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Sample records for preventing adverse drug

  1. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: adverse effects and their prevention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To discuss nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), their history, development, mode of action, toxicities, strategies for the prevention of toxicity, and future developments. - Methods: Medline search for articles published up to 2007, using the keywords acetylsalicylic acid,

  2. Campania preventability assessment committee: a focus on the preventability of the contrast media adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Maurizio; Rossi, Claudia; Rafaniello, Concetta; Mascolo, Annamaria; Cimmaruta, Daniela; Scavone, Cristina; Fiorentino, Sonia; Grassi, Enrico; Reginelli, Alfonso; Rotondo, Antonio; Sportiello, Liberata

    2016-12-01

    The current study aims to assess the preventability of the contrast media adverse drug reactions reported through the Campania spontaneous reporting system, identifying the possible limitations emerged in this type of evaluation. All the individual case safety reports validated by the Campania Pharmacovigilance Regional Centre from July 2012 to September 2015 were screened to select those that reported contrast media as suspected drug. Campania Preventability Assessment Committee, in collaboration with clinicians specialized in Radiology, assessed the preventability according to the P-Method, through a case-by-case approach. From July 2012 to September 2015, 13798 cases were inserted by pharmacovigilance managers in the Italian Pharmacovigilance Network database (in the geographical contest of the Campania Region), of which 67 reported contrast media as suspected drug. Five preventable cases were found. The most reported causes for preventability were the inappropriate drug use for the case clinical conditions and the absence of the preventive measure administrated prior to the contrast media administration. Several limitations were found in the evaluation of the critical criteria for the preventability assessment. Educational initiatives will be organized directly to the healthcare professionals involved in the contrast media administration, to promote an appropriate use of the contrast media.

  3. Quality indicators of preventable adverse drug events in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard

    associated with HbA1c monitoring and treatment was determined using logistic regression. The fourth step in the model was a health economic evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of shifting patients from inadequate to adequate medical treatment. The database used for the AMI indicator study formed...... the database for this study. Five post AMI treatment scenarios were analysed, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios calculated. Results: The systematic literature review (Article 1) revealed that preventable adverse drug The systematic literature review (Article 1) revealed that preventable adverse drug......, that from a public health care systems' point of view, providing intensive cardioprotective treatment according to already accepted guidelines to type 2 diabetes patients is cost-effective. The HbA1c study demonstrated how diabetes-related hospital admissions are frequent, and how preventable adverse drug...

  4. Methods for assessing the preventability of adverse drug events: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Katja Marja; Andersson Sundell, Karolina; Petzold, Max; Hägg, Staffan

    2012-02-01

    Preventable adverse drug events (ADEs) are common in both outpatient and inpatient settings. However, the proportion of preventable ADEs varies considerably in different studies, even when conducted in the same setting, and methods for assessing the preventability of ADEs are diverse. The aim of this article is to identify and systematically evaluate methods for assessing the preventability of ADEs. Seven databases (Cochrane, CINAHL, EMBASE, IPA, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Web of Science) were searched in September 2010 utilizing the databases' index terms and other common terminology on preventable ADEs. No limits for the years of publication were set. Reference lists of included original articles and relevant review articles were also screened. After applying predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria on 4161 unique citations, 142 (3.4%) original research articles were included in the review. One additional article was included from reference lists. Outcome measures of included studies had to include the frequency of ADEs and the assessment of their preventability. Studies were excluded if they focused on individuals with one specific type of treatment, medical condition, medical procedure or ADE. Measurement instruments for determining the preventability of ADEs in each article were extracted and unique instruments were compared. The process of assessing the preventability of ADEs was described based on reported actions taken to standardize and conduct the assessment, and on information about the reliability and validity of the assessment. Eighteen unique instruments for determining the preventability of ADEs were identified. They fell under the following four groups: (i) instruments using a definition of preventability only (n = 3); (ii) instruments with a definition of preventability and an assessment scale for determining preventability (n = 5); (iii) instruments with specific criteria for each preventability category (n = 3); and (iv) instruments

  5. Adverse reactions analysis and prevention of antiseptic drug in the obstetrics and gynecology nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongli; Bo, Qing; Zhang, Ying; He, Jing

    2018-05-01

    Antimicrobial agents are widely used in gynecologic inflammation and surgical period, so as to cure some infectious diseases, reduce the chance of surgical incision infection, but at the same time, there are many adverse reactions. The use of nursing interventions in obstetrics and gynecology can significantly reduce the adverse drug reactions in the treatment. The results showed that the incidence of adverse reactions in the observation group was 8.8%, while that in the control group was 15.6%. The incidence of adverse reactions in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). The results showed that the nursing intervention in obstetrics and gynecology could reduce the adverse drug reactions. In a word, the nursing intervention of obstetrics and gynecology can greatly reduce the adverse reaction of antibiotics and has certain application value. It is worth popularizing in clinical practice.

  6. Effect of a ward-based pharmacy team on preventable adverse drug events in surgical patients (SUREPILL study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, M.; Boeker, E. B.; Ramrattan, M. A.; Kiewiet, J. J. S.; Ram, K.; Gombert-Handoko, K. B.; van Lent-Evers, N. A. E. M.; Kuks, P. F. M.; Mulder, W. M. C.; Breslau, P. J.; Oostenbroek, R. J.; Dijkgraaf, M. G. W.; Lie-A-Huen, L.; Boermeester, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Surgical patients are at risk of adverse drug events (ADEs) causing morbidity and mortality. Much harm is preventable. Ward-based pharmacy interventions to reduce medication-related harm have not been evaluated in surgical patients. This multicentre prospective clinical trial evaluated a

  7. Preventing drug-related adverse events following hospital discharge: the role of the pharmacist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholls J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Justine Nicholls,1 Craig MacKenzie,1 Rhiannon Braund2 1Dunedin Hospital Pharmacy, 2School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand Abstract: Transition of care (ToC points, and in particular hospital admission and discharge, can be associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs and other drug-related problems (DRPs. The growing recognition of the pharmacist as an expert in medication management, patient education and communication makes them well placed to intervene. There is evidence to indicate that the inclusion of pharmacists in the health care team at ToC points reduces ADEs and DRPs and improves patient outcomes. The objectives of this paper are to outline the following using current literature: 1 the increased risk of medication-related problems at ToC points; 2 to highlight some strategies that have been successful in reducing these problems; and 3 to illustrate how the role of the pharmacist across all facets of care can contribute to the reduction of ADEs, particularly for patients at ToC points. Keywords: pharmacist, adverse drug events, drug-related problems, transitions of care, hospital discharge

  8. Use and perceived benefits of mobile devices by physicians in preventing adverse drug events in the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Steven M; Boyce, Richard D; Ligons, Frank M; Perera, Subashan; Nace, David A; Hochheiser, Harry

    2013-12-01

    Although mobile devices equipped with drug reference software may help prevent adverse drug events (ADEs) in the nursing home (NH) by providing medication information at the point of care, little is known about their use and perceived benefits. The goal of this study was to conduct a survey of a nationally representative sample of NH physicians to quantify the use and perceived benefits of mobile devices in preventing ADEs in the NH setting. We surveyed physicians who attended the 2010 American Medical Directors Association Annual Symposium about their use of mobile devices, and beliefs about the effectiveness of drug reference software in preventing ADEs. The overall net valid response rate was 70% (558/800) with 42% (236/558) using mobile devices to assist with prescribing in the NH. Physicians with 15 or fewer years of clinical experience were 67% more likely to be mobile device users, compared with those with more than 15 years of clinical experience (odds ratio = 1.68; 95% confidence interval = 1.17-2.41; P = .005). For those who used a mobile device to assist with prescribing, almost all (98%) reported performing an average of 1 or more drug look-ups per day, performed an average of 1 to 2 lookups per day for potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and most (88%) believed that drug reference software had helped to prevent at least 1 potential ADE in the preceding 4-week period. The proportion of NH physicians who use mobile devices with drug reference software, although significant, is lower than in other clinical environments. Our results suggest that NH physicians who use mobile devices equipped with drug reference software believe they are helpful for reducing ADEs. Further research is needed to better characterize the facilitators and barriers to adoption of the technology in the NH and its precise impact on NH ADEs. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Use and Perceived Benefits of Mobile Devices by Physicians in Preventing Adverse Drug Events in the Nursing Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Steven M.; Boyce, Richard D.; Ligons, Frank; Perera, Subashan; Nace, David A.; Hochheiser, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although mobile devices equipped with drug reference software may help prevent adverse drug events (ADEs) in the nursing home (NH) by providing medication information at the point-of-care, little is known about their use and perceived benefits. The goal of this study was to conduct a survey of a nationally representative sample of NH physicians to quantify the use and perceived benefits of mobile devices in preventing ADEs in the NH setting. Design/Setting/Participants We surveyed physicians who attended the 2010 the AMDA Annual Symposium about their use of mobile devices and beliefs about the effectiveness of drug reference software in preventing ADEs. Results The overall net valid response rate was 70% (558/800) with 42% (236/558) using mobile devices to assist with prescribing in the NH. Physicians with ≤15 years clinical experience were 67% more likely to be mobile device users, compared to those with >15 years of clinical experience (odds ratio=1.68; 95% confidence interval=1.17-2.41; p=0.005). For those who used a mobile device to assist with prescribing, almost all (98%) reported performing an average of one or more drug look-ups per day, performed an average of 1-2 lookups per day for potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and most (88%) believed that drug reference software had helped to prevent at least one potential ADE in the preceding four-week period. Conclusions The proportion of NH physicians who use mobile devices with drug reference software, while significant, is lower than in other clinical environments. Our results suggest that NH physicians who use mobile devices equipped with drug reference software believe they are helpful for reducing ADEs. Further research is needed to better characterize the facilitators and barriers to adoption of the technology in the NH and its precise impact on NH ADEs. PMID:24094901

  10. Systematic review of the incidence and characteristics of preventable adverse drug events in ambulatory care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard; Winterstein, Almut G; Søndergaard, Birthe

    2007-01-01

    studies, health services research, and follow-up studies. Additional articles were found in the reference sections of retrieved articles. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: Peer-reviewed articles assessing pADEs in ambulatory care, with detailed descriptions/frequency distributions of (1) ADE....../pADE incidence, (2) clinical outcomes, (3) associated drug groups, and/or (4) underlying medication errors were included. Study country, year and design, sample size, follow-up time, ADE/pADE identification method, proportion of ADEs/pADEs and ADEs/pADEs requiring hospital admission, and frequency distribution......-months, and the pADE incidence was 5.6 per 1000 person-months (1.1-10.1). The median ADE preventability rate was 21% (11-38%). The median incidence of ADEs requiring hospital admission was 0.45 (0.10-13.1) per 1000 person-months, and the median incidence of pADEs requiring hospital admission was 4.5 per 1000 person...

  11. [Management of adverse drug effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlienger, R G

    2000-09-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are still considered one of the main problems of drug therapy. ADRs are associated with considerable morbidity, mortality, decreased compliance and therapeutic success as well as high direct and indirect medical costs. Several considerations have to come into play when managing a potential ADR. It is critical to establish an accurate clinical diagnosis of the adverse event. Combining information about drug exposure together with considering other possible causes of the reaction is crucial to establish a causal relationship between the reaction and the suspected drug. Identification of the underlying pathogenesis of an ADR together with the severity of the reaction will have profound implications on continuation of drug therapy after an ADR. Since spontaneous reports about ADRs are a key stone of a functioning post-marketing surveillance system and therefore play a key role in improving drug safety, health care professionals are highly encouraged to report ADRs to a local or national organization. However, because the majority of ADRs is dose-dependent and therefore preventable, individualization of pharmacotherapy may have a major impact on reducing such events.

  12. [Use of pharmacogenetic testing to prevent adverse drug reactions during statin therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, N A; Kukes, V G; Kazakov, R E; Rumyantsev, A A; Sychev, D A

    The number of patients receiving statins increases every year and due to the fact that they should take statins during their lives, the problem of their safety use comes to the forefront. The paper analyzes the safety of using the medications of this group and discusses the diagnosis of myopathies induced by statins and the occurrence of immune-mediated statin myopathies. It considers a personalized approach to prescribing statins, analyzes Russian and foreign experience in using pharmacogenetics to reduce the risk of myopathies, publishes the results of the authors' experience in clinically introducing pharmacogenetic testing at hospitals, and analyzes the long-term results of determining the polymorphism of the SLCO1B1 gene for the prediction of the risk of adverse events when using statins and estimating patient compliance to prescribed treatment.

  13. Design of the Anti-tuberculosis Drugs induced Adverse Reactions in China National Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Scheme Study (ADACS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ping

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 1 million tuberculosis (TB patients are receiving the standard anti-TB treatment provided by China National Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Scheme (CNTS in China every year. Adverse reactions (ADRs induced by anti-TB drugs could both do harm to patients and lead to anti-TB treatment failure. The ADACS aimed to explore ADRs' incidences, prognoses, economical and public health impacts for TB patients and TB control, and build a DNA bank of TB patients. Methods/Design Multiple study designs were adopted. Firstly, a prospective cohort with 4488 sputum smears positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients was established. Patients were followed up for 6-9 months in 52 counties of four regions. Those suspected ADRs should be checked and confirmed by Chinese State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA. Secondly, if the suspected ADR was anti-TB drug induced liver injury (ATLI, a nested case-control study would be performed which comprised choosing a matched control and doing a plus questionnaire inquiry. Thirdly, health economical data of ADRs would be collected to analyze financial burdens brought by ADRs and cost-effectiveness of ADRs' treatments. Fourthly, a drop of intravenous blood for each patient was taken and saved in FTA card for DNA banking and genotyping. Finally, the demographic, clinical, environmental, administrative and genetic data would be merged for the comprehensive analysis. Discussion ADACS will give an overview of anti-TB drugs induced ADRs' incidences, risk factors, treatments, prognoses, and clinical, economical and public health impacts for TB patients applying CNTS regimen in China, and provide suggestions for individualized health care and TB control policy.

  14. Design of the Anti-tuberculosis Drugs induced Adverse Reactions in China National Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Scheme Study (ADACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background More than 1 million tuberculosis (TB) patients are receiving the standard anti-TB treatment provided by China National Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Scheme (CNTS) in China every year. Adverse reactions (ADRs) induced by anti-TB drugs could both do harm to patients and lead to anti-TB treatment failure. The ADACS aimed to explore ADRs' incidences, prognoses, economical and public health impacts for TB patients and TB control, and build a DNA bank of TB patients. Methods/Design Multiple study designs were adopted. Firstly, a prospective cohort with 4488 sputum smears positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients was established. Patients were followed up for 6-9 months in 52 counties of four regions. Those suspected ADRs should be checked and confirmed by Chinese State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA). Secondly, if the suspected ADR was anti-TB drug induced liver injury (ATLI), a nested case-control study would be performed which comprised choosing a matched control and doing a plus questionnaire inquiry. Thirdly, health economical data of ADRs would be collected to analyze financial burdens brought by ADRs and cost-effectiveness of ADRs' treatments. Fourthly, a drop of intravenous blood for each patient was taken and saved in FTA card for DNA banking and genotyping. Finally, the demographic, clinical, environmental, administrative and genetic data would be merged for the comprehensive analysis. Discussion ADACS will give an overview of anti-TB drugs induced ADRs' incidences, risk factors, treatments, prognoses, and clinical, economical and public health impacts for TB patients applying CNTS regimen in China, and provide suggestions for individualized health care and TB control policy. PMID:20492672

  15. [Adverse events prevention ability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparo, Ugo Luigi; Aparo, Andrea

    2007-03-01

    The issue of how to address medical errors is the key to improve the health care system performances. Operational evidence collected in the last five years shows that the solution is only partially linked to future technological developments. Cultural and organisational changes are mandatory to help to manage and drastically reduce the adverse events in health care organisations. Classical management, merely based on coordination and control, is inadequate. Proactive, self-organising network based structures must be put in place and managed using adaptive, fast evolving management tools.

  16. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    OpenAIRE

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration.

  17. Biomarkers of adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Daniel F; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2018-02-01

    Adverse drug reactions can be caused by a wide range of therapeutics. Adverse drug reactions affect many bodily organ systems and vary widely in severity. Milder adverse drug reactions often resolve quickly following withdrawal of the casual drug or sometimes after dose reduction. Some adverse drug reactions are severe and lead to significant organ/tissue injury which can be fatal. Adverse drug reactions also represent a financial burden to both healthcare providers and the pharmaceutical industry. Thus, a number of stakeholders would benefit from development of new, robust biomarkers for the prediction, diagnosis, and prognostication of adverse drug reactions. There has been significant recent progress in identifying predictive genomic biomarkers with the potential to be used in clinical settings to reduce the burden of adverse drug reactions. These have included biomarkers that can be used to alter drug dose (for example, Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) and azathioprine dose) and drug choice. The latter have in particular included human leukocyte antigen (HLA) biomarkers which identify susceptibility to immune-mediated injuries to major organs such as skin, liver, and bone marrow from a variety of drugs. This review covers both the current state of the art with regard to genomic adverse drug reaction biomarkers. We also review circulating biomarkers that have the potential to be used for both diagnosis and prognosis, and have the added advantage of providing mechanistic information. In the future, we will not be relying on single biomarkers (genomic/non-genomic), but on multiple biomarker panels, integrated through the application of different omics technologies, which will provide information on predisposition, early diagnosis, prognosis, and mechanisms. Impact statement • Genetic and circulating biomarkers present significant opportunities to personalize patient therapy to minimize the risk of adverse drug reactions. ADRs are a significant heath issue

  18. Differences between Drug-Induced and Contrast Media-Induced Adverse Reactions Based on Spontaneously Reported Adverse Drug Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, JiHyeon; Lee, HeeYoung; Suh, JinUk; Yang, MyungSuk; Kang, WonKu; Kim, EunYoung

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed differences between spontaneously reported drug-induced (not including contrast media) and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Adverse drug reactions reported by an in-hospital pharmacovigilance center (St. Mary's teaching hospital, Daejeon, Korea) from 2010-2012 were classified as drug-induced or contrast media-induced. Clinical patterns, frequency, causality, severity, Schumock and Thornton's preventability, and type A/B reactions were recorded. The trends among causality tools measuring drug and contrast-induced adverse reactions were analyzed. Of 1,335 reports, 636 drug-induced and contrast media-induced adverse reactions were identified. The prevalence of spontaneously reported adverse drug reaction-related admissions revealed a suspected adverse drug reaction-reporting rate of 20.9/100,000 (inpatient, 0.021%) and 3.9/100,000 (outpatients, 0.004%). The most common adverse drug reaction-associated drug classes included nervous system agents and anti-infectives. Dermatological and gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions were most frequently and similarly reported between drug and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Compared to contrast media-induced adverse reactions, drug-induced adverse reactions were milder, more likely to be preventable (9.8% vs. 1.1%, p contrast media-induced adverse reactions (56.6%, p = 0.066). Causality patterns differed between the two adverse reaction classes. The World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre causality evaluation and Naranjo algorithm results significantly differed from those of the Korean algorithm version II (p contrast media-induced adverse reactions. The World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre and Naranjo algorithm causality evaluation afforded similar results.

  19. 78 FR 54469 - Solicitation of Written Comments on Draft National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... Medicine as ``an injury resulting from medical intervention related to a drug.'' This broad term... demonstrate or exhibit concepts of their written responses, however, we request that comments are identified...

  20. Adverse drug reactions induced by cardiovascular drugs in outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholami K

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Considering increased use of cardiovascular drugs and limitations in pre-marketing trials for drug safety evaluation, post marketing evaluation of adverse drug reactions (ADRs induced by this class of medicinal products seems necessary.Objectives: To determine the rate and seriousness of adverse reactions induced by cardiovascular drugs in outpatients. To compare sex and different age groups in developing ADRs with cardiovascular agents. To assess the relationship between frequencies of ADRs and the number of drugs used. Methods: This cross-sectional study was done in cardiovascular clinic at a teaching hospital. All patients during an eight months period were evaluated for cardiovascular drugs induced ADRs. Patient and reaction factors were analyzed in detected ADRs. Patients with or without ADRs were compared in sex and age by using chi-square test. Assessing the relationship between frequencies of ADRs and the number of drugs used was done by using Pearson analysis. Results: The total number of 518 patients was visited at the clinic. ADRs were detected in 105 (20.3% patients. The most frequent ADRs were occurred in the age group of 51-60. The highest rate of ADRs was recorded to be induced by Diltiazem (23.5% and the lowest rate with Atenolol (3%. Headache was the most frequent detected ADR (23%. Assessing the severity and preventability of ADRs revealed that 1.1% of ADRs were detected as severe and 1.9% as preventable reactions. Women significantly developed more ADRs in this study (chi square = 3.978, P<0.05. ADRs more frequently occurred with increasing age in this study (chi square = 15.871, P<0.05. With increasing the number of drugs used, the frequency of ADRs increased (Pearson=0.259, P<0.05. Conclusion: Monitoring ADRs in patients using cardiovascular drugs is a matter of importance since this class of medicines is usually used by elderly patients with critical conditions and underlying diseases.

  1. Ranking Adverse Drug Reactions With Crowdsourcing

    KAUST Repository

    Gottlieb, Assaf; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel; Altman, Russ B

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is no publicly available resource that provides the relative severity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Such a resource would be useful for several applications, including assessment of the risks and benefits of drugs

  2. The effect of an active on-ward participation of hospital pharmacists in Internal Medicine teams on preventable Adverse Drug Events in elderly inpatients: protocol of the WINGS study (Ward-oriented pharmacy in newly admitted geriatric seniors)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopotowska, J.E.; Wierenga, P.C.; de Rooij, S.E.; Stuijt, C.C.; Arisz, L.; Kuks, P.F.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Lie-A-Huen, L.; Smorenburg, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of clinical interventions, aiming at reduction of preventable Adverse Drug Events (preventable ADEs) during hospital stay, have been studied extensively. Clinical Pharmacy is a well-established and effective service, usually consisting of full-time on-ward participation of clinical

  3. Adverse drug reactions induced by cardiovascular drugs in outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Kheirollah; Ziaie, Shadi; Shalviri, Gloria

    2008-01-01

    Considering increased use of cardiovascular drugs and limitations in pre-marketing trials for drug safety evaluation, post marketing evaluation of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) induced by this class of medicinal products seems necessary. To determine the rate and seriousness of adverse reactions induced by cardiovascular drugs in outpatients. To compare sex and different age groups in developing ADRs with cardiovascular agents. To assess the relationship between frequencies of ADRs and the number of drugs used. This cross-sectional study was done in cardiovascular clinic at a teaching hospital. All patients during an eight months period were evaluated for cardiovascular drugs induced ADRs. Patient and reaction factors were analyzed in detected ADRs. Patients with or without ADRs were compared in sex and age by using chi-square test. Assessing the relationship between frequencies of ADRs and the number of drugs used was done by using Pearson analysis. The total number of 518 patients was visited at the clinic. ADRs were detected in 105 (20.3%) patients. The most frequent ADRs were occurred in the age group of 51-60. The highest rate of ADRs was recorded to be induced by Diltiazem (23.5%) and the lowest rate with Atenolol (3%). Headache was the most frequent detected ADR (23%). Assessing the severity and preventability of ADRs revealed that 1.1% of ADRs were detected as severe and 1.9% as preventable reactions. Women significantly developed more ADRs in this study (chi square = 3.978, PPearson=0.259, P<0.05). Monitoring ADRs in patients using cardiovascular drugs is a matter of importance since this class of medicines is usually used by elderly patients with critical conditions and underlying diseases.

  4. The pharmacist and adverse drug reaction reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, K

    1982-08-01

    During premarketing trials, the number of patients exposed to a drug and the length of exposure to a drug are both limited. After marketing, many thousands, frequently millions, of patients are exposed to the drug over considerably longer periods of time, and adverse drug reactions not previously recognized appear. Because of these factors, postmarketing surveillance is extremely important. Pharmacists can contribute to drug safety and improved patient care by understanding and actively participating in the Food and Drug Administration's Spontaneous Reporting Program.

  5. Identifying Adverse Drug Events by Relational Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, David; Costa, Vítor Santos; Natarajan, Sriraam; Barnard, Aubrey; Peissig, Peggy; Caldwell, Michael

    2012-07-01

    The pharmaceutical industry, consumer protection groups, users of medications and government oversight agencies are all strongly interested in identifying adverse reactions to drugs. While a clinical trial of a drug may use only a thousand patients, once a drug is released on the market it may be taken by millions of patients. As a result, in many cases adverse drug events (ADEs) are observed in the broader population that were not identified during clinical trials. Therefore, there is a need for continued, post-marketing surveillance of drugs to identify previously-unanticipated ADEs. This paper casts this problem as a reverse machine learning task , related to relational subgroup discovery and provides an initial evaluation of this approach based on experiments with an actual EMR/EHR and known adverse drug events.

  6. Knowledge engineering for adverse drug event prevention: on the design and development of a uniform, contextualized and sustainable knowledge-based framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutkias, Vassilis; Kilintzis, Vassilis; Stalidis, George; Lazou, Katerina; Niès, Julie; Durand-Texte, Ludovic; McNair, Peter; Beuscart, Régis; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2012-06-01

    The primary aim of this work was the development of a uniform, contextualized and sustainable knowledge-based framework to support adverse drug event (ADE) prevention via Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSSs). In this regard, the employed methodology involved first the systematic analysis and formalization of the knowledge sources elaborated in the scope of this work, through which an application-specific knowledge model has been defined. The entire framework architecture has been then specified and implemented by adopting Computer Interpretable Guidelines (CIGs) as the knowledge engineering formalism for its construction. The framework integrates diverse and dynamic knowledge sources in the form of rule-based ADE signals, all under a uniform Knowledge Base (KB) structure, according to the defined knowledge model. Equally important, it employs the means to contextualize the encapsulated knowledge, in order to provide appropriate support considering the specific local environment (hospital, medical department, language, etc.), as well as the mechanisms for knowledge querying, inference, sharing, and management. In this paper, we present thoroughly the establishment of the proposed knowledge framework by presenting the employed methodology and the results obtained as regards implementation, performance and validation aspects that highlight its applicability and virtue in medication safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Nursing role in reporting adverse drug reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita-Garaicoechea, Ana; Reis-Carvalho, Joana; Ripa-Aisa, Irantzu; Jiménez-Mendoza, Ana; Díaz-Balén, Almudena; Oroviogoicoechea, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous report system, in which suspected adverse drug reaction (ADR) are reported by healthcare workers, is currently one of the primary methods to prevent and discover new and serious ADR to marketed medicinal products. The collaboration of nursing professionals with this task makes it possible to improve patient safety and to reduce ADR costs. Although a total of 781 cases of ADR cases were reported in Navarra in 2011, only 7.33% were reported by nurses. The objectives werw to determine the factors that influence nurses in reporting of ADR, and second, to devise strategies which help to increase reporting. A bibliographic search for articles that included the words: reacciones adversas medicamentosas (adverse drug reactions), notificación (reporting) and enfermería (nursing) was conducted using the PubMed and Cinhal databases. A total of 107 articles were retrieved, of which 27 were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. The conclusion learned by reading and analyzing the selected articles was that the factors that affect the notification depend on the attitude of the notifier, as well as personal and professional factors. The main strategies to encourage notification are education and training, motivation, and the availability of facilitating tools. The main factors that have an influence on under-notification are the lack of knowledge and motivation among professionals. To solve the problem of under-notification, the main actions and strategies to undertake are education, motivation and persistence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Psychiatric Adverse Effects of Dermatological Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Özmen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dermatological drugs, mostly corticosteroids and isotretinoin, cause different psychiatric adverse effects. During steroid therapy, a wide range of psychiatric conditions, from minor clinical symptoms like insomnia and anxiety to serious psychiatric syndromes like psychosis and delirium might be seen. In medical literature, a causal connection is usually suggested between “isotretinoin”, which is used for treatment of acne vulgaris and depression and suicide attempts. However, there are no statistically significant double-blind randomized studies that support this connection. Clinicians must know patient’s psychiatric history before using any dermatological treatment known as causing psychiatric adverse effects, and psychiatric consultation should be established whenever necessary.

  9. Adverse drug events in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Anna; Woo, Sook-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Adverse reactions to medications are common and may have a variety of clinical presentations in the oral cavity. Targeted therapies and the new biologic agents have revolutionized the treatment of cancers, autoimmune diseases, and inflammatory and rheumatologic diseases but have also been associated with adverse events in the oral cavity. Some examples include osteonecrosis, seen with not only bisphosphonates but also antiangiogenic agents, and the distinctive ulcers caused by mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. As newer therapeutic agents are approved, it is likely that more adverse drug events will be encountered. This review describes the most common clinical presentations of oral mucosal reactions to medications, namely, xerostomia, lichenoid reactions, ulcers, bullous disorders, pigmentation, fibrovascular hyperplasia, white lesions, dysesthesia, osteonecrosis, infection, angioedema, and malignancy. Oral health care providers should be familiar with such events, as they will encounter them in their practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ranking Adverse Drug Reactions With Crowdsourcing

    KAUST Repository

    Gottlieb, Assaf

    2015-03-23

    Background: There is no publicly available resource that provides the relative severity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Such a resource would be useful for several applications, including assessment of the risks and benefits of drugs and improvement of patient-centered care. It could also be used to triage predictions of drug adverse events. Objective: The intent of the study was to rank ADRs according to severity. Methods: We used Internet-based crowdsourcing to rank ADRs according to severity. We assigned 126,512 pairwise comparisons of ADRs to 2589 Amazon Mechanical Turk workers and used these comparisons to rank order 2929 ADRs. Results: There is good correlation (rho=.53) between the mortality rates associated with ADRs and their rank. Our ranking highlights severe drug-ADR predictions, such as cardiovascular ADRs for raloxifene and celecoxib. It also triages genes associated with severe ADRs such as epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), associated with glioblastoma multiforme, and SCN1A, associated with epilepsy. Conclusions: ADR ranking lays a first stepping stone in personalized drug risk assessment. Ranking of ADRs using crowdsourcing may have useful clinical and financial implications, and should be further investigated in the context of health care decision making.

  11. Ranking adverse drug reactions with crowdsourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Assaf; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel; Altman, Russ B

    2015-03-23

    There is no publicly available resource that provides the relative severity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Such a resource would be useful for several applications, including assessment of the risks and benefits of drugs and improvement of patient-centered care. It could also be used to triage predictions of drug adverse events. The intent of the study was to rank ADRs according to severity. We used Internet-based crowdsourcing to rank ADRs according to severity. We assigned 126,512 pairwise comparisons of ADRs to 2589 Amazon Mechanical Turk workers and used these comparisons to rank order 2929 ADRs. There is good correlation (rho=.53) between the mortality rates associated with ADRs and their rank. Our ranking highlights severe drug-ADR predictions, such as cardiovascular ADRs for raloxifene and celecoxib. It also triages genes associated with severe ADRs such as epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), associated with glioblastoma multiforme, and SCN1A, associated with epilepsy. ADR ranking lays a first stepping stone in personalized drug risk assessment. Ranking of ADRs using crowdsourcing may have useful clinical and financial implications, and should be further investigated in the context of health care decision making.

  12. An adverse drug event manager facilitates spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Siri; Klarskov, Pia; Borgeskov, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is used for continuous risk-benefit evaluation of marketed pharmaceutical products and for signal detection. The Adverse Drug Event Manager (ADEM) is a service offered to clinicians employed at hospitals in the Capital Region......%). The drugs most frequently reported were lisdexamphetamine (n = 40), rivaroxaban (n = 16) and warfarin (n = 15) (vaccines excluded). In 13 out of 484 reports, the ADR was associated with a fatal outcome. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study indicate that an ADEM promotes and facilitates spontaneous ADR...

  13. [Pharmacotherapy of hyperthyreosis--adverse drug reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perger, Ludwig; Bürgi, Ulrich; Fattinger, Karin

    2011-06-01

    The antithyroid drugs mainly include thioimidazole (carbimazole, methimazole=thiamazole) and propylthiouracil. After absorption, carbimazole is rapidly metabolized to methimazole and thus switching between these two drugs should not be considered in case of side effects. Furthermore, in case of side effects, sometimes even cross reactions between thioimidazoles and propylthiouracil occur. Common and typical adverse reactions of antithyroid drugs include dose dependent hypothyroidism and thus thyroid function should be repeatedly checked while the patient is on antithyroid drugs. Furthermore, pruritus and rash may develop. In this case, one might try to switch from thioimidazoles to propylthiouracil or vice versa. Antithyroid drugs may cause mild dose dependent neutropenia or severe allergy-mediated agranulocytosis, which typically occurs during the first three months of treatment, has an incidence of 3 per 10,000 patients and cross reactivity between thioimidazoles to propylthiouracil may occur. Rarely, antithyroid drugs can cause aplastic anemia. Mainly propylthiouracil, but sometimes also methimazole may lead to an asymptomatic transient increase in liver enzymes or to severe, even lethal liver injury of cholestatic or hepatocellular pattern. Since propylthiouracil associated liver injury was observed increasingly among children and adolescent, it has been suggested to prefer thioimidazoles for these patients. Because of these potential serious adverse effects, physicians should advise patients to immediately seek medical help if they get a fever or sore throat or malaise, abdominal complaints or jaundice, respectively. Furthermore, arthralgias may develop in 1-5% of patients under both antithyroid drugs. Since arthralgias may be the first symptom of more serious immunologic side effects, it is recommended to stop the antithyroid drug in this case. Drug induced polyarthritis mainly develops during the first month of therapy, whereas ANCA-positive vasculitis is

  14. [Adverse drug reaction reporting in emergency medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojevic, Kolia; Chassagnol, Isabelle; Brion, Nathalie; Cléro, Joël; Degrèze, Nathalie; Lambert, Yves

    2004-01-01

    A regional survey was performed between June and September 2002, to evaluate knowledge and attitudes of emergency physicians regarding adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting in a French district. 100 questionnaires completed by physicians working in emergency departments and/or mobile intensive care units were analysed. The frequency of ADRs encountered by emergency practitioners was estimated at > or = 0.73 per year and per physician. The ADR notification rate in emergency medicine was estimated at advertising ADR reporting procedures could help to improve the notification rate in emergency medicine.

  15. Common adverse drug reactions with psychiatric medications and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common adverse drug reactions with psychiatric medications and an approach to their management: Adverse drug reactions are as important in psychiatric practice as they are in any other branch of medicine.

  16. Periodontal treatment for preventing adverse pregnancy outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwendicke, Falk; Karimbux, Nadeem; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Periodontal treatment might reduce adverse pregnancy outcomes. The efficacy of periodontal treatment to prevent preterm birth, low birth weight, and perinatal mortality was evaluated using meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis. METHODS: An existing systematic review was updated...... risk of random errors. RESULTS: Thirteen randomized clinical trials evaluating 6283 pregnant women were meta-analyzed. Four and nine trials had low and high risk of bias, respectively. Overall, periodontal treatment had no significant effect on preterm birth (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] 0.......79 [0.57-1.10]) or low birth weight (0.69 [0.43-1.13]). Trial sequential analysis demonstrated that futility was not reached for any of the outcomes. For populations with moderate occurrence (periodontal treatment was not efficacious for any of the outcomes...

  17. Seamless prevention of adverse events from tattooing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    The boom in tattooing has been paralleled by more frequent adverse events, which may be localised in the skin or systemic and manifested clinically or latent. Infections, allergic reactions from red-coloured tattoos and papulo-nodular reactions from black tattoos dominate. Mild complaints are very...... orchestration of a multi-targeted strategy. High-priority elements of this strategy shall facilitate a qualified 'go' or 'no go' decision by the customer before the tattoo is made and should involve informed consent, qualification of the tattooist and the parlour, including supplies of inks etc., and attention......, which needs attention and timely action to prevent additional cases and epidemic outbreaks, are part of this seamless strategy, along with optimised medical therapy and research....

  18. Adverse events of modern antifungal drugs during treatment of invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Dmitrieva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of adverse events of modern antimycotics by organ systems and comparative frequency between different medicines and their groups are presented. The examples of incompatibility of antifungal drugs with other pharmacological groups are discussed. Records of adverse events and drug compatibility will allow the practitioner to prevent and timely cure possible complications, should they arise.

  19. Adverse events of modern antifungal drugs during treatment of invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Dmitrieva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of adverse events of modern antimycotics by organ systems and comparative frequency between different medicines and their groups are presented. The examples of incompatibility of antifungal drugs with other pharmacological groups are discussed. Records of adverse events and drug compatibility will allow the practitioner to prevent and timely cure possible complications, should they arise.

  20. 3-12 Detection and Management of Adverse Drug React

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MINA SAN

    Detection and Management of Adverse Drug Reactions Related to Antiretroviral Drugs among. HIV/AIDS Patients in Kiambu ... of various adverse drug reactions associated with antiretroviral drugs occurring in patients attending Comprehensive Care .... educational level, perception of ADRs, knowledge of ADRs, detection ...

  1. Consumer reporting of adverse drug reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Nielsen, Lars Hougaard; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reporting adverse drug reactions (ADRs) has traditionally been the sole province of healthcare professionals. Since 2003 in Denmark, consumers have been able to report ADRs directly to the authorities. The objective of this study was to compare ADRs reported by consumers with ADRs...... medicines on level 1 of the anatomical therapeutic chemical (ATC) classification system. ADR reports from consumers were compared with reports from other sources (physicians, pharmacists, lawyers, pharmaceutical companies and other healthcare professionals). Chi-square and odds ratios (ORs) were calculated...... to investigate the dependence between type of reporter and reported ADRs (classified by ATC or SOC). FINDINGS: We analysed 6319 ADR reports corresponding to 15 531 ADRs. Consumers reported 11% of the ADRs. Consumers' share of 'serious' ADRs was comparable to that of physicians (approximately 45%) but lower than...

  2. Epidemiology of adverse drug reactions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouvy, Jacoline C; De Bruin, Marie L; Koopmanschap, Marc A

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) cause considerable mortality and morbidity but no recent reviews are currently available for the European region. Therefore, we performed a review of all epidemiological studies quantifying ADRs in a European setting that were published between 1 January 2000 and 3...... September 2014. Included studies assessed the number of patients who were admitted to hospital due to an ADR, studies that assessed the number of patients who developed an ADR during hospitalization, and studies that measured ADRs in the outpatient setting. In total, 47 articles were included in the final...... review. The median percentage of hospital admissions due to an ADR was 3.5 %, based on 22 studies, and the median percentage of patients who experienced an ADR during hospitalization was 10.1 %, based on 13 studies. Only five studies were found that assessed ADRs occurring in the outpatient setting...

  3. Children and ADRs (Adverse Drug Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napoleone Ettore

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many medicines are prescribed to the paediatric population on an unlicensed or 'off-label' basis because they have not been adequately tested and/or formulated and authorized for use in appropriate paediatric age groups. Regulatory authorities also need to remind health professionals about the importance of their contribution towards the process of paediatric pharmacovigilance thanks to their reporting of adverse drug reactions. The lack of reliable data in the paediatric population is associated with specific problems including: limited availability of safety data due to the lack of clinical trials in the paediatric population; under- or over-dosing in some age groups due to the lack of pharmacokinetics data or dose-finding studies; maturation, growth and development of the paediatric population susceptible to drug-induced growth and development disorders as well as to delayed ADRs not findable in adults. Pre-marketing trials are able to provide information about the benefits of drugs but do not manage to establish a safety profile. Spontaneous reporting of suspected ADRs become an important means to promote reasonable warning signs. Therefore some ADRs may be known in their qualitative aspect and quantitative aspect only after successful marketing and use in the population during a "normal" use. When the drug is used in clinical practice in large unselected populations, epidemiological post-marketing studies are useful as they find their major confirmation in recalling all the events that occur during monitoring, with estimates of incidence of ADRs that can not be obtained by spontaneous reports. In these studies a significant role can be played by the Family Pediatricians with the participation to active pharmacovigilance projects.

  4. Could chiropractors screen for adverse drug events in the community? Survey of US chiropractors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bero Lisa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The "Put Prevention into Practice" campaign of the US Public Health Service (USPHS was launched with the dissemination of the Clinician's Handbook of Preventive Services that recommended standards of clinical care for various prevention activities, including preventive clinical strategies to reduce the risk of adverse drug events. We explored whether nonprescribing clinicians such as chiropractors may contribute to advancing drug safety initiatives by identifying potential adverse drug events in their chiropractic patients, and by bringing suspected adverse drug events to the attention of the prescribing clinicians. Methods Mail survey of US chiropractors about their detection of potential adverse drug events in their chiropractic patients. Results Over half of responding chiropractors (62% reported having identified a suspected adverse drug event occurring in one of their chiropractic patients. The severity of suspected drug-related events detected ranged from mild to severe. Conclusions Chiropractors or other nonprescribing clinicians may be in a position to detect potential adverse drug events in the community. These detection and reporting mechanisms should be standardized and policies related to clinical case management of suspected adverse drug events occurring in their patients should be developed.

  5. Adverse Drug Reactions Related to Drug Administration in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallelli, Luca; Siniscalchi, Antonio; Palleria, Caterina; Mumoli, Laura; Staltari, Orietta; Squillace, Aida; Maida, Francesca; Russo, Emilio; Gratteri, Santo; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2017-01-01

    Drug treatment may be related to the development of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). In this paper, we evaluated the ADRs in patients admitted to Catanzaro Hospital. After we obtained the approval by local Ethical Committee, we performed a retrospective study on clinical records from March 01, 2013 to April 30, 2015. The association between drug and ADR or between drug and drug-drug-interactions (DDIs) was evaluated using the Naranjo's probability scale and Drug Interaction Probability Scale (DIPS), respectively. During the study period, we analyzed 2870 clinical records containing a total of 11,138 prescriptions, and we documented the development of 770 ADRs. The time of hospitalization was significantly higher (P<0.05) in women with ADRs (12.6 ± 1.2 days) with respect to men (11.8± 0.83 days). Using the Naranjo score, we documented a probable association in 78% of these reactions, while DIPS revealed that about 22% of ADRs were related to DDIs. Patients with ADRs received 3052 prescriptions on 11,138 (27.4%) having a mean of 6.1±0.29 drugs that was significantly higher (P<0.01) with respect to patients not experiencing ADRs (mean of 3.4±0.13 drugs). About 19% of ADRs were not diagnosed and were treated as new diseases. Our results indicate that drug administration induces the development of ADRs also during the hospitalization, particularly in elderly women. Moreover, we also documented that ADRs in some patients are under-diagnosed, therefore, it is important to motivate healthcare to report the ADRs in order to optimize the patients' safety. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Adverse drug reactions of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors : towards precision medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoud Pour, S.H.

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, millions of patients with cardiovascular diseases are treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) according to the international treatment guidelines. Although this class of medications is generally well tolerated, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) may prevent their use in

  7. Physician access to drug profiles to reduce adverse reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasnoff, William A.; Tomkins, Edward L.; Dunn, Louise M.

    1995-10-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major source of preventable morbidity and mortality, especially among the elderly, who use more drugs and are more sensitive to them. The insurance industry has recently addressed this problem through the implementation of drug interaction alerts to pharmacists in conjunction with immediate online claims adjudication for almost 60% of prescriptions (expected to reach 90% within 5 years). These alerts are based on stored patient drug profiles maintained by pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) which are updated whenever prescriptions are filled. While these alerts are very helpful, the pharmacist does not prescribe, resulting in time-consuming and costly delays to contact the physician and remedy potential interactions. We have developed and demonstrated the feasibility of the PINPOINT (Pharmaceutical Information Network for prevention of interactions) system for making the drug profile and interaction information easily available to the physician before the prescription is written. We plan to test the cost-effectiveness of the system in a prospective controlled clinical trial.

  8. Adverse Cutaneous Reactions to Psychotropic Drugs: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Novais

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychotropic drugs are often implicated in cutaneous adverse drug reactions. While most of these reactions have a benign character, it is still important, however, to consider its role in the increasing stigma and treatment adherence. A small number of the cutaneous adverse drug reactions can develop into serious and potentially fatal conditions. Objectives: This article aims to review the most common cutaneous adverse drug reactions in patients taking psychotropic drugs. Methods: In this study, a search was carried out in the MEDLINE database for English language articles published , from 1999 to 2014, using as keywords: psychiatric, psychotropic, cutaneous, adverse reaction, antidepressive agents, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, anticonvulsant, dementia. Information available from the Portuguese regulatory and supervising agency (Infarmed was also included.Results: 121 articles were found with reference to cutaneous adverse drug reactions associated with psychotropic drugs. The drugs most frequently reported as associated with such adverse effects were anticonvulsants used as mood stabilizers, followed by the antipsychotics . The antidementia drugs were rarely associated with serious cutaneous adverse reactions. Discussion and Conclusion: Cutaneous drug adverse reactions are common in psychiatric clinical practice and typically are minor in severity. The most severe reactions are most often associated with the use of mood stabilizing medications. Some of these side effects can be solved with reduction or drug discontinuation. More severe cases should be referred to a specialist in dermatology.

  9. Antiretroviral adverse drug reactions and their management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-02

    Jun 2, 2011 ... Nevirapine and efavirenz (and etravirine) can cause a drug hypersensitivity ... HLA-B*5701 are at high risk of ABC hypersensitivity, while those with other variants .... creatinine and the patient's body weight using the modified ...

  10. A case of adverse drug reaction induced by dispensing error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallelli, L; Staltari, O; Palleria, C; Di Mizio, G; De Sarro, G; Caroleo, B

    2012-11-01

    To report about a case of acute renal failure due to absence of communication between physician and patient. A 78 year old man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) accessed our hospital and was brought to our attention in August 2011 for severe renal failure. Clinical history revealed that he had been taking highly active antiretroviral therapy with lamivudine/abacavir and fosamprenavir since 2006. In April 2011 due to an augmentation in creatinine plasma levels, a reduction in lamivudine dosage to 100 mg/day and the prescription of abacavir 300 mg/day became necessary. Unfortunately, the patient took both lamivudine and abacavir therefore the association of the two medications (lamivudine/abacavir) lead to asthenia and acute renal failure within a few days. This case emphasizes the importance about how physicians must pay very careful attention during drug prescription, most particularly, as far as elderly patients are concerned. In fact, communication improvement between physicians and patients can prevent increase of adverse drug reactions related to drug dispensing, with consequential reduction of costs in the healthcare system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  11. Data-driven prediction of adverse drug reactions induced by drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruifeng; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M; Kumar, Kamal; Yu, Xueping; Wallqvist, Anders; Reifman, Jaques

    2017-06-08

    The expanded use of multiple drugs has increased the occurrence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) induced by drug-drug interactions (DDIs). However, such reactions are typically not observed in clinical drug-development studies because most of them focus on single-drug therapies. ADR reporting systems collect information on adverse health effects caused by both single drugs and DDIs. A major challenge is to unambiguously identify the effects caused by DDIs and to attribute them to specific drug interactions. A computational method that provides prospective predictions of potential DDI-induced ADRs will help to identify and mitigate these adverse health effects. We hypothesize that drug-protein interactions can be used as independent variables in predicting ADRs. We constructed drug pair-protein interaction profiles for ~800 drugs using drug-protein interaction information in the public domain. We then constructed statistical models to score drug pairs for their potential to induce ADRs based on drug pair-protein interaction profiles. We used extensive clinical database information to construct categorical prediction models for drug pairs that are likely to induce ADRs via synergistic DDIs and showed that model performance deteriorated only slightly, with a moderate amount of false positives and false negatives in the training samples, as evaluated by our cross-validation analysis. The cross validation calculations showed an average prediction accuracy of 89% across 1,096 ADR models that captured the deleterious effects of synergistic DDIs. Because the models rely on drug-protein interactions, we made predictions for pairwise combinations of 764 drugs that are currently on the market and for which drug-protein interaction information is available. These predictions are publicly accessible at http://avoid-db.bhsai.org . We used the predictive models to analyze broader aspects of DDI-induced ADRs, showing that ~10% of all combinations have the potential to induce ADRs

  12. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Adverse Drug Reaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    . Keywords: Adverse drug reactions; Knowledge, attitude and practice; Health care workers; Yellow card reporting scheme. Received: 24 August 2010. Revised accepted: 22 April 2011. *Corresponding author: E-mail: jofadare@gmail.com ...

  13. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... June 6, 2018 HIV Vaccine Elicits Antibodies in Animals that Neutralize Dozens of HIV Strains , June 4, 2018 ... Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance > Understanding share with facebook share with twitter share ...

  14. Preventing Medication Error Based on Knowledge Management Against Adverse Event

    OpenAIRE

    Hastuti, Apriyani Puji; Nursalam, Nursalam; Triharini, Mira

    2017-01-01

    Introductions: Medication error is one of many types of errors that could decrease the quality and safety of healthcare. Increasing number of adverse events (AE) reflects the number of medication errors. This study aimed to develop a model of medication error prevention based on knowledge management. This model is expected to improve knowledge and skill of nurses to prevent medication error which is characterized by the decrease of adverse events (AE). Methods: This study consisted of two sta...

  15. Adverse Drug Events caused by Serious Medication Administration Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawarkar, Abhivyakti; Keohane, Carol A.; Maviglia, Saverio; Gandhi, Tejal K; Poon, Eric G

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine how often serious or life-threatening medication administration errors with the potential to cause patient harm (or potential adverse drug events) result in actual patient harm (or adverse drug events (ADEs)) in the hospital setting. DESIGN Retrospective chart review of clinical events that transpired following observed medication administration errors. BACKGROUND Medication errors are common at the medication administration stage for hospitalized patients. While many of these errors are considered capable of causing patient harm, it is not clear how often patients are actually harmed by these errors. METHODS In a previous study where 14,041 medication administrations in an acute-care hospital were directly observed, investigators discovered 1271 medication administration errors, of which 133 had the potential to cause serious or life-threatening harm to patients and were considered serious or life-threatening potential ADEs. In the current study, clinical reviewers conducted detailed chart reviews of cases where a serious or life-threatening potential ADE occurred to determine if an actual ADE developed following the potential ADE. Reviewers further assessed the severity of the ADE and attribution to the administration error. RESULTS Ten (7.5% [95% C.I. 6.98, 8.01]) actual adverse drug events or ADEs resulted from the 133 serious and life-threatening potential ADEs, of which 6 resulted in significant, three in serious, and one life threatening injury. Therefore 4 (3% [95% C.I. 2.12, 3.6]) serious and life threatening potential ADEs led to serious or life threatening ADEs. Half of the ten actual ADEs were caused by dosage or monitoring errors for anti-hypertensives. The life threatening ADE was caused by an error that was both a transcription and a timing error. CONCLUSION Potential ADEs at the medication administration stage can cause serious patient harm. Given previous estimates of serious or life-threatening potential ADE of 1.33 per 100

  16. Glycaemic adverse drug reactions from anti-neoplastics used in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    235625 records ... Glycaemic adverse drug reactions from anti-neoplastics used in treating pancreatic cancer. ... Based on the emphasized nine antineoplastic drugs with high hyperglycemic ADR incidence, we found: fluorouracil, sorafenib and pemetrexed with high ADR record of metabolism and nutrition disorders; ...

  17. iADRs: towards online adverse drug reaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Yang; Li, He-Yi; Du, Jhih-Wei; Feng, Wen-Yu; Lo, Chiao-Feng; Soo, Von-Wun

    2012-12-01

    Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) is one of the most important issues in the assessment of drug safety. In fact, many adverse drug reactions are not discovered during limited pre-marketing clinical trials; instead, they are only observed after long term post-marketing surveillance of drug usage. In light of this, the detection of adverse drug reactions, as early as possible, is an important topic of research for the pharmaceutical industry. Recently, large numbers of adverse events and the development of data mining technology have motivated the development of statistical and data mining methods for the detection of ADRs. These stand-alone methods, with no integration into knowledge discovery systems, are tedious and inconvenient for users and the processes for exploration are time-consuming. This paper proposes an interactive system platform for the detection of ADRs. By integrating an ADR data warehouse and innovative data mining techniques, the proposed system not only supports OLAP style multidimensional analysis of ADRs, but also allows the interactive discovery of associations between drugs and symptoms, called a drug-ADR association rule, which can be further developed using other factors of interest to the user, such as demographic information. The experiments indicate that interesting and valuable drug-ADR association rules can be efficiently mined.

  18. The concept of adverse drug reaction reporting: awareness among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    concept of pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reaction reporting, a section on ... ADR go undocumented worldwide8,9. ... international drug monitoring collaborating centre, ... practitioners to report all suspected ADR, the few .... more with some of the guidelines such as nurses, .... patients: a meta-analysis of prospective.

  19. Detection and Management of Adverse Drug Reactions Related to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to establish the detection, prevalence and management of various adverse drug reactions associated with antiretroviral drugs occurring in patients attending Comprehensive Care Centre (CCC) of Kiambu District Hospital. The study was a cross sectional survey where the patients included ...

  20. Characterization of Schizophrenia Adverse Drug Interactions through a Network Approach and Drug Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingchun Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antipsychotic drugs are medications commonly for schizophrenia (SCZ treatment, which include two groups: typical and atypical. SCZ patients have multiple comorbidities, and the coadministration of drugs is quite common. This may result in adverse drug-drug interactions, which are events that occur when the effect of a drug is altered by the coadministration of another drug. Therefore, it is important to provide a comprehensive view of these interactions for further coadministration improvement. Here, we extracted SCZ drugs and their adverse drug interactions from the DrugBank and compiled a SCZ-specific adverse drug interaction network. This network included 28 SCZ drugs, 241 non-SCZs, and 991 interactions. By integrating the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC classification with the network analysis, we characterized those interactions. Our results indicated that SCZ drugs tended to have more adverse drug interactions than other drugs. Furthermore, SCZ typical drugs had significant interactions with drugs of the “alimentary tract and metabolism” category while SCZ atypical drugs had significant interactions with drugs of the categories “nervous system” and “antiinfectives for systemic uses.” This study is the first to characterize the adverse drug interactions in the course of SCZ treatment and might provide useful information for the future SCZ treatment.

  1. Adverse Drug Events and Medication Errors in African Hospitals: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Alemayehu B; Alhawassi, Tariq M; McLachlan, Andrew J; Brien, Jo-Anne E

    2018-03-01

    Medication errors and adverse drug events are universal problems contributing to patient harm but the magnitude of these problems in Africa remains unclear. The objective of this study was to systematically investigate the literature on the extent of medication errors and adverse drug events, and the factors contributing to medication errors in African hospitals. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and Global Health databases from inception to 31 August, 2017 and hand searched the reference lists of included studies. Original research studies of any design published in English that investigated adverse drug events and/or medication errors in any patient population in the hospital setting in Africa were included. Descriptive statistics including median and interquartile range were presented. Fifty-one studies were included; of these, 33 focused on medication errors, 15 on adverse drug events, and three studies focused on medication errors and adverse drug events. These studies were conducted in nine (of the 54) African countries. In any patient population, the median (interquartile range) percentage of patients reported to have experienced any suspected adverse drug event at hospital admission was 8.4% (4.5-20.1%), while adverse drug events causing admission were reported in 2.8% (0.7-6.4%) of patients but it was reported that a median of 43.5% (20.0-47.0%) of the adverse drug events were deemed preventable. Similarly, the median mortality rate attributed to adverse drug events was reported to be 0.1% (interquartile range 0.0-0.3%). The most commonly reported types of medication errors were prescribing errors, occurring in a median of 57.4% (interquartile range 22.8-72.8%) of all prescriptions and a median of 15.5% (interquartile range 7.5-50.6%) of the prescriptions evaluated had dosing problems. Major contributing factors for medication errors reported in these studies were individual practitioner factors (e.g. fatigue and inadequate knowledge

  2. Adverse Drug Event Monitoring at the Food and Drug Administration: Your Report Can Make a Difference

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Syed Rizwanuddin

    2003-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible not only for approving drugs but also for monitoring their safety after they reach the market. The complete adverse event profile of a drug is not known at the time of approval because of the small sample size, short duration, and limited generalizability of pre-approval clinical trials. This report describes the FDA's postmarketing surveillance system, to which many clinicians submit reports of adverse drug events encountered while treati...

  3. Mining adverse drug reactions from online healthcare forums using hidden Markov model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampathkumar, Hariprasad; Chen, Xue-wen; Luo, Bo

    2014-10-23

    Adverse Drug Reactions are one of the leading causes of injury or death among patients undergoing medical treatments. Not all Adverse Drug Reactions are identified before a drug is made available in the market. Current post-marketing drug surveillance methods, which are based purely on voluntary spontaneous reports, are unable to provide the early indications necessary to prevent the occurrence of such injuries or fatalities. The objective of this research is to extract reports of adverse drug side-effects from messages in online healthcare forums and use them as early indicators to assist in post-marketing drug surveillance. We treat the task of extracting adverse side-effects of drugs from healthcare forum messages as a sequence labeling problem and present a Hidden Markov Model(HMM) based Text Mining system that can be used to classify a message as containing drug side-effect information and then extract the adverse side-effect mentions from it. A manually annotated dataset from http://www.medications.com is used in the training and validation of the HMM based Text Mining system. A 10-fold cross-validation on the manually annotated dataset yielded on average an F-Score of 0.76 from the HMM Classifier, in comparison to 0.575 from the Baseline classifier. Without the Plain Text Filter component as a part of the Text Processing module, the F-Score of the HMM Classifier was reduced to 0.378 on average, while absence of the HTML Filter component was found to have no impact. Reducing the Drug names dictionary size by half, on average reduced the F-Score of the HMM Classifier to 0.359, while a similar reduction to the side-effects dictionary yielded an F-Score of 0.651 on average. Adverse side-effects mined from http://www.medications.com and http://www.steadyhealth.com were found to match the Adverse Drug Reactions on the Drug Package Labels of several drugs. In addition, some novel adverse side-effects, which can be potential Adverse Drug Reactions, were also

  4. Prediction of adverse drug reactions using decision tree modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammann, F; Gutmann, H; Vogt, N; Helma, C; Drewe, J

    2010-07-01

    Drug safety is of great importance to public health. The detrimental effects of drugs not only limit their application but also cause suffering in individual patients and evoke distrust of pharmacotherapy. For the purpose of identifying drugs that could be suspected of causing adverse reactions, we present a structure-activity relationship analysis of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the central nervous system (CNS), liver, and kidney, and also of allergic reactions, for a broad variety of drugs (n = 507) from the Swiss drug registry. Using decision tree induction, a machine learning method, we determined the chemical, physical, and structural properties of compounds that predispose them to causing ADRs. The models had high predictive accuracies (78.9-90.2%) for allergic, renal, CNS, and hepatic ADRs. We show the feasibility of predicting complex end-organ effects using simple models that involve no expensive computations and that can be used (i) in the selection of the compound during the drug discovery stage, (ii) to understand how drugs interact with the target organ systems, and (iii) for generating alerts in postmarketing drug surveillance and pharmacovigilance.

  5. Drug Abuse Prevention Starts with Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Drug Abuse Prevention Starts with Parents Page Content Article Body ... for a time when drugs may be offered. Drug abuse prevention starts with parents learning how to talk ...

  6. Consumer adverse drug reaction reporting - A new step in pharmacovigilance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grootheest, K; de Graaf, L; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    2003-01-01

    The direct reporting of adverse drug reactions by patients is becoming an increasingly important topic for discussion in the world of pharmacovigilance. At this time, few countries accept consumer reports. We present an overview of experiences with consumer reporting in various countries of the

  7. Patient stratification and identification of adverse event correlations in the space of 1190 drug related adverse events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roitmann, Eva; Eriksson, Robert; Brunak, Søren

    2014-01-01

    New pharmacovigilance methods are needed as a consequence of the morbidity caused by drugs. We exploit fine-grained drug related adverse event information extracted by text mining from electronic medical records (EMRs) to stratify patients based on their adverse events and to determine adverse...

  8. HLA Association with Drug-Induced Adverse Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Lang Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse drug reactions (ADRs remain a common and major problem in healthcare. Severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCARs, such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN with mortality rate ranges from 10% to more than 30%, can be life threatening. A number of recent studies demonstrated that ADRs possess strong genetic predisposition. ADRs induced by several drugs have been shown to have significant associations with specific alleles of human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes. For example, hypersensitivity to abacavir, a drug used for treating of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, has been proposed to be associated with allele 57:01 of HLA-B gene (terms HLA-B∗57:01. The incidences of abacavir hypersensitivity are much higher in Caucasians compared to other populations due to various allele frequencies in different ethnic populations. The antithyroid drug- (ATDs- induced agranulocytosis are strongly associated with two alleles: HLA-B∗38:02 and HLA-DRB1∗08:03. In addition, HLA-B∗15:02 allele was reported to be related to carbamazepine-induced SJS/TEN, and HLA-B∗57:01 in abacavir hypersensitivity and flucloxacillin induced drug-induced liver injury (DILI. In this review, we summarized the alleles of HLA genes which have been proposed to have association with ADRs caused by different drugs.

  9. Role of peripheral eosinophilia in adverse cutaneous drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, F; Cogorno, L; Agnoletti, A F; Parodi, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to verify whether peripheral eosinophilia (PE) may be a marker of severity for adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR). We investigated for PE in sixty-three patients diagnosed as adverse cutaneous drug reactions. All the patients underwent blood tests at baseline visit. Only patients that showed a very likely connection between ACDR and the suspected causative drug were induced in the study. We found that 11 out of 63 patients (17%) presented PE for values ≥ 0.6 x 10(9) cells/l or for a percentage of total leukocytes ≥ 6%. These 11 patients compared to patients without eosinophilia had a longer recovery time, they showed diffuse severe cutaneous reactions and they all needed a systemic therapy compared to the 41% of patients without eosinophilia. These outcomes prompt us to believe that peripheral eosinophilia may be an index of severity for adverse cutaneous drug reactions. Therefore, we suggest physicians to always detect the presence of peripheral eosinophilia in order to not underestimate the reaction and to promptly start an appropriate therapy.

  10. Parkinsonism caused by adverse drug reactions: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agaba Emmanuel I

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Parkinsonism puts a high direct cost burden on both patient and caregiver. Several reports of drug-induced parkinsonism have been published, but to the best of our knowledge, there has not been any report of quinine or halothane inducing parkinsonism. Case presentation We describe two cases of parkinsonism possibly caused by adverse drug reaction to quinine in a 29-year-old black Nigerian woman and to halothane in a 36-year-old black Hausa (Nigerian man who received it as general anaesthesia for appendicectomy in our teaching hospital. Conclusion These are two unusual cases of parkinsonism caused by adverse drug reactions to high-dose quinine and to halothane as general anaesthesia. We consider that these two cases are important in bringing this potential side-effect to the attention of both pharmacologists and primary care physicians as these are two of the most commonly used medications in our clinics. We conclude that parkinsonism should be included among the adverse drug reactions to high-dose quinine and halothane general anaesthetic.

  11. Patients’ attention to and understanding of adverse drug reaction warnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tresa Muir McNeal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Tresa Muir McNeal1, Colleen Y Colbert1, Christian Cable1, Curtis R Mirkes1, June G Lubowinski2, John D Myers11Department of Medicine, Texas A&M University System HSC College of Medicine, Scott & White Healthcare, Temple, TX, USA; 2RD Haynes Medical Library, Scott & White Healthcare, Temple, TX, USAIntroduction: Medications are critical to the management of patient conditions, and they can have significant effects on the success or failure of medical interventions. Patient perceptions of drug warnings play an important role in medication compliance and ultimately disease management. Several factors may affect patients’ understanding of drug warnings and drug labeling, including health literacy and interactions with physicians and pharmacists.Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the literature related to patient perceptions of drug warnings and drug labeling. Descriptive articles and studies regarding patient perceptions and knowledge of adverse drug reaction warnings were reviewed.Methods: The following databases were utilized to search the literature related to patient perceptions of drug warnings: PubMed, Academic Search Premiere, CINAHL, Medline, Psych Info, Business Source Complete, Alternative Healthwatch, Health Source (both Nursing/Academic and Consumer additions, JSTOR, and Master File Premiere. For the purpose of this review, any peer-reviewed article was eligible. Exclusionary criteria included: articles published in languages other than English, articles/studies on patient perceptions of vaccines and chemotherapy, and articles related to perceptions of medications administered in the inpatient setting. Forty-six articles were included in the review.Results: Health literacy has been shown to have a major impact on patients’ ability to understand potential adverse reactions and instructions on correct dosing of medications. Direct communication with physicians and pharmacists is one of the most important and

  12. Cases of Adverse Reaction to Psychotropic Drugs and Possible Association with Pharmacogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Piatkov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of samples for pharmacogenetic tests have been analysed in our laboratory since its establishment. In this article we describe some of the most interesting cases of CYP poor metabolisers associated with adverse reactions to psychotropic drugs. Prevention of disease/illness, including Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR, is an aim of modern medicine. Scientific data supports the fact that evaluation of drug toxicology includes several factors, one of which is genetic variations in pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drug pathways. These variations are only a part of toxicity evaluation, however, even if it would help to prevent only a small percentage of patients from suffering adverse drug reactions, especially life threatening ADRs, pharmacogenetic testing should play a significant role in any modern psychopharmacologic practice. Medical practitioners should also consider the use of other medications or alternative dosing strategies for drugs in patients identified as altered metabolisers. This will promise not only better and safer treatments for patients, but also potentially lowering overall healthcare costs.

