WorldWideScience

Sample records for preventing heart disease

  1. Heart failure: preventing disease and death worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D; AlHabib, Khalid F; Cowie, Martin R; Force, Thomas L; Hu, Shengshou; Jaarsma, Tiny; Krum, Henry; Rastogi, Vishal; Rohde, Luis E; Samal, Umesh C; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Budi Siswanto, Bambang; Sliwa, Karen; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure is a life-threatening disease and addressing it should be considered a global health priority. At present, approximately 26 million people worldwide are living with heart failure. The outlook for such patients is poor, with survival rates worse than those for bowel, breast or prostate cancer. Furthermore, heart failure places great stresses on patients, caregivers and healthcare systems. Demands on healthcare services, in particular, are predicted to increase dramatically over the next decade as patient numbers rise owing to ageing populations, detrimental lifestyle changes and improved survival of those who go on to develop heart failure as the final stage of another disease. It is time to ease the strain on healthcare systems through clear policy initiatives that prioritize heart failure prevention and champion equity of care for all. Despite the burdens that heart failure imposes on society, awareness of the disease is poor. As a result, many premature deaths occur. This is in spite of the fact that most types of heart failure are preventable and that a healthy lifestyle can reduce risk. Even after heart failure has developed, premature deaths could be prevented if people were taught to recognize the symptoms and seek immediate medical attention. Public awareness campaigns focusing on these messages have great potential to improve outcomes for patients with heart failure and ultimately to save lives. Compliance with clinical practice guidelines is also associated with improved outcomes for patients with heart failure. However, in many countries, there is considerable variation in how closely physicians follow guideline recommendations. To promote equity of care, improvements should be encouraged through the use of hospital performance measures and incentives appropriate to the locality. To this end, policies should promote the research required to establish an evidence base for performance measures that reflect improved outcomes for patients

  2. Guidelines for the secondary prevention of rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrazaq Al-Jazairi

    2017-03-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease can be prevented with appropriate antibiotics administration to prevent the progression of valve damage. The current use of primary and secondary prevention antibiotics in Saudi Arabia is not known. Therefore, this clinical practice guideline is developed, based on the best available evidence, to promote appropriate antibiotics secondary prophylaxis use for prevention of rheumatic heart disease.

  3. Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention: Data Trends & Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention's Data Trends & Maps online tool allows searching for and view of health indicators related to Heart...

  4. Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  5. Heart Disease Prevention: Does Oral Health Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Forum. 2013;16:e232. Chapple ILC, et al. Diabetes and periodontal diseases: Consensus report of the Joint EFP/AAP Workshop on Periodontitis and Systemic Diseases. Journal of Clinical Periodontology. 2013; ...

  6. Antibiotics for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sethi, Naqash J.; Safi, Sanam; Korang, Steven Kwasi

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of antibiotics for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. As a secondary objective, we plan to assess the effects of individual types of antibiotics...

  7. Predicting the effect of prevention of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Priority setting in public health policy must be based on information on the effectiveness of alternative preventive and therapeutic interventions. The purpose of this study is to predict the effect on mortality from ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in Denmark of reduced exposure to the risk factors...

  8. How to Prevent Heart Disease: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease - At Any Age (American Heart Association) Red Wine and Resveratrol: Good for Your Heart? (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Time to Talk: Five Things to Know about Omega-3s for Heart Disease (National Center for ...

  9. Whole population secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in Scotland: the HEARTS database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Frank M; Donnan, Peter T; Love, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Implementing the evidence base for the management of chronic disease is as challenging as discovering which interventions are effective. The HEARTS collaboration (Heart disease Evidence-based Audit and Research in Tayside Scotland) is achieving that goal for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD by linking national databases to manually validated hospital and family practice electronic patient records. Specific data from the system is fed back to practices in a facilitated educational process and through the NHS intranet. This paper describes some of the key features of this strategic decision support system. All residents of the Tayside region of Scotland (n=484,013 mid year estimate 2002) are covered by the system. 9,828 patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction(MI) or who have undergone angioplasty or bypass surgery are registered on the system. Improvements in clinical status and prescribing of effective therapies are 5-10% greater than elsewhere in Scotland.

  10. Costs of heart disease and risk behaviour: implications for expenditure on prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Davidsen, Michael; Madsen, Mette

    2008-01-01

    among individuals at risk of heart disease was about 11%-16% of the attributable cost of heart disease. CONCLUSIONS: Heart disease incurs significant additional costs to the healthcare sector, and more so if heart patients have a history of leading an unhealthy life. Consequently, strategies to prevent......AIMS: The objective of this paper is firstly to estimate the healthcare costs attributable to heart disease in Denmark using recently available data for 2002-05. Secondly, to estimate the attributable healthcare costs of lifestyle risk factors among heart patients, in order to inform decision...... making about prevention programmes specifically targeting patients with heart disease. METHODS: For a cohort consisting of participants in a national representative health interview survey, register-based information about hospital diagnosis was used to identify patients with heart disease. Healthcare...

  11. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes ... the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Cholesterol Salt Video: Know Your ...

  12. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  13. [Current developments in prevention of coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windler, E

    1996-02-01

    The Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study (4S-Studie) has provided proof beyond any doubt that reduction of plasma cholesterol decreases mortality. The enormous rise of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease in both gender calls for preventative measures as an urgent task. With a reduction of cardiac events by 30-40% and of mortality in the same order of magnitude, cholesterol lowering and increase in HDL-cholesterol are most effective measures for the treatment of coronary artery disease. However, not treatment of late stages of the disease, but primary prevention to reduce the incidence of coronary artery disease in this country should be the principle aim. Thus, the international guidelines for the treatment of lipid disorders considering the individual patient's risk profile have been revised.

  14. Can Vitamins Help Prevent a Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitamins help prevent a heart attack? Can taking vitamins help prevent heart disease or a heart attack? Answers ... M.D. It's not yet clear if taking vitamins can reduce your risk of developing heart disease ...

  15. The polypill: the solution for prevention of coronary heart disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendarto Natadidjaja

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In Western countries, cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death and it is expected that it will continue to be so in the near future.(1 If the resulting physical impairment and psychosocial disturbances are also taken into account, clearly this is a serious problem from the viewpoint of productivity, quality of life, as well as community health level. Therefore the institution of preventive measures is an important issue. Unfortunately, however, currently preventive measures that are effective, safe, and at the same time practical and economical, are almost nonexistent.

  16. Heart-Healthy Families. Helping Your Kids Stay Fit Could Prevent Heart Disease in Their Futures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagnini, Frederic J.; Malone, Mary Jo

    1994-01-01

    The conditions and habits that lead to heart disease begin early in life. Obesity is the predecessor of a host of cardiovascular-related diseases; childhood obesity poses serious physical and psychological roadblocks for youngsters as they mature. The article suggests how families can adopt fitter lifestyles and instill good eating and exercise…

  17. Vital Signs – Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    This podcast is based on the September 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. More than 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke. Learn how to manage all the major risk factors.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  18. Coated stents to prevent restenosis in coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In-stent-restenosis (ISR is considered to be an essential limiting factor of stenting in coronary heart disease (CHD. The development of coated stents has raised expectations on substantial lowering restenosis after stenting with decreasing the rate of restenosis and a reduction in the rate of clinical events. Objectives: The present analysis addresses the questions on medical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the use of various coated stent types in CHD. Methods: The literature was searched in December 2004 in the most relevant medical and economic databases. The medical evaluation was conducted on the basis of published RCT. The data from the studies regarding various angiographic, sonographic and clinical endpoints were checked for methodical quality and summarised in meta-analyses. Within the scope of economic evaluation the primary studies were analysed and modelling was performed, applying clinical effect estimates from the meta-analyses of the medical evaluation and current estimates of German costs. Results: Medical evaluation: Ten different stenttypes were used in the included 26 RCT. The results for heparin, silicon-carbide, carbon and PTFE coated stenttypes could not reveal any significant differences between the medical effectiveness of coated and uncoated stents. The application of sirolimus, paclitaxel, everolimus and 7-hexanoyltaxol eluting stents showed a significant lower restenosis at 6-9 months with decrease in the rate of restenosis for polymer-based sirolimus, paclitaxel and 7-hexanoyltaxol eluting stents. In contrast, the use of gold-coated and actinomycin-D eluting stents was associated with a significantly higher restenosis. The polymer-based sirolimus and paclitaxel eluting stents also showed a significant and considerable reduction in the rate of repeated percutaneous revascularisations at 6-12 months (3.5% vs. 19.7%; p<0.0001, RR=0.19 [95%CI: 0.11; 0.33] and 3.5% vs. 12.2%; p<0.0001, RR=0.30 [95%CI: 0

  19. Essential role of stress hormone signaling in cardiomyocytes for the prevention of heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Robert H; Ren, Rongqin; Cruz-Topete, Diana; Bird, Gary S; Myers, Page H; Boyle, Michael C; Schneider, Michael D; Willis, Monte S; Cidlowski, John A

    2013-10-15

    Heart failure is a leading cause of death in humans, and stress is increasingly associated with adverse cardiac outcomes. Glucocorticoids are primary stress hormones, but their direct role in cardiovascular health and disease is poorly understood. To determine the in vivo function of glucocorticoid signaling in the heart, we generated mice with cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These mice are born at the expected Mendelian ratio, but die prematurely from spontaneous cardiovascular disease. By 3 mo of age, mice deficient in cardiomyocyte GR display a marked reduction in left ventricular systolic function, as evidenced by decreases in ejection fraction and fractional shortening. Heart weight and left ventricular mass are elevated, and histology revealed cardiac hypertrophy without fibrosis. Removal of endogenous glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids neither augmented nor lessened the hypertrophic response. Global gene expression analysis of knockout hearts before pathology onset revealed aberrant regulation of a large cohort of genes associated with cardiovascular disease as well as unique disease genes associated with inflammatory processes. Genes important for maintaining cardiac contractility, repressing cardiac hypertrophy, promoting cardiomyocyte survival, and inhibiting inflammation had decreased expression in the GR-deficient hearts. These findings demonstrate that a deficiency in cardiomyocyte glucocorticoid signaling leads to spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and death, revealing an obligate role for GR in maintaining normal cardiovascular function. Moreover, our findings suggest that selective activation of cardiomyocyte GR may represent an approach for the prevention of heart disease.

  20. Behavioral Risk Factor Data: Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2011 to present. BRFSS is a continuous, state-based surveillance system that collects information about modifiable risk factors for chronic diseases and other...

  1. Ivabradine Prevents Heart Rate Acceleration in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Coronary Heart Disease after Salbutamol Inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta C. Hoppe

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated sinus rhythm is an important side effect of inhaled salbutamol which is especially harmful in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and coronary heart disease (CHD. Cross-over, randomized, open label study design. 20 patients (18 males and two females with COPD stage II–IV and comorbide CHD NYHA class I–III were included. Spirometry with 400 mg salbutamol inhalation was performed at two consecutive days of the study. Patients in group I were prescribed 5 mg ivabradine per os 3 h before salbutamol inhalation solely on the first day of the study and patients of group II received 5 mg ivabradine only on the second day of the study. Salbutamol caused a significant increase of HR by 5.5 bpm (95% CI 0.8; 10.2, p < 0.03. After ivabradine ingestion salbutamol did not change HR significantly by −2.4 bpm (−7.0; 2.3, p = 0.33. The attenuation of HR elevation by ivabradine was significant, p < 0.01. Salbutamol alone increased FEV1 by 6.0% (2.7; 9.3, p < 0.01. This effect was not impaired by ivabradine (FEV1 increase by 7.7% (2.8; 12.6, p < 0.01 versus baseline, p = 0.5 versus no ivabradine. Ivabradine 5 mg per os prevents heart rate acceleration after inhalation of 400 mg salbutamol. Ivabradine has no impact on lung function in patients with moderate-to-very-severe COPD and CHD comorbidity.

  2. MyHeart: fighting cardiovascular disease by preventive lifestyle and early diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauter, Josef

    2004-01-01

    MyHeart is an integrated project of the 6th framework programme for research and development of the European Commission under Philips Research Aachen leadership for fighting Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) by prevention and early diagnosis. The major goal of the project is to create business options using smart electronic systems and appropriate services that empower the users to take control of their own health status. MyHeart addresses a wide variety of applications in the cardiovascular disease space and intends to develop lifelong solutions for healthy people, at risk population as well for chronically ill patients.

  3. Determinants for acceptance of preventive treatment against heart disease - a web-based population survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Nielsen Jesper; Ejg, Jarbøl Dorte; Dorte, Gyrd-Hansen; Lind, Barfoed Benedicte Marie; Veldt, Larsen Pia

    2014-08-02

    Patients' perception of risk and their lifestyle choices are of major importance in the treatment of common chronic diseases. This study reveals determinants for and knowledge about why people accept or reject preventive medical interventions against heart disease. A representative sample of 40-60-year-old Danish inhabitants was invited to participate in a web-based survey. The respondents were presented with a hypothetical scenario and asked to imagine that they were at an increased risk of heart disease, and subsequently presented with an offer of a preventive medical intervention. The aim was to elicit preference structures when potential patients are presented with different treatment conditions. About one third of the respondents were willing to accept preventive medical treatment. Respondents with personal experience with heart disease were more likely to accept treatment than respondents with family members with heart disease or no prior experience with heart disease. The willingness to accept treatment was similar for both genders, and when adjusting for experience with heart disease, age was not associated with willingness to accept treatment. Socioeconomic status in terms of lower education was positively associated with acceptance. The price of treatment reduced willingness to accept for the lower income groups, whereas it had no effect in the highest income group. Some 57% of respondents who were willing to accept treatment changed their decision following information on potential side effects. In accordance with our pre-study hypothesis, individuals with low income were more sensitive to price than individuals with high income. Thus, if the price of preventive medication increases above certain limits, a substantial proportion of the population may refrain from treatment. More than half of the respondents who were initially willing to accept treatment changed their decision when informed about the presence of potential side effects. This is an

  4. Oral health of children with congenital heart disease following preventive treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarna, Reshma M; Rai, Kavitha; Hegde, Amitha M

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD), abnormalities in the structural development of the heart, occurs in approximately 8:1000 live births. The causative microorganism for infective endocarditis in more than 60% of the patients with positive hemoculture of viridans streptococci (s.mutans, s.mitior) thus making it mandatory for these children to maintain their oral health. The present study assessed the oral health of children with congenital heart disease following preventive treatment. A total of 74 children with congenital heart disease were selected for the study with 30 healthy controls between the ages 5-16. The oral health was assessed by measuring the microbial counts, the OHI-S and the gingival indices. The data thus obtained were subjected to paired and unpaired t-test. Poor oral health was prevalent among these children of the study group as compared to the controls indicating a lack of sound knowledge of the maintenance of oral hygiene. Following preventive treatment the oral health improved considerably.

  5. Challenges to developing effective streptococcal vaccines to prevent rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Abhinay Sharma, D Patric Nitsche-SchmitzDepartment of Medical Microbiology, Helmholtz Center for Infection Research, Braunschweig, GermanyAbstract: Acute rheumatic fever is a sequela of Streptococcus pyogenes and potentially of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis infections. Acute rheumatic fever is caused by destructive autoimmunity and inflammation in the extracellular matrix and can lead to rheumatic heart disease, which is the most frequent cardiologic disease that is acquired in youth. Although effective treatments are available, acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease remain serious threats to human health, which affect millions and cause high economic losses. This has motivated the search for a vaccine that prevents the causative streptococcal infections. A variety of potential vaccine candidates have been identified and investigated in the past. Today, new approaches are applied to find alternative candidates. Nevertheless, several obstacles lie in the way of an approved S. pyogenes vaccine for use in humans. Herein, a subjective selection of promising vaccine candidates with respect to the prevention of acute rheumatic fever/rheumatic heart disease and safety regarding immunological side effects is discussed.Keywords: autoimmune disease, side effects, M protein vaccine, molecular mimicry, coiled-coil, collagen binding, PARF

  6. Role of the polypill for secondary prevention in ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellano, José M; Fuster, Valentín; Jennings, Catriona

    2017-01-01

    transition. At the same time, the increase in cardiovascular risk factors, together with a decline in mortality in high-income countries in the past two decades, has led to a significant upsurge in the prevalence of secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease. With this, the effect that non...... therapeutic approach for improving medication adherence in cardiovascular disease. In the current paper, we aim to review the need for a polypill strategy in the present scenario of cardiovascular disease, the available data that support such a strategy and the various clinical trials that are in progress...

  7. Clinical Updates in Women's Health Care Summary: Ischemic Heart Disease: Primary and Preventive Care Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Brittany S; Carlyle, Lynn; Voeltz, Michele D

    2017-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among women in the United States. Obstetrician-gynecologists often are the sole health care providers for otherwise healthy women. Therefore, they must be aware of risk factors, signs, and symptoms of cardiovascular disease and be prepared to recognize and treat this condition in patients as well as provide referrals when specialized care is indicated. Women with cardiac problems typically present with chest discomfort; however, they also are more likely than healthy women to present with other common symptoms, such as shortness of breath, back pain, jaw pain, or nausea and vomiting. This monograph, with a primary focus on ischemic heart disease (IHD), discusses the basic anatomy of the heart and coronary arteries; vascular biology; pathogenesis of atherosclerosis; and the screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of IHD as well as the multiple risk factors associated with the development of IHD that contribute to both increased morbidity and mortality.

  8. Determinants for acceptance of preventive treatment against heart disease - a web-based population survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients' perception of risk and their lifestyle choices are of major importance in the treatment of common chronic diseases. This study reveals determinants for and knowledge about why people accept or reject preventive medical interventions against heart disease. Methods: A represen......Background: Patients' perception of risk and their lifestyle choices are of major importance in the treatment of common chronic diseases. This study reveals determinants for and knowledge about why people accept or reject preventive medical interventions against heart disease. Methods....... Socioeconomic status in terms of lower education was positively associated with acceptance. The price of treatment reduced willingness to accept for the lower income groups, whereas it had no effect in the highest income group. Some 57% of respondents who were willing to accept treatment changed their decision...... following information on potential side effects. Conclusions: In accordance with our pre-study hypothesis, individuals with low income were more sensitive to price than individuals with high income. Thus, if the price of preventive medication increases above certain limits, a substantial proportion...

  9. Noninvasive imaging in the assessment and prevention of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llerena Rojas, Luis Roberto; Peix Gonzalez, Amalia; Valiente Mustelier, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Echocardiography, multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear cardiology can all help prevent coronary heart disease. Echocardiography can identify asymptomatic individuals who are at risk of coronary disease and who should receive aggressive preventative therapy by providing data on the carotid intima-media thickness, arterial stiffness and flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery. The calcium score is an independent predictor of cardiac events that influences clinical risk scores such as the Framingham risk score. By using multidetector computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging for coronary angiography, it is possible to visualize both the lumen and vessel walls of coronary arteries and to discriminate between calcified and noncalcified atherosclerotic plaque before invasive coronary angiography is performed. With nuclear cardiology, the functional effects of atherosclerotic lesions can be evaluated by assessing perfusion and ventricular function simultaneously

  10. Coronary artery problems and disease in adults with congenital heart disease: how to evaluate, how to prevent, how to treat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, S; Stuart, A G

    2014-10-01

    There are a wide variety of coronary artery anomalies and disease in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). In fact, the increasing burden of acquired coronary artery disease (CAD) has to be considered in addition to congenital abnormalities of the coronary arteries, isolated or associated to other congenital diseases. This is largely a consequence of the increasing number of patients reaching older age. Due to complex underlying cardiac anatomy, previous surgery and comorbidities, treatment can be challenging. Individualized and multidisciplinary management involving congenital heart cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, coronary interventionists and imaging specialists is essential. This review gives an overview of coronary artery involvement in adults with CHD, summarizes the current literature and focuses on prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The potential role of cardiovascular risk factors for CAD is also discussed.

  11. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... more calcium, the higher your chance for CHD. Exercise stress test . Heart CT scan . Nuclear stress test .

  12. Prevention and control of rheumatic heart disease: Overcoming core challenges in resource-poor environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Dougherty

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic heart disease (RHD has long receded as a significant threat to public health in high-income countries. In low-resource settings, however, the specter of RHD remains unabated, as exemplified by recent data from the Global Burden of Diseases Study. There are many complex reasons for this ongoing global disparity, including inadequate data on disease burden, challenges in effective advocacy, ongoing poverty and inequality, and weak health systems, most of which predominantly affect developing nations. In this review, we discuss how each of these acts as a core challenge in RHD prevention and control. We then examine key lessons learnt from successful control programs in the past and highlight resources that have been developed to help create strong national RHD control programs.

  13. Heart healthy and stroke free: successful business strategies to prevent cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson Koffman, Dyann M; Goetzel, Ron Z; Anwuri, Victoria V; Shore, Karen K; Orenstein, Diane; LaPier, Timothy

    2005-12-01

    Heart disease and stroke, the principal components of cardiovascular disease (CVD), are the first and third leading causes of death in the United States. In 2002, employers representing 88 companies in the United States paid an average of 18,618 dollars per employee for health and productivity-related costs. A sizable portion of these costs are related to CVD. Employers can yield a 3 dollar to 6 dollar return on investment for each dollar invested over a 2 to 5 year period and improve employee cardiovascular health by investing in comprehensive worksite health-promotion programs, and by choosing health plans that provide adequate coverage and support for essential preventive services. The most effective interventions in worksites are those that provide sustained individual follow-up risk factor education and counseling and other interventions within the context of a comprehensive health-promotion program: (1) screening, health risk assessments, and referrals; (2) environmental supports for behavior change (e.g., access to healthy food choices); (3) financial and other incentives; and (4) corporate policies that support healthy lifestyles (e.g., tobacco-free policies). The most effective practices in healthcare settings include systems that use (1) standardized treatment and prevention protocols consistent with national guidelines, (2) multidisciplinary clinical care teams to deliver quality patient care, (3) clinics that specialize in treating/preventing risk factors, (4) physician and patient reminders, and (5) electronic medical records. Comprehensive worksite health-promotion programs, health plans that cover preventive benefits, and effective healthcare systems will have the greatest impact on heart disease and stroke and are likely to reduce employers' health and productivity-related costs.

  14. Population Trends in Aspirin Use for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention 1980-2009: The Minnesota Heart Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luepker, Russell V; Steffen, Lyn M; Duval, Sue; Zantek, Nicole D; Zhou, Xia; Hirsch, Alan T

    2015-12-23

    Daily low-dose aspirin is recommended for primary prevention of myocardial infarction and stroke in higher-risk patients. Population trends in aspirin use for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention in an urban population (Minneapolis/St. Paul, 2010 population 2.85 million) from 1980 to 2009 were evaluated. Surveys of randomly selected adults aged 25 to 74 years were collected at 5-year intervals. Self-reports of regular aspirin use for CVD prevention and history of CVD were obtained. Six cross-sectional surveys included 12 281 men and 14 258 women. Age-adjusted aspirin use for primary prevention increased during this period from 1% to 21% among men and 1% to 12% among women. Aspirin use was highest in those aged 65 to 74 years. For secondary prevention, age-adjusted aspirin use increased from 19% to 74% among men and 11% to 64% among women. While data are based on self-report, a substudy using a biochemical indicator of aspirin use (serum thromboxane B2) supports the validity of self-report. Aspirin for CVD prevention is commonly used by a large and growing portion of the general population. It is not known if this is based on professional advice or self-prescribed use. It is also likely that many who would benefit do not use aspirin and others use aspirin inappropriately. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  15. Nutrition in the prevention of Coronary Heart Disease and the management of lipoprotein disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is comprised of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). CVD is caused by progressive narrowing and blockage of arteries supplying the heart, brain, and other tissues and organs. CVD is the leading cause of death and disability in our ...

  16. Can we reduce preventable heart failure readmissions in patients enrolled in a Disease Management Programme?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, D

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Disease Management Programmes (DMPs) are successful in reducing hospital readmissions in heart failure (HF). However, there remain a number of patients enrolled in a DMP who are readmitted with HF. The primary aim of the study was to determine the proportion of preventable readmissions (PR). The secondary aim was to recognise patient characteristics which would identify certain patients at risk of having a PR. METHODS: A retrospective chart search was performed on patients readmitted over a 1-year period. RESULTS: 38.5% of readmissions were classified as PR. None of these patients made prior contact with the DMP. Admission levels of BNP, potassium, urea and creatinine were significantly lower in the PR group. CONCLUSION: DMP have proven benefits in reducing hospital readmission nonetheless a significant proportion of these readmissions are preventable. Further work is required to prospectively analyse why these patients fail to contact the DMP.

  17. [Efficacy of an intensive prevention programme of coronary heart disease: 5 year follow-up outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Miguel A; Subirana, Isaac; Ramos, Rafael; Franzi, Alicia; Vila, Joan; Marrugat, Jaume

    2008-04-19

    Most evidence on the efficacy of intensive preventive programs of secondary prevention of coronary diseases comes from Anglo-Saxon countries and effectiveness remains controversial. We have scarce information about the efficacy of these types of programs in Spain. In the present analysis we show the results of the ICAR (Intervención en la Comunidad de Alto Riesgo coronario) study, aimed to analyze the efficacy of an intensive preventive program primary care based in reducing the cardiovascular recurrences and mortality in patients with coronary heart disease. We designed a randomized clinical trial, multicenter and community based, which included 23 health care areas in Catalonia, Spain. We followed for 5 years 2 cohorts of patients with coronary heart disease, aged 30-80 years. The intervention group was quarterly examined by their general practitioner, who adjusted treatments to control their cardiovascular risk factors thoroughly and reinforced life style behaviours. In order to do that, patient's weight and blood pressure were determined in each visit and laboratory test carried out twice a year. Patients in the control group received the usual care. In order to analyze the effect of the intervention cardiovascular recurrences and mortality were registered. We included 983 patients. Mean (standard deviation) age was 64 (10) and 74.5% were men. During the follow-up 235 patients suffered some non-fatal cardiovascular recurrence (109 vs 126 in the control and intervention group, respectively; p = 0.84), and 45 died from cardiovascular recurrences (23 vs 22, respectively; p = 0.57). Adjusted hazard ratio of cardiovascular event and total mortality, for the intervention group were 1.01 (95% confidence interval, 0.74-1.39), and 0.92 (95% confidence interval, 0.54-1.56), respectively. The implementation of an intensive secondary prevention program based on periodical reminds to patients with stable coronary heart disease to attend their general practitioners did not

  18. Effect of Dementia on the Use of Drugs for Secondary Prevention of Ischemic Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole R. Fowler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dementia and cardiovascular disease (CVD are frequently comorbid. The presence of dementia may have an effect on how CVD is treated. Objective. To examine the effect of dementia on the use of four medications recommended for secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease (IHD: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers, lipid-lowering medications, and antiplatelet medications. Design. Retrospective analysis of data from the Cardiovascular Health Study: Cognition Study. Setting and Subjects. 1,087 older adults in four US states who had or developed IHD between 1989 and 1998. Methods. Generalized estimating equations to explore the association between dementia and the use of guideline-recommended medications for the secondary prevention of IHD. Results. The length of follow-up for the cohort was 8.7 years and 265 (24% had or developed dementia during the study. Use of medications for the secondary prevention of IHD for patients with and without dementia increased during the study period. In models, subjects with dementia were not less likely to use any one particular class of medication but were less likely to use two or more classes of medications as a group (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.36–0.99. Conclusions. Subjects with dementia used fewer guideline-recommended medications for the secondary prevention of IHD than those without dementia.

  19. Role of depression in secondary prevention of Chinese coronary heart disease patients receiving percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Feng

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CHD patients who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI have higher rates of depression than the general population. However, few researchers have assessed the impact of depression on the secondary prevention of CHD in China.The main purpose of this investigation was to explore the relationship between depression and secondary prevention of CHD in Chinese patients after PCI.This descriptive, cross-sectional one-site study recruited both elective and emergency PCI patients one year after discharge. Data from 1934 patients were collected in the clinic using questionnaires and medical history records between August 2013 and September 2015. Depression was evaluated by the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Secondary prevention of CHD was compared between depression and non-depression groups.We found that depression affected secondary prevention of CHD in the following aspects: lipid levels, blood glucose levels, smoking status, physical activity, BMI, and rates of medication use.Depressive patients with CHD are at increased risk of not achieving the lifestyle and risk factor control goals recommended in the 2006 AHA guidelines. Screening should focus on patients after PCI because treating depression can improve outcomes by improving secondary prevention of CHD.

  20. Role of the polypill for secondary prevention in ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, José M; Fuster, Valentín; Jennings, Catriona; Prescott, Eva; Bueno, Héctor

    2017-06-01

    In 2011, for the first time in the history of humankind, non-communicable diseases became the leading cause of death worldwide. This change in trend is obviously multifactorial and very complex, as it is the paradoxical result of social, economic and health system growth worldwide. Vaccination and infectious diseases control, changing dietary habits worldwide, sedentary behaviour, globalisation, industrialisation (resulting in a shift from manual to sedentary labour), tobacco and sugary beverage surges in low- and middle-income countries and rapid urbanisation have all played a role in this epidemic transition. At the same time, the increase in cardiovascular risk factors, together with a decline in mortality in high-income countries in the past two decades, has led to a significant upsurge in the prevalence of secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease. With this, the effect that non-adherence to cardioprotective drugs is having has become progressively clear, both in terms of clinical outcomes and as a driver of increased healthcare expenditure. The cardiovascular polypill, which was originally proposed as a strategy to improve accessibility to cardioprotective drugs worldwide, has proven to be a mainstay therapeutic approach for improving medication adherence in cardiovascular disease. In the current paper, we aim to review the need for a polypill strategy in the present scenario of cardiovascular disease, the available data that support such a strategy and the various clinical trials that are in progress that will help further shape future indications for the cardiovascular polypill.

  1. Prevention of hypoxic fetal complications in pregnant women with congenital heart disease and anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iu. Davydova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is — to develop a strategy of prevention of hypoxic fetal abnormalities in pregnant women with congenital heart disease, heart failure and iron deficiency anemia. Materials and methods. The study included 86 pregnant women with CHD and NYHA II–III. 68 women in the third trimester of pregnancy is diagnosed anemia (group I, 18 pregnant women with CHD, NYHA II–III without anemia (II group, the control group consisted of 24 pregnant women without cardiac disease, with physiological pregnancy. All pregnant with information registration consent studied the concentration of ferritin, hemoglobin level, morphological study of the placenta. All pregnant women were assigned to iron supplements, oral iron (III hydroxide polymaltose complex (Maltofer when hemoglobin levels above 95 g/l and the expected delivery date more than 40 days of starting treatment. When the hemoglobin level below 95 g/l of intravenously administered iron (III hydroxide sucrose complex (Venofer followed by transfer to oral iron (III. Results. In groups of pregnant I and II did not have perinatal losses, births in gestation less than 28 weeks, with a score Apgar at birth of less than 4 points. Pregnant women with cyanotic heart defects and the need for early delivery in less than 37 weeks are not included in the study. Also, there is a correlation between the degree of severity of anemia in women with CHD with HF and prematurity, and the presence of IUGR child birth asphyxia able to varying degrees (respectively, r=0.8, r=0.75 and r=0.85. Conclusions. Formation of fetoplacental unit in women with CHD on a background of heart failure occurs with complications associated with the presence of tissue hypoxia, as well as the possible impact on the process of oxidative stress. The development of iron deficiency anemia in this group is an additional risk factor for placental dysfunction, which is confirmed by morphometric and morphological studies of placentas

  2. Late radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy. Clinical importance, radiobiological mechanisms and strategies of prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Maurer, Jean; Molls, Michael; Trott, Klaus-Ruediger

    2011-01-01

    The clinical importance of radiation-induced heart disease, in particular in post-operative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients, has been recognised only recently. There is general agreement, that a co-ordinated research effort would be needed to explore all the potential strategies of how to reduce the late risk of radiation-induced heart disease in radiotherapy. This approach would be based, on one hand, on a comprehensive understanding of the radiobiological mechanisms of radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy which would require large-scale long-term animal experiments with high precision local heart irradiation. On the other hand - in close co-operation with mechanistic in vivo research studies - clinical studies in patients need to determine the influence of dose distribution in the heart on the risk of radiation-induced heart disease. The aim of these clinical studies would be to identify the critical structures within the organ which need to be spared and their radiation sensitivity as well as a potential volume and dose effect. The results of the mechanistic studies might also provide concepts of how to modify the gradual progression of radiation damage in the heart by drugs or biological molecules. The results of the studies in patients would need to also incorporate detailed dosimetric and imaging studies in order to develop early indicators of impending radiation-induced heart disease which would be a pre-condition to develop sound criteria for treatment plan optimisation.

  3. Late radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy. Clinical importance, radiobiological mechanisms and strategies of prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Maurer, Jean; Molls, Michael; Trott, Klaus-Rüdiger

    2011-08-01

    The clinical importance of radiation-induced heart disease, in particular in post-operative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients, has been recognised only recently. There is general agreement, that a co-ordinated research effort would be needed to explore all the potential strategies of how to reduce the late risk of radiation-induced heart disease in radiotherapy. This approach would be based, on one hand, on a comprehensive understanding of the radiobiological mechanisms of radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy which would require large-scale long-term animal experiments with high precision local heart irradiation. On the other hand - in close co-operation with mechanistic in vivo research studies - clinical studies in patients need to determine the influence of dose distribution in the heart on the risk of radiation-induced heart disease. The aim of these clinical studies would be to identify the critical structures within the organ which need to be spared and their radiation sensitivity as well as a potential volume and dose effect. The results of the mechanistic studies might also provide concepts of how to modify the gradual progression of radiation damage in the heart by drugs or biological molecules. The results of the studies in patients would need to also incorporate detailed dosimetric and imaging studies in order to develop early indicators of impending radiation-induced heart disease which would be a pre-condition to develop sound criteria for treatment plan optimisation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. DETERMINANTS OF PREVENTIVE BEHAVIOR REGARDING CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES AND RISK FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION AND CHRONIC ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Platonov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze potential determinants of preventive behavior (PB in patients with essential hypertension (HT and chronic ischemic heart disease (CIHD, and to establish their significance and hierarchy. Material and methods. Patients with HT (n=285 and CIHD (n=223 were studied. Questioning of all patients was performed to assess the characteristics of their PB. Differentiated multivariate analysis of activity and efficacy of PB determinants was performed in HT and CIHD patients by the method of step-by-step backward logistic regression. Results. Awareness of the cardiovascular diseases (CVD and its prevention (odds ratio [OR] 6.08 as well as high level of general education (OR=2.29 were the most significant determinants of active PB in HT patients. Sufficient social support (OR=3.77, awareness of CVD and its prevention (OR=3.16 were the most significant determinants of active PB in patients with CIHD. Efficacy of PB in patients with HT and CIHD mostly depends on satisfaction of medical service (OR=10.2 and 6.63, respectively, social support (OR=6.25 and 10.5, respectively, adequate awareness of CVD and its prevention (OR, 6.92 and 6.64, respectively. Conclusion. PB activity and efficacy in patients with HT and CIHD depends on many contributing and impeding factors. Disregarding these factors can result in failure in preventive efforts at both individual and population levels.

  5. Rheumatic and nonrheumatic valvular heart disease: epidemiology, management, and prevention in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essop, Mohammed Rafique; Nkomo, Vuyisile T

    2005-12-06

    Unlike the Western world, valvular disease ranks among the major cardiovascular afflictions in Africa. Acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic valvular disease in their most virulent form are still commonly encountered and impose a huge burden on limited healthcare resources. We performed a systematic review of the literature with PubMed using rheumatic fever, rheumatic heart disease, valvular disease, warfarin anticoagulation, and pregnancy as search items. Literature emanating from Africa was emphasized. Epidemiology, current concepts on pathogenesis, and aspects of the medical and surgical management of this disease as seen from an African perspective are presented. The association of pregnancy with mitral stenosis is common and may be fatal if not managed appropriately. A practical approach to these patients is presented to optimize maternal and fetal outcome. Pregnant patients with mechanical valves require careful attention to ensure maternal survival and prevent fetal warfarin embryopathy. Prolonged subcutaneous heparin and frequent monitoring of the partial thromboplastin time are impractical in this setting, and the merits of different anticoagulation regimens are discussed. Congenital submitral aneurysms are a unique cause of mitral regurgitation, with the vast majority of cases originating from sub-Saharan Africa. Although the precise etiology is as yet unclear, the clinical and echocardiographic features are sufficiently characteristic to allow a preoperative diagnosis to be made. Transesophageal echocardiography allows much better definition of the size and anatomic relationships of the aneurysm. Surgical resection can be difficult but is usually curative. Mitral valve prolapse and endocarditis constitute the remaining frequent causes of valvular disease and are discussed briefly. The spectrum and presentation of valvular disease in Africa are uniquely different from elsewhere. Together with socioeconomic issues and the HIV pandemic, this fact

  6. Comparing primary prevention with secondary prevention to explain decreasing coronary heart disease death rates in Ireland, 1985-2000.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kabir, Zubair

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate whether primary prevention might be more favourable than secondary prevention (risk factor reduction in patients with coronary heart disease(CHD)). METHODS: The cell-based IMPACT CHD mortality model was used to integrate data for Ireland describing CHD patient numbers, uptake of specific treatments, trends in major cardiovascular risk factors, and the mortality benefits of these specific risk factor changes in CHD patients and in healthy people without recognised CHD. RESULTS: Between 1985 and 2000, approximately 2,530 fewer deaths were attributable to reductions in the three major risk factors in Ireland. Overall smoking prevalence declined by 14% between 1985 and 2000, resulting in about 685 fewer deaths (minimum estimate 330, maximum estimate 1,285) attributable to smoking cessation: about 275 in healthy people and 410 in known CHD patients. Population total cholesterol concentrations fell by 4.6%, resulting in approximately 1,300 (minimum estimate 1,115, maximum estimate 1,660) fewer deaths attributable to dietary changes(1,185 in healthy people and 115 in CHD patients) plus 305 fewer deaths attributable to statin treatment (45 in people without CHD and 260 in CHD patients). Mean population diastolic blood pressure fell by 7.2%, resulting in approximately 170 (minimum estimate 105, maximum estimate 300) fewer deaths attributable to secular falls in blood pressure (140 in healthy people and 30 in CHD patients), plus approximately 70 fewer deaths attributable to antihypertensive treatments in people without CHD. Of all the deaths attributable to risk factor falls, some 1,715 (68%) occurred in people without recognized CHD and 815(32%) in CHD patients. CONCLUSION: Compared with secondary prevention, primary prevention achieved a two-fold larger reduction in CHD deaths. Future national CHD policies should therefore prioritize nationwide interventions to promote healthy diets and reduce smoking.

  7. Beneficial effects of Resveratrol, present in grapes in the prevention and treatment of heart disease and failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Movahed

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (3, 5, 4- trihydroxystilbene is one of the natural polyphenolic bioactive compounds synthesized by plants to serve many functions, especially defense against fungal infections, environmental stresses and UV radiation. It is found mainly in grapes, green tea, peanuts and berries. This compound has recently received increased attention in medical research, due to its effects on prevention and treatment of many diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome. Over the past two decades, researchers from all over the world studied the beneficial effects of resveratrol against cardiovascular diseases and heart failure in different animal models. Importantly, the results of these studies have been promising and recently this knowledge has been translated into examining the efficacy of resveratrol in humans with heart failure. Since heart failure continues to be a significant cause of cardiovascular mortality in the developed and also developing countries, and despite different medicines available for the treatment of such common chronic systemic diseases, preventive measures to be necessary to combat the incidence of heart problems. In this review article the protective effects of resveratrol and its mechanisms of action on different metabolic pathways with respect to heart disease and failure will be discussed.

  8. Secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. A survey in an Italian primary care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesti, A; Del Papa, C; Modesti, L; Bartaloni, R; Galloni, V; Dell'omo, G; Pedrinelli, R

    2010-04-01

    Management of patients with pre-existing coronary heart disease (CHD) relies for the most part on primary care physicians, an endeavour whose success is dependent upon acceptance and day-to-day application of guideline recommendations for secondary CHD prevention. The aim of this study is to analyze the status of secondary CHD prevention in an Italian primary care practice consisting of five partnered general practitioners attending 7006 subjects aged 15 years or more (3137 males, 3869 females) in Pontedera, Tuscany. Retrieval of patients with history of CHD (previous myocardial infarction, [MI], and stable angina) from computerized records of the 5987 (2735 men, 3252 women) subjects aged 35-85 years enlisted in the practice. Patients with myocardial infarction <3 months at the time of the query were excluded. Search retrieved 153 (2.6%) subjects with history of CHD, 93 (3.4%) males and 60 (1.8%) females. Females were older and smoked more frequently than men. Antiplatelet drugs, beta-blockers, renin-angiotensin system blockers and statins were prescribed in 84%, 56%, 66% and 68% of the ischemic patients. LDL cholesterol targets of 100 and 70 mg/dL were achieved in only 60 (45%) and 11 (9%) respectively. Systolic blood pressure was above 140 mmHg in 25 out of 146 patients with available data. The surveys shows satisfactory uptake of guideline recommendations but also pitfalls in the implementation of secondary CHD prevention requirements. Targeted interventions on primary care physicians are critically needed to enhance further provider adherence to consensus guidelines for CHD risk reduction.

  9. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001114.htm Congenital heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure ...

  10. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Home About Heart Disease Coronary Artery Disease Heart Attack Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  11. Niacin and heart disease prevention: Engraving its tombstone is a mistake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superko, Harold Robert; Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Hodis, Howard N; Guyton, John R

    Niacin (nicotinic acid) has been used for primary and secondary coronary heart disease prevention for over 40 years. Until recently clinical trials incorporating niacin as part of an intervention strategy consistently demonstrated reduction in clinical events and lesion improvement, including ≥6% absolute mortality reduction. Two large clinical event trials in 2011 (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides and Impact on Global Health Outcomes) and 2014 (Heart Protection Study 2-Treatment of HDL to Reduce the Incidence of Vascular Events) concluded that niacin added to statin therapy did not provide clinical event benefit over statin alone. This has prompted some individuals to call for an end to the use of niacin in statin-treated patients and the US Food and Drug Administration to halt marketing of statin/niacin combination tablets. There are significant differences between the earlier clinical trials that revealed cardiovascular benefit of niacin and the 2 trials that failed to demonstrate a benefit. These differences include dyslipidemia types, niacin formulation, dosing, and timing. In general, the patient population that benefits the most from incorporating niacin in their treatment regimen can be defined by elevations in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The niacin formulation and dose should be capable of achieving adequate lipoprotein change. Mealtime dosing of niacin, as opposed to bedtime dosing, may avoid a counter-regulatory hormone response, including catecholamines, because of altered fuel supply potentially leading to unexpected cardiovascular outcomes. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. WITHDRAWN: Smoking cessation for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, Julia A; Capewell, Simon

    2012-02-15

    Although the importance of smoking as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is beyond doubt, the speed and magnitude of risk reduction when a smoker with coronary heart disease quits are still subjects of debate. To estimate the magnitude of risk reduction when a patient with CHD stops smoking. We searched the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) , MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, CINAHL, PsychLit, Dissertation Abstracts, BIDS ISI Index to Scientific and Technical Proceedings, UK National Research Register from the start of each database. Sixty-one large international cohort studies of cardiovascular disease were identified, and contact made with authors to search for any unpublished results. The search was supplemented by cross-checking references and contact with various experts. Date of last search was April 2003. Any prospective cohort studies of patients with a diagnosis of CHD, which include all-cause mortality as an outcome measure. Smoking status must be measured on at least two occasions to ascertain which smokers have quit, and followed-up for at least two years. Eligibility and trial quality were assessed independently by two reviewers. Twenty studies were included. There was a 36% reduction in crude relative risk (RR) of mortality for those who quit smoking compared with those who continued to smoke (RR 0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.58 to 0.71). There was also a reduction in non-fatal myocardial infarctions (crude RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.57 to 0.82). Many studies did not adequately address quality issues, such as control of confounding, and misclassification of smoking status. However, there was little difference in the results for the six 'higher quality' studies, and little heterogeneity between these studies. This review was not able to assess how quickly the risk of mortality was reduced. Quitting smoking is associated with a substantial reduction in risk of all-cause mortality among patients with CHD. The pooled crude RR was

  13. Life-years gained from coronary heart disease mortality reduction in Scotland: prevention or treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, J A; Capewell, S; Unal, B

    2003-06-01

    Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) death rates have fallen considerably in many countries. We estimated the life-years-gained (LYG) in Scotland between 1975 and 1994 attributable to cardiology treatments, and population reductions in major CHD risk factors, using a previously validated mortality model. This combines published effectiveness data with information on uptake of CHD treatments; risk factor trends; and median survival by age and sex. Compared with 1975, there were 4,536 fewer CHD deaths in 1994, resulting in approximately 48,016 LYG among those aged 45-84 (maximum estimate 53,317; minimum estimate 36,867). Medical and surgical treatments for CHD patients gained approximately 12,025 life-years; the largest contribution coming from pharmacologic secondary prevention. Population reductions in major risk factors (smoking, cholesterol, and blood pressure) accounted for some 35,991 LYG, reductions in smoking accounted for over 50% of this. Modern cardiologic treatments gained many thousands of life-years in Scotland, but modest reductions in risk factors gained almost three times as many life-years.

  14. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ...

  15. African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 22,2017 Heart disease is the ... a marathon.” Learn more: Family History and Heart Disease, Stroke Make the Effort to Prevent Heart Disease with ...

  16. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  17. Cyanotic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the aorta Ebstein anomaly Hypoplastic left heart syndrome Tetralogy of Fallot Total anomalous pulmonary venous return Transposition of the ... through the middle Cardiac catheterization Heart, front view Tetralogy of Fallot Clubbing Cyanotic heart disease References Bernstein D. Cyanotic ...

  18. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  19. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the risk of cardiovascular disease. Poor diet. A diet that's high in fat, salt, sugar and cholesterol can contribute to the development ... other health conditions, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and ... low in salt and saturated fat Maintain a healthy weight Reduce ...

  20. Efficacy of atorvastatin therapy in prevention of postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients with ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Rubanenko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the efficacy of atorvastatin therapy in prevention of atrial fibrillation (AF development after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD with the assessment of inflammation, sheer stress and myocardial injury indicators. Material and methods. The study included 105 patients with IHD who were divided into two groups: patients of group 1 were treated with atorvastatin (59 patients, 81% males, mean age 62.1±7.5 years; patients of group 2 received no HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (46 patients, 89% males, and mean age 61.7±8.1 years. Results. Postoperative AF occurred more often in patients of group 2 (41.3% vs 16.9%; р=0.047. Laboratory analysis revealed the following: the levels of total leukocytes, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, superoxide dismutase and troponin did not different significantly among the patients of two groups. Interleukin-6 level in preand postoperative period was significantly higher in patients of group 2 (35.4±28.5 pg/ml vs 24.1±14.8 pg/ml, р=0.03; 63.7±54.8 pg/ml vs 50.7±40.8 pg/ml, р=0.04, respectively. Conclusion. Our study has shown that atorvastatin therapy contributed to the reduction of number of new cases of AF after CABG in patients with IHD. At that, the efficacy of atorvastatin therapy correlated with the size of left atrium and the severity of inflammatory response. Patients with atorvastatin therapy had significantly lower interleukin-6 level, as a proinflammatory marker, in preand postoperational period as compared with the patients without such treatment.

  1. An Overview Of Risk Factors For Coronary Heart Disease And Prevention Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M A Siddiqui

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available In developed countries, coronary heart disease (CHD accounts for 40-50% of all deaths, while 1 5-35% of all cardiac admissions in hospitals in our country are due to coronary heart disease1. The prevalence of CHD in our country varies from 1.7% to 6.5%2 and is rising, affecting young and middle aged persons in prime of their life and career 3a and it is said that CHD will replace infectious diseases as the major killer in India by year 2015 A.D.3b. Indian immigrants settled abroad have higher incidence and higher mortality as compared to native population. 4jb. The famous cardiologist Paul Dudley White has said "Heart disease before the age 80 is not God's will but due to our own faults" and it is the same message as given by Charaka about 30 centuries back, in 1000 B.C., who emphasized the role of overeating, heavy and fatty meals , worries and sedentary habits in causation of heart disease5. The human and economic costs of such a situation are very heavy.Atherosclerosis, the term introduced by Marchand in 1904, is the lipid rich lesion in the innermost layer of the arteries which is responsible for the majority of cases of myocardial and cerebral infarction. The endothelial lining of the artery is in direct and continuous contact with blood and interaction of blood cells & other constituents with the endothelium gives rise to atherosclerosis. This lesion presents as either fatty streak which is made up of foam cells, lipids & T lymphocytes and occurs early, commonly in children or fibrous plaque consisting of dense connective tissue, lipid droplets, smooth muscle cells, macrophages & T lymphocytes. Platelets adhere and aggregate to ulcerated or fissured plaques.

  2. Running nurse-led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease in primary care: qualitative study of health professionals' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Peter; Campbell, Neil C; Ritchie, Lewis D; Thain, Joan

    2005-07-01

    A randomised trial of nurse-led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease resulted in improved secondary prevention and significantly lowered all-cause mortality at 4-year follow-up. This qualitative trial was conducted to explore the experience of health professionals that had been involved in running the clinics. To identify the barriers and facilitators to establishing secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease within primary care. Semi-structured audiotaped telephone interviews with GPs and nurses involved in running clinics. A stratified, random sample of 19 urban, suburban, and rural general practices in north-east Scotland. Semi-structured telephone interviews with 19 GPs and 17 practice-based nurses involved in running nurse-led clinics for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. Eight practices had run clinics continuously and 11 had stopped, with eight subsequently restarting. Participants accounted for these patterns by referring to advantages and disadvantages of the clinics in four areas: patient care, development of nursing skills, team working, and infrastructure. Most practitioners perceived benefits for patients from attending secondary prevention clinics, but some, from small rural practices, thought they were unnecessary. The extended role for nurses was welcomed, but was dependent on motivated staff, appropriate training and support. Clinics relied on, and could enhance, team working, however, some doctors were wary of delegating. With regard to infrastructure, staff shortages (especially nurses) and accommodation were as problematic as lack of funds. Nurse-led secondary prevention clinics were viewed positively by most healthcare professionals that had been involved in running them, but barriers to their implementation had led most to stop running them at some point. Lack of space and staff shortages are likely to remain ongoing problems, but improvements in funding training and communication within

  3. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and it happens slowly over time. It's the ...

