12. Lethal Consequences in an Infant with Myelomeningocele Following an Inadvertent Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelomeningocele (MMC is a protrusion of spinal cord contents and meninges through a vertebral defect. Iatrogenic deaths of patients with MMC are rarely encountered in forensic practice. In our case, a 3-month-old female was born with a lumbosacral cyst, the size of which had been increasing gradually over age. There was no neurological, orthopedic, or urologic dysfunction. On the day of her death, she received a repetitive and rapid lumbosacral cyst puncture drainage procedure, performed by an illegal medical practitioner. Postmortem autopsy findings confirmed a diagnosis of MMC and the cause of death to be cerebellar tonsillar herniation. This is a pathetic case of preventable infant death. This report suggests that the possibility of MMC should be considered in infants born with a lumbosacral cyst, and aspiration is inadvisable. Besides, forensic autopsy has a valuable role in determining the exact cause of death, identifying, or excluding iatrogenic factors that may be relevant to death following a medical procedure. A final point is that prevention programs should be developed, especially by the health care sectors to reduce such tragedy.

  13. "Real men don't": constructions of masculinity and inadvertent harm in public health interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul J; Lee, Joseph G L; Dworkin, Shari L

    2014-06-01

    Research shows that constraining aspects of male gender norms negatively influence both women's and men's health. Messaging that draws on norms of masculinity in health programming has been shown to improve both women's and men's health, but some types of public health messaging (e.g., Man Up Monday, a media campaign to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted infections) can reify harmful aspects of hegemonic masculinity that programs are working to change. We critically assess the deployment of hegemonic male norms in the Man Up Monday campaign. We draw on ethical paradigms in public health to challenge programs that reinforce harmful aspects of gender norms and suggest the use of gender-transformative interventions that challenge constraining masculine norms and have been shown to have a positive effect on health behaviors.

  14. Experience during the monitoring of inactive scrap for the detection of inadvertent presence of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Ranjit; Anoj Kumar; Vikas; Singh, Rajvir; Patra, R.P.; Vikas Kumar; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes about the experience gained during the radiation monitoring of inactive scrap generated at various nuclear facilities. This type surveillance is carried out to prevent the spread of radioactivity in public domain and also as requirement by regulatory authorities. The inspection and certification of scrap material from nuclear facilities is a regulatory requirement to ensure that no radioactive material reaches public domain. This paper describes the methodology and experience in detection of radioactivity at inactive Scrap monitoring facility. Inactive scraps (metallic and non metallic) generated from various nuclear facilities of BARC, Trombay is dispatched to Trombay Village Store (TVS) for temporary storage before auction to the public. The monitoring at the facility includes visual inspection and radiation measurement before loading the scrap in the truck. An online PC based monitoring system and portable monitoring instruments in the range (nSv/h-µSv/h) are used to carry out radiation monitoring of inactive scrap loaded in a vehicle. Radioactive source of high activity with potential for serious environmental hazard has not been detected, but few cases of presence of radioactive/contaminated material (MS plate/equipments with low level of 137 Cs contamination) have been detected and identified using portable gamma spectrometer. Implementation of strict regulatory measures and radiation monitoring at nuclear facilities can minimize the probability of radioactive material reaching the public domain. The methodology followed for monitoring of inactive scrap is found to be effective even for detection of presence of radioactivity in scrap if any. (author)

  15. Inadvertent Splenectomy During Resection for Colorectal Cancer Does Not Increase Long-term Mortality in a Propensity Score Model: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolle, Ida; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Schefte, David F; Bulut, Orhan; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Rosenstock, Steffen J

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies suggest that long-term mortality is increased in patients who undergo splenectomy during surgery for colorectal cancer. The reason for this association remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between inadvertent splenectomy attributed to iatrogenic lesion to the spleen during colorectal cancer resections and long-term mortality in a national cohort of unselected patients. This was a retrospective, nationwide cohort study. Data were collected from the database of the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group and merged with data from the National Patient Registry and the National Pathology Databank. Danish patients with colorectal cancer undergoing curatively intended resection between 2001 and 2011 were included in the study. The primary outcome was long-term mortality for patients surviving 30 days after surgery. Secondary outcomes were 30-day mortality and risk factors for inadvertent splenectomy. Multivariable and propensity-score matched Cox regression analyses were used to adjust for potential confounding. In total, 23,727 patients were included, of which 277 (1.2%) underwent inadvertent splenectomy. There was no association between inadvertent splenectomy and long-term mortality (adjusted HR = 1.15 (95% CI, 0.95-1.40); p = 0.16) in the propensity score-matched model, whereas 30-day mortality was significantly increased (adjusted HR = 2.31 (95% CI, 1.71-3.11); p splenectomy was most often seen during left hemicolectomy (left hemicolectomy vs right hemicolectomy: OR = 24.76 (95% CI, 15.30-40.06); p splenectomy during resection for colorectal cancer does not seem to increase long-term mortality. The previously reported reduced overall survival after inadvertent splenectomy may be explained by excess mortality in the immediate postoperative period.

  16. Causal Analysis of the Inadvertent Contact with an Uncontrolled Electrical Hazardous Energy Source (120 Volts AC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. James; Dennis E. Raunig; Sean S. Cunningham

    2014-10-01

    On September 25, 2013, a Health Physics Technician (HPT) was performing preparations to support a pneumatic transfer from the HFEF Decon Cell to the Room 130 Glovebox in HFEF, per HFEF OI 3165 section 3.5, Field Preparations. This activity involves an HPT setting up and climbing a portable ladder to remove the 14-C meter probe from above ball valve HBV-7. The HPT source checks the meter and probe and then replaces the probe above HBV-7, which is located above Hood ID# 130 HP. At approximately 13:20, while reaching past the HBV-7 valve position indicator switches in an attempt to place the 14-C meter probe in the desired location, the HPT’s left forearm came in contact with one of the three sets of exposed terminals on the valve position indication switches for HBV 7. This resulted in the HPT receiving an electrical shock from a 120 Volt AC source. Upon moving the arm, following the electrical shock, the HPT noticed two exposed electrical connections on a switch. The HPT then notified the HFEF HPT Supervisor, who in turn notified the MFC Radiological Controls Manager and HFEF Operations Manager of the situation. Work was stopped in the area and the hazard was roped off and posted to prevent access to the hazard. The HPT was escorted by the HPT Supervisor to the MFC Dispensary and then preceded to CFA medical for further evaluation. The individual was evaluated and released without any medical restrictions. Causal Factor (Root Cause) A3B3C01/A5B2C08: - Knowledge based error/Attention was given to wrong issues - Written Communication content LTA, Incomplete/situation not covered The Causal Factor (root cause) was attention being given to the wrong issues during the creation, reviews, verifications, and actual performance of HFEF OI-3165, which covers the need to perform the weekly source check and ensure placement of the probe prior to performing a “rabbit” transfer. This resulted in the hazard not being identified and mitigated in the procedure. Work activities

  17. Wellbore enlargement investigation: Potential analogs to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant during inadvertent intrusion of the repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boak, D.M.; Dotson, L.; Aguilar, R.

    1997-01-01

    This study involved the evaluation and documentation of cases in which petroleum wellbores were enlarged beyond the nominal hole diameter as a consequence of erosion during exploratory drilling, particularly as a function of gas flow into the wellbore during blowout conditions. A primary objective was to identify analogs to potential wellbore enlargement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during inadvertent human intrusion. Secondary objectives were to identify drilling scenarios associated with enlargement, determine the physical extent of enlargement, and establish the physical properties of the formation in which the enlargement occurred. No analogs of sufficient quality to establish quantitative limits on wellbore enlargement at the WIPP disposal system were identified. However, some information was obtained regarding the frequency of petroleum well blowouts and the likelihood that such blowouts would bridge downhole, self-limiting the surface release of disposal-system material. Further work would be necessary, however, to determine the conditions under which bridging could occur and the extent to which the bridging might be applicable to WIPP. In addition, data on casing sizes of petroleum boreholes in the WIPP vicinity support the use of a 12-1/4 inch borehole size in WIPP performance assessment calculations. Finally, although data are limited, there was no evidence of significant wellbore enlargement in any of three blowouts that occur-red in wellbores in the Delaware Basin (South Culebra Bluff Unit No. 1, Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) 6, and WIPP 12)

  18. Inadvertent chest tube insertion in congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation and congenital lobar emphysema-highlighting an important problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, Shailesh M; Choudhury, Subhasis Roy; Solanki, Ravi S; Shetty, Gurucharan S; Agarwala, Surenderkumar

    2013-01-01

    Chest tube insertion in congenital cystic lung lesions is an important problem in children with acute respiratory distress having a cystic lucent lesion on chest radiograph. To evaluate the imaging findings and complications in cases of congenital cystic lung lesions with chest tube insertion and suggest the role of appropriate imaging for management of these patients. Chest radiographs and CT scans of children with congenital cystic lung lesions who had inadvertent chest tube insertion preoperatively were retrospectively reviewed for imaging appearances and complications. Fifteen patients comprising 10 cases of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) and 5 cases of congenital lobar emphysema (CLE) were included. Majority of the cases were infants. CCAM was misdiagnosed as complicated pneumatocele (n = 5) and pneumothorax (n = 5), while CLE was misdiagnosed as tension pneumothorax (n = 5) on the chest radiograph findings. Final diagnosis was made on CT and operative findings with histopathology. Complications noted were pneumothorax, hydropneumothorax, and infection in cases of CCAM, and change in imaging appearance and pneumothorax in cases of CLE. Chest tube insertion in congenital cystic lesions increases the rate of associated complications. Chest CT has a definite role in early diagnosis and deciding appropriate management in these cases

  19. Evaluation of costs accrued through inadvertent continuation of hospital-initiated proton pump inhibitor therapy for stress ulcer prophylaxis beyond hospital discharge: a retrospective chart review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sooyoung Shin Ajou University College of Pharmacy, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea Background: Stress ulcers and related upper gastrointestinal bleeding are well-known complications in intensive care unit (ICU patients. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI-based stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP has been widely prescribed in noncritically ill patients who are at low risk for clinically significant bleeding, which is then injudiciously continued after hospital discharge. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence of inappropriate prescribing of PPI-based preventative therapy in ICU versus non-ICU patients that subsequently continued postdischarge, and to estimate the costs incurred by the unwarranted outpatient continuation of PPI therapy.Methods: A retrospective review of patient data at a major teaching hospital in Korea was performed. During the 4-year study period, adult patients who were newly initiated on PPI-based SUP during hospital admission and subsequently discharged on a PPI without a medical indication for such therapy were captured for data analysis. The incidence rates of inappropriate prescribing of PPIs were compared between ICU and non-ICU patients, and the costs associated with such therapy were also examined.Results: A total of 4,410 patients, more than half of the inpatient-initiated PPI users, were deemed to have been inadvertently prescribed a PPI at discharge in the absence of a medical need for acid suppression. The incidence of inappropriate outpatient continuation of the prophylaxis was higher among ICU patients compared with non-ICU patients (57.7% versus 52.2%, respectively; P=0.001. The total expenditure accrued through the continuation of nonindicated PPI therapy was approximately US$40,175.Conclusion: This study confirmed that excess usage of PPIs for SUP has spread to low-risk, non-ICU patients. The overuse of unwarranted PPI therapy can incur large health care expenditure, as well as clinical complications

  20. TRACE and TRAC-BF1 benchmark against Leibstadt plant data during the event inadvertent opening of relief valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekhri, A.; Baumann, P. [KernkraftwerkLeibstadt AG, 5325 Leibstadt (Switzerland); Wicaksono, D. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology Zurich ETH, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G. [Inst. for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety ISIRYM, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia UPV, Cami de Vera s/n, 46021 Valencia (Spain)

    2012-07-01

    In framework of introducing TRACE code to transient analyses system codes for Leibstadt Power Plant (KKL), a conversion process of existing TRAC-BF1 model to TRACE has been started within KKL. In the first step, TRACE thermal-hydraulic model for KKL has been developed based on existing TRAC-BF1 model. In order to assess the code models a simulation of plant transient event is required. In this matter simulations of inadvertent opening of 8 relief valves event have been performed. The event occurs at KKL during normal operation, and it started when 8 relief valves open resulting in depressurization of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). The reactor was shutdown safely by SCRAM at low level. The high pressure core spray (HPCS) and the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) have been started manually in order to compensate the level drop. The remaining water in the feedwater (FW) lines flashes due to saturation conditions originated from RPV depressurization and refills the reactor downcomer. The plant boundary conditions have been used in the simulations and the FW flow rate has been adjusted for better prediction. The simulations reproduce the plant data with good agreement. It can be concluded that the TRAC-BF1 existing model has been used successfully to develop the TRACE model and the results of the calculations have shown good agreement with plant recorded data. Beside the modeling assessment, the TRACE and TRAC-BF1 capabilities to reproduce plant physical behavior during the transient have shown satisfactory results. The first step of developing KKL model for TRACE has been successfully achieved and this model is further developed in order to simulate more complex plant behavior such as Turbine Trip. (authors)

  1. TRACE and TRAC-BF1 benchmark against Leibstadt plant data during the event inadvertent opening of relief valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekhri, A.; Baumann, P.; Wicaksono, D.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G.

    2012-01-01

    In framework of introducing TRACE code to transient analyses system codes for Leibstadt Power Plant (KKL), a conversion process of existing TRAC-BF1 model to TRACE has been started within KKL. In the first step, TRACE thermal-hydraulic model for KKL has been developed based on existing TRAC-BF1 model. In order to assess the code models a simulation of plant transient event is required. In this matter simulations of inadvertent opening of 8 relief valves event have been performed. The event occurs at KKL during normal operation, and it started when 8 relief valves open resulting in depressurization of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). The reactor was shutdown safely by SCRAM at low level. The high pressure core spray (HPCS) and the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) have been started manually in order to compensate the level drop. The remaining water in the feedwater (FW) lines flashes due to saturation conditions originated from RPV depressurization and refills the reactor downcomer. The plant boundary conditions have been used in the simulations and the FW flow rate has been adjusted for better prediction. The simulations reproduce the plant data with good agreement. It can be concluded that the TRAC-BF1 existing model has been used successfully to develop the TRACE model and the results of the calculations have shown good agreement with plant recorded data. Beside the modeling assessment, the TRACE and TRAC-BF1 capabilities to reproduce plant physical behavior during the transient have shown satisfactory results. The first step of developing KKL model for TRACE has been successfully achieved and this model is further developed in order to simulate more complex plant behavior such as Turbine Trip. (authors)

  2. Adherence to a Gluten-Free Diet in Mexican Subjects with Gluten-Related Disorders: A High Prevalence of Inadvertent Gluten Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Cervantes, Karen Lizzette; Romero-López, Angélica Viridiana; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos Alberto; Uscanga-Domínguez, Luis F

    2016-01-01

    The rate of compliance with a gluten-free diet in patients with gluten-related disorders is unknown in most Latin American countries. To study the adherence to a gluten-free diet of Mexican individuals with celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity at the time of their first medical and nutritional consultation at a tertiary referral center. A cross-sectional study was performed. A specific questionnaire was used to gather information on demographics, clinical condition, and self-reported adherence to a gluten-free diet, and to determine strict compliance and intentional or inadvertent gluten consumption. All questionnaires were applied by a nutritionist with expertise in gluten-related disorders. Fifty-six patients with celiac disease and 24 with non-celiac gluten sensitivity were included. Overall, 46 (57.5%) subjects perceived themselves as strictly adherent; however, inadvertent gluten intake was frequent in both celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity patients (39.2 vs. 33.3%; p = 0.2). Intentional consumption was more prevalent in subjects with celiac disease (48.8 vs. 29.1%; p = 0.048) and individuals with non-celiac gluten sensitivity showed better adherence (37.5 vs. 12.5%; p = 0.035). The importance of a gluten-free diet is underestimated by Mexican patients with celiac disease. The role of a team with expertise in gluten-related disorders is essential to identify inadvertent gluten intake.

  3. Long-Term Performance of Transuranic Waste Inadvertently Disposed in a Shallow Land Burial Trench at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shott, Gregory J.; Yucel, Vefa

    2009-01-01

    In 1986, 21 m3 of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently disposed in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TRU waste must be disposed in accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the only facility meeting these requirements. The National Research Council, however, has found that exhumation of buried TRU waste for disposal in a deep geologic repository may not be warranted when the effort, exposures, and expense of retrieval are not commensurate with the risk reduction achieved. The long-term risks of leaving the TRU waste in-place are evaluated in two probabilistic performance assessments. A composite analysis, assessing the dose from all disposed waste and interacting sources of residual contamination, estimates an annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) of 0.01 mSv, or 3 percent of the dose constraint. A 40 CFR 191 performance assessment also indicates there is reasonable assurance of meeting all requirements. The 40 CFR 191.15 annual mean TEDE for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.055 mSv at 10,000 years, or approximately 37 percent of the 0.15 mSv individual protection requirement. In both assessments greater than 99 percent of the dose is from co-disposed low-level waste. The simulated probability of the 40 CFR 191.13 cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the release limit is estimated to be 0.0093 and less than 0.0001, respectively. Site characterization data and hydrologic process modeling support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis indicates that there is reasonable assurance of meeting all regulatory requirements. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the results

  4. Pregnancy outcome after 1st-trimester inadvertent exposure to barium sulphate as a contrast media for upper gastrointestinal tract radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, B H; Lee, K S; Han, J Y; Choi, J S; Ahn, H K; Ryu, H M; Yang, J H; Han, H W; Nava-Ocampo, A A

    2011-10-01

    Despite barium being used as a contrast media for decades, the specific assessment of its safety in pregnant women is scarce. We are reporting the favourable pregnancy outcome in women who were inadvertently exposed to barium swallow and associated ionising radiation, early in pregnancy. A control group of age- and gravidity-matched unexposed pregnant women was also included. There were 32 live-born babies in the exposed group and 94 in the control group. Women had undergone diagnostic upper gastrointestinal tract (UGT) fluoroscopic examination at 3.3 ± 1.5 weeks' gestation. Estimated maternal radiation dose secondary to barium swallow varied widely, the maximum dose was estimated to be 2.45 mSv. Similar pregnancy outcomes were observed between the groups. The number of babies born with major malformations was not significantly different (p = 1.0) between cases and controls: one (3.1%) vs three (3.2%), respectively. In conclusion, our small prospective cohort study of women suggests no association between inadvertent exposure to ionising radiation and barium sulphate during fluoroscopic barium swallow and adverse fetal outcomes.

  5. Stepping in Place While Voluntarily Turning Around Produces a Long-Lasting Posteffect Consisting in Inadvertent Turning While Stepping Eyes Closed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Sozzi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Training subjects to step in place on a rotating platform while maintaining a fixed body orientation in space produces a posteffect consisting in inadvertent turning around while stepping in place eyes closed (podokinetic after-rotation, PKAR. We tested the hypothesis that voluntary turning around while stepping in place also produces a posteffect similar to PKAR. Sixteen subjects performed 12 min of voluntary turning while stepping around their vertical axis eyes closed and 12 min of stepping in place eyes open on the center of a platform rotating at 60°/s (pretests. Then, subjects continued stepping in place eyes closed for at least 10 min (posteffect. We recorded the positions of markers fixed to head, shoulder, and feet. The posteffect of voluntary turning shared all features of PKAR. Time decay of angular velocity, stepping cadence, head acceleration, and ratio of angular velocity after to angular velocity before were similar between both protocols. Both postrotations took place inadvertently. The posteffects are possibly dependent on the repeated voluntary contraction of leg and foot intrarotating pelvic muscles that rotate the trunk over the stance foot, a synergy common to both protocols. We propose that stepping in place and voluntary turning can be a scheme ancillary to the rotating platform for training body segment coordination in patients with impairment of turning synergies of various origin.

  6. The use of protective barriers to deter inadvertent human intrusion into a mined geologic facility for the disposal of radioactive waste: A review of previous investigations and potential concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolan, T.L.

    1993-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is evaluating the feasibility of developing protective barrier system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to thwart inadvertent human intrusion into this radioactive-waste disposal system for a period of 9,900 years after assumed loss of active institutional controls. The protective barrier system would be part of a series of enduring passive institutional controls whose long-term function will be to reduce the likelihood of inadvertent human activities (e.g., exploratory drilling for resources) that could disrupt the WIPP disposal system

  7. “Real Men Don't”: Constructions of Masculinity and Inadvertent Harm in Public Health Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph G. L.; Dworkin, Shari L.

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that constraining aspects of male gender norms negatively influence both women’s and men’s health. Messaging that draws on norms of masculinity in health programming has been shown to improve both women’s and men’s health, but some types of public health messaging (e.g., Man Up Monday, a media campaign to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted infections) can reify harmful aspects of hegemonic masculinity that programs are working to change. We critically assess the deployment of hegemonic male norms in the Man Up Monday campaign. We draw on ethical paradigms in public health to challenge programs that reinforce harmful aspects of gender norms and suggest the use of gender-transformative interventions that challenge constraining masculine norms and have been shown to have a positive effect on health behaviors. PMID:24825202

  8. The surgical care improvement project and prevention of post-operative infection, including surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Laura H; Politano, Amani D; Sawyer, Robert G

    2011-06-01

    In response to inconsistent compliance with infection prevention measures, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services collaborated with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the Surgical Infection Prevention (SIP) project, introduced in 2002. Quality improvement measures were developed to standardize processes to increase compliance. In 2006, the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) developed out of the SIP project and its process measures. These initiatives, published in the Specifications Manual for National Inpatient Quality Measures, outline process and outcome measures. This continually evolving manual is intended to provide standard quality measures to unify documentation and track standards of care. Seven of the SCIP initiatives apply to the peri-operative period: Prophylactic antibiotics should be received within 1 h prior to surgical incision (1), be selected for activity against the most probable antimicrobial contaminants (2), and be discontinued within 24 h after the surgery end-time (3); (4) euglycemia should be maintained, with well-controlled morning blood glucose concentrations on the first two post-operative days, especially in cardiac surgery patients; (6) hair at the surgical site should be removed with clippers or by depilatory methods, not with a blade; (9) urinary catheters are to be removed within the first two post-operative days; and (10) normothermia should be maintained peri-operatively. There is strong evidence that implementation of protocols that standardize practices reduce the risk of surgical infection. The SCIP initiative targets complications that account for a significant portion of preventable morbidity as well as cost. One of the goals of the SCIP guidelines was a 25% reduction in the incidence of surgical site infections from implementation through 2010. Process measures are becoming routine, and as we practice more evidence-based medicine, it falls to us, the surgeons and scientists, to be active

  9. Safety analysis of increase in heat removal from reactor coolant system with inadvertent operation of passive residual heat removal at no load conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Ge; Cao, Xuewu [School of Mechanical and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-15

    The advanced passive pressurized water reactor (PWR) is being constructed in China and the passive residual heat removal (PRHR) system was designed to remove the decay heat. During accident scenarios with increase of heat removal from the primary coolant system, the actuation of the PRHR will enhance the cooldown of the primary coolant system. There is a risk of power excursion during the cooldown of the primary coolant system. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the thermal hydraulic behavior of the reactor coolant system (RCS) at this condition. The advanced passive PWR model, including major components in the RCS, is built by SCDAP/RELAP5 code. The thermal hydraulic behavior of the core is studied for two typical accident sequences with PRHR actuation to investigate the core cooling capability with conservative assumptions, a main steam line break (MSLB) event and inadvertent opening of a steam generator (SG) safety valve event. The results show that the core is ultimately shut down by the boric acid solution delivered by Core Makeup Tank (CMT) injections. The effects of CMT boric acid concentration and the activation delay time on accident consequences are analyzed for MSLB, which shows that there is no consequential damage to the fuel or reactor coolant system in the selected conditions.

  10. Assessment of the long-term risks of inadvertent human intrusion into a proposed Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault in deep plutonic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuschke, D.M.

    1992-05-01

    This report describes the methodology developed to assess the long-term risk from inadvertent human intrusion into such a facility, and the results of its application to the proposed facility. Four intrusion scenarios were analysed, all initiated by a drilling operation. These scenarios are exposure of a member of the drilling crew, of a technologist conducting a core examination, of a construction worker and of a resident. The consequence of each scenario was estimated using standard computer codes for environmental pathways analysis and radiation dosimetry. For comparison with the risk criterion, an estimate of the probability of each scenario is also required. An event-tree methodology was used to estimate these probabilities. The estimated risks from these intrusion scenarios are several orders of magnitude below the established risk criterion. The event-tree methodology has the advantages of explicitly displaying the assumptions made, of permitting easy testing of the sensitivity of the risk estimates to assumptions, and of combining technical and sociological information

  11. An overlooked environmental issue? A review of the inadvertent formation of PCB-11 and other PCB congeners and their occurrence in consumer products and in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorkamp, Katrin

    2016-01-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are banned from production and use in most countries as they are persistent organic pollutants (POPs) of concern for environment and health. Recent research has pointed at a new environment issue resulting from the inadvertent formation of PCBs in certain processes, in particular the pigment production. PCB-11 is a major by-product in these processes, but PCB-28, PCB-52, PCB-77 as well as the nonachlorinated PCBs and PCB-209 have been found in pigments and consumer products as well. In addition to environmental emissions via point sources, in particular related to industrial and municipal wastewater, atmospheric transport seems to be important for the global distribution of PCB-11. Thus, PCB-11 has also been detected in the polar regions. Worldwide air concentrations appear relatively uniform, but maxima have been found in urban and industrialised areas. Data on the uptake and accumulation of PCB-11 in the food chain are still inconclusive: Although food web studies do not show biomagnification, PCB-11 has been detected in humans. The human exposure might originate from the direct contact to consumer products as well as from the omnipresence of PCB-11 in the environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following an inadvertent dural puncture during an emergency laparotomy for ischemic colitis – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah R

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reena Shah, Agnieszka Kubisz-Pudelko, Jeremy Reid Yeovil District Hospital, Yeovil, UK Abstract: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinico-neuroradiological syndrome characterized by various symptoms of neurological disease. It has commonly been reported in association with acute hypertension, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, sepsis, and exposure to immunosuppressants. Here, we report on a normotensive woman who developed a severe frontal headache, visual disturbances, and hypertension 3 days after undergoing an emergency laparotomy for ischemic colitis during which she suffered an inadvertent dural puncture. Neuro-imaging revealed features consistent with PRES. The patient went on to make a good recovery, being discharged 21 days postoperatively, with only minor visual disturbances and memory problems. This case highlights the importance of awareness of PRES to all specialties. On reviewing the literature, we feel that PRES may be a potential differential diagnosis to post-procedural neurological symptoms in those patients undergoing routine procedures such as spinal anesthetics or lumbar punctures. Keywords: PRES, neurological disease, lumbar puncture, spinal anesthetic

  13. Physiological and bodily changes associated with endurance athletic activities and challenges during peri-operative period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh K Dash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endurance athletic activities, which requires top level cardio respiratory system fitness are recently becoming popular in the various parts of the country. Armed Forces are forefront in participation of those sporting activities, like marathon running, prolonged swimming or cycling. It has been found to have various long term beneficial effect in body function as a result of prolonged endurance activities, but it has also found that there are various bodily changes which may affect in anaesthetising the individual during emergency and elective surgeries. Literature review of various journals related to endurance sporting activities has described those bodily changes and effects of anaesthesia and pain on those changes. Based upon the available literature a guideline has been formulated for perioperative management of those patients. Most of those available literatures are from countries other than our country. The time has come for venturing in for carrying out further studies in our scenario, especially in Armed Forces in this new horizon of anaesthesia and critical care

  14. A review of the peri-operative management of paediatric burns ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adversely affect surgical and anaesthetic outcomes were identified. Results. There were 257 males and .... morphine, this allowed for a higher turnover of patient numbers. Table 3 displays the total .... psychological effects. Premedication was.

  15. Improvement of peri-operative patient management to enable outpatient colectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasserant, P; Gosgnach, M

    2016-11-01

    Outpatient left colectomy has been described in several small series or case reports. We conducted a prospective study to determine whether an optimized management approach could allow performance of this procedure in a broader patient population. Between December 2014 and December 2015, all eligible patients were prospectively and consecutively included in this study. They all underwent surgery following the same outpatient management protocol. After discharge, patients were followed by home health nurses with surgeon follow-up visits on days 10 and 21 (D10, D21) or earlier, if necessary. During this period, 56 patients underwent a left colectomy, 47 of whom met the inclusion criteria. Seven patients refused the outpatient care approach, leaving a total of 40 patients included (8 ASA 3 [American Society of Anesthesiologists], 24 ASA 2, 8 ASA 1). All but one of the patients were able to return home the same evening. Bowel motility was restored on D1 for most patients. Two patients had abdominal pain that required a follow-up visit before D10 but their subsequent course was uneventful. No patient was re-hospitalized. An uncomplicated post-operative course was confirmed at follow-up visits on D10 and D21. Our study confirms that outpatient left colectomy is feasible for most patients, including fragile patients and/or those undergoing more complex procedures. Communication and close coordination by all stakeholders as well AS optimal organization of downstream patient care are essential to guarantee quality and safety. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Monitoring of peri-operative fluid administration by individualized goal-directed therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, M; Holte, Kathrine; Secher, N H

    2007-01-01

    (n = 725) found a reduced hospital stay. Post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and ileus were reduced in three studies and complications were reduced in four studies. Of the monitors that may be applied for goal-directed therapy, only oesophageal Doppler has been tested adequately; however......, several other options exist. CONCLUSION: Goal-directed therapy with the maximization of flow-related haemodynamic variables reduces hospital stay, PONV and complications, and facilitates faster gastrointestinal functional recovery. So far, oesophageal Doppler is recommended, but other monitors...