  13. HOW ADVERSE DRUG-REACTIONS CAN PLAY A ROLE IN INNOVATIVE DRUG RESEARCH - SIMILARITIES IN ADVERSE DRUG REACTION PROFILES OF CAPTOPRIL AND PENICILLAMINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RIKKEN, F; VOS, R

    1995-01-01

    We describe how adverse drug reactions (ADRs) can play an important role in pharmaceutical research and drug development. Not only do ADRs represent the risks and drawbacks associated with drugs but they can also be related to other knowledge available in pharmaceutical and medical research. We

  14. Prevention of adverse reactions to intravascular contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyer, P.; Levesque, M.

    1990-01-01

    The exact mechanisms of adverse reactions to contrast media are still imperfectly known. However, these reactions may be classified as idiosyncratic. Non-idiosyncratic reactions can be prevented by using new, non-ionic contrast agents. Idiosyncratic reactions can be prevented by specific premedication. Patients with a history of idiosyncratic reaction may benefit from corticosteroids and antihistamines administered prophylactically. Patients who seem to be more likely than others to react to contrast media must be premedicated, the risk of reaction being identified and evaluated by questioning. It has recently been suggested that all patients about to receive an intravascular injection of contrast medium should also be premedicated [fr

  15. Sharing adverse drug event data using business intelligence technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Monica M; Cozart, Heidi; Ahmad, Asif; Langman, Matthew K; Ferranti, Jeffrey

    2009-03-01

    Duke University Health System uses computerized adverse drug event surveillance as an integral part of medication safety at 2 community hospitals and an academic medical center. This information must be swiftly communicated to organizational patient safety stakeholders to find opportunities to improve patient care; however, this process is encumbered by highly manual methods of preparing the data. Following the examples of other industries, we deployed a business intelligence tool to provide dynamic safety reports on adverse drug events. Once data were migrated into the health system data warehouse, we developed census-adjusted reports with user-driven prompts. Drill down functionality enables navigation from aggregate trends to event details by clicking report graphics. Reports can be accessed by patient safety leadership either through an existing safety reporting portal or the health system performance improvement Web site. Elaborate prompt screens allow many varieties of reports to be created quickly by patient safety personnel without consultation with the research analyst. The reduction in research analyst workload because of business intelligence implementation made this individual available to additional patient safety projects thereby leveraging their talents more effectively. Dedicated liaisons are essential to ensure clear communication between clinical and technical staff throughout the development life cycle. Design and development of the business intelligence model for adverse drug event data must reflect the eccentricities of the operational system, especially as new areas of emphasis evolve. Future usability studies examining the data presentation and access model are needed.

  16. Hospitalization due to Adverse Drug Reactions and Drug Interactions before and after HAART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Foisy

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize and compare the rates of adverse drug reactions (ADRs and interactions on admission in two, one-year periods: pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART (phase 1 and post-HAART (phase 2.

  17. Drug Development for Metastasis Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontebasso, Yari; Dubinett, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic disease is responsible for 90% of death from solid tumors. However, only a minority of metastasis-specific targets has been exploited therapeutically, and effective prevention and suppression of metastatic disease is still an elusive goal. In this review, we will first summarize the current state of knowledge about the molecular features of the disease, with particular focus on steps and targets potentially amenable to therapeutic intervention. We will then discuss the reasons underlying the paucity of metastatic drugs in the current oncological arsenal and potential ways to overcome this therapeutic gap. We reason that the discovery of novel promising targets, an increased understanding of the molecular features of the disease, the effect of disruptive technologies, and a shift in the current preclinical and clinical settings have the potential to create more successful drug development endeavors.

  18. Identification of possible adverse drug reactions in clinical notes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warrer, Pernille; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Aagaard, Lise

    2015-01-01

    and labeling status. Findings: A total of 207 patients were included in the study leading to the identification of 163 AEs. 14% were categorized as certain, 60% as probable/likely, and 26% as possible. 15 (9%) ADRs were unlabeled of which two were serious: peripheral edema associated with sitagliptin......Objective: Through manual review of clinical notes for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus attending a Danish diabetes center, the aim of the study was to identify adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with three classes of glucose-lowering medicines: "Combinations of oral blood....... Methods: For observed adverse events (AEs) we extracted time to onset, outcome, and suspected medicine(s). AEs were assessed according to World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre causality criteria and analyzed with respect to suspected medicines, type of ADR (system organ class), seriousness...

  19. Global patterns of adverse drug reactions over a decade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Strandell, Johanna; Melskens, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although systems to collect information about suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were established in many countries and by the WHO in the 1960s, few studies have examined reported ADRs related to national income. Objective: The aim of the study was to characterize ADRs reported......, classified in accordance with the World Bank definition: low, lower-middle, upper-middle and high. Results: We analysed 1¿359¿067 ADR reports including 3¿013¿074 ADRs. Overall, 16% of reports were serious and 60% were reported for females. High-income countries had the highest ADR reporting rates (range 3...

  20. Vertigo/dizziness as a Drugs' adverse reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimirri, Serafina; Aiello, Rossana; Mazzitello, Carmela; Mumoli, Laura; Palleria, Caterina; Altomonte, Mariolina; Citraro, Rita; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2013-12-01

    Vertigo, dizziness, and nausea encompass a spectrum of balance-related symptoms caused by a variety of etiologies. Balance is affected by many systems: Proprioceptive pathways and visual, cerebellar, vestibulocochlear, and vascular / vasovagal systems. Vertigo is a subtype of dizziness, in which a subject, as a result to a dysfunction of the vestibular system, improperly experiments the perception of motion. The most useful clinical subdivision is to categorize vertigo into true vertigo and pseudovertigo, whereas from a pathophysiological point of view, vertigo can be classified into central, peripheral, and psychogenic. It is not easy to identify the cause of vertigo since the patients often are not able to precisely describe their symptoms. An impressive list of drugs may cause vertigo or dizziness. The aim of the present study was to analyze the data extracted from the reporting cards of the ADRs (adverse drug reactions), received at our Pharmacovigilance Regional Center (Calabria, Italy) in 2012. In particular, the data concerning the occurrence of vertigo and dizziness, after taking certain classes of drugs, have been considered. Our results show that, among the side-effects of different classes of drugs such as anti-convulsants, anti-hypertensives, antibiotics, anti-depressants, anti-psychotics, and anti-inflammatory, also vertigo or dizziness are included. Spontaneous reports of vertigo or dizziness, as side-effect of certain drugs, received at our Pharmacovigilance Center, represented the 5% of all reports in 2012. Considering the high incidence of such an ADR for several drugs' classes, it can be speculated that under-reporting also affect vertigo and dizziness. Despite the fact that these ADRs might not represent a direct threaten for life, indirectly they can cause secondary damage to patients such as falls, fractures etc. Balance should be accurately monitored during drug use and particularly in fragile patients.

  1. Information about adverse drug reactions reported in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Christensen, Arne; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To review the literature on adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in children with respect to occurrence, seriousness, type, therapeutic group, age and gender of the child and category of reporter. METHODS: Medline and Embase databases were searched from origin and updated until February 2010. We...... included empirically based articles on ADRs in populations aged 0 to 17 years. Studies monitoring ADRs in patients with particular conditions or drug exposure were excluded. We extracted information about types and seriousness of ADRs, therapeutic groups, age and gender of the child and category...... of reporter. ADR occurrence was calculated as incidence rate and prevalence. RESULTS: We included 33 studies monitoring ADRs in general paediatric populations. The highest numbers of ADRs were reported in national ADR databases where data were collected over a longer period than in studies monitoring...

  2. Data-mining for detecting signals of adverse drug reactions of fluoxetine using the Korea Adverse Event Reporting System (KAERS) database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonji; Park, Kyounghoon; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yang, Bo Ram; Choi, Hyun Jin; Park, Byung-Joo

    2017-10-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have become one of the most broadly used medications in psychiatry. Fluoxetine is the first representative antidepressant SSRI drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1987. Safety information on fluoxetine use alone was less reported than its combined use with other drugs. There were no published papers on adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of fluoxetine analyzing spontaneous adverse events reports. We detected signals of the adverse drug reactions of fluoxetine by data mining using the Korea Adverse Events Reporting System (KAERS) database. We defined signals in this study by the reporting odds ratios (ROR), proportional reporting ratios (PRR), and information components (IC) indices. The KAERS database included 860,224 AE reports, among which 866 reports contained fluoxetine. We compared the labels of fluoxetine among the United States, UK, Germany, France, China, and Korea. Some of the signals, including emotional lability, myositis, spinal stenosis, paradoxical drug reaction, drug dependence, extrapyramidal disorder, adrenal insufficiency, and intracranial hemorrhage, were not labeled in the six countries. In conclusion, we identified new signals that were not known at the time of market approval. However, certain factors should be required for signal evaluation, such as clinical significance, preventability, and causality of the detected signals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Potential Return on Public Investment in Detecting Adverse Drug Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybrechts, Krista F; Desai, Rishi J; Park, Moa; Gagne, Joshua J; Najafzadeh, Mehdi; Avorn, Jerry

    2017-06-01

    Many countries lack fully functional pharmacovigilance programs, and public budgets allocated to pharmacovigilance in industrialized countries remain low due to resource constraints and competing priorities. Using 3 case examples, we sought to estimate the public health and economic benefits resulting from public investment in active pharmacovigilance programs to detect adverse drug effects. We assessed 3 examples in which early signals of safety hazards were not adequately recognized, resulting in continued exposure of a large number of patients to these drugs when safer and effective alternative treatments were available. The drug examples studied were rofecoxib, cerivastatin, and troglitazone. Using an individual patient simulation model and the health care system perspective, we estimated the potential costs that could have been averted by early systematic detection of safety hazards through the implementation of active surveillance programs. We found that earlier drug withdrawal made possible by active safety surveillance would most likely have resulted in savings in direct medical costs of $773-$884 million for rofecoxib, $3-$10 million for cerivastatin, and $38-$63 million for troglitazone in the United States through the prevention of adverse events. By contrast, the yearly public investment in Food and Drug Administration initiated population-based pharmacovigilance activities in the United States is about $42.5 million at present. These examples illustrate a critical and economically justifiable role for active adverse effect surveillance in protecting the health of the public.

  4. Evidence behind FDA alerts for drugs with adverse cardiovascular effects: implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackham, Daniel M; C Herink, Megan; Stevens, Ian G; Cardoza, Natalie M; Singh, Harleen

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) periodically publishes Drug Safety Communications and Drug Alerts notifying health care practitioners and the general public of important information regarding drug therapies following FDA approval. These alerts can result in both positive and negative effects on patient care. Most clinical trials are not designed to detect long-term safety end points, and postmarketing surveillance along with patient reported events are often instrumental in signaling the potential harmful effect of a drug. Recently, many cardiovascular (CV) safety announcements have been released for FDA-approved drugs. Because a premature warning could discourage a much needed treatment or prompt a sudden discontinuation, it is essential to evaluate the evidence supporting these FDA alerts to provide effective patient care and to avoid unwarranted changes in therapy. Conversely, paying attention to these warnings in cases involving high-risk patients can prevent adverse effects and litigation. This article reviews the evidence behind recent FDA alerts for drugs with adverse CV effects and discusses the clinical practice implications. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  5. Gender differences in the effects of childhood adversity on alcohol, drug, and polysubstance-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Elizabeth A; Grella, Christine E; Upchurch, Dawn M

    2017-07-01

    To examine gender differences in the associations between childhood adversity and different types of substance use disorders and whether gender moderates these relationships. We analyzed data from 19,209 women and 13,898 men as provided by Wave 2 (2004-2005) of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) to examine whether gender moderates the associations between childhood adversity and DSM-IV defined lifetime occurrence of alcohol, drug, and polysubstance-related disorders. We used multinomial logistic regression, weighted to be representative of the US adult civilian, noninstitutionalized population, and we calculated predicted probabilities by gender, controlling for covariates. To test which specific moderation contrasts were statistically significant, we conducted pair-wise comparisons corrected for multiple comparisons using Bonferroni's method. For each type of substance use disorder, risk was increased by more exposure to childhood adversity, and women had a lower risk than men. However, moderation effects revealed that with more experiences of childhood adversity, the gender gap in predicted probability for a disorder narrowed in relation to alcohol, it converged in relation to drugs such that risk among women surpassed that among men, and it widened in relation to polysubstances. Knowledge regarding substance-specific gender differences associated with childhood adversity exposure can inform evidence-based treatments. It may also be useful for shaping other types of gender-sensitive public health initiatives to ameliorate or prevent different types of substance use disorders.

  6. Adverse-drug-event data provided by pharmaceutical companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudny, Magdalena E; Graham, Angie S

    2008-06-01

    Pharmaceutical company drug information center (PCDIC) responses to queries about adverse drug events (ADEs) were studied to determine whether PCDICs search sources other than the prescribing information on the package insert (PI) and whether the PCDICs' approach differs according to whether an ADE is listed in the PI (labeled) or not (unlabeled). Companies were selected from a list of PCDICs in the Physicians' Desk Reference. One oral or injectable prescription drug from each company was selected. For each drug, a labeled ADE and an unlabeled ADE about which to query the PCDICs were randomly selected from the index of an annual publication on ADEs. The investigators telephoned the PCDICs with an open-ended inquiry about the incidence, timing, and management of the ADE as reported in the literature and the company's internal data; they clarified that the request did not concern a specific patient. Whether or not information was provided, the source searched was recorded (PI, literature, internal database), and the percentages of PCDICs that used each source for labeled and for unlabeled ADEs were analyzed. Results were obtained from 100 companies to questions about 100 drugs (200 ADEs). For ADEs overall, 80% used the PI, 50% the medical literature, and 38% internal data. For labeled versus unlabeled ADEs, respectively, the PI was used by 84% and 76%; literature, both 50%; and internal data, 35% and 41%. The PCDIC specialists referencing the PI did not always provide accurate or up-to-date information. Some specialists, when asked to query internal databases, said that was not an option. For both labeled and unlabeled ADEs, the PI was the primary source used by PCDICs to answer safety questions about their products, and internal data were the least-used source. Most resources used by PCDICs are readily available to practicing pharmacists.

  7. Bias in spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Matsuda

    Full Text Available Attitudes of healthcare professionals regarding spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs in Japan are not well known, and Japan's unique system of surveillance, called early post-marketing phase vigilance (EPPV, may affect these reporting attitudes. Our objectives were to describe potential effects of EPPV and to test whether ADR seriousness, prominence, and frequency are related to changes in reporting over time.A manufacturer's database of spontaneous ADR reports was used to extract data from individual case safety reports for 5 drugs subject to EPPV. The trend of reporting and the time lag between ADR onset and reporting to the manufacturer were examined. The following indices for ADRs occurring with each drug were calculated and analyzed to assess reporting trends: Serious:Non-serious ratio, High prominence:Low prominence ratio, and High frequency:Low frequency ratio.For all 5 drugs, the time lag between ADR onset and reporting to the manufacturer was shorter in the EPPV period than in the post-EPPV period. All drugs showed higher Serious:Non-serious ratios in the post-EPPV period. No specific patterns were observed for the High prominence:Low prominence ratio. The High frequency:Low frequency ratio for peginterferon alpha-2a and sevelamer hydrochloride decreased steadily throughout the study period.Healthcare professionals may be more likely to report serious ADRs than to report non-serious ADRs, but the effect of event prominence on reporting trends is still unclear. Factors associated with ADR reporting attitude in Japan might be different from those in other countries because of EPPV and the involvement of medical representatives in the spontaneous reporting process. Pharmacovigilance specialists should therefore be cautious when comparing data between different time periods or different countries. Further studies are needed to elucidate the underlying mechanism of spontaneous ADR reporting in Japan.

  8. Spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting in rural districts of Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevene, Esperança; Mariano, Alda; Mehta, Ushma; Machai, Maria; Dodoo, Alexander; Vilardell, David; Patel, Sam; Barnes, Karen; Carné, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    The roll out of various public health programmes involving mass administration of medicines calls for the deployment of responsive pharmacovigilance systems to permit identification of signals of rare or even common adverse reactions. In developing countries in Africa, these systems are mostly absent and their performance under any circumstance is difficult to predict given the known shortage of human, financial and technical resources. Nevertheless, the importance of such systems in all countries is not in doubt, and research to identify problems, with the aim of offering pragmatic solutions, is urgently needed. To examine the impact of training and monitoring of healthcare workers, making supervisory visits and the availability of telecommunication and transport facilities on the implementation of a pharmacovigilance system in Mozambique. This was a descriptive study enumerating the lessons learnt and challenges faced in implementing a spontaneous reporting system in two rural districts of Mozambique - Namaacha and Matutuíne - where remote location, poor telecommunication services and a low level of education of health professionals are ongoing challenges. A 'yellow card' system for spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) was instituted following training of health workers in the selected districts. Thirty-five health professionals (3 medical doctors, 2 technicians, 24 nurses, 4 basic healthcare agents and 2 pharmacy agents) in these districts were trained to diagnose, treat and report ADRs to all medicines using a standardized yellow card system. There were routine site visits to identify and clarify any problems in filling in and sending the forms. One focal person was identified in each district to facilitate communication between the health professionals and the National Pharmacovigilance Unit (NPU). The report form was assessed for quality and causality. The availability of telecommunications and transport was assessed. Fourteen months after

  9. Male central hypogonadism secondary to exogenous androgens: a review of the drugs and protocols highlighted by the online community of users for prevention and/or mitigation of adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavolos, Stamatios; Reynolds, Michael; Panagiotopoulou, Nikoletta; McEleny, Kevin; Scally, Michael; Quinton, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Androgen- or anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism (ASIH) is no longer confined to professional athletes; its prevalence amongst young men and teenagers using androgens and/or anabolic steroids (AASs) is rising fast, and those affected can experience significant symptoms. Clinicians are increasingly encountering demanding, well-informed men affected by ASIH, yet lacking authoritative information on the subject may struggle to project a credible message. In this article, we overview the methods and drugs that men use in an attempt to counteract ASIH (with a view to either preventing its onset, or reversing it once it has developed) and summarize the scientific evidence underpinning these. The main channel for obtaining these drugs is the Internet, where they can be readily sourced without a valid prescription. An Internet search using relevant terms revealed a huge number of websites providing advice on how to buy and use products to counteract ASIH. Drugs arising repeatedly in our search included human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs). The quality and accuracy of the online information was variable, but review of medical literature also highlighted a lack of scientific data to guide clinical practice. It is important for clinicians to be aware of the AAS user's self-treatment strategies with regard to ASIH side-effect mitigation. By ensuring that they are well-informed, clinicians are more likely to retain the credibility and trust of AAS users, who will in turn likely be more open to engage with appropriate management. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Incidence of cutaneous adverse drug reactions among medical inpatients of Sultanah Aminah Hospital Johor Bahru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latha, S; Choon, S E

    2017-06-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (cADRs) are common. There are only few studies on the incidence of cADRs in Malaysia. To determine the incidence, clinical features and risk factors of cADRs among hospitalized patients. A prospective study was conducted among medical inpatients from July to December 2014. A total of 43 cADRs were seen among 11 017 inpatients, yielding an incidence rate of 0.4%. cADR accounted for hospitalization in 26 patients. Previous history of cADR was present in 14 patients, with 50% exposed to the same drug taken previously. Potentially lifethreatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR), namely drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS: 14 cases) and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (SJS/TEN: 6 cases) comprise almost 50% of cADRs. The commonest culprit drug group was antibiotics (37.2%), followed by anticonvulsants (18.6%). Cotrimoxazole, phenytoin and rifampicin were the main causative drugs for DRESS. Anticonvulsants were most frequently implicated in SJS/TEN (66.7%). Most cases had "probable" causality relationship with suspected drug (69.8%). The majority of cases were of moderate severity (65.1%), while 18.6% had severe reaction with 1 death recorded. Most cases were not preventable (76.7%). Older age (> 60 years) and mucosal involvement were significantly associated with a more severe reaction. The incidence of cADRs was 0.4%, with most cases classified as moderate severity and not preventable. The commonest reaction pattern was DRESS, while the main culprit drug group was antibiotics. Older age and mucosal membrane involvement predicts a severe drug reaction.

  11. Adverse drug reaction labelling for atomoxetine, methylphenidate and modafinil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2013-01-01

    Medical product information contains information about efficacy and safety for marketed pharmaceuticals. Three studies have compared safety labelling for different therapeutic categories in different countries and detected large variations in a number of reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs......). The rapid increase in use of medications for treatment of ADHD symptoms has created concern due to lack of information about effects from long-term use. The aim of this study was to compare ADR information in product information (PI)/summary of product characteristics (SPC) for oral formulations...... of atomoxetine, methylphenidate and modafinil marketed by the same pharmaceutical companies in Australia, Denmark and the United States. Discrepancies in listed ADRs were defined as types of ADRs (system organ class) not listed in all countries. For ADRs where discrepancies were detected, we extracted...

  12. Adverse drug reactions from psychotropic medicines in the paediatric population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Hansen, Ebba H

    2010-01-01

    of these products in childhood. Little evidence has been reported about the adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of these medicines in practice. As spontaneous reports are the main source for information about previously unknown ADRs, we analysed data submitted to a national ADR database. The objective was to characterise...... ADRs reported for psychotropic medicines in the Danish paediatric population over a decade. FINDINGS: All spontaneous ADR reports from 1998 to 2007 for children from birth to 17 years of age were included. The unit of analysis was one ADR. We analysed the distribution of ADRs per year, seriousness, age...... and gender of the child, suspected medicine and type of reported ADR. A total of 429 ADRs were reported for psychotropic medicines and 56% of these were classified as serious. Almost 20% of psychotropic ADRs were reported for children from birth up to 2 years of age and one half of ADRs were reported...

  13. Inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug events in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallagher Paul F

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inappropriate prescribing (IP in older patients is highly prevalent and is associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs, morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation. Consequently, IP is a major safety concern and with changing population demographics, it is likely to become even more prevalent in the future. IP can be detected using explicit or implicit prescribing indicators. Theoretically, the routine clinical application of these IP criteria could represent an inexpensive and time efficient method to optimise prescribing practice. However, IP criteria must be sensitive, specific, have good inter-rater reliability and incorporate those medications most commonly associated with ADEs in older people. To be clinically relevant, use of prescribing appropriateness tools must translate into positive patient outcomes, such as reduced rates of ADEs. To accurately measure these outcomes, a reliable method of assessing the relationship between the administration of a drug and an adverse clinical event is required. The Naranjo criteria are the most widely used tool for assessing ADE causality, however, they are often difficult to interpret in the context of older patients. ADE causality criteria that allow for the multiple co-morbidities and prescribed medications in older people are required. Ultimately, the current high prevalence of IP and ADEs is unacceptable. IP screening criteria need to be tested as an intervention to assess their impact on the incidence of ADEs in vulnerable older patients. There is a role for IP screening tools in everyday clinical practice. These should enhance, not replace good clinical judgement, which in turn should be based on sound pharmacogeriatric training.

  14. Toward multimodal signal detection of adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpaz, Rave; DuMouchel, William; Schuemie, Martijn; Bodenreider, Olivier; Friedman, Carol; Horvitz, Eric; Ripple, Anna; Sorbello, Alfred; White, Ryen W; Winnenburg, Rainer; Shah, Nigam H

    2017-12-01

    Improving mechanisms to detect adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is key to strengthening post-marketing drug safety surveillance. Signal detection is presently unimodal, relying on a single information source. Multimodal signal detection is based on jointly analyzing multiple information sources. Building on, and expanding the work done in prior studies, the aim of the article is to further research on multimodal signal detection, explore its potential benefits, and propose methods for its construction and evaluation. Four data sources are investigated; FDA's adverse event reporting system, insurance claims, the MEDLINE citation database, and the logs of major Web search engines. Published methods are used to generate and combine signals from each data source. Two distinct reference benchmarks corresponding to well-established and recently labeled ADRs respectively are used to evaluate the performance of multimodal signal detection in terms of area under the ROC curve (AUC) and lead-time-to-detection, with the latter relative to labeling revision dates. Limited to our reference benchmarks, multimodal signal detection provides AUC improvements ranging from 0.04 to 0.09 based on a widely used evaluation benchmark, and a comparative added lead-time of 7-22 months relative to labeling revision dates from a time-indexed benchmark. The results support the notion that utilizing and jointly analyzing multiple data sources may lead to improved signal detection. Given certain data and benchmark limitations, the early stage of development, and the complexity of ADRs, it is currently not possible to make definitive statements about the ultimate utility of the concept. Continued development of multimodal signal detection requires a deeper understanding the data sources used, additional benchmarks, and further research on methods to generate and synthesize signals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug events in older people.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hamilton, Hilary J

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate prescribing (IP) in older patients is highly prevalent and is associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs), morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation. Consequently, IP is a major safety concern and with changing population demographics, it is likely to become even more prevalent in the future. IP can be detected using explicit or implicit prescribing indicators. Theoretically, the routine clinical application of these IP criteria could represent an inexpensive and time efficient method to optimise prescribing practice. However, IP criteria must be sensitive, specific, have good inter-rater reliability and incorporate those medications most commonly associated with ADEs in older people. To be clinically relevant, use of prescribing appropriateness tools must translate into positive patient outcomes, such as reduced rates of ADEs. To accurately measure these outcomes, a reliable method of assessing the relationship between the administration of a drug and an adverse clinical event is required. The Naranjo criteria are the most widely used tool for assessing ADE causality, however, they are often difficult to interpret in the context of older patients. ADE causality criteria that allow for the multiple co-morbidities and prescribed medications in older people are required. Ultimately, the current high prevalence of IP and ADEs is unacceptable. IP screening criteria need to be tested as an intervention to assess their impact on the incidence of ADEs in vulnerable older patients. There is a role for IP screening tools in everyday clinical practice. These should enhance, not replace good clinical judgement, which in turn should be based on sound pharmacogeriatric training.

  16. Predicting adverse drug reaction profiles by integrating protein interaction networks with drug structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang-Chin; Wu, Xiaogang; Chen, Jake Y

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) has become increasingly important, due to the rising concern on serious ADRs that can cause drugs to fail to reach or stay in the market. We proposed a framework for predicting ADR profiles by integrating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks with drug structures. We compared ADR prediction performances over 18 ADR categories through four feature groups-only drug targets, drug targets with PPI networks, drug structures, and drug targets with PPI networks plus drug structures. The results showed that the integration of PPI networks and drug structures can significantly improve the ADR prediction performance. The median AUC values for the four groups were 0.59, 0.61, 0.65, and 0.70. We used the protein features in the best two models, "Cardiac disorders" (median-AUC: 0.82) and "Psychiatric disorders" (median-AUC: 0.76), to build ADR-specific PPI networks with literature supports. For validation, we examined 30 drugs withdrawn from the U.S. market to see if our approach can predict their ADR profiles and explain why they were withdrawn. Except for three drugs having ADRs in the categories we did not predict, 25 out of 27 withdrawn drugs (92.6%) having severe ADRs were successfully predicted by our approach. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Prevention of Hospital-Acquired Adverse Drug Reactions in Older People Using Screening Tool of Older Persons' Prescriptions and Screening Tool to Alert to Right Treatment Criteria: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Marie N; O'Sullivan, David; Gallagher, Paul F; Eustace, Joseph; Byrne, Stephen; O'Mahony, Denis

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether use of the Screening Tool of Older Persons' Prescriptions (STOPP) and Screening Tool to Alert to Right Treatment (START) criteria reduces incident hospital-acquired adverse drug reactions (ADRs), 28-day medication costs, and median length of hospital stay in older adults admitted with acute illness. Single-blind cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) of unselected older adults hospitalized over a 13-month period. Tertiary referral hospital in southern Ireland. Consecutively admitted individuals aged 65 and older (N = 732). Single time point presentation to attending physicians of potentially inappropriate medications according to the STOPP/START criteria. The primary outcome was the proportion of participants experiencing one or more ADRs during the index hospitalization. Secondary outcomes were median length of stay (LOS) and 28-day total medication cost. One or more ADRs occurred in 78 of the 372 control participants (21.0%; median age 78, interquartile range (IQR) 72-84) and in 42 of the 360 intervention participants (11.7%; median age 80, IQR 73-85) (absolute risk reduction = 9.3%, number needed to treat = 11). The median LOS in the hospital was 8 days (IQR 4-14 days) in both groups. At discharge, median medication cost was significantly lower in the intervention group (€73.16, IQR €38.68-121.72) than in the control group (€90.62, IQR €49.38-162.53) (Wilcoxon rank test Z statistic = -3.274, P older adults but did not affect median LOS. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. Pharmacogenetics of drug-induced arrhythmias : a feasibility study using spontaneous adverse drug reactions reporting data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bruin, Marie L; van Puijenbroek, Eugene P; Bracke, Madelon; Hoes, Arno W; Leufkens, Hubert G M

    PURPOSE: The bottleneck in pharmacogenetic research on rare adverse drug reactions (ADR) is retrieval of patients. Spontaneous reports of ADRs may form a useful source of patients. We investigated the feasibility of a pharmacogenetic study, in which cases were selected from the database of a

  19. Detecting drug-drug interactions using a database for spontaneous adverse drug reactions : an example with diuretics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puijenbroek, E P; Egberts, A C; Heerdink, E R; Leufkens, H G

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Drug-drug interactions are relatively rarely reported to spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) for adverse drug reactions. For this reason, the traditional approach for analysing SRS has major limitations for the detection of drug-drug interactions. We developed a method that may enable

  20. Marine Corps Drug Prevention Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stander, Valerie A; Reed, Cheryl; Olson, Cheryl B; Johnson, Judy; Merrill, Lex L; Clapp, John; Elder, John; Lawson, Gary; Mangual, George; Lowe, Nate

    2003-01-01

    .... Some of the common components were information on the consequences of drug use, decision-making skill training, public pledges not to use drugs, values clarification, goal setting, stress management...

  1. Adverse Reactions to Antituberculosis Drugs in Iranian Tuberculosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Farazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Antituberculosis multidrug regimens have been associated with increased incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs. This study aimed to determine the incidence and associated factors of ADRs due to antituberculosis therapy. Methods. This is a retrospective cross-sectional study on tuberculosis patients who were treated in tuberculosis clinics in Markazi province in Iran. The information contained in the medical files was extracted and entered into the questionnaire. Data was descriptively analyzed by using statistical package for social sciences (SPSS 18. Results. A total of 940 TB patients of 1240 patients’ medical records available in 10 medical offices were included in this study. Of the 563 ADRs found in this study, 82.4% were considered minor reactions and 17.6% were major reactions. No death from antituberculosis ADR was observed. We found that the risk of major ADRs was higher in females (P  value=0.0241, age >50 y (P  value=0.0223, coinfection with HIV (P  value=0.0323, smoking (P  value=0.002, retreatment TB (P  value=0.0203, and comorbidities (P  value=0.0005. Conclusions. This study showed that severe side effects of anti-TB drugs are common in patients who have risk factors of ADRs and they should be followed up by close monitoring.

  2. Automatically Recognizing Medication and Adverse Event Information From Food and Drug Administration's Adverse Event Reporting System Narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polepalli Ramesh, Balaji; Belknap, Steven M; Li, Zuofeng; Frid, Nadya; West, Dennis P; Yu, Hong

    2014-06-27

    The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) is a repository of spontaneously-reported adverse drug events (ADEs) for FDA-approved prescription drugs. FAERS reports include both structured reports and unstructured narratives. The narratives often include essential information for evaluation of the severity, causality, and description of ADEs that are not present in the structured data. The timely identification of unknown toxicities of prescription drugs is an important, unsolved problem. The objective of this study was to develop an annotated corpus of FAERS narratives and biomedical named entity tagger to automatically identify ADE related information in the FAERS narratives. We developed an annotation guideline and annotate medication information and adverse event related entities on 122 FAERS narratives comprising approximately 23,000 word tokens. A named entity tagger using supervised machine learning approaches was built for detecting medication information and adverse event entities using various categories of features. The annotated corpus had an agreement of over .9 Cohen's kappa for medication and adverse event entities. The best performing tagger achieves an overall performance of 0.73 F1 score for detection of medication, adverse event and other named entities. In this study, we developed an annotated corpus of FAERS narratives and machine learning based models for automatically extracting medication and adverse event information from the FAERS narratives. Our study is an important step towards enriching the FAERS data for postmarketing pharmacovigilance.

  3. Nicorandil, Gastrointestinal Adverse Drug Reactions and Ulcerations: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Umberto; Deosaran, Jordanna; Leslie, Stephen J; Rushworth, Gordon F; Stewart, Derek; Ford, Ian; Watson, Angus J M

    2016-03-01

    Nicorandil is a popular anti-anginal drug in Europe and Japan. Apart from some common adverse drug reactions (ADR), its safety is satisfactory. Several reports have suggested a link between nicorandil, gastrointestinal (GI) ulceration and fistulas. The review aims to critically appraise, synthesize and present the available evidence of all known GI ADR per anatomical location. The study complied with the PRISMA statement. Literature and pharmacovigilance databases were used to provide rate and/or calculate parameters (median age, median dose, history of symptoms, length of therapy and healing time after withdrawal of the drug). Differences in distribution of quantitative variables were analyzed via Mann-Whitney test. Correlation between quantitative variables was assessed with a Spearman's correlation coefficient. A p value <0.05 was significant. Oral ulcerations occur in 0.2% of the subjects, anal ulcerations are present between 0.07% and 0.37% of patients. Oral and distal GI involvements are the most common ADR (28-29% and 27-31% of all GI ADR, respectively). The hepatobiliary system, the pancreas and salivary glands are not affected by nicorandil exposure. The time to develop oral ulcerations is 74 weeks among people on <30 mg/day compared to only 7.5 weeks in individuals on higher regimens (p = 0.47). There is a significant correlation between dose and ulcer healing time (Spearman's 0.525, p < 0.001). Ulcerative disease is a very commonly reported GI ADR. A delayed ulcerative tendency supports the hypothesis of an ulcerogenic metabolite. Nicorandil seems to act as a cause of the ulcerations, but appears to also work in synergy with other promoting factors. Whether the action of the metabolites relies on a specific mechanism or a simple chemical ulceration is still to be established.

  4. Willingness to pay for adverse drug event regulatory actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvy, Jacoline; Weemers, Just; Schellekens, Huub; Koopmanschap, Marc

    2011-11-01

    . This study is, as far as we know, one of the first attempts to analyse the WTP for drug regulation and should in future be used in studies of the societal costs of drug regulation for epoetin alpha use. Our results indicate that the Dutch general public, especially Dutch dialysis patients, are willing to pay limited amounts to reduce the risk of serious adverse events associated with drug use.

  5. The role of drug profiles as similarity metrics: applications to repurposing, adverse effects detection and drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Santiago; Hripcsak, George

    2017-07-01

    Explosion of the availability of big data sources along with the development in computational methods provides a useful framework to study drugs' actions, such as interactions with pharmacological targets and off-targets. Databases related to protein interactions, adverse effects and genomic profiles are available to be used for the construction of computational models. In this article, we focus on the description of biological profiles for drugs that can be used as a system to compare similarity and create methods to predict and analyze drugs' actions. We highlight profiles constructed with different biological data, such as target-protein interactions, gene expression measurements, adverse effects and disease profiles. We focus on the discovery of new targets or pathways for drugs already in the pharmaceutical market, also called drug repurposing, in the interaction with off-targets responsible for adverse reactions and in drug-drug interaction analysis. The current and future applications, strengths and challenges facing all these methods are also discussed. Biological profiles or signatures are an important source of data generation to deeply analyze biological actions with important implications in drug-related studies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. A study on adverse drug reactions in a tertiary care hospital of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ratan J. Lihite

    2016-06-27

    Jun 27, 2016 ... Patients of all age and either sex were included. Adverse drug ... adverse drug reactions in majority of the patients. The commonly .... ten prescription drugs were excluded. .... Pneumonia with respiratory distress, Vision problem, Knee pain, .... back of spontaneous reporting system i.e. underreporting. Thus ...

  7. EXPLORING THE PATTERN OF POLYPHARMACY AND PROPORTION OF DRUG TO DRUG INTERACTIONS AND ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS IN THE ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayashree Thyagaraj

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The geriatric population is increasing as a result of advanced medical facilities. This population also faces a number of medical health challenges. They tend to receive multiple medications often leading to Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs and other clinical consequences, which compromises their quality of life if not endangering it as well. There are few Indian studies focusing on this problem. Hence, this study was undertaken with the aim to assess the polypharmacy pattern, proportion of DDIs and adverse drug reactions in the geriatric population in a tertiary care hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a cross-sectional study wherein data from 201 geriatric inpatient’s prescriptions were collected. The prescriptions were assessed for demographic details such as age, gender, comorbidities and drugs prescribed. All prescriptions were evaluated for polypharmacy, DDIs and ADRs. DDIs were assessed using Micromedex software. Patients were stratified into groups and DDIs were compared between the groups, gender and also with number of drugs used. RESULTS There were 201 patients with a mean age of approximately 70 years. Polypharmacy occurred in 73.63% of them with mean number of drugs being 6.23. The number of drugs used increased significantly with age (p=0.0001. Hypertension was the most common comorbidity. Polypharmacy was strongly associated with hypertension and dyslipidaemia. A total of 129 (64.17% patients accounted for 425 potential DDIs. The most common drug involved in DDIs was aspirin. A subset analysis of ADRs showed an occurrence of 50.68% with 10.81% being definitely avoidable. CONCLUSION Elderly individuals are at increased risk of being on polypharmacy. This comes with the risk of several potential DDIs, which in turn may lead to adverse drug reactions, which results in morbidity. Doctors involved in the care of the elderly should be aware of these facts and exercise caution while adding any

  8. Ginger for Prevention of Antituberculosis-induced Gastrointestinal Adverse Reactions Including Hepatotoxicity: A Randomized Pilot Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrani, Zahra; Shojaei, Esphandiar; Khalili, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the potential benefits of ginger in preventing antituberculosis drug-induced gastrointestinal adverse reactions including hepatotoxicity have been evaluated in patients with tuberculosis. Patients in the ginger and placebo groups (30 patients in each group) received either 500 mg ginger (Zintoma)(®) or placebo one-half hour before each daily dose of antituberculosis drugs for 4 weeks. Patients' gastrointestinal complaints (nausea, vomiting, dyspepsia, and abdominal pain) and antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity were recorded during the study period. In this cohort, nausea was the most common antituberculosis drug-induced gastrointestinal adverse reactions. Forty eight (80%) patients experienced nausea. Nausea was more common in the placebo than the ginger group [27 (90%) vs 21 (70%), respectively, p = 0.05]. During the study period, 16 (26.7%) patients experienced antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Patients in the ginger group experienced less, but not statistically significant, antituberculosis drug-induced hepatotoxicity than the placebo group (16.7% vs 36.7%, respectively, p = 0.07). In conclusion, ginger may be a potential option for prevention of antituberculosis drug-induced gastrointestinal adverse reactions including hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Analysis of factors associated with hiccups based on the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Ryuichiro; Uesawa, Yoshihiro; Ishii-Nozawa, Reiko; Kagaya, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    Hiccups are occasionally experienced by most individuals. Although hiccups are not life-threatening, they may lead to a decline in quality of life. Previous studies showed that hiccups may occur as an adverse effect of certain medicines during chemotherapy. Furthermore, a male dominance in hiccups has been reported. However, due to the limited number of studies conducted on this phenomenon, debate still surrounds the few factors influencing hiccups. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of medicines and patient characteristics on hiccups using a large-sized adverse drug event report database and, specifically, the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) database. Cases of adverse effects associated with medications were extracted from JADER, and Fisher's exact test was performed to assess the presence or absence of hiccups for each medication. In a multivariate analysis, we conducted a multiple logistic regression analysis using medication and patient characteristic variables exhibiting significance. We also examined the role of dexamethasone in inducing hiccups during chemotherapy. Medicines associated with hiccups included dexamethasone, levofolinate, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, carboplatin, and irinotecan. Patient characteristics associated with hiccups included a male gender and greater height. The combination of anti-cancer agent and dexamethasone use was noted in more than 95% of patients in the dexamethasone-use group. Hiccups also occurred in patients in the anti-cancer agent-use group who did not use dexamethasone. Most of the medications that induce hiccups are used in chemotherapy. The results of the present study suggest that it is possible to predict a high risk of hiccups using patient characteristics. We confirmed that dexamethasone was the drug that has the strongest influence on the induction of hiccups. However, the influence of anti-cancer agents on the induction of hiccups cannot be denied. We consider the results of the present

  10. Workgroup Report by the Joint Task Force Involving American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI); Food Allergy, Anaphylaxis, Dermatology and Drug Allergy (FADDA) (Adverse Reactions to Foods Committee and Adverse Reactions to Drugs, Biologicals, and Latex Committee); and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Botulism Clinical Treatment Guidelines Workgroup-Allergic Reactions to Botulinum Antitoxin: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schussler, Edith; Sobel, Jeremy; Hsu, Joy; Yu, Patricia; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Grammer, Leslie C; Nowak-Wegrzyn, Anna

    2017-12-27

    Naturally occurring botulism is rare, but a large number of cases could result from unintentional or intentional contamination of a commercial food. Despeciated, equine-derived, heptavalent botulinum antitoxin (HBAT) is licensed in the United States. Timely treatment reduces morbidity and mortality, but concerns that botulinum antitoxin can induce anaphylaxis exist. We sought to quantify the allergy risk of botulinum antitoxin treatment and the usefulness of skin testing to assess this risk. We conducted a systematic review of (1) allergic reactions to botulinum antitoxin and (2) the predictive value of skin testing (ST) before botulinum antitoxin administration. We searched 5 scientific literature databases, reviewed articles' references, and obtained data from the HBAT manufacturer and from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Anaphylaxis incidence was determined for HBAT and previously employed botulinum antitoxins. We calculated the positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of ST for anaphylaxis related to HBAT and other botulinum antitoxins. Seven articles were included. Anaphylaxis incidence was 1.64% (5/305 patients) for HBAT and 1.16% (8/687 patients) for all other botulinum antitoxins (relative risk, 1.41 [95% confidence interval, .47-4.27]; P = .5). Observed values for both PPV and NPV for HBAT-ST (33 patients) were 100%. Observed PPVs and NPVs of ST for other botulinum antitoxins (302 patients) were 0-56% and 50%-100%, respectively. There were no reports of fatal anaphylaxis. Considering the <2 % rate of anaphylaxis, fatal outcomes, modest predictive value of ST, resource requirements for ST, and the benefits of early treatment, data do not support delaying HBAT administration to perform ST in a mass botulinum toxin exposure. Anaphylactic reactions may occur among 1%-2% of botulinum antitoxin recipients and will require epinephrine and antihistamine treatment and, possibly, intensive care. Published by Oxford

  11. Comparing Methods for Estimating Direct Costs of Adverse Drug Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllensten, Hanna; Jönsson, Anna K; Hakkarainen, Katja M; Svensson, Staffan; Hägg, Staffan; Rehnberg, Clas

    2017-12-01

    To estimate how direct health care costs resulting from adverse drug events (ADEs) and cost distribution are affected by methodological decisions regarding identification of ADEs, assigning relevant resource use to ADEs, and estimating costs for the assigned resources. ADEs were identified from medical records and diagnostic codes for a random sample of 4970 Swedish adults during a 3-month study period in 2008 and were assessed for causality. Results were compared for five cost evaluation methods, including different methods for identifying ADEs, assigning resource use to ADEs, and for estimating costs for the assigned resources (resource use method, proportion of registered cost method, unit cost method, diagnostic code method, and main diagnosis method). Different levels of causality for ADEs and ADEs' contribution to health care resource use were considered. Using the five methods, the maximum estimated overall direct health care costs resulting from ADEs ranged from Sk10,000 (Sk = Swedish krona; ~€1,500 in 2016 values) using the diagnostic code method to more than Sk3,000,000 (~€414,000) using the unit cost method in our study population. The most conservative definitions for ADEs' contribution to health care resource use and the causality of ADEs resulted in average costs per patient ranging from Sk0 using the diagnostic code method to Sk4066 (~€500) using the unit cost method. The estimated costs resulting from ADEs varied considerably depending on the methodological choices. The results indicate that costs for ADEs need to be identified through medical record review and by using detailed unit cost data. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Cristina Soares; Oliveira, Cesar de

    2016-09-01

    to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) in older adults polymedicated. an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years) were analyzed: 24 (51.1%) concerning ADR, 14 (29.8%) DDI, and 9 studies (19.1%) investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps. identificar e sintetizar estudos que examinam as interações medicamentosas (IM) e reações adversas a medicamentos (RAM) em idosos polimedicados. revisão integrativa de estudos publicados de janeiro de 2008 a dezembro de 2013, de acordo com critérios de inclusão e exclusão, nas bases de dados eletrônicas MEDLINE e EMBASE. foram analisados 47 estudos de texto completo, incluindo 14,624,492 idosos (≥ 60 anos): 24 (51,1%) sobre RAM, 14 (29,8%) sobre IM e 9 estudos (19,1%) que investigaram tanto IM como RAM. Encontramos uma variedade de desenhos metodológicos. Os estudos revisados reforçaram que a polifarmácia é um processo multifatorial, e os preditores e a prescrição inadequada estão associados a

  13. Adverse drug reaction and concepts of drug safety in Ayurveda: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajanal, Manjunath; Nayak, Shradda; Prasad, Buduru Sreenivasa; Kadam, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Drug safety is a very basic and fundamental concept in medical practice. ADRs play an important role in assessing patient safety in any system of medicine. Pharmacovigilance study is thus significant to understand treatment outcomes. Current raised issue with respect to complementary and alternative system medicine (CAM) like Ayurveda is increased in number of safety reports along with report misinterpretation; this generates the negative impact on system. Although, Ayurveda which is holistic system of medicine from India has elaborated the causes and methods of drug-induced consequences along with preventive measures the available data in classical texts is scattered. The compilation and analysis along with modern concept drug safety is need of the hour. Present literature review was conducted from various compendium of Ayurveda and electronic data base with search terms of ‘Vyapad’, ‘Viruddha’, ‘Ahita’, ‘herb–herb interaction’, ‘idiosyncrasy’, ‘Prakritiviruddha’ etc. The reported information was analysed for the possible correlation on concept of ADR and Pharmacovigilance of current science. Overall review demonstrated that drug interaction, iatrogenic, over dose, administration of unsuitable drugs, reprehensive drug administration with respect to disease, complication from five procedural therapies (Panchakarma) and reprehensible preparation of mineral drug are nearer to the modern causes of ADR. Thus, concept of drug safety and ADR is not new to the Ayurveda. The concept “Drug which is not appropriate to be used as medicine”(Abheshaja) of Ayurveda sounds similar as that of modern pharmacovigilance. PMID:24563588

  14. Clinical experience of adverse drug reaction in gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Hyae; Hong, Ju Hee; Lee, Yeon Su; Cha, Kyung Soo; Chang, Suk Il; Lee, Young Chul; Kim, Yeong Soo

    1992-01-01

    Gadopentetate dimenglumine(Gd-DTPA) has low toxicity and good tolerance and it is said that the observed adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA is compatible to those of iodinated nonionic contrast media. The overall incidence of adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA is even lower than those of iodinated nonionic contrast media. Then, the possibility of potential adverse drug reaction of these contrast media is not fully known and recently, many authors have a growing interest in this point. We have taken 2501 cases of MRI and executed 1467 case of Gd-DTPA enhancement scanning(58.7%) and experienced 12 cases of adverse drug reaction(11 cases: mild reaction, 1 case: severs anaphylactic shock) and the overall incidence of our adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA was 0.8%. In conclusion, the adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA is not rare and the severe adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA may occur. So, the possibility of adverse drug reaction after Gd-DTPA injection should always be kept in mind, especially when the patient has a history of reaction to contrast material, allergy(particularly asthma) and cardiac disease. For the safe use of Gd-DTPA, well trained personnel and nearby emergent care facilities should be available

  15. SAFETY AND PREVENTION OF FEBRILE SEIZURES IN PEDIATRICS, IDENITIFY NEW SYMPTOMS, ADVERSE EFFECTS, SIDE EFFECTS, LIFE STYLE MODIFICATIONS, PATIENT COUNCELLING , OBSERVING, MONITORING BY INVOLVING DOCTOR OF PHARMACY

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Gangadhar Rao Gundapu; M. Bhavani; Myle Akshay Kiran; Naveen Kumar Bathula; Dr. Ashok kumar

    2017-01-01

    To observe the management and treatment of febrile seizures in children that is to prevent the condition from becoming worse and to prevent it from causing other complications. A Perform was designed to collect data related to the patient’s treatment . when patients are administration of drugs then we(Doctor of pharmacy) identified new adverse drug reactions like drowsiness, vomiting etc. and also identified new side effects due to antiepiliptic drugs in piadiatric patients with seizures li...

  16. The role of the Australian Adverse Drug Reactions Advisory Committee (ADRAC) in monitoring drug safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, Ian W.

    2002-01-01

    The Australian adverse drug reaction reporting system is acknowledged as one of the best in the world. Despite its small population of less than 20 million people, Australia's current ADR reporting rate of over 12000 reports per year places it in the top few nations in terms of reports per capita. The ADRAC program has been in operation for over 30 years. Australia was a founding member of the WHO International Drug Monitoring Programme which commenced in 1968 and currently there are about 153000 reports in the ADRAC database. Reports from health professionals have uncovered a number of significant safety problems over the years. Of particular importance are flucloxacillin-induced hepatitis, amoxycillin/clavulanate-induced hepatitis, and the association of cystitis with tiaprofenic acid. The number and quality of the reports has allowed an understanding of the characteristics of the reactions and, using ADRAC reporters as a major source of cases, case-control studies have been completed which have identified risk factors. ADRAC's review of Australian reports has highlighted many important associations that have been disseminated through the Australian Adverse Drug Reactions Bulletin

  17. Adverse drug reaction monitoring of newer oral anti diabetic drugs – a pharmacovigilance perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Bhattacharjee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To monitor and evaluate adverse drug reactions (ADRs of newer oral anti-diabetic drugs in type II diabetics by spontaneous/solicited ADR monitoring.Material and methods: Two hundred and thirty two diabetic patients on newer oral antidiabetic drugs were evaluated prospectively in a cross-sectional study over a period of eighteen months. All patients were followed up for ADRs which were evaluated for incidence, frequency, severity and causality. ADR severity was graded according to University of Virginia Health System Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting program criteria and causality assessment was done using WHO-UMC scale.Results: 190 out of 232 patients (42 patients lost to follow up were evaluated. ADRs were observed in 34 cases (17.9%. Most common ADRs were gastrointestinal (44.2% followed by musculoskeletal (17.6%, metabolic (14.7%, infections (5.9% and others (17.6%. The maximal frequency of ADRs was seen with sitagliptin (6.4% followed by vildagliptin(3.8%, saxagliptin(2.7%, saroglitazar(2.1%, linagliptin(1.6%, canagliflozin(1.6%. 25(73.5%, 8(23.5% and 1(3% ADRs were mild, moderate and severe respectively. 24(70% ADRs were classified as possible, 9(27% probable and 1(3% unlikely on causality assessment. Conclusion: Newer oral antidiabetic drugs like gliptins and SGLT-2 inhibitors have potential to cause ADRs. Gastro-intestinal, musculoskeletal, metabolic were most common ADRs. Active pharmacovigilance should be carried out for risk identification and management. 

  18. Adverse drug reactions and drug–drug interactions with over-the-counter NSAIDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore N

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas Moore,1 Charles Pollack,2 Paul Butkerait2 1Department of Pharmacology, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; 2Pfizer Consumer Healthcare, Madison, NJ, USA Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen have a long history of safe and effective use as both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC analgesics/antipyretics. The mechanism of action of all NSAIDs is through reversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs including gastrointestinal bleeding as well as cardiovascular and renal effects have been reported with NSAID use. In many cases, ADRs may occur because of drug–drug interactions (DDIs between the NSAID and a concomitant medication. For example, DDIs have been reported when NSAIDs are coadministered with aspirin, alcohol, some antihypertensives, antidepressants, and other commonly used medications. Because of the pharmacologic nature of these interactions, there is a continuum of risk in that the potential for an ADR is dependent on total drug exposure. Therefore, consideration of dose and duration of NSAID use, as well as the type or class of comedication administered, is important when assessing potential risk for ADRs. Safety findings from clinical studies evaluating prescription-strength NSAIDs may not be directly applicable to OTC dosing. Health care providers can be instrumental in educating patients that using OTC NSAIDs at the lowest effective dose for the shortest required duration is vital to balancing efficacy and safety. This review discusses some of the most clinically relevant DDIs reported with NSAIDs based on major sites of ADRs and classes of medication, with a focus on OTC ibuprofen, for which the most data are available. Keywords: adverse effects, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, renal

  19. Fatal adverse drug reactions of anticancer drugs detected by all-case post-marketing surveillance in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Miura, Yuji; Kami, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    All-case post-marketing surveillance of newly approved anticancer drugs is usually conducted on all patients in Japan. The present study investigates whether all-case post-marketing surveillance identifies fatal adverse drug reactions undetected before market entry. We examined fatal adverse drug reactions identified via all-case post-marketing surveillance by reviewing the disclosed post-marketing surveillance results, and determined the time points in which the fatal adverse drug reactions were initially reported by reviewing drug labels. We additionally scanned emergency alerts on the Japanese regulatory authority website to assess the relationship between all-case post-marketing surveillance and regulatory action. Twenty-five all-case post-marketing surveillances were performed between January 1999 and December 2009. Eight all-case post-marketing surveillances with final results included information on all fatal cases. Of these, the median number of patients was 1287 (range: 106-4998), the median number of fatal adverse drug reactions was 14.5 (range: 4-23). Of the 111 fatal adverse drug reactions detected in the eight post-marketing surveillances, only 28 (25.0%) and 22 (19.6%) were described on the initial global and the initial Japanese drug label, respectively, and 58 (52.3%) fatal adverse drug reactions were first described in the all-case post-marketing surveillance reports. Despite this, the regulatory authority issued only four warning letters, and two of these were prompted by case reports from the all-case post-marketing surveillance. All-case post-marketing surveillance of newly approved anticancer drugs in Japan was useful for the rigorous compilation of non-specific adverse drug reactions, but it rarely detected clinically significant fatal adverse drug reactions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Erythema multiforme-like eruption from a slimming drug preparation cutaneous adverse drug reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Tognetti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 34-year-old woman presenting with an erythema multiforme (EM-like eruption. Lesions developed after a 12-day treatment with a slimming drug preparation (food integrator with thermogenic activity and a herbal remedy (pilosella tincture. Serological investigations excluded viral or bacterial infections. Patch testing with galenic preparations of both drugs demonstrated sensitization to the slimming drug preparation. According to literature reports and immune-chemical properties, those components that are likely to have triggered the skin eruption are clorazepate dipotassium and theobromine. Their interaction with other two constituents such as pseudoephedrine hydrochloride and dehydrocholic acid may have caused the adverse reaction by means of a summation effect. There are no reports specifically about EM caused by a slimming drug preparation and no studies have identified thermogenic pills as cause of EM/EM-like eruption. Weight-loss compounds in slimming preparations should be kept in mind as a possible cause of drug-induced EM-like eruption.

  1. Adverse childhood experiences among women prisoners: relationships to suicide attempts and drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friestad, Christine; Åse-Bente, Rustad; Kjelsberg, Ellen

    2014-02-01

    Women prisoners are known to suffer from an accumulation of factors known to increase the risk for several major health problems. This study examines the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and the relationship between such experiences and suicide attempts and drug use among incarcerated women in Norway. A total of 141 women inmates (75% of all eligible) were interviewed using a structured interview guide covering information on demographics and a range of ACE related to abuse and neglect, and household dysfunction. The main outcome variables were attempted suicide and adult drug abuse. Emotional, physical and sexual abuse during childhood was experienced by 39%, 36% and 19%, respectively, and emotional and physical neglect by 31% and 33%, respectively. Looking at the full range of ACE, 17% reported having experienced none, while 34% reported having experienced more than five ACEs. After controlling for age, immigrant background and marital status, the number of ACEs significantly increased the risk of attempted suicide and current drug abuse. The associations observed between early life trauma and later health risk behaviour indicate the need for early prevention. The findings also emphasize the important role of prison health services in secondary prevention among women inmates.

  2. Automatic detection of adverse events to predict drug label changes using text and data mining techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurulingappa, Harsha; Toldo, Luca; Rajput, Abdul Mateen; Kors, Jan A; Taweel, Adel; Tayrouz, Yorki

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of automatically detected adverse event signals from text and open-source data on the prediction of drug label changes. Open-source adverse effect data were collected from FAERS, Yellow Cards and SIDER databases. A shallow linguistic relation extraction system (JSRE) was applied for extraction of adverse effects from MEDLINE case reports. Statistical approach was applied on the extracted datasets for signal detection and subsequent prediction of label changes issued for 29 drugs by the UK Regulatory Authority in 2009. 76% of drug label changes were automatically predicted. Out of these, 6% of drug label changes were detected only by text mining. JSRE enabled precise identification of four adverse drug events from MEDLINE that were undetectable otherwise. Changes in drug labels can be predicted automatically using data and text mining techniques. Text mining technology is mature and well-placed to support the pharmacovigilance tasks. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. An analysis of serious adverse drug reactions at a tertiary care teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinjal Prajapati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze the various aspects of serious adverse drug reactions (serious ADRs such as clinical presentation, causality, severity, and preventability occurring in a hospital setting. Materials and Methods: All serious ADRs reported from January 2010 to May 2015 at ADR Monitoring Centre, Department of Pharmacology, B. J. Medical College and Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, were selected as per the World health Organization -Uppsala Monitoring Center (WHO-UMC criteria. A retrospective analysis was carried out for clinical presentation, causality (as per the WHO-UMC scale and Naranjo′s algorithm, severity (Hartwig and Siegel scale, and preventability (Schumock and Thornton criteria. Results: Out of 2977 ADRs reported, 375 were serious in nature. The most common clinical presentation involved was skin and appendageal disorders (71, 18.9%. The common causal drug group was antitubercular (129, 34.4% followed by antiretroviral (76, 20.3% agents. The criteria for the majority of serious ADRs were intervention to prevent permanent impairment or damage (164, 43.7% followed by hospitalization (158, 42.1%. Majority of the serious ADRs were continuing (191, 50.9% at the time of reporting, few recovered (101, 26.9%, and two were fatal. The majority of serious ADRs were categorized as possible (182, 48.8% followed by probable (173, 46.1% in nature. Conclusion: Antitubercular, antiretroviral, and antimicrobial drugs were the most common causal drug groups for serious ADRs. This calls for robust ADR monitoring system and education of patients and prescribers for identification and effective management.

  4. Discontinuation of Preventive Drugs in General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John Sahl; Lindberg, Laura Maria Glahder; Nixon, Michael Simon

    Introduction: In Denmark about 600,000 persons are treated for hypertension and more than 300,000 people are receiving cholesterol lowering drugs. The prevalence of hypertension in people aged 80 years is 70%. For antidepressants the defined daily doses/1000 aged >80 years/day exceed 200. By far...... the most preventive drugs are prescribed in general practice. Special considerations exist in relation to medication of elderly patients. The prevalence of polypharmacy and the subsequent increased risk of side effects and drug interactions is high. Drug-related problems represent the fifth leading cause...... of death in the United States. The public expenses to drug treatment are constantly increasing. The possibility to withdraw the medication must be taken into account but the decision to discontinue drugs is complex and poorly understood. Planned studies: 1. Patients’ views upon discontinuation...

  5. [Drug surveillance and adverse reactions to drugs. The literature and importance of historical data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, L; Minora, T; Ventresca, G P

    1996-12-01

    The authors highlight the essential role of pharmacovigilance and the need for a simple, efficient and low-cost system of adverse reaction (AR) reporting which could cover the whole population and all marketed drugs, and suggest that the only one presently viable is based on spontaneous reporting. To support their proposal the authors provide a definition of AR and of the different monitoring system, and list as many drugs as possible to find in the literature that have been associated with a specific AR, together with the active molecule, the therapeutic indication, the features of the AR and the regulatory actions (withdrawal from the market, restriction of use). Moreover, by describing the "history" behind some of these drugs the authors highlight the contribution that pharmacovigilance and spontaneous reporting have had to the development of regulations for approval and marketing of new drugs. It is also highlighted how some of these unexpected events (thalidomide, DES) have had a significant and important contribution to pharmacological and toxicological knowledge.

  6. Adverse drug reactions monitoring of psychotropic drugs: a tertiary care centre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemendra Singh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many new psychotropic drugs/ agents have been developed and found to be effective in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. However, these drugs also exhibit adverse drug reactions (ADRs which may affect compliance in psychiatric patients. Hence the present study was aimed at monitoring and assessing ADRs caused by psychotropic drugs. Methods: A hospital based prospective observational study was carried out in the psychiatry outpatient department of a tertiary care teaching hospital for the duration of six months. Two hundred and two patients were included in the study and ADRs were documented using a predesigned data collection form. The causality assessment was carried out as per the criteria of both the World Health Organization- Uppsala Monitoring Centre (WHO-UMC and Naranjo scale. Severity and predictability assessment of ADRs were also performed. Results: A total of 106 ADRs were observed during the study period with majority of them occurring in 25-35 years of age group (40.56%. Weight gain (18.86% followed by sedation (16.03% and insomnia (11.32% were found to be the commonest ADRs. Risperidone (19.8% and escitalopram (12.3% were the drugs responsible for majority of the ADRs. Causality assessment showed that most of ADRs were possible and probable. 94.33% of ADRs were found to be mild and 89% of them were predictable. Conclusion: A wide range of ADRs affecting central nervous and metabolic systems were reported with psychotropic drugs. The study findings necessitate the need for an active pharmacovigilance programme for the safe and effective use of psychotropics.

  7. Analysis of Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions at a Tertiary Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    drug reactions (ADRs) reported at Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, India. Methods: A prospective ... cost of ADRs was calculated on the basis of hospital expenditure per patient and the amount spent by patients ... drug control mechanisms, patient education regarding self-medication and maintenance of prescription records.

  8. Systematic review: ursodeoxycholic acid--adverse effects and drug interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hempfling, W.; Dilger, K.; Beuers, U.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ursodeoxycholic acid is increasingly being used for the treatment of chronic cholestatic liver diseases. It appears to be generally well tolerated, but a systematic review on drug safety is lacking. AIM: As experimental data suggest a role of bile acids in the regulation of hepatic drug

  9. Occurrence of adverse drug reactions in patients taking tenofovir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Setting: Harare central hospital opportunistic infections clinic. Methods: A cross sectional survey of 100 conveniently sampled HIV-positive adult patients was carried out. Study variables were socio-demographic factors, renal and Central Nervous System (CNS) adverse effects, treatment history and self-reported adherence.

  10. Y-90 microsphere therapy: prevention of adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Cheryl C; Campbell, Janice; Bakalyar, Donovan; Beauvais, Michele; Feng, Wenzheng; Savin, Michael

    2009-08-01

    Thirty-three (33) events that were inconsistent with intended treatment for 471 Y-90 microsphere deliveries were analyzed from 2001 to 2007. Each occurrence was categorized, based on root-cause analysis, as a device/product defect and/or operator error event. Events were further categorized, if there was an adverse outcome, as spill/leak, termination, recatheterization, dose deviation, and/or a regulatory medical event. Of 264 Y-90 Therasphere (MDS Nordion, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) treatments, 15 events were reported (5.7%). Of 207 Y-90 SIR-Spheres (Sirtex, Wilmington, MA) treatments, 18 events were reported (8.7%). Twenty-five (25) of 33 events (76%) were device/product defects: 73% for Therasphere (11 of 15) and 78% for SIR-Spheres (14 of 18). There were 31 adverse outcomes associated with 33 events: 15 were leaks and/or spills, 9 resulted in termination of the dose administration, 3 resulted in recatheterization for dose compensation, 2 were dose deviations (doses differing from the prescribed between 10% and 20%), and 2 were reported as regulatory medical events. Fifty-five (55) corrective actions were taken: 39 (71%) were related to the manufacturer and 16 (29%) were hospital based. This process of analyzing each event and measuring our outcomes has been effective at minimizing adverse events and improving patient safety.

  11. The validity of a patient-reported adverse drug event questionnaire using different recall periods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Sieta T; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M; de Zeeuw, Dick; Denig, Petra

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the validity of a patient-reported adverse drug events (ADEs) questionnaire with a 3-month or 4-week recall period. METHODS: Patients receiving at least one oral glucose-lowering drug were asked to report potential ADEs they experienced related to any drug in a daily diary for a

  12. A continuous GRASP to determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, Michael J.; Meneses, Claudio N.; Pardalos, Panos M.; Ragle, Michelle; Resende, Mauricio G. C.