  4. Expanding the value of qualitative theories of illness experience in clinical practice: a grounded theory of secondary heart disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ononeze, V; Murphy, A W; MacFarlane, A; Byrne, M; Bradley, C

    2009-06-01

    Qualitative theories of illness experience are about the individual interpretations of the psychosocial and cultural aspects of living with illness. Thus, they contribute to a better understanding of health and health care provision. In this paper, we examine how a grounded theory (GT) of heart disease experience can inform secondary prevention. In-depth interviews of individual experience of heart disease were conducted with 26 patients, using GT iterative data collection and analysis framework. A GT was compiled from data and examined within a sociocultural framework to ascertain how experience influenced health behaviour. Despite individual contextual variations, the theory of 'keeping it going' describes the study sample's common attitude to living with heart disease. The theory was adequate in explaining secondary cardiac behaviour, because it identified the aspects of patients' beliefs and attitudes which are key to effective secondary prevention. The assessment of the impact of illness experience on health behaviour within a sociocultural framework helped to articulate the strong influence of social and contextual factors. The study offers an appropriate explanatory framework for encouraging health behaviour change. It emphasizes the importance of interventions being relevant to individual perceptions and interpretations. It provides a framework for designing and evaluating cardiac interventions and the theoretical principles which underpin them.

  5. The interleukin-6 receptor as a target for prevention of coronary heart disease: a mendelian randomisation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swerdlow, Daniel I; Holmes, Michael V; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Engmann, Jorgen E L; Shah, Tina; Sofat, Reecha; Guo, Yiran; Chung, Christina; Peasey, Anne; Pfister, Roman; Mooijaart, Simon P; Ireland, Helen A; Leusink, Maarten; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, Ka Wah; Palmen, Jutta; Howard, Philip; Cooper, Jackie A; Drenos, Fotios; Hardy, John; Nalls, Michael A; Li, Yun Rose; Lowe, Gordon; Stewart, Marlene; Bielinski, Suzette J; Peto, Julian; Timpson, Nicholas J; Gallacher, John; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Tomlinson, Ian; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Luan, Jian'an; Boer, Jolanda M A; Forouhi, Nita G; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Schnabel, Renate B; Hubacek, Jaroslav A; Kubinova, Ruzena; Baceviciene, Migle; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pajak, Andrzej; Topor-Madry, Roman; Malyutina, Sofia; Baldassarre, Damiano; Sennblad, Bengt; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bandenelli, Stefania; Tanaka, Toshiko; Meschia, James F; Singleton, Andrew; Navis, Gerjan; Mateo Leach, Irene; Bakker, Stephan J L; Gansevoort, Ron T; Ford, Ian; Epstein, Stephen E; Burnett, Mary Susan; Devaney, Joe M; Jukema, J Wouter; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Jan de Borst, Gert; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Jong, Pim A; Mailand-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Klungel, Olaf H; de Boer, Anthonius; Doevendans, Pieter A; Stephens, Jeffrey W; Eaton, Charles B; Robinson, Jennifer G; Manson, JoAnn E; Fowkes, F Gerry; Frayling, Timonthy M; Price, Jackie F; Whincup, Peter H; Morris, Richard W; Lawlor, Debbie A; Smith, George Davey; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Redline, Susan; Lange, Leslie A; Kumari, Meena; Wareham, Nick J; Verschuren, W M Monique; Benjamin, Emelia J; Whittaker, John C; Hamsten, Anders; Dudbridge, Frank; Delaney, J A Chris; Wong, Andrew; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Connolly, John J; van der Harst, Pim; Brunner, Eric J; Marmot, Michael G; Wassel, Christina L; Humphries, Steve E; Talmud, Philippa J; Kivimaki, Mika; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Voevoda, Mikhail; Bobak, Martin; Pikhart, Hynek; Wilson, James G; Hakonarson, Hakon; Reiner, Alex P; Keating, Brendan J; Sattar, Naveed; Hingorani, Aroon D; Casas, Juan Pablo

    2012-03-31

    A high circulating concentration of interleukin 6 is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease. Blockade of the interleukin-6 receptor (IL6R) with a monoclonal antibody (tocilizumab) licensed for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis reduces systemic and articular inflammation. However, whether IL6R blockade also reduces risk of coronary heart disease is unknown. Applying the mendelian randomisation principle, we used single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene IL6R to evaluate the likely efficacy and safety of IL6R inhibition for primary prevention of coronary heart disease. We compared genetic findings with the effects of tocilizumab reported in randomised trials in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In 40 studies including up to 133,449 individuals, an IL6R SNP (rs7529229) marking a non-synonymous IL6R variant (rs8192284; p.Asp358Ala) was associated with increased circulating log interleukin-6 concentration (increase per allele 9·45%, 95% CI 8·34-10·57) as well as reduced C-reactive protein (decrease per allele 8·35%, 95% CI 7·31-9·38) and fibrinogen concentrations (decrease per allele 0·85%, 95% CI 0·60-1·10). This pattern of effects was consistent with IL6R blockade from infusions of tocilizumab (4-8 mg/kg every 4 weeks) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis studied in randomised trials. In 25,458 coronary heart disease cases and 100,740 controls, the IL6R rs7529229 SNP was associated with a decreased odds of coronary heart disease events (per allele odds ratio 0·95, 95% CI 0·93-0·97, p=1·53×10(-5)). On the basis of genetic evidence in human beings, IL6R signalling seems to have a causal role in development of coronary heart disease. IL6R blockade could provide a novel therapeutic approach to prevention of coronary heart disease that warrants testing in suitably powered randomised trials. Genetic studies in populations could be used more widely to help to validate and prioritise novel drug targets or to repurpose existing

  6. Feasibility of recruiting families into a heart disease prevention program based on dietary patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offspring of parents with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) inherit a similar genetic profile and share diet and lifestyle behaviors. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of recruiting families at risk of CVD to a dietary prevention program, determine the changes in diet achieved, an...

  7. L-Carnitine prevents the development of ventricular fibrosis and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in hypertensive heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Yosuke; Ohtani, Tomohito; Sakata, Yasushi; Mano, Toshiaki; Takeda, Yasuharu; Tamaki, Shunsuke; Tsukamoto, Yasumasa; Kamimura, Daisuke; Aizawa, Yoshihiro; Miwa, Takeshi; Komuro, Issei; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2012-09-01

    Prognosis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) remains poor because of unknown pathophysiology and unestablished therapeutic strategy. This study aimed to identify a potential therapeutic intervention for HFpEF through metabolomics-based analysis. Metabolomics with capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry was performed using plasma of Dahl salt-sensitive rats fed high-salt diet, a model of hypertensive HFpEF, and showed decreased free-carnitine levels. Reassessment with enzymatic cycling method revealed the decreased plasma and left-ventricular free-carnitine levels in the HFpEF model. Urinary free-carnitine excretion was increased, and the expression of organic cation/carnitine transporter 2, which transports free-carnitine into cells, was down-regulated in the left ventricle (LV) and kidney in the HFpEF model. L-Carnitine was administered to the hypertensive HFpEF model. L-Carnitine treatment restored left-ventricular free-carnitine levels, attenuated left-ventricular fibrosis and stiffening, prevented pulmonary congestion, and improved survival in the HFpEF model independent of the antihypertensive effects, accompanied with increased expression of fatty acid desaturase (FADS) 1/2, rate-limiting enzymes in forming arachidonic acid, and enhanced production of arachidonic acid, a precursor of prostacyclin, and prostacyclin in the LV. In cultured cardiac fibroblasts, L-carnitine attenuated the angiotensin II-induced collagen production with increased FADS1/2 expression and enhanced production of arachidonic acid and prostacyclin. L-Carnitine-induced increase of arachidonic acid was canceled by knock-down of FADS1 or FADS2 in cultured cardiac fibroblasts. Serum free-carnitine levels were decreased in HFpEF patients. L-carnitine supplementation attenuates cardiac fibrosis by increasing prostacyclin production through arachidonic acid pathway, and may be a promising therapeutic option for HFpEF.

  8. Internet-based interventions for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Reena; Singh, Sally J; Powell, John; Fulton, Emily A; Igbinedion, Ewemade; Rees, Karen

    2015-12-22

    The Internet could provide a means of delivering secondary prevention programmes to people with coronary heart disease (CHD). To determine the effectiveness of Internet-based interventions targeting lifestyle changes and medicines management for the secondary prevention of CHD. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, in December 2014. We also searched six other databases in October 2014, and three trials registers in January 2015 together with reference checking and handsearching to identify additional studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating Internet-delivered secondary prevention interventions aimed at people with CHD. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We assessed evidence quality using the GRADE approach and presented this in a 'Summary of findings' table. Eighteen trials met our inclusion criteria. Eleven studies are complete (1392 participants), and seven are ongoing. Of the completed studies, seven interventions are broad, targeting the lifestyle management of CHD, and four focused on physical activity promotion. The comparison group in trials was usual care (n = 6), minimal intervention (n = 3), or traditional cardiac rehabilitation (n = 2).We found no effects of Internet-based interventions for all-cause mortality (odds ratio (OR) 0.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04 to 1.63; participants = 895; studies = 6; low-quality evidence). There was only one case of cardiovascular mortality in a control group (participants = 895; studies = 6). No incidences of non-fatal re-infarction were reported across any of the studies. We found no effects for revascularisation (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.37 to 1.27; participants = 895; studies = 6; low-quality evidence).We found no effects for total cholesterol (mean difference (MD) 0.00, 95% CI -0.27 to 0.28; participants = 439; studies = 4; low

  9. Should Antihypertensive Treatment Recommendations Differ in Patients With and Without Coronary Heart Disease? (from the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial [ALLHAT]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Michael H; Davis, Barry R; Piller, Linda B; Ford, Charles E; Baraniuk, M Sarah; Pressel, Sara L; Assadi, Mahshid A; Einhorn, Paula T; Haywood, L Julian; Ilamathi, Ekambaram; Oparil, Suzanne; Retta, Tamrat M

    2016-01-01

    Thiazide-type diuretics have been recommended for initial treatment of hypertension in most patients, but should this recommendation differ for patients with and without coronary heart disease (CHD)? The Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) was a randomized, double-blind hypertension treatment trial in 42,418 participants with high risk of combined cardiovascular disease (CVD) (25% with preexisting CHD). This post hoc analysis compares long-term major clinical outcomes in those assigned amlodipine (n = 9048) or lisinopril (n = 9,054) with those assigned chlorthalidone (n = 15,255), stratified by CHD status. After 4 to 8 years, randomized treatment was discontinued. Total follow-up (active treatment + passive surveillance using national databases for deaths and hospitalizations) was 8 to 13 years. For most CVD outcomes, end-stage renal disease, and total mortality, there were no differences across randomized treatment arms regardless of baseline CHD status. In-trial rates of CVD were significantly higher for lisinopril compared with chlorthalidone, and rates of heart failure were significantly higher for amlodipine compared with chlorthalidone in those with and without CHD (overall hazard ratios [HRs] 1.10, p heart failure in amlodipine compared with chlorthalidone (HR 1.12; p = 0.01) during extended follow-up did not differ by baseline CHD status. In conclusion, these results provide no reason to alter our previous recommendation to include a properly dosed diuretic (such as chlorthalidone 12.5 to 25 mg/day) in the initial antihypertensive regimen for most hypertensive patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Muertes por enfermedades cardiacas y accidentes cerebrovasculares prevenibles - (Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease and Stroke)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-03

    Este podcast se basa en la edición de septiembre del 2013 del informe Signos Vitales de los CDC. Más de 800,000 personas en los Estados Unidos mueren cada año a causa de enfermedades cardiacas y accidentes cerebrovasculares. Aprenda cómo controlar todos los principales factores de riesgo.  Created: 9/3/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/3/2013.

  11. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  12. Ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg Hansen, Louise; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Correct prehospital diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) may accelerate and improve the treatment. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prehospital diagnoses of ischemic heart diseases assigned by physicians. Methods. The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark...

  13. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 13,2017 Understand the risks of inflammation. Although it is not proven that inflammation causes ...

  14. Dietary recommendations in the prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease: do we have the ideal diet yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahoud, Georges; Aude, Y Wady; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2004-11-15

    To respond to the question of the best "heart-healthy" diet, we reviewed the effects of common diets on lipids, their efficacy, advantages, and limitations. The high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet is effective for weight loss over the short term, but its long-term benefits remain unproved. The very low-fat diet decreases levels of total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and, with lifestyle modifications, may slow progression of coronary atherosclerosis. The high-protein and very low-fat diets are difficult to follow over the long term. The American Heart Association diet, which is rich in fruits, vegetables, and nuts, decreases blood pressure and may be acceptable to most patients. However, it is rich in carbohydrates and may not be suitable for patients who are obese and/or have high levels of triglycerides. In such patients, diet based on foods with a low glycemic index may be an alternative. There is also immense interest in the Mediterranean diet, which is acceptable to most patients, may decrease some biomarkers of coronary atherosclerosis, and may decrease cardiovascular events and death. Despite these options, there is no "fits all" dietary recommendation for prevention of coronary heart disease. Importantly, dietary discretion is only 1 part of lifestyle changes, such as exercise and smoking cessation.

  15. An ecological model using promotores de salud to prevent cardiovascular disease on the US-Mexico border: the HEART project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcázar, Hector; Wise, Sherrie; Rosenthal, E Lee; Ochoa, Cecilia; Rodriguez, Jose; Hastings, Diana; Flores, Leticia; Hernandez, Lorraine; Duarte-Gardea, Maria

    2012-01-01

    To address cardiovascular disease risk factors among Hispanics, a community model of prevention requires a comprehensive approach to community engagement. The objectives of our intervention were to reduce cardiovascular disease risk factors in Hispanics living in 2 low-income areas of El Paso, Texas, and to engage the community in a physical activity and nutrition intervention. Drawing on lessons learned in phase 1 (years 2005-2008) of the HEART Project, we used an iterative, community-based process to develop an intervention based on an ecological framework. New community partners were introduced and community health workers delivered several elements of the intervention, including the curriculum entitled "Mi Corazón, Mi Comunidad" ("MiCMiC" [My Heart, My Community]). We received feedback from the project's Community Health Academy and Leadership Council throughout the development process and established a policy agenda that promotes integration of community health workers into the local and state workforce. Collaboration with 2 new community partners, the YWCA and the Department of Parks and Recreation, were instrumental in the process of community-based participatory research. We enrolled 113 participants in the first cohort; 78% were female, and the mean age was 41 years. More than 50% reported having no health insurance coverage. Seventy-two (60%) participants attended 1 or more promotora-led Su Corazón, Su Vida sessions, and 74 (62%) participants attended 1 or more of the 15 exercise classes. HEART phase 2 includes a multilevel ecological model to address cardiovascular disease risk among Hispanics. Future similarly targeted initiatives can benefit from an ecological approach that also embraces the promotora model.

  16. Metabolomics and ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmiena, Aliki A; Ng, Theodore W; Meikle, Peter J

    2013-03-01

    Ischaemic heart disease accounts for nearly half of the global cardiovascular disease burden. Aetiologies relating to heart disease are complex, but dyslipidaemia, oxidative stress and inflammation are cardinal features. Despite preventative measures and advancements in treatment regimens with lipid-lowering agents, the high prevalence of heart disease and the residual risk of recurrent events continue to be a significant burden to the health sector and to the affected individuals and their families. The development of improved risk models for the early detection and prevention of cardiovascular events in addition to new therapeutic strategies to address this residual risk are required if we are to continue to make inroads into this most prevalent of diseases. Metabolomics and lipidomics are modern disciplines that characterize the metabolite and lipid complement respectively, of a given system. Their application to ischaemic heart disease has demonstrated utilities in population profiling, identification of multivariate biomarkers and in monitoring of therapeutic response, as well as in basic mechanistic studies. Although advances in magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry technologies have given rise to the fields of metabolomics and lipidomics, the plethora of data generated presents challenges requiring specific statistical and bioinformatics applications, together with appropriate study designs. Nonetheless, the predictive and re-classification capacity of individuals with various degrees of risk by the plasma lipidome has recently been demonstrated. In the present review, we summarize evidence derived exclusively by metabolomic and lipidomic studies in the context of ischaemic heart disease. We consider the potential role of plasma lipid profiling in assessing heart disease risk and therapeutic responses, and explore the potential mechanisms. Finally, we highlight where metabolomic studies together with complementary -omic disciplines may make further

  17. [Control of major cardiovascular risk factors of ischemic heart disease in secondary prevention in Aragón: COCINA study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucalon Arenal, J M; Buisac Ramón, C; Marin Ibáñez, A; Castan Ruiz, S; Blay Cortes, M G; Barrasa Villar, J I

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease remains a leading cause of death in Spain. According to the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) and European national societies, secondary prevention for these patients consists of control of major cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) and suitable lifestyle habits. To determine the degree of control of CVRF in the Aragonese population in secondary prevention. Cross-sectional study of a sample of 705 patients of Aragon who had suffered a cardiac event, selected opportunistically in consultations of family physicians participating in the 3 provinces of Aragon. The study was conducted in the second half of 2012. To measure the degree of control of different FRVC and lifestyle habits in this population. Anthropometric, different cardiovascular risk factors, treatment and lifestyle. 58% of men and 52% of women met criteria for monitoring of measured variables. The best result was obtained with smoking cessation and the worst with BMI. Hypertension, Dyslipidemia and Diabetes Mellitus achieve poor control results. The results show that the degree of control of CVRF is still low, especially in variables such as dyslipidemia and Diabetes Mellitus. Only 16.5% of control patients met criteria given the pharmacologically-modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2015 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Beliefs among black and white adults about causes and prevention of cardiovascular disease: the Minnesota Heart Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsom, A R; Sprafka, J M; Luepker, R V; Jacobs, D R

    1988-01-01

    We assessed beliefs about the symptoms, causes, and prevention of cardiovascular disease in population-based surveys of black and white Twin Cities adults in 1985-86. Whites had a generally higher awareness of heart attack symptoms than did blacks; 72% of blacks and 85% of whites mentioned chest pain as a likely symptom. Sixty-five percent of blacks and 76% of whites correctly offered at least one of the three major, modifiable risk factors (smoking, hypertension, and high cholesterol in blood or diet) as likely causes of cardiovascular disease. However, less than 5% of respondents mentioned all three major risk factors. The most frequent response offered as a cause was stress/worry (54% of blacks, 51% of whites). Individuals with higher educational levels generally responded more correctly than those with less education. After accounting for differences in educational level, blacks demonstrated a higher awareness of hypertension as a risk factor, whereas whites were more knowledgeable about smoking and cholesterol. In light of the high percentage of adults still lacking awareness about cardiovascular risk, public education about prevention should continue. Such efforts are broadly desirable but may be most effectively targeted toward minorities and groups with less education, in whom awareness is low and risk of disease is high.

  19. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid (Fish Oil) Supplementation and the Prevention of Clinical Cardiovascular Disease: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siscovick, David S; Barringer, Thomas A; Fretts, Amanda M; Wu, Jason H Y; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Costello, Rebecca B; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Jacobson, Terry A; Engler, Mary B; Alger, Heather M; Appel, Lawrence J; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2017-04-11

    Multiple randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have assessed the effects of supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid (omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, commonly called fish oils) on the occurrence of clinical cardiovascular diseases. Although the effects of supplementation for the primary prevention of clinical cardiovascular events in the general population have not been examined, RCTs have assessed the role of supplementation in secondary prevention among patients with diabetes mellitus and prediabetes, patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease, and those with prevalent coronary heart disease. In this scientific advisory, we take a clinical approach and focus on common indications for omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplements related to the prevention of clinical cardiovascular events. We limited the scope of our review to large RCTs of supplementation with major clinical cardiovascular disease end points; meta-analyses were considered secondarily. We discuss the features of available RCTs and provide the rationale for our recommendations. We then use existing American Heart Association criteria to assess the strength of the recommendation and the level of evidence. On the basis of our review of the cumulative evidence from RCTs designed to assess the effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on clinical cardiovascular events, we update prior recommendations for patients with prevalent coronary heart disease, and we offer recommendations, when data are available, for patients with other clinical indications, including patients with diabetes mellitus and prediabetes and those with high risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicine to treat high blood pressure). A high fasting blood sugar level (or you're on medicine ... find out whether routine testing for DHD will benefit people who have diabetes but no heart disease ...

  1. Heart Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body ... Get Well" card and paying a visit. Can Kids Get Heart Disease? Kids usually don't have ...

  2. Need to combine individual strategies with population-level strategies in the prevention of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Johan Lerbech; Jørgensen, Torben; Borglykke, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine the relation between the distribution of risk, the distribution of coronary heart disease (CHD) events and the proportion who develop CHD according to risk.......The aim of this paper was to examine the relation between the distribution of risk, the distribution of coronary heart disease (CHD) events and the proportion who develop CHD according to risk....

  3. A randomized trial of an intervention to improve use and adherence to effective coronary heart disease prevention strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheridan Stacey L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficacious strategies for the primary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD are underused, and, when used, have low adherence. Existing efforts to improve use and adherence to these efficacious strategies have been so intensive that they are impractical for clinical practice. Methods We conducted a randomized trial of a CHD prevention intervention (including a computerized decision aid and automated tailored adherence messages at one university general internal medicine practice. After obtaining informed consent and collecting baseline data, we randomized patients (men and women age 40-79 with no prior history of cardiovascular disease to either the intervention or usual care. We then saw them for two additional study visits over 3 months. For intervention participants, we administered the decision aid at the primary study visit (1 week after baseline visit and then mailed 3 tailored adherence reminders at 2, 4, and 6 weeks. We assessed our outcomes (including the predicted likelihood of angina, myocardial infarction, and CHD death over 10 years (CHD risk and self-reported adherence between groups at 3 month follow-up. Data collection occurred from June 2007 through December 2009. All study procedures were IRB approved. Results We randomized 160 eligible patients (81 intervention; 79 control and followed 96% to study conclusion. Mean predicted CHD risk at baseline was 11.3%. The intervention increased self-reported adherence to chosen risk reducing strategies by 25 percentage points (95% CI 8% to 42%, with the biggest effect for aspirin. It also changed predicted CHD risk by -1.1% (95% CI -0.16% to -2%, with a larger effect in a pre-specified subgroup of high risk patients. Conclusion A computerized intervention that involves patients in CHD decision making and supports adherence to effective prevention strategies can improve adherence and reduce predicted CHD risk. Clinical trials registration number Clinical

  4. Evaluating the Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of Statin Use Guidelines for Primary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, David J; Coxson, Pamela G; Penko, Joanne; Pletcher, Mark J; Goldman, Lee; Odden, Michelle C; Kazi, Dhruv S; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2017-09-19

    Statins are effective in the primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guideline expands recommended statin use, but its cost-effectiveness has not been compared with other guidelines. We used the Cardiovascular Disease Policy Model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of the ACC/AHA guideline relative to current use, Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines, and universal statin use in all men 45 to 74 years of age and women 55 to 74 years of age over a 10-year horizon from 2016 to 2025. Sensitivity analyses varied costs, risks, and benefits. Main outcomes were incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and numbers needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Each approach produces substantial benefits and net cost savings relative to the status quo. Full adherence to the Adult Treatment Panel III guideline would result in 8.8 million more statin users than the status quo, at a number needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained of 35. The ACC/AHA guideline would potentially result in up to 12.3 million more statin users than the Adult Treatment Panel III guideline, with a marginal number needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained of 68. Moderate-intensity statin use in all men 45 to 74 years of age and women 55 to 74 years of age would result in 28.9 million more statin users than the ACC/AHA guideline, with a marginal number needed to treat for 10 years per quality-adjusted life-year gained of 108. In all cases, benefits would be greater in men than women. Results vary moderately with different risk thresholds for instituting statins and statin toxicity estimates but depend greatly on the disutility caused by daily medication use (pill burden). At a population level, the ACC/AHA guideline for expanded statin use for primary prevention is projected to treat more people, to save more lives, and to cost less

  5. Haemochromatosis gene mutations and risk of coronary heart disease: a west of Scotland coronary prevention study (WOSCOPS) substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, I R; Maxwell, F K; Gaffney, D; McMahon, A D; Packard, C J

    2004-03-01

    To measure the frequency of genotypes of the HFE (haemochromatosis) gene in patients recruited to the west of Scotland coronary prevention study (WOSCOPS), and relate them to the subsequent occurrence of coronary clinical events. Nested case-control study, drawing samples of DNA from the biological bank of a cohort study. Men aged 45-64 years in 1989, with moderate hypercholesterolaemia and no evidence of coronary heart disease at baseline. Follow up for a mean period of 4.9 years. Typing for C282Y and H63D mutations of the HFE gene in 482 subjects with a subsequent coronary event and 1104 without an event. The C282Y mutation was present in 81 of 482 cases (16.8%) and 182 of 1104 controls (16.5%). Comparing the prevalence of gene mutations in the cases and controls, there were no significant differences. The hazard ratio for C282Y heterozygotes was 1.03 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.77 to 1.36) and for C282Y/H63D compound heterozygotes 1.04 (95% CI 0.50 to 2.14). Prespecified subgroup analyses of the pravastatin, placebo, smoking, and non-smoking groups showed no significant differences between cases and controls. Repeating the analyses after adjusting for possible confounding factors produced no change in the results. In a population of moderately hypercholesterolaemic middle aged Scottish men who did not have any evidence of coronary heart disease at baseline, the presence of a C282Y mutation in the HFE gene did not predict the occurrence of coronary events over a mean follow up of 4.9 years.

  6. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk factors ... do smoke, quit. Controlling your cholesterol through diet, exercise, and medicines . Controlling high blood pressure through diet, ...

  7. The global burden of paediatric heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musa, Ndidiamaka L; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Zheleva, Bistra

    2017-01-01

    An estimated 15 million children die or are crippled annually by treatable or preventable heart disease in low- and middle-income countries. Global efforts to reduce under-5 mortality have focused on reducing death from communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries with little...... to no attention focusing on paediatric CHD and acquired heart disease. Lack of awareness of CHD and acquired heart disease, access to care, poor healthcare infrastructure, competing health priorities, and a critical shortage of specialists are important reasons why paediatric heart disease has not been addressed...... in low resourced settings. Non-governmental organisations have taken the lead to address these challenges. This review describes the global burden of paediatric heart disease and strategies to improve the quality of care for paediatric heart disease. These strategies would improve outcomes for children...

  8. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  9. Efficacy and predictors of success of noninvasive ventilation for prevention of extubation failure in critically ill children with heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Punkaj; Kuperstock, Jacob E; Hashmi, Sana; Arnolde, Vickie; Gossett, Jeffrey M; Prodhan, Parthak; Venkataraman, Shekhar; Roth, Stephen J

    2013-04-01

    The study aimed primarily to evaluate the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and to identify possible predictors for success of NIV therapy in preventing extubation failure in critically ill children with heart disease. The secondary objectives of this study were to assess the efficacy of prophylactic NIV therapy initiated immediately after tracheal extubation and to determine the characteristics, outcomes, and complications associated with NIV therapy in pediatric cardiac patients. A retrospective review examined the medical records of all children between the ages 1 day and 18 years who sustained acute respiratory failure (ARF) that required NIV in the cardiovascular intensive care unit (CVICU) at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital between January 2008 and June 2010. Patients were assigned to a prophylactic group if NIV was started directly after extubation and to a nonprophylactic group if NIV was started after signs and symptoms of ARF developed. Patients were designated as responders if they received NIV and did not require reintubation during their CVICU stay and nonresponders if they failed NIV and reintubation was performed. The data collected included demographic data, preexisting conditions, pre-event characteristics, event characteristics, and outcome data. The outcome data evaluated included success or failure of NIV, duration of NIV, CVICU length of stay (LOS), hospital LOS, and hospital mortality. The two complications of NIV assessed in the study included nasal bridge or forehead skin necrosis and pneumothorax. The 221 eligible events during the study period involved 172 responders (77.8 %) and 49 nonresponders (22.2 %). A total of 201 events experienced by the study cohort received continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), with 156 responders (78 %), whereas 20 events received bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP), with 16 responders (80 %). In the study, 58 events (26.3 %) were assigned to the prophylactic group and 163 events (73

  10. Nrf2 signaling and redox homeostasis in the aging heart: A potential target to prevent cardiovascular diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Palacios, Alejandro; Königsberg, Mina; Zazueta, Cecilia

    2016-03-01

    Aging process is often accompanied with a high incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) due to the synergistic effects of age-related changes in heart morphology/function and prolonged exposure to injurious effects of CVD risk factors. Oxidative stress, considered a hallmark of aging, is also an important feature in pathologies that predispose to CVD development, like hypertension, diabetes and obesity. Approaches directed to prevent the occurrence of CVD during aging have been explored both in experimental models and in controlled clinical trials, in order to improve health span, reduce hospitalizations and increase life quality during elderly. In this review we discuss oxidative stress role as a main risk factor that relates CVD with aging. As well as interventions that aim to reduce oxidative stress by supplementing with exogenous antioxidants. In particular, strategies of improving the endogenous antioxidant defenses through activating the nuclear factor related-2 factor (Nrf2) pathway; one of the best studied molecules in cellular redox homeostasis and a master regulator of the antioxidant and phase II detoxification response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical pattern of heart diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejaz, M.S.; Billoo, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    This study was done to determine various causes and clinical presentation of heart disease in children. It was a prospective hospital study conducted in Department of Pediatrics Civil Hospital, Karachi from August 1995 to February 1996. In this study, 70 patients of heart disease upto 12 years of age were inducted. There were 33 (47.14%) cases of congenital heart diseases and 37 (52.85%) cases of acquired heart diseases. The age distribution showed that heart disease was more frequent between 0-11 months of age (41.42%). Congenital heart diseases were also frequent between 0-11 months (28.57%). On the other hand acquired heart diseases were more common between 6-12 years (22.85%). In this study the males were predominantly involved, the male to female ratio was 1.05:1. In congenital heart disease it was 1.3:1 and in acquired heart diseases it was 0.85:1. Ventricular septal defect was the commonest congenital lesion reported (20%). Rheumatic fever and viral myocarditis were two frequently occurring acquired heart-diseases 17.14% each. The common presentation of heart diseases were respiratory distress (94.28%), fever (90%), feeding difficulty (57.14%) and failure to thrive (34.28%). In case of rheumatic fever, chorea was present in 8.57%, arthritis in 11.42% and S/C nodules (2.85%) cases respectively. The early management of the problem may help in decreasing morbidity and mortality due to these disease in children. Prenatal detection of congenital cardiac lesions by fetal echocardiography in high risk pregnancies, early intervention in neonatal period and counseling of the parents may help in prevention of congenital heart diseases in children. Primary prevention of rheumatic fever can be achieved by early diagnosis and treatment of streptococcal throat infection. (author)

  12. Hypertensive Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Hypertensive heart disease is prevalent and during the last decade it has been determined that patients with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy have increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, many have doubted the effectiveness of LV mass assessment because it is difficult...

  13. Membrane omega-3 Fatty Acid deficiency as a preventable risk factor for comorbid coronary heart disease in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Robert K

    2009-01-01

    Major depression disorder (MDD) significantly increases the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) which is a leading cause of mortality in patients with MDD. Moreover, depression is frequently observed in a subset of patients following acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and increases risk for mortality. Here evidence implicating omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid deficiency in the pathoaetiology of CHD and MDD is reviewed, and the hypothesis that n-3 fatty acid deficiency is a preventable risk factor for CHD comorbidity in MDD patients is evaluated. This hypothesis is supported by cross-national and cross-sectional epidemiological surveys finding an inverse correlation between n-3 fatty acid status and prevalence rates of both CHD and MDD, prospective studies finding that lower dietary or membrane EPA+DHA levels increase risk for both MDD and CHD, case-control studies finding that the n-3 fatty acid status of MDD patients places them at high risk for emergent CHD morbidity and mortality, meta-analyses of controlled n-3 fatty acid intervention studies finding significant advantage over placebo for reducing depression symptom severity in MDD patients, and for secondary prevention of cardiac events in CHD patients, findings that n-3 fatty acid status is inversely correlated with other documented CHD risk factors, and patients diagnosed with MDD after ACS exhibit significantly lower n-3 fatty acid status compared with nondepressed ACS patients. This body of evidence provides strong support for future studies to evaluate the effects of increasing dietary n-3 fatty acid status on CHD comorbidity and mortality in MDD patients.

  14. The history of hormone therapy use and recent controversy related to heart disease and breast cancer arising from prevention trial outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Ivy M

    2012-01-01

    The reasons for hormone therapy use have changed dramatically over time from being very popular for the purpose of preserving youth in women to menopause-related symptom management, disease prevention, and now back to menopause-related symptom management. Over time, several important risks associated with the use of hormone therapy have become evident, causing dramatic reductions in the use of hormone therapy for periods of time following identification of these risks. Most recently, randomized controlled prevention trials that evaluated hormone therapy for the purpose of reducing or preventing coronary heart disease among women have found that hormone therapy is associated with increased rather than decreased risks for coronary heart disease. The most recent of these trials again identified increased risks for breast cancer associated with estrogen plus progestogen therapy. The evolving evidence base from these randomized controlled prevention trials is complicated and in some cases contradictory. Specifically, the data suggest that the timing of when hormone therapy is initiated once a woman is postmenopausal may influence her risk for developing heart disease and breast cancer. In this article, contradictory evidence is carefully sifted so risks and benefits can be weighed by clinicians when partnering with women to individualize decisions about using hormone therapy. © 2012 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  15. Rheumatic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Luiza; Cury, Patricia; Demarchi, Lea M.F.; Coelho, Verônica; Abel, Lúcia; Lopez, Ana P.; Oshiro, Sandra Emiko; Aliotti, Selma; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Pomerantzeff, Pablo M.A.; Tanaka, Ana C.; Kalil, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    Heart lesions of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) patients contain T-cell clones that recognize heart proteins and streptococcal M peptides. To functionally characterize heart-infiltrating T lymphocytes, we evaluated their cytokine profile, both directly in situ and in T-cell lines derived from the heart (HIL). Interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-10 expressions were characterized in 20 heart tissue infiltrates from 14 RHD patients by immunohistochemistry. IFN-γ-, TNF-α-, and IL-10-positive cells were consistently predominant, whereas IL-4 was scarce in the valves. In agreement with these data, the in vitro experiments, in which 13 HILs derived from heart samples of eight patients were stimulated with M5 protein and the immunodominant M5 (81-96) peptide, IL-4 was detected in HIL derived from the atrium (three of six) but not from the valve (zero of seven). IFN-γ and IL-10 production were detected in culture supernatants in 11 of 13 and 6 of 12 HILs, respectively. The predominant IFN-γ and TNF-α expression in the heart suggests that Th1-type cytokines could mediate RHD. Unlike in reversible myocardium inflammation, the significantly lower IL-4 expression in the valvular tissue (P = 0.02) may contribute to the progression of the RHD leading to permanent valvular damage (relative risk, 4.3; odds ratio, 15.8). The lack of IL-4 in vitro production by valve-derived HIL also emphasizes the more severe tissue destruction in valves observed in RHD. PMID:15509528

  16. The clinical profile of women with stable ischaemic heart disease in Spain. More effort is needed in secondary prevention. SIRENA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez, J M; Ripoll, T; Barrios, V; Anguita, M; Pedreira, M; Madariaga, I

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death for women, especially ischaemic heart disease, which is still considered a man's disease. In Spain, there are various registries on ischaemic heart disease, although none are exclusively for women. The objectives of the SIRENA study were to describe the clinical profile of women with ischaemic heart disease treated in cardiology consultations, to estimate its prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and understand its clinical management. A multicentre observational study was conducted with a sample of 631 women with stable ischaemic heart disease, consecutively included during cardiology consultations. Forty-one researchers from all over Spain participated in the study. The mean age was 68.5 years. The clinical presentation was in the form of acute coronary syndrome in up to 67.2% of the patients. The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors was high (77.7% of the patients had hypertension, 40.7% had diabetes and 68% had dyslipidaemia), with 30.7% having uncontrolled hypertension, 78.4% having LDL-cholesterol levels higher than 70mg/dL and 49.2% having HbA1c levels greater than 7%. The considerable majority of the patients underwent optimal medical treatment with antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockers and hypolipidaemic agents. Coronary angiography was performed for 88.3% of the patients, and 63.4% underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. Women with stable ischaemic heart disease in Spain initially present some form of acute coronary syndrome and a high prevalence of inadequately controlled cardiovascular risk factors, despite undergoing optimal medical therapy. A high percentage of these women undergo coronary revascularisation. Increased efforts are required for secondary prevention in women with stable ischaemic heart disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  17. The interleukin-6 receptor as a target for prevention of coronary heart disease : a mendelian randomisation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Holmes, Michael V.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Engmann, Jorgen E. L.; Shah, Tina; Sofat, Reecha; Guo, Yiran; Chung, Christina; Peasey, Anne; Ster, Roman Pfi; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Ireland, Helen A.; Leusink, Maarten; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, KaWah; Palmen, Jutta; Howard, Philip; Cooper, Jackie A.; Drenos, Fotios; Hardy, John; Nalls, Michael A.; Li, Yun Rose; Lowe, Gordon; Stewart, Marlene; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Peto, Julian; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Gallacher, John; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Tomlinson, Ian; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Luan, Jian'an; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Kubinova, Ruzena; Baceviciene, Migle; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pajak, Andrzej; Topor-Madry, Roman; Malyutina, Sofi A.; Baldassarre, Damiano; Sennblad, Bengt; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Ferrucci, Luigi; Bandenelli, Stefania; Tanaka, Toshiko; Meschia, James F.; Singleton, Andrew; Navis, Gerjan; Mateo Leach, Irene; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Ford, Ian; Epstein, Stephen E.; Burnett, Mary Susan; Devaney, Joe M.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; de Borst, Gert Jan; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Jong, Pim A.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Klungel, Olaf H.; de Boer, Anthonius; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Stephens, Jeffrey W.; Eaton, Charles B.; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Fowkes, F. Gerry R.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Price, Jackie F.; Whincup, Peter H.; Morris, Richard W.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Smith, George Davey; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Redline, Susan; Lange, Leslie A.; Kumari, Meena; Wareham, Nick J.; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Whittaker, John C.; Hamsten, Anders; Dudbridge, Frank; Delaney, J. A. Chris; Wong, Andrew; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Connolly, John J.; van der Harst, Pim; Brunner, Eric J.; Marmot, Michael G.; Wassel, Christina L.; Humphries, Steve E.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Kivimaki, Mika; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Voevoda, Mikhail; Bobak, Martin; Pikhart, Hynek; Wilson, James G.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Reiner, Alex P.; Keating, Brendan J.; Sattar, Naveed; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Background A high circulating concentration of interleukin 6 is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease. Blockade of the interleukin-6 receptor (IL6R) with a monoclonal antibody (tocilizumab) licensed for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis reduces systemic and articular inflammation.

  18. Prevention of coronary heart disease and osteoporosis in women aged 45 to 49 years: a challenging role for general practitioners.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, H.M.M.; Kuik, A. van; Janse, M.E.J.; Schellevis, F.G.; Lagro-Janssen, T.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Part of the risks for coronary heart disease (CHD) and osteoporosis in women are established by their lifestyle in the premenopausal period. Therefore, we assessed the risk of women aged 45 to 49 years for CHD and osteoporosis and its relation with socioeconomic status (SES) and access to

  19. Coronary heart disease risk in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known coronary heart disease: findings from the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B; Sillesen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Noncoronary forms of atherosclerosis (including transient ischemic attacks or stroke of carotid origin or >50% stenosis of the carotid artery) are associated with a 10-year vascular risk of >20% and are considered as a coronary heart disease (CHD) -risk equivalent from the standpoint of lipid...... management. The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial included patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known CHD regardless of the presence of carotid atherosclerosis. We evaluated the risk of developing clinically recognized CHD in SPARCL patients....

  20. Evaluation of medical and health economic effectiveness of non-pharmacological secondary prevention of coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiner, Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coronary heart disease (CHD is a common and potentially fatal malady with a life time prevalence of over 20%. For Germany, the mortality attributable to chronic ischemic heart disease or acute myocardial infarction is estimated at 140,000 deaths per year. An association between prognosis of CHD and lifestyle risk factors has been consistently shown. To positively influence lifestyle risk factors in patients with CHD, non-pharmaceutical secondary prevention strategies are frequently recommended and implemented. Objectives: The aim of this HTA (HTA = Health Technology Assessment is to summarise the current literature on strategies for non-pharmaceutical secondary prevention in patients with CHD and to evaluate their medical effectiveness/efficacy and cost-effectiveness as well as the ethical, social and legal implications. In addition, this report aims to compare the effectiveness and efficacy of different intervention components and to evaluate the generalisability with regard to the German context. Methods: Relevant publications were identified by means of a structured search of databases accessed through the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI. In addition, a manual search of identified reference lists was conducted. The present report includes German and English literature published between January 2003 and September 2008 targeting adults with CHD. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed according to pre-defined quality criteria, based on the criteria of evidence based medicine. Results: Among 9,074 publications 43 medical publications met the inclusion criteria. Overall study quality is satisfactory, but only half the studies report overall mortality or cardiac mortality as an outcome, while the remaining studies report less reliable outcome parameters. The follow-up duration varies between twelve and 120 months. Although overall effectiveness of non-pharmaceutical secondary

  1. Heart Disease and Stroke in Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-11

    This women's health podcast focuses on the impact of heart disease and stroke in women and includes steps to prevent these conditions.  Created: 5/11/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/11/2009.

  2. Anxiety and coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Anja Kokalj; Brigita Novak Šarotar

    2018-01-01

    In patients with coronary heart disease anxiety is often overlooked. Symptoms of anxiety are often similar to coronary heart disease symptoms. The prevalence of anxiety in general population and coronary heart disease patients is very high. While the underlying pathophysiology of the connection remains unclear, anxiety lowers the quality of life and is a factor for a higher risk of morbidity and mortality due to coronary heart disease.

  3. Task sharing to improve the prevention, diagnosis and management of rheumatic heart disease: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Leila Hussein; Smit, Inge; Engel, Mark E; Watkins, David A; Zühlke, Liesl Joanna

    2018-02-14

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains an important cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality globally due to weak health systems in many countries. RHD can be effectively prevented and managed; however, RHD-related interventions have not been widely adopted in countries with severe human resource constraints. Task sharing is a recognised approach to personnel shortages that could prove effective for RHD and has, anecdotally, been attempted in a few settings. We propose a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol to assess models that use non-physician workers to expand access to, and quality of, RHD-related healthcare. We will include randomised controlled trials (RCT), cluster RCTs, quasi-experimental and controlled before and after studies providing information on the effectiveness of non-physician workers in providing care for streptoccocal pharyngitis, rheumatic fever and RHD. We will search relevant electronic databases and grey literature using medical subject headings. Standardised data extraction forms will be used to collect effect sizes that will be pooled in random-effects models. We will also conduct subgroup analyses and note other important quantitative findings, such as cost reduction, and qualitative findings, such as patient satisfaction. We will also assess study quality and risk of bias and metabias. Ethics approval is not required for this systematic review of previously published literature. The results of the systematic review will be broadly disseminated via conference presentations, multidisciplinary workshops and peer-reviewed publications. CRD42017072989. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. The Office Guidelines Applied to Practice program improves secondary prevention of heart disease in Federally Qualified Healthcare Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adesuwa Olomu

    2016-12-01

    Office-GAP resulted in increased use of guideline-based medications for secondary CVD prevention in underserved populations. The Office-GAP program could serve as a model for implementing guideline-based care for other chronic diseases.

  5. Population-based health-economic evaluation of the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soini, Erkki J O; Davies, Glenn; Martikainen, Janne A; Hu, Henry X; Tunceli, Kaan; Niskanen, Leo

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of generic atorvastatin 20 mg (A20), branded rosuvastatin 10 mg (R10), generic simvastatin 40 mg (S40) and the combination of generic S40 + branded ezetimibe 10 mg (S40 + EZ10) for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) in Finnish patients not meeting the target goal of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) with S40. A probabilistic Markov model was employed to evaluate the costs and health outcomes of the different therapies based on the cardiovascular events avoided. The model included Framingham risk equations, Finnish population characteristics, event rates, quality of life estimates, resource use and unit costs. The LDL-C lowering efficacies were gathered from a systematic literature review, based on a search of Medline carried out in June 2008 (no time limit). Incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained and incremental cost per life year gained (LYG). The efficacy (LDL-C decrease) gained from switching S40 to S40 + EZ10 was consistent in the literature review, whereas the LDL-C decrease gained from switching S40 to A20/R10 was uncertain. The incremental cost per QALY gained from switching generic S40 was lowest for S40 + EZ10 (22,841 euros [24,017 euros] and 26,595 euros [46,686 euros] for diabetic and non-diabetic men [women], respectively). The respective incremental cost per QALY gained for S40 + EZ10 vs. A20 were 19,738 euros (21,405 euros) and 23,596 euros (40,087 euros). A20 dominated R10. Based on the cost-effectiveness acceptability frontier with a willingness-to-pay value of 30,000 euros per QALY gained, the probability of cost-effectiveness for switching generic S40 to S40 + EZ10 was 100% for men and diabetic women. Sensitivity analyses showed that results were robust. In the Finnish secondary prevention population that is not at goal on S40, switching generic S40 to S40 + EZ10 is more cost-effective than switching S40 to generic A20 or R10.

  6. Cost effectiveness of nurse led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease in primary care: follow up of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, James P; Yao, Guiqing L; Murchie, Peter; Campbell, Neil C; Ritchie, Lewis D

    2005-03-26

    To establish the cost effectiveness of nurse led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease based on four years' follow up of a randomised controlled trial. Cost effectiveness analysis. 19 general practices in north east Scotland. 1343 patients (673 in intervention group and 670 in control group, as originally randomised) aged under 80 years with a diagnosis of coronary heart disease but without terminal illness or dementia and not housebound. Nurse led clinics to promote medical and lifestyle components of secondary prevention. Costs of clinics; overall costs to health service; and cost per life year and per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained, expressed as incremental gain in intervention group compared with control group. The cost of the intervention (clinics and drugs) was 136 pounds sterling (254 dollars; 195 euros) per patient higher (1998-9 prices) in the intervention group, but the difference in other NHS costs, although lower for the intervention group, was not statistically significant. Overall, 28 fewer deaths occurred in the intervention group leading to a gain in mean life years per patient of 0.110 and of 0.124 QALYs. The incremental cost per life year saved was 1236 pounds sterling and that per QALY was 1097 pounds sterling. Nurse led clinics for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in primary care seem to be cost effective compared with most interventions in health care, with the main gains in life years saved.

  7. Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Silent Cerebrovascular Disease: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric E; Saposnik, Gustavo; Biessels, Geert Jan; Doubal, Fergus N; Fornage, Myriam; Gorelick, Philip B; Greenberg, Steven M; Higashida, Randall T; Kasner, Scott E; Seshadri, Sudha

    2017-02-01

    Two decades of epidemiological research shows that silent cerebrovascular disease is common and is associated with future risk for stroke and dementia. It is the most common incidental finding on brain scans. To summarize evidence on the diagnosis and management of silent cerebrovascular disease to prevent stroke, the Stroke Council of the American Heart Association convened a writing committee to evaluate existing evidence, to discuss clinical considerations, and to offer suggestions for future research on stroke prevention in patients with 3 cardinal manifestations of silent cerebrovascular disease: silent brain infarcts, magnetic resonance imaging white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin, and cerebral microbleeds. The writing committee found strong evidence that silent cerebrovascular disease is a common problem of aging and that silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are associated with future symptomatic stroke risk independently of other vascular risk factors. In patients with cerebral microbleeds, there was evidence of a modestly increased risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in patients treated with thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke but little prospective evidence on the risk of symptomatic hemorrhage in patients on anticoagulation. There were no randomized controlled trials targeted specifically to participants with silent cerebrovascular disease to prevent stroke. Primary stroke prevention is indicated in patients with silent brain infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, or microbleeds. Adoption of standard terms and definitions for silent cerebrovascular disease, as provided by prior American Heart Association/American Stroke Association statements and by a consensus group, may facilitate diagnosis and communication of findings from radiologists to clinicians. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Statin treatment prevents increased cardiovascular and all-cause mortality associated with clarithromycin in patients with stable coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gorm B; Hilden, Jørgen; Als-Nielsen, Bodil

    2010-01-01

    In the CLARICOR trial, significantly increased cardiovascular (CV) and all-cause mortality in stable patients with coronary heart disease were observed after a short course of clarithromycin. We report on the impact of statin treatment at entry on the CV and all-cause mortality. The multicenter...... CLARICOR trial randomized patients to oral clarithromycin (500 mg daily; n = 2172) versus matching placebo (daily; n = 2201) for 2 weeks. Patients were followed through public databases. In the 41% patients on statin treatment at entry, no significant effect of clarithromycin was observed on CV (hazard.......0003; statin-clarithromycin interaction P = 0.0029) and all-cause mortality (HR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.05-1.67; P = 0.016; statin-clarithromycin interaction P = 0.41). Multivariate analysis and 6-year follow up confirmed these results. Concomitant statin treatment in stable patients with coronary heart disease...

  9. Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention Updated:May 8, ... possibility of heart and coronary artery involvement makes Kawasaki disease unpredictable, but these problems usually are not ...

  10. Telomere length, risk of coronary heart disease, and statin treatment in the West of Scotland Primary Prevention Study: a nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouilette, Scott W; Moore, Jasbir S; McMahon, Alex D; Thompson, John R; Ford, Ian; Shepherd, James; Packard, Chris J; Samani, Nilesh J

    2007-01-13

    Inter-individual differences in biological ageing could affect susceptibility to coronary heart disease. Our aim was to determine whether mean leucocyte telomere length is a predictor of the development of coronary heart disease. We compared telomere lengths at recruitment in 484 individuals in the West of Scotland Primary Prevention Study (WOSCOPS) who went on to develop coronary heart disease events with those from 1058 matched controls who remained event free. We also investigated whether there was any association between telomere length and observed clinical benefit of statin treatment in WOSCOPS. Mean telomere length decreased with age by 9% per decade (95% CI 3.6-14.1; p=0.001) in controls; much the same trend was seen in cases (-5.9% per decade, -3.1 to 14.1; p=0.1902). Individuals in the middle and the lowest tertiles of telomere length were more at risk of developing a coronary heart disease event than were individuals in the highest tertile (odds ratio [OR] for coronary heart disease: 1.51, 95% CI 1.15-1.98; p=0.0029 in the middle tertile; 1.44, 1.10-1.90, p=0.0090 in the lowest). In placebo-treated patients, the risk of coronary heart disease was almost double in those in the lower two tertiles of telomere length compared with those in the highest tertile (1.93, 1.33-2.80, p=0.0005 in the middle tertile; 1.94, 1.33-2.84, p=0.0006 in the lowest). By contrast, in patients treated with pravastatin, the increased risk with shorter telomeres was substantially attenuated (1.12, 0.75-1.69, p=0.5755 in the middle tertile; 1.02, 0.68-1.52, p=0.9380 in the lowest). Mean leucocyte telomere length is a predictor of future coronary heart disease events in middle-aged, high-risk men and could identify individuals who would benefit most from statin treatment. Our findings lend support to the hypothesis that differences in biological ageing might contribute to the risk--and variability in age of onset--of coronary heart disease.

  11. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes complications - heart; Coronary artery disease - diabetes; CAD - diabetes; Cerebrovascular disease - diabetes ... People with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure and high ...

