WorldWideScience

Sample records for preventing adverse drug

  1. Adverse Drug Event Prevention: 2014 Action Plan Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducoffe, Aaron R; Baehr, Avi; Peña, Juliet C; Rider, Briana B; Yang, Sandra; Hu, Dale J

    2016-09-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) have been highlighted as a national patient safety and public health challenge by the National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention (ADE Action Plan), which was released by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in August 2014. The following October, the ADE Prevention: 2014 Action Plan Conference provided an opportunity for federal agencies, national experts, and stakeholders to coordinate and collaborate in the initiative to reduce preventable ADEs. The single-day conference included morning plenary sessions focused on the surveillance, evidence-based prevention, incentives and oversights, and additional research needs of the drug classes highlighted in the ADE Action Plan: anticoagulants, diabetes agents, and opioids. Afternoon breakout sessions allowed for facilitated discussions on measures for tracking national progress in ADE prevention and the identification of opportunities to ensure safe and high-quality health care and medication use. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Percentage of Patients with Preventable Adverse Drug Reactions and Preventability of Adverse Drug Reactions – A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Max; Hägg, Staffan

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous observational studies suggest that preventable adverse drug reactions are a significant burden in healthcare, but no meta-analysis using a standardised definition for adverse drug reactions exists. The aim of the study was to estimate the percentage of patients with preventable adverse drug reactions and the preventability of adverse drug reactions in adult outpatients and inpatients. Methods Studies were identified through searching Cochrane, CINAHL, EMBASE, IPA, Medline, PsycINFO and Web of Science in September 2010, and by hand searching the reference lists of identified papers. Original peer-reviewed research articles in English that defined adverse drug reactions according to WHO’s or similar definition and assessed preventability were included. Disease or treatment specific studies were excluded. Meta-analysis on the percentage of patients with preventable adverse drug reactions and the preventability of adverse drug reactions was conducted. Results Data were analysed from 16 original studies on outpatients with 48797 emergency visits or hospital admissions and from 8 studies involving 24128 inpatients. No studies in primary care were identified. Among adult outpatients, 2.0% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2–3.2%) had preventable adverse drug reactions and 52% (95% CI: 42–62%) of adverse drug reactions were preventable. Among inpatients, 1.6% (95% CI: 0.1–51%) had preventable adverse drug reactions and 45% (95% CI: 33–58%) of adverse drug reactions were preventable. Conclusions This meta-analysis corroborates that preventable adverse drug reactions are a significant burden to healthcare among adult outpatients. Among both outpatients and inpatients, approximately half of adverse drug reactions are preventable, demonstrating that further evidence on prevention strategies is required. The percentage of patients with preventable adverse drug reactions among inpatients and in primary care is largely unknown and should be

  3. Quality indicators of preventable adverse drug events in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard

    interventions against medication errors. Methods: A systematic literature review of the available literature on preventable adverse A systematic literature review of the available literature on preventable adverse drug events was conducted to describe the incidence and characteristics of preventable adverse......Summary Background: Preventable adverse drug events are caused by errors in the medication use Preventable adverse drug events are caused by errors in the medication use process, and are of particular interest when designing interventions to improve the quality of medication therapy. Type 2...... diabetes became the case because a large proportion of patients are undertreated and not monitored as recommended; yet, the epidemiology of preventable adverse drug events in type 2 diabetes is largely unknown. The aims of the studies were to develop quality indicators for preventable adverse drug events...

  4. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: adverse effects and their prevention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, Harald Erwin; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To discuss nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), their history, development, mode of action, toxicities, strategies for the prevention of toxicity, and future developments. - Methods: Medline search for articles published up to 2007, using the keywords acetylsalicylic acid,

  5. Preventable and potentially preventable serious adverse reactions induced by oral protein kinase inhibitors through a database of adverse drug reaction reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egron, Adeline; Olivier-Abbal, Pascale; Gouraud, Aurore; Babai, Samy; Combret, Sandrine; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Bondon-Guitton, Emmanuelle

    2015-06-01

    Antineoplastic drugs are one of the pharmacological classes more frequently involved in occurrence of "serious" adverse drug reactions. However, few epidemiological data are available regarding the preventability of adverse drug reactions with ambulatory cancer chemotherapy. We assessed the rate and characteristics of "preventable" or "potentially preventable" "serious" adverse drug reactions induced by oral protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs). We performed a retrospective study with all "serious" adverse drug reactions (ADRs) recorded from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2009 in the French Pharmacovigilance Database with the eight oral protein kinase inhibitors marketed in France: sorafenib, imatinib, erlotinib, sunitinib, dasatinib, lapatinib, nilotinib and everolimus (Afinitor®) using the French adverse drug reactions preventability scale. This study was carried out on 265 spontaneous notifications. Most of adverse drug reactions were "unpreventable" (63.8 %). Around one third were "unevaluable" due to notifications poorly documented (medical history, dosage, use of drugs as first or second intention, concomitant drugs). One (0.4 %) adverse drug reaction was "preventable" with dasatinib (subdural hematoma) and three (1.1 %) were "potentially preventable" (hepatic adverse drug reactions): two with imatinib and one with sorafenib. For these four cases, we identified some characteristics: incorrect dosages, drug interactions and off-label uses. An appropriate prescription could avoid the occurrence of 1.5 % "serious" adverse drug reactions with oral PKIs. This rate is low and further studies are needed to compare our results by using other preventability instruments and to improve the French ADRs Preventability Scale.

  6. Campania preventability assessment committee: a focus on the preventability of the contrast media adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Maurizio; Rossi, Claudia; Rafaniello, Concetta; Mascolo, Annamaria; Cimmaruta, Daniela; Scavone, Cristina; Fiorentino, Sonia; Grassi, Enrico; Reginelli, Alfonso; Rotondo, Antonio; Sportiello, Liberata

    2016-12-01

    The current study aims to assess the preventability of the contrast media adverse drug reactions reported through the Campania spontaneous reporting system, identifying the possible limitations emerged in this type of evaluation. All the individual case safety reports validated by the Campania Pharmacovigilance Regional Centre from July 2012 to September 2015 were screened to select those that reported contrast media as suspected drug. Campania Preventability Assessment Committee, in collaboration with clinicians specialized in Radiology, assessed the preventability according to the P-Method, through a case-by-case approach. From July 2012 to September 2015, 13798 cases were inserted by pharmacovigilance managers in the Italian Pharmacovigilance Network database (in the geographical contest of the Campania Region), of which 67 reported contrast media as suspected drug. Five preventable cases were found. The most reported causes for preventability were the inappropriate drug use for the case clinical conditions and the absence of the preventive measure administrated prior to the contrast media administration. Several limitations were found in the evaluation of the critical criteria for the preventability assessment. Educational initiatives will be organized directly to the healthcare professionals involved in the contrast media administration, to promote an appropriate use of the contrast media.

  7. Quality indicators of preventable adverse drug events in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard

    population receiving oral antihyperglycaemic treatment (9,791 persons) was set up, and indicator positives identified (Articles no. 2 and 3). The third step in the model consisted of a risk assessment of preventable adverse drug events, including an assessment of clinical areas that need quality improvement...... events are common in primary care, with many resulting in hospitalisation. Projected to a Danish setting, 216,000 patients will experience a preventable adverse drug event each year, and 162,000 of these patients will need hospital admission. Quality improvement interventions should target errors......Summary Background: Preventable adverse drug events are caused by errors in the medication use Preventable adverse drug events are caused by errors in the medication use process, and are of particular interest when designing interventions to improve the quality of medication therapy. Type 2...

  8. National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention: Recommendations for Safer Outpatient Opioid Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducoffe, Aaron R; York, Andrew; Hu, Dale J; Perfetto, Deborah; Kerns, Robert D

    2016-12-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) have been highlighted as a major patient safety and public health challenge by the National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention (ADE Action Plan), which was released by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) in August 2014. The ADE Action Plan focuses on surveillance, evidence-based prevention, incentives, and oversights, additional research needs as well as possible measures and metrics to track progress of ADE prevention within three drug classes: anticoagulants, diabetes agents, and opioids.Objectives and Recommendations. With outpatient opioid prescriptions being a great concern among many healthcare providers, this article focuses on recommendations from the ADE Action Plan to help guide safer opioid use in healthcare delivery settings. Its aim is to discuss current federal methods in place to prevent opioid ADEs while also providing evidence to encourage providers and hospitals to innovate new systems and practices to increase prevention. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Systematic review of the incidence and characteristics of preventable adverse drug events in ambulatory care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard; Winterstein, Almut G; Søndergaard, Birthe

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the incidence and describe characteristics of preventable adverse drug events (pADEs) in ambulatory care. DATA SOURCES: Studies were searched in PubMed (1966-March 2007), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-December 2006), the Cochrane database of systematic reviews...... (1993-March 2007), EMBASE (1980-February 2007), and Web of Science (1945-March 2007). Key words included medication error, adverse drug reaction, iatrogenic disease, outpatient, ambulatory care, primary health care, general practice, patient admission, hospitalization, observational study, retrospective....../pADE incidence, (2) clinical outcomes, (3) associated drug groups, and/or (4) underlying medication errors were included. Study country, year and design, sample size, follow-up time, ADE/pADE identification method, proportion of ADEs/pADEs and ADEs/pADEs requiring hospital admission, and frequency distribution...

  10. Prioritizing strategies for preventing medication errors and adverse drug events in pediatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortescue, Elizabeth B; Kaushal, Rainu; Landrigan, Christopher P; McKenna, Kathryn J; Clapp, Margaret D; Federico, Frank; Goldmann, Donald A; Bates, David W

    2003-04-01

    Medication errors in pediatric inpatients occur at similar rates as in adults but have 3 times the potential to cause harm. Error prevention strategies in this setting remain largely untested. The objective of this study was to classify the major types of medication errors in pediatric inpatients and to determine which strategies might most effectively prevent them. A prospective cohort study was conducted of 1020 patients who were admitted to 2 academic medical centers during a 6-week period in April and May 1999. Medication errors were characterized by subtype. Physician raters evaluated error prevention strategies and identified those that might be most effective in preventing errors. Of 10 778 medication orders reviewed, 616 contained errors. Of these, 120 (19.5%) were classified as potentially harmful, including 115 potential adverse drug events (18.7%) and 5 preventable adverse drug events (0.8%). Most errors occurred at the ordering stage (74%) and involved errors in dosing (28%), route (18%), or frequency (9%). Three interventions might have prevented most potentially harmful errors: 1) computerized physician order entry with clinical decision support systems (76%); 2) ward-based clinical pharmacists (81%); and 3) improved communication among physicians, nurses, and pharmacists (86%). Interrater reliability of error prevention strategy assignment was good (agreement: 0.92; kappa: 0.82). Of the assessed interventions, computerized physician order entry with clinical decision support systems; ward-based clinical pharmacists; and improved communication among physicians, nurses, and pharmacists had the greatest potential to reduce medication errors in pediatric inpatients. Development, implementation, and assessment of such interventions in the pediatric inpatient setting are needed.

  11. e-Prescription: An e-Health System for Preventing Adverse Drug Events in Community Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma M. Puspitasari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes development activities of an e-health system for community health center (Puskesmas with integrated adverse drug events e-prescription module, consist of system design and development, human resource development, e-health system realization, laboratory and implementation test of e-health system. Some e-readiness evaluations were conducted, through a number of field visits and questionnaires. The results had been used in the e-health system design and development, installation of the internet access infrastructure, and implementation of the education and hands-on training for the medical and administrative staff of the healthcare units. After completing the e-health system design and development as well as system realization and laboratory tests stages, a series of field implementation and experiments have been successfully conducted at Puskesmas Babakansari in Bandung. A number of users feed back have been obtained and used for further improvements on both of the software and hardware modules. The e-health system with integrated e-prescription module has successfully developed and shown its expected functions in: patient registration, medical record, paperless prescription, producing the required reports and preventing possible adverse drug events.

  12. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayak Surajit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  13. Adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, K; Borshoff, D C

    2018-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a cause of significant morbidity and mortality to patients and a source of financial burden to the healthcare system. Of the wide spectrum of adverse drug reactions, the most concerning to the anaesthetist remain anaphylaxis and malignant hyperthermia. Although the incidence of anaphylaxis under anaesthesia is difficult to ascertain, it occurs commonly enough that most anaesthetists will manage at least one case in their career. The wide range of drugs given in the peri-operative period and the variable presentation in the anaesthetised patient can delay diagnosis and treatment, and adversely affect outcome. Furthermore, despite improvements in testing, causative drugs can still be difficult to identify, as adverse reactions may be mediated by mechanisms other than IgE activation. With an increase in the reporting of anaphylaxis to newer anaesthetic drugs such as sugammadex, combined with change over the recent decades in the most likely causative peri-operative agents, it is imperative anaesthetists remain up to date on recent developments. In addition, they should be vigilant to patient characteristics, including pharmacogenetic variations that may predispose to adverse drug reactions, in order to help minimise risks of a reaction. The severity of adverse drug reactions to peri-operative drugs means morbidity and mortality remain high. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  14. Preventing drug-related adverse events following hospital discharge: the role of the pharmacist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholls J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Justine Nicholls,1 Craig MacKenzie,1 Rhiannon Braund2 1Dunedin Hospital Pharmacy, 2School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand Abstract: Transition of care (ToC points, and in particular hospital admission and discharge, can be associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs and other drug-related problems (DRPs. The growing recognition of the pharmacist as an expert in medication management, patient education and communication makes them well placed to intervene. There is evidence to indicate that the inclusion of pharmacists in the health care team at ToC points reduces ADEs and DRPs and improves patient outcomes. The objectives of this paper are to outline the following using current literature: 1 the increased risk of medication-related problems at ToC points; 2 to highlight some strategies that have been successful in reducing these problems; and 3 to illustrate how the role of the pharmacist across all facets of care can contribute to the reduction of ADEs, particularly for patients at ToC points. Keywords: pharmacist, adverse drug events, drug-related problems, transitions of care, hospital discharge

  15. Use and perceived benefits of mobile devices by physicians in preventing adverse drug events in the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Steven M; Boyce, Richard D; Ligons, Frank M; Perera, Subashan; Nace, David A; Hochheiser, Harry

    2013-12-01

    Although mobile devices equipped with drug reference software may help prevent adverse drug events (ADEs) in the nursing home (NH) by providing medication information at the point of care, little is known about their use and perceived benefits. The goal of this study was to conduct a survey of a nationally representative sample of NH physicians to quantify the use and perceived benefits of mobile devices in preventing ADEs in the NH setting. We surveyed physicians who attended the 2010 American Medical Directors Association Annual Symposium about their use of mobile devices, and beliefs about the effectiveness of drug reference software in preventing ADEs. The overall net valid response rate was 70% (558/800) with 42% (236/558) using mobile devices to assist with prescribing in the NH. Physicians with 15 or fewer years of clinical experience were 67% more likely to be mobile device users, compared with those with more than 15 years of clinical experience (odds ratio = 1.68; 95% confidence interval = 1.17-2.41; P = .005). For those who used a mobile device to assist with prescribing, almost all (98%) reported performing an average of 1 or more drug look-ups per day, performed an average of 1 to 2 lookups per day for potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and most (88%) believed that drug reference software had helped to prevent at least 1 potential ADE in the preceding 4-week period. The proportion of NH physicians who use mobile devices with drug reference software, although significant, is lower than in other clinical environments. Our results suggest that NH physicians who use mobile devices equipped with drug reference software believe they are helpful for reducing ADEs. Further research is needed to better characterize the facilitators and barriers to adoption of the technology in the NH and its precise impact on NH ADEs. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of a 'ready-to-use' tool that includes preventability, for the assessment of adverse drug events in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Guillaume; Netzer, Florence; Kouakou, Sylvain Landry; Lemare, François; Minvielle, Etienne

    2018-02-14

    Background Adverse drug events (ADEs) occur frequently in oncology and justify continuous assessment and monitoring. There are several methods for detecting them, but the trigger tool method seems the most appropriate. Although a generic tool exists, its use for ADEs in oncology has not been convincing. The development of a focused version is therefore necessary. Objective To provide an oncology-focused trigger tool that evaluates the prevalence, harm, and preventability in a standardised method for pragmatic use in ADE surveillance. Setting Hospitals with cancer care in France. Method The tool has been constructed in two steps: (1) constitution of an oncology-centred list of ADEs; 30 pharmacists/practitioners in cancer care from nine hospitals selected a list of ADEs using a method of agreement adapted from the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method; and (2) construction of three standardised dimensions for the characterisation of each ADE (including causality, severity, and preventability). Main outcome measure The main outcome measure was validation of the tool, including preventability criteria. Results The tool is composed of a final list of 15 ADEs. For each ADE, a 'reviewer form' has been designed and validated by the panel. It comprises (1) the trigger(s), (2) flowcharts to guide the reviewer, (3) criteria for grading harm, and (4) a standardised assessment of preventability with 6-14 closed sentences for each ADE in terms of therapeutic management and/or prevention of side-effects. Conclusion A complete 'ready-to-use' tool for ADE monitoring in oncology has been developed that allows the assessment of three standardised dimensions.

  17. Design of the Anti-tuberculosis Drugs induced Adverse Reactions in China National Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Scheme Study (ADACS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ping

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 1 million tuberculosis (TB patients are receiving the standard anti-TB treatment provided by China National Tuberculosis Prevention and Control Scheme (CNTS in China every year. Adverse reactions (ADRs induced by anti-TB drugs could both do harm to patients and lead to anti-TB treatment failure. The ADACS aimed to explore ADRs' incidences, prognoses, economical and public health impacts for TB patients and TB control, and build a DNA bank of TB patients. Methods/Design Multiple study designs were adopted. Firstly, a prospective cohort with 4488 sputum smears positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients was established. Patients were followed up for 6-9 months in 52 counties of four regions. Those suspected ADRs should be checked and confirmed by Chinese State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA. Secondly, if the suspected ADR was anti-TB drug induced liver injury (ATLI, a nested case-control study would be performed which comprised choosing a matched control and doing a plus questionnaire inquiry. Thirdly, health economical data of ADRs would be collected to analyze financial burdens brought by ADRs and cost-effectiveness of ADRs' treatments. Fourthly, a drop of intravenous blood for each patient was taken and saved in FTA card for DNA banking and genotyping. Finally, the demographic, clinical, environmental, administrative and genetic data would be merged for the comprehensive analysis. Discussion ADACS will give an overview of anti-TB drugs induced ADRs' incidences, risk factors, treatments, prognoses, and clinical, economical and public health impacts for TB patients applying CNTS regimen in China, and provide suggestions for individualized health care and TB control policy.

  18. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  19. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    limiting but they can be the initial presentation of more serious reactions such as Stevens-Johnson and drug hypersensitivity syndromes.3 It is thus important for the clinician to distinguish between self-limiting morbilliform drug eruptions that resolve solely with the withdrawal of the offending drug and the life-threatening ...

  20. [Adverse events prevention ability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparo, Ugo Luigi; Aparo, Andrea

    2007-03-01

    The issue of how to address medical errors is the key to improve the health care system performances. Operational evidence collected in the last five years shows that the solution is only partially linked to future technological developments. Cultural and organisational changes are mandatory to help to manage and drastically reduce the adverse events in health care organisations. Classical management, merely based on coordination and control, is inadequate. Proactive, self-organising network based structures must be put in place and managed using adaptive, fast evolving management tools.

  1. Biomarkers of adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Daniel F; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2018-02-01

    Adverse drug reactions can be caused by a wide range of therapeutics. Adverse drug reactions affect many bodily organ systems and vary widely in severity. Milder adverse drug reactions often resolve quickly following withdrawal of the casual drug or sometimes after dose reduction. Some adverse drug reactions are severe and lead to significant organ/tissue injury which can be fatal. Adverse drug reactions also represent a financial burden to both healthcare providers and the pharmaceutical industry. Thus, a number of stakeholders would benefit from development of new, robust biomarkers for the prediction, diagnosis, and prognostication of adverse drug reactions. There has been significant recent progress in identifying predictive genomic biomarkers with the potential to be used in clinical settings to reduce the burden of adverse drug reactions. These have included biomarkers that can be used to alter drug dose (for example, Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) and azathioprine dose) and drug choice. The latter have in particular included human leukocyte antigen (HLA) biomarkers which identify susceptibility to immune-mediated injuries to major organs such as skin, liver, and bone marrow from a variety of drugs. This review covers both the current state of the art with regard to genomic adverse drug reaction biomarkers. We also review circulating biomarkers that have the potential to be used for both diagnosis and prognosis, and have the added advantage of providing mechanistic information. In the future, we will not be relying on single biomarkers (genomic/non-genomic), but on multiple biomarker panels, integrated through the application of different omics technologies, which will provide information on predisposition, early diagnosis, prognosis, and mechanisms. Impact statement • Genetic and circulating biomarkers present significant opportunities to personalize patient therapy to minimize the risk of adverse drug reactions. ADRs are a significant heath issue

  2. [Adverse cutaneous reactions to drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suástegui-Rodríguez, Irvin; Campos-Jiménez, Karin Ivette; Domínguez-Cherit, Judith; Méndez-Flores, Silvia

    2018-01-01

    Adverse cutaneous reactions to drugs are any undesirable change in the structure or function of the skin. These are among the adverse side effects to common drugs. The most commonly implicated drugs are antibiotics and anticonvulsants. Cutaneous clinical manifestations are diverse ranging from mild or moderate reactions, such as urticaria and maculopapular rash, to severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR), which are known due to their high morbidity and mortality (among these: Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). The clinical pattern, etiology, prognosis and treatment differ among these skin reactions, which is why it is necessary a clear diagnosis based on a comprehensive clinical examination, skin biopsy, and specific laboratory tests. The therapeutic options depend on the clinical diagnosis. For all reactions, a symptomatic and adequate supportive therapy is necessary; in some cases, a systemic immunomodulatory therapy can be useful.

  3. Adverse drug reactions in hospitalized Colombian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Las Salas, Roxana; Díaz-Agudelo, Daniela; Burgos-Flórez, Francisco Javier; Vaca, Claudia; Serrano-Meriño, Dolores Vanessa

    2016-09-30

    The occurrence of adverse drug reactions is an important issue due to the lack of drug safety data in children. To describe the Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatient children under 6 years of age in two general pediatrics wards located in Barranquilla, Colombia. A prospective cohort study based on intensive pharmacovigilance was conducted during six months in order to monitor the emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatients children under 6 years of age with at least one medication prescribed. The study was conducted in two pediatric wards of two hospitals located in Barranquilla, Colombia. Naranjo´s Algorithm was used to evaluate imputability, the modified Hartwig and Siegel assessment scale to establish severity and the Schumock and Thornton criteria to determine preventability. Of a total of 772 monitored patients, 156 Adverse Drug Reactions were detected on 147 children. The cumulative incidence of Adverse Drug Reactions was 19.0% (147/772); the incidence density was 37.6 Adverse Drug Reactions per 1,000 patients-days (147/3,913). The frequency was higher in children under 2 years of age (12.7%). Emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions was higher in male patients (RR= 1.66; 95% CI= 1.22-2.22, p = 0.001) and in those who used systemic antibiotics (RR= 1.82; 95% CI= 1.17-2.82, p = 0.005). Adverse Drug Reactions are common among hospitalized children and represent an additional burden of morbidity and risk, particularly in those who used several medicines, including antibiotics.

  4. Designing an Adverse Drug Event Reporting System to Prevent Unintentional Reexposures to Harmful Drugs: Study Protocol for a Multiple Methods Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddie, David; Small, Serena S; Badke, Katherin; Wickham, Maeve E; Bailey, Chantelle; Chruscicki, Adam; Ackerley, Christine; Balka, Ellen; Hohl, Corinne M

    2016-08-18

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are unintended and harmful events related to medication use. Up to 30% of serious ADEs recur within six months because culprit drugs are unintentionally represcribed and redispensed. Improving the electronic communication of ADE information between care providers, and across care settings, has the potential to reduce recurrent ADEs. We aim to describe the methods used to design Action ADE, a novel electronic ADE reporting system that can be leveraged to prevent unintentional reexposures to harmful drugs in British Columbia, Canada. To develop the new system, our team will use action research and participatory design, approaches that employ social scientific research methods and practitioner participation to generate insights into work settings and problem resolution. We will develop a systematic search strategy to review existing ADE reporting systems identified in academic and grey literature, and analyze the content of these systems to identify core data fields used to communicate ADE information. We will observe care providers in the emergency departments and on the wards of two urban tertiary hospitals and one urban community hospital, in one rural ambulatory care center, and in three community pharmacies in British Columbia, Canada. We will also conduct participatory workshops with providers to understand their needs and priorities related to communicating ADEs and preventing erroneous represcribing or redispensing of culprit medications. These methods will inform the iterative development of a preliminary paper-based reporting form, which we will then pilot test with providers in a real-world setting. This is an ongoing project with results being published as analyses are completed. The systematic review has been completed; field observations, focus groups, and pilot testing of a preliminary paper-based design are ongoing. Results will inform the development of software that will enable clinically useful user-friendly documentation

  5. A Review on Dapsone Hypersensitivity Syndrome Among Chinese Patients with an Emphasis on Preventing Adverse Drug Reactions with Genetic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na; Parimi, Leela; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen

    2017-05-01

    AbstractDapsone is a bactericidal and bacteriostatic against Mycobacterium leprae , a causative agent of leprosy. Dapsone is also applied in a range of medical fields because of its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is a rare yet serious adverse drug reaction (ADR) caused by dapsone involving multiple organs. We performed a systematic review of published articles describing dapsone-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, including all Chinese articles and the latest literature available in online databases published between October 2009 and October 2015. We determined the prevalence, clinical characteristics, and mortality rate of DHS. Importantly, we also summarized the recent advances in genetic testing allowing prediction of ADRs. In an initial systematic electronic search, we retrieved 191 articles. Subsequently, these articles were further filtered and ultimately 84 articles (60 Chinese case reports, 21 non-Chinese articles, and three epidemiological studies) were selected, which included 877 patients. The prevalence of DHS among Chinese patients was 1.5% with a fatality rate of 9.6%. Early withdrawal of dapsone and appropriate treatment reduced the fatality rate. Most importantly, genetic screening for the HLA-B*13:01 allele among high-risk populations showed a significant utility as a useful genetic marker to DHS. In conclusion, this review discusses the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of DHS among Chinese patients, which may help physicians to understand this syndrome.

  6. Risk factors, management and outcomes of adverse drug reactions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Antiretrovirals have been associated with serious adverse drug reactions. Several factors have been suggested as independent risk factors for their development. Identification of these factors may help in prevention and management of the adverse drug reactions. Objective: To describe the factors associated ...

  7. Differences between Drug-Induced and Contrast Media-Induced Adverse Reactions Based on Spontaneously Reported Adverse Drug Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, JiHyeon; Lee, HeeYoung; Suh, JinUk; Yang, MyungSuk; Kang, WonKu; Kim, EunYoung

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed differences between spontaneously reported drug-induced (not including contrast media) and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Adverse drug reactions reported by an in-hospital pharmacovigilance center (St. Mary's teaching hospital, Daejeon, Korea) from 2010-2012 were classified as drug-induced or contrast media-induced. Clinical patterns, frequency, causality, severity, Schumock and Thornton's preventability, and type A/B reactions were recorded. The trends among causality tools measuring drug and contrast-induced adverse reactions were analyzed. Of 1,335 reports, 636 drug-induced and contrast media-induced adverse reactions were identified. The prevalence of spontaneously reported adverse drug reaction-related admissions revealed a suspected adverse drug reaction-reporting rate of 20.9/100,000 (inpatient, 0.021%) and 3.9/100,000 (outpatients, 0.004%). The most common adverse drug reaction-associated drug classes included nervous system agents and anti-infectives. Dermatological and gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions were most frequently and similarly reported between drug and contrast media-induced adverse reactions. Compared to contrast media-induced adverse reactions, drug-induced adverse reactions were milder, more likely to be preventable (9.8% vs. 1.1%, p contrast media-induced adverse reactions (56.6%, p = 0.066). Causality patterns differed between the two adverse reaction classes. The World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre causality evaluation and Naranjo algorithm results significantly differed from those of the Korean algorithm version II (p contrast media-induced adverse reactions. The World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Centre and Naranjo algorithm causality evaluation afforded similar results.

  8. 78 FR 54469 - Solicitation of Written Comments on Draft National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... Medicine as ``an injury resulting from medical intervention related to a drug.'' This broad term... demonstrate or exhibit concepts of their written responses, however, we request that comments are identified...

  9. ADVERSE DRUG REACTION (ADR) MONITORING AND PHARMACOVIGILANCE

    OpenAIRE

    D. KAVITHA

    2013-01-01

    The need for systematic follow up of medicines for adverse drug reactions once they are introduced into general use has been widely recognised today. Even in developing countries like India, national pharmacovigilance programme has been started for monitoring adverse drug reactions. In its first year this program mainly aimed to foster the culture of ADR notification among health care professionals. As a part of health care team every pharmacist must have knowledge about adverse drug reaction...

  10. Adverse drug reactions induced by cardiovascular drugs in outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholami K

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Considering increased use of cardiovascular drugs and limitations in pre-marketing trials for drug safety evaluation, post marketing evaluation of adverse drug reactions (ADRs induced by this class of medicinal products seems necessary.Objectives: To determine the rate and seriousness of adverse reactions induced by cardiovascular drugs in outpatients. To compare sex and different age groups in developing ADRs with cardiovascular agents. To assess the relationship between frequencies of ADRs and the number of drugs used. Methods: This cross-sectional study was done in cardiovascular clinic at a teaching hospital. All patients during an eight months period were evaluated for cardiovascular drugs induced ADRs. Patient and reaction factors were analyzed in detected ADRs. Patients with or without ADRs were compared in sex and age by using chi-square test. Assessing the relationship between frequencies of ADRs and the number of drugs used was done by using Pearson analysis. Results: The total number of 518 patients was visited at the clinic. ADRs were detected in 105 (20.3% patients. The most frequent ADRs were occurred in the age group of 51-60. The highest rate of ADRs was recorded to be induced by Diltiazem (23.5% and the lowest rate with Atenolol (3%. Headache was the most frequent detected ADR (23%. Assessing the severity and preventability of ADRs revealed that 1.1% of ADRs were detected as severe and 1.9% as preventable reactions. Women significantly developed more ADRs in this study (chi square = 3.978, P<0.05. ADRs more frequently occurred with increasing age in this study (chi square = 15.871, P<0.05. With increasing the number of drugs used, the frequency of ADRs increased (Pearson=0.259, P<0.05. Conclusion: Monitoring ADRs in patients using cardiovascular drugs is a matter of importance since this class of medicines is usually used by elderly patients with critical conditions and underlying diseases.

  11. Identifying Adverse Drug Events by Relational Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, David; Costa, Vítor Santos; Natarajan, Sriraam; Barnard, Aubrey; Peissig, Peggy; Caldwell, Michael

    2012-07-01

    The pharmaceutical industry, consumer protection groups, users of medications and government oversight agencies are all strongly interested in identifying adverse reactions to drugs. While a clinical trial of a drug may use only a thousand patients, once a drug is released on the market it may be taken by millions of patients. As a result, in many cases adverse drug events (ADEs) are observed in the broader population that were not identified during clinical trials. Therefore, there is a need for continued, post-marketing surveillance of drugs to identify previously-unanticipated ADEs. This paper casts this problem as a reverse machine learning task , related to relational subgroup discovery and provides an initial evaluation of this approach based on experiments with an actual EMR/EHR and known adverse drug events.

  12. Knowledge engineering for adverse drug event prevention: on the design and development of a uniform, contextualized and sustainable knowledge-based framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutkias, Vassilis; Kilintzis, Vassilis; Stalidis, George; Lazou, Katerina; Niès, Julie; Durand-Texte, Ludovic; McNair, Peter; Beuscart, Régis; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2012-06-01

    The primary aim of this work was the development of a uniform, contextualized and sustainable knowledge-based framework to support adverse drug event (ADE) prevention via Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSSs). In this regard, the employed methodology involved first the systematic analysis and formalization of the knowledge sources elaborated in the scope of this work, through which an application-specific knowledge model has been defined. The entire framework architecture has been then specified and implemented by adopting Computer Interpretable Guidelines (CIGs) as the knowledge engineering formalism for its construction. The framework integrates diverse and dynamic knowledge sources in the form of rule-based ADE signals, all under a uniform Knowledge Base (KB) structure, according to the defined knowledge model. Equally important, it employs the means to contextualize the encapsulated knowledge, in order to provide appropriate support considering the specific local environment (hospital, medical department, language, etc.), as well as the mechanisms for knowledge querying, inference, sharing, and management. In this paper, we present thoroughly the establishment of the proposed knowledge framework by presenting the employed methodology and the results obtained as regards implementation, performance and validation aspects that highlight its applicability and virtue in medication safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Nursing role in reporting adverse drug reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita-Garaicoechea, Ana; Reis-Carvalho, Joana; Ripa-Aisa, Irantzu; Jiménez-Mendoza, Ana; Díaz-Balén, Almudena; Oroviogoicoechea, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous report system, in which suspected adverse drug reaction (ADR) are reported by healthcare workers, is currently one of the primary methods to prevent and discover new and serious ADR to marketed medicinal products. The collaboration of nursing professionals with this task makes it possible to improve patient safety and to reduce ADR costs. Although a total of 781 cases of ADR cases were reported in Navarra in 2011, only 7.33% were reported by nurses. The objectives werw to determine the factors that influence nurses in reporting of ADR, and second, to devise strategies which help to increase reporting. A bibliographic search for articles that included the words: reacciones adversas medicamentosas (adverse drug reactions), notificación (reporting) and enfermería (nursing) was conducted using the PubMed and Cinhal databases. A total of 107 articles were retrieved, of which 27 were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. The conclusion learned by reading and analyzing the selected articles was that the factors that affect the notification depend on the attitude of the notifier, as well as personal and professional factors. The main strategies to encourage notification are education and training, motivation, and the availability of facilitating tools. The main factors that have an influence on under-notification are the lack of knowledge and motivation among professionals. To solve the problem of under-notification, the main actions and strategies to undertake are education, motivation and persistence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Adverse Drug Reactions in Critical Care Settings: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisha, Joshua; Annalakshmi, Velu; Maria, Jose; Padmini, Devi

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of adverse drug reactions is reported to be high in critical care units. We conducted a systematic review to study the prevalence, drugs implicated, preventability, predictability, severity and determinants of adverse drug reactions in critical care settings. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PROQUEST and OVID (January 1995 to June 2015) using pre-specified appropriate medical subject heading terms. Of 1552 studies, 34 studies were included for data extraction and synthesis. Overall, the prevalence of adverse drug reactions was 0.3% to 17% in paediatric intensive care units and 4.5% to 34.1% in adult intensive care units. The highest prevalence reported among critical care settings was 117.4 per 1000 patient days. The most common drug classes implicated were antimicrobials in the medical intensive care units, cardiovascular drugs and anticoagulants in the coronary care units, and analgesics and sedatives in the surgical care units. The prevalence of fatal and severe adverse drug reactions ranged from 0.9 to 19% and 5.7 to 28.6% respectively. The predictable and preventable adverse drug reactions ranged from 74.3 to 90.2% and 8.6 to 62.8% respectively. Only 8 studies reported patient outcomes. About 5.6% to 25.5% of patients died. There is wide variation in prevalence, characteristics and drug classes implicated in the occurrence of adverse drug reactions by type of intensive care unit. Findings of this study would help health care professionals to optimise pharmacotherapy in critical care settings. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. An adverse drug event manager facilitates spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Siri; Klarskov, Pia; Borgeskov, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is used for continuous risk-benefit evaluation of marketed pharmaceutical products and for signal detection. The Adverse Drug Event Manager (ADEM) is a service offered to clinicians employed at hospitals in the Capital Region...

  16. Consumer reporting of adverse drug reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Nielsen, Lars Hougaard; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reporting adverse drug reactions (ADRs) has traditionally been the sole province of healthcare professionals. Since 2003 in Denmark, consumers have been able to report ADRs directly to the authorities. The objective of this study was to compare ADRs reported by consumers with ADRs...... be actively included in systematic drug surveillance systems, including clinical settings, and their reports should be taken as seriously as reports from other sources....

  17. Epidemiology of adverse drug reactions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouvy, Jacoline C; De Bruin, Marie L; Koopmanschap, Marc A

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) cause considerable mortality and morbidity but no recent reviews are currently available for the European region. Therefore, we performed a review of all epidemiological studies quantifying ADRs in a European setting that were published between 1 January 2000 and 3...... regarding the epidemiology of ADRs in this setting....

  18. Psychiatric Adverse Effects of Dermatological Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Özmen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dermatological drugs, mostly corticosteroids and isotretinoin, cause different psychiatric adverse effects. During steroid therapy, a wide range of psychiatric conditions, from minor clinical symptoms like insomnia and anxiety to serious psychiatric syndromes like psychosis and delirium might be seen. In medical literature, a causal connection is usually suggested between “isotretinoin”, which is used for treatment of acne vulgaris and depression and suicide attempts. However, there are no statistically significant double-blind randomized studies that support this connection. Clinicians must know patient’s psychiatric history before using any dermatological treatment known as causing psychiatric adverse effects, and psychiatric consultation should be established whenever necessary.

  19. Adverse drug reactions: classification, susceptibility and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Gerri

    2016-08-10

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are increasingly common and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Historically, ADRs have been classified as type A or type B. Type A reactions are predictable from the known pharmacology of a drug and are associated with high morbidity and low mortality. Type B reactions are idiosyncratic, bizarre or novel responses that cannot be predicted from the known pharmacology of a drug and are associated with low morbidity and high mortality. Not all ADRs fit into type A and type B categories; therefore, additional categories have been developed. These include type C (continuing), type D (delayed use), and type E (end of use) reactions. Susceptibility to ADRs is influenced by age, gender, disease states, pregnancy, ethnicity and polypharmacy. Drug safety is reliant on nurses and other healthcare professionals being alert to the possibility of ADRs, working with patients to optimise medicine use and exercising vigilance in the reporting of ADRs through the Yellow Card Scheme.

  20. Ranking Adverse Drug Reactions With Crowdsourcing

    KAUST Repository

    Gottlieb, Assaf

    2015-03-23

    Background: There is no publicly available resource that provides the relative severity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Such a resource would be useful for several applications, including assessment of the risks and benefits of drugs and improvement of patient-centered care. It could also be used to triage predictions of drug adverse events. Objective: The intent of the study was to rank ADRs according to severity. Methods: We used Internet-based crowdsourcing to rank ADRs according to severity. We assigned 126,512 pairwise comparisons of ADRs to 2589 Amazon Mechanical Turk workers and used these comparisons to rank order 2929 ADRs. Results: There is good correlation (rho=.53) between the mortality rates associated with ADRs and their rank. Our ranking highlights severe drug-ADR predictions, such as cardiovascular ADRs for raloxifene and celecoxib. It also triages genes associated with severe ADRs such as epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), associated with glioblastoma multiforme, and SCN1A, associated with epilepsy. Conclusions: ADR ranking lays a first stepping stone in personalized drug risk assessment. Ranking of ADRs using crowdsourcing may have useful clinical and financial implications, and should be further investigated in the context of health care decision making.

  1. Ranking adverse drug reactions with crowdsourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Assaf; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel; Altman, Russ B

    2015-03-23

    There is no publicly available resource that provides the relative severity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Such a resource would be useful for several applications, including assessment of the risks and benefits of drugs and improvement of patient-centered care. It could also be used to triage predictions of drug adverse events. The intent of the study was to rank ADRs according to severity. We used Internet-based crowdsourcing to rank ADRs according to severity. We assigned 126,512 pairwise comparisons of ADRs to 2589 Amazon Mechanical Turk workers and used these comparisons to rank order 2929 ADRs. There is good correlation (rho=.53) between the mortality rates associated with ADRs and their rank. Our ranking highlights severe drug-ADR predictions, such as cardiovascular ADRs for raloxifene and celecoxib. It also triages genes associated with severe ADRs such as epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), associated with glioblastoma multiforme, and SCN1A, associated with epilepsy. ADR ranking lays a first stepping stone in personalized drug risk assessment. Ranking of ADRs using crowdsourcing may have useful clinical and financial implications, and should be further investigated in the context of health care decision making.

  2. Adverse reactions of immunosuppressive drugs in Iranian adult kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Soha; Sagheb, Mohammad Mahdi; Karimzadeh, Iman

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the pattern of immunosuppressive drug adverse reactions in adult kidney transplant recipients in Iran. Adult kidney transplant outpatients under immunosuppressive therapy were recruited into the study. All adverse drug reactions to immunosuppressants and their relevant clinical and paraclinical characteristics were recorded. Causality assessment was performed by the Naranjo algorithm. The seriousness of adverse drug reactions was determined by the World Health Organization definition. The Schumock and Thornton questionnaire was used to assess the preventability of adverse drug reactions. Statistical analyses were performed. A total of 1100 adverse drug reactions were detected from 120 kidney transplant recipients. Increased appetite (9.09%) was the adverse reaction reported most frequently. Causality assessment revealed that 1019 adverse drug reactions (92.64%) were possible. Forty adverse drug reactions (3.64%) were identified as serious. Six hundred seventy-one adverse drug reactions (61%) were preventable. Posttransplant duration was significantly correlated with the number of adverse drug reactions (R=0.19; P = .035). All renal allograft recipients experienced at least 1 immunosuppressant-related adverse reaction. Prolongation of immunosuppressive treatment resulted in an increase in adverse drug reactions.

  3. Seamless prevention of adverse events from tattooing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    The boom in tattooing has been paralleled by more frequent adverse events, which may be localised in the skin or systemic and manifested clinically or latent. Infections, allergic reactions from red-coloured tattoos and papulo-nodular reactions from black tattoos dominate. Mild complaints are very...... common, with 1/5 of all tattooed individuals having acquired sensitivity to sunlight in the tattooed skin. The potential risk of cancer due to potential carcinogens in some tattoo inks has hitherto not manifested in clinical reports, despite the millions of people who have been tattooed over many decades....... A risk of death from tattooing remains associated with severe infection, i.e. sepsis. Preventive strategies may rely on focused preventions, and sterility and preservation of ink is essential, rational and knowledge-based. The chemical and particle contents of ink nanoparticles cannot be unrestricted...

  4. [Adverse drug reaction reporting in emergency medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojevic, Kolia; Chassagnol, Isabelle; Brion, Nathalie; Cléro, Joël; Degrèze, Nathalie; Lambert, Yves

    2004-01-01

    A regional survey was performed between June and September 2002, to evaluate knowledge and attitudes of emergency physicians regarding adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting in a French district. 100 questionnaires completed by physicians working in emergency departments and/or mobile intensive care units were analysed. The frequency of ADRs encountered by emergency practitioners was estimated at > or = 0.73 per year and per physician. The ADR notification rate in emergency medicine was estimated at advertising ADR reporting procedures could help to improve the notification rate in emergency medicine.

  5. Common adverse drug reactions with psychiatric medications and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common adverse drug reactions with psychiatric medications and an approach to their management: Adverse drug reactions are as important in psychiatric practice as they are in any other branch of medicine.