    2007-01-01

    Adverse drag reactions (ADRs) are estimated to be one of the leading causes of death. Many national and international agencies have set up databases of ADR reports for the express purpose of determining the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions that they cause. We formulate the drug-reaction relationship problem as a continuous optimization problem and utilize C-GRASP, a new continuous global optimization heuristic, to approximately determine the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions. Our approach is compared against others in the literature and is shown to find better solutions

  13. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions in a tertiary care teaching hospital in India: An intensive monitoring study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejal Thakkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The epidemiological data based on intensive monitoring studies are limited for the cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADRs in terms of incidence. Most of earlier Indian studies focused only on types and causative drugs of CADRs. Aim: The aim of this study is to analyze the CADRs with reference to the incidence, its subgroup analysis, causative drugs, and other clinical characteristics in Indian population. Methodology: Intensive monitoring study was carried out over a period of 3 years in the dermatology outpatient and inpatient department. CADRs due to only systematically administered drugs were considered. The WHO definition for CADR, the WHO causality definitions, modified Schumock and Thornton's criteria for preventability, and International Conference on Harmonisation E2A guidelines for seriousness were considered. Incidence was expressed in percentage and its 95% confidence interval. The incidence was analyzed on basis of characteristics of study population and CADRs. Results: A total of 171 CADRs were observed from 37,623 patients. The CADR incidence was 0.45% (95% CI: 0.39–0.53. The incidence did not significantly differ in different age groups and gender. Commonly observed CADRs were maculopapular rash (23.98%, urticaria (21.64%, and fixed drug eruptions (FDEs (18.13%. Antimicrobials (35.18% and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs were suspected in all common CADRs. Anti-infective and NSAIDs were most commonly suspected drugs in overall CADRs, maculopapular rash, urticaria, FDEs, and erythema multiforme. The exact nature of drugs remained inaccessible in one-fourth cases due to use of the over-the-counter self-medications. The incidence of preventable and serious and fatal CADRs was 0.08% (95% CI: 0.05–0.11, 0.04% (95% CI: 0.02–0.06, and 0.003% (95% CI: 0.000–0.001, respectively. Conclusion: Ethnic characteristics should be considered while interpreting incidence from the international studies. The

  14. Adverse effects of sympathomimetic drugs in a group of adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Jerí, F. Raúl; Carbajal, Carlos; Sánchez M., César

    2014-01-01

    Clinical observations of 35 youths who used hallucinogenic drugs for two to four years are mostly present . The proportion of males was three times compared to women , almost all households were from well integrated and belonged to a higher socio- economic level or medium . The drugs used were marijuana , LSD , barbiturates , mescaline , afetamina , methaqualone and alcohol, in various combinations . All of these young people showed signs of psychological disturbance , personality disorders g...

  15. Radiology of adverse reactions to drugs and toxic hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansell, G.

    1989-01-01

    The book reviews the contribution offered by radiological methods to detection of lesions, confirmation of tentative diagnoses, and differentiation of lesions. The radiological methods discussed cover the conventional roentgenology as well as computed tomography, ultrasonography, scintiscanning, and NMR tomography, which are the useful tools for the very important task, to detect and define the manifestations of adverse reactions and toxic hazards, in order to commence treatment in time. (orig.) With 154 figs [de

  16. [Direct costs and clinical aspects of adverse drug reactions in patients admitted to a level 3 hospital internal medicine ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribiño, Gabriel; Maldonado, Carlos; Segura, Omar; Díaz, Jorge

    2006-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) occur frequently in hospitals and increase costs of health care; however, few studies have quantified the clinical and economic impact of ADRs in Colombia. These impacts were evaluated by calculating costs associated with ADRs in patients hospitalized in the internal medicine ward of a Level 3 hospital located in Bogotá, Colombia. In addition, salient clinical features of ADRs were identified and characterized. Intensive follow-ups for a cohort of patients were conducted for a five month period in order to detect ADRs; different ways to classify them, according to literature, were considered as well. Information was collected using the INVIMA reporting format, and causal probability was evaluated with the Naranjo algorithm. Direct costs were calculated from the perspective of payer, based on the following costs: additional hospital stay, medications, paraclinical tests, additional procedures, patient displacement to intermediate or intensive care units, and other costs. Of 836 patients admitted to the service, 268 adverse drug reactions were detected in 208 patients (incidence proportion 25.1%, occurence rate 0.32). About the ADRs found, 74.3% were classified as probable, 92.5% were type A, and 81.3% were moderate. The body system most often affected was the circulatory system (33.9%). Drugs acting on the blood were most frequently those ones associated with adverse reactions (37.6%). The costs resulting from medical care of adverse drug reactions varied from COL dollar 93,633,422 (USD dollar 35,014.92) to COL dollar 122,155,406 (USD dollar 45,680.94), according to insurance type, during the study period. Adverse drug reactions have a significant negative health and financial impact on patient welfare. Because of the substantial resources required for their medical care and the significant proportion of preventable adverse reactions, active programs of institutional pharmacovigilance are highly recommended.

  17. Prevention of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlansky, Barry; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2009-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for their analgesic, antipyretic, and antiinflammatory properties, and aspirin is increasingly employed in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and ischemic stroke. Despite undisputed therapeutic efficacy for these indications, all NSAIDs impart a considerable risk of peptic ulcer disease and upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. A growing body of evidence supports an association between non-aspirin NSAIDs and acute coronary syndromes, and an expanding understanding of the gastroduodenal effects of aspirin, COX-2 selective agents, clopidogrel, and Helicobacter pylori synergism fuel controversies in NSAID use. In this review, we discuss risk stratification of patients taking NSAIDs and the appropriate application of proven gastro-protective strategies to decrease the incidence of gastrointestinal hemorrhage based upon an individualized assessment of risk for potential toxicities. Prevention of NSAID-related gastropathy is an important clinical issue, and therapeutic strategies for both the primary and secondary prevention of adverse events are continually evolving.

  18. Adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs in Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Glauciene Santana Damasceno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to characterize and estimate the frequency of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs in the population treated at the Centro de Saúde Escola Germano Sinval Faria, a primary health care clinic in Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro City, and to explore the relationship between adverse drug reactions and some of the patients' demographic and health characteristics. METHODS: This descriptive study was conducted via patient record review of incident cases between 2004 and 2008. RESULTS: Of the 176 patients studied, 41.5% developed one or more adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs, totaling 126 occurrences. The rate of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs was higher among women, patients aged 50 years or older, those with four or more comorbidities, and those who used five or more drugs. Of the total reactions, 71.4% were mild. The organ systems most affected were as follows: the gastrointestinal tract (29.4%, the skin and appendages (21.4%, and the central and peripheral nervous systems (14.3%. Of the patients who experienced adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs, 65.8% received no drug treatment for their adverse reactions, and 4.1% had one of the antituberculosis drugs suspended because of adverse reactions. "Probable reactions" (75% predominated over "possible reactions" (24%. In the study sample, 64.3% of the reactions occurred during the first two months of treatment, and most (92.6% of the reactions were ascribed to the combination of rifampicin + isoniazid + pyrazinamide (Regimen I. A high dropout rate from tuberculosis treatment (24.4% was also observed. CONCLUSION: This study suggests a high rate of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs.

  19. Adverse drug events associated with vitamin K antagonists: factors of therapeutic imbalance

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    El-Helou N

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nancy El-Helou, Amal Al-Hajje, Rola Ajrouche, Sanaa Awada, Samar Rachidi, Salam Zein, Pascale SalamehClinical and Epidemiological Research Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Lebanese University, Beirut, LebanonBackground: Adverse drug events (ADE occur frequently during treatment with vitamin K antagonists (AVK and contribute to increase hemorrhagic risks.Methods: A retrospective study was conducted over a period of 2 years. Patients treated with AVK and admitted to the emergency room of a tertiary care hospital in Beirut were included. The aim of the study was to identify ADE characterized by a high international normalized ratio (INR and to determine the predictive factors responsible for these events. Statistical analysis was performed with the SPSS statistical package.Results: We included 148 patients. Sixty-seven patients (47.3% with an INR above the therapeutic range were identified as cases. The control group consisted of 81 patients (54.7% with an INR within the therapeutic range. Hemorrhagic complications were observed in 53.7% of cases versus 6.2% of controls (P < 0.0001. No significant difference was noticed between cases and controls regarding the indication and the dose of AVK. Patients aged over 75 years were more likely to present an INR above the therapeutic range (58.2%, P = 0.049. Recent infection was present in 40.3% of cases versus 6.2% of controls (P < 0.0001 and hypoalbuminemia in 37.3% of cases versus 6.1% of controls (P < 0.0001. Treatment with antibiotics, amiodarone, and anti-inflammatory drugs were also factors of imbalance (P < 0.0001.Conclusion: Many factors may be associated with ADE related to AVK. Monitoring of INR and its stabilization in the therapeutic range are important for preventing these events.Keywords: adverse drug events, vitamin K antagonists, bleeding risks, therapeutic imbalance

  20. Can surveillance systems identify and avert adverse drug events? A prospective evaluation of a commercial application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ashish K; Laguette, Julia; Seger, Andrew; Bates, David W

    2008-01-01

    Computerized monitors can effectively detect and potentially prevent adverse drug events (ADEs). Most monitors have been developed in large academic hospitals and are not readily usable in other settings. We assessed the ability of a commercial program to identify and prevent ADEs in a community hospital. and Measurement We prospectively evaluated the commercial application in a community-based hospital. We examined the frequency and types of alerts produced, how often they were associated with ADEs and potential ADEs, and the potential financial impact of monitoring for ADEs. Among 2,407 patients screened, the application generated 516 high priority alerts. We were able to review 266 alerts at the time they were generated and among these, 30 (11.3%) were considered substantially important to warrant contacting the physician caring for the patient. These 30 alerts were associated with 4 ADEs and 11 potential ADEs. In all 15 cases, the responsible physician was unaware of the event, leading to a change in clinical care in 14 cases. Overall, 23% of high priority alerts were associated with an ADE (95% confidence interval [CI] 12% to 34%) and another 15% were associated with a potential ADE (95% CI 6% to 24%). Active surveillance used approximately 1.5 hours of pharmacist time daily. A commercially available, computer-based ADE detection tool was effective at identifying ADEs. When used as part of an active surveillance program, it can have an impact on preventing or ameliorating ADEs.

  1. Determination of the frequency and direct cost of the adverse drug events in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Estela; Rodríguez, Claudio; Pampliega, Eneas; Filinger, Ester

    2009-05-01

    To determine the frequency and the direct costs of adverse drug reactions, in an ambulatory population of the City of Buenos Aires, Argentina and its area of influence. A retrospective study was done during a period of three months on approximately 300.000 residents of the Buenos Aires area, gathering data according to the selected variables by means of the electronic capture of prescriptions dispensed in pharmacies of the area. This method enables the detection and registration of potential conflicts that may arise between a prescribed drug and factors such as: patient's demographic, clinical and drug profile. The analysis unit was defined as the happening of a moderate or severe adverse event reported by the system. The selected variables were the incidence of these effects and the direct cost was calculated as the value of the drugs that induced the adverse event. The events were classified according to the following interactions: a) drug-drug, b) drug-pediatrics, c) drug-gender, d) drug-pregnancy and abuse of controlled substances. The observed frequency shows great variability and the shortage of available data for ambulatory populations. We found 6.74% of reported events over the total of processed items, which generated an additional cost equivalent to 4.58% of the total pharmaceutical expenses. This study has only evaluated the cost occurred by the use of a drug that will lead to an adverse reaction. Moderate and severe reactions were included regardless of the important indirect costs, hospitalization costs, tests, physician fees, etc.

  2. Do Geriatric Conditions Increase Risk of Adverse Drug Reactions in Ambulatory Elders? Results From the VA GEM Drug Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Joseph T.; Sloane, Richard J.; Boscardin, W. John; Schmader, Kenneth E.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Many clinicians prescribe cautiously to older adults with common geriatric conditions for fear of causing adverse drug reactions (ADRs). However, little is known about the association between these conditions and risk of ADRs. Methods. Using data from the VA Geriatric Evaluation and Management Drug Study, we determined any, preventable, and serious ADRs in 808 elders for 12 months after hospital discharge using a validated process involving patient self-report and chart review adjudicated by two health care professionals. Eight common geriatric conditions (activities of daily living, dementia, incontinence, falls, difficulty ambulating, malnourishment, depression, and prolonged bed rest) were evaluated at study baseline through self-report and structured assessments. We used Poisson regression to model the relationship between these geriatric conditions and ADRs. Results. Participants had a mean of 2.9 ± 1.2 geriatric conditions. Over the 12-month follow-up period, 497 ADRs occurred in 269 participants, including 187 ADRs considered preventable and 127 considered severe. On multivariable analyses, participants with dependency in one or more activities of daily living were less likely to suffer ADRs than those who were fully independent (incidence rate ratio: 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.62–1.00). None of the other seven geriatric conditions assessed were associated with ADR risk. Results were similar for preventable and serious ADRs, although participants with a history of falls were more likely to develop serious ADRs (incidence rate ratio: 1.49, 95% confidence interval = 1.00–2.21). Conclusions. Many geriatric conditions were not associated with risk of ADRs. Although it is prudent to prescribe judiciously in patients with these conditions, excessive caution may not be warranted. PMID:21321003

  3. Opportunities for Web-based Drug Repositioning: Searching for Potential Antihypertensive Agents with Hypotension Adverse Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kejian; Wan, Mei; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Weng, Zuquan

    2016-04-01

    Drug repositioning refers to the process of developing new indications for existing drugs. As a phenotypic indicator of drug response in humans, clinical side effects may provide straightforward signals and unique opportunities for drug repositioning. We aimed to identify drugs frequently associated with hypotension adverse reactions (ie, the opposite condition of hypertension), which could be potential candidates as antihypertensive agents. We systematically searched the electronic records of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) through the openFDA platform to assess the association between hypotension incidence and antihypertensive therapeutic effect regarding a list of 683 drugs. Statistical analysis of FAERS data demonstrated that those drugs frequently co-occurring with hypotension events were more likely to have antihypertensive activity. Ranked by the statistical significance of frequent hypotension reporting, the well-known antihypertensive drugs were effectively distinguished from others (with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve > 0.80 and a normalized discounted cumulative gain of 0.77). In addition, we found a series of antihypertensive agents (particularly drugs originally developed for treating nervous system diseases) among the drugs with top significant reporting, suggesting the good potential of Web-based and data-driven drug repositioning. We found several candidate agents among the hypotension-related drugs on our list that may be redirected for lowering blood pressure. More important, we showed that a pharmacovigilance system could alternatively be used to identify antihypertensive agents and sustainably create opportunities for drug repositioning.

  4. Why Clinicians Don't Report Adverse Drug Events: Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohl, Corinne M; Small, Serena S; Peddie, David; Badke, Katherin; Bailey, Chantelle; Balka, Ellen

    2018-02-27

    Adverse drug events are unintended and harmful events related to medications. Adverse drug events are important for patient care, quality improvement, drug safety research, and postmarketing surveillance, but they are vastly underreported. Our objectives were to identify barriers to adverse drug event documentation and factors contributing to underreporting. This qualitative study was conducted in 1 ambulatory center, and the emergency departments and inpatient wards of 3 acute care hospitals in British Columbia between March 2014 and December 2016. We completed workplace observations and focus groups with general practitioners, hospitalists, emergency physicians, and hospital and community pharmacists. We analyzed field notes by coding and iteratively analyzing our data to identify emerging concepts, generate thematic and event summaries, and create workflow diagrams. Clinicians validated emerging concepts by applying them to cases from their clinical practice. We completed 238 hours of observations during which clinicians investigated 65 suspect adverse drug events. The observed events were often complex and diagnosed over time, requiring the input of multiple providers. Providers documented adverse drug events in charts to support continuity of care but never reported them to external agencies. Providers faced time constraints, and reporting would have required duplication of documentation. Existing reporting systems are not suited to capture the complex nature of adverse drug events or adapted to workflow and are simply not used by frontline clinicians. Systems that are integrated into electronic medical records, make use of existing data to avoid duplication of documentation, and generate alerts to improve safety may address the shortcomings of existing systems and generate robust adverse drug event data as a by-product of safer care. ©Corinne M Hohl, Serena S Small, David Peddie, Katherin Badke, Chantelle Bailey, Ellen Balka. Originally published in JMIR

  5. Suspected adverse reactions to veterinary drugs reported in South Africa (January 1998 - February 2001 : special report

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    R. Gehring

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The Veterinary Pharmacovigilance Centre received 59 reports of suspected adverse drug reactions during the period January 1998 - February 2001. The number of reports received increased after the establishment of a formal procedure for recording and responding to reports. The number of reports received per species was: dogs 19, cats 15, cattle 7, sheep/ goats 6, chickens 4, pigs 3, horses 2 and giraffe 1. Many different types of adverse reactions were reported, including lack of efficacy, hypersensitivity, inappropriate use of products by non-veterinarians, known adverse effects and adverse effects encountered with extra-label use of products.

  6. E-pharmacovigilance: development and implementation of a computable knowledge base to identify adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, Antje; Dormann, Harald; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Bürkle, Thomas; Rascher, Wolfgang; Sojer, Reinhold; Brune, Kay; Criegee-Rieck, Manfred

    2013-09-01

    Computer-assisted signal generation is an important issue for the prevention of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). However, due to poor standardization of patients' medical data and a lack of computable medical drug knowledge the specificity of computerized decision support systems for early ADR detection is too low and thus those systems are not yet implemented in daily clinical practice. We report on a method to formalize knowledge about ADRs based on the Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPCs) and linking them with structured patient data to generate safety signals automatically and with high sensitivity and specificity. A computable ADR knowledge base (ADR-KB) that inherently contains standardized concepts for ADRs (WHO-ART), drugs (ATC) and laboratory test results (LOINC) was built. The system was evaluated in study populations of paediatric and internal medicine inpatients. A total of 262 different ADR concepts related to laboratory findings were linked to 212 LOINC terms. The ADR knowledge base was retrospectively applied to a study population of 970 admissions (474 internal and 496 paediatric patients), who underwent intensive ADR surveillance. The specificity increased from 7% without ADR-KB up to 73% in internal patients and from 19.6% up to 91% in paediatric inpatients, respectively. This study shows that contextual linkage of patients' medication data with laboratory test results is a useful and reasonable instrument for computer-assisted ADR detection and a valuable step towards a systematic drug safety process. The system enables automated detection of ADRs during clinical practice with a quality close to intensive chart review. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. A systematic review of adverse drug events associated with administration of common asthma medications in children.

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    James S Leung

    Full Text Available To systematically review the literature and determine frequencies of adverse drug events (ADE associated with pediatric asthma medications.Following PRISMA guidelines, we systematically searched six bibliographic databases between January 1991 and January 2017. Study eligibility, data extraction and quality assessment were independently completed and verified by two reviewers. We included randomized control trials (RCT, case-control, cohort, or quasi-experimental studies where the primary objective was identifying ADE in children 1 month- 18 years old exposed to commercial asthma medications. The primary outcome was ADE frequency.Our search identified 14,540 citations. 46 studies were included: 24 RCT, 15 cohort, 4 RCT pooled analyses, 1 case-control, 1 open-label trial and 1 quasi-experimental study. Studies examined the following drug classes: inhaled corticosteroids (ICS (n = 24, short-acting beta-agonists (n = 10, long-acting beta-agonists (LABA (n = 3, ICS + LABA (n = 3, Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists (n = 3 and others (n = 3. 29 studies occurred in North America, and 29 were industry funded. We report a detailed index of 406 ADE descriptions and frequencies organized by drug class. The majority of data focuses on ICS, with 174 ADE affecting 13 organ systems including adrenal and growth suppression. We observed serious ADE, although they were rare, with frequency ranging between 0.9-6% per drug. There were no confirmed deaths, except for 13 potential deaths in a LABA study including combined adult and pediatric participants. We identified substantial methodological concerns, particularly with identifying ADE and determining severity. No studies utilized available standardized causality, severity or preventability assessments.The majority of studies focus on ICS, with adrenal and growth suppression described. Serious ADE are relatively uncommon, with no confirmed pediatric deaths. We identify substantial methodological concerns

  8. Detecting drug-drug interactions using a database for spontaneous adverse drug reactions: an example with diuretics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Puijenbroek, E P; Egberts, A C; Heerdink, E R; Leufkens, H G

    2000-12-01

    Drug-drug interactions are relatively rarely reported to spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) for adverse drug reactions. For this reason, the traditional approach for analysing SRS has major limitations for the detection of drug-drug interactions. We developed a method that may enable signalling of these possible interactions, which are often not explicitly reported, utilising reports of adverse drug reactions in data sets of SRS. As an example, the influence of concomitant use of diuretics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on symptoms indicating a decreased efficacy of diuretics was examined using reports received by the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Foundation Lareb. Reports received between 1 January 1990 and 1 January 1999 of patients older than 50 years were included in the study. Cases were defined as reports with symptoms indicating a decreased efficacy of diuretics, non-cases as all other reports. Exposure categories were the use of NSAIDs or diuretics versus the use of neither of these drugs. The influence of the combined use of both drugs was examined using logistic regression analysis. The odds ratio of the statistical interaction term of the combined use of both drugs was increased [adjusted odds ratio 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-3.7], which may indicate an enhanced effect of concomitant drug use. The findings illustrate that spontaneous reporting systems have a potential for signal detection and the analysis of possible drug-drug interactions. The method described may enable a more active approach in the detection of drug-drug interactions after marketing.

  9. Development and Initial Validation of a Patient-Reported Adverse Drug Event Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Sieta T.; Mol, Peter G. M.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Denig, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Background Direct patient reporting of adverse drug events (ADEs) is relevant for the evaluation of drug safety. To collect such data in clinical trials and postmarketing studies, a valid questionnaire is needed that can measure all possible ADEs experienced by patients. Objective Our aim was to

  10. Meta-analysis of recent studies on patients admitted to hospital due to adverse drug effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atiqi, R.; Cleophas, T. J.; van Bommel, E.; Zwinderman, A. H.

    2009-01-01

    The use of drugs has expanded during the previous decade. However, earlier studies oil patients admitted for adverse drugs effects (ADEs) have been heterogeneous. The objectives of this Study were to assess the number of recent admissions to hospital Clue to ADEs and to assess the degree of

  11. THE PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY ON CUTANEOUS ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS TO CHEMOTHERAPY

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    Prakash Mani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION There are a wide spectrum of adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDRs varying from transient maculopapular rash to fatal toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN. With the advent of newer and targeted therapy in the field of dermatology, the pattern of cutaneous adverse drug eruptions and the drugs responsible for them keep changing every year. Hence, this study was undertaken to ascertain the clinical spectrum of ACDRs and the causative drugs, in a tertiary care centre in South India. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was a prospective, observational study conducted in Department of Medical Oncology, Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai Medical College, Madurai during the period of March 2015 - August 2015 (6 months. Severity of the reaction was assessed using CTCAE (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events scale version 4.1. Causality of the drug was assessed using Naranjo Causality Assessment Scale. The scale was calculated first for the regimen and then for individual drugs separately. The adverse events with score of 6 or more (probable and definite adverse events were taken for the study. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION The overall incidence of ACDRs found in this study was 85%. Alopecia was the commonest ACDR occurring in 51.6% of patients. Nail pigmentation and supravenous pigmentation were the next common ACDRs, recorded in 35% and 16% of patients respectively. Imatinib caused generalised hypopigmentation in 40% of patients. Bleomycin induced, flagellate erythema and pigmentation in 17% of patients and stomatitis was seen in 11% of patients. Acneiform eruptions were recorded with erlotinib and gefitinib therapy. Supravenous pigmentation was common with 5-fluorouracil and docetaxel, occurring in 53% & 48% respectively. Newer targeted therapies like EGFR (Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors recorded low incidence of ACDRs like alopecia as against conventional antineoplastic agents. The cancer chemotherapeutic drugs are associated

  12. Interventions to prevent adverse fetal programming due to maternal obesity during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanielsz, Peter W; Ford, Stephen P; Long, Nathan M; Vega, Claudia C; Reyes-Castro, Luis A; Zambrano, Elena

    2013-10-01

    Maternal obesity is a global epidemic affecting both developed and developing countries. Human and animal studies indicate that maternal obesity adversely programs the development of offspring, predisposing them to chronic diseases later in life. Several mechanisms act together to produce these adverse health effects. There is a consequent need for effective interventions that can be used in the management of human pregnancy to prevent these outcomes. The present review analyzes the dietary and exercise intervention studies performed to date in both altricial and precocial animals, rats and sheep, with the aim of preventing adverse offspring outcomes. The results of these interventions present exciting opportunities to prevent, at least in part, adverse metabolic and other outcomes in obese mothers and their offspring. © 2013 International Life Sciences Institute.

  13. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Cristina Soares; de Oliveira, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) in older adults polymedicated. Methods: an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. Results: forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years) were analyzed: 24 (51.1%) concerning ADR, 14 (29.8%) DDI, and 9 studies (19.1%) investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. Conclusions: DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps. PMID:27598380

  14. Pattern of adverse drug reactions reported by the community pharmacists in Nepal

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    Palaian S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacovigilance program in Nepal is less than a decade old, and is hospital centered. This study highlights the findings of a community based pharmacovigilance program involving the community pharmacists. Objectives: To collect the demographic details of the patients experiencing adverse drug reactions (ADR reported by the community pharmacists; to identify the common drugs causing the ADRs, the common types of ADRs; and to carry out the causality, severity and preventability assessments of the reported ADRs. Methods: The baseline Knowledge-Attitude-Practices (KAP of 116 community pharmacists from Pokhara valley towards drug safety was evaluated using a validated (Cronbach alpha=0.61 KAP questionnaire having 20 questions [(knowledge 11, attitude 5 and practice 4 maximum possible score 40]. Thirty community pharmacists with high scores were selected for three training sessions, each session lasting for one to two hours, covering the basic knowledge required for the community pharmacists for ADR reporting. Pharmacist from the regional pharmacovigilance center visited the trained community pharmacists every alternate day and collected the filled ADR reporting forms. Results: Altogether 71 ADRs, from 71 patients (37 males were reported. Antibiotics/ antibacterials caused 42% (n=37 of the total ADRs followed by non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [25% (n=22]. Ibuprofen/paracetamol combination accounted for ten ADRs. The most common type of ADR was itching [17.2 % (n=20, followed by generalized edema [8.6 % (n=10]. In order to manage the ADRs, the patients needed medical treatment in 69% (n=49 of the cases. Over two third (69% of the ADRs had a ‘possible’ association with the suspected drugs and a high percentage (70.4% were of ‘mild (level 2’ type. Nearly two third [64.7 % (n=46] of the ADRs were ‘definitely preventable’. Conclusion: The common class of drugs known to cause ADRs was antibacterial/ antibiotics. Ibuprofen

  15. Factors that condition the spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions among nurses: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Alessia; Colaceci, Sofia; Giusti, Angela; Vellone, Ercole; Alvaro, Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    To describe and synthesise previous research on factors conditioning the spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions among nurses. Spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions by health-care providers, are a main instrument for the continuous evaluation of the risk-benefit ratio of every drug. Under-reporting of adverse drug reactions by all health-care providers, in particular by nurses, is a major limitation to this system. An integrated review of the literature was conducted using MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Scopus databases and Google Scholar. After evaluation for appropriateness related to inclusion/exclusion criteria, 16 studies were included in the final analysis and synthesis. Two factors emerged from the study: (1) intrinsic factors related to nurses' knowledge and attitudes; (2) extrinsic factors related to nurses' interaction with health-care organisations and to the relationship between nurses and physicians. Nurses' attitudes that hinder reporting include ignorance, insecurity, fear and lethargy. Nurses are not fully aware of their role in adverse drug reaction reporting. Nurses must acquire greater knowledge to implement specific skills into their daily clinical practice. To improve nurses' reporting of adverse drug reactions, it is necessary to develop management approaches that modify both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Patterns of adverse drug reaction signals in NAFDAC Pharmacovigilance activities from September to November, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awodele, Olufunsho; Ibrahim, Ali; Orhii, Paul

    2016-03-16

    Adverse drug reaction signals are reported information on possible causal relationships between an adverse event and a drug. The National Pharmacovigilance Centre (NPC) in Nigeria has over 3,000 reported adverse drug reaction cases which have been adequately entered into the ADR data bank. Data mining of ADR reports from September to November, 2014 were carried out in this present study with the intention to describe the pattern of ADRs and generate possible signals. A total of about 100 reported cases with arrays of adverse drug reactions were reported between September and November, 2014 and the data were analyzed using SPSS version 17. Efavirenz/Tenofovir/Lamivudine combination was the highest reported drugs (24.2%) while efavirenz alone was reported in 8 times (8.8%) and HIV (63.3%) was the highest reported indication of drug use. Efavirenz caused central nervous system adverse reactions as revealed in the ADRs analyses. Zidovudine/Lamivudine/Nevirapine combination in concomitant use with Cotrimoxazole were reported 8 times with generalized maculopapular rashes on the trunk with some area of hyper pigmentation with intense itching documented twice and big/swollen rashes all over the faces. Zidovudine was also reported four times to cause severe anaemia. More surveillance is advocated so as to ascertain the consistency of the observed ADRs and thereafter establish appropriate signals.

  17. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions seen at a university hospital department of dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jakob E; Andersen, Klaus E; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    Patients with suspected cutaneous adverse drug reactions are often referred to allergy clinics or departments of dermatology for evaluation. These patients are selected compared with patients identified in prospective and cross-sectional studies of hospital populations. This explains the observed...... variation in prevalence of specific reactions and of eliciting drugs. This study investigated the prevalence of cutaneous adverse drug reactions in a university hospital department of dermatology that is specially focused on allergy. An 8-month survey was carried out during the period April-December 2003...

  18. [Prevention and Treatment of Common Acute Adverse Effects With Antipsychotic Use in Adults With Schizophrenia Diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas Borrero, Álvaro Enrique; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; Vélez Traslaviña, Ángela; Castro Díaz, Sergio Mario; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; García Valencia, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    To determine the most adequate strategies for the prevention and treatment of the acute adverse effects of the use of antipsychotics. A clinical practice guideline was elaborated under the parameters of the Methodological Guide of the Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social to identify, synthesize and evaluate the evidence and make recommendations about the treatment and follow-up of adult patients with schizophrenia. A systematic literature search was carried out. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. The non-pharmacological interventions such as nutritional counseling by a nutritionist, exercise and psychotherapy are effective in preventing weight gain with the use of antipsychotics. (Kg Weight reduction in DM of -3.05 (-4.16, -1.94)). The antipsychotic change from olanzapine to aripiprazole showed weight loss and decreased BMI (decreased weight in KG DM -3.21 (-9.03, -2.61). The use of beta blockers was ineffective in reducing akathisia induced by antipsychotic; using as outcome the 50% reduction of symptoms of akathisia comparing beta-blockers with placebo RR was 1.4 (0.59, 1.83). It is recommended to make psychotherapeutic accompaniment and nutrition management of overweight for patients with weight gain. If these alternatives are ineffective is suggested to change the antipsychotic or consider starting metformin. For the management of drug-induced akathisia it is recommended to decrease the dose of the drug and the addition of lorazepam. It is recommended using 5mg biperiden IM or trihexyphenidyl 5mg orally in case of secondary acute dystonia and for the treatment of antipsychotic-induced parkinsonism to decrease the dose of antipsychotic or consider using 2 - 4mg/day of biperiden or diphenhydramine 50mg once daily. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. [Adverse muscle effects of a podofyllotoxin-containing cytotoxic drug product with simvastatin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaipiainen-Seppänen, Oili; Savolainen, Elina; Elfving, Pia; Kononoff, Aulikki

    2009-01-01

    With the ageing population, drug interactions pose an increasing challenge to health professionals. We describe four patients, for whom concurrent administration of a podofyllotoxin-containing cytotoxic drug product and simvastatin caused severe adverse effects on muscles, including muscle pain, soreness or fatigue or weakness, and in some patients also disintegration of muscle tissue, i.e. rhabdomyolysis. The metabolism of both drugs proceeds via the common CYP3A4 enzyme pathway.

  20. Systematic drug repositioning through mining adverse event data in ClinicalTrials.gov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Wen Su

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug repositioning (i.e., drug repurposing is the process of discovering new uses for marketed drugs. Historically, such discoveries were serendipitous. However, the rapid growth in electronic clinical data and text mining tools makes it feasible to systematically identify drugs with the potential to be repurposed. Described here is a novel method of drug repositioning by mining ClinicalTrials.gov. The text mining tools I2E (Linguamatics and PolyAnalyst (Megaputer were utilized. An I2E query extracts “Serious Adverse Events” (SAE data from randomized trials in ClinicalTrials.gov. Through a statistical algorithm, a PolyAnalyst workflow ranks the drugs where the treatment arm has fewer predefined SAEs than the control arm, indicating that potentially the drug is reducing the level of SAE. Hypotheses could then be generated for the new use of these drugs based on the predefined SAE that is indicative of disease (for example, cancer.

  1. Optimal timing of periodontal disease treatment for prevention of adverse pregnancy outcomes: before or during pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xu; Buekens, Pierre; Goldenberg, Robert L; Offenbacher, Steven; Qian, Xu

    2011-08-01

    Several large randomized controlled clinical trials failed to find that standard periodontal therapy during pregnancy reduces the incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes (eg, preterm birth and low birthweight). However, treating periodontal disease during pregnancy may be too late to reduce the inflammation that is related to the adverse pregnancy outcomes. Moreover, periodontal treatment during pregnancy can cause bacteremia, which itself may initiate the pathway leading to the adverse pregnancy outcomes. Finally, the periodontal treatments provided during pregnancy are not always effective in preventing the progression of periodontal disease during pregnancy. Pregnancy may not be an appropriate period for periodontal intervention(s). We hypothesize that periodontal treatment before pregnancy may reduce the rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Future randomized controlled trials are needed to test if treating periodontal disease in the prepregnancy period reduces the rate of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of brand versus generic antiepileptic drug adverse event reporting rates in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Motiur; Alatawi, Yasser; Cheng, Ning; Qian, Jingjing; Plotkina, Annya V; Peissig, Peggy L; Berg, Richard L; Page, David; Hansen, Richard A

    2017-09-01

    Despite the cost saving role of generic anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), debate exists as to whether generic substitution of branded AEDs may lead to therapeutic failure and increased toxicity. This study compared adverse event (AE) reporting rates for brand vs. authorized generic (AG) vs. generic AEDs. Since AGs are pharmaceutically identical to brand but perceived as generics, the generic vs. AG comparison minimized potential bias against generics. Events reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System between January 2004 to March 2015 with lamotrigine, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine listed as primary or secondary suspect were classified as brand, generic, or AG based on the manufacturer. Disproportionality analyses using the reporting odds ratio (ROR) assessed the relative rate of reporting of labeled AEs compared to reporting these events with all other drugs. The Breslow-Day statistic compared RORs across brand, AG, and other generics using a Bonferroni-corrected Pbrand and generics for all three drugs of interest (Breslow-Day Pbrands and generics have similar reporting rates after accounting for generic perception biases. Disproportional suicide reporting was observed for generics compared with AGs and brand, although this finding needs further study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Healthcare professionals and pharmacovigilance of pediatric adverse drug reactions: a 5-year analysis of Adverse Events Reporting System database of the Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, Caterina; Tuccori, Marco; Bocci, Guido

    2017-02-17

    To analyze the Adverse Events Reporting System (AERS) database of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), investigating the characteristics of pediatric adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and describing the effective participation of healthcare professionals in the reporting activity. Reports of ADRs were obtained from the FDA website. Only ADRs in pediatric subjects (divided by age, by country and by professional category) were included into the analysis. The drugs suspected as primary cause of the ADRs in pediatric subjects and their principal anatomic group according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system were considered. To classify the ADRs, the Medical Dictionary for Regularity Activities terminology was adopted. Between 2008 and 2012, FDA collected 113,077 ADRs in pediatric patients. Of the total pediatric ADR reports, those performed by medical doctors were 32%, followed by consumers (26%) and healthcare professionals (25%). Most of the ADR reports were related to the adolescent group (39%). Healthcare professionals resulted the category with the highest rate of ADR reports in neonates and infants. Drugs acting on nervous system and antineoplastic/immunomodulating agents were the most involved the pediatric ADR reports. Pyrexia, convulsion, vomiting and accidental overdose were the reactions more reported both from healthcare professionals and medical doctors. The present study describes the pediatric ADR reports of the FDA database through healthcare professional's perspective, describing the various aspects of pediatric pharmacovigilance.

  4. Incidence and preventability of adverse events requiring intensive care admission: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlayen, Annemie; Verelst, Sandra; Bekkering, Geertruida E; Schrooten, Ward; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Neree

    2012-04-01

    Adverse events are unintended patient injuries or complications that arise from health care management resulting in death, disability or prolonged hospital stay. Adverse events that require critical care are a considerable financial burden to the health care system, but also their global impact on patients and society is probably underestimated. The objectives of this systematic review were to synthesize the best available evidence regarding the estimates of the incidence and preventability of adverse events that necessitate intensive care admission, to determine the type and consequences [mortality, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay and costs] of these adverse events. MEDLINE (from 1966 to present), EMBASE (from 1974 to present) and CENTRAL (version 1-2010) were searched for studies reporting on unplanned admissions on ICUs. Several other sources were searched for additional studies. Only quantitative studies that used chart review for the detection of adverse events requiring intensive care admission were considered for eligibility. For the purposes of this systematic review, ICUs were defined as specialized hospital facilities which provide continuous monitoring and intensive care for acutely ill patients. Studies that were published in the English, Dutch, German, French or Spanish language were eligible for inclusion. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. A total of 27 studies were reviewed. Meta-analysis of the data was not appropriate because of methodological and statistical heterogeneity between studies; therefore, results are presented in a descriptive way. The percentage of surgical and medical adverse events that required ICU admission ranged from 1.1% to 37.2%. ICU readmissions varied from 0% to 18.3%. Preventability of the adverse events varied from 17% to 76.5%. Preventable adverse events are further synthesized by type of event. Consequences of the adverse events included a

  5. Worldwide withdrawal of medicinal products because of adverse drug reactions: a systematic review and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onakpoya, Igho J; Heneghan, Carl J; Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2016-07-01

    We have systematically identified medicinal products withdrawn worldwide because of adverse drug reactions, assessed the level of evidence used for making the withdrawal decisions, and explored the patterns of withdrawals over time. We searched PubMed, the WHO database of withdrawn products, and selected texts. We included products that were withdrawn after launch from 1950 onwards, excluding non-human and over-the-counter medicines. We assessed the levels of evidence on which withdrawals were based using the Oxford Center for Evidence Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. Of 353 medicinal products withdrawn from any country, only 40 were withdrawn worldwide. Anecdotal reports were cited as evidence for withdrawal in 30 (75%) and deaths occurred in 27 (68%). Hepatic, cardiac, and nervous system toxicity accounted for over 60% of withdrawals. In 28 cases, the first withdrawal was initiated by the manufacturer. The median interval between the first report of an adverse drug reaction that led to withdrawal and the first withdrawal was 1 year (range 0-43 years). Worldwide withdrawals occurred within 1 year after the first withdrawal in any country. In conclusion, the time it takes for drugs to be withdrawn worldwide after reports of adverse drug reactions has shortened over time. However, there are inconsistencies in current withdrawal procedures when adverse drug reactions are suspected. A uniform method for establishing worldwide withdrawal of approved medicinal products when adverse drug reactions are suspected should be developed, to facilitate global withdrawals. Rapid synthesis of the evidence on harms should be a priority when serious adverse reactions are suspected.

  6. Adverse effects and Drug Interactions Associated with Inhaled Recreational and Medical Marijuana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisha Kelly Freeman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To provide an overview of the addiction potential; adverse effects (e.g., cardiovascular, immune dysfunction, respiratory system, mental health disorders; drug interactions; effects of accidental exposure; crime statistics; and pharmacist’s considerations for the use of inhaled medical marijuana. Methods: A PubMed search was conducted from 1966 to March 2016 to identify articles in which the safety of inhaled medical marijuana was assessed. Key MeSH search terms included medical marijuana with a subheading for adverse effect. Only articles in adult patients were considered. In addition, medical marijuana or cannabis plus one of the following search terms were searched: drug interactions, herb-drug interactions, drug-related side effects and adverse drug reactions, substance-related disorders, addiction, and abuse. A free-text search was also conducted to identify articles not included in the MeSH term search. A bibliographic search was also conducted. Articles were included if they addressed adverse effects of medical marijuana for the treatment of a condition. Meta-analyses, randomized controlled clinical trials, and case reports were included in the review if the primary focus of the article related to the adverse effect profile of inhaled medical marijuana. Medical marijuana efficacy studies were not assessed. In the absence of this information, case reports or reports of inhaled recreational marijuana use was used. Studies were excluded if published in languages other than English. In addition, studies highlighting mechanisms of action, studies of pharmacodynamics or pharmacokinetic effects were excluded, unless these effects were due to drug-drug interactions. Prescription products containing marijuana or derivatives were excluded from evaluation. An Internet search was conducted to locate the most up-to-date information on the laws concerning medical marijuana. Key findings: A PubMed search revealed 58 articles and 28 of

  7. Suspected adverse drug reactions in elderly patients reported to the Committee on Safety of Medicines.

    OpenAIRE

    Castleden, C M; Pickles, H

    1988-01-01

    1. Spontaneous reports of suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reported to the Committee on Safety of Medicines (CSM) have been studied in relation to patient age. 2. The proportion of reports received for the elderly increased between 1965 and 1983. 3. There was a correlation between the use of drugs and the number of ADR reports. Thus age-related prescription figures for two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAI) and co-trimoxazole matched ADR reports for each drug in each age grou...

  8. Study of adverse drug reactions in out-patient departments of a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinnat Ara Begum

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study conducted in the Medicine and Skin outpatient departments of Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka revealed 19 cases (7 males, 12 females of adverse drug reactions (ADR out of 160 patients. 31.58% ADRs were of mild type, 42.1% were of moderate and 26.32% were of severe in nature. Gastrointestinal complications were the most frequent adverse effect (56%. Antimicrobial drugs were the most common cause of ADR (42.86% followed by NSAIDs (33.33%. This study is a preliminary study for getting information on the pattern of ADRs in Bangladesh needing further studies.

  9. Pharmacodynamic genetic polymorphisms affect adverse drug reactions of haloperidol in patients with alcohol-use disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zastrozhin MS

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mikhail Sergeevich Zastrozhin,1,2 Vadim Markovich Brodyansky,3 Valentin Yurievich Skryabin,4 Elena Anatolievna Grishina,5 Dmitry Vladimirovich Ivashchenko,5 Kristina Anatolievna Ryzhikova,5 Ludmila Mikhaylovna Savchenko,1 Alexander Olegovich Kibitov,3 Evgeny Alekseevich Bryun,1,4 Dmitry Alekseevich Sychev6 1Department of Addictology, Russian Medical Academy of Continuous Professional Education of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia; 2Moscow Research and Practical Centre on Addictions of the Moscow Department of Healthcare, Center for the Prevention of Dependent Behavior, Moscow, Russia; 3Federal Medical Research Centre of Psychiatry and Addictology, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Moscow, Russia; 4Moscow Research and Practical Centre on Addictions of the Moscow Department of Healthcare, Department of Addictology, Moscow, Russia; 5Russian Medical Academy of Continuous Professional Education of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Research Centre, Moscow, Russia; 6Russian Medical Academy of Continuous Professional Education of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapy, Moscow, Russia Background: Antipsychotic action of haloperidol is due to blockade of D2 receptors in the mesolimbic dopamine pathway, while the adverse drug reactions are associated with striatal D2 receptor blockade. Contradictory data concerning the effects of genetic polymorphisms of genes encoding these receptors and associated structures (catechol-O-methyltransferase [COMT], glycine transporter and gene encoding the density of D2 receptors on the neuronal membrane are described.Objective: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the correlation between DRD2, SLC6A3 (DAT and COMT genetic polymorphisms and to investigate their effect on the development of adverse drug reactions in patients with alcohol-use disorder who received haloperidol.Patients and methods: The study

  10. The Adverse Drug Event Collaborative: a joint venture to measure medication-related patient harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Mary E; Jackson, Aaron; Cameron, Chris; Young, Mary L; Escott, Linda; Maharaj, Ashika; Miller, Nigel

    2012-01-25

    To measure the extent of patient harm caused by medications (rate of Adverse Drug Events) in three DHBs, using a standardised trigger tool method. Counties Manukau, Capital and Coast and Canterbury DHBs decided to work collaboratively to implement the ADE Trigger Tool (TT). Definitions of ADE were agreed on and triggers refined. A random sample of closed charts (from March 2010 to February 2011) was obtained excluding patients who were admitted for <48 hours, children under the age of 18 and psychiatric admissions. In each DHB trained reviewers scanned these in a structured way to identify any of the 19 triggers. If triggers were identified, a more detailed, though time-limited review of the chart was done to determine whether an ADE had occurred. The severity of patient harm was categorised using the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention Index. No attempt was made to determine preventability of harm and ADEs from acts of omission were excluded. The ADE TT was applied to 1210 charts and 353 ADE were identified, with an average rate of 28.9/100 admissions and 38/1,000 bed days. 94.5% of the ADE identified were in the lower severity scales with temporary harm, however in 5 patients it was considered that the ADE contributed to their death, 9 required an intervention to sustain life and 4 suffered permanent harm. The most commonly implicated drugs were morphine and other opioids, anticoagulants, antibiotics, Non Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) and diuretics. Patients who suffered an ADE were more likely to be female, older with more complex medical illnesses, and have a longer length of stay. The rate of medication-related harm identified by the ADE TT is considerably higher than that identified through traditional voluntary reporting mechanisms. The ADE TT provides a standardised measure of harm over time that can be used to determine trends and the effect of medication safety improvement programmes. This study not

  11. Choosing Appropriate Theories for Understanding Hospital Reporting of Adverse Drug Events, a Theoretical Domains Framework Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalviri, Gloria; Yazdizadeh, Bahareh; Mirbaha, Fariba; Gholami, Kheirollah; Majdzadeh, Reza

    2018-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) may cause serious injuries including death. Spontaneous reporting of ADEs plays a great role in detection and prevention of them; however, underreporting always exists. Although several interventions have been utilized to solve this problem, they are mainly based on experience and the rationale for choosing them has no theoretical base. The vast variety of behavioural theories makes it difficult to choose appropriate theory. Theoretical domains framework (TDF) is suggested as a solution. The objective of this study was to select the best theory for evaluating ADE reporting in hospitals based on TDF. We carried out three focus group discussions with hospital pharmacists and nurses, based on TDF questions. The analysis was performed through five steps including coding discussions transcript, extracting beliefs, selecting relevant domains, matching related constructs to the extracted beliefs, and determining the appropriate theories in each domain. The theory with the highest number of matched domains and constructs was selected as the theory of choice. A total of six domains were identified relevant to ADE reporting, including "Knowledge", "Skills", "Beliefs about consequences", "Motivation and goals", "Environmental context and resources" and "Social influences". We found theory of planned behavior as the comprehensive theory to study factors influencing ADE reporting in hospitals, since it was relevant theory in five out of six relevant domains and the common theory in 55 out of 75 identified beliefs. In conclusion, we suggest theory of planned behavior for further studies on designing appropriate interventions to increase ADE reporting in hospitals.

  12. Differences by Veteran/civilian status and gender in associations between childhood adversity and alcohol and drug use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Elizabeth A; Upchurch, Dawn M; Simpson, Tracy; Hamilton, Alison B; Hoggatt, Katherine J

    2018-04-01

    To examine differences by US military Veteran status and gender in associations between childhood adversity and DSM-5 lifetime alcohol and drug use disorders (AUD/DUD). We analyzed nationally representative data from 3119 Veterans (n = 379 women; n = 2740 men) and 33,182 civilians (n = 20,066 women; n = 13,116 men) as provided by the 2012-2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC-III). We used weighted multinomial logistic regression, tested interaction terms, and calculated predicted probabilities by Veteran status and gender, controlling for covariates. To test which specific moderation contrasts were statistically significant, we conducted pairwise comparisons. Among civilians, women had lower AUD and DUD prevalence than men; however, with more childhood adversity, this gender gap narrowed for AUD and widened for DUD. Among Veterans, in contrast, similar proportions of women and men had AUD and DUD; with more childhood adversity, AUD-predicted probability among men surpassed that of women. Childhood adversity elevated AUD probability among civilian women to levels exhibited by Veteran women. Among men, Veterans with more childhood adversity were more likely than civilians to have AUD, and less likely to have DUD. Childhood adversity alters the gender gap in AUD and DUD risk, and in ways that are different for Veterans compared with civilians. Department of Defense, Veterans Affairs, and community health centers can prevent and ameliorate the harmful effects of childhood adversity by adapting existing behavioral health efforts to be trauma informed, Veteran sensitive, and gender tailored.

  13. Facilitating adverse drug event detection in pharmacovigilance databases using molecular structure similarity: application to rhabdomyolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Santiago; Harpaz, Rave; Chase, Herbert S; Costanzi, Stefano; Rabadan, Raul

    2011-01-01

    Background Adverse drug events (ADE) cause considerable harm to patients, and consequently their detection is critical for patient safety. The US Food and Drug Administration maintains an adverse event reporting system (AERS) to facilitate the detection of ADE in drugs. Various data mining approaches have been developed that use AERS to detect signals identifying associations between drugs and ADE. The signals must then be monitored further by domain experts, which is a time-consuming task. Objective To develop a new methodology that combines existing data mining algorithms with chemical information by analysis of molecular fingerprints to enhance initial ADE signals generated from AERS, and to provide a decision support mechanism to facilitate the identification of novel adverse events. Results The method achieved a significant improvement in precision in identifying known ADE, and a more than twofold signal enhancement when applied to the ADE rhabdomyolysis. The simplicity of the method assists in highlighting the etiology of the ADE by identifying structurally similar drugs. A set of drugs with strong evidence from both AERS and molecular fingerprint-based modeling is constructed for further analysis. Conclusion The results demonstrate that the proposed methodology could be used as a pharmacovigilance decision support tool to facilitate ADE detection. PMID:21946238

  14. Benzodiazepine Use During Hospitalization: Automated Identification of Potential Medication Errors and Systematic Assessment of Preventable Adverse Events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Franklin Niedrig

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepines and "Z-drug" GABA-receptor modulators (BDZ are among the most frequently used drugs in hospitals. Adverse drug events (ADE associated with BDZ can be the result of preventable medication errors (ME related to dosing, drug interactions and comorbidities. The present study evaluated inpatient use of BDZ and related ME and ADE.We conducted an observational study within a pharmacoepidemiological database derived from the clinical information system of a tertiary care hospital. We developed algorithms that identified dosing errors and interacting comedication for all administered BDZ. Associated ADE and risk factors were validated in medical records.Among 53,081 patients contributing 495,813 patient-days BDZ were administered to 25,626 patients (48.3% on 115,150 patient-days (23.2%. We identified 3,372 patient-days (2.9% with comedication that inhibits BDZ metabolism, and 1,197 (1.0% with lorazepam administration in severe renal impairment. After validation we classified 134, 56, 12, and 3 cases involving lorazepam, zolpidem, midazolam and triazolam, respectively, as clinically relevant ME. Among those there were 23 cases with associated adverse drug events, including severe CNS-depression, falls with subsequent injuries and severe dyspnea. Causality for BDZ was formally assessed as 'possible' or 'probable' in 20 of those cases. Four cases with ME and associated severe ADE required administration of the BDZ antagonist flumazenil.BDZ use was remarkably high in the studied setting, frequently involved potential ME related to dosing, co-medication and comorbidities, and rarely cases with associated ADE. We propose the implementation of automated ME screening and validation for the prevention of BDZ-related ADE.

  15. Adverse drug reactions in older patients during hospitalisation: are they predictable?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Marie N

    2012-11-01

    adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major cause of morbidity and healthcare utilisation in older people. The GerontoNet ADR risk score aims to identify older people at risk of ADRs during hospitalisation. We aimed to assess the clinical applicability of this score and identify other variables that predict ADRs in hospitalised older people.

  16. Adverse drug reactions reported by consumers for nervous system medications in Europe 2007 to 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2013-01-01

    Reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) has traditionally been the sole province of healthcare professionals. In the European Union, more countries have allowed consumers to report ADRs directly to the regulatory agencies. The aim of this study was to characterize ADRs reported by European...... consumer for nervous system medications....

  17. Adverse drug reactions of haloperidol used in critically ill children for the treatment of delirium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, E.; Slooff, V.; Van Puijenbroek, E.; Jessurun, N.; De Hoog, M.; Tibboel, D.; De Wildt, S.

    BACKGROUND: As delirium in critically ill children is increasingly recognized, more children are treated with the antipsychotic drug haloperidol. However, little is known about its safety in this context. The objective of this study was to investigate the incidence and nature of adverse events

  18. Sex-dimorphic adverse drug reactions to immune suppressive agents in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Zelinkova (Zuzana); E. Bultman (Evelien); L. Vogelaar (Lauran); C. Bouziane (Cheima); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); C.J. van der Woude (Janneke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAIM: To analyze sex differences in adverse drug reactions (ADR) to the immune suppressive medication in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. METHODS: All IBD patients attending the IBD outpatient clinic of a referral hospital were identifed through the electronic diagnosis

  19. Adverse effects of the antimalaria drug, mefloquine: due to primary liver damage with secondary thyroid involvement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herxheimer Andrew

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mefloquine is a clinically important antimalaria drug, which is often not well tolerated. We critically reviewed 516 published case reports of mefloquine adverse effects, to clarify the phenomenology of the harms associated with mefloquine, and to make recommendations for safer prescribing. Presentation We postulate that many of the adverse effects of mefloquine are a post-hepatic syndrome caused by primary liver damage. In some users we believe that symptomatic thyroid disturbance occurs, either independently or as a secondary consequence of the hepatocellular injury. The mefloquine syndrome presents in a variety of ways including headache, gastrointestinal disturbances, nervousness, fatigue, disorders of sleep, mood, memory and concentration, and occasionally frank psychosis. Previous liver or thyroid disease, and concurrent insults to the liver (such as from alcohol, dehydration, an oral contraceptive pill, recreational drugs, and other liver-damaging drugs may be related to the development of severe or prolonged adverse reactions to mefloquine. Implications We believe that people with active liver or thyroid disease should not take mefloquine, whereas those with fully resolved neuropsychiatric illness may do so safely. Mefloquine users should avoid alcohol, recreational drugs, hormonal contraception and co-medications known to cause liver damage or thyroid damage. With these caveats, we believe that mefloquine may be safely prescribed in pregnancy, and also to occupational groups who carry out safety-critical tasks. Testing Mefloquine's adverse effects need to be investigated through a multicentre cohort study, with small controlled studies testing specific elements of the hypothesis.

  20. A study on adverse drug reactions in a tertiary care hospital of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acne (46) was commonly reported reaction. Topical steroids, betamethasone sodium phosphate and clobetasol were reported to induce maximum number of reactions (59). Skin (227, 66.9%) was commonly affected organ system. Most of the adverse drug reactions were possible (240, 94.1%) and mild (222, 87%) in nature.

  1. Signal Detection of Imipenem Compared to Other Drugs from Korea Adverse Event Reporting System Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyounghoon; Soukavong, Mick; Kim, Jungmee; Kwon, Kyoung Eun; Jin, Xue Mei; Lee, Joongyub; Yang, Bo Ram; Park, Byung Joo

    2017-05-01

    To detect signals of adverse drug events after imipenem treatment using the Korea Institute of Drug Safety & Risk Management-Korea adverse event reporting system database (KIDS-KD). We performed data mining using KIDS-KD, which was constructed using spontaneously reported adverse event (AE) reports between December 1988 and June 2014. We detected signals calculated the proportional reporting ratio, reporting odds ratio, and information component of imipenem. We defined a signal as any AE that satisfied all three indices. The signals were compared with drug labels of nine countries. There were 807582 spontaneous AEs reports in the KIDS-KD. Among those, the number of antibiotics related AEs was 192510; 3382 reports were associated with imipenem. The most common imipenem-associated AE was the drug eruption; 353 times. We calculated the signal by comparing with all other antibiotics and drugs; 58 and 53 signals satisfied the three methods. We compared the drug labelling information of nine countries, including the USA, the UK, Japan, Italy, Switzerland, Germany, France, Canada, and South Korea, and discovered that the following signals were currently not included in drug labels: hypokalemia, cardiac arrest, cardiac failure, Parkinson's syndrome, myocardial infarction, and prostate enlargement. Hypokalemia was an additional signal compared with all other antibiotics, and the other signals were not different compared with all other antibiotics and all other drugs. We detected new signals that were not listed on the drug labels of nine countries. However, further pharmacoepidemiologic research is needed to evaluate the causality of these signals. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017

  2. Big Data Mining and Adverse Event Pattern Analysis in Clinical Drug Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federer, Callie; Yoo, Minjae; Tan, Aik Choon

    2016-12-01

    Drug adverse events (AEs) are a major health threat to patients seeking medical treatment and a significant barrier in drug discovery and development. AEs are now required to be submitted during clinical trials and can be extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov ( https://clinicaltrials.gov/ ), a database of clinical studies around the world. By extracting drug and AE information from ClinicalTrials.gov and structuring it into a database, drug-AEs could be established for future drug development and repositioning. To our knowledge, current AE databases contain mainly U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. However, our database contains both FDA-approved and experimental compounds extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov . Our database contains 8,161 clinical trials of 3,102,675 patients and 713,103 reported AEs. We extracted the information from ClinicalTrials.gov using a set of python scripts, and then used regular expressions and a drug dictionary to process and structure relevant information into a relational database. We performed data mining and pattern analysis of drug-AEs in our database. Our database can serve as a tool to assist researchers to discover drug-AE relationships for developing, repositioning, and repurposing drugs.

  3. Oral adverse effects of gastrointestinal drugs and considerations for dental management in patients with gastrointestinal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramya Karthik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal disease is associated with alterations in the mouth or influence the course of the dental diseases, and the dental health care workers are expected to recognize, diagnose, and treat oral conditions associated with gastrointestinal diseases and also provide safe and appropriate dental care for afflicted individuals. Drugs used in the management of these diseases result in oral adverse effects and also are known to interact with those prescribed during dental care. Hence, this article has reviewed the drug considerations and guidelines for drug use during dental management of patients with gastrointestinal diseases.

  4. Adverse childhood experiences and consumption of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs among adolescents of a Brazilian birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Helen; Soares, Ana Luiza Gonçalves; Santos, Ana Paula Gomes Dos; Ribeiro, Camila Garcez; Bierhals, Isabel Oliveira; Vieira, Luna Strieder; Hellwig, Natália Limões; Wehrmeister, Fernando C; Menezes, Ana M B

    2016-11-03

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and the use of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs among adolescents from a Brazilian cohort. The occurrence of five ACEs, the use of alcohol and tobacco and trying illicit drugs were investigated in the 1993 Pelotas birth cohort at the age of 15 (n = 4,230). A score was created for the ACEs and their association with the use of substances was evaluated. Around 25% of adolescents consumed alcohol, 6% smoked and 2.1% reported having used drugs at least once in their lives. The ACEs were associated with the use of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs. A dose-response relation between the number of ACEs and the substance use was found, particularly with regard to illicit drugs. The occurrence of ACEs was positively associated with the use of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs among adolescents and the risk may be different for men and women. These results point to the fact that strategies for preventing the use of substances should include interventions both among adolescents and within the family environment.

  5. A dataset of 200 structured product labels annotated for adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Shooshan, Sonya E; Rodriguez, Laritza; Aronson, Alan R; Lang, Francois; Rogers, Willie; Roberts, Kirk; Tonning, Joseph

    2018-01-30

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs), unintended and sometimes dangerous effects that a drug may have, are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality during medical care. To date, there is no structured machine-readable authoritative source of known ADRs. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) partnered with the National Library of Medicine to create a pilot dataset containing standardised information about known adverse reactions for 200 FDA-approved drugs. The Structured Product Labels (SPLs), the documents FDA uses to exchange information about drugs and other products, were manually annotated for adverse reactions at the mention level to facilitate development and evaluation of text mining tools for extraction of ADRs from all SPLs. The ADRs were then normalised to the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and to the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA). We present the curation process and the structure of the publicly available database SPL-ADR-200db containing 5,098 distinct ADRs. The database is available at https://bionlp.nlm.nih.gov/tac2017adversereactions/; the code for preparing and validating the data is available at https://github.com/lhncbc/fda-ars.

  6. Preventing Prescription Drug Abuse in Adolescence: A Collaborative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Beth A.; Fullwood, Harry; Hawthorn, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    With the growing awareness of adolescent prescription drug abuse, communities and schools are beginning to explore prevention and intervention strategies which are appropriate for their youth. This article provides a framework for developing a collaborative approach to prescription drug abuse prevention--called the Prevention Awareness Team--that…

  7. ADVERPred-Web Service for Prediction of Adverse Effects of Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Sergey M; Lagunin, Alexey A; Rudik, Anastasia V; Filimonov, Dmitry A; Poroikov, Vladimir V

    2018-01-22

    Application of structure-activity relationships (SARs) for the prediction of adverse effects of drugs (ADEs) has been reported in many published studies. Training sets for the creation of SAR models are usually based on drug label information which allows for the generation of data sets for many hundreds of drugs. Since many ADEs may not be related to drug consumption, one of the main problems in such studies is the quality of data on drug-ADE pairs obtained from labels. The information on ADEs may be included in three sections of the drug labels: "Boxed warning," "Warnings and Precautions," and "Adverse reactions." The first two sections, especially Boxed warning, usually contain the most frequent and severe ADEs that have either known or probable relationships to drug consumption. Using this information, we have created manually curated data sets for the five most frequent and severe ADEs: myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, cardiac failure, severe hepatotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity, with more than 850 drugs on average for each effect. The corresponding SARs were built with PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances) software and had balanced accuracy values of 0.74, 0.7, 0.77, 0.67, and 0.75, respectively. They were implemented in a freely available ADVERPred web service ( http://www.way2drug.com/adverpred/ ), which enables a user to predict five ADEs based on the structural formula of compound. This web service can be applied for estimation of the corresponding ADEs for hits and lead compounds at the early stages of drug discovery.

  8. How Can Prescription Drug Misuse Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the Brain ... research findings for the educated lay public, legislators, educational groups, and practitioners. The series reports on research ...

  9. Monitoring of Adverse Drug Reactions Associated with Antihypertensive Medicines at a University Teaching Hospital in New Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fowad Khurshid

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim To monitor the adverse drug reactions (ADRs caused by antihypertensive medicines prescribed in a university teaching hospital.Methods:he present work was an open, non-comparative, observational study conducted on hypertensive patients attending the Medicine OPD of Majeedia Hospital, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India by conducting patient interviews and recording the data on ADR monitoring form as recommended by Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO, Government of India.Results:A total of 21 adverse drug reactions were observed in 192 hypertensive patients. Incidence of adverse drug reactions was found to be higher in patients more than 40 years in age, and females experienced more ADRs (n = 14, 7.29 % than males, 7 (3.64 %. Combination therapy was associated with more number of adverse drug reactions (66.7 % as against monotherapy (33.3 %. Calcium channel blockers were found to be the most frequently associated drugs with adverse drug reactions (n = 7, followed by diuretics (n = 5, and beta- blockers (n = 4. Among individual drugs, amlodipine was found to be the commonest drug associated with adverse drug reactions (n = 7, followed by torasemide (n = 3. Adverse drug reactions associated with central nervous system were found to be the most frequent (42.8 % followed by musculo-skeletal complaints (23.8 % and gastro-intestinal disorders (14.3 %. Conclusions:The present pharmacovigilance study represents the adverse drug reaction profile of the antihypertensive medicines prescribed in our university teaching hospital. The above findings would be useful for physicians in rational prescribing. Calcium channel blockers were found to be the most frequently associated drugs with adverse drug reactions.

  10. Predictive modeling of structured electronic health records for adverse drug event detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Henriksson, Aron; Asker, Lars; Boström, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    The digitization of healthcare data, resulting from the increasingly widespread adoption of electronic health records, has greatly facilitated its analysis by computational methods and thereby enabled large-scale secondary use thereof. This can be exploited to support public health activities such as pharmacovigilance, wherein the safety of drugs is monitored to inform regulatory decisions about sustained use. To that end, electronic health records have emerged as a potentially valuable data source, providing access to longitudinal observations of patient treatment and drug use. A nascent line of research concerns predictive modeling of healthcare data for the automatic detection of adverse drug events, which presents its own set of challenges: it is not yet clear how to represent the heterogeneous data types in a manner conducive to learning high-performing machine learning models. Datasets from an electronic health record database are used for learning predictive models with the purpose of detecting adverse drug events. The use and representation of two data types, as well as their combination, are studied: clinical codes, describing prescribed drugs and assigned diagnoses, and measurements. Feature selection is conducted on the various types of data to reduce dimensionality and sparsity, while allowing for an in-depth feature analysis of the usefulness of each data type and representation. Within each data type, combining multiple representations yields better predictive performance compared to using any single representation. The use of clinical codes for adverse drug event detection significantly outperforms the use of measurements; however, there is no significant difference over datasets between using only clinical codes and their combination with measurements. For certain adverse drug events, the combination does, however, outperform using only clinical codes. Feature selection leads to increased predictive performance for both data types, in isolation and

  11. Adverse events in children and adolescents treated with quetiapine: an analysis of adverse drug reaction reports from the Danish Medicines Agency database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Klaus D.; Wallach-Kildemoes, Helle; Bruhn, Christina H.