  12. Tachyarrhythmias in structural heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiès, Philippine

    2006-01-01

    Ventricular tachyarrhythmias, the major cause of sudden unexpected cardiac arrest, occur specifically in patients with structural heart disease. In general, all types of structural heart disease may lead to chronic heart failure, a severe condition with an additional high risk of atrial- and

  13. Heart Attack Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Heart Attack Coronary Artery Disease, Angina Basic Facts & Information What ... and oxygen supply; this is what causes a heart attack. If the damaged area is small, however, your ...

  14. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B

    2015-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events....... Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable....... It is difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts...

  15. Acute Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Varun; Barr, Brian; Srivastava, Mukta

    2018-02-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is a common clinical entity. Recognition of decompensated VHD is crucial to instituting appropriate workup and management. Initial evaluation focuses on hemodynamics, peripheral perfusion, volume overload, and active myocardial ischemia. Initial therapy is targeted at improving hemodynamics, fluid status, and decreasing myocardial ischemia before intervention. Echocardiography can rapidly identify VHD etiology and severity along with physical examination findings. Owing to improved survival with cardiac surgery over the past several decades, prosthetic valve dysfunction should be recognized and initial treatment understood. Mechanical circulatory support is increasingly part of clinical practice in stabilizing patients with decompensated VHD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Green, Amber, Red Delineation of Risk and Need (GARDIAN) management system: a pragmatic approach to optimizing heart health from primary prevention to chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Melinda J; Kok, Simone; Jansen, Kiki; Stewart, Simon

    2013-08-01

    A sustained epidemic of cardiovascular disease and related risk factors is a global phenomenon contributing significantly to premature deaths and costly morbidity. Preventative strategies across the full continuum of life, from a population to individual perspective, are not optimally applied. This paper describes a simple and adaptable 'traffic-light' system we have developed to systematically perform individual risk and need delineation in order to 'titrate' the intensity and frequency of healthcare intervention in a cost-effective manner. The GARDIAN (Green Amber Red Delineation of Risk and Need) system is an individual assessment of risk and need that modulates the frequency and intensity of future healthcare intervention. Individual assessment of risk and need for ongoing intervention and support is determined with reference to three domains: (1) clinical stability, (2) gold-standard management, and (3) a broader, holistic assessment of individual circumstance. This can be applied from a primary prevention, secondary prevention, or chronic disease management perspective. Our experience with applying and validating GARDIAN to titrate healthcare resources according to need has been extensive to date, with >5000 individuals profiled in a host of clinical settings. A series of clinical randomized trials will determine the impact of the GARDIAN system on important indices of healthcare utilization and health status. The GARDIAN model to delineating risk and need for varied intensity of management shows strong potential to cost effectively improve health outcomes for both individuals at risk of heart disease and those with established heart disease.

  17. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fluids and diuretics Heart failure - home monitoring Heart failure - what to ask your ... of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  18. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is vastly different to that observed in acquired heart disease. Unlike acquired HF in which pharmacological strategies are the cornerstone for protecting and improving ventricular function, ACHD-related HF relies heavily upon structural and other interventions to achieve these aims. patients with ACHD constitute a small percentage of the total adult heart transplant population (∼3%), although the number of ACHD heart transplant recipients is growing rapidly with a 40% increase over the last two decades. The worldwide experience to date has confirmed heart transplantation as an effective life-extending treatment option in carefully selected patients with ACHD with end-stage cardiac disease. Opportunities for improving outcomes in patients with ACHD-related HF include (i) earlier recognition and referral to centres with combined expertise in ACHD and HF, (ii) increased awareness of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death risk in this population, (iii) greater collaboration between HF and ACHD specialists at the time of heart transplant assessment, (iv) expert surgical planning to reduce ischaemic time and bleeding risk at the time of transplant, (v) tailored immunosuppression in the post-transplant period and (vi) development and validation of ACHD-specific risk scores to predict mortality and guide patient selection. The purpose of this article is to review current approaches to diagnosing and treating advanced HF in patients with ACHD including indications, contraindications and clinical outcomes after heart transplantation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy

  20. A systematic review of published interventions for primary and secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in rural populations of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Laura V; Peterson, Karen L; Jacobs, Jane P; Allender, Steven; Nichols, Melanie

    2016-08-27

    Rural Australians are known to experience a higher burden of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) than their metropolitan counterparts and the reasons for this appear to be highly complex and not well understood. It is not clear what interventions and prevention efforts have occurred specifically in rural Australia in terms of IHD. A summary of this evidence could have implications for future action and research in improving the health of rural communities. The aim of this study was to review all published interventions conducted in rural Australia that were aimed at the primary and/or secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in adults. Systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature published between January 1990 and December 2015. Search terms were derived from four major topics: (1) rural; (2) ischaemic heart disease; (3) Australia and; (4) intervention/prevention. Terms were adapted for six databases and three independent researchers screened results. Studies were included if the published work described an intervention focussed on the prevention or reduction of IHD or risk factors, specifically in a rural population of Australia, with outcomes specific to participants including, but not limited to, changes in diet, exercise, cholesterol or blood pressure levels. Of 791 papers identified in the search, seven studies met the inclusion criteria, and one further study was retrieved from searching reference lists of screened abstracts. Typically, excluded studies focused on cardiovascular diseases without specific reference to IHD, or presented intervention results without stratification by rurality. Larger trials that included metropolitan residents without stratification were excluded due to differences in the specific needs, characteristics and health service access challenges of rural populations. Six interventions were primary prevention studies, one was secondary prevention only and one included both primary and secondary intervention strategies. Two

  1. A systematic review of published interventions for primary and secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD in rural populations of Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura V. Alston

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rural Australians are known to experience a higher burden of ischaemic heart disease (IHD than their metropolitan counterparts and the reasons for this appear to be highly complex and not well understood. It is not clear what interventions and prevention efforts have occurred specifically in rural Australia in terms of IHD. A summary of this evidence could have implications for future action and research in improving the health of rural communities. The aim of this study was to review all published interventions conducted in rural Australia that were aimed at the primary and/or secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD in adults. Methods Systematic review of the peer-reviewed literature published between January 1990 and December 2015. Search terms were derived from four major topics: (1 rural; (2 ischaemic heart disease; (3 Australia and; (4 intervention/prevention. Terms were adapted for six databases and three independent researchers screened results. Studies were included if the published work described an intervention focussed on the prevention or reduction of IHD or risk factors, specifically in a rural population of Australia, with outcomes specific to participants including, but not limited to, changes in diet, exercise, cholesterol or blood pressure levels. Results Of 791 papers identified in the search, seven studies met the inclusion criteria, and one further study was retrieved from searching reference lists of screened abstracts. Typically, excluded studies focused on cardiovascular diseases without specific reference to IHD, or presented intervention results without stratification by rurality. Larger trials that included metropolitan residents without stratification were excluded due to differences in the specific needs, characteristics and health service access challenges of rural populations. Six interventions were primary prevention studies, one was secondary prevention only and one included both

  2. The heart: Congenital disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    The most important diagnostic requirement in congenital heart disease (CHD) is definition of cardiovascular pathoanatomy. The considerable success in operative correction of even the most complex anomalies in recent years compels ever increasing precision in preoperative demonstration of these anomalies. Early experience with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at several institutions indicated that this modality is an effective noninvasive technique for evaluation of CHD. Indeed, MRI seems to have some advantage over other techniques, including angiography, for definitive diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the heart and great arteries and veins. The absence of ionizing radiation and contrast medium in MRI is an additional advantage; the former is particularly important for children, who, up to this time, have frequently been subjected to enormous radiation burdens from multiple cineangiograms during initial diagnosis and follow-up. This chapter describes the MRI appearance of cardiovascular anatomy im the segmental fashion proposed for analysis of complex CHD. Likewise, MRI demonstration of congenital cardiovascular lesions is organized into abnormalities situated at the four segmental cardiovascular levels: great vessels, atria, ventricles, and visceroatrial relationship. The role of MRI in evaluation of complex ventricular anomalies such as single ventricle and thoracic aortic abnormalities is specifically described

  3. Nutrigenomics, the Microbiome, and Gene-Environment Interactions: New Directions in Cardiovascular Disease Research, Prevention, and Treatment: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jane F; Allayee, Hooman; Gerszten, Robert E; Ideraabdullah, Folami; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Ordovás, José M; Rimm, Eric B; Wang, Thomas J; Bennett, Brian J

    2016-06-01

    Cardiometabolic diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide and are strongly linked to both genetic and nutritional factors. The field of nutrigenomics encompasses multiple approaches aimed at understanding the effects of diet on health or disease development, including nutrigenetic studies investigating the relationship between genetic variants and diet in modulating cardiometabolic risk, as well as the effects of dietary components on multiple "omic" measures, including transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, lipidomics, epigenetic modifications, and the microbiome. Here, we describe the current state of the field of nutrigenomics with respect to cardiometabolic disease research and outline a direction for the integration of multiple omics techniques in future nutrigenomic studies aimed at understanding mechanisms and developing new therapeutic options for cardiometabolic disease treatment and prevention. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Metabolic syndrome with and without C-reactive protein as a predictor of coronary heart disease and diabetes in the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Naveed; Gaw, Allan; Scherbakova, Olga; Ford, Ian; O'Reilly, Denis St J; Haffner, Steven M; Isles, Chris; Macfarlane, Peter W; Packard, Chris J; Cobbe, Stuart M; Shepherd, James

    2003-07-29

    The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) recently proposed a simple definition for metabolic syndrome. Information on the prospective association of this definition for coronary heart disease (CHD) and type 2 diabetes is currently limited. We used a modified NCEP definition with body mass index in place of waist circumference. Baseline assessments in the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study were available for 6447 men to predict CHD risk and for 5974 men to predict incident diabetes over 4.9 years of follow-up. Mean LDL cholesterol was similar but C-reactive protein was higher (Pdiseases.

  5. Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  6. Valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carabello, B.; Crawford, F.

    1998-01-01

    The predicts of the patients with valvular heart disease it has improved substantially in the last 15 years.A better understanding of the appropriate programming of the surgery it is one of the key reasons .In general the surgery for the illness valvular stenosis it can take a long time until the appearance of the symptoms. Probably that in the future it progresses toward a conservation of the native valves in the patient.It will be beneficial because the valves modern prosthetic even have inherent risks .The aortic stenosis acquired it will follow requiring a valve prosthetic substitution .But the valvular disease it will be treated every time but by means of procedures that keep the native valves.They include the lung autograft for the aortic stenosis ,The balloonla commissurectomy with ball for the mitral stenosis ,the aortic valvular repair for aortic inadequacy .This procedures will make that the surgery is but attractive eliminating the risks associated with the prosthetics.The continuous advances in the valuation non invasive of the aortic and mitral valves, the of the appropriate selection moment for the derivation for surgical treatment, the improves of the surgical techniques for the valvular substitution and reconstruction and the very recent advances in less aggressive surgical focuses they should combine to improve the patients' perspectives with cardiopatia valvular [es

  7. Effects of secondary prevention clinics on health status in patients with coronary heart disease: 4 year follow-up of a randomized trial in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Peter; Campbell, Neil C; Ritchie, Lewis D; Deans, H George; Thain, Joan

    2004-10-01

    The long-term effects of disease management programmes for coronary heart disease on health status are unknown. In a randomized trial of nurse-led secondary prevention clinics, we found significantly improved health status at 1 year. Participants were followed-up again at 4 years to determine if improvements had been sustained. Our aim was to evaluate the effects on health of nurse-led clinics for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in primary care. A total of 1343 patients with coronary heart disease were randomized to nurse-led secondary prevention clinics or usual care, with follow-up at 1 and 4 years by review of medical case notes and national data sets, and postal questionnaires. The study involved a stratified, random sample of 19 general practices in north-east Scotland. Health status was measured by the SF-36 questionnaire, chest pain by the angina TyPE specification and anxiety and depression by the hospital anxiety and depression scale. At 1 year, there were significant improvements in five of eight SF-36 domains (all functioning scales, pain and general health) in patients randomized to clinics. Role limitations attributed to physical problems improved the most [adjusted difference 8.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.16-12.9]. At 4 years, the intervention group scored higher than control in all domains, but differences were no longer significant. At 1 year, fewer patients in the intervention group reported worsening chest pain (odds ratio 0.59, 95% C1 0.37-0.94). At 4 years, there were no significant differences between the proportion of intervention or control group patients who reported chest pain in the last week or who reported worsening chest pain. No significant effects were observed on anxiety or depression at 1 or 4 years. We have demonstrated previously a significantly greater survival in attendees at nurse-led secondary prevention clinics. Despite this, improvements in health status achieved in the first year of the study were

  8. Valvular aspects of rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenyi, Boglarka; ElGuindy, Ahmed; Smith, Sidney C; Yacoub, Magdi; Holmes, David R

    2016-03-26

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease remain major global health problems. Although strategies for primary and secondary prevention are well established, their worldwide implementation is suboptimum. In patients with advanced valvular heart disease, mechanical approaches (both percutaneous and surgical) are well described and can, for selected patients, greatly improve outcomes; however, access to centres with experienced staff is very restricted in regions that have the highest prevalence of disease. Development of diagnostic strategies that can be locally and regionally provided and improve access to expert centres for more advanced disease are urgent and, as yet, unmet clinical needs. We outline current management strategies for valvular rheumatic heart disease on the basis of either strong evidence or expert consensus, and highlight areas needing future research and development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. General Concepts in Adult Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ferit Onur Mutluer; Alpay Çeliker

    2018-01-01

    Congenital heart disease in adults (adult congenital heart disease) is a growing burden for healthcare systems. While infant mortality due to congenital heart disease in the last four decades decreased by almost 3-fold, adult congenital heart disease prevalence increased by more than 2-fold in United States. Adult congenital heart disease prevalence is expected to increase steadily until 2050 in projections. Adult congenital heart disease is a multifaceted problem with many dimensions. This m...

  10. THE USE OF ATORVASTATIN FOR THE PREVENTION OF RECURRENT ATRIAL FIBRILLATION AFTER ELECTRICAL CARDIOVERSION IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Tereshchenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the effect of atorvastatin on the rate of atrial fibrillation (AF recurrence after electrical cardioversion in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD and paroxysmal AF.Material and Methods. Sixty outpatients and inpatients (aged 30-70 y.o. with IHD and paroxysmal AF were included into the open controlled randomized study immediately after the restoration of sinus rhythm by electrical cardioversion. Patients were randomized into 2 groups. Patients in Group 1 (n=30 received standard therapy recommended for maintenance of sinus rhythm in paroxysmal AF and atorvastatin (average dose 23.5±3.7 mg/day, and patients in Group 2 (n=30 had only the standard therapy. Routine blood analysis, blood chemistry (transaminases, creatine phosphokinase, creatinine, bilirubin, glucose, lipid profile, daily ECG monitoring, treatment safety evaluation were performed. AF relapse was considered as a primary endpoint.Results. Significant reduction in the rate of AF recurrence in was revealed in patients treated with atorvastatin. According to daily ECG monitoring AF relapse was recorded in 8.3 and 48% of patients in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively (p<0.001. Episodes of sinus tachycardia decreased on 52.3% (p<0.001 and 48,5% (p<0.01 in patients of the 1st and the 2 nd group, respectively.Conclusion. The addition of atorvastatin to the standard therapy for maintenance of sinus rhythm reduces effectively the rate of AF recurrence in patients with IHD and paroxysmal AF.

  11. Cyanotic congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Yoo, Shi Joon; Han, Man Chung; Hong, Chang Yee; Lee, Yung Kyoon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-12-15

    Authors analyzed 265 cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between April 1973 and August 1979. The results are as follows; 1. Among 265 cases, 178 patients were male and 87 patients were female. 240 patients were below the age of 20 and none was over 35 year. 2. The incidence of individual lesions are as follows: tetralogy of Fallot-176; double outlet right ventricle-20; pentalogy-12; trilogy-11; corrected transposition of great arteries-10; complete transposition of great arteries-8; pulmonary atresia-7; single ventricle-6; Ebstein's anomaly-5; total anomalous pulmonary venous return-4; tricuspid atresia-3; double outlet left ventricle-1; truncus arteriosus-1; hypoplastic left ventricle-1. 3. Fallot's teralogy, pentalogy and trilogy were characteristic in their simple chest and angiocardiographic manifestations, but in a few cases of tetralogy and pentalogy it was difficult to differentiate them from double outlet right ventricle or pulmonary atresia. 4. In double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries which are the pathologic spectrum resulting from abnormal conal growth, differential points were ventricular and great arterial loop patterns and their connections but it was very difficult to differentiate them from each other by single injection into one ventricle alone. 5. Ebstein's anomaly and total anomalous pulmonary venous return were so characteristic in angiocardiography was done ventriculography alone. 6. In 7 cases with double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries, selective biventriculography was done and more accurate diagnosis could be made, which was quite difficult with one ventriculography alone. In 31 cases, cineangiocardiography was done and it gave more accurate information about the type and degree of pulmonary stenosis and overriding of aorta, the origin

  12. Cyanotic congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Yoo, Shi Joon; Han, Man Chung; Hong, Chang Yee; Lee, Yung Kyoon

    1979-01-01

    Authors analyzed 265 cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between April 1973 and August 1979. The results are as follows; 1. Among 265 cases, 178 patients were male and 87 patients were female. 240 patients were below the age of 20 and none was over 35 year. 2. The incidence of individual lesions are as follows: tetralogy of Fallot-176; double outlet right ventricle-20; pentalogy-12; trilogy-11; corrected transposition of great arteries-10; complete transposition of great arteries-8; pulmonary atresia-7; single ventricle-6; Ebstein's anomaly-5; total anomalous pulmonary venous return-4; tricuspid atresia-3; double outlet left ventricle-1; truncus arteriosus-1; hypoplastic left ventricle-1. 3. Fallot's teralogy, pentalogy and trilogy were characteristic in their simple chest and angiocardiographic manifestations, but in a few cases of tetralogy and pentalogy it was difficult to differentiate them from double outlet right ventricle or pulmonary atresia. 4. In double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries which are the pathologic spectrum resulting from abnormal conal growth, differential points were ventricular and great arterial loop patterns and their connections but it was very difficult to differentiate them from each other by single injection into one ventricle alone. 5. Ebstein's anomaly and total anomalous pulmonary venous return were so characteristic in angiocardiography was done ventriculography alone. 6. In 7 cases with double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries, selective biventriculography was done and more accurate diagnosis could be made, which was quite difficult with one ventriculography alone. In 31 cases, cineangiocardiography was done and it gave more accurate information about the type and degree of pulmonary stenosis and overriding of aorta, the origin of great

  13. Treatment-resistant hypertension and the incidence of cardiovascular disease and end-stage renal disease: results from the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntner, Paul; Davis, Barry R; Cushman, William C; Bangalore, Sripal; Calhoun, David A; Pressel, Sara L; Black, Henry R; Kostis, John B; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; Whelton, Paul K; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-11-01

    Apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (aTRH) is defined as uncontrolled hypertension despite the use of ≥3 antihypertensive medication classes or controlled hypertension while treated with ≥4 antihypertensive medication classes. Although a high prevalence of aTRH has been reported, few data are available on its association with cardiovascular and renal outcomes. We analyzed data on 14 684 Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) participants to determine the association between aTRH (n=1870) with coronary heart disease, stroke, all-cause mortality, heart failure, peripheral artery disease, and end-stage renal disease. We defined aTRH as blood pressure not at goal (systolic/diastolic blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg) while taking ≥3 classes of antihypertensive medication or taking ≥4 classes of antihypertensive medication with blood pressure at goal during the year 2 ALLHAT study visit (1996-2000). Use of a diuretic was not required to meet the definition of aTRH. Follow-up occurred through 2002. The multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) comparing participants with versus without aTRH were as follows: coronary heart disease (1.44 [1.18-1.76]), stroke (1.57 [1.18-2.08]), all-cause mortality (1.30 [1.11-1.52]), heart failure (1.88 [1.52-2.34]), peripheral artery disease (1.23 [0.85-1.79]), and end-stage renal disease (1.95 [1.11-3.41]). aTRH was also associated with the pooled outcomes of combined coronary heart disease (hazard ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-1.71) and combined cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-1.64). These results demonstrate that aTRH increases the risk for cardiovascular disease and end-stage renal disease. Studies are needed to identify approaches to prevent aTRH and reduce risk for adverse outcomes among individuals with aTRH. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Heart disease and intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP). Eur Heart J . ... A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, ...

  15. Travel and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... transporting smaller loads and making more trips. The engine — or in this case, your heart — has to ... to go to Johannesburg and go to a game park for the day,” Gandy said. Plane Precautions ...

  16. Anesthesia in pregnancy with heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Luthra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of pregnant women with heart disease remains challenging due to the advancement of innovations in cardiac surgery and correction of complex cardiac anomalies, and more recently, with the successful performance of heart transplants, cardiac diseases are not only likely to coexist with pregnancy, but will also increase in frequency over the years to come. In developing countries with a higher prevalence of rheumatic fever, cardiac disease may complicate as many as 5.9% of pregnancies with a high incidence of maternal death. Since many of these deaths occur during or immediately following parturition, heart disease is of special importance to the anesthesiologist. This importance arises from the fact that drugs used for preventing or relieving pain during labor and delivery exert a major influence – for better or for worse – on the prognosis of the mother and newborn. Properly administered anesthesia and analgesia can contribute to the reduction of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity.

  17. Anticoagulation in ischaemic heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    De Cristofaro, R

    2006-01-01

    Although treatments with oral anti‐vitamin K agents have become more refined and safer over the years, physicians are reluctant to prescribe these agents for fear they will cause bleeding, particular in patients with ischaemic heart disease

  18. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mortality statistics found in the Heart Disease & Stroke Statistics Update . Because mortality is considered "hard" data, it's possible to do time-trend analysis and compute percent changes over time. What are ...

  19. Acute heart failure: Epidemiology, risk factors, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmakis, Dimitrios; Parissis, John; Lekakis, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-03-01

    Acute heart failure represents the first cause of hospitalization in elderly persons and is the main determinant of the huge healthcare expenditure related to heart failure. Despite therapeutic advances, the prognosis of acute heart failure is poor, with in-hospital mortality ranging from 4% to 7%, 60- to 90-day mortality ranging from 7% to 11%, and 60- to 90-day rehospitalization from 25% to 30%. Several factors including cardiovascular and noncardiovascular conditions as well as patient-related and iatrogenic factors may precipitate the rapid development or deterioration of signs and symptoms of heart failure, thus leading to an acute heart failure episode that usually requires patient hospitalization. The primary prevention of acute heart failure mainly concerns the prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and heart disease, including coronary artery disease, while the secondary prevention of a new episode of decompensation requires the optimization of heart failure therapy, patient education, and the development of an effective transition and follow-up plan. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. What is killing? People's knowledge about coronary heart disease, attitude towards prevention and main risk reduction barriers in Ismailia, Egypt (descriptive cross-sectional study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seef, Sameh; Jeppsson, Anders; Stafström, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a public health concern everywhere, especially ischemic or coronary heart diseases (CHD) which are on top of causes list of mortality and morbidity in both genders globally. From which nearly 80% can be because of modifiable risks. In Egypt, there is a lack of studies on the knowledge of people about coronary heart diseases and its modifiable risks. So, this research reported here we designed to measure the dimensions of peoples knowledge about CHD and their attitude towards prevention, and to identify the main risk reduction barriers. By using comprehensive cross-sectional, descriptive research design, all adult individuals attending the family health clinic at Suez Canal University Hospital were eligible for inclusion with total number 125 participants. An interview questionnaire designed and used to collect data. The study revealed that (10.4%) of participants had a history of CHD, and (7.2%) had a family history of CHD. 79.2% Had a satisfactory total knowledge about CHD, and (94.4%) had a positive total attitude towards prevention. Risk reduction barriers as a medical setting barriers were (24%), patient related barriers were (22.4%). Community-societal barriers were almost the same as knowledge barriers which were around (16%). At last the systemic-organizational barriers were (9.6%). The findings settled that, total knowledge about CHD was satisfactory but lower than the level total of attitude. More effort the health system needs to improve the settings and engage patients in their plans and breaking related barriers, with development of health education programs based on needs assessment. Further studies we recommend to explore the reasons and follow up the changes.

  1. Prophylactic levosimendan for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome and mortality in paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Johanna; Rücker, Gerta; Stiller, Brigitte

    2017-08-02

    Low cardiac output syndrome remains a serious complication, and accounts for substantial morbidity and mortality in the postoperative course of paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. Standard prophylactic and therapeutic strategies for low cardiac output syndrome are based mainly on catecholamines, which are effective drugs, but have considerable side effects. Levosimendan, a calcium sensitiser, enhances the myocardial function by generating more energy-efficient myocardial contractility than achieved via adrenergic stimulation with catecholamines. Thus potentially, levosimendan is a beneficial alternative to standard medication for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome in paediatric patients after open heart surgery. To review the efficacy and safety of the postoperative prophylactic use of levosimendan for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome and mortality in paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. We identified trials via systematic searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and Web of Science, as well as clinical trial registries, in June 2016. Reference lists from primary studies and review articles were checked for additional references. We only included randomised controlled trials (RCT) in our analysis that compared prophylactic levosimendan with standard medication or placebo, in infants and children up to 18 years of age, who were undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias according to a pre-defined protocol. We obtained additional information from all but one of the study authors of the included studies. We used the five GRADE considerations (study limitations, consistency of effect, imprecision, indirectness, and publication bias) to assess the quality of evidence from the studies that contributed data to the meta-analyses for the prespecified outcomes. We created a 'Summary of findings' table to

  2. [Genetics of congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Damien

    2017-06-01

    Developmental genetics of congenital heart diseases has evolved from analysis of serial slices in embryos towards molecular genetics of cardiac morphogenesis with a dynamic view of cardiac development. Genetics of congenital heart diseases has also changed from formal genetic analysis of familial recurrences or population-based analysis to screening for mutations in candidates genes identified in animal models. Close cooperation between molecular embryologists, pathologists involved in heart development and pediatric cardiologists is crucial for further increase of knowledge in the field of cardiac morphogenesis and genetics of cardiac defects. The genetic model for congenital heart disease has to be revised to favor a polygenic origin rather than a monogenic one. The main mechanism is altered genic dosage that can account for heart diseases in chromosomal anomalies as well as in point mutations in syndromic and isolated congenital heart diseases. The use of big data grouping information from cardiac development, interactions between genes and proteins, epigenetic factors such as chromatin remodeling or DNA methylation is the current source for improving our knowledge in the field and to give clues for future therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. General Concepts in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutluer, Ferit Onur; Çeliker, Alpay

    2018-01-20

    Congenital heart disease in adults (adult congenital heart disease) is a growing burden for healthcare systems. While infant mortality due to congenital heart disease in the last four decades decreased by almost 3-fold, adult congenital heart disease prevalence increased by more than 2-fold in United States. Adult congenital heart disease prevalence is expected to increase steadily until 2050 in projections. Adult congenital heart disease is a multifaceted problem with many dimensions. This manuscript aims to provide an overview of the common adult congenital heart diseases and summarize important points in management of these diseases with possible problems and complications that the patients and the physicians face.

  4. General Concepts in Adult Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferit Onur Mutluer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease in adults (adult congenital heart disease is a growing burden for healthcare systems. While infant mortality due to congenital heart disease in the last four decades decreased by almost 3-fold, adult congenital heart disease prevalence increased by more than 2-fold in United States. Adult congenital heart disease prevalence is expected to increase steadily until 2050 in projections. Adult congenital heart disease is a multifaceted problem with many dimensions. This manuscript aims to provide an overview of the common adult congenital heart diseases and summarize important points in management of these diseases with possible problems and complications that the patients and the physicians face

  5. Prevention of periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentino, Andrew R; Kassab, Moawia M; Renner, Erica J

    2005-07-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal disease prevention is to maintain the dentition over a lifetime in a state of health, comfort, and function in an aesthetically pleasing presentation. This article focuses on primary and secondary periodontal disease prevention as they relate to gingivitis and periodontitis. Risk assessment, mechanical plaque control, chemical plaque control, current clinical recommendations for optimal prevention, and future preventive strategies are discussed.

  6. Preventing Heart Attacks and Strokes: Increasing Awareness ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary: Chronic cardiovascular disease imposes a significant health and economic burden on individuals and communities. Despite decades of improvement in cardiovascular mortality, cardiovascular disease and stroke remain the leading cause of death in the U.S. and disparities in health outcomes persist. Moreover, the continuous improvement in cardiovascular mortality typical of the last four decades has ended motivating new and innovative approaches to improve population health and wellbeing. Apart from continued focus on traditional risk factor modification such as identification and treatment of high blood pressure and cholesterol, cessation of smoking, and appropriate use of evidence-based pharmacological prevention measures and disease management, other factors should be considered such as increasing physical activity, dietary sodium reduction and modification of social and environmental determinants known to cause heart attacks and stroke and exacerbate vascular disease. Such an approach will require greater cooperation among public health, environmental health, the broader public and private healthcare delivery and payment systems, and federal agencies. To introduce this concept the U.S. EPA held a workshop in September 2016 bringing together representatives of local and state public health officials, the healthcare system, educators, data analytics, and federal partners (CMS, CDC, Dept. of State and EPA) for the purpose of exploring the idea of prom

  7. A randomized multifactorial intervention study for prevention of ischaemic heart disease (Inter99): The long-term effect on physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, L.V.H.; Ladelund, S.; Borch-Johnsen, K.

    2008-01-01

    on the development in physical activity when compared with group C. This was regardless of baseline physical activity level. At 36-month follow-up there was no significant difference between groups A and B. There was no intervention effect among women. CONCLUSIONS: Only men seemed to benefit from the intervention.......AIM: To examine the effect of a randomized multiple risk factor intervention study for prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) on the development in physical activity over a 36-month period. METHODS: Two random samples (high intensity intervention, group A, n=11,708; low intensity intervention......, group B, n=1,308) were invited for a health examination, an assessment of absolute risk of developing IHD, and an individualized lifestyle intervention. The participation rate was 52.5%. High-risk persons in group A were also offered diet/physical activity and/or smoking cessation group counselling...

  8. A randomized multifactorial intervention study for prevention of ischaemic heart disease (Inter99): the long-term effect on physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Huth Smith, Lisa; Ladelund, Steen; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of a randomized multiple risk factor intervention study for prevention of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) on the development in physical activity over a 36-month period. METHODS: Two random samples (high intensity intervention, group A, n=11,708; low intensity intervention....... High-risk persons in group B were referred to their GP. High-risk persons were re-counselled after 12 and 36 months. The control group (group C, n=5,264, response rate=61.3%) answered a mailed questionnaire. Data were analysed using longitudinal linear regression models with random effects. MAIN...... OUTCOME: Change in physical activity from baseline to 12-and 36-month follow-up. RESULTS: In men, the high-intensity (group A) intervention had a beneficial effect at 12-month follow-up, whereas after 36 months both the high-intensity and the low-intensity (group B) intervention had a beneficial effect...

  9. The timing hypothesis and hormone replacement therapy: a paradigm shift in the primary prevention of coronary heart disease in women. Part 2: comparative risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodis, Howard N; Mack, Wendy J

    2013-06-01

    A major misperception concerning postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is that the associated risks are large in magnitude and unique to HRT, but over the past 10 years, sufficient data have accumulated so that the magnitude and perspective of risks associated with the primary coronary heart disease prevention therapies of statins, aspirin, and postmenopausal HRT have become more fully defined. Review of randomized controlled trials indicates that the risks of primary prevention therapies and other medications commonly used in women's health are of similar type and magnitude, with the majority of these risks categorized as rare to infrequent (risks of postmenopausal HRT are predominantly rare (risks, including breast cancer, stroke, and venous thromboembolism are common across medications and are rare, and even rarer when HRT is initiated in women younger than 60 or who are less than 10 years since menopause. In Part 1 of this series, the sex-specificity of statins and aspirin and timing of initiation of HRT as modifiers of efficacy in women were reviewed. Herein, the comparative risks of primary prevention therapies in women are discussed. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Diabetes and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Natasha; Ballegaard, Søren; Holmager, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test i) whether patients having diabetes and ischemic heart disease (IHD), i.e., patients suffering from two chronic diseases, demonstrate a higher degree of chronic stress when compared with patients suffering from IHD alone, and ii) whether suffering from the two...

  11. Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ...

  12. Coronary heart disease risk in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known coronary heart disease: findings from the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B; Sillesen, Henrik; Benavente, Oscar; Zweifler, Richard M; Callahan, Alfred; Hennerici, Michael G; Zivin, Justin A; Welch, K Michael A

    2010-03-01

    Noncoronary forms of atherosclerosis (including transient ischemic attacks or stroke of carotid origin or >50% stenosis of the carotid artery) are associated with a 10-year vascular risk of >20% and are considered as a coronary heart disease (CHD) -risk equivalent from the standpoint of lipid management. The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial included patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known CHD regardless of the presence of carotid atherosclerosis. We evaluated the risk of developing clinically recognized CHD in SPARCL patients. A total of 4731 patients (mean age, 63 years) was randomized to 80 mg/day atorvastatin placebo. The rates of major coronary event, any CHD event, and any revascularization procedure were evaluated. After 4.9 years of follow-up, the risks of a major coronary event and of any CHD end point in the placebo group were 5.1% and 8.6%, respectively. The rate of outcome of stroke decreased over time, whereas the major coronary event rate was stable. Relative to those having a large vessel-related stroke at baseline, those having a transient ischemic attack, hemorrhagic stroke, small vessel stroke, or a stroke of unknown cause had similar absolute rates for a first major coronary event and for any CHD event; transient ischemic attack, small vessel, and unknown cause groups had lower absolute revascularization procedure rates. Major coronary event, any CHD event, and any revascularization procedure rates were similarly reduced in all baseline stroke subtypes in the atorvastatin arm compared with placebo with no heterogeneity between groups. CHD risk can be substantially reduced by atorvastatin therapy in patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack regardless of stroke subtype.

  13. Self-Care for the Prevention and Management of Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Barbara; Moser, Debra K; Buck, Harleah G; Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Dunbar, Sandra B; Lee, Christopher S; Lennie, Terry A; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Mitchell, Judith E; Treat-Jacobson, Diane J; Webber, David E

    2017-08-31

    Self-care is defined as a naturalistic decision-making process addressing both the prevention and management of chronic illness, with core elements of self-care maintenance, self-care monitoring, and self-care management. In this scientific statement, we describe the importance of self-care in the American Heart Association mission and vision of building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. The evidence supporting specific self-care behaviors such as diet and exercise, barriers to self-care, and the effectiveness of self-care in improving outcomes is reviewed, as is the evidence supporting various individual, family-based, and community-based approaches to improving self-care. Although there are many nuances to the relationships between self-care and outcomes, there is strong evidence that self-care is effective in achieving the goals of the treatment plan and cannot be ignored. As such, greater emphasis should be placed on self-care in evidence-based guidelines. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  14. Prevention of diseases after menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, R A; Davis, S R; De Villiers, T J; Gompel, A; Henderson, V W; Hodis, H N; Lumsden, M A; Mack, W J; Shapiro, S; Baber, R J

    2014-10-01

    Women may expect to spend more than a third of their lives after menopause. Beginning in the sixth decade, many chronic diseases will begin to emerge, which will affect both the quality and quantity of a woman's life. Thus, the onset of menopause heralds an opportunity for prevention strategies to improve the quality of life and enhance longevity. Obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, cognitive decline, dementia and depression, and cancer are the major diseases of concern. Prevention strategies at menopause have to begin with screening and careful assessment for risk factors, which should also include molecular and genetic diagnostics, as these become available. Identification of certain risks will then allow directed therapy. Evidence-based prevention for the diseases noted above include lifestyle management, cessation of smoking, curtailing excessive alcohol consumption, a healthy diet and moderate exercise, as well as mentally stimulating activities. Although the most recent publications from the follow-up studies of the Women's Health Initiative do not recommend menopause hormonal therapy as a prevention strategy, these conclusions may not be fully valid for midlife women, on the basis of the existing data. For healthy women aged 50-59 years, estrogen therapy decreases coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality; this interpretation is entirely consistent with results from other randomized, controlled trials and observational studies. Thus. as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic disease after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered as part of the armamentarium.

  15. Role of Circulating Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Measurement in Primary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease Among Chinese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi Ho; Woo, Yu Cho; Chow, Wing Sun; Cheung, Chloe Yu Yan; Fong, Carol Ho Yi; Yuen, Michele Mae Ann; Xu, Aimin; Tse, Hung Fat; Lam, Karen Siu Ling

    2017-06-06

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) has demonstrated beneficial effects on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. In cross-sectional studies, an association of raised circulating FGF21 levels with coronary heart disease (CHD) was found in some but not all studies. Here we investigated prospectively whether baseline serum FGF21 levels could predict incident CHD in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and no known cardiovascular diseases. Baseline serum FGF21 levels were measured in 3528 Chinese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus recruited from the Hong Kong West Diabetes Registry. The role of baseline serum FGF21 levels in predicting incident CHD over a median follow-up of 3.8 years was analyzed using Cox regression analysis. Among 3528 recruited subjects without known cardiovascular diseases, 147 (4.2%) developed CHD over a mean follow-up of 4 years. Baseline serum log-transformed FGF21 levels were significantly higher in those who had incident CHD than those who did not (222.7 pg/mL [92.8-438.4] versus 151.1 pg/mL [75.6-274.6]; P 206.22 pg/mL derived from our study, independently predicted incident CHD (hazard ratio, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.10-2.19; P =0.013) and significantly improved net reclassification index and integrated discrimination improvement after adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors. We have demonstrated, for the first time, that serum FGF21 level is an independent predictor of incident CHD and might be usefully utilized as a biomarker for identifying type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects with raised CHD risk, for primary prevention. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  16. Homocysteine and coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Robert; Bennett, Derrick A; Parish, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) appreci......Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR...

  17. [Congenital Heart Diseases and Sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wippermann, Friederike; Oberhoffer, Renate; Hager, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    Daily activity is essential for children's development. Especially children with congenital heart disease do not burden adequate, even physical activity is beneficial for them. They should get used to activity and individual athletic performance. Once risks are defined or excluded in a cardiological examination, a detailed sports medical examination is recommended to give advice on individual intensity for leisure and school sports activities. By participation in sporting activities with their peers, they will benefit both physically as well as psychologically. Furthermore, children with congenital heart disease are able to experience their performance limitations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Haemochromatosis gene mutations and risk of coronary heart disease: a west of Scotland coronary prevention study (WOSCOPS) substudy

    OpenAIRE

    Gunn, I R; Maxwell, F K; Gaffney, D; McMahon, A D; Packard, C J

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To measure the frequency of genotypes of the HFE (haemochromatosis) gene in patients recruited to the west of Scotland coronary prevention study (WOSCOPS), and relate them to the subsequent occurrence of coronary clinical events.

  19. Million Hearts: Key to Collaboration to Reduce Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Extension has taught successful classes to address heart disease, yet heart disease remains the number one killer in the United States. The U.S. government's Million Hearts initiative seeks collaboration among colleges, local and state health departments, Extension and other organizations, and medical providers in imparting a consistent message…

  20. Changing Landscape of Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Berto J; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2017-03-17

    Congenital heart disease is the most frequently occurring congenital disorder affecting ≈0.8% of live births. Thanks to great efforts and technical improvements, including the development of cardiopulmonary bypass in the 1950s, large-scale repair in these patients became possible, with subsequent dramatic reduction in morbidity and mortality. The ongoing search for progress and the growing understanding of the cardiovascular system and its pathophysiology refined all aspects of care for these patients. As a consequence, survival further increased over the past decades, and a new group of patients, those who survived congenital heart disease into adulthood, emerged. However, a large range of complications raised at the horizon as arrhythmias, endocarditis, pulmonary hypertension, and heart failure, and the need for additional treatment became clear. Technical solutions were sought in perfection and creation of new surgical techniques by developing catheter-based interventions, with elimination of open heart surgery and new electronic devices enabling, for example, multisite pacing and implantation of internal cardiac defibrillators to prevent sudden death. Over time, many pharmaceutical studies were conducted, changing clinical treatment slowly toward evidence-based care, although results were often limited by low numbers and clinical heterogeneity. More attention has been given to secondary issues like sports participation, pregnancy, work, and social-related difficulties. The relevance of these issues was already recognized in the 1970s when the need for specialized centers with multidisciplinary teams was proclaimed. Finally, research has become incorporated in care. Results of intervention studies and registries increased the knowledge on epidemiology of adults with congenital heart disease and their complications during life, and at the end, several guidelines became easily accessible, guiding physicians to deliver care appropriately. Over the past decades

  1. Meal Timing and Frequency: Implications for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Ard, Jamy; Baskin, Monica L; Chiuve, Stephanie E; Johnson, Heather M; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Varady, Krista

    2017-02-28

    Eating patterns are increasingly varied. Typical breakfast, lunch, and dinner meals are difficult to distinguish because skipping meals and snacking have become more prevalent. Such eating styles can have various effects on cardiometabolic health markers, namely obesity, lipid profile, insulin resistance, and blood pressure. In this statement, we review the cardiometabolic health effects of specific eating patterns: skipping breakfast, intermittent fasting, meal frequency (number of daily eating occasions), and timing of eating occasions. Furthermore, we propose definitions for meals, snacks, and eating occasions for use in research. Finally, data suggest that irregular eating patterns appear less favorable for achieving a healthy cardiometabolic profile. Intentional eating with mindful attention to the timing and frequency of eating occasions could lead to healthier lifestyle and cardiometabolic risk factor management. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Predicting coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Fuster, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and disabling disease. Whereas risk factors are well known and constitute therapeutic targets, they are not useful for prediction of risk of future myocardial infarction, stroke, or death. Therefore, methods to identify atherosclerosis itself have bee...

  3. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAD - women; Coronary artery disease - women ... NOT smoke or use tobacco. Get plenty of exercise. Women who need to lose or keep off ... least 60 to 90 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise on most days. To maintain your health, get ...

  4. Coronary Heart Disease and Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga SAKA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease is a chronic process, of which the progression can rapidly change the functional capacity of patients. In CAD patients, the quality of life can be improved with an appropriate exercise prescription. This article explains how a safe exercise program for CAD patients can be prescribed.

  5. Chelation for Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conventional medicine , such as treating lead poisoning or iron overload. When used as a complementary treatment for heart disease, a health care provider typically administers a solution of disodium EDTA, a man-made amino acid, in a series of infusions ...

  6. Monocytes in ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The link between the immune system and ischemic heart disease has been recognized for years and great improvements have been made in understanding the role of immune cells in the context of infarct healing, atherosclerosis and arteriogenesis, using experimental and in vitro models. However, the role

  7. Heart Disease in Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... does have a bit of a penchant for racial bias where Hispanic and Latina women are concerned. And the statistics above are proof. Why? “Hispanic women think [heart disease] is something that is ‘my’ problem and they don’t want to share it ...

  8. Congenital Heart Disease and ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Risk factors for inattention, hyperactivity and impaired school performance were examined in 109 children, 5 to 10 years of age, who had undergone newborn cardiac surgery for complex congenital heart disease (CHD at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, PA.

  9. Primary prevention of coronary heart disease: integration of new data, evolving views, revised goals, and role of rosuvastatin in management. A comprehensive survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kones R

    2011-06-01

    . Hence, after all such fractional reductions are multiplied, only a modest portion of total cardiovascular risk burden is actually being eliminated, and the full potential of risk reduction remains unrealized. Worldwide the situation is similar, with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome approaching 50%. Primordial prevention, resulting from healthful lifestyle habits that do not permit the appearance of risk factors, is the preferred method to lower cardiovascular risk. Lowering the prevalence of obesity is the most urgent matter, and is pleiotropic since it affects blood pressure, lipid profiles, glucose metabolism, inflammation, and atherothrombotic disease progression. Physical activity also improves several risk factors, with the additional potential to lower heart rate. Given the current obstacles, success of primordial prevention remains uncertain. At the same time, the consequences of delay and inaction will inevitably be disastrous, and the sense of urgency mounts. Since most CHD events arise in a large subpopulation of low- to moderate-risk individuals, identifying a high proportion of those who will go on to develop events with accuracy remains unlikely. Without a refinement in risk prediction, the current model of targeting high-risk individuals for aggressive therapy may not succeed alone, especially given the rising burden of risk. Estimating cardiovascular risk over a period of 10 years, using scoring systems such as Framingham or SCORE, continues to enjoy widespread use and is recommended for all adults. Limitations in the former have been of concern, including the under- or over-estimation of risk in specific populations, a relatively short 10-year risk horizon, focus on myocardial infarction and CHD death, and exclusion of family history. Classification errors may occur in up to 37% of individuals, particularly women and the young. Several different scoring systems are discussed in this review. The use of lifetime risk is an important conceptual advance

  10. Preparing for change in the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease: a qualitative evaluation of cardiac rehabilitation within a region of Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alexander M; Barbour, Rosaline S; McIntyre, Paul D

    2002-09-01

    Secondary prevention of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is often poorly managed and its benefits attained in only a minority of those with CHD. Guidelines developed in the United Kingdom and North America suggest that in future cardiac rehabilitation programmes should provide services through individualized programmes that cater for a wide range of conditions associated with CHD. This will involve substantial and costly changes to current programmes that are mostly standardized and for postmyocardial infarction patients. Based on change theory, this study examined the dynamics, strengths and weaknesses of an existing programme in a Scottish region which was due to undergo the changes suggested by guidelines. To examine the perceived provision of secondary prevention services for CHD from the perspectives of health professionals within one region in the West of Scotland. A purposive sample of 14 health professionals (eight primary and six secondary care health professionals) was selected to cover a range of professional roles including both specialists and generalists. Separate focus group discussions (2) were held with primary care and secondary care professionals. Whilst the health professionals were enthusiastic about CHD prevention and their involvement, they perceived barriers to the success of the existing service as being complex and multifactorial, including patient, social and service-related factors. Although both groups identified motivation as the most influential personal factor, secondary care staff tended to focus on the importance of patient factors in influencing motivation to change, whereas the primary care staff referred more to the cumulative effects of social and cultural factors. Professionals highlighted weaknesses in the transition between hospital and community-based services with regard to the information flow between primary and secondary care. Although the study has immediate relevance for the local area, it highlighted issues of more

  11. [Coronary heart disease: epidemiologic-genetic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, F H

    1985-01-01

    Coronary heart disease and the risk factors which predispose to it aggregate in families. How much of this clustering of disease is "explained" by the familial resemblance in predisposing factors? The published reports which bear on this question fall into six distinct study designs: prospective studies, persons at high or low risk or persons with and without a positive family history as points of departure, case-control studies, studies of patients who had a coronary angiogram and studies in different ethnic groups. The findings of the 16 investigations reviewed suggest that there are as yet unidentified factors - genetic, environmental or both - which are responsible for familial clustering of coronary heart disease, apart from the three main risk factors (serum lipids, blood pressure, smoking) and diabetes. Future research must put greater emphasis on studies of families rather than individuals and on closer collaboration between epidemiologists and geneticists, in order to fill these gaps in knowledge. It is likely that the individual predisposition to coronary heart disease is due in part to genetic influences which remain to be discovered in the course of such studies. They would help in identifying susceptible person in the population with greater precision than is now possible. The "high-risk strategy" of coronary heart disease prevention will become more efficient as more specific and sensitive tests of disease prediction are developed. In the meantime, preventive programmes must be put into action on the basis of what is already known, on the level of both the high-risk and the community-wide mass strategy.

  12. Dietary intake of antioxidants and fats in the context of coronary heart disease prevention among elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Kolarzyk

    2018-03-01

    The majority of elderly people made mistakes in their nutrition. The enrichment in natural antioxidants of the diets of elderly people and the normalization of their fats consumption should become an important element of primary and secondary prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases

  13. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk and stress in a person's life, their health behaviors and socioeconomic status. These factors may affect established ... Syndrome • Pericarditis • Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) • Stroke • Vascular Health • Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) • Consumer Healthcare • Tools For Your Heart Health • Watch, Learn & ...