  17. Improving peri-operative care using an anaesthesia information management system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, F.O.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis investigates a reminder system and intends to form a proof of the concept that decision support, using patient and situation specific automated reminders, can actually improve patient outcome. The research in this thesis was planned and executed within the scope of a guideline

  18. Coronary artery angioplasty for treatment of peri-operative myocardial ischaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obal, D.; Kindgen-Milles, D.; Schoebel, F.; Schlack, W.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing numbers of elderly patients with severe co-existing medical diseases undergo major surgery. With these patients there is also an accompanying risk of age-related cardiovascular complications such as life-threatening myocardial ischaemia. We present a patient who suffered a myocardial

  19. Influence of Peri-Operative Hypothermia on Surgical Site Infection in Prolonged Gastroenterological Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Toshie; Takesue, Yoshio; Ichiki, Kaoru; Uede, Takashi; Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Uchino, Motoi

    2016-10-01

    There have been several recent studies on the correlation between intra-operative hypothermia and the occurrence of surgical site infection (SSI). Differences in the depth and timing of hypothermia and the surgical procedure may have led to conflicting results. Patients undergoing gastroenterologic surgery with a duration of >3 h were analyzed. Hypothermia was defined as a core temperature <36°C and was classified as mild (35.5-35.9°C), moderate (35.0-35.4°C), or severe (<35.0°C). Hypothermia also was classified as early-nadir (<36°C within two h of anesthesia induction) and late-nadir (after that time). Risk factors for SSIs were analyzed according to these classifications. Among 1,409 patients, 528 (37.5%) had hypothermia, which was classified as mild in 358, moderate in 137, and severe in 33. Early-nadir and late-nadir hypothermia was found in 23.7% and 13.8%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the incidence of SSIs between patients with and without hypothermia (relative risk 1.00; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-1.25; p = 0.997). However, there was a significantly greater incidence of SSIs in patients with severe hypothermia (33.3%) than in those with normothermia (19.2%; p = 0.045) or mild hypothermia (17.0%; p = 0.021). The incidence of SSIs also was significantly greater in patients with late-nadir than in those with early-nadir hypothermia (23.7% vs. 16.5%; p = 0.041). The incidence of organ/space SSIs was significantly greater in patients with late-nadir hypothermia (19.6%) than in patients with normothermia (12.7%; p = 0.012). In multivariable analysis, neither severe hypothermia (odds ratio 1.24; 95% CI 0.56-2.77] nor late-nadir hypothermia (OR 0.71; 95% CI 0.46-1.01) was an independent risk factor for SSIs. Severe and late-nadir hypothermia were associated with a greater incidence of SSIs and organ/space SSIs. However, neither of these patterns was identified as an independent risk factor for SSIs, possibly because of the small number of patients.

  20. Is peri-operative cortisol secretion related to post-operative cognitive dysfunction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasmussen, L.S.; O'Brien, J.T.; Silverstein, J.H.; Johnson, T.; Siersma, V.D.; Canet, J.; Jolles, J.; Hanning, C.D.; Kuipers, H.M.; Abildstrom, H.; Papaioannou, A.; Raeder, J.; Yli-Hankala, A.; Sneyd, J.R.; Munoz, L.; Moller, J.T.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The pattern of cortisol secretion is influenced by surgery. As cortisol can adversely affect neuronal function, this may be an important factor in the development of post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). We hypothesized that the incidence of POCD would be related to changes in

  1. A preoperative cotininury test for abdominoplasty reduces peri-operative complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunay, F; Coquerel-Beghin, D; Magalon, G; Cohen, S R; Casanova, D; Niddam, J; Milliez, P-Y; Peillon, C; Delpierre, V; Auquit-Auckbur, I

    2018-05-16

    Smoking induces complications in plastic surgery, in particular wound healing delays. Despite a 4-weeks' abstinence asking before and after surgery, some patients denied or hid their consumption. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a cotininury detection test in terms of improvement in outcomes after an abdominoplasty. This retrospective cohort study included patients who underwent an abdominoplasty with umbilical transposition and lipoaspiration. Current smokers were asked to stop smoking 4 weeks before and after surgery. After 2013, we performed a preoperative cotininury test for patients having abdominoplasty, with a cancellation of surgery in case of positive result. We analyzed the test's effectiveness on delayed healing and on other complications. Two hundred and thirty-five patients were included; 80 were tested and 21,3% had a positive test. There was significantly less delayed healing in the "screening" group than in the "no screening": 20,3% versus 41,5% (P=0,002). Alike, complications were significantly less frequent in the "screening" group than in the "no screening": 18,1% versus 42,3% (P<0,001). The routine use of the cotininury test in preoperative abdominoplasties significantly reduces risk of delayed healing and other serious complications. It is an objective test, which is simple, quick and non-invasive. Smoking cessation must be at least 4 weeks before and after the surgery. Following medical advice to cease smoking by the surgeon and anesthetist, referral to an appropriate tobacco-addiction specialist clinic may be helpful for the patient who has difficulty stopping smoking. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Peri-operative concerns in a patient with thyroid storm secondary to molar pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvir Samra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Awareness of the presence of thyroid function abnormalities in patients with molar pregnancy is important for its prompt diagnosis and management. We report the development of thyroid storm in the immediate post-operative period in a 25-year-old female who underwent evacuation of her molar pregnancy under saddle spinal block after being controlled for her thyrotoxicosis with a combination of antithyroid drugs, iodine, steroids and adrenergic blocking agents. We advocate the use of esmolol infusions up to a maximum dose of 200 μg/kg/min for immediate haemodynamic management of the patient. Optimum time needed for stabilisation of the hyper metabolic state after initiation of antithyroid drugs is still not known and evacuation of molar pregnancy remains the only definitive management of the thyrotoxic state.

  3. Inadvertent intrathecal injection of atracurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirak, Nahid; Soltani, Ghasem; Ghomian, Naiere; Hasanpour, Mohamad Reza; Mashayekhi, Zahra

    2011-04-01

    This report relates how tracurium was given by mistake, intrathecally, during spinal anesthesia, to a 38-year-old woman, who was a candidate for abdominal hysterectomy. When no analgesia was observed, the mistake in giving the injection was understood. She was evaluated postoperatively by train of four ratio, measuring her breathing rate, eye opening, and protruding of tongue at one, two, twenty-four, and forty-eight hours, and then at one and two weeks, with the final evaluation the following month. The patient had normal timings during the operation and postoperation periods, and no abnormal findings were observed through the first month. This finding was contrary to several studies, which described adverse reactions due to accidental intrathecal injection of neuromuscular blocking drugs.

  4. Inadvertent intrathecal injection of atracurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Zirak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This report relates how tracurium was given by mistake, intrathecally, during spinal anesthesia, to a 38-year-old woman, who was a candidate for abdominal hysterectomy. When no analgesia was observed, the mistake in giving the injection was understood. She was evaluated postoperatively by train of four ratio, measuring her breathing rate, eye opening, and protruding of tongue at one, two, twenty-four, and forty-eight hours, and then at one and two weeks, with the final evaluation the following month. The patient had normal timings during the operation and postoperation periods, and no abnormal findings were observed through the first month. This finding was contrary to several studies, which described adverse reactions due to accidental intrathecal injection of neuromuscular blocking drugs.

  5. Equine ulnar fracture repair with locking compression plates can be associated with inadvertent penetration of the lateral cortex of the radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuemmerle, Jan M; Kühn, Karolin; Bryner, Marco; Fürst, Anton E

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate if the use of locking head screws (LHS) in the distal holes of a locking compression plate (LCP) applied to the caudal aspect of the ulna to treat equine ulnar fractures is associated with a risk of injury to the lateral cortex of the radius. Controlled laboratory study. Cadaveric equine forelimbs (n = 8 pair). After transverse ulnar osteotomy, osteosynthesis was performed with a narrow 10-13 hole 4.5/5.0 LCP applied to the caudal aspect of each ulna. The distal 3 holes were filled with 4.5 mm cortex screws (CS) in 1 limb (group 1) and with 5.0 mm LHS contralaterally (group 2). CS were inserted in an angle deemed appropriate by the surgeon and LHS were inserted perpendicular to the plate. Implant position and injury to the lateral cortex of the radius were assessed by radiography, CT, and limb dissection. In group 1, injury of the lateral radius cortex did not occur. In group 2, 4 limbs and 6/24 LHS were associated with injury of the lateral radius cortex by penetration of a LHS. This difference was statistically significant. CS were inserted with a mean angle of 17.6° from the sagittal plane in a caudolateral-craniomedial direction. Use of LHS in the distal part of a LCP applied to the caudal aspect of the ulna is associated with a risk of inadvertent injury to the lateral cortex of the radius. © Copyright 2013 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. Assessment of the long-term risks of inadvertent human intrusion into a proposed Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault in deep plutonic rock -revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuschke, D.M.

    1996-04-01

    Canada has conducted an extensive research program on a concept of safe disposal of nuclear fuel wastes deep In plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. An essential goal of this program has been to develop and demonstrate a methodology to evaluate the performance of the facility against safety criteria established by Canada's regulatory agency, the Atomic Energy Control Board. These criteria are expressed in terms of risk, where risk is defined as the sum, over all significant scenarios, of the product of the probability of the scenario, the magnitude of the resultant dose, and the probability of a health effect per unit dose. This report describes the methodology developed to assess the long-term risk from inadvertent human intrusion into such a facility, and the results of its application to the proposed facility. Four intrusion scenarios were analysed, all initiated by a drilling operation. These scenarios are exposure of a member of the drilling crew, of a technologist conducting a core examination, of a construction worker and of a resident. The consequence of each scenario was estimated using standard computer codes for environmental pathways analysis and radiation dosimetry. For comparison with the risk criterion, an estimate of the probability of each scenario is also required. An event-tree methodology was used to estimate these probabilities. The estimated risks from these intrusion scenarios are several orders of magnitude below the established risk criterion. The event-tree methodology has the advantages of explicity displaying the assumptions made, of permitting easy testing of the sensitivity of the risk estimates to assumptions, and of combining technical and sociological information. (author). 53 refs., 8 tabs., 2 figs

  7. Assessment of the long-term risks of inadvertent human intrusion into a proposed Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault in deep plutonic rock -revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuschke, D M

    1996-04-01

    Canada has conducted an extensive research program on a concept of safe disposal of nuclear fuel wastes deep In plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. An essential goal of this program has been to develop and demonstrate a methodology to evaluate the performance of the facility against safety criteria established by Canada`s regulatory agency, the Atomic Energy Control Board. These criteria are expressed in terms of risk, where risk is defined as the sum, over all significant scenarios, of the product of the probability of the scenario, the magnitude of the resultant dose, and the probability of a health effect per unit dose. This report describes the methodology developed to assess the long-term risk from inadvertent human intrusion into such a facility, and the results of its application to the proposed facility. Four intrusion scenarios were analysed, all initiated by a drilling operation. These scenarios are exposure of a member of the drilling crew, of a technologist conducting a core examination, of a construction worker and of a resident. The consequence of each scenario was estimated using standard computer codes for environmental pathways analysis and radiation dosimetry. For comparison with the risk criterion, an estimate of the probability of each scenario is also required. An event-tree methodology was used to estimate these probabilities. The estimated risks from these intrusion scenarios are several orders of magnitude below the established risk criterion. The event-tree methodology has the advantages of explicity displaying the assumptions made, of permitting easy testing of the sensitivity of the risk estimates to assumptions, and of combining technical and sociological information. (author). 53 refs., 8 tabs., 2 figs.

  8. Assessment of the long-term risks of inadvertent human intrusion into a disposal vault in deep plutonic rock: reassessment using ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuschke, D.M.

    1996-06-01

    Canada has conducted an extensive research program on the safe disposal of nuclear fuel waste. The program has focussed on the concept of disposal in durable containers in an engineered facility or 'vault' located 500 to 1000 m deep in plutonic rock on the Canadian Shield. As part of this task, a methodology was developed to assess the long-term risk from inadvertent intrusion scenarios, and applied to a reference conceptual design of a facility for disposal of used fuel. The AECB has specified that 'the predicted radiological risk to individuals from a waste disposal facility shall not exceed 10 -6 fatal cancers and serious genetic effects in a year.' Risk is defined as the sum, of the product of the probability of the scenario, the magnitude of the resultant radiation dose, and the probability of a health effect per unit dose. The AECB also specifies that 'calculations of individual risk should be made by using the risk conversion factor of 2 x 10 -2 per sievert.' Our earlier assessment of four human intrusion scenarios showed that the estimated risk using the risk conversion factor recommended by the AECB was at least 3 orders of magnitude below the AECB risk criterion, at all times up to 10 000 a, for each of the four scenarios analysed. The AECB risk criterion and risk conversion factor are based on the recommendations of the Intemafional Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in their Publication ICRP 26. More recently, in its Publication ICRP 60, the ICRP has recommended dose factors for fatal cancers that are larger than those in ICRP 26 and an increase in the risk factor for serious hereditary effects in all future generations. Another ICRP Publication, ICRP 64, states that 'For potential exposure situations, the consideration of the basic dose response used for stochastic effects must be extended into the range of high doses where deterministic effects also occur.' For the new assessments of risk we use the estimated doses and probabilities of

  9. Optimum Operating Room Environment for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Sara; Luo, James N; Gilbert, Jack; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C

    Surgical site infections (SSI), whether they be incisional or deep, can entail major morbidity and death to patients and additional cost to the healthcare system. A significant amount of effort has gone into optimizing the surgical patient and the operating room environment to reduce SSI. Relevant guidelines and literature were reviewed. The modern practice of surgical antisepsis involves the employment of strict sterile techniques inside the operating room. Extensive guidelines are available regarding the proper operating room antisepsis as well as pre-operative preparation. The use of pre-operative antimicrobial prophylaxis has become increasingly prevalent, which also presents the challenge of opportunistic and nosocomial infections. Ongoing investigative efforts have brought about a greater appreciation of the surgical patient's endogenous microflora, use of non-bactericidal small molecules, and pre-operative microbial screening. Systematic protocols exist for optimizing the surgical sterility of the operating room to prevent SSIs. Ongoing research efforts aim to improve the precision of peri-operative antisepsis measures and personalize these measures to tailor the patient's unique microbial environment.

  10. Control of Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Material Inadvertently Incorporated into Scrap Metal and Semi-finished Products of the Metal Recycling Industries. Results of the Meetings Conducted to Develop a Draft Code of Conduct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-02-01

    In 2010, the IAEA initiated the development of a code of conduct on the transboundary movement of radioactive material inadvertently incorporated into scrap metal and semi- finished products of the metal recycling industries (Metal Recycling Code of Conduct). The Metal Recycling Code of Conduct was intended to harmonize the approaches of Member States in relation to the discovery of radioactive material that may inadvertently be present in scrap metals and semi-finished products subject to transboundary movement, and their safe handling and management to facilitate regulatory control. The Metal Recycling Code of Conduct was envisaged as being complementary to the Safety Guide on Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSG-17), which provides recommendations, principally within a national context, on the protection of workers, members of the public and the environment in relation to the control of radioactive material inadvertently incorporated in scrap metal. In February 2013, the third open-ended meeting of technical and legal experts to develop the Metal Recycling Code of Conduct was organized. The objective of this meeting was to address the comments received from Member States and to finalize the text of the draft Metal Recycling Code of Conduct. Representatives from 55 Member States, one non-Member State and the EU, together with seven observers from the metal recycling industry, reviewed the comments and revised the draft accordingly. In September 2013, in Resolution GC(57)/RES/9, the IAEA General Conference recorded that it 'Appreciates the intensive efforts undertaken by the Secretariat to develop a code of conduct on the transboundary movement of scrap metal, or materials produced from scrap metal, that may inadvertently contain radioactive material, and encourages the Secretariat to make the results of the discussion conducted on this issue available to

  11. Risk evaluation of the alternate-3A modification to the ATWS prevention/mitigation system in a BWR-4, MARK-II power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papazoglou, I.A.; Bari, R.A.; Karol, R.; Shiu, K.

    1983-01-01

    The authors present a risk evaluation of the ATWS Alternate 3A modification proposed by NRC staff in NUREG-0460 to the ATWS prevention/mitigation system in a BWR nuclear power plant. The evaluation is done relative to three risk indices: the frequency of core damage, the expected early fatalities, and the expected latent fatalities. The ATWS prevention tree includes: the mechanical subsystem of the reactor protection system, the electrical subsystem of the reactor protection system, the recirculation pump trip and the Alternate Rod Insertion System. The mitigation tree includes: standby liquid control system, opening of the relief valves, reclosing the relief valves, failure of coolant injection, inadvertent actuation of the automatic depressurization system, inadvertent operation of high-pressure injection system and containment heat removal

  12. Salmonella Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and in vegetable and fruit harvesting and packing operations may help prevent salmonellosis caused by contaminated foods. Better education of food industry workers in basic food safety and restaurant inspection procedures may prevent cross-contamination and other ...

  13. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysical (Facet) Joint Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle Choices 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen ...

  14. The impact of surgery and anesthesia on post-operative cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease development: biomarkers and preventive strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapila, Ayush K; Watts, Helena R; Wang, Tianlong; Ma, Daqing

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a major social and clinical burden in the elderly, affecting 5% of people aged over 65 and 20% aged over 80. Despite improved management, a cure has not been found and hence analysis of predisposing factors to identify preventive strategies has become increasingly important. Surgery and anesthesia have been proposed to increase the incidence of post-operative cognitive decline (POCD) and AD. This is hypothesized to be the result of a malignant neuroinflammatory response and subsequent synaptic impairment in the elderly and susceptible individuals. As a result, strategies are being explored to prevent surgery and anesthesia induced cognitive impairment. Whereas previously the diagnosis of AD was primarily dependent on clinical examination, biomarkers such as inflammatory cytokines, amyloid-β, and tau deposition in the cerebrospinal fluid have received increased attention. Nonetheless, AD is currently still treated symptomatically with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and NMDA antagonists to improve cholinergic transmission and prevent glutamatergic excitotoxicity. Therapeutic success is, however, often not achieved, since these treatment methods do not address the ongoing neuroinflammatory processes and hence novel therapeutic and protective strategies are urgently needed. This review provides an insight into the current understanding of age-related cognitive impairment post-surgery and reflects on novel markers of AD pathogeneses exploring their use as targets for treatment. It gives a summary of recent efforts in preventing and treating POCD or AD with regards to the choice and depth of anesthesia, surgical strategy, and peri-operative medication, and discusses the mechanism of action and therapeutic prospects of novel agents.

  15. Preventative Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorino, James

    Boards of education must be convinced that spending money up front for preventive maintenance will, in the long run, save districts' tax dollars. A good program of preventive maintenance can minimize disruption of service; reduce repair costs, energy consumption, and overtime; improve labor productivity and system equipment reliability; handle…

  16. Preventive analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jørgen B; Kehlet, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This paper will discuss the concepts of pre-emptive and preventive analgesia in acute and persistent postsurgical pain, based on the most recent experimental and clinical literature, with a special focus on injury-induced central sensitization and the development from acute to chronic pain. Recent...... of preventive analgesia for persistent postoperative pain are promising. However, clinicians must be aware of the demands for improved design of their clinical studies in order to get more conclusive answers regarding the different avenues for intervention. Summary: The concept of preventive analgesia is still...

  17. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic ... Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety Pregnancy and Back Pain Preventing Osteoporosis Back Pain ...

  18. Preventing Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After the transplant Preventing rejection Post-transplant medications Types of immunosuppressants Switching immunosuppressants Side effects Other medications Generic and brand name drugs Post-transplant tests Infections and immunity Lifestyle changes Health concerns Back to work or ...

  19. Prevent Cyberbullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips for Teachers Report Cyberbullying Print Share Prevent Cyberbullying Be Aware of What Your Kids are Doing ... Signs a Child is Being Cyberbullied or is Cyberbullying Others Many of the warning signs that cyberbullying ...

  20. Preventing Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... protective factors listed below: Skills in problem solving, conflict resolution, and nonviolent ways of handling disputes Effective ... 2017 Page last updated: August 9, 2017 Content source: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division ...

  1. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A SPECIALIST Prevention Strengthening Exercise Committee Exercise Committee Core Strengthening Many popular forms of exercise focus on ... acute pain, you should stop doing it. Transverse Core Strengthening This strengthens the muscles that cross from ...

  2. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety Pregnancy and Back Pain Preventing Osteoporosis Back Pain Basics ... increases your back pain after five repetitions, or causes acute pain, you should stop doing it. Transverse ...

  3. Preventing accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    As the most effective strategy for improving safety is to prevent accidents from occurring at all, the Volpe Center applies a broad range of research techniques and capabilities to determine causes and consequences of accidents and to identify, asses...

  4. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility ... Pain Preventing Osteoporosis Back Pain Basics Book RESOURCES Patient Information Feature Articles Patient Q&A Success Stories ...

  5. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Preventing Osteoporosis Back Pain Basics Book RESOURCES Patient Information Feature Articles Patient Q&A Success Stories Definitions Anatomy of the Spine Definitions A-Z Spine Specialists Videos 9 ...

  6. HIV Prevention

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-01

    Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, talks about steps people can take to protect their health from HIV.  Created: 2/1/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/1/2012.

  7. Inadvertent P-hacking among trials and systematic reviews of the effect of progestogens in pregnancy? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, M; Hibberd, R; Asemota, N; Thornton, J G

    2017-06-01

    Progestogens have been evaluated in numerous trials and meta-analyses, many of which concluded they were effective. However, two large trials PROMISE and OPPTIMUM have recently concluded that progesterone was ineffective. This raises the possibility that earlier studies and reviews had been biased by either selective publication or selective choice of outcomes, so called "P-hacking". To compare the findings all progestogen trials and systematic reviews with those of trials with pre-registered primary outcomes which avoided selective outcome reporting. Search of PubMed, the Cochrane Library and trial registries. Registration PROSPERO CRD42016035303. Systematic reviews of randomised trials comparing progestogen with placebo in pregnancy and the individual trials included in those reviews. The subset of trials reporting a pre-registered primary outcome were compared with the totality of trials and reviews. For reviews all outcomes were included. For individual trials all outcomes reported in the systematic reviews were included. For the comparison group we recorded the registered primary outcome from trials that were either registered before they started, or registered during the recruitment phase and also double blind. Nineteen of twenty-nine meta-analyses concluded that progestogens were effective. Twenty-two trials reported their pre-registered primary outcomes. There was no effect of progesterone on primary registered dichotomous outcome RR 1.00 (95% CI 0.94-1.07). Only one of the 22 showed a nominally statistically significant benefit. When evaluated in registered double-blind trials with analysis restricted to predefined primary outcomes, progestational agents in pregnancy are ineffective. Progestogens to prevent pregnancy loss, an example of P-hacking. © 2017 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  8. Cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubiana, M

    1999-01-01

    Over 70% of human cancers are associated with lifestyle and about half of cancer deaths could be prevented by relatively simple individual actions: no smoking, moderate consumption of alcohol, increased consumption of fruit and vegetables, avoidance of sunbathing, obesity and a too high consumption of saturated lipids. Most of these efforts would also markedly decrease the incidence of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. However, the concept of prevention is currently neither well accepted nor understood by the medical community and the general public. It is often felt that it restricts freedom, imposes a choice between pleasure and duty, and that passing judgement on lifestyle is a form of intolerance. The case of tobacco illustrates the difficulties encountered by prevention, notably among adolescents. The fight against smoking requires information, a societal approach (ban on advertising, increase in price), and a reduction of the example given by adult smoking (parents, peers, teachers, physicians, TV presenters, movie stars, have a great influence on adolescents), while tobacco cessation programs must be promoted. The various approaches should be integrated into a global program of health prevention, including health education at school from 5 to 12 years of age. The efficacy of each of the global program's components should be evaluated. Misconceptions such as overestimation of the impact of pollution on health should also be corrected. Health is created and experienced by people within the setting of their daily lives, in particular during childhood. Prevention is the responsibility of individual members of the community but also of the community as a whole.

  9. Prevent Pneumonia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-06

    CDC’s Matthew Westercamp explains what pneumonia is, its symptoms, and how to prevent it.  Created: 8/6/2015 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), Respiratory Diseases Branch (RDB).   Date Released: 8/6/2015.

  10. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information Feature Articles Patient Q&A Success Stories Definitions Anatomy of the Spine Definitions A-Z Spine Specialists Videos 9 for Spine Epidural Steroid Injections Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Prevention ...

  11. Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... corresponding to World Suicide Prevention Day, to celebrate life, hope, and reasons to live. SAMHSA is committed to ... members, and helping people navigate the struggles of life to find a sustainable sense of hope, meaning, and purpose. For information about how you ...

  12. Bullying Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the milestone project is to focus on bridging the gap of bullying and classroom instruction methods. There has to be a defined expectations and level of accountability that has to be defined when supporting and implementing a plan linked to bullying prevention. All individuals involved in the student's learning have to be aware of…

  13. Tracheostomy: current practice on timing, correction of coagulation disorders and peri-operative management - a postal survey in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veelo, D. P.; Dongelmans, D. A.; Phoa, K. N.; Spronk, P. E.; Schultz, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several factors may delay tracheostomy. As many critically ill patients either suffer from coagulation abnormalities or are being treated with anticoagulants, fear of bleeding complications during the procedure may also delay tracheostomy. It is unknown whether such (usually mild)

  14. Patterns in current anaesthesiological peri-operative practice for colonic resections: a survey in five northern-European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannemann, P; Lassen, K; Hausel, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For colorectal surgery, evidence suggests that optimal management includes: no pre-operative fasting, a thoracic epidural analgesia continued for 2 days post-operatively, and avoidance of fluid overload. In addition, no long-acting benzodiazepines on the day of surgery and use of shor...

  15. Inflammatory and Nutritional Serum Markers as Predictors of Peri-operative Morbidity and Survival in Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amanika; Torres, Michelle L; Cliby, William A; Kalli, Kimberly R; Bogani, Giorgio; Aletti, Giovanni; Nitschmann, Caroline C; Multinu, Francesco; Weaver, Amy L; Block, Matthew S; Mariani, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    To identify preoperative nutritional and inflammatory markers that predict perioperative outcomes in patients with ovarian cancer (OC). Fifty patients who underwent primary debulking for advanced (stage III/IV) OC were selected from a cohort of patients who underwent surgery between 2002 and 2009. We analyzed C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL6) and albumin and their impact on mortality and surgical outcomes. Two patients were excluded since they did not have adequate measurements of CRP and IL6. Among the remaining patients, 25 (52%) were ≥70 years old. Nine (19%), 12 (25%) and 12 (25%) patients had low serum albumin (<3.0 g/dl), elevated CRP (≥70 mg/l) and elevated IL6 (≥24 pg/ml), respectively. Age was a significant predictor of non-home discharge (p=0.01). Low serum albumin (<3.0 g/dl) was a predictor of death within 6 month (p=0.03). Elevated CRP (≥70 mg/l) was a predictor of non-home discharge (p=0.02), death within 6 months (p=0.02), death within 12 months (p=0.04), and longer hospital stay (p=0.01). Elevated IL6 (≥24 pg/ml) was a predictor of non-home discharge (p=0.002) and surgical complications (p=0.02), and also associated with longer hospital stay (p=0.03). Poor nutrition and high inflammatory status negatively influence surgical and oncological outcomes of patients with OC. These preoperative markers can be used for selection of patients for neoadjuvant chemotherapy at high risk of short survival, non-home discharge and long hospital stay. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. Complications in pediatric intestine transplantation in the absence of peri-operative donor or recipient bowel decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouse, Jared W; Kubal, Chandrashekhar A; Fridell, Jonathan A; Mangus, Richard S

    2018-05-01

    This study reports the clinical complication and infection rates of an active pediatric IT program that has never utilized bowel decontamination in either the donor or the recipient. All patients undergoing IT from 2003 to 2015 at a single pediatric IT center were reviewed. Post-transplant surgical, infectious, and immunosuppressive complications are reported. There were 52 patients who underwent IT during the study period. Among these patients, 4% developed a postoperative abscess, one developed an enteric fistula (2%), and one had an enteric or anastomotic leak (2%). The rate of any bacterial infection was 90% in the first year, with a wound infection rate of 23%. Any fungal infection occurred in 25% of patients. Any viral infection occurred in 75% of patients. Gastrointestinal viruses were diagnosed in 52% of patients, and cytomegalovirus infections occurred in 17%. Rejection rates were 39% at any time post-transplant (isolated 44% and 35% for multivisceral patients). At this center in which no bowel decontamination was used, rates of surgical complications, infections, and rejection were similar to those reported by other centers. These findings suggest bowel decontamination may provide no significant benefit in this population of high-risk transplant patients. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Peri-operative morbidity and early results of a randomised trial comparing TVT and TVT-O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschia, Michele; Bertozzi, Rosanna; Pifarotti, Paola; Baccichet, Roberto; Bernasconi, Francesco; Guercio, Elso; Magatti, Fabio; Minini, Gianfranco

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the morbidity and short-term efficacy of retro-pubic (TVT) and inside-out trans-obturator (TVT-O) sub-urethral sling in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. This was a prospective multi-centre randomised trial; 231 women with primary stress urinary incontinence were randomised to TVT (114) or TVT-O (117). The International Consultation on Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-SF), Women Irritative Prostate Symptoms Score (W-IPSS) and Patient Global Impression of Severity (PGI-S) questionnaires were used to evaluate the impact of incontinence and voiding dysfunction on QoL and to measure the patient's perception of incontinence severity. The primary and secondary outcome measures were rates of success and complications. The SPSS software was used for data analysis. The TVT-O procedure was associated with significantly shorter operation time and with a more extensive use of general anaesthesia when compared with TVT. There were 5 (4%) bladder perforations in the TVT group compared with none in the TVT-O group. Rates of early post-operative urinary retention and voiding difficulty were similar for both groups and no difference was found in the average hospital stay. Six patients (5%) in the TVT-O group complained of thigh pain in the post-operative course. The median follow-up time was 6 months. Two hundred eighteen patients were available for the analysis of outcomes. Subjective and objective cure rates were 92% and 92% in the TVT group and 87% and 89% in the TVT-O group. The ICIQ-SF questionnaire symptoms score showed a highly statistical decrease in both groups, the W-IPSS on the contrary was unchanged. Our data show that both procedures were equally effective in the short-term for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence with a highly significant improvement in incontinence-related QoL.