    2017-01-01

    Quetiapine is a low-affinity dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, approved for the treatment of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in children and adolescents by the Food and Drug Administration, but not by European Medicine Agency. Although knowledge of adverse drug reactions in children...... and adolescents is scarce, quetiapine is increasingly being used for youth in Denmark. The aim of this case study is to discuss adverse drug events (ADEs) spontaneously reported to the Danish Medicines Agency on quetiapine used in the pediatric population in relation to adversive drug reactions (ADRs) reported......, hallucinations. As some of the reported ADEs are life threatening and not listed as ADRs in the SPCs, off-label use of quetiapine in children and adolescents gives rise to safety concerns....

  12. Adverse drug reaction and toxicity caused by commonly used antimicrobials in canine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Arunvikram

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An adverse drug reaction (ADR is a serious concern for practicing veterinarians and other health professionals, and refers to an unintended, undesired and unexpected response to a drug that negatively affects the patient's health. It may be iatrogenic or genetically induced, and may result in death of the affected animal. The ADRs are often complicated and unexpected due to myriad clinical symptoms and multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction. Toxicity due to commonly used drugs is not uncommon when they are used injudiciously or for a prolonged period. Licosamides, exclusively prescribed against anaerobic pyoderma, often ends with diarrhoea and vomiting in canines. Treatment with Penicillin and β-lactam antibiotics induces onset of pemphigious vulgare, drug allergy or hypersensitivity. Chloroamphenicol and aminoglycosides causes Gray's baby syndrome and ototoxicity in puppies, respectively. Aminoglycosides are very often associated with nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity and neuromuscular blockage. Injudicious use of fluroquinones induces the onset of arthropathy in pups at the weight bearing joints. The most effective therapeutic measure in managing ADR is to treat the causative mediators, followed by supportive and symptomatic treatment. So, in this prospective review, we attempt to bring forth the commonly occurring adverse drug reactions, their classification, underlying mechanism, epidemiology, treatment and management as gleaned from the literature available till date and the different clinical cases observed by the authors.

  13. Post-marketing withdrawal of analgesic medications because of adverse drug reactions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onakpoya, Igho J; Heneghan, Carl J; Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2018-01-01

    Many analgesics have been withdrawn from the market because of adverse drug reactions. Controversy still surrounds the use of some approved analgesics for pain management. However, the trends and reasons for withdrawal of analgesics when harms are attributed to their use have not been systematically assessed. Areas covered: We conducted searches in PubMed; Embase; Google Scholar; clinicaltrials.gov; WHO databases of withdrawn products; websites of the European Medicines Agency, the US Food and Drug Administration, the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency; Meyler's Side Effects of Drugs; Stephens' Detection of New Adverse Drug Reactions; the Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Encyclopedia; and the Merck Index. We included licensed analgesics that were withdrawn after marketing because of adverse reactions between 1950 and March 2017. We excluded herbal products, non-human medicines, and non-prescription medicines. We used the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine criteria to document the levels of evidence, and chi-squared tests to compare withdrawal patterns across geographical regions. Expert opinion: Pharmacovigilance systems in low-resource settings should be strengthened. Greater co-ordination across regulatory authorities in assessing and interpreting the benefit-harm balance of new analgesics should be encouraged. Future reporting of harms in clinical trials of analgesics should follow standardized guidelines.

  14. Pharmacovigilance and drug safety in Calabria (Italy): 2012 adverse events analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giofrè, Chiara; Scicchitano, Francesca; Palleria, Caterina; Mazzitello, Carmela; Ciriaco, Miriam; Gallelli, Luca; Paletta, Laura; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; Leporini, Christian; Ventrice, Pasquale; Carbone, Claudia; Saullo, Francesca; Rende, Pierandrea; Menniti, Michele; Mumoli, Laura; Chimirri, Serafina; Patanè, Marinella; Esposito, Stefania; Cilurzo, Felisa; Staltari, Orietta; Russo, Emilio; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2013-12-01

    Pharmacovigilance (PV) is designed to monitor drugs continuously after their commercialization, assessing and improving their safety profile. The main objective is to increase the spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), in order to have a wide variety of information. The Italian Drug Agency (Agenzia Italiana del Farmaco [AIFA]) is financing several projects to increase reporting. In Calabria, a PV information center has been created in 2010. We obtained data using the database of the National Health Information System AIFA relatively to Italy and Calabria in the year 2012. Descriptive statistics were performed to analyze the ADRs. A total number of 461 ADRs have been reported in the year 2012 with an increase of 234% compared with 2011 (138 reports). Hospital doctors are the main source of this reporting (51.62%). Sorafenib (Nexavar(®)), the combination of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and ketoprofen represent the drugs most frequently reported causing adverse reactions. Adverse events in female patients (61.83%) were more frequently reported, whereas the age groups "41-65" (39.07%) and "over 65" (27.9%) were the most affected. Calabria has had a positive increase in the number of ADRs reported, although it has not yet reached the gold standard set by World Health Organization (about 600 reports), the data have shown that PV culture is making inroads in this region and that PV projects stimulating and increasing PV knowledge are needed.

  15. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions seen in a tertiary hospital in Johor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wen Yi; Lee, Chew Kek; Choon, Siew Eng

    2010-07-01

    Adverse drug reactions are most commonly cutaneous in nature. Patterns of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and their causative drugs vary among the different populations previously studied. Our aim is to determine the clinical pattern of drug eruptions and the common drugs implicated, particularly in severe cutaneous ADRs in our population. This study was done by analyzing the database established for all adverse cutaneous drug reactions seen from January 2001 until December 2008. A total of 281 cutaneous ADRs were seen in 280 patients. The most common reaction pattern was maculopapular eruption (111 cases, 39.5%) followed by Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS: 79 cases, 28.1%), drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS: 19 cases, 6.8%), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN: 16 cases, 5.7 %), urticaria/angioedema (15 cases, 5.3%) and fixed drug eruptions (15 cases, 5.3%). Antibiotics (38.8%) and anticonvulsants (23.8%) accounted for 62.6% of the 281 cutaneous ADRs seen. Allopurinol was implicated in 39 (13.9%), carbamazepine in 29 (10.3%), phenytoin in 27 (9.6%) and cotrimoxazole in 26 (9.3%) cases. Carbamazepine, allopurinol and cotrimoxazole were the three main causative drugs of SJS/TEN accounting for 24.0%, 18.8% and 12.5% respectively of the 96 cases seen whereas DRESS was mainly caused by allopurinol (10 cases, 52.6%) and phenytoin (3 cases, 15.8%). The reaction patterns and drugs causing cutaneous ADRs in our population are similar to those seen in other countries although we have a much higher proportion of severe cutaneous ADRs probably due to referral bias, different prescribing habit and a higher prevalence of HLA-B*1502 and HLA-B*5801 which are genetic markers for carbamazepine-induced SJS/TEN and allopurinol-induced SJS/TEN/DRESS respectively. The most common reaction pattern seen in our study population was maculopapular eruptions. Antibiotics, anticonvulsants and NSAIDs were the most frequently implicated drug groups. Carbamazepine

  16. The Impact of Herbal Drug Use on Adverse Drug Reaction Profiles of Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinashe Mudzviti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The main objective was to determine the impact of herbal drug use on adverse drug reactions in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART. Methodology. Patients receiving first-line ART from the national roll-out program participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were interviewed and a data collection sheet was used to collect information from the corresponding medical record. Results. The majority (98.2% of participants were using at least one herbal drug together with ART. The most common herbal remedies used were Allium Sativum (72.7%, Bidens pilosa (66.0%, Eucalyptus globulus (52.3%, Moringa oleifera (44.1%, Lippia javanica (36.3%, and Peltoforum africanum (34.3%. Two indigenous herbs, Musakavakadzi (OR=0.25; 95% CI 0.076–0.828 and Peltoforum africanum (OR=0.495; 95% CI 0.292–0.839 reduced the occurrence of adverse drug events. Conclusions. The use of herbal drugs is high in the HIV-infected population and there is need for pharmacovigilance programs to recognize the role they play in altering ADR profiles.

  17. Adverse drug reaction reports for cardiometabolic drugs from sub-Saharan Africa: a study in VigiBase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhe, Derbew Fikadu; Juhlin, Kristina; Star, Kristina; Beyene, Kidanemariam G M; Dheda, Mukesh; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M; Taxis, Katja; Mol, Peter G M

    2015-06-01

    Identifying key features in individual case safety reports (ICSR) of suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) with cardiometabolic drugs from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) compared with reports from the rest of the world (RoW). Reports on suspected ADRs of cardiometabolic drugs (ATC: A10[antidiabetic], B01[antithrombotics] and C[cardiovascular]) were extracted from WHO Global database, VigiBase(®) (1992-2013). We used vigiPoint, a logarithmic odds ratios (log2 OR)-based method to study disproportional reporting between SSA and RoW. Case-defining features were considered relevant if the lower limit of the 99% CI > 0.5. In SSA, 3773 (9%) of reported ADRs were for cardiometabolic drugs, in RoW for 18%. Of these, 79% originated from South Africa and 81% were received after 2007. Most reports were for drugs acting on the renin-angiotensin system (36% SSA & 14% RoW). Compared with RoW, reports were more often sent for patients 18-44 years old (log2 OR 0.95 [99 CI 0.80; 1.09]) or with non-fatal outcome (log2 OR 1.16 [99 CI 1.10; 1.22]). Eight ADRs (cough, angioedema, lip swelling, face oedema, swollen tongue, throat irritation, drug ineffective and blood glucose abnormal) and seven drugs (enalapril, rosuvastatin, perindopril, vildagliptin, insulin glulisine, nifedipine and insulin lispro) were disproportionally more reported in SSA than in the RoW. 'In recent years, the number of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reported in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has sharply increased. The data showed the well-known population-based differential ADR profile of ACE inhibitors in the SSA population.' © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Expanding the domain of drug delivery for HIV prevention: exploration of the transdermal route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Ashana; Sivaraman, Arunprasad; Zhang, Wei; Clark, Meredith R; Banga, Ajay K

    2017-01-01

    Constant efforts for HIV prevention using antiretroviral drugs, pre- and postexposure prophylactic agents, and microbicides are being made by researchers. Drug-delivery systems such as oral tablets and coitally dependent vaginal gels are short acting, require daily application, and are associated with user adherence issues, whereas the coitally independent systems such as injectables and biodegradable implants are long acting, lasting several months, during which time the termination of prophylaxis is impractical in case of adverse effects. An effective drug-delivery system to be used for an intermediate duration, if available, would be an attractive alternative option for users in terms of adherence. Transdermal delivery systems, overcoming most of the limitations of the other routes of administration and aiming to provide sustained delivery of drugs through skin, may be explored for HIV prevention. Passive and physical enhancement techniques may be designed strategically to improve the transdermal delivery of HIV preventive agents.

  19. High-Performance Signal Detection for Adverse Drug Events using MapReduce Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kai; Sun, Xingzhi; Tao, Ying; Xu, Linhao; Wang, Chen; Mao, Xianling; Peng, Bo; Pan, Yue

    2010-11-13

    Post-marketing pharmacovigilance is important for public health, as many Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) are unknown when those drugs were approved for marketing. However, due to the large number of reported drugs and drug combinations, detecting ADE signals by mining these reports is becoming a challenging task in terms of computational complexity. Recently, a parallel programming model, MapReduce has been introduced by Google to support large-scale data intensive applications. In this study, we proposed a MapReduce-based algorithm, for common ADE detection approach, Proportional Reporting Ratio (PRR), and tested it in mining spontaneous ADE reports from FDA. The purpose is to investigate the possibility of using MapReduce principle to speed up biomedical data mining tasks using this pharmacovigilance case as one specific example. The results demonstrated that MapReduce programming model could improve the performance of common signal detection algorithm for pharmacovigilance in a distributed computation environment at approximately liner speedup rates.

  20. A PROSPECTIVE, OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF ADVERSE REACTIONS TO DRUG REGIME FOR MULTI-DRUG RESISTANT PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS IN CENTRAL INDIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Rohan C. Hire

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: 1 To assess the adverse drug reactions of second line anti-tubercular drugs used to treat Multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis (MDR TB in central India on the basis of causality, severity and avoidability scales. 2 To study the relationship of type of MDR TB (primary or secondary and presence of diabetes mellitus (DM with mean smear conversion time. Material and Methods: A prospective, observational study was carried out on diagnosed multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients enrolled for DOTS‑Plus regimen at TB and Chest Disease Department from January to December 2012. They were followed for 9 months thereafter and encountered adverse drug reactions (ADRs were noted along with the time of sputum conversion. The data were analysed by Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test and unpaired student’s‘t’ test. Results: Total 64 ADRs were reported in 55 patients out of total 110 patients (n = 110. As per the Naranjo causality assessment of ADRs, 7 patients had “definite” causal relation, 45 had “probable” causal relation and 3 had “possible” causal relation with drugs of DOTS Plus regime. As per the Hartwig’s severity assessment scale, there were total 7 ADRs in Level 1, 6 in Level 2, 33 in Level 3 and 9 in Level 4. Hallas avoidability assessment scale divided the ADRs as 3 being “Definitely avoidable”, 26 “Possibly avoidable”, 23 “Not avoidable” and 3 “unevaluable”. . Mean sputum smear conversion time is significantly higher in patients with secondary type than that of primary type of MDR TB (p = 0.0001 and in patients with DM than those without DM (p <0.0001. Conclusion: ADRs were common in patients of MDR TB on DOTs-Plus drug regime. It was due to lack of availability of safer and equally potent drugs in DOTs-Plus drug regime compared to DOTS regime in non-resistant TB. The frequency and severity of ADRs can be reduced by strict vigilance about known and unknown ADRs, monitoring their laboratory and

  1. The concept of adverse drug reaction reporting: awareness among pharmacy students in a Nigerian university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Segun Showande

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse drug reaction (ADR is poorly reported globally but more in developing countries with poor participation by health professionals. Currently, there is no known literature on the Nigerian pharmacy students’ knowledge on ADR reporting. Hence the purpose of this study was to find out the level of knowledge of pharmacy students on the concept of pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reaction reporting and also to evaluate their opinions on the National Pharmacovigilance Centre guidelines on adverse drug reaction reporting. A pretested 34-item semi-structured questionnaire was administered among 69 pharmacy undergraduate students in their penultimate and final years that consented to take part in the study, in one of the universities in Nigeria. The study was carried out strictly adhering to the principles outlined in the Helsinki declaration of 1964, which was revised in 1975. The questionnaire used had four sections which included a section on biographical data, a section which evaluated the students knowledge on the concept of pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reaction reporting, a section on students personal experiences of adverse drug reactions and modes of reporting them and the final section of the questionnaire evaluated the students’ opinions on the National Pharmacovigilance Centre guidelines for reporting adverse drug reactions. Descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis statistical tests were used to analyze the data obtained. None of the participants knew the sequence of reporting ADR. More than half, 40(58.0% had heard about pharmacovigilance at symposiums, 7(10.1% during clinical clerkship program and 18(26.1% from media jingles. Twenty nine (42.0% agreed that pharmacovigilance was in their curriculum, however only 16(23.2% could define the term correctly. None of the participants had seen or used an ADR form prior to the study, but the students could easily identify and describe the type of ADR they had

  2. Predicting and detecting adverse drug reactions in old age: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangoni, Arduino A

    2012-05-01

    Increased, often inappropriate, drug exposure, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes, reduced homeostatic reserve and frailty increase the risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the older population, thereby imposing a significant public health burden. Predicting and diagnosing ADRs in old age presents significant challenges for the clinician, even when specific risk scoring systems are available. The picture is further compounded by the potential adverse impact of several drugs on more 'global' health indicators, for example, physical function and independence, and the fragmentation of care (e.g., increased number of treating doctors and care transitions) experienced by older patients during their clinical journey. The current knowledge of drug safety in old age is also curtailed by the lack of efficacy and safety data from pre-marketing studies. Moreover, little consideration is given to individual patients' experiences and reporting of specific ADRs, particularly in the presence of cognitive impairment. Pending additional data on these issues, the close review and monitoring of individual patients' drug prescribing, clinical status and biochemical parameters remain essential to predict and detect ADRs in old age. Recently developed strategies, for example, medication reconciliation and trigger tool methodology, have the potential for ADRs risk mitigation in this population. However, more information is required on their efficacy and applicability in different healthcare settings.

  3. Adverse effects and Drug Interactions Associated with Inhaled Recreational and Medical Marijuana

    OpenAIRE

    Maisha Kelly Freeman; Pilar Z Murphy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To provide an overview of the addiction potential; adverse effects (e.g., cardiovascular, immune dysfunction, respiratory system, mental health disorders); drug interactions; effects of accidental exposure; crime statistics; and pharmacist’s considerations for the use of inhaled medical marijuana. Methods: A PubMed search was conducted from 1966 to March 2016 to identify articles in which the safety of inhaled medical marijuana was assessed. Key MeSH search terms included med...

  4. STUDIES OF ADVERSE DRUG REACTION PROFILE OF ANTISNAKE VENOM AT DISTRICT GENERAL HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Mulchand Shende *, Sneha Gawali , Kanchan Bhongade , Vivek Bhuskade , Abhijit Nandgaonkar

    2017-01-01

    Snake bite is a common predominant problem of the rural and periurban areas, neglected and frequently devastating environmental and occupational disease, especially in rural areas of tropical developing countries. This study aimed to investigate of the adverse drug reaction profile of anti-snake venom (ASV) in a district general hospital. An observational study was conducted in hospital for six months. A total number of 142 indoor case papers of snake bite from October 2016 to April 2017 were...

  5. Post-marketing surveillance of the safety profile of iodixanol in the outpatient CT setting. A prospective, multicenter, observational study of patient risk factors, adverse reactions and preventive measures in 9953 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Frank Hugo Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Non-interventional study in outpatient, contrast-enhanced CT: 1. to determine the extent of preventive measures for risk reduction of adverse drug reactions after contrast-enhanced CT examinations. 2. to prospectively determine the incidence and severity of adverse drug reactions occurring after administration of the iso-osmolar contrast medium iodixanol. 3. to determine a possible influence of preventive measures on the incidence/severity of adverse drug reactions. Evaluable documentation was provided for 9953 patients from 66 radiology centers across Germany. Patient characteristics, aspects of iodixanol administration, and adverse events with an at least 'possible' relationship were documented on a standardized case report form (CRF) and were evaluated up to seven days after contrast medium administration. About 55.5% of patients showed one or more risk factors (e.g. impaired renal function 4.4%, diabetes mellitus 8.5%, hypertension 20.6%). One third of the sites did not implement any preventive measures. Patients with a known risk for an allergy-like reaction were more likely to receive pharmacologic preventive treatment (0.5-50.5%). Oral hydration was the main preventive measure in patients with renal risk factors (<8%) followed by intravenous hydration (1%). Adverse drug reactions, mainly hypersensitivity reactions, occurred in 77 patients (0.74%), but were classified as serious in only 3 patients (0.03%). No statistically significant correlation between risk factors, preventive measures, and adverse reactions could be found. The use of preventive measures for CT examinations in this outpatient setting was generally low with risk patients being pre-medicated more often, depending on their history. In the routine outpatient setting, iso-osmolar iodixanol was very well tolerated in almost 10 000 patients undergoing diagnostic CT. The rate of acute and delayed adverse reactions was low. No correlation could be found between risk factors, preventive measures and

  6. Post-marketing surveillance of the safety profile of iodixanol in the outpatient CT setting. A prospective, multicenter, observational study of patient risk factors, adverse reactions and preventive measures in 9953 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Frank Hugo Heinz [Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Center, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Non-interventional study in outpatient, contrast-enhanced CT: 1. to determine the extent of preventive measures for risk reduction of adverse drug reactions after contrast-enhanced CT examinations. 2. to prospectively determine the incidence and severity of adverse drug reactions occurring after administration of the iso-osmolar contrast medium iodixanol. 3. to determine a possible influence of preventive measures on the incidence/severity of adverse drug reactions. Evaluable documentation was provided for 9953 patients from 66 radiology centers across Germany. Patient characteristics, aspects of iodixanol administration, and adverse events with an at least 'possible' relationship were documented on a standardized case report form (CRF) and were evaluated up to seven days after contrast medium administration. About 55.5% of patients showed one or more risk factors (e.g. impaired renal function 4.4%, diabetes mellitus 8.5%, hypertension 20.6%). One third of the sites did not implement any preventive measures. Patients with a known risk for an allergy-like reaction were more likely to receive pharmacologic preventive treatment (0.5-50.5%). Oral hydration was the main preventive measure in patients with renal risk factors (<8%) followed by intravenous hydration (1%). Adverse drug reactions, mainly hypersensitivity reactions, occurred in 77 patients (0.74%), but were classified as serious in only 3 patients (0.03%). No statistically significant correlation between risk factors, preventive measures, and adverse reactions could be found. The use of preventive measures for CT examinations in this outpatient setting was generally low with risk patients being pre-medicated more often, depending on their history. In the routine outpatient setting, iso-osmolar iodixanol was very well tolerated in almost 10 000 patients undergoing diagnostic CT. The rate of acute and delayed adverse reactions was low. No correlation could be found between risk factors, preventive

  7. Leveraging 3D chemical similarity, target and phenotypic data in the identification of drug-protein and drug-adverse effect associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Santiago; Hripcsak, George

    2016-01-01

    Drug-target identification is crucial to discover novel applications for existing drugs and provide more insights about mechanisms of biological actions, such as adverse drug effects (ADEs). Computational methods along with the integration of current big data sources provide a useful framework for drug-target and drug-adverse effect discovery. In this article, we propose a method based on the integration of 3D chemical similarity, target and adverse effect data to generate a drug-target-adverse effect predictor along with a simple leveraging system to improve identification of drug-targets and drug-adverse effects. In the first step, we generated a system for multiple drug-target identification based on the application of 3D drug similarity into a large target dataset extracted from the ChEMBL. Next, we developed a target-adverse effect predictor combining targets from ChEMBL with phenotypic information provided by SIDER data source. Both modules were linked to generate a final predictor that establishes hypothesis about new drug-target-adverse effect candidates. Additionally, we showed that leveraging drug-target candidates with phenotypic data is very useful to improve the identification of drug-targets. The integration of phenotypic data into drug-target candidates yielded up to twofold precision improvement. In the opposite direction, leveraging drug-phenotype candidates with target data also yielded a significant enhancement in the performance. The modeling described in the current study is simple and efficient and has applications at large scale in drug repurposing and drug safety through the identification of mechanism of action of biological effects.

  8. Enhancing communication about paediatric medicines: lessons from a qualitative study of parents' experiences of their child's suspected adverse drug reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, Janine; Hesselgreaves, Hannah; Nunn, Anthony J; Peak, Matthew; Pirmohamed, Munir; Smyth, Rosalind L; Turner, Mark A; Young, Bridget

    2012-01-01

    There is little research on parents' experiences of suspected adverse drug reactions in their children and hence little evidence to guide clinicians when communicating with families about problems associated with medicines. To identify any unmet information and communication needs described by parents whose child had a suspected adverse drug reaction. Semi-structured qualitative interviews with parents of 44 children who had a suspected adverse drug reaction identified on hospital admission, during in-patient treatment or reported by parents using the Yellow Card Scheme (the UK system for collecting spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions). Interviews were conducted face-to-face or by telephone; most interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed. Analysis was informed by the principles of the constant comparative method. Many parents described being dissatisfied with how clinicians communicated about adverse drug reactions and unclear about the implications for their child's future use of medicines. A few parents felt that clinicians had abandoned their child and reported refusing the use of further medicines because they feared a repeated adverse drug reaction. The accounts of parents of children with cancer were different. They emphasised their confidence in clinicians' management of adverse drug reactions and described how clinicians prospectively explained the risks associated with medicines. Parents linked symptoms to medicines in ways that resembled the established reasoning that clinicians use to evaluate the possibility that a medicine has caused an adverse drug reaction. Clinicians' communication about adverse drug reactions was poor from the perspective of parents, indicating that improvements are needed. The accounts of parents of children with cancer indicate that prospective explanation about adverse drug reactions at the time of prescription can be effective. Convergence between parents and clinicians in their reasoning for linking children

  9. Enhancing communication about paediatric medicines: lessons from a qualitative study of parents' experiences of their child's suspected adverse drug reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Arnott

    Full Text Available There is little research on parents' experiences of suspected adverse drug reactions in their children and hence little evidence to guide clinicians when communicating with families about problems associated with medicines.To identify any unmet information and communication needs described by parents whose child had a suspected adverse drug reaction.Semi-structured qualitative interviews with parents of 44 children who had a suspected adverse drug reaction identified on hospital admission, during in-patient treatment or reported by parents using the Yellow Card Scheme (the UK system for collecting spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions. Interviews were conducted face-to-face or by telephone; most interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed. Analysis was informed by the principles of the constant comparative method.Many parents described being dissatisfied with how clinicians communicated about adverse drug reactions and unclear about the implications for their child's future use of medicines. A few parents felt that clinicians had abandoned their child and reported refusing the use of further medicines because they feared a repeated adverse drug reaction. The accounts of parents of children with cancer were different. They emphasised their confidence in clinicians' management of adverse drug reactions and described how clinicians prospectively explained the risks associated with medicines. Parents linked symptoms to medicines in ways that resembled the established reasoning that clinicians use to evaluate the possibility that a medicine has caused an adverse drug reaction.Clinicians' communication about adverse drug reactions was poor from the perspective of parents, indicating that improvements are needed. The accounts of parents of children with cancer indicate that prospective explanation about adverse drug reactions at the time of prescription can be effective. Convergence between parents and clinicians in their reasoning for

  10. Enhancing Communication about Paediatric Medicines: Lessons from a Qualitative Study of Parents' Experiences of Their Child's Suspected Adverse Drug Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, Janine; Hesselgreaves, Hannah; Nunn, Anthony J.; Peak, Matthew; Pirmohamed, Munir; Smyth, Rosalind L.

    2012-01-01

    Background There is little research on parents' experiences of suspected adverse drug reactions in their children and hence little evidence to guide clinicians when communicating with families about problems associated with medicines. Objective To identify any unmet information and communication needs described by parents whose child had a suspected adverse drug reaction. Methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews with parents of 44 children who had a suspected adverse drug reaction identified on hospital admission, during in-patient treatment or reported by parents using the Yellow Card Scheme (the UK system for collecting spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions). Interviews were conducted face-to-face or by telephone; most interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed. Analysis was informed by the principles of the constant comparative method. Results Many parents described being dissatisfied with how clinicians communicated about adverse drug reactions and unclear about the implications for their child's future use of medicines. A few parents felt that clinicians had abandoned their child and reported refusing the use of further medicines because they feared a repeated adverse drug reaction. The accounts of parents of children with cancer were different. They emphasised their confidence in clinicians' management of adverse drug reactions and described how clinicians prospectively explained the risks associated with medicines. Parents linked symptoms to medicines in ways that resembled the established reasoning that clinicians use to evaluate the possibility that a medicine has caused an adverse drug reaction. Conclusion Clinicians' communication about adverse drug reactions was poor from the perspective of parents, indicating that improvements are needed. The accounts of parents of children with cancer indicate that prospective explanation about adverse drug reactions at the time of prescription can be effective. Convergence between parents and

  11. Choosing a Drug to Prevent Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Malaria About Malaria FAQs Fast Facts Disease Biology Ecology Human Factors Sickle Cell Mosquitoes Parasites Where Malaria ... medicines, also consider the possibility of drug-drug interactions with other medicines that the person might be ...

  12. Adverse events and the relation with quality of life in adults with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour using psychotropic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheifes, Arlette; Walraven, Sanne; Stolker, Joost Jan; Nijman, Henk L I; Egberts, Toine C G; Heerdink, Eibert R

    2016-01-01

    Psychotropic drugs are prescribed to approximately 30-40% of adults with intellectual disability (ID) and challenging behaviour, despite the limited evidence of effectiveness and the potential of adverse events. To assess the prevalence of adverse events in association with psychotropic drug use in adults with ID and challenging behaviour and to examine the relation of these adverse events with the person's quality of life. The presence of adverse events was measured with a questionnaire that had to be filled in by the physicians of the participants. Movement disorders were measured separately with a standardised protocol. The strength of the association between adverse events and Intellectual Disability Quality of Life-16 (IDQOL-16), and daily functioning was investigated using linear regression analyses, taking into account the severity of disease (CGI-S) as potential confounder. Virtually all of 103 adults with ID and challenging behaviour had at least one adverse event (84.4%) and almost half had ≥3 adverse events (45.6%) across different subclasses. Using psychotropic drugs increased the prevalence of adverse events significantly. Respectively 13% of the patients without psychotropic drugs and 61% of the patients with ≥2 psychotropic drugs had ≥3 adverse events. Having adverse events had a significantly negative influence on the quality of life. A large majority of all patients had at least one adverse event associated with psychotropic drug use. More attention is needed for these adverse events and their negative influence on the quality of life of these patients, taking into account the lack of evidence of effectiveness of psychotropic drugs for challenging behaviour. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. The validation of an invitro colonic motility assay as a biomarker for gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keating, Christopher; Martinez, Vicente; Ewart, Lorna; Gibbons, Stephen; Grundy, Luke; Valentin, Jean-Pierre; Grundy, David

    2010-01-01

    Motility-related gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions (GADRs), such as constipation and diarrhea, are some of the most frequently reported adverse events associated with the clinical development of new chemical entities, and for marketed drugs. However, biomarkers capable of detecting such GADRs are lacking. Here, we describe an in vitro assay developed to detect and quantify changes in intestinal motility as a surrogate biomarker for constipation/diarrhea-type GADRs. In vitro recordings of intraluminal pressure were used to monitor the presence of colonic peristaltic motor complexes (CPMCs) in mouse colonic segments. CPMC frequency, contractile and total mechanical activity were assessed. To validate the assay, two experimental protocols were conducted. Initially, five drugs with known gastrointestinal effects were tested to determine optimal parameters describing excitation and inhibition as markers for disturbances in colonic motility. This was followed by a 'blinded' evaluation of nine drugs associated with or without clinically identified constipation/diarrhea-type GADRs. Concentration-response relationships were determined for these drugs and the effects were compared with their maximal free therapeutic plasma concentration in humans. The assay detected stimulatory and inhibitory responses, likely correlating to the occurrence of diarrhea or constipation. Concentration-related effects were identified and potential mechanisms of action were inferred for several drugs. Based on the results from the fourteen drugs assessed, the sensitivity of the assay was calculated at 90%, with a specificity of 75% and predictive capacity of 86%. These results support the potential use of this assay in screening for motility-related GADRs during early discovery phase, safety pharmacology assessment.

  14. Puppet Play as Interactive Approach in Drug Abuse Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadic-Bilan, Diana; Vigato, Teodora

    2010-01-01

    The national strategies of drug abuse prevention across Europe have come to recognise that the drug abuse problem presents a complex set of issues of which there is no simple solution. There is a considerable increase in investment in prevention, treatment and harm-reduction activities and increased focus on supply reduction. School settings are…

  15. Drug Abuse Prevention for You and Your Friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Novelli and Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This booklet, written for adolescents, focuses on the individual's role and responsibility, both to themselves and their friends, in preventing drug abuse problems. Short statements define the influence of peer pressure on prevention, friendship, and intervention. The results of a ninth grade student survey list 22 reasons for using drugs,…

  16. Limitations and obstacles of the spontaneous adverse drugs reactions reporting: Two “challenging” case reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palleria, Caterina; Leporini, Christian; Chimirri, Serafina; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; Sacchetta, Sabrina; Bruno, Lucrezia; Lista, Rosaria M.; Staltari, Orietta; Scuteri, Antonio; Scicchitano, Francesca; Russo, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, based on several epidemiological data, iatrogenic disease is an emerging public health problem, especially in industrialized countries. Adverse drugs reactions (ADRs) are extremely common and, therefore, clinically, socially, and economically worthy of attention. Spontaneous reporting system for suspected ADRs represents the cornerstone of the pharmacovigilance, because it allows rapid detection of potential alarm signals related to drugs use. However, spontaneous reporting system shows several limitations, which are mainly related to under-reporting. In this paper, we describe two particular case reports, which emphasize some reasons of under-reporting and other common criticisms of spontaneous reporting systems. Materials and Methods: We performed a computer-aided search of Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library databases, national and international databases of suspected ADRs reports in order to identify previous published case reports and spontaneous reports about the ADRs reviewed in this paper, and to examine the role of suspected drugs in the pathogenesis of the described adverse reactions. Results: First, we reported a case of tizanidine-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. In the second case report, we presented an episode of asthma exacerbation after taking bimatoprost. Through the review of these two cases, we highlighted some common criticisms of spontaneous reporting systems: under-reporting and false causality attribution. Discussion and Conclusion: Healthcare workers sometimes do not report ADRs because it is challenging to establish with certainty the causal relationship between drug and adverse reaction; however, according to a key principle of pharmacovigilance, it is always better to report even a suspicion to generate an alarm in the interest of protecting public health. PMID:24347986

  17. Limitations and obstacles of the spontaneous adverse drugs reactions reporting: Two "challenging" case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palleria, Caterina; Leporini, Christian; Chimirri, Serafina; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; Sacchetta, Sabrina; Bruno, Lucrezia; Lista, Rosaria M; Staltari, Orietta; Scuteri, Antonio; Scicchitano, Francesca; Russo, Emilio

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, based on several epidemiological data, iatrogenic disease is an emerging public health problem, especially in industrialized countries. Adverse drugs reactions (ADRs) are extremely common and, therefore, clinically, socially, and economically worthy of attention. Spontaneous reporting system for suspected ADRs represents the cornerstone of the pharmacovigilance, because it allows rapid detection of potential alarm signals related to drugs use. However, spontaneous reporting system shows several limitations, which are mainly related to under-reporting. In this paper, we describe two particular case reports, which emphasize some reasons of under-reporting and other common criticisms of spontaneous reporting systems. We performed a computer-aided search of Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library databases, national and international databases of suspected ADRs reports in order to identify previous published case reports and spontaneous reports about the ADRs reviewed in this paper, and to examine the role of suspected drugs in the pathogenesis of the described adverse reactions. First, we reported a case of tizanidine-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. In the second case report, we presented an episode of asthma exacerbation after taking bimatoprost. Through the review of these two cases, we highlighted some common criticisms of spontaneous reporting systems: under-reporting and false causality attribution. Healthcare workers sometimes do not report ADRs because it is challenging to establish with certainty the causal relationship between drug and adverse reaction; however, according to a key principle of pharmacovigilance, it is always better to report even a suspicion to generate an alarm in the interest of protecting public health.

  18. Endogenous information, adverse selection, and prevention: Implications for genetic testing policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Richard; Richter, Andreas; Thistle, Paul

    2017-09-01

    We examine public policy toward the use of genetic information by insurers. Individuals engage in unobservable primary prevention and have access to different prevention technologies. Thus, insurance markets are affected by moral hazard and adverse selection. Individuals can choose to take a genetic test to acquire information about their prevention technology. Information has positive decision-making value, that is, individuals may adjust their behavior based on the result of the test. However, testing also exposes individuals to uncertainty over the available insurance contract, so-called classification risk, which lowers the value of information. In our analysis we distinguish between four different policy regimes, determine the value of information under each regime and associated equilibrium outcomes on the insurance market. We show that the policy regimes can be Pareto ranked, with a duty to disclose being the preferred regime and an information ban the least preferred one. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Patch testing in non-immediate cutaneous adverse drug reactions: value of extemporaneous patch tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assier, Haudrey; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Gener, Gwendeline; Verlinde Carvalh, Muriel; Chosidow, Olivier; Wolkenstein, Pierre

    2017-11-01

    Patch testing following a standardized protocol is reliable for identifying the culprit drug in cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADRs). However, these patch tests (PTs) require pharmaceutical material and staff, which are not always easily available. To evaluate an extemporaneous PT method in CADRs. We retrospectively analysed data for all patients referred to our department between March 2009 and June 2013 for patch testing after a non-immediate CADR. The patients who supplied their own suspected drugs were tested both with extemporaneous PTs and with conventional PTs. Extemporaneous PTs involved a nurse crushing and diluting the drug in pet. in a ratio of approximately one-third to two-thirds. Standardized PTs were performed according to guidelines, with commercial drugs diluted to 30% or with active ingredients diluted to 10%. We analysed the data for the two PT methods in terms of the number of positive test reactions, drugs tested, and type of CADR for patients in whom the two PT methods were used. In total, 75 of 156 patients underwent the two PT procedures, including 91 double tests. Overall, 21 tests gave positive reactions with the two methods, and 69 other tests gave negative results with the two methods. Our series yielded results similar to those of published series concerning the types of CADR and the drugs responsible. Our results suggest that, for CADRs, if a patient supplies a suspected drug but if the pharmaceutical material and staff are not available for conventional PTs, extemporaneous PTs performed by the nurse with the commercial drug used by the patient can be useful and reliable. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [PHARMACOLOGICAL TREATMENT IN PALLIATIVE CARE. DRUG ADMINISTRATION ROUTE, CONTINUOUS SUBCUTANEOUS INFUSION, ADVERSE SIDE EFFECTS, SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez Álvarez, Rocío; Calderón Carrasco, Justo; García Colchero, Francisco; Postigo Mota, Salvador; Alburquerque Medina, Eulalia

    2015-01-01

    To achieve well-being in patients in Palliative Care is required to know which are the most common symptoms, which are the drugs used for relief, which are the routes of administration of drugs that are suitable, how effective the drugs are and what incompatibilities, interactions and adverse effects occur. The aim of this article is to review the relevant issues in the management of the drugs commonly used by nursing in Palliative Care and presenting recommendations to clinical practice. Management interventions drugs for nurses in Palliative Care recommended by the scientific literature after a search of Scopus, CINAHL, Medline, PubMed, UpToDate and Google Scholar are selected. The oral route is the choice for patients in palliative situation and subcutaneous route when the first is not available. The symptoms, complex, intense and moody, should be systematically reevaluated by the nurse, to predict when a possible decompensation of it needing extra dose of medication. Nurses must be able to recognize the imbalance of well-being and act quickly and effectively, to get relief to some unpleasant situations for the patient as the pain symptoms, dyspnea or delirium. For the proper administration of rescue medication, the nurse should know the methods of symptomatic evaluation, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, the time intervals to elapse between different rescues and nccocc rocnnnco t thocm

  1. Suspected adverse drug reactions in elderly patients reported to the Committee on Safety of Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleden, C M; Pickles, H

    1988-10-01

    1. Spontaneous reports of suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reported to the Committee on Safety of Medicines (CSM) have been studied in relation to patient age. 2. The proportion of reports received for the elderly increased between 1965 and 1983. 3. There was a correlation between the use of drugs and the number of ADR reports. Thus age-related prescription figures for two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAI) and co-trimoxazole matched ADR reports for each drug in each age group. 4. The reported ADR was more likely to be serious or fatal in the elderly. 5. The commonest ADRs reported for the elderly affected the gastrointestinal (GIT) and haemopoietic systems, where more reports were received than would be expected from prescription figures. 6. The drug suspected of causing a GIT reaction was a NSAI in 75% of the reports. 7. Ninety-one per cent of fatal reports of GIT bleeds and perforations associated with NSAI drugs were in patients over 60 years of age.

  2. An analysis of potential costs of adverse events based on Drug Programs in Poland. Pulmonology focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szkultecka-Debek Monika

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The project was performed within the Polish Society for Pharmacoeconomics (PTFE. The objective was to estimate the potential costs of treatment of side effects, which theoretically may occur as a result of treatment of selected diseases. We analyzed the Drug Programs financed by National Health Fund in Poland in 2012 and for the first analysis we selected those Programs where the same medicinal products were used. We based the adverse events selection on the Summary of Product Characteristics of the chosen products. We extracted all the potential adverse events defined as frequent and very frequent, grouping them according to therapeutic areas. This paper is related to the results in the pulmonology area. The events described as very common had an incidence of ≥ 1/10, and the common ones ≥ 1/100, <1/10. In order to identify the resources used, we performed a survey with the engagement of clinical experts. On the basis of the collected data we allocated direct costs incurred by the public payer. We used the costs valid in December 2013. The paper presents the estimated costs of treatment of side effects related to the pulmonology disease area. Taking into account the costs incurred by the NHF and the patient separately e calculated the total spending and the percentage of each component cost in detail. The treatment of adverse drug reactions generates a significant cost incurred by both the public payer and the patient.

  3. [Description of contributing factors in adverse events related to patient safety and their preventability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-García, María Mercedes; Campos-Rivas, Beatriz; Sanmarful-Schwarz, Alexandra; Vírseda-Sacristán, Alicia; Dorrego-López, M Aránzazu; Charle-Crespo, Ángeles

    2017-11-25

    To assess the extent of healthcare related adverse events (AEs), their effect on patients, and their seriousness. To analyse the factors leading to the development of AEs, their relationship with the damage caused, and their degree of preventability. Retrospective descriptive study. Porriño, Pontevedra, Spain, Primary Care Service, from January-2014 to April-2016. Reported AEs were entered into the Patient Safety Reporting and Learning System (SiNASP). The variables measured were: Near Incident (NI) an occurrence with no effect or harm on the patient; Adverse Event (AE) an occurrence that affects or harms a patient. The level of harm is classified as minimal, minor, moderate, critical, and catastrophic. Preventability was classified as little evidence of being preventable, 50% preventable, and sound evidence of being preventable. percentages and Chi-squared test for qualitative variables; P<.05 with SPSS.15. SiNASP. Ethical considerations: approved by the Research Ethics Committee (2016/344). There were 166 recorded AEs (50.6% in males, and 46.4% in women. The mean age was 60.80years). Almost two-thirds 62.7% of AEs affected the patient, with 45.8% causing minimal damage, while 2.4% caused critical damages. Healthcare professionals were a contributing factor in 71.7% of the AEs, with the trend showing that poor communication and lack of protocols were related to the damage caused. Degree of preventability: 96.4%. Most AEs affected the patient, and were related to medication, diagnostic tests, and laboratory errors. The level of harm was related to communication problems, lack of, or deficient, protocols and a poor safety culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Preventing drug resistance in severe influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolny, Hana; Deecke, Lucas

    2015-03-01

    Severe, long-lasting influenza infections are often caused by new strains of influenza. The long duration of these infections leads to an increased opportunity for the emergence of drug resistant mutants. This is particularly problematic for new strains of influenza since there is often no vaccine, so drug treatment is the first line of defense. One strategy for trying to minimize drug resistance is to apply periodic treatment. During treatment the wild-type virus decreases, but resistant virus might increase; when there is no treatment, wild-type virus will hopefully out-compete the resistant virus, driving down the number of resistant virus. We combine a mathematical model of severe influenza with a model of drug resistance to study emergence of drug resistance during a long-lasting infection. We apply periodic treatment with two types of antivirals: neuraminidase inhibitors, which block release of virions; and adamantanes, which block replication of virions. We compare the efficacy of the two drugs in reducing emergence of drug resistant mutants and examine the effect of treatment frequency on the emergence of drug resistant mutants.

  5. [Data-mining characteristics of adverse drug reactions and pharmacovi-gilance of Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum herbs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Meng; Li, Fan; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Xiao-Fen; Piao, Jing-Zhu

    2018-01-01

    The common Aconitum herbs in clinical application mainly include Aconiti Radix(Chuanwu), Aconiti Kusnezoffii Radix(Caowu) and Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparaia(Fuzi), all of which have toxicity. Therefore, the safety of using Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum herbs has become an hot topic in clinical controversy. Based on the data-mining methods, this study explored the characteristics and causes of adverse drug reactions/events (ADR/ADE) of the Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum, in order to provide pharmacovigilance and rational drug use suggestions for clinical application. The detailed ADR/ADE reports about the Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum herbs were retrieved in the domestic literature databases since 1984 to now. The information extraction and data-mining were conducted based on the platforms of Microsoft office Excel 2016, Clementine 12.0 and Cytoscape 3.3.0. Finally, 78 detailed ADR/ADE reports involving a total of 30 varieties were included. 92.31% ADR/ADE were surely or likely led by the Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum, mostly involving multiple system/organ damages with good prognosis, and even 1 case of death. The incidence of included ADRs/ADEs was associated with various factors such as the patient idiosyncratic, drug toxicity, as well as clinical medication. The patient age was most closely related to ADR/ADEs, and those aged from 60 to 69 were more easily suffered from the ADRs/ADEs of Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum. The probability of ADR/ADEs for the drugs including Chuanwu or Caowu was greater than that of Fuzi, and the using beyond the instructions dose was the most important potential safety hazard in the clinical medication process. For the regular and characteristics of ADR/ADEs led by Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum, special attention shall be paid to the elder patients or with the patients with allergies; strictly control the dosage and course of treatment, strengthen the safety medication

  6. Adverse drug reactions due to antipsychotics and sedative-hypnotics in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha S Kate

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychotropic drugs are commonly used to manage mental and behavioral problems in geriatric patients. This is, however, accompanied by the risk of developing adverse drug reactions (ADRs, impacting the safety with which the drug can be used. In this article, we provide an overview of the factors associated with the ADRs due to psychotropic medication in the elderly, and the ADRs associated with the use of antipsychotics and sedative-hypnotics in the geriatric population. For this, literature searches were conducted through MEDLINE, PubMed, and Google Scholar using keyword terms: Geriatric, elderly, safety, adverse events, ADRs, antipsychotic, names of individual antipsychotics, benzodiazepine, sedative, hypnotic, zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone. Research data indicate that antipsychotics are associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome, thromboembolism, cerebrovascular and cardiac events, pneumonia, fractures, and increased mortality. Among antipsychotics, aripiprazole seems to have fewer ADRs while other antipsychotics (typical and atypicals have reports of troublesome side effect profiles. Sedative-hypnotics are associated with a risk of falls, fractures, cognitive impairment, and may increase the risk of developing dementia with long-term use. The risk of these complications is present with both benzodiazepines and medications such as zolpidem and zopiclone.

  7. Dictionary construction and identification of possible adverse drug events in Danish clinical narrative text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Robert; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Frankild, Sune; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Brunak, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Drugs have tremendous potential to cure and relieve disease, but the risk of unintended effects is always present. Healthcare providers increasingly record data in electronic patient records (EPRs), in which we aim to identify possible adverse events (AEs) and, specifically, possible adverse drug events (ADEs). Based on the undesirable effects section from the summary of product characteristics (SPC) of 7446 drugs, we have built a Danish ADE dictionary. Starting from this dictionary we have developed a pipeline for identifying possible ADEs in unstructured clinical narrative text. We use a named entity recognition (NER) tagger to identify dictionary matches in the text and post-coordination rules to construct ADE compound terms. Finally, we apply post-processing rules and filters to handle, for example, negations and sentences about subjects other than the patient. Moreover, this method allows synonyms to be identified and anatomical location descriptions can be merged to allow appropriate grouping of effects in the same location. The method identified 1 970 731 (35 477 unique) possible ADEs in a large corpus of 6011 psychiatric hospital patient records. Validation was performed through manual inspection of possible ADEs, resulting in precision of 89% and recall of 75%. The presented dictionary-building method could be used to construct other ADE dictionaries. The complication of compound words in Germanic languages was addressed. Additionally, the synonym and anatomical location collapse improve the method. The developed dictionary and method can be used to identify possible ADEs in Danish clinical narratives.

  8. Valproic acid-induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy - a potentially fatal adverse drug reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Carla

    2013-12-01

    A patient with an early diagnosed epilepsy Valproic acid is one of the most widely used antiepileptic drugs. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare, but potentially fatal, adverse drug reaction to valproic acid. A patient with an early diagnosed epilepsy, treated with valproic acid, experienced an altered mental state after 10 days of treatment. Valproic acid serum levels were within limits, hepatic function tests were normal but ammonia levels were above the normal range. Valproic acid was stopped and the hyperammonemic encephalopathy was treated with lactulose 15 ml twice daily, metronidazole 250 mg four times daily and L-carnitine 1 g twice daily. Monitoring liver function and ammonia levels should be recommended in patients taking valproic acid. The constraints of the pharmaceutical market had to be taken into consideration and limited the pharmacological options for this patient's treatment. Idiosyncratic symptomatic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is completely reversible, but can induce coma and even death, if not timely detected. Clinical pharmacists can help detecting adverse drug reactions and provide evidence based information for the treatment.

  9. Predicting Adverse Drug Effects from Literature- and Database-Mined Assertions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Mary K; Sedykh, Alexander; Fourches, Denis; Muratov, Eugene; Tropsha, Alexander

    2018-06-06

    Given that adverse drug effects (ADEs) have led to post-market patient harm and subsequent drug withdrawal, failure of candidate agents in the drug development process, and other negative outcomes, it is essential to attempt to forecast ADEs and other relevant drug-target-effect relationships as early as possible. Current pharmacologic data sources, providing multiple complementary perspectives on the drug-target-effect paradigm, can be integrated to facilitate the inference of relationships between these entities. This study aims to identify both existing and unknown relationships between chemicals (C), protein targets (T), and ADEs (E) based on evidence in the literature. Cheminformatics and data mining approaches were employed to integrate and analyze publicly available clinical pharmacology data and literature assertions interrelating drugs, targets, and ADEs. Based on these assertions, a C-T-E relationship knowledge base was developed. Known pairwise relationships between chemicals, targets, and ADEs were collected from several pharmacological and biomedical data sources. These relationships were curated and integrated according to Swanson's paradigm to form C-T-E triangles. Missing C-E edges were then inferred as C-E relationships. Unreported associations between drugs, targets, and ADEs were inferred, and inferences were prioritized as testable hypotheses. Several C-E inferences, including testosterone → myocardial infarction, were identified using inferences based on the literature sources published prior to confirmatory case reports. Timestamping approaches confirmed the predictive ability of this inference strategy on a larger scale. The presented workflow, based on free-access databases and an association-based inference scheme, provided novel C-E relationships that have been validated post hoc in case reports. With refinement of prioritization schemes for the generated C-E inferences, this workflow may provide an effective computational method for

  10. Adverse Health Consequences of Performance-Enhancing Drugs: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Harrison G.; Wood, Ruth I.; Rogol, Alan; Nyberg, Fred; Bowers, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of performance-enhancing drug (PED) use, media attention has focused almost entirely on PED use by elite athletes to illicitly gain a competitive advantage in sports, and not on the health risks of PEDs. There is a widespread misperception that PED use is safe or that adverse effects are manageable. In reality, the vast majority of PED users are not athletes but rather nonathlete weightlifters, and the adverse health effects of PED use are greatly underappreciated. This scientific statement synthesizes available information on the medical consequences of PED use, identifies gaps in knowledge, and aims to focus the attention of the medical community and policymakers on PED use as an important public health problem. PED users frequently consume highly supraphysiologic doses of PEDs, combine them with other PEDs and/or other classical drugs of abuse, and display additional associated risk factors. PED use has been linked to an increased risk of death and a wide variety of cardiovascular, psychiatric, metabolic, endocrine, neurologic, infectious, hepatic, renal, and musculoskeletal disorders. Because randomized trials cannot ethically duplicate the large doses of PEDs and the many factors associated with PED use, we need observational studies to collect valid outcome data on the health risks associated with PEDs. In addition, we need studies regarding the prevalence of PED use, the mechanisms by which PEDs exert their adverse health effects, and the interactive effects of PEDs with sports injuries and other high-risk behaviors. We also need randomized trials to assess therapeutic interventions for treating the adverse effects of PEDs, such as the anabolic-androgen steroid withdrawal syndrome. Finally, we need to raise public awareness of the serious health consequences of PEDs. PMID:24423981

  11. Adverse childhood experiences and prescription drug use in a cohort study of adult HMO patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dube Shanta R

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prescription drugs account for approximately 11% of national health expenditures. Prior research on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs, which include common forms of child maltreatment and related traumatic stressors, has linked them to numerous health problems. However, data about the relationship of these experiences to prescription drug use are scarce. Method We used the ACE Score (an integer count of 8 different categories of ACEs as a measure of cumulative exposure to traumatic stress during childhood. We prospectively assessed the relationship of the Score to prescription drug use in a cohort of 15,033 adult HMO patients (mean follow-up: 6.1 years and assessed mediation of this relationship by documented ACE-related health and social problems. Results Nearly 1.2 million prescriptions were recorded; prescriptions rates increased in a graded fashion as the ACE Score increased (p for trend Conclusion ACEs substantially increase the number of prescriptions and classes of drugs used for as long as 7 or 8 decades after their occurrence. The increases in prescription drug use were largely mediated by documented ACE-related health and social problems.

  12. Potentially inappropriate prescribing and the risk of adverse drug reactions in critically ill older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galli TB

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Potentially inappropriate medication (PIM use in the elderly is associated with increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs, but there is limited information regarding PIM use in the intensive care unit (ICU setting. Objective: The aim of the study is to describe the prevalence and factors associated with the use of PIM and the occurrence of PIM-related adverse reactions in the critically ill elderly. Methods: This study enrolled all critically ill older adults (60 years or more admitted to medical or cardiovascular ICUs between January and December 2013, in a large tertiary teaching hospital. For all patients, clinical pharmacists listed the medications given during the ICU stay and data on drugs were analyzed using 2012 Beers Criteria, to identify the prevalence of PIM. For each identified PIM the medical records were analyzed to evaluate factors associated with its use. The frequency of ADRs and, the causal relationship between PIM and the ADRs identified were also evaluated through review of medical records. Results: According to 2012 Beers Criteria, 98.2% of elderly patients used at least one PIM (n=599, of which 24.8% were newly started in the ICUs. In 29.6% of PIMs, there was a clinical circumstance that justified their prescription. The number of PIMs was associated with ICU length of stay and total number of medications. There was at least one ADR identified in 17.8% of patients; more than 40% were attributed to PIM, but there was no statistical association. Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of PIM used in acutely ill older people, but they do not seem to be the major cause of adverse drug reactions in this population. Although many PIMs had a clinical circumstance that led to their prescription during the course of ICU hospitalization, many were still present upon hospital discharge. Therefore, prescription of PIMs should be minimized to improve the safety of elderly patients.

  13. Dictionary construction and identification of possible adverse drug events in Danish clinical narrative text

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Robert; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune

    2013-01-01

    Objective Drugs have tremendous potential to cure and relieve disease, but the risk of unintended effects is always present. Healthcare providers increasingly record data in electronic patient records (EPRs), in which we aim to identify possible adverse events (AEs) and, specifically, possible...... the patient. Moreover, this method allows synonyms to be identified and anatomical location descriptions can be merged to allow appropriate grouping of effects in the same location.Results The method identified 1 970 731 (35 477 unique) possible ADEs in a large corpus of 6011 psychiatric hospital patient...

  14. Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/ ...

  15. A New Zealand platform to enable genetic investigation of adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggo, Simran Ds; Chua, Eng Wee; Chin, Paul; Cree, Simone; Pearson, John; Doogue, Matthew; Kennedy, Martin A

    2017-12-01

    A multitude of factors can affect drug response in individuals. It is now well established that variations in genes, especially those coding for drug metabolising enzymes, can alter the pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic profile of a drug, impacting on efficacy and often resulting in drug-induced toxicity. The UDRUGS study is an initiative from the Carney Centre for Pharmacogenomics to biobank DNA and store associated clinical data from patients who have suffered rare and/or serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The aim is to provide a genetic explanation of drug-induced ADRs using methods ranging from Sanger sequencing to whole exome and whole genome sequencing. Participants for the UDRUGS study are recruited from various sources, mainly via referral through clinicians working in Canterbury District Health Board, but also from district health boards across New Zealand. Participants have also self-referred to us from word-of-mouth communication between participants. We have recruited various ADRs across most drug classes. Where possible, we have conducted genetic analyses in single or a cohort of cases to identify known and novel genetic association(s) to offer an explanation to why the ADR occurred. Any genetic results relevant to the ADR are communicated back to the referring clinician and/or participant. In conclusion, we have developed a programme for studying the genetic basis of severe, rare or unusual ADR cases resulting from pharmacological treatment. Genomic analyses could eventually identify most genetic variants that predispose to ADRs, enabling a priori detection of such variants with high throughput DNA tests.

  16. ADEpedia: a scalable and standardized knowledge base of Adverse Drug Events using semantic web technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoqian; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2011-01-01

    A source of semantically coded Adverse Drug Event (ADE) data can be useful for identifying common phenotypes related to ADEs. We proposed a comprehensive framework for building a standardized ADE knowledge base (called ADEpedia) through combining ontology-based approach with semantic web technology. The framework comprises four primary modules: 1) an XML2RDF transformation module; 2) a data normalization module based on NCBO Open Biomedical Annotator; 3) a RDF store based persistence module; and 4) a front-end module based on a Semantic Wiki for the review and curation. A prototype is successfully implemented to demonstrate the capability of the system to integrate multiple drug data and ontology resources and open web services for the ADE data standardization. A preliminary evaluation is performed to demonstrate the usefulness of the system, including the performance of the NCBO annotator. In conclusion, the semantic web technology provides a highly scalable framework for ADE data source integration and standard query service.

  17. Causes for the underreporting of adverse drug events by health professionals: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Rossi Varallo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Identifying the main causes for underreporting of Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR by health professionals. Method: A systematic review carried out in the following databases: LILACS, PAHO, SciELO, EMBASE and PubMed in the period between 1992 and 2012. Descriptors were used in the search for articles, and the identified causes of underreporting were analyzed according to the classification of Inman. Results: In total, were identified 149 articles, among which 29 were selected. Most studies were carried out in hospitals (24/29 for physicians (22/29, and pharmacists (10/29. The main causes related to underreporting were ignorance (24/29, insecurity (24/29 and indifference (23/29. Conclusion: The data show the eighth sin in underreporting, which is the lack of training in pharmacovigilance. Therefore, continuing education can increase adherence of professionals to the service and improve knowledge and communication of risks due to drug use.

  18. Ontology-based knowledge management for personalized adverse drug events detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feng; Sun, Xingzhi; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Li, Bo; Li, Jing; Pan, Yue

    2011-01-01

    Since Adverse Drug Event (ADE) has become a leading cause of death around the world, there arises high demand for helping clinicians or patients to identify possible hazards from drug effects. Motivated by this, we present a personalized ADE detection system, with the focus on applying ontology-based knowledge management techniques to enhance ADE detection services. The development of electronic health records makes it possible to automate the personalized ADE detection, i.e., to take patient clinical conditions into account during ADE detection. Specifically, we define the ADE ontology to uniformly manage the ADE knowledge from multiple sources. We take advantage of the rich semantics from the terminology SNOMED-CT and apply it to ADE detection via the semantic query and reasoning.

  19. Concordance and predictive value of two adverse drug event data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cami, Aurel; Reis, Ben Y

    2014-08-22

    Accurate prediction of adverse drug events (ADEs) is an important means of controlling and reducing drug-related morbidity and mortality. Since no single "gold standard" ADE data set exists, a range of different drug safety data sets are currently used for developing ADE prediction models. There is a critical need to assess the degree of concordance between these various ADE data sets and to validate ADE prediction models against multiple reference standards. We systematically evaluated the concordance of two widely used ADE data sets - Lexi-comp from 2010 and SIDER from 2012. The strength of the association between ADE (drug) counts in Lexi-comp and SIDER was assessed using Spearman rank correlation, while the differences between the two data sets were characterized in terms of drug categories, ADE categories and ADE frequencies. We also performed a comparative validation of the Predictive Pharmacosafety Networks (PPN) model using both ADE data sets. The predictive power of PPN using each of the two validation sets was assessed using the area under Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (AUROC). The correlations between the counts of ADEs and drugs in the two data sets were 0.84 (95% CI: 0.82-0.86) and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.91-0.93), respectively. Relative to an earlier snapshot of Lexi-comp from 2005, Lexi-comp 2010 and SIDER 2012 introduced a mean of 1,973 and 4,810 new drug-ADE associations per year, respectively. The difference between these two data sets was most pronounced for Nervous System and Anti-infective drugs, Gastrointestinal and Nervous System ADEs, and postmarketing ADEs. A minor difference of 1.1% was found in the AUROC of PPN when SIDER 2012 was used for validation instead of Lexi-comp 2010. In conclusion, the ADE and drug counts in Lexi-comp and SIDER data sets were highly correlated and the choice of validation set did not greatly affect the overall prediction performance of PPN. Our results also suggest that it is important to be aware of the

  20. Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Machado-Alba

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the adverse drug reactions (ADRs and their incidence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated in the Colombian health system. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using information from all patients who were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and attended specialized health care centers in the cities of Bogotá, Cali, Manizales, Medellin, and Pereira between 1 December 2009 and 30 August 2013. The ADRs were obtained from medical records and the pharmacovigilance system registry and sorted by frequency and affected tissue according to World Health Organization Adverse Reaction Terminology (WHO-ART. A total of 949 reports of ADRs were obtained from 419 patients (32.8 ADRs per 100 patient-years; these patients were from a cohort of 1 364 patients being treated for rheumatoid arthritis and followed up for an average of 23.8 months (± 12.9. The cohort was mostly female (366, 87.4% and had a mean age of 52.7 years (± 13.1. The highest numbers of ADRs were reported following the use of tocilizumab, rituximab, and infliximab (28.8, 23.1, and 13.3 reports per 100 patient-years respectively. The most frequently reported ADRs were elevated transaminase levels and dyspepsia. Overall, 87.7% of ADRs were classified as type A, 36.6% as mild, 40.7% as moderate, and 22.7% as severe. As a result, 73.2% of patients who experienced an ADR stopped taking their drugs. The occurrence of ADRs in patients treated for rheumatoid arthritis is common, especially in those associated with the use of biotechnologically produced anti-rheumatic drugs. This outcome should be studied in future research and monitoring is needed to reduce the risks in these patients.

  1. A systematic investigation of computation models for predicting Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifan Kuang

    Full Text Available Early and accurate identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs is critically important for drug development and clinical safety. Computer-aided prediction of ADRs has attracted increasing attention in recent years, and many computational models have been proposed. However, because of the lack of systematic analysis and comparison of the different computational models, there remain limitations in designing more effective algorithms and selecting more useful features. There is therefore an urgent need to review and analyze previous computation models to obtain general conclusions that can provide useful guidance to construct more effective computational models to predict ADRs.In the current study, the main work is to compare and analyze the performance of existing computational methods to predict ADRs, by implementing and evaluating additional algorithms that have been earlier used for predicting drug targets. Our results indicated that topological and intrinsic features were complementary to an extent and the Jaccard coefficient had an important and general effect on the prediction of drug-ADR associations. By comparing the structure of each algorithm, final formulas of these algorithms were all converted to linear model in form, based on this finding we propose a new algorithm called the general weighted profile method and it yielded the best overall performance among the algorithms investigated in this paper.Several meaningful conclusions and useful findings regarding the prediction of ADRs are provided for selecting optimal features and algorithms.

  2. A systematic investigation of computation models for predicting Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Qifan; Wang, MinQi; Li, Rong; Dong, YongCheng; Li, Yizhou; Li, Menglong

    2014-01-01

    Early and accurate identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is critically important for drug development and clinical safety. Computer-aided prediction of ADRs has attracted increasing attention in recent years, and many computational models have been proposed. However, because of the lack of systematic analysis and comparison of the different computational models, there remain limitations in designing more effective algorithms and selecting more useful features. There is therefore an urgent need to review and analyze previous computation models to obtain general conclusions that can provide useful guidance to construct more effective computational models to predict ADRs. In the current study, the main work is to compare and analyze the performance of existing computational methods to predict ADRs, by implementing and evaluating additional algorithms that have been earlier used for predicting drug targets. Our results indicated that topological and intrinsic features were complementary to an extent and the Jaccard coefficient had an important and general effect on the prediction of drug-ADR associations. By comparing the structure of each algorithm, final formulas of these algorithms were all converted to linear model in form, based on this finding we propose a new algorithm called the general weighted profile method and it yielded the best overall performance among the algorithms investigated in this paper. Several meaningful conclusions and useful findings regarding the prediction of ADRs are provided for selecting optimal features and algorithms.