  14. Oral Administration of GW788388, an Inhibitor of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Signaling, Prevents Heart Fibrosis in Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Fabiane L.; Araújo-Jorge, Tania C.; de Souza, Elen M.; de Oliveira, Gabriel M.; Degrave, Wim M.; Feige, Jean-Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas disease induced by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection is a major cause of mortality and morbidity affecting the cardiovascular system for which presently available therapies are largely inadequate. Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFß) has been involved in several regulatory steps of T. cruzi invasion and in host tissue fibrosis. GW788388 is a new TGFß type I and type II receptor kinase inhibitor that can be orally administered. In the present work, we studied its effects in vivo during the acute phase of experimental Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Male Swiss mice were infected intraperitoneally with 104 trypomastigotes of T. cruzi (Y strain) and evaluated clinically. We found that this compound given once 3 days post infection (dpi) significantly decreased parasitemia, increased survival, improved cardiac electrical conduction as measured by PR interval in electrocardiography, and restored connexin43 expression. We could further show that cardiac fibrosis development, evaluated by collagen type I and fibronectin expression, could be inhibited by this compound. Interestingly, we further demonstrated that administration of GW788388 at the end of the acute phase (20 dpi) still significantly increased survival and decreased cardiac fibrosis (evaluated by Masson's trichrome staining and collagen type I expression), in a stage when parasite growth is no more central to this event. Conclusion/Significance This work confirms that inhibition of TGFß signaling pathway can be considered as a potential alternative strategy for the treatment of the symptomatic cardiomyopathy found in the acute and chronic phases of Chagas disease. PMID:22720109

  15. [Priorities of secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease in conditions of a depressive region: preliminary results of the North Caucasian project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, M N; Didigova, R T; Ugurchieva, Z O; Inarokova, A M

    2011-01-01

    was detection of behavioral factors, main risk factors of development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), assessment of adequacy of their management, as well as assessment of quality of life in a cohort of patients with ischemic heart disease from three republics of the North Caucasian region. A sample of patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) aged 40-69 years (n=1500) from 3 republics of the North Caucasian Federal Okrug (Ingushetia, Kabardino-Balkaria, and North Ossetia - Alania) were included in a clinico-epidemiological project. In this work we present results obtained in three towns and districts of the Republic Ingushetia (300 men and 230 women with IHD and class II-III effort angina). Socio-demographic factors, family history of CVD, disturbances of nutrition, and physical activity were assessed by standard WHO questionnaires. For assessment of anthropometric deviations we measured height, body mass, and waist circumference. With the aim of detection of hyperlipidemia and disturbances of carbohydrate metabolism we measured levels of total cholesterol and fasting glucose in venous blood. Quality of life was assessed by EQ-5D questionnaire which comprised 5 points: movement, self service, everyday activity, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression. Each forth men (24.3%) smoked, and 12% were alcohol abusers. Each forth patient had severe disturbance of nutrition. Disturbances of nutrition of medium degree were detected twice more often. Way of life was sedentary in 63% of women and 46% of men. Abdominal obesity was detected in 46% of men and 72.6% of women. Prevalence of hypercholesterolemia was 96.7% among men and 90.7% among women. Every fifth patient with IHD had diabetes, in 10% of patients diabetes was newly detected. Quality of life changed in every second IHD patient with angina because of limitation in carrying out everyday work, movement and presence of chest discomfort, this was associated with presence of anxiety/depression. Main priority of

  16. Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houyel, Lucile; To-Dumortier, Ngoc-Tram; Lepers, Yannick; Petit, Jérôme; Roussin, Régine; Ly, Mohamed; Lebret, Emmanuel; Fadel, Elie; Hörer, Jürgen; Hascoët, Sébastien

    2017-05-01

    With the advances in congenital cardiac surgery and postoperative care, an increasing number of children with complex congenital heart disease now reach adulthood. There are already more adults than children living with a congenital heart defect, including patients with complex congenital heart defects. Among these adults with congenital heart disease, a significant number will develop ventricular dysfunction over time. Heart failure accounts for 26-42% of deaths in adults with congenital heart defects. Heart transplantation, or heart-lung transplantation in Eisenmenger syndrome, then becomes the ultimate therapeutic possibility for these patients. This population is deemed to be at high risk of mortality after heart transplantation, although their long-term survival is similar to that of patients transplanted for other reasons. Indeed, heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease is often challenging, because of several potential problems: complex cardiac and vascular anatomy, multiple previous palliative and corrective surgeries, and effects on other organs (kidney, liver, lungs) of long-standing cardiac dysfunction or cyanosis, with frequent elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance. In this review, we focus on the specific problems relating to heart and heart-lung transplantation in this population, revisit the indications/contraindications, and update the long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. The effects of a cardiovascular disease prevention program on knowledge and adoption of a heart healthy lifestyle in Jordanian working adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshah, Nidal F; Bond, A Elaine; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2010-12-01

    Improving cardiac related knowledge to further healthy lifestyles is the best preventive strategy against coronary heart diseases (CHD). Previous studies revealed a critical shortage in all-around cardiac related knowledge, plus an overall shortage in adopting healthy lifestyle behaviors. To evaluate the effectiveness of an education, counseling and behavioral skill-building program in Jordanian working adults' knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about CHD and adoption of a healthy lifestyle. A non-equivalent quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention program that is based on Pender's Health Promotion Model. The Response Questionnaire and HPLP-II were used to measure subjects' knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and adoption of healthy lifestyle. One hundred six subjects completed the posttest questionnaires. Experimental group showed significantly better cardiac related knowledge, better scores for attitudes, and better scores for the health responsibility, nutritional behaviors, interpersonal relationships and total HPLP-II score. Subject's beliefs, physical activity, spiritual growth and stress management were not improved significantly. Men had better scores in beliefs and women had better scores for health responsibility. Individual commitment to healthier lifestyles should be encouraged, and researchers have to design and apply more specific interventions that are directed toward improving factors that are not significantly improved through traditional programs. Copyright © 2010 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Burden and Prevention of Adverse Cardiac Events in Patients with Concomitant Chronic Heart Failure and Coronary Artery Disease: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Louis; Khoury, Hanane; Welner, Sharon; Briere, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-06-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) or coronary artery disease (CAD) confers risk for thromboembolism and secondary adverse cardiac events (ACEs) (e.g., mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke). When HF and CAD occur concomitantly, ACE risk is reported to be elevated. We investigated ACEs, their epidemiology, and the resulting burden among patients with concomitant HF and CAD through a structured review of recent literature. Antithrombotic treatment for ACE prevention was assessed. Pertinent databases (PubMed, other) were searched for relevant articles published from January 2004 to March 2015. Data collected included ACE incidence, healthcare resource use, costs, change in quality of life attributed to ACEs, and treatment practice for prevention of ACEs in patients with concomitant HF and CAD. Mortality rates for patients with both HF and CAD ranged from 4.9-12.3% at 30 days to 13.7-86% for periods between 9.9 months and 10 years. Incidence of ACEs among HF patients with CAD is, respectively, at least 82% and 15% higher than for patients without HF or without CAD, except for stroke investigated in two studies. All-cause and HF-related hospitalization is the main driver of the economic burden in patients with HF, the majority of whom had CAD origin. Despite high prevalence of ischemic complications, there is limited evidence to support the use of warfarin-type antithrombotics among HF patients. This study confirms that patients with concomitant HF and CAD are at elevated risk for ACEs and suggests the need for effective new antithrombotic treatments to further decrease ischemic complication rates in this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease: a 10-year follow-up of a randomised controlled trial in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, E K; Murchie, P; Lee, A J; Ritchie, L D; Campbell, N C

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of nurse-led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease (CHD) in primary care on total mortality and coronary event rates after 10 years. Follow-up of a randomised controlled trial by review of national datasets. Stratified random sample of 19 general practices in northeast Scotland. Original study cohort of 1343 patients, aged coronary events (non-fatal myocardial infarctions (MIs) and coronary deaths). Mean (SD) follow-up was at 10.2 (0.19) years. No significant differences in total mortality or coronary events were found at 10 years. 254 patients in the intervention group and 277 patients in the control group had died: cumulative death rates were 38% and 41%, respectively (p = 0.177). 196 coronary events occurred in the intervention group and 195 in the control group: cumulative event rates were 29.1% and 29.1%, respectively (p = 0.994). When Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, adjusted for age, sex and general practice, was used, proportional hazard ratios were 0.88 (0.74 to 1.04) for total mortality and 0.96 (0.79 to 1.18) for coronary death or non-fatal MI. No significant differences in the distribution of cause of death classifications was found at either 4 or 10 years. After 10 years, differences between groups were no longer significant. Total mortality survival curves for the intervention and control groups had not converged, but the coronary event survival curves had. Possibly, therefore, the earlier that secondary prevention is optimised, the less likely a subsequent coronary event is to prove fatal.

  20. The contribution of qualitative research in designing a complex intervention for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in two different healthcare systems.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Corrrigan, Mairead

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Developing complex interventions for testing in randomised controlled trials is of increasing importance in healthcare planning. There is a need for careful design of interventions for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD). It has been suggested that integrating qualitative research in the development of a complex intervention may contribute to optimising its design but there is limited evidence of this in practice. This study aims to examine the contribution of qualitative research in developing a complex intervention to improve the provision and uptake of secondary prevention of CHD within primary care in two different healthcare systems. METHODS: In four general practices, one rural and one urban, in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, patients with CHD were purposively selected. Four focus groups with patients (N = 23) and four with staff (N = 29) informed the development of the intervention by exploring how it could be tailored and integrated with current secondary prevention activities for CHD in the two healthcare settings. Following an exploratory trial the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention were discussed in four focus groups (17 patients) and 10 interviews (staff). The data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Integrating qualitative research into the development of the intervention provided depth of information about the varying impact, between the two healthcare systems, of different funding and administrative arrangements, on their provision of secondary prevention and identified similar barriers of time constraints, training needs and poor patient motivation. The findings also highlighted the importance to patients of stress management, the need for which had been underestimated by the researchers. The qualitative evaluation provided depth of detail not found in evaluation questionnaires. It highlighted how the intervention needed to be more practical by minimising administration

  1. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is called a valve-in-valve procedure. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes to Treat Other Related Heart Conditions To ... your doctor may advise you to make heart-healthy lifestyle changes, such as: Heart-healthy eating Aiming for ...

  2. Bradyarrhythmias in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Steven K; Patel, Akash R; Chang, Philip M

    2017-06-01

    Bradyarrhythmias in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) comprise a complex group of arrhythmia disorders with congenital and acquired origins, highly variable long-term sequelae, and complicated treatment options. They can develop across the spectrum of CHD defects and can be encountered at all ages. Although permanent pacing is effective in treating bradyarrhythmias, it is associated with many complications and morbidity, where it is often used early in life. This section discusses the incidence and prevalence of bradyarrhythmias in the CHD population, their timing of occurrence with respect to specific disease entities and interventions, and their short- and long-term clinical sequelae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH HYPERTENSION, CORONARY HEART DISEASE, AND ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESION OF LOWER EXTREMITY ARTERIES IN THE SECONDARY PREVENTION OF COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Karlov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic lesion of lower extremity arteries frequently complicates the long-term course of hypertension and it is generally associated with coronary heart disease. Our study has attempted to evaluate the impact of combination antihypertensive therapy involving amlodipine, bisoprolol, and lisinopril on quality of life in this category of patients.

  4. QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH HYPERTENSION, CORONARY HEART DISEASE, AND ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESION OF LOWER EXTREMITY ARTERIES IN THE SECONDARY PREVENTION OF COMPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Karlov; N. A. Karlova; E. A. Zolozova; E. V. Sayutina; V. V. Chigineva

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesion of lower extremity arteries frequently complicates the long-term course of hypertension and it is generally associated with coronary heart disease. Our study has attempted to evaluate the impact of combination antihypertensive therapy involving amlodipine, bisoprolol, and lisinopril on quality of life in this category of patients.

  5. C-reactive protein as a risk factor for coronary heart disease: a systematic review and meta-analyses for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, David I; Fu, Rongwei; Freeman, Michele; Rogers, Kevin; Helfand, Mark

    2009-10-06

    C-reactive protein (CRP) may help to refine global risk assessment for coronary heart disease (CHD), particularly among persons who are at intermediate risk on the basis of traditional risk factors alone. To assist the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) in determining whether CRP should be incorporated into guidelines for CHD risk assessment. MEDLINE search of English-language articles (1966 to November 2007), supplemented by reference lists of reviews, pertinent studies, editorials, and Web sites and by expert suggestions. Prospective cohort, case-cohort, and nested case-control studies relevant to the independent predictive ability of CRP when used in intermediate-risk persons. Included studies were reviewed according to predefined criteria, and the quality of each study was rated. The validity of the body of evidence and the net benefit or harm of using CRP for CHD risk assessment were evaluated. The combined magnitude of effect was determined by meta-analysis. The body of evidence is of good quality, consistency, and applicability. For good studies that adjusted for all Framingham risk variables, the summary estimate of relative risk for incident CHD was 1.58 (95% CI, 1.37 to 1.83) for CRP levels greater than 3.0 mg/L compared with levels less than 1.0 mg/L. Analyses from 4 large cohorts were consistent in finding evidence that including CRP improves risk stratification among initially intermediate-risk persons. C-reactive protein has desirable test characteristics, and good data exist on the prevalence of elevated CRP levels in intermediate-risk persons. Limited evidence links changes in CRP level to primary prevention of CHD events. Study methods for measuring Framingham risk variables and other covariates varied. Ethnic and racial minority populations were poorly represented in most studies, limiting generalizability. Few studies directly assessed the effect of CRP on risk reclassification in intermediate-risk persons. Strong evidence indicates

  6. Relevance of genetics and genomics for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, the Stroke Council, and the Functional Genomics and Translational Biology Interdisciplinary Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Donna K; Baird, Alison E; Barkley, Ruth A; Basson, Craig T; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ganesh, Santhi K; Herrington, David M; Hong, Yuling; Jaquish, Cashell; McDermott, Deborah A; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2007-06-05

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major health problem in the United States and around the world. Evidence accumulated over decades convincingly demonstrates that family history in a parent or a sibling is associated with atherosclerotic CVD, manifested as coronary heart disease, stroke, and/or peripheral arterial disease. Although there are several mendelian disorders that contribute to CVD, most common forms of CVD are believed to be multifactorial and to result from many genes, each with a relatively small effect working alone or in combination with modifier genes and/or environmental factors. The identification and the characterization of these genes and their modifiers would enhance prediction of CVD risk and improve prevention, treatment, and quality of care. This scientific statement describes the approaches researchers are using to advance understanding of the genetic basis of CVD and details the current state of knowledge regarding the genetics of myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic CVD, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension. Current areas of interest and investigation--including gene-environment interaction, pharmacogenetics, and genetic counseling--are also discussed. The statement concludes with a list of specific recommendations intended to help incorporate usable knowledge into current clinical and public health practice, foster and guide future research, and prepare both researchers and practitioners for the changes likely to occur as molecular genetics moves from the laboratory to clinic.

  7. Employment after heart transplantation among adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Dmitry; Chou, Helen; Hayes, Don; Tobias, Joseph D; Galantowicz, Mark; McConnell, Patrick I

    2017-12-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease may require heart transplantation for end-stage heart failure. Whereas heart transplantation potentially allows adults with congenital heart disease to resume their usual activities, employment outcomes in this population are unknown. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence and predictors of work participation after heart transplantation for congenital heart disease. Retrospective review of a prospective registry. United Network for Organ Sharing registry of transplant recipients in the United States. Adult recipients of first-time heart transplantation with a primary diagnosis of congenital heart disease, performed between 2004 and 2015. None. Employment status reported by transplant centers at required follow-up intervals up to 5 y posttransplant. Among 470 patients included in the analysis (mean follow-up: 5 ± 3 y), 127 (27%) worked after transplant, 69 (15%) died before beginning or returning to work, and 274 (58%) survived until censoring, but did not participate in paid work. Multivariable competing-risks regression analysis examined characteristics associated with posttransplant employment, accounting for mortality as a competing outcome. In descriptive and multivariable analysis, pretransplant work participation was associated with a greater likelihood of posttransplant employment, while the use of Medicaid insurance at the time of transplant was associated with a significantly lower likelihood of working after transplant (subhazard ratio compared to private insurance: 0.55; 95% confidence interval: 0.32, 0.95; P = .032). Employment was rare after heart transplantation for congenital heart disease, and was significantly less common than in the broader population of adults with congenital heart disease. Differences in return to work were primarily related to pretransplant employment and the use of public insurance, rather than clinical characteristics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Primary prevention of coronary heart disease: integration of new data, evolving views, revised goals, and role of rosuvastatin in management. A comprehensive survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kones, Richard

    2011-01-01

    cardiovascular risk burden is actually being eliminated, and the full potential of risk reduction remains unrealized. Worldwide the situation is similar, with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome approaching 50%. Primordial prevention, resulting from healthful lifestyle habits that do not permit the appearance of risk factors, is the preferred method to lower cardiovascular risk. Lowering the prevalence of obesity is the most urgent matter, and is pleiotropic since it affects blood pressure, lipid profiles, glucose metabolism, inflammation, and atherothrombotic disease progression. Physical activity also improves several risk factors, with the additional potential to lower heart rate. Given the current obstacles, success of primordial prevention remains uncertain. At the same time, the consequences of delay and inaction will inevitably be disastrous, and the sense of urgency mounts. Since most CHD events arise in a large subpopulation of low- to moderate-risk individuals, identifying a high proportion of those who will go on to develop events with accuracy remains unlikely. Without a refinement in risk prediction, the current model of targeting high-risk individuals for aggressive therapy may not succeed alone, especially given the rising burden of risk. Estimating cardiovascular risk over a period of 10 years, using scoring systems such as Framingham or SCORE, continues to enjoy widespread use and is recommended for all adults. Limitations in the former have been of concern, including the under- or over-estimation of risk in specific populations, a relatively short 10-year risk horizon, focus on myocardial infarction and CHD death, and exclusion of family history. Classification errors may occur in up to 37% of individuals, particularly women and the young. Several different scoring systems are discussed in this review. The use of lifetime risk is an important conceptual advance, since ≥90% of young adults with a low 10-year risk have a lifetime risk of ≥39%; over half of

  9. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in indigenous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Andrew C; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2009-12-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease are diseases of socioeconomic disadvantage. These diseases are common in developing countries and in Indigenous populations in industrialized countries. Clinicians who work with Indigenous populations need to maintain a high index of suspicion for the potential diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever, particularly in patients presenting with joint pain. Inexpensive medicines, such as aspirin, are the mainstay of symptomatic treatment of rheumatic fever; however, antiinflammatory treatment has no effect on the long-term rate of progression or severity of chronic valvular disease. The current focus of global efforts at prevention of rheumatic heart disease is on secondary prevention (regular administration of penicillin to prevent recurrent rheumatic fever), although primary prevention (timely treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis to prevent rheumatic fever) is also important in populations in which it is feasible.

  10. Prevention of coronary heart disease in people with severe mental illnesses: a qualitative study of patient and professionals' preferences for care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazareth Irwin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with severe mental illness (SMI are at increased risk of developing coronary heart disease (CHD and there is growing emphasis on the need to monitor their physical health. However, there is little consensus on how services for the primary prevention of CHD should be organised for this patient group. We explored the views of people with SMI and health professionals from primary care and community mental health teams (CMHTs on how best to provide these services. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of patients with SMI (n = 31 and staff from primary care (n = 10 and community mental health teams (n = 25 in North Central London. Transcripts of the qualitative interviews were analysed using a 'framework' approach to identify the main themes in opinions regarding various service models. Results Cardiovascular risk factors in people with SMI were of concern to participants. However, there was some disagreement about the best way to deliver appropriate care. Although staff felt that primary care should take responsibility for risk factor screening and management, patients favoured CHD screening in their CMHT. Problems with both approaches were identified. These included a lack of familiarity in general practice with SMI and antipsychotic side effects and poor communication of physical health issues to the CMHT. Lack of knowledge regarding CHD risk factor screening and difficulties in interpreting screening results and implementing appropriate interventions exist in secondary care. Conclusion Management of physical health care for people with SMI requires complex solutions that cross the primary-secondary care interface. The views expressed by our participants suggest that neither primary nor secondary care services on their own can provide a comprehensive service for all patients. The increased risk of CHD associated with SMI and antipsychotic medications requires flexible solutions with clear

  11. When a Heart Murmur Signals Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understanding Problems and Causes Heart Murmurs and Valve Disease "Innocent" Heart Murmur Problem: Valve Stenosis - Problem: Aortic Valve Stenosis - Problem: Mitral Valve Stenosis - Problem: Tricuspid Valve Stenosis - Problem: Pulmonary Valve Stenosis Problem: Mitral ...

  12. Nutrition in neonatal congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan CT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Conall T Morgan,1 Anne Marie Shine,2 Colin J McMahon1 1Department of Pediatric Cardiology, 2Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin, Dublin, Republic of Ireland Abstract: There are 40,000 infants born in the USA with congenital heart disease annually. Achievement of adequate oral nutrition is difficult in this population. Malnutrition is common. Single ventricle physiology, the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, and cardiopulmonary bypass prevent the establishment of normal oral feeding patterns. Improved nutrition results in improved surgical outcomes, lower mortality, and shorter hospital stay. In this review, we discuss the challenges this population faces. Keywords: necrotizing enterocolitis, malnutrition, growth failure, hypoplastic left heart

  13. Profiles in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freed, M.D.; Keane, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Pediatric cardiology has made great strides in the diagnosis, management, and correction of complex congenital malformations in the past two decades. The foundation of these advances is a more precise understanding of the physiology and anatomy of complex lesions that has been obtained from cardiac catheterization and angiography. The techniques for catheterization of infants and children have been discussed in another paper. This chapter focuses on brief profiles of some of the more important congenital abnormalities. The incidence cited in the discussion of each abnormality pertains to a population comprises of children and adults referred to The Children's Hospital Medical Center and Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, respectively, for evaluation of congenital heart disease

  14. Pathogenetic relationship between coronary heart disease and osteopenic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Mykhailovskaya

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the comorbidity problem of coronary heart disease and osteoporosis is caused by the rising prevalence, lack of early detection, prevention, severe complications and significant impact on the quality of life of the patients. Aim. In order to compile and submit a current point of view on the pathogenetic relationship between the coronary heart disease and the osteopenic syndrome we reviewed specialized literature. Conclusion. We established that coronary heart disease and osteoporosis have common mechanisms of progression involving a cascade of proinflammatory cytokines, osteoprotegerin, endothelial dysfunction, estrogen, calcium deficiency, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous system.

  15. ASPIRE-2-PREVENT: a survey of lifestyle, risk factor management and cardioprotective medication in patients with coronary heart disease and people at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotseva, Kornelia; Jennings, Catriona S; Turner, Elizabeth L; Mead, Alison; Connolly, Susan; Jones, Jennifer; Bowker, Timothy J; Wood, David A

    2012-06-01

    To determine in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and people at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) whether the Joint British Societies' guidelines on CVD prevention (JBS2) are followed in everyday clinical practice. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken of medical records and patient interviews and examinations at least 6 months after the recruiting event or diagnosis using standardised instruments and a central laboratory for measurement of lipids and glucose. The ASPIRE-2-PREVENT survey was undertaken in 19 randomly selected hospitals and 19 randomly selected general practices in 12 geographical regions in England, Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland. In hospitals, 1474 consecutive patients with CHD were identified and 676 (25.6% women) were interviewed. In general practice, 943 people at high CVD risk were identified and 446 (46.5% women) were interviewed. The prevalence of risk factors in patients with CHD and high-risk individuals was, respectively: smoking 14.1%, 13.3%; obesity 38%, 50.2%; not reaching physical activity target 83.3%, 85.4%; blood pressure ≥130/80 mm Hg (patients with CHD and self-reported diabetes) or ≥140/85 mm Hg (high-risk individuals) 46.9%, 51.3%; total cholesterol ≥4 mmol/l 52.6%, 78.7%; and diabetes 17.8%, 43.8%. The potential among patients with CHD and individuals at high risk of developing CVD in the UK to achieve the JBS2 lifestyle and risk factor targets is considerable. CVD prevention needs a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach, addressing all aspects of lifestyle and risk factor management. The challenge is to engage and motivate cardiologists, physicians and other health professionals to routinely practice high quality preventive cardiology in a healthcare system which must invest in prevention.

  16. Primary prevention of coronary heart disease: integration of new data, evolving views, revised goals, and role of rosuvastatin in management. A comprehensive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kones, Richard

    2011-01-01

    cardiovascular risk burden is actually being eliminated, and the full potential of risk reduction remains unrealized. Worldwide the situation is similar, with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome approaching 50%. Primordial prevention, resulting from healthful lifestyle habits that do not permit the appearance of risk factors, is the preferred method to lower cardiovascular risk. Lowering the prevalence of obesity is the most urgent matter, and is pleiotropic since it affects blood pressure, lipid profiles, glucose metabolism, inflammation, and atherothrombotic disease progression. Physical activity also improves several risk factors, with the additional potential to lower heart rate. Given the current obstacles, success of primordial prevention remains uncertain. At the same time, the consequences of delay and inaction will inevitably be disastrous, and the sense of urgency mounts. Since most CHD events arise in a large subpopulation of low- to moderate-risk individuals, identifying a high proportion of those who will go on to develop events with accuracy remains unlikely. Without a refinement in risk prediction, the current model of targeting high-risk individuals for aggressive therapy may not succeed alone, especially given the rising burden of risk. Estimating cardiovascular risk over a period of 10 years, using scoring systems such as Framingham or SCORE, continues to enjoy widespread use and is recommended for all adults. Limitations in the former have been of concern, including the under- or over-estimation of risk in specific populations, a relatively short 10-year risk horizon, focus on myocardial infarction and CHD death, and exclusion of family history. Classification errors may occur in up to 37% of individuals, particularly women and the young. Several different scoring systems are discussed in this review. The use of lifetime risk is an important conceptual advance, since ≥90% of young adults with a low 10-year risk have a lifetime risk of ≥39%; over half of

  17. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genchi, Giuseppe; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Carocci, Alessia; Lauria, Graziantonio; Catalano, Alessia

    2017-01-12

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  18. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Genchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  19. Genetics of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jonathan J; Gelb, Bruce D

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this review is to highlight recent discoveries in the field of genetics as it relates to congenital heart disease (CHD). Recent advancements in next generation sequencing technology and tools to interpret this growing body of data have allowed us to refine our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that result in CHD. From multiple different study designs, the genetic lesions that cause CHD are increasingly being elucidated. Of the more novel findings, a forward genetic screen in mice has implicated recessive inheritance and the ciliome broadly in CHD pathogenesis. The developmental delays frequently observed in patients with CHD appear to result from mutations affecting genes that overlap heart and brain developmental regulation. A meta-analysis has provided clarity, discriminating pathologic from incidental copy number variations and defining a critical region or gene. Recent technological advances have rapidly expanded our understanding of CHD genetics, and support the applicability to the clinical domain in both sporadic and inherited disease. Though significant gaps remain, genetic lesions remain the primary explanation for CHD pathogenesis, although the precise mechanism is likely multifactorial.

  20. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Census Bureau. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Facts Heart Disease is the first and stroke ...

  1. Heart valve disease among patients with hyperprolactinemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Charlotte; Maegbaek, Merete Lund; Laurberg, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Increased risk of heart valve disease during treatment with certain dopamine agonists, such as cabergoline, has been observed in patients with Parkinson's disease. The same compound is used to treat hyperprolactinemia, but it is unknown whether this also associates with heart valve disease....

  2. The second rheumatic heart disease forum report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zühlke, Liesl J; Engel, Mark E; Remenyi, Bo; Wyber, Rosemary; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    The second rheumatic heart disease (RHD) forum was held on February 18, 2013, at the Sixth World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery in Cape Town, South Africa, to focus attention on key areas in global RHD control, management, and prevention. Building on the foundation of the first RHD forum, over 150 interested participants met to discuss critical issues on the RHD landscape. Unique to this meeting was a mixture of diverse backgrounds and disciplines, all crucially important to the conversation around RHD control and prevention. Some clear priorities have emerged for RHD activities in the next era: the necessity for political intervention and policy change; increasing the health workforce by incorporating teaching, training, and task-shifting; revitalizing the research agenda by merging basic, clinical, and translational research; and obtaining universal access to high-quality penicillin. There was also an urgent request for new resources; for existing resources to be further developed, improved, and shared across platforms; and for resources to be supported in the nonmedical arena. Finally, the necessity of involving the patient community in the ongoing discussion was highlighted. The participants of both the first and second RHD forum represent a new, thriving, and growing community of RHD activists who should usher in a new era of significant improvements in RHD control and prevention. Copyright © 2013 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Being active when you have heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regular exercise when you have heart disease is important. Exercise can make your heart muscle stronger. It may ... exercise program. You need to make sure the exercise you would like to do is safe for you. This is especially important if: You recently had a heart attack. You ...

  4. Imaging of ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipton, Martin J.; Reba, Richard C.; Bogaert, Jan; Boxt, Larry M.

    2002-01-01

    Despite advances in the understanding and treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy, characterized by extensive coronary artery disease and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, the prognosis remains poor with only a 50-60% 5-year survival rate. The composition of atherosclerotic lesions is currently regarded as being more important than the degree of stenosis in determining acute events. If imaging techniques could distinguish vulnerable from stable plaques, then high-risk patient subgroups could be identified. Another important concept is that LV dysfunction may be the result of either scarring due to necrosis or to the presence of myocardial hibernation, in which there is sufficient blood flow to sustain viable myocytes, but insufficient to maintain systolic contraction. This concept of myocardial viability is critical for making optimal clinical management decisions. This review describes how noninvasive imaging methods can be used to distinguish regions of irreversibly injured myocardium from viable but hibernating segments. Technical advances in CT and MR have made imaging of the beating heart possible. Considerable clinical progress has already been made and further cardiac applications are expected. Radiologists therefore have new opportunities for involvement in cardiac imaging but must recognize the political implications as well as the diagnostic potential of these modalities not only for the heart, but also for the whole vascular system. This review focuses on imaging myocardial injury. It compares state-of-the-art CT and MR with more established yet contemporary echocardiography and nuclear scintigraphy. (orig.)

  5. Effectiveness of two intensive treatment methods for smoking cessation and relapse prevention in patients with coronary heart disease: study protocol and baseline description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Nadine; Bolman, Catherine; Lechner, Lilian; Mudde, Aart; Verheugt, Freek W A; de Vries, Hein

    2012-05-15

    There is no more effective intervention for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease than smoking cessation. Yet, evidence about the (cost-)effectiveness of smoking cessation treatment methods for cardiac inpatients that also suit nursing practice is scarce. This protocol describes the design of a study on the (cost-)effectiveness of two intensive smoking cessation interventions for hospitalised cardiac patients as well as first results on the inclusion rates and the characteristics of the study population. An experimental study design is used in eight cardiac wards of hospitals throughout the Netherlands to assess the (cost-)effectiveness of two intensive smoking cessation counselling methods both combined with nicotine replacement therapy. Randomization is conducted at the ward level (cross-over). Baseline and follow-up measurements after six and 12 months are obtained. Upon admission to the cardiac ward, nurses assess patients' smoking behaviour, ensure a quit advice and subsequently refer patients for either telephone counselling or face-to-face counselling. The counselling interventions have a comparable structure and content but differ in provider and delivery method, and in duration. Both counselling interventions are compared with a control group receiving no additional treatment beyond the usual care. Between December 2009 and June 2011, 245 cardiac patients who smoked prior to hospitalisation were included in the usual care group, 223 in the telephone counselling group and 157 in the face-to-face counselling group. Patients are predominantly male and have a mean age of 57 years. Acute coronary syndrome is the most frequently reported admission diagnosis. The ultimate goal of the study is to assess the effects of the interventions on smoking abstinence and their cost-effectiveness. Telephone counselling is expected to be more (cost-)effective in highly motivated patients and patients with high SES, whereas face-to-face counselling is expected to be

  6. Improvement in rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease management and prevention using a health centre-based continuous quality improvement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Anna P; Fittock, Marea; Schultz, Rosalie; Thompson, Dale; Dowden, Michelle; Clemens, Tom; Parnaby, Matthew G; Clark, Michele; McDonald, Malcolm I; Edwards, Keith N; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Bailie, Ross S

    2013-12-18

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains a major health concern for Aboriginal Australians. A key component of RHD control is prevention of recurrent acute rheumatic fever (ARF) using long-term secondary prophylaxis with intramuscular benzathine penicillin (BPG). This is the most important and cost-effective step in RHD control. However, there are significant challenges to effective implementation of secondary prophylaxis programs. This project aimed to increase understanding and improve quality of RHD care through development and implementation of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) strategy. We used a CQI strategy to promote implementation of national best-practice ARF/RHD management guidelines at primary health care level in Indigenous communities of the Northern Territory (NT), Australia, 2008-2010. Participatory action research methods were employed to identify system barriers to delivery of high quality care. This entailed facilitated discussion with primary care staff aided by a system assessment tool (SAT). Participants were encouraged to develop and implement strategies to overcome identified barriers, including better record-keeping, triage systems and strategies for patient follow-up. To assess performance, clinical records were audited at baseline, then annually for two years. Key performance indicators included proportion of people receiving adequate secondary prophylaxis (≥80% of scheduled 4-weekly penicillin injections) and quality of documentation. Six health centres participated, servicing approximately 154 people with ARF/RHD. Improvements occurred in indicators of service delivery including proportion of people receiving ≥40% of their scheduled BPG (increasing from 81/116 [70%] at baseline to 84/103 [82%] in year three, p = 0.04), proportion of people reviewed by a doctor within the past two years (112/154 [73%] and 134/156 [86%], p = 0.003), and proportion of people who received influenza vaccination (57/154 [37%] to 86/156 [55%], p

  7. Update on Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Light of Recent Evidence: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Caroline S; Golden, Sherita Hill; Anderson, Cheryl; Bray, George A; Burke, Lora E; de Boer, Ian H; Deedwania, Prakash; Eckel, Robert H; Ershow, Abby G; Fradkin, Judith; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Nelson, Robert G; Patel, Mahesh J; Pignone, Michael; Quinn, Laurie; Schauer, Philip R; Selvin, Elizabeth; Vafiadis, Dorothea K

    2015-08-25

    Cardiovascular disease risk factor control as primary prevention in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus has changed substantially in the past few years. The purpose of this scientific statement is to review the current literature and key clinical trials pertaining to blood pressure and blood glucose control, cholesterol management, aspirin therapy, and lifestyle modification. We present a synthesis of the recent literature, new guidelines, and clinical targets, including screening for kidney and subclinical cardiovascular disease for the contemporary management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Ischemic heart disease in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Kellan E; Geraci, Stephen A

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women. Although overall mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD) has decreased, there are subsets of patients, particularly young women, in whom the mortality rate has increased. Underlying sex differences in CHD may be an explanation. Women have more frequent symptoms, more ischemia, and higher mortality than men, but less obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Despite this, traditional risk factor assessment has been ineffective in risk stratifying women, prompting the emergence of novel markers and prediction scores to identify a population at risk. Sex differences in manifestations and the pathophysiology of CHD also have led to differences in the selection of diagnostic testing and treatment options for women, having profound effects on outcomes. The frequent finding of nonobstructive CAD in women with ischemia suggests microvascular dysfunction as an underlying cause; therefore, coronary reactivity and endothelial function testing may add to diagnostic accuracy in female patients. In spite of evidence that women benefit from the same therapies as men, they continue to receive less-aggressive therapy, which is reflected in higher healthcare resource utilization and adverse outcomes. More sex-specific research is needed in the area of symptomatic nonobstructive CAD to define the optimal therapeutic approach.

  9. Radioisotope heart examination during exercise to diagnose ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farsky, S.

    1986-01-01

    The radioisotope exercise test is discussed and its benefits characterized for the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, namely the use of 99m Tc in scintiscanning heart ventricles and of 201 Tl in scintiscanning myocardial perfusion. The exercise ventricular function and perfusion scintigraphies are compared with the common exercise ECG examination, and their superior sensitivity and specificity emphasized. Considering the constraints of scintigraphic imaging, indications are outlined for patients including those with suspect serious ischemic heart disease in whom the exercise ECG test has been negative or inconclusive, patients with the so-called nondiagnostic ECG, patients with atypical symptoms, and healthy individuals for whom the exercise ECG test indicated with respect to their occupation has been positive. Both radionuclide imaging techniques are complementary and are shown to be valuable not only in improving the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease but also in identifying the high-risk patients in whom cardiac surgery is to be considered. (L.O.)

  10. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Diseases Resources Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... important step in staying healthy. If you have cardiovascular disease, talk with your doctor about getting your vaccinations ...

  11. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Valves Sometimes heart valves can’t be repaired and must be replaced. This surgery involves removing the faulty valve and replacing it with a man-made or biological valve. Biological valves are made ...

  12. ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC DIAGNOSTICS OF CARCINOID HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Ravnik

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Carcinoid heart disease is a rare heart disease which affects endocard and heart valves on the right side of heart. It affects only patients with manifested carcinoid syndrome, which is thought to be the consequence of secretory active metastases of carcinoid tumour. The carcinoid endocardial plaques cause structural changes of tricuspid and pulmonic valve and later on their stenosis and/or insufficiency.Patients and methods. In this article we introduce a carcinoid valve heart disease (CVHD scoring system for easier end exact echocardiographic diagnostics. Four echocardiographic parameters are beeing estimated: structural changes of tricuspid valve, tricuspid valve regurgitation, stenosis of pulmonic valve and pulmonic valve regurgitation.Conclusions. The scoring system allows us to make an early diagnosis and evaluation of progression of carcinoid heart disease, which is very important for planning the treatment process. Our experiences confirm the usefulness of this scoring system in echocardiographic follow–up of patients with carcinoid syndrome.

  13. Imaging of Heart Disease in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailor, Tina D; Kicska, Gregory A; Jacobs, Jill E; Pampaloni, Miguel H; Litmanovich, Diana E; Reddy, Gautham P

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the number one cause of death of women in the United States, accounting for over a quarter of a million annual female deaths. Evidence within the last several decades supports sex-specific differences in the prevalence, symptoms, and prognosis of ischemic heart disease between men and women. Despite women having a lower burden of obstructive coronary artery disease compared with men, the prevalence of angina and mortality from ischemic heart disease is higher for women than men. In addition to ischemic heart disease, certain nonischemic conditions may also have sex-specific differences in clinical presentation and occurrence. With the rising utilization of noninvasive modalities for the diagnosis and management of ischemic heart disease, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with the unique considerations for imaging women with heart disease. The purpose of this review is to discuss challenges for detection of heart disease in women, examine performance of noninvasive modalities in the detection of ischemic heart disease, and discuss nonischemic cardiomyopathies unique to or prevalent in women. Considerations for cardiac imaging in pregnancy are also discussed. © RSNA, 2017.

  14. Acquired heart conditions in adults with congenital heart disease: a growing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutarel, Oktay

    2014-09-01

    The number of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing due to the great achievements in the field of paediatric cardiology, congenital heart surgery and intensive care medicine over the last decades. Mortality has shifted away from the infant and childhood period towards adulthood. As congenital heart disease patients get older, a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors is encountered similar to the general population. Consequently, the contribution of acquired morbidities, especially acquired heart conditions to patient outcome, is becoming increasingly important. Therefore, to continue the success story of the last decades in the treatment of congenital heart disease and to further improve the outcome of these patients, more attention has to be given to the prevention, detection and adequate therapy of acquired heart conditions. The aim of this review is to give an overview about acquired heart conditions that may be encountered in adults with congenital heart disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 7. Recommendations on stress management. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, J D; Barnett, P A; Linden, W; Ramsden, V; Taenzer, P

    1999-05-04

    . Individualized cognitive behavioural interventions are more likely to be effective than single-component interventions. These recommendations were reviewed by all of the sponsoring organizations and by participants in a satellite symposium of the fourth International Conference on Preventive Cardiology. They have not been clinically tested. The Canadian Hypertension Society, the Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

  16. Benefits of smoking cessation for coronary heart disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Hidayat

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD incidence increases with age and is frequently higher in the elderly.(1 Therefore prevention of CVD in the elderly through management of risk factors is important in order to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD. There are several risk factors of CVD that can be modified, such as smoking, physical activity, and unhealthy diet. Cessation of smoking is the most potent measure to prevent thousands of CVD events and death

  17. Smoking, Stress, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Leonard H.; Perkins, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on the interrelation between stressors and smoking, and on its potential impact on coronary heart disease risk beyond that due to stressors or to smoking alone. Reviews evidence supporting the stress-smoking interrelationship, its relevance to the risk of heart disease, and mechanisms explaining why smokers smoke more during stress and why…

  18. Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Mar 16, ... be life-threatening. It’s a condition known as sleep apnea, in which the person may experience pauses ...

  19. Flu and Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease includes but is not limited to coronary artery disease [heart attack or myocardial infarction, acute coronary ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  20. Valvular Disorders in Carcinoid Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    Full Text Available Abstract Carcinoid heart disease is a rare but important cause of intrinsic right heart valve disorders leading to right heart failure. Occasionally, left-sided heart valves may also be involved. The characteristic cardiac pathological findings of carcinoid heart disease are endocardial thickening as a result of fibrous deposits on the endocardium. Echocardiographic examination and right heart catheterization are very useful for the diagnosis of the lesion. If more cardiac valves are affected, multiple valve replacement should be considered. The management of the pulmonary valve lesion depends on the extent of the diseased valve, either by valvulotomy, valvectomy, or valve replacement. Percutaneous valve implantations in the pulmonary and in the inferior vena cava positions have been advocated for high-risk patients.

  1. The potential role of honey and its polyphenols in preventing heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the risk of coronary heart disease by three major actions: improving coronary vasodilatation, decreasing the ability of platelets in the blood to clot, and preventing low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) from oxidizing. In this review paper, we discussed the preventive role of polyphenols of honey against cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Chemistry, Pharmacology, and Medicinal Property of Sage (Salvia to Prevent and Cure Illnesses such as Obesity, Diabetes, Depression, Dementia, Lupus, Autism, Heart Disease, and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Hamidpour

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, sage (Salvia species have been used in traditional medicine for the relief of pain, protecting the body against oxidative stress, free radical damages, angiogenesis, inflammation, bacterial and virus infection, etc., Several studies suggest that sage species can be considered for drug development because of their reported pharmacology and therapeutic activities in many countries of Asia and Middle East, especially China and India. These studies suggest that Salvia species, in addition to treating minor common illnesses, might potentially provide novel natural treatments for the relief or cure of many serious and life-threatening diseases such as depression, dementia, obesity, diabetes, lupus, heart disease, and cancer. This article presents a comprehensive analysis of the botanical, chemical, and pharmacological aspects of sage (Saliva.

  3. Chemistry, Pharmacology, and Medicinal Property of Sage (Salvia) to Prevent and Cure Illnesses such as Obesity, Diabetes, Depression, Dementia, Lupus, Autism, Heart Disease, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidpour, Mohsen; Hamidpour, Rafie; Hamidpour, Soheila; Shahlari, Mina

    2014-04-01

    For a long time, sage (Salvia) species have been used in traditional medicine for the relief of pain, protecting the body against oxidative stress, free radical damages, angiogenesis, inflammation, bacterial and virus infection, etc., Several studies suggest that sage species can be considered for drug development because of their reported pharmacology and therapeutic activities in many countries of Asia and Middle East, especially China and India. These studies suggest that Salvia species, in addition to treating minor common illnesses, might potentially provide novel natural treatments for the relief or cure of many serious and life-threatening diseases such as depression, dementia, obesity, diabetes, lupus, heart disease, and cancer. This article presents a comprehensive analysis of the botanical, chemical, and pharmacological aspects of sage (Saliva).

  4. How Does Heart Disease Affect Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic influences and prevent or delay heart problems. Preeclampsia Preeclampsia (pre-e-KLAMP-se-ah) is a ... for a Healthy Weight Web site. Stress and Depression Research shows that getting upset or angry can ...

  5. Preattentive processing of heart cues and the perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, Petra A.; Kindt, Merel; Everaerd, Walter; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The present study was aimed at clarifying whether preattentive processing of heart cues results in biased perception of heart sensations in patients with congenital heart disease (ConHD) who are also highly trait anxious. Twenty-six patients with ConHD and 22 healthy participants categorized

  6. HealthMap: a cluster randomised trial of interactive health plans and self-management support to prevent coronary heart disease in people with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Sarity; Klassen, Karen M; McDonald, Karalyn; Millard, Tanya; Osborne, Richard H; Battersby, Malcolm W; Fairley, Christopher K; Simpson, Julie A; Lorgelly, Paula; Tonkin, Andrew; Roney, Janine; Slavin, Sean; Sterjovski, Jasminka; Brereton, Margot; Lewin, Sharon R; Crooks, Levinia; Watson, Jo; Kidd, Michael R; Williams, Irith; Elliott, Julian H

    2016-03-05

    The leading causes of morbidity and mortality for people in high-income countries living with HIV are now non-AIDS malignancies, cardiovascular disease and other non-communicable diseases associated with ageing. This protocol describes the trial of HealthMap, a model of care for people with HIV (PWHIV) that includes use of an interactive shared health record and self-management support. The aims of the HealthMap trial are to evaluate engagement of PWHIV and healthcare providers with the model, and its effectiveness for reducing coronary heart disease risk, enhancing self-management, and improving mental health and quality of life of PWHIV. The study is a two-arm cluster randomised trial involving HIV clinical sites in several states in Australia. Doctors will be randomised to the HealthMap model (immediate arm) or to proceed with usual care (deferred arm). People with HIV whose doctors are randomised to the immediate arm receive 1) new opportunities to discuss their health status and goals with their HIV doctor using a HealthMap shared health record; 2) access to their own health record from home; 3) access to health coaching delivered by telephone and online; and 4) access to a peer moderated online group chat programme. Data will be collected from participating PWHIV (n = 710) at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months and from participating doctors (n = 60) at baseline and 12 months. The control arm will be offered the HealthMap intervention at the end of the trial. The primary study outcomes, measured at 12 months, are 1) 10-year risk of non-fatal acute myocardial infarction or coronary heart disease death as estimated by a Framingham Heart Study risk equation; and 2) Positive and Active Engagement in Life Scale from the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ). The study will determine the viability and utility of a novel technology-supported model of care for maintaining the health and wellbeing of people with HIV. If shown to be effective, the HealthMap model

  7. Psychosocial factors during the first year after a coronary heart disease event in cases and referents. Secondary Prevention in Uppsala Primary Health Care Project (SUPRIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toss Henrik

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large number of studies have reported on the psychosocial risk factor pattern prior to coronary heart disease events, but few have investigated the situation during the first year after an event, and none has been controlled. We therefore performed a case-referent study in which the prevalence of a number of psychosocial factors was evaluated. Methods Three hundred and forty-six coronary heart disease male and female cases no more than 75 years of age, discharged from hospital within the past 12 months, and 1038 referents from the general population, matched to the cases by age, sex and place of living, received a postal questionnaire in which information on lifestyle, psychosocial and quality of life measures were sought. Results The cases were, as expected, on sick leave to a larger extent than the referents, reported poorer fitness, poorer perceived health, fewer leisure time activities, but unexpectedly reported better social support, and more optimistic views of the future than the referents. There were no significant case-referent differences in everyday life stress, stressful life events, vital exhaustion, depressive mood, coping or life orientation test. However, women reported less favourable situations than men regarding stressful life events affecting others, vital exhaustion, depressive mood, coping, self-esteem, sleep, and symptom reporting, and female cases reported the most unfavourable situation of all groups. Conclusion In this first controlled study of the situation during the first year after a CHD event disease and gender status both appeared to be determinants of psychological well-being, with gender status apparently the strongest. This may have implications for cardiac rehabilitation programmes.

  8. Behavior patterns and coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The relationships between two behavioral patterns, cardiac risk factors, and coronary heart disease are investigated. Risk factors used in the analysis were family history of coronary disease, smoking, cholesterol, obesity, systotic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, blood sugar, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood unit. It was found that conventional, non-behavioral pattern risk factors alone were not significantly related to coronary heart disease.

  9. Chemotherapy Side Effects: A Cause of Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A cause of heart disease? Can chemotherapy side effects increase the risk of heart disease? Answers from Timothy J. Moynihan, M.D. Chemotherapy side effects may increase the risk of heart disease, including ...

  10. Heterogeneity in national U.S. mortality trends within heart disease subgroups, 2000-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidney, Stephen; Quesenberry, Charles P; Jaffe, Marc G; Sorel, Michael; Go, Alan S; Rana, Jamal S

    2017-07-18

    The long-term downward national U.S. trend in heart disease-related mortality slowed substantially during 2011-2014 before turning upward in 2015. Examining mortality trends in the major subgroups of heart disease may provide insight into potentially more targeted and effective prevention and treatment approaches to promote favorable trajectories. We examined national trends between 2000 and 2015 in mortality attributed to major heart disease subgroups including ischemic heart disease, heart failure, and all other types of heart disease. Using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research (WONDER) data system, we determined national trends in age-standardized mortality rates attributed to ischemic heart disease, heart failure, and other heart diseases from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011, and from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2015. Annual rate of changes in mortality attributed to ischemic heart disease, heart failure, and other heart diseases for 2000-2011 and 2011-2015 were compared. Death attributed to ischemic heart disease declined from 2000 to 2015, but the rate of decline slowed from 4.96% (95% confidence interval 4.77%-5.15%) for 2000-2011 to 2.66% (2.00%-3.31%) for 2011-2015. In contrast, death attributed to heart failure and all other causes of heart disease declined from 2000 to 2011 at annual rates of 1.94% (1.77%-2.11%) and 0.64% (0.44%-0.82%) respectively, but increased from 2011 to 2015 at annual rates of 3.73% (3.21% 4.26%) and 1.89% (1.33-2.46%). Differences in 2000-2011 and 2011-2015 decline rates were statistically significant for all 3 endpoints overall, by sex, and all race/ethnicity groups except Asian/Pacific Islanders (heart failure only significant) and American Indian/Alaskan Natives. While the long-term decline in death attributed to heart disease slowed between 2011 and 2014 nationally before turning upward in 2015, heterogeneity existed in the trajectories attributed to

  11. The effect of a smartphone-based coronary heart disease prevention (SBCHDP) programme on awareness and knowledge of CHD, stress, and cardiac-related lifestyle behaviours among the working population in Singapore: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Ying; Nguyen, Hoang D; Poo, Danny Chiang Choon; Wang, Wenru

    2017-03-14

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most prevalent type of cardiac disease among adults worldwide, including those in Singapore. Most of its risk factors, such as smoking, physical inactivity and high blood pressure, are preventable. mHealth has improved in the last decade, showing promising results in chronic disease prevention and health promotion worldwide. Our aim was to develop and examine the effect of a 4-week Smartphone-Based Coronary Heart Disease Prevention (SBCHDP) programme in improving awareness and knowledge of CHD, perceived stress as well as cardiac-related lifestyle behaviours in the working population of Singapore. The smartphone app "Care4Heart" was developed as the main component of the programme. App content was reviewed and validated by a panel of experts, including two cardiologists and two experienced cardiology-trained nurses. A pilot randomised controlled trial was conducted. Eighty working people were recruited and randomised to either the intervention group (n = 40) or the control group (n = 40). The intervention group underwent a 4-week SBCHDP programme, whereas the control group were offered health promotion websites only. The participants' CHD knowledge, perceived stress and behavioural risk factors were measured at baseline and on the 4th week using the Heart Disease Fact Questionnaire-2, Perceived Stress Scale, and Behavioural Risk Factor Surveillance System. After the SBCHDP programme, participants in the intervention group had a better awareness of CHD being the second leading cause of death in Singapore (X 2   = 6.486, p = 0.039), a better overall CHD knowledge level (t = 3.171, p = 0.002), and better behaviour concerning blood cholesterol control (X 2  = 4.54, p = 0.033) than participants in the control group. This pilot study partially confirmed the positive effects of the SBCHDP programme in improving awareness and knowledge of CHD among the working population. Due to the small sample size and

  12. Coronary heart disease: dietary links and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, S; Lanzmann-Petithory, D

    2001-04-01

    For decades it has been postulated that the main environmental factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) was the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Nevertheless, confirmation of the role of SFA in CHD through intervention trials has been disappointing. It was only when the diet was enriched in n-3 fatty acids that CHD was significantly prevented, especially cardiac death. In addition to n-3 fatty acids, many other foodstuffs or nutrients such as fibers, antioxidants, folic acid, calcium and even alcohol contribute to prevent CHD. Thus the relationship between diet and CHD morbidity and mortality appears to be much more complex than formerly suspected considering as key factors only SFA, linoleic acid, cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Some of the mechanisms are briefly described, but many additional nutrients (or non nutrients) may also play an important role in the pathogenesis of CHD. Finally, as a result of the most recent epidemiologic studies the ideal diet may comprise: 8% energy from SFA, 5% from polyunsaturated fatty acids with a ratio 5/1 of linoleic/alpha-linolenic acid+longer chains n-3, oleic acid as desired, large intake of cereals, vegetables, legumes and fruits, fish twice a week, cheese and yogurt as dairy products, rapeseed and olive oils as edible fat. Without side effects, such a diet can be highly palatable, easily enjoyed by many populations and may prevent effectively and rapidly (within a few weeks or months) CHD.

  13. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazacu, A.; Ciubotaru, A.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of congenital heart disease can be attributed to major improvements in diagnosis and treatment. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the clinical management strategy of patients with congenital heart disease. The development of new cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques allows comprehensive assessment of complex cardiac anatomy and function and provides information about the long-term residual post-operative lesions and complications of surgery. It overcomes many of the limitations of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. This review evaluates the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging modality in the management of subject with congenital heart disease (CHD). (authors)

  14. What is killing? People's knowledge about coronary heart disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From which nearly 80% can be because of modifiable risks. In Egypt, there is a lack of studies on the knowledge of people about coronary heart diseases and its modifiable risks. So, this research reported here we designed to measure the dimensions of peoples knowledge about CHD and their attitude towards prevention, ...