  18. Peri-operative morbidity associated with radical cystectomy in a multicenter database of community and academic hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke T Lavallée

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize the frequency and timing of complications following radical cystectomy in a cohort of patients treated at community and academic hospitals. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Radical cystectomy patients captured from NSQIP hospitals from January 1 2006 to December 31 2012 were included. Baseline information and complications were abstracted by study surgical clinical reviewers through a validated process of medical record review and direct patient contact. We determined the incidence and timing of each complication and calculated their associations with patient and operative characteristics. RESULTS: 2303 radical cystectomy patients met inclusion criteria. 1115 (48% patients were over 70 years old and 1819 (79% were male. Median hospital stay was 8 days (IQR 7-13 days. 1273 (55.3% patients experienced at least 1 post-operative complication of which 191 (15.6% occurred after hospital discharge. The most common complication was blood transfusion (n = 875; 38.0%, followed by infectious complications with 218 (9.5% urinary tract infections, 193 (8.4% surgical site infections, and 223 (9.7% sepsis events. 73 (3.2% patients had fascial dehiscence, 82 (4.0% developed a deep vein thrombosis, and 67 (2.9% died. Factors independently associated with the occurrence of any post-operative complication included: age, female gender, ASA class, pre-operative sepsis, COPD, low serum albumin concentration, pre-operative radiotherapy, pre-operative transfusion >4 units, and operative time >6 hours (all p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Complications remain common following radical cystectomy and a considerable proportion occur after discharge from hospital. This study identifies risk factors for complications and quality improvement needs.

  19. Peri-operative comparison between daVinci-assisted radical prostatectomy and open radical prostatectomy in obese patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Carter Q.; Ho, Khai-Linh V.; Slezak, Jeffrey M.; Blute, Michael L.; Gettman, Matthew T.

    2007-02-01

    Introduction: While the effects of increasing body mass index on prostate cancer epidemiology and surgical approach have recently been studied, its effects on surgical outcomes are less clear. We studied the perioperative outcomes of obese (BMI >= 30) men treated with daVinci-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (DLP) and compared them to those treated with open radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) in a contemporary time frame. Method: After Institutional Review Board approval, we used the Mayo Clinic Radical Prostatectomy database to identify patients who had undergone DLP by a single surgeon and those who had undergone open RRP by a single surgeon between December 2002 and March 2005. Baseline demographics, peri- and post-operative courses, and complications were collected by retrospective chart review, and variables from the two cohorts compared using chi-square method and least-squares method of linear regression where appropriate. Results: 59 patients who had DLP and 76 undergoing RRP were available for study. Baseline demographics were not statistically different between the two cohorts. Although DLP had a significantly lower clinical stage than RRP (p=0.02), pathological stage was not statistically different (p=0.10). Transfusion rates, hospital stay, overall complications, and pathological Gleason were also not significantly different, nor were PSA progression, positive margin rate, or continence at 1 year. After bilateral nerve-sparing, erections suitable for intercourse with or without therapy at 1 year was 88.5% (23/26) for DLP and 61.2% (30/49) for RRP (p=0.01). Follow-up time was similar. Conclusion: For obese patients, DLP appears to have similar perioperative, as well as short-term oncologic and functional outcomes when compared to open RRP.

  20. US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Its Partners' Contributions to Global Health Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappero, Jordan W; Cassell, Cynthia H; Bunnell, Rebecca E; Angulo, Frederick J; Craig, Allen; Pesik, Nicki; Dahl, Benjamin A; Ijaz, Kashef; Jafari, Hamid; Martin, Rebecca

    2017-12-01

    To achieve compliance with the revised World Health Organization International Health Regulations (IHR 2005), countries must be able to rapidly prevent, detect, and respond to public health threats. Most nations, however, remain unprepared to manage and control complex health emergencies, whether due to natural disasters, emerging infectious disease outbreaks, or the inadvertent or intentional release of highly pathogenic organisms. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) works with countries and partners to build and strengthen global health security preparedness so they can quickly respond to public health crises. This report highlights selected CDC global health protection platform accomplishments that help mitigate global health threats and build core, cross-cutting capacity to identify and contain disease outbreaks at their source. CDC contributions support country efforts to achieve IHR 2005 compliance, contribute to the international framework for countering infectious disease crises, and enhance health security for Americans and populations around the world.

  1. Allergy prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muche-Borowski, Cathleen; Kopp, Matthias; Reese, Imke; Sitter, Helmut; Werfel, Thomas; Schäfer, Torsten

    2010-09-01

    The further increase of allergies in industrialized countries demands evidence-based measures of primary prevention. The recommendations as published in the guideline of 2004 were updated and consented on the basis of a systematic literature search. Evidence from the period February 2003-May 2008 was searched in the electronic databases Cochrane and MEDLINE as well as in reference lists of recent reviews and by contacting experts. The retrieved citations were screened for relevance first by title and abstract and in a second step as full paper. Levels of evidence were assigned to each included study and the methodological quality of the studies was assessed as high or low. Finally the revised recommendations were formally consented (nominal group process) by representatives of relevant societies and organizations including a self-help group. Of originally 4556 hits, 217 studies (4 Cochrane Reviews, 14 meta-analyses, 19 randomized controlled trials, 135 cohort and 45 case-control studies) were included and critically appraised. Grossly unchanged remained the recommendations on avoiding environmental tobacco smoke, breast-feeding over 4 months (alternatively hypoallergenic formulas for children at risk), avoiding a mold-promoting indoor climate, vaccination according to current recommendations, and avoidance of furry pets (especially cats) in children at risk. The recommendation on reducing the house dust mite allergen exposure as a measure of primary prevention was omitted and the impact of a delayed introduction of supplementary food was reduced. New recommendations were adopted concerning fish consumption (during pregnancy / breast-feeding and as supplementary food in the first year), avoidance of overweight, and reducing the exposure to indoor and outdoor air pollutants. The revision of this guideline on a profound evidence basis led to (1) a confirmation of existing recommendations, (2) substantial revisions, and (3) new recommendations. Thereby it is possible

  2. The adverse effects of inadvertent intraoperative intravenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-03-03

    Mar 3, 2012 ... We present the case of a 24-year-old woman who was scheduled for an elective diagnostic laparoscopy for chronic pelvic pain. ... Shortly afterwards, the patient developed tachycardia with a heart rate up .... healthy 29-year-old male scheduled for an ambulatory coelioscopic cholecystectomy. Their patient ...

  3. Inadvertent filtering bleb following sutureless cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Sunil

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The case history of a sixty-two-year-old lady, who presented with a bleb in the upper part of her left eye following cataract surgery was studied. The patient had no prior history of any glaucoma surgery. Gonioscopy revealed fishmouthing of the internal aspect of the scleral tunnel incision. The diagnosis of post-cataract filtering bleb was made which was managed by resuturing the wound. This case highlights the use of gonioscopy to visualise and evaluate the internal wound and discusses intraoperative recognition of internal leak and its management with horizontal sutures.

  4. Dietary assessment in children adhering to a food allergen avoidance diet for allergy prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlieg-Boerstra, B J; van der Heide, S; Bijleveld, C M A; Kukler, J; Duiverman, E J; Wolt-Plompen, S A A; Dubois, A E J

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to verify if avoidance of allergenic foods in children adhering to a food allergen avoidance diet from birth was complete and feasible, and whether dietary assessment can be used as a tool in predicting the outcome of double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFCs). Children adhering to an allergen avoidance diet from birth underwent DBPCFCs. The investigator-dietician verified whether the elimination was complete, using food frequency questionnaires for common allergenic foods. University Medical Centre Groningen, the Netherlands. Thiry-eight children aged 1-13 years, who were consecutively referred to the University Medical Centre Groningen for DBPCFC between January 2002 and February 2004. Among the 38 children undergoing DBPCFCs, there were 15 challenges with egg, 15 with peanut, five with hazelnut and three with soy. Fifteen food challenges (39%) were positive. Small quantities of allergenic foods were inadvertently present in the diets of 13 patients (34%), were possibly present in the diets of 14 patients (37%) and could not be identified in the diets of 11 patients (29%). Seven patients (54%) who had inadvertently ingested small quantities of allergenic foods without sequelae had a positive DBPCFC. Dietary avoidance was incomplete and not feasible in most cases. Tolerance of small amounts of allergenic foods does not preclude positive challenge reactions. Dietary assessment does not seem a useful tool in predicting the outcome of DBPCFC in children adhering to an elimination diet. The Stichting Astma Bestrijding (Foundation for the Prevention of Asthma), The Netherlands.

  5. INFECTION AFTER RADICAL ABDOMINAL HYSTERECTOMY AND PELVIC LYMPHADENECTOMY - PREVENTION OF INFECTION WITH A 2-DOSE PERIOPERATIVE ANTIBIOTIC-PROPHYLAXIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOUMA, J

    1993-01-01

    Surgical site-related infections occurred in 21% of 87 consecutive patients undergoing radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy (RHPL) without planned peri-operative prophylaxis. A prospective, randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 68 consecutive RHPL patients.

  6. Rotating preventers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangedahl, M.J.; Stone, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that recent changes in the oil and gas industry and ongoing developments in horizontal and underbalanced drilling necessitated development of a better rotating head. A new device called the rotating blowout preventer (RBOP) was developed by Seal-Tech. It is designed to replace the conventional rotating control head on top of BOP stacks and allows drilling operations to continue even on live (underbalanced) wells. Its low wear characteristics and high working pressure (1,500 psi) allow drilling rig crews to drill safely in slightly underbalanced conditions or handle severe well control problems during the time required to actuate other BOPs in the stack. Drilling with a RBOP allows wellbores to be completely closed in tat the drill floor rather than open as with conventional BOPs

  7. Sunburn: Treatment and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & Prevention Safety and Prevention Immunizations ...

  8. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recruiting Patients & Families Consortia, Networks & Centers Reports & Planning Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) The NIDDK-sponsored Diabetes Prevention ... Diabetes Prevention Program for those who are eligible. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) DPP Goal The DPP looked ...

  9. Cholera Prevention and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... name=”commit” type=”submit” value=”Submit” /> Prevention & Control Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Prevention of ... of cholera and other diarrheal disease prevention. Prevention & Control Topics Ending Cholera: The Global Roadmap to 2030 ...

  10. Diabetes Prevention and Treatment Programs for Western PA FY04 and FY05

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Monica m. Dinardo, Patrick Forte, Laura Bettencourt, Suzanne Rocks, Mary T . Korytkowski. Use of a Peri- Operative Treatment Prot ocol Improv es...Linda Siminerio, PhD Megan G. Marks, PhD This project was designed to develop a Diabetes Self- Managemen t Education program t o improve access...minimum 20 minutes), and required the addition of clinical, medication managemen t , patient snapshot, patient -provider interface and new lett er

  11. Comparison of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions to prevent delirium in critically ill patients: a protocol for a systematic review incorporating network meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burry, L D; Hutton, B; Guenette, M; Williamson, D; Mehta, S; Egerod, I; Kanji, S; Adhikari, N K; Moher, D; Martin, C M; Rose, L

    2016-09-08

    Delirium is characterized by acute changes in mental status including inattention, disorganized thinking, and altered level of consciousness, and is highly prevalent in critically ill adults. Delirium has adverse consequences for both patients and the healthcare system; however, at this time, no effective treatment exists. The identification of effective prevention strategies is therefore a clinical and research imperative. An important limitation of previous reviews of delirium prevention is that interventions were considered in isolation and only direct evidence was used. Our systematic review will synthesize all existing data using network meta-analysis, a powerful statistical approach that enables synthesis of both direct and indirect evidence. We will search Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO, and Web of Science from 1980 to March 2016. We will search the PROSPERO registry for protocols and the Cochrane Library for published systematic reviews. We will examine reference lists of pertinent reviews and search grey literature and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for unpublished studies and ongoing trials. We will include randomized and quasi-randomized trials of critically ill adults evaluating any pharmacological, non-pharmacological, or multi-component intervention for delirium prevention, administered in or prior to (i.e., peri-operatively) transfer to the ICU. Two authors will independently screen search results and extract data from eligible studies. Risk of bias assessments will be completed on all included studies. To inform our network meta-analysis, we will first conduct conventional pair-wise meta-analyses for primary and secondary outcomes using random-effects models. We will generate our network meta-analysis using a Bayesian framework, assuming a common heterogeneity parameter across all comparisons, and accounting for correlations in multi-arm studies. We will perform analyses using WinBUGS software. This systematic review

  12. Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research Case Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zackary Suleiman

    A publication of the College of Medicine and Allied Health Sciences, University of Sierra Leone ... Case Study ... Peri-operative management of patients with significant cardio-respiratory disease ... contribute to patient safety by preventing any.

  13. Polio and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Essays Photo Collections Videos Polio Today → Polio + Prevention Polio + Prevention Polio and prevention Polio is a crippling ... for poliovirus within 48 hours of onset. Bulbar polio More extensive paralysis, involving the trunk and muscles ...

  14. Prevent Child Abuse America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Week Parenting Tip of the Week – Preventing Child Sexual Abuse Parenting Tip of the Week Parenting Tip of the Week – Talking to Teens about Healthy Relationships ... of child abuse prevention through our Pinwheels for Prevention campaign. ...

  15. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiatives Best Practices Our Network Media Resources National Suicide Prevention Lifeline We can all help prevent suicide. The ... Call The Lifeline Everyone Plays A Role In Suicide Prevention Here are some helpful links: GET HELP NOW ...

  16. Prevention Research Matters

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Prevention Research Matters is a series of one-on-one interviews with researchers from 26 university prevention research centers across the country. Their work focuses on preventing and controlling chronic diseases like obesity, cancer, and heart disease.

  17. Scabies: Prevention and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Scabies FAQs Workplace FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology Disease Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Medications Institutional Settings Prevention ...

  18. Reflections on preventive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Olli S

    2014-10-01

    Having thought much about medicine in my career-long effort to understand it and the research for its advancement, I have come to views rather different form the now-prevailing ones in respect to what preventive medicine is about; what epidemiology is in relation to preventive medicine; what distinguishes preventive medicine in preventive healthcare at large; the relation of preventive medicine to public health; the concept of health promotion; and also the core principles of preventive medicine. All of these views I set forth in this article, for the readers' critical reflection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Implementation of a prospective pregnancy registry for antiretroviral based HIV prevention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhlanga, Felix G; Noguchi, Lisa; Balkus, Jennifer E; Kabwigu, Samuel; Scheckter, Rachel; Piper, Jeanna; Watts, Heather; O'Rourke, Colin; Torjesen, Kristine; Brown, Elizabeth R; Hillier, Sharon L; Beigi, Richard

    2018-02-01

    Safety data on pregnancy and fetal outcomes among women in HIV prevention trials are urgently needed to inform use of effective antiretroviral agents for HIV prevention. We describe an effective, efficient, and novel method to prospectively collect perinatal safety data concurrent with on-going parent clinical trials. The Microbicide Trials Network (MTN)-016 study is a multinational prospective pregnancy exposure registry designed to capture pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. Studies currently contributing data to this registry included phase I and II safety trials with planned exposures to candidate HIV prevention agents, as well as phase IIB and III efficacy trials capturing data on pregnancy and infant outcomes following inadvertent fetal exposure during study participation. To date, participants from two phase I studies and two effectiveness trials have participated in MTN-016, resulting in 420 pregnant women and 381 infants enrolled. Infant retention has been high, with 329 of 381 (86%) infants completing the 12-month follow-up visit. In a research setting context, it is feasible to establish and implement a prospective, multinational HIV chemoprophylaxis pregnancy registry that will generate pregnancy exposure data in a robust fashion.

  20. Traditional preventive treatment options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longbottom, C; Ekstrand, K; Zero, D

    2009-01-01

    Preventive treatment options can be divided into primary, secondary and tertiary prevention techniques, which can involve patient- or professionally applied methods. These include: oral hygiene (instruction), pit and fissure sealants ('temporary' or 'permanent'), fluoride applications (patient...... options....

  1. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow What role does diet and hydration play in preventing pressure ...

  2. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Colorectal Cancer Key Points Colorectal cancer is a disease in ...

  3. Cancer treatment - preventing infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation - preventing infection; Bone marrow transplant - preventing infection; Cancer treatment - immunosuppression ... this is a short-lived side effect of cancer treatment. Your provider may give you medicines to help ...

  4. Research Areas: Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI’s prevention research has a broad focus, from identifying environmental and lifestyle factors that influence cancer risk to studying the biology of how cancer develops and studying ways to disseminate prevention interventions.

  5. Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sexual, & Bladder Problems Clinical Trials Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Perhaps you have learned that you have a ... I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows ...

  6. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from Hospital to Home ...

  7. Prevention of gravitational collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, J.W.; Taylor, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    We apply a new theory of gravitation to the question of gravitational collapse to show that collapse is prevented in this theory under very reasonable conditions. This result also extends to prevent ultimate collapse of the Universe. (orig.)

  8. Marine Pollution Prevention Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Pollution Prevention Act of 2008 implements the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, including related Protocols (MARPOL)...

  9. Risk Factors and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Back to Patient Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Even people who look healthy and ... Blood Pressure , high cholesterol, diabetes, and thyroid disease. Risk Factors For Arrhythmias and Heart Disease The following ...

  10. Preventing Weight Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Local Programs Related Topics Diabetes Nutrition Preventing Weight Gain Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... cancer. Choosing an Eating Plan to Prevent Weight Gain So, how do you choose a healthful eating ...

  11. Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... from starting. Risk-reducing surgery . General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  12. Settings for Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Suicide Populations Racial/Ethnic Groups Older Adults Adolescents LGBT Military/Veterans Men Effective Prevention Comprehensive Approach Identify ... Based Prevention Settings American Indian/Alaska Native Settings Schools Colleges and Universities Primary Care Emergency Departments Behavioral ...

  13. Prevent Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... professional printing [PDF-1.5MB] Cancer Home “Prevent Cervical Cancer” Infographic Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Prevent Cervical Cancer with the Right Test at the Right Time ...

  14. Fall Prevention: Simple Tips to Prevent Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a gentle exercise that involves slow and graceful dance-like movements. Such activities reduce the risk of ... healthy-lifestyle/healthy-aging/in-depth/fall-prevention/art-20047358 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  15. Cancer risks and prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vessey, M.P.; Gray, M.

    1985-01-01

    A series of essays in honour of Sir Richard Doll is presented. Chapters cover the preventability of cancer, geography, smoking, diet, occupation, radiation, infections and immune impairment, exogenous and endogenous hormones, other drugs, prevention through legislation and by education and cancer risks and prevention in the Third World. The chapter on radiation has been indexed separately. (UK)

  16. Statewide Suicide Prevention Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Employees Statewide Suicide Prevention Council DHSS State of Alaska Home Divisions and Agencies National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Alaska Community Mental Health Centers National Survivors of Suicide Meetings Presentations 2010 Alaska Statewide Suicide Prevention Summit: Mending the Net Connect with us on

  17. Prevention IS Care

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-03-26

    This podcast provides an overview of the Prevention IS Care campaign, which provides HIV prevention tools for medical care providers to use on a daily basis with patients who are living with HIV.  Created: 3/26/2009 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/26/2009.

  18. [Prevention of mental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel-Heller, Steffi; Gühne, Uta

    2013-12-01

    Investment in prevention is a major public health requirement. Mental disorders are common and are associated with severe consequences. They are a major target for prevention. Based on vulnerabilitiy-stress-models the theoretical background for prevention in mental disorders is outlined. Effective strategies for children, adolescents, adults and individuals in old age do exist. Results regarding the prevention of depres-sion and psychoses are outlined and risk groups which require current actions are determined. Current activities towards a national prevention strategy in Germany are discussed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Prevention Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an important cause for neurological morbidity and mortality. Prevention of ischemic stroke involves identification and prevention of risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy. Risk factors have been classified as modifiable and non-modifiable; control of modifiable factors should prevent stroke occurrence. Stroke prevention has been described at three levels: primary, secondary and tertiary. Prolonged hypertension increases an individual′s risk for developing fatal or nonfatal stroke by three times and its control has been shown to prevent stroke. Diabetes mellitus is an important cause for microangiopathy and predisposes to stroke. Statin trials have shown significant reduction in stroke in those who were treated with statins. Stroke risk can be reduced by avoiding tobacco use, control of obesity and avoiding sedentary life style. Anti platelet medications are effective for secondary prevention of stroke. Educating society regarding modifiable risk factors and optimal use of pharmacotherapy form the cornerstone for the prevention of stroke.

  20. Human factors considerations in designing for infection prevention and control in neonatal care - findings from a pre-design inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Chantal; Cobb, Sue; Momtahan, Kathryn; Brintnell, Janet; Mitchell, Ann

    2018-01-01

    Qualitative data collection methods drawn from the early stages of human-centred design frameworks combined with thematic analysis were used to develop an understanding of infection prevention practice within an existing neonatal intensive care unit. Findings were used to generate a framework of understanding which in turn helped inform a baseline approach for future research and design development. The study revealed that a lack of clarity between infection transmission zones and a lack of design attributes needed to uphold infection prevention measures may be undermining healthcare workers' understanding and application of good practice. The issue may be further complicated by well-intentioned behavioural attitudes to meeting work objectives; undue influences from spatial constraints; the influence of inadvertent and excessive touch-based interactions; physical and/or cognitive exertion to maintain transmission barriers; and the impact of expanding job design and increased workload to supplement for lack of effective barriers. Practitioner Summary: Despite high hand hygiene compliance within a neonatal intensive care unit, healthcare workers expressed concerns about the unit design and infection prevention practice. Early inquiry methods from human-centred design and thematic analysis helped develop a framework to understand how design can be used to aid infection prevention.

  1. Prevention of suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is a major public health problem in India, probably even bigger than in the West. Suicidal behavior is the best conceptualized as a multifaceted complex problem involving social factors and mental illnesses. Broadly, there are two approaches to suicide prevention; population preventive strategies and high-risk preventive strategies. Population preventive strategies include reducing availability of means for suicide, education of primary care physicians, influencing media portrayal of suicidal behavior, education of the public, telephone helplines, and addressing economic issues associated with suicidal behavior. High-risk preventive strategy includes identifying individuals with high risk of committing suicide, intensively treating mental illness if present, and providing psychosocial support. Thus, prevention requires a multipronged effort with collaboration from various sectors including mental health professionals, social justice department, and macroeconomic policy makers.

  2. Prevent Infections During Chemotherapy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-24

    This podcast discusses the importance of preventing infections in cancer patients who are undergoing chemotherapy. Dr. Lisa Richardson, CDC oncologist, talks about a new Web site for cancer patients and their caregivers.  Created: 10/24/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 10/24/2011.

  3. CSI cardiac prevent 2015

    OpenAIRE

    S Ramakrishnan; Manisha Kaushik

    2015-01-01

    The CSI Cardiac Prevent 2015 was held at Hotel Taj Palace, New Delhi, on September 25-27, 2015. The major challenge was to create interest among cardiologists and physicians on preventive cardiology, a neglected area. The theme of the conference was "Innovations in Heart Disease Prevention.′′ This conference included "CSI at WHF Roadmap Workshop, Inauguration Ceremony, scientific program, plenary sessions, Nursing/Dietician track, Industry Exhibition, Social Events," Great India blood pressur...

  4. Prevention of Prosthetic Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremin O.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Prevention in prosthetic dentistry is not just a regular oral hygiene and the prevention of caries in the early stages of its development. The initial goal of orthopedic and dental should be the ability to convey to the patient's sense of pros-thetics that proteziruya one saved more. An example is included prosthetic dental arch defects with bridges or single artificial crowns on implants that will prevent movement of teeth and the continuity of the dentition

  5. Prevention, not just treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G L; Hilling, L

    1998-03-01

    A tragic burden of disease, disability, and death has resulted from smoking. The role of pulmonary rehabilitation is not only in treatment and rehabilitation of lung disease but in the prevention of lung disease. The skills of the pulmonary rehabilitation specialist should be used in the earlier detection and prevention of lung disease through primary and secondary prevention. The spirometer must gain acceptance in the medical community as the early tool to evaluate lung health, not the chest radiograph or the stethoscope. The lung age formula and sputum pap smears are just a few of the evaluation tools used to detect and motivate susceptible individuals. Prevention is the key to enhancing lung health.

  6. Crime-prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønsted, Lone

    In Denmark, crime prevention is embedded in state professional practices in kindergartens, schools and youth clubs. These welfare institutions are conceived as safe places that safeguard children and young people through inclusive learning environments, warm and empathic relationships between......-sectional cooperation called “SSP”. SSP is a locally anchored cooperation of the school (S), the social services (S) and the police (P) and its aim is to create a coordinated system of prevention, e.g., to prevent crime or school drop outs. In continuation of this, crime preventive work is understood as a practice...

  7. Work hazard prevention plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertos Campos, F.

    2009-01-01

    The prevention of industrial risks is a constantly evolving discipline that has changed considerable in the last 25 years. The Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plants has always been operated with a clear policy favoring prevention by supporting the principle of its integration, i. e., that the hierarchical functional organization of the company make sure that industrial risk prevention is effective and that health and safety standards are met. The historical evolution of occupational safety in the Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant shows a a clear trend towards improvement and is the results of many years of hard work and effort by the plants own and contractor personnel in the field of industrial risk prevention. (Author)

  8. Speech disorder prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladis Fornaris-Méndez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Language therapy has trafficked from a medical focus until a preventive focus. However, difficulties are evidenced in the development of this last task, because he is devoted bigger space to the correction of the disorders of the language. Because the speech disorders is the dysfunction with more frequently appearance, acquires special importance the preventive work that is developed to avoid its appearance. Speech education since early age of the childhood makes work easier for prevent the appearance of speech disorders in the children. The present work has as objective to offer different activities for the prevention of the speech disorders.

  9. Toxoplasmosis: Prevention and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Toxoplasmosis FAQs Toxoplasmosis & Pregnancy FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology Disease Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Printable Resources Additional ...

  10. A randomised, controlled study of peri-operative low dose s(+)-ketamine in combination with postoperative patient-controlled s(+)-ketamine and morphine after radical prostatectomy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijdelaar, D.G.; Cornelisse, H.B.; Schmid, R.L.; Katz, J.

    2004-01-01

    In a randomised, double-blind prospective study we compared the effects on postoperative pain and analgesic consumption of intra-operative s(+)-ketamine (100 microg.kg-1 bolus and a continuous infusion of 2 microg.kg-1.min-1) followed by postoperative patient-controlled analgesia with morphine (1 mg

  11. Robotic assisted radical prostatectomy accelerates postoperative stress recovery: Final results of a contemporary prospective study assessing pathophysiology of cortisol peri-operative kinetics in prostate cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio B. Porcaro

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Our study shows that PCa surgery immediately (POD 0 triggers the stress system which respond by overproduction of cortisol which induces the negative feedback mechanism that starts on POD 1, is still ongoing on POD 5, but is completely settled on POD 45. Moreover, after surgical trauma, our study gives evidence that the RARP procedure associates with stress recovery faster than RRP. Further confirmatory studies are required.