  6. Pharmacogenetics of adverse reactions to antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke-Galindo, I; Jung-Cook, H; LLerena, A; López-López, M

    2018-04-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major public health concern and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. In the case of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), ADRs constitute a barrier to successful treatment since they decrease treatment adherence and impact patients' quality of life of patients. Pharmacogenetics aims to identify genetic polymorphisms associated with drug safety. This article presents a review of genes coding for drug metabolising enzymes and drug transporters, and HLA system genes that have been linked to AED-induced ADRs. To date, several genetic variations associated with drug safety have been reported: CYP2C9*2 and *3 alleles, which code for enzymes with decreased activity, have been linked to phenytoin (PHT)-induced neurotoxicity; GSTM1 null alleles with hepatotoxicity induced by carbamazepine (CBZ) and valproic acid (VPA); EPHX1 polymorphisms with teratogenesis; ABCC2 genetic variations with CBZ- and VPA-induced neurological ADRs; and HLA alleles (e.g. HLA-B*15:02, -A*31:01, -B*15:11, -C*08:01) with cutaneous ADRs. Published findings show that there are ADRs with a pharmacogenetic basis and a high interethnic variability, which indicates a need for future studies in different populations to gather more useful results for larger number of patients. The search for biomarkers that would allow predicting ADRs to AEDs could improve pharmacotherapy for epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Glycaemic Adverse Drug Reactions from Anti-Neoplastics Used in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-24

    Jan 24, 2018 ... Hyperglycemia is one of the severe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in cancer treatment. The aim was to analyze the blood glucose‑related ADR of ... can be suggested. Keywords: Adverse drug reaction, antineoplastic, hyperglycemia, pancreatic cancer, VigiBase. Glycaemic Adverse Drug Reactions from ...

  8. Evaluation of the adverse drug reaction surveillance system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Medicines Control Authority of Zimbabwe monitors reactions to medicines through the Adverse Drugs Reactions Surveillance System. The system relies on health professionals to report adverse drug reactions to maximize patient safety. We report results of an evaluation of the Adverse Drugs Reactions Surveillance ...

  9. Adverse events of modern antifungal drugs during treatment of invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Dmitrieva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of adverse events of modern antimycotics by organ systems and comparative frequency between different medicines and their groups are presented. The examples of incompatibility of antifungal drugs with other pharmacological groups are discussed. Records of adverse events and drug compatibility will allow the practitioner to prevent and timely cure possible complications, should they arise.

  10. Children and ADRs (Adverse Drug Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napoleone Ettore

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many medicines are prescribed to the paediatric population on an unlicensed or 'off-label' basis because they have not been adequately tested and/or formulated and authorized for use in appropriate paediatric age groups. Regulatory authorities also need to remind health professionals about the importance of their contribution towards the process of paediatric pharmacovigilance thanks to their reporting of adverse drug reactions. The lack of reliable data in the paediatric population is associated with specific problems including: limited availability of safety data due to the lack of clinical trials in the paediatric population; under- or over-dosing in some age groups due to the lack of pharmacokinetics data or dose-finding studies; maturation, growth and development of the paediatric population susceptible to drug-induced growth and development disorders as well as to delayed ADRs not findable in adults. Pre-marketing trials are able to provide information about the benefits of drugs but do not manage to establish a safety profile. Spontaneous reporting of suspected ADRs become an important means to promote reasonable warning signs. Therefore some ADRs may be known in their qualitative aspect and quantitative aspect only after successful marketing and use in the population during a "normal" use. When the drug is used in clinical practice in large unselected populations, epidemiological post-marketing studies are useful as they find their major confirmation in recalling all the events that occur during monitoring, with estimates of incidence of ADRs that can not be obtained by spontaneous reports. In these studies a significant role can be played by the Family Pediatricians with the participation to active pharmacovigilance projects.

  11. Potential drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in dermatological inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Lukas; Kränke, Birger; Aberer, Werner

    2016-11-01

    To present information on the frequency of drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions, and to provide assistance on how to minimize these major problems in the pharmacological treatment of dermatological inpatients. The medications given to 1,099 dermatological inpatients were retrospectively analyzed for drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions using web-based drug interaction software (Diagnosia ® Check). We report an overall frequency of relevant drug-drug interactions of 51.7 %, with an average of 3.2 interactions per affected inpatient. Drug combinations that should have been avoided were found in 5.7 % of the study population. Total drug count was the most important risk factor. Drug groups involved in the majority of interactions were analgesics, cardiovascular and antithrombotic agents, as well as antidepressants. The risk of developing adverse drug reactions was rated as "high" in 53.1 % of inpatients. The top five adverse reactions in this patient group were bleeding, constipation, anticholinergic effects, sedation, and orthostatic effects. Potential drug-drug interactions as well as adverse drug reactions are alarmingly common in dermatological inpatients. Every other patient is at risk of experiencing such interactions or adverse reactions, and every twentieth patient receives a drug combination that should not be administered. Increased alertness is a must in order to identify patients at risk. © 2016 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Could chiropractors screen for adverse drug events in the community? Survey of US chiropractors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bero Lisa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The "Put Prevention into Practice" campaign of the US Public Health Service (USPHS was launched with the dissemination of the Clinician's Handbook of Preventive Services that recommended standards of clinical care for various prevention activities, including preventive clinical strategies to reduce the risk of adverse drug events. We explored whether nonprescribing clinicians such as chiropractors may contribute to advancing drug safety initiatives by identifying potential adverse drug events in their chiropractic patients, and by bringing suspected adverse drug events to the attention of the prescribing clinicians. Methods Mail survey of US chiropractors about their detection of potential adverse drug events in their chiropractic patients. Results Over half of responding chiropractors (62% reported having identified a suspected adverse drug event occurring in one of their chiropractic patients. The severity of suspected drug-related events detected ranged from mild to severe. Conclusions Chiropractors or other nonprescribing clinicians may be in a position to detect potential adverse drug events in the community. These detection and reporting mechanisms should be standardized and policies related to clinical case management of suspected adverse drug events occurring in their patients should be developed.

  13. Could chiropractors screen for adverse drug events in the community? Survey of US chiropractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Monica; Bero, Lisa; Carber, Lynne

    2010-11-17

    The "Put Prevention into Practice" campaign of the US Public Health Service (USPHS) was launched with the dissemination of the Clinician's Handbook of Preventive Services that recommended standards of clinical care for various prevention activities, including preventive clinical strategies to reduce the risk of adverse drug events. We explored whether nonprescribing clinicians such as chiropractors may contribute to advancing drug safety initiatives by identifying potential adverse drug events in their chiropractic patients, and by bringing suspected adverse drug events to the attention of the prescribing clinicians. Mail survey of US chiropractors about their detection of potential adverse drug events in their chiropractic patients. Over half of responding chiropractors (62%) reported having identified a suspected adverse drug event occurring in one of their chiropractic patients. The severity of suspected drug-related events detected ranged from mild to severe. Chiropractors or other nonprescribing clinicians may be in a position to detect potential adverse drug events in the community. These detection and reporting mechanisms should be standardized and policies related to clinical case management of suspected adverse drug events occurring in their patients should be developed.

  14. Adverse drug reaction reporting by doctors in a developing country ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting is the most widely used and cost effective method of monitoring the safety of drugs. This method is heavily afflicted by underreporting by healthcare professionals. The study aims at assessing adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting rate by doctors, knowledge of the ...

  15. Could chiropractors screen for adverse drug events in the community? Survey of US chiropractors

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Monica; Bero, Lisa; Carber, Lynne

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The "Put Prevention into Practice" campaign of the US Public Health Service (USPHS) was launched with the dissemination of the Clinician's Handbook of Preventive Services that recommended standards of clinical care for various prevention activities, including preventive clinical strategies to reduce the risk of adverse drug events. We explored whether nonprescribing clinicians such as chiropractors may contribute to advancing drug safety initiatives by identifying potentia...

  16. Increase of 10% in the Rate of Adverse Drug Reactions for Each Drug Administered in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Marisa Rosimeire; Motta, Antonio Abílio; Marcondes-Fonseca, Luiz Augusto; Kalil-Filho, Jorge; Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    To assess the risk factors, incidence and severity of adverse drug reactions in in-patients. This prospective study evaluated 472 patients treated at a teaching hospital in Brazil between 2010 and 2013 by five medical specialties: Internal Medicine, General Surgery, Geriatrics, Neurology, and Clinical Immunology and Allergy. The following variables were assessed: patient age, gender, comorbidities, family history of hypersensitivity, personal and family history of atopy, number of prescribed drugs before and during hospitalization, hospital diagnoses, days of hospitalization. The patients were visited every other day, and medical records were reviewed by the investigators to detect adverse drug reactions. There were a total of 94 adverse drug reactions in 75 patients. Most reactions were predictable and of moderate severity. The incidence of adverse drug reactions was 16.2%, and the incidence varied, according to the medical specialty; it was higher in Internal Medicine (30%). Antibiotics were the most commonly involved medication. Chronic renal failure, longer hospital stay, greater number of diagnoses and greater number of medications upon admission were risk factors. For each medication introduced during hospitalization, there was a 10% increase in the rate of adverse drug reaction. In the present study, the probability of observing an adverse drug reaction was 1 in 104 patients per day. Adverse drug reactions are frequent and potentially serious and should be better monitored in patients with chronic renal failure or prolonged hospitalization and especially in those on 'polypharmacy' regimens. The rational use of medications plays an important role in preventing adverse drug reactions.

  17. Adverse drug reactions in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcher, Robert; Dzierba, Amy L; Kim, Catherine; Smithburger, Pamela L; Kane-Gill, Sandra L

    2017-03-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves survival and neurologic function in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Many medications used to support TH have altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics during this treatment. It is unknown if or at what frequency the medications used during TH cause adverse drug reactions (ADRs). A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) after cardiac arrest and treated with TH from January 2009 to June 2012 at two urban, university-affiliated, tertiary-care medical centres. Medications commonly used during TH were screened for association with significant ADRs (grade 3 or greater per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) using three published ADR detection instruments. A total of 229 patients were included, the majority being males with median age of 62 presenting with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in pulseless electrical activity or asystole. The most common comorbidities were hypertension, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. There were 670 possible ADRs and 69 probable ADRs identified. Of the 670 possible ADRs, propofol, fentanyl, and acetaminophen were the most common drugs associated with ADRs. Whereas fentanyl, insulin, and propofol were the most common drugs associated with a probable ADR. Patients were managed with TH for a median of 22 hours, with 38% of patients surviving to hospital discharge. Patients undergoing TH after cardiac arrest frequently experience possible adverse reactions associated with medications and the corresponding laboratory abnormalities are significant. There is a need for judicious use and close monitoring of drugs in the setting of TH until recommendations for dose adjustments are available to help prevent ADRs.

  18. Attitude and Practice of Doctors Toward Adverse Drug Reactions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background : Adverse drug reactions, (ADRs), constitute an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Spontaneous adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting is the bedrock of post-marketing surveillance but under-reporting remains its major drawback. Objectives : This study aimed at evaluating the attitude and ...

  19. Prevalence and assessment of factors contributing to adverse drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Adverse drug reactions account for the highest proportion among the causes of morbidity and mortality in clinical wards and are posing a considerable challenge. Hence, the objective of this study was to find out the prevalence of adverse drug reactions and the factors which contribute to their prevalence.

  20. Adverse drug reactions among HIV infected and uninfected adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Information about the prevalence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) among HIV infected and HIV uninfected patients receiving anti-tuberculous therapy in Africa is limited due to unavailability of local data or publications and hence the basis of this study. Objective: To determine the prevalence of adverse drug ...

  1. Prevalence of adverse drug reactions in adult patients on anti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There has been an increased access to anti-retrovirals in resourceconstrained settings. However, few studies have addressed the area of adverse drug reactions in these settings. Objective: To determine the prevalence of adverse drugs reactions in HIV-infected persons receiving anti-retrovirals. Design: A ...

  2. 3-12 Detection and Management of Adverse Drug React

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MINA SAN

    educational level, perception of ADRs, knowledge of ADRs, detection and management of ADRs. Sampling technique and sample size determination .... Burning sensation, numbness, tingling. Table 3: Prevalence of adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reaction Number of respondents with the ADR Prevalence (95% CI).

  3. Role of systems pharmacology in understanding drug adverse events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Seth I.; Iyengar, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Systems pharmacology involves the application of systems biology approaches, combining large-scale experimental studies with computational analyses, to the study of drugs, drug targets, and drug effects. Many of these initial studies have focused on identifying new drug targets, new uses of known drugs, and systems-level properties of existing drugs. This review focuses on systems pharmacology studies that aim to better understand drug side effects and adverse events. By studying the drugs in the context of cellular networks, these studies provide insights into adverse events caused by off-targets of drugs as well as adverse events-mediated complex network responses. This allows rapid identification of biomarkers for side effect susceptibility. In this way, systems pharmacology will lead to not only newer and more effective therapies, but safer medications with fewer side effects. PMID:20803507

  4. Adverse drug events caused by serious medication administration errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Abhivyakti; Keohane, Carol A; Maviglia, Saverio; Gandhi, Tejal K; Poon, Eric G

    2012-11-01

    To determine how often serious or life-threatening medication administration errors with the potential to cause harm (potential adverse drug events) result in actual harm (adverse drug events (ADEs)) in the hospital setting. Retrospective chart review of clinical events following observed medication administration errors. Medication errors are common at the medication administration stage for inpatients. While many errors can cause harm, it is unclear exactly how often. In a previous study where 14 041 medication administrations were directly observed, 1271 medication administration errors were discovered, of which 133 had the potential to cause serious or life-threatening harm and were considered serious or life-threatening potential adverse drug events. As a follow-up, clinical reviewers conducted detailed chart review of serious or life-threatening potential ADEs to determine if they caused an ADE. Reviewers assessed severity of the ADE and attribution to the error. Ten (7.5% (95% CI 6.98 to 8.01)) actual ADEs resulted from the 133 serious and life-threatening potential ADEs, of which 6 resulted in significant, three in serious, and one life threatening injury. Therefore 4 (3% (95% CI 2.12 to 3.6)) of serious or life threatening potential ADEs led to serious or life threatening ADEs. Half of the ADEs were caused by dosage or monitoring errors for anti-hypertensives. Unintercepted potential ADEs at the medication administration stage can cause serious patient harm. At hospitals where 6 million doses are administered per year, about 4000 preventable ADEs would be attributable to medication administration errors annually.

  5. Drug Education & Prevention. Chapter 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acampora, Alfonso P., Ed.; Nebelkopf, Ethan, Ed.

    This document contains seven papers from the ninth World Conference of Therapeutic Communities (TCs) that deal with drug education and prevention. Papers include: (1) "State of the Art of Drug Prevention Programs: A Five Year Retrospective of School Curricula" (Natalie Silverstein, et al.); (2) "TCs: Education for Wholeness"…

  6. Antiretroviral adverse drug reactions and their management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-02

    Jun 2, 2011 ... This article discusses the common and serious adverse effects (AEs) related to the above antiretrovirals ... transaminases to more than 5 times the upper limit of normal. This is more frequent in ..... The prime suspect for causing the tumours is aloin A, which together with other aloe extracts was removed from ...

  7. Promoting adverse drug reaction reporting: comparison of different approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Ribeiro-Vaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe different approaches to promote adverse drug reaction reporting among health care professionals, determining their cost-effectiveness. METHODS We analyzed and compared several approaches taken by the Northern Pharmacovigilance Centre (Portugal to promote adverse drug reaction reporting. Approaches were compared regarding the number and relevance of adverse drug reaction reports obtained and costs involved. Costs by report were estimated by adding the initial costs and the running costs of each intervention. These costs were divided by the number of reports obtained with each intervention, to assess its cost-effectiveness. RESULTS All the approaches seem to have increased the number of adverse drug reaction reports. We noted the biggest increase with protocols (321 reports, costing 1.96 € each, followed by first educational approach (265 reports, 20.31 €/report and by the hyperlink approach (136 reports, 15.59 €/report. Regarding the severity of adverse drug reactions, protocols were the most efficient approach, costing 2.29 €/report, followed by hyperlinks (30.28 €/report, having no running costs. Concerning unexpected adverse drug reactions, the best result was obtained with protocols (5.12 €/report, followed by first educational approach (38.79 €/report. CONCLUSIONS We recommend implementing protocols in other pharmacovigilance centers. They seem to be the most efficient intervention, allowing receiving adverse drug reactions reports at lower costs. The increase applied not only to the total number of reports, but also to the severity, unexpectedness and high degree of causality attributed to the adverse drug reactions. Still, hyperlinks have the advantage of not involving running costs, showing the second best performance in cost per adverse drug reactions report.

  8. Assessment of Adverse Drug Reactions Based on Spontaneous Signals at Secondary Care Public Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusankar, S; Tejaswini, M; Chaitanya, M

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are considered to be among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Approximately 5-25% of hospital admissions are due to adverse drug reactions and 6-15% of hospitalized patients experience serious adverse drug reactions, causing significant prolongation of hospital stay. Thus this study was aimed at determining adverse drug reactions by conducting spontaneous reporting in secondary care Govt. District Head Quarters Hospital at Ooty. A prospective Spontaneous Adverse Drug Reaction reporting study was conducted over a period of 12 months from July 2012 to June 2013. The assessment, categorization, causality, severity and preventability were assessed using standard criteria. A total of 47 suspected adverse drug reactions were reported during the study period. Over all incidences was 1.29% among the study population. Antibiotics (31.91%) were the class of drug most commonly involved, while ciprofloxacin (14.89%) was the most frequently reported. Type H (Hypersensitivity) reactions (51.06%) accounted for majority of the reports and a greater share of the adverse drug reactions are probable (89.36%) based on causality assessment. Mild reactions accounted 82.97% based on modified Hartwig and Siegel severity scale. In 76.59% of the reports, the reaction was considered to be preventable based on Schumock and Thornton preventability scale. The implementation of monitoring based on spontaneous reporting will be useful for the detection and evaluation is associated with increase in morbidity and duration of hospitalization. This study also has established the vital role of clinical pharmacist in the adverse drug reaction monitoring program.

  9. The effect of an active on-ward participation of hospital pharmacists in Internal Medicine teams on preventable Adverse Drug Events in elderly inpatients: protocol of the WINGS study (Ward-oriented pharmacy in newly admitted geriatric seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkgraaf Marcel G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of clinical interventions, aiming at reduction of preventable Adverse Drug Events (preventable ADEs during hospital stay, have been studied extensively. Clinical Pharmacy is a well-established and effective service, usually consisting of full-time on-ward participation of clinical pharmacists in medical teams. Within the current Hospital Pharmacy organisation in the Netherlands, such on-ward service is less feasible and therefore not yet established. However, given the substantial incidence of preventable ADEs in Dutch hospitals found in recent studies, appears warranted. Therefore, "Ward-Oriented Pharmacy", an on-ward service tailored to the Dutch hospital setting, will be developed. This service will consist of multifaceted interventions implemented in the Internal Medicine wards by hospital pharmacists. The effect of this service on preventable ADEs in elderly inpatients will be measured. Elderly patients are at high risk for ADEs due to multi-morbidity, concomitant disabilities and polypharmacy. Most studies on the incidence and preventability of ADEs in elderly patients have been conducted in the outpatient setting or on admission to a hospital, and fewer in the inpatient setting. Moreover, recognition of ADEs by the treating physicians is challenging in elderly patients because their disease presentation is often atypical and complex. Detailed information about the performance of the treating physicians in ADE recognition is scarce. Methods/Design The design is a multi-centre, interrupted time series study. Patients of 65 years or older, consecutively admitted to Internal Medicine wards will be included. After a pre-measurement, a Ward-Oriented Pharmacy service will be introduced and the effect of this service will be assessed during a post-measurement. The primary outcome measures are the ADE prevalence on admission and ADE incidence during hospital stay. These outcomes will be assessed using structured

  10. Adverse drug reactions and organ damage: The skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, Angelo V; Borghi, Alessandro; Cugno, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions are frequent, affecting 2-3% of hospitalized patients and in one twentieth of them are potentially life-threatening. Almost any pharmacologic agent can induce skin reactions, and certain drug classes, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and antiepileptics, have drug eruption rates ranging from 1% to 5%. Cutaneous drug reactions recognize several different pathomechanisms: some skin manifestations are immune-mediated like allergic reactions while others are the result of non immunological causes such as cumulative toxicity, photosensitivity, interaction with other drugs or different metabolic pathways. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions can be classified into two groups: common non-severe and rare life-threatening adverse drug reactions. Non-severe reactions are often exanthematous or urticarial whereas life-threatening reactions typically present with skin detachment or necrosis of large areas of the body and mucous membrane involvement, as in the Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis. Clinicians should carefully evaluate the signs and symptoms of all cutaneous adverse drug reactions thought to be due to drugs and immediately discontinue drugs that are not essential. Short cycles of systemic corticosteroids in combination with antihistamines may be necessary for widespread exanthematous rashes, while more aggressive corticosteroid regimens or intravenous immunoglobulins associated with supportive treatment should be used for patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cadec: A corpus of adverse drug event annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Sarvnaz; Metke-Jimenez, Alejandro; Kemp, Madonna; Wang, Chen

    2015-06-01

    CSIRO Adverse Drug Event Corpus (Cadec) is a new rich annotated corpus of medical forum posts on patient-reported Adverse Drug Events (ADEs). The corpus is sourced from posts on social media, and contains text that is largely written in colloquial language and often deviates from formal English grammar and punctuation rules. Annotations contain mentions of concepts such as drugs, adverse effects, symptoms, and diseases linked to their corresponding concepts in controlled vocabularies, i.e., SNOMED Clinical Terms and MedDRA. The quality of the annotations is ensured by annotation guidelines, multi-stage annotations, measuring inter-annotator agreement, and final review of the annotations by a clinical terminologist. This corpus is useful for studies in the area of information extraction, or more generally text mining, from social media to detect possible adverse drug reactions from direct patient reports. The corpus is publicly available at https://data.csiro.au.(1). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Preventing Medication Error Based on Knowledge Management Against Adverse Event

    OpenAIRE

    Hastuti, Apriyani Puji; Nursalam, Nursalam; Triharini, Mira

    2017-01-01

    Introductions: Medication error is one of many types of errors that could decrease the quality and safety of healthcare. Increasing number of adverse events (AE) reflects the number of medication errors. This study aimed to develop a model of medication error prevention based on knowledge management. This model is expected to improve knowledge and skill of nurses to prevent medication error which is characterized by the decrease of adverse events (AE). Methods: This study consisted of two sta...

  13. Guillain-Barré syndrome after vaccination in United States: data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Food and Drug Administration Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (1990-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souayah, Nizar; Nasar, Abu; Suri, M Fareed K; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2009-09-01

    There are isolated reports of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) after receiving vaccination. To determine the rates and characteristics of GBS after administration of vaccination in United States We used data for 1990 to 2005 from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, which is a cooperative program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the US Food and Drug Administration. There were 1000 cases (mean age, 47 years) of GBS reported after vaccination in the United States between 1990 and 2005. The onset of GBS was within 6 weeks in 774 cases, >6 weeks in 101, and unknown in 125. Death and disability after the event occurred in 32 (3.2%) and 167 (16.7%) subjects, respectively. The highest number (n = 632) of GBS cases was observed in subjects receiving influenza vaccine followed by hepatitis B vaccine (n = 94). Other vaccines or combinations of vaccines were associated with 274 cases of GBS. The incidence of GBS after influenza vaccination was marginally higher in subjects or=65 years (P = 0.09); for hepatitis vaccine, the incidence was significantly higher (P Death was more frequent in subjects >or=65 years compared with those vaccines other than influenza vaccine can be associated with GBS. Vaccination-related GBS results in death or disability in one fifth of affected individuals, which is comparable to the reported rates in the general GBS population.

  14. Prevention and Drug Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Mark F.; Smith, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Evidence linking alcohol and other drug abuse with child maltreatment, particularly neglect, is strong. But does substance abuse cause maltreatment? According to Mark Testa and Brenda Smith, such co-occurring risk factors as parental depression, social isolation, homelessness, or domestic violence may be more directly responsible than substance…

  15. Retrospective clinical analysis of adverse drug reactions associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rentia van Graan

    This retrospective analysis can serve as a platform for future ADR studies within this district. Sustainable and continuous efforts should be made to train and create more awareness among healthcare workers in this district. Keywords: antiretroviral therapy, adverse drug reactions, drug safety, pharmacovigilance, gender ...

  16. Detection and Management of Adverse Drug Reactions Related to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to establish the detection, prevalence and management of various adverse drug reactions associated with antiretroviral drugs occurring in patients attending Comprehensive Care Centre (CCC) of Kiambu District Hospital. The study was a cross sectional survey where the patients included ...

  17. Glycaemic adverse drug reactions from anti-neoplastics used in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    235625 records ... Glycaemic adverse drug reactions from anti-neoplastics used in treating pancreatic cancer. ... Based on the emphasized nine antineoplastic drugs with high hyperglycemic ADR incidence, we found: fluorouracil, sorafenib and pemetrexed with high ADR record of metabolism and nutrition disorders; ...

  18. iADRs: towards online adverse drug reaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Yang; Li, He-Yi; Du, Jhih-Wei; Feng, Wen-Yu; Lo, Chiao-Feng; Soo, Von-Wun

    2012-12-01

    Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) is one of the most important issues in the assessment of drug safety. In fact, many adverse drug reactions are not discovered during limited pre-marketing clinical trials; instead, they are only observed after long term post-marketing surveillance of drug usage. In light of this, the detection of adverse drug reactions, as early as possible, is an important topic of research for the pharmaceutical industry. Recently, large numbers of adverse events and the development of data mining technology have motivated the development of statistical and data mining methods for the detection of ADRs. These stand-alone methods, with no integration into knowledge discovery systems, are tedious and inconvenient for users and the processes for exploration are time-consuming. This paper proposes an interactive system platform for the detection of ADRs. By integrating an ADR data warehouse and innovative data mining techniques, the proposed system not only supports OLAP style multidimensional analysis of ADRs, but also allows the interactive discovery of associations between drugs and symptoms, called a drug-ADR association rule, which can be further developed using other factors of interest to the user, such as demographic information. The experiments indicate that interesting and valuable drug-ADR association rules can be efficiently mined.

  19. Adverse drug reactions associated with antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini-Oliveira, Marilia; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2014-12-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) drug use during pregnancy significantly reduces mother-to-child HIV transmission, delays disease progression in the women and reduces the risk of HIV transmission to HIV-serodiscordant partners. Pregnant women are susceptible to the same adverse reactions to ARVs as nonpregnant adults as well as to specific pregnancy-related reactions. In addition, we should consider adverse pregnancy outcomes and adverse reactions in children exposed to ARVs during intrauterine life. However, studies designed to assess the safety of ARV in pregnant women are rare, usually with few participants and short follow-up periods. In this review, we discuss studies reporting adverse reactions to ARV drugs, including maternal toxicity, adverse pregnancy outcomes and the consequences of exposure to ARV in infants. We included results of observational studies, both prospective and retrospective, as well as randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses. The benefits of ARV use during pregnancy outweigh the risks of adverse reactions identified to date. More studies are needed to assess the adverse effects in the medium- and long term in children exposed to ARVs during pregnancy, as well as pregnant women using lifelong antiretroviral therapy and more recently available drugs.

  20. Adverse Drug Events and Medication Errors in African Hospitals: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Alemayehu B; Alhawassi, Tariq M; McLachlan, Andrew J; Brien, Jo-Anne E

    2018-03-01

    Medication errors and adverse drug events are universal problems contributing to patient harm but the magnitude of these problems in Africa remains unclear. The objective of this study was to systematically investigate the literature on the extent of medication errors and adverse drug events, and the factors contributing to medication errors in African hospitals. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and Global Health databases from inception to 31 August, 2017 and hand searched the reference lists of included studies. Original research studies of any design published in English that investigated adverse drug events and/or medication errors in any patient population in the hospital setting in Africa were included. Descriptive statistics including median and interquartile range were presented. Fifty-one studies were included; of these, 33 focused on medication errors, 15 on adverse drug events, and three studies focused on medication errors and adverse drug events. These studies were conducted in nine (of the 54) African countries. In any patient population, the median (interquartile range) percentage of patients reported to have experienced any suspected adverse drug event at hospital admission was 8.4% (4.5-20.1%), while adverse drug events causing admission were reported in 2.8% (0.7-6.4%) of patients but it was reported that a median of 43.5% (20.0-47.0%) of the adverse drug events were deemed preventable. Similarly, the median mortality rate attributed to adverse drug events was reported to be 0.1% (interquartile range 0.0-0.3%). The most commonly reported types of medication errors were prescribing errors, occurring in a median of 57.4% (interquartile range 22.8-72.8%) of all prescriptions and a median of 15.5% (interquartile range 7.5-50.6%) of the prescriptions evaluated had dosing problems. Major contributing factors for medication errors reported in these studies were individual practitioner factors (e.g. fatigue and inadequate knowledge

  1. Pattern of Adverse Drug Reactions to Anticancer Drugs: A Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shruti; Dhasmana, D C; Bisht, Manisha; Singh, Prashant Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Anticancer drugs contribute significantly to the global burden of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Any attempt to quantify their magnitude and provide upgraded knowledge would help oncologists in writing safer prescriptions. This observational follow-up study was conducted on newly diagnosed cancer patients receiving anticancer therapy with an aim to determine the frequency, severity, causality, predictability, and preventability of ADRs. The patients were followed up for 6 months for the appearance of adverse events. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 22.0. (Armonk, NY) and presented in the form of descriptive statistics. Each patient was prescribed approximately 6.85 ± 1.51 (mean ± standard error) drugs on average. All the patients (100%) receiving anticancer chemotherapy had ADRs. Alopecia, nausea and vomiting, burning tingling, and numbness were the most frequently encountered ADRs. The incidence of alopecia ( P reactions were of Grade 2 (69.53%). Most of the reactions (75.80%) appeared within 10 days of receiving the first cycle. 99.58% reactions were not serious. According to the WHO - The Uppsala Monitoring Centre criteria, 99.47% ADRs fell in possible category. According to the Naranjo's algorithm, 100% ADRs fell in probable category. About 94.80% reactions were found to be predictable. About 56.47% reactions were probably preventable, and 43.53% reactions were not preventable. Multiple ADRs were seen in newly diagnosed cancer patients. Most of them were predictable, of mild-to-moderate severity, nonserious, and preventable. A majority of the ADRs recovered over time.

  2. Morphological Pattern of Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions due to Antiepileptic Drugs in Eastern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Punit Kumar; Kumar, Dharmendra; Kumar, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cutaneous manifestations of adverse drug reactions are a common occurrence and need to be differentiated from other causes of similar manifestations. Antiepileptic drugs (AED) usually are responsible for severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) like Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) and drug rash with eosinophillia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). There is paucity of published research regarding morphological pattern of CADR due to various antiepileptic drugs AED. Objective: To study the morphological patterns of CADR due to AED and common anticonvulsant drugs implicated particularly in severe CADR such as SJS/TEN and DRESS in a tertiary care teaching hospital in eastern India. Materials and Methods: A prospective, observational study was conducted over a period of 4 years from August 2009 to July 2013 after the approval of the Institutional Ethics Committee using self-reporting method for selection of cases. Settings: All patients with CADR after AED consumption for various conditions presenting to the Dermatology outpatient department (OPD) and Pediatric OPD and Indoor patients of a tertiary care teaching hospital located in Rohtas district of Bihar were included in this study. Results: During the study period, 64 cases of severe CADRs were included in this study. Out of 64 patients, 28 were male and 36 were female with mean age 36.1 years (range 6 years to 72 years). Most common AED implicated for CADR was Phenytoin. Maculopapular rash was the most common cutaneous manifestation of ADRs (42.85%). Serious CADR like TEN and SSJS were more likely in patients prescribed Phenytoin and Carbemazepine simultaneously. Conclusion: CADRs are a common occurrence and awareness about the same is essential for diagnosis and prevention. This study identified combined use of phenytoin and carbamezepine as a most important risk factor for serious CADR like SJS and TEN. PMID:25738068

  3. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN CARBAMAZEPINE INDUCED SEVERE CUTANEOUS ADVERSE DRUG REACTION AND HLA POLIMORPHISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safrina Dewi Ratnaningrum

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbamazepine as an antiepileptic drug that is used widely and was known can cause severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions like SJS-TEN. These adverse drug reactions is known to be associated with some specific HLA polymorphism in European populations (HLA-A*31: 01, China (HLA-A*31: 01; HLA-B*15:02, Japan (HLA-A*31 : 01; HLA-B*15: 11, Korea HLA-A*31: 01; HLA-B*15: 02; HLA-B*15: 11, India (HLA-B*15:02, Thailand (HLA-B*15: 02, and Malaysia (HLA-B*15: 02. Information related to certain HLA polymorphism is important to prevent adverse drug reaction but there is no sufficient data on the population of Indonesia.

  4. Pharmaco-epidemiology as a Tool in Pharmacovigilance: Studying cancer as adverse drug reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.R. Ruiter (Tanneke Rikje)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPharmacovigilance is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as the science and activities relating to the detection, assessment, understanding and prevention of adverse effects or any other possible drug-related problem. There has been concern about the safety of medicines

  5. Adverse drug reactions in the paediatric population in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Weber, Camilla Blicher; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The potential risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the paediatric population has become a public health concern and regulatory agencies in Europe and the US have acknowledged that there is a need for more research in this area. Spontaneous reporting systems can provide important new...

  6. Consumer adverse drug reaction reporting - A new step in pharmacovigilance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grootheest, K; de Graaf, L; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    2003-01-01

    The direct reporting of adverse drug reactions by patients is becoming an increasingly important topic for discussion in the world of pharmacovigilance. At this time, few countries accept consumer reports. We present an overview of experiences with consumer reporting in various countries of the

  7. adverse drug reactions among hiv infected and uninfected adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 88 No. 10 October 2011. ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS AMONG HIV INFECTED AND UNINFECTED ADULTS RECEIVING ANTI-. TUBERCULOUS THERAPY AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL. J. O. Masese, M. Pharm (Clin. Pharm), Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmacy ...

  8. Occurrence of adverse drug reactions associated with highly active ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Life-saving highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) has been accompanied by the challenge of incident adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Locally generated data is scanty, inadequately documented, and therefore not available to inform revision of clinical protocols. Objective: To study and document the ...

  9. Adverse drug reactions associated with asthma medications in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2014-01-01

    on the occurrence and characteristics of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in children, reported for asthma medications licensed for paediatric use. Methods We systematically reviewed the literature following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement guidelines. PubMed, Embase...

  10. Evaluation of Adverse Drug Reactions to Artemisinin-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The study was carried out to evaluate the incidence of adverse reactions to antimalarial drugs among residents of a Nigeria university community with a focus on artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). Specifically, the profile of use, and the reporting culture of people with respect to experienced reactions ...

  11. Adverse drug reactions associated with antiretroviral therapy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa has one of the highest prevalences of HIV and AIDS in the world. HIV/AIDS patients face countless challenges, one of which is the risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). This study aimed to describe the ADRs reported in South Africa with reference to the type of ADRs, antiretrovirals (ARVs) implicated, ...

  12. Evaluating adverse drug reactions among HAART patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The high prevalence of HIV in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa, has greatly increased the demand for antiretroviral therapy (ART), resulting in an exponential increase in the number of patients initiated on highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). However, little information about adverse drug reactions in these ...

  13. Adverse drug reactions in patients admitted on Internal Medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The burden of both community and hospital acquired adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are some of the important issues in pharmacotherapy. At the time of this study there was very scanty literature in this area from Africa. Objective: This study was done to determine the frequency and characteristics of ADRs in ...

  14. Glycaemic Adverse Drug Reactions from Anti-Neoplastics Used in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-01

    Jun 1, 2017 ... in cancer treatment. The aim was to analyze the blood glucose‑related ADR of antineoplastics in treating pancreatic cancer. Materials and Methods: .... Figure 2: Record numbers on general adverse drug reactions (metabolism and nutrition disorder ratio = metabolism and nutrition disorder/total number.

  15. Orofacial manifestations of adverse drug reactions: a review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiari, Sedigheh; Sehatpour, Marziye; Mortazavi, Hamed; Bakhshi, Mahin

    2018-01-01

    Adverse reaction to medication is common and may have a variety of clinical manifestations in the oral cavity. The present review paper aimed to describe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) which might be encountered by dental practitioners in every discipline. In this narrative review article, the specialized databases such as PubMed, PubMed Central, MEDLINE, EBSCO, Science Direct, Scopus, and reference books from the years 2000-2016 were used to find relevant documents by using MeSH terms: Adverse Drug Reaction, Drug induced, Medication Related, Mouth, Oral Manifestation, Tooth, Hard Tissue, Soft Tissue. The data were categorized in 4 groups as follows: saliva and salivary glands involvement, soft tissue (mucosal) involvement, hard tissue involvement, and non specific conditions (taste disorders, halitosis, neuropathies, movement disturbances, and infection). Most articles were about the adverse effect of drugs on the function of salivary glands, which often cause a decrease in saliva secretion. Other reactions were less common; meanwhile, the side effect of bisphosphonate was increasing in the alveolar bone, because of its unlimited prescription. Oral health care providers should be familiar with such events, as they will be confronted with them in their practice.

  16. Adverse drug reaction reporting among health care workers at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) are an important contributor to patient morbidity and hospitalisation in Uganda. Under-reporting of ADRs may increase medicine-induced morbidity and mortality among patients. This study determined the extent of ADR reporting, and associated factors, among healthcare ...

  17. The concept of adverse drug reaction reporting: awareness among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is poorly reported globally but more in developing countries with poor participation by health professionals. Currently, there is no known literature on the Nigerian pharmacy students' knowledge on ADR reporting. Hence the purpose of this study was to find out the level of knowledge of ...

  18. Contribution of pharmacists to the reporting of adverse drug reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grootheest, AC; van Puijenbroek, EP; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    2002-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study is to get a better view about the possible contribution of pharmacists' reports to the quantity and the quality of reports and in this way to the quality of a voluntary reporting system of adverse drug reactions. Methods A total of 15 293 reports, sent to the Netherlands

  19. An unrecognised Adverse Drug Reaction of Enalapril Led to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    An Unrecognised Adverse Drug Reaction of Enalapril. Led to Suspicion of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Infection. 1. 2. 2. 2. 1. Kosamu T., Mwanza K., Mbayo E., Gondwe K. and Besa C. 1School of Medicine, The Copperbelt University, Ndola Campus, Ndola, Zambia. 2 Kitwe Central Hospital, Ministry of Health, Kitwe, Zambia.

  20. Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring in Ethiopia: Analysis of case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjørn

    Methods: The study analyzed the number of adverse drug reaction case reports received by DACA in a period of six years (2002 – 2007GC). ... Conclusions: The level of ADR case reporting is very low showing the need to address major constraints of ongoing ... admissions; and it saves substantial amount of financial.

  1. HLA Association with Drug-Induced Adverse Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Lang Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse drug reactions (ADRs remain a common and major problem in healthcare. Severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCARs, such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN with mortality rate ranges from 10% to more than 30%, can be life threatening. A number of recent studies demonstrated that ADRs possess strong genetic predisposition. ADRs induced by several drugs have been shown to have significant associations with specific alleles of human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes. For example, hypersensitivity to abacavir, a drug used for treating of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, has been proposed to be associated with allele 57:01 of HLA-B gene (terms HLA-B∗57:01. The incidences of abacavir hypersensitivity are much higher in Caucasians compared to other populations due to various allele frequencies in different ethnic populations. The antithyroid drug- (ATDs- induced agranulocytosis are strongly associated with two alleles: HLA-B∗38:02 and HLA-DRB1∗08:03. In addition, HLA-B∗15:02 allele was reported to be related to carbamazepine-induced SJS/TEN, and HLA-B∗57:01 in abacavir hypersensitivity and flucloxacillin induced drug-induced liver injury (DILI. In this review, we summarized the alleles of HLA genes which have been proposed to have association with ADRs caused by different drugs.

  2. Effectiveness of adverse effects search filters: drugs versus medical devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Farrah, MLIS, AHIP

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study tested the performance of adverse effects search filters when searching for safety information on medical devices, procedures, and diagnostic tests in MEDLINE and Embase. Methods: The sensitivity of 3 filters was determined using a sample of 631 references from 131 rapid reviews related to the safety of health technologies. The references were divided into 2 sets by type of intervention: drugs and nondrug health technologies. Keyword and indexing analysis were performed on references from the nondrug testing set that 1 or more of the filters did not retrieve. Results: For all 3 filters, sensitivity was lower for nondrug health technologies (ranging from 53%– 87% than for drugs (88%–93% in both databases. When tested on the nondrug health technologies set, sensitivity was lower in Embase (ranging from 53%–81% than in MEDLINE (67%–87% for all filters. Of the nondrug records that 1 or more of the filters missed, 39% of the missed MEDLINE records and 18% of the missed Embase records did not contain any indexing terms related to adverse events. Analyzing the titles and abstracts of nondrug records that were missed by any 1 filter, the most commonly used keywords related to adverse effects were: risk, complications, mortality, contamination, hemorrhage, and failure. Conclusions: In this study, adverse effects filters were less effective at finding information about the safety of medical devices, procedures, and tests compared to information about the safety of drugs.

  3. Role of peripheral eosinophilia in adverse cutaneous drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, F; Cogorno, L; Agnoletti, A F; Parodi, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to verify whether peripheral eosinophilia (PE) may be a marker of severity for adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR). We investigated for PE in sixty-three patients diagnosed as adverse cutaneous drug reactions. All the patients underwent blood tests at baseline visit. Only patients that showed a very likely connection between ACDR and the suspected causative drug were induced in the study. We found that 11 out of 63 patients (17%) presented PE for values ≥ 0.6 x 10(9) cells/l or for a percentage of total leukocytes ≥ 6%. These 11 patients compared to patients without eosinophilia had a longer recovery time, they showed diffuse severe cutaneous reactions and they all needed a systemic therapy compared to the 41% of patients without eosinophilia. These outcomes prompt us to believe that peripheral eosinophilia may be an index of severity for adverse cutaneous drug reactions. Therefore, we suggest physicians to always detect the presence of peripheral eosinophilia in order to not underestimate the reaction and to promptly start an appropriate therapy.

  4. Parkinsonism caused by adverse drug reactions: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agaba Emmanuel I

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Parkinsonism puts a high direct cost burden on both patient and caregiver. Several reports of drug-induced parkinsonism have been published, but to the best of our knowledge, there has not been any report of quinine or halothane inducing parkinsonism. Case presentation We describe two cases of parkinsonism possibly caused by adverse drug reaction to quinine in a 29-year-old black Nigerian woman and to halothane in a 36-year-old black Hausa (Nigerian man who received it as general anaesthesia for appendicectomy in our teaching hospital. Conclusion These are two unusual cases of parkinsonism caused by adverse drug reactions to high-dose quinine and to halothane as general anaesthesia. We consider that these two cases are important in bringing this potential side-effect to the attention of both pharmacologists and primary care physicians as these are two of the most commonly used medications in our clinics. We conclude that parkinsonism should be included among the adverse drug reactions to high-dose quinine and halothane general anaesthetic.

  5. HLA-associated drug hypersensitivity and the prediction of adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, Simone; Becquemont, Laurent

    2017-10-01

    Adverse drug reactions are an important cause of morbidity and mortality and constitute the leading reason of drug withdrawal from the market. Besides classical reactions that are related to pharmacologic activity of the drug, some reactions are unpredictable, not dose dependent, and seem to occur in genetically predisposed individuals. The majority of this reaction is immunologically driven and they are referred to as hypersensitivity reactions. A growing number of studies provided evidences that specific HLA alleles increase the risk of developing hypersensitivity drug reactions. In this context, drug hypersensitivities that have more robust pharmacogenetic data include abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome and severe cutaneous adverse reactions induced by allopurinol and carbamazepine.