  15. Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can't Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... white and African-American women. 5 African-American women: Are more likely than other groups to have heart disease risk factors like high blood pressure, obesity, and diabetes 6,7 May be less likely than others to receive preventive treatment including medicines to lower blood pressure and advice ...

  16. Dyslipidaemia and coronary heart disease: nature vs nurture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegele, R A

    In order to enhance health care for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), genetic markers of susceptibility could be incorporated into a formula for risk evaluation that includes traditional factors. Preventive measures could then be targeted towards 'high-risk' subjects. But can the genetic component be dissected from the environmental component in an intermediate CHD phenotype, such as plasma lipoproteins.

  17. Resistance training and predicted risk of coronary heart disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of resistance training, designed to prevent the development of coronary heart disease (CHD) based on the Framingham Risk Assessment (FRA) score. Twenty-five healthy sedentary men with low CHD risk were assigned to participate in a 16-week (three days per week) ...

  18. The changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bom, Teun; Zomer, A. Carla; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital disorder in newborns. Advances in cardiovascular medicine and surgery have enabled most patients to reach adulthood. Unfortunately, prolonged survival has been achieved at a cost, as many patients suffer late complications, of which heart

  19. Genetics Home Reference: critical congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MW, Willems PJ. Genetic factors in non-syndromic congenital heart malformations. Clin Genet. 2010 Aug;78(2):103-23. doi: 10.1111/j.1399-0004.2010.01435.x. Epub 2010 May 17. Review. Citation on ... genes in congenital heart disease. Nature. 2013 Jun 13;498(7453): ...

  20. [Emotional distress in elderly people with heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Santamaría, Emilia; Lameiras Fernández, María; González Lorenzo, Manuel; Rodríguez Castro, Yolanda

    2006-06-30

    To analyse the emotional distress associated with ageing, and its prevalence among elderly people who suffer from heart disease. Personal interviews with elderly people with and without heart problems. Interviews were conducted in public hospitals and old people's homes in the south of Galicia, Spain. The sample was made up of 130 elderly people (65 with heart problems and 65 without). The Inventory of Coping Strategies, of Halroyd and Reynolk (1984); Scheir, Caver, and Bridges Test (1984); the Life Satisfaction Scale of Diener, Emmuns, Larsen, and Griffen (1985); Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (1965); and an instrument to measure Associated Symptoms (SCL-90; Derogatis, 1975). Elderly people with heart problems experienced greater anxiety and had lower self-esteem than those without such problems. Heart patients also tended to suffer more phobic anxiety and to retreat from social interaction more. With the passing of time, heart patients over 60 showed more anxiety, irritability and psychosomatic disorders. This study clearly shows the existence of emotional distress in elderly heart patients. This makes it particularly important to conduct risk-prevention programmes, since a lot of heart disease is brought on by unhealthy conduct.

  1. Interactive Whole-Heart Segmentation in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Danielle F; Dalca, Adrian V; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J; Moghari, Mehdi H; Golland, Polina

    2015-10-01

    We present an interactive algorithm to segment the heart chambers and epicardial surfaces, including the great vessel walls, in pediatric cardiac MRI of congenital heart disease. Accurate whole-heart segmentation is necessary to create patient-specific 3D heart models for surgical planning in the presence of complex heart defects. Anatomical variability due to congenital defects precludes fully automatic atlas-based segmentation. Our interactive segmentation method exploits expert segmentations of a small set of short-axis slice regions to automatically delineate the remaining volume using patch-based segmentation. We also investigate the potential of active learning to automatically solicit user input in areas where segmentation error is likely to be high. Validation is performed on four subjects with double outlet right ventricle, a severe congenital heart defect. We show that strategies asking the user to manually segment regions of interest within short-axis slices yield higher accuracy with less user input than those querying entire short-axis slices.

  2. Data and Statistics: Women and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Summary Coverdell Program 2012-2015 State Summaries Data & Statistics Fact Sheets Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheets ... Roadmap for State Planning Other Data Resources Other Statistic Resources Grantee Information Cross-Program Information Online Tools ...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  4. Cardiac Arrhythmias In Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Khairy

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmias figure prominently among the complications encountered in the varied and diverse population of patients with congenital heart disease, and are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The incidence generally increases as the patient ages, with multifactorial predisposing features that may include congenitally malformed or displaced conduction systems, altered hemodynamics, mechanical or hypoxic stress, and residual or postoperative sequelae. The safe and effective management of arrhythmias in congenital heart disease requires a thorough appreciation for conduction system variants, arrhythmia mechanisms, underlying anatomy, and associated physiology. We, therefore, begin this review by presenting the scope of the problem, outlining therapeutic options, and summarizing congenital heart disease-related conduction system anomalies associated with disorders of the sinus node and AV conduction system. Arrhythmias encountered in common forms of congenital heart disease are subsequently discussed. In so doing, we touch upon issues related to risk stratification for sudden death, implantable cardiac devices, catheter ablation, and adjuvant surgical therapy.

  5. Job Dissatisfaction and Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Based on the psychosocial factor that life dissatisfactions may be associated with physical illnesses, this research examines the relationship between job dissatisfaction and its causal link to premature death from heart disease. (Author/RK)

  6. Comparative Assessment of the Preventive Use of Intra-Aortic Baloon Counterpulsation and Levosimendan in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease and Low Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Boboshko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to compare the efficiency of the use of intraaortic balloon counterpulsation (IABP and levosi-mendan in patients with low left ventricular ejection fraction operated on under cardiopulmonary bypass. The study included 90 patients who were randomized into three groups according to the strategy of hemodynamic support. Group A patients received IABP 24 hours before surgery. In group B, preventive IABP was combined with intraoperative levosimendan infusion. Group C patients received intraoperative levosimendan infusion only. Hemodynamics, the markers of myocardial damage and heart failure, postoperative complications and length of hospital stay were observed. The patients treated with lev-osimendan had a more stable hemodynamic profile. Troponin I level was significantly lower in Group C six hours after cardiopulmonary bypass than that in group A. Length of stay in intensive care was significantly lower in Group C. The pre-operative concentration of BNP (>360 pg/ml is a predictor of inotropic support in the postoperative period. The results of our study indicate that the use of levosimendan in high-risk patients is effective and shows the results comparable with those of intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation.

  7. [Hypothyroidism in patients with heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiskra, Jan

    Hypothyroidism is frequently found in patients with heart disease. It is a risk factor for atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease and has a direct negative effect on both the left and right ventricular functions (hypothyroidism-induced cardiomyopathy). The confirmed manifest hypothyroidism is always a reason for replacement therapy with levothyroxine; regarding patients with heart disease, we always begin treatment with a small dose and increase it gradually. The treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism in patients with heart disease is disputable and its benefits probably depend on age. At a higher age, the therapy-related risks often outweigh its benefits, so we make do with the target levels of the thyroid stimulating hormone being within the upper band of the normal range, or even slightly above it, rather than overdosing the patient. To summarize in a simplified way, the treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism in patients with heart disease is the most effective in younger individuals, mainly those aged below 65, while at a higher age > 80 years the risk usually outweighs the benefit.Key words: cardiovascular risk - hypothyroidism - ischemic heart disease - left ventricular dysfunction - right ventricular dysfunction - subclinical hypothyroidism - thyroid peroxidase antibodies.

  8. Chagas Heart Disease: Report on Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Shirani, Jamshid; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Mukherjee, Shankar; Nelson, Randin; Coyle, Christina M.; Spray, David C.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Guan, Fangxia; Prado, Cibele M.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Weiss, Louis M.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiac disease in endemic areas of Latin America. It is now being diagnosed in non-endemic areas due to immigration. Typical cardiac manifestations of Chagas disease include dilated cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, cardioembolism and stroke. Clinical and laboratory-based research to define the pathology resulting from T. cruzi infection has shed light on many of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to these manifestations. Antiparasitic treatment may not be appropriate for patients with advanced cardiac disease. Clinical management of Chagas heart disease is similar to that used for cardiomyopathies due to other processes. Cardiac transplantation has been successfully performed in a small number of patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:22293860

  9. The SPHERE Study. Secondary prevention of heart disease in general practice: protocol of a randomised controlled trial of tailored practice and patient care plans with parallel qualitative, economic and policy analyses. [ISRCTN24081411

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leathem Claire

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the SPHERE study is to design, implement and evaluate tailored practice and personal care plans to improve the process of care and objective clinical outcomes for patients with established coronary heart disease (CHD in general practice across two different health systems on the island of Ireland. CHD is a common cause of death and a significant cause of morbidity in Ireland. Secondary prevention has been recommended as a key strategy for reducing levels of CHD mortality and general practice has been highlighted as an ideal setting for secondary prevention initiatives. Current indications suggest that there is considerable room for improvement in the provision of secondary prevention for patients with established heart disease on the island of Ireland. The review literature recommends structured programmes with continued support and follow-up of patients; the provision of training, tailored to practice needs of access to evidence of effectiveness of secondary prevention; structured recall programmes that also take account of individual practice needs; and patient-centred consultations accompanied by attention to disease management guidelines. Methods SPHERE is a cluster randomised controlled trial, with practice-level randomisation to intervention and control groups, recruiting 960 patients from 48 practices in three study centres (Belfast, Dublin and Galway. Primary outcomes are blood pressure, total cholesterol, physical and mental health status (SF-12 and hospital re-admissions. The intervention takes place over two years and data is collected at baseline, one-year and two-year follow-up. Data is obtained from medical charts, consultations with practitioners, and patient postal questionnaires. The SPHERE intervention involves the implementation of a structured systematic programme of care for patients with CHD attending general practice. It is a multi-faceted intervention that has been developed to respond to

  10. The SPHERE Study. Secondary prevention of heart disease in general practice: protocol of a randomised controlled trial of tailored practice and patient care plans with parallel qualitative, economic and policy analyses. [ISRCTN24081411].

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Andrew W

    2005-07-29

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the SPHERE study is to design, implement and evaluate tailored practice and personal care plans to improve the process of care and objective clinical outcomes for patients with established coronary heart disease (CHD) in general practice across two different health systems on the island of Ireland. CHD is a common cause of death and a significant cause of morbidity in Ireland. Secondary prevention has been recommended as a key strategy for reducing levels of CHD mortality and general practice has been highlighted as an ideal setting for secondary prevention initiatives. Current indications suggest that there is considerable room for improvement in the provision of secondary prevention for patients with established heart disease on the island of Ireland. The review literature recommends structured programmes with continued support and follow-up of patients; the provision of training, tailored to practice needs of access to evidence of effectiveness of secondary prevention; structured recall programmes that also take account of individual practice needs; and patient-centred consultations accompanied by attention to disease management guidelines. METHODS: SPHERE is a cluster randomised controlled trial, with practice-level randomisation to intervention and control groups, recruiting 960 patients from 48 practices in three study centres (Belfast, Dublin and Galway). Primary outcomes are blood pressure, total cholesterol, physical and mental health status (SF-12) and hospital re-admissions. The intervention takes place over two years and data is collected at baseline, one-year and two-year follow-up. Data is obtained from medical charts, consultations with practitioners, and patient postal questionnaires. The SPHERE intervention involves the implementation of a structured systematic programme of care for patients with CHD attending general practice. It is a multi-faceted intervention that has been developed to respond to barriers and solutions to

  11. Process evaluation of a community-based program for prevention and control of non-communicable disease in a developing country: The Isfahan Healthy Heart Program, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiei, Katayoun; Kelishadi, Roya; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Abedi, Heidar Ali; Alavi, Mousa; Heidari, Kamal; Bahonar, Ahmad; Boshtam, Maryam; Zare, Karim; Sadeghi, Shahryar

    2009-02-12

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of mortality in Iran. A six-year, comprehensive, integrated community-based demonstration study entitled Isfahan Healthy Heart Program (IHHP) conducted in Iran, and it started in 2000. Evaluation and monitoring are integrated parts of this quasi-experimental trial, and consists of process, as well as short and long-term impact evaluations. This paper presents the design of the "process evaluation" for IHHP, and the results pertaining to some interventional strategies that were implemented in workplaces The process evaluation addresses the internal validity of IHHP by ascertaining the degree to which the program was implemented as intended. The IHHP process evaluation is a triangulated study conducted for all interventions at their respective venues. All interventional activities are monitored to determine why and how some are successful and sustainable, to identify mechanisms as well as barriers and facilitators of implementation. The results suggest that factory workers and managers are satisfied with the interventions. In the current study, success was mainly shaped by the organizational readiness and timing of the implementation. Integrating most of activities of the project to the existing ongoing activities of public health officers in worksites is suggested to be the most effective means of implementation of the health promoting activities in workplaces. The results of our experience may help other developing countries to plan for similar interventions.

  12. [Stress management in heart diseases, obesity, nicotine and alcohol use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterbauer, E; Anders, I; Ladurner, G; Huemer, M; Wranek, U

    2001-12-17

    Heart diseases, obesity, nicotine and alcohol abuse are all relevant stroke risk factors. Some studies refer to stress stimuli and coping strategies as modulators for stroke risk factors. This study investigated differences between stroke prevention patients with heart complaints, obesity, nicotine or alcohol abuse and stroke prevention patients without these risk factors. 5993 stroke prevention patients participated in a medical-psychological stroke risk investigation at the Christian Doppler Clinic in Salzburg. The differences in coping strategies between groups of patients with risk factors and groups without were investigated by means of multivariate analysis of covariance. Significant differences in stress coping were found for every risk factor (split by sex). Men suffering from heart diseases showed higher values in the coping strategy tendency to flee. Women with heart complaints demonstrated significantly lower values in minimising by comparison. Obese/adipose patients performed significantly higher values in the coping strategies vicarious satisfaction and aggression (men). Nicotine abusing prevention patients showed significantly higher values in drug intake and lower scores in continued thoughts. Non-smoking men furthermore reached higher values in vicarious satisfaction and non-smoking women in minimising. Persons not consuming alcohol demonstrated higher drug intake and aggression (men). Wine drinkers showed lower scores of self-pity and increased situation control attempts (women). Prevention patients with risk factors demonstrated significant differences in coping strategies in comparison to those without risk factors. Persons with heart diseases demonstrate a more defensive behaviour. The risk factors obesity, nicotine and alcohol consumption are associated with a risk factor supporting stress coping behaviour. The modification of the coping strategies drug intake and vicarious satisfaction towards a more active confrontation could probably

  13. Natriuretic peptides in common valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, Christopher D; Ray, Simon; Ng, Leong L; McCann, Gerry P

    2010-05-11

    Valvular heart disease, particularly aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation, accounts for a large proportion of cardiology practice, and their prevalence is predicted to increase. Management of the asymptomatic patient remains controversial. Biomarkers have been shown to have utility in the management of cardiovascular disease such as heart failure and acute coronary syndromes. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine the current evidence relating to natriuretic peptides as potential biomarkers in aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. The natriuretic peptides correlate with measures of disease severity and symptomatic status and also can be used to predict outcome. This review shows that natriuretic peptides have much promise as biomarkers in common valvular heart disease, but the impact of their measurement on clinical practice and outcomes needs to be further assessed in prospective studies before routine clinical use becomes a reality. Copyright 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The educational gradient in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariansen, Inger; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Igland, Jannicke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Independently of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, cognitive ability may account for some of the excess risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) associated with lower education. We aimed to assess how late adolescence cognitive ability and midlife CVD risk factors are associated...

  15. Cost-effectiveness of a stepped-care intervention to prevent major depression in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or coronary heart disease and subthreshold depression: design of a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Susan E M; Pols, Alide D; Adriaanse, Marcel C; Bosmans, Judith E; Elders, Petra J M; van Marwijk, Harm W J; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2013-05-07

    Co-morbid major depression is a significant problem among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or coronary heart disease and this negatively impacts quality of life. Subthreshold depression is the most important risk factor for the development of major depression. Given the highly significant association between depression and adverse health outcomes and the limited capacity for depression treatment in primary care, there is an urgent need for interventions that successfully prevent the transition from subthreshold depression into a major depressive disorder. Nurse led stepped-care is a promising way to accomplish this. The aim of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a nurse-led indicated stepped-care program to prevent major depression among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or coronary heart disease in primary care who also have subthreshold depressive symptoms. An economic evaluation will be conducted alongside a cluster-randomized controlled trial in approximately thirty general practices in the Netherlands. Randomization takes place at the level of participating practice nurses. We aim to include 236 participants who will either receive a nurse-led indicated stepped-care program for depressive symptoms or care as usual. The stepped-care program consists of four sequential but flexible treatment steps: 1) watchful waiting, 2) guided self-help treatment, 3) problem solving treatment and 4) referral to the general practitioner. The primary clinical outcome measure is the cumulative incidence of major depressive disorder as measured with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Secondary outcomes include severity of depressive symptoms, quality of life, anxiety and physical outcomes. Costs will be measured from a societal perspective and include health care utilization, medication and lost productivity costs. Measurements will be performed at baseline and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. The intervention being investigated is expected

  16. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Chagas Heart Disease: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Lindsey H; Singh, Gagan D; Amsterdam, Ezra A

    2015-11-01

    Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, results from infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and is a major cause of cardiac disease worldwide. Until recently, Chagas disease was confined to those areas of South and Central America where Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic. With the migration of infected individuals, however, the disease has spread, and it is estimated that 6-7 million people worldwide are infected. In the US alone, more than 7 million people from Trypanosoma cruzi-endemic countries became legal US residents by the turn of the century, resulting in a surge of Chagas disease in this country. According to preliminary estimates, the US now ranks seventh in the Western Hemisphere in number of individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, and the disease has become a major public health concern due to limited awareness in the medical community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Short Telomere Length and Ischemic Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madrid, Alexander Scheller; Rode, Line; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Short telomeres are associated with aging and have been associated with a high risk of ischemic heart disease in observational studies; however, the latter association could be due to residual confounding and/or reverse causation. We wanted to test the hypothesis that short telomeres...... are associated with high risk of ischemic heart disease using a Mendelian randomization approach free of reverse causation and of most confounding. METHODS: We genotyped 3 genetic variants in OBFC1 (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding fold containing 1), TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase), and TERC...... (telomerase RNA component), which code for proteins and RNA involved in telomere maintenance. We studied 105 055 individuals from Copenhagen; 17 235 of these individuals were diagnosed with ischemic heart disease between 1977 and 2013, and 66 618 had telomere length measured. For genetic studies, we further...

  19. Adult congenital heart disease: the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstappen, Amy; Pearson, Disty; Kovacs, Adrienne H

    2006-11-01

    This article presents the adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patient "voice" by high-lighting issues and challenges commonly identified in peer support forums but rarely addressed in the existing literature. Representative patient quotations are provided, and relevant research on patient education and psychosocial function is referenced. Issues discussed include the provision of overly pessimistic and overly optimistic prognoses, common patient misperceptions and knowledge gaps, frustrations and dangerous encounters in the medical system, and living with invisible disabilities. Patient self-perception of congenital heart disease, the gifts of congenital heart disease, and the role of patient associations are also discussed. For each issue identified, implications for the ACHD health professional are outlined and recommendations for best practices are made.

  20. Pulmonary Hypertension secondary to Left Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbach, Ghazal; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2017-09-12

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) related to left heart disease (LHD) is the most common form of PH, accounting for more than two third of all PH cases. The hemodynamic abnormalities seen in PH-LHD are complex, and there are currently minimal evidence-based recommendations for the management of PH-LHD. While it is accepted that PH in the context of left heart disease is a marker of worse prognosis, it remains unclear whether its primary treatment is beneficial or harmful. In this article, we discuss the prevalence and significance of PH in patients with heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) as well as HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), and those with valvular heart disease and provide insights into the complex pathophysiology of cardiopulmonary interrelationship in individuals with PH due to left heart disease. Furthermore, we provide a framework for diagnostic testing and an approach to optimal management of these complex patients based on current European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Genetics, Disease Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content FAQ About Genetics, Disease Prevention and Treatment Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News ...

  2. Epidemiology of congenital heart disease in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdester Cavalcante Pinto Júnior

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction:Congenital heart disease is an abnormality in the structure or cardiocirculatory function, occurring from birth, even if diagnosed later. It can result in intrauterine death in childhood or in adulthood. Accounted for 6% of infant deaths in Brazil in 2007.Objective:To estimate underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease in Brazil and its subtypes.Methods:The calculations of prevalence were performed by applying coefficients, giving them function rates for calculations of health problems. The study makes an approach between the literature and the governmental registries. It was adopted an estimate of 9: 1000 births and prevalence rates for subtypes applied to births of 2010. Estimates of births with congenital heart disease were compared with the reports to the Ministry of Health and were studied by descriptive methods with the use of rates and coefficients represented in tables.Results:The incidence in Brazil is 25,757 new cases/year, distributed in: North 2,758; Northeast 7,570; Southeast 10,112; South 3,329; and Midwest 1,987. In 2010, were reported to System of Live Birth Information of Ministry of Health 1,377 cases of babies with congenital heart disease, representing 5.3% of the estimated for Brazil. In the same period, the most common subtypes were: ventricular septal defect (7,498; atrial septal defect (4,693; persistent ductus arteriosus (2,490; pulmonary stenosis (1,431; tetralogy of Fallot (973; coarctation of the aorta (973; transposition of the great arteries (887; and aortic stenosis 630. The prevalence of congenital heart disease, for the year of 2009, was 675,495 children and adolescents and 552,092 adults.Conclusion:In Brazil, there is underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease, signaling the need for adjustments in the methodology of registration.

  3. Relationship between stress and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurd, Bushra Jawaid; Dar, Mudassir Iqbal; Shoaib, Maria; Malik, Laraib; Aijaz, Zobia; Asif, Iqra

    2014-02-01

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and accounts for 13.7% of deaths in countries like Pakistan. Its association with stress has not been well considered in our setup. Patients with coronary artery disease admitted for coronary artery bypass grafting may have a high prevalence of stress that might increase the risk of adverse outcomes. 60 patients with coronary artery disease admitted to the Civil Hospital Karachi for coronary artery bypass graft surgery from January 1 to March 31, 2012, were evaluated using a stress evaluation scale. Stress of varying degrees was found to be a significant independent risk factor in patients with coronary heart disease. Analysis of our collected sample of patients with stress showed 60% with high stress (p = 0.025) and 36.7% moderate stress (p = 0.0025). An appreciable relationship was found between stress and patient age, sex, body mass index, blood group, and the incidence of myocardial infarction. Our study found evidence of an independent causative association between psychological stress and coronary heart disease, of a similar order to the more conventional coronary heart disease risk factors.

  4. Heart to Heart: An Innovative Approach to Preventing Child Sexual Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounce of Prevention Fund.

    This pamphlet discusses the problems of child sexual abuse, and introduces the Heart to Heart program created by the Ounce of Prevention Fund in Illinois. The pamphlet begins with reflections of adolescents who were sexually abused during childhood, and presents statistical information on this issue. It also discusses the various effects of…

  5. [Dizziness in patients with heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuesen, Leif; May, Ole; Brorholt-Petersen, Jens Uffe; Christensen, Per Dahl

    2013-11-04

    In patients with heart disease, dizziness is primarily associated with syncope or pre-syncope and mandates further investigation to obtain a specific diagnosis, estimation of risk of sudden death and treatment options. After a focused history and physical examination, the cause of the problem may be determined in more than half of the patients. The reflex syncope is by far the most common form and may usually be handled by reassurance of the benign nature of the problem. Patients with syncope caused by brachy- or tachy-arrhythmia or structural or ischaemic heart disease should be referred to a cardiological department for specific diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Chronic kidney disease in congenital heart disease patients: a narrative review of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Catherine; Al-Aklabi, Mohammed; Garcia Guerra, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease have a number of risk factors for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is well known that CKD has a large negative impact on health outcomes. It is important therefore to consider that patients with congenital heart disease represent a population in whom long-term primary and secondary prevention strategies to reduce CKD occurrence and progression could be instituted and significantly change outcomes. There are currently no clear guidelines for clinicians in terms of renal assessment in the long-term follow up of patients with congenital heart disease. Consolidation of knowledge is critical for generating such guidelines, and hence is the purpose of this view. This review will summarize current knowledge related to CKD in patients with congenital heart disease, to highlight important work that has been done to date and set the stage for further investigation, development of prevention strategies, and re-evaluation of appropriate renal follow-up in patients with congenital heart disease. The literature search was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar. Current epidemiological evidence suggests that CKD occurs in patients with congenital heart disease at a higher frequency than the general population and is detectable early in follow-up (i.e. during childhood). Best evidence suggests that approximately 30 to 50 % of adult patients with congenital heart disease have significantly impaired renal function. The risk of CKD is higher with cyanotic congenital heart disease but it is also present with non-cyanotic congenital heart disease. Although significant knowledge gaps exist, the sum of the data suggests that patients with congenital heart disease should be followed from an early age for the development of CKD. There is an opportunity to mitigate CKD progression and negative renal outcomes by instituting interventions such as stringent blood pressure control and reduction of proteinuria. There is a need to

  7. The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone-system and right heart failure in congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Stine Andersen, Stine Andersen; Andersen, Asger; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik

    2017-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease represent a rapidly growing patient group. Dysfunction of the right ventricle is often present, and right heart failure constitutes the main cause of death. Heart failure therapies used in acquired left heart failure are often initiated in adults with right heart failure due to congenital heart disease, but the right ventricle differs substantially from the left ventricle, and the clinical evidence for this treatment strategy is lacking. In this review,...

  8. Vital Exhaustion and Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frestad, Daria; Prescott, Eva

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate the empiri......OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate.......22-1.85) for prospective studies, and 2.61 (95% CI = 1.66-4.10) for case-control studies using hospital controls. Risk of recurrent events in patients with CHD was 2.03 (95% CI = 1.54-2.68). The pooled adjusted risk of chronic heart failure in healthy populations was 1.37 (95% CI = 1.21-1.56), but this was based...

  9. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether...... patients with CCHD are protected against atherosclerosis. Results have shown that the coronary arteries of patients with CCHD are free from plaques and stenosis. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness and low total plasma cholesterol may indicate a reduced risk of later development of atherosclerosis....... However, the evidence is still sparse and questionable, and a reasonable explanation for the decreased risk of developing atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD is still missing.This review provides an overview of what is known about the prevalence and potential causes of the reduced risk...

  10. The polypill and the prevention of heart attacks and strokes by Caroline Telfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, David S

    2013-07-01

    David S Wald speaks to Caroline Telfer, Assistant Commissioning Editor. David S Wald is a Consultant Cardiologist and Reader in Preventive Cardiology. He trained at Oxford University (UK) and Imperial College of Science and Technology, London (UK). His work combines interventional and preventive approaches to cardiovascular disease. He is currently leading a multicenter randomized trial assessing the value of preventive angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction and a UK trial of a polypill for people over the age of 50 years for the prevention of ischemic heart disease and stroke.

  11. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Launch Programs and Activities National Wear Red Day ® Road Show Stories from the Road Road Show Photographs Lower Heart Disease Risk What is ... physical activity that's best for you. Eat less salt and sodium, saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol. ...

  12. HEART SIZE IN PRIMARY MYOCARDIAL DISEASE*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-07-10

    Jul 10, 1971 ... Heart volllme and cardia-Thoracic raTio were compared. STaTiSTically wiTh rhe haemodynamic and angiocardio- graphic paramerers measured aT cardiac caThererizaTion in. ]8 paTienis wiTh primary myocardial disease. Three paTients had mild cardiomyopaThy, 17 had classical cardiomyo- parhy, in 6 ...

  13. Employment in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Mascha; Vogels, Ton; Ottenkamp, Jaap; van der Wall, Ernst E.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S. Pauline; Vliegen, Hubert W.

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate job participation, career-related problems, and actual job problems in adults with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) compared with adults with mild CHD and reference groups. Cross-sectional study. Patients were randomly selected from the archives of the Department of Pediatric

  14. Employment in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, M.; Vogels, T.; Ottenkamp, J.; Wall, E.E. van der; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.; Vliegen, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate job participation, careerrelated problems, and actual job problems in adults with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) compared with adults with mild CHD and reference groups. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Patients were randomly selected from the archives of the

  15. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knekt, Paul; Ritz, John; Pereira, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have suggested a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) at higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain. Whether this association is due to antioxidant vitamins or some other factors remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation between the intake...

  16. The right side in congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuuring, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Life expectancy of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased dramatically during the past years, due to the successes of cardiac surgery. At present, nearly all of these children with CHD can be operated at young age and more than 90% reach adulthood. At adult age, however, many

  17. cholesterol, coronary heart disease and oestrogens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-04-03

    Apr 3, 1971 ... Present concepts of the interrelationship between oestro- gens, endogenous and exogenous, and the development of atheromatosis and coronalY heart disease in the human female are reviewed. Aspects of research conducted by me at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, are incorporated.

  18. Berlin Heart EXCOR use in patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, David L S; Zafar, Farhan; Almond, Christopher S; Canter, Charles; Fynn-Thompson, Francis; Conway, Jennifer; Adachi, Iki; Lorts, Angela

    2017-11-01

    Management of mechanical circulatory support in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) is challenging due to physiologic variations and anatomic limitations to device placement. In this study we examine the use of Berlin Heart EXCOR in CHD patients. CHD patients were identified from the EXCOR Pediatric Study data set (2007 to 2010). Mortality and serious adverse events were compared between CHD and non-CHD cohorts, and predictors of poor outcomes in the CHD cohort were identified. CHD was present in 29% (n = 59, 18 with 1-ventricle physiology) of all EXCOR patients (N = 204). Successful bridge (transplant or wean) was less likely in CHD patients compared with non-CHD patients (48% vs 80%; p 1 year) were successfully bridged. Pre-implant congenital heart surgery (CHS) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) on the same admission occurred in 60% of children ≤1 year of age (83% of neonates, 50% of infants), with 8% survival. Regardless of age, patients who did not have CHS and ECMO had 61% survival. Smaller pump, pre-implant bilirubin >1.2 mg/dl and renal dysfunction were independently associated with mortality. End-organ function at implant reliably predicts adverse outcomes and should be considered when making implant decisions. EXCOR use in neonates and infants with CHD should be approached cautiously. If patients have undergone pre-implant CHS and ECMO, EXCOR support may not provide any survival benefit. EXCOR support in non-infants with CHD is challenging but can be consistently successful with appropriate patient selection. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Autoimmune pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease: looking back, looking ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonney, Kevin M; Engman, David M

    2015-06-01

    Chagas heart disease is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in approximately one-third of individuals infected with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the discovery of T. cruzi by Carlos Chagas >100 years ago, much has been learned about Chagas disease pathogenesis; however, the outcome of T. cruzi infection is highly variable and difficult to predict. Many mechanisms have been proposed to promote tissue inflammation, but the determinants and the relative importance of each have yet to be fully elucidated. The notion that some factor other than the parasite significantly contributes to the development of myocarditis was hypothesized by the first physician-scientists who noted the conspicuous absence of parasites in the hearts of those who succumbed to Chagas disease. One of these factors-autoimmunity-has been extensively studied for more than half a century. Although questions regarding the functional role of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease remain unanswered, the development of autoimmune responses during infection clearly occurs in some individuals, and the implications that this autoimmunity may be pathogenic are significant. In this review, we summarize what is known about the pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease and conclude with a view of the future of Chagas disease diagnosis, pathogenesis, therapy, and prevention, emphasizing recent advances in these areas that aid in the management of Chagas disease. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evidence for inequalities in the management of coronary heart disease in Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, C R; Hannaford, P C; Williams, D

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether sex, age, and deprivation inequalities existed in the prescription of secondary preventive treatment for coronary heart disease (CHD) in Scottish general practice and whether these differences altered over time.

  1. Electrocardiography in Chagas' heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio A.C. Garzon

    Full Text Available Conventional ECG still plays an important role in the overall knowledge of Chagas' cardiopathy, because of its importance in longitudinal and epidemiological studies, its diagnostic value, and its utility in prognostic evaluation. The authors discuss these aspects, as well as the use of ECG in the acute phase and the significance of a normal ECG in Chagas' disease. Correlations were made between ECG and hemodynamic/angiographic variables among 1010 patients with positive laboratory tests for Chagas' disease: a in the group with normal ECG there were no significant differences between symptomatic and non-symptomatic patients with regard to ejection fraction and angiographic abnormalities; b slight abnormalities on the ECG corresponded to an intermediate level of severity of the disease, that is, between normal ECG and ECG with significant abnormalities; c fibrosis on the ECG was not predictive of akinesia in the related area on the angiography; d combined ECG abnormalities generally correlated with greater myocardial compromise compared to isolated abnormalities; e under multiple regression analysis the ECG abnormalities that independently correlated with depressed ejection fraction were: premature ventricular beats, ventricular tachycardia, left bundle branch block, atrial fibrillation, complete AV block, and anterior and inferior fibrosis. Male sex, cardiac insufficiency and cardiomegaly on the thorax radiography were also significantly related.

  2. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described.

  3. The prevention of neurogenetic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, R N; Iannaccone, S T

    1995-04-01

    A significant number of major neurogenetic diseases have been defined at the molecular level in recent years, making it possible to determine precisely the genotype for familial Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, Machado-Joseph disease, dominantly inherited ataxia, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, myotonic muscular dystrophy, Duchenne-Becker muscular dystrophy, familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and neurofibromatosis. This information has made it possible to identify the abnormal genotype of at-risk persons for these diseases and for at-risk pregnancies for several of them. Precise molecular diagnoses are thus possible using applied molecular markers. Prevention of disease can be achieved using these molecular markers with genetic counseling and appropriate family planning. Significant progress is being made in this regard with Tay-Sachs disease, Huntington's disease, the dominantly inherited ataxias, and the muscular dystrophies. Further, this molecular genotyping will be of indispensible value to families with these diseases when somatic cell gene therapy becomes available. The field of molecular neurogenetics is moving forward rapidly, and advances in gene identification for these diseases will lead in the near future to the means to prevent many of them.

  4. A vital role for complement in heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena

    2014-01-01

    fibrillation often share risk factors both with coronary heart disease and heart failure, and there is some evidence implicating complement activation in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, Chagas heart disease, a protozoal infection, is an important cause of heart failure in Latin America, and the complement...

  5. Multimodality Imaging of Heart Valve Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajani, Ronak, E-mail: Dr.R.Rajani@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Khattar, Rajdeep [Department of Cardiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Chiribiri, Amedeo [Divisions of Imaging Sciences, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Victor, Kelly; Chambers, John [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Unidentified heart valve disease is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. It has therefore become important to accurately identify, assess and monitor patients with this condition in order that appropriate and timely intervention can occur. Although echocardiography has emerged as the predominant imaging modality for this purpose, recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography indicate that they may have an important contribution to make. The current review describes the assessment of regurgitant and stenotic heart valves by multimodality imaging (echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance) and discusses their relative strengths and weaknesses.

  6. Depression and coronary heart disease: recommendations for screening, referral, and treatment: a science advisory from the American Heart Association Prevention Committee of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing, Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, and Interdisciplinary Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research: endorsed by the American Psychiatric Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtman, Judith H; Bigger, J Thomas; Blumenthal, James A; Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Kaufmann, Peter G; Lespérance, François; Mark, Daniel B; Sheps, David S; Taylor, C Barr; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2008-10-21

    Depression is commonly present in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and is independently associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Screening tests for depressive symptoms should be applied to identify patients who may require further assessment and treatment. This multispecialty consensus document reviews the evidence linking depression with CHD and provides recommendations for healthcare providers for the assessment, referral, and treatment of depression.

  7. Heart rate, heart rate variability, and arrhythmias in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD).......Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD)....

  8. Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Emmanuelle; Bailly, Minh Tam; Hatimi, Safwane El; Robard, Ingrid; Rezgui, Hatem; Bouchachi, Amir; Montani, David; Sitbon, Olivier; Chemla, Denis; Assayag, Patrick

    Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease, also known as group 2 pulmonary hypertension according to the European Society of Cardiology/European Respiratory Society classification, is the most common cause of pulmonary hypertension. In patients with left heart disease, the development of pulmonary hypertension favours right heart dysfunction, which has a major impact on disease severity and outcome. Over the past few years, this condition has been considered more frequently. However, epidemiological studies of group 2 pulmonary hypertension are less exhaustive than studies of other causes of pulmonary hypertension. In group 2 patients, pulmonary hypertension may be caused by an isolated increase in left-sided filling pressures or by a combination of this condition with increased pulmonary vascular resistance, with an abnormally high pressure gradient between arteries and pulmonary veins. A better understanding of the conditions underlying pulmonary hypertension is of key importance to establish a comprehensive diagnosis, leading to an adapted treatment to reduce heart failure morbidity and mortality. In this review, epidemiology, mechanisms and diagnostic approaches are reviewed; then, treatment options and future approaches are considered. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Uptake of a Consumer-Focused mHealth Application for the Assessment and Prevention of Heart Disease: The <30 Days Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Shivani; Morita, Plinio P; Picton, Peter; Seto, Emily; Zbib, Ahmad; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2016-03-24

    Lifestyle behavior modification can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, one of the leading causes of death worldwide, by up to 80%. We hypothesized that a dynamic risk assessment and behavior change tool delivered as a mobile app, hosted by a reputable nonprofit organization, would promote uptake among community members. We also predicted that the uptake would be influenced by incentives offered for downloading the mobile app. The primary objective of our study was to evaluate the engagement levels of participants using the novel risk management app. The secondary aim was to assess the effect of incentives on the overall uptake and usage behaviors. We publicly launched the app through the iTunes App Store and collected usage data over 5 months. Aggregate information included population-level data on download rates, use, risk factors, and user demographics. We used descriptive statistics to identify usage patterns, t tests, and analysis of variance to compare group means. Correlation and regression analyses determined the relationship between usage and demographic variables. We captured detailed mobile usage data from 69,952 users over a 5-month period, of whom 23,727 (33.92%) were registered during a 1-month AIR MILES promotion. Of those who completed the risk assessment, 73.92% (42,380/57,330) were female, and 59.38% (34,042/57,330) were 22 challenges. On average, users in the incentives group completed slightly more challenges during the first 30 days of the intervention (mean 7.9, SD 0.13) than those in the nonincentives group (mean 6.1, SD 0.06, t28870=-12.293, P<.001, d=0.12, 95% CI -2.02 to -1.47). The regression analysis suggested that sex, age group, ethnicity, having 5 of the risk factors (all but alcohol), incentives, and the number of family histories were predictors of the number of challenges completed by a user (F14, 56,538 = 86.644, P<.001, adjusted R(2) = .021). While the younger population downloaded the app the most, the older population

  10. Serotonergic Drugs and Valvular Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Richard B.; Baumann, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Background The serotonin (5-HT) releasers (±)-fenfluramine and (+)-fenfluramine were withdrawn from clinical use due to increased risk of valvular heart disease. One prevailing hypothesis (i.e., the “5-HT hypothesis”) suggests that fenfluramine-induced increases in plasma 5-HT underlie the disease. Objective Here we critically evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for fenfluramine-associated valve disease. Methods Findings from in vitro and in vivo experiments performed in our laboratory are reviewed. The data are integrated with existing literature to address the validity of the 5-HT hypothesis and suggest alternative explanations. Conclusions The overwhelming majority of evidence refutes the 5-HT hypothesis. A more likely cause of fenfluramine-induced valvulopathy is activation of 5-HT2B receptors on heart valves by the metabolite norfenfluramine. Future serotonergic medications should be designed to lack 5-HT2B agonist activity. PMID:19505264

  11. New techniques and models for assessing ischemic heart disease risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.N. Yakovina

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on tasks of creating and implementing a new technique aimed at assessing ischemic heart diseases risk. The techniques is based on a laboratory-diagnostic complex which includes oxidative, lipid-lipoprotein, inflammatory and metabolic biochemical parameters; s system of logic-mathematic models used for obtaining numeric risk assessments; and a program module which allows to calculate and analyze the results. we justified our models in the course of our re-search which included 172 patients suffering from ischemic heart diseases (IHD combined with coronary atherosclerosis verified by coronary arteriography and 167 patients who didn't have ischemic heart diseases. Our research program in-cluded demographic and social data, questioning on tobacco and alcohol addiction, questioning about dietary habits, chronic diseases case history and medications intake, cardiologic questioning as per Rose, anthropometry, 3-times meas-ured blood pressure, spirometry, and electrocardiogram taking and recording with decoding as per Minnesota code. We detected biochemical parameters of each patient and adjusted our task of creating techniques and models for assessing ischemic heart disease risks on the basis of inflammatory, oxidative, and lipid biological markers. We created a system of logic and mathematic models which is a universal scheme for laboratory parameters processing allowing for dissimilar data specificity. The system of models is universal, but a diagnostic approach to applied biochemical parameters is spe-cific. The created program module (calculator helps a physician to obtain a result on the basis of laboratory research data; the result characterizes numeric risks of coronary atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease for a patient. It also allows to obtain a visual image of a system of parameters and their deviation from a conditional «standard – pathology» boundary. The complex is implemented into practice by the Scientific

  12. Coronary heart disease after radiotherapy for peptic ulcer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, Zhanat A.; Land, Charles E.; Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Weinstock, Robert W.; Stovall, Marilyn; Griem, Melvin L.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular disease after radiotherapy (RT) for peptic ulcer disease. Methods and materials: Peptic ulcer disease patients treated with RT (n = 1859) or by other means (n = 1860) at the University of Chicago Medical Center between 1936 and 1965, were followed through 1997. The observed numbers of cause-specific deaths were compared with the expected numbers from the general population rates. During RT, 5% of the heart was in the treatment field and the remainder of the heart mostly received scattered radiation. A volume-weighted cardiac dose was computed to describe the average tissue dose to the entire organ. We used Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to analyze the CHD and cerebrovascular disease risk associated with RT, adjusting for confounding factors. Results: Greater than expected CHD mortality was observed among the irradiated patients. The irradiated patients received volume-weighted cardiac doses ranging from 1.6 to 3.9 Gy and the portion of the heart directly in the field received doses of 7.6-18.4 Gy. The CHD risk increased with the cardiac dose (p trend = 0.01). The cerebrovascular disease risk was not associated with the surrogate carotid dose. Conclusion: The excess CHD risk in patients undergoing RT for peptic ulcer disease decades previously indicates the need for long-term follow-up for cardiovascular disease after chest RT

  13. Nutrigenomics, the microbiome, and gene environment interactions: new directions in cardiovascular disease research, prevention, and treatment. A scientific statement From the American Heart Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiometabolic diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide and are strongly linked to both genetic and nutritional factors. The field of nutrigenomics encompasses multiple approaches aimed at understanding the effects of diet on health or disease development, including nutrigenetic studies in...

  14. Prevention of Stroke in Patients With Silent Cerebrovascular Disease : A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Eric E; Saposnik, Gustavo; Biessels, Geert Jan; Doubal, Fergus N; Fornage, Myriam; Gorelick, Philip B; Greenberg, Steven M; Higashida, Randall T; Kasner, Scott E; Seshadri, Sudha

    2017-01-01

    Two decades of epidemiological research shows that silent cerebrovascular disease is common and is associated with future risk for stroke and dementia. It is the most common incidental finding on brain scans. To summarize evidence on the diagnosis and management of silent cerebrovascular disease to

  15. Awareness of heart disease among female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Laura R; Etnyre, Annette; Adams, Melinda; Herbers, Sharon; Witte, Amy; Horlen, Cheryl; Baynton, Sally; Estrada, Rosanna; Jones, Mary Elaine

    2010-12-01

    Awareness of heart disease as the leading cause of death in women has increased over the past 10 years, but little is known about the awareness level of college students. This study evaluated the level of awareness and knowledge of heart disease in women among college students. Using a cross-sectional design, a sample of 320 women from a private university was queried. A 13-item survey assessed demographic information and awareness of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The mean age was 23 years; the majority were single and of Hispanic ethnicity. Almost one third believed breast cancer was the greatest problem facing women. One half recognized CVD as the leading cause of death among women. Students aged 18-24 years were significantly less likely to identify heart disease/heart attack as the leading cause of death in women compared with students aged 25-34 years. Significant ethnic differences in perceptions of risk were found. Family history and obesity were seen as major contributors to CVD; less than a fourth ever discussed CVD with their healthcare provider. Information was gained primarily from television, magazines, and the Internet. Exercise and maintenance of healthy blood pressure were viewed as priorities in prevention of CVD. Results add to the body of research on CVD risk and the need for intervention to increase awareness and knowledge of heart disease risk among younger and ethnically diverse young women and raises questions about the role of colleges and universities in promotion of student health. Colleges and universities may provide the last opportunity to reach youth as a group to affect lifestyle changes.

  16. Virtual Surgery in Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Mosegaard, Jesper; Kislinskiy, Stefan

    2014-01-01

     Teaching, diagnosing, and planning of therapy in patients with complex structural cardiovascular heart disease require profound understanding of the three-dimensional (3D) nature of cardiovascular structures in these patients. To obtain such understanding, modern imaging modalities provide high...... et al., Cardiol Young 13:451–460, 2003). In combination with the availability of virtual models of congenital heart disease (CHD), techniques for computer- based simulation of cardiac interventions have enabled early clinical exploration of the emerging concept of virtual surgery (Sorensen et al......., Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg 5:536–539, 2006; Sorensen et al., Pediatr Radiol 38:1314–1322, 2008). This chapter serves as an introduction to virtual surgery for patient-specific preoperative planning and teaching of cardiovascular anatomy and interventions for clinicians. The chapter is mainly based...

  17. Coronary Heart Disease and Emotional Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachaki, Chrisanthy; Maridaki Kassotaki, Katerina

    2013-09-23

    Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is associated with emotions, especially negative ones, namely anxiety and depression. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a psychological model that consists of a variety of emotional skills. The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between different dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and coronary heart disease. A total of 300 participants were studied during a 3-year period in an attempt to partially replicate and further expand a previous study conducted in Greece among CHD patients, which indicated a strong association between certain dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and the incidence of CHD. All participants completed a self-report questionnaire, assessing several aspects of Emotional Intelligence. The results showed that there is a link between the regulation of emotions and the occurrence of CHD. The evidence reported in the present study makes stronger the claim that EI plays a significant role in the occurrence of CHD.

  18. False Heart Rate Feedback and the Perception of Heart Symptoms in Patients with Congenital Heart Disease and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, Petra A.; Kindt, Merel; Rietveld, Simon; Everaerd, Walter; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known about the mechanisms explaining an increased perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease (ConHD). In the present study, it was suggested that a combination of high trait anxiety and disease history increases the perception of heart symptoms. Purpose It was

  19. False heart rate feedback and the perception of heart symptoms in patients with congenital heart disease and anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, P.A.; Kindt, M.; Rietveld, S.; Everaerd, W.; Mulder, B.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the mechanisms explaining an increased perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease (ConHD). In the present study, it was suggested that a combination of high trait anxiety and disease history increases the perception of heart symptoms. Purpose: It was

  20. The Relationship between Ischemic Heart Disease and Diabete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Mette Lykke

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is common among patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), where the prevalence is as high as 20%. Patients with diabetes requiring glucose-lowering medication (GLM) have been reported as having the same long-term risk...... of major cardiovascular outcomes as patients with a previous MI. Focus on the adverse prognosis carried by diabetes in the post-MI patients has caused new guidelines to be developed recommending similar preventive strategies to reduce the risk in these patients. Furthermore, heart failure is common after...... THE FOLLOWING OBJECTIVES ON THE SUBJECT: The relationship between ischemic heart disease and diabetes: 1. To examine the short- and long-term risk of death and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with incident diabetes and in patients with first-time MI during a 10 year period in Denmark, using the general...

  1. Holography for imaging in structural heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan; Rotschild, Carmel

    2016-05-17

    Three-dimensional imaging modalities for structural heart disease interventions have become a common feature in the procedural workflow. The images acquired are usually presented on 2D displays, thereby restricting their usefulness and the ability to interact with them. Holographic images created in real time from the volumetric data which float in the air during the procedure, in front of the operator and above the patient, could provide an intuitive and interactive display for the interventionalist and improve procedure outcomes.

  2. [Stress echo and valvular heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monin, J L

    2005-06-01

    Stress echo has already been validated in some forms of valvular heart disease, especially in calcific aortic stenosis with low cardiac output and dynamic mitral regurgitation (MR) of valvular heart disease. Stress Doppler haemodynamics is a term used to differentiate these new indications from that of segmental wall analysis of the left atrium in ischaemic heart disease. In calcific aortic stenosis with low output, the haemodynamics with low dose dobutamine allows assessment of the real severity of the aortic stenosis and identification of the rare cases with mild stenosis: the principal indication remains the assessment of operative risk and long-term prognosis by the study of left ventricular contractile reserve. In cases of ischaemic left ventricular systolic dysfunction, the presence of mild mitral regurgitation (regurgitant surface area >20 mm2 at rest) is a poor prognostic factor. The dynamic character of mitral regurgitation is related to left ventricular remodelling which leads to deformation of the valvular apparatus (mitral tenting). Dynamic mitral regurgitation (regurgitant orifice area >13 mm2 on exercise) is a powerful prognostic factor, the role of which has recently been demonstrated in the genesis of acute pulmonary oedema. the other indications of stress haemodynamics are under validation, mainly the assessment of exercise capacity and valvular compliance in mitral stenosis or asymptomatic aortic stenosis.

  3. [Sports in children with congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosser, Gilles; Moulin-Zinsch, Anne; Fischer-Atalla, Reem

    2017-05-01

    The practice of physical activity is one of the essential elements for health in general but also for the well-being and the quality of life. It is highly desirable to encourage physical activities in children with congenital heart diseases, taking into account all the benefits associated with this practice (quality of life, life expectancy) and this especially since these children often have limited capacity (due to their heart disease but also often by relative deconditioning). While there is a transient increase in risk of cardiac complications during intense activity, it would nevertheless be inappropriate to contra-indicate physical activities considering the well-known benefits in the medium and long term. The risks associated with the practice of physical activity must be assessed, on one hand, in terms of the severity of the heart disease, and on the other hand, on the nature and intensity of the activity. The stress test is here an essential tool because it helps to assess the physical capacity and cardiorespiratory adaptations to exercise. The international recommendations for competitive sports generally give an appropriate advice for a specific situation but the practice of moderate activity or leisure sports which are highly desirable should not be neglected and be strongly encouraged. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Rheumatic heart disease screening: Current concepts and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Dougherty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic heart disease (RHD is a disease of poverty, is almost entirely preventable, and is the most common cardiovascular disease worldwide in those under 25 years. RHD is caused by acute rheumatic fever (ARF which typically results in cumulative valvular lesions that may present clinically after a number of years of subclinical disease. Therapeutic interventions, therefore, typically focus on preventing subsequent ARF episodes (with penicillin prophylaxis. However, not all patients with ARF develop symptoms and not all symptomatic cases present to a physician or are correctly diagnosed. Therefore, if we hope to control ARF and RHD at the population level, we need a more reliable discriminator of subclinical disease. Recent studies have examined the utility of echocardiographic screening, which is far superior to auscultation at detecting RHD. However, there are many concerns surrounding this approach. Despite the introduction of the World Heart Federation diagnostic criteria in 2012, we still do not really know what constitutes the most subtle changes of RHD by echocardiography. This poses serious problems regarding whom to treat and what to do with the rest, both important decisions with widespread implications for already stretched health-care systems. In addition, issues ranging from improving the uptake of penicillin prophylaxis in ARF/RHD-positive patients, improving portable echocardiographic equipment, understanding the natural history of subclinical RHD and how it might respond to penicillin, and developing simplified diagnostic criteria that can be applied by nonexperts, all need to be effectively tackled before routine widespread screening for RHD can be endorsed.