  12. A randomized clinical trial of a peri-operative behavioral intervention to improve physical activity adherence and functional outcomes following total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Hua

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Total knee replacement (TKR is a common and effective surgical procedure to relieve advanced knee arthritis that persists despite comprehensive medical treatment. Although TKR has excellent technical outcomes, significant variation in patient-reported functional improvement post-TKR exists. Evidence suggests that consistent post-TKR exercise and physical activity is associated with functional gain, and that this relationship is influenced by emotional health. The increasing use of TKR in the aging US population makes it critical to find strategies that maximize functional outcomes. Methods/Design This randomized clinical trial (RCT will test the efficacy of a theory-based telephone-delivered Patient Self-Management Support intervention that seeks to enhance adherence to independent exercise and activity among post- TKR patients. The intervention consists of 12 sessions, which begin prior to surgery and continue for approximately 9 weeks post-TKR. The intervention condition will be compared to a usual care control condition using a randomized design and a probabilistic sample of men and women. Assessments are conducted at baseline, eight weeks, and six- and twelve- months. The project is being conducted at a large healthcare system in Massachusetts. The study was designed to provide greater than 80% power for detecting a difference of 4 points in physical function (SF36/Physical Component Score between conditions (standard deviation of 10 at six months with secondary outcomes collected at one year, assuming a loss to follow up rate of no more than 15%. Discussion As TKR use expands, it is important to develop methods to identify patients at risk for sub-optimal functional outcome and to effectively intervene with the goal of optimizing functional outcomes. If shown efficacious, this peri-TKR intervention has the potential to change the paradigm for successful post-TKR care. We hypothesize that Patient Self-Management Support to enhance adherence to independent activity and exercise will enhance uniform, optimal improvement in post-TKR function and patient autonomy, the ultimate goals of TKR. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00566826

  13. Changes in utilization and peri-operative outcomes of bariatric surgery in large U.S. hospital database, 2011-2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhang

    Full Text Available With the epidemic of morbid obesity, bariatric surgery has been accepted as one of the most effective treatments of obesity.To investigate recent changes in the utilization of bariatric surgery, patients and hospital characteristics, and in-hospital complications in a nationwide hospital database in the United States.This is a secondary data analysis of the Premier Perspective database.ICD-9 codes were used to identify bariatric surgeries performed between 2011 and 2014. Descriptive statistics were computed and regression was used.A total of 74,774 bariatric procedures were identified from 436 hospitals between 2011 and 2014. During this time period, the proportion of gastric bypass (from 44.8% to 31.3%; P for trend < 0.0001 and gastric banding (from 22.8% to 5.2%; P for trend < 0.0001 decreased, while the proportion of sleeve gastrectomy (from 13.7% to 56.9%; P for trend < 0.0001 increased substantially. The proportion of bariatric surgery performed for outpatients decreased from 17.15% in 2011 to 8.11% in 2014 (P for trend < 0.0001. The majority of patients undergoing surgery were female (78.5%, white (65.6%, younger than 65 years (93.8%, and insured with managed care (53.6%. In-hospital mortality rate and length of hospital stay remained stable. The majority of surgeries were performed in high-volume (71.8% and urban (91.6% hospitals.Results based on our study sample indicated that the popularity of various bariatric surgery procedures changed significantly from 2011 to 2014. While the rates of in-hospital complications were stable, disparities in the use of bariatric surgery regarding gender, race, and insurance still exist.

  14. Novel utilization of 3D technology and the hybrid operating theatre: Peri-operative assessment of posterior sterno-clavicular dislocation using cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowhurst, James A; Campbell, Douglas; Whitby, Mark; Pathmanathan, Pavthrun

    2013-01-01

    A patient with a medial and posterior dislocation of the right sterno-clavicular (SC) joint and displacement of the trachea and brachiocephalic artery by the medial head of the clavicle underwent general anaesthetic in the operating theatre for an open reduction procedure. The surgeon initially attempted a closed reduction, but this required imaging to check SC alignment. The patient was transferred to an adjacent hybrid operating theatre for imaging. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed, which successfully demonstrated a significant reduction in the dislocation of the SC joint. The trachea and brachiocephalic artery were no longer compressed or displaced. This case study demonstrates an alternative to the patient being transferred to the medical imaging department for multi-slice CT. It also describes a novel use of the hybrid operating theatre and its CBCT capabilities

  15. Surgical site infections following operative management of cervical spondylotic myelopathy: prevalence, predictors of occurence, and influence on peri-operative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalai, C M; Worley, N; Poorman, G W; Cruz, D L; Vira, S; Passias, P G

    2016-06-01

    Studies have examined infection rates following spine surgery and their relationship to post-operative complications and increased length of stay. Few studies, however, have investigated predictors of infection, specifically in the setting of operative intervention for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). This study aims to identify the incidence and factors predictive of infection amongst this cohort. This study performed a retrospective review of the prospectively collected American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database. Patients included those treated surgically for CSM (ICD-9 code 721.1) from 2010 to 2012. Patient demographics and surgical data were collected with outcome variables including the occurrence of one of the following surgical site infections (SSIs) within 30 days of index operation: superficial SSI, deep incisional SSI, and organ/space SSI. 3057 patients were included in this analysis. Overall infection rate was 1.15 % (35/3057), of which 54.3 % (19/35) were superficial SSIs, 28.6 % (10/35) were deep incisional SSI, and 20 % (7/35) were peri-spinal SSI. Logistic regression revealed factors associated with SSI included: higher BMI [OR 1.162 (CI 1.269-1.064), p = 0.001] and operative time ≥208 min [OR 4.769 (CI 20.220-1.125), p = 0.034]. The overall SSI rate for the examined CSM cohort was 1.15 %. This study identified increased BMI and operative time ≥208 min as predictors of infection in surgical CSM patients. This information should be carefully considered in delivering patient education and future efforts to optimize risk in CSM patients indicated for surgical intervention.

  16. Tratamiento perioperatorio del paciente con antiagregación o anticoagulación Peri-operative management of patients with anti-platelet or anticoagulation treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Déaz M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available El tratamiento del paciente que recibe terapias que afectan la hemostasia normal (anticoagulantes y/o antiagregantes plaquetarios y que será sometido a un procedimiento quirúrgico, es uno de los retos que se presentan cada vez con mayor frecuencia en los servicios de cardiología. La toma de la mejor opción terapéutica en este grupo de pacientes requiere un profundo conocimiento sobre los riesgos de sangrado en caso de continuarse el tratamiento, frente a los riesgos de trombosis o embolismo en caso de suspenderlo. Por tradición, esa decisión se ha basado más en el temor al riesgo de sangrado, por lo cual en muchos casos se ha suspendido dicha terapia de manera innecesaria. En los últimos años, la aparición de la evidencia que indica que no sólo no es alto el riesgo de sangrado sino que además la continuación de estos medicamentos en muchos casos disminuye desenlaces adversos mayores, ha llevado a replantear esta conducta. En este artículo se revisará la evidencia actual existente al respecto y se suministrarán pautas que permitan la toma de una decisión adecuada.Treatment of patients receiving therapies that affect normal hemostasis (anticoagulants and / or anti-platelet aggregators and that will undergo surgery, is one of the challenges that arise with increasing frequency in the cardiology services. Making the best therapeutic option in these patients requires a thorough understanding of the risks of bleeding in case of continuing the treatment against the risks of thrombosis or embolism in case of stopping it. By tradition, this decision has been based more on fear to the risk of bleeding, whereby in many cases this therapy has been suspended unnecessarily. In recent years, the emergence of evidence indicates that the risk of bleeding is not high and that continuation of these drugs in many cases reduce major adverse outcomes. This has led to redefine this behavior. In this article we review the current evidence available on the subject and provide guidelines that allow making a right decision.

  17. Novel utilization of 3D technology and the hybrid operating theatre: Peri-operative assessment of posterior sterno-clavicular dislocation using cone beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowhurst, James A; Campbell, Douglas; Whitby, Mark; Pathmanathan, Pavthrun [The Prince Charles Hospital, Rode Road, Chermside, Queensland (Australia)

    2013-06-15

    A patient with a medial and posterior dislocation of the right sterno-clavicular (SC) joint and displacement of the trachea and brachiocephalic artery by the medial head of the clavicle underwent general anaesthetic in the operating theatre for an open reduction procedure. The surgeon initially attempted a closed reduction, but this required imaging to check SC alignment. The patient was transferred to an adjacent hybrid operating theatre for imaging. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed, which successfully demonstrated a significant reduction in the dislocation of the SC joint. The trachea and brachiocephalic artery were no longer compressed or displaced. This case study demonstrates an alternative to the patient being transferred to the medical imaging department for multi-slice CT. It also describes a novel use of the hybrid operating theatre and its CBCT capabilities.

  18. Decreasing delays in urgent and expedited surgery in a university teaching hospital through audit and communication between peri-operative and surgical directorates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, J F; Gaughan, M; Snowden, C P; Lees, T

    2008-06-01

    National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death guidelines for urgent surgery recommend a fully staffed emergency operating theatre and restriction of 'after-midnight' operating to immediate life-, limb- or organ-threatening conditions. Audit performed in our institution demonstrated significant decreases in waiting times for urgent surgery and an increased seniority of medical care associated with overnight pre-operative assessment of patients by anaesthetic trainees. Nevertheless, urgent cases continued to be delayed unnecessarily. A classification of delays was developed from existing guidelines and their incidence was audited. The results were disseminated to involved directorates. A repeat of the audit demonstrated a significant decrease in delays (p = 0.001), a significant increase in the availability of surgeons (p = 0.001) and a significant decrease in the median waiting time for urgent surgery compared to the first audit cycle and a previous standard (p auditing delays and disseminating the results of the audit significantly decreases delays and median waiting times for urgent surgery because of improved surgical availability.

  19. HIV Risk and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Risk and Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ...

  20. Can I Prevent Acne?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Can I Prevent Acne? KidsHealth / For Teens / Can I Prevent Acne? Print en español ¿Puedo prevenir el acné? What Causes Acne? Contrary to what you may have heard, acne ...

  1. [Prevention of psychosocial risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle, Édouard; Trichard-Salembier, Alexandra; Sobaszek, Annie

    2018-02-01

    The theme of psychosocial risks remains in the workplace. It is therefore essential that all members of a company are made aware of the terminology and specific prevention actions in this field. Distinguishing between the manifestations of these risks and their causes and consequences helps to improve prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevention of Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartalena, Luigi

    2012-06-01

    Smoking is the most important risk factor for the occurrence/progression of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO), as well as for its lower/slower response to immunosuppression. Accordingly, refrain from smoking should be urged, both as primary prevention (removal of risk factors in Graves' patients without GO), secondary prevention (early detection and treatment of asymptomatic/very mild GO) and tertiary prevention (reduction of complications/disability of overt GO). A 6-month course of 200 μg/day sodium selenite can prevent progression of mild GO to more severe GO and is, therefore, a form of secondary prevention and, probably, primary prevention. Correction of thyroid dysfunction and stable maintenance of euthyroidism are important preventive measures. The optimal treatment for hyperthyroidism in patients with GO is uncertain, because evidence demonstrating the superiority of antithyroid drugs over thyroid ablation (radioiodine, thyroidectomy, or both) is lacking. If radioiodine is used, low-dose steroid prophylaxis is recommended, particularly in smokers, to prevent radioiodine-associated GO progression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevent Cervical Cancer!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-08

    Cervical cancer can be prevented. Listen as two friends—one a doctor—talk about screening tests and early detection. Learn what test you might need.  Created: 1/8/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/8/2015.

  4. Poison Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Substance Misuse and Addiction Prevention Finance & Management Services Health Care , Technology: For more info about the national Poison Help program and to request materials visit: http Seniors & Disabilities Services Substance Misuse and Addiction Prevention State of Alaska myAlaska My

  5. Prevention of preterm birth.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flood, Karen

    2012-02-01

    Preterm birth (delivery before 37 completed weeks of gestation) is common and rates are increasing. In the past, medical efforts focused on ameliorating the consequences of prematurity rather than preventing its occurrence. This approach resulted in improved neonatal outcomes, but it remains costly in terms of both the suffering of infants and their families and the economic burden on society. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of preterm labor has altered the approach to this problem, with increased focus on preventive strategies. Primary prevention is a limited strategy which involves public education, smoking cessation, improved nutritional status and avoidance of late preterm births. Secondary prevention focuses on recurrent preterm birth which is the most recognisable risk factor. Widely accepted strategies include cervical cerclage, progesterone and dedicated clinics. However, more research is needed to explore the role of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory treatments in the prevention of this complex problem.

  6. Measuring waste prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorpas, Antonis A; Lasaridi, Katia

    2013-05-01

    The Waste Framework Directive (WFD-2008/98/EC) has set clear waste prevention procedures, including reporting, reviewing, monitoring and evaluating. Based on the WFD, the European Commission and will offer support to Member States on how to develop waste prevention programmes through guidelines and information sharing on best practices. Monitoring and evaluating waste prevention activities are critical, as they constitute the main tools to enable policy makers, at the national and local level, to build their strategic plans and ensure that waste prevention initiatives are effective and deliver behaviour change. However, how one can measure something that is not there, remains an important and unresolved research question. The paper reviews and attempts to evaluate the methods that are being used for measuring waste prevention and the impact of relevant implemented activities at the household level, as the available data is still limited. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Combining the Sterile Insect Technique with Wolbachia-Based Approaches: II--A Safer Approach to Aedes albopictus Population Suppression Programmes, Designed to Minimize the Consequences of Inadvertent Female Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongjing Zhang

    Full Text Available Due to the absence of a perfect method for mosquito sex separation, the combination of the sterile insect technique and the incompatible insect technique is now being considered as a potentially effective method to control Aedes albopictus. In this present study first we examine the minimum pupal irradiation dose required to induce complete sterility in Wolbachia triple-infected (HC, double-infected (GUA and uninfected (GT female Ae. albopictus. The HC line is a candidate for Ae. albopictus population suppression programmes, but due to the risk of population replacement which characterizes this triple infected line, the individuals to be released need to be additionally irradiated. After determining the minimum irradiation dose required for complete female sterility, we test whether sterilization is sufficient to prevent invasion of the triple infection from the HC females into double-infected (GUA populations. Our results indicate that irradiated Ae. albopictus HC, GUA and GT strain females have decreased fecundity and egg hatch rate when irradiated, inversely proportional to the dose, and the complete sterilization of females can be acquired by pupal irradiation with doses above 28 Gy. PCR-based analysis of F1 and F2 progeny indicate that the irradiated HC females, cannot spread the new Wolbachia wPip strain into a small cage GUA population, released at a 1:5 ratio. Considering the above results, we conclude that irradiation can be used to reduce the risk of population replacement caused by an unintentional release of Wolbachia triple-infected Ae. albopictus HC strain females during male release for population suppression.

  8. Novel preventive treatment options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longbottom, C; Ekstrand, K; Zero, D

    2009-01-01

    A number of novel preventive treatment options which, as with traditional methods, can be differentiated into 3 categories of prevention (primary, secondary and tertiary), have been and are being currently investigated. Those reviewed are either commercially available or appear relatively close...... of these techniques show considerable promise and dentists should be aware of these developments and follow their progress, the evidence for each of these novel preventive treatment options is currently insufficient to make widespread recommendations. Changes in dental practice should be explored to see how oral...

  9. Prevention of Eye Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Pashby, Tom

    1981-01-01

    In Canada 30,000 people are registered as blind; in one third of these, blindness might have been avoided. Prevention is the key to reducing the number of eye injuries and blind eyes. The role of the family physician in early identification of treatable conditions and in the education of patients is discussed, but responsibility for prevention belongs to all physicians. The success of prevention is seen in the great reduction in eye injuries in industry and sports since eye protectors have be...

  10. Obesity Prevention and Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Eleanor R; Olson, Alexandra; DiFazio, Marc; Cassidy, Omni

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is widespread, associated with several physical and psychosocial comorbidities, and is difficult to treat. Prevention of obesity across the lifespan is critical to improving the health of individuals and society. Screening and prevention efforts in primary care are an important step in addressing the obesity epidemic. Each period of human development is associated with unique risks, challenges, and opportunities for prevention and intervention. Screening tools for overweight/obesity, although imperfect, are quick and easy to administer. Screening should be conducted at every primary care visit and tracked longitudinally. Screening tools and cutoffs for overweight and obesity vary by age group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. CSI cardiac prevent 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ramakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The CSI Cardiac Prevent 2015 was held at Hotel Taj Palace, New Delhi, on September 25-27, 2015. The major challenge was to create interest among cardiologists and physicians on preventive cardiology, a neglected area. The theme of the conference was "Innovations in Heart Disease Prevention.′′ This conference included "CSI at WHF Roadmap Workshop, Inauguration Ceremony, scientific program, plenary sessions, Nursing/Dietician track, Industry Exhibition, Social Events," Great India blood pressure Survey, and CSI Smart Heart App. A total of 848 delegates/faculties attended this conference against a total of 1140 people registered for the meeting.

  12. Measuring pollution prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, D.G.; Bridges, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    To assess progress in pollution prevention, estimates or measurements of the amounts of pollution actually prevented have to be made. Such estimates or measurements tell us how far we have come and, possibly, how much farther there is to go in utilizing pollution prevention as a tool for improving environmental quality. They can, theoretically, be used to assess progress on a scale ranging from the individual facility or even the individual process or activity generation wastes to scale as large as a geographical area such as a county, a state or even the United States as a whole. 3 refs

  13. Help prevent hospital errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000618.htm Help prevent hospital errors To use the sharing features ... in the hospital. If You Are Having Surgery, Help Keep Yourself Safe Go to a hospital you ...

  14. Institutional Preventive Stress Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, James C.

    1987-01-01

    Stress is an inevitable characteristic of academic life, but colleges and universities can introduce stress management activities at the organizational level to avert excessive tension. Preventive actions are described, including flexible work schedules and social supports. (Author/MSE)

  15. Preventing Diabetes Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Clinical Trials Preventing Diabetes Problems View or Print All Sections Heart Disease & ... to help control symptoms and restore intimacy. Depression & Diabetes Depression is common among people with a chronic, ...

  16. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores ... sores? What is a Spinal Cord Injury? SCI Medical Experts People Living With SCI Personal Experiences By ...

  17. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hours? play_arrow What's the best way to do daily skin inspections? play_arrow What are the ... for someone with a spinal cord injury to do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow Why is ...

  18. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  19. Preventing Learned Helplessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Cheri

    1986-01-01

    To prevent learned helplessness in learning disabled students, teachers can share responsibilities with the students, train students to reinforce themselves for effort and self control, and introduce opportunities for changing counterproductive attitudes. (CL)

  20. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and how can it be increased? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_ ...

  1. Can Vaginitis Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... examples of safe sex. 1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010). Self-study STD module—vaginitis . ... Halvorson New Chief of Gynecologic Health and Disease Branch Division of Epidemiology, Statistics, ...

  2. Preventing food allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Silva, Debra; Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Thusu, Sundeep

    2013-01-01

    The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology is developing guidelines about how to prevent and manage food allergy. As part of the guidelines development process, a systematic review is planned to examine published research about the prevention of food allergy. This systematic review...... is one of seven inter-linked evidence syntheses that are being undertaken in order to provide a state-of-the-art synopsis of the current evidence base in relation to epidemiology, prevention, diagnosis and clinical management, and impact on quality of life, which will be used to inform clinical...... recommendations. The aim of this systematic review will be to assess the effectiveness of approaches for the primary prevention of food allergy....

  3. Naval Preventive Diplomacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cassel, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Naval power, as part of a U.S. preventive diplomacy effort, can be flexibly mixed with political, economic, and informational power to intervene early in places of incipient crisis or before mass violence...

  4. Prevention of cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayati Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin has a well-established role in the treatment of broad spectrum of malignancies; however its use is limited because of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity (CIN which can be progressive in more than 50% of cases. The most important risk factors for CIN include higher doses of cisplatin, previous cisplatin chemotherapy, underlying kidney damage and concurrent treatment with other potential nephrotoxin agents, such as aminoglycosides, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, or iodinated contrast media. Different strategies have been offered to diminish or prevent nephrotoxicity of cisplatin. The standard approach for prevention of CIN is the administration of lower doses of cisplatin in combination with full intravenous hydration prior and after cisplatin administration. Cisplatin-induced oxidative stress in the kidney may be prevented by natural antioxidant compounds. The results of this review show that many strategies for prevention of CIN exist, however, attention to the administration of these agent for CIN is necessary.

  5. Disaster prevention surveillance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, Satoru; Kamiya, Eisei

    2001-01-01

    Fuji Electric Co., Ltd. has supplied many management systems to nuclear reactor institution. 'The nuclear countermeasures-against-calamities special-measures' was enforced. A nuclear entrepreneur has devised the measure about expansion prevention and restoration of a calamity while it endeavors after prevention of generating of a nuclear calamity. Our company have supplied the 'disaster prevention surveillance system' to the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokai Research Establishment aiming at strengthening of the monitoring function at the time (after the accident) of the accident used as one of the above-mentioned measures. A 'disaster prevention surveillance system' can share the information on the accident spot in an on-site command place, an activity headquarters, and support organizations, when the serious accident happens. This system is composed of various sensors (temperature, pressure and radiation), cameras, computers and network. (author)

  6. Prevent Infections During Chemotherapy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast discusses the importance of preventing infections in cancer patients who are undergoing chemotherapy. Dr. Lisa Richardson, CDC oncologist, talks about a new Web site for cancer patients and their caregivers.

  7. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medical Experts People Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  8. United to prevent emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carta Petrolera

    2001-01-01

    The paper is about the national plan of contingencies, as tool of coordination inter-institutional that has allowed strengthening the actions of prevention and attention of spills of hydrocarbons and chemical substances in Colombia

  9. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from ... Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa ...

  10. Youth Suicide Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalafat, John

    2006-01-01

    Youth suicide prevention programs are described that promote the identification and referral of at-risk youth, address risk factors, and promote protective factors. Emphasis is on programs that are both effective and sustainable in applied settings.

  11. Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or removed safely. How are children exposed to lead? Lead-based paint and lead contaminated dust are ... What can be done to prevent exposure to lead? It is important to determine the construction year ...

  12. Prevent Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you have an injury, health condition, or disability, ask your doctor or nurse which types of exercise are best for you. Get tips on staying active with a disability . Next section Prevent Injuries Previous section Am I ...

  13. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow ...

  14. Home Improvements Prevent Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Falls and Older Adults Home Improvements Prevent Falls Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... and ensure your safety. "Safe-ty-fy" Your Home Some Questions for Your Provider Will my medicines ...

  15. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... increased? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_ ...

  16. Preventing Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Newsletter Donate Blog Skip breadcrumb navigation Preventing Knee Injuries Knee injuries in children and adolescent athletes ... this PDF Share this page: WHAT ARE COMMON KNEE INJURIES? Pain Syndromes One of the most common ...

  17. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Living with SCI Personal Experiences by Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Preventing Pressure Sores Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  18. Sexual Violence Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Sexual Violence Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir April ... stop sexual violence before it begins. Understanding Sexual Violence Sexual violence is any sexual activity where consent ...

  19. Preventing High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Cholesterol Salt Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Preventing High Blood Pressure: Healthy Living Habits Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... meal and snack options can help you avoid high blood pressure and its complications. Be sure to eat plenty ...

  20. Prevention of malignant neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    D. G. Zaridze; D. M. Maksimovich

    2017-01-01

    Research in causation of cancer is an important part of cancer research in general and is an essential prerequisite for cancer prevention. The effective primary prevention is not visible without evidence based knowledge in the causation of cancer in humans.There is sufficient evidence that certain life style and environment factors cause cancer in humans. These factors include: smoking and other types of tobacco consumption, overweight and obesity, lack of physical activity, diet rich in proc...

  1. Early prevention of obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio Maffeis

    2014-01-01

    Childhood obesity is the metabolic disorder with the highest prevalence in both children and adults. Urgency to treat and prevent childhood obesity is based on the clear evidence that obesity tends to track from childhood to adulthood, is associated to morbidity also in childhood and to long-term mortality. Early life, i.e., intrauterine life and the first two years, is a sensitive window for prevention. Anatomical and functional maturation of the hypothalamic structures devoted to regulating...

  2. Industrial pollution prevention handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    This book presents the techniques, technologies, regulations, and strategies that define pollution prevention. The subject is addressed from many perspectives by prominent experts. In many ways pollution prevention, rather than being a specialty field itself, is actually a convergence of fields drawing upon knowledge in a wide variety of more typical fields of expertise. Individual chapters have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  3. [Can falls be prevented?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubousset, Jean

    2014-06-01

    Most recommendations and measures intended to prevent falls focus on the elderly (see HAS guideline of April 2009) but, in our opinion, this isfar too late: prevention must begin much earlier, not only by identifying persons at risk, but also by providing personalized lifestyle advice adapted to each individual's biomechanical, somatic, neurological and biological characteristics. The first preventive measure is to identify a possible deterioration of balance, starting with a physical examination at the age of 45 and repeated regularly throughout life. Extrinsic preventive measures focusing on the domestic and external environments are clearly necessary. But what is most important is to detect and, if necessary, correct any degradation of intrinsic (intracorporeal or somatic) factors starting at the age of 45 years; these include vision, vestibular function and balance, proprioception, and psychological and neurological status. Chronic illnesses and their treatments must also be taken into account: treatment must be limited to indispensable drugs; sedative psychotropics must be avoided if possible; and polymedication must be tightly controlled, as it is a major risk factor for falls. Prevention also requires a diet sufficiently rich in protein, calcium and vitamin D3 (to prevent osteoporosis), and regular daily exercise adapted to the individual, if possible associated with a simultaneous cognitive task. The last key point is the absolute need for thorough functional rehabilitation after any accidental or medical trauma, regardless of age, with the aim of restoring functional status to that existing prior to the accident.

  4. Preventive Migraine Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article reviews the evidence base for the preventive treatment of migraine. Recent Findings: Evidence-based guidelines for the preventive treatment of migraine have recently been published by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the Canadian Headache Society (CHS), providing valuable guidance for clinicians. Strong evidence exists to support the use of metoprolol, timolol, propranolol, divalproex sodium, sodium valproate, and topiramate for migraine prevention, according to the AAN. Based on best available evidence, adverse event profile, and expert consensus, topiramate, propranolol, nadolol, metoprolol, amitriptyline, gabapentin, candesartan, Petasites (butterbur), riboflavin, coenzyme Q10, and magnesium citrate received a strong recommendation for use from the CHS. Summary: Migraine preventive drug treatments are underutilized in clinical practice. Principles of preventive treatment are important to improve compliance, minimize side effects, and improve patient outcomes. Choice of preventive treatment of migraine should be based on the presence of comorbid and coexistent illness, patient preference, reproductive potential and planning, and best available evidence. PMID:26252585

  5. Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wellness Courts Cultural Competence Diverse Populations and Communities Domestic Violence Human Trafficking Laws & Policies Service Array Statistics ... Home Topics Preventing Child Abuse & Neglect Preventing Child Abuse & Neglect Resources on child abuse prevention, protecting children ...

  6. Grant Programs for Pollution Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics is responsible for overseeing several grant programs for tribes and states which promote pollution prevention through source reduction and resource conservation.

  7. Implementing trials of complex interventions in community settings: The USC – Rancho Los Amigos Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Florence; Pyatak, Elizabeth A.; Carlson, Mike; Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Vigen, Cheryl; Hay, Joel; Mallinson, Trudy; Blanchard, Jeanine; Unger, Jennifer B.; Garber, Susan L.; Diaz, Jesus; Florindez, Lucia I.; Atkins, Michal; Rubayi, Salah; Azen, Stanley Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Randomized trials of complex, non-pharmacologic interventions implemented in home and community settings, such as the University of Southern California (USC)–Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center (RLANRC) Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS), present unique challenges with respect to: (a) participant recruitment and retention, (b) intervention delivery and fidelity, (c) randomization and assessment, and (d) potential inadvertent treatment effects. Purpose We describe the methods employed to address the challenges confronted in implementing PUPS. In this randomized controlled trial, we are assessing the efficacy of a complex, preventive intervention in reducing the incidence of, and costs associated with, the development of medically serious pressure ulcers in people with spinal cord injury. Method Individuals with spinal cord injury recruited from RLANRC were assigned to either a 12-month preventive intervention group or a standard care control group. The primary outcome is the incidence of serious pressure ulcers with secondary endpoints including ulcer-related surgeries, medical treatment costs, and quality of life. These outcomes are assessed at 12 and 24 months after randomization. Additionally, we are studying the mediating mechanisms that account for intervention outcomes. Results PUPS has been successfully implemented, including recruitment of the target sample size of 170 participants, assurance of the integrity of intervention protocol delivery with an average 90% treatment adherence rate, and enactment of the assessment plan. However, implementation has been replete with challenges. To meet recruitment goals, we instituted a five-pronged approach customized for an underserved, ethnically diverse population. In intervention delivery, we increased staff time to overcome economic and cultural barriers to retention and adherence. To ensure treatment fidelity and replicability, we monitored intervention protocol delivery in accord

  8. Implementing trials of complex interventions in community settings: the USC-Rancho Los Amigos pressure ulcer prevention study (PUPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Florence; Pyatak, Elizabeth A; Carlson, Mike; Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Vigen, Cheryl; Hay, Joel; Mallinson, Trudy; Blanchard, Jeanine; Unger, Jennifer B; Garber, Susan L; Diaz, Jesus; Florindez, Lucia I; Atkins, Michal; Rubayi, Salah; Azen, Stanley Paul

    2014-04-01

    Randomized trials of complex, non-pharmacologic interventions implemented in home and community settings, such as the University of Southern California (USC)-Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center (RLANRC) Pressure Ulcer Prevention Study (PUPS), present unique challenges with respect to (1) participant recruitment and retention, (2) intervention delivery and fidelity, (3) randomization and assessment, and (4) potential inadvertent treatment effects. We describe the methods employed to address the challenges confronted in implementing PUPS. In this randomized controlled trial, we are assessing the efficacy of a complex, preventive intervention in reducing the incidence of, and costs associated with, the development of medically serious pressure ulcers in people with spinal cord injury. Individuals with spinal cord injury recruited from RLANRC were assigned to either a 12-month preventive intervention group or a standard care control group. The primary outcome is the incidence of serious pressure ulcers with secondary endpoints including ulcer-related surgeries, medical treatment costs, and quality of life. These outcomes are assessed at 12 and 24 months after randomization. Additionally, we are studying the mediating mechanisms that account for intervention outcomes. PUPS has been successfully implemented, including recruitment of the target sample size of 170 participants, assurance of the integrity of intervention protocol delivery with an average 90% treatment adherence rate, and enactment of the assessment plan. However, implementation has been replete with challenges. To meet recruitment goals, we instituted a five-pronged approach customized for an underserved, ethnically diverse population. In intervention delivery, we increased staff time to overcome economic and cultural barriers to retention and adherence. To ensure treatment fidelity and replicability, we monitored intervention protocol delivery in accordance with a rigorous plan. Finally, we

  9. [Preventive strategies for dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Patrick; Schmicker, Marlen; Müller, Notger G

    2017-05-01

    In the context of the demographically induced increase in the prevalence of dementia and the simultaneous lack of causal pharmacological therapies, preventive approaches are gaining in importance. By reducing risk factors and with measures which induce neuroplasticity successful aging can be supported. This article summarizes the current developments in preventing dementia by modification of life style factors. The main focus lies on the impact of cognitive and physical activity on neuroprotection. A promising approach combines both activities within a dance training program. Further studies that meet the demanding criteria of a randomized clinical trial are urgently needed.