  6. Patients’ attention to and understanding of adverse drug reaction warnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tresa Muir McNeal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Tresa Muir McNeal1, Colleen Y Colbert1, Christian Cable1, Curtis R Mirkes1, June G Lubowinski2, John D Myers11Department of Medicine, Texas A&M University System HSC College of Medicine, Scott & White Healthcare, Temple, TX, USA; 2RD Haynes Medical Library, Scott & White Healthcare, Temple, TX, USAIntroduction: Medications are critical to the management of patient conditions, and they can have significant effects on the success or failure of medical interventions. Patient perceptions of drug warnings play an important role in medication compliance and ultimately disease management. Several factors may affect patients’ understanding of drug warnings and drug labeling, including health literacy and interactions with physicians and pharmacists.Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the literature related to patient perceptions of drug warnings and drug labeling. Descriptive articles and studies regarding patient perceptions and knowledge of adverse drug reaction warnings were reviewed.Methods: The following databases were utilized to search the literature related to patient perceptions of drug warnings: PubMed, Academic Search Premiere, CINAHL, Medline, Psych Info, Business Source Complete, Alternative Healthwatch, Health Source (both Nursing/Academic and Consumer additions, JSTOR, and Master File Premiere. For the purpose of this review, any peer-reviewed article was eligible. Exclusionary criteria included: articles published in languages other than English, articles/studies on patient perceptions of vaccines and chemotherapy, and articles related to perceptions of medications administered in the inpatient setting. Forty-six articles were included in the review.Results: Health literacy has been shown to have a major impact on patients’ ability to understand potential adverse reactions and instructions on correct dosing of medications. Direct communication with physicians and pharmacists is one of the most important and

  7. Ethnic differences in adverse drug reactions to asthma medications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yusun; Cantarero-Arévalo, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information on ethnic diversity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to asthma medications is rare despite evidence suggesting higher risk for African Americans when using β2-adrenergic receptor agonists. The objectives are to investigate how ethnic background was involved in ADR assessment...... studies disaggregated information by ethnic background, and reports of ADRs to asthma medications in different ethnic groups were rare. We suggest that the inclusion of ADR analysis by different ethnic backgrounds is desirable....

  8. Adverse drug reaction, patent blue V dye and anaesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathy, Swagata; Nair, Priya V

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Patent blue vital (PBV) dye is used for varied perioperative indications, and has a potential for causing life-threatening allergic reactions. In this retrospective case series study, at a tertiary level neurosciences centre, we analysed the nature, management and outcome of adverse drug reaction to the preoperative use of PBV for marking vertebral level prior to back surgeries. Methods: Patients were identified from the theatre and radiology database. Data were collected ...

  9. Sharing adverse drug event data using business intelligence technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Monica M; Cozart, Heidi; Ahmad, Asif; Langman, Matthew K; Ferranti, Jeffrey

    2009-03-01

    Duke University Health System uses computerized adverse drug event surveillance as an integral part of medication safety at 2 community hospitals and an academic medical center. This information must be swiftly communicated to organizational patient safety stakeholders to find opportunities to improve patient care; however, this process is encumbered by highly manual methods of preparing the data. Following the examples of other industries, we deployed a business intelligence tool to provide dynamic safety reports on adverse drug events. Once data were migrated into the health system data warehouse, we developed census-adjusted reports with user-driven prompts. Drill down functionality enables navigation from aggregate trends to event details by clicking report graphics. Reports can be accessed by patient safety leadership either through an existing safety reporting portal or the health system performance improvement Web site. Elaborate prompt screens allow many varieties of reports to be created quickly by patient safety personnel without consultation with the research analyst. The reduction in research analyst workload because of business intelligence implementation made this individual available to additional patient safety projects thereby leveraging their talents more effectively. Dedicated liaisons are essential to ensure clear communication between clinical and technical staff throughout the development life cycle. Design and development of the business intelligence model for adverse drug event data must reflect the eccentricities of the operational system, especially as new areas of emphasis evolve. Future usability studies examining the data presentation and access model are needed.

  10. Adverse drug events leading to emergency department visits at an eye hospital: A brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Safa; Mohebbi, Niayesh; Gholami, Kheirollah; Jabbarvand, Mahmoud

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate adverse drug events (ADEs) resulting in emergency department visits in an eye hospital. Emergency department visits at Farabi Eye Hospital were assessed for a 7-day period. The patients' eye disorders and drug history were evaluated to detect ADEs. Of 1631 emergency visits, 5 (0.3%, 95% CI: 0.13-0.71%) were drug related. Tetracaine eye drops accounted for 4 (80%, 95% CI: 38-96%) cases with corneal involvement. The other case was an intense conjunctival injection due to naphazoline eye drops. ADEs should be considered in differential diagnosis of ocular emergency problems and preventive measure should be considered.

  11. Patient knowledge on reporting adverse drug reactions in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniszewska, Anna; Dąbrowska-Bender, Marta; Olejniczak, Dominik; Duda-Zalewska, Aneta; Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess patient knowledge on reporting of adverse drug reactions. A prospective study was conducted among 200 patients. The study was based on an original survey composed of 15 single- and multiple-choice questions. The study involved individuals who have experienced adverse reactions as well as individuals who have never experienced any adverse reactions; people over the age of 18; literate; residing in Mazowieckie Voivodeship, who have not been diagnosed with any disease that could compromise their logical thinking skills. The respondents who lived in the city had a greater knowledge compared to the respondents who lived in the countryside (Pearson's χ 2 =47.70, P =0.0013). The respondents who lived in the city were also more statistically likely to provide a correct answer to the question about the type of adverse reactions to be reported (Pearson's χ 2 =50.66, P =0.012). Statistically significant associations were found between the place of residence of the respondents and the correct answer to the question about the data that must be included in the report on adverse reactions (Pearson's χ 2 =11.7, P <0.0001).

  12. Patient stratification and identification of adverse event correlations in the space of 1190 drug related adverse events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roitmann, Eva; Eriksson, Robert; Brunak, Søren

    2014-01-01

    New pharmacovigilance methods are needed as a consequence of the morbidity caused by drugs. We exploit fine-grained drug related adverse event information extracted by text mining from electronic medical records (EMRs) to stratify patients based on their adverse events and to determine adverse...... event co-occurrences. We analyzed the similarity of adverse event profiles of 2347 patients extracted from EMRs from a mental health center in Denmark. The patients were clustered based on their adverse event profiles and the similarities were presented as a network. The set of adverse events in each...... main patient cluster was evaluated. Co-occurrences of adverse events in patients (p-value patients typically had a most distinguishing adverse event. Examination of the co-occurrences of adverse events in patients led...

  13. Nurses' spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions: expert review of routine reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Diogo; Alves, Carlos; Batel Marques, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    The aims of this study were to analyse spontaneously reported adverse drug reactions according to their previous description, seriousness, causality and the reporting professional. Previous findings showed that fewer nurses than physicians and pharmacists report adverse drug reactions. This is not attributed to any lack of ability in identifying adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions received by the Central Portugal Regional Pharmacovigilance Unit, between 2001 and 2011, were studied. Certain and probable adverse drug reactions were included to test differences between professional groups for serious and non-serious adverse drug reactions. The Central Portugal Regional Pharmacovigilance Unit received 1014 adverse drug reactions. Fifty-four nurses reported 66 adverse drug reactions, whereas 232 physicians and 145 pharmacists reported 589 and 357 adverse drug reactions, respectively. Considering the number of practising professionals, it was estimated that 0.55% of nurses, 3.96% of physicians and 7.08% of pharmacists have reported an adverse drug reaction. Of the 633 adverse drug reactions assessed as certain or probable, 46 (21 serious), 387 (192 serious) and 198 (77 serious) were reported from nurses, physicians and pharmacists, respectively. There were no differences in the reporting of serious adverse drug reactions among nurses, physicians and pharmacists. Nurses are able to identify serious adverse drug reactions although they report less than other professionals. Nurses need to increase their involvement in spontaneous reporting schemes by taking responsibility for routinely reporting suspected adverse drug reactions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. An adverse drug event manager facilitates spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Siri; Klarskov, Pia; Borgeskov, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    %). The drugs most frequently reported were lisdexamphetamine (n = 40), rivaroxaban (n = 16) and warfarin (n = 15) (vaccines excluded). In 13 out of 484 reports, the ADR was associated with a fatal outcome. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study indicate that an ADEM promotes and facilitates spontaneous ADR...... reporting and helps raise awareness about ADRs, including how and why they should be reported. Hopefully, this will assist national and European spontaneous reporting systems in their work to increase patient safety nationally and abroad. FUNDING: none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant. ....

  15. Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Family Checkup: Positive Parenting Prevents Drug Abuse Could your kids be at risk for substance ... drugs. Research supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has shown the important role that parents ...

  16. Herbal medication: potential for adverse interactions with analgesic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, W

    2002-12-01

    The use of herbal supplements in the US has increased dramatically in recent years. These products are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) with the same scrutiny as conventional drugs. Patients who use herbal supplements often do so in conjunction with conventional drugs. This article is a review of potential adverse interactions between some of the commonly used herbal supplements and analgesic drugs. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), particularly aspirin, have the potential to interact with herbal supplements that are known to possess antiplatelet activity (ginkgo, garlic, ginger, bilberry, dong quai, feverfew, ginseng, turmeric, meadowsweet and willow), with those containing coumarin (chamomile, motherworth, horse chestnut, fenugreek and red clover) and with tamarind, enhancing the risk of bleeding. Acetaminophen may also interact with ginkgo and possibly with at least some of the above herbs to increase the risk of bleeding. Further, the incidences of hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity may be augmented by acetaminophen when concomitantly used with the potentially hepatotoxic herbs Echinacea and kava, and with herbs containing salicylate (willow, meadowsweet), respectively. The concomitant use of opioid analgesics with the sedative herbal supplements, valerian, kava and chamomile, may lead to increased central nervous system (CNS) depression. The analgesic effect of opioids may also be inhibited by ginseng. It is suggested that health-care professionals should be more aware of the potential adverse interactions between herbal supplements and analgesic drugs, and take appropriate precautionary measures to avoid their possible occurrences. However, as most of the interaction information available is based on individual case reports, animal studies and in vitro data, further research is needed to confirm and assess the clinical significance of these potential interactions.

  17. Pharmacogenomics and adverse drug reactions in diagnostic and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolopoulos, Vangelis G

    2007-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics deal with genetically determined variations in how individuals respond to drugs. They hold the potential to revolutionize drug therapy. The clinical need for novel approaches to improve pharmacotherapy stems from the high rate of adverse reactions to drugs and their lack of effectiveness in many individuals. Despite the accumulation of research findings showing the potential for clinical benefit for several drug-metabolizing enzymes and some receptors that constitute drug targets, the translation of these findings into tangible clinical applications occurs very slowly. The main steps for clinical implementation of pharmacogenomics include: a) education of clinicians and all other parties involved in the use and benefits of pharmacogenomics; b) execution of large prospective clinical and pharmacoeconomic studies showing the benefit of pharmacogenomic genotyping; c) provision of incentives to develop tests; d) development of specific clinical guidelines; and e) creation of a solid regulatory and ethical framework. Furthermore, the potential should be explored to use existing therapeutic drug monitoring laboratories to introduce pharmacogenomic testing into hospitals. Overall, our thesis is that pharmacogenomics is already a reality in clinical practice and is bound to continue gaining acceptance by clinicians in the coming years.

  18. Retrospective evaluation of adverse drug reactions induced by antihypertensive treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rende, Pierandrea; Paletta, Laura; Gallelli, Giuseppe; Raffaele, Gianluca; Natale, Vincenzo; Brissa, Nazareno; Costa, Cinzia; Gratteri, Santo; Giofrè, Chiara; Gallelli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The use of cardiovascular drugs is related to the development of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in about 24% of the patients in the Cardiovascular Care Unit. Here, we evaluated the ADRs in patients treated with antihypertensive drugs. The study was conducted in two phases: In the first phase, we performed a retrospective study on clinical records of Clinical Divisions (i.e., Internal Medicine Operative Unit and Geriatric Operative Unit) from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Moreover from January 1, 2013 to March 30, 2013 we performed a prospective study on the outpatients attending the Emergency Department (ED) of the Pugliese-Ciaccio Hospital of Catanzaro, by conducting patient interviews after their informed consent was obtained. The association between a drug and ADR was evaluated using the Naranjo scale. We recorded 72 ADRs in the Clinical Divisions and six in the ED, and these were more frequent in women. Using the Naranjo score, we showed a probable association in 92% of these reactions and a possible association in 8%. The most vulnerable age group involved in ADRs was that of the elderly patients. In conclusion, our results indicate that antihypertensive drugs may be able to induce the development of ADRs, particularly in elderly women receiving multiple drug treatment. Therefore, it is important to motivate the healthcare providers to understand their role and responsibility in the detection, management, documentation, and reporting of ADRs, as also all the essential activities for optimizing patient safety. PMID:24347982

  19. Analysis of Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions at a Tertiary Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Tertiary Care Hospital – a Prospective Study. SP Shah*, MK Desai and ... drug reactions manifest as skin rashes and/or eruptions. The incidence ..... Safety Monitoring on. Medicinal Products. Geneva (Switzerland):. Office of Publications, World Health. Organization; 2002. 6. Hartwig SC, Siegel J, Schneider PJ. Preventability.

  20. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Soares Rodrigues

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI and adverse drug reactions (ADR in older adults polymedicated. Methods: an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. Results: forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years were analyzed: 24 (51.1% concerning ADR, 14 (29.8% DDI, and 9 studies (19.1% investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. Conclusions: DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps.

  1. Pattern of Adverse Drug Reactions Reported with Cardiovascular Drugs in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Muthiah; Selvarajan, Sandhiya; George, Melvin; Subramaniyan, Ganesan; Dkhar, Steven Aibor; Pillai, Ajith Ananthakrishna; Jayaraman, Balachander; Chandrasekaran, Adithan

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are one of the leading causes of non-communicable disease related deaths globally. Patients with cardiovascular diseases are often prescribed multiple drugs and have higher risk for developing more adverse drug reactions due to polypharmacy. To evaluate the pattern of adverse drug reactions reported with cardiovascular drugs in an adverse drug reaction monitoring centre (AMC) of a tertiary care hospital. Adverse drug reactions related to cardiovascular drugs reported to an AMC of a tertiary care hospital were included in this prospective observational study. All cardiovascular drugs related adverse drug reactions (ADRs) received in AMC through spontaneous reporting system and active surveillance method from January 2011 to March 2013 were analysed for demographic profile, ADR pattern, severity and causality assessment. The study used descriptive statistics and the values were expressed in numbers and percentages. During the study period, a total of 463 ADRs were reported from 397 patients which included 319 males (80.4%) and 78 females (19.6%). The cardiovascular drug related reports constituted 18.1% of the total 2188 ADR reports. In this study, the most common ADRs observed were cough (17.3%), gastritis (7.5%) and fatigue (6.5%). Assessment of ADRs using WHO-causality scale revealed that 62% of ADRs were possible, 28.2% certain and 6.8% probable. As per Naranjo's scale most of the reports were possible (68.8%) followed by probable (29.7%). According to Hartwig severity scale majority of the reports were mild (95%) followed by moderate (4.5%). A system wise classification of ADRs showed that gastrointestinal system (20.7%) related reactions were the most frequently observed adverse reactions followed by respiratory system (18.4%) related adverse effects. From the reported ADRs, the drugs most commonly associated with ADRs were found to be enalapril (17.5%), atorvastatin (14.9%), aspirin (8.4%) and metoprolol (8.4%). The cardiovascular

  2. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions in Indian population: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tejas K; Thakkar, Sejal H; Sharma, DC

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological data is limited for cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADRs) in India. Most of the Indian studies have small sample size and are of limited duration. Aims: The aim of this study is to analyze CADRs with reference to the causative drugs and their clinical characteristics in Indian population. Materials and Methods: As per selection criteria, electronic databases were searched for publications describing CADRs from January-1995 to April-2013 by two independent investigators. Data of the causative drugs and clinical characteristics were extracted and summarized by absolute numbers, percentages, ranges, and means as presented by the authors. The subgroup analysis of causative drugs was performed for causality assessment, severe or nonsevere reactions and occurrence of common CADRs. Studies showing “definite” and “probable” categories of causality analysis were labeled as “definite and probable causality (DPC) studies”. The other included studies were labeled as “non-DPC studies”. Results: Of 8337 retrieved references, 18 prospective studies were selected for analysis. The pooled incidence was 9.22/1000 total among outpatient and inpatient cases. Commonly observed reactions were maculopapular rash (32.39%), fixed drug eruptions (FDEs) (20.13%), urticaria (17.49%) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) (6.84%). The major causative drug groups were antimicrobials (45.46%), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (20.87%) and anti-epileptic drugs (14.57%). Commonly implicated drugs were sulfa (13.32%), β-lactams (8.96%) and carbamazepine (6.65%). High frequency of CADRs is observed with anti-epileptic drugs in DPC studies only. Carbamazepine, phenytoin and fluoroquinolones had higher severe to nonsevere cutaneous reaction ratio than other drugs. Antimicrobials were the main causative drugs for maculopapular rash, FDEs and SJS/TEN, and NSAIDs for the urticaria. The mortality for overall CADRs, SJS

  3. Adverse drug reaction labelling for atomoxetine, methylphenidate and modafinil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2013-01-01

    Medical product information contains information about efficacy and safety for marketed pharmaceuticals. Three studies have compared safety labelling for different therapeutic categories in different countries and detected large variations in a number of reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs...... not mentioned in PIs issued in the United States. In conclusion, information about possible ADRs associated with the use of a specific product should be made available worldwide, as the prescriber information about medicines' safety profile should not depend on the country in which the medication is licensed....

  4. [Pilot study evaluating the ratio of adverse drug reactions related to antimicrobials over their consumption in 2012-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérard, C; Cerruti, L; Cotteret, C; Lebel, D; Bussières, J-F

    2016-03-01

    As part of our antimicrobials stewardship program, we were interested in the use of antimicrobials and prevalence of adverse drug reactions associated with the use of these drugs. The retrospective and descriptive study was conducted over a one year-period between April 1st 2012 and March 31st 2013 in a mother-child Hospital. We determined the ratio: number of adverse drug reactions over 10,000 defined daily dose or 10,000days of therapy. We identified the ratios higher than average for which the confidence interval did not cross the calculated average. The severity of the adverse drug reactions was codified using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. We found 570 adverse drug reactions including 100 (17.5%) adverse drug reactions related to antimicrobials during the financial year 2012-2013. It represented 96 patients. Thus, five antimicrobials, for which the confidence interval does not cross the calculated average value, may be targeted in risk management because they have a higher ratio than average: piperacillin (290 [113-722]), valganciclovir (244 [43-1260]), ceftriaxone (114 [56-234]), acyclovir (76 [26-220]) and liposomal amphotericin B (72 [20-258]). In a mother-child university hospital, we calculated a ratios of 19 [15-23] and 13 [10-15], it allows us targeting some antimicrobials in our approach to prevention and management of adverse drug reactions. Copyright © 2015 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The Potential Return on Public Investment in Detecting Adverse Drug Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybrechts, Krista F; Desai, Rishi J; Park, Moa; Gagne, Joshua J; Najafzadeh, Mehdi; Avorn, Jerry

    2017-06-01

    Many countries lack fully functional pharmacovigilance programs, and public budgets allocated to pharmacovigilance in industrialized countries remain low due to resource constraints and competing priorities. Using 3 case examples, we sought to estimate the public health and economic benefits resulting from public investment in active pharmacovigilance programs to detect adverse drug effects. We assessed 3 examples in which early signals of safety hazards were not adequately recognized, resulting in continued exposure of a large number of patients to these drugs when safer and effective alternative treatments were available. The drug examples studied were rofecoxib, cerivastatin, and troglitazone. Using an individual patient simulation model and the health care system perspective, we estimated the potential costs that could have been averted by early systematic detection of safety hazards through the implementation of active surveillance programs. We found that earlier drug withdrawal made possible by active safety surveillance would most likely have resulted in savings in direct medical costs of $773-$884 million for rofecoxib, $3-$10 million for cerivastatin, and $38-$63 million for troglitazone in the United States through the prevention of adverse events. By contrast, the yearly public investment in Food and Drug Administration initiated population-based pharmacovigilance activities in the United States is about $42.5 million at present. These examples illustrate a critical and economically justifiable role for active adverse effect surveillance in protecting the health of the public.

  6. Drug Abuse Prevention Starts with Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Drug Abuse Prevention Starts with Parents Page Content Article ... Learn the facts about the harmful effects of drugs. Talk with your child about the negative effects ...

  7. An update on HLA alleles associated with adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke-Galindo, Ingrid; LLerena, Adrián; López-López, Marisol

    2017-05-24

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are considered as an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The hypersensitivity reactions are immune-mediated ADRs, which are dose-independent, unpredictable and have been associated with several HLA alleles. The present review aimed to describe HLA alleles that have been associated with different ADRs in populations worldwide, the recommendations of regulatory agencies and pharmacoeconomic information and databases for the study of HLA alleles in pharmacogenetics. A systematic search was performed in June 2016 of articles relevant to this issue in indexed journals and in scientific databases (PubMed and PharmGKB). The information of 95 association studies found was summarized. Several HLA alleles and haplotypes have been associated with ADRs induced mainly by carbamazepine, allopurinol, abacavir and nevirapine, among other drugs. Years with the highest numbers of publications were 2013 and 2014. The majority of the reports have been performed on Asians and Caucasians, and carbamazepine was the most studied ADR drug inducer. Two HLA alleles' databases are described, as well as the recommendations of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the European Medicine Agency and the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium. Pharmacoeconomic studies on this issue are also mentioned. The strongest associations remain for HLA-B*58:01, HLA-B*57:01, HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-A*31:01 but only in certain populations; therefore, studies on different ethnic groups would be useful. Due to the improvement of drug therapy and the economic benefit that HLA screening represents, investigations on HLA alleles associated with ADR should continue.

  8. Pharmacovigilance: pharmacists’ perspective on spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Muhammad Abdul; Neoh, Chin Fen; Zin, Rosdi M; Elrggal, Mahmoud E; Cheema, Ejaz

    2017-01-01

    Globally, adverse drug reactions (ADRs), one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, will continue to pose a threat to public health as long as drugs are being used to treat various ailments. Prompt ADR reporting is crucial in ensuring drug safety. The aim of this narrative review was to highlight the role of pharmacists in pharmacovigilance and to identify barriers and facilitators toward ADR reporting documented in the literature. The perspective of pharmacy students on pharmacovigilance and ADR reporting has also been discussed with an aim to highlight the need to improve content related to ADR reporting and pharmacovigilance in undergraduate pharmacy curriculum. Globally, although the role of pharmacists within national pharmacovigilance systems varies, it is very well recognized. In general, pharmacists acknowledge that ADR reporting is part of their professional responsibility and have a positive attitude toward reporting ADRs. However, current research evidence suggests that there are still critical knowledge gaps with regard to ADR reporting among pharmacists, especially in countries where the role of pharmacists within the health care system is limited. These knowledge gaps can be fulfilled through continuous professional development programs and reinforcing theoretical and practical knowledge in undergraduate pharmacy curriculums. Without adequately identifying and fulfilling training needs of pharmacists and other health care professionals, the efficiency of national pharmacovigilance systems is unlikely to improve which may compromise patient’s safety. PMID:29354555

  9. Immunohistopathological Findings of Severe Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Orime

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions should involve immunohistopathological examination, which gives insight into the pathomechanisms of these disorders. The characteristic histological findings of erythema multiforme (EM, Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS, and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN provide conclusive evidence demonstrating that SJS/TEN can be distinguished from EM. Established SJS/TEN shows full-thickness, extensive keratinocyte necrosis that develops into subepidermal bullae. Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS and exanthema in drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS each display a variety of histopathological findings, which may partly correlate with the clinical manifestations. Although the histopathology of DRESS is nonspecific, the association of two or more of the four patterns—eczematous changes, interface dermatitis, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis- (AGEP- like patterns, and EM-like patterns—might appear in a single biopsy specimen, suggesting the diagnosis and severe cutaneous manifestations of DRESS. Cutaneous dendritic cells may be involved in the clinical course. AGEP typically shows spongiform superficial epidermal pustules accompanied with edema of the papillary dermis and abundant mixed perivascular infiltrates. Mutations in IL36RN may have a definite effect on pathological similarities between AGEP and generalized pustular psoriasis.

  10. Male central hypogonadism secondary to exogenous androgens: a review of the drugs and protocols highlighted by the online community of users for prevention and/or mitigation of adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavolos, Stamatios; Reynolds, Michael; Panagiotopoulou, Nikoletta; McEleny, Kevin; Scally, Michael; Quinton, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Androgen- or anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism (ASIH) is no longer confined to professional athletes; its prevalence amongst young men and teenagers using androgens and/or anabolic steroids (AASs) is rising fast, and those affected can experience significant symptoms. Clinicians are increasingly encountering demanding, well-informed men affected by ASIH, yet lacking authoritative information on the subject may struggle to project a credible message. In this article, we overview the methods and drugs that men use in an attempt to counteract ASIH (with a view to either preventing its onset, or reversing it once it has developed) and summarize the scientific evidence underpinning these. The main channel for obtaining these drugs is the Internet, where they can be readily sourced without a valid prescription. An Internet search using relevant terms revealed a huge number of websites providing advice on how to buy and use products to counteract ASIH. Drugs arising repeatedly in our search included human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs). The quality and accuracy of the online information was variable, but review of medical literature also highlighted a lack of scientific data to guide clinical practice. It is important for clinicians to be aware of the AAS user's self-treatment strategies with regard to ASIH side-effect mitigation. By ensuring that they are well-informed, clinicians are more likely to retain the credibility and trust of AAS users, who will in turn likely be more open to engage with appropriate management. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Adverse reactions to antiepileptic drugs in epileptic outpatients: a cross-sectional study in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Soha; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Karimzadeh, Iman

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the pattern and possible risk factors of adverse reactions to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in epileptic outpatients in Iran. We conducted a cross-sectional study for a period of 1 year on epileptic outpatients under antiepileptic therapy. All present adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to antiepileptics and their clinical and paraclinical characteristics were recorded. Causality assessment was performed by the Naranjo algorithm. Seriousness of ADRs was assessed by the World Health Organization's definition. Schumock and Thornton questionnaire was applied to determine the preventability of ADRs. Statistical-descriptive analyses were performed. A total of 1055 adverse reactions to AEDs were recorded from 201 epileptic outpatients. Their mean ± SD age was 28.63 ± 15.06 years. The most frequent detected adverse reactions to AEDs were sedation (7.29%) and amnesia (6.35%). According to the Naranjo algorithm, 604 (57.25%) ADRs were possible. The rate of preventable ADRs was 57%. Only 8 (0.76%) ADRs were identified as serious. No statistically significant association was found between the number of ADRs and age, sex, type of epilepsy, and AED generation (P > 0.05). In contrast, polytherapy was associated with more ADRs than monotherapy (P = 0.039). According to multivariate logistic regression analysis, females were at a higher risk of experiencing an adverse reaction to AEDs than males (odds ratio, 3.676; 95% confidence interval, 1.198-11.283; P = 0.023). Adverse reactions to AEDs were very common among epileptic outpatients. The female sex was identified as a risk factor for experiencing an ADR.

  12. Incidence of cutaneous adverse drug reactions among medical inpatients of Sultanah Aminah Hospital Johor Bahru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latha, S; Choon, S E

    2017-06-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (cADRs) are common. There are only few studies on the incidence of cADRs in Malaysia. To determine the incidence, clinical features and risk factors of cADRs among hospitalized patients. A prospective study was conducted among medical inpatients from July to December 2014. A total of 43 cADRs were seen among 11 017 inpatients, yielding an incidence rate of 0.4%. cADR accounted for hospitalization in 26 patients. Previous history of cADR was present in 14 patients, with 50% exposed to the same drug taken previously. Potentially lifethreatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR), namely drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS: 14 cases) and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (SJS/TEN: 6 cases) comprise almost 50% of cADRs. The commonest culprit drug group was antibiotics (37.2%), followed by anticonvulsants (18.6%). Cotrimoxazole, phenytoin and rifampicin were the main causative drugs for DRESS. Anticonvulsants were most frequently implicated in SJS/TEN (66.7%). Most cases had "probable" causality relationship with suspected drug (69.8%). The majority of cases were of moderate severity (65.1%), while 18.6% had severe reaction with 1 death recorded. Most cases were not preventable (76.7%). Older age (> 60 years) and mucosal involvement were significantly associated with a more severe reaction. The incidence of cADRs was 0.4%, with most cases classified as moderate severity and not preventable. The commonest reaction pattern was DRESS, while the main culprit drug group was antibiotics. Older age and mucosal membrane involvement predicts a severe drug reaction.

  13. Identification of possible adverse drug reactions in clinical notes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warrer, Pernille; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Aagaard, Lise

    2015-01-01

    information is generally available for causality assessment. However, manual review of clinical notes is too time-consuming for routine use and hence there is a need for developing information technology (IT) tools for automatic screening of patient records with the purpose to detect information about......Objective: Through manual review of clinical notes for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus attending a Danish diabetes center, the aim of the study was to identify adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with three classes of glucose-lowering medicines: "Combinations of oral blood......-glucose lowering medicines" (A10BD), "dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DDP-4) inhibitors" (A10BH), and "other blood glucose lowering medicines" (A10BX). Specifically, we aimed to describe the potential of clinical notes to identify new ADRs and to evaluate if sufficient information can be obtained for causality assessment...

  14. Testing an explanatory model of nurses' intention to report adverse drug reactions in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, Alessia De; Pancani, Luca; Steca, Patrizia; Colaceci, Sofia; Giusti, Angela; Tibaldi, Laura; Alvaro, Rosaria; Ausili, Davide; Vellone, Ercole

    2017-05-01

    To test an explanatory model of nurses' intention to report adverse drug reactions in hospital settings, based on the theory of planned behaviour. Under-reporting of adverse drug reactions is an important problem among nurses. A cross-sectional design was used. Data were collected with the adverse drug reporting nurses' questionnaire. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to test the factor validity of the adverse drug reporting nurses' questionnaire, and structural equation modelling was used to test the explanatory model. The convenience sample comprised 500 Italian hospital nurses (mean age = 43.52). Confirmatory factor analysis supported the factor validity of the adverse drug reporting nurses' questionnaire. The structural equation modelling showed a good fit with the data. Nurses' intention to report adverse drug reactions was significantly predicted by attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control (R² = 0.16). The theory of planned behaviour effectively explained the mechanisms behind nurses' intention to report adverse drug reactions, showing how several factors come into play. In a scenario of organisational empowerment towards adverse drug reaction reporting, the major predictors of the intention to report are support for the decision to report adverse drug reactions from other health care practitioners, perceptions about the value of adverse drug reaction reporting and nurses' favourable self-assessment of their adverse drug reaction reporting skills. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Adverse drug reaction, patent blue V dye and anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Swagata; Nair, Priya V

    2012-11-01

    Patent blue vital (PBV) dye is used for varied perioperative indications, and has a potential for causing life-threatening allergic reactions. In this retrospective case series study, at a tertiary level neurosciences centre, we analysed the nature, management and outcome of adverse drug reaction to the preoperative use of PBV for marking vertebral level prior to back surgeries. Patients were identified from the theatre and radiology database. Data were collected from the patients' notes retrieved from the medical records division. Eleven of 1247 (0.88%) patients experienced adverse reactions: 6 (0.48%) patients had minor grade I reactions (urticaria, blue hives, pruritis or generalised rash), 4 (0.32%) had grade II reactions (transient hypotension/bronchospasm/laryngospasm) and grade III reaction (hypotension requiring prolonged vasopressor support) was noted in 1 (0.08%) patient. No mortality was seen. The time of onset (range 10-45 min) frequently coincided with induction of anaesthesia or prone positioning of patient. Seven (63.6%) cases were cancelled or postponed (range 2-63 days). Treatment varied independent of the grade of reaction. Allergy workup (often incomplete) was done for 6 (54%) patients. An awareness of the time of onset and infrequency of life-threatening reactions to patent blue dye may result in better management, less postponement, more complete workup and referral of these events.

  16. Adverse drug reaction, patent blue V dye and anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata Tripathy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Patent blue vital (PBV dye is used for varied perioperative indications, and has a potential for causing life-threatening allergic reactions. In this retrospective case series study, at a tertiary level neurosciences centre, we analysed the nature, management and outcome of adverse drug reaction to the preoperative use of PBV for marking vertebral level prior to back surgeries. Methods: Patients were identified from the theatre and radiology database. Data were collected from the patients′ notes retrieved from the medical records division. Results: Eleven of 1247 (0.88% patients experienced adverse reactions: 6 (0.48% patients had minor grade I reactions (urticaria, blue hives, pruritis or generalised rash, 4 (0.32% had grade II reactions (transient hypotension/bronchospasm/laryngospasm and grade III reaction (hypotension requiring prolonged vasopressor support was noted in 1 (0.08% patient. No mortality was seen. The time of onset (range 10-45 min frequently coincided with induction of anaesthesia or prone positioning of patient. Seven (63.6% cases were cancelled or postponed (range 2-63 days. Treatment varied independent of the grade of reaction. Allergy workup (often incomplete was done for 6 (54% patients. Conclusion: An awareness of the time of onset and infrequency of life-threatening reactions to patent blue dye may result in better management, less postponement, more complete workup and referral of these events.

  17. Severe cutaneous adverse reactions to antiepileptic drugs in Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C-Y; Dao, R-L; Lee, T-J; Lu, C-W; Yang, C-H; Hung, S-I; Chung, W-H

    2011-12-06

    Ethnicity has been shown to be a contributing risk factor regarding antiepileptic drug (AED)-induced severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCARs). To increase the clinical and epidemiologic information in Asians, we investigated the characteristics, outcome, and tolerability toward alternative drugs for AED-induced SCARs. A total of 154 patients with AED-induced SCARs, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrosis (TEN), and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), were analyzed for demographic characteristics, causative AEDs, latent period, organ involvement, complications, and mortality. Tolerability toward alternative AEDs was followed for patients after AED-SCARs episodes. Carbamazepine (CBZ) and phenytoin (PHT) were the most common causative AEDs for SJS/TEN (67.8%) and DRESS (43.6%), respectively. No SCARs case was caused by nonaromatic AEDs, e.g., valproic acid (VPA) and topiramate (TPM). The liver was the most frequently involved internal organ in AED-DRESS, whereas ocular complications were more commonly seen in AED-SJS/TEN. The mortality of AED-SJS/TEN and -DRESS was 6.1% and 7.7%, respectively. By following alternative AED usage of patients after AED-SCARs episodes, we noted that most patients were tolerant of nonaromatic AEDs. One case of oxcarbazepine-SJS had cross-hypersensitivity to lamotrigine (LTG) and further developed into DRESS. CBZ, PHT, and LTG were the major causative AEDs for SCARs. The mortality of PHT-SCARs was higher than CBZ-SCARs due to complicated comorbidity in patients. Nonaromatic AEDs were safe alternatives for patients with aromatic AED-induced SCARs.

  18. Inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug events in older people.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hamilton, Hilary J

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate prescribing (IP) in older patients is highly prevalent and is associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs), morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation. Consequently, IP is a major safety concern and with changing population demographics, it is likely to become even more prevalent in the future. IP can be detected using explicit or implicit prescribing indicators. Theoretically, the routine clinical application of these IP criteria could represent an inexpensive and time efficient method to optimise prescribing practice. However, IP criteria must be sensitive, specific, have good inter-rater reliability and incorporate those medications most commonly associated with ADEs in older people. To be clinically relevant, use of prescribing appropriateness tools must translate into positive patient outcomes, such as reduced rates of ADEs. To accurately measure these outcomes, a reliable method of assessing the relationship between the administration of a drug and an adverse clinical event is required. The Naranjo criteria are the most widely used tool for assessing ADE causality, however, they are often difficult to interpret in the context of older patients. ADE causality criteria that allow for the multiple co-morbidities and prescribed medications in older people are required. Ultimately, the current high prevalence of IP and ADEs is unacceptable. IP screening criteria need to be tested as an intervention to assess their impact on the incidence of ADEs in vulnerable older patients. There is a role for IP screening tools in everyday clinical practice. These should enhance, not replace good clinical judgement, which in turn should be based on sound pharmacogeriatric training.

  19. Inappropriate prescribing and adverse drug events in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallagher Paul F

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inappropriate prescribing (IP in older patients is highly prevalent and is associated with an increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs, morbidity, mortality and healthcare utilisation. Consequently, IP is a major safety concern and with changing population demographics, it is likely to become even more prevalent in the future. IP can be detected using explicit or implicit prescribing indicators. Theoretically, the routine clinical application of these IP criteria could represent an inexpensive and time efficient method to optimise prescribing practice. However, IP criteria must be sensitive, specific, have good inter-rater reliability and incorporate those medications most commonly associated with ADEs in older people. To be clinically relevant, use of prescribing appropriateness tools must translate into positive patient outcomes, such as reduced rates of ADEs. To accurately measure these outcomes, a reliable method of assessing the relationship between the administration of a drug and an adverse clinical event is required. The Naranjo criteria are the most widely used tool for assessing ADE causality, however, they are often difficult to interpret in the context of older patients. ADE causality criteria that allow for the multiple co-morbidities and prescribed medications in older people are required. Ultimately, the current high prevalence of IP and ADEs is unacceptable. IP screening criteria need to be tested as an intervention to assess their impact on the incidence of ADEs in vulnerable older patients. There is a role for IP screening tools in everyday clinical practice. These should enhance, not replace good clinical judgement, which in turn should be based on sound pharmacogeriatric training.

  20. Mining severe drug-drug interaction adverse events using Semantic Web technologies: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoqian; Liu, Hongfang; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are a major contributing factor for unexpected adverse drug events (ADEs). However, few of knowledge resources cover the severity information of ADEs that is critical for prioritizing the medical need. The objective of the study is to develop and evaluate a Semantic Web-based approach for mining severe DDI-induced ADEs. We utilized a normalized FDA Adverse Event Report System (AERS) dataset and performed a case study of three frequently prescribed cardiovascular drugs: Warfarin, Clopidogrel and Simvastatin. We extracted putative DDI-ADE pairs and their associated outcome codes. We developed a pipeline to filter the associations using ADE datasets from SIDER and PharmGKB. We also performed a signal enrichment using electronic medical records (EMR) data. We leveraged the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event (CTCAE) grading system and classified the DDI-induced ADEs into the CTCAE in the Web Ontology Language (OWL). We identified 601 DDI-ADE pairs for the three drugs using the filtering pipeline, of which 61 pairs are in Grade 5, 56 pairs in Grade 4 and 484 pairs in Grade 3. Among 601 pairs, the signals of 59 DDI-ADE pairs were identified from the EMR data. The approach developed could be generalized to detect the signals of putative severe ADEs induced by DDIs in other drug domains and would be useful for supporting translational and pharmacovigilance study of severe ADEs.

  1. Predicting adverse drug reaction profiles by integrating protein interaction networks with drug structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang-Chin; Wu, Xiaogang; Chen, Jake Y

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) has become increasingly important, due to the rising concern on serious ADRs that can cause drugs to fail to reach or stay in the market. We proposed a framework for predicting ADR profiles by integrating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks with drug structures. We compared ADR prediction performances over 18 ADR categories through four feature groups-only drug targets, drug targets with PPI networks, drug structures, and drug targets with PPI networks plus drug structures. The results showed that the integration of PPI networks and drug structures can significantly improve the ADR prediction performance. The median AUC values for the four groups were 0.59, 0.61, 0.65, and 0.70. We used the protein features in the best two models, "Cardiac disorders" (median-AUC: 0.82) and "Psychiatric disorders" (median-AUC: 0.76), to build ADR-specific PPI networks with literature supports. For validation, we examined 30 drugs withdrawn from the U.S. market to see if our approach can predict their ADR profiles and explain why they were withdrawn. Except for three drugs having ADRs in the categories we did not predict, 25 out of 27 withdrawn drugs (92.6%) having severe ADRs were successfully predicted by our approach. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Marine Corps Drug Prevention Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stander, Valerie A; Reed, Cheryl; Olson, Cheryl B; Johnson, Judy; Merrill, Lex L; Clapp, John; Elder, John; Lawson, Gary; Mangual, George; Lowe, Nate

    2003-01-01

    .... Some of the common components were information on the consequences of drug use, decision-making skill training, public pledges not to use drugs, values clarification, goal setting, stress management...

  3. Detecting drug-drug interactions using a database for spontaneous adverse drug reactions : an example with diuretics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puijenbroek, E P; Egberts, A C; Heerdink, E R; Leufkens, H G

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Drug-drug interactions are relatively rarely reported to spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) for adverse drug reactions. For this reason, the traditional approach for analysing SRS has major limitations for the detection of drug-drug interactions. We developed a method that may enable

  4. Adverse Reactions to Antituberculosis Drugs in Iranian Tuberculosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Farazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Antituberculosis multidrug regimens have been associated with increased incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs. This study aimed to determine the incidence and associated factors of ADRs due to antituberculosis therapy. Methods. This is a retrospective cross-sectional study on tuberculosis patients who were treated in tuberculosis clinics in Markazi province in Iran. The information contained in the medical files was extracted and entered into the questionnaire. Data was descriptively analyzed by using statistical package for social sciences (SPSS 18. Results. A total of 940 TB patients of 1240 patients’ medical records available in 10 medical offices were included in this study. Of the 563 ADRs found in this study, 82.4% were considered minor reactions and 17.6% were major reactions. No death from antituberculosis ADR was observed. We found that the risk of major ADRs was higher in females (P  value=0.0241, age >50 y (P  value=0.0223, coinfection with HIV (P  value=0.0323, smoking (P  value=0.002, retreatment TB (P  value=0.0203, and comorbidities (P  value=0.0005. Conclusions. This study showed that severe side effects of anti-TB drugs are common in patients who have risk factors of ADRs and they should be followed up by close monitoring.

  5. The role of HLA genes in pharmacogenomics: unravelling HLA associated adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illing, Patricia T; Purcell, Anthony W; McCluskey, James

    2017-08-01

    Genetic polymorphism in the genes encoding the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules enables presentation of a wide range peptide ligands thus maximising immune surveillance of pathogens. A consequence of the diversification of the HLA Ag-binding pocket is the enhanced opportunity for off-target binding of small drugs by HLA molecules, with subsequent immune reactivity. These potential off-target interactions are 'set up' to generate T cell-mediated adverse drug reactions even though the precise mechanisms of most HLA-drug interactions are still poorly understood. The association between abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome and HLA-B*57:01 is one exception that has been resolved at a molecular and mechanistic level. Here, we explore the road to understanding the interaction between abacavir and the HLA-B*57:01 molecule and review the current state of understanding of interactions between other drugs and HLA molecules implicated in adverse drug reactions, which appear to involve multiple mechanisms. The continued expansion of the pharmacopoeia generates an imperative to understand these interactions at the molecular level in order to prevent the continued burden on individuals and the health care system.