  5. Atrial fibrillation, ischaemic heart disease, and the risk of death in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Dyg; Søndergaard, Peter; Nielsen, Tonny

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a risk factor for death in patients with a myocardial infarction, but highly variable results are reported in patients with heart failure. We studied the prognostic impact of AF in heart failure patients with and without ischaemic heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS...... and without ischaemic heart disease, HR was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.88-1.16) and P=0.88. CONCLUSION: AF is associated with increased risk of death only in patients with ischaemic heart disease. This finding may explain the variable results of studies of the prognosis associated with AF in heart failure....

  6. Current strategies for preventing renal dysfunction in patients with heart failure: a heart failure stage approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Victor Sarli; Andrade, Lúcia; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2013-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is common during episodes of acute decompensated heart failure, and historical data indicate that the mean creatinine level at admission has risen in recent decades. Different mechanisms underlying this change over time have been proposed, such as demographic changes, hemodynamic and neurohumoral derangements and medical interventions. In this setting, various strategies have been proposed for the prevention of renal dysfunction with heterogeneous results. In the present article, we review and discuss the main aspects of renal dysfunction prevention according to the different stages of heart failure. PMID:23644863

  7. Serum calcium levels are not associated with coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Y

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Yuelong Jin,* Lianping He,* Quanhai Wang, Yan Chen, Xiaohua Ren, Hui Tang, Xiuli Song, Lingling Ding, Qin Qi, Zhiwei Huang, Jiegen Yu, Yingshui Yao Department of Preventive Medicine, Wannan Medical College, Wuhu, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Numerous studies have reported that low calcium intake is related to a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease. However, the relationship between serum calcium and coronary heart disease is unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare serum calcium levels in patients with coronary heart disease and those in healthy individuals. Methods: This retrospective, case-control study conducted in the People's Republic of China comprised 380 cases and 379 controls. Serum calcium levels, blood lipids, and anthropometric measurements were measured in both groups. The Student's unpaired t-test or Chi-square test was used to compare differences between cases and controls. Pearson's partial correlation coefficient was used to determine the association between serum calcium, blood lipids, and blood pressure in both groups. Results: Our results indicate that the average level of serum calcium in cases was higher than in controls. Serum calcium levels showed no correlation with any parameter except for triglycerides in either group. Conclusion: Overall, these data suggest that serum calcium has no influence on coronary heart disease or triglyceride levels in the general population. Keywords: serum calcium, hypertension, blood lipids

  8. Harnessing publicly available genetic data to prioritize lipid modifying therapeutic targets for prevention of coronary heart disease based on dysglycemic risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tragante, Vinicius; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Palmer, Tom M; Moore, Jason H; de Bakker, Paul I W; Keating, Brendan J; Holmes, Michael V

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic interventions that lower LDL-cholesterol effectively reduce the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, statins, the most widely prescribed LDL-cholesterol lowering drugs, increase diabetes risk. We used genome-wide association study (GWAS) data in the public domain to

  9. Prevention of diseases in Gynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebija Izetbegovic

    2013-01-01

    Results: There are five primary functions of management as: Anticipate and plan, organize, command, coordinate and control. If we introduce the following definition in the sense of medical science and apply it to the medical practice that would mean way of recognizing, managing and resolving issues of diagnosis and therapy of diseases (in this case gynecology diseases according to certain guidelines and treatment algorithms. Treatment of family doctors is an important aspect in the quality-of-life of women and their reproductive health as well as a significant issue in public, environmental and social problems. Conclusions: It is very important to deal with it on the primary care level and in addition to promote the primary and secondary prevention of diseases, which is sometimes more important than the curative procedures. The primary prevention involves regular gynecological examinations and screening. The doctors have also a duty to educate women about the risk factors for malignant diseases, as well as proposing some of the qualitative preventive measures.

  10. Cardiac autonomic testing and treating heart disease. 'A clinical perspective'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L. DePace

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Coronary heart disease (CHD is a major health concern, affecting nearly half the middle-age population and responsible for nearly one-third of all deaths. Clinicians have several major responsibilities beyond diagnosing CHD, such as risk stratification of patients for major adverse cardiac events (MACE and treating risks, as well as the patient. This second of a two-part review series discusses treating risk factors, including autonomic dysfunction, and expected outcomes. Methods Therapies for treating cardiac mortality risks including cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN, are discussed. Results While risk factors effectively target high-risk patients, a large number of individuals who will develop complications from heart disease are not identified by current scoring systems. Many patients with heart conditions, who appear to be well-managed by traditional therapies, experience MACE. Parasympathetic and Sympathetic (P&S function testing provides more information and has the potential to further aid doctors in individualizing and titrating therapy to minimize risk. Advanced autonomic dysfunction (AAD and its more severe form cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy have been strongly associated with an elevated risk of cardiac mortality and are diagnosable through autonomic testing. This additional information includes patient-specific physiologic measures, such as sympathovagal balance (SB. Studies have shown that establishing and maintaining proper SB minimizes morbidity and mortality risk. Conclusions P&S testing promotes primary prevention, treating subclinical disease states, as well as secondary prevention, thereby improving patient outcomes through (1 maintaining wellness, (2 preventing symptoms and disorder and (3 treating subclinical manifestations (autonomic dysfunction, as well as (4 disease and symptoms (autonomic neuropathy.

  11. Challenges of congenital heart disease in grown-up patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerzmann, Markus; Schwitz, Fabienne; Thomet, Corina; Kadner, Alexander; Pfammatter, Jean-Pierre; Wustmann, Kerstin

    2017-10-04

    Nowadays, more than 90% of all children born with congenital heart disease (CHD) reach adult life. Although initially considered to be cured, the majority of them continue to need specialised follow-up because they require re-do interventions or are at increased risk of cardiovascular complications and premature death. Arrhythmias are the most common cause of unscheduled hospital visits for grown-up CHD (GUCH) patients, accounting for one third of emergency admissions in these patients. Some GUCH patients are also at increased risk for sudden cardiac death. The principles of arrhythmia management and the prevention of sudden cardiac death in GUCH patients are similar to those used in adults with acquired heart disease, but are not evidence based. Decompensated heart failure is the other leading cause of death. Conventional medical heart-failure therapy for left ventricular dysfunction is not effective in GUCH patients at highest risk of heart failure, i.e., those with right or single ventricular failure. Careful haemodynamic assessment and structural interventions are the first step to consider in GUCH patients presenting with heart failure symptoms. Adults with moderate or complex CHD and regular follow-up in specialised GUCH centres have a survival benefit compared with patients without such follow-up. Cardiac surgery in GUCH patients should be performed by surgeons trained in treatment of CHD, i.e., surgeons also operating on paediatric patients. A structured transition programme with a defined transfer of care from the paediatric to the adult care environment is important to avoid lapses of care in today's adolescents with CHD. For GUCH patients with an intervention performed decades ago and no specific cardiac follow-up in later life, referral to a specialised GUCH centre is recommended and may save lives.

  12. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-06-01

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether patients with CCHD are protected against atherosclerosis. Results have shown that the coronary arteries of patients with CCHD are free from plaques and stenosis. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness and low total plasma cholesterol may indicate a reduced risk of later development of atherosclerosis. However, the evidence is still sparse and questionable, and a reasonable explanation for the decreased risk of developing atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD is still missing.This review provides an overview of what is known about the prevalence and potential causes of the reduced risk of atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Occupational risk factors for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkanen, J; Heinonen, O P

    1992-01-01

    To investigate possible associations between cardiovascular malformations and maternal occupational exposure to various factors during the first trimester of pregnancy, 406 cases and 756 controls were studied retrospectively. The cases were taken from all infants diagnosed with cardiovascular malformations born in Finland during 1982 and 1983. The controls were randomly selected from all normal births in the country during the same period. All mothers were interviewed approximately 3 months after delivery by a midwife, using a structured questionnaire. Maternal overall exposure to chemicals at work was more prevalent among the case group (35.8%) than the control group (26.2%, P less than 0.01). Among the specific chemical groups, maternal exposure to dyes, lacquers, or paints was significantly associated with the risk of congenital heart disease. Exposure to organic solvents during the first trimester seemed to increase to risk of ventricular septal defect (P less than 0.05). Work at video display terminals was slightly more prevalent among the case group (6.3%) than among the control group (5.0%). The mothers' education level, regular exposure to passive smoking at work, or temperature at the workplace were not risk factors for congenital heart disease in the offspring, neither was maternal exposure to microwave ovens, disinfectants, pesticides, or anesthetic gases. It is concluded that many maternal exposures at work seem not to have a teratogenic effect on the fetal heart, although the limited power of this investigation needs to be borne in mind.

  14. Perspectives on Trypanosoma cruzi-induced heart disease (Chagas disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanowitz, Herbert B; Machado, Fabiana S; Jelicks, Linda A; Shirani, Jamshid; de Carvalho, Antonio C Campos; Spray, David C; Factor, Stephen M; Kirchhoff, Louis V; Weiss, Louis M

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It is a common cause of heart disease in endemic areas of Latin America. The year 2009 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of T cruzi infection and Chagas disease by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas. Chagasic cardiomyopathy develops in from 10% to 30% of persons who are chronically infected with this parasite. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important modalities in the evaluation and prognostication of individuals with chagasic heart disease. The etiology of chagasic heart disease likely is multifactorial. Parasite persistence, autoimmunity, and microvascular abnormalities have been studied extensively as possible pathogenic mechanisms. Experimental studies suggest that alterations in cardiac gap junctions may be etiologic in the pathogenesis of conduction abnormalities. The diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease is made by serology. The treatment of this infection has shortcomings that need to be addressed. Cardiac transplantation and bone marrow stem cell therapy for persons with Chagas disease have received increasing research attention in recent years.

  15. Medical compliance to evidence-based clinical guidelines on secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in a hospital from Lima, Peru: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaira Castañeda-Amado

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen INTRODUCCIÓN La enfermedad cardiovascular constituye la principal causa de mortalidad a nivel mundial. Cuando se presenta un infarto agudo de miocardio se deben instaurar medidas en prevención secundaria, las cuales pueden disminuir la mortalidad en 50%. Las guías de práctica clínica establecen que un tratamiento médico óptimo se basa en cuatro grupos de fármacos: antiagregantes plaquetarios, estatinas, β-bloqueadores e inhibidores de la enzima convertidora de angiotensina o antagonistas de los receptores de la angiotensina II. OBJETIVO Determinar la adherencia a las recomendaciones de las guías de práctica clínica basadas en evidencia, sobre prevención secundaria en enfermedad coronaria establecida. MÉTODOS Se realizó un estudio observacional, tipo cohorte retrospectiva, en el Hospital Cayetano Heredia en Lima, Perú. Se incluyeron pacientes con diagnóstico confirmado de síndrome coronario agudo desde el 1 de febrero de 2011 hasta el 28 de febrero de 2013. Los datos que se recolectaron incluyeron anamnesis, examen físico, exámenes auxiliares y terapia médica al alta. Además, las prescripciones médicas fueron seguidas al primer, tercer y sexto mes posterior al alta. Se compararon las prescripciones médicas con las recomendaciones tipo I, nivel de evidencia A, de la guía de práctica clínica de la American Heart Association. RESULTADOS Se estudiaron 143 pacientes. De estos, 54 (37,8% tuvieron infarto de miocardio con ST elevado y 89 (62,2% pacientes tuvieron un infarto de miocardio con ST no elevado o angina inestable. Las cuatro estrategias terapéuticas seleccionadas para la prevención secundaria en enfermedad coronaria fueron indicadas en 40 (28% pacientes al alta y solo en 12,6%, 7% y 3,5% en el primer, tercer y sexto mes de seguimiento, respectivamente. Además, se describió la adherencia del paciente a asistir a la consulta en el servicio de cardiología al primer, tercer y sexto mes, observándose una

  16. Developing Family Healthware, a Family History Screening Tool to Prevent Common Chronic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Paula W.; Scheuner, Maren T.; Jorgensen, Cynthia; Khoury, Muin J.

    2008-01-01

    Family health history reflects the effects of genetic, environmental, and behavioral factors and is an important risk factor for a variety of disorders including coronary heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. In 2004, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed Family Healthware, a new interactive, Web-based tool that assesses familial risk for 6 diseases (coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and colorectal, breast, and ovarian cancer) and provides a "prevention plan" with pe...

  17. Genetics of Dyslipidemia and Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kavita; Baliga, Ragavendra R

    2017-05-01

    Genetic dyslipidemias contribute to the prevalence of ischemic heart disease. The field of genetic dyslipidemias and their influence on atherosclerotic heart disease is rapidly developing and accumulating increasing evidence. The purpose of this review is to describe the current state of knowledge in regard to inherited atherogenic dyslipidemias. The disorders of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) and elevated lipoprotein(a) will be detailed. Genetic technology has made rapid advancements, leading to new discoveries in inherited atherogenic dyslipidemias, which will be explored in this review, as well as a description of possible future developments. Increasing attention has come upon the genetic disorders of familial hypercholesterolemia and elevated lipoprotein(a). This review includes new knowledge of these disorders including description of these disorders, their method of diagnosis, their prevalence, their genetic underpinnings, and their effect on the development of cardiovascular disease. In addition, it discusses major advances in genetic technology, including the completion of the human genome sequence, next-generation sequencing, and genome-wide association studies. Also discussed are rare variant studies with specific genetic mechanisms involved in inherited dyslipidemias, such as in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) enzyme. The field of genetics of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease is rapidly growing, which will result in a bright future of novel mechanisms of action and new therapeutics.

  18. Large Mammalian Animal Models of Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Camacho

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the biological complexity of the cardiovascular system, the animal model is an urgent pre-clinical need to advance our knowledge of cardiovascular disease and to explore new drugs to repair the damaged heart. Ideally, a model system should be inexpensive, easily manipulated, reproducible, a biological representative of human disease, and ethically sound. Although a larger animal model is more expensive and difficult to manipulate, its genetic, structural, functional, and even disease similarities to humans make it an ideal model to first consider. This review presents the commonly-used large animals—dog, sheep, pig, and non-human primates—while the less-used other large animals—cows, horses—are excluded. The review attempts to introduce unique points for each species regarding its biological property, degrees of susceptibility to develop certain types of heart diseases, and methodology of induced conditions. For example, dogs barely develop myocardial infarction, while dilated cardiomyopathy is developed quite often. Based on the similarities of each species to the human, the model selection may first consider non-human primates—pig, sheep, then dog—but it also depends on other factors, for example, purposes, funding, ethics, and policy. We hope this review can serve as a basic outline of large animal models for cardiovascular researchers and clinicians.

  19. Congenital Heart Disease: Vascular Risk Factors and Medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P.M. Smedts (Dineke)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCongenital heart disease (CHD) is among the most common congenital abnormalities and involves structural anomalies of the heart and/or related major blood vessels. Congenital heart disease arises in the fi rst trimester of pregnancy, occurring often and in many forms. The reported CHD

  20. Echocardiographic patterns of juvenile rheumatic heart disease at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the echocardiographic features of children with rheumatic heart disease seen at the Kenyatta National Hospital. Design: A retrospective study. Setting: The Kenyatta National Hospital Heart Unit. Subjects: Patients aged 20 years and less with echocardiographic diagnosis of rheumatic heart disease.

  1. HeartCare+: A Smart Heart Care Mobile Application for Framingham-Based Early Risk Prediction of Hard Coronary Heart Diseases in Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Ahmed Galal Elsayed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Healthcare is a challenging, yet so demanding sector that developing countries are paying more attention to recently. Statistics show that rural areas are expected to develop a high rate of heart diseases, which is a leading cause of sudden mortality, in the future. Thus, providing solutions that can assist rural people in detecting the cardiac risks early will be vital for uncovering and even preventing the long-term complications of cardiac diseases. Methodology. Mobile technology can be effectively utilized to limit the cardiac diseases’ prevalence in rural Middle East. This paper proposes a smart mobile solution for early risk detection of hard coronary heart diseases that uses the Framingham scoring model. Results. Smart HeartCare+ mobile app estimates accurately coronary heart diseases’ risk over 10 years based on clinical and nonclinical data and classifies the patient risk to low, moderate, or high. HeartCare+ also directs the patients to further treatment recommendations. Conclusion. This work attempts to investigate the effectiveness of the mobile technology in the early risk detection of coronary heart diseases. HeartCare+ app intensifies the communication channel between the lab workers and patients residing in rural areas and cardiologists and specialist residing in urban places.

  2. Triglycerides and Heart Disease, Still a Hypothesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ira J.; Eckel, Robert H.; McPherson, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the basic and clinical science relating plasma triglycerides and cardiovascular disease. Although many aspects of the basic physiology of triglyceride production, its plasma transport and tissue uptake have been known for several decades, the relationship of plasma triglyceride levels to vascular disease is uncertain. Are triglyceride rich lipoproteins, their influence on HDL and LDL, or the underlying diseases leading to defects in triglyceride metabolism the culprit? Animal models have failed to confirm that anything other than early fatty lesions can be produced by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Metabolic products of triglyceride metabolism can be toxic to arterial cells; however, these studies are primarily in vitro. Correlative studies of fasting and postprandial triglycerides and genetic diseases implicate VLDL and their remnants, and chylomicron remnants in atherosclerosis development; but the concomitant alterations in other lipoproteins and other risk factors obscure any conclusions about direct relationships between disease and triglycerides. Genes that regulate triglyceride levels also correlate with vascular disease. Human intervention trials, however, have lacked an appropriately defined population, and have produced outcomes without definitive conclusions. The time is more than ripe for new and creative approaches to understanding the relationship of triglycerides and heart disease. PMID:21527746

  3. [Disease management for chronic heart failure patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bläuer, Cornelia; Pfister, Otmar; Bächtold, Christa; Junker, Therese; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited in their quality of life, have a poor prognosis and face frequent hospitalisations. Patient self-management was shown to improve quality of life, reduce rehospitalisations and costs in patients with chronic HF. Comprehensive disease management programmes are critical to foster patient self-management. The chronic care model developed by the WHO serves as the basis of such programmes. In order to develop self-management skills a needs orientated training concept is mandatory, as patients need both knowledge of the illness and the ability to use the information to make appropriate decisions according to their individual situation. Switzerland has no established system for the care of patients with chronic diseases in particular those with HF. For this reason a group of Swiss experts for HF designed a model for disease management for HF patients in Switzerland. Since 2009 the Swiss Heart Foundation offers an education programme based on this model. The aim of this programme is to offer education and support for practitioners, patients and families. An initial pilot evaluation of the program showed mixed acceptance by practitioners, whereas patient assessed the program as supportive and in line with their requirements.

  4. Stress echo for evaluation of valvular heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yavagal, S.T.; Deshpande, Niteen; Admane, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Resting echocardiography is the most important tool for diagnosing valvular heart disease. However, treatment planning in valvular heart diseases may require additional information in some patients, particularly asymptomatic patients with severe valve disease or symptomatic patients with moderate disease. Stress echocardiography provides invaluable information in these situations and aids decision making. Stress echocardiography is performed using either physical stress or dobutamine stress a...

  5. Psychological factors and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadži-Pešić Marina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CAD results from an interaction of different somatic, environmental and behavioral risk factors. Commonly, development of CAD is associated with arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking, sedentary life style and the like. Psychological factors in their own sake or in combination with other risk factors are also important for genesis of CAD. In this study, 170 people that were diagnosed with CAD and 170 healthy controls of corresponding sex and age were compared for anxiety, aggressiveness and Eysenck's two personality dimension. The data indicate that patients with CAD have very low level of anxiety and aggressiveness and very high level of neuroticism relative to the controls. .

  6. Tracheal quadrifurcation associated with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Ahmad, Ozaire [Narayana Multispeciality Hospital and Mazumdar Shaw Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2015-08-15

    Tracheal anomalies are known in association with congenital cardiac defects. Some of the well-described anomalies include accessory (displaced) tracheal bronchus with variants, tracheal trifurcation and accessory cardiac bronchus. Here we describe a case of tracheal quadrifurcation associated with complex congenital heart disease. Illustration of complex airway anatomy was simplified by the use of multidetector CT using a variety of image display options. Awareness of this complex anomaly will expand our knowledge of tracheal anomalies and equip the anesthesia and surgical team for better airway management. (orig.)

  7. Ventricular tachycardia in ischemic heart disease substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olujimi A. Ajijola

    2014-01-01

    This review will discuss the central role of the ischemic heart disease substrate in the development MMVT. Electrophysiologic characterization of the post-infarct myocardium using bipolar electrogram amplitudes to delineate scar border zones will be reviewed. Functional electrogram determinants of reentrant circuits such as isolated late potentials will be discussed. Strategies for catheter ablation of reentrant ventricular tachycardia, including structural and functional targets will also be examined, as will the role of the epicardial mapping and ablation in the management of recurrent MMVT.

  8. Coronary Heart Disease: Pandemic in a True Sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are caused because of abnormalities in the heart and blood vessels. Recent trends reveal that the incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD has gradually decreased in many developed countries, but the situation remains quite challenging in developing nations that account for more than 60% of the global burden. Multiple socio-demographic, personal, physician related and healthcare delivery system related factors have been identified which act in variable combinations to either influence the incidence of CHD or affect the short/long-term outcome of the disease. Of all CHD cases who succumb within 28 days of onset of symptoms, almost 67% fail to reach even a hospital. This clearly signifies the importance of primary prevention and early recognition of the warning signs in averting cause-specific mortality. The main priority is to develop cost-effective equitable health care innovations in CHD prevention and to monitor the trend of CHD so that evidence-based interventions can be formulated. To conclude, inculcating health-promoting behaviors in school children and the general population by means of community-based health screening and education interventions could avert many more deaths attributed to CHDs.

  9. Secondary prevention- an essential component of the comprehensive rehabilitation of patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop Dana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is currently a real public health problem due to the extremely high morbidity and mortality of this disease. In this context, cardiovascular prevention measures should be implemented as early as possible. In addition to classic prevention measures, a number of extremely important specific recommendations should be considered: informing patients about their underlying disease, identifying the cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular factors that have led to cardiac decompensation, reducing daily salt consumption, monitoring body weight, forbidding smoking and recreational substances, conducting a regular exercise program under supervision, and increasing adherence to treatment.

  10. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, Iolanda; Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, Theodora

    2017-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital anomaly, representing an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Congenital heart disease represents a group of heart anomalies that include septal defects, valve defects, and outflow tract anomalies. The exact genetic, epigenetic, or environmental basis of congenital heart disease remains poorly understood, although the exact mechanism is likely multifactorial. However, the development of new technologies including copy number variants, single-nucleotide polymorphism, next-generation sequencing are accelerating the detection of genetic causes of heart anomalies. Recent studies suggest a role of small non-coding RNAs, micro RNA, in congenital heart disease. The recently described epigenetic factors have also been found to contribute to cardiac morphogenesis. In this review, we present past and recent genetic discoveries in congenital heart disease.

  11. Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Scope of the Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor Dray, Efrat; Marelli, Ariane J

    2015-11-01

    This article reviews the changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease summarizing its impact on the demographics of the congenital heart disease population and the progress made in order to improve outcomes in this patient population. Birth prevalence of congenital heart disease can be modified by many factors. As a result of decreasing mortality and increasing survival in all forms of congenital heart disease, the median age of patients has increased and adults now compose two-thirds of patients with congenital heart disease. Disease burden and resulting health services utilization increase significantly across the lifespan. Bridging the gap between policy and quality of care can be improved by referral to specialized adult congenital heart disease centers and planning delivery of specialized services that are commensurate with population needs, program accreditation criteria and certified training of designated workforce. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Project h[schwa]li?dx[superscript w]/Healthy Hearts across Generations: Development and Evaluation Design of a Tribally Based Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Intervention for American Indian Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Karina L.; LaMarr, June; Levy, Rona L.; Pearson, Cynthia; Maresca, Teresa; Mohammed, Selina A.; Simoni, Jane M.; Evans-Campbell, Teresa; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Fryberg, Sheryl; Jobe, Jared B.

    2012-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) populations are disproportionately at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, and obesity, compared with the general US population. This article describes the h[schwa]li?dx[superscript w]/Healthy Hearts Across Generations project, an AIAN-run, tribally based randomized controlled trial (January…

  13. Heart failure in patients with kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuegel, Courtney; Bansal, Nisha

    2017-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the population of CKD patients with concurrent HF continues to grow. The accurate diagnosis of HF is challenging in patients with CKD in part due to a lack of validated imaging and biomarkers specifically in this population. The pathophysiology between the heart and the kidneys is complex and bidirectional. Patients with CKD have greater prevalence of traditional HF risk factors as well as unique kidney-specific risk factors including malnutrition, acid-base alterations, uraemic toxins, bone mineral changes, anemia and myocardial stunning. These risk factors also contribute to the decline of kidney function seen in patients with subclinical and clinical HF. More targeted HF therapies may improve outcomes in patients with kidney disease as current HF therapies are underutilised in this population. Further work is also needed to develop novel HF therapies for the CKD population. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. High sensitivity troponin and valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Cian P; Donnellan, Eoin; Phelan, Dermot; Griffin, Brian P; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; McEvoy, John W

    2017-07-01

    Blood-based biomarkers have been extensively studied in a range of cardiovascular diseases and have established utility in routine clinical care, most notably in the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (e.g., troponin) and the management of heart failure (e.g., brain-natriuretic peptide). The role of biomarkers is less well established in the management of valvular heart disease (VHD), in which the optimal timing of surgical intervention is often challenging. One promising biomarker that has been the subject of a number of recent VHD research studies is high sensitivity troponin (hs-cTn). Novel high-sensitivity assays can detect subclinical myocardial damage in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, hs-cTn may have utility in the assessment of asymptomatic patients with severe VHD who do not have a clear traditional indication for surgical intervention. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine the current evidence for hs-cTn as a potential biomarker in the most commonly encountered VHD conditions, aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. This review provides a synopsis of early evidence indicating that hs-cTn has promise as a biomarker in VHD. However, the impact of its measurement on clinical practice and VHD outcomes needs to be further assessed in prospective studies before routine clinical use becomes a reality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Psychological Stress, Inflammation, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Petra H; von Känel, Roland

    2017-09-20

    In this review, we summarize evidence on the risk factor psychological stress in the context of coronary heart disease (CHD) in humans and explore the role of inflammation as a potential underlying mechanism. While chronic stress increases the risk of incident CHD and poor cardiovascular prognosis, acute emotional stress can trigger acute CHD events in vulnerable patients. Evidence supporting a potential role for inflammation as a promising biological mechanism comes from population-based studies showing associations between chronic stress and increased inflammation. Similarly, experimental studies demonstrate acute stress-induced increases in inflammatory markers and suggest modulatory potential for pharmacological and biobehavioral interventions. So far, studies investigating patients with cardiovascular disease are few and the full sequence of events from stress to inflammation to CHD remains to be established. Psychological stress is an independent CHD risk factor associated with increased inflammation. Although promising, causality needs to be further explored.

  16. THE EFFECT OF WAIST CIRCUMFERENCES MORE THAN NORMAL ON THE INCIDENT OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pria Wahyu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Coronary heart disease is known as the most common disease that causes mortality in the world, one of the examination to identify the risks of coronary heart disease is measuring waist circumference. The purpose of this study was to identify correlation between large waist circumferences and the incident of coroner heart disease. Method: Design used in this study was analytic observational (retrospective with cross sectional approach. There were 63 respondents which sampling by simple random sampling. The independent variable was waist circumferences and the dependent variable was coronary heart disease. Data were collected by direct observation then analyzed by spearman correlation statistic test with significance level α≤0.05. Result: The result showed that waist circumferences more than normal had significant correlation with the incident of coronary heart disease (p=0.02. Analysis: It can be concluded that there was correlation between waist circumferences more than normal and the incident of coronary heart disease to the clients with coroner cardiac disease. Discussion: Earlier screening and detection is needed to prevent coronary heart disease.

  17. Women's Heart Disease: Join the Heart Truth Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has held a Red Dress runway event during Fashion Week in New York City. The event is ... African American and Hispanic women, in particular, have high rates of the major risk factors for heart ...

  18. Preventing Heart Disease - At Any Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search By Zipcode Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) ... Hey Kids, Learn About Blood Sugar and Diabetes Teaching Gardens Teaching Gardens Recognition Teaching Gardens-See Our ...

  19. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  20. Illness understanding in children and adolescents with heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Veldtman, G; Matley, S; Kendall, L; Quirk, J; Gibbs, J; Parsons, J; Hewison, J

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To evaluate illness knowledge and understanding in children and adolescents with congenital and acquired heart disease, and whether the degree of understanding is related to age, sex, or complexity of the heart disease.
DESIGN—Prospective cohort study.
SETTING—Tertiary paediatric cardiac centre.
METHODS—Patients' understanding of their congenital heart disease was assessed in a representative sample of volunteers aged between 7-18 years using semistructured interviews based upon Leventha...

  1. Illness understanding in children and adolescents with heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Veldtman, G R; Matley, S L; Kendall, L; Quirk, J; Gibbs, J L; Parsons, J M; Hewison, J

    2001-01-01

    Aims To evaluate illness knowledge and understanding in children and adolescents with congenital and acquired heart disease and to assess whether the degree of understanding is related to age, sex, or complexity of the heart disease. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary pediatric cardiac center. Methods Patients' understanding of their congenital heart disease was assessed in a representative sample of volunteers aged between 7 and 18 years using semistructured interviews based o...

  2. Nocturnal breathing in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legault, Sylvie; Lanfranchi, Paola; Montplaisir, Jacques; Nielsen, Tore; Dore, Annie; Khairy, Paul; Marcotte, François; Mercier, Lise-Andrée

    2008-08-18

    Sleep disordered breathing is frequently observed in patients with cardiovascular disease. Even in the absence of heart disease, acute and chronic hypoxia have been shown to promote sleep-related periodic breathing with central apnea characterized by a repetitive reduction or lack of respiratory activity. Cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) is associated with chronic hypoxia, regardless of whether an increase in pulmonary artery pressures coexists. Sleep aggravated hypoxia has been observed in many such patients, but it remains to be determined whether sleep disordered breathing is contributory. We, therefore, sought to assess sleep-related breathing pattern in patients with CCHD. Adults with CCHD, resting arterial oxygen saturation 40% were prospectively enrolled in a cross-sectional study. To assess sleep and respiratory indices, subjects underwent a standardized clinical appraisal that included arterial blood gas analysis and a comprehensive sleep study with an ambulatory device. An apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >or=5/h was considered to indicate sleep apnea. Ten adults with CCHD, aged 38+/-11 years, completed the study. Seven patients had elevated pulmonary artery pressures, with a mean systolic pressure of 86.3+/-18.1 mm Hg. All patients demonstrated normal sleep parameters. Oxygen saturation further declined in 5 patients during sleep. However, no associated alteration in respiratory parameters was observed and no significant arrhythmia. The mean AHI was 1.1+/-1.0/h. No subject met the pre-defined criterion for sleep apnea. Although further oxygen desaturation may be observed during sleep in patients with CCHD, it occurs in the absence of sleep disordered breathing.

  3. Metabolic Syndrome: Systems Thinking in Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommermuth, Ron; Ewing, Kristine

    2018-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors. MetS is associated with approximately 4-fold increase in the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and a 2-fold increase in the incidence of cardiovascular disease complications. MetS is a progressive, proinflammatory, prothrombotic condition that manifests itself along a broad spectrum of disease. It is associated with hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, fatty liver disease, gout, and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Intervening in and reversing the pathologic process become more difficult as the disease progresses, highlighting the needs for increased individual and community surveillance and primary prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ivabradine in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated heart rate is an established marker of cardiovascular risk. Previous analyses have suggested that ivabradine, a heart-rate-reducing agent, may improve outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease, left ventricular dysfunction, and a heart rate of 70 beats per m...

  5. Identifying strategies to maximise recruitment and retention of practices and patients in a multicentre randomised controlled trial of an intervention to optimise secondary prevention for coronary heart disease in primary care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leathem, Claire S

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recruitment and retention of patients and healthcare providers in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is important in order to determine the effectiveness of interventions. However, failure to achieve recruitment targets is common and reasons why a particular recruitment strategy works for one study and not another remain unclear. We sought to describe a strategy used in a multicentre RCT in primary care, to report researchers\\' and participants\\' experiences of its implementation and to inform future strategies to maximise recruitment and retention. METHODS: In total 48 general practices and 903 patients were recruited from three different areas of Ireland to a RCT of an intervention designed to optimise secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. The recruitment process involved telephoning practices, posting information, visiting practices, identifying potential participants, posting invitations and obtaining consent. Retention involved patients attending reviews and responding to questionnaires and practices facilitating data collection. RESULTS: We achieved high retention rates for practices (100%) and for patients (85%) over an 18-month intervention period. Pilot work, knowledge of the setting, awareness of change in staff and organisation amongst participant sites, rapid responses to queries and acknowledgement of practitioners\\' contributions were identified as being important. Minor variations in protocol and research support helped to meet varied, complex and changing individual needs of practitioners and patients and encouraged retention in the trial. A collaborative relationship between researcher and practice staff which required time to develop was perceived as vital for both recruitment and retention. CONCLUSION: Recruiting and retaining the numbers of practices and patients estimated as required to provide findings with adequate power contributes to increased confidence in the validity and generalisability of RCT results. A

  6. Identifying strategies to maximise recruitment and retention of practices and patients in a multicentre randomised controlled trial of an intervention to optimise secondary prevention for coronary heart disease in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathem, Claire S; Cupples, Margaret E; Byrne, Mary C; O'Malley, Mary; Houlihan, Ailish; Murphy, Andrew W; Smith, Susan M

    2009-06-19

    Recruitment and retention of patients and healthcare providers in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is important in order to determine the effectiveness of interventions. However, failure to achieve recruitment targets is common and reasons why a particular recruitment strategy works for one study and not another remain unclear. We sought to describe a strategy used in a multicentre RCT in primary care, to report researchers' and participants' experiences of its implementation and to inform future strategies to maximise recruitment and retention. In total 48 general practices and 903 patients were recruited from three different areas of Ireland to a RCT of an intervention designed to optimise secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. The recruitment process involved telephoning practices, posting information, visiting practices, identifying potential participants, posting invitations and obtaining consent. Retention involved patients attending reviews and responding to questionnaires and practices facilitating data collection. We achieved high retention rates for practices (100%) and for patients (85%) over an 18-month intervention period. Pilot work, knowledge of the setting, awareness of change in staff and organisation amongst participant sites, rapid responses to queries and acknowledgement of practitioners' contributions were identified as being important. Minor variations in protocol and research support helped to meet varied, complex and changing individual needs of practitioners and patients and encouraged retention in the trial. A collaborative relationship between researcher and practice staff which required time to develop was perceived as vital for both recruitment and retention. Recruiting and retaining the numbers of practices and patients estimated as required to provide findings with adequate power contributes to increased confidence in the validity and generalisability of RCT results. A continuous dynamic process of monitoring progress

  7. Identifying strategies to maximise recruitment and retention of practices and patients in a multicentre randomised controlled trial of an intervention to optimise secondary prevention for coronary heart disease in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houlihan Ailish

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recruitment and retention of patients and healthcare providers in randomised controlled trials (RCTs is important in order to determine the effectiveness of interventions. However, failure to achieve recruitment targets is common and reasons why a particular recruitment strategy works for one study and not another remain unclear. We sought to describe a strategy used in a multicentre RCT in primary care, to report researchers' and participants' experiences of its implementation and to inform future strategies to maximise recruitment and retention. Methods In total 48 general practices and 903 patients were recruited from three different areas of Ireland to a RCT of an intervention designed to optimise secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. The recruitment process involved telephoning practices, posting information, visiting practices, identifying potential participants, posting invitations and obtaining consent. Retention involved patients attending reviews and responding to questionnaires and practices facilitating data collection. Results We achieved high retention rates for practices (100% and for patients (85% over an 18-month intervention period. Pilot work, knowledge of the setting, awareness of change in staff and organisation amongst participant sites, rapid responses to queries and acknowledgement of practitioners' contributions were identified as being important. Minor variations in protocol and research support helped to meet varied, complex and changing individual needs of practitioners and patients and encouraged retention in the trial. A collaborative relationship between researcher and practice staff which required time to develop was perceived as vital for both recruitment and retention. Conclusion Recruiting and retaining the numbers of practices and patients estimated as required to provide findings with adequate power contributes to increased confidence in the validity and generalisability of RCT

  8. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Men's and Women's Health Beliefs Differentially Predict Coronary Heart Disease Incidence in a Population-Based Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korin, Maya Rom; Chaplin, William F.; Shaffer, Jonathan A.; Butler, Mark J.; Ojie, Mary-Jane; Davidson, Karina W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine gender differences in the association between beliefs in heart disease preventability and 10-year incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in a population-based sample. Methods: A total of 2,688 Noninstitutionalized Nova Scotians without prior CHD enrolled in the Nova Scotia Health Study (NSHS95) and were followed for 10…

  10. Risk factors for coronary heart disease in the black population of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional study of risk factors for ischaemic heart disease (IHO) in a random sample of 986 black people aged 15 - 64 years living in the Cape ... In addition, schools should promote a healthy lifestyle and the prevention of chronic degenerative diseases should be incorporated into the evolving primary health care ...

  11. Perceived Vulnerability to Heart Disease in Patients with Familial Hypercholesterolemia: A Qualitative Interview Study

    OpenAIRE

    Frich, Jan C.; Ose, Leiv; Malterud, Kirsti; Fugelli, Per

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE Knowledge about the ways patients perceive their vulnerability to disease is important for communication with patients about risk and preventive health measures. This interview study aimed to explore how patients with a diagnosis of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia understand and perceive their vulnerability to coronary heart disease.

  12. Ocular pathology in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, A M; Bitar, F F; Traboulsi, E I; Kassak, K M; Obeid, M Y; Megarbane, A; Salti, H I

    2005-01-01

    To describe the ocular findings in subjects with congenital heart disease (CHD). In a prospective study, the same observer examined 240 consecutive patients with CHD admitted to the medical centre. Two independent geneticists performed identification of syndromes. The commonest anatomic cardiac anomalies were ventricular or atrial septal defects (62), tetralogy of Fallot (39), pulmonary stenosis (25), and transposition of the great arteries (24). The heart lesions were divided physiologically into volume overload (90), cyanotic (87), and obstructive (63). In all, 105 syndromic subjects included the velocardiofacial syndrome (18), Down's syndrome (17), CHARGE association (6), DiGeorge syndrome (5), Williams syndrome (3), Edwards syndrome (3), Noonan syndrome (3), VACTERL association (2), and Patau syndrome (trisomy 13) (2). The paediatric team recognized 51 patients as syndromic. Two independent geneticists recognized additional 54 patients as syndromic. Positive eye findings were present in 55% (132) and included retinal vascular tortuosity (46), optic disc hypoplasia (30), trichomegaly (15), congenital ptosis (12), strabismus (11), retinal haemorrhages (8), prominent eyes (7), and congenital cataract (6). There was a strong correlation between the retinal vascular tortuosity and both a low haematocrit (P=0.000) and a low arterial oxygen saturation (P=0.002). Patients with CHD are at a high risk for ocular pathology and need screening for various ocular abnormalities.

  13. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks

  14. Remnant cholesterol and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review recent advances in the field of remnant cholesterol as a contributor to the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD). RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiologic, mechanistic, and genetic studies all support a role for elevated remnant cholesterol (=cholesterol in triglyceride......-rich lipoproteins) as a contributor to the development of atherosclerosis and IHD. Observational studies show association between elevated remnant cholesterol and IHD, and mechanistic studies show remnant cholesterol accumulation in the arterial wall like LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) accumulation. Furthermore, large...... genetic studies show evidence of remnant cholesterol as a causal risk factor for IHD independent of HDL-cholesterol levels. Genetic studies also show that elevated remnant cholesterol is associated with low-grade inflammation, whereas elevated LDL-C is not. There are several pharmacologic ways of lowering...

  15. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knekt, Paul; Ritz, John; Pereira, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have suggested a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) at higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain. Whether this association is due to antioxidant vitamins or some other factors remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation between the intake...... of antioxidant vitamins and CHD risk. DESIGN: A cohort study pooling 9 prospective studies that included information on intakes of vitamin E, carotenoids, and vitamin C and that met specific criteria was carried out. During a 10-y follow-up, 4647 major incident CHD events occurred in 293 172 subjects who were...... free of CHD at baseline. RESULTS: Dietary intake of antioxidant vitamins was only weakly related to a reduced CHD risk after adjustment for potential nondietary and dietary confounding factors. Compared with subjects in the lowest dietary intake quintiles for vitamins E and C, those in the highest...

  16. Chronic heart disease caused by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horimoto, Masashi; Matsuhashi, Hironobu; Nakano, Hiroshi; Honda, Hajime; Sekiguchi, Morie.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis was made of 5 patients who had chronic heart disease 18 months to 13 years after radiation therapy for breast cancer or rib osteoblastoma. A total dose of X-ray or electron beam was ≥50 Gy for each patient. Computed tomography of the chest and cardiac catheterization led to the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis with chronic pericardial effusion in one patient and chronic effusive pericarditis in the other three patients. Complete or incomplete right bundle branch block was observed on ECG in 3 patients. Endomyocardial biopsy of the right ventricle for 4 patients revealed nonspecific pathological findings, such as hypertrophy, disarray of cardiac muscle cells, various sized cell nuclei, rarefaction of myofibrils, and slight interstitial fibrosis with infrequent cellular infiltration. The results may implicate radiation-induced myocardial disturbance. Long-term follow-up is mandatory for the management of patients treated with radiation. (Namekawa, K.)

  17. In vino veritas: alcohol and heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joseph A

    2005-03-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies, numbering nearly 100, have documented an inverse association between alcohol consumption and vascular risk. The preponderance of evidence supports an independent beneficial effect of mild-to-moderate alcoholic beverage consumption on risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, it is important to remember that observational data cannot prove causation; unmeasured or incompletely controlled confounding factors cannot be excluded. That said, most authorities now attribute a causal role to the relationship: moderate alcohol consumption reduces the risk of CHD, and current research centers on the mechanistic underpinnings and whether patterns of drinking are important. Here, I review the association between alcohol use and CHD risk, explore putative mechanisms, and make recommendations.

  18. Genetics and Genomics of Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Samir; Brueckner, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect, and due to major advances in medical and surgical management, there are now more adults living with CHD than children. Until recently, the cause of the majority of CHD was unknown. Advances in genomic technologies have discovered the genetic etiology of a significant fraction of CHD, while at the same time pointing to remarkable complexity in CHD genetics. This review will focus on the evidence for genetic causes underlying CHD and discuss data supporting both monogenic and complex genetic mechanisms underlying CHD. The discoveries from CHD genetic studies draw attention to biological pathways that simultaneously open the door to a better understanding of cardiac development, and impact clinical care of CHD patients. Finally, we address clinical genetic evaluation of patients and families affected by CHD. PMID:28302740

  19. Imaging congenital heart disease in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, P J

    2011-12-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography is the first-line modality for cardiovascular imaging in adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD). The windows of access that are possible with transthoracic echocardiography are, however, rarely adequate for all regions of interest. The choice of further imaging depends on the clinical questions that remain to be addressed. The strengths of MRI include comprehensive access and coverage, providing imaging of all parts of the right ventricle, the pulmonary arteries, pulmonary veins and aorta. Cine images and velocity maps are acquired in specifically aligned planes, with stacks of cines or dynamic contrast angiography providing more comprehensive coverage. Tissues can be characterised if necessary, and MRI provides relatively accurate measurements of biventricular function and volume flow. These parameters are important in the assessment and follow-up of adults after repairs for tetralogy of Fallot or transposition of the great arteries and after Fontan operations. The superior spatial resolution and rapid acquisition of CT are invaluable in selected situations, including the visualisation of anomalous coronary or aortopulmonary collateral arteries, the assessment of luminal patency after stenting and imaging in patients with pacemakers. Ionising radiation is, however, a concern in younger patients who may need repeated investigation. Adults with relatively complex conditions should ideally be imaged in a specialist ACHD centre, where dedicated echocardiographic and cardiovascular MRI services are a necessary facility. General radiologists should be aware of the nature and pathophysiology of congenital heart disease, and should be alert for previously undiagnosed cases presenting in adulthood, including cases of atrial septal defect, aortic coarctation, patent ductus arteriosus, double-chambered right ventricle and congenitally corrected transposition.

  20. Silent disease progression in clinically stable heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbah, Hani N

    2017-04-01

    Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is a progressive disorder whereby cardiac structure and function continue to deteriorate, often despite the absence of clinically apparent signs and symptoms of a worsening disease state. This silent yet progressive nature of HFrEF can contribute to the increased risk of death-even in patients who are 'clinically stable', or who are asymptomatic or only mildly symptomatic-because it often goes undetected and/or undertreated. Current therapies are aimed at improving clinical symptoms, and several agents more directly target the underlying causes of disease; however, new therapies are needed that can more fully address factors responsible for underlying progressive cardiac dysfunction. In this review, mechanisms that drive HFrEF, including ongoing cardiomyocyte loss, mitochondrial abnormalities, impaired calcium cycling, elevated LV wall stress, reactive interstitial fibrosis, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, are discussed. Additionally, limitations of current HF therapies are reviewed, with a focus on how these therapies are designed to counteract the deleterious effects of compensatory neurohumoral activation but do not fully prevent disease progression. Finally, new investigational therapies that may improve the underlying molecular, cellular, and structural abnormalities associated with HF progression are reviewed. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.

  1. [Resting heart rate and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2014-07-07

    Heart rate reflects autonomic nervous system activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an increased heart rate at rest is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as an independent risk factor. It has been shown a link between cardiac autonomic balance and inflammation. Thus, an elevated heart rate produces a micro-inflammatory response and is involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. In turn, decrease in heart rate produces benefits in congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Alteration of other heart rate-related parameters, such as their variability and recovery after exercise, is associated with risk of cardiovascular events. Drugs reducing the heart rate (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and inhibitors of If channels) have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Although not recommended in healthy subjects, interventions for reducing heart rate constitute a reasonable therapeutic goal in certain pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worse. Heart-healthy lifestyle changes include: Heart-healthy eating Aiming for a healthy weight Managing stress Physical activity Quitting smoking Many lifestyle habits begin during childhood. Thus, parents and families should ...

  3. Homocysteine, vitamins, and prevention of vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCully, Kilmer S

    2004-04-01

    Within the past four decades, the efforts of investigators worldwide have established the amino acid homocysteine as an important factor in arteriosclerosis and diseases of aging. After its discovery in 1932, homocysteine was demonstrated to be an important intermediate in the metabolism of amino acids. However, little was known about the broader biomedical significance of homocysteine until 1962, when children with mental retardation, accelerated growth, dislocated ocular lenses, and frequent vascular thrombosis were found to excrete homocysteine in the urine. My study of two patients with homocystinuria caused by different inherited enzymatic disorders in 1968 disclosed advanced widespread arteriosclerotic plaques in both cases. This discovery led to the conclusion that homocysteine causes vascular disease by a direct effect on the cells and tissues of the arteries. This interpretation suggests that homocysteine is important in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis in persons with hereditary, dietary, environmental, hormonal, metabolic, and other factors predisposing them to hyperhomocysteinemia. Within the past decade, many major clinical and epidemiological studies have proven that hyperhomocysteinemia is a potent independent risk factor for vascular disease. According to the homocysteine theory of arteriosclerosis, insufficient dietary intake of the B vitamins, folic acid and pyridoxine, caused by losses of these nutrients during processing of foods, leads to elevation of blood homocysteine and vascular disease in the general population. The dramatic decline in cardiovascular mortality since the 1960s in the United States is attributed to fortification of the food supply by synthetic pyridoxine and folic acid. The recent Swiss Heart Study showed that B vitamins slowed restenosis in patients with coronary arteriosclerosis treated with angioplasty. Currently, more than 20 prospective, worldwide, interventional trials involving at least 100,000 participants are

  4. Global research priorities in rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Zühlke, Liesl J

    2011-01-01

    We now stand at a critical juncture for rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) control. In recent years, we have seen a surge of interest in these diseases in regions of the world where RF/RHD mostly occur. This brings real opportunities to make dramatic progress in the next few years, but also real risks if we miss these opportunities. Most public health and clinical approaches in RF/RHD arose directly from programmes of research. Many unanswered questions remain, including those around how to implement what we know will work, so research will continue to be essential in our efforts to bring a global solution to this disease. Here we outline our proposed research priorities in RF/RHD for the coming decade, grouped under the following four challenges: Translating what we know already into practical RHD control; How to identify people with RHD earlier, so that preventive measures have a higher chance of success; Better understanding of disease pathogenesis, with a view to improved diagnosis and treatment of ARF and RHD; and Finding an effective approach to primary prevention. We propose a mixture of basic, applied, and implementation science. With concerted efforts, strong links to clinical and public health infrastructure, and advocacy and funding support from the international community, there are good prospects for controlling these RF and RHD over the next decade

  5. Role of hepatic resection for patients with carcinoid heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernheim, A.M.; Connolly, H.M.; Rubin, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of resection of hepatic carcinoid metastases on progression and prognosis of carcinoid heart disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From our database of 265 consecutive patients diagnosed as having carcinoid heart disease from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2005,...

  6. The trace elements in congenital cyanotic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Hegazi

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Congenital cyanotic heart disease were associated with a highly significant decrease in the mean serum selenium and zinc levels, when compared with control group and non significant increase the mean serum copper levels. Changes in these trace elements suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of myocardial damage in congenital cyanotic heart disease.

  7. Heart Disease in Women: Understand Symptoms and Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Some research has found that if you had pregnancy complications such as high blood pressure or diabetes your children may also have an increased risk of heart disease in the future. Women with inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus, may also have a higher risk of heart ...

  8. status, risk factors disease Socio-economic and coronary heart

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-21

    Jul 21, 1990 ... status, risk factors disease. Socio-economic and coronary heart. The CORIS baseline study. J. E. ROSSOUW, P. L. JOOSTE, H. J. STEENKAMP, M. L. THOMPSON, ... and coronary risk factors (RFs) with coronary heart disease .... definition, was decided upon after exploration of their strength of association ...

  9. Heart disease among children with HIV/AIDS attending the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There are very few published studies of heart disease in HIV infected children living in sub-Saharan Africa, a region with more than 50% of the world's population of HIV infected patients. Objectives: To determine the prevalence, and describe the type and clinical presentation of heart disease among children ...

  10. Job strain as a risk factor for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, G David

    2012-01-01

    Published work assessing psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is inconsistent and subject to publication bias and reverse causation bias. We analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease with a meta-analysis of published and unpublishe...