  10. Building in Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    this chapter devotes its focus primarily on the small bumps on the road by initially discussing how physical structural prevention can be an appropriate strategy not only to bring about behavioural change in the population as a whole but also to reduce the negative consequences of a stigmatising health...... preventive work might be changed to direct focus onto a greater extent on establishing frameworks for people to master their own lives instead of one-sided initiatives, which leave the individual with a sense of guilt at their own illness....

  11. Preventing Errors in Laterality

    OpenAIRE

    Landau, Elliot; Hirschorn, David; Koutras, Iakovos; Malek, Alexander; Demissie, Seleshie

    2014-01-01

    An error in laterality is the reporting of a finding that is present on the right side as on the left or vice versa. While different medical and surgical specialties have implemented protocols to help prevent such errors, very few studies have been published that describe these errors in radiology reports and ways to prevent them. We devised a system that allows the radiologist to view reports in a separate window, displayed in a simple font and with all terms of laterality highlighted in sep...

  12. Preventing Melanoma PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-06-02

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the June 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. In 2011, there were more than 65,000 cases of melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer. Learn how everyone can help prevent skin cancer.  Created: 6/2/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 6/2/2015.

  13. Nanomaterials in preventive dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannig, Matthias; Hannig, Christian

    2010-08-01

    The prevention of tooth decay and the treatment of lesions and cavities are ongoing challenges in dentistry. In recent years, biomimetic approaches have been used to develop nanomaterials for inclusion in a variety of oral health-care products. Examples include liquids and pastes that contain nano-apatites for biofilm management at the tooth surface, and products that contain nanomaterials for the remineralization of early submicrometre-sized enamel lesions. However, the treatment of larger visible cavities with nanomaterials is still at the research stage. Here, we review progress in the development of nanomaterials for different applications in preventive dentistry and research, including clinical trials.

  14. Aspirin for Primary Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Ilana B; Owens, Douglas K

    2017-07-01

    Aspirin reduces the risk of nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke, and the risk of colorectal cancer. Aspirin increases the risk of gastrointestinal and intracranial bleeding. The best available evidence supports initiating aspirin in select populations. In 2016, the US Preventive Services Task Force recommended initiating aspirin for the primary prevention of both cardiovascular disease and colorectal cancer among adults ages 50 to 59 who are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Adults 60 to 69 who are at increased cardiovascular disease risk may also benefit. There remains considerable uncertainty about whether younger and older patients may benefit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevention in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Stephen; Bridgman, Colette; Brocklehurst, Paul

    2015-01-01

    could be identified early enough to facilitate prevention, what evidence based therapies and treatments were available and how, given the collective evidence, could these be introduced in general dental practice within different reimbursement models. CONCLUSIONS: While examples of best practice were...... provided from both social care and insurance models it was clear that further work was required on both provider and payer side to ensure that evidence based prevention was both implemented properly but also reimbursed sufficiently. It is clear that savings can be made but these must not be overstated...

  16. HOW TO PREVENT FRAUD?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionela – Corina Chersan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Fraud can range from minor employee theft and unproductive behavior tomisappropriation of assets and fraudulent financial reporting. The risk of fraud can be reduced through a combination of prevention and detection measures. Moreover, prevention and deterrence measures are much less costly than the time and expense required for fraud detection and investigation. The information presented in this document generally is applicable to entities of all sizes. However, the degree to which certain programs and controls are applied in smaller, less-complex entities and the formality of theirapplication are likely to differ from larger organizations.

  17. Prevention of hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Maja H; Ebbehøj, Niels E; Vejlstrup, Søren Grove

    2018-01-01

    Objective Occupational hand eczema has adverse health and socioeconomic impacts for the afflicted individuals and society. Prevention and treatment strategies are needed. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of an educational intervention on sickness absence, quality of life and severity...... of hand eczema. Methods PREVEX (PreVention of EXema) is an individually randomized, parallel-group superiority trial investigating the pros and cons of one-time, 2-hour, group-based education in skin-protective behavior versus treatment as usual among patients with newly notified occupational hand eczema...

  18. Preventing falls and fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulfarsson, J; Robinson, B E

    1994-11-01

    One of four persons over age 65 in the community falls; those over age 75 in institutions fall more frequently. Falls, a complex phenomena suggesting present disease and predicting future disability, are caused by interactions between the environment and dynamic balance which is determined by the quality of sensory input, central processing, and motor responses. Clinical factors which predispose to falling often produce observable disturbances in gait and balance, making observation critical in assessment. Acute illness and drug therapy produce particularly preventable falls. Therapeutic exercise and environmental modification for safety are the clinical interventions most likely to successfully prevent fall-related injury.

  19. Preliminary Assessment of Noise Pollution Prevention in Wind Turbines Based on an Exergy Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofelia A. Jianu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Most existing methods for energy transformation and use are inadvertently contaminating our watersupplies, releasing greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere, emitting compounds that diminish the earth'sprotective blanket of ozone, and depleting the earth's crust of natural resources. As a result, scientists andengineers are increasingly pursuing sustainable technologies so that costs associated with global warmingcan be minimized and adverse impact on living organisms can be prevented. A promising sustainablemethod is to harness energy from the wind via wind turbines. However, the noise generated by wind turbinesproves to be one of the most significant hindrances to the extensive use of wind turbines. In this study,noise generation produced by flow over objects is investigated to characterize the noise generated due toflow-structure interaction and aeroacoustics. As a benchmark, flow over a cylinder has been chosen for thisstudy, with the aim of correlating three main characteristics in noise generation. Hence, the generated soundpressure level, exergy destroyed and the normal flow velocity (∪ ∞ are employed to characterize the systemin order to relate the exergy destruction to the noise generated in the flow. The correlation has the potentialto be used in wind turbine designs to minimize noise pollution due to aerodynamic noise.

  20. Dosimetric analysis of the alopecia preventing effect of hippocampus sparing whole brain radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadevan, Anand; Sampson, Carrie; LaRosa, Salvatore; Floyd, Scott R.; Wong, Eric T.; Uhlmann, Erik J.; Sengupta, Soma; Kasper, Ekkehard M.

    2015-01-01

    Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is widely used for the treatment of brain metastases. Cognitive decline and alopecia are recognized adverse effects of WBRT. Recently hippocampus sparing whole brain radiation therapy (HS-WBRT) has been shown to reduce the incidence of memory loss. In this study, we found that multi-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), with strict constraints to the brain parenchyma and to the hippocampus, reduces follicular scalp dose and prevents alopecia. Suitable patients befitting the inclusion criteria of the RTOG 0933 trial received Hippocampus sparing whole brain radiation. On follow up, they were noticed to have full scalp hair preservation. 5 mm thickness of follicle bearing scalp in the radiation field was outlined in the planning CT scans. Conventional opposed lateral WBRT radiation fields were applied to these patient-specific image sets and planned with the same nominal dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. The mean and maximum dose to follicle bearing skin and Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) data were analyzed for conventional and HS-WBRT. Paired t-test was used to compare the means. All six patients had fully preserved scalp hair and remained clinically cognitively intact 1–3 months after HS-WBRT. Compared to conventional WBRT, in addition to the intended sparing of the Hippocampus, HS-WBRT delivered significantly lower mean dose (22.42 cGy vs. 16.33 cGy, p < 0.0001), V 24 (9 cc vs. 44 cc, p < 0.0000) and V 30 (9 cc vs. 0.096 cc, p = 0.0106) to follicle hair bearing scalp and prevented alopecia. There were no recurrences in the Hippocampus area. HS-WBRT, with an 11-field set up as described, while attempting to conserve hippocampus radiation and maintain radiation dose to brain inadvertently spares follicle-bearing scalp and prevents alopecia

  1. Obesity Prevention Interventions in US Public Schools: Are Schools Using Programs That Promote Weight Stigma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Erica L; Wintner, Suzanne; Lee, Rebekka M; Austin, S Bryn

    2017-12-28

    Despite substantial research on school-based obesity prevention programs, it is unclear how widely they are disseminated. It is also unknown whether schools use obesity programs that inadvertently promote weight stigma or disordered weight-control behaviors. In spring 2016, we distributed an online survey about school wellness programming to a simple random sample of US public school administrators (N = 247 respondents; 10.3% response rate). We analyzed survey responses and conducted immersion/crystallization analysis of written open-ended responses. Slightly less than half (n = 117, 47.4%) of schools offered any obesity prevention program. Only 17 (6.9%) reported using a predeveloped program, and 7 (2.8%) reported using a program with evidence for effectiveness. Thirty-seven schools (15.0%) reported developing intervention programs that focused primarily on individual students' or staff members' weight rather than nutrition or physical activity; 28 schools (11.3% of overall) used staff weight-loss competitions. School administrators who reported implementing a program were more likely to describe having a program champion and adequate buy-in from staff, families, and students. Lack of funding, training, and time were widely reported as barriers to implementation. Few administrators used educational (n = 12, 10.3%) or scientific (n = 6, 5.1%) literature for wellness program decision making. Evidence-based obesity prevention programs appear to be rarely implemented in US schools. Schools may be implementing programs lacking evidence and programs that may unintentionally exacerbate student weight stigma by focusing on student weight rather than healthy habits. Public health practitioners and researchers should focus on improving support for schools to implement evidence-based programs.

  2. Gender-Based Violence Prevention. Issues in Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This issue of "Issues in Prevention" focuses on gender-based violence prevention. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Preventing Gender-Based Violence: An Overview (Linda Langford); (2) Q&A With Amelia Cobb; (3) Denim Day at HBCUs; (4) Dear Colleague Letter; (5) ED Grants for Violence Prevention; and (6) Higher Education Center…

  3. Crafting safe and effective suicide prevention media messages: outcomes from a workshop in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ftanou, Maria; Skehan, Jaelea; Krysinska, Karolina; Bryant, Marc; Spittal, Matthew J; Pirkis, Jane

    2018-01-01

    Suicide and suicide-related behaviours are major public health concerns in Australia and worldwide. One universal intervention that has received an increased focus as a means of preventing suicide is the use of media campaigns. There is, however, a lack of understanding of the kinds of campaign messages that are safe and effective. The current paper aims to expand on this knowledge. The study objectives were to: (1) explore what suicide prevention experts consider to be essential characteristics of effective and safe suicide media campaigns; (2) develop suicide prevention media messages; and (3) explore the impact that these messages might have on different audiences. We conducted a workshop in July 2015 which was attended by 21 experts (professionals with knowledge about suicide prevention and/or media campaigns, and people with a lived experience of suicide). The experts were split into three groups, and each group developed a suicide prevention message for one of the following target audiences: people at risk of suicide; family and peers of people at risk of suicide; and people bereaved by suicide. The three groups generally agreed that these messages had to include two key characteristics: (1) validate or reflect the target group's issues and needs; and (2) promote help-seeking behaviours. They noted, however, that messages that might have a positive impact for one target audience might inadvertently have a negative impact for other target audiences. In particular, they were concerned that messages designed for family and peers about being supportive and looking for warning signs might leave those who had been bereaved by suicide feeling isolated, guilty or traumatised. Workshop participants highlighted that gaps exist in relation to the use of appropriate language, were unsure of how to create destigmatising messages without normalising or sensationalising suicide and commented on the lack of evaluative evidence for the efficacy of media campaigns. Developing

  4. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... arrow What's the best way to do daily skin inspections? play_arrow What are the most important ... to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow What is “skin tolerance” and how can it be increased? play_ ...

  5. Prevention of relapsing backache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raspe, Heiner

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The condition of non-specific back pain is characterized by high prevalence, non satisfactory therapeutic options and severe socioeconomic consequences. Therefore prevention seems an attractive option to downsize the problem. However, the construction of effective preventive measures is complicated by the obscure aetiology of the condition, the multidimensionality of risk and prognostic factors (bio psychosocial model! and the variability of its natural as well as clinical course. This led to the development of a wide variety of preventive measures: e. g. exercise programs, educational measures (including back school, ergonomic modification of the work environment, mechanical supports (e. g. back belts as well as multidisciplinary interventions. For two reasons the workplace seems to be a suitable setting for prevention. First, because a number of strong risk factors are associated with working conditions and second, because it allows addressing a large proportion of the adult population. Against this background the assessment at hand sets out to answer the following questions: What is the amount and methodological quality of the available scientific literature on the effectiveness of back pain prevention in the workplace environment? What are effective measures for the prevention of back pain and its consequences in the workplace environment and how effective are they? Is back pain prevention in the workplace environment cost-effective? Is there a need for more research? As primary outcomes for effectiveness the assessment will focus on time lost from work and the frequency and duration of episodes with back pain. The preventive measures assessed belong to the following categories: exercise programs, educational and information measures, multidimensional interventions, back belts, lifting teams and ergonomic interventions. Methods: The assessment is based on a systematic review of the published literature according to the

  6. Cervical Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors for some types of cancer, but only smoking can be avoided. Regular exercise and a healthy diet may be protective factors ... may help prevent certain cancers. Risk factors include smoking, being ... enough exercise. Increasing protective factors such as quitting smoking and ...

  7. Skin Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors for some types of cancer, but only smoking can be avoided. Regular exercise and a healthy diet may be protective factors ... may help prevent certain cancers. Risk factors include smoking, being ... enough exercise. Increasing protective factors such as quitting smoking and ...

  8. Endometrial Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors for some types of cancer, but only smoking can be avoided. Regular exercise and a healthy diet may be protective factors ... may help prevent certain cancers. Risk factors include smoking, being ... enough exercise. Increasing protective factors such as quitting smoking and ...

  9. Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors for some types of cancer, but only smoking can be avoided. Regular exercise and a healthy diet may be protective factors ... may help prevent certain cancers. Risk factors include smoking, being ... enough exercise. Increasing protective factors such as quitting smoking and ...

  10. Esophageal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors for some types of cancer, but only smoking can be avoided. Regular exercise and a healthy diet may be protective factors ... may help prevent certain cancers. Risk factors include smoking, being ... enough exercise. Increasing protective factors such as quitting smoking and ...

  11. Oral Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors for some types of cancer, but only smoking can be avoided. Regular exercise and a healthy diet may be protective factors ... may help prevent certain cancers. Risk factors include smoking, being ... enough exercise. Increasing protective factors such as quitting smoking and ...

  12. Prostate Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors for some types of cancer, but only smoking can be avoided. Regular exercise and a healthy diet may be protective factors ... may help prevent certain cancers. Risk factors include smoking, being ... enough exercise. Increasing protective factors such as quitting smoking and ...

  13. Injury Prevention Research

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-01

    Research provides the knowledge that we need to understand what is possible, what is not, and the best way to proceed in our intervention efforts.  Created: 9/1/2009 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 9/1/2009.

  14. Bullying Prevention for Kids

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-01-19

    This podcast discusses what victims of bullying may experience and provides recommendations for coping with it.  Created: 1/19/2012 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 1/19/2012.

  15. Preventing Skin Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-05-18

    A man and a woman talk about how they’ve learned to protect their skin from the sun over the years. .  Created: 5/18/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/18/2016.

  16. Police and Suicide Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, Lisa; Smith, Mark; Long, Matthew; Kisby, Charlotte; Hawton, Keith

    2016-05-01

    Police officers are frequently the first responders to individuals in crisis, but generally receive little training for this role. We developed and evaluated training in suicide awareness and prevention for frontline rail police in the UK. To investigate the impact of training on officers' suicide prevention attitudes, confidence, and knowledge. Fifty-three participants completed a brief questionnaire before and after undertaking training. In addition, two focus groups were conducted with 10 officers to explore in greater depth their views and experiences of the training program and the perceived impact on practice. Baseline levels of suicide prevention attitudes, confidence, and knowledge were mixed but mostly positive and improved significantly after training. Such improvements were seemingly maintained over time, but there was insufficient power to test this statistically. Feedback on the course was generally excellent, notwithstanding some criticisms and suggestions for improvement. Training in suicide prevention appears to have been well received and to have had a beneficial impact on officers' attitudes, confidence, and knowledge. Further research is needed to assess its longer-term effects on police attitudes, skills, and interactions with suicidal individuals, and to establish its relative effectiveness in the context of multilevel interventions.

  17. [Improving suicide prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debout, Michel

    2017-04-01

    Suicidal thoughts precede a suicide attempt. Knowing the people who are exposed to such thoughts enables prevention to be improved. The results of a study of the general population show that one in five French people claim to have already seriously considered committing suicide. This represents a particularly concerning public health issue. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Why Prevention? Why Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, Joan

    2013-01-01

    In 1995, the American Medical Association declared sexual abuse a "silent, violent epidemic." Since that declaration, there has been a growing acceptance and awareness of the need for a broader public health approach to preventing sexual violence. However, it is only recently that individuals and organizations are beginning to look at…

  19. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and how can it be increased? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to know about pressure sores? play_arrow What do family members and caregivers need to do to prevent pressure sores? play_ ...

  20. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the most important thing to do to prevent pressure sores? What is a Spinal Cord Injury? SCI Medical Experts People Living With SCI Personal Experiences By Topic Resources Blog Peer Counseling About Media Donate Contact Us Terms of ...

  1. Responsible Hospitality. Prevention Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colthurst, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Responsible Hospitality (RH)--also called Responsible Beverage Service (RBS)--encompasses a variety of strategies for reducing risks associated with the sale and service of alcoholic beverages. RH programs have three goals: (1) to prevent illegal alcohol service to minors; (2) to reduce the likelihood of drinkers becoming intoxicated; and (3) to…

  2. To Prevent Misbehavior

    OpenAIRE

    Telep, Valya Goodwin, 1955-

    2009-01-01

    This series of lessons was prepared for parents like you - parents who want to do a better job of disciplining their children. The lessons were especially written for parents of preschool children, ages two to six, but some of the discipline methods are appropriate for older children, too. This lesson focuses on preventing misbehavior.

  3. Injury prevention in football

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    other sports,[1,2] and youth football players are no exception to this. ... at risk of sports injury because of high levels of exposure at a time of major physiological change.[4] The ..... As part of injury prevention, adequate injury management and.

  4. Preventing infections when visiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need.) When you visit a patient in the hospital, keep your hands away from your face. Cough or sneeze into a tissue or into the crease of your elbow, not into the air. References Calfee DP. Prevention and control of health care-associated infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  5. Preventing the White Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Casper Worm; Jensen, Peter S.; Madsen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause of death worldwide and, while treatable by antibiotics since the 1940s, drug resistant strains have emerged. This paper estimates the effects of the establishment of a pre-antibiotic era public health institution, known as a TB dispensary, designed to prevent...

  6. Travel health prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    All around the world there has been a rapid growth in the number of international travels. According to the World Tourism Organisation the number of international tourist arrivals reached 1,235 billion in 2016 and continues to grow at a high rate. This has been much due to the development of air transport (including low-cost airlines), increasingly common economic migration, a growing number of travellers visiting friends and relatives, and an increase in medical tourism. With tropical destinations becoming increasingly popular among travellers, doctors have seen a rising number of patients who seek medical advice on health risks prevalent in hot countries and health prevention measures to be taken in tropical destinations, especially where sanitation is poor. The risk for developing a medical condition while staying abroad depends on a variety of factors, including the traveller's general health condition, health prevention measures taken before or during travel (vaccinations, antimalarial chemoprophylaxis, health precautions during air, road and sea travel, proper acclimatisation, prevention of heat injuries, protection against local flora and fauna, personal hygiene, water, food and feeding hygiene), as well as the prevalence of health risk factors in a given location. Health prevention is a precondition for safe travel and maintaining good physical health; in the era of a rapid growth in international tourism it has become of key importance for all travellers.

  7. Statins and Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... opposed to the use of another type of lipid-lowering drug, fibrates). [Statins and the risk of colorectal cancer. Poynter, JN., et al. New England Journal of Medicine , May 26, 2005, (352:2184–92]. Is NCI supporting research with statins to prevent other types of cancer? ...

  8. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cushion? play_arrow What’s important to know about positioning in bed to prevent pressure sores? play_arrow ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ...

  9. Preventing Melanoma PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the June 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S. In 2011, there were more than 65,000 cases of melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer. Learn how everyone can help prevent skin cancer.

  10. Preventing School Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulloda, Rudolfo Barcena

    2011-01-01

    School violence has mushroomed into a devastating epidemic and is deteriorating the basic foundation of education. In this article, the author will present several teaching strategies for preventing school violence from becoming an arduous enigma within the classroom and school environments, and focus on assessment and reflection in order to…

  11. Youth Suicide Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Madelyn S.; Kramer, Rachel A.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews research literature on youth suicide that has emerged during the past two decades and examines the possibility of linking this research to the practice of suicide prevention. Such research could be used to develop and evaluate appropriate crisis centers and hotlines as well as school-based suicide awareness curriculum programs. Table…

  12. Prevention of COPD exacerbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Lange, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Exacerbations have significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Most guidelines emphasise prevention of exacerbations by treatment with long-acting bronchodilators and/or anti-inflammatory drugs. Whereas most of this treatment is eviden...

  13. Neonatal Pressure Ulcer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheans, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pressure ulcers in acutely ill infants and children ranges up to 27 percent in intensive care units, with a range of 16-19 percent in NICUs. Anatomic, physiologic, and developmental factors place ill and preterm newborns at risk for skin breakdown. Two case studies illustrate these factors, and best practices for pressure ulcer prevention are described.

  14. Prevention of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Removing the threat of a nuclear war-as the General Assembly formally stated in the Final Document of its first special session devoted to disarmament, in 1978-is considered to be the task of the present day. In that Document, the General Assembly sought to establish principles, guidelines and procedures for preventing nuclear war. It declared that to that end, it was imperative to remove the threat of nuclear weapons, to halt and reverse the nuclear-arms race until the total elimination of nuclear weapons and their delivery systems had been achieved (see chapter iv), and to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons (see chapter VII). At the same time, it called for other measures designed to prevent the outbreak of nuclear war and to lessen the danger of the treat or use of nuclear weapons. The Assembly's clear call for action was dictated by the awareness that there was no insuperable barrier dividing peace from war and that, unless nations brought the spiralling nuclear-arms race to an end, the day might come when nuclear weapons would actually be used, with catastrophic consequences. In adopting the Final Document, the international community achieved, for the first time, a consensus on an international disarmament strategy having as its immediate goal the elimination of the danger of a nuclear war and the implementation of measures to halt and reverse the arms race. The General Assembly, at its second special session on disarmament, in 1982, reaffirmed the validity of the 1978 Final Document. This paper reports that nuclear issues and in particular the prevention of nuclear war remain, however, major concerns of all States. Undoubtedly, all nations have a vital interest in the negotiation of effective measures for her prevention of nuclear war, since nuclear weapons pose a unique threat to human survival. If nuclear war were to occur, its consequences would be global, not simple regional

  15. Preventive Detention: A Necessity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Mishra

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available State, ever since, its emergence, has been concerned with the maintenance of law and order and protecting people from external aggression and internal threats, thereby, ensuring safety and security to its inhabitants. The authority to maintain law and order empowers the state to use coercive power. It also emanates from various laws that are enacted from time to time. More often than not, coercive laws are self-contradictory because on the one hand they guarantee rights to people and on the other hand, they take away the right of a person or persons. Therefore, it is not wrong to say that modern states are repository of contradictions and India is no exception. There are several undemocratic provisions in the Indian Constitution; preventive detention is one of them. It seeks to detain a person to prevent him/her from indulging in any activity which is likely to pose a threat to the security of the State. In Britain and America this provision was used during World War II while, in India it can be used even in peacetime. This provision has been extensively used against the political dissidents during the post-colonial period. Justice Mahajan of the Supreme Court of India has held that ‘preventive detention laws are repugnant to democratic constitution and they cannot be found to exist in any of the democratic countries of the world’. The question that one can ask at this juncture is that why did the Government of ‘independent’ India retain preventive detention laws? And further, framed new ones. This research contribution examines the circumstances which compelled the Government to frame ‘preventive detention’ laws, and its use during national emergency and peace time.

  16. Intentional and inadvertent chemical contamination of food, water, and medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MCKay, Charles; Scharman, Elizabeth J

    2015-02-01

    Numerous examples of chemical contamination of food, water, or medication have led to steps by regulatory agencies to maintain the safety of this critical social infrastructure and supply chain. Identification of contaminant site is important. Environmental testing and biomonitoring can define the nature and extent of the event and are useful for providing objective information, but may be unavailable in time for clinical care. Clinical diagnosis should be based on toxidrome recognition and assessment of public health implications. There are several resources available to assist and these can be accessed through regional poison control centers or local/state public health departments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Inadvertent doping through nutritional supplements is a reality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    In 1994 legislation was passed by the United States Food and Drug Administration ... resulting in contamination of nutritional supplements, which may be a possible ... Nutritional supplement manufacturing is not subject to the same stringent ...

  18. An Inadvertent Concurrent Replication: Same Roadmap, Different Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Christopher J.; King, Seth A.; Davidson, Kimberly A.; Berryessa, Teresa L.; Gajjar, Shimul A.; Sacks, Lia H.

    2016-01-01

    Replication is a critical aspect of scientific inquiry that presents a variety of challenges to researchers, even under the best of conditions. We conducted a review of replication rates in special education journals similar to the review conducted by Makel et al. in this issue. Unknowingly conducting independent reviews allowed for an unexpected…

  19. Inadvertent presence of genetically modified elements in maize food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-07-31

    Jul 31, 2013 ... The maize imported into Kenya contained Bt genetic elements. Nevertheless, the .... obtained from various open air markets and retail shops located in ... Magic, Bokomo and Temmy) was not successful. Assessment of cry1Ab ...

  20. Inadvertent injection of succinylcholine as an epidural test dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chryssa Pourzitaki

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Epidural action of neuromuscular blocking agents could be explained under the light of their physicochemical characteristics and epidural space properties. In the literature there are few cases of accidental neuromuscular agent's epidural administration, manifesting mainly with neuromuscular blockade institution or fasciculations. Case report: We report a case of accidental succinylcholine administration as an epidural test dose, in a female patient undergoing scheduled laparotomy, under combined general and epidural anesthesia. Approximately 2 min after the succinylcholine injection the patient complained for shortness of breath, while mild fasciculations appeared in her trunk and face, managed by immediate general anesthesia institution. With the exception of a relatively longer duration of neuromuscular blockade compared with intravenous administration, no neurological or cardiovascular sequelae or other symptoms of local or systemic toxicity were observed. Conclusions: Oral administration of diazepam seems to lessen the adverse effects from accidental epidural administration of succinylcholine. The meticulous and discriminative labeling of syringes, as well as keeping persistent cautions during all anesthesia procedures remains of crucial importance.