  6. Possible adverse drug events leading to hospital admission in a Brazilian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Rossi Varallo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Drug safety problems can lead to hospital admission. In Brazil, the prevalence of hospitalization due to adverse drug events is unknown. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of hospitalization due to adverse drug events and to identify the drugs, the adverse drug events, and the risk factors associated with hospital admissions. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was performed in the internal medicine ward of a teaching hospital in São Paulo State, Brazil, from August to December 2008. All patients aged ≥18 years with a length of stay ≥24 hours were interviewed about the drugs used prior to hospital admission and their symptoms/complaints/causes of hospitalization. RESULTS: In total, 248 patients were considered eligible. The prevalence of hospitalization due to potential adverse drug events in the ward was 46.4%. Overprescribed drugs and those indicated for prophylactic treatments were frequently associated with possible adverse drug events. Frequently reported symptoms were breathlessness (15.2%, fatigue (12.3%, and chest pain (9.0%. Polypharmacy was a risk factor for the occurrence of possible adverse drug events. CONCLUSION: Possible adverse drug events led to hospitalization in a high-complexity hospital, mainly in polymedicated patients. The clinical outcomes of adverse drug events are nonspecific, which delays treatment, hinders causality analysis, and contributes to the underreporting of cases.

  7. An electronic trigger based on care escalation to identify preventable adverse events in hospitalised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhise, Viraj; Sittig, Dean F; Vaghani, Viralkumar; Wei, Li; Baldwin, Jessica; Singh, Hardeep

    2018-03-01

    Methods to identify preventable adverse events typically have low yield and efficiency. We refined the methods of Institute of Healthcare Improvement's Global Trigger Tool (GTT) application and leveraged electronic health record (EHR) data to improve detection of preventable adverse events, including diagnostic errors. We queried the EHR data repository of a large health system to identify an 'index hospitalization' associated with care escalation (defined as transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU) or initiation of rapid response team (RRT) within 15 days of admission) between March 2010 and August 2015. To enrich the record review sample with unexpected events, we used EHR clinical data to modify the GTT algorithm and limited eligible patients to those at lower risk for care escalation based on younger age and presence of minimal comorbid conditions. We modified the GTT review methodology; two physicians independently reviewed eligible 'e-trigger' positive records to identify preventable diagnostic and care management events. Of 88 428 hospitalisations, 887 were associated with care escalation (712 ICU transfers and 175 RRTs), of which 92 were flagged as trigger-positive and reviewed. Preventable adverse events were detected in 41 cases, yielding a trigger positive predictive value of 44.6% (reviewer agreement 79.35%; Cohen's kappa 0.573). We identified 7 (7.6%) diagnostic errors and 34 (37.0%) care management-related events: 24 (26.1%) adverse drug events, 4 (4.3%) patient falls, 4 (4.3%) procedure-related complications and 2 (2.2%) hospital-associated infections. In most events (73.1%), there was potential for temporary harm. We developed an approach using an EHR data-based trigger and modified review process to efficiently identify hospitalised patients with preventable adverse events, including diagnostic errors. Such e-triggers can help overcome limitations of currently available methods to detect preventable harm in hospitalised patients. © Article

  8. Incidence and determinants of medication errors and adverse drug events among hospitalized children in West Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Dedefo, Mohammed Gebre; Mitike, Abraham Haileamlak; Angamo, Mulugeta Tarekegn

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication errors cause a large number of adverse drug events with negative patient health outcomes and are a major public-health burden contributing to 18.7?56?% of all adverse drug events among hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and determinants of medication errors and adverse drug events among hospitalized children. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted among hospitalized children in the pediatrics ward of Nekemte Referral...

  9. EXPLORING THE PATTERN OF POLYPHARMACY AND PROPORTION OF DRUG TO DRUG INTERACTIONS AND ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS IN THE ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayashree Thyagaraj

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The geriatric population is increasing as a result of advanced medical facilities. This population also faces a number of medical health challenges. They tend to receive multiple medications often leading to Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs and other clinical consequences, which compromises their quality of life if not endangering it as well. There are few Indian studies focusing on this problem. Hence, this study was undertaken with the aim to assess the polypharmacy pattern, proportion of DDIs and adverse drug reactions in the geriatric population in a tertiary care hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a cross-sectional study wherein data from 201 geriatric inpatient’s prescriptions were collected. The prescriptions were assessed for demographic details such as age, gender, comorbidities and drugs prescribed. All prescriptions were evaluated for polypharmacy, DDIs and ADRs. DDIs were assessed using Micromedex software. Patients were stratified into groups and DDIs were compared between the groups, gender and also with number of drugs used. RESULTS There were 201 patients with a mean age of approximately 70 years. Polypharmacy occurred in 73.63% of them with mean number of drugs being 6.23. The number of drugs used increased significantly with age (p=0.0001. Hypertension was the most common comorbidity. Polypharmacy was strongly associated with hypertension and dyslipidaemia. A total of 129 (64.17% patients accounted for 425 potential DDIs. The most common drug involved in DDIs was aspirin. A subset analysis of ADRs showed an occurrence of 50.68% with 10.81% being definitely avoidable. CONCLUSION Elderly individuals are at increased risk of being on polypharmacy. This comes with the risk of several potential DDIs, which in turn may lead to adverse drug reactions, which results in morbidity. Doctors involved in the care of the elderly should be aware of these facts and exercise caution while adding any

  10. Workgroup Report by the Joint Task Force Involving American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI); Food Allergy, Anaphylaxis, Dermatology and Drug Allergy (FADDA) (Adverse Reactions to Foods Committee and Adverse Reactions to Drugs, Biologicals, and Latex Committee); and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Botulism Clinical Treatment Guidelines Workgroup-Allergic Reactions to Botulinum Antitoxin: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schussler, Edith; Sobel, Jeremy; Hsu, Joy; Yu, Patricia; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Grammer, Leslie C; Nowak-Wegrzyn, Anna

    2017-12-27

    Naturally occurring botulism is rare, but a large number of cases could result from unintentional or intentional contamination of a commercial food. Despeciated, equine-derived, heptavalent botulinum antitoxin (HBAT) is licensed in the United States. Timely treatment reduces morbidity and mortality, but concerns that botulinum antitoxin can induce anaphylaxis exist. We sought to quantify the allergy risk of botulinum antitoxin treatment and the usefulness of skin testing to assess this risk. We conducted a systematic review of (1) allergic reactions to botulinum antitoxin and (2) the predictive value of skin testing (ST) before botulinum antitoxin administration. We searched 5 scientific literature databases, reviewed articles' references, and obtained data from the HBAT manufacturer and from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Anaphylaxis incidence was determined for HBAT and previously employed botulinum antitoxins. We calculated the positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of ST for anaphylaxis related to HBAT and other botulinum antitoxins. Seven articles were included. Anaphylaxis incidence was 1.64% (5/305 patients) for HBAT and 1.16% (8/687 patients) for all other botulinum antitoxins (relative risk, 1.41 [95% confidence interval, .47-4.27]; P = .5). Observed values for both PPV and NPV for HBAT-ST (33 patients) were 100%. Observed PPVs and NPVs of ST for other botulinum antitoxins (302 patients) were 0-56% and 50%-100%, respectively. There were no reports of fatal anaphylaxis. Considering the <2 % rate of anaphylaxis, fatal outcomes, modest predictive value of ST, resource requirements for ST, and the benefits of early treatment, data do not support delaying HBAT administration to perform ST in a mass botulinum toxin exposure. Anaphylactic reactions may occur among 1%-2% of botulinum antitoxin recipients and will require epinephrine and antihistamine treatment and, possibly, intensive care. Published by Oxford

  11. How Can Prescription Drug Misuse Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... press ctrl+c to copy Featured Publications Drugs, Brains, and Behavior: The Science of Addiction Principles of Substance Abuse Prevention for Early Chil... Marijuana: Facts Parents Need to Know Marijuana: Facts for ...

  12. Post-war prevention: Emerging frameworks to prevent drug use after the War on Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werb, Dan

    2018-01-01

    The prevention of drug use is one of the primary goals of the War on Drugs. However, despite investment in high-profile interventions such as social marketing campaigns and enforcement-based deterrence, these efforts have generally failed. With the emergence of novel policy frameworks to control and regulate drug use, a window of opportunity exists to test approaches to drug prevention that take into account existing evidence and the rights of individuals who use drugs. Specifically, there is a growing consensus that entry into drug use is a socially-defined event that individuals experience within particular socio-structural contexts. This understanding, coupled with a distinction between the value of preventing problematic drug use rather than all drug use, provides a useful framework within which to develop effective and rights-based approaches to drug prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparing Methods for Estimating Direct Costs of Adverse Drug Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllensten, Hanna; Jönsson, Anna K; Hakkarainen, Katja M; Svensson, Staffan; Hägg, Staffan; Rehnberg, Clas

    2017-12-01

    To estimate how direct health care costs resulting from adverse drug events (ADEs) and cost distribution are affected by methodological decisions regarding identification of ADEs, assigning relevant resource use to ADEs, and estimating costs for the assigned resources. ADEs were identified from medical records and diagnostic codes for a random sample of 4970 Swedish adults during a 3-month study period in 2008 and were assessed for causality. Results were compared for five cost evaluation methods, including different methods for identifying ADEs, assigning resource use to ADEs, and for estimating costs for the assigned resources (resource use method, proportion of registered cost method, unit cost method, diagnostic code method, and main diagnosis method). Different levels of causality for ADEs and ADEs' contribution to health care resource use were considered. Using the five methods, the maximum estimated overall direct health care costs resulting from ADEs ranged from Sk10,000 (Sk = Swedish krona; ~€1,500 in 2016 values) using the diagnostic code method to more than Sk3,000,000 (~€414,000) using the unit cost method in our study population. The most conservative definitions for ADEs' contribution to health care resource use and the causality of ADEs resulted in average costs per patient ranging from Sk0 using the diagnostic code method to Sk4066 (~€500) using the unit cost method. The estimated costs resulting from ADEs varied considerably depending on the methodological choices. The results indicate that costs for ADEs need to be identified through medical record review and by using detailed unit cost data. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Cristina Soares; Oliveira, Cesar de

    2016-09-01

    to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) in older adults polymedicated. an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years) were analyzed: 24 (51.1%) concerning ADR, 14 (29.8%) DDI, and 9 studies (19.1%) investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps. identificar e sintetizar estudos que examinam as interações medicamentosas (IM) e reações adversas a medicamentos (RAM) em idosos polimedicados. revisão integrativa de estudos publicados de janeiro de 2008 a dezembro de 2013, de acordo com critérios de inclusão e exclusão, nas bases de dados eletrônicas MEDLINE e EMBASE. foram analisados 47 estudos de texto completo, incluindo 14,624,492 idosos (≥ 60 anos): 24 (51,1%) sobre RAM, 14 (29,8%) sobre IM e 9 estudos (19,1%) que investigaram tanto IM como RAM. Encontramos uma variedade de desenhos metodológicos. Os estudos revisados reforçaram que a polifarmácia é um processo multifatorial, e os preditores e a prescrição inadequada estão associados a

  15. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Adverse Drug Events: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehr, Avi; Peña, Juliet C; Hu, Dale J

    2015-12-01

    The 2014 National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention has recognized adverse drug events (ADEs) as a national priority in order to facilitate a nationwide reduction in patient harms from these events. Throughout this effort, it will be integral to identify populations that may be at particular risk in order to improve care for these patients. We have undertaken a systematic review to evaluate the evidence regarding racial or ethnic disparities in ADEs with particular emphasis on anticoagulants, diabetes agents, and opioids due to the clinical significance and preventability of ADEs associated with these medication classes. From an initial search yielding 3302 studies, we identified 40 eligible studies. Twenty-seven of these included studies demonstrated the presence of a racial or ethnic disparity. There was no consistent evidence for racial or ethnic disparities in the eight studies of ADEs in general. Asians were most frequently determined to be at higher risk of anticoagulant-related ADEs, and black patients were most frequently determined to be at higher risk for diabetes agents-related ADEs. Whites were most frequently identified as at increased risk for opioid-related ADEs. However, few of these studies were specifically designed to evaluate racial or ethnic disparities, lacking a standardized approach to racial/ethnic categorization as well as control for potential confounders. We suggest the need for targeted interventions to reduce ADEs in populations that may be at increased risk, and we suggest strategies for future research.

  16. Clinical experience of adverse drug reaction in gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Hyae; Hong, Ju Hee; Lee, Yeon Su; Cha, Kyung Soo; Chang, Suk Il; Lee, Young Chul; Kim, Yeong Soo

    1992-01-01

    Gadopentetate dimenglumine(Gd-DTPA) has low toxicity and good tolerance and it is said that the observed adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA is compatible to those of iodinated nonionic contrast media. The overall incidence of adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA is even lower than those of iodinated nonionic contrast media. Then, the possibility of potential adverse drug reaction of these contrast media is not fully known and recently, many authors have a growing interest in this point. We have taken 2501 cases of MRI and executed 1467 case of Gd-DTPA enhancement scanning(58.7%) and experienced 12 cases of adverse drug reaction(11 cases: mild reaction, 1 case: severs anaphylactic shock) and the overall incidence of our adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA was 0.8%. In conclusion, the adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA is not rare and the severe adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA may occur. So, the possibility of adverse drug reaction after Gd-DTPA injection should always be kept in mind, especially when the patient has a history of reaction to contrast material, allergy(particularly asthma) and cardiac disease. For the safe use of Gd-DTPA, well trained personnel and nearby emergent care facilities should be available

  17. Clinical experience of adverse drug reaction in gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Hyae; Hong, Ju Hee; Lee, Yeon Su; Cha, Kyung Soo; Chang, Suk Il [Sung Ae Gernral Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Chul; Kim, Yeong Soo [Chung Ang University Colege of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-15

    Gadopentetate dimenglumine(Gd-DTPA) has low toxicity and good tolerance and it is said that the observed adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA is compatible to those of iodinated nonionic contrast media. The overall incidence of adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA is even lower than those of iodinated nonionic contrast media. Then, the possibility of potential adverse drug reaction of these contrast media is not fully known and recently, many authors have a growing interest in this point. We have taken 2501 cases of MRI and executed 1467 case of Gd-DTPA enhancement scanning(58.7%) and experienced 12 cases of adverse drug reaction(11 cases: mild reaction, 1 case: severs anaphylactic shock) and the overall incidence of our adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA was 0.8%. In conclusion, the adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA is not rare and the severe adverse drug reaction of Gd-DTPA may occur. So, the possibility of adverse drug reaction after Gd-DTPA injection should always be kept in mind, especially when the patient has a history of reaction to contrast material, allergy(particularly asthma) and cardiac disease. For the safe use of Gd-DTPA, well trained personnel and nearby emergent care facilities should be available.

  18. Analysis of Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions at a Tertiary Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    medication and maintenance of prescription records. The cost associated with ADRs is high. ADR monitoring is essential to reduce patient suffering as well as to achieve the substantial savings in health care cost. Keywords: Cutaneous adverse ...

  19. Adverse drug reactions and drug–drug interactions with over-the-counter NSAIDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore N

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas Moore,1 Charles Pollack,2 Paul Butkerait2 1Department of Pharmacology, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; 2Pfizer Consumer Healthcare, Madison, NJ, USA Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen have a long history of safe and effective use as both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC analgesics/antipyretics. The mechanism of action of all NSAIDs is through reversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs including gastrointestinal bleeding as well as cardiovascular and renal effects have been reported with NSAID use. In many cases, ADRs may occur because of drug–drug interactions (DDIs between the NSAID and a concomitant medication. For example, DDIs have been reported when NSAIDs are coadministered with aspirin, alcohol, some antihypertensives, antidepressants, and other commonly used medications. Because of the pharmacologic nature of these interactions, there is a continuum of risk in that the potential for an ADR is dependent on total drug exposure. Therefore, consideration of dose and duration of NSAID use, as well as the type or class of comedication administered, is important when assessing potential risk for ADRs. Safety findings from clinical studies evaluating prescription-strength NSAIDs may not be directly applicable to OTC dosing. Health care providers can be instrumental in educating patients that using OTC NSAIDs at the lowest effective dose for the shortest required duration is vital to balancing efficacy and safety. This review discusses some of the most clinically relevant DDIs reported with NSAIDs based on major sites of ADRs and classes of medication, with a focus on OTC ibuprofen, for which the most data are available. Keywords: adverse effects, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, renal

  20. Fatal adverse drug reactions of anticancer drugs detected by all-case post-marketing surveillance in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Miura, Yuji; Kami, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    All-case post-marketing surveillance of newly approved anticancer drugs is usually conducted on all patients in Japan. The present study investigates whether all-case post-marketing surveillance identifies fatal adverse drug reactions undetected before market entry. We examined fatal adverse drug reactions identified via all-case post-marketing surveillance by reviewing the disclosed post-marketing surveillance results, and determined the time points in which the fatal adverse drug reactions were initially reported by reviewing drug labels. We additionally scanned emergency alerts on the Japanese regulatory authority website to assess the relationship between all-case post-marketing surveillance and regulatory action. Twenty-five all-case post-marketing surveillances were performed between January 1999 and December 2009. Eight all-case post-marketing surveillances with final results included information on all fatal cases. Of these, the median number of patients was 1287 (range: 106-4998), the median number of fatal adverse drug reactions was 14.5 (range: 4-23). Of the 111 fatal adverse drug reactions detected in the eight post-marketing surveillances, only 28 (25.0%) and 22 (19.6%) were described on the initial global and the initial Japanese drug label, respectively, and 58 (52.3%) fatal adverse drug reactions were first described in the all-case post-marketing surveillance reports. Despite this, the regulatory authority issued only four warning letters, and two of these were prompted by case reports from the all-case post-marketing surveillance. All-case post-marketing surveillance of newly approved anticancer drugs in Japan was useful for the rigorous compilation of non-specific adverse drug reactions, but it rarely detected clinically significant fatal adverse drug reactions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Erythema multiforme-like eruption from a slimming drug preparation cutaneous adverse drug reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Tognetti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 34-year-old woman presenting with an erythema multiforme (EM-like eruption. Lesions developed after a 12-day treatment with a slimming drug preparation (food integrator with thermogenic activity and a herbal remedy (pilosella tincture. Serological investigations excluded viral or bacterial infections. Patch testing with galenic preparations of both drugs demonstrated sensitization to the slimming drug preparation. According to literature reports and immune-chemical properties, those components that are likely to have triggered the skin eruption are clorazepate dipotassium and theobromine. Their interaction with other two constituents such as pseudoephedrine hydrochloride and dehydrocholic acid may have caused the adverse reaction by means of a summation effect. There are no reports specifically about EM caused by a slimming drug preparation and no studies have identified thermogenic pills as cause of EM/EM-like eruption. Weight-loss compounds in slimming preparations should be kept in mind as a possible cause of drug-induced EM-like eruption.

  2. Adverse childhood experiences among women prisoners: relationships to suicide attempts and drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friestad, Christine; Åse-Bente, Rustad; Kjelsberg, Ellen

    2014-02-01

    Women prisoners are known to suffer from an accumulation of factors known to increase the risk for several major health problems. This study examines the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and the relationship between such experiences and suicide attempts and drug use among incarcerated women in Norway. A total of 141 women inmates (75% of all eligible) were interviewed using a structured interview guide covering information on demographics and a range of ACE related to abuse and neglect, and household dysfunction. The main outcome variables were attempted suicide and adult drug abuse. Emotional, physical and sexual abuse during childhood was experienced by 39%, 36% and 19%, respectively, and emotional and physical neglect by 31% and 33%, respectively. Looking at the full range of ACE, 17% reported having experienced none, while 34% reported having experienced more than five ACEs. After controlling for age, immigrant background and marital status, the number of ACEs significantly increased the risk of attempted suicide and current drug abuse. The associations observed between early life trauma and later health risk behaviour indicate the need for early prevention. The findings also emphasize the important role of prison health services in secondary prevention among women inmates.

  3. Data-driven prediction of adverse drug reactions induced by drug drug interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-08

    DDI(Φ,didj) must be higher than 0 for a synergis- tic DDI-induced ADR. The higher the DDI score, the more severe is its effect. Data for drug-protein...pairs; and vestibular disorder (C0042594), 1,022 drug pairs. Figure 4 shows the model performance results, with bar heights representing mean AUC...Unified Medical Language System code C0035439), heat stroke (C0018843), spontaneous abortion (C0000786), and vestibular disorder (C0042594). These ADRs

  4. JADE: a tool for medical researchers to explore adverse drug events using health claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlinger, D; Sauter, S K; Rinner, C; Neuhofer, L M; Wolzt, M; Grossmann, W; Endel, G; Gall, W

    2014-01-01

    The objective of our project was to create a tool for physicians to explore health claims data with regard to adverse drug reactions. The Java Adverse Drug Event (JADE) tool should enable the analysis of prescribed drugs in connection with diagnoses from hospital stays. We calculated the number of days drugs were taken by using the defined daily doses and estimated possible interactions between dispensed drugs using the Austria Codex, a database including drug-drug interactions. The JADE tool was implemented using Java, R and a PostgreSQL database. Beside an overview of the study cohort which includes selection of gender and age groups, selected statistical methods like association rule learning, logistic regression model and the number needed to harm have been implemented. The JADE tool can support physicians during their planning of clinical trials by showing the occurrences of adverse drug events with population based information.

  5. Automatic detection of adverse events to predict drug label changes using text and data mining techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurulingappa, Harsha; Toldo, Luca; Rajput, Abdul Mateen; Kors, Jan A; Taweel, Adel; Tayrouz, Yorki

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of automatically detected adverse event signals from text and open-source data on the prediction of drug label changes. Open-source adverse effect data were collected from FAERS, Yellow Cards and SIDER databases. A shallow linguistic relation extraction system (JSRE) was applied for extraction of adverse effects from MEDLINE case reports. Statistical approach was applied on the extracted datasets for signal detection and subsequent prediction of label changes issued for 29 drugs by the UK Regulatory Authority in 2009. 76% of drug label changes were automatically predicted. Out of these, 6% of drug label changes were detected only by text mining. JSRE enabled precise identification of four adverse drug events from MEDLINE that were undetectable otherwise. Changes in drug labels can be predicted automatically using data and text mining techniques. Text mining technology is mature and well-placed to support the pharmacovigilance tasks. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. An analysis of serious adverse drug reactions at a tertiary care teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinjal Prajapati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze the various aspects of serious adverse drug reactions (serious ADRs such as clinical presentation, causality, severity, and preventability occurring in a hospital setting. Materials and Methods: All serious ADRs reported from January 2010 to May 2015 at ADR Monitoring Centre, Department of Pharmacology, B. J. Medical College and Civil Hospital, Ahmedabad, were selected as per the World health Organization -Uppsala Monitoring Center (WHO-UMC criteria. A retrospective analysis was carried out for clinical presentation, causality (as per the WHO-UMC scale and Naranjo′s algorithm, severity (Hartwig and Siegel scale, and preventability (Schumock and Thornton criteria. Results: Out of 2977 ADRs reported, 375 were serious in nature. The most common clinical presentation involved was skin and appendageal disorders (71, 18.9%. The common causal drug group was antitubercular (129, 34.4% followed by antiretroviral (76, 20.3% agents. The criteria for the majority of serious ADRs were intervention to prevent permanent impairment or damage (164, 43.7% followed by hospitalization (158, 42.1%. Majority of the serious ADRs were continuing (191, 50.9% at the time of reporting, few recovered (101, 26.9%, and two were fatal. The majority of serious ADRs were categorized as possible (182, 48.8% followed by probable (173, 46.1% in nature. Conclusion: Antitubercular, antiretroviral, and antimicrobial drugs were the most common causal drug groups for serious ADRs. This calls for robust ADR monitoring system and education of patients and prescribers for identification and effective management.

  7. Discontinuation of Preventive Drugs in General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John Sahl; Lindberg, Laura Maria Glahder; Nixon, Michael Simon

    Introduction: In Denmark about 600,000 persons are treated for hypertension and more than 300,000 people are receiving cholesterol lowering drugs. The prevalence of hypertension in people aged 80 years is 70%. For antidepressants the defined daily doses/1000 aged >80 years/day exceed 200. By far...... the most preventive drugs are prescribed in general practice. Special considerations exist in relation to medication of elderly patients. The prevalence of polypharmacy and the subsequent increased risk of side effects and drug interactions is high. Drug-related problems represent the fifth leading cause...... of death in the United States. The public expenses to drug treatment are constantly increasing. The possibility to withdraw the medication must be taken into account but the decision to discontinue drugs is complex and poorly understood. Planned studies: 1. Patients’ views upon discontinuation...

  8. Prospects of consumer-initiated adverse drug reaction reporting in cardiovascular pharmacovigilance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinu Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Drugs used for the treatment of cardiovascular disorders are frequently reported to cause adverse drug reactions (ADRs, second only to antimicrobials. ADRs strain the patients′ health and finances further and could prove fatal too. Pharmacovigilance programs aim to detect, monitor and understand ADRs in order to prevent them. Pharmacovigilance provides vital input to drug regulatory agencies to monitor safety of new as well as old drugs. Spontaneous reporting of suspected ADRs by healthcare professionals forms the backbone of pharmacovigilance programs worldwide including the Pharmacovigilance Program of India (PvPI launched in 2010. The PvPI has significantly contributed to strengthening pharmacovigilance in India but suffers from under-reporting of ADRs like similar programs worldwide. Consumer-initiated reporting of ADRs incorporated in pharmacovigilance programs of several countries has been found to decrease under-reporting rates besides supplementing traditional pharmacovigilance information. The PvPI has recently introduced the facility for consumers to report ADRs by contacting a hotline (1800-180-3024, through e-mail (pvpi.compat@gmail.com or by filling specifically designed ADR reporting forms, either in English language or vernacular translations, and submitting them to the nearest ADR monitoring centre. This is a welcome step in empowering patients as consumers of drugs with the mechanism to monitor their safety. It could potentially fill the huge gap in spontaneous ADR reporting and supplement the indigenous drug safety database with patients′ perspectives regarding ADRs e.g. effect on their quality of life. Whether it encourages rational prescription practices by doctors or enhances transparency regarding safety of investigational drugs in clinical trials needs to be seen.

  9. Severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions of Chinese inpatients: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qiancheng; Fang, Xia; Zeng, Qinghai; Lu, Jianyun; Jing, Chen; Huang, Jinhua

    2017-01-01

    The rate of severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions is low, and these reactions can result in death or disability. An evidence-based epidemiological study of severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions in China has not been reported. The aim of this study was to analyze epidemiology and characteristics of severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions of Chinese inpatients during the recent 15 years with meta-analysis. We retrospectively reviewed Chinese literature reporting severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions and collecting data from 2000 to 2015, which were in accordance with our inclusion criteria. All included data were analyzed with the Launch Open Meta-Analyst software. Twenty-five articles involving 928 cases with severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions were included. Men to women ratio was 1.14:1. Twenty-one per cent of the patients had drug allergy history. Antibiotics (26.0%), sedative hypnotics and anticonvulsants (21.6%), and antipyretic analgesics (17.1%) were the most common causative drugs. The most frequent clinical subtype was Stevens-Johnson syndrome (50.1%), followed by toxic epidermal necrolysis (25.4%), exfoliative dermatitis (21.0%) and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (1.6%). In addition to skin rashes, patients with severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions suffered mostly from fever (73%), and blood routine abnormality (66.7%). This meta-analysis is limited by its retrospective design and by its methodological variation. The most common causative drugs were antibiotics and sedative hypnotics and anticonvulsants. Stevens-Johnson syndrome was the most frequent clinical subtype of severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions. In addition to skin rashes, patients with severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions suffered mostly from fever, mucosal lesion, and hematologic abnormalities.

  10. Prevention of non-drug addictions

    OpenAIRE

    PELECHOVÁ, Kateřina

    2010-01-01

    Non-drug addictions are part of us, including children and youth. It is important to realize that non-drug addictions influence us and are underestimated despite their seriousness. They constitute serious social-pathological phenomenon of the present. This Bachelor Thesis deals particularly with prevention and the present situation of socially undesired behaviour that is very widespread in current society. With pathological gambling, mobile phone addiction, virtual addictions, alimentary diso...

  11. Local drug delivery to prevent restenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedial, Stephen M; Ghosh, Soumojit; Saunders, R Scott; Suwanabol, Pasithorn A; Shi, Xudong; Liu, Bo; Kent, K Craig

    2013-05-01

    Despite significant advances in vascular biology, bioengineering, and pharmacology, restenosis remains a limitation to the overall efficacy of vascular reconstructions, both percutaneous and open. Although the pathophysiology of intimal hyperplasia is complex, a number of drugs and molecular tools have been identified that can prevent restenosis. Moreover, the focal nature of this process lends itself to treatment with local drug administration. This article provides a broad overview of current and future techniques for local drug delivery that have been developed to prevent restenosis after vascular interventions. A systematic electronic literature search using PubMed was performed for all accessible published articles through September 2012. In an effort to remain current, additional searches were performed for abstracts presented at relevant societal meetings, filed patents, clinical trials, and funded National Institutes of Health awards. The efficacy of local drug delivery has been demonstrated in the coronary circulation with the current clinical use of drug-eluting stents. Until recently, however, drug-eluting stents were not found to be efficacious in the peripheral circulation. Further pursuit of intraluminal devices has led to the development of balloon-based technologies, with a recent surge in trials involving drug-eluting balloons. Early data appear encouraging, particularly for treatment of superficial femoral artery lesions, and several devices have recently received the Conformité Européene mark in Europe. Investigators have also explored the periadventitial application of biomaterials containing antirestenotic drugs, an approach that could be particularly useful for surgical bypass or endarterectomy. In the past, systemic drug delivery has been unsuccessful; however, there has been recent exploration of intravenous delivery of drugs designed specifically to target injured or reconstructed arteries. Our review revealed a multitude of additional

  12. Y-90 microsphere therapy: prevention of adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Cheryl C; Campbell, Janice; Bakalyar, Donovan; Beauvais, Michele; Feng, Wenzheng; Savin, Michael

    2009-08-01

    Thirty-three (33) events that were inconsistent with intended treatment for 471 Y-90 microsphere deliveries were analyzed from 2001 to 2007. Each occurrence was categorized, based on root-cause analysis, as a device/product defect and/or operator error event. Events were further categorized, if there was an adverse outcome, as spill/leak, termination, recatheterization, dose deviation, and/or a regulatory medical event. Of 264 Y-90 Therasphere (MDS Nordion, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) treatments, 15 events were reported (5.7%). Of 207 Y-90 SIR-Spheres (Sirtex, Wilmington, MA) treatments, 18 events were reported (8.7%). Twenty-five (25) of 33 events (76%) were device/product defects: 73% for Therasphere (11 of 15) and 78% for SIR-Spheres (14 of 18). There were 31 adverse outcomes associated with 33 events: 15 were leaks and/or spills, 9 resulted in termination of the dose administration, 3 resulted in recatheterization for dose compensation, 2 were dose deviations (doses differing from the prescribed between 10% and 20%), and 2 were reported as regulatory medical events. Fifty-five (55) corrective actions were taken: 39 (71%) were related to the manufacturer and 16 (29%) were hospital based. This process of analyzing each event and measuring our outcomes has been effective at minimizing adverse events and improving patient safety.

  13. Adverse drug reactions monitoring of psychotropic drugs: a tertiary care centre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemendra Singh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many new psychotropic drugs/ agents have been developed and found to be effective in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. However, these drugs also exhibit adverse drug reactions (ADRs which may affect compliance in psychiatric patients. Hence the present study was aimed at monitoring and assessing ADRs caused by psychotropic drugs. Methods: A hospital based prospective observational study was carried out in the psychiatry outpatient department of a tertiary care teaching hospital for the duration of six months. Two hundred and two patients were included in the study and ADRs were documented using a predesigned data collection form. The causality assessment was carried out as per the criteria of both the World Health Organization- Uppsala Monitoring Centre (WHO-UMC and Naranjo scale. Severity and predictability assessment of ADRs were also performed. Results: A total of 106 ADRs were observed during the study period with majority of them occurring in 25-35 years of age group (40.56%. Weight gain (18.86% followed by sedation (16.03% and insomnia (11.32% were found to be the commonest ADRs. Risperidone (19.8% and escitalopram (12.3% were the drugs responsible for majority of the ADRs. Causality assessment showed that most of ADRs were possible and probable. 94.33% of ADRs were found to be mild and 89% of them were predictable. Conclusion: A wide range of ADRs affecting central nervous and metabolic systems were reported with psychotropic drugs. The study findings necessitate the need for an active pharmacovigilance programme for the safe and effective use of psychotropics.

  14. Peer counseling: Drug and alcohol abuse prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, R A

    1983-12-01

    A peer counseling program was developed as a method for preventing drug and alcohol abuse among high school juniors and seniors. The program was implemented and the results were monitored to evaluate the impact of the program on the students. An analysis of the data showed that the students were able to learn and utilize peer counseling skills but that the prevention of drug abuse could not be documented in this study. Subjective reports, however, were found to support the effects of the program.

  15. Occurrence of adverse drug reactions in patients taking tenofovir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Setting: Harare central hospital opportunistic infections clinic. Methods: A cross sectional survey of 100 conveniently sampled HIV-positive adult patients was carried out. Study variables were socio-demographic factors, renal and Central Nervous System (CNS) adverse effects, treatment history and self-reported adherence.

  16. Utilization and Incidence of Adverse Drug Reactions to Artemisinin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efforts to monitor the use of ACTs among this group of vulnerable population are recommended. Furthermore, institutionalization of a functioning and effective mechanism to increase awareness and improve reporting of adverse effects of ACT generally is also suggested. Keywords: Malaria, artemisinin-based combination ...

  17. Quality of life in children with adverse drug reactions: a narrative and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozzo-Magaña, Blanca R; Rieder, Michael J; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro

    2015-10-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a common problem affecting adults and children. The economic impact of the adverse drug reactions has been widely evaluated; however, studies of the impact on the quality of life of children with adverse drug reactions are scarce. The aim was to evaluate studies assessing the health-related quality of life of children with adverse drug reactions. We conducted a systematic review that included the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library (including the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and the Health Technology Assessment Databases). Nine studies were included. Four of the studies were conducted in children with epilepsy; the rest of them involved children with chronic viral hepatitis, Crohn's disease, paediatric cancer and multiple adverse drug reactions compared with healthy children. Based on their findings, authors of all studies concluded that adverse drug reactions had a negative impact on the quality of life of children. No meta-analysis was conducted given the heterogeneous nature of the studies. To date, there is no specific instrument that measures quality of life of children with adverse drug reactions, and the information available is poor and variable. In general, adverse drug reactions have a negative impact on the quality of life of affected children. For those interested in this area, more work needs to be done to improve tools that help to evaluate efficiently the health-related quality of life of children with adverse drug reactions and chronic diseases. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. Prospective Observational Study of Adverse Drug Reactions of Anticancer Drugs Used in Cancer Treatment in a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, V K; Sewal, R K; Ahmad, Yusra; Medhi, B

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of anticancer drugs are a worldwide problem and cannot be ignored. Adverse drug reactions can range from nausea, vomiting or any other mild reaction to severe myelosuppression. The study was planned to observe the suspected adverse drug reactions of cancer chemotherapy in patients aged >18 years having cancer attending Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh. During the study period, 101 patients of breast cancer and 73 patients of lung cancer were screened for occurrence of adverse drug reactions during their treatment with chemotherapy. About 87.36% patients experienced adverse drug reactions, 90.09% and 83.56% of breast and lung cancer patients experienced at least one adverse drug reaction respectively. In breast cancer patients, 41.58% patients were prescribed fluorouracil+doxorubicin+cyclophosphamide while paclitaxel was prescribed to 22.77% patients. Alopecia (54.94%), nail discolouration (43.96%), dysgeusia (38.46%), anorexia (30.77%), nausea (29.67%), and neuropathy (29.67%) were found to be very common in breast cancer patients treated with single/combined regimen. In lung cancer group of patients, cisplatin with docetaxel, cisplatin with pemetrexed and cisplatin with irinotecan were prescribed to 30.14, 24.65 and 17.81% patients, respectively. Dysgeusia (40.98%), diarrhoea (39.34%), anorexia (32.77%) and constipation (31.15%) and alopecia (31.15%) were commonly observed adverse drug reactions having lung cancer patients. Causality assessments using World Health Organization causality assessment scale showed that observed adverse drug reactions were of probable (64.67%) and possible (35.33%) categories. Alopecia, dysgeusia, anorexia, constipation diarrhoea, nausea, nail discoloration were more prevalent amongst the cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  19. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions in a tertiary care teaching hospital in India: An intensive monitoring study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejal Thakkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The epidemiological data based on intensive monitoring studies are limited for the cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADRs in terms of incidence. Most of earlier Indian studies focused only on types and causative drugs of CADRs. Aim: The aim of this study is to analyze the CADRs with reference to the incidence, its subgroup analysis, causative drugs, and other clinical characteristics in Indian population. Methodology: Intensive monitoring study was carried out over a period of 3 years in the dermatology outpatient and inpatient department. CADRs due to only systematically administered drugs were considered. The WHO definition for CADR, the WHO causality definitions, modified Schumock and Thornton's criteria for preventability, and International Conference on Harmonisation E2A guidelines for seriousness were considered. Incidence was expressed in percentage and its 95% confidence interval. The incidence was analyzed on basis of characteristics of study population and CADRs. Results: A total of 171 CADRs were observed from 37,623 patients. The CADR incidence was 0.45% (95% CI: 0.39–0.53. The incidence did not significantly differ in different age groups and gender. Commonly observed CADRs were maculopapular rash (23.98%, urticaria (21.64%, and fixed drug eruptions (FDEs (18.13%. Antimicrobials (35.18% and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs were suspected in all common CADRs. Anti-infective and NSAIDs were most commonly suspected drugs in overall CADRs, maculopapular rash, urticaria, FDEs, and erythema multiforme. The exact nature of drugs remained inaccessible in one-fourth cases due to use of the over-the-counter self-medications. The incidence of preventable and serious and fatal CADRs was 0.08% (95% CI: 0.05–0.11, 0.04% (95% CI: 0.02–0.06, and 0.003% (95% CI: 0.000–0.001, respectively. Conclusion: Ethnic characteristics should be considered while interpreting incidence from the international studies. The

  20. Adverse effects of sympathomimetic drugs in a group of adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Jerí, F. Raúl; Departamento de Medicina, Sección de Neurología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Carbajal, Carlos; Departamento de Medicina, Sección de Neurología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Sánchez M., César; Departamento de Medicina, Sección de Neurología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Clinical observations of 35 youths who used hallucinogenic drugs for two to four years are mostly present . The proportion of males was three times compared to women , almost all households were from well integrated and belonged to a higher socio- economic level or medium . The drugs used were marijuana , LSD , barbiturates , mescaline , afetamina , methaqualone and alcohol, in various combinations . All of these young people showed signs of psychological disturbance , personality disorders g...

  1. Increasing the Number of Adverse Drug Reactions Reporting: the Role of Clinical Pharmacy Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniasadi, Shadi; Habibi, Maryam; Haghgoo, Roodabeh; Karimi Gamishan, Masoumeh; Dabaghzadeh, Fatemeh; Farasatinasab, Maryam; Farsaei, Shadi; Gharekhani, Afshin; Kafi, Hamidreza; Karimzadeh, Iman; Kharazmkia, Ali; Najmeddin, Farhad; Nikvarz, Naemeh; Oghazian, Mohammad Bagher; Rezaee, Haleh; Sadeghi, Kourosh; Tafazzoli, Ali; Shahsavari, Nahid; Fahimi, Fanak

    2014-01-01

    Detection of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in hospitals provides an important measure of the burden of drug related morbidity on the healthcare system. Spontaneous reporting of ADRs is scare and several obstacles to such reporting have been identified formerly. This study aimed to determine the role of clinical pharmacy residents in ADR reporting within a hospital setting. Clinical pharmacy residents were trained to report all suspected ADRs through ADR-reporting yellow cards. The incidence, pattern, seriousness, and preventability of the reported ADRs were analyzed. During the period of 12 months, for 8559 patients, 202 ADR reports were received. The most frequently reported reactions were due to anti-infective agents (38.38%). Rifampin accounted for the highest number of the reported ADRs among anti-infective agents. The gastro-intestinal system was the most frequently affected system (21.56%) of all reactions. Fifty four of the ADRs were reported as serious reactions. Eighteen of the ADRs were classified as preventable. Clinical pharmacy residents' involvement in the ADR reporting program could improve the ADR reporting system. PMID:24734083

  2. [Direct costs and clinical aspects of adverse drug reactions in patients admitted to a level 3 hospital internal medicine ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribiño, Gabriel; Maldonado, Carlos; Segura, Omar; Díaz, Jorge

    2006-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) occur frequently in hospitals and increase costs of health care; however, few studies have quantified the clinical and economic impact of ADRs in Colombia. These impacts were evaluated by calculating costs associated with ADRs in patients hospitalized in the internal medicine ward of a Level 3 hospital located in Bogotá, Colombia. In addition, salient clinical features of ADRs were identified and characterized. Intensive follow-ups for a cohort of patients were conducted for a five month period in order to detect ADRs; different ways to classify them, according to literature, were considered as well. Information was collected using the INVIMA reporting format, and causal probability was evaluated with the Naranjo algorithm. Direct costs were calculated from the perspective of payer, based on the following costs: additional hospital stay, medications, paraclinical tests, additional procedures, patient displacement to intermediate or intensive care units, and other costs. Of 836 patients admitted to the service, 268 adverse drug reactions were detected in 208 patients (incidence proportion 25.1%, occurence rate 0.32). About the ADRs found, 74.3% were classified as probable, 92.5% were type A, and 81.3% were moderate. The body system most often affected was the circulatory system (33.9%). Drugs acting on the blood were most frequently those ones associated with adverse reactions (37.6%). The costs resulting from medical care of adverse drug reactions varied from COL dollar 93,633,422 (USD dollar 35,014.92) to COL dollar 122,155,406 (USD dollar 45,680.94), according to insurance type, during the study period. Adverse drug reactions have a significant negative health and financial impact on patient welfare. Because of the substantial resources required for their medical care and the significant proportion of preventable adverse reactions, active programs of institutional pharmacovigilance are highly recommended.

  3. Prevention and Management of Adverse Reactions Induced by Iodinated Contrast Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi Wei; Leow, Kheng Song; Zhu, Yujin; Tan, Cher Heng

    2016-04-01

    Iodinated radiocontrast media (IRCM) is widely used in current clinical practice. Although IRCM is generally safe, serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs) may still occur. IRCM-induced ADRs may be subdivided into chemotoxic and hypersensitivity reactions. Several factors have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of ADRs, including previous contrast media reactions, history of asthma and allergic disease, etc. Contrast media with lower osmolality is generally recommended for at-risk patients to prevent ADRs. Current premedication prophylaxis in at-risk patients may reduce the risk of ADRs. However, there is still a lack of consensus on the prophylactic role of premedication. Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is another component of IRCM-related ADRs. Hydration remains the mainstay of CIN prophylaxis in at-risk patients. Despite several preventive measures, ADRs may still occur. Treatment strategies for potential contrast reactions are also summarised in this article. This article summarises the pathophysiology, epidemiology and risk factors of ADRs with emphasis on prevention and treatment strategies. This will allow readers to understand the rationale behind appropriate patient preparation for diagnostic imaging involving IRCM.