  3. Adverse and Advantageous Selection in the Medicare Supplemental Market: A Bayesian Analysis of Prescription drug Expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Trivedi, Pravin K

    2016-02-01

    This paper develops an extended specification of the two-part model, which controls for unobservable self-selection and heterogeneity of health insurance, and analyzes the impact of Medicare supplemental plans on the prescription drug expenditure of the elderly, using a linked data set based on the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey data for 2003-2004. The econometric analysis is conducted using a Bayesian econometric framework. We estimate the treatment effects for different counterfactuals and find significant evidence of endogeneity in plan choice and the presence of both adverse and advantageous selections in the supplemental insurance market. The average incentive effect is estimated to be $757 (2004 value) or 41% increase per person per year for the elderly enrolled in supplemental plans with drug coverage against the Medicare fee-for-service counterfactual and is $350 or 21% against the supplemental plans without drug coverage counterfactual. The incentive effect varies by different sources of drug coverage: highest for employer-sponsored insurance plans, followed by Medigap and managed medicare plans. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. A web-based quantitative signal detection system on adverse drug reaction in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chanjuan; Xia, Jielai; Deng, Jianxiong; Chen, Wenge; Wang, Suzhen; Jiang, Jing; Chen, Guanquan

    2009-07-01

    To establish a web-based quantitative signal detection system for adverse drug reactions (ADRs) based on spontaneous reporting to the Guangdong province drug-monitoring database in China. Using Microsoft Visual Basic and Active Server Pages programming languages and SQL Server 2000, a web-based system with three software modules was programmed to perform data preparation and association detection, and to generate reports. Information component (IC), the internationally recognized measure of disproportionality for quantitative signal detection, was integrated into the system, and its capacity for signal detection was tested with ADR reports collected from 1 January 2002 to 30 June 2007 in Guangdong. A total of 2,496 associations including known signals were mined from the test database. Signals (e.g., cefradine-induced hematuria) were found early by using the IC analysis. In addition, 291 drug-ADR associations were alerted for the first time in the second quarter of 2007. The system can be used for the detection of significant associations from the Guangdong drug-monitoring database and could be an extremely useful adjunct to the expert assessment of very large numbers of spontaneously reported ADRs for the first time in China.

  5. Pharmacovigilance and drug safety 2011 in Calabria (Italy: Adverse events analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Scicchitano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Pharmacovigilance assesses the safety profile of drugs. Its main aim is the increase of spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs. The Italian Drug Agency (AIFA; Agenzia Italiana del Farmaco is financing several projects to the aim of increasing reporting, and in Calabria a Pharmacovigilance Information Centre has been created. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the AIFA database relatively to Calabria in the year 2011 and we have analyzed ADRs using descriptive statistics. We have also collected a questionnaire-based interview in order to describe the background knowledge in the field. Results : Regarding the number of AIFA reported ADRs from Calabria, a 38% increase (138 vs. 100 in comparison to 2010 was evidenced. Hospital Doctors represent the main source of signaling (71.7 %. Ketoprofene and the combination amoxicillin/clavulanic acid represent the most frequently reported drugs causing ADRs. Our questionnaires indicated that despite the health professionals have met at least once an ADR only a small percentage of them was reported to the authorities (37%. There is a very good knowledge of the ADR concept and reporting system (90% of interviewed distinguish an ADR and knows how to report it, and there is a strong interest in participating to training courses in the field (95% are interested. Conclusions : Despite Calabria has had a positive increase in the number of reported ADRs, the total number is very low and the pharmacovigilance culture is far from being achieved in this region.

  6. Pharmacovigilance and drug safety 2011 in Calabria (Italy): Adverse events analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scicchitano, Francesca; Giofrè, Chiara; Palleria, Caterina; Mazzitello, Carmela; Ciriaco, Miriam; Gallelli, Luca; Paletta, Laura; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; De Fazio, Salvatore; Menniti, Michele; Curia, Rubens; Arena, Concetta; Chimirri, Serafina; Patanè, Marinella; Esposito, Stefania; Cilurzo, Felisa; Staltari, Orietta; Russo, Emilio; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2012-09-01

    Pharmacovigilance assesses the safety profile of drugs. Its main aim is the increase of spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The Italian Drug Agency (AIFA; Agenzia Italiana del Farmaco) is financing several projects to the aim of increasing reporting, and in Calabria a Pharmacovigilance Information Centre has been created. We analyzed the AIFA database relatively to Calabria in the year 2011 and we have analyzed ADRs using descriptive statistics. We have also collected a questionnaire-based interview in order to describe the background knowledge in the field. Regarding the number of AIFA reported ADRs from Calabria, a 38% increase (138 vs. 100) in comparison to 2010 was evidenced. Hospital Doctors represent the main source of signaling (71.7 %). Ketoprofene and the combination amoxicillin/clavulanic acid represent the most frequently reported drugs causing ADRs. Our questionnaires indicated that despite the health professionals have met at least once an ADR only a small percentage of them was reported to the authorities (37%). There is a very good knowledge of the ADR concept and reporting system (90% of interviewed distinguish an ADR and knows how to report it), and there is a strong interest in participating to training courses in the field (95% are interested). Despite Calabria has had a positive increase in the number of reported ADRs, the total number is very low and the pharmacovigilance culture is far from being achieved in this region.

  7. Adverse Drug Reactions Causing Admission to Medical Wards: A Cross-Sectional Survey at 4 Hospitals in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, Johannes P; Njuguna, Christine; Kramer, Nicole; Stewart, Annemie; Mehta, Ushma; Blockman, Marc; Fortuin-De Smidt, Melony; De Waal, Reneé; Parrish, Andy G; Wilson, Douglas P K; Igumbor, Ehimario U; Aynalem, Getahun; Dheda, Mukesh; Maartens, Gary; Cohen, Karen

    2016-05-01

    Limited data exist on the burden of serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in sub-Saharan Africa, which has high HIV and tuberculosis prevalence. We determined the proportion of adult admissions attributable to ADRs at 4 hospitals in South Africa. We characterized drugs implicated in, risk factors for, and the preventability of ADR-related admissions.We prospectively followed patients admitted to 4 hospitals' medical wards over sequential 30-day periods in 2013 and identified suspected ADRs with the aid of a trigger tool. A multidisciplinary team performed causality, preventability, and severity assessment using published criteria. We categorized an admission as ADR-related if the ADR was the primary reason for admission.There were 1951 admissions involving 1904 patients: median age was 50 years (interquartile range 34-65), 1057 of 1904 (56%) were female, 559 of 1904 (29%) were HIV-infected, and 183 of 1904 (10%) were on antituberculosis therapy (ATT). There were 164 of 1951 (8.4%) ADR-related admissions. After adjustment for age and ATT, ADR-related admission was independently associated (P ≤ 0.02) with female sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.51, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.06-2.14), increasing drug count (aOR 1.14 per additional drug, 95% CI 1.09-1.20), increasing comorbidity score (aOR 1.23 per additional point, 95% CI 1.07-1.41), and use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) if HIV-infected (aOR 1.92 compared with HIV-negative/unknown, 95% CI 1.17-3.14). The most common ADRs were renal impairment, hypoglycemia, liver injury, and hemorrhage. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, insulin, rifampicin, and warfarin were most commonly implicated, respectively, in these 4 ADRs. ART, ATT, and/or co-trimoxazole were implicated in 56 of 164 (34%) ADR-related admissions. Seventy-three of 164 (45%) ADRs were assessed as preventable.In our survey, approximately 1 in 12 admissions was because of an ADR. The range of ADRs and implicated drugs reflect South Africa's high HIV

  8. 2010 drug packaging review: identifying problems to prevent errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Prescrire's analyses showed that the quality of drug packaging in 2010 still left much to be desired. Potentially dangerous packaging remains a significant problem: unclear labelling is source of medication errors; dosing devices for some psychotropic drugs create a risk of overdose; child-proof caps are often lacking; and too many patient information leaflets are misleading or difficult to understand. Everything that is needed for safe drug packaging is available; it is now up to regulatory agencies and drug companies to act responsibly. In the meantime, health professionals can help their patients by learning to identify the pitfalls of drug packaging and providing safe information to help prevent medication errors.

  9. An adverse events potential costs analysis based on Drug Programs in Poland. Dermatology focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szkultecka-Debek Monika

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the project, carried out within the Polish Society for Pharmacoeconomics (PTFE, was to estimate the potential costs of treatment of the side effects which (theoretically may occur as a result of treatments for the selected diseases. This paper deals solely with dermatology related events. Herein, several Drug Programs financed by the National Health Fund in Poland, in 2012, were analyzed. The adverse events were selected based on the Summary of Product Characteristics of the chosen products. We focused the project on those potential adverse events which were defined in SPC as frequent and very frequent. The results are presented according to their therapeutic areas, and in this paper, the focus is upon that which is related to dermatology. The events described as ‘very common’ had an incidence of ≥ 1/10, and that which is ‘common’ - ≥ 1/100, <1 /10. In order to identify the resources used, we, with the engagement of clinical experts, performed a survey. In our work, we employed only the total direct costs incurred by the public payer, based on valid individual cost data in February 2014. Moreover, we calculated the total spending from the public payer’s perspective, as well as the patient’s perspective, and the percentage of each component of the total cost in detail. The paper, thus, informs the reader of the estimated costs of treatment of side effects related to the dermatologic symptoms and reactions. Based on our work, we can state that the treatment of skin adverse drug reactions generates a significant cost - one incurred by both the public payer and the patient.

  10. Dealing with Drug Problems: Preventing and Treating Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pittsburgh is looking at whether teaching healthy caregiving strategies to parents can help promote self-regulation skills in children and prevent substance abuse later on. Starting when children are two years old, Shaw’s study enrolls families at risk of substance use problems ...

  11. Filtering big data from social media--Building an early warning system for adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Kiang, Melody; Shang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are believed to be a leading cause of death in the world. Pharmacovigilance systems are aimed at early detection of ADRs. With the popularity of social media, Web forums and discussion boards become important sources of data for consumers to share their drug use experience, as a result may provide useful information on drugs and their adverse reactions. In this study, we propose an automated ADR related posts filtering mechanism using text classification methods. In real-life settings, ADR related messages are highly distributed in social media, while non-ADR related messages are unspecific and topically diverse. It is expensive to manually label a large amount of ADR related messages (positive examples) and non-ADR related messages (negative examples) to train classification systems. To mitigate this challenge, we examine the use of a partially supervised learning classification method to automate the process. We propose a novel pharmacovigilance system leveraging a Latent Dirichlet Allocation modeling module and a partially supervised classification approach. We select drugs with more than 500 threads of discussion, and collect all the original posts and comments of these drugs using an automatic Web spidering program as the text corpus. Various classifiers were trained by varying the number of positive examples and the number of topics. The trained classifiers were applied to 3000 posts published over 60 days. Top-ranked posts from each classifier were pooled and the resulting set of 300 posts was reviewed by a domain expert to evaluate the classifiers. Compare to the alternative approaches using supervised learning methods and three general purpose partially supervised learning methods, our approach performs significantly better in terms of precision, recall, and the F measure (the harmonic mean of precision and recall), based on a computational experiment using online discussion threads from Medhelp. Our design provides

  12. Adverse drug reactions to CT contrast media in south Korea: Incidence and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Kyung Soo; Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Moon, Jin Il; Choi, Bo Hwa; Baek, Hye Jin; Cho, Soo Buem; Lee, Sang Min; Ha, Ji Young; Choi, Dae Seob; Cho, Jae Min; Na, Jae Beom

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence, severity, and risk factors of adverse drug reactions (ADR) to intravenous administration of nonionic iodinated contrast media in computed tomography (CT), and to determine the recurrence rate after premedication in patients with a previous history of ADR. We prospectively recorded all ADR to intravenous CT contrast media in 32313 consecutive outpatients (54572 cases) who underwent contrast enhanced CT examinations. Clinical report forms and electronic medical records were reviewed to search for the incidence of ADR, treatment, and clinical outcome of patients. The risk factors of ADR to CT contrast media (age, sex, history of previous ADR, season) were evaluated using statistical analysis. Of the 54572 cases, a total of 191 (0.35%) had adverse reactions. Of the 191 cases, 157 (82%) were categorized as mild reactions, 29 (15%) were moderate, and 5 (3%) were severe. A total of 165 (86.4%) cases had acute adverse reactions (which occurred within 1 hour after administration), while 26 (13.6%) had delayed adverse reactions (occurred 1 hour after the administration). The rate of ADR was significantly higher in females [relative risk (RR) = 2.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.53-2.75], patients under the age of 60 years (RR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.07-1.98), patients with a history of previous ADR (RR = 6.51, 95% CI 3.13-13.57), and in the spring season (RR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.07-1.95). The recurrence rate after premedication in patients with previous ADR to CT contrast media was 3.2% (8/247). No deaths occurred that were attributed to the contrast media. The incidence of ADR to nonionic CT contrast media was 0.35%; most of which were mild reactions. Risk factors for ADR included female gender, an age of under 60 years, a history of previous ADR, and spring season

  13. Adverse drug reactions to CT contrast media in south Korea: Incidence and risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Kyung Soo; Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Moon, Jin Il; Choi, Bo Hwa; Baek, Hye Jin; Cho, Soo Buem [Dept. of Radiology, Gyeongsang National University Changwon Hospital, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min; Ha, Ji Young; Choi, Dae Seob; Cho, Jae Min; Na, Jae Beom [Dept. of Radiology, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    To evaluate the incidence, severity, and risk factors of adverse drug reactions (ADR) to intravenous administration of nonionic iodinated contrast media in computed tomography (CT), and to determine the recurrence rate after premedication in patients with a previous history of ADR. We prospectively recorded all ADR to intravenous CT contrast media in 32313 consecutive outpatients (54572 cases) who underwent contrast enhanced CT examinations. Clinical report forms and electronic medical records were reviewed to search for the incidence of ADR, treatment, and clinical outcome of patients. The risk factors of ADR to CT contrast media (age, sex, history of previous ADR, season) were evaluated using statistical analysis. Of the 54572 cases, a total of 191 (0.35%) had adverse reactions. Of the 191 cases, 157 (82%) were categorized as mild reactions, 29 (15%) were moderate, and 5 (3%) were severe. A total of 165 (86.4%) cases had acute adverse reactions (which occurred within 1 hour after administration), while 26 (13.6%) had delayed adverse reactions (occurred 1 hour after the administration). The rate of ADR was significantly higher in females [relative risk (RR) = 2.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.53-2.75], patients under the age of 60 years (RR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.07-1.98), patients with a history of previous ADR (RR = 6.51, 95% CI 3.13-13.57), and in the spring season (RR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.07-1.95). The recurrence rate after premedication in patients with previous ADR to CT contrast media was 3.2% (8/247). No deaths occurred that were attributed to the contrast media. The incidence of ADR to nonionic CT contrast media was 0.35%; most of which were mild reactions. Risk factors for ADR included female gender, an age of under 60 years, a history of previous ADR, and spring season.

  14. Risk factors in prevention of drug dependences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orosova, Ol'ga; Gajdosova, Beata; Madarasova-Geckova, Andrea; Van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2007-01-01

    The study presents the state-of-art of knowledge of risk factors of drug use as a form of risk behaviour in adolescents in individual, interpersonal, and environmental domain (family, school, society). The attention is paid to general deviation syndrome and to the construct of general tendency to

  15. Association between ABCG2 and SLCO1B1 polymorphisms and adverse drug reactions to regorafenib: a preliminary study
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Akimitsu; Ando, Hitoshi; Ura, Takashi; Komori, Azusa; Hasegawa, Ayako; Taniguchi, Hiroya; Kadowaki, Shigenori; Muro, Kei; Tajika, Masahiro; Kobara, Makiko; Matsuzaki, Masahide; Hashimoto, Naoya; Maeda, Mieko; Kojima, Yasushi; Aoki, Masahiro; Kondo, Eisaku; Mizutani, Akiyoshi; Fujimura, Akio

    2017-05-01

    Due to the occurrence of severe adverse drug reactions to regorafenib, a drug used in cancer therapy, the identification of a predictive marker(s) is needed to increase the therapeutic applicability of this compound. We therefore investigated whether polymorphisms in the ABCG2 and SLCO1B genes are associated with adverse drug reactions to regorafenib. For these analyses, 37 Japanese cancer patients were treated with regorafenib, genotyped for polymorphisms in ABCG2 and SLCO1B, and evaluated for drug-related adverse drug reactions. There was no association between the ABCG2 421C>A variant and adverse drug reactions to regorafenib. After treatment, the incidences of increased aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) as well as increased total bilirubin (grade ≥ 2) were 8%, 4%, and 12%, and 42%, 25%, and 25% among SLCO1B1*1b carriers and non-carriers, respectively. There were no significant associations between elevated ALT and bilirubin and the SLCO1B1*1b allele. However, there were significantly lower incidences of increased AST (8% vs. 42%) and anemia (16% vs. 50%) in SLCO1B1*1b carriers than in non-carriers. The absence of SLCO1B1*1b allele appears to be associated with the development of adverse drug reactions to regorafenib; however, further studies involving larger test groups and other populations are needed to confirm these findings.
.

  16. Team Up for Drug Prevention with America's Young Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deighan, William P., Comp.; And Others

    Materials useful in drug and alcohol abuse prevention programs directed towards high school athletes are contained in this document. Nine topic areas are covered: (1) effects of athletics on young people, such as pressure to win; (2) reasons athletes use drugs and alcohol, including coping with stress and feeling good; (3) enabling behaviors of…

  17. Alcohol and drug screening of occupational drivers for preventing injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cashman, Clodagh M.; Ruotsalainen, Jani H.; Greiner, Birgit A.; Beirne, Paul V.; Verbeek, Jos H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Workforce alcohol and drug testing is commonplace but its effect in reducing occupational injuries remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of alcohol and drug screening of occupational drivers (operating a motorised vehicle) in preventing injury or work-related effects such as

  18. Drug Abuse on College Campuses: Emerging Issues. Issues in Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This "Issues in Prevention" focuses on emerging issues concerning drug abuse on college campuses. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Drug Abuse Trends; (2) Q&A With Jim Lange; (3) Bath Salts; (4) Refuse to Abuse; (5) Related Federal Resource; and (6) Higher Education Center Resources.

  19. Dictionary construction and identification of possible adverse drug events in Danish clinical narrative text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Robert; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Frankild, Sune; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Brunak, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Objective Drugs have tremendous potential to cure and relieve disease, but the risk of unintended effects is always present. Healthcare providers increasingly record data in electronic patient records (EPRs), in which we aim to identify possible adverse events (AEs) and, specifically, possible adverse drug events (ADEs). Materials and methods Based on the undesirable effects section from the summary of product characteristics (SPC) of 7446 drugs, we have built a Danish ADE dictionary. Starting from this dictionary we have developed a pipeline for identifying possible ADEs in unstructured clinical narrative text. We use a named entity recognition (NER) tagger to identify dictionary matches in the text and post-coordination rules to construct ADE compound terms. Finally, we apply post-processing rules and filters to handle, for example, negations and sentences about subjects other than the patient. Moreover, this method allows synonyms to be identified and anatomical location descriptions can be merged to allow appropriate grouping of effects in the same location. Results The method identified 1 970 731 (35 477 unique) possible ADEs in a large corpus of 6011 psychiatric hospital patient records. Validation was performed through manual inspection of possible ADEs, resulting in precision of 89% and recall of 75%. Discussion The presented dictionary-building method could be used to construct other ADE dictionaries. The complication of compound words in Germanic languages was addressed. Additionally, the synonym and anatomical location collapse improve the method. Conclusions The developed dictionary and method can be used to identify possible ADEs in Danish clinical narratives. PMID:23703825

  20. The role of drugs in HIV prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kembaren, T.

    2018-03-01

    WHO reports 36.7 million people are living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) worldwide by 2016 with about 1.8 million new infections each year. It will be a specific health problem for the world in both developed and developing countries so it is necessary strategies to reduce HIV transmission to the community. HIV transmission in people with risk factors is largely determined by the amount of virus in the blood of people who are the source of infection. Antiretroviral (ARV) therapy has long been used in HIV patients, which serves to suppress viral replication so that the patient’s immunity increases; opportunistic infections are resolved and prolong the lifespan and lower transmission rates. In the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) study 052 there was a 96% reduction in transmission in earlier antiretroviral. ARV is also used in the prevention of transmission in people exposed to HIV virus that is Postexposure Prophylaxis as well as in people at risk before exposure (Pre-exposure Prophylaxis). Three prevention strategies with the provision of ARV is expected to be guided as a means of prevention of transmission in addition to behavioral changes has long been declared since the beginning of the HIV epidemic.

  1. Preventing Prescription Drug Overdose PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from an overdose of prescription opioid painkillers. Learn what can be done to make painkiller prescribing safer and help prevent overdoses.

  2. Vital Signs-Preventing Prescription Drug Overdose

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast is based on the July 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from an overdose of prescription opioid painkillers. Learn what can be done to make painkiller prescribing safer and help prevent overdoses.

  3. A transdisciplinary focus on drug abuse prevention: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Steve; Stacy, Alan W; Johnson, C Anderson; Pentz, Mary Ann; Robertson, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces the scope of the Special Issue. A variety of scientific disciplines are brought together to establish theoretical integration of the arenas of drug use, misuse, "abuse," and drug misuse prevention. Transdisciplinary scientific collaboration (TDSC) is utilized as a process of integration. Introductory comments regarding the strengths and limitations of TDSC are presented. Then, the relevance of genetics to substance misuse and substance misuse prevention is presented. Next, the relevance of cognition for prevention is discussed. Specifically, neurologically plausible distinctions in cognition and implicit cognition and their relevance for prevention are discussed. At a relatively molar social-level of analysis, social network theory, systems dynamic models, geographic information systems models, cultural psychology, and political science approaches to drug misuse and its prevention are introduced. The uses of both quantitative and qualitative statistical approaches to prevention are mentioned next. Finally, targeted prevention, bridging the efficacy-effectiveness gap, and a statement on overcoming disbalance round out the Special Issue. The bridges created will serve to propel drug misuse "prevention science" forward in the years to come. Advances in understanding etiological issues, translation to programs, and ecological fit of programming are desired results.

  4. Development and implementation of a critical pathway for prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media for computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Keun Jo [Presbyterian Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kweon, Dae Cheol; Kim, Myeong Goo [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Beong Gyu [Wonkwang Health Science College, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a critical pathway (CP) for the prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media for computed tomography. The CP was developed and implemented by a multidisciplinary group is Seoul National University Hospital. The CP was applied to CT patients. Patients who underwent CT scanning were included in the CP group from March in 2004. The satisfaction of the patients with CP was compared with non-CP groups. We also investigated the degree of satisfaction among the radiological technologists and nurses. The degree of patient satisfaction with the care process increased patient information (24%), prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media (19%), pre-cognitive effect of adverse reactions to contrast media (39%) and information degree of adverse reactions to contrast media (19%). This CP program can be used as one of the patient care tools for reducing the adverse reactions to contrast media and increasing the efficiency of care process in CT examination settings.

  5. Development and implementation of a critical pathway for prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Keun Jo; Kweon, Dae Cheol; Kim, Myeong Goo; Yoo, Beong Gyu

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a critical pathway (CP) for the prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media for computed tomography. The CP was developed and implemented by a multidisciplinary group is Seoul National University Hospital. The CP was applied to CT patients. Patients who underwent CT scanning were included in the CP group from March in 2004. The satisfaction of the patients with CP was compared with non-CP groups. We also investigated the degree of satisfaction among the radiological technologists and nurses. The degree of patient satisfaction with the care process increased patient information (24%), prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media (19%), pre-cognitive effect of adverse reactions to contrast media (39%) and information degree of adverse reactions to contrast media (19%). This CP program can be used as one of the patient care tools for reducing the adverse reactions to contrast media and increasing the efficiency of care process in CT examination settings

  6. REBAMIPIDE: EFFECTIVE DRUG PREVENTION OF NSAID ENTEROPATHY IS POSSIBLE

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Moroz; A. E. Karateev

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) complications is the most important element for the rational use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and low-dose aspirin (LDA). Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have long been the only medication to prevent these complications. However, PPIs are only effective in preventing and treating upper GIT diseases (NSAID gastropathy) rather than small intestinal injury (NSAID enteropathy). Rebamipide has emerged as a novel agent to protect the gast...

  7. Preventable and mitigable adverse events in cancer care: Measuring risk and harm across the continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipitz-Snyderman, Allison; Pfister, David; Classen, David; Atoria, Coral L; Killen, Aileen; Epstein, Andrew S; Anderson, Christopher; Fortier, Elizabeth; Weingart, Saul N

    2017-12-01

    Patient safety is a critical concern in clinical oncology, but the ability to measure adverse events (AEs) across cancer care is limited by a narrow focus on treatment-related toxicities. The objective of this study was to assess the nature and extent of AEs among cancer patients across inpatient and outpatient settings. This was a retrospective cohort study of 400 adult patients selected by stratified random sampling who had breast (n = 128), colorectal (n = 136), or lung cancer (n = 136) treated at a comprehensive cancer center in 2012. Candidate AEs, or injuries due to medical care, were identified by trained nurse reviewers over the course of 1 year from medical records and safety-reporting databases. Physicians determined the AE harm severity and the likelihood of preventability and harm mitigation. The 400-patient sample represented 133,358 days of follow-up. Three hundred four AEs were identified for an overall rate of 2.3 events per 1000 patient days (91.2 per 1000 inpatient days and 0.9 per 1000 outpatient days). Thirty-four percent of the patients had 1 or more AEs (95% confidence interval, 29%-39%), and 16% of the patients had 1 or more preventable or mitigable AEs (95% confidence interval, 13%-20%). The AE rate for patients with breast cancer was lower than the rate for patients with colorectal or lung cancer (P ≤ .001). The preventable or mitigable AE rate was 0.9 per 1000 patient days. Six percent of AEs and 4% of preventable AEs resulted in serious harm. Examples included lymphedema, abscess, and renal failure. A heavy burden of AEs, including preventable or mitigable events, has been identified. Future research should examine risk factors and improvement strategies for reducing their burden. Cancer 2017;123:4728-4736. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  8. Nivolumab, a new immunomodulatory drug, a new adverse effect; adrenal crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Karbek Akarca

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the advancements in medicine, new information is obtained regarding cancer, new antineoplastic agents are developed. Frequent use of these new pharmacological agents emergency physicians to be vigilant about their side effects. We present a case of adrenal crisis in a patient with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, caused by an immunomodulatory drug; nivolumab. While adverse events are related to other immunomodulatory drugs have been reported in literature, our case is the first nivolumab-related adrenal failure to be reported. A patient with lung cancer presented to the emergency room(ER with nausea and vomiting. Hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, persistent hypoglycemia led to the diagnosis of adrenal crisis. Having direct effect on the immune system, these drugs were claimed to be highly reliable. However, there is no reliable data on the side effect profile of these agents. It should be kept in mind that life-threatening auto-immune reactions may occur. Keywords: Nivolumab, Immunomodulation, CTLA 4 antigen, Adrenal crisis

  9. Preventing Prescription Drug Overdose PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-01

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from an overdose of prescription opioid painkillers. Learn what can be done to make painkiller prescribing safer and help prevent overdoses.  Created: 7/1/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/1/2014.

  10. Vital Signs-Preventing Prescription Drug Overdose

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-01

    This podcast is based on the July 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from an overdose of prescription opioid painkillers. Learn what can be done to make painkiller prescribing safer and help prevent overdoses.  Created: 7/1/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/1/2014.

  11. Quantifying the utility of taking pills for preventing adverse health outcomes: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Robert; Pignone, Michael P; Sheridan, Stacey L; Viera, Anthony J

    2015-05-11

    The utility value attributed to taking pills for prevention can have a major effect on the cost-effectiveness of interventions, but few published studies have systematically quantified this value. We sought to quantify the utility value of taking pills used for prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Cross-sectional survey. Central North Carolina. 708 healthcare employees aged 18 years and older. Utility values for taking 1 pill/day, assessed using time trade-off, modified standard gamble and willingness-to-pay methods. Mean age of respondents was 43 years (19-74). The majority of the respondents were female (83%) and Caucasian (80%). Most (80%) took at least 2 pills/day. Mean utility values for taking 1 pill/day using the time trade-off method were: 0.9972 (95% CI 0.9962 to 0.9980). Values derived from the standard gamble and willingness-to-pay methods were 0.9967 (0.9954 to 0.9979) and 0.9989 (95% CI 0.9986 to 0.9991), respectively. Utility values varied little across characteristics such as age, sex, race, education level or number of pills taken per day. The utility value of taking pills daily in order to prevent an adverse CVD health outcome is approximately 0.997. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Extent of poly-pharmacy, occurrence and associated factors of drug-drug interaction and potential adverse drug reactions in Gondar Teaching Referral Hospital, North West Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endalkachew Admassie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the extent of poly-pharmacy, occurrence, and associated factors for the occurrence of drug-drug interaction (DDI and potential adverse drug reaction (ADR in Gondar University Teaching Referral Hospital. Institutional-based retrospective cross-sectional study. This study was conducted on prescriptions of both in and out-patients for a period of 3 months at Gondar University Hospital. Both bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify risk factors for the occurrence of DDI and possible ADRs. All the statistical calculations were performed using SPSS; software. A total of 12,334 prescriptions were dispensed during the study period of which, 2,180 prescriptions were containing two or more drugs per prescription. A total of 21,210 drugs were prescribed and the average number of drugs per prescription was 1.72. Occurrences of DDI of all categories (Major, Moderate, and Minor were analyzed and DDI were detected in 711 (32.6% prescriptions. Sex was not found to be a risk factor for the occurrence of DDI and ADR, while age and number of medications per prescription were found to be significant risk factors for the occurrence of DDI and ADR. The mean number of drugs per prescription was 1.72 and hence with regard to the WHO limit of drugs per prescription, Gondar hospital was able to maintain the limit and prescriptions containing multiple drugs supposed to be taken systemically. Numbers of drugs per prescription as well as older age were found to be predisposing factors for the occurrence of DDI and potential ADRs while sex was not a risk factor.

  13. Prevention and management of statin adverse effects: A practical approach for pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Arden R; Beach, Jessica E; Pearson, Glen J

    2018-01-01

    Statin-associated adverse effects, primarily muscle-related symptoms, occur in up to approximately one-third of patients in clinical practice. Recently, a Canadian Consensus Working Group outlined 6 key principles to assess and manage patients with goal-inhibiting statin intolerance, defined as a syndrome characterized by symptoms or biomarker abnormalities that prevent the long-term use of and adherence to indicated statin therapy, which includes a trial of at least 2 statins and precludes reversible causes of statin adverse effects. These principles ensure patients are appropriately receiving a statin and aware of both the benefits and risks of therapy. As well, they address factors that may increase the risk of statin-associated myopathy. A thorough assessment of patients' clinical and laboratory history should be performed in any patient presenting with muscle symptoms on statin therapy, followed by a systematic dechallenge/rechallenge approach. In practice, most patients with statin intolerance due to muscle symptoms will be able to tolerate another statin. This is of particular importance because of the relative paucity of compelling evidence demonstrating a cardiovascular benefit with nonstatin therapies. Pharmacists are ideally situated to provide patient education, recommend changes to therapy and monitor patients with goal-inhibiting statin intolerance.

  14. Adverse drug reactions in children reported by European consumers from 2007 to 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2014-01-01

    Background Information about medicines safety in children is very limited. Consumer adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports can provide information about serious and unknown ADRs from medicine use in children. Objective To characterize ADRs in children reported by consumers in Europe from 2007 to 2011...... agents for 23 % and sex hormones for 13 %. Conclusion Only few paediatric ADR consumer reports were found in EudraVigilance. Many of these ADRs were serious, and fatal cases were reported, however also nonserious reports were present. The findings indicate that consumer reports may be of value....... Methods We analysed ADRs reported to the European ADR database, EudraVigilance (EV) for individuals from birth to 17 years. Data were characterized with respect to age and sex of the child, type of ADR (system organ class and preferred term), seriousness and suspected medicines (anatomical therapeutic...

  15. Text mining for adverse drug events: the promise, challenges, and state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpaz, Rave; Callahan, Alison; Tamang, Suzanne; Low, Yen; Odgers, David; Finlayson, Sam; Jung, Kenneth; LePendu, Paea; Shah, Nigam H

    2014-10-01

    Text mining is the computational process of extracting meaningful information from large amounts of unstructured text. It is emerging as a tool to leverage underutilized data sources that can improve pharmacovigilance, including the objective of adverse drug event (ADE) detection and assessment. This article provides an overview of recent advances in pharmacovigilance driven by the application of text mining, and discusses several data sources-such as biomedical literature, clinical narratives, product labeling, social media, and Web search logs-that are amenable to text mining for pharmacovigilance. Given the state of the art, it appears text mining can be applied to extract useful ADE-related information from multiple textual sources. Nonetheless, further research is required to address remaining technical challenges associated with the text mining methodologies, and to conclusively determine the relative contribution of each textual source to improving pharmacovigilance.

  16. Detection of Adverse Reaction to Drugs in Elderly Patients through Predictive Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael San-Miguel Carrasco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Geriatrics Medicine constitutes a clinical research field in which data analytics, particularly predictive modeling, can deliver compelling, reliable and long-lasting benefits, as well as non-intuitive clinical insights and net new knowledge. The research work described in this paper leverages predictive modeling to uncover new insights related to adverse reaction to drugs in elderly patients. The differentiation factor that sets this research exercise apart from traditional clinical research is the fact that it was not designed by formulating a particular hypothesis to be validated. Instead, it was data-centric, with data being mined to discover relationships or correlations among variables. Regression techniques were systematically applied to data through multiple iterations and under different configurations. The obtained results after the process was completed are explained and discussed next.

  17. Safety aspects of protease inhibitors for chronic hepatitis C: adverse events and drug-to-drug interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosângela Teixeira

    Full Text Available The standard of care therapy of chronic hepatitis C with the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin for 24 or 48 weeks was a remarkable accomplishment of the past decade. However, sustained virological responses rates of about 80% (genotypes 2-3 and 50% (geno 3 type 1 were not satisfactory especially for patients infected with genotype 1. Important advances in the biology of HCV have made possible the development of the direct-acting antiviral agents boceprevir and telaprevir with substantial increase in the rates of sustained virological response with shorter duration of therapy for a large number of patients. However, the complexity of triple therapy is higher and several new side effects are expected suggesting greater expertise in the patient management. Anemia and disgeusia are frequent with boceprevir while cutaneous rash, ranging from mild to severe, is expected with telaprevir. Higher risk of drug-drug interactions demand further clinical consideration of the previous well-known adverse events of pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Identification and prompt management of these potential new problems with boceprevir and telaprevir are crucial in clinical practice for optimizing treatment and assuring safety outcomes to HCV-genotype 1 patients.

  18. Safety aspects of protease inhibitors for chronic hepatitis C: adverse events and drug-to-drug interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosângela Teixeira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The standard of care therapy of chronic hepatitis C with the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin for 24 or 48 weeks was a remarkable accomplishment of the past decade. However, sustained virological responses rates of about 80% (genotypes 2-3 and 50% (geno 3 type 1 were not satisfactory especially for patients infected with genotype 1. Important advances in the biology of HCV have made possible the development of the direct-acting antiviral agents boceprevir and telaprevir with substantial increase in the rates of sustained virological response with shorter duration of therapy for a large number of patients. However, the complexity of triple therapy is higher and several new side effects are expected suggesting greater expertise in the patient management. Anemia and disgeusia are frequent with boceprevir while cutaneous rash, ranging from mild to severe, is expected with telaprevir. Higher risk of drug-drug interactions demand further clinical consideration of the previous well-known adverse events of pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Identification and prompt management of these potential new problems with boceprevir and telaprevir are crucial in clinical practice for optimizing treatment and assuring safety outcomes to HCV-genotype 1 patients.

  19. Severe adverse drug reaction following Crotalidae Polyvalent Immune Fab (Ovine) administration for copperhead snakebite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepak, Maryjoy R; Bochenek, Samantha H; Bush, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    To present the case of a severe anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reaction to Crotalidae Polyvalent Immune Fab (Ovine) in a patient bitten by a copperhead snake. A 68-year-old man presented with progressive envenomation after receiving a copperhead snakebite on each hand. Crotalinae Fab antivenom was administered. While the initial and only dose was partially infusing, the patient developed an adverse drug reaction (ADR) of urticaria and hypotension, which resolved with cessation of the infusion, recurred with resumption of the infusion, and ultimately was completed with supportive care. An additional episode of hypotension, urticaria, and angioedema occurred shortly after antivenom therapy completion. Epinephrine was administered, resolving the reaction with complete patient recovery. The event received a Naranjo score of 10, indicating a definite ADR. Treating copperhead snakebites with antivenom is a matter of debate. Concern over adverse events and cost induce some physicians to manage copperhead bites without antivenom because they are generally milder in severity. As demonstrated in this case, severe ADR can occur with Crotalinae Fab antivenom, and its efficacy for copperhead envenoming needs to be better established via placebo-controlled, randomized trials. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Pharmacy Student Facilitation of Reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions in a Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzell, Jason; Nguyen, Tiffany; Bui, Stephanie; MacDonald, Erika

    2017-01-01

    Health Canada relies on health professionals to voluntarily report adverse reactions to the Canada Vigilance Program. Current rates of reporting adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are inadequate to detect important safety issues. To assess the impact of pharmacy student facilitation of ADR reporting by pharmacists at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Canada. The intervention of interest, implemented at one campus of the hospital, was facilitation of ADR reporting by pharmacy students. The students received training on how to submit ADR reports and presented information sessions on the topic to hospital pharmacists; the pharmacists were then encouraged to report ADRs to a designated student for formal reporting. Frequency of reporting by pharmacists at the intervention campus was compared with reporting at a control campus of the same hospital. Data were collected prospectively over a 6-month pilot period, starting in April 2015. During the pilot period, 27 ADR reports were submitted at the intervention campus, and 3 reports at the control campus. All student participants strongly agreed that they would recommend that responsibility for submitting ADR reports to the Canada Vigilance Program remain with pharmacy students during future rotations. Availability of a pharmacy student to facilitate reporting of ADRs may increase the frequency of ADR reporting and could alleviate pharmacist workload; this activity is also a potentially valuable learning experience for students.

  1. Fatigue during treatment with antiepileptic drugs: A levetiracetam-specific adverse event?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mula, Marco; von Oertzen, Tim J; Cock, Hannah R; Yogarajah, Mahinda; Lozsadi, Dora A; Agrawal, Niruj

    2017-07-01

    To examine the prevalence and clinical correlates of fatigue as an adverse event (AE) of antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment in patients with epilepsy. Data from 443 adult outpatients with epilepsy assessed with the Adverse Event Profile (AEP) and the Neurological Disorder Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDIE) were analysed. Fatigue is reported by 36.6% of patients as always a problem during AED treatment. Fatigue is more likely to be reported by females (64.8% vs. 35.2%; Chi-Square=16.762; df=3; p=0.001) and during treatment with levetiracetam (42.3% vs. 33.2%; Chi-Square=11.462; df=3; p=0.009). The associations with the female gender and levetiracetam treatment were not mediated by depression, as identified with the NDDIE, and could not be simply explained by the large number of subjects on levetiracetam treatment, as analogous figures resulted from the analysis of a monotherapy subsample (41.7% vs. 30.3%; Chi-Square=11.547; df=3; p=0.009). One third of patients with epilepsy reports fatigue as a significant problem during AED treatment. Fatigue is more likely to be reported by females and seems to be specifically associated with LEV treatment. However, fatigue is not mediated by a negative effect of LEV on mood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Adverse event management in mass drug administration for neglected tropical diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Arthur; Zink, Amanda

    2014-03-01

    The ethical challenges of reporting and managing adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) in the context of mass drug administration (MDA) for the treatment of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) require reassessment of domestic and international policies on a global scale. Although the World Health Organization has set forth AE/SAE guidelines specifically for NTD MDA that incorporate suspected causality, and recommends that only SAEs get reported in this setting, most regulatory agencies continue to require the reporting of all SAEs exhibiting even a merely temporal relationship to activities associated with an MDA program. This greatly increases the potential for excess "noise" and undue risk aversion and is not only impractical but arguably unethical where huge proportions of populations are being treated for devastating diseases, and no good baseline exists against which to compare possible AE/SAE reports. Other population-specific variables that might change the way drug safety ought to be assessed include differing efficacy rates of a drug, background morbidity/mortality rates of the target disease in question, the growth rate of the incidence of disease, the availability of rescue or salvage therapies, and the willingness of local populations to take risks that other populations might not. The fact that NTDs are controllable and potentially eradicable with well-tolerated, effective, existing drugs might further alter our assessment of MDA safety and AE/SAE tolerability. At the same time, diffuseness of population, communication barriers, lack of resources, and other difficult surveillance challenges may present in NTD-affected settings. These limitations could impair the ability to monitor an MDA program's success, as well as hinder efforts to obtain informed consent or provide rescue therapy. Denying beneficial research interventions and MDA programs intended to benefit millions requires sound ethical justification based on more than the identification of

  3. [Current movements of four serious adverse events induced by medicinal drugs based on spontaneous reports in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Chie; Azuma, Yu-ichiro; Maekawa, Keiko; Kaniwa, Nahoko; Sai, Kimie; Saito, Yoshiro

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous reports on suspected serious adverse events caused by medicines from manufacturing/distributing pharmaceutical companies or medical institutions/pharmacies are regulated by the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law of Japan, and this system is important for post-marketing safety features. Although causal relationship between the medicine and the adverse event is not evaluated, and one incidence may be redundantly reported, this information would be useful to roughly grasp the current movements of drug-related serious adverse events, We searched open-source data of the spontaneous reports publicized by Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency for 4 serious adverse events (interstitial lung disease, rhabdomyolysis, anaphylaxis, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis) from 2004 to 2010 fiscal year (for 2010, from April 1 st to January 31th). Major drug-classes suspected to the adverse events were antineoplastics for interstitial lung disease, hyperlipidemia agents and psychotropics for rhabdomyolysis, antibiotics/chemotherapeutics, antineoplastics and intracorporeal diagnostic agents for anaphylaxis (anaphylactic shock, anaphylactic reactions, anaphylactoid shock and anaphylactoid reactions), and antibiotics/chemotherapeutics, antipyretics and analgesics, anti-inflammatory agents/common cold drugs, and antiepileptics for Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis. These results would help understanding of current situations of the 4 drug-related serious adverse events in Japan.

  4. [Trends in drug-induced liver injury based on reports of adverse reactions to PMDA in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Chie; Maekawa, Keiko; Segawa, Katsunori; Hanatani, Tadaaki; Sai, Kimie; Saito, Yoshiro

    2012-01-01

    Reports on drug-related adverse reactions from manufacturing/distributing pharmaceutical companies or medical institutions/pharmacies are regulated under the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law of Japan, and this system is important for post-marketing safety measures. Although association between the medicine and the adverse event has not been clearly evaluated, and an incidence may be redundantly reported, this information would be useful to roughly grasp the current status of drug-related adverse reactions. In the present study, we analyzed the incidence of drug-induced liver injury by screening the open-source data publicized by the homepage of Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency from 2005 to 2011 fiscal years. Major drug-classes suspected to cause general drug-induced liver injury were antineoplastics, anti-inflammatory agents/common cold drugs, chemotherapeutics including antituberculous drugs, antidiabetics, antiulcers and antiepileptics. In addition, reported cases for fulminant hepatitis were also summarized. We found that antituberculous isoniazid and antineoplastic tegafur-uracil were the top two suspected drugs. These results might deepen understanding of current situations for the drug-induced liver injury in Japan.

  5. Consequences of the exclusion of known adverse drug reactions in a spontaneous reporting system on the possibility to detect unknown drug/ADR combinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgsteede, Sander; Van Puijenbroek, Eugene; Van Grootheest, Kees

    Background: The Reporting Odds Ratio (ROR) is one of the expressions to analyse disproportionallity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in a spontaneous reporting system. The ROR is defined as the extent to which the association between a suspected drug and ADR stands out against the background

  6. Computerized surveillance of opioid-related adverse drug events in perioperative care: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gattis Katherine G

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the complexity of surgical care, perioperative patients are at high risk of opioid-related adverse drug events. Existing methods of detection, such as trigger tools and manual chart review, are time-intensive which makes sustainability challenging. Using strategic rule design, computerized surveillance may be an efficient, pharmacist-driven model for event detection that leverages existing staff resources. Methods Computerized adverse drug event surveillance uses a logic-based rules engine to identify potential adverse drug events or evolving unsafe clinical conditions. We extended an inpatient rule (administration of naloxone to detect opioid-related oversedation and respiratory depression to perioperative care at a large academic medical center. Our primary endpoint was the adverse drug event rate. For all patients with a naloxone alert, manual chart review was performed by a perioperative clinical pharmacist to assess patient harm. In patients with confirmed oversedation, other patient safety event databases were queried to determine if they could detect duplicate, prior, or subsequent opioid-related events. Results We identified 419 cases of perioperative naloxone administration. Of these, 101 were given postoperatively and 69 were confirmed as adverse drug events after chart review yielding a rate of 1.89 adverse drug events/1000 surgical encounters across both the inpatient and ambulatory settings. Our ability to detect inpatient opioid adverse drug events increased 22.7% by expanding surveillance into perioperative care. Analysis of historical surveillance data as well as a voluntary reporting database revealed that 11 of our perioperative patients had prior or subsequent harmful oversedation. Nine of these cases received intraoperative naloxone, and 2 had received naloxone in the post-anesthesia care unit. Pharmacist effort was approximately 3 hours per week to evaluate naloxone alerts and confirm adverse drug

  7. Analysis of adverse events of renal impairment related to platinum-based compounds using the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganuma, Misa; Motooka, Yumi; Sasaoka, Sayaka; Hatahira, Haruna; Hasegawa, Shiori; Fukuda, Akiho; Nakao, Satoshi; Shimada, Kazuyo; Hirade, Koseki; Mori, Takayuki; Yoshimura, Tomoaki; Kato, Takeshi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2018-01-01

    Platinum compounds cause several adverse events, such as nephrotoxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, myelosuppression, ototoxicity, and neurotoxicity. We evaluated the incidence of renal impairment as adverse events are related to the administration of platinum compounds using the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report database. We analyzed adverse events associated with the use of platinum compounds reported from April 2004 to November 2016. The reporting odds ratio at 95% confidence interval was used to detect the signal for each renal impairment incidence. We evaluated the time-to-onset profile of renal impairment and assessed the hazard type using Weibull shape parameter and used the applied association rule mining technique to discover undetected relationships such as possible risk factor. In total, 430,587 reports in the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report database were analyzed. The reporting odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for renal impairment resulting from the use of cisplatin, oxaliplatin, carboplatin, and nedaplatin were 2.7 (2.5-3.0), 0.6 (0.5-0.7), 0.8 (0.7-1.0), and 1.3 (0.8-2.1), respectively. The lower limit of the reporting odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for cisplatin was >1. The median (lower-upper quartile) onset time of renal impairment following the use of platinum-based compounds was 6.0-8.0 days. The Weibull shape parameter β and 95% confidence interval upper limit of oxaliplatin were impairment during cisplatin use in real-world setting. The present findings demonstrate that the incidence of renal impairment following cisplatin use should be closely monitored when patients are hypertensive or diabetic, or when they are co-administered furosemide, loxoprofen, or pemetrexed. In addition, healthcare professionals should closely assess a patient's background prior to treatment.

  8. [Prevention of adverse effects in latex allergic patients: organizing a latex safe operating theatre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonalumi, Sabrina; Barbonaglia, Patrizia; Bertocchi, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    In 2001 the General Health Direction of Region Lombardia approved (decree n. 22303) a guideline for the prevention of latex allergic reactions in patients and health care workers. This document provides general recommendations in order to standardize behaviors in regional health care facilities. The reason is due to a rise in the incident of reactions to latex products in the last 20 years. Nowadays the prevalence is higher in certain risk groups (subjected to frequent and repeated exposures) rather than the general population. The aim of the project was to organize a latex safe operating theatre in the Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mangiagalli e Regina Elena of Milan (Fondazione) and to standardize behaviors in order to prevent adverse effects in latex allergic patients. Thanks to the literature review and the creation of a multidisciplinar team, we produced a protocol. Therefore, we requested manufacturers the certification of the latex content of their products. Results and conclusion. When latex allergic patients need to undergone surgery in our hospital, a latex safe operating theatre is organized by personnel following a multidisciplinar protocol. No allergic reactions were experienced during surgical procedures after the creation of an environment as free as possible from latex contamination. The project will involve an emergency room, one room or more of a ward and of the outpatients department.

  9. Gingival bleeding, a possible "serious" adverse drug reaction: An observational study in the French PharmacoVigilance Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondon-Guitton, Emmanuelle; Mourgues, Thibaut; Rousseau, Vanessa; Cousty, Sarah; Cottin, Judith; Drablier, Guillaume; Micallef, Joëlle; Montastruc, Jean-Louis

    2017-09-01

    Antithrombotic drugs are known to increase the risk of gingival bleeding because they affect coagulation. However, other drugs could also be involved in gingival bleeding. We performed a pharmacoepidemiological study to identify the drugs most frequently "suspected" in the occurrence of gingival bleeding. We selected reports of "gingival bleeding" from 1 January 1985 to 30 September 2014 in the French PharmacoVigilance Database. Among 523,808 reports of adverse drug reactions, we identified 454 reports of gingival bleeding (0.09%). Most of them were "serious" (58.4%) and occurred in females (54.6%). The frequency of gingival bleeding increased with age. The most frequently "suspected" drugs were antithrombotics (67.8%), particularly fluindione. Other drugs frequently involved were furosemide followed by paracetamol, amiodarone, amoxicillin, paroxetine, ketoprofen, zolpidem, enalapril and ramipril. Thirty-nine reports involved a drug-drug interaction with antithrombotics, mainly with anti-infectives. Gingival bleeding can be an adverse drug reaction, often "serious" and rarely fatal. Patients older than 50 years and women are particularly at risk. Among drugs known to increase the risk of gingival bleeding, the most frequently involved were fluindione, furosemide, paracetamol, amiodarone, amoxicillin, paroxetine or ketoprofen. We also identified signal for drugs not usually known to be involved in bleeding, like zolpidem, enalapril or ramipril. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Systematic drug safety evaluation based on public genomic expression (Connectivity Map) data: myocardial and infectious adverse reactions as application cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kejian; Weng, Zuquan; Sun, Liya; Sun, Jiazhi; Zhou, Shu-Feng; He, Lin

    2015-02-13

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is of great importance to both regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. Various techniques, such as quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) and animal toxicology, are widely used to identify potential risks during the preclinical stage of drug development. Despite these efforts, drugs with safety liabilities can still pass through safety checkpoints and enter the market. This situation raises the concern that conventional chemical structure analysis and phenotypic screening are not sufficient to avoid all clinical adverse events. Genomic expression data following in vitro drug treatments characterize drug actions and thus have become widely used in drug repositioning. In the present study, we explored prediction of ADRs based on the drug-induced gene-expression profiles from cultured human cells in the Connectivity Map (CMap) database. The results showed that drugs inducing comparable ADRs generally lead to similar CMap expression profiles. Based on such ADR-gene expression association, we established prediction models for various ADRs, including severe myocardial and infectious events. Drugs with FDA boxed warnings of safety liability were effectively identified. We therefore suggest that drug-induced gene expression change, in combination with effective computational methods, may provide a new dimension of information to facilitate systematic drug safety evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pharmacist's knowledge, practice and attitudes toward pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reactions reporting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyagh, Maysa; Farah, Doaa; Abu Farha, Rana

    2015-04-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major cause of drug related morbidity and mortality. Pharmacovigilance is the science that plays an essential role in the reduction of ADRs, thus the evolution and growth of this science are critical for effective and safe clinical practice. This study is considered the first study in the region to evaluate pharmacist's knowledge, practice and attitudes toward ADRs reporting after establishing the national ADRs reporting center in Jordan. A cross sectional study was used to evaluate pharmacist knowledge and attitude toward ADRs reporting. A structured validated questionnaire was developed for this purpose and a total of 208 pharmacists were recruited to participate in this study. The majority of pharmacists have insufficient awareness and lack of knowledge about pharmacovigilance and ADRs reporting. Also the rate of reporting of ADRs was extremely poor. Several factors were found to discourage pharmacists from reporting ADRs, which include inadequate information available from the patient, unavailability of pharmacist ADRs form when needed, unawareness of the existence of the national ADRs reporting system. Also pharmacists think that ADRs are unimportant or they did not know how to report them. The results of this study suggest that pharmacists have insufficient knowledge about the concept of pharmacovigilance and spontaneous ADRs reporting. On the other hand, pharmacists had positive attitudes toward pharmacovigilance, despite their little experience with ADRs reporting. Educational programs are needed to increase pharmacist's role in the reporting process, and thus to have a positive impact on the overall patient caring process.

  12. Direct costs of managing adverse drug reactions during rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis treatment in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnippel, K; Firnhaber, C; Berhanu, R; Page-Shipp, L; Sinanovic, E

    2018-04-01

    To estimate the provider costs of managing adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to standard long-course treatment for multidrug- and rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/RR-TB) according to South African guidelines. We parameterised a published Markov health state model for MDR/RR-TB with guidelines-based, bottom-up public-sector provider costing of ADR management. Frequency of ADR occurrence was extracted from the literature. Costs were estimated over 10 years, discounted 3% annually and tested using probabilistic sensitivity analysis. On average, guidelines-based costing of moderate ADRs weighted by the frequency of occurrence was US$135.76 (standard deviation [SD] US$17.18) and the cost of serious ADRs was US$521.29 (SD US$55.99). We estimated that the incremental costs of ADR management were US$380.17 annually per patient initiating MDR/RR-TB treatment. The incremental costs of ADR management for the public health sector in South Africa was US$4.76 million, 8.3% of the estimated cohort costs of MDR/RR-TB treatment ($57.55 million) for the 2015 cohort of 12 527 patients. Management of multiple ADRs and serious ADRs, which are common during the first 6 months of standard, long-course MDR/RR-TB treatment, substantially increases provider treatment costs. These results need to be taken into account when comparing regimen costs, and highlight the urgent need to identify drug regimens with improved safety profiles.

  13. Hybrid Semantic Analysis for Mapping Adverse Drug Reaction Mentions in Tweets to Medical Terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadzadeh, Ehsan; Sarker, Abeed; Nikfarjam, Azadeh; Gonzalez, Graciela

    2017-01-01

    Social networks, such as Twitter, have become important sources for active monitoring of user-reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Automatic extraction of ADR information can be crucial for healthcare providers, drug manufacturers, and consumers. However, because of the non-standard nature of social media language, automatically extracted ADR mentions need to be mapped to standard forms before they can be used by operational pharmacovigilance systems. We propose a modular natural language processing pipeline for mapping (normalizing) colloquial mentions of ADRs to their corresponding standardized identifiers. We seek to accomplish this task and enable customization of the pipeline so that distinct unlabeled free text resources can be incorporated to use the system for other normalization tasks. Our approach, which we call Hybrid Semantic Analysis (HSA), sequentially employs rule-based and semantic matching algorithms for mapping user-generated mentions to concept IDs in the Unified Medical Language System vocabulary. The semantic matching component of HSA is adaptive in nature and uses a regression model to combine various measures of semantic relatedness and resources to optimize normalization performance on the selected data source. On a publicly available corpus, our normalization method achieves 0.502 recall and 0.823 precision (F-measure: 0.624). Our proposed method outperforms a baseline based on latent semantic analysis and another that uses MetaMap.

  14. Antibiotic-Related Adverse Drug Reactions at a Tertiary Care Hospital in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Young Jung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs are any unwanted/uncomfortable effects from medication resulting in physical, mental, and functional injuries. Antibiotics account for up to 40.9% of ADRs and are associated with several serious outcomes. However, few reports on ADRs have evaluated only antimicrobial agents. In this study, we investigated antibiotic-related ADRs at a tertiary care hospital in South Korea. Methods. This is a retrospective cohort study that evaluated ADRs to antibiotics that were reported at a 2400-bed tertiary care hospital in 2015. ADRs reported by physicians, pharmacists, and nurses were reviewed. Clinical information reported ADRs, type of antibiotic, causality assessment, and complications were evaluated. Results. 1,277 (62.8% patients were considered antibiotic-related ADRs based on the World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Center criteria (certain, 2.2%; probable, 35.7%; and possible, 62.1%. Totally, 44 (3.4% patients experienced serious ADRs. Penicillin and quinolones were the most common drugs reported to induce ADRs (both 16.0%, followed by third-generation cephalosporins (14.9%. The most frequently experienced side effects were skin manifestations (45.1% followed by gastrointestinal disorders (32.6%. Conclusion. Penicillin and quinolones are the most common causative antibiotics for ADRs and skin manifestations were the most frequently experienced symptom.

  15. Reporting of adverse drug reactions: predictors of under-reporting in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Zoriah; Siang, Tan Ching; Badarudin, Nurul Suhaida

    2007-02-01

    Malaysia like many other countries worldwide uses spontaneous reporting systems as a mean of collecting data on suspected adverse drug reaction (ADR). However, compared to other countries, which use the system, the reporting rate in Malaysia is very low. Why some physicians do not report ADRs is not well understood. To identify factors, which would predict physicians' failure to send ADR reports. Face-to-face interview using a structured questionnaire involving physicians working at the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia. About a third of the physicians in the Centre participated. Sixty-five of the 415 approached refused to participate. A high proportion of the respondents (81.4%) indicated that they had suspected an ADR but did not report it, while about 40% of the respondents were not aware of the existence of the national reporting system in Malaysia. Logistic regression modelling identified the variable 'ADR considered to be too trivial or too well known to report' as the strongest predictor of not reporting, followed by physicians' category and uncertainty that the reaction had been definitely caused by a drug. Important predictor variables, which limit physicians from reporting ADR in Malaysia, were related to uncertainty of types of reaction to report, lack of awareness about the existence, function and purpose of national ADR reporting. The findings could be useful for planning strategies to improve the reporting rate.

  16. [Adverse reactions to drugs reported by the primary care physicians of Andalusia. Analysis of underreporting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torelló Iserte, J; Castillo Ferrando, J R; Laínez, M M; García Morillas, M; Arias González, A

    1994-04-15

    To discover the sort of adverse reactions to medication (ARM) notified by Primary Care doctors and identify the under-notification of those cases having special clinical-epidemiological interest. Retrospective study in which 2,597 ARM corresponding to 1,467 Yellow Cards (YC) were analysed. These were notified by Primary Care doctors to the Centro Andaluz de Farmacovigilancia (Andalusian Drug-watch centre) during the period from 1/6/90 to 31/12/92. To assess the seriousness of the ARM, their terminological classification and imputability, the criteria used in the WHO's international "Yellow Card" programme of spontaneous notification were followed. 77.2% of all notifications were from Primary Care, of which 7.4% were of special interest due to their serious or novel character. However an undernotification of serious and well-known ARM was detected, such as digestive haemorrhages (1.07/10(6) inhibitants per year), anaphylactic shock (0.34/10(6) inhab/year), agranulocytosis (0.23/10(6) inhab/year) and aplastic anaemia (0.05/10(6) inhab/year), among others. Most of the main under-notified ARM are generated in the community but treated in hospital Casualty departments. Therefore it would be useful to develop specific Drug-watch programmes in the hospitals themselves.

  17. Pharmacovigilance in oncology: pattern of spontaneous notifications, incidence of adverse drug reactions and under-reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Berlofa Visacri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The high toxicity and narrow therapeutic window of antineoplastic agents makes pharmacovigilance studies essential in oncology. The objectives of the current study were to analyze the pattern of spontaneous notifications of adverse drug reactions (ADRs in oncology patients and to analyze the incidence of ADRs reported by outpatients on antineoplastic treatment in a tertiary care teaching hospital. To compose the pattern of ADR, the notification forms of reactions in oncology patients in 2010 were reviewed, and the reactions were classified based on the drug involved, mechanism, causality, and severity. To evaluate the incidence of reactions, a questionnaire at the time of chemotherapy was included, and the severity was classified based on the Common Terminology Criteria. The profiles of the 10 responses reported to the Pharmacovigilance Sector were type B, severe, possible, and they were primarily related to platinum compounds and taxanes. When the incidence of reactions was analyzed, it was observed that nausea, alopecia, fatigue, diarrhea, and taste disturbance were the most frequently reported reactions by oncology patients, and the grade 3 and 4 reactions were not reported. Based on this analysis, it is proposed that health professionals should be trained regarding notifications and clinical pharmacists should increasingly be brought on board to reduce under-reporting of ADRs.

  18. A research framework for pharmacovigilance in health social media: Identification and evaluation of patient adverse drug event reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Chen, Hsinchun

    2015-12-01

    Social media offer insights of patients' medical problems such as drug side effects and treatment failures. Patient reports of adverse drug events from social media have great potential to improve current practice of pharmacovigilance. However, extracting patient adverse drug event reports from social media continues to be an important challenge for health informatics research. In this study, we develop a research framework with advanced natural language processing techniques for integrated and high-performance patient reported adverse drug event extraction. The framework consists of medical entity extraction for recognizing patient discussions of drug and events, adverse drug event extraction with shortest dependency path kernel based statistical learning method and semantic filtering with information from medical knowledge bases, and report source classification to tease out noise. To evaluate the proposed framework, a series of experiments were conducted on a test bed encompassing about postings from major diabetes and heart disease forums in the United States. The results reveal that each component of the framework significantly contributes to its overall effectiveness. Our framework significantly outperforms prior work. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. DL-ADR: a novel deep learning model for classifying genomic variants into adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhaohui; Huang, Jimmy Xiangji; Zeng, Xing; Zhang, Gang

    2016-08-10

    Genomic variations are associated with the metabolism and the occurrence of adverse reactions of many therapeutic agents. The polymorphisms on over 2000 locations of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP) due to many factors such as ethnicity, mutations, and inheritance attribute to the diversity of response and side effects of various drugs. The associations of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the internal pharmacokinetic patterns and the vulnerability of specific adverse reactions become one of the research interests of pharmacogenomics. The conventional genomewide association studies (GWAS) mainly focuses on the relation of single or multiple SNPs to a specific risk factors which are a one-to-many relation. However, there are no robust methods to establish a many-to-many network which can combine the direct and indirect associations between multiple SNPs and a serial of events (e.g. adverse reactions, metabolic patterns, prognostic factors etc.). In this paper, we present a novel deep learning model based on generative stochastic networks and hidden Markov chain to classify the observed samples with SNPs on five loci of two genes (CYP2D6 and CYP1A2) respectively to the vulnerable population of 14 types of adverse reactions. A supervised deep learning model is proposed in this study. The revised generative stochastic networks (GSN) model with transited by the hidden Markov chain is used. The data of the training set are collected from clinical observation. The training set is composed of 83 observations of blood samples with the genotypes respectively on CYP2D6*2, *10, *14 and CYP1A2*1C, *1 F. The samples are genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. A hidden Markov chain is used as the transition operator to simulate the probabilistic distribution. The model can perform learning at lower cost compared to the conventional maximal likelihood method because the transition distribution is conditional on the previous state of the hidden Markov

  20. Association between Selective Beta-adrenergic Drugs and Blood Pressure Elevation: Data Mining of the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Katsuhiro; Inoue, Michiko

    2016-01-01

    Selective beta-adrenergic drugs are used clinically to treat various diseases. Because of imperfect receptor selectivity, beta-adrenergic drugs cause some adverse drug events by stimulating other adrenergic receptors. To examine the association between selective beta-adrenergic drugs and blood pressure elevation, we reviewed the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Reports (JADERs) submitted to the Japan Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency. We used the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) Preferred Terms extracted from Standardized MedDRA queries for hypertension to identify events related to blood pressure elevation. Spontaneous adverse event reports from April 2004 through May 2015 in JADERs, a data mining algorithm, and the reporting odds ratio (ROR) were used for quantitative signal detection, and assessed by the case/non-case method. Safety signals are considered significant if the ROR estimates and lower bound of the 95% confidence interval (CI) exceed 1. A total of 2021 reports were included in this study. Among the nine drugs examined, significant signals were found, based on the 95%CI for salbutamol (ROR: 9.94, 95%CI: 3.09-31.93) and mirabegron (ROR: 7.52, 95%CI: 4.89-11.55). The results of this study indicate that some selective beta-adrenergic drugs are associated with blood pressure elevation. Considering the frequency of their indications, attention should be paid to their use in elderly patients to avoid adverse events.

  1. Systematic drug safety evaluation based on public genomic expression (Connectivity Map) data: Myocardial and infectious adverse reactions as application cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kejian, E-mail: kejian.wang.bio@gmail.com [Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Weng, Zuquan [Japan National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Kawasaki (Japan); Sun, Liya [Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Sun, Jiazhi; Zhou, Shu-Feng [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); He, Lin, E-mail: helin@Bio-X.com [Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-02-13

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is of great importance to both regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. Various techniques, such as quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) and animal toxicology, are widely used to identify potential risks during the preclinical stage of drug development. Despite these efforts, drugs with safety liabilities can still pass through safety checkpoints and enter the market. This situation raises the concern that conventional chemical structure analysis and phenotypic screening are not sufficient to avoid all clinical adverse events. Genomic expression data following in vitro drug treatments characterize drug actions and thus have become widely used in drug repositioning. In the present study, we explored prediction of ADRs based on the drug-induced gene-expression profiles from cultured human cells in the Connectivity Map (CMap) database. The results showed that drugs inducing comparable ADRs generally lead to similar CMap expression profiles. Based on such ADR-gene expression association, we established prediction models for various ADRs, including severe myocardial and infectious events. Drugs with FDA boxed warnings of safety liability were effectively identified. We therefore suggest that drug-induced gene expression change, in combination with effective computational methods, may provide a new dimension of information to facilitate systematic drug safety evaluation. - Highlights: • Drugs causing common toxicity lead to similar in vitro gene expression changes. • We built a model to predict drug toxicity with drug-specific expression profiles. • Drugs with FDA black box warnings were effectively identified by our model. • In vitro assay can detect severe toxicity in the early stage of drug development.