  1. Inadvertent Exemplars: Life History Portraits of Two Socially Just Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This study creates life history portraits of two White middle-class native-English-speaking principals demonstrating commitments to social justice in their work in public elementary schools serving disproportionately high populations of students who are marginalized by poverty, race, and linguistic heritage. Through self-reported life histories of…

  2. Incident of inadvertent radiation exposure in a linac bunker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerts, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Implementation of a new Biomedical Equipment and service database poses special challenges. This paper describes the challenges and solutions during implementation of BEIMS (Mercury Computers) at RPAH and other sites within SSWAHS. During implementation we faced challenges of Code/Label design, workflow redesign, and data cleanup. Considerable time and effort went into the design of descriptive codes for breakdowns, tests, equipment types, meta-categories and the like. Some of the codes are explored and described to allow adoption by other entities if desired. Workflow redesign required us to include considerations of biomedical Technicians and Nurse Requestors. A simplified document was created for the self-education of Requestors and a full user manual (complete with screen shots) was created for Biomeds. More work remains, including simplification of standardised reports and ability to generate KPI's. The result is a system with improved utility compared to the old system and a flexible design enabling future improvements. (author)

  3. Osteoradionecrosis: Causes and prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is one of the most serious complications arising from head and neck radiation therapy. Current research has shown that ORN represents nonhealing, dead bone and is not a state of infection. ORN is the result of functional and structural bony changes that may not be expressed for months or years. ORN may occur spontaneously or in response to wounding. Predisposing factors include absorbed radiation dose, fractionation, delivery modality, and dental status. Timing of dental extractions and other factors have also been shown to affect incidence. ORN may be reduced through early intraoral evaluation, treatment, and adequate healing time prior to beginning RT. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy has been beneficial in the prevention and treatment of ORN. It is of paramount importance for the medical community to recognize the factors that may reduce ORN incidence, endorse oral care protocols, and acknowledge the value of HBO therapy in the prevention and treatment of this disease. 60 references

  4. Crime prevention and Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønsted, Lone Bæk

    , street worker, social workers) by focusing on how welfare workers form, reform and transform interventions, and thereby instigate the structure of welfare work with social effects. Finally, the paper aims to examine how an inter-professional meeting outside the school environment produces understandings...... of such a preventive work aiming at creating trustful relations between the school and the children and focusing on children’s democracy understandings, experienced discrimination and peer pressure. Furthermore, the school are to activate children’s reflections on existential questions and their empathy with others...... a statutory duty for schools to have due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism. The school and education in general are seen as safe spaces. Notions like “safe space” and school as a “protection factor” reflect an educational discourse that reflect discoursive changes...

  5. Preventing Financial Crime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    This paper investigates the Swedish tax authority’s (Skatteverkets) compliance initiative called Preventing Financial Crime. In Sweden tax evasion related to organised moon-lighting is defined as a major risk to the revenue collection and to the legitimacy of Skatteverket. The traditional approach...... on this, the paper shows that the Swedish tax officials seek to motivate large construction contractors and municipalities to take preventive measures in relation to their sub-contractors to avoid and abate tax evasion. The paper shows the challenges in engaging and involving these external stakeholders...... has implications for how tax authorities (and other state authorities) reform their coercive regulation. If they decide to pursue a voluntary based approach where the actions of external partners play a central role, then the analysis helps to show some of the implied challenges and potentials....

  6. Let's prevent diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gray, Laura J.; Khunti, Kamlesh; Williams, Sian

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prevention of type 2 diabetes is a globally recognised health care priority, but there is a lack of rigorous research investigating optimal methods of translating diabetes prevention programmes, based on the promotion of a healthy lifestyle, into routine primary care. The aim...... of the study is to establish whether a pragmatic structured education programme targeting lifestyle and behaviour change in conjunction with motivational maintenance via the telephone can reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes in people with impaired glucose regulation (a composite of impaired glucose...... of type 2 diabetes. Secondary outcomes include changes in HbA1c, blood glucose levels, cardiovascular risk, the presence of the Metabolic Syndrome and the cost-effectiveness of the intervention.Methods: The study consists of screening and intervention phases within 44 general practices coordinated from...

  7. Preventive Radiation Protection Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roewer, H.

    1988-01-01

    The commentary is intended to contribute to protection of the population by a practice-oriented discussion and explanation of questions arising in connection with the Preventive Radiation Protection Act. Leaving aside discussions about abandonment of nuclear power, or criticism from any legal point of view, the commentary adopts the practical approach that accepts, and tries to help implementing, the act as it is. It is a guide for readers who are not experts in the law and gives a line of orientation by means of explanations and sometimes by citations from other acts (in footnotes). The commentary also presents the EURATOM Directive No. 3954/87 dated 22 December 1987, the EC Directive No. 3955/87 dated 22 December 1987, and the EC Directive No. 1983/88 dated 5 July 1988. A tabular survey shows the system of duties and competences defined by the Preventive Radiation Protection Act. (RST) [de

  8. The Prevention of Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Antonio; Kan, Yuet Wai

    2013-01-01

    The thalassemias are among the most common inherited diseases worldwide, affecting individuals originating from the Mediterranean area, Middle East, Transcaucasia, Central Asia, Indian subcontinent, and Southeast Asia. As the diseases require long-term care, prevention of the homozygous state constitutes a major armament in the management. This article discusses the major prevention programs that are set up in many countries in Europe, Asia, and Australia, often drawing from the experience in Sardinia. These comprehensive programs involve carrier detections, molecular diagnostics, genetic counseling, and prenatal diagnosis. Variability of clinical severity can be attributable to interactions with α-thalassemia and mutations that increase fetal productions. Special methods taht are currently quite expensive and not widely applicable are preimplantation and preconception diagnosis. The recent successful studies of fetal DNA in maternal plasma may allow future prenatal diagnosis that is noninvasive for the fetus. PMID:23378598

  9. Teleophthalmology in preventive medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Michelson, Georg

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date overview of the clinical applications, methods, and technologies of teleophthalmology within the field of preventive medicine. The ability of novel methods to detect the initial signs of neurodegenerative diseases on the basis of alterations in the retina is reviewed, and detailed attention is paid to the role of teleophthalmology in screening for vision-threatening diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. A major part of the book is devoted to novel imaging methods and the latest information technologies, including advanced mobile communication and Web 2.0 applications in teleophthalmology. In addition, the initial projects of an interdisciplinary cooperation in preventive medicine are described. All of the authors are experienced in the scientific and practical aspects of teleophthalmology, including e-learning, and have produced a book that will meet the needs of all medical care providers interested in using teleophthalmology.

  10. Culturally Relevant Cyberbullying Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Gregory John

    2017-01-01

    In this action research study, I, along with a student intervention committee of 14 members, developed a cyberbullying intervention for a large urban high school on the west coast. This high school contained a predominantly African American student population. I aimed to discover culturally relevant cyberbullying prevention strategies for African American students. The intervention committee selected video safety messages featuring African American actors as the most culturally relevant cyber...

  11. Prevention of criticality accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canavese, S.I.

    1982-01-01

    These notes used in the postgraduate course on Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety discuss macro-and microscopic nuclear constants for fissile materials systems. Critical systems: their definition; criteria to analyze the critical state; determination of the critical size; analysis of practical problems about prevention of criticality. Safety of isolated units and of sets of units. Application of standards. Conception of facilities from the criticality control view point. (author) [es

  12. Prevention in insurance markets

    OpenAIRE

    Marie-Cécile FAGART; Bidénam KAMBIA-CHOPIN

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers a competitive insurance market under moral hazard and adverse selection, in which preventive efforts and self-protection costs are unobservable by insurance companies. Under reasonable assumptions, the conclusions of Rothschild and Stiglitz (1976) are preserved in our context even if it involves moral hazard. The riskier agents in equilibrium, who would also be the riskier agents under perfect information, receive their moral hazard contract. For other agents, adverse sel...

  13. Optimal preventive bank supervision

    OpenAIRE

    Belhaj, Mohamed; Klimenko, Nataliya

    2012-01-01

    Early regulator interventions into problem banks is one of the key suggestions of Basel Committee on Banking Supervision. However, no guidance is given on their design. To fill this gap, we outline an incentive-based preventive supervision strategy that eliminates bad asset management in banks. Two supervision techniques are combined: temporary regulatory administration and random audits. Our design ensures good management without excessive supervision costs, through a gradual adjustment of...

  14. Osteoradionecrosis prevention myths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To critically analyze controversial osteoradionecrosis (ORN) prevention techniques, including preradiation extractions of healthy or restorable teeth and the use of prophylactic antibiotics or hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatments for preradiation and postradiation extractions. Methods: The author reviewed ORN studies found on PubMed and in other article references, including studies on overall ORN incidence and pre- and postradiation incidence, with and without prophylactic HBO or antibiotics. Results: Owing in part to more efficient radiation techniques, the incidence of ORN has been declining in radiation patients over the last 2 decades, but the prevention of ORN remains controversial. A review of the available literature does not support the preradiation extraction of restorable or healthy teeth. There is also insufficient evidence to support the use of prophylactic HBO treatments or prophylactic antibiotics before extractions or other oral surgical procedures in radiation patients. Conclusions: To prevent ORN, irradiated dental patients should maintain a high level of oral health. A preradiation referral for a dental evaluation and close collaboration by a multidisciplinary team can be invaluable for radiation patients. As with most other dental patients, restorable and healthy teeth should be retained in irradiated patients. The use of prophylactic HBO or antibiotics should be reconsidered for preradiation and postradiation extractions

  15. Prevention of malignant neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Zaridze

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Research in causation of cancer is an important part of cancer research in general and is an essential prerequisite for cancer prevention. The effective primary prevention is not visible without evidence based knowledge in the causation of cancer in humans.There is sufficient evidence that certain life style and environment factors cause cancer in humans. These factors include: smoking and other types of tobacco consumption, overweight and obesity, lack of physical activity, diet rich in processed meat and poor in vegetables and fruits, certain types of viral and bacterial infection, ultraviolet radiation, ionizing radiation, ambient air pollution, carcinogens at workplace, exogenous hormones.Cancer mortality is decreasing in majority of developed countries, including Russia. This mortality trend is mostly due to decrease in incidence and death rates of lung and other smoking related cancers and is caused by decline in smoking prevalence and change in tar content of cigarette smoke.In Russia trend in mortality from all cancers is as well determined by decrease in incidence and mortality from gastric cancer, which is due to decline in prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and improvement of diet, increase in consumption of fruits and vegetables. Thus the decline in cancer mortality is mostly the result of primary prevention which is the most effective avenue of cancer control. 

  16. [Prevention of pressure ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Kenichi

    2009-12-01

    Even though they have not been diagnosed with a recognized disease, many people have or are at risk of contracting debilitating conditions. They can be referred to as being in the "ill-health zone." For example, many bedridden elderly develop pressure ulcers. The prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers should focus on two main factors: the role of pressure in the development of circulatory disorders; and increased dermal pH. In preventing the development of circulatory disorders resulting in pressure ulcers, using an air or polyurethane mattress is helpful. However, changing the mattress has little effect if the position of the bedridden person is not also changed regularly. To avoid an increase in dermal pH, caregivers should apply moisture-repellent cream and/or oil to the sacral region after careful cleansing. It is important that such preventive measures and treatment be performed daily, and caregivers should be educated on this need and subsequently monitored. Pharmacists have a role in caring for those in the ill-health zone.

  17. Guidelines for prevention in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The effectiveness of prevention to enhance human functioning and reduce psychological distress has been demonstrated. From infancy through adulthood, access to preventive services and interventions is important to improve the quality of life and human functioning and reduce illness and premature death. The importance of prevention is consistent with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. Even with the increased focus on prevention, psychology training programs rarely require specific courses on prevention. In particular, conceptualizations about best practices in prevention, particularly at the environmental level, are lacking. Therefore, psychologists engaged in prevention can benefit from a set of guidelines that address and inform prevention practices. Accordingly, the Guidelines for Prevention in Psychology are intended to "inform psychologists, the public, and other interested parties regarding desirable professional practices" in prevention. The Prevention Guidelines are recommended based on their potential benefits to the public and the professional practice of psychology. They support prevention as an important area of practice, research, and training for psychologists. The Guidelines give increased attention to prevention within APA, encouraging psychologists to become involved with preventive activities relevant to their area of practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. [AIDS prevention in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, E

    2007-04-01

    In 1987 the national AIDS prevention campaign "Gib AIDS keine Chance" (Don't give AIDS a chance) was started in Germany. After a very difficult and controversial political debate about a probably successful response to AIDS, in the end a political decision was made in favour of the implementation of a long term "social learning strategy". Thus, since then the Bundeszentrale für gesundheitliche Aufklärung (Federal Centre for Health Education, BZgA) has been running the campaign on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Health. The result of this prevention program is a low rate of infections. In Germany there were 2600 newly diagnosed infections in 2005: 59 % in homosexual men, 16 % by heterosexual contacts, 17 % in people from high prevalence countries and 7 % in i.v. drug users. In comparison to the international situation Germany has a relatively low HIV-prevalence even nowadays. However, Germany has also been confronted with an increasing number of newly diagnosed infections in the last few years. When the prevention program was started it was very important to build new structures for a successful implementation of the campaign. That meant for instance to build up an effective infrastructure for cooperation between the governmental and the nongovernmental sector, including organising the coordinated action among the partners at the federal, regional and local levels. Likewise, international networking was of great importance. A key element, relevant for the success of the campaign was the close cooperation at the federal level between the BZgA and the Deutsche AIDS Hilfe (German AIDS Help, DAH), to combine the highreach intervention in low-prevalence populations with intensive interventions for high prevalence groups. An effective national AIDS prevention campaign must reach the whole population; inform the public about the main risks of infection, about methods of protection and about what is not infectious. Moreover groups with a higher level of risk of

  19. Early prevention of obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Maffeis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Childhood obesity is the metabolic disorder with the highest prevalence in both children and adults. Urgency to treat and prevent childhood obesity is based on the clear evidence that obesity tends to track from childhood to adulthood, is associated to morbidity also in childhood and to long-term mortality. Early life, i.e., intrauterine life and the first two years, is a sensitive window for prevention. Anatomical and functional maturation of the hypothalamic structures devoted to regulating energy intake and expenditure and body size mainly occurs in the first 1,000 days of life. Therefore, factors affecting the foetal exposition to maternal metabolic environment and early postnatal nutrition are crucial in modulating the definition of the metabolic programming processes in the brain. Maternal diseases, mainly malnutrition for defect or excess, obesity and diabetes, placental disorders and dysfunctions, maternal use of alcohol and drugs, smoking, affect long term metabolic programming of the foetus with lifelong consequences. Similarly, early nutrition contributes to complete the long-term metabolic regulating framework initiated in the uterus. Breastfeeding, adequate weaning, attention to portion size and diet composition are potential tools for reducing the obesity risk later in childhood. Longitudinal randomized controlled studies are needed for exploring the efficacy of obesity prevention strategies initiated after conception.Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · The last ten years, the next ten years in Neonatology Guest Editors: Vassilios Fanos, Michele Mussap, Gavino Faa, Apostolos Papageorgiou

  20. Preventive measures for emergencies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calliess, J.

    1990-01-01

    The meeting discussed the new provisions for civil defense on account of the amended Disaster Control Act which had been recently adopted by the Lower House of Parliament. In 6 working groups it was discussed how appropriate and sensible the attempt is to make provisions for civil defence in order to protect the population, and how adequate legislative measures are in the face of true threat and var scenarios. Ethical aspects and aspects of international law were considered, as well as the role of public health and free charitable institutions concering preventive measures in emergencies. (orig. HSCH) [de

  1. Medical Services: Preventive Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-15

    those at risk. Isoniazid (INH)administered orally is normally used for preventive therapy (300 mg daily for adults and 10 to 14 mg/kg body weight not to...netting, and insecticide aerosols; by taking approved chemoprophylaxis; and by wearing the uniform properly. d. Enteric disease by using iodine tablets ...National stock number: 6850–00–985–7166 Description: Water purification tablet , iodine, 50’s Unit/Issue: BT Allowance: 400 Authority: CTA 8–100 Notes: 1

  2. Prevention of acute malnutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Pee, Saskia; Grais, Rebecca; Fenn, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    of cash or food, enables households to better meet the food, health, and other needs of household members and may increase resilience; water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and health interventions help prevent and address illness and hence reduce wasting risk. The contributions of specific interventions...... "best possible" treatment, can provide evidence about what works, to what extent, at what cost, and under which circumstances. Programs should address the most important causes in given contexts, be feasible to implement at scale, and assess implementation, coverage, and outcomes....

  3. Accident prevention programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This study by the Steel Industry Safety and Health Commission was made within the context of the application by undertakings of the principles of accident and disease prevention previously adopted by the said Commission. It puts forward recommendations for the effective and gradual implementation of a programme of action on occupational health and safety in the various departments of an undertaking and in the undertaking as a whole. The methods proposed in this study are likely to be of interest to all undertakings in the metallurgical industry and other industrial sectors

  4. Preventing medical device recalls

    CERN Document Server

    Raheja, Dev

    2014-01-01

    Introduction to Medical Device RequirementsIntroductionThe ChallengesSources of ErrorsUnderstanding the Science of Safety     Overview of FDA Quality System Regulation     Overview of Risk Management Standard ISO 14971     Overview of FDA Device Approval Process     Overview of Regulatory Requirements for Clinical TrialsSummaryReferencesPreventing Recalls during Specification WritingIntroductionConduct Requirements Analysis to Identify Missing RequirementsSpecifications for Safety, Durability, and

  5. Selenium for preventing cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Dennert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selenium is a trace element essential to humans. Higher selenium exposure and selenium supplements have been suggested to protect against several types of cancers. OBJECTIVE: Two research questions were addressed in this review: What is the evidence for: 1. an aetiological relationship between selenium exposure and cancer risk in women and men?; 2. the efficacy of selenium supplementation for cancer prevention in women and men? SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched electronic databases and bibliographies of reviews and included publications. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included prospective observational studies to answer research question (a and randomised controlled trials (RCTs to answer research question (b. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We conducted random effects meta-analyses of epidemiological data when five or more studies were retrieved for a specific outcome. We made a narrative summary of data from RCTs. MAIN RESULTS: We included 49 prospective observational studies and six RCTs. In epidemiologic data, we found a reduced cancer incidence (summary odds ratio, OR, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.53 to 0.91 and mortality (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.83 with higher selenium exposure. Cancer risk was more pronouncedly reduced in men (incidence: OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.42 to 1.05 than in women (incidence: OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.77. These findings have potential limitations due to study design, quality and heterogeneity of the data, which complicated the interpretation of the summary statistics. The RCTs found no protective efficacy of selenium yeast supplementation against non-melanoma skin cancer or L-selenomethionine supplementation against prostate cancer. Study results for the prevention of liver cancer with selenium supplements were inconsistent and studies had an unclear risk of bias. The results of the Nutritional Prevention of Cancer Trial (NPCT and SELECT raised concerns about possible harmful effects of selenium supplements. AUTHORS

  6. Stroke Prevention & Treatment: Diet & Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention & Treatment: Diet & Nutrition Stroke Prevention & Treatment: Diet & Nutrition A healthy diet can reduce your risk for ... Treatment How does a stroke affect eating and nutrition? Stroke can devastate a person's nutritional health because ...

  7. Head Lice: Prevention and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and General Public. Contact Us Parasites Home Prevention & Control Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... that can be taken to help prevent and control the spread of head lice: Avoid head-to- ...

  8. Body Lice Prevention and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and General Public. Contact Us Parasites Home Prevention & Control Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Body lice ... that can be taken to help prevent and control the spread of body lice: Bathe regularly and ...

  9. Immunoglobulins for preventing hepatitis A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jian Ping; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Fei, Yutong

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis A (infectious hepatitis) is a common epidemic disease. Immunoglobulins for passive immunisation are used as prevention.......Hepatitis A (infectious hepatitis) is a common epidemic disease. Immunoglobulins for passive immunisation are used as prevention....

  10. The Science of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The science of cancer prevention is described by Dr. Barnett S. Kramer, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute (NCI). The Division of Cancer Prevention administers a broad spectrum of research that spans basic pre-clinical, laboratory research, supportive and palliative care research, early detection, and randomized controlled clinical trials. The Division also supports the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program and is devoted to the balanced communication of scientific results.

  11. Eating Disorders: Prevention through Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, K. L.; Jones, Karen H.

    1993-01-01

    School prevention programs for teenage eating disorders should emphasize nutrition education (knowledge, attitudes, behavior) and living skills (self-concept, coping). Secondary prevention involves identifying early warning signs and places for referral; tertiary prevention creates a supportive school environment for recoverers with teachers as…

  12. Evaluation Methods for Prevention Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Amy V.; Barnette, J. Jackson; Ferguson, Kristi J.; Garr, David R.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the importance of assessing medical students' competence in prevention knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Provides general guidance for programs interested in evaluating their prevention instructional efforts, and gives specific examples of possible methods for evaluating prevention education. Stresses the need to tailor assessment…

  13. INITIAL ALLERGY PREVENTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Pampura

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergy prevention is an urgent pediatric issue. Food allergy spread among infants amounts to 6–8%. This review highlights the modern viewpoints on diet prevention of this pathology among children, including by means of the hypoallergic nutritional formulas.Key words: food allergy, prevention, allergies, prebiotics, children.

  14. Can prevention eliminate caries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D

    1995-07-01

    There are four main factors involved in the carious process: at-risk tooth structure, plaque flora, fermentable carbohydrates, and time. Based on our knowledge of the carious process, four main preventive strategies have been developed over the years, namely, fluorides, fissure sealing, dietary choice, and plaque control. Fluorides are having a major impact on smooth-surface caries; hence, strategies combining fluorides and fissure sealing are very effective. However, use of fissure sealing is still problematic. Changing dietary practices with a view to reducing dental caries seems to be having little impact on a global scale. Plaque control, as practiced routinely by the majority of people, is not sufficient to result in caries reductions. Deprivation and poverty are strongly associated with high caries levels. Although the preventive strategies currently available are likely to result in lower caries levels for many, for logistical reasons and because of factors associated with deprivation and poverty, caries is likely to remain a major public health problem in most communities for the foreseeable future.

  15. Cholera - management and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Hannah G; Bowman, Conor; Luby, Stephen P

    2017-06-01

    Cholera is an acute secretory diarrhoeal infection caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. It is likely to have originated in the Indian sub-continent; however, it spread to cause six worldwide pandemics between 1817-1923. The ongoing seventh worldwide pandemic of cholera began in 1961. The intensity, duration and severity of cholera epidemics have been increasing, signaling the need for more effective control and prevention measures. The response to the cholera pandemics of the 19th century led to the development of safe and effective sanitation and water systems which have effectively removed the risk of cholera in many settings. However, such systems are not in place to protect billions of people worldwide. Although some progress has been made in expanding access to water in recent years, achieving optimal infrastructure will, in the most optimistic scenario, take decades. Climate change, extreme weather events and rapid urbanisation suggests that alternatives to the current paradigm of providing large centralised water and sanitation systems should be considered, including smaller decentralised systems. The aim of this review paper is to provide an overview of current knowledge regarding management of cholera with a focus on prevention measures including vaccination and water and sanitation interventions. © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Exercise Prevents Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnomo, K. I.; Doewes, M.; Giri, M. K. W.; Setiawan, K. H.; Wibowo, I. P. A.

    2017-03-01

    Multiple current studies show that neuroinflammation may contribute to mental illness such as depression, anxiety, and mood disorder. Chronic inflammation in peripheral tissues is indicated by the increase of inflammatory marker like cytokine IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β. Pro-inflammatory cytokine in peripheral tissues can reach brain tissues and activate microglia and it causes neuroinflammation. Psychological stress may led peripheral and central inflammation. Activated microglia will produce pro-inflammatory cytokine, ROS, RNS, and tryptophan catabolizes. This neuroinflammation can promote metabolism changes of any neurotransmitter, such as serotonin, dopamine, and glutamate that will influence neurocircuit in the brain including basal ganglia and anterior cingulated cortex. It leads to mental illness. Exercise give contribution to reduce tissue inflammation. When muscle is contracting in an exercise, muscle will produce the secretion of cytokine like IL-6, IL-1ra, and IL-10. It will react as anti-inflammation and influence macrophage, T cell, monosit, protein Toll-Like Receptor (TLR), and then reduce neuroinflammation, characterised by the decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokine and prevent the activation of microglia in the brain. The objective of the present study is to review scientific articles in the literature related to the contribution of exercise to prevent and ease mental illness.

  17. Prevention of hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Estera Kowalska

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B (Hepatitis B is a hepatitis B virus (HBV -based liver disease. This virus has an affinity for liver cells, it can cause both acute and chronic viral infections of varying severity. The consequences of chronic HBV infection can be cirrhosis and liver cancer. In Poland in 1989 a preventive program was implemented to reduce HBV infection. Universal vaccinations have been introduced to reduce the prevalence of Type B hepatitis B from 40.3 / 100,000 in 1989 to 7/100 in 2000. In the last 20 years in Poland there has been huge progress in the prevention and suppression of HBV infections. Decrease in the incidence of hepatitis B is mainly the result of the introduction of compulsory vaccination and improving hygiene procedures and improve sanitation aimed at aborting the pathways of the virus. However, still a large part of society is not immune on HBV infection acting potential group of the risk of infection. In addition, in the era of a growing group of followers. movements of the anti vaccine it is necessary to continue to promote knowledge of HBV and the efficacy and safety of vaccination.

  18. Obesity prevention in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Luis A; Bel-Serrat, Silvia; Santaliestra-Pasías, Alba M; Rodríguez, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity continues to be unacceptably high and of public health concern in Europe. During childhood and adolescence, environmental factors are the main drivers of obesity development. Obesity is caused by a chronic energy imbalance involving both dietary intake and physical activity patterns. Several risk factors are influencing obesity development, even starting in the prenatal period. From birth, along life, mainly diet and physical activity/inactivity are the most important drivers on top of genetic susceptibility. The first years of life can therefore be crucial to start preventive interventions that can have an impact on lifestyle and on later overweight and obesity. Schools are an attractive and popular setting for implementing interventions for children. Interventions including a community component are considered to be the most effective. Obesity control will require policy interventions to improve the environments that promote poor dietary intake and physical inactivity rather than individually focused interventions. More solid institutional and health policies are needed together with more effective interventions to obtain evident changes for the prevention of excess adiposity among children. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Initiatives for proliferation prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    Preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction is a central part of US national security policy. A principal instrument of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) program for securing weapons of mass destruction technology and expertise and removing incentives for scientists, engineers and technicians in the newly independent states (NIS) of the former Soviet Union to go to rogue countries or assist terrorist groups is the Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP). IPP was initiated pursuant to the 1994 Foreign Operations Appropriations Act. IPP is a nonproliferation program with a commercialization strategy. IPP seeks to enhance US national security and to achieve nonproliferation objectives by engaging scientists, engineers and technicians from former NIS weapons institutes; redirecting their activities in cooperatively-developed, commercially viable non-weapons related projects. These projects lead to commercial and economic benefits for both the NIS and the US IPP projects are funded in Russian, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus. This booklet offers an overview of the IPP program as well as a sampling of some of the projects which are currently underway

  20. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  1. Xylitol and caries prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duane, Brett

    2015-06-01

    Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science Conference Proceedings, Proquest Dissertations and Theses, US National Institutes of Health Trials Register (http://clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No language or year restrictions were used. Randomised controlled trials assessing the effects of xylitol products on dental caries in children and adults. Two review authors independently screened the results of the electronic searches, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. Authors were contacted where possible for missing data or clarification where feasible. For continuous outcomes, means and standard deviations were used to obtain the mean difference and 95% confidence interval (CI). Continuous data was used to calculate prevented fractions (PF) and 95% CIs to summarise the percentage reduction in caries. For dichotomous outcomes, reported risk ratios (RR) and 95% CIs were used. As there were fewer than four studies included in the meta-analysis, a fixed effect model was used. Ten studies were included with a total of 5903 participants. One study was assessed as being at low risk of bias, two were assessed as unclear risk of bias with seven at high risk of bias. Over 2.5–3 years, low quality evidence demonstrated that with 4216 children analysed, a fluoride toothpaste with 10% xylitol (exact dosage unsure) reduced caries by 13% when compared to a fluoride only toothpaste. (PF −0.13, 95% CI −0.18 to −0.08. Remaining evidence of the use of xylitol in children has risk of bias and uncertainty of effect and was therefore insufficient to determine a benefit from xylitol. Four studies reported that there were no adverse effects from any of the interventions. Two studies reported similar rates of adverse effects between study arms. The remaining studies either mentioned adverse effects

  2. Primary Prevention With Statins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Martin B; Afzal, Shoaib; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend initiating primary prevention for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) with statins based on absolute ASCVD risk assessment. Recently, alternative trial-based and hybrid approaches were suggested for statin treatment eligibility. OBJECTIVES: This study...... the population studied, 42% were eligible for statin therapy according to the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) risk assessment and cholesterol treatment guidelines approach, versus 56% with the trial-based approach and 21% with the hybrid approach. Among these statin......-eligible subjects, the ASCVD event rate per 1,000 person-years was 9.8, 6.8, and 11.2, respectively. The ACC/AHA-recommended absolute risk score was well calibrated around the 7.5% 10-year ASCVD risk treatment threshold and discriminated better than the trial-based or hybrid approaches. Compared with the ACC...

  3. Protective and preventative measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, P. N

    2002-01-01

    Health care workers who come in contact with blood and other body fluids in their working environment risk being exposed to blood borne diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B and C. An anti-hepatitis B vaccine is available as well as hepatitis B immunoglobulin but no vaccine is available against hepatitis C and HIV. The best way to protect against exposure to blood and body fluids is to use 'Universal Precautions' which encourage safe working methods. If an exposure does take place it should be regarded as an urgent medical problem and every facility should have a management policy to deal with this problem. The source patient's rights must also be protected. The preventative and protective measures available to health care workers as well as practical suggestions to carry out in the event of an exposure are discussed (Au)

  4. Preventing Juvenile Delinquency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina dos Reis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to problematize discourses about protection and care that have surrounded compulsory hospitalization by evidencing its use as a control and punishment mechanism that increases the social vulnerability of young drug users. For such, we analyze lawsuits involving juveniles who were consigned to psychiatric institutions for drug addiction treatment as a protection measure in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, in Brazil. The analysis of the materials has evidenced discourses that have circumscribed young drug users and constructed this population as potentially dangerous subjects as well as a population category at risk. In this sense, we point out how compulsory hospitalization has emerged out of the lawsuits as a tool for prevention of juvenile delinquency.