  4. Adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs in Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauciene Santana Damasceno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to characterize and estimate the frequency of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs in the population treated at the Centro de Saúde Escola Germano Sinval Faria, a primary health care clinic in Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro City, and to explore the relationship between adverse drug reactions and some of the patients' demographic and health characteristics. METHODS: This descriptive study was conducted via patient record review of incident cases between 2004 and 2008. RESULTS: Of the 176 patients studied, 41.5% developed one or more adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs, totaling 126 occurrences. The rate of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs was higher among women, patients aged 50 years or older, those with four or more comorbidities, and those who used five or more drugs. Of the total reactions, 71.4% were mild. The organ systems most affected were as follows: the gastrointestinal tract (29.4%, the skin and appendages (21.4%, and the central and peripheral nervous systems (14.3%. Of the patients who experienced adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs, 65.8% received no drug treatment for their adverse reactions, and 4.1% had one of the antituberculosis drugs suspended because of adverse reactions. "Probable reactions" (75% predominated over "possible reactions" (24%. In the study sample, 64.3% of the reactions occurred during the first two months of treatment, and most (92.6% of the reactions were ascribed to the combination of rifampicin + isoniazid + pyrazinamide (Regimen I. A high dropout rate from tuberculosis treatment (24.4% was also observed. CONCLUSION: This study suggests a high rate of adverse reactions to antituberculosis drugs.

  5. Paediatric adverse drug reactions following use of asthma medications in Europe from 2007 to 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2014-01-01

    Background Information about safety issues from use of asthma medications in children is limited. Spontaneous adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports can provide information about serious and rarely occurring ADRs in children. Objective To characterize paediatric ADRs reported for asthma medications...

  6. Adverse drug reactions: 'six rights' to ensure best practice for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanneh, Agnes

    2011-06-01

    In the second of a two-part article on adverse drug reactions Agnes Kanneh describes the six 'rights' of the recipient of a drug. These are: that the right person should receive the right drug, in the right dose, at the right time within the right intervals, via the right route, followed by the right (correct) documentation. The author argues that the observance of these 'rights' by children's nurses ensures the best pharmacotherapeutic practice, thus a robust practical safeguard in adverse drug reactions and threats to the good reputation of the nursing profession.

  7. Use of a trigger tool to detect adverse drug reactions in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Silvana Maria; Romualdo, Aruana; de Abreu Ferraresi, Andressa; Zelezoglo, Giovana Roberta; Marra, Alexandre R; Edmond, Michael B

    2017-11-15

    Although there are systems for reporting adverse drug reactions (ADR), these safety events remain under reported. The low-cost, low-tech trigger tool method is based on the detection of events through clues, and it seems to increase the detection of adverse events compared to traditional methodologies. This study seeks to estimate the prevalence of adverse reactions to drugs in patients seeking care in the emergency department. Retrospective study from January to December, 2014, applying the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) trigger tool methodology for patients treated at the emergency room of a tertiary care hospital. The estimated prevalence of adverse reactions in patients presenting to the emergency department was 2.3% [CI 95 1.3% to 3.3%]; 28.6% of cases required hospitalization at an average cost of US$ 5698.44. The most common triggers were hydrocortisone (57% of the cases), diphenhydramine (14%) and fexofenadine (14%). Anti-infectives (19%), cardiovascular agents (14%), and musculoskeletal drugs (14%) were the most common causes of adverse reactions. According to the Naranjo Scale, 71% were classified as possible and 29% as probable. There was no association between adverse reactions and age and sex in the present study. The use of the trigger tool to identify adverse reactions in the emergency department was possible to identify a prevalence of 2.3%. It showed to be a viable method that can provide a better understanding of adverse drug reactions in this patient population.

  8. Low quality of reporting adverse drug reactions in paediatric randomised controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Tjalling W; van Roon, Eric N

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Randomised controlled trials (RCT) offer an opportunity to learn about frequency and character of adverse drug reactions. To improve the quality of reporting adverse effects, the Consort group published recommendations. The authors studied the application of these recommendations in RCTs

  9. Knowledge of health care workers on corticosteroid adverse drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Corticosteroids form the cornerstone of management for a myriad of rheumatological, dermatological and chronic respiratory tract diseases. Whereas these drugs are crucial in reducing morbidity and mortality, they are not without inherent grave risks. Health Care Workers (HCWs) providing care to patients on ...

  10. EDITORIAL ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS Two articles in th

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pharm-chem

    bleeding, deafness, erectile dysfunction and loss of libido, amenorrhoea, alopecia, insomnia, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, nightmares, peripheral neuropathy, seizures, rashes, fever, weight gain and spontaneous tendon damage. The liver and kidney are important organs in metabolism and excretion of drugs, respectively.

  11. Is it Safe? Adverse drug effects and cardiac arrhythmias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varkevisser, R.

    2014-01-01

    The potentially life-threatening polymorphic ventricular arrhythmia Torsade de Pointes (TdP) generally occurs in the setting of delayed ventricular repolarization, as reflected on the ECG by a prolonged QT interval. A growing number of drugs are associated with QT prolongation and/or TdP, as a

  12. Common adverse drug reactions with psychiatric medications and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    psychiatry' yielded 113 entries, implicating a wide range of psychiatric drugs in ADRs. Most of these papers were case reports, but there are in addition a range of ADR studies over a number of years that have reported on psychiatric patient samples.

  13. The adverse effects of albendazole and praziquantel in mass drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and headache. This shows that more pupils from Mwea, (albendazole and praziquantel) than from Ndia (albendazole alone) experienced minor side effects. These results show that both drugs have temporary, minor side effects, which can be managed by trained schoolteachers by ensuring that the school children do not ...

  14. Information about adverse drug reactions reported in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Christensen, Arne; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2010-01-01

    included empirically based articles on ADRs in populations aged 0 to 17 years. Studies monitoring ADRs in patients with particular conditions or drug exposure were excluded. We extracted information about types and seriousness of ADRs, therapeutic groups, age and gender of the child and category...

  15. Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring in Ethiopia: Analysis of case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjørn

    2. Embassy of India. 2006. Market survey on bulk drug and pharmaceutical products. [Online]. Embassy of. India. Available from the World Wide Web: . [Accessed 14 May, 2008]. 3. Pirmohamed M, Atuah K, Dodoo A, Winstanley P. Pharmacovigilance in developing countries. British.

  16. Determination of the frequency and direct cost of the adverse drug events in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Estela; Rodríguez, Claudio; Pampliega, Eneas; Filinger, Ester

    2009-05-01

    To determine the frequency and the direct costs of adverse drug reactions, in an ambulatory population of the City of Buenos Aires, Argentina and its area of influence. A retrospective study was done during a period of three months on approximately 300.000 residents of the Buenos Aires area, gathering data according to the selected variables by means of the electronic capture of prescriptions dispensed in pharmacies of the area. This method enables the detection and registration of potential conflicts that may arise between a prescribed drug and factors such as: patient's demographic, clinical and drug profile. The analysis unit was defined as the happening of a moderate or severe adverse event reported by the system. The selected variables were the incidence of these effects and the direct cost was calculated as the value of the drugs that induced the adverse event. The events were classified according to the following interactions: a) drug-drug, b) drug-pediatrics, c) drug-gender, d) drug-pregnancy and abuse of controlled substances. The observed frequency shows great variability and the shortage of available data for ambulatory populations. We found 6.74% of reported events over the total of processed items, which generated an additional cost equivalent to 4.58% of the total pharmaceutical expenses. This study has only evaluated the cost occurred by the use of a drug that will lead to an adverse reaction. Moderate and severe reactions were included regardless of the important indirect costs, hospitalization costs, tests, physician fees, etc.

  17. [Methodology for Estimating the Risk of Adverse Drug Reactions in Pregnant Women: Analysis of the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Takamasa; Ohtsu, Fumiko; Sekiya, Yasuaki; Mori, Chiyo; Sakata, Hiroshi; Goto, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Safety information regarding drug use during pregnancy is insufficient. The present study aimed to establish an optimal signal detection method to identify adverse drug reactions in pregnant women and to evaluate information in the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) database between April 2004 and November 2014. We identified reports on pregnant women using the Standardised MedDRA Queries. We calculated the proportional reporting ratio (PRR) and reporting odds ratio (ROR) of the risk factors for the two known risks of antithyroid drugs and methimazole (MMI) embryopathy, and ritodrine and fetal/infant cardiovascular events. The PRR and ROR values differed between all reports in the JADER database and those on pregnant women, affecting whether signal detection criteria were met. Therefore we considered that reports on pregnant women should be used when risks associated with pregnancy were determined using signal detection. Analyses of MMI embryopathy revealed MMI signals [PRR, 159.7; ROR, 669.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 282.4-1588.7] but no propylthiouracil signals (PRR, 1.98; ROR, 2.0; 95%CI, 0.3-15.4). These findings were consistent with those of reported risks. Analyses of fetal/infant cardiovascular events revealed ritodrine signals (PRR, 2.1; ROR, 2.1; 95%CI, 1.4-3.3). These findings were also consistent with reported risks. Mining the JADER database was helpful for analyzing adverse drug reactions in pregnant women.

  18. Adverse drug reactions in a psychiatric department of tertiary care teaching hospital in India: Analysis of spontaneously reported cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tejas K; Bhabhor, Prakash H; Desai, Nimisha; Shah, Saurabh; Patel, Parvati B; Vatsala, Ela; Panigrahi, Sanjibani

    2015-10-01

    The epidemiological data are limited for the spontaneous adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting system in psychiatry and its comparison with intensive monitoring studies in terms of causative drugs, seriousness, preventability and drug interactions. This spontaneous ADR reporting study was carried out over a period of three years in the psychiatry department. We adopted WHO definition for an ADR, Naranjo's algorithm for causality, WHO-ADR terminology for the labeling of involved organ-system, International conference on harmonisation (ICH) E2A guidelines for seriousness, modified Schumock and Thornton's criteria for preventability and Medscape drug interaction checker for drug interactions. Two subgroup analyses were performed to find out the risk factors for the serious and preventable reactions. A total of 97 ADRs from 67 patients were included for analysis. The incidence of 'overall' and 'serious ADRs were 0.69% (95% CI: 0.54%, 0.88%) and 0.18% (95% CI: 0.12-0.29%), respectively. The females experienced more ADRs than males. The most commonly reported ADR, incriminated pharmacology group and drug, were extrapyramidal movement disorders (22.68%), atypical antipsychotics (35.62%) and escitalopram (13.91%), respectively. One out of five and one out three reactions were considered as 'serious' and 'preventable', respectively. The drug interactions contributed in 34.02% reactions. The factors significantly associated with 'serious' reactions were typical antipsychotics [OR: 5.47 (1.68, 17.87)], central and peripheral nervous system disorders [OR: 24.00 (5.12, 112.5)] and extrapyramidal reactions [OR: 14.03 (4.43, 44.43)]. The polypharmacy [OR: 5.85 (1.90, 18.03)] was significantly associated with 'preventable' reactions. The spontaneous reporting system is efficient to detect serious reactions and preventable reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Research on foreign countries laws and regulations on surveillance and reporting of postmarketing drugs adverse reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng; Xie, Yanming

    2009-06-01

    Following more and more new drugs are authorized into market, new, serious or unexpected adverse drug reactions appear frequently, which is a serious threat to people health and life. Through making laws and guidelines, governments of various countries aim to strengthen and standardize the surveillance and reporting of postmarketing drugs. The drugs management department of our country are doing related jobs positively, but there are some problems, such as drug risk-menagement is not emphasized well, and the management department lacks clarity on operating related regulations. This article tries to explore foreign countries' laws and regulations on the surveillance and reporting of postmarketing drugs, aiming to provide reference for our courtry.

  20. Understanding and preventing drug–drug and drug–gene interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Cara; Sheehan, Nancy L

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant administration of multiple drugs can lead to unanticipated drug interactions and resultant adverse drug events with their associated costs. A more thorough understanding of the different cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and drug transporters has led to new methods to try to predict and prevent clinically relevant drug interactions. There is also an increased recognition of the need to identify the impact of pharmacogenetic polymorphisms on drug interactions. More stringent regulatory requirements have evolved for industry to classify cytochrome inhibitors and inducers, test the effect of drug interactions in the presence of polymorphic enzymes, and evaluate multiple potentially interacting drugs simultaneously. In clinical practice, drug alert software programs have been developed. This review discusses drug interaction mechanisms and strategies for screening and minimizing exposure to drug interactions. We also provide future perspectives for reducing the risk of clinically significant drug interactions. PMID:24745854

  1. Preventing Drug Abuse in the Workplace. Drug Abuse Prevention Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicary, Judith R.; Resnik, Henry

    This monograph is designed to help employers, employees, managers, and union officials develop effective workplace policies and programs to prevent drug and alcohol abuse and other health problems. The text of the monograph: (1) presents information regarding the costs of drug and alcohol use in the workplace, and evidence of potential…

  2. School-Based Drug Prevention: What Kind of Drug Use Does It Prevent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulkins, Jonathan P.; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Paddock, Susan; Chiesa, James

    School-based drug prevention programs target not only the use of illicit drugs such as marijuana but also licit substances such as alcohol and tobacco. These programs thus have the potential of benefiting society not only by reducing the violence and criminal justice costs associated with abuse of alcohol and cigarettes. This opportunity for…

  3. Why Clinicians Don't Report Adverse Drug Events: Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohl, Corinne M; Small, Serena S; Peddie, David; Badke, Katherin; Bailey, Chantelle; Balka, Ellen

    2018-02-27

    Adverse drug events are unintended and harmful events related to medications. Adverse drug events are important for patient care, quality improvement, drug safety research, and postmarketing surveillance, but they are vastly underreported. Our objectives were to identify barriers to adverse drug event documentation and factors contributing to underreporting. This qualitative study was conducted in 1 ambulatory center, and the emergency departments and inpatient wards of 3 acute care hospitals in British Columbia between March 2014 and December 2016. We completed workplace observations and focus groups with general practitioners, hospitalists, emergency physicians, and hospital and community pharmacists. We analyzed field notes by coding and iteratively analyzing our data to identify emerging concepts, generate thematic and event summaries, and create workflow diagrams. Clinicians validated emerging concepts by applying them to cases from their clinical practice. We completed 238 hours of observations during which clinicians investigated 65 suspect adverse drug events. The observed events were often complex and diagnosed over time, requiring the input of multiple providers. Providers documented adverse drug events in charts to support continuity of care but never reported them to external agencies. Providers faced time constraints, and reporting would have required duplication of documentation. Existing reporting systems are not suited to capture the complex nature of adverse drug events or adapted to workflow and are simply not used by frontline clinicians. Systems that are integrated into electronic medical records, make use of existing data to avoid duplication of documentation, and generate alerts to improve safety may address the shortcomings of existing systems and generate robust adverse drug event data as a by-product of safer care. ©Corinne M Hohl, Serena S Small, David Peddie, Katherin Badke, Chantelle Bailey, Ellen Balka. Originally published in JMIR

  4. Prescription drug therapies for prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Mary Beth

    2006-07-01

    To characterize the changes in bone mass with age in women and men, explain the physiology and pathophysiology of the bone remodeling process, identify the targets for prescription osteoporosis drugs in this process, and provide details about the uses, efficacy, safety, and economics of prescription drug therapies for osteoporosis prevention and treatment. Preventing accelerated bone loss and decreasing age-related decreases in bone density are the primary goals of prescription drug therapy for osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates are the drugs of choice for preventing and treating postmenopausal osteoporosis. Alternatives for patients who cannot take bisphosphonates include raloxifene and calcitonin salmon. Menopause is accompanied by a rapid loss in bone mass that is followed by annual losses due to aging in women, which are similar to age-related bone mass decreases in men. Most prescription drug therapies for osteoporosis prevention or treatment reduce bone resorption by inhibiting osteoclast activation and activity, with only one medication class able to increase bone formation by stimulating osteoblasts. Denosumab, an investigational monoclonal antibody that inhibits nuclear factor kB ligand, would be a new class of anti-resorptive medications. Bisphosphonates currently are the drugs of choice for preventing and treating osteoporosis, with 7- and 10-year safety data available for risedronate and alendronate, respectively. Weekly and monthly regimens of bisphosphonates improve patient acceptance. Recently, an injectable form of ibandronate received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for once every 3 months administration. Raloxifene and calcitonin salmon are alternatives for patients who cannot take bisphosphonates because of contraindications or adverse effects. Teriparatide, a recombinant parathyroid hormone fragment, not only increases bone mineral density but also increases bone connectivity. Osteoporosis medications are usually safe, especially if used

  5. Suspected adverse reactions to veterinary drugs reported in South Africa (January 1998 - February 2001 : special report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gehring

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The Veterinary Pharmacovigilance Centre received 59 reports of suspected adverse drug reactions during the period January 1998 - February 2001. The number of reports received increased after the establishment of a formal procedure for recording and responding to reports. The number of reports received per species was: dogs 19, cats 15, cattle 7, sheep/ goats 6, chickens 4, pigs 3, horses 2 and giraffe 1. Many different types of adverse reactions were reported, including lack of efficacy, hypersensitivity, inappropriate use of products by non-veterinarians, known adverse effects and adverse effects encountered with extra-label use of products.

  6. Drug-induced Liver Injury is Frequently Associated with Severe Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions: Experience from Two Australian Tertiary Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wendy C; Adler, Nikki R; Graudins, Linda V; Goldblatt, Caitlin; Goh, Michelle Sy; Roberts, Stuart K; Trubiano, Jason A; Aung, Ar Kar

    2018-01-08

    Drug-induced liver injury can be associated with certain cutaneous adverse drug reactions. We aim to demonstrate the prevalence of drug-induced liver injury in patients with cutaneous adverse drug reactions. Severity and patterns of liver injury, risk factors, causal medications and outcomes are also examined. A retrospective cohort study of patients with cutaneous adverse drug reactions was conducted across two hospitals in Australia. Patients were identified through cross-linkage of multiple databases. 104 patients with cutaneous adverse drug reactions were identified. Of these, 33 (31.7%) had liver injury, representing 50% of patients with drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, and 30.2% of patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis. Most cases of liver injury (69.7%) were of a cholestatic/mixed pattern with severe disease in 18.2%. No significant risk factors for development of liver injury were noted, but peripheral lymphocytosis may represent a risk in patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome (OR=6.0, 95% CI:1.8-19.7, p=0.003). Antimicrobials were the most common class to be implicated in drug-induced liver injury. The median length of inpatient stay was longer in patients with liver injury compared to those without (19 vs. 11 days, p=0.002). The mortality rate in those with liver injury was 15.2% and 9.9% in those without. No patients required liver transplantation. Drug-induced liver injury commonly occurs in patients with cutaneous adverse drug reactions and is associated with longer inpatient stay. Patients with Stevens-Johnson/toxic epidermal necrolysis and peripheral lymphocytosis appear to be at higher risk for developing associated liver injury. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Interventions to prevent adverse fetal programming due to maternal obesity during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanielsz, Peter W; Ford, Stephen P; Long, Nathan M; Vega, Claudia C; Reyes-Castro, Luis A; Zambrano, Elena

    2013-10-01

    Maternal obesity is a global epidemic affecting both developed and developing countries. Human and animal studies indicate that maternal obesity adversely programs the development of offspring, predisposing them to chronic diseases later in life. Several mechanisms act together to produce these adverse health effects. There is a consequent need for effective interventions that can be used in the management of human pregnancy to prevent these outcomes. The present review analyzes the dietary and exercise intervention studies performed to date in both altricial and precocial animals, rats and sheep, with the aim of preventing adverse offspring outcomes. The results of these interventions present exciting opportunities to prevent, at least in part, adverse metabolic and other outcomes in obese mothers and their offspring. © 2013 International Life Sciences Institute.

  8. A systematic review of adverse drug events associated with administration of common asthma medications in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David W.; Sperou, Arissa J.; Crotts, Jennifer; Saude, Erik; Hartling, Lisa; Stang, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the literature and determine frequencies of adverse drug events (ADE) associated with pediatric asthma medications. Methods Following PRISMA guidelines, we systematically searched six bibliographic databases between January 1991 and January 2017. Study eligibility, data extraction and quality assessment were independently completed and verified by two reviewers. We included randomized control trials (RCT), case-control, cohort, or quasi-experimental studies where the primary objective was identifying ADE in children 1 month– 18 years old exposed to commercial asthma medications. The primary outcome was ADE frequency. Findings Our search identified 14,540 citations. 46 studies were included: 24 RCT, 15 cohort, 4 RCT pooled analyses, 1 case-control, 1 open-label trial and 1 quasi-experimental study. Studies examined the following drug classes: inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) (n = 24), short-acting beta-agonists (n = 10), long-acting beta-agonists (LABA) (n = 3), ICS + LABA (n = 3), Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists (n = 3) and others (n = 3). 29 studies occurred in North America, and 29 were industry funded. We report a detailed index of 406 ADE descriptions and frequencies organized by drug class. The majority of data focuses on ICS, with 174 ADE affecting 13 organ systems including adrenal and growth suppression. We observed serious ADE, although they were rare, with frequency ranging between 0.9–6% per drug. There were no confirmed deaths, except for 13 potential deaths in a LABA study including combined adult and pediatric participants. We identified substantial methodological concerns, particularly with identifying ADE and determining severity. No studies utilized available standardized causality, severity or preventability assessments. Conclusion The majority of studies focus on ICS, with adrenal and growth suppression described. Serious ADE are relatively uncommon, with no confirmed pediatric deaths. We identify substantial

  9. Development and Initial Validation of a Patient-Reported Adverse Drug Event Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Sieta T.; Mol, Peter G. M.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Denig, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Background Direct patient reporting of adverse drug events (ADEs) is relevant for the evaluation of drug safety. To collect such data in clinical trials and postmarketing studies, a valid questionnaire is needed that can measure all possible ADEs experienced by patients. Objective Our aim was to

  10. Long term adverse drug reaction to Efavirenz in a HIV infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    2015-08-31

    Aug 31, 2015 ... He regained his memory, no longer had bad dreams or demonstrated any irrational behavior or attitude. Physicians who are involved in the care of HIV infected patients need to be aware of the possibility of adverse Drug reactions occurring in patients who have been on antiretroviral drugs for years.

  11. THE PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY ON CUTANEOUS ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS TO CHEMOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Mani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION There are a wide spectrum of adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDRs varying from transient maculopapular rash to fatal toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN. With the advent of newer and targeted therapy in the field of dermatology, the pattern of cutaneous adverse drug eruptions and the drugs responsible for them keep changing every year. Hence, this study was undertaken to ascertain the clinical spectrum of ACDRs and the causative drugs, in a tertiary care centre in South India. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was a prospective, observational study conducted in Department of Medical Oncology, Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai Medical College, Madurai during the period of March 2015 - August 2015 (6 months. Severity of the reaction was assessed using CTCAE (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events scale version 4.1. Causality of the drug was assessed using Naranjo Causality Assessment Scale. The scale was calculated first for the regimen and then for individual drugs separately. The adverse events with score of 6 or more (probable and definite adverse events were taken for the study. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION The overall incidence of ACDRs found in this study was 85%. Alopecia was the commonest ACDR occurring in 51.6% of patients. Nail pigmentation and supravenous pigmentation were the next common ACDRs, recorded in 35% and 16% of patients respectively. Imatinib caused generalised hypopigmentation in 40% of patients. Bleomycin induced, flagellate erythema and pigmentation in 17% of patients and stomatitis was seen in 11% of patients. Acneiform eruptions were recorded with erlotinib and gefitinib therapy. Supravenous pigmentation was common with 5-fluorouracil and docetaxel, occurring in 53% & 48% respectively. Newer targeted therapies like EGFR (Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors recorded low incidence of ACDRs like alopecia as against conventional antineoplastic agents. The cancer chemotherapeutic drugs are associated

  12. New Perspectives on Drug Education/Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Marsha

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, Oregon, Alaska, and the District of Columbia joined Colorado and Washington as voters approved initiatives to legally regulate and tax marijuana for adults. Other states, including California, are likely to follow in 2016. While none of these new laws allow sales to minors, there is widespread concern about the potential impact of these reforms on teenagers. Many worry that legalization will "send the wrong message," and increase access and availability, leading to an escalation in teenage use. This new social, political and cultural context presents a new challenge, as marijuana gradually becomes a normal part of the adult world, akin to alcohol. The movement toward legalization provides an opportunity to re-think our approach to teen drug education/prevention. This is the moment to examine current approaches, and devise innovative, pragmatic strategies for dealing with teens and marijuana (and other drug use). As we examine the issue of drug education/prevention in the context of legalization, we detail efforts that have been tried, and what is realistically possible to accomplish, with the health and safety of teenagers our highest priority. A reality-based approach advocates honest, science-based information; encourages moderation, if experimentation persists; promotes an understanding of the legal consequences and social context of drug use; emphasizes safety through personal responsibility and knowledge; and encourages the delay of experimentation with all intoxicating substances until adulthood.

  13. Factors that condition the spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions among nurses: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Alessia; Colaceci, Sofia; Giusti, Angela; Vellone, Ercole; Alvaro, Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    To describe and synthesise previous research on factors conditioning the spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions among nurses. Spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions by health-care providers, are a main instrument for the continuous evaluation of the risk-benefit ratio of every drug. Under-reporting of adverse drug reactions by all health-care providers, in particular by nurses, is a major limitation to this system. An integrated review of the literature was conducted using MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Scopus databases and Google Scholar. After evaluation for appropriateness related to inclusion/exclusion criteria, 16 studies were included in the final analysis and synthesis. Two factors emerged from the study: (1) intrinsic factors related to nurses' knowledge and attitudes; (2) extrinsic factors related to nurses' interaction with health-care organisations and to the relationship between nurses and physicians. Nurses' attitudes that hinder reporting include ignorance, insecurity, fear and lethargy. Nurses are not fully aware of their role in adverse drug reaction reporting. Nurses must acquire greater knowledge to implement specific skills into their daily clinical practice. To improve nurses' reporting of adverse drug reactions, it is necessary to develop management approaches that modify both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [Prevention and Treatment of Common Acute Adverse Effects With Antipsychotic Use in Adults With Schizophrenia Diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas Borrero, Álvaro Enrique; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; Vélez Traslaviña, Ángela; Castro Díaz, Sergio Mario; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; García Valencia, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    To determine the most adequate strategies for the prevention and treatment of the acute adverse effects of the use of antipsychotics. A clinical practice guideline was elaborated under the parameters of the Methodological Guide of the Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social to identify, synthesize and evaluate the evidence and make recommendations about the treatment and follow-up of adult patients with schizophrenia. A systematic literature search was carried out. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. The non-pharmacological interventions such as nutritional counseling by a nutritionist, exercise and psychotherapy are effective in preventing weight gain with the use of antipsychotics. (Kg Weight reduction in DM of -3.05 (-4.16, -1.94)). The antipsychotic change from olanzapine to aripiprazole showed weight loss and decreased BMI (decreased weight in KG DM -3.21 (-9.03, -2.61). The use of beta blockers was ineffective in reducing akathisia induced by antipsychotic; using as outcome the 50% reduction of symptoms of akathisia comparing beta-blockers with placebo RR was 1.4 (0.59, 1.83). It is recommended to make psychotherapeutic accompaniment and nutrition management of overweight for patients with weight gain. If these alternatives are ineffective is suggested to change the antipsychotic or consider starting metformin. For the management of drug-induced akathisia it is recommended to decrease the dose of the drug and the addition of lorazepam. It is recommended using 5mg biperiden IM or trihexyphenidyl 5mg orally in case of secondary acute dystonia and for the treatment of antipsychotic-induced parkinsonism to decrease the dose of antipsychotic or consider using 2 - 4mg/day of biperiden or diphenhydramine 50mg once daily. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Factors affecting patient reporting of adverse drug reactions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Dweik, Rania; Stacey, Dawn; Kohen, Dafna; Yaya, Sanni

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the barriers and motives influencing consumer reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). A systematic review, guided by the Cochrane Handbook, was conducted. Electronic searches included MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from 1964 to December 2014. Eligible studies addressed patients' perceptions and factors influencing ADR reporting. Studies about healthcare professional (HCP) reporting of ADRs were excluded. Studies were appraised for quality, and results were analysed descriptively. Of 1435 citations identified, 21 studies were eligible. Studies were primarily conducted in the UK, the Netherlands and Australia. The identified barriers to patient reporting of ADRs (n = 15 studies) included poor awareness, confusion about who should report the ADR, difficulties with reporting procedures, lack of feedback on submitted reports, mailing costs, ADRs resolved and prior negative reporting experiences. The identified motives for patients reporting ADRs (n = 10 studies) were: preventing others from having similar ADRs, wanting personal feedback, improving medication safety, informing regulatory agencies, improving HCP practices, responding to HCPs not reporting their ADRs and having been asked to report ADRs by HCPs. Most patients were not aware of reporting systems and others were confused about reporting. Patients were mainly motivated to make their ADRs known to prevent similar suffering in other patients. By increasing patient familiarity and providing clear reporting processes, reporting systems could better achieve patient reporting of ADRs. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. The effect size of type 2 diabetes mellitus on tuberculosis drug resistance and adverse treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Navarro, Lucia Monserrat; Restrepo, Blanca I; Fuentes-Dominguez, Francisco Javier; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Morales-Romero, Jaime; López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Comas, Iñaki; Zenteno-Cuevas, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the effect size of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on tuberculosis (TB) treatment outcomes and multi drug resistance (MDR). A cohort with 507 individuals with diagnosed TB included 183 with coexistence of T2DM and TB (TB-T2DM). Participants were identified at the time of TB diagnosis and followed during the course of TB treatment. Then we computed relative risks and adjustments by Cox proportional hazards for outcome variables (drug resistance, death, relapse, treatment failure), and the size of their effect as Cohen's-d. Patients with TB-T2DM were more likely to remain positive for acid-fast bacilli after two months of anti-TB treatment RR = [2.01 (95% CI: 1.3, 3.1)], to have drug resistant (DR) [OR 3.5 (95% CI: 1.8, 6.7)] and multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB [OR 3.5 (95% CI: 1.8, 7.1)]. The Cohen's-d for DR or MDR in T2DM was 0.69 when compared with non-DM subjects. The T2DM patients had higher odds of resistance to isoniazid (OR 3.9, 95% CI: 2.01, 7.9), rifampicin (OR 3.4, 95% CI: 1.6, 7.2) and pyrazinamide (OR 9.4, 95% CI: 2.8, 25.6), and their effect sizes were ≥0.67. Patients with TB-T2DM (versus no DM) were more likely to present with MDR TB (HR 3.1; 95% CI: 1.7, 5.8; p < 0.001), treatment failure (HR 2.04; 95% CI: 1.07, 3.8; p = 0.02) and relapse (HR 1.86; 95% CI: 1.09, 3.1; p = 0.02), with effect size ≥0.34. T2DM showed a substantial contribution to the presence of DR or MDR-TB and to adverse clinical outcomes during and after TB treatment. Our findings support the importance for routine screening of T2DM among newly-diagnosed TB patients in order to stratify them for immediate DR assessment, and highlight the need for clinical trials to evaluate variations to the standard TB treatment in TB-T2DM to prevent adverse treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Knowledge graph prediction of unknown adverse drug reactions and validation in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Daniel M; Wu, Honghan; Iqbal, Ehtesham; Dzahini, Olubanke; Ibrahim, Zina M; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; Dobson, Richard J B

    2017-11-27

    Unknown adverse reactions to drugs available on the market present a significant health risk and limit accurate judgement of the cost/benefit trade-off for medications. Machine learning has the potential to predict unknown adverse reactions from current knowledge. We constructed a knowledge graph containing four types of node: drugs, protein targets, indications and adverse reactions. Using this graph, we developed a machine learning algorithm based on a simple enrichment test and first demonstrated this method performs extremely well at classifying known causes of adverse reactions (AUC 0.92). A cross validation scheme in which 10% of drug-adverse reaction edges were systematically deleted per fold showed that the method correctly predicts 68% of the deleted edges on average. Next, a subset of adverse reactions that could be reliably detected in anonymised electronic health records from South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust were used to validate predictions from the model that are not currently known in public databases. High-confidence predictions were validated in electronic records significantly more frequently than random models, and outperformed standard methods (logistic regression, decision trees and support vector machines). This approach has the potential to improve patient safety by predicting adverse reactions that were not observed during randomised trials.

  18. Towards Large-scale Twitter Mining for Drug-related Adverse Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Jiang; Topaloglu, Umit; Yu, Fan

    2012-10-29

    Drug-related adverse events pose substantial risks to patients who consume post-market or Drug-related adverse events pose substantial risks to patients who consume post-market or investigational drugs. Early detection of adverse events benefits not only the drug regulators, but also the manufacturers for pharmacovigilance. Existing methods rely on patients' "spontaneous" self-reports that attest problems. The increasing popularity of social media platforms like the Twitter presents us a new information source for finding potential adverse events. Given the high frequency of user updates, mining Twitter messages can lead us to real-time pharmacovigilance. In this paper, we describe an approach to find drug users and potential adverse events by analyzing the content of twitter messages utilizing Natural Language Processing (NLP) and to build Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers. Due to the size nature of the dataset (i.e., 2 billion Tweets), the experiments were conducted on a High Performance Computing (HPC) platform using MapReduce, which exhibits the trend of big data analytics. The results suggest that daily-life social networking data could help early detection of important patient safety issues.

  19. Incidence and determinants of medication errors and adverse drug events among hospitalized children in West Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedefo, Mohammed Gebre; Mitike, Abraham Haileamlak; Angamo, Mulugeta Tarekegn

    2016-07-07

    Medication errors cause a large number of adverse drug events with negative patient health outcomes and are a major public-health burden contributing to 18.7-56 % of all adverse drug events among hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and determinants of medication errors and adverse drug events among hospitalized children. A prospective observational study was conducted among hospitalized children in the pediatrics ward of Nekemte Referral Hospital from February 24 to March 28, 2014. Data were collected by using checklist guided observation and review of medication order sheets, medication administration records, and other medical charts of the patients. To identify the independent predictors of medication errors and adverse drug events, backward logistic regression analysis was used. Statistical significance was considered at p-value Nekemte Referral Hospital. In particular, children with multiple medications and longer hospital stays, and those with co-morbidities and longer hospital stays, were at greater risk for medication errors and adverse drug events, respectively.

  20. [Introduction of "the manual for handling disorders due to adverse drug reactions"--focus on the antibiotics related severe adverse drug reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Mitsuo

    2008-08-01

    Because the drug-induced severe adverse reaction (SAR) is rare and often occur in the unexpected organs, the physician could be unfamiliar to SAR. In that case the early stage of the SAR is easy to overlook. So the Ministry of the Health and Welfare of Japan (MHLW) started the "Comprehensive project to deal with the disorders due to adverse drug reactions" as a four years plan since 2005. In this project, the MHLW published "the manual for handling disorders due to adverse drug reactions" in corporation with the academia. This manual is constituted by two parts, one is intended for the parents, and the other is for the general healthcare providers. In this article, the aim and the progress of the manuals and the brief summary of the SAR induced by the antibiotics will be explained. By the end of the June 2008, 29 manuals have been released, and 16 of them are antibiotics-related. It is needless to say that antibiotics are essential in the modern medical care, close monitoring of the symptom of SAR in untargeted organ is required in use of the antibiotics.

  1. Anticancer Drugs Induced Severe Adverse Cutaneous Drug Reactions: An Updated Review on the Risks Associated with Anticancer Targeted Therapy or Immunotherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau Yee Ng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous adverse drug reactions are commonly seen in patients with anticancer drug treatment. Anticancer drugs, including chemotherapy, target therapy, and recent immunotherapy causing skin reactions ranging from mild skin rash to life-threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs, such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrosis (TEN with increase morbidity and mortality while they are receiving cancer treatments, have been proposed to be a result of direct skin toxicity or drug hypersensitivity reactions (these are proposed mechanism, not definite. Differentiating SCARs from other more commonly seen reactions with a better outcome help prevent discontinuation of therapy and inappropriate use of systemic immunosuppressants for presumable allergic reactions, of which will affect the clinical outcome. In this article, we have reviewed published articles from 1950 to August 2017 for SJS/TEN associated with anticancer drugs, including chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy. We aimed to provide an overview of SJS/TEN associated with anticancer drugs to increase clinician recognition and accelerate future studies on the pathomechanism and managements.

  2. Systematic drug repositioning through mining adverse event data in ClinicalTrials.gov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Wen Su

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug repositioning (i.e., drug repurposing is the process of discovering new uses for marketed drugs. Historically, such discoveries were serendipitous. However, the rapid growth in electronic clinical data and text mining tools makes it feasible to systematically identify drugs with the potential to be repurposed. Described here is a novel method of drug repositioning by mining ClinicalTrials.gov. The text mining tools I2E (Linguamatics and PolyAnalyst (Megaputer were utilized. An I2E query extracts “Serious Adverse Events” (SAE data from randomized trials in ClinicalTrials.gov. Through a statistical algorithm, a PolyAnalyst workflow ranks the drugs where the treatment arm has fewer predefined SAEs than the control arm, indicating that potentially the drug is reducing the level of SAE. Hypotheses could then be generated for the new use of these drugs based on the predefined SAE that is indicative of disease (for example, cancer.

  3. CEFTRIAXONE RELATED ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS IN CHILDREN IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL, KOLKATA, WEST BENGAL, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjan Adhikari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ceftriaxone is a third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic, which has broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. It is a frequently used antibiotic in children worldwide. Studies revealed a number of adverse reactions related to this third generation antibiotic. A survey was done where data related with adverse drug reactions (ADRs were collected for three months from the Department of Pediatrics of a tertiary care hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India and then evaluated. In the study, fifteen ADRs were detected. Ceftriaxone itself or its combinations correlated with more than thirty three percent (33.4% adverse reaction cases in this study. Most common adverse drug reactions in the present study population were different types of rashes like urticaria and maculopapular eruptions.

  4. 3D Pharmacophoric Similarity improves Multi Adverse Drug Event Identification in Pharmacovigilance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Santiago; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Hripcsak, George

    2015-03-01

    Adverse drugs events (ADEs) detection constitutes a considerable concern in patient safety and public health care. For this reason, it is important to develop methods that improve ADE signal detection in pharmacovigilance databases. Our objective is to apply 3D pharmacophoric similarity models to enhance ADE recognition in Offsides, a pharmacovigilance resource with drug-ADE associations extracted from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). We developed a multi-ADE predictor implementing 3D drug similarity based on a pharmacophoric approach, with an ADE reference standard extracted from the SIDER database. The results showed that the application of our 3D multi-type ADE predictor to the pharmacovigilance data in Offsides improved ADE identification and generated enriched sets of drug-ADE signals. The global ROC curve for the Offsides ADE candidates ranked with the 3D similarity score showed an area of 0.7. The 3D predictor also allows the identification of the most similar drug that causes the ADE under study, which could provide hypotheses about mechanisms of action and ADE etiology. Our method is useful in drug development, screening potential adverse effects in experimental drugs, and in drug safety, applicable to the evaluation of ADE signals selected through pharmacovigilance data mining.

  5. Drug Education and Prevention: Has Progress Been Made?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggans, Niall

    2006-01-01

    Ten years after publication of the UK Government's strategy for drug misuse in 1995, Tackling Drugs Together, the impact of drug education and prevention programmes remains less than desired. The 1995 strategy envisaged a new emphasis on education and prevention and there have been developments since then in drug education, especially with…

  6. Comprehensive evaluations of the adverse effects of drugs: importance of appropriate study selection and data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Yoon K; Golder, Su P; Vandenbroucke, Jan P

    2011-04-01

    While systematic reviews and meta-analyses are at the top of the evidence hierarchy, most of the methodology has focused on assessing treatment benefit. Hence, we propose a structured framework for the initial steps of searching and identifying relevant data sources so that adverse effects can be evaluated in a comprehensive, unbiased manner. The unique methodological challenges stem from the difficulties of addressing diverse outcomes encompassing common, mild symptoms to rare, fatal events. Retrieval of the most appropriate studies should be specifically tailored to fit the nature of the adverse effects, according to the primary objective and study question. In our framework, the structure of the review takes different forms depending on whether the main aim is on scoping/hypothesis generation, or evaluating statistically the magnitude of risk (hypothesis testing), or clarifying characteristics and risk factors of the adverse effect. The wide range of data sources covering adverse effects all have distinct strengths and limitations, and selection of appropriate sources depends on characteristics of the adverse effect (e.g. background incidence and effect size of the drug, clinical presentation, time of onset after drug exposure). Reviewers need to retrieve particular study designs that are most likely to yield robust data on the adverse effects of interest, rather than rely on studies that cannot reliably detect adverse effects, and may yield 'false negatives'. Type II errors (a particular problem when evaluating rare adverse effects) can lull us into a false sense of security (e.g. wrongly concluding that there was no significant difference in harm between drug and control, with the drug erroneously judged as safe). Given the rapid rate at which methodological improvements occur, this proposed framework is by no means definitive, but aims to stimulate further debate and discussion amongst the pharmacoepidemiological and systematic review communities to reach a

  7. Incidence and preventability of adverse events requiring intensive care admission: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlayen, Annemie; Verelst, Sandra; Bekkering, Geertruida E; Schrooten, Ward; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Neree

    2012-04-01

    Adverse events are unintended patient injuries or complications that arise from health care management resulting in death, disability or prolonged hospital stay. Adverse events that require critical care are a considerable financial burden to the health care system, but also their global impact on patients and society is probably underestimated. The objectives of this systematic review were to synthesize the best available evidence regarding the estimates of the incidence and preventability of adverse events that necessitate intensive care admission, to determine the type and consequences [mortality, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay and costs] of these adverse events. MEDLINE (from 1966 to present), EMBASE (from 1974 to present) and CENTRAL (version 1-2010) were searched for studies reporting on unplanned admissions on ICUs. Several other sources were searched for additional studies. Only quantitative studies that used chart review for the detection of adverse events requiring intensive care admission were considered for eligibility. For the purposes of this systematic review, ICUs were defined as specialized hospital facilities which provide continuous monitoring and intensive care for acutely ill patients. Studies that were published in the English, Dutch, German, French or Spanish language were eligible for inclusion. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. A total of 27 studies were reviewed. Meta-analysis of the data was not appropriate because of methodological and statistical heterogeneity between studies; therefore, results are presented in a descriptive way. The percentage of surgical and medical adverse events that required ICU admission ranged from 1.1% to 37.2%. ICU readmissions varied from 0% to 18.3%. Preventability of the adverse events varied from 17% to 76.5%. Preventable adverse events are further synthesized by type of event. Consequences of the adverse events included a

  8. Can causality assessment fulfill the new European definition of adverse drug reaction? A review of methods used in spontaneous reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascolo, Annamaria; Scavone, Cristina; Sessa, Maurizio; di Mauro, Gabriella; Cimmaruta, Daniela; Orlando, Valentina; Rossi, Francesco; Sportiello, Liberata; Capuano, Annalisa

    2017-09-01

    Causality assessment is a fundamental biomedical technique for the signal detection performed by Pharmacovigilance centers in a Spontaneous reporting system. Moreover, it is a crucial and important practice for detecting preventable adverse drug reactions. Among different methods for causality assessment, algorithms (such as the Naranjo, or Begaud Methods) seem for their operational procedure and easier applicability one of the most commonly used methods. With the upcoming of the new European Pharmacovigilance legislation including in the definition of the adverse event also effects resulting from abuse, misuse and medication error, all well-known preventable causes of ADRs, there was an emerging need to evaluate whether algorithms could fulfill this new definition. In this review, twenty-two algorithmic methods were identified and none of them seemed to fulfill perfectly the new criteria of adverse event although some of them come close. In fact, several issues were arisen in applying causality assessment algorithms to these new definitions as for example the impossibility to answer the rechallenge question in case of medication error or AEFI (Adverse Event Following Immunization). Moreover, the exact conditions at which events occurred, as for example dosage or mode of administration should be considered to better assess causality in conditions of abuse/overdose, or misuse as well as in conditions of lack of expected efficacy reports for biotechnological drugs and adverse event occurring after mixing of vaccines. Therefore, this review highlights the need of updating algorithmic methods to allow a perfect applicability in all possible clinical scenarios accordingly or not with the terms of marketing authorization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of brand versus generic antiepileptic drug adverse event reporting rates in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Motiur; Alatawi, Yasser; Cheng, Ning; Qian, Jingjing; Plotkina, Annya V; Peissig, Peggy L; Berg, Richard L; Page, David; Hansen, Richard A

    2017-09-01

    Despite the cost saving role of generic anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), debate exists as to whether generic substitution of branded AEDs may lead to therapeutic failure and increased toxicity. This study compared adverse event (AE) reporting rates for brand vs. authorized generic (AG) vs. generic AEDs. Since AGs are pharmaceutically identical to brand but perceived as generics, the generic vs. AG comparison minimized potential bias against generics. Events reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System between January 2004 to March 2015 with lamotrigine, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine listed as primary or secondary suspect were classified as brand, generic, or AG based on the manufacturer. Disproportionality analyses using the reporting odds ratio (ROR) assessed the relative rate of reporting of labeled AEs compared to reporting these events with all other drugs. The Breslow-Day statistic compared RORs across brand, AG, and other generics using a Bonferroni-corrected Pbrand and generics for all three drugs of interest (Breslow-Day Pbrands and generics have similar reporting rates after accounting for generic perception biases. Disproportional suicide reporting was observed for generics compared with AGs and brand, although this finding needs further study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Healthcare professionals and pharmacovigilance of pediatric adverse drug reactions: a 5-year analysis of Adverse Events Reporting System database of the Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, Caterina; Tuccori, Marco; Bocci, Guido

    2017-02-17

    To analyze the Adverse Events Reporting System (AERS) database of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), investigating the characteristics of pediatric adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and describing the effective participation of healthcare professionals in the reporting activity. Reports of ADRs were obtained from the FDA website. Only ADRs in pediatric subjects (divided by age, by country and by professional category) were included into the analysis. The drugs suspected as primary cause of the ADRs in pediatric subjects and their principal anatomic group according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system were considered. To classify the ADRs, the Medical Dictionary for Regularity Activities terminology was adopted. Between 2008 and 2012, FDA collected 113,077 ADRs in pediatric patients. Of the total pediatric ADR reports, those performed by medical doctors were 32%, followed by consumers (26%) and healthcare professionals (25%). Most of the ADR reports were related to the adolescent group (39%). Healthcare professionals resulted the category with the highest rate of ADR reports in neonates and infants. Drugs acting on nervous system and antineoplastic/immunomodulating agents were the most involved the pediatric ADR reports. Pyrexia, convulsion, vomiting and accidental overdose were the reactions more reported both from healthcare professionals and medical doctors. The present study describes the pediatric ADR reports of the FDA database through healthcare professional's perspective, describing the various aspects of pediatric pharmacovigilance.