  2. Systematic drug safety evaluation based on public genomic expression (Connectivity Map) data: Myocardial and infectious adverse reactions as application cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Kejian; Weng, Zuquan; Sun, Liya; Sun, Jiazhi; Zhou, Shu-Feng; He, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is of great importance to both regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. Various techniques, such as quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) and animal toxicology, are widely used to identify potential risks during the preclinical stage of drug development. Despite these efforts, drugs with safety liabilities can still pass through safety checkpoints and enter the market. This situation raises the concern that conventional chemical structure analysis and phenotypic screening are not sufficient to avoid all clinical adverse events. Genomic expression data following in vitro drug treatments characterize drug actions and thus have become widely used in drug repositioning. In the present study, we explored prediction of ADRs based on the drug-induced gene-expression profiles from cultured human cells in the Connectivity Map (CMap) database. The results showed that drugs inducing comparable ADRs generally lead to similar CMap expression profiles. Based on such ADR-gene expression association, we established prediction models for various ADRs, including severe myocardial and infectious events. Drugs with FDA boxed warnings of safety liability were effectively identified. We therefore suggest that drug-induced gene expression change, in combination with effective computational methods, may provide a new dimension of information to facilitate systematic drug safety evaluation. - Highlights: • Drugs causing common toxicity lead to similar in vitro gene expression changes. • We built a model to predict drug toxicity with drug-specific expression profiles. • Drugs with FDA black box warnings were effectively identified by our model. • In vitro assay can detect severe toxicity in the early stage of drug development

  3. Risk factors for adverse drug reactions in pediatric inpatients: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Paulo Henrique Santos; Lobo, Iza Maria Fraga; da Silva, Wellington Barros

    2017-01-01

    The present study aims to identify the risk factors for adverse drug reactions (ADR) in pediatric inpatients. A prospective cohort study in one general pediatric ward in a hospital in Northeast Brazil was conducted in two stages: the first stage was conducted between August 17th and November 6th, 2015, and the second one between March 1st and August 25th, 2016. We included children aged 0-14 years 11 months hospitalized with a minimum stay of 48 hours. Observed outcomes were the ADR occurrence and the time until the first ADR observed. In the univariate analysis, the time to the first ADR was compared among groups using a log-rank test. For the multivariate analysis, the Cox regression model was used. A total of 173 children (208 admissions) and 66 ADR classified as "definite" and "probable" were identified. The incidence rate was 3/100 patient days. The gastro-intestinal system disorders were the main ADR observed (28.8%). In addition, 22.7% of the ADR were related to antibacterials for systemic use and 15.2% to general anesthesia. Prior history of ADR of the child [hazard ratio (HR) 2.44; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-5.00], the use of meglumine antimonate (HR 4.98; 95% CI 1.21-20.54), antibacterial for systemic use (HR 2.75; 95% CI 1.08-6.98) and antiepileptic drugs (HR 3.84; 95% CI 1.40-10.56) were identified risk factors for ADR. We identified as risk factors the prior history of ADR of the child and the use of meglumine antimonate, antibacterial for systemic use and antiepileptic drugs.

  4. Risk factors for adverse drug reactions in pediatric inpatients: A cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Santos Andrade

    Full Text Available The present study aims to identify the risk factors for adverse drug reactions (ADR in pediatric inpatients.A prospective cohort study in one general pediatric ward in a hospital in Northeast Brazil was conducted in two stages: the first stage was conducted between August 17th and November 6th, 2015, and the second one between March 1st and August 25th, 2016. We included children aged 0-14 years 11 months hospitalized with a minimum stay of 48 hours. Observed outcomes were the ADR occurrence and the time until the first ADR observed. In the univariate analysis, the time to the first ADR was compared among groups using a log-rank test. For the multivariate analysis, the Cox regression model was used.A total of 173 children (208 admissions and 66 ADR classified as "definite" and "probable" were identified. The incidence rate was 3/100 patient days. The gastro-intestinal system disorders were the main ADR observed (28.8%. In addition, 22.7% of the ADR were related to antibacterials for systemic use and 15.2% to general anesthesia. Prior history of ADR of the child [hazard ratio (HR 2.44; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.19-5.00], the use of meglumine antimonate (HR 4.98; 95% CI 1.21-20.54, antibacterial for systemic use (HR 2.75; 95% CI 1.08-6.98 and antiepileptic drugs (HR 3.84; 95% CI 1.40-10.56 were identified risk factors for ADR.We identified as risk factors the prior history of ADR of the child and the use of meglumine antimonate, antibacterial for systemic use and antiepileptic drugs.

  5. Designing an Effective Prevention Program: Principles Underlying the Rand Smoking and Drug Prevention Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellickson, Phyllis L.

    This paper describes the Project ALERT program (Adolescent Learning Experiences in Resistance Training) which was established by the Rand Corporation to prevent smoking and drug use among seventh graders. The program is based on the social influence model of drug use initiation. Curriculum features are described including motivation to resist and…

  6. PTH prevents the adverse effects of focal radiation on bone architecture in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Abhishek; Lan, Shenghui; Zhu, Ji; Lin, Tiao; Zhang, Xianrong; Siclari, Valerie A; Altman, Allison R; Cengel, Keith A; Liu, X Sherry; Qin, Ling

    2013-08-01

    Radiation therapy is a common treatment regimen for cancer patients. However, its adverse effects on the neighboring bone could lead to fractures with a great impact on quality of life. The underlying mechanism is still elusive and there is no preventive or curative solution for this bone loss. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a current therapy for osteoporosis that has potent anabolic effects on bone. In this study, we found that focal radiation from frequent scans of the right tibiae in 1-month-old rats by micro-computed tomography severely decreased trabecular bone mass and deteriorated bone structure. Interestingly, PTH daily injections remarkably improved trabecular bone in the radiated tibiae with increases in trabecular number, thickness, connectivity, structure model index and stiffness, and a decrease in trabecular separation. Histomorphometric analysis revealed that radiation mainly decreased the number of osteoblasts and impaired their mineralization activity but had little effects on osteoclasts. PTH reversed these adverse effects and greatly increased bone formation to a similar level in both radiated and non-radiated bones. Furthermore, PTH protects bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from radiation-induced damage, including a decrease in number and an increase in adipogenic differentiation. While radiation generated the same amount of free radicals in the bone marrow of vehicle-treated and PTH-treated animals, the percentage of apoptotic bone marrow cells was significantly attenuated in the PTH group. Taken together, our data demonstrate a radioprotective effect of PTH on bone structure and bone marrow and shed new light on a possible clinical application of anabolic treatment in radiotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Treating periodontal disease for preventing adverse birth outcomes in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iheozor-Ejiofor, Zipporah; Middleton, Philippa; Esposito, Marco; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2017-06-12

    Periodontal disease has been linked with a number of conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes and adverse pregnancy outcomes, all likely through systemic inflammatory pathways. It is common in women of reproductive age and gum conditions tend to worsen during pregnancy. Some evidence from observational studies suggests that periodontal intervention may reduce adverse pregnancy outcomes. There is need for a comprehensive Cochrane review of randomised trials to assess the effect of periodontal treatment on perinatal and maternal health. To assess the effects of treating periodontal disease in pregnant women in order to prevent or reduce perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 6 October 2016), Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register (to 7 October 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 9) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 6 October 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 6 October 2016), and LILACS BIREME Virtual Health Library (Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Information database; 1982 to 6 October 2016). ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials on 6 October 2016. We placed no restrictions on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of periodontal treatment in preventing or reducing perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality. We excluded studies where obstetric outcomes were not reported. Two review authors independently screened titles and abstracts and extracted data using a prepiloted data extraction form. Missing data were obtained by contacting authors and risk of bias was assessed using Cochrane's 'Risk of bias' tool. Where appropriate

  8. A Retrospective Analysis of Spontaneous Adverse Drug Reactions Reports Relating to Paediatric Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosliana Rosli

    Full Text Available Spontaneous reporting on adverse drug reactions (ADR has been established in Malaysia since 1987, and although these reports are monitored by the Malaysia drug monitoring authority, the National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau, information about ADRs in the paediatric patient population still remains unexplored. The aims of this study, therefore, were to characterize the ADRs reported in respect to the Malaysian paediatric population and to relate the data to specific paediatric age groups.Data on all ADRs reported to the National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau between 2000 and 2013 for individuals aged from birth to 17 years old were analysed with respect to age and gender, type of reporter, suspected medicines (using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification, category of ADR (according to system organ class as well as the severity of the ADR.In total, 11,523 ADR reports corresponding to 22,237 ADRs were analysed, with half of these reporting one ADR per report. Vaccines comprised 55.7% of the 11,523 ADR reports with the remaining being drug related ADRs. Overall, 63.9% of ADRs were reported for paediatric patients between 12 and 17 years of age, with the majority of ADRs reported in females (70.7%. The most common ADRs reported were from the following system organ classes: application site disorders (32.2%, skin and appendages disorders (20.6%, body as a whole general disorders (12.8% and central and peripheral nervous system disorders (11.2%. Meanwhile, ADRs in respect to anti-infectives for systemic use (2194/5106; 43.0% were the most frequently reported across all age groups, followed by drugs from the nervous system (1095/5106; 21.4%. Only 0.28% of the ADR cases were reported as fatal. A large proportion of the reports were received from healthcare providers in government health facilities.ADR reports concerning vaccines and anti-infectives were the most commonly reported in children, and are mainly seen in adolescents, with most of

  9. Days lost due to disability of diclofenac-induced adverse drug reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas D

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY is a widely used measure to quantify the burden of diseases or illness. DALYs for a disease is calculated as the sum of the Years of Life Lost (YLL due to premature mortality in the population and the equivalent healthy Years Lost due to Disability (YLD. The only difference from the YLD and Days Lost due to Disability (DLD calculation is that instead of considering the duration of Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR in years, it is calculated in days. Objective: DLD was measured for diclofenac tablets to prepare the ADR profile.Methods: The study was done on the patients (18-65 years old attending the community pharmacy at Kasaragod district, South India, with prescription of diclofenac tablets. Patients reported ADRs on their next visit to the pharmacy or they had called to the provided phone number and reported it. Disability Weight (DW was calculated in an analogue scale from 0-1. Zero represent complete health and 1 represent death or equivalent condition. DW was multiplied with occurrence and duration of ADRs in days.Results: About 943 patients received diclofenac tablets in 1000 prescriptions were successfully followed up for possible, probable and definite ADRs. A total of 561 reactions reported in 2010 for diclofenac tablet in the study population. There were 34 different types of ADRs under 12 physiological systems/organs. Most common reactions were on gastrointestinal (GI system (48%, followed by skin (14%, Central Nervous System (10%, renal (7%, and cardiovascular (7%. Abdominal pain, cramps or flatulence was the highest occurring GI ADR (107, followed by 43 rashes, 42 nausea/vomiting, 37 indigestion, 34 peptic ulcers, 31 edema etc. DLD for peptic ulcer was considerably high (0.078 per 1000 of the study population on diclofenac. The most damaging ADR were peptic ulcer with or without perforation, followed by rash 0.036 DLD and edema 0.027 DLD. There was considerable DLD by acute renal failure (0.012 Steven

  10. [A systematic review of decided litigated cases on adverse drug events in Japan: classification of decided cases appearing in law reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Rika; Kato, Masahisa; Kaneko, Erina; Kusaba, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Manabu; Yamano, Toru; Seo, Takashi; Hagihara, Akihito

    2015-01-01

    Much of the damage to health caused by drugs could be prevented by appropriate care. A well-defined duty of care and further information are required for healthcare professionals. Although there are many litigation cases to use as references, neither the extent of the duty of care nor the obligation to explain medication according to the type of drug prescribed has yet been fully established. Thus, we systematically collected decided cases of adverse drug events, and assessed the degree of the duties of care and information. Specifically, we collected decided cases in which physicians, dentists, pharmacists, nurses, or hospitals had been sued. Data were derived from Bessatsu Jurist Iryo-kago Hanrei Hyakusen, Hanrei Jihou, and Hanrei Times from 1989 to November 2013, and information on precedents in the records of the Supreme Court of Japan from 2001 to November 2013. We analyzed the cases, and assessed the following according to the type of drug: (1) standards and explanations when dealing with drugs that were critical issues in litigation, and (2) the degree of the physician's or pharmacist's duties of care and information. In total, 126 cases were collected. The number of drug categories classified was 27, and 9 were considered of practical importance. After this systematic review, we found a trend in the degree of the required level of care and information on several drugs. With respect to duties of care and information, the gap between the required level and actual practice suggests that healthcare professionals must improve their care and explanations.

  11. Profile of rheumatology patients willing to report adverse drug reactions: bias from selective reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protić D

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dragana Protić,1 Nada Vujasinović-Stupar,2 Zoran Bukumirić,3 Slavica Pavlov-Dolijanović,4 Snežana Baltić,5 Slavica Mutavdžin,6 Ljiljana Markovic-Denić,7 Marija Zdravković,8 Zoran Todorović1 1Department of Pharmacology, Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 2Department 2, Institute of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 3Institute for Medical Statistics and Informatics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 4Department 5, Institute of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 5Department 5, Institute of Rheumatology, Belgrade, Serbia; 6Institute of Physiology “Rihard Burjan”, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 7Institute of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 8Department of Cardiology, Medical Center “Bežanijska kosa”, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia Background: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs have a significant impact on human health and health care costs. The aims of our study were to determine the profile of rheumatology patients willing to report ADRs and to identify bias in such a reporting system. Methods: Semi-intensive ADRs reporting system was used in our study. Patients willing to participate (N=261 completed the questionnaire designed for the purpose of the study at the hospital admission. They were subsequently classified into two groups according to their ability to identify whether they had experienced ADRs during the previous month. Group 1 included 214 out of 261 patients who were able to identify ADRs, and group 2 consisted of 43 out of 261 patients who were not able to identify ADRs in their recent medical history. Results: Group 1 patients were more significantly aware of their diagnosis than the patients from group 2. Marginal significance was found

  12. [High activity antiretroviral therapy change associated to adverse drug reactions in a specialized center in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subiela, José D; Dapena, Elida

    2016-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent the first cause of change of the first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen, therefore, they constitute the main limiting factor in the long-term follow up of HIV patients in treatment. A retrospective study was carried out in a specialized center in Lara State, Venezuela, including 99 patients over 18 years of age who had change of first-line HAART regimen due to ADRs, between 2010 and 2013. The aims of this research were to describe the sociodemographic and clinical variables, frequency of ADRs related to change of HAART, duration of the first-line HAART regimen, to determine the drugs associated with ARVs and to identify the risk factors. The ADRs constituted 47.5% of all causes of change of first-line HAART regimen, the median duration was 1.08±0.28 years. The most frequent ADRs were anemia (34.3%), hypersensitivity reactions (20.2%) and gastrointestinal intolerance (13.1%). The most frequent ARV regimen type was the protease inhibitors-based regimen (59.6%), but zidovudine was the ARV most linked to ADRs (41.4%). The regression analysis showed increased risk of ADRs in singles and students in the univariate analysis and heterosexuals and homosexuals in multivariate analysis; and decreased risk in active workers. The present work shows the high prevalence of ADRs in the studied population and represents the first case-based study that describes the pharmacoepidemiology of a cohort of HIV-positive patients treated in Venezuela.

  13. Public awareness and perception toward Adverse Drug Reactions reporting in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Ibrahim; Aljadhey, Hisham; Albogami, Yasser; Mahmoud, Mansour A

    2017-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the general public awareness and perception about Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) reporting and pharmacovigilance. Method: A cross-sectional study conducted on June 2012 during awareness campaign held in two malls in Riyadh city for two days. A self-administered questionnaire consisting of three parts was distributed to the attendees who accepted to participate in the study. Results: A total of 204 questionnaires were collected with a response rate of 68%. Twenty-three percent could correctly define ADRs. Only 13(15.7%) of responders were familiar with the term "Pharmacovigilance" and only 78.6% were aware about the Saudi Pharmacovigilance Center. Sixty-seventy percent indicated that their physicians or pharmacists don't actively encourage them to report ADRs that may occur when they take their medications. The majority of responders (73.2%) believed that the medical team, rather than consumers, should report ADRs. When asked why patients do not report ADRs, 19.1(48.5%) believed that patients do not know whether the ADR is from the medication or not, 18.1(46.1%) stated that the reason was because patients don't know about the Pharmacovigilance Center, 16(40.7%) think that patients don't know about the importance of ADRs reporting, and 14(36.3%) responded that patients probably don't know how to report ADRs. Conclusion: The general public in Saudi Arabia are not aware about ADRs reporting and the pharmacovigilance system. The Saudi Food and Drug Authorities (FDA) need to put more efforts to increasing public awareness about the importance of ADRs reporting process and the importance of pharmacovigilance system in promoting patient safety.

  14. Bridging data models and terminologies to support adverse drug event reporting using EHR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declerck, G; Hussain, S; Daniel, C; Yuksel, M; Laleci, G B; Twagirumukiza, M; Jaulent, M-C

    2015-01-01

    This article is part of the Focus Theme of METHODs of Information in Medicine on "Managing Interoperability and Complexity in Health Systems". SALUS project aims at building an interoperability platform and a dedicated toolkit to enable secondary use of electronic health records (EHR) data for post marketing drug surveillance. An important component of this toolkit is a drug-related adverse events (AE) reporting system designed to facilitate and accelerate the reporting process using automatic prepopulation mechanisms. To demonstrate SALUS approach for establishing syntactic and semantic interoperability for AE reporting. Standard (e.g. HL7 CDA-CCD) and proprietary EHR data models are mapped to the E2B(R2) data model via SALUS Common Information Model. Terminology mapping and terminology reasoning services are designed to ensure the automatic conversion of source EHR terminologies (e.g. ICD-9-CM, ICD-10, LOINC or SNOMED-CT) to the target terminology MedDRA which is expected in AE reporting forms. A validated set of terminology mappings is used to ensure the reliability of the reasoning mechanisms. The percentage of data elements of a standard E2B report that can be completed automatically has been estimated for two pilot sites. In the best scenario (i.e. the available fields in the EHR have actually been filled), only 36% (pilot site 1) and 38% (pilot site 2) of E2B data elements remain to be filled manually. In addition, most of these data elements shall not be filled in each report. SALUS platform's interoperability solutions enable partial automation of the AE reporting process, which could contribute to improve current spontaneous reporting practices and reduce under-reporting, which is currently one major obstacle in the process of acquisition of pharmacovigilance data.

  15. Treatments that generate higher number of adverse drug reactions and their symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Fernández-López

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs are an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and generate high health costs. Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine the treatments which produce more ADRs in general population and the main symptoms they generate. Methods: An observational, cross-sectional study consisting in performing a self-rated questionnaire was carried out. 510 patients were asked about the treatments, illnesses and ADRs, they had suffered from. Results: 26.7% of patients had suffered from some ADR. Classifying patients according to the type of prescribed treatment and studying the number of ADR that they had, we obtained significant differences (p ≤ 0.05 for treatments against arthrosis, anemia and nervous disorders (anxiety, depression, insomnia. Moreover, determining absolute frequencies of these ADRs appearance in each treatment, higher frequencies were again for drugs against arthrosis (22.6% of patients treated for arthrosis suffered some ADR, anemia (14.28%, nerve disorders (13.44% and also asthma (16%. Regarding the symptoms produced by ADRs, the most frequent were gastrointestinal (60% of patients who suffered an ADR, had gastrointestinal symptoms and nervous alterations (dizziness, headache, sleep disturbances etc (24.6%. Conclusion: Therapeutic groups which produce more commonly ADRs are those for arthrosis, anemia, nervous disorders and asthma. In addition, symptoms which are generated more frequently are gastrointestinal and nervous problems. This is in accordance with the usual side effects of mentioned treatments. Health professionals should be informed about it, so that they would be more alert about a possible emergence of an ADR in these treatments. They also could provide enough information to empower patients and thus, they probably could detect ADR events. This would facilitate ADR detection and would avoid serious consequences generated to both patients' health and health economics.

  16. Incidence and cost estimate of treating pediatric adverse drug reactions in Lagos, Nigeria

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    Kazeem Adeola Oshikoya

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs may cause prolonged hospital admissions with high treatment costs. The burden of ADRs in children has never been evaluated in Nigeria. The incidence of pediatric ADRs and the estimated cost of treatment over an 18-month period were determined in this study. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective observational study on children admitted to the pediatric wards of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH in Nigeria, between July 2006 and December 2007. METHODS: Each patient was assessed for ADRs throughout admission. Medical and non-medical costs to the hospital and patient were estimated for each ADR by reviewing the medical and pharmacy bills, medical charts and diagnostic request forms and by interviewing the parents. Cost estimates were performed in 2007 naira (Nigeria currency from the perspectives of the hospital (government, service users (patients and society (bearers of the total costs attributable to treating ADRs. The total estimated cost was expressed in 2007 United States dollars (USD. RESULTS: Two thousand and four children were admitted during the study; 12 (0.6% were admitted because of ADRs and 23 (1.2% developed ADR(s during admission. Forty ADRs were suspected in these 35 patients and involved 53 medicines. Antibiotics (50% were the most suspected medicines. Approximately 1.83 million naira (USD 15,466.60 was expended to manage all the patients admitted due to ADRs. CONCLUSIONS: Treating pediatric ADRs was very expensive. Pediatric drug use policies in Nigeria need to be reviewed so as to discourage self-medication, polypharmacy prescription and sales of prescription medicines without prescription.

  17. Factors Associated with the Reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions by Health Workers in Nnewi Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeuko, Amaka Y.; Ebenebe, Uzo E.; Nnebue, Chinomnso C; Ugoji, John O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Under-reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) by the prescribers is a common public health problem. Monitoring of factors that influence ADR reporting will reduce risks associated with drug use; improve patients care, safety and treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with the reporting of ADRs by health workers in Nnewi Nigeria. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 372 health workers in different health facilities in Nnewi North Local Government Area of Anambra state, selected using multistage sampling technique was done. Data collection employed pretested, self-administered structured questionnaires. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 17. Tests of statistical significance were carried out using Chi-square tests for proportions. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Out of the 372 respondents studied, 255 (68.5%) were females, and 117 (31.5%) were males. The modal age range (37.6%) was 31–40 years. Factors related by the respondents to influence ADR reporting include: Unavailability of electronic reporting (83.6%), unavailability of reporting forms (66.4%) and ignorance (58.2%). The difference among medical practitioners who related unavailability of electronic reporting process as obstacle to ADR reporting was not significant (P = 0.18). Conclusions: The study results revealed the factors associated with the reporting of ADRs among health workers in Nnewi Nigeria. It is desirable to initiate electronic reporting process, training programs on ADR reporting and make reporting forms/guidelines available to relevant health workers. PMID:25949775

  18. Reducing Adverse Effects During Drug Development: The Example of Lesogaberan and Paresthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydholm, Hans; von Corswant, Christian; Denison, Hans; Jensen, Jörgen M; Lehmann, Anders; Ruth, Magnus; Söderlind, Erik; Aurell-Holmberg, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Lesogaberan, a γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptor agonist, was developed for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with a partial response to proton pump inhibitor therapy. A high prevalence of paresthesia was observed in healthy individuals after dosing with lesogaberan in early-phase clinical trials. The aim of this review was to gain further insight into paresthesia caused by lesogaberan by summarizing the relevant preclinical and clinical data. This study was a narrative review of the literature and unpublished data. The occurrence of paresthesia may depend on the route or rate of drug administration; several studies were conducted to test this hypothesis, and formulations were developed to minimize the occurrence of paresthesia. Phase I clinical studies showed that, in healthy individuals, paresthesia occurred soon after administration of lesogaberan in a dose-dependent manner regardless of the route of administration. The occurrence of paresthesia could be decreased by fractionating the dose or reducing the rate of administration. These findings suggest that the initial rate of absorption plays an important part in the development of paresthesia. Modified-release formulations minimize the occurrence of paresthesia while retaining the anti-reflux activity of the drug, as measured by esophageal pH and the number of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations. The development of lesogaberan was halted because the effect on gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms observed in Phase II studies was not considered clinically meaningful in the target patient population. Nevertheless, it is an example of successful formulation development designed to minimize the occurrence of a compound's adverse effect while retaining its pharmacodynamic action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of Health Education on Prevention of Drug Abuse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken to investigate the influence of health education on prevention of drug abuse. 192 adolescents comprising of male and females, randomly selected from two secondary schools and a university were used as sample with ages ranging from 12-22years with a mean of 17years. The questionnaire ...

  20. Five typologies of alcohol and drug prevention programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Jakob Johan; Laura Marie, Schierff

    2018-01-01

    Adolescents exhibit a high rate of use of alcohol and illicit drugs. Effect studies rarely describe the actual content of the interventions in detail. Less is known about what was actually done in the prevention than about their effects. Aim: This study is a review study grouping the qualitatively...

  1. Incidence of adverse drug reactions in human immune deficiency virus-positive patients using highly active antiretroviral therapy

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    B Akshaya Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs in Human immune deficiency virus (HIV patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. To identify the risk factors associated with ADRs in HIV patients. To analyze reported ADRs based on various parameters like causality, severity, predictability, and preventability. Retrospective case-control study. An 18-month retrospective case-control study of 208 patients newly registered in ART center, RIMS hospital, Kadapa, were intensively monitored for ADRs to HAART. Predictability was calculated based on the history of previous exposure to drug. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify the risk factors for ADRs. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test for estimating the correlation between ADRs and different variables. All statistical calculations were performed using EpiInfo version 3.5.3. Monitoring of 208 retrospective patients by active Pharmacovigilance identified 105 ADRs that were identified in 71 patients. Skin rash and anemia were the most commonly observed ADRs. The organ system commonly affected by ADR was skin and appendages (31.57%. The ADRs that were moderate were 90.14% of cases. The incidence of ADRs (53.52% was higher with Zidovudine + Lamivudine + Nevirapine combination. CD4 cell count less than <250 cells/μl were 80.28%, male gender were observed to be the risk factors for ADRs. Our study finding showed that there is a need of active pharmaceutical care with intensive monitoring for ADRs in Indian HIV-positive patients who are illiterate, of male and female gender, with CD4 count ≤250 cells/mm 3 with comorbid conditions.

  2. Clinical coding of prospectively identified paediatric adverse drug reactions--a retrospective review of patient records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellis, Jennifer R; Kirkham, Jamie J; Nunn, Anthony J; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2014-12-17

    National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in the UK use a system of coding for patient episodes. The coding system used is the International Classification of Disease (ICD-10). There are ICD-10 codes which may be associated with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and there is a possibility of using these codes for ADR surveillance. This study aimed to determine whether ADRs prospectively identified in children admitted to a paediatric hospital were coded appropriately using ICD-10. The electronic admission abstract for each patient with at least one ADR was reviewed. A record was made of whether the ADR(s) had been coded using ICD-10. Of 241 ADRs, 76 (31.5%) were coded using at least one ICD-10 ADR code. Of the oncology ADRs, 70/115 (61%) were coded using an ICD-10 ADR code compared with 6/126 (4.8%) non-oncology ADRs (difference in proportions 56%, 95% CI 46.2% to 65.8%; p codes as a single means of detection. Data derived from administrative healthcare databases are not reliable for identifying ADRs by themselves, but may complement other methods of detection.

  3. Factors that influence spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions: a model centralized in the medical professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdeiro, María T; Polonia, Jorge; Gestal-Otero, Juan J; Figueiras, Adolfo

    2004-11-01

    The spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) through the yellow card and made concrete by the knowledge and attitudes of doctors, has been rousing a great deal of bibliographical interest in recent years. However, there does not seem to be any actual revision in the theme on which the theoretical models that explain the process of decision in reporting are proposed. In this work an explanatory model of the factors that condition reporting is proposed and a revision of the literature on the subject has also been carried out. The proposed model is centralized in the medical professional and it considers the habit of reporting as the result of the doctor's formation and his interaction with the environment. The combination of knowledge-attitudes-practices and the theory of the satisfaction of needs seemed very adequate for ADR systematization. The results also indicate that, to improve the participation of health professionals in surveillance systems through spontaneous reporting, it might be necessary to design combined strategies that modify both intrinsic (knowledge, attitudes) and extrinsic (relationship between health professionals and their patients, the national health system and pharmaceutical companies) factors.

  4. Adverse drug reaction profile of anti-snake venom in a rural tertiary care teaching hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Rushikesh Prabhakar; Motghare, Vijay Motiram; Padwal, Sudhir Laxman; Pore, Rakesh Ramkrishna; Bhamare, Chetanraj Ghanshyam; Deshmukh, Vinod Shivaji; Pise, Harshal Nutan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The study was carried out with the aim of evaluation of the adverse drug reaction profile of anti-snake venom serum (ASV) in a rural tertiary care hospital. Methods An observational study was conducted in SRTR Medical College, Ambajogai, Maharashtra, India. A total number of 296 indoor case papers of snake bite from February to September 2011 and June to August 2012 were retrieved from the record section and the antivenom reactions were assessed. In addition, basic epidemiological data and prescribing practices of ASV were also analyzed. Results Vasculotoxic snake bites were more common (50.61%) than neuroparalytic ones (22.56%). Mild envenomation was the commonest presentation. A total of 92 (56.10%) patients who received ASV suffered from antivenom reactions. The most common nature of reaction was chills, rigors (69.56%) followed by nausea and vomiting (34.8%). 10-15% patients suffered from moderate to severe reactions like hypotension and sudden respiratory arrest. We did not find any dose response relationship of ASV to risk of reactions (odds ratio 0.37). Intradermal sensitivity test was performed in about 72% cases. Conclusion Our study showed a higher incidence of reactions to ASV at our institute. PMID:24396245

  5. Reporting patterns of adverse drug reactions over recent years in China: analysis from publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao-jing; Ye, Xiao-fei; Wang, Xing-xing; Wang, Jing; Shi, Wen-tao; Gao, Qing-bin; Zhang, Tian-yi; Xu, Jin-fang; Zhu, Tian-tian; He, Jia

    2015-02-01

    The goal of this study was to clarify the reporting patterns of self-reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in China. A variety of sources were searched, including the official website of China FDA, the national center for ADR monitoring center, publications from PubMed, and so on. We retrieved the relevant information and made descriptive and comparative analysis from the year 2009 to 2013. The ADR reporting numbers were 638,996, 692,904, 852,799, 1,200,000 and 1,317,000 from 2009 to 2013, respectively. Healthcare professionals contributed significantly, and their proportion always exceeded 80% before 2012. The average report per million inhabitants has increased from 479 to 983 from 2009 to 2013. However, the proportion of new or serious report was always below 25%. The reports mainly concern anti-infective agents and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), especially TCM injection. The proportion of ADR reports in geriatric patients has increased for 4 consecutive years. ADR report numbers and reporting rates in China are on the rise. However, the proportion of new or serious reports as well as the proportion of reports contributed by consumers and pharmaceutical companies are still quite low. More attention should be paid to the elderly, anti-infective agents and TCM, especially TCM injections.

  6. Attitudes and knowledge of hospital pharmacists to adverse drug reaction reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher F; Mottram, David R; Rowe, Philip H; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2001-01-01

    Aims To investigate the attitudes of UK hospital pharmacists towards, and their understanding, of adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting. Methods A postal questionnaire survey of 600 randomly selected hospital pharmacists was conducted. Results The response rate was 53.7% (n = 322). A total of 217 Yellow Cards had been submitted to the CSM/MCA by 78 (25.6%) of those responding. Half of those responding felt that ADR reporting should be compulsory and over three-quarters felt it was a professional obligation. However, almost half were unclear as to what should be reported, while the time available in clinical practice and time taken to complete forms were deemed to be major deterrents to reporting. Pharmacists were not dissuaded from reporting by the need to consult a medical colleague or by the absence of a fee. Education and training had a significant influence on pharmacists' participation in the Yellow Card Scheme. Conclusions Pharmacists have a reasonable knowledge and are supportive of the Yellow Card spontaneous ADR reporting scheme. However, education and training will be important in maintaining and increasing ADR reports from pharmacists. PMID:11167664

  7. A 3-armed randomized controlled trial of nurses' continuing education meetings on adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarayani, Amir; Naderi-Behdani, Fahimeh; Hadavand, Naser; Javadi, Mohammadreza; Farsad, Fariborz; Hadjibabaie, Molouk; Gholami, Kheirollah

    2015-01-01

    Nurses' insufficient knowledge of adverse drug reactions is reported as a barrier to spontaneous reporting. Therefore, CE meetings could be utilized to enhance nurses' competencies. In a 3-armed randomized controlled trial, 496 nurses, working in a tertiary medical center, were randomly allocated to a didactic lecture, brainstorming workshop, or the control group (delayed education). Similar instructors (2 clinical pharmacists) prepared and delivered the educational content to all 3 groups. Outcomes were declarative/procedural knowledge (primary outcome), participation rate, and satisfaction. Knowledge was evaluated using a validated researcher-made questionnaire in 3 time points: immediately before, immediately after, and 3 months after each session. Participants' satisfaction was assessed immediately after each meeting via a standard tool. Data were analyzed using appropriate parametric and nonparametric tests. Rate of participation was 37.7% for the lecture group and 47.5% for the workshop group. The workshop participants were significantly more satisfied in comparison with the lecture group (p techniques. © 2015 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  8. Nurses' reporting of suspect adverse drug reactions: a mixed-methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia De Angelis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess nurses' knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP towards spontaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs reporting. METHODS: The mixed-method study was conducted following a quanti-qualitative sequential approach: a survey (using a KAP questionnaire followed by a focus group was performed. RESULTS: In the quantitative findings, responders (570 hospital nurses declared that they were unaware of the pharmacovigilance system (58.1%, n = 331; where to find the reporting form (63.5%, n = 362; how fill it in (71.6%, n = 408; to whom and how to send it (65.8%, n = 375. Only 11.1% (n = 63 reported ADRs. The qualitative phase supported the quantitative findings and provided new information about other factors that condition ADR reporting: misinterpretation of the meaning of "reporting", unawareness of nurses' autonomy in ADR reporting and fear of consequences after ADR reporting. CONCLUSION: Nurses are not fully aware of their role in ADR reporting. We recommend educational interventions and management changes.

  9. [Do pediatricians identify adverse drug reactions even when they do not report them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Ríos, Olga; Jasso-Gutiérrez, Luis; Garduño-Espinosa, Juan; Olivar-López, Víctor; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre

    Spontaneous notification depends on the ability of pediatricians to identify adverse drug reactions (ADRs) along with their habit of reporting these incidents. During the years 2008 and 2009, the frequency of reports of ADRs to the Electronic Program of Pharmacovigilance (SISFAR) in the Hospital Infantil of Mexico Federico Gomez (HIMFG) was low (0.44% and 0.20%, respectively). Because of the above, the ability of pediatricians from the Emergency Department (ED) to identify ADRs using the clinical chart review was evaluated in 2010 in this study. A descriptive, observational, cross-sectional retrospective study was conducted in the ED from March 1 to August 31. ADRs were classified and quantified as "ADRs identified by pediatricians" when there was evidence in the clinical chart that pediatricians associated a clinical sign, symptom and laboratory value with an ADR. The numbers of notifications reported in SISFAR were quantified. Descriptive analysis was done using SPSS v.18. Considering patients who were admitted to the ED, the frequency of ADRs was 21.8%. The frequency of ADRs identified by physicians in clinical charts was 86%. The pharmacist detected 14% of ADRs. The frequency of ADRs reported by physicians was 6.1%. Although identification of ADRs in the clinical charts by pediatricians was high, it is possible that some ADRs were undetected. Because underreporting was very high, it is necessary to take actions to improve the reporting process. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A.

  10. The importance of monitoring adverse drug reactions in pediatric patients: the results of a national surveillance program in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnovale, Carla; Brusadelli, Tatiana; Zuccotti, GianVincenzo; Beretta, Silvia; Sullo, Maria Giuseppa; Capuano, Annalisa; Rossi, Francesco; Moschini, Martina; Mugelli, Alessandro; Vannacci, Alfredo; Laterza, Marcella; Clementi, Emilio; Radice, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    To gain information on safety of drugs used in pediatrics through a 4-year post-marketing active pharmacovigilance program. The program sampled the Italian population and was termed 'Monitoring of the Adverse Effects in Pediatric population' (MEAP). Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were collected for individuals aged 0 - 17 years treated in hospitals and territorial health services in Lombardy, Tuscany, Apulia and Campania; located to gain an appropriate sampling of the population. ADRs were evaluated using the Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale (Naranjo) and analyzed with respect to time, age, sex, category of ADR, seriousness, suspected medicines, type of reporter and off-label use. We collected and analyzed reports from 3539 ADRs. Vaccines, antineoplastic and psychotropic drugs were the most frequently pharmacotherapeutic subgroups involved. Seventeen percent of reported ADRs were serious; of them fever, vomiting and angioedema were the most frequently reported. Eight percent of ADRs were associated with off-label use, and 10% were unknown ADRs. Analysis of these revealed possible strategies of therapy optimization. The MEAP project demonstrated that active post-marketing pharmacovigilance programs are a valid strategy to increase awareness on pediatric pharmacology, reduce underreporting and provide information on drug actions in pediatrics. This information enhances drug therapy optimization in the pediatric patients.

  11. Methodological Considerations for Comparison of Brand Versus Generic Versus Authorized Generic Adverse Event Reports in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Motiur; Alatawi, Yasser; Cheng, Ning; Qian, Jingjing; Peissig, Peggy L; Berg, Richard L; Page, David C; Hansen, Richard A

    2017-12-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS), a post-marketing safety database, can be used to differentiate brand versus generic safety signals. To explore the methods for identifying and analyzing brand versus generic adverse event (AE) reports. Public release FAERS data from January 2004 to March 2015 were analyzed using alendronate and carbamazepine as examples. Reports were classified as brand, generic, and authorized generic (AG). Disproportionality analyses compared reporting odds ratios (RORs) of selected known labeled serious adverse events stratifying by brand, generic, and AG. The homogeneity of these RORs was compared using the Breslow-Day test. The AG versus generic was the primary focus since the AG is identical to brand but marketed as a generic, therefore minimizing generic perception bias. Sensitivity analyses explored how methodological approach influenced results. Based on 17,521 US event reports involving alendronate and 3733 US event reports involving carbamazepine (immediate and extended release), no consistently significant differences were observed across RORs for the AGs versus generics. Similar results were obtained when comparing reporting patterns over all time and just after generic entry. The most restrictive approach for classifying AE reports yielded smaller report counts but similar results. Differentiation of FAERS reports as brand versus generic requires careful attention to risk of product misclassification, but the relative stability of findings across varying assumptions supports the utility of these approaches for potential signal detection.

  12. Adverse Drug Reaction Identification and Extraction in Social Media: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardon, Jérémy; Abdellaoui, Redhouane; Bellet, Florelle; Asfari, Hadyl; Souvignet, Julien; Texier, Nathalie; Jaulent, Marie-Christine; Beyens, Marie-Noëlle; Burgun, Anita; Bousquet, Cédric

    2015-07-10

    The underreporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) through traditional reporting channels is a limitation in the efficiency of the current pharmacovigilance system. Patients' experiences with drugs that they report on social media represent a new source of data that may have some value in postmarketing safety surveillance. A scoping review was undertaken to explore the breadth of evidence about the use of social media as a new source of knowledge for pharmacovigilance. Daubt et al's recommendations for scoping reviews were followed. The research questions were as follows: How can social media be used as a data source for postmarketing drug surveillance? What are the available methods for extracting data? What are the different ways to use these data? We queried PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar to extract relevant articles that were published before June 2014 and with no lower date limit. Two pairs of reviewers independently screened the selected studies and proposed two themes of review: manual ADR identification (theme 1) and automated ADR extraction from social media (theme 2). Descriptive characteristics were collected from the publications to create a database for themes 1 and 2. Of the 1032 citations from PubMed and Embase, 11 were relevant to the research question. An additional 13 citations were added after further research on the Internet and in reference lists. Themes 1 and 2 explored 11 and 13 articles, respectively. Ways of approaching the use of social media as a pharmacovigilance data source were identified. This scoping review noted multiple methods for identifying target data, extracting them, and evaluating the quality of medical information from social media. It also showed some remaining gaps in the field. Studies related to the identification theme usually failed to accurately assess the completeness, quality, and reliability of the data that were analyzed from social media. Regarding extraction, no study proposed a generic approach to easily

  13. Coping with adverse drug events in patients with heart failure : Exploring the role of medication beliefs and perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Smedt, R. H.; Jaarsma, T.; Ranchor, A. V.; van der Meer, K.; Groenier, K. H.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F. M.; Denig, P.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes coping strategies that patients with heart failure (HF) use to manage adverse drug events (ADEs). The included coping strategies were social support seeking, information seeking, non-adherence and taking alleviating medication. The role of beliefs about medication and ADE

  14. Attitudes and Usage of the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System Among Gastroenterology Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salk, Allison; Ehrenpreis, Eli D

    2016-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) is used for postmarketing pharmacovigilance. Our study sought to assess attitudes and usage of the FAERS among gastroenterology nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs). A survey was administered at the August 2012 Principles of Gastroenterology for the Nurse Practitioner and Physician Assistant course, held in Chicago, IL. Of the 128 respondents, 123 (96%) reported a specialty in gastroenterology or hepatology and were included in analysis. Eighty-nine participants were NPs and 32 PAs, whereas 2 did not report their profession. Although 119 (98%) agreed or strongly agreed with the statement that accurately reporting adverse drug reactions is an important process to optimize patient safety, the majority of participants (54% NPs and 81% PAs) were unfamiliar with the FAERS. In addition, only 20% of NPs and 9% of PAs reported learning about the FAERS in NP or PA schooling. Our study shows enthusiasm among gastroenterology NPs and PAs for the reporting of adverse drug reactions, coupled with a lack of familiarity with the FAERS. This presents an opportunity for enhanced education about reporting of adverse drug reactions for gastroenterology NPs and PAs.

  15. Potentially inappropriate medications defined by STOPP criteria and the risk of adverse drug events in older hospitalized patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hamilton, Hilary

    2011-06-13

    Previous studies have not demonstrated a consistent association between potentially inappropriate medicines (PIMs) in older patients as defined by Beers criteria and avoidable adverse drug events (ADEs). This study aimed to assess whether PIMs defined by new STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Persons\\' potentially inappropriate Prescriptions) criteria are significantly associated with ADEs in older people with acute illness.

  16. AOP: An R Package For Sufficient Causal Analysis in Pathway-based Screening of Drugs and Chemicals for Adversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary: How can I quickly find the key events in a pathway that I need to monitor to predict that a/an beneficial/adverse event/outcome will occur? This is a key question when using signaling pathways for drug/chemical screening in pharma-cology, toxicology and risk assessment. ...

  17. Can preventable adverse events be predicted among hospitalized older patients? The development and validation of a predictive model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeg, L. van de; Langelaan, M.; Wagner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To develop and validate a predictive model for preventable adverse events (AEs) in hospitalized older patients, using clinically important risk factors that are readily available on admission. Design: Data from two retrospective patient record review studies on AEs were used. Risk factors

  18. [Active surveillance of adverse drug reaction in the era of big data: challenge and opportunity for control selection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S F; Zhan, S Y

    2016-07-01

    Electronic healthcare databases have become an important source for active surveillance of drug safety in the era of big data. The traditional epidemiology research designs are needed to confirm the association between drug use and adverse events based on these datasets, and the selection of the comparative control is essential to each design. This article aims to explain the principle and application of each type of control selection, introduce the methods and parameters for method comparison, and describe the latest achievements in the batch processing of control selection, which would provide important methodological reference for the use of electronic healthcare databases to conduct post-marketing drug safety surveillance in China.

  19. Dose-Specific Adverse Drug Reaction Identification in Electronic Patient Records: Temporal Data Mining in an Inpatient Psychiatric Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Robert; Werge, Thomas; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2014-01-01

    patient-specific adverse events (AEs) and links these to specific drugs and dosages in a temporal manner, based on integration of text mining results and structured data. The structured data contained precise information on drug identity, dosage and strength.When applying the method to the 3,394 patients...... all indication areas.The aim of this study was to take advantage of techniques for temporal data mining of EPRs in order to detect ADRs in a patient- and dose-specific manner.We used a psychiatric hospital’s EPR system to investigate undesired drug effects. Within one workflow the method identified...

  20. REBAMIPIDE: EFFECTIVE DRUG PREVENTION OF NSAID ENTEROPATHY IS POSSIBLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Moroz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of gastrointestinal tract (GIT complications is the most important element for the rational use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin (LDA. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs have long been the only medication to prevent these complications. However, PPIs are only effective in preventing and treating upper GIT diseases (NSAID gastropathy rather than small intestinal injury (NSAID enteropathy. Rebamipide has emerged as a novel agent to protect the gastrointestinal mucosa today. The effect of the drug differs from that of PPIs: it is a typical gastroand enteroprotector that enhances the synthesis of endogenous prostaglandins and possesses a significant anti-inflammatory potential. Rebamipide has long been widely used by doctors inJapan,South Korea, andChinaas an effective and safe agent for the treatment of many diseases of the digestive system. There is a strong evidence base for the efficacy of rebamipide in preventing and treating NSAID gastropathy and NSAID enteropathy (including LDA-induced injuries. Controlled studies have found that the drug is not inferior to the classic gastroprotective agent misoprostol, significantly outperforming the latter in its tolerability. This review describes the mechanism of action of rebamipide and main clinical trials of its therapeutic effect in NSAID gastropathy and NSAID enteropathy. 

  1. Dietary supplementation with cysteine prevents adverse metabolic outcomes of repeated cures with paracetamol in old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Carole; Pourpe, Charlène; Voyard, Guillaume; Rémond, Didier; Migné, Carole; Centeno, Delphine; Dardevet, Dominique; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Papet, Isabelle

    2017-12-01

    Cysteine (Cys), a conditionally indispensable amino acid, is required for the detoxification of paracetamol (acetaminophen, N-acetyl-para-aminophenol, 4-hydroxy-acetanilide, APAP), a drug of widespread use in older persons. We recently reported that repeated APAP cures could worsen sarcopenia in old rats, likely to be due to the impairment of Cys/GSH homoeostasis. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether a dietary Cys supplementation during APAP cures could improve Cys/GSH homoeostasis and thus preserve skeletal muscle. Male 21·5-month-old Wistar rats received three 2-week-long cures of APAP (1 % of diet) alone or with extra Cys (0·5 % of diet), intercalated with washout periods of 2 weeks (APAP and APAP-Cys groups, respectively). They were compared with untreated control rats (CT group). CT and APAP-Cys groups were pair-fed to the APAP group. Dietary Cys supplementation was efficient to prevent increase in liver mass (P<0·0001), decrease in liver GSH (P<0·0001), increase in blood GSH concentration (P<0·0001), and to some extent, decrease in plasma free Cys concentration (P<0·05), all induced by repeated APAP cures. The addition of Cys to APAP cures decreased plasma alanine transaminase (P<0·05), the fractional synthesis rate of liver proteins (P<0·01), and increased masses of extensor digitorum longus (P<0·01), and soleus (P<0·05), compared with the APAP group. Cys supplementation prevented alteration in Cys/GSH homoeostasis and increased some muscle masses in old rats under repeated cures with a non-toxic dose of APAP.

  2. Do Health Professionals have Positive Perception Towards Consumer Reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshakka, Mohammed Ahmed; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of general practitioners (GPs) and community pharmacists (CPs) in Penang, Malaysia, towards consumer reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs). A cross-sectional mail survey was adopted for the performance of the study. Survey questionnaires were sent to 192 CPs and 400 GPs in the state of Penang, Malaysia. Reminders were sent to all the non-respondents after 3 weeks of the initial mailing. Data which were collected from the questionnaires were analyzed by using the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS), version 15. The Chi-square test was used to determine as to whether there was any significant difference between expected and observed frequencies at the alpha level of 0.05. Only 104 respondents (47 CPs and 57 GPs) returned the survey, with a response rate of 18.0%- a figure which could be considered to be low. This study indicated that GPs and CPs were aware about the importance and benefits of consumer reporting. A majority of them (88.0%) thought that consumer reporting would add more benefits to the existing pharmacovigilance program. Similarly, 97% of the respondents agreed that reporting of ADRs was necessary and 87.0% respondents had seen ADRs among their patients. However, 57 of them (6.0%), had not been aware that the national program in Malaysia allowed consumers to report ADRs. A majority of them (97.0%) agreed that consumers needed more education regarding ADR reporting. Most of them (84.0%) thought that consumers could not write valid reports which were similar to reports which were made by healthcare professionals (HCPs). A majority of the respondents (68.0%) had not heard about the consumer reporting program in Malaysia and half of them did not believe that consumer reporting could overcome under-reporting, which was the main problem of the national pharmacovigilance program in Malaysia. The GPs and CPs were aware about the importance and benefits of consumer reporting. Such reporting

  3. Do Health Professionals have Positive Perception Towards Consumer Reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshakka, Mohammed Ahmed; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of general practitioners (GPs) and community pharmacists (CPs) in Penang, Malaysia, towards consumer reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs). Methodology: A cross-sectional mail survey was adopted for the performance of the study. Survey questionnaires were sent to 192 CPs and 400 GPs in the state of Penang, Malaysia. Reminders were sent to all the non-respondents after 3 weeks of the initial mailing. Data which were collected from the questionnaires were analyzed by using the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS), version 15. The Chi-square test was used to determine as to whether there was any significant difference between expected and observed frequencies at the alpha level of 0.05. Results: Only 104 respondents (47 CPs and 57 GPs) returned the survey, with a response rate of 18.0%- a figure which could be considered to be low. This study indicated that GPs and CPs were aware about the importance and benefits of consumer reporting. A majority of them (88.0%) thought that consumer reporting would add more benefits to the existing pharmacovigilance program. Similarly, 97% of the respondents agreed that reporting of ADRs was necessary and 87.0% respondents had seen ADRs among their patients. However, 57 of them (6.0%), had not been aware that the national program in Malaysia allowed consumers to report ADRs. A majority of them (97.0%) agreed that consumers needed more education regarding ADR reporting. Most of them (84.0%) thought that consumers could not write valid reports which were similar to reports which were made by healthcare professionals (HCPs). A majority of the respondents (68.0%) had not heard about the consumer reporting program in Malaysia and half of them did not believe that consumer reporting could overcome under-reporting, which was the main problem of the national pharmacovigilance program in Malaysia. Conclusion: The GPs and CPs were aware about the importance and benefits

  4. Meaningful use of health information technology and declines in in-hospital adverse drug events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Michael F; Spector, William D; Rhona Limcangco, M; Encinosa, William E

    2017-07-01

    Nationwide initiatives have promoted greater adoption of health information technology as a means to reduce adverse drug events (ADEs). Hospital adoption of electronic health records with Meaningful Use (MU) capabilities expected to improve medication safety has grown rapidly. However, evidence that MU capabilities are associated with declines in in-hospital ADEs is lacking. Data came from the 2010-2013 Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System and the 2008-2013 Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) Analytics Database. Two-level random intercept logistic regression was used to estimate the association of MU capabilities and occurrence of ADEs, adjusting for patient characteristics, hospital characteristics, and year of observation. Rates of in-hospital ADEs declined by 19% from 2010 to 2013. Adoption of MU capabilities was associated with 11% lower odds of an ADE (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-0.96). Interoperability capability was associated with 19% lower odds of an ADE (95% CI, 0.67- 0.98). Adoption of MU capabilities explained 22% of the observed reduction in ADEs, or 67,000 fewer ADEs averted by MU. Concurrent with the rapid uptake of MU and interoperability, occurrence of in-hospital ADEs declined significantly from 2010 to 2013. MU capabilities and interoperability were associated with lower occurrence of ADEs, but the effects did not vary by experience with MU. About one-fifth of the decline in ADEs from 2010 to 2013 was attributable to MU capabilities. Findings support the contention that adoption of MU capabilities and interoperability spurred by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act contributed in part to the recent decline in ADEs. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  5. Herbal medicine use and linked suspected adverse drug reactions in a prospective cohort of Ugandan inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiguba, Ronald; Ononge, Sam; Karamagi, Charles; Bird, Sheila M

    2016-05-26

    Clinical history-taking can be employed as a standardized approach to elucidate the use of herbal medicines and their linked suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) among hospitalized patients. We sought to identify herbal medicines nominated by Ugandan inpatients; compare nomination rates by ward and gender; confirm the herbs' known pharmacological properties from published literature; and identify ADRs linked to pre-admission use of herbal medicines. Prospective cohort of consented adult inpatients designed to assess medication use and ADRs on one gynaecological and three medical wards of 1790-bed Mulago National Referral Hospital. Baseline and follow-up data were obtained on patients' characteristics, including pre-admission use of herbal medicines. Fourteen percent (26/191) of females in Gynaecology nominated at least one specific herbal medicine compared with 20 % (114/571) of inpatients on medical wards [20 % (69/343) of females; 20 % (45/228) of males]. Frequent nominations were Persea americana (30), Mumbwa/multiple-herb clay rods (23), Aloe barbadensis (22), Beta vulgaris (12), Vernonia amygdalina (11), Commelina africana (7), Bidens pilosa (7), Hoslundia opposita (6), Mangifera indica (4), and Dicliptera laxata (4). Four inpatients experienced 10 suspected ADRs linked to pre-admission herbal medicine use including Commelina africana (4), multiple-herb-mumbwa (1), or unspecified local-herbs (5): three ADR-cases were abortion-related and one kidney-related. The named herbal medicines and their nomination rates generally differed by specialized ward, probably guided by local folklore knowledge of their use. Clinical elicitation from inpatients can generate valuable safety data on herbal medicine use. However, larger routine studies might increase the utility of our method to assess herbal medicine use and detect herb-linked ADRs. Future studies should take testable samples of ADR-implicated herbal medicines for further analysis.

  6. Implementation of a module to promote competency in adverse drug reaction reporting in undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Raakhi Kaliprasad; Jalgaonkar, Sharmila Vinayak; Sarkate, Pankaj V; Rege, Nirmala Narayan

    2016-10-01

    Underreporting and poor quality of adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports pose a challenge for the Pharmacovigilance Program of India. A module to impart knowledge and skills of ADR reporting to MBBS students was developed and evaluated. The module consisted of (a) e-mailing an ADR narrative and online filling of the "suspected ADR reporting form" (SARF) and (b) a week later, practical on ADR reporting was conducted followed by online filling of SARF postpractical at 1 and 6 months. SARF was an 18-item form with a total score of 36. The module was implemented in the year 2012-2013. Feedback from students and faculty was taken using 15-item prevalidated feedback questionnaires. The module was modified based on the feedback and implemented for the subsequent batch in the year 2013-2014. The evaluation consisted of recording the number of students responding and the scores achieved. A total of 171 students in 2012-2013 batch and 179 in 2013-2014 batch participated. In the 2012-2013 batch, the number of students filling the SARF decreased from basal: 171; 1 month: 122; 6 months: 17. The average scores showed improvement from basal 16.2 (45%) to 26.4 (73%) at 1 month and to 27.3 (76%) at 6 months. For the 2013-2014 batch, the number ( n = 179) remained constant throughout and the average score progressively increased from basal 10.5 (30%) to 27.8 (77%) at 1 month and 30.3 (84%) at 6 months. This module improved the accuracy of filling SARF by students and this subsequently will led to better ADR reporting. Hence, this module can be used to inculcate better ADR reporting practices in budding physicians.

  7. Deep learning for pharmacovigilance: recurrent neural network architectures for labeling adverse drug reactions in Twitter posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocos, Anne; Fiks, Alexander G; Masino, Aaron J

    2017-07-01

    Social media is an important pharmacovigilance data source for adverse drug reaction (ADR) identification. Human review of social media data is infeasible due to data quantity, thus natural language processing techniques are necessary. Social media includes informal vocabulary and irregular grammar, which challenge natural language processing methods. Our objective is to develop a scalable, deep-learning approach that exceeds state-of-the-art ADR detection performance in social media. We developed a recurrent neural network (RNN) model that labels words in an input sequence with ADR membership tags. The only input features are word-embedding vectors, which can be formed through task-independent pretraining or during ADR detection training. Our best-performing RNN model used pretrained word embeddings created from a large, non-domain-specific Twitter dataset. It achieved an approximate match F-measure of 0.755 for ADR identification on the dataset, compared to 0.631 for a baseline lexicon system and 0.65 for the state-of-the-art conditional random field model. Feature analysis indicated that semantic information in pretrained word embeddings boosted sensitivity and, combined with contextual awareness captured in the RNN, precision. Our model required no task-specific feature engineering, suggesting generalizability to additional sequence-labeling tasks. Learning curve analysis showed that our model reached optimal performance with fewer training examples than the other models. ADR detection performance in social media is significantly improved by using a contextually aware model and word embeddings formed from large, unlabeled datasets. The approach reduces manual data-labeling requirements and is scalable to large social media datasets. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. The attitudes of pharmacists and physicians in Bosnia and Herzegovina towards adverse drug reaction reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Catic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs are threat to the patient’s safety and the quality of life, and they increase the cost of health care. Spontaneous ADR reporting system mainly relies on physicians, but also pharmacists, nurses, and even patients. The aim of this study was to explore attitudes, barriers, and possible improvements to ADR reporting practices in Bosnia and Herzegovina.Methods: A self-reported questionnaire was developed to collect data on the perception of pharmacovigilance practice and ADR reporting. The survey was conducted in the period between September, 2014 and October, 2014.Results: The response rate was 73% (44 of 60 and 93% (148 of 160 among the pharmacist and family medicine physician groups, respectively. Regarding the attitudes to pharmacovigilance practice and reporting, both the pharmacists and physicians found the practices important. The majority of pharmacists and physicians in year 2014 did not report any ADR, while 18% of the pharmacists and 12% of the physicians, who participated in this study, reported one ADR. Reporting procedure, uncertainty, and their exposure were the main barriers to reporting ADRs for the pharmacists. The physicians claimed lack of knowledge to whom to report an ADR as the main barrier. A significant number of the respondents thought that additional education in ADR reporting would have a positive impact, and would increase the ADR reporting rate.Conclusions: Despite the overall positive attitude towards ADR reporting, the reporting rate in Bosnia and Herzegovina is still low. Different barriers to the ADR reporting have been identified, and there is also the need for improvements in the traditional education in this field.

  9. A prospective three-step intervention study to prevent medication errors in drug handling in paediatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Dorothee; Bertsche, Astrid; Meyrath, David; Koepf, Ellen D; Traiser, Carolin; Seebald, Katja; Schmitt, Claus P; Hoffmann, Georg F; Haefeli, Walter E; Bertsche, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    To prevent medication errors in drug handling in a paediatric ward. One in five preventable adverse drug events in hospitalised children is caused by medication errors. Errors in drug prescription have been studied frequently, but data regarding drug handling, including drug preparation and administration, are scarce. A three-step intervention study including monitoring procedure was used to detect and prevent medication errors in drug handling. After approval by the ethics committee, pharmacists monitored drug handling by nurses on an 18-bed paediatric ward in a university hospital prior to and following each intervention step. They also conducted a questionnaire survey aimed at identifying knowledge deficits. Each intervention step targeted different causes of errors. The handout mainly addressed knowledge deficits, the training course addressed errors caused by rule violations and slips, and the reference book addressed knowledge-, memory- and rule-based errors. The number of patients who were subjected to at least one medication error in drug handling decreased from 38/43 (88%) to 25/51 (49%) following the third intervention, and the overall frequency of errors decreased from 527 errors in 581 processes (91%) to 116/441 (26%). The issue of the handout reduced medication errors caused by knowledge deficits regarding, for instance, the correct 'volume of solvent for IV drugs' from 49-25%. Paediatric drug handling is prone to errors. A three-step intervention effectively decreased the high frequency of medication errors by addressing the diversity of their causes. Worldwide, nurses are in charge of drug handling, which constitutes an error-prone but often-neglected step in drug therapy. Detection and prevention of errors in daily routine is necessary for a safe and effective drug therapy. Our three-step intervention reduced errors and is suitable to be tested in other wards and settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Prospective observational study of adverse drug reactions to diclofenac in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standing, Joseph F; Ooi, Kuan; Keady, Simon; Howard, Richard F; Savage, Imogen; Wong, Ian C K

    2009-01-01

    AIM The aim of this study was to investigate the type of common (occurring in >1% of patients) adverse reactions caused by diclofenac when given to children for acute pain. METHODS A prospective observational study was undertaken on paediatric surgical patents aged ≤12 years at Great Ormond Street and University College London Hospitals. All adverse events were recorded, and causality assessment used to judge the likelihood of them being due to diclofenac. Prospective recruitment meant not all patients were prescribed diclofenac, allowing an analysis of utilization. Causality of all serious adverse events was reviewed by an expert panel. RESULTS Children prescribed diclofenac were significantly older, and stayed in hospital for shorter periods than those who were not. Diclofenac was not avoided in asthmatic patients. Data on 380 children showed they suffer similar types of nonserious adverse reactions to adults. The incidence (95% confidence interval) of rash was 0.8% (0.016, 2.3); minor central nervous system disturbance 0.5% (0.06, 1.9); rectal irritation with suppositories 0.3% (0.009, 1.9); and diarrhoea 0.3% (0.007, 1.5). No serious adverse event was judged to be caused by diclofenac, meaning the incidence of serious adverse reactions to diclofenac in children is Children given diclofenac for acute pain appeared to suffer similar types of adverse reactions to adults; the incidence of serious adverse reaction is <0.8%. PMID:19694745

  11. Building a knowledge base of severe adverse drug events based on AERS reporting data using semantic web technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoqian; Wang, Liwei; Liu, Hongfang; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    A semantically coded knowledge base of adverse drug events (ADEs) with severity information is critical for clinical decision support systems and translational research applications. However it remains challenging to measure and identify the severity information of ADEs. The objective of the study is to develop and evaluate a semantic web based approach for building a knowledge base of severe ADEs based on the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) reporting data. We utilized a normalized AERS reporting dataset and extracted putative drug-ADE pairs and their associated outcome codes in the domain of cardiac disorders. We validated the drug-ADE associations using ADE datasets from SIDe Effect Resource (SIDER) and the UMLS. We leveraged the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event (CTCAE) grading system and classified the ADEs into the CTCAE in the Web Ontology Language (OWL). We identified and validated 2,444 unique Drug-ADE pairs in the domain of cardiac disorders, of which 760 pairs are in Grade 5, 775 pairs in Grade 4 and 2,196 pairs in Grade 3.

  12. Effectiveness of HIV prevention social marketing with injecting drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, David R; Zhang, Guili; Cassady, Diana; Pappas, Les; Mitchell, Joyce; Kegeles, Susan M

    2010-10-01

    Social marketing involves applying marketing principles to promote social goods. In the context of health behavior, it has been used successfully to reduce alcohol-related car crashes, smoking among youths, and malaria transmission, among other goals. Features of social marketing, such as audience segmentation and repeated exposure to prevention messages, distinguish it from traditional health promotion programs. A recent review found 8 of 10 rigorously evaluated social marketing interventions responsible for changes in HIV-related behavior or behavioral intentions. We studied 479 injection drug users to evaluate a community-based social marketing campaign to reduce injection risk behavior among drug users in Sacramento, California. Injecting drugs is associated with HIV infection in more than 130 countries worldwide.

  13. Are adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs different in symptomatic partial and idiopathic generalized epilepsies? The Portuguese-Brazilian validation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, H H; Alonso, N B; Vidal-Dourado, M; Carbonel, T D; de Araújo Filho, G M; Caboclo, L O; Yacubian, E M; Guilhoto, L M

    2011-11-01

    We report the results of administration of the Portuguese-Brazilian translation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP) to 100 patients (mean age=34.5, SD=12.12; 56 females), 61 with symptomatic partial epilepsy (SPE) and 39 with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) (ILAE, 1989) who were on a stable antiepileptic drug (AED) regimen and being treated in a Brazilian tertiary epilepsy center. Carbamazepine was the most commonly used AED (43.0%), followed by valproic acid (32.0%). Two or more AEDs were used by 69.0% of patients. The mean LAEP score (19 questions) was 37.6 (SD=13.35). The most common adverse effects were sleepiness (35.0%), memory problems (35.0%), and difficulty in concentrating (25.0%). Higher LAEP scores were associated with polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.005), female gender (P0.001) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Depression: r=0.637, P<0.001; Anxiety: r=0.621, P<0.001) dimensions. LAEP overall scores were similar in people with SPE and IGE and were not helpful in differentiating adverse effects in these two groups. Clinical variables that influenced global LAEP were seizure frequency (P=0.050) and generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the last month (P=0.031) in the IGE group, and polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.003 and P=0.003) in both IGE and SPE groups. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 21 CFR 310.305 - Records and reports concerning adverse drug experiences on marketed prescription drugs for human...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... specificity. For example, under this definition, hepatic necrosis would be unexpected (by virtue of greater... only listed cerebral vascular accidents. “Unexpected,” as used in this definition, refers to an adverse...