  11. The genetics of congenital heart disease… understanding and improving long-term outcomes in congenital heart disease: a review for the general cardiologist and primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, M Abigail; Brueckner, Martina

    2017-10-01

    This review has two purposes: to provide an updated review of the genetic causes of congenital heart disease (CHD) and the clinical implications of these genetic mutations, and to provide a clinical algorithm for clinicians considering a genetics evaluation of a CHD patient. A large portion of congenital heart disease is thought to have a significant genetic contribution, and at this time a genetic cause can be identified in approximately 35% of patients. Through the advances made possible by next generation sequencing, many of the comorbidities that are frequently seen in patients with genetic congenital heart disease patients can be attributed to the genetic mutation that caused the congenital heart disease. These comorbidities are both cardiac and noncardiac and include: neurodevelopmental disability, pulmonary disease, heart failure, renal dysfunction, arrhythmia and an increased risk of malignancy. Identification of the genetic cause of congenital heart disease helps reduce patient morbidity and mortality by improving preventive and early intervention therapies to address these comorbidities. Through an understanding of the clinical implications of the genetic underpinning of congenital heart disease, clinicians can provide care tailored to an individual patient and continue to improve the outcomes of congenital heart disease patients.

  12. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  13. Heart disease and gender in mass print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Juanne

    2008-03-01

    Heart disease is a major cause of death, disease and disability in the developed world for both men and women. Nevertheless, the evidence suggests that women are under-diagnosed both because they fail to visit the doctor with relevant symptoms and because doctors tend to dismiss the seriousness of women's symptoms of heart disease. This study examines the way that popular mass print media present the possible links between gender and heart disease. The findings suggest that the 'usual candidates' for heart disease are considered to be high achieving and active men for whom the 'heart attack' is sometimes seen as a 'badge of honour' and a symbol of their success. In contrast, women are less often seen as likely to succumb, but they are portrayed as if they are and ought to be worried about their husbands. Women's own bodies are described as so problematic as to be perhaps useless to diagnose, because they are so difficult to understand and treat.

  14. Heart-Healthy Diet: Eight Steps to Prevent Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You can grind the seeds in a coffee grinder or food processor and stir a teaspoon of ... Coconut, palm, cottonseed and palm-kernel oils Lean meat, poultry and fish, low-fat dairy products, and ...

  15. Increased arterial stiffness in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häcker, Anna-Luisa; Reiner, Barbara; Oberhoffer, Renate; Hager, Alfred; Ewert, Peter; Müller, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Objective Central systolic blood pressure (SBP) is a measure of arterial stiffness and strongly associated with atherosclerosis and end-organ damage. It is a stronger predictor of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality than peripheral SBP. In particular, for children with congenital heart disease, a higher central SBP might impose a greater threat of cardiac damage. The aim of the study was to analyse and compare central SBP in children with congenital heart disease and in healthy counterparts. Patients and methods Central SBP was measured using an oscillometric method in 417 children (38.9% girls, 13.0 ± 3.2 years) with various congenital heart diseases between July 2014 and February 2017. The test results were compared with a recent healthy reference cohort of 1466 children (49.5% girls, 12.9 ± 2.5 years). Results After correction for several covariates in a general linear model, central SBP of children with congenital heart disease was significantly increased (congenital heart disease: 102.1 ± 10.2 vs. healthy reference cohort: 100.4 ± 8.6, p congenital heart disease subgroups revealed higher central SBP in children with left heart obstructions (mean difference: 3.6 mmHg, p hearts after total cavopulmonary connection (mean difference: 2.1 mmHg, p = .015) compared with the reference. Conclusion Children with congenital heart disease have significantly higher central SBP compared with healthy peers, predisposing them to premature heart failure. Screening and long-term observations of central SBP in children with congenital heart disease seems warranted in order to evaluate the need for treatment.

  16. Metabolic syndrome in patients with ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasmin, S.; Naveed, T.; Shakoor, T.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in patients with Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD). Cross-sectional, descriptive study. A total of 100 subjects with ischemic heart disease, fulfilling the inclusion criteria, were enrolled in the study. Demographic data (age and gender) and the 5 component conditions of the metabolic syndrome were noted. Subjects were physically assessed for the abdominal obesity, based on waist circumference. Fasting blood samples for glucose and lipid profile in first 24 hours after acute coronary insult were drawn and tested in central laboratory. Variables were processed for descriptive statistics. In this study population, 68% were male and 32% were female with mean age of 52 +-13.6 years in men and 56 +- 12.5 years in women. Frequency of metabolic syndrome was 32% in men and 28% in women. It increased with age. The highest rate of metabolic syndrome was in men diagnosed as STEMI (odds ratio: 3.39, 95% CI=1.36-8.41). Frequency of metabolic syndrome was high among the patients with IHD. It supports the potential for preventive efforts in persons with high-risk of IHD. (author)

  17. Improving coronary heart disease self-management using mobile technologies (Text4Heart): a randomised controlled trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Dale, Leila Pfaeffli; Whittaker, Robyn; Jiang, Yannan; Stewart, Ralph; Rolleston, Anna; Maddison, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a secondary prevention program that offers education and support to assist patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) make lifestyle changes. Despite the benefits of CR, attendance at centre-based sessions remains low. Mobile technology (mHealth) has potential to reach more patients by delivering CR directly to mobile phones, thus providing an alternative to centre-based CR. The aim of this trial is to evaluate if a mHealth comprehensive CR program ca...

  18. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Nagib Gaui

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. Objective: To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast, from 1996 to 2011. Methods: Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Results: Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Conclusions: Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes.

  19. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib; Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes de; Klein, Carlos Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes

  20. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib, E-mail: engaui@cardiol.br; Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Klein, Carlos Henrique [Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública Sérgio Arouca da Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-06-15

    Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes.

  1. Carcinoid Heart Disease without Severe Tricuspid Valve Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killu, Ammar M; Newman, Darrell B; Miranda, William R; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Pellikka, Patricia; Schaff, Hartzell V; Connolly, Heidi M

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid syndrome causes a rare form of acquired valvular heart disease which typically occurs in the setting of liver metastases. In carcinoid-induced valvular heart disease, the tricuspid valve is almost universally affected; left-sided valve disease occurs infrequently in affected patients. Herein, we report 2 cases of carcinoid-induced valvular heart disease; one case had no evidence of tricuspid valve involvement despite severe involvement of all other valves, while the other case was without severe tricuspid valve involvement. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Right Ventricular Adaptation in Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrijs Bartelds

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last four decades, enormous progress has been made in the treatment of congenital heart diseases (CHD; most patients now survive into adulthood, albeit with residual lesions. As a consequence, the focus has shifted from initial treatment to long-term morbidity and mortality. An important predictor for long-term outcome is right ventricular (RV dysfunction, but knowledge on the mechanisms of RV adaptation and dysfunction is still scarce. This review will summarize the main features of RV adaptation to CHD, focusing on recent knowledge obtained in experimental models of the most prevalent abnormal loading conditions, i.e., pressure load and volume load. Models of increased pressure load for the RV have shown a similar pattern of responses, i.e., increased contractility, RV dilatation and hypertrophy. Evidence is accumulating that RV failure in response to increased pressure load is marked by progressive diastolic dysfunction. The mechanisms of this progressive dysfunction are insufficiently known. The RV response to pressure load shares similarities with that of the LV, but also has specific features, e.g., capillary rarefaction, oxidative stress and inflammation. The contribution of these pathways to the development of failure needs further exploration. The RV adaptation to increased volume load is an understudied area, but becomes increasingly important in the growing groups of survivors of CHD, especially with tetralogy of Fallot. Recently developed animal models may add to the investigation of the mechanisms of RV adaptation and failure, leading to the development of new RV-specific therapies.

  3. Diet and cancer and heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    The modern Western diet bears little resemblance to the diet which forged the human genome over many million years. The change in basic food structure is operating to distort biology even before conception and into late years, with the epidemic of obesity and diabetes likely to lead to stroke, heart disease, and now dementia, being flagged as a consequence. In addition, mental ill health is overtaking all other burdens of ill health, and almost certainly has its roots in early disturbance of brain development. Whilst lifestyle will be playing its part, there can be little doubt that the common denominator is the aberrations in food development, predominantly in the last century. It seems it is time to reassess food policy. The principle of food production should be nutrition and human health. The globalisation of a food structure linked to such disorders and their appearance globally in response asks that steps be taken to protect other countries from making the same mistakes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Genomic imbalances in syndromic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molck, Miriam Coelho; Simioni, Milena; Paiva Vieira, Társis; Sgardioli, Ilária Cristina; Paoli Monteiro, Fabíola; Souza, Josiane; Fett-Conte, Agnes Cristina; Félix, Têmis Maria; Lopes Monlléo, Isabella; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera Lúcia

    To identify pathogenic genomic imbalances in patients presenting congenital heart disease (CHD) with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS). 78 patients negative for the 22q11.2 deletion, previously screened by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and/or multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA) were tested by chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). Clinically significant copy number variations (CNVs ≥300kb) were identified in 10% (8/78) of cases. In addition, potentially relevant CNVs were detected in two cases (993kb duplication in 15q21.1 and 706kb duplication in 2p22.3). Genes inside the CNV regions found in this study, such as IRX4, BMPR1A, SORBS2, ID2, ROCK2, E2F6, GATA4, SOX7, SEMAD6D, FBN1, and LTPB1 are known to participate in cardiac development and could be candidate genes for CHD. These data showed that patients presenting CHD with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 DS should be investigated by CMA. The present study emphasizes the possible role of CNVs in CHD. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Zakirova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the role of endothelial vasodilating, vasoconstrictive and adhesive dysfunction in the development of angina pectoris (AP in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD.Material and methods. 83 patients with IHD were included in the study. 30 patients had AP of functional class (FC-II, 27 patients - FC-III and 26 patients - FC-IV. The control group consisted of 25 healthy persons. Bicycle ergometry, daily ECG monitoring and echocardiography were used for verification of IHD. Endothelial vasodilating function was assessed by endothelium-dependent (EDVD and endothelium-independent vasodilatation (EIDVD of brachial artery. Vasoconstrictive function was assessed by the level of endothelin (ET-1. Endothelial adhesive function was evaluated by plasma concentration of intracellular adhesion molecules – JCAM-1, VCAM-1 and Е-selectin.Results. Normal EDVD and EIDVD were observed in patients with AP of FC-II. The more severe FC of AP the more prominent endothelial vasodilating dysfunction was revealed as well as the higher levels of ET-1 and intracellular adhesion molecules. Patients with AP of FC-IV had hyperexpression of JCAM-1, VCAM-1, Е-selectin and ET-1 and low levels of EDVD and EIDVD.Conclusion. Progression of IHD related with growing endothelial vasodilating, vasoconstrictive and adhesive dysfunction.

  6. Genomic imbalances in syndromic congenital heart disease,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Coelho Molck

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To identify pathogenic genomic imbalances in patients presenting congenital heart disease (CHD with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS. Methods: 78 patients negative for the 22q11.2 deletion, previously screened by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and/or multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA were tested by chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA. Results: Clinically significant copy number variations (CNVs ≥300 kb were identified in 10% (8/78 of cases. In addition, potentially relevant CNVs were detected in two cases (993 kb duplication in 15q21.1 and 706 kb duplication in 2p22.3. Genes inside the CNV regions found in this study, such as IRX4, BMPR1A, SORBS2, ID2, ROCK2, E2F6, GATA4, SOX7, SEMAD6D, FBN1, and LTPB1 are known to participate in cardiac development and could be candidate genes for CHD. Conclusion: These data showed that patients presenting CHD with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 DS should be investigated by CMA. The present study emphasizes the possible role of CNVs in CHD.

  7. Parental overprotection and heart-focused anxiety in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Lephuong; Nolan, Robert P; Irvine, Jane; Kovacs, Adrienne H

    2011-09-01

    The care of adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) is challenging from a mental health perspective, as these patients continue to face a variety of biopsychosocial issues that may impact emotional functioning. Despite these issues, there are limited data on the psychosocial functioning of adults with CHD, and there are no data on the impact of parental overprotection on heart-focused anxiety in this patient population. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between patient recollections of parental overprotection and current heart-focused anxiety in adults with CHD. A cross-sectional sample of 190 adult patients with CHD (51% male; mean age = 32.28, SD = 11.86 years) completed validated measures of perceived parental overprotection (Parental Bonding Instrument) and heart-focused anxiety (Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire). The results indicated that perceived parental overprotection (β = 0.19, p = 0.02) and heart defect complexity (β = 0.17, p = 0.03) were significantly related to heart-focused anxiety. Contrary to hypotheses, perceived parental overprotection did not vary as a function of heart defect complexity (F (2, 169) = 0.02, p = 0.98). Perceived parental overprotection and heart defect complexity are associated with heart-focused anxiety in adults with congenital heart disease. These results can inform the development of clinical interventions aimed at improving the psychosocial adjustment of this patient population.

  8. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Application CDC Legionella Healthy Swimming CDC Vessel Sanitation Program Unexplained Respiratory Disease Outbreaks (URDO) European Legionnaires’ Disease Surveillance Network (ELDSNet) Prevention Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  9. Heart rate and heart rate variability in dogs with different degrees of myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    HEART RATE AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN DOGS WITH DIFFERENT DEGREES OF MYXOMATOUS MITRAL VALVE DISEASE. CE Rasmussen1, T Falk1, NE Zois1, SG Moesgaard1, HD Pedersen2, J Häggström3 and LH Olsen1. 1. Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University...... of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. 2. Novo Nordic A/S, Maaloev, Denmark. 3. Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Uppsala, Sweden. Heart rate variability (HRV) is an indirect measurement of the autonomic modulation of heart rate (HR). Reduced HRV measured from short......-time electrocardiography is seen in dogs with heart failure (HF) secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). However, HRV is suggested to increase with disease severity at early stages of MMVD. The aims of this study were 1) to associate HR and HRV with severity of MMVD in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCS...

  10. Variabilidade entre cardiologistas na abordagem aos pacientes em prevenção secundária da cardiopatia isquêmica Variability among cardiologists in the management of patients under secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Stein

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar o manejo dos pacientes com cardiopatia isquêmica, atendidos por cardiologistas em ambulatório geral de cardiologia, com aquele realizado em ambulatório específico de cardiopatia isquêmica, dando ênfase à solicitação do perfil lipídico e ao tratamento farmacológico prescrito. MÉTODOS: Dados obtidos de prontuário médico de 52 pacientes consecutivos atendidos no ambulatório de cardiopatia isquêmica (grupo I e de 43 acompanhados no ambulatório de cardiologia geral (grupo II, sendo o diagnóstico anatômico de cardiopatia isquêmica, condição básica para sua inclusão. Considerou-se critério para dislipidemia, colesterol total > 200mg/dl e/ou LDL colesterol > 100 mg/dl em pacientes em uso ou não de hipolipemiantes e o uso de drogas hipolipemiantes, mesmo quando os níveis de colesterol total e/ou LDL colesterol eram OBECTIVE: To compare the management of patients with ischemic heart disease being followed up in a general cardiology outpatient clinic with that of patients being followed up in an outpatient clinic specific for ischemic heart disease, emphasizing the lipid profile and the pharmacological treatment prescribed. METHODS: Data were collected from the medical records of 52 patients consecutively treated in the outpatient clinic for ischemic heart disease (group I and of 43 patients treated in the general cardiology outpatient clinic (group II, the anatomical diagnosis of ischemic heart disease being the basic condition for their inclusion in the study. The criteria for dyslipidemia were as follows: total cholesterol > 200 mg/dL or LDL-cholesterol > 100 mg/dL, or both, in patients using or not lipid-lowering drugs, and the use of lipid-lowering drugs, even when the total cholesterol or LDL-cholesterol levels were < 200 mg/dL and 100 mg/dL, respectively, or both. The Fisher exact test was used for comparing the variables, and a 2-tailed p < 0.05 was accepted as significant. RESULTS: Demographic

  11. Management of Cardiac Involvement Associated With Neuromuscular Diseases: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, Brian; Mahle, William T; Auerbach, Scott; Clemens, Paula; Domenighetti, Andrea A; Jefferies, John L; Judge, Daniel P; Lal, Ashwin K; Markham, Larry W; Parks, W James; Tsuda, Takeshi; Wang, Paul J; Yoo, Shi-Joon

    2017-09-26

    For many neuromuscular diseases (NMDs), cardiac disease represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The management of cardiac disease in NMDs is made challenging by the broad clinical heterogeneity that exists among many NMDs and by limited knowledge about disease-specific cardiovascular pathogenesis and course-modifying interventions. The overlay of compromise in peripheral muscle function and other organ systems, such as the lungs, also makes the simple application of endorsed adult or pediatric heart failure guidelines to the NMD population problematic. In this statement, we provide background on several NMDs in which there is cardiac involvement, highlighting unique features of NMD-associated myocardial disease that require clinicians to tailor their approach to prevention and treatment of heart failure. Undoubtedly, further investigations are required to best inform future guidelines on NMD-specific cardiovascular health risks, treatments, and outcomes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. The Genetics of Ischemic Heart Disease: From Current Knowledge to Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elosua, Roberto; Sayols-Baixeras, Sergi

    2017-09-01

    Ischemic heart disease continues to cause high morbidity and mortality. Its prevalence is expected to increase due to population aging, and its prevention is a major goal of health policies. The risk of developing ischemic heart disease is related to a complex interplay between genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors. In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in knowledge of the genetic architecture of this disease. This narrative review provides an overview of current knowledge of the genetics of ischemic heart disease and of its translation to clinical practice: identification of new therapeutic targets, assessment of the causal relationship between biomarkers and disease, improved risk prediction, and identification of responders and nonresponders to specific drugs (pharmacogenomics). Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  14. Parental reactions to children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garson, A; Benson, R S; Ivler, L; Patton, C

    1978-01-01

    Informal discussions with 260 families of children with congenital heart disease are reported. Parents raised questions concerning etiology, timing of the diagnosis, pathophysiology and symptomatology, and need for restriction. Depending upon the stage and seriousness of the disease, common parental behavior was observed. A psychological process similar to mourning is required at the time of diagnosis and at the time of corrective surgery in order to promote the family's adaptation to the child with congenital heart disease. Management suggestions are included.

  15. Pandora's Box: mitochondrial defects in ischaemic heart disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andalib, Sasan; Divani, Afshin A; Michel, Tanja M; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul F; Vafaee, Manouchehr S; Gjedde, Albert

    2017-04-05

    Ischaemic heart disease and stroke are vascular events with serious health consequences worldwide. Recent genetic and epigenetic techniques have revealed many genetic determinants of these vascular events and simplified the approaches to research focused on ischaemic heart disease and stroke. The pathogenetic mechanisms of ischaemic heart disease and stroke are complex, with mitochondrial involvement (partially or entirely) recently gaining substantial support. Not only can mitochondrial reactive oxygen species give rise to ischaemic heart disease and stroke by production of oxidised low-density lipoprotein and induction of apoptosis, but the impact on pericytes contributes directly to the pathogenesis. Over the past two decades, publications implicate the causative role of nuclear genes in the development of ischaemic heart disease and stroke, in contrast to the potential role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the pathophysiology of the disorders, which is much less understood, although recent studies do demonstrate that the involvement of mitochondria and mtDNA in the development of ischaemic heart disease and stroke is likely to be larger than originally thought, with the novel discovery of links among mitochondria, mtDNA and vascular events. Here we explore the molecular events and mtDNA alterations in relation to the role of mitochondria in ischaemic heart disease and stroke.

  16. Baseline Depressive Symptoms Predict Subsequent Heart Disease; A 20-Year Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Moghani Lankarani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Depression is common among patients with heart disease. Depression is also associated with worse outcomes among patients with heart disease. Fewer studies have shown whether or not baseline depressive symptoms predict subsequent heart disease in general population.

  17. Comparative assessment of the diets of healthy individuals, subjects with preclinical coronary heart disease and patients with severe heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronov, D.M.; Eganyan, R.A.; Kovaleva, O.F.; Zhidko, N.I.; Danielov, G.Eh.; Rozhnov, A.V.; Shcherbakova, I.A.

    1991-01-01

    92 males aged 26 to 55 (28 healthy individuals, 45 persons with preclinical coronary heart disease and 19 patients with functional class 1-2 coronary heart disease) were examined to study the peculiarities and dietary patterns of persons with a high physical working capacity and having no typical clinical signs of the disease. All persons were subjected to a complex examination which included questionnarire, myocardial scintigraphy with 201 Tl at a maximum physical loading, echocardiography, coronaroangiography. Certain dietary peculiarities are established in persons with preclinical coronary heart disease

  18. State of the Art Coronary Heart Disease Risk Estimation based on the Framingham Heart Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reissigová, Jindra; Tomečková, Marie

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2005), s. 180-186 ISSN 0022-1732 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Framingham heart study * coronary heart disease * risk validation study * calibration * discrimination Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  19. Stress-induced heart symptoms and perceptual biases in patients with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, Petra A.; Kindt, Merel; Rietveld, Simon; Everaerd, Walter; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study is to clarify whether biased symptom perception towards heart symptoms may explain a reduced quality of life in patients with congenital heart disease (ConHD). The present study tested the hypothesis that the combination of ConHD and high trait anxiety

  20. The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone-system and right heart failure in congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine Andersen

    2016-06-01

    To conclude, existing studies do not support the use of RAAS inhibitory treatments in right heart failure due to congenital heart disease but contain important limitations. Hence, there is a need for new well-designed trials including higher numbers of patients and validated endpoints to optimize and guide future treatment of this patient group.

  1. Widespread recent increases in county-level heart disease mortality across age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Adam S; Ritchey, Matthew D; Hannan, Judy; Kramer, Michael R; Casper, Michele

    2017-12-01

    Recent national trends show decelerating declines in heart disease mortality, especially among younger adults. National trends may mask variation by geography and age. We examined recent county-level trends in heart disease mortality by age group. Using a Bayesian statistical model and National Vital Statistics Systems data, we estimated overall rates and percent change in heart disease mortality from 2010 through 2015 for four age groups (35-44, 45-54, 55-64, and 65-74 years) in 3098 US counties. Nationally, heart disease mortality declined in every age group except ages 55-64 years. County-level trends by age group showed geographically widespread increases, with 52.3%, 58.5%, 69.1%, and 42.0% of counties experiencing increases with median percent changes of 0.6%, 2.2%, 4.6%, and -1.5% for ages 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, and 65-74 years, respectively. Increases were more likely in counties with initially high heart disease mortality and outside large metropolitan areas. Recent national trends have masked local increases in heart disease mortality. These increases, especially among adults younger than age 65 years, represent challenges to communities across the country. Reversing these trends may require intensification of primary and secondary prevention-focusing policies, strategies, and interventions on younger populations, especially those living in less urban counties. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Overview of Coronary Heart Disease Risk Initiatives in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Ankur; Bhatt, Deepak L; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Suri, Kunal; Mishra, Sundeep; Iqbal, Romaina; Virani, Salim S

    2017-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is now the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Industrialization and economic growth have led to an unprecedented increment in the burden of CVD and their risk factors in less industrialized regions of the world. While there are abundant data on CVD and their risk factors from longitudinal cohort studies done in the West, good-quality data from South Asia are lacking. Several multi-institutional, observational, prospective registries, and epidemiologic cohorts in South Asia have been established to systematically evaluate the burden of CVD and their risk factors. The PINNACLE (Practice Innovation and Clinical Excellence) India Quality Improvement Program (PIQIP), the Kerala Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS), and Trivandrum Heart Failure registries have focused on secondary prevention of CVD and performance measurement in both outpatient and inpatient settings, respectively. The Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiology (PURE), Centre for Cardiometabolic Risk Reduction in South Asia (CARRS), and other epidemiologic and genetic studies have focused on primary prevention of CVD and evaluated variables such as environment, smoking, physical activity, health systems, food and nutrition policy, dietary consumption patterns, socioeconomic factors, and healthy neighborhoods. The international cardiovascular community has been responsive to a burgeoning cardiovascular disease burden in South Asia. Several collaborations have formed between the West (North America in particular) and South Asia to catalyze evidence-based and data-driven changes in the federal health policy in this part of the world to promote cardiovascular health and mitigate cardiovascular risk.

  3. Congenital and Acquired Valvular Heart Disease in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Sarah A; Ward, Cary C

    2017-08-24

    The number of pregnancies complicated by valvular heart disease is increasing. This review describes the hemodynamic effects of clinically important valvular abnormalities during pregnancy and reviews current guideline-driven management strategies. Valvular heart disease in women of childbearing age is most commonly caused by congenital abnormalities and rheumatic heart disease. Regurgitant lesions are well tolerated, while stenotic lesions are associated with a higher risk of pregnancy-related complications. Management of symptomatic disease during pregnancy is primarily medical, with percutaneous interventions considered for refractory symptoms. Most guidelines addressing the management of valvular heart disease during pregnancy are based on case reports and observational studies. Additional investigation is required to further advance the care of this growing patient population.

  4. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid biomarkers and coronary heart disease: Pooling project of 19 cohort studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids for primary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) remains controversial. Most prior longitudinal studies evaluated self-reported consumption rather than biomarkers. This study sought to evaluate biomarkers of seafood-derived eicosapentaenoic acid ...

  5. Changes in total death rate and in ischaemic heart disease death ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in total death rate and in ischaemic heart disease death rate in interethnic South African populations, 1978 - 1989. ... While knowledge of the reasons for the rises and falls in IHD rates reInains incomplete, whites have none the less taken some preventive action, although Asians and coloureds apparently little.

  6. Serum zinc values in children with congenital heart disease | Sadoh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Some children with congenital heart diseases (CHD) may have increased pulmonary blood flow that causes recurrent bronchopneumonia and congestive heart failure. Serum zinc is reduced in children with pneumonia and patients on diuretics. Objective: To evaluate the serum zinc level of children with CHD ...

  7. Carcinoid heart disease: two clinical cases and a review | Weinreich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and quality of life for patients with carcinoid heart disease. Therapy includes somatostatin analogues and treatment for heart failure, removal of primary or metastatic tumour deposits, valve replacement in the presence of valvular involvement, and radioisotopes therapy. Keywords: carcinoid, cardiac involvement, treatment ...

  8. Heartbeat sensitivity in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, Simon; Karsdorp, Petra A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2004-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that patients with a congenital heart disease are sensitive regarding heartbeat perception, reflected in enhanced attention for heartbeat, estimation of own heart rate, and a vulnerability to become anxious by listening to heartbeat sounds. Twenty adults with a

  9. [Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is a rare inherited heart disease.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Tfelt-Hansen, 1jacob; Olesen, Morten S

    2010-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is a rare inherited heart disease, which can lead to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in patients with a structurally normal heart. The age of onset is usually between two and 12 years and the initial symptom is frequently syncope...

  10. Pattern and Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Disease in Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the pattern of Congenital Heart Diseases (CHD) in children referred to Ahmed Gasim Cardiac Center) in Khartoum. Methods: This is a prospective cross-sectional, clinic based study conducted over a six months period. The children were referred to the Cardiac Centre because of suspected heart ...

  11. Women, Loneliness, and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Rebecca C.; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine associations between loneliness and risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) over a 19-year follow-up period in a community sample of men and women. Loneliness, the perceived discrepancy between actual and desired social relationships, has been linked to several adverse health outcomes. However, no previous research has prospectively examined the association between loneliness and incident CHD in a community sample of men and women. Methods Hypotheses were examined using data from the First National Health and Nutrition Survey and its follow-up studies (n = 3003). Loneliness, assessed by one item from the Center for Epidemiologic Studies of Depression scale, and covariates were derived from baseline interviews. Incident CHD was derived from hospital records/death certificates over 19 years of follow-up. Hypotheses were evaluated, using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Among women, high loneliness was associated with increased risk of incident CHD (high: hazard ratio = 1.76, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.17â2.63; medium: hazard ratio = 0.98, 95% Confidence Interval = 0.64â1.49; reference: low), controlling for age, race, education, income, marital status, hypertension, diabetes, cholesterol, physical activity, smoking, alcohol use, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and body mass index. Findings persisted additionally controlling for depressive symptoms. No significant associations were observed among men. Conclusions Loneliness was prospectively associated with increased risk of incident CHD, controlling for multiple confounding factors. Loneliness among women may merit clinical attention, not only due to its impact on quality of life but also its potential implications for cardiovascular health. PMID:19661189

  12. Benefits of olive oil phenolic compounds in disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martinez, Olga; Ruiz, Concepcion; Gutierrez-Ibanez, Alvaro; Illescas-Montes, Rebeca; Melguizo-Rodriguez, Lucia

    2018-02-12

    The preventive effects of olive oil against different diseases have been attributed to its high phenolic compound content. The objective of this study was to examine available scientific evidence on the beneficial effects against chronic diseases of olive oil phenolic compounds. This article examines recently published data on olive oil phenolic compounds and their potential benefits in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, cancer, neurodegenerative disease, and osteoporosis. The antioxidant, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory activities of olive oil phenolic compounds have preventive effects against heart disease and cancer. These compounds also exert neuroprotective and neuromodulator effects against neurodegenerative disease, inhibiting the development of amyloid plaques. Finally, they are known to protect against osteoporosis, favoring bone regeneration. Dietary intake of olive oil can be recommended by healthcare professionals as an important source of phenolic compounds that play a role in the prevention of chronic disease and the consequent improvement in quality of life. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) About Ebola Questions & Answers 2014- ...

  14. Direct myocardial perfusion imaging in valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, R.C.; Durante, M.L.; Villacorta, E.V.; Torres, J.F.; Monzon, O.P.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty two patients with rheumatic valvular heart disease - 21 having a history of heart failure - were studied using direct coronary injection of sup(99m)Tc labelled MAA particles during the course of hemodynamic and arteriographic studies. Myocardial perfusion deficit patterns have been shown to be consistent or indicative of either patchy, regional or gross ischemia. In patients with history of documented heart failure 90% (18 cases) had ischemic perfusion deficit in the involved ventricle. We conclude that diminished myocardial blood flow is an important mechanism contributing to the development of heart failure. (orig.) [de

  15. Childhood Heart Disease - A partnership model of integrated care

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Holly; Brooke, Mark

    2018-01-01

    HeartKids is a national charity supporting infants, children, young people and adults living with or impacted by congenital / childhood heart disease. For over 20 years HeartKids has worked in partnership with Lady Cilento Children's Hospital to deliver services and support to families.HeartKids supports families in hosptial and in the commuity with a suite of support programs lead by both health profesisonals and volunteers.  Critical to our model of care is a partnership with Lady Cilento C...

  16. Prevalence and correlates of heart disease among adults in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picco, Louisa; Subramaniam, Mythily; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2016-02-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and it has been well established that it is associated with both mental and physical conditions. This paper describes the prevalence of heart disease with mental disorders and other chronic physical conditions among the Singapore resident population. Data were from the Singapore Mental Health Study which was a representative, cross-sectional epidemiological survey undertaken with 6616 Singapore residents, between December 2009 and December 2010. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 was used to establish the diagnosis of mental disorders, while a chronic medical conditions checklist was used to gather information on 15 physical conditions, including various forms of heart disease. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Euro-Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D). The lifetime prevalence of heart disease was 2.8%. Socio-demographic correlates of heart disease included older age, Indian ethnicity, secondary education (vs. tertiary) and being economically inactive. After adjusting for socio-demographic variables and other comorbid physical and mental disorders, the prevalence of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder were significantly higher among those with heart disease, as were diabetes, arthritis, kidney failure and lung disease. These findings highlight important associations between heart disease and various socio-demographic correlates, mental disorders and physical conditions. Given the high prevalence of mood disorders among heart disease patients, timely and appropriate screening and treatment of mental disorders among this group is essential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. MicroRNAs in Valvular Heart Diseases: Potential Role as Markers and Actors of Valvular and Cardiac Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Oury, C?cile; Servais, Laurence; Bouznad, Nassim; Hego, Alexandre; Nchimi, Alain; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2016-01-01

    miRNAs are a class of over 5000 noncoding RNAs that regulate more than half of the protein-encoding genes by provoking their degradation or preventing their translation. miRNAs are key regulators of complex biological processes underlying several cardiovascular disorders, including left ventricular hypertrophy, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, hypertension and arrhythmias. Moreover, circulating miRNAs herald promise as biomarkers in acute myocardial infarction and heart failure. In this...

  18. Prevalence of coronary heart disease in Scotland: Scottish Heart Health Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, W C; Kenicer, M B; Tunstall-Pedoe, H; Clark, E C; Crombie, I K

    1990-01-01

    Data from 10,359 men and women aged 40-59 years from 22 districts in the Scottish Heart Health Study were used to describe the prevalence rates of coronary heart disease in Scotland in 1984-1986 and their relation to the geographical variation in mortality in these districts. Prevalence was measured by previous history, Rose chest pain questionnaire, and the Minnesota code of a 12 lead resting electrocardiogram. The prevalence of coronary heart disease in Scotland was high compared with studi...

  19. Establishment of Relational Model of Congenital Heart Disease Markers and GO Functional Analysis of the Association between Its Serum Markers and Susceptibility Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Min; Zhao, Luosha; Yuan, Jiaying

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of present study was to construct the best screening model of congenital heart disease serum markers and to provide reference for further prevention and treatment of the disease. Methods. Documents from 2006 to 2014 were collected and meta-analysis was used for screening susceptibility genes and serum markers closely related to the diagnosis of congenital heart disease. Data of serum markers were extracted from 80 congenital heart disease patients and 80 healthy controls,...

  20. Heart and/or soul : reality and fiction in the association between the two strongest contributors to the global burden of disease - ischemic heart disease and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Peter

    Depression and heart disease are the strongest contributors to the global burden of disease and are often intertwined: depression is a risk factor for heart disease and vice versa. Moreover, depression in patients with established heart disease is associated with cardiovascular disease progression.

  1. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Overweight and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Women Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease Overweight and Obesity A healthy weight is important for a long, vigorous life. Yet overweight and obesity (extreme overweight) have reached epidemic levels ...

  2. Genetically elevated bilirubin and risk of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Frikke-Schmidt, R; Nordestgaard, B G

    2013-01-01

    Elevated plasma levels of bilirubin, an endogenous antioxidant, have been associated with reduced risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). Whether this is a causal relationship remains unclear....

  3. heart disease in southern africa with special reference to ischaemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-06-12

    arteriosclerotic and degenera- tive heart disease' appears to be the highest in the world. If serum cholesterol levels bear any relationship to the development of atherosclerosis, the observations of Du. Plessis et al." are of special ...

  4. Recognizing the Symptoms of Worsening Heart Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... become short of breath? Is it walking three miles? Or has that three mile distance gotten shorter and shorter over time so ... her life depended on it. This content was last reviewed May 2016. Heart Valve Problems and Disease • ...

  5. Preventing Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors through Aerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focused on the reduction of cardiovascular disease risk factors, through aerobic exercises. The central argument here is that through exercise there is the tendency for increased strength of the heart muscles. When this is the case, what follows is a reduction in body weight and ultimately less risk on the ...

  6. Ivabradine, coronary artery disease, and heart failure: beyond rhythm control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scicchitano, Pietro; Cortese, Francesca; Ricci, Gabriella; Carbonara, Santa; Moncelli, Michele; Iacoviello, Massimo; Cecere, Annagrazia; Gesualdo, Michele; Zito, Annapaola; Caldarola, Pasquale; Scrutinio, Domenico; Lagioia, Rocco; Riccioni, Graziano; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Elevated heart rate could negatively influence cardiovascular risk in the general population. It can induce and promote the atherosclerotic process by means of several mechanisms involving endothelial shear stress and biochemical activities. Furthermore, elevated heart rate can directly increase heart ischemic conditions because of its skill in unbalancing demand/supply of oxygen and decreasing the diastolic period. Thus, many pharmacological treatments have been proposed in order to reduce heart rate and ameliorate the cardiovascular risk profile of individuals, especially those suffering from coronary artery diseases (CAD) and chronic heart failure (CHF). Ivabradine is the first pure heart rate reductive drug approved and currently used in humans, created in order to selectively reduce sinus node function and to overcome the many side effects of similar pharmacological tools (ie, β-blockers or calcium channel antagonists). The aim of our review is to evaluate the role and the safety of this molecule on CAD and CHF therapeutic strategies. PMID:24940047

  7. Women, the menopause, hormone replacement therapy and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whayne, Thomas F; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease considerations are associated with the menopause. Despite a misconception that women have a minimal risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), it is the major cause of female deaths. This review highlights issues of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and CHD in women. A woman under age 60, who suffers a myocardial infarction (MI), has a 2-year post-MI mortality of 28.9%; it is 19.6% in men. CHD and MI in women are subtle. In addition, female mortality from CHD increases after the menopause. The increased inflammatory risk factor status of women plays a role in development of atherosclerosis, before and after the menopause. Until after the menopause, women overall have a lower CHD mortality rate. Menopause is associated with unique symptoms, especially vasomotor ones; preexisting cardiovascular disease further exacerbates problems associated with the menopause. Use of HRT after the menopause is a major issue. Early menopause at age 39 years or younger and late menopause at age 56 years or older increase cardiovascular risk. HRT should not be prescribed for cardiovascular risk prevention, but when less than 10 years from menopause at a normal age, women can be reassured that cardiovascular risk from HRT is very low. Prescription of HRT should never be made only for cardiovascular risk reduction. However, when symptom-related and other indications are present, HRT is appropriate and well tolerated in the early years after menopause with onset at a normal age.

  8. Diagnosis and Management of Noncardiac Complications in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, George K; Saidi, Arwa; Bhatt, Ami B; Burchill, Luke J; Deen, Jason F; Earing, Michael G; Gewitz, Michael; Ginns, Jonathan; Kay, Joseph D; Kim, Yuli Y; Kovacs, Adrienne H; Krieger, Eric V; Wu, Fred M; Yoo, Shi-Joon

    2017-11-14

    Life expectancy and quality of life for those born with congenital heart disease (CHD) have greatly improved over the past 3 decades. While representing a great advance for these patients, who have been able to move from childhood to successful adult lives in increasing numbers, this development has resulted in an epidemiological shift and a generation of patients who are at risk of developing chronic multisystem disease in adulthood. Noncardiac complications significantly contribute to the morbidity and mortality of adults with CHD. Reduced survival has been documented in patients with CHD with renal dysfunction, restrictive lung disease, anemia, and cirrhosis. Furthermore, as this population ages, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and its risk factors are becoming increasingly prevalent. Disorders of psychosocial and cognitive development are key factors affecting the quality of life of these individuals. It is incumbent on physicians who care for patients with CHD to be mindful of the effects that disease of organs other than the heart may have on the well-being of adults with CHD. Further research is needed to understand how these noncardiac complications may affect the long-term outcome in these patients and what modifiable factors can be targeted for preventive intervention. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Trends in Mortality From Ischemic Heart Disease and Cerebrovascular Disease in Europe: 1980 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Adam; Marshall, Dominic C; Salciccioli, Justin D; Sikkel, Markus B; Maruthappu, Mahiben; Shalhoub, Joseph

    2016-05-17

    Trends in cardiovascular mortality across Europe demonstrate significant geographical variation, and an understanding of these trends has a central role in global public health. Ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease age-standardized death rates (as per International Classification of Diseases, ninth and tenth revisions) were collated from the World Health Organization mortality database for member states of the European Union. Trends were characterized by using Joinpoint regression analysis. An overall trend for reduction in ischemic heart disease mortality was observed, most pronounced in Western Europe (>60% for the Netherlands, United Kingdom, and Ireland) for both sexes from 1980 to 2009. Eastern European states, Romania, Croatia, and Slovakia, had modest mortality reductions. Most recently (2009), Lithuania had the highest mortality for males and females (318.1/100 000 and 166.1/100 000, respectively), followed by Latvia and Slovakia. France had the lowest mortality: 39.8/100 000 for males and 14.7/100 000 for females. Analysis of cerebrovascular disease mortality revealed that Austria had the largest reduction for both sexes (76.8% males, 76.5% females) from 1980 to 2009. The smallest improvement over this period was seen in Lithuania, Poland, and Cyprus (-5% to +20% approximately). France has the lowest present-day cerebrovascular disease mortality for both males and females (23.9/100 000 and 17.3/100 000, respectively). There is a growing disparity in cardiovascular mortality between Western and Eastern Europe, for which diverse explanations are discussed. The need for population-wide health promotion and primary prevention policies is emphasized. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. A Fuzzy Petri Nets System for Heart Disease Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussin Attya Lafta

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have proposed a Fuzzy Petri Nets Expert System for heart disease diagnosis. The aim of the proposed system is simulating experience of experts in Diagnosis Heart Disease stage, based on Fuzzy Rule System and modeling reasoning operation by using Fuzzy Petri Nets. The database taken from Machine Learning Repository Center for machine learning and intelligent system. The system has 11 input fields and one output field. The accuracy of proposed system is 75%.

  11. The association of congenital neuroblastoma and congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellah, R.; D'Andrea, A.; Children's Hospital, Boston, MA; Darillis, E.; Fellows, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Several authors have reported an association between neuroblastoma and congenital heart disease; others contend that, unlike specific wellknown associations between malignancy and congenital defects (Wilm's tumor and aniridia, leukemia and Down's syndrome), no real relationship exists. We present three cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which subclinical neuroblastoma was found. We speculate that abnormal neural crest cell migration and development may be a common link between cardiac malformations and congenital neuroblastoma. (orig.)

  12. Sexual functioning is impaired in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Opic (Petra); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien); J.A.A.E. Cuypers (Judith); M. Witsenburg (Maarten); A.E. van den Bosch (Annemien); R.T. van Domburg (Ron); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); E.M.W.J. Utens (Elisabeth)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To investigate the overall sexual functioning and disease specific sexual problems in congenital heart disease (ConHD) patients, for both genders and different cardiac diagnostic groups, and compare these with Dutch normative data. Also disease specific sexual problems were

  13. Explaining the Decline in Coronary Heart Disease Mortality in the Czech Republic between 1985 and 2007

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bruthans, J.; Cifková, R.; Lánská, V.; O'Flaherty, M.; Critchley, J.A.; Holub, J.; Janský, P.; Zvárová, Jana; Capewell, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2014), s. 829-839 ISSN 2047-4873 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : coronary heart disease * Czech MONICA and Czech post-MONICA * coronary heart disease management * coronary heart disease mortality * coronary heart disease risk factors Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 3.319, year: 2014

  14. Poisson Mixture Regression Models for Heart Disease Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Hamza

    2016-01-01

    Early heart disease control can be achieved by high disease prediction and diagnosis efficiency. This paper focuses on the use of model based clustering techniques to predict and diagnose heart disease via Poisson mixture regression models. Analysis and application of Poisson mixture regression models is here addressed under two different classes: standard and concomitant variable mixture regression models. Results show that a two-component concomitant variable Poisson mixture regression model predicts heart disease better than both the standard Poisson mixture regression model and the ordinary general linear Poisson regression model due to its low Bayesian Information Criteria value. Furthermore, a Zero Inflated Poisson Mixture Regression model turned out to be the best model for heart prediction over all models as it both clusters individuals into high or low risk category and predicts rate to heart disease componentwise given clusters available. It is deduced that heart disease prediction can be effectively done by identifying the major risks componentwise using Poisson mixture regression model. PMID:27999611

  15. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Patrícia; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M; Koshiyama, Dayane Bohn; Zen, Tatiana Diehl; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G

    2014-06-01

    To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype. Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on. Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky. Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype.

  16. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Trevisan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype.DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on.DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome. These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky.CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype.

  17. Update on Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Light of Recent Evidence: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Sherita Hill; Anderson, Cheryl; Bray, George A.; Burke, Lora E.; de Boer, Ian H.; Deedwania, Prakash; Eckel, Robert H.; Ershow, Abby G.; Fradkin, Judith; Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Nelson, Robert G.; Patel, Mahesh J.; Pignone, Michael; Quinn, Laurie; Schauer, Philip R.; Selvin, Elizabeth; Vafiadis, Dorothea K.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk factor control as primary prevention in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus has changed substantially in the past few years. The purpose of this scientific statement is to review the current literature and key clinical trials pertaining to blood pressure and blood glucose control, cholesterol management, aspirin therapy, and lifestyle modification. We present a synthesis of the recent literature, new guidelines, and clinical targets, including screening for kidney and subclinical cardiovascular disease for the contemporary management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26246459

  18. Serotonin Mechanisms in Heart Valve Disease I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Bo; Xu, Jie; Connolly, Jeanne; Savani, Rashmin C.; Narula, Navneet; Liang, Bruce; Levy, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Clinical disorders associated with increased serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] levels, such as carcinoid syndrome, and the use of serotonin agonists, such as fenfluoramine have been associated with a valvulopathy characterized by hyperplastic valvular and endocardial lesions with increased extracellular matrix. Furthermore, 5-HT has been demonstrated to up-regulate transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in mesangial cells via G-protein signal transduction. We investigated the hypothesis that increased exposure of heart valve interstitial cells to 5-HT may result in increased TGF-β1 expression and activity because of serotonin receptor-mediated signal transduction with activation of Gαq, and subsequently up-regulation of phospholipase C. Thus, in the present study we performed a clinical-pathological investigation of retrieved carcinoid and normal valve cusps using immunohistochemical techniques to detect the presence of TGF-β1 and other proteins associated with TGF-β expression, including TGF-β receptors I and II, latent TGF-β-associated peptide (LAP), and α-smooth muscle actin. Carcinoid valve cusps demonstrated the unusual finding of widespread smooth muscle actin involving the interstitial cells in the periphery of carcinoid nodules; these same cells were also positive for LAP. Normal valve cusps were only focally positive for smooth muscle actin and LAP. In sheep aortic valve interstitial cell cultures 5-HT induced TGF-β1 mRNA production and increased TGF-β1 activity. 5-HT also increased collagen biosynthesis at the dosages studied. Furthermore, TGF-β1 added to SAVIC cultures increased the production of sulfated glycan and hyaluronic acid. In addition, overexpression of Gαq using an adenoviral expression vector for a constitutively active Gαq mutant (Q209L-Gαq) resulted in increased phospholipase C activity as well as up-regulation of TGF-β expression and activity. These results strongly support the view that G-protein-related signal

  19. Coronary heart disease policy models: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capewell Simon

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease (CHD is complex. A variety of models have therefore been developed to try and explain past trends and predict future possibilities. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the strengths and limitations of existing CHD policy models. Methods A search strategy was developed, piloted and run in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases, supplemented by manually searching reference lists of relevant articles and reviews. Two reviewers independently checked the papers for inclusion and appraisal. All CHD modelling studies were included which addressed a defined population and reported on one or more key outcomes (deaths prevented, life years gained, mortality, incidence, prevalence, disability or cost of treatment. Results In total, 75 articles describing 42 models were included; 12 (29% of the 42 models were micro-simulation, 8 (19% cell-based, and 8 (19% life table analyses, while 14 (33% used other modelling methods. Outcomes most commonly reported were cost-effectiveness (36%, numbers of deaths prevented (33%, life-years gained (23% or CHD incidence (23%. Among the 42 models, 29 (69% included one or more risk factors for primary prevention, while 8 (19% just considered CHD treatments. Only 5 (12% were comprehensive, considering both risk factors and treatments. The six best-developed models are summarised in this paper, all are considered in detail in the appendices. Conclusion Existing CHD policy models vary widely in their depth, breadth, quality, utility and versatility. Few models have been calibrated against observed data, replicated in different settings or adequately validated. Before being accepted as a policy aid, any CHD model should provide an explicit statement of its aims, assumptions, outputs, strengths and limitations.

  20. Lung Function Abnormalities in Smokers with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Frits M E; Soriano, Joan B; Roche, Nicolas; Bloomfield, Paul H; Brusselle, Guy; Fabbri, Leonardo M; García-Rio, Francisco; Kearney, Mark T; Kwon, Namhee; Lundbäck, Bo; Rabe, Klaus F; Raillard, Alice; Muellerova, Hana; Cockcroft, John R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the ALICE (Airflow Limitation in Cardiac Diseases in Europe) study was to investigate the prevalence of airflow limitation in patients with ischemic heart disease and the effects on quality of life, healthcare use, and future health risk. To examine prebronchodilator and post-bronchodilator spirometry in outpatients aged greater than or equal to 40 years with clinically documented ischemic heart disease who were current or former smokers. This multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 cardiovascular outpatient clinics in nine European countries. Airflow limitation was defined as post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC less than 0.70. Among the 3,103 patients with ischemic heart disease who were recruited, lung function was defined for 2,730 patients. Airflow limitation was observed in 30.5% of patients with ischemic heart disease: 11.3% had mild airflow limitation, 15.8% moderate airflow limitation, 3.3% severe airflow limitation, and 0.1% very severe airflow limitation. Most patients with airflow limitation (70.6%) had no previous spirometry testing or diagnosed pulmonary disease. Airflow limitation was associated with greater respiratory symptomatology, impaired health status, and more frequent emergency room visits (P < 0.05). Airflow limitation compatible with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease affects almost one-third of patients with ischemic heart disease. Although airflow limitation is associated with additional morbidity and societal burden, it is largely undiagnosed and untreated. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01485159).

  1. Valvular Heart Disease in Adults: Management of Prosthetic Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, John F; Hollenberg, Steven M

    2017-06-01

    Patients undergoing cardiac valve replacement may receive mechanical or bioprosthetic valves. Mechanical valves require lifelong anticoagulation but are durable and the need for a second surgery is up to eightfold times less than with bioprosthetic valves. Bioprosthetic valves do not require lifelong anticoagulation and thus are associated with fewer bleeding complications but they are less durable and associated with higher morbidity and mortality rates, particularly in younger patients. Anticoagulation with mechanical valves is achieved using warfarin; use of direct-acting oral anticoagulants is not indicated. Concomitant low-dose aspirin is recommended for patients with mechanical valves and as sole thromboembolism prophylaxis for patients receiving aortic or mitral bioprosthetic valves. If a patient taking warfarin is to undergo a surgical procedure that requires interruption of anticoagulation, bridging therapy with heparin is indicated if the patient has a mechanical aortic valve and any risk of thromboembolism, an older-generation mechanical aortic valve, or a mechanical mitral valve. Warfarin is teratogenic; pregnant women should take heparin. Patients with mechanical or bioprosthetic valves should receive antibiotic prophylaxis before some dental and surgical procedures to prevent endocarditis. Thrombolytic therapy should be considered in patients who develop a thrombus on a valve that does not resolve with heparin. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  2. Preoperative Prevention of Heart Failure in Noncardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Likhvantsev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congestive heart failure is consistently associated with adverse outcomes, and is characterized by a twofold increase in mortality in noncardiac surgery. In this regard, developing the methods aimed to prevent and treatacute heart failure (AHF in the intraoperative period remain a challenging problem.Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of preoperative levosimendan infusion in reduction both mortality and duration of treatment of elderly patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction in noncardiac surgery.Material and Methods. Design: Multicenter blind randomized placebocontrolled study. Patients: 81 patients operated on abdominal organs. The main endpoint of the study: The length of stay in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU and at the hospital were chosen as the primary endpoints. The secondary endpoints of the study were 30 day and annual mortality, the rate of acute myocardial infarction and stroke.Results. Levosimendan infusion at a rate of 0,05 μg/kg/min — 0,1 μg/kg/min to patients with low left ven tricular ejection fraction just before the surgery reduced the length of stay in ICU for 2 days and required hospital stay for 3 days. NTproBNP showed the best ratio of sensitivity/specificity in predicting 30day mortality in cumulative group: AUC=0,86 (90,77 to 0,93, P<0,0001. From other indicators the most informative were the Inotropes scoring, no change or decrease of a left ventricular ejection fraction, and cardiac index.Conclusion. To reduce perioperative mortality, the intravenous infusion of levosimendan at a rate of 0,05—0,1 μg/kg/min in elderly patients with low left ventricular ejection fraction is recommened as a preoperative preparation the day before the alleged noncardiac surgery.