  11. Worldwide withdrawal of medicinal products because of adverse drug reactions: a systematic review and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onakpoya, Igho J; Heneghan, Carl J; Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2016-07-01

    We have systematically identified medicinal products withdrawn worldwide because of adverse drug reactions, assessed the level of evidence used for making the withdrawal decisions, and explored the patterns of withdrawals over time. We searched PubMed, the WHO database of withdrawn products, and selected texts. We included products that were withdrawn after launch from 1950 onwards, excluding non-human and over-the-counter medicines. We assessed the levels of evidence on which withdrawals were based using the Oxford Center for Evidence Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. Of 353 medicinal products withdrawn from any country, only 40 were withdrawn worldwide. Anecdotal reports were cited as evidence for withdrawal in 30 (75%) and deaths occurred in 27 (68%). Hepatic, cardiac, and nervous system toxicity accounted for over 60% of withdrawals. In 28 cases, the first withdrawal was initiated by the manufacturer. The median interval between the first report of an adverse drug reaction that led to withdrawal and the first withdrawal was 1 year (range 0-43 years). Worldwide withdrawals occurred within 1 year after the first withdrawal in any country. In conclusion, the time it takes for drugs to be withdrawn worldwide after reports of adverse drug reactions has shortened over time. However, there are inconsistencies in current withdrawal procedures when adverse drug reactions are suspected. A uniform method for establishing worldwide withdrawal of approved medicinal products when adverse drug reactions are suspected should be developed, to facilitate global withdrawals. Rapid synthesis of the evidence on harms should be a priority when serious adverse reactions are suspected.

  12. Adverse Drug Reactions to Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Patients at the Largest Public Hospital in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorío, Marco; Colasanti, Jonathan; Moreira, Sumaya; Gutierrez, Gamaliel; Quant, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to antiretroviral therapy (ART) are an important cause of hospitalization, treatment discontinuation, and regimen changes in both developed and developing countries. This study is the first to examine and understand ADRs in HIV-infected patients in Nicaragua. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted from May 2010 to March 2011, in a cohort of HIV-infected patients receiving ART at the largest public hospital in Managua, Nicaragua. Patients were identified based on ADRs reporting on a standardized antiretroviral pharmacotherapy form. Subsequently, chart reviews of these patients were performed in order to document the specific ADRs. Six hundred ninety-two patients on ART were included. The incidence of ADRs was 6.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.5-8.2). Females demonstrated a higher incidence, that is, 10.2% (95% CI 5.3-15.1, P = .020). Patients treated with combinations of zidovudine (ZDV)/lamivudine (3TC) and emtricitabine (FTC)/tenofovir (TDF) had fewer ADRs (P reactions. Adverse drug reactions were classified as "likely ADRs" (25 of 44) and "possible ADRs" (19 of 44). No ADRs were preventable. Adverse drug reactions most frequently affected the central nervous system. No ADR was life threatening. The frequency of ADRs in this Nicaraguan patient population was less than that reported from other studies in resource-limited settings. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Personalized Medicine and Adverse Drug Reactions: The Experience of An Italian Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Russa, Raffaele; Finesch, Vittorio; Di Sanzo, Mariantonia; Gatto, Vittorio; Santurro, Alessandro; Martini, Gabriella; Scopetti, Matteo; Frati, Paola

    2017-01-01

    The personalized medicine is a model of medicine based on inherent difference given by the genetic heritage that characterizes us, diversity that can affect also our response to administered therapy. Nowadays, the term "adverse drug reaction" is identified with any harmful effect involuntary resulting from the use of a medicinal product; pharmacogenomics, in this field, has the aim to improve the drug response and to reduce the adverse reaction. We analyzed all reports of adverse reaction collected in the Pharmacovigilance Centre database of an Italian University Hospital, at the Sant'Andrea Hospital Sapienza University of Rome, in a period of two years. Comparing the data result from our analysis with several studies found in literature, it is evident that adverse drug reactions represent an important problem in the management of a health care system. However, the development of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics, allowing a personalized treatment, can improve clinical practice. This study highlights the great potential of pharmacogenomics in reducing adverse reactions and suggests the need for further pharmacogenomic clinical trials to better personalize drug treatment and to refine the current pharmacovigilance strategies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Adverse effects and Drug Interactions Associated with Inhaled Recreational and Medical Marijuana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisha Kelly Freeman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To provide an overview of the addiction potential; adverse effects (e.g., cardiovascular, immune dysfunction, respiratory system, mental health disorders; drug interactions; effects of accidental exposure; crime statistics; and pharmacist’s considerations for the use of inhaled medical marijuana. Methods: A PubMed search was conducted from 1966 to March 2016 to identify articles in which the safety of inhaled medical marijuana was assessed. Key MeSH search terms included medical marijuana with a subheading for adverse effect. Only articles in adult patients were considered. In addition, medical marijuana or cannabis plus one of the following search terms were searched: drug interactions, herb-drug interactions, drug-related side effects and adverse drug reactions, substance-related disorders, addiction, and abuse. A free-text search was also conducted to identify articles not included in the MeSH term search. A bibliographic search was also conducted. Articles were included if they addressed adverse effects of medical marijuana for the treatment of a condition. Meta-analyses, randomized controlled clinical trials, and case reports were included in the review if the primary focus of the article related to the adverse effect profile of inhaled medical marijuana. Medical marijuana efficacy studies were not assessed. In the absence of this information, case reports or reports of inhaled recreational marijuana use was used. Studies were excluded if published in languages other than English. In addition, studies highlighting mechanisms of action, studies of pharmacodynamics or pharmacokinetic effects were excluded, unless these effects were due to drug-drug interactions. Prescription products containing marijuana or derivatives were excluded from evaluation. An Internet search was conducted to locate the most up-to-date information on the laws concerning medical marijuana. Key findings: A PubMed search revealed 58 articles and 28 of

  15. Adverse psychosocial outcomes associated with drug use among US high school seniors: a comparison of alcohol and marijuana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamar, Joseph J; Fenstermaker, Michael; Kamboukos, Dimita; Ompad, Danielle C; Cleland, Charles M; Weitzman, Michael

    2014-11-01

    There is debate about whether marijuana (cannabis) use is more dangerous than alcohol use. Although difficult to make objective comparisons, research is needed to compare relative dangers in order to help inform preventive efforts and policy. Data were analyzed from a nationally representative sample of high school seniors in the Monitoring the Future study (2007-2011; Weighted n = 7437; modal age: 18) who reported lifetime use of alcohol or marijuana. Students were asked to indicate whether they experienced various adverse psychosocial outcomes resulting from use of each substance. We examined which outcomes were more prevalent for each substance. Compared to alcohol use, marijuana use was more commonly reported to compromise relationships with teachers or supervisors, result in less energy or interest, and result in lower school or job performance. Compared to marijuana use, alcohol was more commonly reported to compromise relationships with friends and significant others; it was also reported to lead to more regret (particularly among females), and driving unsafely. Marijuana users were more likely to report no adverse outcomes. Females and white students were more likely to report various adverse outcomes and higher frequency use of each substance also increased occurrences of reported adverse outcomes. Marijuana and alcohol are associated with unique adverse psychosocial outcomes. Outcomes differ by sex and race/ethnicity, and perception or experience of outcomes may also be related to legal status and associated stigma. Public health interventions may be more effective by focusing on harm reduction strategies for these drug-specific outcomes.

  16. Ocular Toxoplasmosis: Therapy-Related Adverse Drug Reactions and Their Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, M; Zweifel, S; Barthelmes, D; Meier, F; Fehr, J; Böni, C

    2017-04-01

    Background There are different treatment options for ocular toxoplasmosis (OT). "Classic" therapy consists of pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine and folinic acid combined with systemic steroids and is still widely used. However, potentially severe side effects of this therapy have been reported. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence and types of adverse drug reactions in patients treated for OT. Clinical management of each adverse drug reaction was assessed. Patients and Methods In this retrospective analysis, we reviewed data of patients with OT, who were consecutively examined between December 2011 and December 2015 at the Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Zurich. Results In total, 49 patients had at least one episode of active OT. In 54 (83.0 %) of 65 treated episodes, the classic regimen was used. Of the 37 patients who received classic treatment, 9 (24.3 %) developed at least one adverse drug reaction which led to drug discontinuation, including elevated creatinine (5.4 %), elevated liver enzymes (5.4 %), vomiting (5.4 %), rash (5.4 %) and facial swelling (2.7 %). In 5 patients, treatment was switched to another drug, while in the other 4 patients, therapy was stopped. In these 9 patients, inflammation was well controlled 8 weeks after onset of therapy. No patient suffered from severe side effects, such as potentially life-threatening allergic reactions or pancytopenia. Conclusions In OT patients who were treated with classic therapy, adverse drug reactions are common. Therefore, clinical and laboratory monitoring is mandatory. Adverse drug reactions may require interdisciplinary management. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Pharmacodynamic genetic polymorphisms affect adverse drug reactions of haloperidol in patients with alcohol-use disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zastrozhin MS

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mikhail Sergeevich Zastrozhin,1,2 Vadim Markovich Brodyansky,3 Valentin Yurievich Skryabin,4 Elena Anatolievna Grishina,5 Dmitry Vladimirovich Ivashchenko,5 Kristina Anatolievna Ryzhikova,5 Ludmila Mikhaylovna Savchenko,1 Alexander Olegovich Kibitov,3 Evgeny Alekseevich Bryun,1,4 Dmitry Alekseevich Sychev6 1Department of Addictology, Russian Medical Academy of Continuous Professional Education of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia; 2Moscow Research and Practical Centre on Addictions of the Moscow Department of Healthcare, Center for the Prevention of Dependent Behavior, Moscow, Russia; 3Federal Medical Research Centre of Psychiatry and Addictology, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Moscow, Russia; 4Moscow Research and Practical Centre on Addictions of the Moscow Department of Healthcare, Department of Addictology, Moscow, Russia; 5Russian Medical Academy of Continuous Professional Education of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Research Centre, Moscow, Russia; 6Russian Medical Academy of Continuous Professional Education of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapy, Moscow, Russia Background: Antipsychotic action of haloperidol is due to blockade of D2 receptors in the mesolimbic dopamine pathway, while the adverse drug reactions are associated with striatal D2 receptor blockade. Contradictory data concerning the effects of genetic polymorphisms of genes encoding these receptors and associated structures (catechol-O-methyltransferase [COMT], glycine transporter and gene encoding the density of D2 receptors on the neuronal membrane are described.Objective: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the correlation between DRD2, SLC6A3 (DAT and COMT genetic polymorphisms and to investigate their effect on the development of adverse drug reactions in patients with alcohol-use disorder who received haloperidol.Patients and methods: The study

  18. The Adverse Drug Event Collaborative: a joint venture to measure medication-related patient harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Mary E; Jackson, Aaron; Cameron, Chris; Young, Mary L; Escott, Linda; Maharaj, Ashika; Miller, Nigel

    2012-01-25

    To measure the extent of patient harm caused by medications (rate of Adverse Drug Events) in three DHBs, using a standardised trigger tool method. Counties Manukau, Capital and Coast and Canterbury DHBs decided to work collaboratively to implement the ADE Trigger Tool (TT). Definitions of ADE were agreed on and triggers refined. A random sample of closed charts (from March 2010 to February 2011) was obtained excluding patients who were admitted for <48 hours, children under the age of 18 and psychiatric admissions. In each DHB trained reviewers scanned these in a structured way to identify any of the 19 triggers. If triggers were identified, a more detailed, though time-limited review of the chart was done to determine whether an ADE had occurred. The severity of patient harm was categorised using the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention Index. No attempt was made to determine preventability of harm and ADEs from acts of omission were excluded. The ADE TT was applied to 1210 charts and 353 ADE were identified, with an average rate of 28.9/100 admissions and 38/1,000 bed days. 94.5% of the ADE identified were in the lower severity scales with temporary harm, however in 5 patients it was considered that the ADE contributed to their death, 9 required an intervention to sustain life and 4 suffered permanent harm. The most commonly implicated drugs were morphine and other opioids, anticoagulants, antibiotics, Non Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) and diuretics. Patients who suffered an ADE were more likely to be female, older with more complex medical illnesses, and have a longer length of stay. The rate of medication-related harm identified by the ADE TT is considerably higher than that identified through traditional voluntary reporting mechanisms. The ADE TT provides a standardised measure of harm over time that can be used to determine trends and the effect of medication safety improvement programmes. This study not

  19. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions seen at a university hospital department of dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jakob E; Andersen, Klaus E; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    Patients with suspected cutaneous adverse drug reactions are often referred to allergy clinics or departments of dermatology for evaluation. These patients are selected compared with patients identified in prospective and cross-sectional studies of hospital populations. This explains the observed...... variation in prevalence of specific reactions and of eliciting drugs. This study investigated the prevalence of cutaneous adverse drug reactions in a university hospital department of dermatology that is specially focused on allergy. An 8-month survey was carried out during the period April-December 2003...... at injection sites were the most frequent reactions (25% and 18.8%, respectively). Beta-lactam antibiotics, extracts for desensitization and insulins were the main drug groups involved, and accounted for 22.8%, 17.1% and 14.2%, respectively, of the reactions. Extracts for desensitization and insulins elicited...

  20. HARM REDUCTION IN THE PREVENTION OF DRUG ADDICTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    KALOUSOVÁ, Dita

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation on Harm Reduction approach in the prevention of drug addictions deals with tertiary drug prevention. It aims to show the importance of how much information about this topic students at comprehensive schools get and have. The theoretical part provides some information about the consequences of drug addiction in general, about drug prevention, substitution treatment, Harm Reduction approach and the services involved. The practical part presents the results of a survey which ai...

  1. Facilitating adverse drug event detection in pharmacovigilance databases using molecular structure similarity: application to rhabdomyolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Santiago; Harpaz, Rave; Chase, Herbert S; Costanzi, Stefano; Rabadan, Raul

    2011-01-01

    Background Adverse drug events (ADE) cause considerable harm to patients, and consequently their detection is critical for patient safety. The US Food and Drug Administration maintains an adverse event reporting system (AERS) to facilitate the detection of ADE in drugs. Various data mining approaches have been developed that use AERS to detect signals identifying associations between drugs and ADE. The signals must then be monitored further by domain experts, which is a time-consuming task. Objective To develop a new methodology that combines existing data mining algorithms with chemical information by analysis of molecular fingerprints to enhance initial ADE signals generated from AERS, and to provide a decision support mechanism to facilitate the identification of novel adverse events. Results The method achieved a significant improvement in precision in identifying known ADE, and a more than twofold signal enhancement when applied to the ADE rhabdomyolysis. The simplicity of the method assists in highlighting the etiology of the ADE by identifying structurally similar drugs. A set of drugs with strong evidence from both AERS and molecular fingerprint-based modeling is constructed for further analysis. Conclusion The results demonstrate that the proposed methodology could be used as a pharmacovigilance decision support tool to facilitate ADE detection. PMID:21946238

  2. Adverse drug events associated with the antidotes for methanol and ethylene glycol poisoning: a comparison of ethanol and fomepizole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepik, Katherine J; Levy, Adrian R; Sobolev, Boris G; Purssell, Roy A; DeWitt, Christopher R; Erhardt, Gunnar D; Kennedy, James R; Daws, Derek E; Brignall, Jane L

    2009-04-01

    We investigate adverse drug events associated with antidotes ethanol and fomepizole in methanol or ethylene glycol poisonings. An "adverse drug event" is harm associated with normal or incorrect drug use. We describe type, frequency, severity, seriousness, and onset time of adverse drug events and test the hypothesis that fomepizole results in fewer adverse drug events than ethanol. This cohort study included patients aged 13 years or older, hospitalized between 1996 and 2005 for methanol or ethylene glycol poisoning (identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision or 10th Revision codes) and treated with at least 1 dose of ethanol or fomepizole. Two abstractors separately reviewed each chart, identifying new clinical events during antidote treatment. Three toxicologists determined, by consensus, which events were adverse drug events. The primary outcome was at least 1 adverse drug event, expressed as adverse drug event rate per person-day of antidote treatment. Association between time to first adverse drug event and antidote type was modeled by Cox regression, adjusted for confounders. Two hundred twenty-three charts were reviewed and 172 analyzed. Toxicologists identified at least 1 adverse drug event in 74 of 130 (57%) ethanol-treated and 5 of 42 (12%) fomepizole-treated cases. Central nervous system symptoms accounted for most adverse drug events (48% ethanol-treated, 2% fomepizole-treated). Severe adverse drug events occurred in 26 of 130 (20%) ethanol-treated (coma, extreme agitation, cardiovascular) and 2 of 42 (5%) fomepizole-treated (coma, cardiovascular). Serious (life-threatening) adverse drug events occurred in 11 of 130 (8%) ethanol-treated (respiratory depression, hypotension) and 1 of 42 (2%) fomepizole-treated (hypotension, bradycardia) cases. Median adverse drug event onset was within 3 hours after the start of either antidote. Ethanol and fomepizole adverse drug event rates were 0.93 and 0.13 adverse drug events per

  3. Adverse effects of the antimalaria drug, mefloquine: due to primary liver damage with secondary thyroid involvement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herxheimer Andrew

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mefloquine is a clinically important antimalaria drug, which is often not well tolerated. We critically reviewed 516 published case reports of mefloquine adverse effects, to clarify the phenomenology of the harms associated with mefloquine, and to make recommendations for safer prescribing. Presentation We postulate that many of the adverse effects of mefloquine are a post-hepatic syndrome caused by primary liver damage. In some users we believe that symptomatic thyroid disturbance occurs, either independently or as a secondary consequence of the hepatocellular injury. The mefloquine syndrome presents in a variety of ways including headache, gastrointestinal disturbances, nervousness, fatigue, disorders of sleep, mood, memory and concentration, and occasionally frank psychosis. Previous liver or thyroid disease, and concurrent insults to the liver (such as from alcohol, dehydration, an oral contraceptive pill, recreational drugs, and other liver-damaging drugs may be related to the development of severe or prolonged adverse reactions to mefloquine. Implications We believe that people with active liver or thyroid disease should not take mefloquine, whereas those with fully resolved neuropsychiatric illness may do so safely. Mefloquine users should avoid alcohol, recreational drugs, hormonal contraception and co-medications known to cause liver damage or thyroid damage. With these caveats, we believe that mefloquine may be safely prescribed in pregnancy, and also to occupational groups who carry out safety-critical tasks. Testing Mefloquine's adverse effects need to be investigated through a multicentre cohort study, with small controlled studies testing specific elements of the hypothesis.

  4. Adverse drug reactions reported by consumers for nervous system medications in Europe 2007 to 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2013-01-01

    Reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) has traditionally been the sole province of healthcare professionals. In the European Union, more countries have allowed consumers to report ADRs directly to the regulatory agencies. The aim of this study was to characterize ADRs reported by European...

  5. Adverse effects of the antimalaria drug, mefloquine: due to primary liver damage with secondary thyroid involvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Ashley M; Herxheimer, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Background Mefloquine is a clinically important antimalaria drug, which is often not well tolerated. We critically reviewed 516 published case reports of mefloquine adverse effects, to clarify the phenomenology of the harms associated with mefloquine, and to make recommendations for safer prescribing. Presentation We postulate that many of the adverse effects of mefloquine are a post-hepatic syndrome caused by primary liver damage. In some users we believe that symptomatic thyroid disturbance occurs, either independently or as a secondary consequence of the hepatocellular injury. The mefloquine syndrome presents in a variety of ways including headache, gastrointestinal disturbances, nervousness, fatigue, disorders of sleep, mood, memory and concentration, and occasionally frank psychosis. Previous liver or thyroid disease, and concurrent insults to the liver (such as from alcohol, dehydration, an oral contraceptive pill, recreational drugs, and other liver-damaging drugs) may be related to the development of severe or prolonged adverse reactions to mefloquine. Implications We believe that people with active liver or thyroid disease should not take mefloquine, whereas those with fully resolved neuropsychiatric illness may do so safely. Mefloquine users should avoid alcohol, recreational drugs, hormonal contraception and co-medications known to cause liver damage or thyroid damage. With these caveats, we believe that mefloquine may be safely prescribed in pregnancy, and also to occupational groups who carry out safety-critical tasks. Testing Mefloquine's adverse effects need to be investigated through a multicentre cohort study, with small controlled studies testing specific elements of the hypothesis. PMID:11914150

  6. Adverse drug reactions in older patients during hospitalisation: are they predictable?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Marie N

    2012-11-01

    adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a major cause of morbidity and healthcare utilisation in older people. The GerontoNet ADR risk score aims to identify older people at risk of ADRs during hospitalisation. We aimed to assess the clinical applicability of this score and identify other variables that predict ADRs in hospitalised older people.

  7. Adverse drug reaction in HIV-infected people treated with HAART in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The results demonstrate a high incidence of ADRs in HIV-patients treated with HAART, which should be monitored closely during follow-up therapy. Keywords: HIV, AIDS, Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), Adverse drug reaction. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is indexed by Science ...

  8. Adverse events with use of antiepileptic drugs: a prescription and event symmetry analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsiropoulos, Ioannis; Andersen, Morten; Hallas, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess adverse events with use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) by the method of sequence symmetry analysis. METHODS: We used data from two population-based sources in Funen County, Denmark (population 2006: 479 000); prescription data from Odense University Pharmacoepidemiological Datab...

  9. Sex-dimorphic adverse drug reactions to immune suppressive agents in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Zelinkova (Zuzana); E. Bultman (Evelien); L. Vogelaar (Lauran); C. Bouziane (Cheima); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); C.J. van der Woude (Janneke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAIM: To analyze sex differences in adverse drug reactions (ADR) to the immune suppressive medication in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. METHODS: All IBD patients attending the IBD outpatient clinic of a referral hospital were identifed through the electronic diagnosis

  10. Determinants of signal selection in a spontaneous reporting system for adverse drug reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puijenbroek, E P; van Grootheest, K; Diemont, W L; Leufkens, H G; Egberts, A C

    2001-01-01

    AIMS: Detection of new adverse drug reactions (ADR) after marketing is often based on a manual review of reports sent to a Spontaneous Reporting System (SRS). Among the many potential signals that are identified, only a limited number are important enough to require further attention. The goal of

  11. Application of quantitative signal detection in the Dutch spontaneous reporting system for adverse drug reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puijenbroek, Eugène; Diemont, Willem; van Grootheest, Kees

    2003-01-01

    The primary aim of spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) is the timely detection of unknown adverse drug reactions (ADRs), or signal detection. Generally this is carried out by a systematic manual review of every report sent to an SRS. Statistical analysis of the data sets of an SRS, or quantitative

  12. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor induced angioedema - an overlooked and potentially lethal adverse drug reaction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Susanne Irene; Andersen, Michelle Fog; Aagaard, Lise

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Angioedema is a potentially fatal adverse drug reaction of some medications, as swellings of the upper airways can cause death by asphyxiation. Angiotensin converting enzyme-inhibitors are widely known to cause angioedema but less is known about the association between dipeptidyl...

  13. A study on adverse drug reactions in a tertiary care hospital of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acne (46) was commonly reported reaction. Topical steroids, betamethasone sodium phosphate and clobetasol were reported to induce maximum number of reactions (59). Skin (227, 66.9%) was commonly affected organ system. Most of the adverse drug reactions were possible (240, 94.1%) and mild (222, 87%) in nature.

  14. Rates of spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions for drugs reported in children: a cross-sectional study with data from the Swedish adverse drug reaction database and the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstedt, Susanna M; Brunlöf, Gertrud; Sundström, Anders

    2011-08-01

    Knowledge of drug safety is limited in the paediatric population, especially for drugs not used as labelled. Spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) may be an important source for increased knowledge, but the extent of the overall rate of reporting in children is not known. The main objective of the study was to determine the extent of the spontaneous reporting of ADRs in children with a focus on drugs not used as labelled; this involved investigations of reporting rates of individual case safety reports (ICSRs) per 1000 treated individuals for drugs reported in children, to compare these between drugs labelled and not labelled for use in children, and to compare the rates for children with those of adults. ICSRs (extracted from the Swedish ADR database) and number of treated individuals (extracted from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register) were analysed for a 2-year period (2006-7). For drugs with one or more ICSR regarding children, rates of ICSRs per 1000 treated individuals were determined and compared between children (10% of the volume was sold over-the-counter or for in-hospital use were excluded. The overall reporting ratio of aggregated ICSRs per 1000 treated individuals was calculated between drugs not labelled and drugs labelled for use in children, separately for children and adults. The overall reporting ratio was also calculated between children and adults, separately for drugs labelled and drugs not labelled for use in children. A total of 255 (children) and 1402 (adults) ICSRs concerning 94 drugs were included in the analysis. Seventy-four (29%) and 711 (51%) ICSRs in children and adults, respectively, were registered as serious (p rates of ICSRs per 1000 treated individuals varied between (range) 0.01-6.45 (children) and 0.01-6.39 (adults). For 17 of the drugs (18%) the rates of ICSRs per treated individual were significantly higher for children than for adults, and for 2 of the drugs (2%) the result was the opposite. The overall

  15. Adverse drug reactions in Colombian patients, 2007-2013: Analysis of population databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Alba, Jorge Enrique; Londoño-Builes, Manuel José; Echeverri-Cataño, Luis Felipe; Ochoa-Orozco, Sergio Andrés

    2016-03-03

    Recognizing adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is becoming more important in clinical practice.  To determine the frequency of adverse drug reactions and ADR suspicions among the population affiliated to the Colombian health system and to describe the drugs, reactions and associated variables.  We revised ADRs and ADRs suspicion databases from drugs dispensed by Audifarma, S.A., both for inpatient and outpatient care from 2007 to 2013. Variables included ADR report date, city, drug, drug's Anatomical Therapeutic Classification (ATC), ADR severity, ADR type, ADR classification and ADR probability according to the World Health Organization's definitions.  We obtained 5,342 reports for 468 different drugs. The ATC groups with the most reports were anti-infectives for systemic use (25.5%), nervous system agents (17.1%) and cardiovascular system drugs (15.0%). The drugs with the highest number of reports were metamizole (4.2%), enalapril (3.8%), clarithromycin (2.8%), warfarin (2.5%) and ciprofloxacin (2.4%). The most common ADR, classified following the World Health Organization adverse reaction terminology, were: skin and appendages disorders (35.3%), general disorders (14.2%) and gastrointestinal system disorders (11.8%). Overall, 49.4% of the ADRs were classified as "moderate" and 45.1% as "mild".  An increasing number of ADR reports were found coinciding with a worldwide tendency. Differences between inpatient and outpatient ADR reports were found when compared to scientific publications. The information on ADR reports, mainly gathered by the Instituto Nacional de Vigilancia de Medicamentos y Alimentos - Invima, should be made public for academic and institutional use.

  16. Big Data Mining and Adverse Event Pattern Analysis in Clinical Drug Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federer, Callie; Yoo, Minjae; Tan, Aik Choon

    2016-12-01

    Drug adverse events (AEs) are a major health threat to patients seeking medical treatment and a significant barrier in drug discovery and development. AEs are now required to be submitted during clinical trials and can be extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov ( https://clinicaltrials.gov/ ), a database of clinical studies around the world. By extracting drug and AE information from ClinicalTrials.gov and structuring it into a database, drug-AEs could be established for future drug development and repositioning. To our knowledge, current AE databases contain mainly U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. However, our database contains both FDA-approved and experimental compounds extracted from ClinicalTrials.gov . Our database contains 8,161 clinical trials of 3,102,675 patients and 713,103 reported AEs. We extracted the information from ClinicalTrials.gov using a set of python scripts, and then used regular expressions and a drug dictionary to process and structure relevant information into a relational database. We performed data mining and pattern analysis of drug-AEs in our database. Our database can serve as a tool to assist researchers to discover drug-AE relationships for developing, repositioning, and repurposing drugs.

  17. Resonant Messages to Prevent Prescription Drug Misuse by Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twombly, Eric C.; Holtz, Kristen D.; Agnew, Christine B.

    2011-01-01

    Prescription drug misuse is a major health problem, particularly among teens. A key step in curbing misuse is the development of effective prescription drug prevention messages. This paper explores the elements of prescription drug misuse prevention messages that resonate with teens using data from focus groups with seventh and eighth grade…

  18. Adverse childhood experiences and consumption of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs among adolescents of a Brazilian birth cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Abstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the association between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs and the use of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs among adolescents from a Brazilian cohort. The occurrence of five ACEs, the use of alcohol and tobacco and trying illicit drugs were investigated in the 1993 Pelotas birth cohort at the age of 15 (n = 4,230. A score was created for the ACEs and their association with the use of substances was evaluated. Around 25% of adolescents consumed alcohol, 6% smoked and 2.1% reported having used drugs at least once in their lives. The ACEs were associated with the use of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs. A dose-response relation between the number of ACEs and the substance use was found, particularly with regard to illicit drugs. The occurrence of ACEs was positively associated with the use of alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs among adolescents and the risk may be different for men and women. These results point to the fact that strategies for preventing the use of substances should include interventions both among adolescents and within the family environment.

  19. Medication errors and adverse drug events in kidney transplant recipients: incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, David J; Pilch, Nicole A; Bratton, Charles F; McGillicuddy, John W; Chavin, Kenneth D; Baliga, Prabhakar K

    2012-12-01

    To determine the incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcomes associated with clinically significant medication errors or adverse drug events in kidney transplant recipients. Retrospective observational study. Transplant center at an academic medical center. A total of 476 adults who received kidney transplants between June 2006 and July 2009. Severe or significant medication errors and adverse drug events (medication-related problems [MRPs]) were identified by medical record review. Only patient-induced medication errors (e.g., took wrong dose or frequency of drug, took drug not prescribed) were captured. Clinical outcomes included patient and graft survival, infections (including cytomegalovirus), readmissions, and acute rejection episodes. Thirty-seven (8%) of the 476 patients developed a clinically significant MRP. Univariate and confirmatory multivariate analyses revealed that female sex, African-American race, pretransplantation diabetes mellitus, delayed graft function, and retransplant recipients were independent risk factors for developing an MRP. Patients with MRPs had significantly higher rates of acute rejection (11% vs 30%, p=0.004), cytomegalovirus infection (15% vs 30%, p=0.033), and 30-day readmissions (5% vs 16%, p=0.018). Graft survival was also significantly lower in patients who had MRPs (pmedication errors and associated adverse drug events were common in kidney transplant recipients. General and transplant-specific risk factors were associated with the development of these MRPs, and MRPs were associated with increased risk of rejection and graft loss. © 2012 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  20. A dataset of 200 structured product labels annotated for adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Shooshan, Sonya E; Rodriguez, Laritza; Aronson, Alan R; Lang, Francois; Rogers, Willie; Roberts, Kirk; Tonning, Joseph

    2018-01-30

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs), unintended and sometimes dangerous effects that a drug may have, are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality during medical care. To date, there is no structured machine-readable authoritative source of known ADRs. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) partnered with the National Library of Medicine to create a pilot dataset containing standardised information about known adverse reactions for 200 FDA-approved drugs. The Structured Product Labels (SPLs), the documents FDA uses to exchange information about drugs and other products, were manually annotated for adverse reactions at the mention level to facilitate development and evaluation of text mining tools for extraction of ADRs from all SPLs. The ADRs were then normalised to the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and to the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA). We present the curation process and the structure of the publicly available database SPL-ADR-200db containing 5,098 distinct ADRs. The database is available at https://bionlp.nlm.nih.gov/tac2017adversereactions/; the code for preparing and validating the data is available at https://github.com/lhncbc/fda-ars.

  1. Dictionary construction and identification of possible adverse drug events in Danish clinical narrative text

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Robert; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune

    2013-01-01

    Objective Drugs have tremendous potential to cure and relieve disease, but the risk of unintended effects is always present. Healthcare providers increasingly record data in electronic patient records (EPRs), in which we aim to identify possible adverse events (AEs) and, specifically, possible...... adverse drug events (ADEs).Materials and methods Based on the undesirable effects section from the summary of product characteristics (SPC) of 7446 drugs, we have built a Danish ADE dictionary. Starting from this dictionary we have developed a pipeline for identifying possible ADEs in unstructured...... clinical narrative text. We use a named entity recognition (NER) tagger to identify dictionary matches in the text and post-coordination rules to construct ADE compound terms. Finally, we apply post-processing rules and filters to handle, for example, negations and sentences about subjects other than...

  2. Preventing Prescription Drug Abuse in Adolescence: A Collaborative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Beth A.; Fullwood, Harry; Hawthorn, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    With the growing awareness of adolescent prescription drug abuse, communities and schools are beginning to explore prevention and intervention strategies which are appropriate for their youth. This article provides a framework for developing a collaborative approach to prescription drug abuse prevention--called the Prevention Awareness Team--that…

  3. Neonatal adverse drug reactions: an analysis of reports to the French pharmacovigilance database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaguelidou, Florentia; Beau-Salinas, Frédérique; Jonville-Bera, Annie Pierre; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2016-10-01

    Term and preterm neonates are at high risk for serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs). A descriptive study of reports registered in the French pharmacovigilance database from 1986 to 2012 were obtained. All reports concerning neonates (≤1 month of life) with direct drug exposure were retrieved. Characteristics of the reports, including reported ADR(s), drug(s) and the causality assessment using the French causality assessment method, were described. A total of 1688 reports were analyzed and more than half of them were classified as serious (n = 995). Median age at ADR occurrence was 9 days. Overall, 3127 ADRs were described in these reports in relation to 2238 suspect/interacting drugs. The most commonly reported system organ classes (SOCs) were injury, poisoning and procedural complications (16%), general disorders and administration site conditions (12.5%) and blood and lymphatic system disorders (12%). In the majority of ADRs reported (73%), infants fully recovered and less than 4% of neonates deceased as a consequence of the reported ADR. One out of five ADRs was associated with drug administration errors. Therapeutic classes commonly incriminated were anti-infectives, nervous system and alimentary tract drugs. Substances most frequently related to serious ADRs were zidovudine, ibuprofen and nevirapine. Among the 10 most frequently encountered drug-ADR pairs, two substances were mainly implicated, zidovudine in haematological adverse reactions and phytomenadione in maladministrations. Anti-infective drugs, mainly antiretroviral therapy, account for the majority of ADRs reported in neonates. The specific issue of drug maladministration and medication errors remains to be addressed in neonates. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. ADVERPred-Web Service for Prediction of Adverse Effects of Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Sergey M; Lagunin, Alexey A; Rudik, Anastasia V; Filimonov, Dmitry A; Poroikov, Vladimir V

    2018-01-22

    Application of structure-activity relationships (SARs) for the prediction of adverse effects of drugs (ADEs) has been reported in many published studies. Training sets for the creation of SAR models are usually based on drug label information which allows for the generation of data sets for many hundreds of drugs. Since many ADEs may not be related to drug consumption, one of the main problems in such studies is the quality of data on drug-ADE pairs obtained from labels. The information on ADEs may be included in three sections of the drug labels: "Boxed warning," "Warnings and Precautions," and "Adverse reactions." The first two sections, especially Boxed warning, usually contain the most frequent and severe ADEs that have either known or probable relationships to drug consumption. Using this information, we have created manually curated data sets for the five most frequent and severe ADEs: myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, cardiac failure, severe hepatotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity, with more than 850 drugs on average for each effect. The corresponding SARs were built with PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances) software and had balanced accuracy values of 0.74, 0.7, 0.77, 0.67, and 0.75, respectively. They were implemented in a freely available ADVERPred web service ( http://www.way2drug.com/adverpred/ ), which enables a user to predict five ADEs based on the structural formula of compound. This web service can be applied for estimation of the corresponding ADEs for hits and lead compounds at the early stages of drug discovery.

  5. Assessment of the expectancy, seriousness and severity of adverse drug reactions reported for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Guenka; Stoimenova, Assena; Dimitrova, Maria; Kamusheva, Maria; Petrova, Daniela; Georgiev, Ognian

    2017-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions can cause increased morbidity and mortality, and therefore information needs to be studied systematically. Little is known about the adverse drug reactions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy. The goal of this study is to assess the expectedness, seriousness and severity of adverse drug reactions during chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy based on their reporting in the national pharmacovigilance system. This was a prospective, observational, 1-year, real-life study about the pharmacotherapy of a sample of 390 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Prescribed medicines were systematized and national pharmacovigilance databases were searched for reported adverse drug reactions. The expectedness was evaluated through the review of the summary of product characteristics, the seriousness was evaluated by the clinicians based on the life threatening nature of the adverse drug reactions, and the severity was evaluated through Hartwig's Severity Assessment Scale. Descriptive statistics of the reported adverse drug reactions was performed and the relative risk of developing an adverse drug reaction with all international non-proprietary names included in the analysis was calculated. Results confirm that the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a disease with high appearance of adverse drug reactions, and causes many additional costs to the healthcare system. Unexpected and severe adverse drug reactions are frequent. A total of 4.8% of adverse drug reactions were evaluated as life threatening. Majority of adverse drug reactions are classified in Levels 1 (32.6%), 2 (26.4%) and 3 (19%) according to Hartwig's Severity Assessment Scale. Approximately 22% of reported adverse drug reactions affect people's everyday life to a greater extent and require additional therapy which might further increase the risk. The relative risk of developing an adverse drug reaction was highest for novphyllin (relative risk = 0

  6. A Multicenter Evaluation of Off-Label Medication Use and Associated Adverse Drug Reactions in Adult Medical ICUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithburger, Pamela L; Buckley, Mitchell S; Culver, Mark A; Sokol, Sarah; Lat, Ishaq; Handler, Steven M; Kirisci, Levent; Kane-Gill, Sandra L

    2015-08-01

    Prior research indicates that off-label use is common in the ICU; however, the safety of off-label use has not been assessed. The study objective was to determine the prevalence of adverse drug reactions associated with off-label use and evaluate off-label use as a risk factor for the development of adverse drug reactions in an adult ICU population. Multicenter, observational study : Medical ICUs at three academic medical centers. Adult patients (age ≥ 18 yr old) receiving medication therapy. All administered medications were evaluated for Food and Drug Administration-approved or off-label use. Patients were assessed daily for the development of an adverse drug reaction through active surveillance. Three adverse drug reaction assessment instruments were used to determine the probability of an adverse drug reaction resulting from drug therapy. Severity and harm of the adverse drug reaction were also assessed. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to identify a set of covariates that influenced the rate of adverse drug reactions. Overall, 1,654 patient-days (327 patients) and 16,391 medications were evaluated, with 43% of medications being used off-label. One hundred and sixteen adverse drug reactions were categorized dichotomously (Food and Drug Administration or off-label), with 56% and 44% being associated with Food and Drug Administration-approved and off-label use, respectively. The number of adverse drug reactions for medications administered and the number of harmful and severe adverse drug reactions did not differ for medications used for Food and Drug Administration-approved or off-label use (0.74% vs 0.67%; p = 0.336; 33 vs 31 events, p = 0.567; 24 vs 24 events, p = 0.276). Age, sex, number of high-risk medications, number of off-label medications, and severity of illness score were included in the Cox proportional hazard regression. It was found that the rate of adverse drug reactions increases by 8% for every one additional off-label medication

  7. Monitoring of Adverse Drug Reactions Associated with Antihypertensive Medicines at a University Teaching Hospital in New Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fowad Khurshid

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim To monitor the adverse drug reactions (ADRs caused by antihypertensive medicines prescribed in a university teaching hospital.Methods:he present work was an open, non-comparative, observational study conducted on hypertensive patients attending the Medicine OPD of Majeedia Hospital, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India by conducting patient interviews and recording the data on ADR monitoring form as recommended by Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO, Government of India.Results:A total of 21 adverse drug reactions were observed in 192 hypertensive patients. Incidence of adverse drug reactions was found to be higher in patients more than 40 years in age, and females experienced more ADRs (n = 14, 7.29 % than males, 7 (3.64 %. Combination therapy was associated with more number of adverse drug reactions (66.7 % as against monotherapy (33.3 %. Calcium channel blockers were found to be the most frequently associated drugs with adverse drug reactions (n = 7, followed by diuretics (n = 5, and beta- blockers (n = 4. Among individual drugs, amlodipine was found to be the commonest drug associated with adverse drug reactions (n = 7, followed by torasemide (n = 3. Adverse drug reactions associated with central nervous system were found to be the most frequent (42.8 % followed by musculo-skeletal complaints (23.8 % and gastro-intestinal disorders (14.3 %. Conclusions:The present pharmacovigilance study represents the adverse drug reaction profile of the antihypertensive medicines prescribed in our university teaching hospital. The above findings would be useful for physicians in rational prescribing. Calcium channel blockers were found to be the most frequently associated drugs with adverse drug reactions.