  15. Adverse event reporting patterns of newly approved drugs in the USA in 2006: an analysis of FDA Adverse Event Reporting System data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Pankdeep; Chen, Xing; Weiss, Sheila R

    2013-11-01

    The Weber effect states that adverse event (AE) reporting tends to increase in the first 2 years after a new drug is placed onto the market, peaks at the end of the second year, and then declines. However, since the Weber effect was originally described, there has been improvement in the communication of safety information and new policies regarding the reporting of AEs by healthcare professionals and consumers, prompting reassessment of the existence of the Weber effect in the current AE reporting scenario. To determine the AE reporting patterns for new molecular entity (NME) drugs and biologics approved in 2006 and to examine these patterns for the existence of the Weber effect. Publicly available FDA Adverse Event Reporting System data were used to assess the AE reporting patterns for a 5-year period from the drug’s approval date. The total number of annual reports from all sources, based on the report date, was plotted against time (in years). In the period from 2006 to 2011, a total of 91,187 AE reports were submitted for 19 NMEs approved in 2006. The highest number of AE reports were submitted for varenicline tartrate (N = 47,158) and the lowest number for anidulafungin (N = 161). Anidulafungin was reported to have the highest proportion of death reports (36 %) and varenicline tartrate the lowest proportion (1.7 %). The classic Weber pattern was not observed for any of the 19 NMEs approved in 2006. While there was no one predominant pattern of AE report volume, we grouped the drugs into four general categories; the majority of drugs had either a continued increase in reports (Category A 31.6 %) or an N-pattern with reporting reaching an initial peak in year 2 or 3, declining and then beginning to climb again (Category B 42.1 %). There have been numerous changes in AE reporting, particularly a huge increase in overall annual report volume, since the Weber effect was first reported. Our results suggest that a Weber-type reporting pattern should not be assumed

  16. Dose-specific adverse drug reaction identification in electronic patient records: temporal data mining in an inpatient psychiatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Robert; Werge, Thomas; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Brunak, Søren

    2014-04-01

    Data collected for medical, filing and administrative purposes in electronic patient records (EPRs) represent a rich source of individualised clinical data, which has great potential for improved detection of patients experiencing adverse drug reactions (ADRs), across all approved drugs and across all indication areas. The aim of this study was to take advantage of techniques for temporal data mining of EPRs in order to detect ADRs in a patient- and dose-specific manner. We used a psychiatric hospital's EPR system to investigate undesired drug effects. Within one workflow the method identified patient-specific adverse events (AEs) and links these to specific drugs and dosages in a temporal manner, based on integration of text mining results and structured data. The structured data contained precise information on drug identity, dosage and strength. When applying the method to the 3,394 patients in the cohort, we identified AEs linked with a drug in 2,402 patients (70.8 %). Of the 43,528 patient-specific drug substances prescribed, 14,736 (33.9 %) were linked with AEs. From these links we identified multiple ADRs (p patient population, larger doses were prescribed to sedated patients than non-sedated patients; five antipsychotics [corrected] exhibited a significant difference (p<0.05). Finally, we present two cases (p < 0.05) identified by the workflow. The method identified the potentially fatal AE QT prolongation caused by methadone, and a non-described likely ADR between levomepromazine and nightmares found among the hundreds of identified novel links between drugs and AEs (p < 0.05). The developed method can be used to extract dose-dependent ADR information from already collected EPR data. Large-scale AE extraction from EPRs may complement or even replace current drug safety monitoring methods in the future, reducing or eliminating manual reporting and enabling much faster ADR detection.

  17. Prepsychotic treatment for schizophrenia: preventive medicine, social control, or drug marketing strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosden, R

    1999-01-01

    The definition of schizophrenia is currently being extended to include a "prepsychotic" phase. Prepsychosis detection and intervention programs have already been established in Australia. These are intended to identify people "at-risk" for schizophrenia and treat them to prevent their transition into psychosis. However, analysis of leading research in this field shows high levels of arbitrariness in the selection of diagnostic indicators and a lack of convincing evidence about the efficacy of treatments. The favored prophylactic treatment is atypical neuroleptic medication, and sponsorship of research is providing manufacturers of these drugs with a ubiquitous presence in the field. Many risks are associated with atypical neuroleptics and adverse reactions include psychosis. Taken together these factors suggest that prepsychotic intervention may be more concerned with expanding the market for atypical neuroleptics than with preventing schizophrenia.

  18. Evaluating Environmental Management Approaches to Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Prevention. Prevention Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, William; Langford, Linda M.

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have seen an upsurge in prevention work focused on changing the campus and community environments in which college students make decisions about alcohol and other drug (AOD) use. This approach, called "environmental management," is based on three fundamental premises: (1) Substance use problems are aggravated by a physical, social,…

  19. New Technology Tools: Using Social Media for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention. Prevention Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    When it comes to using social media technology for alcohol, drug abuse, and violence prevention, Thomas Workman, at Baylor College of Medicine's John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science, points out that social media is interactive. This means that a person is entering a conversation rather than a declaration, and…

  20. A Review of Adverse Cutaneous Drug Reactions Resulting from the Use of Interferon and Ribavirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Mistry

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced cutaneous eruptions are named among the most common side effects of many medications. Thus, cutaneous drug eruptions are a common cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in hospital settings. The present article reviews different presentations of drug-induced cutaneous eruptions, with a focus on eruptions reported secondary to the use of interferon and ribavirin. Presentations include injection site reactions, psoriasis, eczematous drug reactions, alopecia, sarcoidosis, lupus, fixed drug eruptions, pigmentary changes and lichenoid eruptions. Also reviewed are findings regarding life-threatening systemic drug reactions.

  1. The frequency of anti-infliximab antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated in routine care and the associations with adverse drug reactions and treatment failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krintel, Sophine B; Grunert, Veit Peter; Hetland, Merete L

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of anti-infliximab antibodies in patients with RA and the associations with adverse drug reactions and treatment failure.......To investigate the frequency of anti-infliximab antibodies in patients with RA and the associations with adverse drug reactions and treatment failure....

  2. Zolpidem prescribing and adverse drug reactions in hospitalized general medicine patients at a Veterans Affairs hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Jane E; Webb, Melissa J; Gray, Shelly L

    2004-03-01

    Zolpidem is prescribed for sleep disruption in hospitalized patients, but data on the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are based largely on outpatient studies. Thus, the incidence of ADRs in hospitalized patients may be much higher. The goal of this study was to describe prescribing patterns of zolpidem for hospitalized medical patients aged 50 years, the incidence of ADRs possibly and probably associated with its use, and the factors associated with central nervous system (CNS) ADRs. This case series was conducted in 4 general medicine wards at a Veterans Affairs hospital and was a consecutive sample of patients aged 50 years who were hospitalized between 1993 and 1997 and received zolpidem as a hypnotic during hospitalization, but had not received it in the previous 3 months. Chart review was conducted by 2 evaluators. Data extracted from the medical records included admission demographic characteristics, medications, comorbidities, and levels of function in performing basic and instrumental activities of daily living. The main outcome measure was ADRs possibly or probably related to zolpidem use. The association between zolpidem and the occurrence of CNS ADRs (eg, confusion, dizziness, daytime somnolence) was analyzed separately. The review included 119 medical patients aged > or =50 years who had newly received zolpidem for sleep disruption during hospitalization. The median age of the population was 70 years; 86 (72.3%) patients were aged 65 years. The initial zolpidem dose was 5 mg in 42 patients (35.3%) and 10 mg in 77 patients (64.7%). Twenty-three patients had a respective 16 and 10 ADRs possibly and probably related to zolpidem use (19.3% incidence). Of a total of 26 ADRs, 21 (80.8%) were CNS ADRs, occurring with both zolpidem 5 mg (10.8% of users) and 10 mg (18.3% of users). On univariate analyses, the only factor significantly associated with a CNS ADR was functional impairment at baseline (P = 0.003). Zolpidem was discontinued in 38.8% of

  3. An ensemble method for extracting adverse drug events from social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Zhao, Songzheng; Zhang, Xiaodi

    2016-06-01

    Because adverse drug events (ADEs) are a serious health problem and a leading cause of death, it is of vital importance to identify them correctly and in a timely manner. With the development of Web 2.0, social media has become a large data source for information on ADEs. The objective of this study is to develop a relation extraction system that uses natural language processing techniques to effectively distinguish between ADEs and non-ADEs in informal text on social media. We develop a feature-based approach that utilizes various lexical, syntactic, and semantic features. Information-gain-based feature selection is performed to address high-dimensional features. Then, we evaluate the effectiveness of four well-known kernel-based approaches (i.e., subset tree kernel, tree kernel, shortest dependency path kernel, and all-paths graph kernel) and several ensembles that are generated by adopting different combination methods (i.e., majority voting, weighted averaging, and stacked generalization). All of the approaches are tested using three data sets: two health-related discussion forums and one general social networking site (i.e., Twitter). When investigating the contribution of each feature subset, the feature-based approach attains the best area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) values, which are 78.6%, 72.2%, and 79.2% on the three data sets. When individual methods are used, we attain the best AUC values of 82.1%, 73.2%, and 77.0% using the subset tree kernel, shortest dependency path kernel, and feature-based approach on the three data sets, respectively. When using classifier ensembles, we achieve the best AUC values of 84.5%, 77.3%, and 84.5% on the three data sets, outperforming the baselines. Our experimental results indicate that ADE extraction from social media can benefit from feature selection. With respect to the effectiveness of different feature subsets, lexical features and semantic features can enhance the ADE extraction

  4. 21 CFR 314.80 - Postmarketing reporting of adverse drug experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... specificity. For example, under this definition, hepatic necrosis would be unexpected (by virtue of greater... only listed cerebral vascular accidents. “Unexpected,” as used in this definition, refers to an adverse...

  5. Patient safety incident reports related to traditional Japanese Kampo medicines: medication errors and adverse drug events in a university hospital for a ten-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yutaka; Fujimoto, Makoto; Nogami, Tatsuya; Watari, Hidetoshi; Kitahara, Hideyuki; Misawa, Hiroki; Kimbara, Yoshiyuki

    2017-12-21

    transiently harmed and required substantial treatment). There are many patient safety issues related to Kampo medicines. Patient safety awareness should be raised to prevent medication errors, especially administration errors, and adverse drug events in Kampo medicine.

  6. Knowledge, perception, practices and barriers of healthcare professionals in Bosnia and Herzegovina towards adverse drug reaction reporting and pharmacovigilance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maša Amrain

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pharmacovigilance is an arm of patient care. No one wants to harm patients, but unfortunately any medicine will sometimes do just this. Underreporting of adverse drug reactions by healthcare professionals is a major problem in many countries. In order to determine whether our pharmacovigilance system could be improved, and identify reasons for under-reporting, a study to investigate the role of health care professionals in adverse drug reaction (ADR reporting was performed.Methods: A pretested questionnaire comprising of 20 questions was designed for assessment of knowledge, perceptions, practice and barriers toward ADR reporting on a random sample of 1000 healthcare professionals in Bosnia and Herzegovina.Results: Of the 1000 respondents, 870 (87% completed the questionnaire. The survey showed that 62.9% health care professionals would report ADR to the Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Device of Bosnia and Herzegovina (ALMBIH. Most of surveyed respondents has a positive perception towards ADR reporting, and believes that this is part of their professional and legal obligation, and they also recognize the importance of reporting adverse drug reactions. Only small percent (15.4% of surveyed health care professionals reported adverse drug reaction.Conclusions: The knowledge of ADRs and how to report them is inadequate among health care professionals. Perception toward ADR reporting was positive, but it is not reflected in the actual practice of ADRs, probably because of little experience and knowledge regarding pharmacovigilance. Interventions such as education and training, focusing on the aims of pharmacovigilance, completing the ADR form and clarifying the reporting criteria are strongly recommended.

  7. Influence of Japanese Regulatory Action on Denosumab-Related Hypocalcemia Using Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeyama, Mayu; Sai, Kimie; Imatoh, Takuya; Segawa, Katsunori; Hirasawa, Noriyasu; Saito, Yoshiro

    2017-01-01

    The anti-receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) antibody, Denosumab (DEN), was approved in April 2012 in Japan, but a Dear Healthcare Professional Letter of Rapid Safety Communication was released in September, 2012 by the regulatory authority because of the severe hypocalcemia risks. Currently, the effectiveness of this regulatory action has not been evaluated and, therefore, this study aimed to assess its impact on DEN-induced hypocalcemia using the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report database (JADER). The case reports from April 2012 to September 2014 were collected from the JADER, which included 151642 adverse events for the primary suspected drugs. The reporting odds ratio (ROR) of hypocalcemia as a signal of the target adverse event was analyzed for DEN and zoledronic acid (ZOL, a reference drug). Changes in RORs were compared between the pre- (Pre, April 2012 to September 2012) and post- (Post 1, October 2012 to September 2013 and Post 2, October 2013 to September 2014) periods of the regulatory action. A decrease in the hypocalcemia ROR was observed for DEN in the post-periods, especially Post 2. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed a significant decrease in hypocalcemia signal in Post 1 (p=0.0306 vs. Pre) and Post 2 (p=0.0054 vs. Pre). ZOL caused no significant changes in ROR of hypocalcemia, and none of the drugs caused ROR changes in jaw osteonecrosis (a reference adverse event). This study suggests that the regulatory action against hypocalcemia in DEN effectively decreased hypocalcemia signal. Further studies using medical information databases are needed to confirm this result.

  8. New therapies versus first-generation biologic drugs in psoriasis: a review of adverse events and their management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, J M; Del-Alcazar, E

    2018-04-01

    Biologic drugs have revolutionized the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis in recent years because of their high efficacy and low risk of toxicity. However, even within the group of biologic therapies, there are differences related to the different mechanisms of action. Areas covered: We review the main adverse events associated with the biologic agents currently available for the treatment of psoriasis and the new inhibitors targeting the p19 subunit of interleukin (IL) 23 and the IL-17A receptor. This review covers injection site reactions, infections, cardiovascular events, demyelinating disorders, tumours, class effects secondary adverse events, immunogenicity, safety in pregnancy and vaccines efficacy. Expert commentary: More than a decade after the first approval of biologic drugs for use in psoriasis, the good safety profile of these drugs is one of the main justifications and incentives for their long-term use. The emergence of new pharmacological groups has made it possible to avoid some of the class effects of first-generation biologic agents and the new therapies appear to pose less risk of reactivation of latent infections, such as hepatitis B virus and tuberculosis. However, they are associated with new adverse effects related to their mechanism of action, including candidiasis and the risk of exacerbation or onset of inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. An epidemiological and clinical analysis of cutaneous adverse drug reactions seen in a tertiary hospital in Johor, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew-Eng Choon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence, clinical patterns, and causative drugs of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (cADR vary among the different populations previously studied. Aim: To determine the prevalence, the clinical patterns of drug eruptions, and the common drugs implicated, particularly in severe cADR such as Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS in our population. Methods: We analyzed the database established for all cADR seen by the department of Dermatology from January 2001 till December 2010. Results: A total of 362 cADR were seen among 42 170 new clinic attendees, yielding an incidence rate of 0.86%. The most common reaction pattern seen was maculopapular eruption (153 cases followed by SJS/TEN (110 cases and DRESS (34 cases. Antibiotics was the most commonly implicated drug group (146 cases followed by anticonvulsants (81 cases and antigout drugs (50 cases. The most frequently implicated drug was allopurinol (50 cases. Carbamazepine, allopurinol, and cotrimoxazole were the three main causative drugs of SJS/TEN accounting for 21.8%, 20.9%, and 12.7%, respectively, of the 110 cases seen, whereas DRESS was mainly caused by allopurinol (15 cases. Mortality rates for TEN, SJS, and DRESS were 28.6%, 2.2%, and 5.9%, respectively Conclusions: The low rate of cADR with a high proportion of severe reactions observed in this study was probably due to referral bias. Otherwise, the reaction patterns and drugs causing cADR in our population were similar to those seen in other countries. Carbamazepine, allopurinol, and cotrimoxazole were the three main causative drugs of SJS/TEN in our population.

  10. An epidemiological and clinical analysis of cutaneous adverse drug reactions seen in a tertiary hospital in Johor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choon, Siew-Eng; Lai, Nai-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence, clinical patterns, and causative drugs of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (cADR) vary among the different populations previously studied. To determine the prevalence, the clinical patterns of drug eruptions, and the common drugs implicated, particularly in severe cADR such as Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) in our population. We analyzed the database established for all cADR seen by the department of Dermatology from January 2001 till December 2010. A total of 362 cADR were seen among 42 170 new clinic attendees, yielding an incidence rate of 0.86%. The most common reaction pattern seen was maculopapular eruption (153 cases) followed by SJS/TEN (110 cases) and DRESS (34 cases). Antibiotics was the most commonly implicated drug group (146 cases) followed by anticonvulsants (81 cases) and antigout drugs (50 cases). The most frequently implicated drug was allopurinol (50 cases). Carbamazepine, allopurinol, and cotrimoxazole were the three main causative drugs of SJS/TEN accounting for 21.8%, 20.9%, and 12.7%, respectively, of the 110 cases seen, whereas DRESS was mainly caused by allopurinol (15 cases). Mortality rates for TEN, SJS, and DRESS were 28.6%, 2.2%, and 5.9%, respectively. The low rate of cADR with a high proportion of severe reactions observed in this study was probably due to referral bias. Otherwise, the reaction patterns and drugs causing cADR in our population were similar to those seen in other countries. Carbamazepine, allopurinol, and cotrimoxazole were the three main causative drugs of SJS/TEN in our population.

  11. Types, frequencies, and burden of nonspecific adverse events of drugs: analysis of randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahr, Alfred; Golmard, Clara; Pham, Emilie; Iordache, Laura; Deville, Laure; Faure, Pierre

    2017-07-01

    Scarce studies analyzing adverse event (AE) data from randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials (RPCCTs) of selected illnesses suggested that a substantial proportion of collected AEs are unrelated to the drug taken. This study analyzed the nonspecific AEs occurring with active-drug exposure in RPCCTs for a large range of medical conditions. Randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials published in five prominent medical journals during 2006-2012 were searched. Only trials that evaluated orally or parenterally administered active drugs versus placebo in a head-to-head setting were selected. For AEs reported from ≥10 RPCCTs, Pearson's correlation coefficients (r) were calculated to determine the relationship between AE rates in placebo and active-drug recipients. Random-effects meta-analyses were used to compute proportions of nonspecific AEs, which were truncated at a maximum of 100%, in active-drug recipients. We included 231 trials addressing various medical domains or healthy participants. For the 88 analyzed AE variables, AE rates for placebo and active-drug recipients were in general strongly correlated (r > 0.50) or very strongly correlated (r > 0.80). The pooled proportions of nonspecific AEs for the active-drug recipients were 96.8% (95%CI: 95.5-98.1) for any AEs, 100% (97.9-100) for serious AEs, and 77.7% (72.7-83.2) for drug-related AEs. Results were similar for individual medical domains and healthy participants. The pooled proportion of nonspecificity of 82 system organ class and individual AE types ranged from 38% to 100%. The large proportion of nonspecific AEs reported in active-drug recipients of RPCCTs, including serious and drug-related AEs, highlights the limitations of clinical trial data to determine the tolerability of drugs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Despite 2007 law requiring FDA hotline to be included in print drug ads, reporting of adverse events by consumers still low.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dongyi; Goldsmith, John; Aikin, Kathryn J; Encinosa, William E; Nardinelli, Clark

    2012-05-01

    In 2007 the federal government began requiring drug makers to include in their print direct-to-consumer advertisements information for consumers on how to contact the Food and Drug Administration directly, either by phone or through the agency's website, to report any adverse events that they experienced after taking a prescription drug. Adverse events can range from minor skin problems like itching to serious injuries or illness that result in hospitalization, permanent disability, or even death. Even so, current rates of adverse event reporting are low. We studied adverse event reports about 123 drugs that came from patients before and after the enactment of the print advertising requirement and estimated that requirement's impact with model simulations. We found that if monthly spending on print direct-to-consumer advertising increased from zero to $7.7 million per drug, the presence of the Food and Drug Administration contact information tripled the increase in patient-reported adverse events, compared to what would have happened in the absence of the law. However, the absolute monthly increase was fewer than 0.24 reports per drug, suggesting that the public health impact of the increase was small and that the adverse event reporting rate would still be low. The study results suggest that additional measures, such as more publicity about the Adverse Event Reporting System or more consumer education, should be considered to promote patient reporting of adverse events.

  13. Adverse drug reaction reports for cardiometabolic drugs from sub Sahara Africa: A study in VigiBase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berhe, Derbew F.; Juhlin, Kristina; Star, Kristina; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Michael, Kidane; Taxis, Katja; Mol, Peter G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many pharmacovigilance centers have been established in Sub Sahara Africa (SSA) in recent years. Their focus has been on ADRs to drugs for communicable diseases. Little is known about ADRs caused by drugs for cardiometabolic diseases, although its burden is increasing rapidly in SSA.

  14. Stimulated reporting: the impact of US food and drug administration-issued alerts on the adverse event reporting system (FAERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Keith B; Demakas, Andrea R; Dimbil, Mo; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Erdman, Colin B

    2014-11-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) uses the Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) to support post-marketing safety surveillance programs. Currently, almost one million case reports are submitted to FAERS each year, making it a vast repository of drug safety information. Sometimes cited as a limitation of FAERS, however, is the assumption that "stimulated reporting" of adverse events (AEs) occurs in response to warnings, alerts, and label changes that are issued by the FDA. To determine the extent of "stimulated reporting" in the modern-day FAERS database. One hundred drugs approved by the FDA between 2001 and 2010 were included in this analysis. FDA alerts were obtained by a comprehensive search of the FDA's MedWatch and main websites. Publicly available FAERS data were used to assess the "primary suspect" AE reporting pattern for up to four quarters before, and after, the issuance of an FDA alert. A few drugs did demonstrate "stimulated reporting" trends. A majority of the drugs, however, showed little evidence for significant reporting changes associated with the issuance of alerts. When we compared the percentage changes in reporting after an FDA alert with those after a sham "control alert", the overall reporting trends appeared to be quite similar. Of 100 drugs analyzed for short-term reporting trends, 21 real alerts and 25 sham alerts demonstrated an increase (greater than or equal to 1 %) in reporting. The long-term analysis of 91 drugs showed that 24 real alerts and 28 sham alerts demonstrated a greater than or equal to 1 % increase. Our results suggest that most of modern day FAERS reporting is not significantly affected by the issuance of FDA alerts.

  15. High-throughput identification of off-targets for the mechanistic study of severe adverse drug reactions induced by analgesics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Jian-Bo [Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Ji, Nan; Pan, Wen; Hong, Ru [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361102 (China); Wang, Hao [Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Ji, Zhi-Liang, E-mail: appo@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361102 (China); Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2014-01-01

    Drugs may induce adverse drug reactions (ADRs) when they unexpectedly bind to proteins other than their therapeutic targets. Identification of these undesired protein binding partners, called off-targets, can facilitate toxicity assessment in the early stages of drug development. In this study, a computational framework was introduced for the exploration of idiosyncratic mechanisms underlying analgesic-induced severe adverse drug reactions (SADRs). The putative analgesic-target interactions were predicted by performing reverse docking of analgesics or their active metabolites against human/mammal protein structures in a high-throughput manner. Subsequently, bioinformatics analyses were undertaken to identify ADR-associated proteins (ADRAPs) and pathways. Using the pathways and ADRAPs that this analysis identified, the mechanisms of SADRs such as cardiac disorders were explored. For instance, 53 putative ADRAPs and 24 pathways were linked with cardiac disorders, of which 10 ADRAPs were confirmed by previous experiments. Moreover, it was inferred that pathways such as base excision repair, glycolysis/glyconeogenesis, ErbB signaling, calcium signaling, and phosphatidyl inositol signaling likely play pivotal roles in drug-induced cardiac disorders. In conclusion, our framework offers an opportunity to globally understand SADRs at the molecular level, which has been difficult to realize through experiments. It also provides some valuable clues for drug repurposing. - Highlights: • A novel computational framework was developed for mechanistic study of SADRs. • Off-targets of drugs were identified in large scale and in a high-throughput manner. • SADRs like cardiac disorders were systematically explored in molecular networks. • A number of ADR-associated proteins were identified.

  16. High-throughput identification of off-targets for the mechanistic study of severe adverse drug reactions induced by analgesics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Jian-Bo; Ji, Nan; Pan, Wen; Hong, Ru; Wang, Hao; Ji, Zhi-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Drugs may induce adverse drug reactions (ADRs) when they unexpectedly bind to proteins other than their therapeutic targets. Identification of these undesired protein binding partners, called off-targets, can facilitate toxicity assessment in the early stages of drug development. In this study, a computational framework was introduced for the exploration of idiosyncratic mechanisms underlying analgesic-induced severe adverse drug reactions (SADRs). The putative analgesic-target interactions were predicted by performing reverse docking of analgesics or their active metabolites against human/mammal protein structures in a high-throughput manner. Subsequently, bioinformatics analyses were undertaken to identify ADR-associated proteins (ADRAPs) and pathways. Using the pathways and ADRAPs that this analysis identified, the mechanisms of SADRs such as cardiac disorders were explored. For instance, 53 putative ADRAPs and 24 pathways were linked with cardiac disorders, of which 10 ADRAPs were confirmed by previous experiments. Moreover, it was inferred that pathways such as base excision repair, glycolysis/glyconeogenesis, ErbB signaling, calcium signaling, and phosphatidyl inositol signaling likely play pivotal roles in drug-induced cardiac disorders. In conclusion, our framework offers an opportunity to globally understand SADRs at the molecular level, which has been difficult to realize through experiments. It also provides some valuable clues for drug repurposing. - Highlights: • A novel computational framework was developed for mechanistic study of SADRs. • Off-targets of drugs were identified in large scale and in a high-throughput manner. • SADRs like cardiac disorders were systematically explored in molecular networks. • A number of ADR-associated proteins were identified

  17. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions: clinical pattern and causative agents--a 6 year series from Chandigarh, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma V

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the different clinical spectrum of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (ADR and to determine the causative drugs. MATERIALS & METHODS: A prospective, hospital based study was carried out over a period of 6 years recording various cutaneous ADR. RESULTS: A total of 500 patients with cutaneous ADR were enrolled in the study. The most common types of cutaneous ADR patterns were maculopapular rash (34.6%, fixed drug eruption (FDE (30% and urticaria (14%. The drugs most often incriminated for the various cutaneous ADR were antimicrobials (42.6%, anticonvulsants (22.2% and NSAIDs (18%. Anticonvulsants were implicated in 41.6% of maculopapular rashes. Sulfonamides accounted for 43.3% and NSAIDs for 30.7% of FDE. Urticaria was caused mainly by NSAIDs(24.3% and penicillins(20%. Anticonvulsants were responsible for 43.8% of life-threatening toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens Johnson syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical pattern and drugs causing cutaneous ADR are similar to those observed in other countries except for minor variations. Cutaneous ADR patterns and the drugs causing various reactions are changing every year, which may be due to the emergence of newer molecules and changing trends in the use of drugs.

  18. A Pharmacovigilance Approach for Post-Marketing in Japan Using the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER Database and Association Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu Fujiwara

    Full Text Available Rapid dissemination of information regarding adverse drug reactions is a key aspect for improving pharmacovigilance. There is a possibility that unknown adverse drug reactions will become apparent through post-marketing administration. Currently, although there have been studies evaluating the relationships between a drug and adverse drug reactions using the JADER database which collects reported spontaneous adverse drug reactions, an efficient approach to assess the association between adverse drug reactions of drugs with the same indications as well as the influence of demographics (e.g. gender has not been proposed.We utilized the REAC and DEMO tables from the May 2015 version of JADER for patients taking antidepressant drugs (SSRI, SNRI, and NaSSA. We evaluated the associations using association analyses with an apriori algorithm. Support, confidence, lift, and conviction were used as indicators for associations. The highest score in adverse drug reactions for SSRI was obtained for "aspartate aminotransferase increased", "alanine aminotransferase increased", with values of 0.0059, 0.93, 135.5, and 13.9 for support, confidence, lift and conviction, respectively. For SNRI, "international normalized ratio increased", "drug interaction" were observed with 0.0064, 1.00, 71.9, and NA. For NaSSA, "anxiety", "irritability" were observed with 0.0058, 0.80, 49.9, and 4.9. For female taking SSRI, the highest support scores were observed in "twenties", "suicide attempt", whereas "thirties", "neuroleptic malignant syndrome" were observed for male. Second, for SNRI, "eighties", "inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion" were observed for female, whereas "interstitial lung disease" and "hepatitis fulminant" were for male. Finally, for NaSSA, "suicidal ideation" was for female, and "rhabdomyolysis" was for male.Different combinations of adverse drug reactions were noted between the antidepressants. In addition, the reported adverse drug reactions

  19. Prevention of Contrast-Induced AKI: A Review of Published Trials and the Design of the Prevention of Serious Adverse Events following Angiography (PRESERVE) Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Martin; Kaufman, James; Cass, Alan; Parikh, Chirag R.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Shunk, Kendrick A.; McCullough, Peter A.; Fine, Michael J.; Mor, Maria K.; Lew, Robert A.; Huang, Grant D.; Conner, Todd A.; Brophy, Mary T.; Lee, Joanne; Soliva, Susan; Palevsky, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Contrast-induced AKI (CI-AKI) is a common condition associated with serious, adverse outcomes. CI-AKI may be preventable because its risk factors are well characterized and the timing of renal insult is commonly known in advance. Intravenous (IV) fluids and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) are two of the most widely studied preventive measures for CI-AKI. Despite a multitude of clinical trials and meta-analyses, the most effective type of IV fluid (sodium bicarbonate versus sodium chloride) and the benefit of NAC remain unclear. Careful review of published trials of these interventions reveals design limitations that contributed to their inconclusive findings. Such design limitations include the enrollment of small numbers of patients, increasing the risk for type I and type II statistical errors; the use of surrogate primary endpoints defined by small increments in serum creatinine, which are associated with, but not necessarily causally related to serious, adverse, patient-centered outcomes; and the inclusion of low-risk patients with intact baseline kidney function, yielding low event rates and reduced generalizability to a higher-risk population. The Prevention of Serious Adverse Events following Angiography (PRESERVE) trial is a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial that will enroll 8680 high-risk patients undergoing coronary or noncoronary angiography to compare the effectiveness of IV isotonic sodium bicarbonate versus IV isotonic sodium chloride and oral NAC versus oral placebo for the prevention of serious, adverse outcomes associated with CI-AKI. This article discusses key methodological issues of past trials investigating IV fluids and NAC and how they informed the design of the PRESERVE trial. PMID:23660180

  20. Adverse Events Involving Radiation Oncology Medical Devices: Comprehensive Analysis of US Food and Drug Administration Data, 1991 to 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, Michael J.; Marshall, Deborah C.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Moore, Kevin; Cervino, Laura; Atwood, Todd; Sanghvi, Parag; Mundt, Arno J.; Pawlicki, Todd; Recht, Abram; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology relies on rapidly evolving technology and highly complex processes. The US Food and Drug Administration collects reports of adverse events related to medical devices. We sought to characterize all events involving radiation oncology devices (RODs) from the US Food and Drug Administration's postmarket surveillance Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database, comparing these with non–radiation oncology devices. Methods and Materials: MAUDE data on RODs from 1991 to 2015 were sorted into 4 product categories (external beam, brachytherapy, planning systems, and simulation systems) and 5 device problem categories (software, mechanical, electrical, user error, and dose delivery impact). Outcomes included whether the device was evaluated by the manufacturer, adverse event type, remedial action, problem code, device age, and time since 510(k) approval. Descriptive statistics were performed with linear regression of time-series data. Results for RODs were compared with those for other devices by the Pearson χ"2 test for categorical data and 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for distributions. Results: There were 4234 ROD and 4,985,698 other device adverse event reports. Adverse event reports increased over time, and events involving RODs peaked in 2011. Most ROD reports involved external beam therapy (50.8%), followed by brachytherapy (24.9%) and treatment planning systems (21.6%). The top problem types were software (30.4%), mechanical (20.9%), and user error (20.4%). RODs differed significantly from other devices in each outcome (P<.001). RODs were more likely to be evaluated by the manufacturer after an event (46.9% vs 33.0%) but less likely to be recalled (10.5% vs 37.9%) (P<.001). Device age and time since 510(k) approval were shorter among RODs (P<.001). Conclusions: Compared with other devices, RODs may experience adverse events sooner after manufacture and market approval. Close postmarket surveillance, improved

  1. Adverse Events Involving Radiation Oncology Medical Devices: Comprehensive Analysis of US Food and Drug Administration Data, 1991 to 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Michael J. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Marshall, Deborah C.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Moore, Kevin; Cervino, Laura; Atwood, Todd; Sanghvi, Parag; Mundt, Arno J.; Pawlicki, Todd [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A., E-mail: jhattangadi@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology relies on rapidly evolving technology and highly complex processes. The US Food and Drug Administration collects reports of adverse events related to medical devices. We sought to characterize all events involving radiation oncology devices (RODs) from the US Food and Drug Administration's postmarket surveillance Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database, comparing these with non–radiation oncology devices. Methods and Materials: MAUDE data on RODs from 1991 to 2015 were sorted into 4 product categories (external beam, brachytherapy, planning systems, and simulation systems) and 5 device problem categories (software, mechanical, electrical, user error, and dose delivery impact). Outcomes included whether the device was evaluated by the manufacturer, adverse event type, remedial action, problem code, device age, and time since 510(k) approval. Descriptive statistics were performed with linear regression of time-series data. Results for RODs were compared with those for other devices by the Pearson χ{sup 2} test for categorical data and 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for distributions. Results: There were 4234 ROD and 4,985,698 other device adverse event reports. Adverse event reports increased over time, and events involving RODs peaked in 2011. Most ROD reports involved external beam therapy (50.8%), followed by brachytherapy (24.9%) and treatment planning systems (21.6%). The top problem types were software (30.4%), mechanical (20.9%), and user error (20.4%). RODs differed significantly from other devices in each outcome (P<.001). RODs were more likely to be evaluated by the manufacturer after an event (46.9% vs 33.0%) but less likely to be recalled (10.5% vs 37.9%) (P<.001). Device age and time since 510(k) approval were shorter among RODs (P<.001). Conclusions: Compared with other devices, RODs may experience adverse events sooner after manufacture and market approval. Close postmarket surveillance

  2. Combination of Deep Recurrent Neural Networks and Conditional Random Fields for Extracting Adverse Drug Reactions from User Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutubalina, Elena; Nikolenko, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an essential part of the analysis of drug use, measuring drug use benefits, and making policy decisions. Traditional channels for identifying ADRs are reliable but very slow and only produce a small amount of data. Text reviews, either on specialized web sites or in general-purpose social networks, may lead to a data source of unprecedented size, but identifying ADRs in free-form text is a challenging natural language processing problem. In this work, we propose a novel model for this problem, uniting recurrent neural architectures and conditional random fields. We evaluate our model with a comprehensive experimental study, showing improvements over state-of-the-art methods of ADR extraction.

  3. Combination of Deep Recurrent Neural Networks and Conditional Random Fields for Extracting Adverse Drug Reactions from User Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tutubalina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse drug reactions (ADRs are an essential part of the analysis of drug use, measuring drug use benefits, and making policy decisions. Traditional channels for identifying ADRs are reliable but very slow and only produce a small amount of data. Text reviews, either on specialized web sites or in general-purpose social networks, may lead to a data source of unprecedented size, but identifying ADRs in free-form text is a challenging natural language processing problem. In this work, we propose a novel model for this problem, uniting recurrent neural architectures and conditional random fields. We evaluate our model with a comprehensive experimental study, showing improvements over state-of-the-art methods of ADR extraction.

  4. Examining Wrong Eye Implant Adverse Events in the Veterans Health Administration With a Focus on Prevention: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neily, Julia; Chomsky, Amy; Orcutt, James; Paull, Douglas E; Mills, Peter D; Gilbert, Christina; Hemphill, Robin R; Gunnar, William

    2018-03-01

    The study goals were to examine wrong intraocular lens (IOL) implant adverse events in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), identify root causes and contributing factors, and describe system changes that have been implemented to address this challenge. This study represents collaboration between the VHA's National Center for Patient Safety (NCPS) and the National Surgery Office (NSO). This report includes 45 wrong IOL implant surgery adverse events reported to established VHA NCPS and NSO databases between July 1, 2006, and June 31, 2014. There are approximately 50,000 eye implant procedures performed each year in the VHA. Wrong IOL implant surgery adverse events are reported by VHA facilities to the NCPS and the NSO. Two authors (A.C. and J.N.) coded the reports for event type (wrong lens or expired lens) and identified the primary contributing factor (coefficient κ = 0.837). A descriptive analysis was conducted, which included the reported yearly event rate. The main outcome measure was the reported wrong IOL implant surgery adverse events. There were 45 reported wrong IOL implant surgery adverse events. Between 2011 and June 30, 2014, there was a significant downward trend (P = 0.02, R = 99.7%) at a pace of -0.08 (per 10,000 cases) every year. The most frequently coded primary contributing factor was incomplete preprocedure time-out (n = 12) followed by failure to perform double check of preprocedural calculations based upon original data and implant read-back at the time the surgical eye implant was performed (n = 10). Preventing wrong IOL implant adverse events requires diligence beyond performance of the preprocedural time-out. In 2013, the VHA has modified policy to ensure double check of preprocedural calculations and implant read-back with positive impact. Continued analysis of contributing human factors and improved surgical team communication are warranted.

  5. Impulsive Delayed Reward Discounting as a Genetically-Influenced Target for Drug Abuse Prevention: A Critical Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua C. Gray

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review evaluates the viability of delayed reward discounting (DRD, an index of how much an individual devalues a future reward based on its delay in time, for genetically-informed drug abuse prevention. A review of the literature suggests that impulsive DRD is robustly associated with drug addiction and meets most of the criteria for being an endophenotype, albeit with mixed findings for specific molecular genetic influences. Several modes of experimental manipulation have been demonstrated to reduce DRD acutely. These include behavioral strategies, such as mindfulness, reward bundling, and episodic future thinking; pharmacological interventions, including noradrengic agonists, adrenergic agonists, and multiple monoamine agonists; and neuromodulatory interventions, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. However, the generalization of these interventions to positive clinical outcomes remains unclear and no studies to date have examined interventions on DRD in the context of prevention. Collectively, these findings suggest it would be premature to target DRD for genetically-informed prevention. Indeed, given the evidence of environmental contributions such as early life adversity to impulsive DRD, whether genetically-informed secondary prevention would ever be warranted is debatable. However, progress in identifying polymorphisms associated with DRD preference could further clarify the underlying biological systems implicated in impulsive DRD for further progress in pharmacological and neuromodulatory interventions. Furthermore, independent of genetically-informed prevention, impulsive DRD is a qualitatively different risk factor from existing prevention programs and is generally worthy of investigation as a novel and promising drug abuse prevention target.

  6. Influence of depression and early adverse experiences on illicit drug dependence: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferigolo, Maristela; Stein, Airton T; Fuchs, Flavio D; Barros, Helena M T

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between depression and illicit drug dependence among a Latin-American population. illicit drug dependent patients (n = 137) and controls (n = 274) were interviewed using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies, in order to detect lifetime and current depressive disorder and illicit (cocaine, cannabis or inhalants) substance dependence. A regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratio for drug dependence according to the diagnosis of depression. The lifetime diagnosis of depression (p = 0.001; OR = 4.9; 95% CI, 1.9-12.7) predicts illegal drugs dependence. Sociodemographic variables such as male gender (p drug dependence. Additional influent factors detected were having parents (p = 0.006; OR = 18.9; 95% CI, 2.3-158) or friends (p illicit drugs dependents. although a causal relationship between dependence on illicit drugs and depression cannot be determined, comparison of the sequence of events point to the occurrence of depression later in life than dependence. It remains to be determined whether depression is a comorbidity of dependence, sharing etiological factors, or a consequence of drug abuse and/or abstinence.

  7. Mast Cell Stabilizers as Host Modulatory Drugs to Prevent and Control Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhoom Singh Mehta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mast cells are among the first cells to get in-volved in periodontal inflammation. Their numbers have been shown to be in-creased in cases of gingivitis and periodontal disease. The hypothesis: Since mast cell stabilizers like sodium cromogly-cate (SCG and nedocromil sodium (NS have been used in the prophylaxis of bronchial asthma without any significant adverse effects and also the fact that drugs like SCG show significant anti-inflammatory activities, it would be logical to use mast cell stabilizers as host modulating drugs for the treatment and prevention of peri-odontal disease. Evaluation of the hypothesis: Safety and efficacy of both SCG and NS are well documented. So, it will be systemically safe to use in humans. However, oral administration SCG or delivery of the drug by means local irrigation will not be very useful because SCG may not be secreted in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF(as in the case of oral administraion or the drug may get washed out from periodontal pocket due to the constant flow of GCF(as in the case of irrigation. A local or targeted drug delivery of mast cell stabilizers can be used in patients with periodontal disease. Role of mast cells in periodontal disease has been dealt in-depth in many studies and articles. However, limited amount of research has been done on using mast cell stabilizers in the prevention and control of periodontal diseases. More studies are needed to study the efficacy and effective-ness of mast cell stabilizers as an adjunct to phase I therapy in the control of periodontal disease.

  8. adverse events to first line anti-tuberculosis drugs in patients co

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    status on the risk of developing adverse events to first line anti-TB therapy. Method: The ... with TB-HIV infection were allocated to a second group. ... and negative responses were entered into individual .... Extra-pulmonary TB (yes versus no).

  9. Long term adverse drug reaction to Efavirenz in a HIV infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is only one published case of serious adverse reaction to Efavirenz in an adolescent after long-term use. The case of a male HIV Positive Nigerian patient aged 13 years. He presented with five-day history of Difficulty sleeping, abnormal dreams, inability to concentrate, restlessness, irrational behavior and long-term ...

  10. Patient Drug Safety Reporting: Diabetes Patients' Perceptions of Drug Safety and How to Improve Reporting of Adverse Events and Product Complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Puja; Spears, David; Eriksen, Betina Østergaard; Lollike, Karsten; Sacco, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Global health care manufacturer Novo Nordisk commissioned research regarding awareness of drug safety department activities and potential to increase patient feedback. Objectives were to examine patients' knowledge of pharmaceutical manufacturers' responsibilities and efforts regarding drug safety, their perceptions and experiences related to these efforts, and how these factors influence their thoughts and behaviors. Data were collected before and after respondents read a description of a drug safety department and its practices. We conducted quantitative survey research across 608 health care consumers receiving treatment for diabetes in the United States, Germany, United Kingdom, and Italy. This research validated initial, exploratory qualitative research (across 40 comparable consumers from the same countries) which served to guide design of the larger study. Before reading a drug safety department description, 55% of respondents were unaware these departments collect safety information on products and patients. After reading the description, 34% reported the department does more than they expected to ensure drug safety, and 56% reported "more confidence" in the industry as a whole. Further, 66% reported themselves more likely to report an adverse event or product complaint, and 60% reported that they were more likely to contact a drug safety department with questions. The most preferred communication methods were websites/online forums (39%), email (27%), and telephone (25%). Learning about drug safety departments elevates consumers' confidence in manufacturers' safety efforts and establishes potential for patients to engage in increased self-monitoring and reporting. Study results reveal potentially actionable insights for the industry across patient and physician programs and communications.

  11. Rates of medical errors and preventable adverse events among hospitalized children following implementation of a resident handoff bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starmer, Amy J; Sectish, Theodore C; Simon, Dennis W; Keohane, Carol; McSweeney, Maireade E; Chung, Erica Y; Yoon, Catherine S; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Wassner, Ari J; Harper, Marvin B; Landrigan, Christopher P

    2013-12-04

    Handoff miscommunications are a leading cause of medical errors. Studies comprehensively assessing handoff improvement programs are lacking. To determine whether introduction of a multifaceted handoff program was associated with reduced rates of medical errors and preventable adverse events, fewer omissions of key data in written handoffs, improved verbal handoffs, and changes in resident-physician workflow. Prospective intervention study of 1255 patient admissions (642 before and 613 after the intervention) involving 84 resident physicians (42 before and 42 after the intervention) from July-September 2009 and November 2009-January 2010 on 2 inpatient units at Boston Children's Hospital. Resident handoff bundle, consisting of standardized communication and handoff training, a verbal mnemonic, and a new team handoff structure. On one unit, a computerized handoff tool linked to the electronic medical record was introduced. The primary outcomes were the rates of medical errors and preventable adverse events measured by daily systematic surveillance. The secondary outcomes were omissions in the printed handoff document and resident time-motion activity. Medical errors decreased from 33.8 per 100 admissions (95% CI, 27.3-40.3) to 18.3 per 100 admissions (95% CI, 14.7-21.9; P < .001), and preventable adverse events decreased from 3.3 per 100 admissions (95% CI, 1.7-4.8) to 1.5 (95% CI, 0.51-2.4) per 100 admissions (P = .04) following the intervention. There were fewer omissions of key handoff elements on printed handoff documents, especially on the unit that received the computerized handoff tool (significant reductions of omissions in 11 of 14 categories with computerized tool; significant reductions in 2 of 14 categories without computerized tool). Physicians spent a greater percentage of time in a 24-hour period at the patient bedside after the intervention (8.3%; 95% CI 7.1%-9.8%) vs 10.6% (95% CI, 9.2%-12.2%; P = .03). The average duration of verbal

  12. Factors Affecting Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting of Healthcare Professionals and Their Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice towards ADR Reporting in Nekemte Town, West Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lense Temesgen Gurmesa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adverse drug reactions are global problems of major concern. Adverse drug reaction reporting helps the drug monitoring system to detect the unwanted effects of those drugs which are already in the market. Aims. To assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of health care professionals working in Nekemte town towards adverse drug reaction reporting. Methods and Materials. A cross-sectional study design was conducted on a total of 133 health care professionals by interview to assess their knowledge, attitude, and practice using structured questionnaire. Results. Of the total respondents, only 64 (48.2%, 56 (42.1%, and 13 (9.8% health care professionals have correctly answered the knowledge, attitude, and practice assessment questions, respectively. Lack of awareness and knowledge on what, when, and to whom to report adverse drug reactions and lack of commitments of health care professionals were identified as the major discouraging factors against adverse drug reaction reporting. Conclusion. This study has revealed that the knowledge, attitude, and practice of the health care professionals working in Nekemte town towards spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting were low that we would like to recommend the concerned bodies to strive on the improvement of the knowledge, attitude, and practice status of health care professionals.

  13. [Extrapyramidal toxicity caused by metoclopramide and clebopride: study of voluntary notifications of adverse effects to the Spanish Drug Surveillance System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuena Boy, R; Maciá Martínez, M A

    1998-03-31

    To clarify if there is any basis for the hypothesis that Clebopride leads to more extrapyramidal reactions than Metoclopramide. Observational, longitudinal, retrospective and comparative study of two series of cases. The entire Spanish healthcare system. Those notified to the Spanish Drug watch system as possibly having suffered an adverse reaction to Metoclopramide (n = 98) or Clebopride (n = 123) between 1/1/1990 and 10/6/1997. None. 84.3% of suspected adverse reactions to Clebopride and 51.6% of those to Metoclopramide had a non-hospital precedence (P Clebopride, there was extrapyramidal toxicity (P = 0.021). There is a basis for the hypothesis that Clebopride causes more extrapyramidal reactions than Metoclopramide. It was reasonable to realize a study based on this hypothesis.

  14. Amenorrhea as a rare drug-related adverse event associated with everolimus for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Maruno, Atsuko; Kawashima, Yohei; Ito, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Masami; Mine, Tetsuya

    2014-11-14

    The patient was an asymptomatic 43-year-old woman. Abdominal ultrasonography and enhanced computed tomography showed a tumor lesion accompanied by multiple cystic changes in the liver and the pancreatic tail. Endoscopic ultrasound-fine needle aspiration was performed on the pancreatic tumor lesion and revealed pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET). As it was unresectable due to multiple liver metastases, the decision was made to initiate treatment with everolimus and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization. The patient ceased menstruating after the start of everolimus administration. When the administration was discontinued due to interstitial lung disease, menstruation resumed, but then again stopped with everolimus resumption. An association between everolimus and amenorrhea was highly suspected. Amenorrhea occurred as a rare adverse event of everolimus. As the younger women might be included in PNETs patients, we should put this adverse event into consideration.

  15. Machine learning-based prediction of adverse drug effects: An example of seizure-inducing compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengxuan Gao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Various biological factors have been implicated in convulsive seizures, involving side effects of drugs. For the preclinical safety assessment of drug development, it is difficult to predict seizure-inducing side effects. Here, we introduced a machine learning-based in vitro system designed to detect seizure-inducing side effects. We recorded local field potentials from the CA1 alveus in acute mouse neocortico-hippocampal slices, while 14 drugs were bath-perfused at 5 different concentrations each. For each experimental condition, we collected seizure-like neuronal activity and merged their waveforms as one graphic image, which was further converted into a feature vector using Caffe, an open framework for deep learning. In the space of the first two principal components, the support vector machine completely separated the vectors (i.e., doses of individual drugs that induced seizure-like events and identified diphenhydramine, enoxacin, strychnine and theophylline as “seizure-inducing” drugs, which indeed were reported to induce seizures in clinical situations. Thus, this artificial intelligence-based classification may provide a new platform to detect the seizure-inducing side effects of preclinical drugs.

  16. Preventable health and cost burden of adverse birth outcomes associated with pregestational diabetes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Cora; Grosse, Scott D; Li, Rui; Sharma, Andrea J; Razzaghi, Hilda; Herman, William H; Gilboa, Suzanne M

    2015-01-01

    Preconception care for women with diabetes can reduce the occurrence of adverse birth outcomes. We aimed to estimate the preconception care (PCC)-preventable health and cost burden of adverse birth outcomes associated with diagnosed and undiagnosed pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM) in the United States. Among women of reproductive age (15-44 years), we estimated age- and race/ethnicity-specific prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes. We applied age and race/ethnicity-specific pregnancy rates, estimates of the risk reduction from PCC for 3 adverse birth outcomes (preterm birth, major birth defects, and perinatal mortality), and lifetime medical and lost productivity costs for children with those outcomes. Using a probabilistic model, we estimated the reduction in adverse birth outcomes and costs associated with universal PCC compared with no PCC among women with PGDM. We did not assess maternal outcomes and associated costs. We estimated 2.2% of US births are to women with PGDM. Among women with diagnosed diabetes, universal PCC might avert 8397 (90% prediction interval [PI], 5252-11,449) preterm deliveries, 3725 (90% PI, 3259-4126) birth defects, and 1872 (90% PI, 1239-2415) perinatal deaths annually. Associated discounted lifetime costs averted for the affected cohort of children could be as high as $4.3 billion (90% PI, 3.4-5.1 billion) (2012 US dollars). PCC among women with undiagnosed diabetes could yield an additional $1.2 billion (90% PI, 951 million-1.4 billion) in averted cost. Results suggest a substantial health and cost burden associated with PGDM that could be prevented by universal PCC, which might offset the cost of providing such care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Adverse Childhood Experiences among a Community of Resilient Centenarians and Seniors: Implications for a Chronic Disease Prevention Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer-Hwang, Rhonda; Torres, Xochitl; Valladares, Johanny; Pasco-Rubio, Marco; Dougherty, Molly; Kim, Wonha

    2018-03-11

    Research has linked adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) with chronic disease in adults and diminished life span. Adverse biological embedding of ACEs potentially occurs through inflammatory mechanisms; inflammatory marker alterations are identified as candidate biomarkers for mediating health consequences. Lifestyle practices of residents of California's Loma Linda Blue Zone, one of five worldwide longevity hotspots, may provide insight into inflammation remediation and chronic disease prevention. Little research has been done on centenarians' early-life experiences or on ACEs in a longevity community. To interview centenarians and seniors in this region regarding their childhood experiences to inform chronic disease prevention frameworks. Qualitative study of Loma Linda Blue Zone community members. Childhood exposures and practices were assessed using focus groups and semistructured key informant interviews, with open-ended questions on general hardships and ACEs and supplemented with lifestyle and resiliency factor questions. Data were audiorecorded and transcribed. Integrative grounded theory methods guided coding and theming. Exposure to ACEs and practice of resiliency factors. Participants (7 centenarians and 29 seniors) reported exposure to multiple ACEs (domains: Economic deprivation, family dysfunction, and community violence). Community members reported practicing resiliency factors, each with anti-inflammatory properties suggesting mitigation of ACE-related toxic stress. This is one of the first studies of its kind to identify a community of resilient members despite their tremendous burden of ACEs. Embedding the identified resiliency factors into chronic disease prevention frameworks has potential for mitigating systemic inflammation, alleviating chronic disease burden, and promoting a culture of health.

  18. N-acetylcysteine prevents ketamine-induced adverse effects on development, heart rate and monoaminergic neurons in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Bonnie; Dumas, Melanie; Gu, Qiang; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2018-06-08

    N-acetylcysteine, a precursor molecule of glutathione, is an antioxidant. Ketamine, a pediatric anesthetic, has been implicated in cardiotoxicity and neurotoxicity including modulation of monoaminergic systems in mammals and zebrafish. Here, we show that N-acetylcysteine prevents ketamine's adverse effects on development and monoaminergic neurons in zebrafish embryos. The effects of ketamine and N-acetylcysteine alone or in combination were measured on the heart rate, body length, brain serotonergic neurons and tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-IR) neurons. In the absence of N-acetylcysteine, a concentration of ketamine that produces an internal embryo exposure level comparable to human anesthetic plasma concentrations significantly reduced heart rate and body length and those effects were prevented by N-acetylcysteine co-treatment. Ketamine also reduced the areas occupied by serotonergic neurons in the brain, whereas N-acetylcysteine co-exposure counteracted this effect. TH-IR neurons in the embryo brain and TH-IR cells in the trunk were significantly reduced with ketamine treatment, but not in the presence of N-acetylcysteine. In our continued search for compounds that can prevent ketamine toxicity, this study using specific endpoints of developmental toxicity, cardiotoxicity and neurotoxicity, demonstrates protective effects of N-acetylcysteine against ketamine's adverse effects. This is the first study that shows the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine on ketamine-induced developmental defects of monoaminergic neurons as observed in a whole organism. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Adverse Drug Reaction reports for cardiometabolic drugs from sub-Saharan Africa : a study in VigiBase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berhe, Derbew Fikadu; Juhlin, Kristina; Star, Kristina; Beyene, Kidanemariam G. M.; Dheda, Mukesh; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Taxis, Katja; Mol, Peter G. M.

    OBJECTIVE: Identifying key features of cardiometabolic ADR reports in sub Saharan Africa (SSA) compared with reports from the rest of the world (RoW). METHODS: Reports on suspected ADRs of cardiometabolic drugs (ATC: A10[antidiabetic], B01[antithrombotics] and C[cardiovascular]) were extracted from

  20. Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Pattern in Turkey: Analysis of the National Database in the Context of the First Pharmacovigilance Legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Gulnihal; Aykac, Emel; Kasap, Yelda; Nemutlu, Nergiz T; Sen, Ebru; Aydinkarahaliloglu, N Demet

    2016-03-01

    In Turkey, pharmacovigilance began in 1985. A fully structured adverse drug reaction (ADR)-reporting system was established with the publication of the first pharmacovigilance regulation in 2005. Subsequent regulation published in 2014 brought further improvements to the system. In this study, we aimed to analyse the ADR-reporting pattern in the context of the first pharmacovigilance legislation in Turkey. We analysed ADR reports submitted to the Turkish Pharmacovigilance Center (TUFAM) from 2005 to 2014 with respect to reporting rate (RR), patient characteristics, type of the ADRs, suspected drugs, source of the report and the profession of the reporter. The annual RR increased gradually over the study period. RRs for females were greater than those for males. RRs were highly correlated with age. Most commonly reported ADRs were skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders. Most commonly suspected drugs were antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents. There was no remarkable change in reporting pattern of ADRs, patient characteristics or classes of suspected drugs over the years. The most common source of reports was spontaneous reporting. Contribution of the reports from studies increased gradually. Most of the reports were reported by physicians. RRs by pharmacists increased substantially over the years. This study showed that the annual RR increased gradually over the 9-year study period. This increase was neither due to an increased reporting of a specific group of ADRs or drugs, nor to an increased reporting in a specific group of patients. There was a general increase in RR in parallel to pharmacovigilance activities.

  1. Discrepancies in listed adverse drug reactions in pharmaceutical product information supplied by the regulatory authorities in Denmark and the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Robert; Aagaard, Lise; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Borisova, Liza; Hørlück, Dorte; Brunak, Søren; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceutical product information (PI) supplied by the regulatory authorities serves as a source of information on safe and effective use of drugs. The objectives of this study were to qualitatively and quantitatively compare PIs for selected drugs marketed in both Denmark and the USA with respect to consistency and discrepancy of listed adverse drug reaction (ADR) information. We compared individual ADRs listed in PIs from Denmark and the USA with respect to type and frequency. Consistency was defined as match of ADRs and of ADR frequency or match could not be ruled out. Discrepancies were defined as ADRs listed only in one country or listed with different frequencies. We analyzed PIs for 40 separate drugs from ten therapeutic groups and assigned the 4003 identified ADRs to System Organ Classes (Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities [MedDRA] terminology). Less than half of listed ADRs (n = 1874; 47%) showed consistency. Discrepancies (n = 2129; 53%) were split into ADRs listed only in the USA (n = 1558; 39%), ADRs listed only in Denmark (n = 325; 8%) and ADRs listed with different frequencies (n = 246; 6%). The majority of listed ADRs were of the type "gastrointestinal disorders" and "nervous system disorders". Our results show great differences in PIs for drugs approved in both Denmark and the USA illuminating concerns about the credibility of the publicly available PIs. The results also represent an argument for further harmonization across borders to improve consistency between authority-supplied information.

  2. Diagnosis, prevention, and management of statin adverse effects and intolerance: Canadian Working Group Consensus update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, G B John; Tashakkor, A Yashar; Baker, Steven; Bergeron, Jean; Fitchett, David; Frohlich, Jiri; Genest, Jacques; Gupta, Milan; Hegele, Robert A; Ng, Dominic S; Pearson, Glen J; Pope, Janet

    2013-12-01

    The Proceedings of a Canadian Working Group Consensus Conference, first published in 2011, provided a summary of statin-associated adverse effects and intolerance and management suggestions. In this update, new clinical studies identified since then that provide further insight into effects on muscle, cognition, cataracts, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer are discussed. Of these, the arenas of greatest controversy pertain to purported effects on cognition and the emergence of diabetes during long-term therapy. Regarding cognition, the available evidence is not strongly supportive of a major adverse effect of statins. In contrast, the linkage between statin therapy and incident diabetes is more firm. However, this risk is more strongly associated with traditional risk factors for new-onset diabetes than with statin itself and any possible negative effect of new-onset diabetes during statin treatment is far outweighed by the cardiovascular risk reduction benefits. Additional studies are also discussed, which support the principle that systematic statin rechallenge, and lower or intermittent statin dosing strategies are the main methods for dealing with suspected statin intolerance at this time. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Federal Strategy for Prevention of Drug Abuse and Drug Trafficking, 1982. Prepared for the President Pursuant to the Drug Abuse Office and Treatment Act of 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Policy Development, Washington, DC.

    This document describes the Federal response to drug abuse and drug trafficking. The actions of President Reagan, in Executive Order 12368, establishing an official advisor on drug abuse policy matters, and the priorities, issues, and objectives (international cooperation, drug law enforcement, education and prevention, detoxification and…

  4. Pathogenesis of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Gastropathy: Clues to Preventative Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim MA Bastaki

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric ulceration and bleeding are major impediments to the chronic use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The development of effective therapies for prevention of these adverse effects requires better understanding of their pathogenesis. Several features of NSAIDs contribute to the development of damage in the stomach, including the topical irritant effects of these drugs on the epithelium, impairment of the barrier properties of the mucosa, suppression of gastric prostaglandin synthesis, reduction of gastric mucosal blood flow and interference with the repair of superficial injury. The presence of acid in the lumen of the stomach also contributes to the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced ulcers and bleeding in a number of ways. Acid impairs the restitution process, interferes with hemostasis and can inactivate several growth factors that are important in mucosal integrity and repair. Profound suppression of gastric acid secretion has been shown to be effective in preventing NSAID-induced ulceration. There is a strong possibility that new NSAIDs entering the market will have greatly reduced toxicity in the gastrointestinal tract.

  5. Drugs and Medical Devices: Adverse Events and the Impact on Women's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Jennifer L; Nader, Nathalie; Chai, Peter R; Carreiro, Stephanie; Griswold, Matthew K; Boyle, Katherine L

    2017-01-01

    A large number of medications and medical devices removed from the market by the US Food and Drug Administration over the past 4 decades specifically posed greater health risks to women. This article reviews the historical background of sex and gender in clinical research policy and describes several approved drugs and devices targeted for use in women that have caused major morbidity and mortality. The intended population for the medications and devices, population affected, approval process, and the basic and legal actions taken against the medication/drug company are also discussed. It is recognized that women are still at risk for harm from unsafe medications and devices, and continued improvements in legislation that promotes inclusion of sex and gender into the design and analysis of research will improve safety for both men and women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adverse drug reaction prediction using scores produced by large-scale drug-protein target docking on high-performance computing machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBute, Montiago X; Zhang, Xiaohua; Lenderman, Jason; Bennion, Brian J; Wong, Sergio E; Lightstone, Felice C

    2014-01-01

    Late-stage or post-market identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is a significant public health issue and a source of major economic liability for drug development. Thus, reliable in silico screening of drug candidates for possible ADRs would be advantageous. In this work, we introduce a computational approach that predicts ADRs by combining the results of molecular docking and leverages known ADR information from DrugBank and SIDER. We employed a recently parallelized version of AutoDock Vina (VinaLC) to dock 906 small molecule drugs to a virtual panel of 409 DrugBank protein targets. L1-regularized logistic regression models were trained on the resulting docking scores of a 560 compound subset from the initial 906 compounds to predict 85 side effects, grouped into 10 ADR phenotype groups. Only 21% (87 out of 409) of the drug-protein binding features involve known targets of the drug subset, providing a significant probe of off-target effects. As a control, associations of this drug subset with the 555 annotated targets of these compounds, as reported in DrugBank, were used as features to train a separate group of models. The Vina off-target models and the DrugBank on-target models yielded comparable median area-under-the-receiver-operating-characteristic-curves (AUCs) during 10-fold cross-validation (0.60-0.69 and 0.61-0.74, respectively). Evidence was found in the PubMed literature to support several putative ADR-protein associations identified by our analysis. Among them, several associations between neoplasm-related ADRs and known tumor suppressor and tumor invasiveness marker proteins were found. A dual role for interstitial collagenase in both neoplasms and aneurysm formation was also identified. These associations all involve off-target proteins and could not have been found using available drug/on-target interaction data. This study illustrates a path forward to comprehensive ADR virtual screening that can potentially scale with increasing number

  7. Adverse drug reaction prediction using scores produced by large-scale drug-protein target docking on high-performance computing machines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montiago X LaBute

    Full Text Available Late-stage or post-market identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs is a significant public health issue and a source of major economic liability for drug development. Thus, reliable in silico screening of drug candidates for possible ADRs would be advantageous. In this work, we introduce a computational approach that predicts ADRs by combining the results of molecular docking and leverages known ADR information from DrugBank and SIDER. We employed a recently parallelized version of AutoDock Vina (VinaLC to dock 906 small molecule drugs to a virtual panel of 409 DrugBank protein targets. L1-regularized logistic regression models were trained on the resulting docking scores of a 560 compound subset from the initial 906 compounds to predict 85 side effects, grouped into 10 ADR phenotype groups. Only 21% (87 out of 409 of the drug-protein binding features involve known targets of the drug subset, providing a significant probe of off-target effects. As a control, associations of this drug subset with the 555 annotated targets of these compounds, as reported in DrugBank, were used as features to train a separate group of models. The Vina off-target models and the DrugBank on-target models yielded comparable median area-under-the-receiver-operating-characteristic-curves (AUCs during 10-fold cross-validation (0.60-0.69 and 0.61-0.74, respectively. Evidence was found in the PubMed literature to support several putative ADR-protein associations identified by our analysis. Among them, several associations between neoplasm-related ADRs and known tumor suppressor and tumor invasiveness marker proteins were found. A dual role for interstitial collagenase in both neoplasms and aneurysm formation was also identified. These associations all involve off-target proteins and could not have been found using available drug/on-target interaction data. This study illustrates a path forward to comprehensive ADR virtual screening that can potentially scale with

  8. The Checkpoint Immunotherapy Revolution: What Started as a Trickle Has Become a Flood, Despite Some Daunting Adverse Effects; New Drugs, Indications, and Combinations Continue to Emerge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Walter

    2016-03-01

    What started as a trickle of new agents that help the body's immune system fight cancer has now become a flood, despite some daunting adverse effects. This report discusses the new drugs, indications, and combinations that continue to emerge.