  3. Ivabradine, coronary artery disease, and heart failure: beyond rhythm control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicchitano P

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Scicchitano,1 Francesca Cortese,1 Gabriella Ricci,1 Santa Carbonara,1 Michele Moncelli,1 Massimo Iacoviello,1 Annagrazia Cecere,1 Michele Gesualdo,1 Annapaola Zito,1 Pasquale Caldarola,2 Domenico Scrutinio,3 Rocco Lagioia,3 Graziano Riccioni,4 Marco Matteo Ciccone1 1Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari, School of Medicine, Policlinico, Bari, Italy; 2Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Policlinic, San Paolo Hospital, Bari, Italy; 3Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Fondazione Maugeri, Cassano Murge, Italy; 4Intensive Cardiology Care Unit, San Camillo de Lellis Hospital, Manfredonia, Foggia, Italy Abstract: Elevated heart rate could negatively influence cardiovascular risk in the general population. It can induce and promote the atherosclerotic process by means of several mechanisms involving endothelial shear stress and biochemical activities. Furthermore, elevated heart rate can directly increase heart ischemic conditions because of its skill in unbalancing demand/supply of oxygen and decreasing the diastolic period. Thus, many pharmacological treatments have been proposed in order to reduce heart rate and ameliorate the cardiovascular risk profile of individuals, especially those suffering from coronary artery diseases (CAD and chronic heart failure (CHF. Ivabradine is the first pure heart rate reductive drug approved and currently used in humans, created in order to selectively reduce sinus node function and to overcome the many side effects of similar pharmacological tools (ie, β-blockers or calcium channel antagonists. The aim of our review is to evaluate the role and the safety of this molecule on CAD and CHF therapeutic strategies. Keywords: chronic heart failure, heart rate reduction, cardiac ischemic disease, heart-rate lowering drugs, funny current

  4. Women's magazine coverage of heart disease risk factors: Good Housekeeping magazine, 1997 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edy, Carolyn M

    2010-03-01

    Women, who often turn to magazines for health information, continue to underestimate their risk for heart disease, though it remains the leading cause of death among women in the United States. This textual analysis considered the portrayal of women's risk factors for heart disease as problem and remedy frames within articles published by the highest circulation women's magazine in the U.S., Good Housekeeping, from 1997 to 2007. These findings were then compared with corresponding information endorsed by the American Heart Association. Far from underestimating a woman's risk for heart disease, GH articles seemed to target women at low risk for heart disease, while emphasizing risk factors unique to women. The magazine coverage was largely consistent with American Heart Association information, yet offered a broader range of treatment and prevention strategies that were sometimes contradictory or vague. One significant risk factor, race, was not mentioned in the magazine articles. This review calls for future research to determine the pervasiveness and possible effects of such coverage.

  5. The tricuspid valve in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginns, Jonathan; Ammash, Naser; Bernier, Pierre-Luc

    2014-01-01

    The tricuspid valve is frequently affected in adults with congenital heart disease but is also frequently overlooked. Disease of this valve can occur primarily or develop secondary to changes in the right ventricle caused by other disease states. The embryology and anatomy of the tricuspid valve are important to understanding pathogenesis of valve dysfunction in congenital heart disease. Clinical findings can be subtle. Multimodality imaging may be necessary to fully assess the cause and impact of tricuspid valve lesions. More research is needed in pathophysiology, imaging, and treatment in this area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Postnatal Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Control in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke Nederend

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital defect. During childhood, survival is generally good but, in adulthood, late complications are not uncommon. Abnormal autonomic control in children with congenital heart disease may contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of these long term sequelae. This narrative review of 34 studies aims to summarize current knowledge on function of the autonomic nervous system in children with a congenital heart defect. Large scale studies that measure both branches of the nervous system for prolonged periods of time in well-defined patient cohorts in various phases of childhood and adolescence are currently lacking. Pending such studies, there is not yet a good grasp on the extent and direction of sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic function in pediatric congenital heart disease. Longitudinal studies in homogenous patient groups linking autonomic nervous system function and clinical outcome are warranted.

  7. Features of The Heart Remodeling in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases, Combined with Coronary Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Yu. Ryabova

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of heart remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases ( COPD, associated with coronary heart diseases (CHD were examined. The changes of structural and functional state of myocardium, intracardiac relationships with associated pathology were under study. The role of blood inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-a and the level of cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 in exacerbating myocardial dysfunction was clarified.

  8. Reconsideration of Secondary Risk Management Strategies in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiyama, Kuninobu; Sonoda, Shinjo; Otsuji, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    The main risk factors in ischemic heart diseases, including myocardial infarction, are hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, obesity and smoking. The incidence of ischemic heart disease in Japan has been lower than that in Western countries because of differences in lifestyle and the anatomy of the coronary arteries, but the situation has been changing recently because of the westernization of lifestyle. Cardiovascular diseases have become the second most common cause of death in Japan, and 40% of those deaths are attributed to ischemic heart disease. Patients with a history of myocardial infarction, especially, have an increased risk of re-infarction, so strict management of coronary risk factors is important for the prevention of secondary ischemic heart disease. Although there are many guidelines about how to manage the risk factors, there are still many problems. Although lipid management has been demonstrated to have a protective effect against coronary artery disease and arteriosclerotic guidelines have been developed, it is reported that only about one third of patients achieved the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) target value under secondary prevention. Moreover, it is unclear whether the lower target value is required for high-risk patients. Recent research on diabetes has reported increased mortality in patients with intensive glycemic control. We should discuss when to start treatment, which medicine to use, and to what extent we should manage glycemic control. Strict management based on current therapeutic guidelines is effective for secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease, with target values of less than 135/85 mmHg for home blood pressure, less than 100 mg/dl for LDL-C, more than 40 mg/dl for HDL-C, less than 150 mg/dl for TG, and, for diabetic patients, less than 7.0% for HbA1c (NGSP).

  9. Congenital Heart Diseases associated with Identified Syndromes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recognised syndromes were seen in 69(68%) cases. Down syndrome with 54 children contributed 78.3% of those with known syndromes. Other identified syndromes and associations were Marfan's, Noonan's, Edwards, Prune Belly, Apert, Ellis-van creveld syndrome and congenital rubella syndrome. Congenital heart ...

  10. Rheumatic Heart Disease Associated with Secondary Renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... non-specific chronic inflammatory changes. The patient's secondary amyloidosis was presumed to be related to the long standing RHD after exclusion of other causes of secondary amyloidosis. The patient finally died due to heart failure and acute pulmonary edema. Conclusion: Long standing RHD can lead to secondary ...

  11. HEART SIZE IN PRIMARY MYOCARDIAL DISEASE*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-07-10

    Jul 10, 1971 ... The clinical diagnosis was. SUMMARY. Heart volllme and cardia-Thoracic raTio were ... present in all and tricuspid incompetence in 4. In each patient the degree of ventricular dysfunction was ..... petence of first the mitral. and later the tricuspid valve so that functional atrio-ventricular valve incompetence ...

  12. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia Vilar-Pereira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol's actions using metformin (AMPK-activator or tempol (SOD-mimetic. Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC.

  13. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Santos, Hilton; Vicentino, Amanda R. R.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Meyer-Fernandes, José R.; Paula-Neto, Heitor A.; Medei, Emiliano; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Paiva, Claudia N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol’s actions using metformin (AMPK-activator) or tempol (SOD-mimetic). Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC. PMID:27788262

  14. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy People healthfinder Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Spotlight: This Diabetes Month, Don’t Forget About the Importance of Exercise for People with Type 1 Diabetes In honor ...

  15. X-ray picture of the heart turn in echocardiographic diagnosis of rheumatic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishkevich, A.M.; Goryanina, N.K.

    1986-01-01

    The paper is concerned with X-ray and echocardiographic investigation of the heart in 461 patients with mitral-tricuspidal disease. In 377 (82%) cases a turn of the heart along the longitudinal axis (counter clockwise) to the left and back was revealed. X-ray recognition of the heart turn made it possible to set an echocardiographic sensor to spot some of the cardiac cavities, interventricular septum and valvular apparatus. The correct setting of the echocardiographic sensor resulted in the determination of true sizes of each cardiac cavity, diagnosis of the nature of each valvular lesion and the recognition of such complications of rheumatic heart diseases as valvular calcinosis, left atrial thrombosis and disorder of myocardial contractility

  16. Heart Transplantation in Congenital Heart Disease: In Whom to Consider and When?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenhofer Jost, Christine H.; Schmidt, Dörthe; Huebler, Michael; Balmer, Christian; Noll, Georg; Caduff, Rosmarie; Greutmann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Due to impressive improvements in surgical repair options, even patients with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) may survive into adulthood and have a high risk of end-stage heart failure. Thus, the number of patients with CHD needing heart transplantation (HTx) has been increasing in the last decades. This paper summarizes the changing etiology of causes of death in heart failure in CHD. The main reasons, contraindications, and risks of heart transplantation in CHD are discussed and underlined with three case vignettes. Compared to HTx in acquired heart disease, HTx in CHD has an increased risk of perioperative death and rejection. However, outcome of HTx for complex CHD has improved over the past 20 years. Additionally, mechanical support options might decrease the waiting list mortality in the future. The number of patients needing heart-lung transplantation (especially for Eisenmenger's syndrome) has decreased in the last years. Lung transplantation with intracardiac repair of a cardiac defect is another possibility especially for patients with interatrial shunts. Overall, HTx will remain an important treatment option for CHD in the near future. PMID:23577237

  17. The epidemiology of heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Fred H; Marelli, Ariane J

    2014-01-01

    The impact of lifelong exposure to myocardial dysfunction in populations with congenital heart disease (CHD) is becoming increasingly recognized. Most children born with CHD now reach adulthood and the long-term sequelae of treatment are contributing to substantial comorbidity. The combination of structural changes present at birth with changes resulting from cardiac surgery can result in heart failure. This article reports on the current state of knowledge on the epidemiology of heart failure in this patient population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Heart rate as a therapeutic target after acute coronary syndrome and in chronic coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosetti, Marco; Scardina, Giuseppe; Favretto, Giuseppe; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Faggiano, Pompilio Massimo; Greco, Cesare; Pedretti, Roberto Franco

    2017-03-01

    For patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD), either after hospitalization for acute cardiac events or in the chronic phase, comprehensive treatment programs should be devoted to: (i) reducing mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events, (ii) reducing the ischemic burden and related symptoms, and (iii) increasing exercise capacity and quality of life.Heart rate (HR) has demonstrated to have prognostic value and patients beyond the limit of 70 bpm display increased risk of all the above adverse outcomes, even after adjustment for parameters such as the extension of myocardial infarction and the presence of heart failure. It is well known that a sustained HR elevation may contribute to the pathogenesis of SCAD, being the likelihood of developing ischemia, plaque instability, trigger for arrhythmias, increased vascular oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction the mechanisms resulting in this effect. Moreover, high HR could promote chronotropic incompetence, leading to functional disability and reduced quality of life.Despite the strong relationship between HR and prognosis, there is heterogeneity among current guidelines in considering HR as a formal therapeutic target for secondary prevention in SCAD, as far as the cut-off limit. This expert opinion document considered major trials and observational registries in the modern treatment era with beta-blockers and ivabradine, suggesting that an adequate HR control could represent a target for (i), (ii), and (iii) therapeutic goals in SCAD patients with systolic dysfunction (with major evidence for reduced left ventricular ejection fraction SCAD patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The defined cut-off limit is 70 bpm. To date, there is room for improvement of HR control, since in contemporary SCAD patients HR values <70 bpm are present in less than half of cases, even in the vulnerable phase after an acute coronary syndrome.

  19. Differences Characteristics Patients Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 with and without Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nindara Citra Aquarista

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is the third highest Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs, which causes death in Indonesia.The incidence of coronary heart disease in diabetes mellitus is high, 65% of people with diabetes mellitus die due to coronary heart disease and stroke. The purpose of this study is to analyze the differences in the characteristics of Diabetes mellitus type 2 in patients with and without coronary heart disease in Haji General Hospital Surabaya year 2016. This research uses observational analysis with cross sectional study design. The subject of the study is the incidence of diabetes Mellitus type 2 with and without coronary heart disease with undergoing outpatient treatment at Haji General Hospital Surabaya year 2016. The Samples were taken by fixed-disease sampling method with 42 people as the samples. The data analysis uses Chi Square test. The results show for the independent variables that have the most significant difference inHaji General Hospital Surabaya year 2016 is smoking behavior (p = 0.00; PR = 7.85; 95% CI = 2.09 to 29.50 and hypertension (p = 0,002; PR = 3.51; 95% CI = 1.42 to 8.67. In conclusion, the smoking behavior and hypertension can lead to complications of coronary heart disease for patients with type in Diabetes Mellitus type 2 in Haji General Hospital year 2016. It needs awareness to check blood pressure regularly and eliminate the smoking habit as the prevention of complications of coronary heart disease for patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. Keywords: diabetes mellitus type 2, coronary hearth disease.

  20. Obstetric and perinatal aspects in patients with congenital heart diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenilson Amaral Oliveira

    Full Text Available The benefits of surgical treatment for patients with congenital heart disease in relation to pregnancy are still controversial. We studied 48 pregnant women (mean age = 25 years with surgically-corrected congenital heart diseases (Group 1. This included 15 cyanotic diseases: Fallot's tetralogy (11 cases; Ebstein's anomaly (2 cases; transposition of the great arteries (1 case; and double outlet of the right ventricle (1 case. We compared them to 52 pregnant women (mean age = 26 years with untreated congenital heart diseases, which included 11 cases of Eisenmenger's syndrome (Group 2. Group 2 showed a higher incidence of maternal death (12 vs. 0 percent; p=0.01, perinatal mortality (15 vs. 0 percent; p=0.01 and prematurity (32 vs. 7 percent; p=0.01. Spontaneous abortion (4 vs. 10 percent, Caesarean deliveries (48 vs. 66 percent or growth retardation (13 vs. 28 percent did not present any significant differences between these groups. Surgical treatment in patients with heart diseases is associated with a better maternal and fetal prognosis. Therefore, surgery must be considered when counseling patients with congenital heart diseases.

  1. Prevention and Conservative Therapy of Diverticular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Elena; Leifeld, Ludger

    2015-04-01

    Diverticular disease is a common problem. Prevention and treatment of complications depend on the stage of the disease. Lifestyle modifications are suitable preventive measures, aiming to reduce obesity and to balance the diet with a high amount of fiber and a low amount of meat. However, evidence to guide the pharmacological treatment of diverticular disease and diverticulitis is limited. Literature review. Antibiotics are not proven to be effective in patients with uncomplicated diverticulitis and without further risk factors; neither do they improve treatment nor prevent complications. Mesalazine might have an effect on pain relief in diverticular disease even though it has no significant effect on the outcome of diverticulitis. In complicated diverticulitis, inpatient treatment including antibiotics is mandatory. Evidence for the treatment of diverticular disease is limited. Further research is needed.

  2. Strengthening the prevention of periodontal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the burden of periodontal disease in adult populations worldwide, to emphasize the essential risk factors common to periodontal disease and chronic diseases, to outline important new strategies for effective prevention of periodontal...... disease, and to inform about the role of the World Health Organization (WHO) in developing a national capacity for the prevention of disease. METHODS: Information about periodontal health status as measured by the Community Periodontal Index system is stored in the WHO Global Oral Health Data Bank......; advanced disease with deep periodontal pockets (> or =6 mm) affects approximately 10% to 15% of adults worldwide. The available evidence shows that important risk factors for periodontal disease relate to poor oral hygiene, tobacco use, excessive alcohol consumption, stress, and diabetes mellitus...

  3. Bone Marrow Therapies for Chronic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Keating, Armand; Gale, Robert Peter

    2015-11-01

    Chronic heart failure is a leading cause of death. The demand for new therapies and the potential regenerative capacity of bone marrow-derived cells has led to numerous clinical trials. We critically discuss current knowledge of the biology and clinical application of bone marrow cells. It appears unlikely that bone marrow cells can develop into functional cardiomyocyte after infusion but may have favorable paracrine effects. Most, but not all, clinical trials report a modest short- but not long-term benefit of infusing bone marrow-derived cells. Effect size appears to correlate with stringency of study-design: the most stringent trials report the smallest effect-sizes. We conclude there may be short- but not substantial long-term benefit of infusing bone marrow-derived cells into persons with chronic heart failure and any benefit observed is unlikely to result from trans-differentiation of bone marrow-derived cells into functioning cardiomyocytes. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  4. Chance of surgery in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheugt, Carianne L; Uiterwaal, Cuno Spm; Vaartjes, Ilonca; van der Velde, Enno T; Zomer, A C; Meijboom, Folkert J; Pieper, Petronella G; Post, Marco C; Vliegen, Hubert W; Hazekamp, Mark G; Grobbee, Diederick E; Mulder, Barbara Jm

    2017-08-01

    Background Young patients with congenital heart disease reaching adulthood face mandatory transition to adult cardiology. Their new cardiologist needs to assess the chances of major future events such as surgery. Using a large national registry, we assessed if patient characteristics at the age of 18 years could predict the chance of congenital heart surgery in adulthood. Design and methods Of 10,300 patients from the CONCOR national registry, we used general patient characteristics at age 18 years, underlying congenital heart defect, history of complications, and interventions in childhood as potential predictors of congenital heart surgery occurring from age 18 years up to age 40 and 60 years. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Analyses were performed separately for all congenital heart surgery and for valvular surgery alone. Results Altogether 2427 patients underwent congenital heart surgery after age 18 years, 1389 of whom underwent valvular surgery. Underlying heart defect, male sex, multiple defects, childhood endocarditis, supraventricular arrhythmia, aortic complications and paediatric cardiovascular surgery, independently predicted adult congenital heart surgery. The mean chance of congenital heart surgery was 22% up to age 40 and 43% up to age 60 years; individual chances spanned from 9-68% up to age 40 and from 19-93% up to age 60 years. Conclusion At the time of transition from paediatric to adult cardiology, an easily obtainable set of characteristics of patients with congenital heart disease can meaningfully inform cardiologists about the patient's individual chance of surgery in adulthood. Our findings warrant validation in other cohorts.

  5. Differences in heart rate profile during exercise among subjects with subclinical thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maor, Elad; Kivity, Shaye; Kopel, Eran; Segev, Shlomo; Sidi, Yechezkel; Goldenberg, Ilan; Olchovsky, David

    2013-10-01

    Clinical thyroid disease is associated with changes in the cardiovascular system, including changes in heart rate during exercise. However, data on the relation between subclinical thyroid disease (SCTD) and heart rate during exercise are limited. We investigated 3799 apparently healthy subjects who were evaluated in the Institute for Preventive Medicine at the Sheba Medical Center. All subjects answered standard health questionnaires; were examined by a physician; completed routine blood tests including thyrotropin, free triiodothyronine, and free thyroxine levels; and underwent a treadmill exercise according to the Bruce protocol. Subjects with known thyroid disease or those who were taking thyroid-related drugs were excluded from the analysis. Heart rate profile was compared between patients with subclinical hypothyroidism (SCHypoT), patients with normal thyroid function, and patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism (SCHyperT) using propensity score matching. Seventy patients had SCHyperT and 273 had SCHypoT. Compared with age- and sex-matched normal subjects, SCHyperT subjects had a higher resting heart rate (83±17 vs. 76±12 beats per minute [bpm], p=0.006), a significantly higher recovery heart rate (94±12 vs. 90±12 bpm, p=0.045), and a significantly lower heart rate reserve (80±20 vs. 87±18 bpm, p=0.006). Subjects with SCHypoT showed a trend toward a lower resting heart rate (75±13 vs. 77±15 bpm, p=0.09) and had a significantly lower recovery heart rate (88±12 vs. 90±13 bpm, p=0.035). There was no significant difference in exercise duration or blood pressure between subjects with SCTD and their matched normal controls. Subjects with SCTD have a significantly different heart rate profile during rest, exercise, and recovery.

  6. Inhibition of Autoimmune Chagas-Like Heart Disease by Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimaro, Maria C.; Alves, Rozeneide M.; Rose, Ester; Sousa, Alessandro O.; de Cássia Rosa, Ana; Hecht, Mariana M.; Sousa, Marcelo V.; Andrade, Rafael R.; Vital, Tamires; Plachy, Jiří; Nitz, Nadjar; Hejnar, Jiří; Gomes, Clever C.; L. Teixeira, Antonio R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi manifests in mammals as Chagas heart disease. The treatment available for chagasic cardiomyopathy is unsatisfactory. Methods/Principal Findings To study the disease pathology and its inhibition, we employed a syngeneic chicken model refractory to T. cruzi in which chickens hatched from T. cruzi inoculated eggs retained parasite kDNA (1.4 kb) minicircles. Southern blotting with EcoRI genomic DNA digests revealed main 18 and 20 kb bands by hybridization with a radiolabeled minicircle sequence. Breeding these chickens generated kDNA-mutated F1, F2, and F3 progeny. A targeted-primer TAIL-PCR (tpTAIL-PCR) technique was employed to detect the kDNA integrations. Histocompatible reporter heart grafts were used to detect ongoing inflammatory cardiomyopathy in kDNA-mutated chickens. Fluorochromes were used to label bone marrow CD3+, CD28+, and CD45+ precursors of the thymus-dependent CD8α+ and CD8β+ effector cells that expressed TCRγδ, vβ1 and vβ2 receptors, which infiltrated the adult hearts and the reporter heart grafts. Conclusions/Significance Genome modifications in kDNA-mutated chickens can be associated with disruption of immune tolerance to compatible heart grafts and with rejection of the adult host's heart and reporter graft, as well as tissue destruction by effector lymphocytes. Autoimmune heart rejection was largely observed in chickens with kDNA mutations in retrotransposons and in coding genes with roles in cell structure, metabolism, growth, and differentiation. Moreover, killing the sick kDNA-mutated bone marrow cells with cytostatic and anti-folate drugs and transplanting healthy marrow cells inhibited heart rejection. We report here for the first time that healthy bone marrow cells inhibited heart pathology in kDNA+ chickens and thus prevented the genetically driven clinical manifestations of the disease. PMID:25521296

  7. Coronary heart disease in women: a challenge for the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília Solimene

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart disease is the first killer of women in the modern era, regardless of age, race and of ethnicity, although its prevalence rises after menopause. Modern women have professional and housewife responsibilities, consume excess of fat and carbohydrates, smoke, do not exercise regularly and do not have enough time to rest. This situation leads to overweight, dyslipidemia, arterial hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. Women do not often participate in preventive studies and still undergo less intensive and invasive evaluation and treatment for chest pain when compared to men. However, the rate of coronary death is twice higher in women than in men after myocardial infarction and revascularization procedures. The objective of this review is to analyze the main gender differences regarding symptoms, diagnosis, management and prognosis of coronary heart disease and to discuss the influence of hormonal replacement therapy in the prevention of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women.

  8. Stress echocardiography in valvular heart disease: a current appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Peyman; Patel, Krishna; Griffin, Brian P; Desai, Milind Y

    2015-03-01

    Stress echocardiography is increasingly used in the management of patients with valvular heart disease and can aid in evaluation, risk stratification and clinical decision making in these patients. Evaluation of symptoms, exercise capacity and changes in blood pressure can be done during the exercise portion of the test, whereas echocardiographic portion can reveal changes in severity of disease, pulmonary artery pressure and left ventricular function in response to exercise. These parameters, which are not available at rest, can have diagnostic and prognostic importance. In this article, we will review the indications and diagnostic implications, prognostic implications, and clinical impact of stress echocardiography in decision making and management of patients with valvular heart disease.

  9. Thigh circumference and risk of heart disease and premature death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitmann, Berit L; Frederiksen, Peder

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine associations between thigh circumference and incident cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease and total mortality. DESIGN: Prospective observational cohort study with Cox proportional hazards model and restricted cubic splines. SETTING: Random subset of adults...... in Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 1436 men and 1380 women participating in the Danish MONICA project, examined in 1987-8 for height, weight, and thigh, hip, and waist circumference, and body composition by impedance. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: 10 year incidence of cardiovascular and coronary heart disease and 12.5 years...... of follow-up for total death. RESULTS: A small thigh circumference was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and coronary heart diseases and total mortality in both men and women. A threshold effect for thigh circumference was evident, with greatly increased risk of premature death below...

  10. Applications of cardiac MRI in pediatric heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Xiaojuan; Zeng Jinjin; Sun Jihang; Cheng Hua; Yin Guangheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric heart diseases. Methods: Ninety-seven cases received cardiac MR scanning in this present study. The age range was 2 day to 13 years including 62 boys and 35 girls, the median age was 6 years. They were performed on h 5 T scanner with cardiac phased-array coil and VCG. Results: Eighty-five of the 97 cases were positive. Those positive findings included cardiomyopathy in 41 cases, congenital heart disease in 20 cases, constrictive pericarditis in 4 cases, pericardiac effusions with or without other cardiovascular diseases in 17 cases, cardiac tumor in 2 cases,thrombus in 3 cases and in 5 other cases. Conclusion: Cardiac MRI is an excellent imaging modality for the anatomical and functional abnormalities of pediatric heart diseases. (authors)

  11. Echocardiographic specrtrum of heart disease in a secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death world wide with 80% of these deaths occurring in low and middle income countries. Echocardiography has become the most common and cost effective cardiac imaging modality available in the diagnosis of heart disease. The non-invasive nature of ...

  12. Perceived stress and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Naja Rod; Kristensen, Tage Søndergård; Prescott, Eva

    2006-01-01

    It is unclear whether the commonly recognized link between stress and cardiovascular disease is causal or the result of reporting bias. The objective of this study was to address the association between perceived stress and first incidence of ischemic heart disease and to evaluate the suggested...

  13. Exploring lifestyle changes in women with ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Malene; Nielsen, Karina; Jensen, Peter Errboe

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is a major cause of death for women worldwide, and thus it is important to focus on lifestyle changes to reduce the impact of the disease on women’s everyday lives. Nine women were interviewed using an explorative approach to describe women’s lifestyle changes after...

  14. Interleukin-6 receptor pathways in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, Nadeem; Butterworth, Adam S; Freitag, Daniel F

    2012-01-01

    Persistent inflammation has been proposed to contribute to various stages in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Interleukin-6 receptor (IL6R) signalling propagates downstream inflammation cascades. To assess whether this pathway is causally relevant to coronary heart disease, we studied...

  15. Spirituality and negative emotions in individuals with coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginting, H.; Näring, G.W.B.; Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Becker, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    Many individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD) experience disease-related anxiety, depressive symptoms, and anger. Spirituality may be helpful to cope with these negative emotions. Research findings on the role of spirituality in dealing with negative emotions are inconsistent. In this study, we

  16. Attentional bias and anxiety in individuals with coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginting, H.; Näring, G.W.B.; Becker, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether in an emotional Stroop task, individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD) would show greater attention towards the threatening words related to their disease than healthy persons, and if such an attentional bias is associated with anxiety. An emotional Stroop task with

  17. An assessment of the physical fitness and coronary heart disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health and fitness clubs play an important role in addressing the causes of hypokinetic diseases and coronary heart disease (CHD). In order to be well prepared, service providers should be aware of the health and fitness profiles of their clients when they join their clubs. In the current study 243 white female subjects ...

  18. Outcome after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Puyvelde, Tim; Ameloot, Koen; Roggen, Mieke; Troost, Els; Gewillig, Marc; Budts, Werner; Van De Bruaene, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Outcome after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in patients with underlying congenital heart disease is uncertain. This study aimed at evaluating outcome after CPR in patients with underlying congenital heart disease, factors related to worse outcome after CPR and whether survivors of sudden cardiac death (SCD) have a worse outcome when compared to an age, gender and disease-matched control population. Between 1984 and 2015, all patients with congenital heart disease who received in or out-of-hospital CPR were identified from the database of congenital heart disease from the University Hospitals Leuven. Postoperative and neonatal (CPR was excluded. For each survivor of SCD, two control patients matched for gender, age and underlying heart defect were included in the study. Thirty-eight patients (66% men; median age 25 years (interquartile range 9-40); 68% out-of-hospital) were identified, of which 27 (66%) survived the event. The main cause of SCD was ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation ( n=21). Heart defect complexity (odds ratio (OR) 5.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-21.9; P=0.027), pulmonary hypertension (OR 13.8; 95% CI 2.1-89.5; P=0.006) and time to return of spontaneous circulation (OR 1.1; 95% CI 1.0-1.1; P=0.046) were related to worse outcome. Survivors of SCD had a worse prognosis when compared to an age, gender and disease-matched control group (5-year survival 76% vs. 98%; P=0.002). The complexity of underlying heart defect, pulmonary hypertension and time to return of spontaneous circulation are related to worse outcome in the case of CPR. Survivors of SCD have a worse outcome when compared to matched controls, indicating the need for adequate implantable cardioverter defibrillator indication assessment and for stringent follow-up of patients with worsening haemodynamics.

  19. Stress echo for evaluation of valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavagal, S T; Deshpande, Niteen; Admane, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Resting echocardiography is the most important tool for diagnosing valvular heart disease. However, treatment planning in valvular heart diseases may require additional information in some patients, particularly asymptomatic patients with severe valve disease or symptomatic patients with moderate disease. Stress echocardiography provides invaluable information in these situations and aids decision making. Stress echocardiography is performed using either physical stress or dobutamine stress and various valve parameters are monitored during the stress. Further, the ventricular performance, which is an important determinant of outcome in valve disease is also closely monitored during stress which helps immensely in planning the intervention. Lastly, possibility of associated coronary artery disease can also be evaluated, especially in the elderly. This article discusses the role of stress evaluation in assessment of valve disease in the commonly encountered clinical situations. Copyright © 2014 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Psychological interventions for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Suzanne H; Anderson, Lindsey; Jenkinson, Caroline E; Whalley, Ben; Rees, Karen; Davies, Philippa; Bennett, Paul; Liu, Zulian; West, Robert; Thompson, David R; Taylor, Rod S

    2017-04-28

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common cause of death globally, although mortality rates are falling. Psychological symptoms are prevalent for people with CHD, and many psychological treatments are offered following cardiac events or procedures with the aim of improving health and outcomes. This is an update of a Cochrane systematic review previously published in 2011. To assess the effectiveness of psychological interventions (alone or with cardiac rehabilitation) compared with usual care (including cardiac rehabilitation where available) for people with CHD on total mortality and cardiac mortality; cardiac morbidity; and participant-reported psychological outcomes of levels of depression, anxiety, and stress; and to explore potential study-level predictors of the effectiveness of psychological interventions in this population. We updated the previous Cochrane Review searches by searching the following databases on 27 April 2016: CENTRAL in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Ovid), PsycINFO (Ovid), and CINAHL (EBSCO). We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of psychological interventions compared to usual care, administered by trained staff, and delivered to adults with a specific diagnosis of CHD. We selected only studies estimating the independent effect of the psychological component, and with a minimum follow-up of six months. The study population comprised of adults after: a myocardial infarction (MI), a revascularisation procedure (coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)), and adults with angina or angiographically defined coronary artery disease (CAD). RCTs had to report at least one of the following outcomes: mortality (total- or cardiac-related); cardiac morbidity (MI, revascularisation procedures); or participant-reported levels of depression, anxiety, or stress. Two review authors independently screened titles and abstracts of all references for eligibility. A lead review author

  1. Geographical Overlapping of Obesity, Heart Disease, and Type 2 Diabetes

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-09

    This podcast features Kayla Smurthwaite, an undergraduate student at Australian National University in Canberra, Australia, and one of the winners of PCD’s 2017 Student Research Paper Contest. Kayla answers questions about her winning research and what impact her study has on chronic disease prevention and public health.  Created: 10/9/2017 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/9/2017.

  2. Nutritional Recommendations for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Eilat-Adar, Sigal; Sinai, Tali; Yosefy, Chaim; Henkin, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Lifestyle factors, including nutrition, play an important role in the etiology of Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). This position paper, written by collaboration between the Israel Heart Association and the Israel Dietetic Association, summarizes the current, preferably latest, literature on the association of nutrition and CVD with emphasis on the level of evidence and practical recommendations. The nutritional information is divided into three main sections: dietary patterns, individual food it...

  3. Does prevention for Alzheimer's disease exist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Dozzi Brucki

    Full Text Available Abstract The prevention of Alzheimer's disease is a growing public health concern amidst an ageing population. Meanwhile, there is no effective or curative treatment available where prevention could greatly reduce health costs. This review was based on reports of potential preventive factors, including modifiable lifestyle factors, as well as preventive pharmacological strategies. Although the present review was not systematic, the reports selected from PubMed using "Alzheimer's disease" and "prevention" as key-words, allow us to affirm that pursuing a healthy lifestyle; physical, cognitive, leisure activities; good social engagement; a high consumption of fish, low consumption of dietary fat and moderate consumption of wine, and control of vascular risk factors appear to be potential factors for delaying dementia.

  4. Congenital Heart Disease and Impacts on Child Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Alievi Mari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the child development and evaluate a possible association with the commitment by biopsychosocial factors of children with and without congenital heart disease. Methods: Observational study of case-control with three groups: Group 1 - children with congenital heart disease without surgical correction; Group 2 - children with congenital heart disease who underwent surgery; and Group 3 - healthy children. Children were assessed by socio-demographic and clinical questionnaire and the Denver II Screening Test. Results: One hundred and twenty eight children were evaluated, 29 in Group 1, 43 in Group 2 and 56 in Group 3. Of the total, 51.56% are girls and ages ranged from two months to six years (median 24.5 months. Regarding the Denver II, the children with heart disease had more "suspicious" and "suspect/abnormal" ratings and in the group of healthy children 53.6% were considered with "normal" development (P≤0.0001. The biopsychosocial variables that were related to a possible developmental delay were gender (P=0.042, child's age (P=0.001 and income per capita (P=0.019. Conclusion: The results suggest that children with congenital heart disease are likely to have a developmental delay with significant difference between children who have undergone surgery and those awaiting surgery under clinical follow-up.

  5. Guideline for appropriate use of cardiac CT in heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Hong, Yoo Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yong, Hwan Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Mok [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong A [Dept. of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Dong Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of deaths in Korea, along with malignant neoplasms and cerebrovascular diseases. The proper diagnosis and management for patients with suspected heart diseases should be warranted for the public health care. Advances in CT technology have allowed detailed images of the heart to be obtained, which enable evaluations not only of the coronary arteries but also of other cardiac structures. Currently, the latest multi-detector CT machines are widespread around Korea. The appropriate use of cardiac CT may lead to improvements of the physicians' medical performances and to reduce medical costs which eventually contribute to promotions of public health. However, until now, there has been no guidelines regarding the appropriate use of cardiac CT in Korea. We intend to provide guidelines for the appropriate use of cardiac CT in heart diseases based on scientific data. The purpose of this guideline is to assist the clinicians and other health professionals when using cardiac CT for diagnosis and treatments of heart diseases.

  6. Pediatric cardiology. Clinical and practical experiences with heart diseases of children, juveniles and young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Nikolaus A.

    2011-01-01

    The book on pediatric cardiology covers the following chapters: (I) Fundamentals and diagnostics: pediatric cardiologic anamnesis, electrocardiograms, thorax X-radiography, MRT and CT of the heart, nuclear medical diagnostics, exercise tests, heart catheter examination, electrophysiological tests. (II) Leading symptoms: Cyanosis, cardiac murmur, thorax pain, palpitation, syncopes. (III) Disease pictures: congenital heart defects, acquired heart defects, cardiomyopathies, heart rhythm disturbances, heart insufficiency, arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, other heart involving syndromes. (IV) Therapy: Catheter interventional therapy, post-surgical pediatric cardiac therapy, surgery involving the life-support machine, mechanical cardiovascular support systems, initial treatment of newborns with critical heart defects, heart transplantation, vaccination of children with heart diseases, medicinal therapy.

  7. Determinants of heart rate turbulence in individuals without apparent heart disease and in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnacchio, Gaetano; Lanza, Gaetano Antonio; Stazi, Alessandra; Careri, Giulia; Coviello, Ilaria; Mollo, Roberto; Crea, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    To assess the characteristics and determinants of heart rate turbulence (HRT) in individuals without any apparent heart disease and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Heart rate turbulence parameters, turbulence onset (TO), and turbulence slope (TS) were calculated on 24 h electrocardiogram recordings in 209 individuals without any heart disease (group 1) and in 157 CAD patients (group 2). In group 1, only age independently predicted abnormal TO (≥0%) [odds ratio (OR), 1.05; PCoronary artery disease group, however, did not predict abnormal HRT parameters in multivariable analyses, both in the whole population and when comparing two subgroups matched for age and gender. Age and (for TS) LVEF, indeed, were the only independent predictors of abnormal HRT. Age is a major HRT determinant both in subjects without any apparent heart disease and in stable CAD patients. Hypertension and LVEF contribute independently to HRT in these two groups, respectively. Coronary artery disease group was not by itself associated with abnormal HRT parameters in multivariable analyses. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Forkhead box transcription factors in embryonic heart development and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic heart development is a very complicated process regulated precisely by a network composed of many genes and signaling pathways in time and space. Forkhead box (Fox, FOX) proteins are a family of transcription factors characterized by the presence of an evolutionary conserved "forkhead"or "winged-helix" DNA-binding domain and able to organize temporal and spatial gene expression during development. They are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, such as cell cycle progression, proliferation, differentiation, migration, metabolism and DNA damage response. An abundance of studies in model organisms and systems has established that Foxa2, Foxc1/c2, Foxh1 and Foxm1, Foxos and Foxps are important components of the signaling pathways that instruct cardiogenesis and embryonic heart development, playing paramount roles in heart development. The previous studies also have demonstrated that mutations in some of the forkhead box genes and the aberrant expression of forkhead box gene are heavily implicated in the congenital heart disease (CHD) of humans. This review primarily focuses on the current understanding of heart development regulated by forkhead box transcription factors and molecular genetic mechanisms by which forkhead box factors modulate heart development during embryogenesis and organogenesis. This review also summarizes human CHD related mutations in forkhead box genes as well as the abnormal expression of forkhead box gene, and discusses additional possible regulatory mechanisms of the forkhead box genes during embryonic heart development that warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The pediatric heart network: meeting the challenges to multicenter studies in pediatric heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kristin M; Pemberton, Victoria L; Pearson, Gail D

    2015-10-01

    Because of the relatively small numbers of pediatric patients with congenital heart disease cared for in any individual center, there is a significant need for multicenter clinical studies to validate new medical or surgical therapies. The Pediatric Heart Network (PHN), with 15 years of experience in multicenter clinical research, has tackled numerous challenges when conducting multicenter studies. This review describes the challenges encountered and the strategies employed to conduct high-quality, collaborative research in pediatric cardiovascular disease. Sharing lessons learned from the PHN can provide guidance to investigators interested in conducting pediatric multicenter studies.

  10. Regenerative Therapy Prevents Heart Failure Progression in Dyssynchronous Nonischemic Narrow QRS Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Satsuki; Arrell, D Kent; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Behfar, Atta; Kane, Garvan C; Perez-Terzic, Carmen M; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J; McDonald, Robert J; Wyles, Saranya P; Zlatkovic-Lindor, Jelena; Nelson, Timothy J; Terzic, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac resynchronization therapy using bi-ventricular pacing is proven effective in the management of heart failure (HF) with a wide QRS-complex. In the absence of QRS prolongation, however, device-based resynchronization is reported unsuitable. As an alternative, the present study tests a regenerative cell-based approach in the setting of narrow QRS-complex HF. Methods and Results Progressive cardiac dyssynchrony was provoked in a chronic transgenic model of stress-triggered dilated cardiomyopathy. In contrast to rampant end-stage disease afflicting untreated cohorts, stem cell intervention early in disease, characterized by mechanical dyssynchrony and a narrow QRS-complex, aborted progressive dyssynchronous HF and prevented QRS widening. Stem cell-treated hearts acquired coordinated ventricular contraction and relaxation supporting systolic and diastolic performance. Rescue of contractile dynamics was underpinned by a halted left ventricular dilatation, limited hypertrophy, and reduced fibrosis. Reverse remodeling reflected a restored cardiomyopathic proteome, enforced at systems level through correction of the pathological molecular landscape and nullified adverse cardiac outcomes. Cell therapy of a dyssynchrony-prone cardiomyopathic cohort translated prospectively into improved exercise capacity and prolonged survivorship. Conclusions In narrow QRS HF, a regenerative approach demonstrated functional and structural benefit, introducing the prospect of device-autonomous resynchronization therapy for refractory disease. PMID:25964205

  11. Ischemic Heart Disease: Special Considerations in Cardio-Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giza, Dana Elena; Boccalandro, Fernando; Lopez-Mattei, Juan; Iliescu, Gloria; Karimzad, Kaveh; Kim, Peter; Iliescu, Cezar

    2017-05-01

    The interplay and balance between the competing morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases and cancer have a significant impact on both short- and long-term health outcomes of patients who survived cancer or are being treated for cancer. Ischemic heart disease in patients with cancer or caused by cancer therapy is a clinical problem of emerging importance. Prompt recognition and optimum management of ischemic heart disease mean that patients with cancer can successfully receive therapies to treat their malignancy and reduce morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease. In this sense, the presence of cancer and cancer-related comorbidities (e.g., thrombocytopenia, propensity to bleed, thrombotic status) substantially complicates the management of cardiovascular diseases in cancer patients. In this review, we will summarize the current state of knowledge on the management strategies for ischemic disease in patients with cancer, focusing on the challenges encountered when addressing these complexities.

  12. Evaluation of thallium-201 exercise scintigraphy in coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.G.; McKillop, J.H.; Bessent, R.G.; Turner, J.G.; Lorimer, A.R.; Hutton, I.; Greig, W.R.; Lawrie, T.D.V.

    1979-01-01

    Thallium-201 myocardial imaging provides a non-invasive technique in the investigation of patients with suspected coronary heart disease. This study was designed to evaluate thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) scintigraphy in predicting the presence or absence of coronary heart disease in 50 patients presenting with chest pain. The results suggest that computer analysed 201 Tl exercise scintigraphy is a valuable technique for identifying patients with significant coronary artery disease. 201 Tl image data were highly sensitive for detecting the presence of coronary artery disease though accuracy in predicting the extent of disease was limited in patients with multiple vessel disease. The data provides further justification for the use of exercise 201 Tl scintigraphy especially in conjunction with exercise electrocardiography in the investigation of patients with chest pain. (author)

  13. Urinary and plasma magnesium and risk of ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Michel M; Gansevoort, Ron T; Mukamal, Kenneth J; van der Harst, Pim; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Feskens, Edith J M; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J L

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies on dietary magnesium and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) have yielded inconsistent results, in part because of a lack of direct measures of actual magnesium uptake. Urinary excretion of magnesium, an indicator of dietary magnesium uptake, might provide more consistent results. The objective was to investigate whether urinary magnesium excretion and plasma magnesium are associated with IHD risk. We examined 7664 adult participants free of known cardiovascular disease in the Prevention of Renal and Vascular End-Stage Disease (PREVEND) study-a prospective population-based cohort study. Urinary magnesium excretion was measured in 2 baseline 24-h urine collections. Mean ± SD urinary magnesium excretion was 4.24 ± 1.65 mmol/24 h for men and 3.54 ± 1.40 mmol/24 h for women. During a median follow-up of 10.5 y (IQR: 9.9-10.8 y), 462 fatal and nonfatal IHD events occurred. After multivariable adjustment, urinary magnesium excretion had a nonlinear relation with IHD risk (P-curvature = 0.01). The lowest sex-specific quintile (men: magnesium excretion. A similar increase in risk of the lowest quintile was observed for mortality related to IHD (HR: 1.70; 95% CI: 1.10, 2.61). No associations were observed between circulating magnesium and risk of IHD. Low urinary magnesium excretion was independently associated with a higher risk of IHD incidence. An increased dietary intake of magnesium, particularly in those with the lowest urinary magnesium, could reduce the risk of IHD.

  14. Causes and Predictors of Death in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease (from the Heart and Soul Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Elizabeth Y; Dixson, Jeffrey; Schiller, Nelson B; Whooley, Mary A

    2017-01-01

    Although the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in the United States has increased during the past 25 years, cardiovascular mortality has decreased due to advances in CHD therapy and prevention. We sought to determine the proportion of patients with CHD who die from cardiovascular versus noncardiovascular causes and the causes and predictors of death, in a cohort of patients with CHD. The Heart and Soul Study enrolled 1,024 participants with stable CHD from 2000 to 2002 and followed them for 10 years. Causes of mortality were assigned based on detailed review of medical records, death certificates, and coroner reports by blinded adjudicators. During 7,680 person-years of follow-up, 401 participants died. Of these deaths, 42.4% were cardiovascular and 54.4% were noncardiovascular. Myocardial infarction, stroke, and sudden death accounted for 72% of cardiovascular deaths. Cancer, pneumonia, and sepsis accounted for 67% of noncardiovascular deaths. Independent predictors of cardiac mortality were older age, inducible ischemia on stress echocardiography, higher heart rate at rest, smoking, lower hemoglobin, and higher N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (all p values <0.05); independent predictors of noncardiac mortality included older age, inducible ischemia, higher heart rate, lower exercise capacity, and nonuse of statins (all p values <0.05). In conclusion, mortality in this cohort was more frequently due to noncardiovascular causes, and predictors of noncardiovascular mortality included factors traditionally associated with cardiovascular mortality. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Type A Behaviours and Heart Disease: Epidemiological and Experimental Foundations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Bennett

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper critically examines three strands of evidence that concern the relationship between type A behaviours and coronary heart disease; prospective epidemiological studies of healthy populations, studies of those at high risk for coronary heart disease, and angiographic studies of atherosclerosis. The first of these would seem to provide the strongest test. Methodological and conceptual issues mean that the results of studies using the other methods should be interpreted with care. It is concluded that there is relatively strong evidence of an association between Type A behaviour as measured by Structured Interview and coronary heart disease. Hostility and anger appear to be the most powerful determinants of CHD. However, it is likely that they interact with other type A behaviours and related environmental factors in determining risk.

  16. Evolving Concepts of Pulmonary Hypertension Secondary to Left Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramu, Bhavadharini; Thenappan, Thenappan

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease is the most common form of pulmonary hypertension. Although its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood, it is now well recognized that the presence of pulmonary hypertension is associated with a worse prognosis. Right ventricular failure has independent and additive prognostic value over pulmonary hypertension for adverse outcomes in left heart disease. Recently, several new terminologies have been introduced to better define and characterize the nature and severity of pulmonary hypertension. Several new treatment options including the use of pulmonary arterial hypertension specific therapies are being considered, but there is lack of evidence. Here, we review the recent advances in this field and summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities of use in the management of pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease.

  17. Prediction Of Heart Disease Using Back Propagation MLP Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durairaj M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Diagnosing the presence of heart disease is actually tedious processas it requires depth knowledge and rich experience. In general the prediction of heart disease lies upon the traditional way of examining medical report such as ECG The Electrocardiogram MRI Magnetic Resonance Imaging Blood Pressure Stress tests by a medical practitioner. Now days a large volume of medical data is available in medical industry and acts as a great source of predicting useful and hidden facts in almost all medical problems. These facts would really in turn help the practitioners to make accurate predictions. The novel techniques of Artificial Neural Network concepts have also been contributing themselves in yielding highest prediction accuracy over medical data. This paper aims to predict the existence of heart disease using Back Propagation MLP Multilayer Perceptron of Artificial Nerual Network. The results are compared with the existing works carried out in the same domain.

  18. [Depression, anxiety, and stress in patients with coronary heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belialov, F I

    The analytical paper summarized the results of recent studies of an association of depression, anxiety, and stress with coronary heart disease (CHD). Mental disorders are shown to be associated with increased risk of CHD and to worsen the course of coronary disease. Antidepressants and psychotherapy improve the control of mental disorders, quality of life, and, in some cases, have a positive impact on the course of coronary disease.

  19. [Condom effectiveness to prevent sexually transmitted diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Eduardo Gayón; Orozco, Hilda Hernández; Soto, Selene Sam; Aburto, Esther Lombardo

    2008-02-01

    Sexual transmitted diseases (included HIV/AIDS) are a common and preventable cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. When used consistently and correctly, condoms are effective to prevent these diseases, however, its protection does not account for 100%. To know the effectiveness of male condom, through bibliographic evidence, to prevent sexual transmitted infections in heterosexual serodiscordant partners. A bibliographical review of Medline/Pubmed, LILACS and Cochrane databases, and publications of the National Health Institutes, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, World Health Organization, and WHO AIDS Global Program was done to analyze male condom effectiveness to prevent sexual transmitted diseases. Reports demonstrated that male condom protection against HIV/AIDS in heterosexual serodiscordant partners goes from 60 to 95%. Most recent information (2006) showed 80%. Two studies demonstrated no HPV protection with male condom, and another one 70% of protection. Male condom demonstrated no HPV-1 protection, but decrease of risk in HVS-2 transmission in women (0.85 of protection). Male condom protection against sexual transmitted diseases is not 100%. There must be used additional measures that have demonstrated its utility to decrease transmission risk.

  20. Anemic syndrome in patients with ischemic heart disease and chronic heart failure (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shvarts Y.G.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anemic syndrome of different severity often accompanies ischemic heart disease (IHD and chronic heart failure (CHF. Anemia has association with unfavorable prognosis in patients with all forms of CVD — acute and chronic. In this article the authors summarize a literature review of English articles dedicated to the problem of anemia and ischemic heart disease (IHD and the results of original research on the relationship between anemic syndrome and prognosis in the hospitalized patients with IHD and chronic heart failure (CHF. Anemia is frequently observed in patients with CHF, and evidence suggests that anemia might be associated with an increased mortality in both systolic and diastolic chronic heart failure (CHF, morbidity and rate of hospitalization in CHF patients. Moreover, CHF itself could be involved in the pathogenesis of anemia. Early studies suggested a pathogenic role of inflammation mediators. The normalization of hemoglobin concentration by EPO and iron supply in patients with CHF and chronic renal insufficiency results in improved exercise capacity by increasing oxygen delivery and improving cardiac function. However, there is limited information concerning the association of hemoglobin concentration and new onset of clinically recognized coronary artery disease, and lack of information about the effect of anemia treatment on prognosis of acute forms of IHD