  8. Adverse drug reaction and toxicity caused by commonly used antimicrobials in canine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Arunvikram

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An adverse drug reaction (ADR is a serious concern for practicing veterinarians and other health professionals, and refers to an unintended, undesired and unexpected response to a drug that negatively affects the patient's health. It may be iatrogenic or genetically induced, and may result in death of the affected animal. The ADRs are often complicated and unexpected due to myriad clinical symptoms and multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction. Toxicity due to commonly used drugs is not uncommon when they are used injudiciously or for a prolonged period. Licosamides, exclusively prescribed against anaerobic pyoderma, often ends with diarrhoea and vomiting in canines. Treatment with Penicillin and β-lactam antibiotics induces onset of pemphigious vulgare, drug allergy or hypersensitivity. Chloroamphenicol and aminoglycosides causes Gray's baby syndrome and ototoxicity in puppies, respectively. Aminoglycosides are very often associated with nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity and neuromuscular blockage. Injudicious use of fluroquinones induces the onset of arthropathy in pups at the weight bearing joints. The most effective therapeutic measure in managing ADR is to treat the causative mediators, followed by supportive and symptomatic treatment. So, in this prospective review, we attempt to bring forth the commonly occurring adverse drug reactions, their classification, underlying mechanism, epidemiology, treatment and management as gleaned from the literature available till date and the different clinical cases observed by the authors.

  9. Wheeze as an Adverse Event in Pediatric Vaccine and Drug Randomized Controlled Trials: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangu, Diana; Kovacs, Stephanie; Walson, Judd; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Ortiz, Justin R.; John-Stewart, Grace; Horne, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wheeze is an important sign indicating a potentially severe adverse event in vaccine and drug trials, particularly in children. However, there are currently no consensus definitions of wheeze or associated respiratory compromise in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Objective To identify definitions and severity grading scales of wheeze as an adverse event in vaccine and drug RCTs enrolling children Vaccines made up the majority (90%) of interventions, particularly influenza vaccines (65%). Only 15 trials provided explicit definitions of wheeze. Of 24 studies that described severity, 11 described wheeze severity in the context of an explicit wheeze definition. The remaining 13 studies described wheeze severity where wheeze was defined as part of a respiratory illness or a wheeze equivalent. Wheeze descriptions were elicited from caregiver reports (14%), physical examination by a health worker (45%) or a combination (41%). There were 21/58 studies in which wheeze definitions included combined caregiver report and healthcare worker assessment. The use of these two methods appeared to have the highest combined sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion Standardized wheeze definitions and severity grading scales for use in pediatric vaccine or drug trials are lacking. Standardized definitions of wheeze are needed for assessment of possible adverse events as new vaccines and drugs are evaluated. PMID:26319071

  10. Post-marketing withdrawal of analgesic medications because of adverse drug reactions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onakpoya, Igho J; Heneghan, Carl J; Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2018-01-01

    Many analgesics have been withdrawn from the market because of adverse drug reactions. Controversy still surrounds the use of some approved analgesics for pain management. However, the trends and reasons for withdrawal of analgesics when harms are attributed to their use have not been systematically assessed. Areas covered: We conducted searches in PubMed; Embase; Google Scholar; clinicaltrials.gov; WHO databases of withdrawn products; websites of the European Medicines Agency, the US Food and Drug Administration, the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency; Meyler's Side Effects of Drugs; Stephens' Detection of New Adverse Drug Reactions; the Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Encyclopedia; and the Merck Index. We included licensed analgesics that were withdrawn after marketing because of adverse reactions between 1950 and March 2017. We excluded herbal products, non-human medicines, and non-prescription medicines. We used the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine criteria to document the levels of evidence, and chi-squared tests to compare withdrawal patterns across geographical regions. Expert opinion: Pharmacovigilance systems in low-resource settings should be strengthened. Greater co-ordination across regulatory authorities in assessing and interpreting the benefit-harm balance of new analgesics should be encouraged. Future reporting of harms in clinical trials of analgesics should follow standardized guidelines.

  11. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions seen in a tertiary hospital in Johor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wen Yi; Lee, Chew Kek; Choon, Siew Eng

    2010-07-01

    Adverse drug reactions are most commonly cutaneous in nature. Patterns of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and their causative drugs vary among the different populations previously studied. Our aim is to determine the clinical pattern of drug eruptions and the common drugs implicated, particularly in severe cutaneous ADRs in our population. This study was done by analyzing the database established for all adverse cutaneous drug reactions seen from January 2001 until December 2008. A total of 281 cutaneous ADRs were seen in 280 patients. The most common reaction pattern was maculopapular eruption (111 cases, 39.5%) followed by Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS: 79 cases, 28.1%), drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS: 19 cases, 6.8%), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN: 16 cases, 5.7 %), urticaria/angioedema (15 cases, 5.3%) and fixed drug eruptions (15 cases, 5.3%). Antibiotics (38.8%) and anticonvulsants (23.8%) accounted for 62.6% of the 281 cutaneous ADRs seen. Allopurinol was implicated in 39 (13.9%), carbamazepine in 29 (10.3%), phenytoin in 27 (9.6%) and cotrimoxazole in 26 (9.3%) cases. Carbamazepine, allopurinol and cotrimoxazole were the three main causative drugs of SJS/TEN accounting for 24.0%, 18.8% and 12.5% respectively of the 96 cases seen whereas DRESS was mainly caused by allopurinol (10 cases, 52.6%) and phenytoin (3 cases, 15.8%). The reaction patterns and drugs causing cutaneous ADRs in our population are similar to those seen in other countries although we have a much higher proportion of severe cutaneous ADRs probably due to referral bias, different prescribing habit and a higher prevalence of HLA-B*1502 and HLA-B*5801 which are genetic markers for carbamazepine-induced SJS/TEN and allopurinol-induced SJS/TEN/DRESS respectively. The most common reaction pattern seen in our study population was maculopapular eruptions. Antibiotics, anticonvulsants and NSAIDs were the most frequently implicated drug groups. Carbamazepine

  12. Antiepileptic drug-related adverse reactions and factors influencing these reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Bakrani, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    According to the basic role of drug side effects in selection of an appropriate drug, patient compliance and the quality of life in epileptic patients, and forasmuch as new drugs with unknown side effect have been introduced, necessity of this research is explained. This study was conducted to evaluate the incidence and clinical characteristics of anti epileptic drug (AED) related adverse reactions in children. In this descriptive study, children less than 14 years old with AED side effects referred to the Children's Medical Center and Mofid Childeren's Hospital (Tehran, Iran) were evaluated during 2010-2012. The informations were: sex, age, incriminating drug, type of drug side effect, incubation period, history of drug usage, and patient and family allergy history. Exclusive criterions were age more than 14 years old and reactions due to reasons other than AEDs. A total of 70 patients with AED reaction were enrolled in this study. They included 26 (37%) females and 44 (63%) males. The maximum rate of incidence was seen at age less than 5 years old. All the patients had cutaneous eruptions that the most common cutaneous drug eruption was maculopapular rash. The most common culprit was phenobarbital (70%) and the least common was lamotrigine (1.4%). In this study, we found higher rates of drug rash in patients treated with aromatic AEDs and lower rates with non-aromatic AEDs. Various endogenous and environmental factors may influence the propensity to develop these reactions.

  13. Adverse drug reaction reports for cardiometabolic drugs from sub-Saharan Africa: a study in VigiBase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhe, Derbew Fikadu; Juhlin, Kristina; Star, Kristina; Beyene, Kidanemariam G M; Dheda, Mukesh; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M; Taxis, Katja; Mol, Peter G M

    2015-06-01

    Identifying key features in individual case safety reports (ICSR) of suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) with cardiometabolic drugs from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) compared with reports from the rest of the world (RoW). Reports on suspected ADRs of cardiometabolic drugs (ATC: A10[antidiabetic], B01[antithrombotics] and C[cardiovascular]) were extracted from WHO Global database, VigiBase(®) (1992-2013). We used vigiPoint, a logarithmic odds ratios (log2 OR)-based method to study disproportional reporting between SSA and RoW. Case-defining features were considered relevant if the lower limit of the 99% CI > 0.5. In SSA, 3773 (9%) of reported ADRs were for cardiometabolic drugs, in RoW for 18%. Of these, 79% originated from South Africa and 81% were received after 2007. Most reports were for drugs acting on the renin-angiotensin system (36% SSA & 14% RoW). Compared with RoW, reports were more often sent for patients 18-44 years old (log2 OR 0.95 [99 CI 0.80; 1.09]) or with non-fatal outcome (log2 OR 1.16 [99 CI 1.10; 1.22]). Eight ADRs (cough, angioedema, lip swelling, face oedema, swollen tongue, throat irritation, drug ineffective and blood glucose abnormal) and seven drugs (enalapril, rosuvastatin, perindopril, vildagliptin, insulin glulisine, nifedipine and insulin lispro) were disproportionally more reported in SSA than in the RoW. 'In recent years, the number of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reported in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has sharply increased. The data showed the well-known population-based differential ADR profile of ACE inhibitors in the SSA population.' © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) : an original multisystem adverse drug reaction. Results from the prospective RegiSCAR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardaun, S. H.; Sekula, P.; Valeyrie-Allanore, L.; Liss, Y.; Chu, C. Y.; Creamer, D.; Sidoroff, A.; Naldi, L.; Mockenhaupt, M.; Roujeau, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundCases of severe drug hypersensitivity, demonstrating a variable spectrum of cutaneous and systemic involvement, are reported under various names, especially drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). Case definition and overlap with other severe cutaneous adverse

  15. Identifying adverse drug event information in clinical notes with distributional semantic representations of context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Aron; Kvist, Maria; Dalianis, Hercules; Duneld, Martin

    2015-10-01

    For the purpose of post-marketing drug safety surveillance, which has traditionally relied on the voluntary reporting of individual cases of adverse drug events (ADEs), other sources of information are now being explored, including electronic health records (EHRs), which give us access to enormous amounts of longitudinal observations of the treatment of patients and their drug use. Adverse drug events, which can be encoded in EHRs with certain diagnosis codes, are, however, heavily underreported. It is therefore important to develop capabilities to process, by means of computational methods, the more unstructured EHR data in the form of clinical notes, where clinicians may describe and reason around suspected ADEs. In this study, we report on the creation of an annotated corpus of Swedish health records for the purpose of learning to identify information pertaining to ADEs present in clinical notes. To this end, three key tasks are tackled: recognizing relevant named entities (disorders, symptoms, drugs), labeling attributes of the recognized entities (negation, speculation, temporality), and relationships between them (indication, adverse drug event). For each of the three tasks, leveraging models of distributional semantics - i.e., unsupervised methods that exploit co-occurrence information to model, typically in vector space, the meaning of words - and, in particular, combinations of such models, is shown to improve the predictive performance. The ability to make use of such unsupervised methods is critical when faced with large amounts of sparse and high-dimensional data, especially in domains where annotated resources are scarce. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. High-Performance Signal Detection for Adverse Drug Events using MapReduce Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kai; Sun, Xingzhi; Tao, Ying; Xu, Linhao; Wang, Chen; Mao, Xianling; Peng, Bo; Pan, Yue

    2010-11-13

    Post-marketing pharmacovigilance is important for public health, as many Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) are unknown when those drugs were approved for marketing. However, due to the large number of reported drugs and drug combinations, detecting ADE signals by mining these reports is becoming a challenging task in terms of computational complexity. Recently, a parallel programming model, MapReduce has been introduced by Google to support large-scale data intensive applications. In this study, we proposed a MapReduce-based algorithm, for common ADE detection approach, Proportional Reporting Ratio (PRR), and tested it in mining spontaneous ADE reports from FDA. The purpose is to investigate the possibility of using MapReduce principle to speed up biomedical data mining tasks using this pharmacovigilance case as one specific example. The results demonstrated that MapReduce programming model could improve the performance of common signal detection algorithm for pharmacovigilance in a distributed computation environment at approximately liner speedup rates.

  17. The concept of adverse drug reaction reporting: awareness among pharmacy students in a Nigerian university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Segun Showande

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse drug reaction (ADR is poorly reported globally but more in developing countries with poor participation by health professionals. Currently, there is no known literature on the Nigerian pharmacy students’ knowledge on ADR reporting. Hence the purpose of this study was to find out the level of knowledge of pharmacy students on the concept of pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reaction reporting and also to evaluate their opinions on the National Pharmacovigilance Centre guidelines on adverse drug reaction reporting. A pretested 34-item semi-structured questionnaire was administered among 69 pharmacy undergraduate students in their penultimate and final years that consented to take part in the study, in one of the universities in Nigeria. The study was carried out strictly adhering to the principles outlined in the Helsinki declaration of 1964, which was revised in 1975. The questionnaire used had four sections which included a section on biographical data, a section which evaluated the students knowledge on the concept of pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reaction reporting, a section on students personal experiences of adverse drug reactions and modes of reporting them and the final section of the questionnaire evaluated the students’ opinions on the National Pharmacovigilance Centre guidelines for reporting adverse drug reactions. Descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis statistical tests were used to analyze the data obtained. None of the participants knew the sequence of reporting ADR. More than half, 40(58.0% had heard about pharmacovigilance at symposiums, 7(10.1% during clinical clerkship program and 18(26.1% from media jingles. Twenty nine (42.0% agreed that pharmacovigilance was in their curriculum, however only 16(23.2% could define the term correctly. None of the participants had seen or used an ADR form prior to the study, but the students could easily identify and describe the type of ADR they had

  18. A PROSPECTIVE, OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF ADVERSE REACTIONS TO DRUG REGIME FOR MULTI-DRUG RESISTANT PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS IN CENTRAL INDIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Rohan C. Hire

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: 1 To assess the adverse drug reactions of second line anti-tubercular drugs used to treat Multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis (MDR TB in central India on the basis of causality, severity and avoidability scales. 2 To study the relationship of type of MDR TB (primary or secondary and presence of diabetes mellitus (DM with mean smear conversion time. Material and Methods: A prospective, observational study was carried out on diagnosed multidrug resistant tuberculosis patients enrolled for DOTS‑Plus regimen at TB and Chest Disease Department from January to December 2012. They were followed for 9 months thereafter and encountered adverse drug reactions (ADRs were noted along with the time of sputum conversion. The data were analysed by Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test and unpaired student’s‘t’ test. Results: Total 64 ADRs were reported in 55 patients out of total 110 patients (n = 110. As per the Naranjo causality assessment of ADRs, 7 patients had “definite” causal relation, 45 had “probable” causal relation and 3 had “possible” causal relation with drugs of DOTS Plus regime. As per the Hartwig’s severity assessment scale, there were total 7 ADRs in Level 1, 6 in Level 2, 33 in Level 3 and 9 in Level 4. Hallas avoidability assessment scale divided the ADRs as 3 being “Definitely avoidable”, 26 “Possibly avoidable”, 23 “Not avoidable” and 3 “unevaluable”. . Mean sputum smear conversion time is significantly higher in patients with secondary type than that of primary type of MDR TB (p = 0.0001 and in patients with DM than those without DM (p <0.0001. Conclusion: ADRs were common in patients of MDR TB on DOTs-Plus drug regime. It was due to lack of availability of safer and equally potent drugs in DOTs-Plus drug regime compared to DOTS regime in non-resistant TB. The frequency and severity of ADRs can be reduced by strict vigilance about known and unknown ADRs, monitoring their laboratory and

  19. Post-marketing surveillance of the safety profile of iodixanol in the outpatient CT setting. A prospective, multicenter, observational study of patient risk factors, adverse reactions and preventive measures in 9953 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Frank Hugo Heinz [Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Center, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Non-interventional study in outpatient, contrast-enhanced CT: 1. to determine the extent of preventive measures for risk reduction of adverse drug reactions after contrast-enhanced CT examinations. 2. to prospectively determine the incidence and severity of adverse drug reactions occurring after administration of the iso-osmolar contrast medium iodixanol. 3. to determine a possible influence of preventive measures on the incidence/severity of adverse drug reactions. Evaluable documentation was provided for 9953 patients from 66 radiology centers across Germany. Patient characteristics, aspects of iodixanol administration, and adverse events with an at least 'possible' relationship were documented on a standardized case report form (CRF) and were evaluated up to seven days after contrast medium administration. About 55.5% of patients showed one or more risk factors (e.g. impaired renal function 4.4%, diabetes mellitus 8.5%, hypertension 20.6%). One third of the sites did not implement any preventive measures. Patients with a known risk for an allergy-like reaction were more likely to receive pharmacologic preventive treatment (0.5-50.5%). Oral hydration was the main preventive measure in patients with renal risk factors (<8%) followed by intravenous hydration (1%). Adverse drug reactions, mainly hypersensitivity reactions, occurred in 77 patients (0.74%), but were classified as serious in only 3 patients (0.03%). No statistically significant correlation between risk factors, preventive measures, and adverse reactions could be found. The use of preventive measures for CT examinations in this outpatient setting was generally low with risk patients being pre-medicated more often, depending on their history. In the routine outpatient setting, iso-osmolar iodixanol was very well tolerated in almost 10 000 patients undergoing diagnostic CT. The rate of acute and delayed adverse reactions was low. No correlation could be found between risk factors, preventive

  20. Adverse effects and Drug Interactions Associated with Inhaled Recreational and Medical Marijuana

    OpenAIRE

    Maisha Kelly Freeman; Pilar Z Murphy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To provide an overview of the addiction potential; adverse effects (e.g., cardiovascular, immune dysfunction, respiratory system, mental health disorders); drug interactions; effects of accidental exposure; crime statistics; and pharmacist’s considerations for the use of inhaled medical marijuana. Methods: A PubMed search was conducted from 1966 to March 2016 to identify articles in which the safety of inhaled medical marijuana was assessed. Key MeSH search terms included med...

  1. A Drug Safety Rating System Based on Postmarketing Costs Associated with Adverse Events and Patient Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Keith B; Dimbil, Mo; Kyle, Robert F; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Erdman, Colin B; Demakas, Andrea; Chen, Dingguo; Overstreet, Brian M

    2015-12-01

    Given the multiple limitations associated with relatively homogeneous preapproval clinical trials, inadequate data disclosures, slow reaction times from regulatory bodies, and deep-rooted bias against disclosing and publishing negative results, there is an acute need for the development of analytics that reflect drug safety in heterogeneous, real-world populations. To develop a drug safety statistic that estimates downstream medical costs associated with serious adverse events (AEs) and unfavorable patient outcomes associated with the use of 706 FDA-approved drugs. All primary suspect case reports for each drug were collected from the FDA's Adverse Event Reporting System database (FAERS) from 2010-2014. The Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) was used to code serious AEs and outcomes, which were tallied for each case report. Medical costs associated with AEs and poor patient outcomes were derived from Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) survey data, and their corresponding ICD-9-CM codes were mapped to MedDRA terms. Nonserious AEs and outcomes were not included. For each case report, either the highest AE cost or, if no eligible AE was listed, the highest outcome cost was used. All costed cases were aggregated for each drug and divided by the number of patients exposed to obtain a downstream estimated direct medical cost burden per exposure. Each drug was assigned a corresponding 1-100 point total. The 706 drugs showed an exponential distribution of downstream costs, and the data were transformed using the natural log to approximate a normal distribution. The minimum score was 8.29, and the maximum score was 99.25, with a mean of 44.32. Drugs with the highest individual scores tended to be kinase inhibitors, thalidomide analogs, and endothelin receptor antagonists. When scores were analyzed across Established Pharmacologic Class (EPC), the kinase inhibitor and endothelin receptor antagonist classes had the highest total. However

  2. Leveraging 3D chemical similarity, target and phenotypic data in the identification of drug-protein and drug-adverse effect associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Santiago; Hripcsak, George

    2016-01-01

    Drug-target identification is crucial to discover novel applications for existing drugs and provide more insights about mechanisms of biological actions, such as adverse drug effects (ADEs). Computational methods along with the integration of current big data sources provide a useful framework for drug-target and drug-adverse effect discovery. In this article, we propose a method based on the integration of 3D chemical similarity, target and adverse effect data to generate a drug-target-adverse effect predictor along with a simple leveraging system to improve identification of drug-targets and drug-adverse effects. In the first step, we generated a system for multiple drug-target identification based on the application of 3D drug similarity into a large target dataset extracted from the ChEMBL. Next, we developed a target-adverse effect predictor combining targets from ChEMBL with phenotypic information provided by SIDER data source. Both modules were linked to generate a final predictor that establishes hypothesis about new drug-target-adverse effect candidates. Additionally, we showed that leveraging drug-target candidates with phenotypic data is very useful to improve the identification of drug-targets. The integration of phenotypic data into drug-target candidates yielded up to twofold precision improvement. In the opposite direction, leveraging drug-phenotype candidates with target data also yielded a significant enhancement in the performance. The modeling described in the current study is simple and efficient and has applications at large scale in drug repurposing and drug safety through the identification of mechanism of action of biological effects.

  3. Choosing a Drug to Prevent Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Malaria About Malaria FAQs Fast Facts Disease Biology Ecology Human Factors Sickle Cell Mosquitoes Parasites Where Malaria ... medicines, also consider the possibility of drug-drug interactions with other medicines that the person might be ...

  4. Drug Prevention with Vulnerable Young People: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Stephen; Becker, Jane

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a comprehensive and systematic review of the literature on drug-use prevention with vulnerable young people. A search of electronic databases was conducted to find evaluations of prevention programmes targeted at high-risk young people and including illegal drug use as an outcome measure. Sixteen relevant…

  5. Puppet Play as Interactive Approach in Drug Abuse Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadic-Bilan, Diana; Vigato, Teodora

    2010-01-01

    The national strategies of drug abuse prevention across Europe have come to recognise that the drug abuse problem presents a complex set of issues of which there is no simple solution. There is a considerable increase in investment in prevention, treatment and harm-reduction activities and increased focus on supply reduction. School settings are…

  6. Influence of Health Education on Prevention of Drug Abuse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The increasing scourge of drug abuse among adolescents is a major challenge facing mankind. As the importance of health education in disease prevention is enormous, drug misuse prevention programme requires introducing innovations, flexibility and reinforcement which will be effective in shortest possible time among ...

  7. The validation of an invitro colonic motility assay as a biomarker for gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keating, Christopher; Martinez, Vicente; Ewart, Lorna; Gibbons, Stephen; Grundy, Luke; Valentin, Jean-Pierre; Grundy, David

    2010-01-01

    Motility-related gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions (GADRs), such as constipation and diarrhea, are some of the most frequently reported adverse events associated with the clinical development of new chemical entities, and for marketed drugs. However, biomarkers capable of detecting such GADRs are lacking. Here, we describe an in vitro assay developed to detect and quantify changes in intestinal motility as a surrogate biomarker for constipation/diarrhea-type GADRs. In vitro recordings of intraluminal pressure were used to monitor the presence of colonic peristaltic motor complexes (CPMCs) in mouse colonic segments. CPMC frequency, contractile and total mechanical activity were assessed. To validate the assay, two experimental protocols were conducted. Initially, five drugs with known gastrointestinal effects were tested to determine optimal parameters describing excitation and inhibition as markers for disturbances in colonic motility. This was followed by a 'blinded' evaluation of nine drugs associated with or without clinically identified constipation/diarrhea-type GADRs. Concentration-response relationships were determined for these drugs and the effects were compared with their maximal free therapeutic plasma concentration in humans. The assay detected stimulatory and inhibitory responses, likely correlating to the occurrence of diarrhea or constipation. Concentration-related effects were identified and potential mechanisms of action were inferred for several drugs. Based on the results from the fourteen drugs assessed, the sensitivity of the assay was calculated at 90%, with a specificity of 75% and predictive capacity of 86%. These results support the potential use of this assay in screening for motility-related GADRs during early discovery phase, safety pharmacology assessment.

  8. Medicinal plant reported with adverse reactions in Cuba: potential interactions with conventional drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Martínez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: Herbal drugs are a mixture of active compounds and the chemical complexity of each formulation increase with the possibility of interactions between them and conventional drugs. Many mechanisms are implicated in the interactions; scientific community has dedicated the attentions to enzymes as P-gp and CYP450. Aims: To investigate in the literature the principal plants with suspicions of adverse reactions in Cuba and their potential interactions with conventional drugs. Methods: PubMed was the database used as source of information until February 2014. Key words: Herb-Drug, Drug-Plant, Herbal–Drug, Interactions with scientific names of plants was used. Information was structured and analysed with EndNote X4. Analysis and integration of the information: Allium sativum L. (garlic was the plant with the high number of studies related with CYP450 and P-gp. Plants with great demand as Morinda citrifolia L. (noni, Psidium guajava L. (guayaba, Zingiber officinale Roscoe (ginger and Eucalyptus spp. (eucalyptus have a very small number of studies. The professionals of the health should keep in mind the possibility of interactions between herbal products and conventional drugs to increase the effectiveness of phytotherapy. Conclusions: It is necessary enhance reports and investigations and to put to disposition of the system of health information on the interactions of plants and to stimulate the investigation that offers information for the rational use of our medicinal plants.

  9. Measures for Prevention of Irrational Drug Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursel Surmelioglu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Irrational drug use is one of the main health problems all over the world, especially in developing countries. Limited studies about irrational drug use examples showed that main defects. These are polypharmacy, use of drug drug incompatible with diagnosis, inappropriate use of antibiotics, unnecessary use of expensive drug and people's self-treatment with over the counter and prescribing drugs. There are many reasons for irrational drug use. The main reasons are lack of education, socio-cultural, economic and resulting from regulatory mechanism factors. These reasons affect each other, so problems become more complicated. Reasons resulting from pharmacist and doctors occurs basic of irrational drug use. So attitude of doctors and pharmacist toward rational drug use should be evaluated for resolve defects, formal and non-formal education should be continually used and improved. Rational drug use policies should be developed involving drug companies, doctors, pharmacists and patients. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(4.000: 452-462

  10. Orlistat-associated adverse effects and drug interactions: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippatos, Theodosios D; Derdemezis, Christos S; Gazi, Irene F; Nakou, Eleni S; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Elisaf, Moses S

    2008-01-01

    Orlistat, an anti-obesity drug, is a potent and specific inhibitor of intestinal lipases. In light of the recent US FDA approval of the over-the-counter sale of orlistat (60 mg three times daily), clinicians need to be aware that its use may be associated with less well known, but sometimes clinically relevant, adverse effects. More specifically, the use of orlistat has been associated with several mild-to-moderate gastrointestinal adverse effects, such as oily stools, diarrhoea, abdominal pain and faecal spotting. A few cases of serious hepatic adverse effects (cholelithiasis, cholostatic hepatitis and subacute liver failure) have been reported. However, the effects of orlistat on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are beneficial. Orlistat-induced weight loss seems to have beneficial effects on blood pressure. No effect has been observed on calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, copper or zinc balance or on bone biomarkers. Interestingly, the use of orlistat has been associated with rare cases of acute kidney injury, possibly due to the increased fat malabsorption resulting from the inhibition of pancreatic and gastric lipase by orlistat, leading to the formation of soaps with calcium and resulting in increased free oxalate absorption and enteric hyperoxaluria. Orlistat has a beneficial effect on carbohydrate metabolism. No significant effect on cancer risk has been reported with orlistat.Orlistat interferes with the absorption of many drugs (such as warfarin, amiodarone, ciclosporin and thyroxine as well as fat-soluble vitamins), affecting their bioavailability and effectiveness. This review considers orlistat-related adverse effects and drug interactions. The clinical relevance and pathogenesis of these effects is also discussed.

  11. Drug Treatment as HIV Prevention: Expanding Treatment Options

    OpenAIRE

    Metzger, David S.; Zhang, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Research conducted during the first 20 years of the AIDS epidemic provided a solid foundation of data supporting methadone treatment as HIV prevention. Drug users in methadone treatment were consistently found to reduce the frequency of drug use, risk behaviors, and infections. These data have been consistent over time and across cultural settings and have been used to promote the expansion of drug treatment as a prevention intervention. More recently, data has emerged suggesting the preventi...

  12. Automated Summarization of Publications Associated with Adverse Drug Reactions from PubMed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Chen, Qinlang; Adams, Hayden; Friedman, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Academic literature provides rich and up-to-date information concerning adverse drug reactions (ADR), but it is time consuming and labor intensive for physicians to obtain information of ADRs from academic literature because they would have to generate queries, review retrieved articles and summarize the results. In this study, a method is developed to automatically detect and summarize ADRs from journal articles, rank them and present them to physicians in a user-friendly interface. The method studied ADRs for 6 drugs and returned on average 4.8 ADRs that were correct. The results demonstrated this method was feasible and effective. This method can be applied in clinical practice for assisting physicians to efficiently obtain information about ADRs associated with specific drugs. Automated summarization of ADR information from recent publications may facilitate translation of academic research into actionable information at point of care.

  13. Post-marketing surveillance of the safety profile of iodixanol in the outpatient CT setting: a prospective, multicenter, observational study of patient risk factors, adverse reactions and preventive measures in 9953 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, F H H

    2014-11-01

    Non-interventional study in outpatient, contrast-enhanced CT; 1. to determine the extent of preventive measures for risk reduction of adverse drug reactions after contrast-enhanced CT examinations. 2. to prospectively determine the incidence and severity of adverse drug reactions occurring after administration of the iso-osmolar contrast medium iodixanol. 3. to determine a possible influence of preventive measures on the incidence/severity of adverse drug reactions.. Evaluable documentation was provided for 9953 patients from 66 radiology centers across Germany. Patient characteristics, aspects of iodixanol administration, and adverse events with an at least "possible" relationship were documented on a standardized case report form (CRF) and were evaluated up to seven days after contrast medium administration. About 55.5 % of patients showed one or more risk factors (e. g. impaired renal function 4.4 %, diabetes mellitus 8.5 %, hypertension 20.6 %). One third of the sites did not implement any preventive measures. Patients with a known risk for an allergy-like reaction were more likely to receive pharmacologic preventive treatment (0.5 - 50.5 %). Oral hydration was the main preventive measure in patients with renal risk factors (Adverse drug reactions, mainly hypersensitivity reactions, occurred in 77 patients (0.74 %), but were classified as serious in only 3 patients (0.03 %). No statistically significant correlation between risk factors, preventive measures, and adverse reactions could be found. The use of preventive measures for CT examinations in this outpatient setting was generally low with risk patients being pre-medicated more often, depending on their history. In the routine outpatient setting, iso-osmolar iodixanol was very well tolerated in almost 10,000 patients undergoing diagnostic CT. The rate of acute and delayed adverse reactions was low. No correlation could be found between risk factors, preventive measures and the incidence

  14. [Description of contributing factors in adverse events related to patient safety and their preventability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-García, María Mercedes; Campos-Rivas, Beatriz; Sanmarful-Schwarz, Alexandra; Vírseda-Sacristán, Alicia; Dorrego-López, M Aránzazu; Charle-Crespo, Ángeles

    2017-11-25

    To assess the extent of healthcare related adverse events (AEs), their effect on patients, and their seriousness. To analyse the factors leading to the development of AEs, their relationship with the damage caused, and their degree of preventability. Retrospective descriptive study. Porriño, Pontevedra, Spain, Primary Care Service, from January-2014 to April-2016. Reported AEs were entered into the Patient Safety Reporting and Learning System (SiNASP). The variables measured were: Near Incident (NI) an occurrence with no effect or harm on the patient; Adverse Event (AE) an occurrence that affects or harms a patient. The level of harm is classified as minimal, minor, moderate, critical, and catastrophic. Preventability was classified as little evidence of being preventable, 50% preventable, and sound evidence of being preventable. percentages and Chi-squared test for qualitative variables; P<.05 with SPSS.15. SiNASP. Ethical considerations: approved by the Research Ethics Committee (2016/344). There were 166 recorded AEs (50.6% in males, and 46.4% in women. The mean age was 60.80years). Almost two-thirds 62.7% of AEs affected the patient, with 45.8% causing minimal damage, while 2.4% caused critical damages. Healthcare professionals were a contributing factor in 71.7% of the AEs, with the trend showing that poor communication and lack of protocols were related to the damage caused. Degree of preventability: 96.4%. Most AEs affected the patient, and were related to medication, diagnostic tests, and laboratory errors. The level of harm was related to communication problems, lack of, or deficient, protocols and a poor safety culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Rebound effect of modern drugs: serious adverse event unknown by health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Marcus Zulian

    2013-01-01

    Supported in the Hippocratic aphorism primum non nocere, the bioethical principle of non-maleficence pray that the medical act cause the least damage or injury to the health of the patient, leaving it to the doctor to assess the risks of a particular therapy through knowledge of possible adverse events of drugs. Among these, the rebound effect represents a common side effect to numerous classes of modern drugs, may cause serious and fatal disorders in patients. This review aims to clarify the health professionals on clinical and epidemiological aspects of rebound phenomenon. A qualitative, exploratory and bibliographic review was held in the PubMed database using the keywords 'rebound', 'withdrawal', 'paradoxical', 'acetylsalicylic acid', 'anti-inflammatory', 'bronchodilator', 'antidepressant', 'statin', 'proton pump inhibitor' and 'bisphosphonate'. The rebound effect occurs after discontinuation of numerous classes of drugs that act contrary to the disease disorders, exacerbating them at levels above those prior to treatment. Regardless of the disease, the drug and duration of treatment, the phenomenon manifests itself in a small proportion of susceptible individuals. However, it may cause serious and fatal adverse events should be considered a public health problem in view of the enormous consumption of drugs by population. Bringing together a growing and unquestionable body of evidence, the physician needs to have knowledge of the consequences of the rebound effect and how to minimize it, increasing safety in the management of modern drugs. On the other hand, this rebound can be used in a curative way, broadening the spectrum of the modern therapeutics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Systematic review of paediatric studies of adverse drug reactions from pharmacovigilance databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff-Eribo, Kennedy Obebi; Sammons, Helen; Choonara, Imti

    2016-10-01

    To perform a systematic review of studies describing paediatric adverse drug reactions (ADRs) conducted from national pharmacovigilance databases. A systematic literature search of studies describing results for paediatric ADRs from national pharmacovigilance databases was performed. PubMed database, Embase and MEDLINE were searched up to March 2015. The descriptive studies included were analysed for country of origin, reporters, and ADR reporting rate, drugs, ADRs and number of fatalities. 20 studies were identified. Doctors were the largest group of reporters in all the studies, and with more consumer reports seen in USA. The studies ranged from 3 - 37 years. The highest ADR reporting rate was 1458 reports per year per million children in Cuba. Antibiotics and vaccines were the most frequently reported drugs, in almost all the studies. The most frequent ADRs were skin and nervous system disorders. The highest proportion of fatalities and serious reports was from North America. Drugs used for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (ADHD) and isotretinoin were the most frequently reported drugs for ADRs in North America. There were geographical differences in drugs responsible for ADRs and their seriousness, especially in North America. Very few studies were conducted in Asia and Latin America, none were found from Africa.

  17. An analysis of potential costs of adverse events based on Drug Programs in Poland. Pulmonology focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szkultecka-Debek Monika

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The project was performed within the Polish Society for Pharmacoeconomics (PTFE. The objective was to estimate the potential costs of treatment of side effects, which theoretically may occur as a result of treatment of selected diseases. We analyzed the Drug Programs financed by National Health Fund in Poland in 2012 and for the first analysis we selected those Programs where the same medicinal products were used. We based the adverse events selection on the Summary of Product Characteristics of the chosen products. We extracted all the potential adverse events defined as frequent and very frequent, grouping them according to therapeutic areas. This paper is related to the results in the pulmonology area. The events described as very common had an incidence of ≥ 1/10, and the common ones ≥ 1/100, <1/10. In order to identify the resources used, we performed a survey with the engagement of clinical experts. On the basis of the collected data we allocated direct costs incurred by the public payer. We used the costs valid in December 2013. The paper presents the estimated costs of treatment of side effects related to the pulmonology disease area. Taking into account the costs incurred by the NHF and the patient separately e calculated the total spending and the percentage of each component cost in detail. The treatment of adverse drug reactions generates a significant cost incurred by both the public payer and the patient.

  18. Pharmacokinetic drug interaction profile of omeprazole with adverse consequences and clinical risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li W

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Wei Li,1 Su Zeng,2 Lu-Shan Yu,2 Quan Zhou31Division of Medical Affairs, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis and Drug Metabolism, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pharmacy, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: Omeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI, is widely used for the treatment of dyspepsia, peptic ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and functional dyspepsia. Polypharmacy is common in patients receiving omeprazole. Drug toxicity and treatment failure resulting from inappropriate combination therapy with omeprazole have been reported sporadically. Systematic review has not been available to address the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction (DDI profile of omeprazole with adverse consequences, the factors determining the degree of DDI between omeprazole and comedication, and the corresponding clinical risk management.Methods: Literature was identified by performing a PubMed search covering the period from January 1988 to March 2013. The full text of each article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed.Results: Omeprazole has actual adverse influences on the pharmacokinetics of medications such as diazepam, carbamazepine, clozapine, indinavir, nelfinavir, atazanavir, rilpivirine, methotrexate, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, clopidogrel, digoxin, itraconazole, posaconazole, and oral iron supplementation. Meanwhile, low efficacy of omeprazole treatment would be anticipated, as omeprazole elimination could be significantly induced by comedicated efavirenz and herb medicines such as St John's wort, Ginkgo biloba, and yin zhi huang. The mechanism for DDI involves induction or inhibition of cytochrome P450, inhibition of P-glycoprotein or breast

  19. Genetics or environment in drug transport: the case of organic anion transporting polypeptides and adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, John D; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2012-03-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) uptake transporters are important for the disposition of many drugs and perturbed OATP activity can contribute to adverse drug reactions (ADRs). It is well documented that both genetic and environmental factors can alter OATP expression and activity. Genetic factors include single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that change OATP activity and epigenetic regulation that modify OATP expression levels. SNPs in OATPs contribute to ADRs. Environmental factors include the pharmacological context of drug-drug interactions and the physiological context of liver diseases. Liver diseases such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cholestasis and hepatocellular carcinoma change the expression of multiple OATP isoforms. The role of liver diseases in the occurrence of ADRs is unknown. This article covers the roles OATPs play in ADRs when considered in the context of genetic or environmental factors. The reader will gain a greater appreciation for the current evidence regarding the salience and importance of each factor in OATP-mediated ADRs. A SNP in a single OATP transporter can cause changes in drug pharmacokinetics and contribute to ADRs but, because of overlap in substrate specificities, there is potential for compensatory transport by other OATP isoforms. By contrast, the expression of multiple OATP isoforms is decreased in liver diseases, reducing compensatory transport and thereby increasing the probability of ADRs. To date, most research has focused on the genetic factors in OATP-mediated ADRs while the impact of environmental factors has largely been ignored.

  20. Drug Abuse and Eating Disorders: Prevention Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, W. David; Ellis, Anne Marie

    1992-01-01

    Explored relationship between drug and alcohol abuse and eating disorders in female adolescents (n=826). Eating Disorders Risk Scale was adopted and correlated with drug and alcohol use, other forms of deviance, family and peer relationships, and depression. Findings support concept of generalized theory of addictions based on psychosocial,…

  1. Preventing drug resistance in severe influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolny, Hana; Deecke, Lucas

    2015-03-01

    Severe, long-lasting influenza infections are often caused by new strains of influenza. The long duration of these infections leads to an increased opportunity for the emergence of drug resistant mutants. This is particularly problematic for new strains of influenza since there is often no vaccine, so drug treatment is the first line of defense. One strategy for trying to minimize drug resistance is to apply periodic treatment. During treatment the wild-type virus decreases, but resistant virus might increase; when there is no treatment, wild-type virus will hopefully out-compete the resistant virus, driving down the number of resistant virus. We combine a mathematical model of severe influenza with a model of drug resistance to study emergence of drug resistance during a long-lasting infection. We apply periodic treatment with two types of antivirals: neuraminidase inhibitors, which block release of virions; and adamantanes, which block replication of virions. We compare the efficacy of the two drugs in reducing emergence of drug resistant mutants and examine the effect of treatment frequency on the emergence of drug resistant mutants.

  2. Helping Schools Prevent Drug and Alcohol Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton.

    This report describes the efforts of the New Jersey State Department of Education to assist local school districts in a comprehensive approach to combat drug and alcohol abuse in the schools. The introduction examines the drug and alcohol problems of students in New Jersey and discusses the State Board of Education's recent adoption of the first…

  3. Discontinuation of Preventive Drugs in General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John Sahl; Lindberg, Laura Maria Glahder; Nixon, Michael Simon

    of death in the United States. The public expenses to drug treatment are constantly increasing. The possibility to withdraw the medication must be taken into account but the decision to discontinue drugs is complex and poorly understood. Planned studies: 1. Patients’ views upon discontinuation...

  4. Pattern of adverse drug reactions due to cancer chemotherapy in a tertiary care hospital in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajitha Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Studies regarding pattern of adverse drug reactions (ADRs in cancer chemotherapy patients are scarce in India. This study was conducted to evaluate the pattern of occurrence of ADRs due to cancer chemotherapy in hospitalized patients and to assess the causality, severity, predictability, and preventability of these reactions. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective, descriptive study and the occurrence and nature of ADR, suspected drug, duration of hospital stay and outcome were noted from case records. These ADRs were assessed for causality using both World Health Organization (WHO causality assessment scale and Naranjo′s algorithm. The severity and preventability of the reported reactions were assessed using modified Hartwig and Siegel scale and modified Schumock and Thornton scale respectively. Results: Five hundred ADRs were recorded from 195 patients. Most common ADRs were infections (22.4%, nausea/vomiting (21.6% and febrile neutropenia (13%. Platinum compounds, nitrogen mustards, taxanes, antibiotics and 5-fluorouracil were the most common drugs causing ADRs. WHO causality assessment scale showed 65% of the reactions to be "probable" and 35% to be "possible," while Naranjo′s algorithm indicated that 65.6% of ADRs were "probable" and 34.4% were "possible". Modified Hartwig and Siegel scale showed most reactions (41.4% to be of "moderate level 4(a" severity, while 30.6% of reactions were of "mild level 1" severity. About 30.8% of the ADRs were "definitely preventable" according to the modified Schumock and Thornton scale. Conclusion: ADRs are most important causes of morbidity and mortality and increase the economic burden on patient and society. By careful ADR monitoring, their incidence can be decreased.