  9. Association Between the Occurrence of Adverse Drug Events and Modification of First-Line Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in Ghanaian HIV Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Raymond A; Nartey, Edmund T; Lartey, Margaret; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Yankey, Barbara A; Dodoo, Alexander N O

    2016-11-01

    Patients initiated on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) generally remain on medication indefinitely. A modification in the HAART regimen may become necessary because of possible acute or chronic toxicities, concomitant clinical conditions, development of virological failure or the advent of adverse drug events. The study documents adverse drug events of HIV-positive Ghanaian patients with HAART modifications. It also investigates the association between documented adverse drug events and HAART modification using an unmatched case-control study design. The study was conducted in the Fevers Unit of the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital and involved patients who attended the HIV Care Clinic between January 2004 and December 2009. Data from 298 modified therapy patients (cases) were compared with 298 continuing therapy patients (controls) who had been on treatment for at least 1 month before the end of study. Controls were sampled from the same database of a cohort of HIV-positive patients on HAART, at the time a case occurred, in terms of treatment initiation ±1 month. Data were obtained from patients' clinical folders and the HIV clinic database linked to the pharmacy database. The nature of the documented adverse drug events of the cases was described and the association between the documented adverse drug events and HAART modification was determined by logistic regression with reported odds ratios (ORs) and their 95 % confidence interval (CI). Among the 298 modified therapy patients sampled in this study, 52.7 % of them had at least one documented adverse drug event. The most documented adverse drug event was anaemia, recorded in 18.5 % of modified therapy patients, all of whom were on a zidovudine-based regimen. The presence of documented adverse drug events was significantly associated with HAART modification [adjusted OR = 2.71 (95 % CI 2.11-3.48), p < 0.001]. Among HIV patients on HAART, adverse drug events play a major role in treatment

  10. Adverse events with use of antiepileptic drugs: a prescription and event symmetry analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsiropoulos, Ioannis; Andersen, Morten; Hallas, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Database (OPED) for the period of 1 August 1990-31 December 2006, and diagnoses from the County Hospital register for the period of 1994-2006 to perform sequence symmetry analysis. The method assesses the distribution of disease entities and prescription of other drugs (ODs), before and after initiation...

  11. Pharmacy student driven detection of adverse drug reactions in the community pharmacy setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Troels; Søndergaard, Birthe; Honoré, Per Hartvig

    2011-01-01

    of pharmacists in ADR reporting, although varies significantly among countries. Pharmacists in community pharmacies are in a unique position for detection of experienced ADRs by the drug users. The study reports from a study on community pharmacy internship students' proactive role in ADR detection through...

  12. Adverse drug reactions to tocolytic treatment for preterm labour: Prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. de Heus (Roel); B.W.J. Mol (Ben); J.J.H.M. Erwich; H.P. van Geijn (Herman); W.J. Gyselaers (Wilfried); M. Hanssens (Myriam); L. Harmark (Linda); C.D. van Holsbeke (Caroline); J.J. Duvekot (Hans); F. Famschobben; H. Wolf (Hans Uwe); G.H. Visser (Gerhard Henk)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractObjective To evaluate the incidence of serious maternal complications after the use of various tocolytic drugs for the treatment of preterm labour in routine clinical situations. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 28 hospitals in the Netherlands and Belgium. Participants 1920

  13. Analysis of Adverse Reaction of Analgesics, Antipyretics and Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Prescribed by Physicians of Health Care Facilities in Podilskyi Region during 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Stepaniuk, N. H.; Hladkykh, F. V.; Basarab, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of medicines rational use exists all over the world. It concerns particularly analgesics, antipyretics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In Ukraine the side effects caused by non-steroidal antiphlogistics rank the second place according to the prevalence among all registered cases.The objective of the research was to analyze adverse drug reaction report forms concerning adverse reactions caused by the use of NSAIDs, analgesics, antipyretics, and were submitted du...

  14. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Saag, Michael S.; Benson, Constance A.; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Sax, Paul E.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Smith, Davey M.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults. OBJECTIVE To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis. EVIDENCE REVIEW A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society-USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence. FINDINGS Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory

  15. [Drug-eluting stent thrombosis and its pharmacological prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershukov, I V; Batyraliev, T A

    2007-01-01

    The problem of drug eluting stents (DES) safety has been actively discussed throughout 2006 because of increase of frequency of development of late stent thromboses which were noted during almost 2 years after stenting. In December 2006 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory panel acknowledged increase of development of late stent thrombosis. At the same time FDA accepted new definition of stent-thrombosis suggested by the Academic Research Consortium. According to this definition thrombosis can be definite, probable and possible. Any unexplained death before end of follow-up in a trial should be considered thrombosis related. Recalculation of thrombosis rate using this definition caused pronounced increase of this parameter in previously conducted trials. Thrombosis rate rose from 0,6 to 3,3% for bare metal stents, from 0,8 to 3,6% for sirolimus eluting stents and from 1,3 to 3,5% for paclitaxel eluting stents. Professional cardiological and angiographical societies (ACC, AHA, SCAI) responding to FDA advisory panel published their proofs and vision of the problem of stent thrombosis. In February 2007 ACC, AHA, SCAI, American College of Surgeons and Association of Dentists published scientific bulletin in which described preventive measures aimed at lowering of risk of thrombosis development. This document contains strict recommendation to continue double antithrombotic therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel for 12 months after implantation of DES or abandonment of the use of this type of stents when long term double antithrombotic therapy is not possible.

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuate the Adverse Effects of Immunosuppressive Drugs on Distinct T Cell Subopulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájková, Michaela; Heřmánková, Barbora; Javorková, Eliška; Boháčová, Pavla; Zajícová, Alena; Holáň, Vladimír; Krulová, Magdaléna

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2017), s. 104-115 ISSN 1550-8943 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12580S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1508; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cells * immunosuppressive drugs * stem cell therapy Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry OBOR OECD: Immunology Impact factor: 2.967, year: 2016

  17. Adverse reactions among patients being treated for multi-drug resistant tuberculosis at Abbassia Chest Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Tag El Din

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: There is a relation between both tobacco smoking and drug addiction, and MDR TB. The most common type of resistance is acquired resistance because of lack of adherence to treatment or inappropriate treatment. The most common co-morbidities associated with MDR TB are diabetes and chronic obstructive lung diseases. The most important predictors of patients’ outcome are sputum conversion, number of previous TB treatment and presence of co-morbidities.

  18. Endocrine and Metabolic Adverse Effects of Psychotropic Drugs in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim Aktepe

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Much as an increase in the use of psychotropic drugs is observed in children and adolescents over the last decade, the endocrine and metabolic side effects of these drugs can limit their use. Atypical antipsychotics can cause many side effects, which are not suitable for the developmental periods of children and adolescents, such as those related with thyroid, blood sugar, level of sex hormones, growth rate and bone metabolism. Children are under a more serious risk regarding the weight increasing effects of atypical antipsychotics and weight gain that is not proportionate with age is especially important due to the association between glucose or lipid abnormalities and cardiovascular mortality. Aripiprazole and ziprasidone are the least risky antipsychotic drugs when it comes to metabolic side affects. The antipsychotic drug that is associated with weight increase and diabetes in children and adolescents most is olanzapine. Even though there are no comparative long-term data concerning children, it is suggested by the currently available information that metabolic side effects including dyslipidemia and impaired glucose tolerance are at an alarming level when it comes to long-term treatment with antipsychotics. The most risky agents in terms of hyperglycemia and glucosuria development are olanzapine and clozapine. Use of risperidone and haloperidol should be undertaken with caution since it may bring about the risk of hyperprolactinemia. Among the antidepressants associated with weight loss and suppression of appetite are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, bupropion and venlafaxine. Thyroid functions can be affected by lithium, carbamazepine and valproate treatments. It is reported that the side effect most frequently associated with valproate is weight increase. The relationship between valproate treatment and the development of hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovary syndrome in young women should also be kept in mind. [TAF Prev

  19. Standard-based comprehensive detection of adverse drug reaction signals from nursing statements and laboratory results in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suehyun; Choi, Jiyeob; Kim, Hun-Sung; Kim, Grace Juyun; Lee, Kye Hwa; Park, Chan Hee; Han, Jongsoo; Yoon, Dukyong; Park, Man Young; Park, Rae Woong; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Ju Han

    2017-07-01

    We propose 2 Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities-enabled pharmacovigilance algorithms, MetaLAB and MetaNurse, powered by a per-year meta-analysis technique and improved subject sampling strategy. This study developed 2 novel algorithms, MetaLAB for laboratory abnormalities and MetaNurse for standard nursing statements, as significantly improved versions of our previous electronic health record (EHR)-based pharmacovigilance method, called CLEAR. Adverse drug reaction (ADR) signals from 117 laboratory abnormalities and 1357 standard nursing statements for all precautionary drugs ( n   = 101) were comprehensively detected and validated against SIDER (Side Effect Resource) by MetaLAB and MetaNurse against 11 817 and 76 457 drug-ADR pairs, respectively. We demonstrate that MetaLAB (area under the curve, AUC = 0.61 ± 0.18) outperformed CLEAR (AUC = 0.55 ± 0.06) when we applied the same 470 drug-event pairs as the gold standard, as in our previous research. Receiver operating characteristic curves for 101 precautionary terms in the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities Preferred Terms were obtained for MetaLAB and MetaNurse (0.69 ± 0.11; 0.62 ± 0.07), which complemented each other in terms of ADR signal coverage. Novel ADR signals discovered by MetaLAB and MetaNurse were successfully validated against spontaneous reports in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System database. The present study demonstrates the symbiosis of laboratory test results and nursing statements for ADR signal detection in terms of their system organ class coverage and performance profiles. Systematic discovery and evaluation of the wide spectrum of ADR signals using standard-based observational electronic health record data across many institutions will affect drug development and use, as well as postmarketing surveillance and regulation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American

  20. Bigger, Brighter, Bluer-Better?Current light-emitting devices- adverse sleep properties and preventative strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eGringras

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveIn an effort to enhance the efficiency, brightness and contrast of light-emitting (LE devices during the day, displays often generate substantial short-wavelength (blue-enriched light emissions that can adversely affect sleep. We set out to verify the extent of such short-wavelength emissions, produced by a tablet (iPad Air, e-reader (Kindle Paperwhite 1st generation and smartphone (iPhone 5s and to determine the impact of strategies designed to reduce these light emissions. SettingUniversity of Surrey dedicated chronobiology facility.MethodsFirstly, the spectral power of all the light-emitting (LE devices was assessed when displaying identical text. Secondly, we compared the text output with that of ‘Angry Birds’-a popular top 100 ‘App Store’ game. Finally we measured the impact of two strategies that attempt to reduce the output of short-wavelength light emissions. The first strategy employed an inexpensive commercially available pair of orange-tinted ‘blue-blocking’ glasses. The second tested an app designed to be ‘sleep-aware’ whose designers deliberately attempted to reduce blue-enriched light emissions.ResultsAll the LE devices shared very similar enhanced blue-light peaks when displaying text. This included the output from the backlit Kindle Paperwhite device. The spectra when comparing text to the Angry Birds game were also very similar, although the

  1. Increased introduction, advertising, and sales of preventive drugs during 1986-2002 in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, J Lars G; Melander, Arne

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to survey how introduction of new drugs and promotional activities influence drug sales in Sweden. All drugs on the Swedish market were categorized as curative, symptom-alleviating, substitutive, or preventive. The number of new drugs introduced, drug sales in volume and value, and the number of drug advertisements appearing in the major Swedish medical journal during 1986-2002 were determined for each of the 4 drug categories. Between 1986 and 1998, the relative shares of the 4 drug categories were relatively constant. From 1998 to 2002, the share of new preventive drugs increased from 24% to 30%, their share of advertisements increased from 20% to 35%, and their sales value increased from 25% to 30%. During the same period, the shares of other drugs decreased correspondingly. Pharmaceutical companies have shifted their attention to the introduction, advertising, and sales of preventive drugs in an attempt to exploit preventive medicine. This might lead to waste of resources when expensive preventive drugs are used by numerous patients over many years, as the benefit of preventive drugs for the individual patient cannot be judged easily.

  2. SSEL-ADE: A semi-supervised ensemble learning framework for extracting adverse drug events from social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Zhao, Songzheng; Wang, Gang

    2018-01-01

    With the development of Web 2.0 technology, social media websites have become lucrative but under-explored data sources for extracting adverse drug events (ADEs), which is a serious health problem. Besides ADE, other semantic relation types (e.g., drug indication and beneficial effect) could hold between the drug and adverse event mentions, making ADE relation extraction - distinguishing ADE relationship from other relation types - necessary. However, conducting ADE relation extraction in social media environment is not a trivial task because of the expertise-dependent, time-consuming and costly annotation process, and the feature space's high-dimensionality attributed to intrinsic characteristics of social media data. This study aims to develop a framework for ADE relation extraction using patient-generated content in social media with better performance than that delivered by previous efforts. To achieve the objective, a general semi-supervised ensemble learning framework, SSEL-ADE, was developed. The framework exploited various lexical, semantic, and syntactic features, and integrated ensemble learning and semi-supervised learning. A series of experiments were conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed framework. Empirical results demonstrate the effectiveness of each component of SSEL-ADE and reveal that our proposed framework outperforms most of existing ADE relation extraction methods The SSEL-ADE can facilitate enhanced ADE relation extraction performance, thereby providing more reliable support for pharmacovigilance. Moreover, the proposed semi-supervised ensemble methods have the potential of being applied to effectively deal with other social media-based problems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Adverse events reported to the Food and Drug Administration from 2004 to 2016 for cosmetics and personal care products marketed to newborns and infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Erika; Kwa, Michael; Paller, Amy S; Xu, Shuai

    2018-03-01

    Despite their ubiquitous use and several recent health controversies involving cosmetics and personal care products for children, the Food and Drug Administration has little oversight of these products and relies on consumer-submitted adverse event reports. We assessed the recently released Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Adverse Event Reporting System database for adverse event reports submitted to the Food and Drug Administration for baby personal care products and to determine whether useful insights can be derived. We extracted the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Adverse Event Reporting System data file from 2004 to 2016 and examined the subset classified according to the Food and Drug Administration-designated product class as a baby product. Events were manually categorized into product type and symptom type to assess for trends. Only 166 total adverse events were reported to the Food and Drug Administration for baby products from 2004 to 2016. The majority of reports indicated rash or other skin reaction; 46% of reported events led to a health care visit. Pediatric dermatologists should consider submitting cosmetics and personal care product adverse event reports and encouraging consumers to do so likewise in situations in which a product adversely affects a child's health. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Prediction of drug-related cardiac adverse effects in humans--B: use of QSAR programs for early detection of drug-induced cardiac toxicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Anna A; Matthews, Edwin J

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the use of three quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) programs to predict drug-related cardiac adverse effects (AEs), BioEpisteme, MC4PC, and Leadscope Predictive Data Miner. QSAR models were constructed for 9 cardiac AE clusters affecting Purkinje nerve fibers (arrhythmia, bradycardia, conduction disorder, electrocardiogram, palpitations, QT prolongation, rate rhythm composite, tachycardia, and Torsades de pointes) and 5 clusters affecting the heart muscle (coronary artery disorders, heart failure, myocardial disorders, myocardial infarction, and valve disorders). The models were based on a database of post-marketing AEs linked to 1632 chemical structures, and identical training data sets were configured for three QSAR programs. Model performance was optimized and shown to be affected by the ratio of the number of active to inactive drugs. Results revealed that the three programs were complementary and predictive performances using any single positive, consensus two positives, or consensus three positives were as follows, respectively: 70.7%, 91.7%, and 98.0% specificity; 74.7%, 47.2%, and 21.0% sensitivity; and 138.2, 206.3, and 144.2 chi(2). In addition, a prospective study using AE data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) MedWatch Program showed 82.4% specificity and 94.3% sensitivity. Furthermore, an external validation study of 18 drugs with serious cardiotoxicity not considered in the models had 88.9% sensitivity. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. How Does the Fast Track Intervention Prevent Adverse Outcomes in Young Adulthood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Lucy C; Dodge, Kenneth A

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that childhood interventions can foster improved outcomes in adulthood. Less well understood is precisely how-that is, through which developmental pathways-these interventions work. This study assesses mechanisms by which the Fast Track project (n = 891), a randomized intervention in the early 1990s for high-risk children in four communities (Durham, NC; Nashville, TN; rural PA; and Seattle, WA), reduced delinquency, arrests, and general and mental health service utilization in adolescence through young adulthood (ages 12-20). A decomposition of treatment effects indicates that about a third of Fast Track's impact on later crime outcomes can be accounted for by improvements in social and self-regulation skills during childhood (ages 6-11), such as prosocial behavior, emotion regulation, and problem solving. These skills proved less valuable for the prevention of general and mental health problems. © 2015 The Authors. Child Development © 2015 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  6. A survey of the FDA's AERS database regarding muscle and tendon adverse events linked to the statin drug class.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith B Hoffman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cholesterol management drugs known as statins are widely used and often well tolerated; however, a variety of muscle-related side effects can arise. These adverse events (AEs can have serious impact, and form a significant barrier to therapy adherence. Surveillance of post-marketing AEs is of vital importance to understand real-world AEs and reporting differences between individual statin drugs. We conducted a review of post-approval muscle and tendon AE reports in association with statin use, to assess differences within the drug class. METHODS: We analyzed all case reports from the FDA AE Reporting System (AERS database linking muscle-related AEs to statin use (07/01/2005-03/31/2011. Drugs examined were: atorvastatin, simvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, and fluvastatin. RESULTS: Relative risk rates for rosuvastatin were consistently higher than other statins. Atorvastatin and simvastatin showed intermediate risks, while pravastatin and lovastatin appeared to have the lowest risk rates. Relative risk of muscle-related AEs, therefore, approximately tracked with per milligram LDL-lowering potency, with fluvastatin an apparent exception. Incorporating all muscle categories, rates for atorvastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, and lovastatin were, respectively, 55%, 26%, 17%, and 7.5% as high, as rosuvastatin, approximately tracking per milligram potency (Rosuvastatin>Atorvastatin>Simvastatin>Pravastatin ≈ Lovastatin and comporting with findings of other studies. Relative potency, therefore, appears to be a fundamental predictor of muscle-related AE risk, with fluvastatin, the least potent statin, an apparent exception (risk 74% vs rosuvastatin. INTERPRETATION: AE reporting rates differed strikingly for drugs within the statin class, with relative reporting aligning substantially with potency. The data presented in this report offer important reference points for the selection of statins for cholesterol management in

  7. Category 3 and 4 Controlled Drugs Users' Perceptions of Participating in Drug-Abuse-Health Prevention Lectures in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fan-Ko; Long, Ann; Yu, Pei-Jane; Huang, Hui-Man; Chiang, Chun-Ying; Yao, YuChun

    2017-08-01

    This study was designed to explore Category 3 and 4 controlled drug users' perceptions of participating in health-prevention lectures. A phenomenological approach was used. Twelve participants were interviewed after completing the lectures. Findings revealed five themes (1) mixed emotions; (2) self-development; (3) finding the lectures lacked practicality and relevance; (4) highlighting three stages for discontinuing drug-usage; and, (5) suggesting tips for the advancement of lectures. These findings could be used as a map to help health professionals understand drug users' perceptions of attending health prevention lectures and provide insight into how young people might stop using drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Exposure to Prescription Drugs Labeled for Risk of Adverse Effects of Suicidal Behavior or Ideation among 100 Air Force Personnel Who Died by Suicide, 2006-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Jill E.; McCarthy, Michael; Chapman, Richard; Petrilla, Allison; Knox, Kerry L.

    2012-01-01

    Prescription drugs for many indications are labeled with warnings for potential risk of suicidal ideation or behavior. Exposures to prescription drugs labeled for adverse effects of suicidal behavior or ideation among 100 Air Force personnel who died by suicide between 2006 and 2009 are described. Air Force registry data were linked to…

  9. Sports celebrities and public health: Diego Maradona's influence on drug use prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William J; de Matviuk, Marcela Alejandra Chavan

    2010-06-01

    Exposure to a sports celebrity through media and sporting events can have important influences on a public health issue associated with that celebrity. The battle against drug use by Argentinean soccer icon Diego Maradona has provoked concerns about drug abuse and prevention in Argentina, particularly among young people. The present study analyzes how two forms of involvement with Maradona affected the public's concern and perceptions of drug use after Maradona's drug-related health crisis in 2004. Results indicate that those who had a greater degree of parasocial interaction with Maradona were more likely to have an increased awareness of drug abuse, a greater personal concern about drug abuse, abstained from drug use, and more strongly support drug abuse prevention programs. In contrast, identification with Maradona had a mitigating effect on drug use prevention. Implications of these findings regarding the influence of sports celebrities on substance abuse are discussed.

  10. Minimizing Cardiovascular Adverse Effects of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs in Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi T. Khasawneh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of atypical antipsychotic agents has rapidly increased in the United States and worldwide in the last decade. Nonetheless, many health care practitioners do not appreciate the significance of the cardiovascular side effects that may be associated with their use and the means to minimize them. Thus, atypical antipsychotic medications can cause cardiovascular side effects such as arrhythmias and deviations in blood pressure. In rare cases, they may also cause congestive heart failure, myocarditis, and sudden death. Patients with schizophrenia have a higher risk of cardiovascular mortality than healthy individuals, possibly because of excessive smoking, the underlying disorder itself, or a combination of both factors. Increased awareness of these potential complications can allow pharmacists and physicians to better manage and monitor high risk patients. Accurate assessments are very important to avoid medications from being given to patients inappropriately. Additionally, monitoring patients regularly via blood draws and checking blood pressure, heart rate, and electrocardiogram can help catch any clinical problems and prevent further complications. Finally, patient and family-member education, which pharmacists in particular can play key roles in, is central for the management and prevention of side effects, which is known to reflect positively on morbidity and mortality in these patients.

  11. Analysis of the use and adverse effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perić Aneta

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The use and adverse effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in outpatients with rheumatic diseases has not yet been studied enough. The aim of this study was to evaluate the data about the efficacy and safety of NSAIDs obtained from the questionnaires submitted to the outpatients receiving these drugs. Methods. The patients who had been prescribed any of NSAIDs within the period from June to September, 2004 were included in the study. The answers obtained from the questionnaires were statistically analyzed by means of χ2-test. Results. At the time of the study, 150 patients had been prescribed ibuprofen or some other NSAID. Out of the total number of dispensed questionnaires (n = 150, only 45 (30% were shown to be correctly filled-in. Their analysis showed that 64.4% of the patients had suffered from rheumatic diseases for more than five years, and had regularly used NSAIDs. The average age of these patients was about 70 years, and the number of females was double as high as that of the males. The most frequently used NSAIDs were diclofenac and ibuprofen (46.14%, and 23.24%, respectively. According to the answers given by the patients, the most often adverse reactions were gastric complaints such as nausea (11.1%, and stomach pain (8.9%. Due to this, the majority of the patients (64.4% used some of the antiulcer drugs, most often ranitidine (31.1%. Conclusion. The results of this pilot study revealed that among the outpatients suffering from rheumatic diseases, the number of females was double as high as the number of males, that these patients were of the mean age of 70 years, and that their diseases lasted longer than five years. Gastric complains such as nausea and gastric pain of mild intensity were the most often adverse effects of NSAIDs reported by our patients. It could be the consequence of the predominant use of diclofenac and ibuprofen, NSAIDs with mild to moderate ulcerogenic potential, as well as the

  12. Factors affecting the development of adverse drug reactions to β-blockers in hospitalized cardiac patient population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugoša S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Snežana Mugoša,1,2 Nataša Djordjević,3 Nina Djukanović,4 Dragana Protić,5 Zoran Bukumirić,6 Ivan Radosavljević,7 Aneta Bošković,8 Zoran Todorović5,9 1Department of Pharmacotherapy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Montenegro, 2Clinical Trial Department, Agency for Medicines and Medical Devices of Montenegro, Podgorica, Montenegro; 3Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, 4High Medical School “Milutin Milanković”, Belgrade, 5Department of Pharmacology, Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, 6Institute for Medical Statistics and Informatics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, 7Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Serbia; 8Clinic for Heart Diseases, Clinical Centre of Montenegro, Podgorica, Montenegro; 9Department of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Medical Center “Bežanijska kosa”, Belgrade, Serbia Abstract: The aim of the present study was to undertake a study on the prevalence of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6 poor metabolizer alleles (*3, *4, *5, and *6 on a Montenegrin population and its impact on developing adverse drug reactions (ADRs of β-blockers in a hospitalized cardiac patient population. A prospective study was conducted in the Cardiology Center of the Clinical Center of Montenegro and included 138 patients who had received any β-blocker in their therapy. ADRs were collected using a specially designed questionnaire, based on the symptom list and any signs that could point to eventual ADRs. Data from patients’ medical charts, laboratory tests, and other available parameters were observed and combined with the data from the questionnaire. ADRs to β-blockers were observed in 15 (10.9% patients. There was a statistically significant difference in the frequency of ADRs in relation to genetically determined enzymatic activity (P<0.001, with ADRs’ occurrence significantly

  13. Linezolid Trough Concentrations Correlate with Mitochondrial Toxicity-Related Adverse Events in the Treatment of Chronic Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Taeksun; Lee, Myungsun; Jeon, Han-Seung; Park, Yumi; Dodd, Lori E; Dartois, Véronique; Follman, Dean; Wang, Jing; Cai, Ying; Goldfeder, Lisa C; Olivier, Kenneth N; Xie, Yingda; Via, Laura E; Cho, Sang Nae; Barry, Clifton E; Chen, Ray Y

    2015-11-01

    Long-term linezolid use is limited by mitochondrial toxicity-associated adverse events (AEs). Within a prospective, randomized controlled trial of linezolid to treat chronic extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, we serially monitored the translational competence of mitochondria isolated from peripheral blood of participants by determining the cytochrome c oxidase/citrate synthase activity ratio. We compared this ratio with AEs associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Linezolid trough concentrations were determined for 38 participants at both 600 mg and 300 mg doses. Those on 600 mg had a significantly higher risk of AE than those on 300 mg (HR 3·10, 95% CI 1·23-7 · 86). Mean mitochondrial function levels were significantly higher in patients before starting linezolid compared to their concentrations on 300 mg (P = 0·004) or 600 mg (P linezolid trough concentrations were associated with lower mitochondrial function levels (Spearman's ρ = - 0.48; P = 0.005). Mitochondrial toxicity risk increased with increasing linezolid trough concentrations, with all patients with mean linezolid trough > 2 μg/ml developing an AE related to mitochondrial toxicity, whether on 300 mg or 600 mg. Therapeutic drug monitoring may be useful to prevent the development of mitochondrial toxicity associated with long-term linezolid use.

  14. Adverse drug reactions reporting : Knowledge and opinion of general public in Penang, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkalmi, Ramadan; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Al-Lela, Omar Qutaiba; Jawad Awadh, Ammar Ihsan; Al-Shami, Abdul Kareem; Jamshed, Shazia Qasim

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the knowledge of the general population towards ADR and their reporting system. An anonymous, self-administered questionnaire (15 items) was designed. The questionnaire was subjected to face validity and content validity. The reliability coefficient was found to be 0.71. This study recruited proportionately large convenience sample of the general public in Penang. Interviews using a structured questionnaire were conducted over a week period in August 2009. The recommended sample size was calculated to be 368. Three hundred thirty-four responses were received. Slightly more than half of the respondents were in the age group of 18-25 years (53.6%; n = 179). When asked about the sources of their medication majority of them reported medical doctor (85.6%), whereas small number (34.7%) reported community pharmacists as sources of medications. Three-quarter of the respondents (77.2%) get their information about the side-effects of drugs from physicians, followed by pharmacist (44.6%). More than half of the respondents (65.6%, n = 219) reported unawareness about the existence of ADR center set up by the Ministry of Health. Respondents reflected inadequate knowledge on ADR reporting. This needs to be corrected as the trend of future pharmacovigilance is toward the patient. Moreover, the new trend seems to be more appropriate as the patient is the group of the people who are directly affected from the ADR of a particular drug and not the health-care providers. Furthermore, the patient will be informed about the economic implications of not reporting ADR. It is recommended that government agencies, like MADRAC needs to find ways to increase patient- reported ADR cases.

  15. Adverse drug reactions reporting : Knowledge and opinion of general public in Penang, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan Elkalmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the knowledge of the general population towards ADR and their reporting system. Methods: An anonymous, self-administered questionnaire (15 items was designed. The questionnaire was subjected to face validity and content validity. The reliability coefficient was found to be 0.71. This study recruited proportionately large convenience sample of the general public in Penang. Interviews using a structured questionnaire were conducted over a week period in August 2009. The recommended sample size was calculated to be 368. Results: Three hundred thirty-four responses were received. Slightly more than half of the respondents were in the age group of 18-25 years (53.6%; n = 179. When asked about the sources of their medication majority of them reported medical doctor (85.6%, whereas small number (34.7% reported community pharmacists as sources of medications. Three-quarter of the respondents (77.2% get their information about the side-effects of drugs from physicians, followed by pharmacist (44.6%. More than half of the respondents (65.6%, n = 219 reported unawareness about the existence of ADR center set up by the Ministry of Health. Conclusion: Respondents reflected inadequate knowledge on ADR reporting. This needs to be corrected as the trend of future pharmacovigilance is toward the patient. Moreover, the new trend seems to be more appropriate as the patient is the group of the people who are directly affected from the ADR of a particular drug and not the health-care providers. Furthermore, the patient will be informed about the economic implications of not reporting ADR. It is recommended that government agencies, like MADRAC needs to find ways to increase patient- reported ADR cases.

  16. A secure distributed logistic regression protocol for the detection of rare adverse drug events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Emam, Khaled; Samet, Saeed; Arbuckle, Luk; Tamblyn, Robyn; Earle, Craig; Kantarcioglu, Murat

    2013-05-01

    There is limited capacity to assess the comparative risks of medications after they enter the market. For rare adverse events, the pooling of data from multiple sources is necessary to have the power and sufficient population heterogeneity to detect differences in safety and effectiveness in genetic, ethnic and clinically defined subpopulations. However, combining datasets from different data custodians or jurisdictions to perform an analysis on the pooled data creates significant privacy concerns that would need to be addressed. Existing protocols for addressing these concerns can result in reduced analysis accuracy and can allow sensitive information to leak. To develop a secure distributed multi-party computation protocol for logistic regression that provides strong privacy guarantees. We developed a secure distributed logistic regression protocol using a single analysis center with multiple sites providing data. A theoretical security analysis demonstrates that the protocol is robust to plausible collusion attacks and does not allow the parties to gain new information from the data that are exchanged among them. The computational performance and accuracy of the protocol were evaluated on simulated datasets. The computational performance scales linearly as the dataset sizes increase. The addition of sites results in an exponential growth in computation time. However, for up to five sites, the time is still short and would not affect practical applications. The model parameters are the same as the results on pooled raw data analyzed in SAS, demonstrating high model accuracy. The proposed protocol and prototype system would allow the development of logistic regression models in a secure manner without requiring the sharing of personal health information. This can alleviate one of the key barriers to the establishment of large-scale post-marketing surveillance programs. We extended the secure protocol to account for correlations among patients within sites through

  17. Ethical issues in HIV prevention research with people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Jeremy; Rose, Scott M; Metzger, David

    2014-04-01

    Injection drug use continues to significantly contribute to new infections with HIV. Moreover, conducting HIV prevention research with people who inject drugs (PWIDs) can be complicated for an array of practical, social, legal, and ethical reasons. It is critical that these research efforts are sensitive to the particular vulnerabilities associated with injection drug use as well as those related to being at risk of acquiring HIV so as to minimize harm to participants in research. To describe how we addressed some of these ethical challenges during the course of a large-scale multinational randomized HIV prevention trial involving PWIDs, which was successfully completed. The ethical issues encountered during the life cycle of the trial were cataloged by the principal investigator, study coordinator, and ethicist working on the trial. Relevant study documents were then reviewed to provide pertinent details. The ethical issues unique to the trial were then described. Before implementation, the trial faced particularly complex challenges related to the vulnerability of PWIDs, where HIV seroincidence rates in the population were high and legal policies and stigma regarding injection drug use was severe. Accordingly, a rapid policy assessment was commissioned, and a series of community engagement activities were conducted. During the trial, in addition to using careful standard operating procedures regarding all aspects of trial conduct and extensive staff training, the trial standardized informed consent procedures and assessed them. Furthermore, social harms were monitored along with physical harms and adverse events. Following the decision to close the study, it was critical to develop an orderly and safe process for closing it. The issue of post-trial access to the study medication and a complex intervention also surfaced for consideration. The issues described in this article are necessarily limited to how they manifested themselves within the context of a

  18. Antiplatelet drug selection in PCI to vein grafts in patients with acute coronary syndrome and adverse clinical outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sirker, Alex; Kwok, Chun Shing; Kontopantelis, Evangelos

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate outcomes associated with different P2Y12 agents in Saphenous Vein graft (SVG) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). BACKGROUND: SVG PCI is associated with greater risks of ischemic complications, compared with native coronary PCI. Outcomes associated...... with the use of potent P2Y12 blocking drugs, Prasugrel and Ticagrelor, in SVG PCI are unknown. METHODS: Patients included in the study underwent SVG PCI in the United Kingdom between 2007 and 2014 for acute coronary syndrome and were grouped by P2Y12 antiplatelet use. In-hospital major adverse cardiac events....... CONCLUSIONS: Our real world national study provides no clear evidence to indicate that use of potent P2Y12 blockers in SVG PCI is associated with improved clinical outcomes....

  19. Drugs for preventing malaria in pregnant women in endemic areas: any drug regimen versus placebo or no treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radeva-Petrova, Denitsa; Kayentao, Kassoum; ter Kuile, Feiko O; Sinclair, David; Garner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Pregnancy increases the risk of malaria and this is associated with poor health outcomes for both the mother and the infant, especially during the first or second pregnancy. To reduce these effects, the World Health Organization recommends that pregnant women living in malaria endemic areas sleep under insecticide-treated bednets, are treated for malaria illness and anaemia, and receive chemoprevention with an effective antimalarial drug during the second and third trimesters. Objectives To assess the effects of malaria chemoprevention given to pregnant women living in malaria endemic areas on substantive maternal and infant health outcomes. We also summarised the effects of intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) alone, and preventive regimens for Plasmodium vivax. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and reference lists up to 1 June 2014. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs of any antimalarial drug regimen for preventing malaria in pregnant women living in malaria-endemic areas compared to placebo or no intervention. In the mother, we sought outcomes that included mortality, severe anaemia, and severe malaria; anaemia, haemoglobin values, and malaria episodes; indicators of malaria infection, and adverse events. In the baby, we sought foetal loss, perinatal, neonatal and infant mortality; preterm birth and birthweight measures; and indicators of malaria infection. We included regimens that were known to be effective against the malaria parasite at the time but may no longer be used because of parasite drug resistance. Data collection and analysis Two review authors applied inclusion criteria, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. Dichotomous outcomes were compared using risk ratios (RR), and continuous outcomes using mean differences (MD); both are presented with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We

  20. The incidence, root-causes, and outcomes of adverse events in surgical units: implication for potential prevention strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenewegen Peter P

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We need to know the scale and underlying causes of surgical adverse events (AEs in order to improve the safety of care in surgical units. However, there is little recent data. Previous record review studies that reported on surgical AEs in detail are now more than ten years old. Since then surgical technology and quality assurance have changed rapidly. The objective of this study was to provide more recent data on the incidence, consequences, preventability, causes and potential strategies to prevent AEs among hospitalized patients in surgical units. Methods A structured record review study of 7,926 patient records was carried out by trained nurses and medical specialist reviewers in 21 Dutch hospitals. The aim was to determine the presence of AEs during hospitalizations in 2004 and to consider how far they could be prevented. Of all AEs, the consequences, responsible medical specialty, causes and potential prevention strategies were identified. Surgical AEs were defined as AEs attributable to surgical treatment and care processes and were selected for analysis in detail. Results Surgical AEs occurred in 3.6% of hospital admissions and represented 65% of all AEs. Forty-one percent of the surgical AEs was considered to be preventable. The consequences of surgical AEs were more severe than for other types of AEs, resulting in more permanent disability, extra treatment, prolonged hospital stay, unplanned readmissions and extra outpatient visits. Almost 40% of the surgical AEs were infections, 23% bleeding, and 22% injury by mechanical, physical or chemical cause. Human factors were involved in the causation of 65% of surgical AEs and were considered to be preventable through quality assurance and training. Conclusions Surgical AEs occur more often than other types of AEs, are more often preventable and their consequences are more severe. Therefore, surgical AEs have a major impact on the burden of AEs during hospitalizations

  1. Mortality due to acute adverse drug reactions in Galicia: 1997-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel-Arias, Domingo; Pereiro Gómez, César; Bermejo Barrera, Ana M; López de Abajo Rodríguez, Benito; Sobrido Prieto, María

    2016-03-02

    The aim of this research is to study all people who died in the Autonomous Community of Galicia from acute death after drugconsumption (ADR) in which there was judicial intervention during the period from 1997 to 2011, according to inclusion and exclusión criteria established by the National Drug Plan for the entire national territory. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of deceased subjects were studied, in order to identify key risk factors and/or vulnerable populations.A total of 805 deaths were recorded. The distribution by provinces and municipalities corresponds to the areas of greatest population, incidence of consumption and proximity to the coast. The average age of these patients was 34.34 years, with a gradual increase over years. Most of them were male (91.2%) and single (47.7). 43.5% of the deceased habitually used the parenteral route of administration and 36.4% had positive HIV serology. The most frequently-detected substances corresponded to opiates (heroin: 61.3%, methadone: 35.6%), followed by cocaine (53.7%), although the most common pattern was that of poly-consumption. ADR mortality figures remain relatively stable throughout the study period. The predominant pattern is that of males, opiates and a long history of consumption.

  2. A prediction model-based algorithm for computer-assisted database screening of adverse drug reactions in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Joep H G; van Hunsel, Florence P A M; Hak, Eelko; van Puijenbroek, Eugène P

    2018-02-01

    The statistical screening of pharmacovigilance databases containing spontaneously reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is mainly based on disproportionality analysis. The aim of this study was to improve the efficiency of full database screening using a prediction model-based approach. A logistic regression-based prediction model containing 5 candidate predictors was developed and internally validated using the Summary of Product Characteristics as the gold standard for the outcome. All drug-ADR associations, with the exception of those related to vaccines, with a minimum of 3 reports formed the training data for the model. Performance was based on the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results were compared with the current method of database screening based on the number of previously analyzed associations. A total of 25 026 unique drug-ADR associations formed the training data for the model. The final model contained all 5 candidate predictors (number of reports, disproportionality, reports from healthcare professionals, reports from marketing authorization holders, Naranjo score). The AUC for the full model was 0.740 (95% CI; 0.734-0.747). The internal validity was good based on the calibration curve and bootstrapping analysis (AUC after bootstrapping = 0.739). Compared with the old method, the AUC increased from 0.649 to 0.740, and the proportion of potential signals increased by approximately 50% (from 12.3% to 19.4%). A prediction model-based approach can be a useful tool to create priority-based listings for signal detection in databases consisting of spontaneous ADRs. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology & Drug Safety Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. ADEPt, a semantically-enriched pipeline for extracting adverse drug events from free-text electronic health records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehtesham Iqbal

    Full Text Available Adverse drug events (ADEs are unintended responses to medical treatment. They can greatly affect a patient's quality of life and present a substantial burden on healthcare. Although Electronic health records (EHRs document a wealth of information relating to ADEs, they are frequently stored in the unstructured or semi-structured free-text narrative requiring Natural Language Processing (NLP techniques to mine the relevant information. Here we present a rule-based ADE detection and classification pipeline built and tested on a large Psychiatric corpus comprising 264k patients using the de-identified EHRs of four UK-based psychiatric hospitals. The pipeline uses characteristics specific to Psychiatric EHRs to guide the annotation process, and distinguishes: a the temporal value associated with the ADE mention (whether it is historical or present, b the categorical value of the ADE (whether it is assertive, hypothetical, retrospective or a general discussion and c the implicit contextual value where the status of the ADE is deduced from surrounding indicators, rather than explicitly stated. We manually created the rulebase in collaboration with clinicians and pharmacists by studying ADE mentions in various types of clinical notes. We evaluated the open-source Adverse Drug Event annotation Pipeline (ADEPt using 19 ADEs specific to antipsychotics and antidepressants medication. The ADEs chosen vary in severity, regularity and persistence. The average F-measure and accuracy achieved by our tool across all tested ADEs were 0.83 and 0.83 respectively. In addition to annotation power, the ADEPT pipeline presents an improvement to the state of the art context-discerning algorithm, ConText.

  4. Risk of myocardial infarction in patients with HIV infection exposed to specific individual antiretroviral drugs from the 3 major drug classes: the data collection on adverse events of anti-HIV drugs (D:A:D) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Signe Westring; Sabin, Caroline; Weber, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been assessed in 13 anti-HIV drugs in the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study. METHODS. Poisson regression models were adjusted for cardiovascular risk...... factors, cohort, calendar year, and use of other antiretroviral drugs and assessed the association between MI risk and cumulative (per year) or recent (current or in the past 6 months) use of antiretroviral drugs, with >30,000 person-years of exposure. RESULTS. Over 178,835 person-years, 580 patients......% CI, 1.01-1.17], respectively) after adjustment for lipids but were not altered further after adjustment for other metabolic parameters. CONCLUSIONS. Of the drugs considered, only indinavir, lopinavir-ritonavir, didanosine, and abacavir were associated with a significantly increased risk of MI...

  5. When prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission fails: preventing pretreatment drug resistance in African children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inzaule, Seth C.; Hamers, Raph L.; Calis, Job; Boerma, Ragna; Sigaloff, Kim; Zeh, Clement; Mugyenyi, Peter; Akanmu, Sulaimon; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2018-01-01

    : The scale-up of antiretroviral prophylaxis to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV has significantly reduced new pediatric infections in sub-Saharan Africa. However, among infants who become HIV-infected despite prevent mother-to-child transmission, more than 50% have drug-resistant HIV.

  6. The Development of Videos in Culturally Grounded Drug Prevention for Rural Native Hawaiian Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Scott K.; Helm, Susana; McClain, Latoya L.; Dinson, Ay-Laina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt and validate narrative scripts to be used for the video components of a culturally grounded drug prevention program for rural Native Hawaiian youth. Scripts to be used to film short video vignettes of drug-related problem situations were developed based on a foundation of pre-prevention research funded by the…

  7. Clopidogrel-Proton Pump Inhibitor Drug-Drug Interaction and Risk of Adverse Clinical Outcomes Among PCI-Treated ACS Patients: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbin, Michael A; Guzauskas, Gregory F; Veenstra, David L

    2016-08-01

    Uncertainty regarding clopidogrel effectiveness attenuation because of a drug-drug interaction with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) has led to conflicting guidelines on concomitant therapy. In particular, the effect of this interaction in patients who undergo a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a population known to have increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, has not been systematically evaluated. To synthesize the evidence of the effect of clopidogrel-PPI drug interaction on adverse cardiovascular outcomes in a PCI patient population. We conducted a systematic literature review for studies reporting clinical outcomes in patients who underwent a PCI and were initiated on clopidogrel with or without a PPI. Studies were included in the analysis if they reported at least 1 of the clinical outcomes of interest (major adverse cardiovascular event [MACE], cardiovascular death, all-cause death, myocardial infarction, stroke, stent thrombosis, and bleed events). We excluded studies that were not exclusive to PCI patients or had no PCI subgroup analysis and/or did not report at least a 6-month follow-up. Statistical and clinical heterogeneity were evaluated and HRs and 95% CIs for adverse clinical events were pooled using the DerSimonian and Laird random-effects meta-analysis method. We identified 12 studies comprising 50,277 PCI patients that met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. Our analysis included retrospective analyses of randomized controlled trials (2), health registries (3), claims databases (2), and institutional records (5); no prospective studies of PCI patients were identified. On average, patients were in their mid-60s, male, and had an array of comorbidities, including hyperlipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, and smoking history. Concomitant therapy following PCI resulted in statistically significant increases in composite MACE (HR = 1.28; 95% CI = 1.24-1.32), myocardial infarction (HR = 1.51; 95% CI = 1.40-1.62), and stroke (HR = 1.46; 95

  8. Interstitial lung disease caused by TS-1: a case of long-term drug retention as a fatal adverse reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joong-Min; Hwang, In Gyu; Suh, Suk-Won; Chi, Kyong-Choun

    2011-12-01

    TS-1 is an oral anti-cancer agent for gastric cancer with a high response rate and low toxicity. We report a case of long-term drug retention of TS-1 causing interstitial lung disease (ILD) as a fatal adverse reaction. A 65-year-old woman underwent a total gastrectomy with pathologic confirmation of gastric adenocarcinoma. She received 6 cycles of TS-1 and low-dose cisplatin for post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy followed by single-agent maintenance therapy with TS-1. After 8 months, the patient complained of a productive cough with sputum and mild dyspnea. A pulmonary evaluation revealed diffuse ILD in the lung fields, bilaterally. In spite of discontinuing chemotherapy and the administration of corticosteroids, the pulmonary symptoms did not improve, and the patient died of pulmonary failure. TS-1-induced ILD can be caused by long-term drug retention that alters the lung parenchyma irreversibly, the outcome of which can be life-threatening. Pulmonary evaluation for early detection of disease is recommended.

  9. Failure of antiarrhythmic drugs to prevent experimental reperfusion ventricular fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, M; Michelson, E L; Kmetzo, J J; Kaplinsky, E; Dreifus, L S

    1981-01-01

    Ninety-nine adult mongrel dogs underwent acute ligation of the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery. Thirty minutes later, the occlusion was released to evaluate the effectiveness of five antiarrhythmic protocols in eliminating reperfusion ventricular fibrillation. The five protocols included: protocol 1 --i.v. lidocaine, preligation and prerelease (n = 19); protocol 2 -- i.v. lidocaine, prereperfusion only (n = 22); protocol 3 -- chronic, oral, daily amiodarone for 2 weeks preligation (n = 19); protocol 4 -- i.v. procainamide, preligation and prereperfusion (n = 21); and protocol 5 -- i.v. verapamil, prereperfusion (n = 18). Each regimen was evaluated with respect to the incidence of reperfusion ventricular fibrillation in dogs that survived to reperfusion, and the results were compared to 77 control dogs that underwent identical coronary artery occlusion and release procedures without drug therapy. The incidence of reperfusion ventricular fibrillation was as follows: protocol 1 -- seven of 15 dogs (47%); protocol 2 -- six of 18 (33%); protocol 3 -- 11 of 16 dogs (69%); protocol 4 -- eight of 17 dogs (47%); and protocol 5 -- 10 of 17 dogs (59%), compared with 36 of 60 (60%) in control dogs. Using chi-square analysis, protocol 2 was beneficial (p antecedent coronary artery ligation periods, and predictive risk indexes for the occurrence of reperfusion ventricular fibrillation were developed. the Mantel-Haenszel method of statistical analysis revealed that none of these protocols resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of reperfusion ventricular fibrillation. Thus, use of these predictive indexes plus appropriate statistical methods has revealed, unexpectedly, limitations in the efficacy of a spectrum of antiarrhythmic agents in preventing reperfusion ventricular fibrillation.

  10. Literature Analysis of Adverse Drug Reactions Induced by Bupivacaine Injection%布比卡因注射液致不良反应文献分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄迪; 陈勇; 窦元元

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析布比卡因注射液致药品不良反应的特点和规律,为临床合理用药提供参考。方法:以“布比卡因”、“不良反应”等关键词检索中国期刊全文数据库、维普资讯网和万方数据库文献,共检索2000~2013年布比卡因注射液致不良反应病例56例,对报告进行统计与分析。结果:布比卡因注射液所致不良反应可发生于各个年龄段,多在用药10 min内发生。其不良反应可累及多个系统和器官,主要表现为心血管系统损害、中枢神经系统、呼吸系统和全身性损害等。结论:布比卡因注射液所致不良反应多在短时间内发生,应加强临床用药监测,防范不良反应的发生。目前,国内说明书存在不良反应信息提示不足的情况,建议相关部门对说明书进行修改和完善。%Objective:To analyze the characteristics and regularity of adverse drug reactions ( ADRs) induced by bupivacaine injec-tion and provide basis for clinical rational drug use.Methods: With "Bupivacaine","adverse drug reaction"as keywords, retrieved literatures from CNKI,CQVIP and Wanfang database in 2000 to 2013,232 cases of ADR by bupivacaine injection were statistically ana-lyzed.Results:The ADRs induced by bupivacaine injection could occur at all ages with a higher incidence of within 10 minutes after administration.ADR involved multiple systems and organs.The main clinical manifestation represented as cardiovascular system (28.10%),central nervous system(26.64%), respiratory system(14.60%) and systemic damage(11.31%),there may be serious death.Conclusion:ADR induced by bupivacaine injection occured mostly in a short period of time.The clinical application should be monitored closely to prevent the occurrence of adverse reactions.The domestic drug package inserts are lack of warnings for ADR infor-mation.It is suggested that related administration departments should revise and improve the drug package

  11. Evaluation of Internet Social Networks using Net scoring Tool: A Case Study in Adverse Drug Reaction Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsahian, Sandrine; Simond Moreau, Erica; Leprovost, Damien; Lardon, Jeremy; Bousquet, Cedric; Kerdelhué, Gaétan; Abdellaoui, Redhouane; Texier, Nathalie; Burgun, Anita; Boussadi, Abdelali; Faviez, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Suspected adverse drug reactions (ADR) reported by patients through social media can be a complementary tool to already existing ADRs signal detection processes. However, several studies have shown that the quality of medical information published online varies drastically whatever the health topic addressed. The aim of this study is to use an existing rating tool on a set of social network web sites in order to assess the capabilities of these tools to guide experts for selecting the most adapted social network web site to mine ADRs. First, we reviewed and rated 132 Internet forums and social networks according to three major criteria: the number of visits, the notoriety of the forum and the number of messages posted in relation with health and drug therapy. Second, the pharmacist reviewed the topic-oriented message boards with a small number of drug names to ensure that they were not off topic. Six experts have been chosen to assess the selected internet forums using a French scoring tool: Net scoring. Three different scores and the agreement between experts according to each set of scores using weighted kappa pooled using mean have been computed. Three internet forums were chosen at the end of the selection step. Some criteria get high score (scores 3-4) no matter the website evaluated like accessibility (45-46) or design (34-36), at the opposite some criteria always have bad scores like quantitative (40-42) and ethical aspect (43-44), hyperlinks actualization (30-33). Kappa were positives but very small which corresponds to a weak agreement between experts. The personal opinion of the expert seems to have a major impact, undermining the relevance of the criterion. Our future work is to collect results given by this evaluation grid and proposes a new scoring tool for Internet social networks assessment.

  12. The Quality of Clinical Information in Adverse Drug Reaction Reports by Patients and Healthcare Professionals: A Retrospective Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfes, Leàn; van Hunsel, Florence; van der Linden, Laura; Taxis, Katja; van Puijenbroek, Eugène

    2017-07-01

    Clinical information is needed to assess the causal relationship between a drug and an adverse drug reaction (ADR) in a reliable way. Little is known about the level of relevant clinical information about the ADRs reported by patients. The aim was to determine to what extent patients report relevant clinical information about an ADR compared with their healthcare professional. A retrospective analysis of all ADR reports on the same case, i.e., cases with a report from both the patient and the patient's healthcare professional, selected from the database of the Dutch Pharmacovigilance Center Lareb, was conducted. The extent to which relevant clinical information was reported was assessed by trained pharmacovigilance assessors, using a structured tool. The following four domains were assessed: ADR, chronology, suspected drug, and patient characteristics. For each domain, the proportion of reported information in relation to information deemed relevant was calculated. An average score of all relevant domains was determined and categorized as poorly (≤45%), moderately (from 46 to 74%) or well (≥75%) reported. Data were analyzed using a paired sample t test and Wilcoxon signed rank test. A total of 197 cases were included. In 107 cases (54.3%), patients and healthcare professionals reported a similar level of clinical information. Statistical analysis demonstrated no overall differences between the groups (p = 0.126). In a unique study of cases of ADRs reported by patients and healthcare professionals, we found that patients report clinical information at a similar level as their healthcare professional. For an optimal pharmacovigilance, both healthcare professionals and patient should be encouraged to report.

  13. Adverse drug reactions in hospitalised children in Germany are decreasing: results of a nine year cohort-based comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Kathrin Oehme

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In recent years, efforts have been made to improve paediatric drug therapy. The aim of this research was to investigate any changes regarding the frequency and nature of adverse drug reactions (ADRs in hospitalized children in one paediatric general medical ward over a 9-year period. METHODOLOGY: Two prospective observational cohort studies were conducted at a large University hospital in Germany in 1999 and 2008, respectively. Children aged 0-18 years admitted to the study ward during the study periods were included. ADRs were identified using intensive chart review. Uni- and multivariable regression has been used for data analysis. RESULTS: A total of 520 patients (574 admissions were included [1999: n = 144 (167; 2008: n = 376 (407]. Patients received a total of 2053 drugs [median 3, interquartile range (IQR 2-5]. 19% of patients did not receive any medication. Median length of stay was 4 days (IQR 3-7; range 1-190 days with a significantly longer length of stay in 1999. The overall ADR incidence was 13.1% (95% CI, 9.8-16.3 varying significantly between the two study cohorts [1999: 21.9%, 95% CI, 14.7-29.0; 2008: 9.2%, 95% CI, 5.9-12.5 (p<0.001]. Antibacterials and corticosteroids for systemic use caused most of the ADRs in both cohorts (1999; 2008. Exposure to systemic antibacterials decreased from 62.9% to 43.5% whereas exposure to analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs increased from 17.4% to 45.2%, respectively. The use of high risk drugs decreased from 75% to 62.2%. In 1999, 45.7% and in 2008 96.2% of ADRs were identified by treating clinicians (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Between 1999 and 2008, the incidence of ADRs decreased significantly. Improved treatment strategies and an increased awareness of ADRs by physicians are most likely to be the cause for this positive development. Nevertheless further research on ADRs particularly in primary care and the establishment of prospective pharmacovigilance systems are still

  14. Developing a Web-Based Intervention to Prevent Drug Use among Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinn, Traci Marie; Hopkins, Jessica Elizabeth; Schinke, Steven Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Girls' rates of drug use have met up with and, in some instances, surpassed boys' rates. Although girls and boys share risk and protective factors associated with drug use, girls also have gender-specific risks. Interventions to prevent girls' drug use must be tailored to address the dynamics of female adolescence. Methods: One such…

  15. How do pharmaceutical companies handle consumer adverse drug reaction reports? An overview based on a survey of French drug safety managers and officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleuranceau-Morel, P

    2002-01-01

    It is surprising to see how consumer Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) reports have been continuously increasing for the last few years in Europe. This probably results from the influence of United States (US) market where the patients feels justified in telephoning the pharmaceutical companies directly with queries regarding their treatment. The growing number of alternative sources of information (e.g. health and popular magazines, spots on radio and TV etc.) to which a consumer is exposed has added to this growth too. The changing relationship between patients and doctors may also contribute to this phenomenon. It is then interesting to evaluate the way pharmaceutical companies currently deal with consumer ADR reports. The management of consumer ADR reporting was investigated by means of a questionnaire sent to 46 French drug safety managers and drug safety officers (DSOs) of multinational pharmaceutical companies. The analysis of the survey stressed the fact that pharmaceutical companies should be prepared to face up to an increase in the number of consumer ADR reports. It clearly appears that the consumers who telephone to register side-effects should be forwarded to a trained DSO with medical or pharmaceutical background and the communication skills acquired through specific training. This person should also be able to release adequate product information validated by his/her own company. The influence of the US market seems to be changing the way pharmaceutical companies deal with consumer ADR reports. Nowadays, these reports are entered into a drug safety database by most of the companies without previously having contacted the patient's general practitioner (GP) or specialist for medical confirmation. Lastly, the drug safety managers and DSOs consulted have divided opinions about the usefulness of call centres and e-mails as tools for ADR reporting. But both tools are globally rejected by the pharmaceutical companies as a reliable means of reporting. As stated

  16. Reacciones adversas a medicamentos como causa de abandono del tratamiento farmacológico en hipertensos Adverse reactions to drugs as leaving drug therapy cause in hypertensive persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Julia García Milián

    2009-03-01

    , Gramma, Santiago de Cuba, and Ciego de Avila provinces. Survey was the method of information collection. RESULTS: more used anti-hypertensive drugs were Captopril, Hydrochlorothiazide, and Atenolol and the first one with a 31,9 %, the drug with higher percentage of non-fulfillment and the cause of an adverse event. Fulfillment was higher in patients younger aged than 30. Second place within causes of adverse reactions, with the 16,9 % for leave treatment was for cough, skin reactions, and weakness. CONCLUSIONS: Adverse reactions are located within the more frequent causes of leaving anti-hypertensive treatment and Captopril and Hydrochlorothiazide those with the greatest frequency of leaving. Most of adverse reactions mentioned are considered as minor.

  17. Drug poisoning deaths in Sweden show a predominance of ethanol in mono-intoxications, adverse drug-alcohol interactions and poly-drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A W; Kugelberg, F C; Holmgren, A; Ahlner, J

    2011-03-20

    Over a 10-year period (1998-2007) all deaths in Sweden classified by forensic pathologists as fatal drug poisonings (N = 6894) were retrieved from a toxicology database (TOXBASE) belonging to the National Board of Forensic Medicine. The deaths were further classified as suicides N = 2288 (33%), undetermined N = 2260 (33%) and accidental N = 2346 (34%). The average age (± SD) of all victims was 49.1 ± 15.9 years and men 47.4 ± 15.6 years were 5-year younger than women 52.2 ± 15.8 years (p intoxications) was found in 22% of all poisoning deaths (p intoxication deaths were mostly ethanol-related (N = 976) and the mean and median blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) was 3.06 g/L and 3.10 g/L, respectively. The BAC decreased as the number of additional drugs in blood increased from 2.15 g/L with one drug to 1.25 g/L with 6 or more drugs. The mean (median) concentrations of non-alcohol drugs in mono-intoxication deaths were morphine (N = 93) 0.5mg/L (0.2mg/L), amphetamine (N = 39) 2.0mg/L (1.2mg/L), dextropropoxyphene (N = 33) 3.9 mg/L (2.9 mg/L), dihydro-propiomazine (N = 32) 1.6 mg/L (1.0mg/L) and 7-amino-flunitrazepam (N = 28), 0.4 mg/L (0.3mg/L). Elevated blood morphine in these poisoning deaths mostly reflected abuse of heroin as verified by finding 6-monoacetyl morphine (6-MAM) in the blood samples. When investigating drug poisoning deaths a comprehensive toxicological analysis is essential although the results do not reveal the extent of prior exposure to drugs or the development of pharmacological tolerance. The concentrations of drugs determined in post-mortem blood are one element in the case. The autopsy report, the police investigation, the findings at the scene and eye-witness statements should all be carefully considered when the cause and manner of death are determined. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of organizational safety practices and perceived safety climate on PPE usage, engineering controls, and adverse events involving liquid antineoplastic drugs among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJoy, David M; Smith, Todd D; Woldu, Henok; Dyal, Mari-Amanda; Steege, Andrea L; Boiano, James M

    2017-07-01

    Antineoplastic drugs pose risks to the healthcare workers who handle them. This fact notwithstanding, adherence to safe handling guidelines remains inconsistent and often poor. This study examined the effects of pertinent organizational safety practices and perceived safety climate on the use of personal protective equipment, engineering controls, and adverse events (spill/leak or skin contact) involving liquid antineoplastic drugs. Data for this study came from the 2011 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Health and Safety Practices Survey of Healthcare Workers which included a sample of approximately 1,800 nurses who had administered liquid antineoplastic drugs during the past seven days. Regression modeling was used to examine predictors of personal protective equipment use, engineering controls, and adverse events involving antineoplastic drugs. Approximately 14% of nurses reported experiencing an adverse event while administering antineoplastic drugs during the previous week. Usage of recommended engineering controls and personal protective equipment was quite variable. Usage of both was better in non-profit and government settings, when workers were more familiar with safe handling guidelines, and when perceived management commitment to safety was higher. Usage was poorer in the absence of specific safety handling procedures. The odds of adverse events increased with number of antineoplastic drugs treatments and when antineoplastic drugs were administered more days of the week. The odds of such events were significantly lower when the use of engineering controls and personal protective equipment was greater and when more precautionary measures were in place. Greater levels of management commitment to safety and perceived risk were also related to lower odds of adverse events. These results point to the value of implementing a comprehensive health and safety program that utilizes available hazard controls and effectively communicates

  19. Number of medications and adverse drug events by unintentional poisoning among older adults in consideration of inappropriate drug use : A Swedish population-based matched case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rausch, Christian; Laflamme, L.; Bultmann, U.; Moller, J.

    Purpose This national, population-based study aims to determine the association between the number of prescribed medications and adverse drug events (ADE) by unintentional poisoning and examine this risk when known indicators of inappropriate drug use (IDU) are accounted for. Methods We employed a

  20. EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF LIPID-LOWERING DRUGS IN PRIMARY AND SECONDARY PREVENTION OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES IN THE ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Ushkalova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of hyperlipidemia on morbidity and mortality in elderly patients is considered. Authors also cover issues of efficacy and safety of lipid-lowering therapy in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases in patients ≥80 years of age who are the most quickly growing group of population and have the highest cardiovascular risk. They stress the need to take into account polymorbidity and polypharmacy that increase the risk of adverse reactions due to the use of both statins and their drug-drug interactions, which requires an assessment of risk/benefit ratio. In addition, there is a need for development of reliable prognostic tools to predict relevant outcomes (e.g., stroke, decrease in functionality/independence, quality of life reduction and rationales for lipid-lowering therapy in the elderly and also their adherence to treatment.

  1. Iodinated Contrast Media and the Alleged "Iodine Allergy": An Inexact Diagnosis Leading to Inferior Radiologic Management and Adverse Drug Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Ingrid; Nairz, Knud; Morelli, John N; Keller, Patricia Silva Hasembank; Heverhagen, Johannes T

    2017-04-01

    Purpose  To test the hypothesis that the incomplete diagnosis "iodine allergy" is a possibly dangerous concept for patients under routine radiologic conditions. Materials and Methods  300 patients with a history of an "iodine allergy" were retrospectively screened and compared with two age-, sex-, and procedure-matched groups of patients either diagnosed with a nonspecific "iodine contrast medium (ICM) allergy" or an allergy to a specific ICM agent. For all groups, the clinical symptoms of the most recent past adverse drug reaction (ADR), prophylactic actions taken for subsequent imaging, and ultimate outcome were recorded and analyzed. Results  The diagnosis "iodine allergy" was not otherwise specified in 84.3 % patients. For this group, in most cases, the symptoms of the previous ADRs were not documented. In contrast, the type of ADR was undocumented in only a minority of patients in the comparison groups. In the group of patients with an "iodine allergy" the percentage of unenhanced CT scans was greater than within the other two groups (36.7 % vs. 28.7 %/18.6 %). ADRs following prophylactic measures were only observed in the "iodine allergy" group (OR of 9.24 95 % CI 1.16 - 73.45; p contrast media containing covalently bound iodine.. · There is a clear correlation between the exactness of the diagnosis - from the alleged "iodine allergy" to "contrast media allergy" to naming the exact culprit CM - and the quality of documentation of the symptoms.. · Management of patients diagnosed with "iodine allergy" was associated with uncertainty leading to unenhanced scans and sometimes unnecessary prophylactic actions.. · The term "iodine allergy" should be omitted, because it is potentially dangerous and can decrease the quality of radiology exams.. Citation Format · Böhm Ingrid, Nairz Knud, Morelli John N et al. Iodinated Contrast Media and the Alleged "Iodine Allergy": An Inexact Diagnosis Leading to Inferior Radiologic Management and

  2. Caracterización de las reacciones adversas medicamentosas en ancianos: Cuba, 2003-2005 Characterization of the adverse reactions to drugs in the elderly: Cuba, 2003-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raisa Rodriguez Duque

    2007-12-01

    notifications of suspicions of drug adverse reactions in individuals over 60 that were received at the National Coordinating Unit for Drug Surveillance from January 1 to December 31, 2005. The objectives of the work were the identification of the pharmacological groups that produced the adverse rea