  5. Prevention of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kuroczycki-Saniutycz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA accounts for 95% of all pancreatic cancers. About 230,000 PDA cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. PDA has the lowest five-year survival rate as compared to others cancers. PDA in Poland is the fifth leading cause of death after lung, stomach, colon and breast cancer. In our paper we have analysed the newest epidemiological research, some of it controversial, to establish the best practical solution for pancreatic cancer prevention in the healthy population as well as treatment for patients already diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. We found that PDA occurs quite frequently but is usually diagnosed too late, at its advanced stage. Screening for PDA is not very well defined except in subgroups of high-risk individuals with genetic disorders or with chronic pancreatitis. We present convincing, probable, and suggestive risk factors associated with pancreatic cancer, many of which are modifiable and should be introduced and implemented in our society.

  6. A preventive maintenance lubricant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapaykina, S A; Ol' kov, P L; Pertsev, A N; Rodzevillo, I T; Rogacheva, O I; Zinov' yev, A P

    1980-02-15

    A method is disclosed to lower the adherence of materials by reducing the viscosity of a preventive maintenance lubricant against adhesion of moist, freeflowing materials, containing extract of selective cleaning of oil fractions and asphalt. Gas oil of catalytic cracking is added having a boiling point of 190-300 degrees, with the following ratio of components (%): selective cleaning extract, 43-50; asphalt, 14-16; and gas oil of catalytic cracking, the remainder, Treating a surface with the proposed lubricant lowers the specific resistance to shift of rock compared with the prototype (g/cm/sup 2/): sand (moisture content, 18%) from 3.82 to 1.55; and clay (moisture content 16%), from 5.41 to 3.51.

  7. Preventing Informal Urban Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig; McLaren, Robin

    2008-01-01

    . This is directly linked to citizen participation in the process of land use control. Decentralisation should aim to combine responsibility for decision making with accountability for financial, social, and environmental consequences. Decentralisation requires access to appropriate quality of land information......, addresses the main issue of how to prevent informal urban development, especially through the use of adequate and sustainable means of land use control and good governance. Three key means are addressed: Decentralisation: There is a need to separate central policy/regulation making and local decision making...... in the decision making process? Legislation in itself is not enough. A cultural change within society may need to be encouraged. Again, access to participation requires access to land information. Comprehensive planning at local level supported by citizen participation should also enable establishment proper...

  8. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Supplementation to Prevent Arteriovenous Fistula and Graft Failure: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viecelli, Andrea K; Irish, Ashley B; Polkinghorne, Kevan R; Hawley, Carmel M; Johnson, David W; Mori, Trevor A; Pascoe, Elaine M; Strippoli, Giovanni F M; Lok, Charmaine E; Palmer, Suetonia C

    2018-01-27

    Arteriovenous access failure frequently occurs in people on hemodialysis and is associated with morbidity, mortality and large healthcare expenditures. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 PUFA) may improve access outcomes via pleiotropic effects on access maturation and function, but may cause bleeding complications. Systematic review with meta-analysis. Adults requiring hemodialysis via arteriovenous fistula or graft. Trials evaluating omega-3 PUFA for arteriovenous access outcomes identified by searches in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and Embase to 24 January 2017. Omega-3 PUFA. Primary patency loss, dialysis suitability failure, access abandonment, interventions to maintain patency or assist maturation, bleeding, gastrointestinal side-effects, all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, hospitalization, and treatment adherence. Treatment effects were summarized as relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Evidence was assessed using GRADE. Five eligible trials (833 participants) with a median follow-up of 12 months compared peri-operative omega-3 PUFA supplementation with placebo. One trial (n=567) evaluated treatment for fistulae and four (n=266) for grafts. Omega-3 PUFA supplementation prevented primary patency loss with moderate certainty (761 participants, RR 0.81, CI 0.68-0.98). Low quality evidence suggested, that omega-3 PUFA may have had little or no effect on dialysis suitability failure (536 participants, RR 0.95, CI 0.73-1.23), access abandonment (732 participants, RR 0.78, CI 0.59-1.03), need for interventions (732 participants, RR 0.82, CI 0.64-1.04), or all-cause mortality (799 participants, RR 0.99, CI 0.51-1.92). Bleeding risk (793 participants, RR 1.40, CI 0.78-2.49) or gastrointestinal side-effects (816 participants, RR 1.22, CI 0.64-2.34) from treatment were uncertain. There was no evidence of different treatment effects for grafts and fistulae. Small number and methodological limitations of included trials. Omega-3 PUFA supplementation

  9. The incidental pulmonary nodule in a child. Part 2: Commentary and suggestions for clinical management, risk communication and prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westra, Sjirk J.; Thacker, Paul G.; Podberesky, Daniel J.; Lee, Edward Y.; Iyer, Ramesh S.; Hegde, Shilpa V.; Guillerman, R.P.; Mahani, Maryam Ghadimi

    2015-01-01

    The incidental detection of small lung nodules in children is a vexing consequence of an increased reliance on CT. We present an algorithm for the management of lung nodules detected on CT in children, based on the presence or absence of symptoms, the presence or absence of elements in the clinical history that might explain these nodules, and the imaging characteristics of the nodules (such as attenuation measurements within the nodule). We provide suggestions on how to perform a thoughtfully directed and focused search for clinically occult extrathoracic disease processes (including malignant disease) that may present as an incidentally detected lung nodule on CT. This algorithm emphasizes that because of the lack of definitive information on the natural history of small solid nodules that are truly detected incidentally, their clinical management is highly dependent on the caregivers' individual risk tolerance. In addition, we present strategies to reduce the prevalence of these incidental findings, by preventing unnecessary chest CT scans or inadvertent inclusion of portions of the lungs in scans of adjacent body parts. Application of these guidelines provides pediatric radiologists with an important opportunity to practice patient-centered and evidence-based medicine. (orig.)

  10. Review of techniques to prevent introduction of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) during native mussel (Unionoidea) conservation activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, W.G.; Newton, T.J.; Gatenby, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    Because of the declines in diversity and abundance of native freshwater mussels (superfamily Unionoidea), and the potential decimation of populations of native mussels resulting from the rapid spread of the exotic zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha, management options to eliminate or reduce the threat of the zebra mussel are needed. Relocating native mussels to refugia (artificial and natural) has been proposed to mitigate the threat of zebra mussels to native species. Relocation of native mussels to refugia such as fish hatchery facilities or natural habitats within their historic range. Which are unlikely to be infested by zebra mussels, necessitates that protocols be developed to prevent the inadvertent introduction of zebra mussels. Several recent studies have developed Such protocols, and have assessed their effectiveness on the health and survival of native mussels during subsequent relocation to various refugia. The purpose of this project is to synthesize and evaluate the current protocols and to develop a set of procedures that resource managers and researchers should consider before conducting conservation activities in zebra mussel infested waters. We found that the existing protocols have many common points of concern, such as facility modification and suitability, zebra mussel risk assessment and management procedures, and health and disease management procedures. These conservation protocols may have broad applicability to other situations and locations. A summary and evaluation of the information in these main areas, along with recommended guidelines, are presented in this article.

  11. Politics of prevention: The emergence of prevention science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumeliotis, Filip

    2015-08-01

    This article critically examines the political dimension of prevention science by asking how it constructs the problems for which prevention is seen as the solution and how it enables the monitoring and control of these problems. It also seeks to examine how prevention science has established a sphere for legitimate political deliberation and which kinds of statements are accepted as legitimate within this sphere. The material consists of 14 publications describing and discussing the goals, concepts, promises and problems of prevention science. The analysis covers the period from 1993 to 2012. The analysis shows that prevention science has established a narrow definition of "prevention", including only interventions aimed at the reduction of risks for clinical disorders. In publications from the U.S. National Institute of Drug Abuse, the principles of prevention science have enabled a commitment to a zero-tolerance policy on drugs. The drug using subject has been constructed as a rational choice actor lacking in skills in exerting self-control in regard to drug use. Prevention science has also enabled the monitoring and control of expertise, risk groups and individuals through specific forms of data gathering. Through the juxtaposition of the concepts of "objectivity" and "morality", prevention science has constituted a principle of delineation, disqualifying statements not adhering to the principles of prevention science from the political field, rendering ethical and conflictual dimensions of problem representations invisible. The valorisation of scientific accounts of drugs has acted to naturalise specific political ideals. It simultaneously marginalises the public from the public policy process, giving precedence to experts who are able to provide information that policy-makers are demanding. Alternative accounts, such as those based on marginalisation, poverty or discrimination are silenced within prevention science. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  12. Optimizing preventive maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiCola, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    The traditional approach to preventive maintenance (PM) is based on adherence to manufacturers's requirements and recommended frequencies. When equipment fails, either new procedures are established or the frequency is increased. This leads to an increase in the number of PM activities, overloading not only maintenance resources, but support as well. There is no correlation between more PM and an increase in equipment reliability. More PM may actually induce failures. Reliability-centered maintenance, a new concept in utility maintenance, is based on identifying system/subsystem functions, failures, and dominant failure modes to develop or revise PM tasks. The activities described in this paper are based on actual implementation of this concept on an ongoing project to upgrade the PM program at one of the largest electric utilities in the country. Optimum PM activities are those that, when implemented, will minimize factors that c cause equipment to fail. One technique described illustrates how equipment performance, failure modes, and causes can be related to minimize the occurrence of failures. Operating history and service life of a component are key factors in determining the most effective PM activities, provided that the factors are related to failure modes and causes

  13. PREVENTION OF OCCUPATIONAL ACCIDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovica Jovanovic

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical services, physicians and nurses play an essential role in the plant safety program through primary treatment of injured workers and by helping to identify workplace hazards. The physician and nurse should participate in the worksite investigations to identify specific hazard or stresses potentially causing the occupational accidents and injuries and in planning the subsequent hazard control program. Physicians and nurses must work closely and cooperatively with supervisors to ensure the prompt reporting and treatment of all work related health and safety problems. Occupational accidents, work related injuries and fatalities result from multiple causes, affect different segments of the working population, and occur in a myriad of occupations and industrial settings. Multiple factors and risks contribute to traumatic injuries, such as hazardous exposures, workplace and process design, work organization and environment, economics, and other social factors. With such a diversity of theories, it will not be difficult to understand that there does not exist one single theory that is considered right or correct and is universally accepted. These theories are nonetheless necessary, but not sufficient, for developing a frame of reference for understanding accident occurrences. Prevention strategies are also varied, and multiple strategies may be applicable to many settings, including engineering controls, protective equipment and technologies, management commitment to and investment in safety, regulatory controls, and education and training. Research needs are thus broad, and the development and application of interventions involve many disciplines and organizations.

  14. Selenium for preventing cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinceti, Marco; Dennert, Gabriele; Crespi, Catherine M; Zwahlen, Marcel; Brinkman, Maree; Zeegers, Maurice PA; Horneber, Markus; D'Amico, Roberto; Del Giovane, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Background This review is an update of the first Cochrane publication on selenium for preventing cancer (Dennert 2011). Selenium is a metalloid with both nutritional and toxicological properties. Higher selenium exposure and selenium supplements have been suggested to protect against several types of cancers. Objectives Two research questions were addressed in this review: What is the evidence for: an aetiological relation between selenium exposure and cancer risk in humans? andthe efficacy of selenium supplementation for cancer prevention in humans? Search methods We conducted electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2013, Issue 1), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1966 to February 2013 week 1), EMBASE (1980 to 2013 week 6), CancerLit (February 2004) and CCMed (February 2011). As MEDLINE now includes the journals indexed in CancerLit, no further searches were conducted in this database after 2004. Selection criteria We included prospective observational studies (cohort studies including sub-cohort controlled studies and nested case-control studies) and randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with healthy adult participants (18 years of age and older). Data collection and analysis For observational studies, we conducted random effects meta-analyses when five or more studies were retrieved for a specific outcome. For RCTs, we performed random effects meta-analyses when two or more studies were available. The risk of bias in observational studies was assessed using forms adapted from the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale for cohort and case-control studies; the criteria specified in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions were used to evaluate the risk of bias in RCTs. Main results We included 55 prospective observational studies (including more than 1,100,000 participants) and eight RCTs (with a total of 44,743 participants). For the observational studies, we found lower cancer incidence (summary odds ratio (OR) 0

  15. 14. Breast cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, A K; Fentiman, I S

    2002-05-01

    Increased risk of breast cancer may result from potentially modifiable causes such as endogenous hormone levels, obesity, HRT, and non-lactation, or non-modifiable factors including genetic susceptibility and increasing age. The Gail model, based on known factors, may be useful for estimating lifetime risk in some individuals, but those risk factors that are easier to modify may have a limited impact on the totality of breast cancer. Tamoxifen prevention still remains contentious, with a significant reduction in risk of breast cancer in women given tamoxifen in the NSABP P1 study but no effect in the Italian and Royal Marsden trials. Raloxifene, tested in the MORE trial, reduced the incidence of breast cancer by 65% but this was restricted to oestrogen receptor positive tumours. Lifestyle factors such as diet, obesity, exercise and age at first full term pregnancy and number of pregnancies have a mild to moderate impact on risk, so may have little effect on the incidence of breast cancer. Reduction of alcohol intake could lead to a modest reduction in the risk of breast cancer but possibly adversely affect other diseases. Fat reduction and GnRH analogue reduce mammographic density but have not yet been shown to affect risk. For women with BRCA1/2 mutation, options include unproven surveillance and prophylactic mastectomy with an unquantified risk reduction. Interesting new candidates for chemoprevention include aromatase inhibitors, new generation SERMs, demethylating agents, non-selective COX inhibitors, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and polyamine synthetic inhibitors.

  16. Prevention of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olver, Ian N

    2016-11-21

    Modifiable lifestyle factors may reduce the risk of developing breast cancer. Obesity is associated particularly with post-menopausal breast cancer. Diet is important, and exercise equivalent to running for up to 8 hours each week reduces the risk of breast cancer, both in its own right and through reducing obesity. Alcohol consumption may be responsible for 5.8% of breast cancers in Australia and it is recommended to reduce this to two standard drinks per day. Drinking alcohol and smoking increases the risk for breast cancer and, therefore, it is important to quit tobacco smoking. Prolonged use of combined oestrogen and progesterone hormone replacement therapy and oral contraceptives may increase breast cancer risk and this must be factored into individual decisions about their use. Ionising radiation, either from diagnostic or therapeutic radiation or through occupational exposure, is associated with a high incidence of breast cancer and exposure may be reduced in some cases. Tamoxifen chemoprevention may reduce the incidence of oestrogen receptor positive cancer in 51% of women with high risk of breast cancer. Uncommon but serious side effects include thromboembolism and uterine cancer. Raloxifene, which can also reduce osteoporosis, can be used in post-menopausal women and is not associated with the development of uterine cancer. Surgical prophylaxis with bilateral mastectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy can reduce the risk of breast cancer in patients carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. For preventive treatments, mammographic screening can identify other women at high risk.

  17. Prevention of nuclear war

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lifton, R.J.

    1980-10-01

    Physicians are exercising their responsibility as healers in their efforts to prevent nuclear war. Death for Hiroshima survivors was experienced in four stages: the immediate impact of destruction, the acute impact of radiation, delayed radiation effects, and later identification as an atomic bomb survivor. Each phase had its physical and psychological impacts and negates Hiroshima as a model for rational behavior despite those who claim survival is possible for those who are prepared. The psychic effects of modern nuclear, chemical, and germ warfare need to be challenged with a symbolization of life and immortality. Studies of psychological reactions to the terror children felt during practice air-raid drills indicate that the fears can be surpressed and re-emerge in adult life as a linking of death with collective annihilation. Other themes which emerge are feelings of impermanence, craziness, identification with the bomb, and a double existence. Psychic numbing and the religion of nuclearism cause dangerous conflicts with the anxieties caused by increasing awareness of death. (DCK)

  18. Prevention of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifton, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Physicians are exercising their responsibility as healers in their efforts to prevent nuclear war. Death for Hiroshima survivors was experienced in four stages: the immediate impact of destruction, the acute impact of radiation, delayed radiation effects, and later identification as an atomic bomb survivor. Each phase had its physical and psychological impacts and negates Hiroshima as a model for rational behavior despite those who claim survival is possible for those who are prepared. The psychic effects of modern nuclear, chemical, and germ warfare need to be challenged with a symbolization of life and immortality. Studies of psychological reactions to the terror children felt during practice air-raid drills indicate that the fears can be surpressed and re-emerge in adult life as a linking of death with collective annihilation. Other themes which emerge are feelings of impermanence, craziness, identification with the bomb, and a double existence. Psychic numbing and the religion of nuclearism cause dangerous conflicts with the anxieties caused by increasing awareness of death

  19. Trying to prevent abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromham, D R; Oloto, E J

    1997-06-01

    It is known that, since antiquity, women confronted with an unwanted pregnancy have used abortion as a means of resolving their dilemma. Although undoubtedly widely used in all historical ages, abortion has come to be regarded as an event preferably avoided because of the impact on the women concerned as well as considerations for fetal life. Policies to reduce numbers and rates of abortion must acknowledge certain observations. Criminalization does not prevent abortion but increases maternal risks. A society's 'openness' in discussing sexual matters inversely correlates with abortion rates. Correlation between contraceptive use and abortion is also inverse but relates most closely to the efficacy of contraceptive methods used. 'Revolution' in the range of contraceptive methods used will have an equivalent impact on abortion rates. Secondary or emergency contraceptive methods have a considerable role to play in the reduction of abortion numbers. Good sex (and 'relationships') education programs may delay sexual debut, increase contraceptive usage and be associated with reduced abortion. Finally, interaction between socioeconomic factors and the choice between abortion and ongoing pregnancy are complex. Abortion is not necessarily chosen by those least able to support a child financially.

  20. Municipal water pollution prevention program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    EPA believes that the most effective and equitable means of assuring viability of this infrastructure is through environmentally preferred pollution prevention approaches especially through application of Municipal Water Pollution Prevention (MWPP). These approaches may enhance worker safety, improve the usability of sludge, increase the ability for local community expansion, and reduce operation and compliance costs. State-based municipal pollution prevention programs focus attention on a series of actions to prevent pollution in advance rather than taking more expensive corrective actions. MWPP encourages resource conservation to reduce water and energy use, appropriate pricing, toxicity reductions at the source, BOD reductions, recycling, proper treatment of wastes, and beneficial uses of sludge

  1. Pollution prevention: A regulatory update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walzer, A.E.; Maynard, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Pollution prevention is the emphasis of the 1990s environmental philosophy. This new environmental era was ushered in when President Bush signed the Pollution Prevention Act in October 1990. This law, with its accompanying philosophy, was in response to the realization that end-of-the-pipe treatment, which frequently changed the media in which a pollutant or waste was discharged, was inadequate to protect the environment and human health. Pollution prevention advocates source reduction, where material substitutions and engineering solutions are sought to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste and pollutants. This proactive approach reduces environmental impacts such as those of former waste sites which have produced environmental legacies that will cost billions of dollars and take decades to remediate. This paper describes pollution prevention philosophy and summarizes regulatory pollution prevention requirements. It describes current regulatory trends in the area of pollution prevention, including voluntary programs and enforcement actions. The Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 is described, and pollution prevention initiatives embodied in other laws, including the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and the Toxic Substances Control Act, are discussed. A historical overview of waste minimization initiatives within the Department of Energy is given, and other pollution prevention initiatives that affect federal facilities, such as Executive Order 12780, which mandates recycling and the procurement of recycled materials, are also outlined

  2. Fungal Diseases: Ringworm Risk & Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Treatment & Outcomes Health Professionals Statistics More Resources Candidiasis Candida infections of the mouth, throat, and esophagus Vaginal candidiasis Invasive candidiasis Definition Symptoms Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis ...

  3. Nutrition and Cancer Prevention Research Practicum | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nutritional Science Research Group in the Division of Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health and the Department of Nutrition at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health are offering a one week educational opportunity in "Nutrition and Cancer Prevention Research" for individuals with a sustained commitment to nutrition

  4. A broad-spectrum sunscreen prevents cumulative damage from repeated exposure to sub-erythemal solar ultraviolet radiation representative of temperate latitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seité, S; Christiaens, F; Bredoux, C; Compan, D; Zucchi, H; Lombard, D; Fourtanier, A; Young, A R

    2010-02-01

    We have previously shown the detrimental effects of 19 sub-erythemal exposures to daily ultraviolet radiation (DUVR, which mimics non-extreme exposure conditions), delivered over 4 weeks to volunteers. This source had UVA (320-400 nm) to UVB (290-320 nm) irradiance ratio of 25, instead of that close to 10 that is typically the case with solar-simulated radiation (SSR) that represents summer global sunlight with a clear sky and quasi-zenith solar irradiance. Here, we report on an extension of this previous study, in which we evaluated the photoprotection afforded by a broad-spectrum daily-care product with a low-sun protection factor (SPF 8, UVA-PF 7 and 3* rated UVA protection). We assessed cellular and molecular markers of photodamage that are relevant to skin cancer and photoageing. This study shows that biological effects of repeated exposure to DUVR can be prevented by a broad-spectrum daily-care product and that the level of protection afforded varies with the studied endpoint. Efficient daily UVR protection, as provided by a broad-spectrum daily-care product, is necessary to prevent the 'silent' sub-erythemal cumulative effects of UVR from inadvertent sun exposure.

  5. Postpartum haemorrhage: prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmow, David

    2011-04-04

    Loss of more than 500 mL of blood following childbirth is usually caused by failure of the uterus to contract fully after delivery of the placenta, and occurs in over 10% of deliveries, with a 1% mortality rate worldwide. Other causes of postpartum haemorrhage include retained placental tissue, lacerations to the genital tract, and coagulation disorders. Uterine atony is more likely in women who have had a general anaesthetic or oxytocin, an over-distended uterus, a prolonged or precipitous labour, or who are of high parity. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug interventions and of drug interventions to prevent primary postpartum haemorrhage? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 40 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: active management of the third stage of labour, carboprost injection, controlled cord traction, ergot compounds (ergometrine/methylergotamine), immediate breastfeeding, misoprostol (oral, rectal, sublingual, or vaginal), oxytocin, oxytocin plus ergometrine combinations, prostaglandin E2 compounds, and uterine massage.

  6. Selenium for preventing cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinceti, Marco; Filippini, Tommaso; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Dennert, Gabriele; Zwahlen, Marcel; Brinkman, Maree; Zeegers, Maurice Pa; Horneber, Markus; D'Amico, Roberto; Crespi, Catherine M

    2018-01-29

    This review is the third update of the Cochrane review "Selenium for preventing cancer". Selenium is a naturally occurring element with both nutritional and toxicological properties. Higher selenium exposure and selenium supplements have been suggested to protect against several types of cancer. To gather and present evidence needed to address two research questions:1. What is the aetiological relationship between selenium exposure and cancer risk in humans?2. Describe the efficacy of selenium supplementation for cancer prevention in humans. We updated electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 2), MEDLINE (Ovid, 2013 to January 2017, week 4), and Embase (2013 to 2017, week 6), as well as searches of clinical trial registries. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and longitudinal observational studies that enrolled adult participants. We performed random-effects (RE) meta-analyses when two or more RCTs were available for a specific outcome. We conducted RE meta-analyses when five or more observational studies were available for a specific outcome. We assessed risk of bias in RCTs and in observational studies using Cochrane's risk assessment tool and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, respectively. We considered in the primary analysis data pooled from RCTs with low risk of bias. We assessed the certainty of evidence by using the GRADE approach. We included 83 studies in this updated review: two additional RCTs (10 in total) and a few additional trial reports for previously included studies. RCTs involved 27,232 participants allocated to either selenium supplements or placebo. For analyses of RCTs with low risk of bias, the summary risk ratio (RR) for any cancer incidence was 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93 to 1.10; 3 studies, 19,475 participants; high-certainty evidence). The RR for estimated cancer mortality was 1.02 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.30; 1 study, 17,444 participants). For the most frequently

  7. [Psychotic parricide. Prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornic, F; Olié, J-P

    2006-01-01

    Parricide is a rare event. In France, statistics indicate that it accounts for 2 to 3% of all homicides. It also represents an appreciable part (up to 30%) of homicides committed by psychotic subjects. Many studies suggest a strong positive correlation between criminality and characterized mental illness. The correlation is better when there is a diagnosis of schizophrenia, an alcohol or drugs consumption and a past personal history of violence. Parricide is a crime mainly committed by males. The most frequent form of parricide is patricide committed by sons. However, considering only psychotic parricides, the number of mothers killed seems is equal or higher to the number of fathers killed. The typical profile of an adult committing parricide could be described as follows: a young single unemployed male, living with his victim, suffering from schizophrenia with comorbidity of alcohol or drug abuse and consumption, who stops his medication, and having a past history of medicolegal behaviours. The parricide act can be divided into three stages; first, the contention of the emergence of parricide ideas; second, the violence and brutality of the act; third, following a transient appeasement suicidal thoughts or attempts are frequently observed. Preventing parricides and homicides committed by psychotic subjects is a great challenge. Only a few studies aim to a better understanding of the underlying motivations of such criminals. According to theses studies, we can point out several warning signals. Psychiatrist should particularly increase their vigilance to persecutive delusions, history of a long lasting illness with history of violence during acute stages, threats against family or friends, suicidal thoughts, failures of help requests and attempt to escape.

  8. Malaria: prevention in travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Ashley M

    2010-07-12

    Malaria transmission occurs most frequently in environments with humidity greater than 60% and ambient temperature of 25 °C to 30 °C. Risks increase with longer visits and depend on activity. Infection can follow a single mosquito bite. Incubation is usually 10 to 14 days but can be up to 18 months depending on the strain of parasite. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug preventive interventions in non-pregnant adult travellers? What are the effects of drug prophylaxis in non-pregnant adult travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria vaccines in adult and child travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria interventions in child travellers, pregnant travellers, and in airline pilots? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 79 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aerosol insecticides, amodiaquine, air conditioning and electric fans, atovaquone-proguanil, biological control measures, chloroquine (alone or with proguanil), diethyltoluamide (DEET), dietary supplementation, doxycycline, electronic mosquito repellents, full-length and light-coloured clothing, insecticide-treated clothing/nets, mefloquine, mosquito coils and vapourising mats, primaquine, pyrimethamine-dapsone, pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine, smoke, topical (skin-applied) insect repellents, and vaccines.

  9. [Boxing: traumatology and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanis, Emmanuel-Alain; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Perez, Georges; Senegas, Xavier; Furgoni, Julien; Pineau, Jean-Claude; Louquet, Jean-Louis; Henrion, Roger

    2010-10-01

    In 1986, a surgeon who, as an amateur boxer himself was concerned with boxers' health, approached a pioneering Parisian neuroimaging unit. Thus began a study in close cooperation with the French Boxing Federation, spanning 25 years. In a first series of 52 volunteer boxers (13 amateurs and 39 professionals), during which MRI gradually replaced computed tomography, ten risk factors were identified, which notably included boxing style: only one of 40 "stylists" with a good boxing technique had cortical atrophy (4.5 %), compared to 15 % of "sloggers". Changes to the French Boxing Federation rules placed the accent on medical prevention. The second series, of 247 boxers (81 amateurs and 266 professionals), showed a clear improvement, as lesions were suspected in 14 individuals, of which only 4 (1.35 %) were probably due to boxing. The third and fourth series were part of a protocol called "Brain-Boxing-Ageing", which included 76 boxers (11 having suffered KOs) and 120 MRI scans, with reproducible CT and MRI acquisitions (9 sequences with 1.5 T then 3 T, and CT). MRI anomalies secondary to boxing were found in 11 % of amateurs and 38 % of professionals (atrophy, high vascular T2 signal areas, 2 cases of post-KO subdural bleeding). CT revealed sinus damage in 13 % of the amateurs and 19 % of the professionals. The risk of acute and chronic facial and brain damage was underline, along with detailed precautionary measures (organization of bouts, role of the referee and ringside doctor, and application of French Boxing Federation rules).

  10. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE. HONEYWELL PLANNING GUIDE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeywell, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.

    THIS HONEYWELL PAMPHLET DISCUSSES SOME ASPECTS OF PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE OF AUTOMATIC CONTROLS, HEATING, VENTILATING, AND AIR CONDITIONING, AND COMPARES IN-PLANT WITH CONTRACT SERVICE, CONCLUDING THAT CONTRACT SERVICE IS PREFERABLE AND DESCRIBING A NUMBER OF MAINTENANCE PLANS WHICH THEY FURNISH. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE PROVIDES--(1) MORE EFFICIENT…

  11. Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Hyman, Marvin H.

    2002-01-01

    This chapter offers pollution prevention techniques for design, industrial process, maintenance, and environmental remediation activities. It provides examples of waste reduction, tools for identifying pollution prevention opportunities, and ways of calculating the payback or return on investment associated with the opportunities

  12. Primary Prevention of Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shisslak, Catherine M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Summarizes current understanding of anorexia nervosa and bulimia (clinical symptoms and outcome, prevalence and risk factors), offering suggestions for the primary prevention of these disorders at the individual, family, and community levels, and emphasizing prevention in the schools. (Author/KS)

  13. Educating Students in Preventive Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conyne, Robert K.

    1997-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive set of competencies for counselors doing primary prevention. Describes 10 expanded clusters of skills (primary prevention perspective, personal attributes and behaviors, ethics, marketing, multiculturalism, group facilitation, organization and setting dynamics, trends and political dynamics, and research and evaluation)…

  14. Fall Prevention Hits Stumbling Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Charlotte

    2018-03-01

    Implementation of efforts to screen older people for fall risk-and to intervene before falls occur-have been scattershot at best. Ongoing studies of fall prevention called STRIDE (Strategies to Reduce Injuries and Develop Confidence in Elders) might change that. The studies look at whether clinicians can implement a fall-prevention program across rural, urban, and suburban treatment settings.

  15. Expert incentives: cure versus prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jaegher, K.

    This paper distinguishes between two scenarios for the expert-client encounter. In the cure scenario, the client does not know whether a loss can be recovered. In the prevention scenario, the client faces a threat but does not know whether this threat is real enough to justify preventive action. The

  16. Major Depression Can Be Prevented

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Ricardo F.; Beardslee, William R.; Leykin, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The 2009 Institute of Medicine report on prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders (National Research Council & Institute of Medicine, 2009b) presented evidence that major depression can be prevented. In this article, we highlight the implications of the report for public policy and research. Randomized controlled trials have shown…

  17. Get Real about Diabetes Prevention

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-01

    This podcast delivers a diabetes prevention message promoting small steps that can lead to big rewards.  Created: 11/1/2007 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 11/15/2007.

  18. Disaster: Prevention, Preparedness and Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Sally

    1981-01-01

    Discission of threat of disaster to library archival materials focuses on prevention (building maintenance, materials storage, fire prevention), preparedness (preplanning, procedures for handling emergencies, finances of recovery operation), and action (instructions for handling damaged materials). Current library activities in disaster planning…

  19. Family Wellness, Not HIV Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swendeman, Dallas; Flannery, Diane

    2010-01-01

    HIV exceptionalism (and disease-specific programs generally) garner both unbalanced funding and the most talented personnel, distorting local health priorities. In support of HIV exceptionalism, the successful mobilization of significant global health sector resources was not possible prior to HIV. Both sides of the debate have merits; rather than perpetuating polarization, we suggest that sustained improvements in global health require creating a prevention infrastructure to meet multiple health challenges experienced by local communities. We propose four fundamental shifts in HIV and disease prevention: (1) horizontally integrating prevention at one site locally, with priorities tailored to local health challenges and managed by local community leaders; (2) using a family wellness metaphor for services, not disease prevention; (3) implementing evidence-based prevention programs (EBPP) based on common principles, factors, and processes, rather than replication of specific programs; and (4) utilizing the expertise of private enterprise to re-design EBPP into highly attractive, engaging, and accessible experiences. PMID:19148744

  20. Can atopic dermatitis be prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-de la Fuente, E

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis has become a health problem in our setting due to its rising prevalence, impact on quality of life, associated costs, and role in the progression to other atopic diseases. Furthermore, atopic dermatitis has no definitive cure and therefore preventive measures are important. In this article, we review the latest advances in both primary prevention (reduction of the incidence of atopic dermatitis) and secondary prevention (reduction of associated morbidity and reduction of the atopic march). We analyze the different preventive strategies available, including modification of the immune system through microbial exposure, induction of immune tolerance through antigen exposure, and restoration of skin barrier function to halt the atopic march. Dermatologists need to be familiar with these strategies in order to apply them where necessary and to accurately inform patients and their relatives to prevent misguided or inappropriate actions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  1. Allergy and asthma prevention 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieto, Antonio; Wahn, Ulrich; Bufe, Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases have become one of the epidemics of the 21st century in developed countries. Much of the success of other areas of medicine, such as infectious diseases, lies on preventive measures. Thus, much effort is also being placed lately in the prevention of asthma and allergy....... This manuscript reviews the current evidence, divided into four areas of activity. Interventions modifying environmental exposure to allergens have provided inconsistent results, with multifaceted interventions being more effective in the prevention of asthma. Regarding nutrition, the use of hydrolyzed formulas...... that antiviral vaccines could be useful in the future. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is effective for the treatment of allergic patients with symptoms; the study of its value for primary and secondary prevention of asthma and allergy is in its very preliminary phases. The lack of success in the prevention...

  2. Preventive psychiatry in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Sood

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last two and a half decades, there have been series of global burden of disease studies which have highlighted significant disability attributable to mental and behavioral disorders with a huge treatment gap. Integration of the preventive strategies in the clinical practice has the potential to reduce the disability due to mental illnesses. The patients come to the clinic with an intention to get treated and investigated for the symptoms they have. At this point, they may also be amenable to the advice related to prevention. Therefore, the clinical encounter can be seen as an opportunity to implement preventive strategies. Preventive efforts in clinical practice must be guided by knowledge about the epidemiological data related to specific mental illnesses and about the evidence-based preventive strategies available for specific mental illnesses. These should be directed toward all those persons (patients, caregivers accompanying and at home, teachers, employers, etc. who are present and also toward those who are not present during the clinical encounter and must be age, gender, and culture sensitive. Sociodemographic characteristics of a person seeking relief from a problem in the clinical encounter help in directing the preventive efforts. The preventive efforts are also driven by the fact that the patient has the first episode or established or treatment refractory mental illness and the short or long duration of illness. For prevention-minded clinical practice, it helps to have a template so that the assessments and interventions relevant for prevention can be carried out as per that scheme; it also helps in orienting the practicing mental health professionals. While making various assessments, making a list of the likely issues to be addressed by preventive efforts during clinical encounter ( first and subsequent is also helpful.

  3. CONTEMPORARY PRINCIPLES OF SUICIDE PREVENTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljusic, Dragana; Ravanic, Dragan; Filipovic Danic, Snezana; Soldatovic, Ivan; Cvetkovic, Jovana; Stojanovic Tasic, Mirjana

    2016-11-01

    Suicide remains a significant public health problem worldwide. This study is aimed at analyzing and presenting contemporary methods in suicide prevention in the world as well as at identifying specific risk groups and risk factors in order to explain their importance. in suicide prevention. The literature search covered electronic databases PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus. In order to select the relevant articles, the authors searched for the combination of key-words which included the following medical subject heading terms (suicide or suicide ideation or attempted) and (prevention or risk factors) and (man or elders or mental disorders). Data analysis covered meta-analyses, systematic reviews and original scientific papers with different characteristics of suicide preventions, risk factors and risk groups. Worldwide evidence-based interventions for suicide prevention are divided in universal, selective and indicated interventions. Restricted approach to various methods of committing suicide as well as pharmacotherapy contributes to a lower suicide rate. Suicide risk factors can be categorized as proximal and distal. The following groups are at highest risk of committing suicide: males. older persons and persons with registered psychiatric disorders. There is a lot of evidence that suicide is preventable. It is known that only 28 coun tries in the world have national suicide prevention strategies and Serbia is not one of them.

  4. New horizons in fall prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Stephen R; Close, Jacqueline C T

    2018-04-25

    Falls pose a major threat to the well-being and quality of life of older people. Falls can result in fractures and other injuries, disability and fear and can trigger a decline in physical function and loss of autonomy. This article synthesises recent published findings on fall risk and mobility assessments and fall prevention interventions and considers how this field of research may evolve in the future. Fall risk topics include the utility of remote monitoring using wearable sensors and recent work investigating brain activation and gait adaptability. New approaches for exercise for fall prevention including dual-task training, cognitive-motor training with exergames and reactive step training are discussed. Additional fall prevention strategies considered include the prevention of falls in older people with dementia and Parkinson's disease, drugs for fall prevention and safe flooring for preventing fall-related injuries. The review discusses how these new initiatives and technologies have potential for effective fall prevention and improved quality of life. It concludes by emphasising the need for a continued focus on translation of evidence into practice including robust effectiveness evaluations of so that resources can be appropriately targeted into the future.

  5. Injury Prevention in Youth Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracciolini, Andrea; Sugimoto, Dai; Howell, David R

    2017-03-01

    Children and adolescents are now participating in competitive sports at younger ages and with increasing intensity. As a result, increasing numbers of young athletes are presenting to pediatricians for care of sports-related injuries and advice about prevention. Understanding and identifying modifiable risk factors for injury in the young athletic population is a critical first step in injury prevention. Risk factors vary by sport, age, and sex. This article reviews the most common risk factors for injury and the evidence to support proposed strategies for prevention. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(3):e99-e105.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. [Strategies for cardiovascular disease prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabus, Vincent; Wuerzner, Grégoire; Saubade, Mathieu; Favre, Lucie; Jacot Sadowski, Isabelle; Nanchen, David

    2018-02-28

    Atherosclerosis is a disease which develops very gradually over decades. Under the influence of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, such as blood pressure, LDL-cholesterol level, smoking or lifestyle, clinical symptoms of atherosclerosis manifest more or less early in life. When cardiovascular risk factors accumulate, the risk of having a cardiovascular event increases and the benefits of prevention measures are greater. This article summarizes existing strategies for controlling modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in primary prevention. The physician can rely on an interprofessional network of cardiovascular prevention. Managing risk factors while respecting the autonomy and priorities of the patient will bring the greatest benefit.

  7. Pollution prevention and air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes Hector; Tsihrintzis Vassilios

    1997-01-01

    Pollution prevention (P2) results from the combined effect of the public opinion, a new environmental value system, government regulation, but above all, the search for an economic development within the context of environmental protection. The reasons for prevention are fundamental: profit from a new economic frontier; reduced potential for civil and criminal liability; and the effective and economic protection of the environment. This paper addresses, among other relevant issues, the following topics: justification and objective of pollution prevention; strategy and methodology for its implementation; examples of successes and tools; benefits and barriers and some recommendation

  8. Mobile radiation monitoring of Delhi for the prevention of malicious acts during the Common Wealth Games (CWG-2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saindane, Shashank S.; Chatterjee, M.K.; Romal, Jis; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Singh, B.R.

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive sources are widely used in industry, research, agriculture and medical applications. In spite of various measures adopted for ensuring the safety and security of these sources, similar to Mayapuri incident, many cases of lost, misplaced, stolen radioactive sources and inadvertent radiation exposure due to radiological emergencies are reported world over. In the aftermath of the attack on the World Trade Center 2001, malicious acts using radioactive material is considered as a threat for which prevention and preparedness for response are recommended by IAEA. Hence radiation monitoring of all related area prior to and during Major Public Events (MPEs) like Olympics, World cup football etc are implemented by many nations for prevention and preparedness to such radiological threats/emergencies. Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) through their Emergency Response Centres planned and executed detailed radiation monitoring programme for the Delhi Common Wealth Games (CWG 2010) which covered all CWG stadiums. Commonwealth village etc. In addition to DAE emergency response teams of 15 members in readiness, source recovery and shielding facilities, Portable Personnel Decontamination Unit (PPDU), Radiation monitors, Protective gears, Aerial Gamma Spectrometry System (AGSS for Aerial surveys) etc. were maintained at two DAE control rooms. This paper discusses the mobile radiation monitoring carried out on Delhi city roads with the help of various state-of-the-art monitoring systems to detect the presence or movement of any orphan sources. The mobile radiation monitoring was focused on main road networks connecting to stadiums, areas surrounding stadiums, airport and Games village. For this state-of-the-art systems like Portable Mobile Gamma Spectrometry System (PMGSS), Portable Radiation Scanner (PRS), Compact Radiation Monitoring System integrated with GPS, GSM based Radiation Monitoring System (GRaMS), Gammatracers, Selection and placement of different monitoring

  9. Hearts and minds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, A R

    2012-01-01

    The American Heart Association liberalised guidelines for carotid stenting (CAS) into average risk patients based on the following interpretations and assumptions; (i) CAS doubles the risk of procedural stroke; (ii) CEA doubles the risk of procedural myocardial infarction (MI); (iii) peri-operative MI significantly reduces long-term survival; (iv) poorer long-term survival is attributable to a greater proportion of CEA patients dying after their peri-operative MI. (v) reduced survival in CEA patients suffering a peri-operative MI offsets any benefit conferred by the lower procedural stroke risk so that; (vi) CAS is considered equivalent to CEA and may even be safer in those considered high risk for procedural MI. However, this much publicised rationale is flawed by the simple fact that the poorer survival rates observed in CREST were not attributable to a greater proportion of CEA patients dying following their procedural MI. In fact, a relatively higher proportion of CAS patients suffering a peri-operative MI died during follow-up. This observation changes how the literature should be interpreted. The clinical reality is that up to 10% of patients will suffer a stroke within seven days of their index TIA and the benefits of intervening in the hyperacute period after onset of symptoms (ie offering greater stroke prevention) will far outweigh any potential consequences of peri-operative MI and reduced life expectancy. Peri-operative MI should inform, but not drive the current debate. More importantly, it should not deflect attention away from the most important management priority; the prevention of stroke. This is one situation where the heart should not rule the head! Copyright © 2011 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . NOISE AND HEARING LOSS PREVENTION Language: English (US) Español ( ... when hazardous noise levels cannot be adequately reduced. Noise and Hearing Loss on the NIOSH Science Blog ...

  11. [Prevention of schizophrenia: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh

    2013-01-01

    Research over the years has introduced multiple interventions for schizophrenia. Notwithstanding the nature of intervention pharmacological or psychological a complete cure for the condition remains a much-desired, yet unachieved goal. What is required is an exploration of alternative intervention strategies for treating schizophrenia a preventive approach is such an option. The chronic nature of schizophrenia and its associated disabilities have a tremendously negative affect the quality of life of patients, their families, and communities. Among the preferred approaches to reducing the negative consequences associated with the disorder is the prevention of its emergence. This review aimed to present the available data on the prevention of schizophrenia data that suggest some pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions have a potential role in the prevention of schizophrenia. Nonetheless, the findings are restricted to a few sites and are at best preliminary; as such, the findings must be replicated in new studies that include large samples and different settings.

  12. Clinical Cancer Genetics and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olufunmilayo F. Olopade MD, FACP, Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics and Director of the Cancer Risk Clinic Department of Medicine, BSD Section of Hematology/Oncology University of Chicago, presented "Clinical Cancer Genetics and Prevention".

  13. Treating and Preventing Sports Hernias

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close ‹ Back to Healthy Living Treating and Preventing Sports Hernias If you play ice hockey, tennis or ... for the most commonly misdiagnosed groin pain—a sports hernia. A sports hernia often results from overuse ...

  14. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... 000 women will have been diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, and nearly 41,000 women will die from ...

  15. Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Protect: Know the Signs and Symptoms of Infection Neutropenia and Risk for Infection Health Care Providers Educational Materials Cancer and Flu How to Prevent Flu from Spreading Flu Symptoms Information for Families and Caregivers Flu Treatment for Cancer Patients and ...

  16. Tips to Prevent Mosquito Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discourage mosquitoes, ticks and other biting insects from landing on you. Here are tips for other preventive ... CDC Mosquito Control Methods - NPIC Exit Top of Page Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, ...

  17. Preventing Burns in Your Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clothing when you handle chemicals. Store chemicals, including gasoline, out of the reach of children. To prevent ... mild burn? What is the treatment for smoke inhalation? Resources American Red Cross, Home Fire Safety Centers ...

  18. Preventing Interpersonal Violence in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Sethi

    2014-06-01

    CONCLUSION: Community surveys can play an important role to better understand the scale and risk factors of different types of interpersonal violence. Readers are called upon to support a coordinated public health response to prevent this societal and health threat.

  19. Prevention: What You Can Do

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke Prevention: What You Can Do Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Live ... healthy diet. Choosing healthful meal and snack options can help you avoid heart disease and its complications. ...

  20. Preventing hepatitis B or C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000401.htm Preventing hepatitis B or C To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections cause irritation and ...

  1. The science of violence prevention

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Twenty years after Rodrigo Guerrero-Velasco treated violence like a disease, using epidemiology to find the causes, his approach to violence prevention has been taken up across the Americas. He talks to Alyssa Greenhouse.

  2. The Justice of Preventive War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stephenson, Henry

    2004-01-01

    In response to the 9/11 attacks and continuing threats of mass-casualty terrorism, the United States has adopted a new security strategy that emphasizes anticipatory actions, including preventive war...

  3. Reducing Stress through Preventive Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, James C.; Quick, Jonathan D.

    1979-01-01

    Two levels of prevention can be used to counter the key stressors of personnel at work; the first deals with organizational techniques and the second with individual techniques such as systematic desensitization, biofeedback, or aerobic exercise. (Author)

  4. Lessons from obesity prevention for the prevention of mental disorders: the primordial prevention approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Joshua; Jacka, Felice N; Waters, Elizabeth; Allender, Steven

    2014-09-10

    Emerging evidence supports a relationship between risk factors for obesity and the genesis of the common mental disorders, depression and anxiety. This suggests common mental disorders should be considered as a form of non-communicable disease, preventable through the modification of lifestyle behaviours, particularly diet and physical activity. Obesity prevention research since the 1970's represents a considerable body of knowledge regarding strategies to modify diet and physical activity and so there may be clear lessons from obesity prevention that apply to the prevention of mental disorders. For obesity, as for common mental disorders, adolescence represents a key period of vulnerability. In this paper we briefly discuss relationships between modifiable lifestyle risk factors and mental health, lifestyle risk factor interventions in obesity prevention research, the current state of mental health prevention, and the implications of current applications of systems thinking in obesity prevention research for lifestyle interventions. We propose a potential focus for future mental health promotion interventions and emphasise the importance of lessons available from other lifestyle modification intervention programmes.

  5. Phlebitis: treatment, care and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Ray; Parry, Andrew

    Peripheral venous catheter-associated phlebitis is caused by inflammation to the vein at a cannula access site. It can have a mechanical, chemical or infectious cause. Good practice when inserting a cannula, including appropriate choice of device and site, can help to prevent phlebitis. Good infection control techniques are also vital in preventing the condition. There are two phlebitis scoring systems, which should be used in routine practice to identify and treat early signs of the Peripheral venous cannulation

  6. Skin contamination - prevention and decontaminating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, K.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed examination is made of the structure of human skin. Measures were drawn up to prevent skin contamination in nuclear installations as well as contaminated skin was decontaminated from the personnel. By systematically applying these measures a significant level of success was achieved in preventing contamination in nuclear installations. Cases where more far-reaching chemical methods had to be used were kept to a minimum. (R.P.)

  7. Exemestane in the prevention setting

    OpenAIRE

    Litton, Jennifer Keating; Bevers, Therese B.; Arun, Banu K.

    2012-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors are well-established therapies in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant and metastatic settings for breast cancer. In adjuvant trials, this class of drugs has shown preventative properties by decreasing the rate of contralateral breast cancer. Recently, the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group MAP.3 study evaluated exemestane as a breast cancer prevention agent for women with specified higher risks of developing breast cancer. We review the history of exemestane ...

  8. Bullying Prevention for the Public

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-01-19

    This is the first podcast of a series to discuss the severity of bullying and provide resources for prevention efforts. CDC shares the most recent statistics and trends, provides valuable tips to implement in communities, and teaches individuals how to take action against bullying.  Created: 1/19/2012 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 1/19/2012.

  9. Prevention of Infection in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Ledger

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We believe the prevention of infection-related adverse pregnancy outcome is the most important focus for obstetricians today. An emphasis upon immunization of susceptible women, prevention of transmissible disease by modification of patient behavior, and identification and treatment of silent infections should become standards of practice. This will require educational initiatives for physicians and their patients as well as continued clinical trials to determine costs and effectiveness.

  10. Preventing Falls in Older Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Lainie Van Voast; Mire, L Glen

    2017-08-15

    The American Geriatrics Society and British Geriatrics Society recommend that all adults older than 65 years be screened annually for a history of falls or balance impairment. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and American Academy of Family Physicians recommend exercise or physical therapy and vitamin D supplementation to prevent falls in community-dwelling older adults who are at increased risk of falls. Although the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and American Academy of Family Physicians do not recommend routine multifactorial intervention to prevent falls in all community-dwelling older adults, they state that it may be appropriate in individual cases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed an algorithm to aid in the implementation of the American Geriatrics Society/British Geriatrics Society guideline. The algorithm suggests assessment and multifactorial intervention for those who have had two or more falls or one fall-related injury. Multifactorial interventions should include exercise, particularly balance, strength, and gait training; vitamin D supplementation with or without calcium; management of medications, especially psychoactive medications; home environment modification; and management of postural hypotension, vision problems, foot problems, and footwear. These interventions effectively decrease falls in the community, hospital, and nursing home settings. Fall prevention is reimbursed as part of the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit.

  11. Challenges in pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dealey, Carol; Brindle, C Tod; Black, Joyce; Alves, Paulo; Santamaria, Nick; Call, Evan; Clark, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Although this article is a stand-alone article, it sets the scene for later articles in this issue. Pressure ulcers are considered to be a largely preventable problem, and yet despite extensive training and the expenditure of a large amount of resources, they persist. This article reviews the current understanding of pressure ulcer aetiology: pressure, shear and microclimate. Individual risk factors for pressure ulceration also need to be understood in order to determine the level of risk of an individual. Such an assessment is essential to determine appropriate prevention strategies. The main prevention strategies in terms of reducing pressure and shear and managing microclimate are studied in this article. The problem of pressure ulceration related to medical devices is also considered as most of the standard prevention strategies are not effective in preventing this type of damage. Finally, the possibility of using dressings as an additional preventive strategy is raised along with the question: is there enough evidence to support their use? © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Seroepidemiological profile of pregnant women after inadvertent rubella vaccination in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2001-2002 Perfil seroepidemiológico de embarazadas después de recibir inadvertidamente la vacuna antirrubeólica, estado de Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, 2001-2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Regina da Silva e Sá

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To analyze postvaccination serological status in pregnant women inadvertently vaccinated against rubella in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of pregnant women 15 to 29 years old, vaccinated against rubella and measles from November 2001 to March 2002, who were unaware of their pregnancy at the time of vaccination or who became pregnant within 30 days thereafter. They were tested for rubella-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM and G (IgG and classified as immune (IgM-negative, IgG-positive, tested within 30 days after vaccination, susceptible (IgM-positive after vaccination or indeterminate (IgM-negative, IgG-positive, vaccination- serological testing interval greater than 30 days. RESULTS: Of 2 292 women, 288 (12.6% were susceptible, 316 (13.8% immune, 1 576 (68.8% indeterminate, 8 (0.3% ineligible, and 104 (4.5% lost to follow-up. IgM seropositivity by vaccination-serological testing interval was 16.1% (d" 30 days, 15.4% (30-60 days, and 14.2% (61-90 days. Considering the campaign's target age, the 20-to-24-year age group had the largest proportion of individuals susceptible to rubella (14.8% and represented 42.4% (122/288 of all susceptible women. In 75% of susceptible pregnant women, gestational age was 5 weeks or less at the time of vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: Mass immunization of childbearing-age women was justified on the basis of epidemiological and serological data. Follow-up of vaccinated pregnant women revealed no cases of congenital rubella syndrome due to rubella vaccination. However, the observed rate of congenital infection supports the recommendation to avoid vaccinating pregnant women, and to avoid conception for up to 1 month following rubella vaccination.OBJETIVOS: Analizar el estado serológico de mujeres embarazadas tras haber recibido inadvertidamente la vacuna antirrubeólica, en el estado de Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio transversal de mujeres

  13. Update on child abuse prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Scott D; Lane, Wendy G; Walsh, Christina M

    2007-12-01

    Child abuse remains a significant problem in the United States with 2.9 million reports and 825 000 indicated cases in 2005. This report will highlight recent efforts toward child abuse prevention, focusing on home visiting programs, abusive head trauma primary prevention, parent training programs, sexual abuse prevention, and the effectiveness of laws banning corporal punishment. Most home visitation programs have demonstrated a lack of effectiveness in recent randomized trials. One exception is the Nurse Family Partnership, which remains the most effective and longest enduring intervention for high-risk families. Child sexual abuse prevention programs and parent training programs need further evaluation with more rigorous methodology and outcome measures. Providing universal parent education about coping with crying infants appears to be effective in lowering the incidence of abusive head trauma. Although advocated for, further study will determine the effectiveness of laws banning corporal punishment or mandating abusive head trauma education to parents of newborns. Pediatricians play an important role in the prevention of child maltreatment. Their knowledge of the effectiveness of different programs can help guide parents toward appropriate services.

  14. Nutritional approach to preeclampsia prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achamrah, Najate; Ditisheim, Agnès

    2018-05-01

    Although not fully understood, the physiopathology of preeclampsia is thought to involve an abnormal placentation, diffuse endothelial cell dysfunction and increased systemic inflammation. As micronutrients play a key role in placental endothelial function, oxidative stress and expression of angiogenic factors, periconceptional micronutrient supplementation has been proposed to reduce the risk of preeclampsia. However, recent studies reported conflicting results. Calcium intake (>1 g/day) may reduce the risk of preeclampsia in women with low-calcium diet. Data from recently updated Cochrane reviews did not support routine supplementation of vitamins C, E or D for either the prevention or treatment of preeclampsia. Evidences are also poor to support zinc or folic acid supplementation for preeclampsia prevention. Dark chocolate, flavonoid-rich food, and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids might also be candidates for prevention of preeclampsia. Through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory or vasoactive proprieties, micronutrients are good candidates for preeclampsia prevention. Calcium supplementation is recommended to prevent preeclampsia in women with low-calcium intake. Despite positive clinical and in-vitro data, strong evidence to support periconceptional supplementation of other micronutrients for preeclampsia risk-reduction is still lacking. Further studies are also needed to evaluate the benefit of nutritional supplementation such as chocolate and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  15. The Money Laundering Prevention System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Cindori

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the money laundering and terrorist financing prevention system in Croatia. The basic concepts are defined, the principles and fundamentals of international regulations analysed, and the regulatory system in Croatia covered by statute and money laundering prevention Regulations is presented, in conjunction with a description of the organisation, remit and international actions of the Money Laundering Prevention Office.The infiltration of dirty money is a crucial problem from national economies. The purchase of shares, of real estate, the establishment of dirty investment funds and the use of the banking system for the embedding of such resources is a danger to the credibility of a whole country, and in particular to the security of the financial and banking system. Croatia has adopted statutory measures aimed at the effective detection and prevention of suspicious financial transactions, in other words the prevention of money laundering.Launderers constantly find new ways, make use of new non-financial channels and expand their activities to real estate, artworks and insurance. Hence it is necessary to keep up with European approaches and recommendations, to strive for further improvement of the laws and the modernisation of the system, and to adopt new regulations harmonised with international standards, particularly with Directive 2005/60/EC.

  16. Prevention strategies in child maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Philip V

    2010-10-01

    Child maltreatment remains a prevalent problem for which notable best practices such as home visitation can be effective; however, most eligible families do not receive these beneficial services. Additionally, there are other promising prevention interventions to effectively address child maltreatment. This review focuses on the recent advances and strategies for child maltreatment prevention. Although home visiting does not have a single clearly defined methodology of providing service to children and families, the general supportive framework to improve maternal, child, and family factors makes this intervention the most widely studied and accepted prevention strategy. However, there has been limited effectiveness for most models. The Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) has provided consistently positive results by targeting families with many risk factors by using highly trained professionals when implementing a research-based intervention. A promising public health approach to parent training (Triple P) may reduce maltreatment and out-of-home placement. Parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT), while a treatment model, is becoming an increasingly important approach to child maltreatment prevention. There may be an opportunity to reduce child maltreatment by enhancing care in the pediatric medical home setting. Effective child maltreatment prevention efforts exist; however, not all programs provide the same effectiveness, or target the same maltreatment issues. Pediatricians are in a key position to offer support to families in their own practice, as well as to direct families to the appropriate resources available.

  17. Prevention vs. treatment: what's the right balance?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Faust, Halley S; Menzel, Paul T

    2012-01-01

    .... This book explores this observation by examining the actual spending on prevention, the history of health policies and structural features that affect prevention's apparent relative lack of emphasis...

  18. Fiscal Year 2015 Pollution Prevention Grant Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics is responsible for overseeing several grant programs for tribes and states which promote pollution prevention through source reduction and resource conservation.

  19. Fiscal Year 2014 Pollution Prevention Grant Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics is responsible for overseeing several grant programs for tribes and states which promote pollution prevention through source reduction and resource conservation.

  20. Preventing pollution from plutonium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-01-01

    The plutonium processing facility at Los Alamos has adopted the strategic goal of becoming a facility that processes plutonium in a way that produces only environmentally benign waste streams. Pollution prevention through source reduction and environmentally sound recycling are being pursued. General approaches to waste reductions are administrative controls, modification of process technologies, and additional waste polishing. Recycling of waste materials, such as spent acids and salts, are technical possibilities and are being pursued to accomplish additional waste reduction. Liquid waste stream polishing to remove final traces of plutonium and hazardous chemical constituents is accomplished through (a) process modifications, (b) use of alternative chemicals and sorbents for residue removal, (c) acid recycling, and (d) judicious use of a variety of waste polishing technologies. Technologies that show promise in waste minimization and pollution prevention are identified. Working toward this goal of pollution prevention is a worthwhile endeavor, not only for Los Alamos, but for the Nuclear Complex of the future