  5. Evaluating the reporting of adverse events in controlled clinical trials conducted in 2010-2015 on migraine drug treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Lindqvist, Janus Kaufmann; Do, Thien Phu

    2018-01-01

    Background In 2008, the International Headache Society published guidelines on the "evaluation and registration of adverse events in clinical drug trials on migraine". They listed seven recommendations for reporting adverse events in randomized controlled trials on migraine. The present study aimed to evaluate adherence to these recommendations, and based on the results, to recommend improvements. Methods We searched the PubMed/MEDLINE database to identify controlled trials on migraine drugs published from 2010 to 2015. For each trial, we noted whether five of the recommended parameters were presented. In addition, we noted whether adverse events were reported in abstracts. Results We identified 73 trials; 51 studied acutely administered drugs and 22 studied prophylactic drugs for migraine. The number of patients with any adverse events were reported in 74% of acute-administration and 86% of prophylactic drug trials. Only 30 (41%) of the 73 studies reported adverse events with data in the abstracts, and 27 (37%) abstracts did not mention adverse events. Conclusion Adverse events, both frequency and symptoms, should be reported to allow a fair judgement of benefit/tolerability ratio when randomized controlled trials in migraine treatment are published. Clinically significant adverse events should be included in the abstract of every randomized controlled trial in migraine treatment.

  6. Dictionary construction and identification of possible adverse drug events in Danish clinical narrative text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Robert; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Frankild, Sune; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Brunak, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Drugs have tremendous potential to cure and relieve disease, but the risk of unintended effects is always present. Healthcare providers increasingly record data in electronic patient records (EPRs), in which we aim to identify possible adverse events (AEs) and, specifically, possible adverse drug events (ADEs). Based on the undesirable effects section from the summary of product characteristics (SPC) of 7446 drugs, we have built a Danish ADE dictionary. Starting from this dictionary we have developed a pipeline for identifying possible ADEs in unstructured clinical narrative text. We use a named entity recognition (NER) tagger to identify dictionary matches in the text and post-coordination rules to construct ADE compound terms. Finally, we apply post-processing rules and filters to handle, for example, negations and sentences about subjects other than the patient. Moreover, this method allows synonyms to be identified and anatomical location descriptions can be merged to allow appropriate grouping of effects in the same location. The method identified 1 970 731 (35 477 unique) possible ADEs in a large corpus of 6011 psychiatric hospital patient records. Validation was performed through manual inspection of possible ADEs, resulting in precision of 89% and recall of 75%. The presented dictionary-building method could be used to construct other ADE dictionaries. The complication of compound words in Germanic languages was addressed. Additionally, the synonym and anatomical location collapse improve the method. The developed dictionary and method can be used to identify possible ADEs in Danish clinical narratives.

  7. Valproic acid-induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy - a potentially fatal adverse drug reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Carla

    2013-12-01

    A patient with an early diagnosed epilepsy Valproic acid is one of the most widely used antiepileptic drugs. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare, but potentially fatal, adverse drug reaction to valproic acid. A patient with an early diagnosed epilepsy, treated with valproic acid, experienced an altered mental state after 10 days of treatment. Valproic acid serum levels were within limits, hepatic function tests were normal but ammonia levels were above the normal range. Valproic acid was stopped and the hyperammonemic encephalopathy was treated with lactulose 15 ml twice daily, metronidazole 250 mg four times daily and L-carnitine 1 g twice daily. Monitoring liver function and ammonia levels should be recommended in patients taking valproic acid. The constraints of the pharmaceutical market had to be taken into consideration and limited the pharmacological options for this patient's treatment. Idiosyncratic symptomatic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is completely reversible, but can induce coma and even death, if not timely detected. Clinical pharmacists can help detecting adverse drug reactions and provide evidence based information for the treatment.

  8. On the creation of a clinical gold standard corpus in Spanish: Mining adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oronoz, Maite; Gojenola, Koldo; Pérez, Alicia; de Ilarraza, Arantza Díaz; Casillas, Arantza

    2015-08-01

    The advances achieved in Natural Language Processing make it possible to automatically mine information from electronically created documents. Many Natural Language Processing methods that extract information from texts make use of annotated corpora, but these are scarce in the clinical domain due to legal and ethical issues. In this paper we present the creation of the IxaMed-GS gold standard composed of real electronic health records written in Spanish and manually annotated by experts in pharmacology and pharmacovigilance. The experts mainly annotated entities related to diseases and drugs, but also relationships between entities indicating adverse drug reaction events. To help the experts in the annotation task, we adapted a general corpus linguistic analyzer to the medical domain. The quality of the annotation process in the IxaMed-GS corpus has been assessed by measuring the inter-annotator agreement, which was 90.53% for entities and 82.86% for events. In addition, the corpus has been used for the automatic extraction of adverse drug reaction events using machine learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Adverse drug reactions due to antipsychotics and sedative-hypnotics in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha S Kate

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychotropic drugs are commonly used to manage mental and behavioral problems in geriatric patients. This is, however, accompanied by the risk of developing adverse drug reactions (ADRs, impacting the safety with which the drug can be used. In this article, we provide an overview of the factors associated with the ADRs due to psychotropic medication in the elderly, and the ADRs associated with the use of antipsychotics and sedative-hypnotics in the geriatric population. For this, literature searches were conducted through MEDLINE, PubMed, and Google Scholar using keyword terms: Geriatric, elderly, safety, adverse events, ADRs, antipsychotic, names of individual antipsychotics, benzodiazepine, sedative, hypnotic, zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone. Research data indicate that antipsychotics are associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome, thromboembolism, cerebrovascular and cardiac events, pneumonia, fractures, and increased mortality. Among antipsychotics, aripiprazole seems to have fewer ADRs while other antipsychotics (typical and atypicals have reports of troublesome side effect profiles. Sedative-hypnotics are associated with a risk of falls, fractures, cognitive impairment, and may increase the risk of developing dementia with long-term use. The risk of these complications is present with both benzodiazepines and medications such as zolpidem and zopiclone.

  10. [Data-mining characteristics of adverse drug reactions and pharmacovi-gilance of Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum herbs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Meng; Li, Fan; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Xiao-Fen; Piao, Jing-Zhu

    2018-01-01

    The common Aconitum herbs in clinical application mainly include Aconiti Radix(Chuanwu), Aconiti Kusnezoffii Radix(Caowu) and Aconiti Lateralis Radix Praeparaia(Fuzi), all of which have toxicity. Therefore, the safety of using Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum herbs has become an hot topic in clinical controversy. Based on the data-mining methods, this study explored the characteristics and causes of adverse drug reactions/events (ADR/ADE) of the Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum, in order to provide pharmacovigilance and rational drug use suggestions for clinical application. The detailed ADR/ADE reports about the Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum herbs were retrieved in the domestic literature databases since 1984 to now. The information extraction and data-mining were conducted based on the platforms of Microsoft office Excel 2016, Clementine 12.0 and Cytoscape 3.3.0. Finally, 78 detailed ADR/ADE reports involving a total of 30 varieties were included. 92.31% ADR/ADE were surely or likely led by the Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum, mostly involving multiple system/organ damages with good prognosis, and even 1 case of death. The incidence of included ADRs/ADEs was associated with various factors such as the patient idiosyncratic, drug toxicity, as well as clinical medication. The patient age was most closely related to ADR/ADEs, and those aged from 60 to 69 were more easily suffered from the ADRs/ADEs of Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum. The probability of ADR/ADEs for the drugs including Chuanwu or Caowu was greater than that of Fuzi, and the using beyond the instructions dose was the most important potential safety hazard in the clinical medication process. For the regular and characteristics of ADR/ADEs led by Chinese patent drugs including Aconitum, special attention shall be paid to the elder patients or with the patients with allergies; strictly control the dosage and course of treatment, strengthen the safety medication

  11. Adverse Health Consequences of Performance-Enhancing Drugs: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Harrison G.; Wood, Ruth I.; Rogol, Alan; Nyberg, Fred; Bowers, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of performance-enhancing drug (PED) use, media attention has focused almost entirely on PED use by elite athletes to illicitly gain a competitive advantage in sports, and not on the health risks of PEDs. There is a widespread misperception that PED use is safe or that adverse effects are manageable. In reality, the vast majority of PED users are not athletes but rather nonathlete weightlifters, and the adverse health effects of PED use are greatly underappreciated. This scientific statement synthesizes available information on the medical consequences of PED use, identifies gaps in knowledge, and aims to focus the attention of the medical community and policymakers on PED use as an important public health problem. PED users frequently consume highly supraphysiologic doses of PEDs, combine them with other PEDs and/or other classical drugs of abuse, and display additional associated risk factors. PED use has been linked to an increased risk of death and a wide variety of cardiovascular, psychiatric, metabolic, endocrine, neurologic, infectious, hepatic, renal, and musculoskeletal disorders. Because randomized trials cannot ethically duplicate the large doses of PEDs and the many factors associated with PED use, we need observational studies to collect valid outcome data on the health risks associated with PEDs. In addition, we need studies regarding the prevalence of PED use, the mechanisms by which PEDs exert their adverse health effects, and the interactive effects of PEDs with sports injuries and other high-risk behaviors. We also need randomized trials to assess therapeutic interventions for treating the adverse effects of PEDs, such as the anabolic-androgen steroid withdrawal syndrome. Finally, we need to raise public awareness of the serious health consequences of PEDs. PMID:24423981

  12. Development and validation of a risk model for predicting adverse drug reactions in older people during hospital stay: Brighton Adverse Drug Reactions Risk (BADRI model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamurugan Tangiisuran

    Full Text Available Older patients are at an increased risk of developing adverse drug reactions (ADR. Of particular concern are the oldest old, which constitute an increasingly growing population. Having a validated clinical tool to identify those older patients at risk of developing an ADR during hospital stay would enable healthcare staff to put measures in place to reduce the risk of such an event developing. The current study aimed to (1 develop and (2 validate an ADR risk prediction model.We used a combination of univariate analysis and multivariate binary logistic regression to identify clinical risk factors for developing an ADR in a population of older people from a UK teaching hospital. The final ADR risk model was then validated in a European population (European dataset.Six-hundred-ninety patients (median age 85 years were enrolled in the development stage of the study. Ninety-five reports of ADR were confirmed by independent review in these patients. Five clinical variables were identified through multivariate analysis and included in our final model; each variable was attributed a score of 1. Internal validation produced an AUROC of 0.74, a sensitivity of 80%, and specificity of 55%. During the external validation stage the AUROC was 0.73, with sensitivity and specificity values of 84% and 43% respectively.We have developed and successfully validated a simple model to use ADR risk score in a population of patients with a median age of 85, i.e. the oldest old. The model is based on 5 clinical variables (≥8 drugs, hyperlipidaemia, raised white cell count, use of anti-diabetic agents, length of stay ≥12 days, some of which have not been previously reported.

  13. Combining Potent Statin Therapy with Other Drugs to Optimize Simultaneous Cardiovascular and Metabolic Benefits while Minimizing Adverse Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kwang Kon; Sakuma, Ichiro; Shimada, Kazunori; Hayashi, Toshio; Quon, Michael J

    2017-07-01

    Hypercholesterolemia and hypertension are among the most important risk factors for cardiovascular (CV) disease. They are also important contributors to metabolic diseases including diabetes that further increase CV risk. Updated guidelines emphasize targeted reduction of overall CV risks but do not explicitly incorporate potential adverse metabolic outcomes that also influence CV health. Hypercholesterolemia and hypertension have synergistic deleterious effects on interrelated insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin system is an important pathophysiological mechanism linking insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction to atherogenesis. Statins are the reference standard treatment to prevent CV disease in patients with hypercholesterolemia. Statins work best for secondary CV prevention. Unfortunately, most statin therapies dose-dependently cause insulin resistance, increase new onset diabetes risk and exacerbate existing type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pravastatin is often too weak to achieve target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels despite having beneficial metabolic actions. Renin-angiotensin system inhibitors improve both endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in addition to controlling blood pressure. In this regard, combined statin-based and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitor therapies demonstrate additive/synergistic beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, and other metabolic parameters in addition to lowering both cholesterol levels and blood pressure. This combined therapy simultaneously reduces CV events when compared to either drug type used as monotherapy. This is mediated by both separate and interrelated mechanisms. Therefore, statin-based therapy combined with RAS inhibitors is important for developing optimal management strategies in patients with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, or obesity. This combined therapy can help

  14. The Effect of Real-time Clinical Monitoring and a "Closed Loop" Medication System on Adverse Drug Event Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mendelowitz, Paul C

    2008-01-01

    ...; as well as beside bar code scanning of patient, staff and medications. The implementation of this comprehensive redesign has allowed us to conduct research to determine whether decision support will foster a reduction in adverse drug events...

  15. Causes for the underreporting of adverse drug events by health professionals: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Rossi Varallo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Identifying the main causes for underreporting of Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR by health professionals. Method: A systematic review carried out in the following databases: LILACS, PAHO, SciELO, EMBASE and PubMed in the period between 1992 and 2012. Descriptors were used in the search for articles, and the identified causes of underreporting were analyzed according to the classification of Inman. Results: In total, were identified 149 articles, among which 29 were selected. Most studies were carried out in hospitals (24/29 for physicians (22/29, and pharmacists (10/29. The main causes related to underreporting were ignorance (24/29, insecurity (24/29 and indifference (23/29. Conclusion: The data show the eighth sin in underreporting, which is the lack of training in pharmacovigilance. Therefore, continuing education can increase adherence of professionals to the service and improve knowledge and communication of risks due to drug use.

  16. HOSPITALIZATIONS DUE TO ADVERSE DRUG EVENTS IN THE ELDERLY – A RETROSPECTIVE REGISTER STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Outi Laatikainen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Adverse drug events (ADEs are more likely to affect geriatric patients due to physiological changes occurring with aging. Even though this is an internationally recognized problem, similar research data in Finland is still lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the number of geriatric medication-related hospitalizations in the Finnish patient population and to discover the potential means of recognizing patients particularly at risk of ADEs. The study was conducted retrospectively from the 2014 emergency department patient records in Oulu University Hospital. A total number of 290 admissions were screened for ADEs, adverse drug reactions (ADRs and drug-drug interactions (DDIs by a multi-disciplinary research team. Customized Naranjo scale was used as a control method. All admissions were categorized into ‘probable’, ‘possible’, or ‘doubtful’ by both assessment methods. In total, 23.1% of admissions were categorized as ‘probably’ or ‘possibly’ medication-related. Vertigo, falling, and fractures formed the largest group of ADEs. The most common ADEs were related to medicines from N class of the ATC-code system. Age, sex, residence, or specialty did not increase the risk for medication-related admission significantly (min p= 0.077. Polypharmacy was, however, found to increase the risk (OR 3,3; 95% CI, 1.5-6.9 p = 0.01. In conclusion, screening patients for specific demographics or symptoms would not significantly improve the recognition of ADEs. In addition, as ADE detection today is largely based on voluntary reporting systems and retrospective manual tracking of errors, it is evident that more effective methods for ADE detection are needed in the future.

  17. Determinants of under-reporting of adverse drug reactions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Gonzalez, Elena; Herdeiro, Maria T; Figueiras, Adolfo

    2009-01-01

    A voluntary reporting system of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is fundamental to drug safety surveillance but under-reporting is its major limitation. This bibliographic review sought to assess the influence of personal and professional characteristics on ADR reporting and to identify knowledge and attitudes associated with ADR reporting. A systematic review was conducted using the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. We included papers that were published in English, French and Spanish, and covered a study population made up of health professionals. In each case, the following data were extracted: study population; workplace; study type; sample size; type of questionnaire; type of scale for measuring knowledge; response rate; personal and professional factors; and knowledge and attitudes (based on Inman's 'seven deadly sins') associated with reporting. Based on a search of computerized databases, we identified a total of 657 papers in MEDLINE and 973 in EMBASE. In all, the review covered 45 papers that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Medical specialty was the professional characteristic most closely associated with under-reporting in 76% of studies involving physicians. Other factors associated with under-reporting were ignorance (only severe ADRs need to be reported) in 95%; diffidence (fear of appearing ridiculous for reporting merely suspected ADRs) in 72%; lethargy (an amalgam of procrastination, lack of interest or time to find a report card, and other excuses) in 77%; indifference (the one case that an individual doctor might see could not contribute to medical knowledge) and insecurity (it is nearly impossible to determine whether or not a drug is responsible for a particular adverse reaction) in 67%; and complacency (only safe drugs are allowed on the market) in 47% of studies. While personal and professional factors display a weak influence, the knowledge and attitudes of health professionals appear to be strongly related with reporting in a high proportion of

  18. [Preventive measures against human error based on the classification of the adverse events].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    It is impossible to entirely eliminate human error; however, systematic attempts have been made to comprehensively minimize accidents originating in human error. It appears that the "work classification" we proposed previously is not able to reduce adverse events, fifty percent of which were duty confirmation failures. We have therefore reviewed and classified the causes of human error from the perspective of working conditions to create a simpler and more preventative strategy. Text-mining analysis was applied to speech part classification to reveal areas with room for improvement. In an objective approach, a conduct code was created and put into practice, based on the common features revealed from a classification of human error in the examples investigated. The average number of accidents per year was reduced from 36 to 24, and those due to human error per year were reduced from 17.6 to 11. This objective approach appears to achieve a reduction of adverse events, including those caused by human error. However, these results were obtained over only one year, in a single-center analysis, and thus, widespread and continuous enforcement would be needed to demonstrate the validity of this objective approach to the prevention of human error.

  19. Concordance and predictive value of two adverse drug event data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cami, Aurel; Reis, Ben Y

    2014-08-22

    Accurate prediction of adverse drug events (ADEs) is an important means of controlling and reducing drug-related morbidity and mortality. Since no single "gold standard" ADE data set exists, a range of different drug safety data sets are currently used for developing ADE prediction models. There is a critical need to assess the degree of concordance between these various ADE data sets and to validate ADE prediction models against multiple reference standards. We systematically evaluated the concordance of two widely used ADE data sets - Lexi-comp from 2010 and SIDER from 2012. The strength of the association between ADE (drug) counts in Lexi-comp and SIDER was assessed using Spearman rank correlation, while the differences between the two data sets were characterized in terms of drug categories, ADE categories and ADE frequencies. We also performed a comparative validation of the Predictive Pharmacosafety Networks (PPN) model using both ADE data sets. The predictive power of PPN using each of the two validation sets was assessed using the area under Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (AUROC). The correlations between the counts of ADEs and drugs in the two data sets were 0.84 (95% CI: 0.82-0.86) and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.91-0.93), respectively. Relative to an earlier snapshot of Lexi-comp from 2005, Lexi-comp 2010 and SIDER 2012 introduced a mean of 1,973 and 4,810 new drug-ADE associations per year, respectively. The difference between these two data sets was most pronounced for Nervous System and Anti-infective drugs, Gastrointestinal and Nervous System ADEs, and postmarketing ADEs. A minor difference of 1.1% was found in the AUROC of PPN when SIDER 2012 was used for validation instead of Lexi-comp 2010. In conclusion, the ADE and drug counts in Lexi-comp and SIDER data sets were highly correlated and the choice of validation set did not greatly affect the overall prediction performance of PPN. Our results also suggest that it is important to be aware of the

  20. Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Machado-Alba

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the adverse drug reactions (ADRs and their incidence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated in the Colombian health system. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using information from all patients who were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and attended specialized health care centers in the cities of Bogotá, Cali, Manizales, Medellin, and Pereira between 1 December 2009 and 30 August 2013. The ADRs were obtained from medical records and the pharmacovigilance system registry and sorted by frequency and affected tissue according to World Health Organization Adverse Reaction Terminology (WHO-ART. A total of 949 reports of ADRs were obtained from 419 patients (32.8 ADRs per 100 patient-years; these patients were from a cohort of 1 364 patients being treated for rheumatoid arthritis and followed up for an average of 23.8 months (± 12.9. The cohort was mostly female (366, 87.4% and had a mean age of 52.7 years (± 13.1. The highest numbers of ADRs were reported following the use of tocilizumab, rituximab, and infliximab (28.8, 23.1, and 13.3 reports per 100 patient-years respectively. The most frequently reported ADRs were elevated transaminase levels and dyspepsia. Overall, 87.7% of ADRs were classified as type A, 36.6% as mild, 40.7% as moderate, and 22.7% as severe. As a result, 73.2% of patients who experienced an ADR stopped taking their drugs. The occurrence of ADRs in patients treated for rheumatoid arthritis is common, especially in those associated with the use of biotechnologically produced anti-rheumatic drugs. This outcome should be studied in future research and monitoring is needed to reduce the risks in these patients.

  1. Factors Affecting the Timing of Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Hashiguchi

    Full Text Available We investigated factors affecting the timing of signal detection by comparing variations in reporting time of known and unknown ADRs after initial drug release in the USA. Data on adverse event reactions (AERs submitted to U.S. FDA was used. Six ADRs associated with 6 drugs (rosuvastatin, aripiprazole, teriparatide, telithromycin, exenatide, varenicline were investigated: Changes in the proportional reporting ratio, reporting odds ratio, and information component as indexes of signal detection were followed every 3 months after each drugs release, and the time for detection of signals was investigated. The time for the detection of signal to be detected after drug release in the USA was 2-10 months for known ADRs and 19-44 months for unknown ones. The median lag time for known and unknown ADRs was 99.0-122.5 days and 185.5-306.0 days, respectively. When the FDA released advisory information on rare but potentially serious health risks of an unknown ADR, the time lag to report from the onset of ADRs to the FDA was shorter. This study suggested that one factor affecting signal detection time is whether an ADR was known or unknown at release.

  2. Pharmacovigilance and drug safety 2011 in Calabria (Italy: Adverse events analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Scicchitano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Pharmacovigilance assesses the safety profile of drugs. Its main aim is the increase of spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs. The Italian Drug Agency (AIFA; Agenzia Italiana del Farmaco is financing several projects to the aim of increasing reporting, and in Calabria a Pharmacovigilance Information Centre has been created. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the AIFA database relatively to Calabria in the year 2011 and we have analyzed ADRs using descriptive statistics. We have also collected a questionnaire-based interview in order to describe the background knowledge in the field. Results : Regarding the number of AIFA reported ADRs from Calabria, a 38% increase (138 vs. 100 in comparison to 2010 was evidenced. Hospital Doctors represent the main source of signaling (71.7 %. Ketoprofene and the combination amoxicillin/clavulanic acid represent the most frequently reported drugs causing ADRs. Our questionnaires indicated that despite the health professionals have met at least once an ADR only a small percentage of them was reported to the authorities (37%. There is a very good knowledge of the ADR concept and reporting system (90% of interviewed distinguish an ADR and knows how to report it, and there is a strong interest in participating to training courses in the field (95% are interested. Conclusions : Despite Calabria has had a positive increase in the number of reported ADRs, the total number is very low and the pharmacovigilance culture is far from being achieved in this region.

  3. [Analysis and countermeasures of adverse drug reactions of traditional Chinese medicine injections in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi-Lian; Li, Meng; Rong, Ping; Ma, Rong

    2012-09-01

    We aimed to analyse the adverse drug reactions (ADR) in children due to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) injections and the related factors, and explored the rational use of medicines and safty countermeasures in clinical. We preformed statistical analyses on data from the CNKI and researched on literatures, from April 1987 to May 2012, relevant to the TCM injections which lead to reactions of clinical adverse, to conduct a analysis of the species, cases, clinical manifestations and related factors of these injections. The incidence of ADR in children leaded by TCM injections is high and the manifestations were chiefly characterized by the luscious of skin and appendages. In addition to the correlation with the physiological and pathologic characteristic in childhood, the ADR is also closely related with preparing technology, irrational use and imperfect supervisory system. Because of the high incidence, we should taking appropriate measures, such as constructing strict supervision system and strengthening rational drug use, to reduce the occurrence of ADRs to the greatest extent.

  4. Severe Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in Pediatric Patients: A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibek Misirlioglu, Emine; Guvenir, Hakan; Bahceci, Semiha; Haktanir Abul, Mehtap; Can, Demet; Usta Guc, Belgin Emine; Erkocoğlu, Mustafa; Toyran, Muge; Nacaroglu, Hikmet Tekin; Civelek, Ersoy; Buyuktiryaki, Betul; Ginis, Tayfur; Orhan, Fazil; Kocabas, Can Naci

    The severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCARs) are rare but could be life-threatening. These include drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. The purpose of this study was the evaluation of the clinical characteristics of patients with the diagnosis of SCARs. Patients who were diagnosed with SCARs between January 2011 and May 2016 by pediatric allergy clinics in the provinces of Ankara, Trabzon, Izmir, Adana, and Bolu were included in this multicenter study. Clinical and laboratory findings, the time between suspected drug intake and development of clinical findings, treatments they have received, and length of recovery time were recorded. Fifty-eight patients with SCARs were included in this study. The median age of the patients was 8.2 years (interquartile range, 5.25-13 years) and 50% (n = 29) were males. Diagnosis was Stevens-Johnson syndrome/TEN in 60.4% (n = 35), DRESS in 27.6% (n = 16), and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis in 12% (n = 7) of the patients. In 93.1% of the patients, drugs were the cause of the reactions. Antibiotics ranked first among the drugs (51.7%) and antiepileptic drugs were the second (31%) most common. A patient who was diagnosed with TEN developed lagophthalmos and a patient who was diagnosed with DRESS developed secondary diabetes mellitus. Only 1 patient with the diagnosis of TEN died. SCARs in children are not common but potentially serious. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of SCARs will reduce the incidence of morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A method for systematic discovery of adverse drug events from clinical notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan; Jung, Kenneth; Winnenburg, Rainer; Shah, Nigam H

    2015-11-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are undesired harmful effects resulting from use of a medication, and occur in 30% of hospitalized patients. The authors have developed a data-mining method for systematic, automated detection of ADEs from electronic medical records. This method uses the text from 9.5 million clinical notes, along with prior knowledge of drug usages and known ADEs, as inputs. These inputs are further processed into statistics used by a discriminative classifier which outputs the probability that a given drug-disorder pair represents a valid ADE association. Putative ADEs identified by the classifier are further filtered for positive support in 2 independent, complementary data sources. The authors evaluate this method by assessing support for the predictions in other curated data sources, including a manually curated, time-indexed reference standard of label change events. This method uses a classifier that achieves an area under the curve of 0.94 on a held out test set. The classifier is used on 2,362,950 possible drug-disorder pairs comprised of 1602 unique drugs and 1475 unique disorders for which we had data, resulting in 240 high-confidence, well-supported drug-AE associations. Eighty-seven of them (36%) are supported in at least one of the resources that have information that was not available to the classifier. This method demonstrates the feasibility of systematic post-marketing surveillance for ADEs using electronic medical records, a key component of the learning healthcare system. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Reporting of serious adverse events during cancer clinical trials to the institutional review board: an evaluation by the research on adverse drug events and reports (RADAR) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belknap, S M; Georgopoulos, C H; Lagman, J; Weitzman, S A; Qualkenbush, L; Yarnold, P R; Edwards, B J; McKoy, J M; Trifilio, S M; West, D P

    2013-12-01

    Global introspection is considered an unreliable method for attribution of causality of serious adverse events (SAEs), yet remains widely used for cancer drug clinical trials. Here, we compare structured case abstraction (SCA) to the routine method for detecting, evaluating, and reporting ADEs during cancer drug clinical trials to an Institutional Review Board (IRB). We obtained all SAE reports (2001-2008) received by one IRB for six clinical trials involving bevacizumab or oxaliplatin for treatment of gastrointestinal cancers. We compared the routine IRB SAE method to SCA for adverse event detection and causality attribution. Of 205 adverse events, 182 events (75%) were not reported; of these, 6 (20%) of 30 SAEs requiring an IRB report were unreported. For the 10 item Naranjo score, the amount of information useful for causality attribution was higher with SCA than the routine method (6.0 vs. 2.4 items, P < .0001). One-fifth of SAEs requiring an IRB report were unreported to the IRB via the routine method. SCA provided more useful information as to whether an SAE was caused by a cancer drug exposure. Our results suggest that SCA may improve SAE detection and the accuracy of attribution of causality during cancer drug clinical trials. © 2013, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  7. 2010 drug packaging review: identifying problems to prevent errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Prescrire's analyses showed that the quality of drug packaging in 2010 still left much to be desired. Potentially dangerous packaging remains a significant problem: unclear labelling is source of medication errors; dosing devices for some psychotropic drugs create a risk of overdose; child-proof caps are often lacking; and too many patient information leaflets are misleading or difficult to understand. Everything that is needed for safe drug packaging is available; it is now up to regulatory agencies and drug companies to act responsibly. In the meantime, health professionals can help their patients by learning to identify the pitfalls of drug packaging and providing safe information to help prevent medication errors.

  8. Adverse drug reactions to CT contrast media in south Korea: Incidence and risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Kyung Soo; Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Moon, Jin Il; Choi, Bo Hwa; Baek, Hye Jin; Cho, Soo Buem [Dept. of Radiology, Gyeongsang National University Changwon Hospital, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min; Ha, Ji Young; Choi, Dae Seob; Cho, Jae Min; Na, Jae Beom [Dept. of Radiology, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    To evaluate the incidence, severity, and risk factors of adverse drug reactions (ADR) to intravenous administration of nonionic iodinated contrast media in computed tomography (CT), and to determine the recurrence rate after premedication in patients with a previous history of ADR. We prospectively recorded all ADR to intravenous CT contrast media in 32313 consecutive outpatients (54572 cases) who underwent contrast enhanced CT examinations. Clinical report forms and electronic medical records were reviewed to search for the incidence of ADR, treatment, and clinical outcome of patients. The risk factors of ADR to CT contrast media (age, sex, history of previous ADR, season) were evaluated using statistical analysis. Of the 54572 cases, a total of 191 (0.35%) had adverse reactions. Of the 191 cases, 157 (82%) were categorized as mild reactions, 29 (15%) were moderate, and 5 (3%) were severe. A total of 165 (86.4%) cases had acute adverse reactions (which occurred within 1 hour after administration), while 26 (13.6%) had delayed adverse reactions (occurred 1 hour after the administration). The rate of ADR was significantly higher in females [relative risk (RR) = 2.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.53-2.75], patients under the age of 60 years (RR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.07-1.98), patients with a history of previous ADR (RR = 6.51, 95% CI 3.13-13.57), and in the spring season (RR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.07-1.95). The recurrence rate after premedication in patients with previous ADR to CT contrast media was 3.2% (8/247). No deaths occurred that were attributed to the contrast media. The incidence of ADR to nonionic CT contrast media was 0.35%; most of which were mild reactions. Risk factors for ADR included female gender, an age of under 60 years, a history of previous ADR, and spring season.

  9. Multi-omic landscape of Rheumatoid Arthritis: re-evaluation of drug adverse effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo eTieri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To provide a frame to estimate the systemic impact (side/adverse events of (novel therapeutic targets by taking into consideration drugs potential on the numerous districts involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA from the inflammatory and immune response to the gut-intestinal (GI microbiome.Methods: We curated the collection of molecules from high-throughput screens of diverse (multi-omic biochemical origin, experimentally associated to RA. Starting from such collection we generated RA-related protein-protein interaction (PPI networks (interactomes based on experimental PPI data. Pharmacological treatment simulation, topological and functional analyses were further run to gain insight into the proteins most affected by therapy and by multi-omic modelling.Results: Simulation on the administration of MTX results in the activation of expected (apoptosis and adverse (nitrogenous metabolism alteration effects. Growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2 and Interleukin-1 Receptor Associated Kinase-4 (IRAK4, already an RA target emerge as relevant nodes. The former controls the activation of inflammatory, proliferative and degenerative pathways in host and pathogens. The latter controls immune alterations and blocks innate response to pathogens.Conclusions: This multi-omic map properly recollects in a single analytical picture known, yet complex, information like the adverse/side effects of MTX, and provides a reliable platform for in silico hypothesis testing or recommendation on novel therapies. These results can support the development of RA translational research in the design of validation experiments and clinical trials, as such we identify GRB2 as a robust potential new target for RA for its ability to control both synovial degeneracy and dysbiosis, and, conversely, warn on the usage of IRAK4-inhibitors recently promoted, as this involves potential adverse effects in the form of impaired innate response to pathogens.

  10. Sulfites--a food and drug administration review of recalls and reported adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbo, Babgaleh; Koehler, Kathleen M; Wolyniak, Cecilia; Klontz, Karl C

    2004-08-01

    Sulfite-sensitive individuals can experience adverse reactions after consuming foods containing sulfiting agents (sulfites), and some of these reactions may be severe. In the 1980s and 1990s, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) acted to reduce the likelihood that sulfite-sensitive individuals would unknowingly consume foods containing sulfites. The FDA prohibited the use of sulfites on fruits and vegetables (except potatoes) to be served or presented fresh to the public and required that the presence of detectable levels of sulfites be declared on food labels, even when these sulfites are used as a processing aid or are a component of another ingredient in the food. In the present study, data from FDA recall records and adverse event reports were used to examine the current status of problems of sensitivity to sulfites in foods. From 1996 through 1999, the FDA processed a total of 59 recalls of foods containing undeclared sulfites; these 59 recalls involved 93 different food products. Fifty (55%) of the recalled products were classified as class I, a designation indicating that a consumer reasonably could have ingested > or = 10 mg of undeclared sulfites on a single occasion, a level that could potentially cause a serious adverse reaction in a susceptible person. From 1996 through mid-1999, the FDA received a total of 34 reports of adverse reactions allegedly due to eating foods containing undeclared sulfites. The average of 10 reports per year, although derived from a passive surveillance system, was lower than the average of 111 reports per year that the FDA received from 1980 to 1987, a decrease that may have resulted in part from FDA regulatory action.

  11. Risk factors in prevention of drug dependences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orosova, Ol'ga; Gajdosova, Beata; Madarasova-Geckova, Andrea; Van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2007-01-01

    The study presents the state-of-art of knowledge of risk factors of drug use as a form of risk behaviour in adolescents in individual, interpersonal, and environmental domain (family, school, society). The attention is paid to general deviation syndrome and to the construct of general tendency to

  12. Filtering big data from social media--Building an early warning system for adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Kiang, Melody; Shang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are believed to be a leading cause of death in the world. Pharmacovigilance systems are aimed at early detection of ADRs. With the popularity of social media, Web forums and discussion boards become important sources of data for consumers to share their drug use experience, as a result may provide useful information on drugs and their adverse reactions. In this study, we propose an automated ADR related posts filtering mechanism using text classification methods. In real-life settings, ADR related messages are highly distributed in social media, while non-ADR related messages are unspecific and topically diverse. It is expensive to manually label a large amount of ADR related messages (positive examples) and non-ADR related messages (negative examples) to train classification systems. To mitigate this challenge, we examine the use of a partially supervised learning classification method to automate the process. We propose a novel pharmacovigilance system leveraging a Latent Dirichlet Allocation modeling module and a partially supervised classification approach. We select drugs with more than 500 threads of discussion, and collect all the original posts and comments of these drugs using an automatic Web spidering program as the text corpus. Various classifiers were trained by varying the number of positive examples and the number of topics. The trained classifiers were applied to 3000 posts published over 60 days. Top-ranked posts from each classifier were pooled and the resulting set of 300 posts was reviewed by a domain expert to evaluate the classifiers. Compare to the alternative approaches using supervised learning methods and three general purpose partially supervised learning methods, our approach performs significantly better in terms of precision, recall, and the F measure (the harmonic mean of precision and recall), based on a computational experiment using online discussion threads from Medhelp. Our design provides

  13. Association between ABCG2 and SLCO1B1 polymorphisms and adverse drug reactions to regorafenib: a preliminary study
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Akimitsu; Ando, Hitoshi; Ura, Takashi; Komori, Azusa; Hasegawa, Ayako; Taniguchi, Hiroya; Kadowaki, Shigenori; Muro, Kei; Tajika, Masahiro; Kobara, Makiko; Matsuzaki, Masahide; Hashimoto, Naoya; Maeda, Mieko; Kojima, Yasushi; Aoki, Masahiro; Kondo, Eisaku; Mizutani, Akiyoshi; Fujimura, Akio

    2017-05-01

    Due to the occurrence of severe adverse drug reactions to regorafenib, a drug used in cancer therapy, the identification of a predictive marker(s) is needed to increase the therapeutic applicability of this compound. We therefore investigated whether polymorphisms in the ABCG2 and SLCO1B genes are associated with adverse drug reactions to regorafenib. For these analyses, 37 Japanese cancer patients were treated with regorafenib, genotyped for polymorphisms in ABCG2 and SLCO1B, and evaluated for drug-related adverse drug reactions. There was no association between the ABCG2 421C>A variant and adverse drug reactions to regorafenib. After treatment, the incidences of increased aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) as well as increased total bilirubin (grade ≥ 2) were 8%, 4%, and 12%, and 42%, 25%, and 25% among SLCO1B1*1b carriers and non-carriers, respectively. There were no significant associations between elevated ALT and bilirubin and the SLCO1B1*1b allele. However, there were significantly lower incidences of increased AST (8% vs. 42%) and anemia (16% vs. 50%) in SLCO1B1*1b carriers than in non-carriers. The absence of SLCO1B1*1b allele appears to be associated with the development of adverse drug reactions to regorafenib; however, further studies involving larger test groups and other populations are needed to confirm these findings.
.

  14. Alcohol and drug screening of occupational drivers for preventing injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cashman, Clodagh M.; Ruotsalainen, Jani H.; Greiner, Birgit A.; Beirne, Paul V.; Verbeek, Jos H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Workforce alcohol and drug testing is commonplace but its effect in reducing occupational injuries remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of alcohol and drug screening of occupational drivers (operating a motorised vehicle) in preventing injury or work-related effects such as

  15. Drug Abuse on College Campuses: Emerging Issues. Issues in Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This "Issues in Prevention" focuses on emerging issues concerning drug abuse on college campuses. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Drug Abuse Trends; (2) Q&A With Jim Lange; (3) Bath Salts; (4) Refuse to Abuse; (5) Related Federal Resource; and (6) Higher Education Center Resources.

  16. Team Up for Drug Prevention with America's Young Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deighan, William P., Comp.; And Others

    Materials useful in drug and alcohol abuse prevention programs directed towards high school athletes are contained in this document. Nine topic areas are covered: (1) effects of athletics on young people, such as pressure to win; (2) reasons athletes use drugs and alcohol, including coping with stress and feeling good; (3) enabling behaviors of…

  17. Drugs Education and Prevention for School-Aged Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrystal, Patrick; Winning, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    Drug misuse in Northern Ireland, like many parts of the world, is becoming one of the major issues facing society today. A first stage to addressing this problem is effective drugs education and prevention strategies to school-aged young people. A survey of a range of education providers including mainstream and special needs schools, and school…

  18. hiv prevention among drug and alcohol users: models of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    HIV PREVENTION AMONG DRUG AND ALCOHOL USERS: MODELS. OF INTERVENTION IN KENYA. Clement S. Deveau. Academy for Educational Development (AED). Capable Partners Program (CAP). Nairobi, Kenya. ABSTRACT. The spread of HIV among drug and alcohol users, as a high-risk group, is a significant ...

  19. The role of drugs in HIV prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kembaren, T.

    2018-03-01

    WHO reports 36.7 million people are living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) worldwide by 2016 with about 1.8 million new infections each year. It will be a specific health problem for the world in both developed and developing countries so it is necessary strategies to reduce HIV transmission to the community. HIV transmission in people with risk factors is largely determined by the amount of virus in the blood of people who are the source of infection. Antiretroviral (ARV) therapy has long been used in HIV patients, which serves to suppress viral replication so that the patient’s immunity increases; opportunistic infections are resolved and prolong the lifespan and lower transmission rates. In the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) study 052 there was a 96% reduction in transmission in earlier antiretroviral. ARV is also used in the prevention of transmission in people exposed to HIV virus that is Postexposure Prophylaxis as well as in people at risk before exposure (Pre-exposure Prophylaxis). Three prevention strategies with the provision of ARV is expected to be guided as a means of prevention of transmission in addition to behavioral changes has long been declared since the beginning of the HIV epidemic.

  20. Current and Future Directions in Elementary School Drug Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, William B.

    2010-01-01

    Drug prevention efforts in elementary schools are widespread. Nonetheless, there are clear challenges that both researchers and practitioners face. Because there may be occasional unintended negative outcomes--statistically these are guaranteed--does not mean all prevention efforts should grind to a halt. It is far better that any observed…

  1. A transdisciplinary focus on drug abuse prevention: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Steve; Stacy, Alan W; Johnson, C Anderson; Pentz, Mary Ann; Robertson, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces the scope of the Special Issue. A variety of scientific disciplines are brought together to establish theoretical integration of the arenas of drug use, misuse, "abuse," and drug misuse prevention. Transdisciplinary scientific collaboration (TDSC) is utilized as a process of integration. Introductory comments regarding the strengths and limitations of TDSC are presented. Then, the relevance of genetics to substance misuse and substance misuse prevention is presented. Next, the relevance of cognition for prevention is discussed. Specifically, neurologically plausible distinctions in cognition and implicit cognition and their relevance for prevention are discussed. At a relatively molar social-level of analysis, social network theory, systems dynamic models, geographic information systems models, cultural psychology, and political science approaches to drug misuse and its prevention are introduced. The uses of both quantitative and qualitative statistical approaches to prevention are mentioned next. Finally, targeted prevention, bridging the efficacy-effectiveness gap, and a statement on overcoming disbalance round out the Special Issue. The bridges created will serve to propel drug misuse "prevention science" forward in the years to come. Advances in understanding etiological issues, translation to programs, and ecological fit of programming are desired results.

  2. Development and implementation of a critical pathway for prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media for computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Keun Jo [Presbyterian Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kweon, Dae Cheol; Kim, Myeong Goo [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Beong Gyu [Wonkwang Health Science College, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a critical pathway (CP) for the prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media for computed tomography. The CP was developed and implemented by a multidisciplinary group is Seoul National University Hospital. The CP was applied to CT patients. Patients who underwent CT scanning were included in the CP group from March in 2004. The satisfaction of the patients with CP was compared with non-CP groups. We also investigated the degree of satisfaction among the radiological technologists and nurses. The degree of patient satisfaction with the care process increased patient information (24%), prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media (19%), pre-cognitive effect of adverse reactions to contrast media (39%) and information degree of adverse reactions to contrast media (19%). This CP program can be used as one of the patient care tools for reducing the adverse reactions to contrast media and increasing the efficiency of care process in CT examination settings.

  3. Development and implementation of a critical pathway for prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Keun Jo; Kweon, Dae Cheol; Kim, Myeong Goo; Yoo, Beong Gyu

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a critical pathway (CP) for the prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media for computed tomography. The CP was developed and implemented by a multidisciplinary group is Seoul National University Hospital. The CP was applied to CT patients. Patients who underwent CT scanning were included in the CP group from March in 2004. The satisfaction of the patients with CP was compared with non-CP groups. We also investigated the degree of satisfaction among the radiological technologists and nurses. The degree of patient satisfaction with the care process increased patient information (24%), prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media (19%), pre-cognitive effect of adverse reactions to contrast media (39%) and information degree of adverse reactions to contrast media (19%). This CP program can be used as one of the patient care tools for reducing the adverse reactions to contrast media and increasing the efficiency of care process in CT examination settings

  4. Perceived adverse drug reactions among non-institutionalized children and adolescents in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, Hildtraud; Du, Yong

    2010-09-01

    Drug safety in paediatric medication is a public health concern. According to previous studies, the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) varies greatly from 0.7% to 2.7% among paediatric outpatients and from 2.6% to 18.1% among paediatric inpatients. Little has been reported on the risks of drug use in the general child population. Our study showed that the prevalence of perceived ADRs in Germany was 0.9% among non-institutionalized children in general and 1.7% among children who had used at least one medicine within the 7 days before the medical interview. Perceived ADRs in the general child population were clustered with gastrointestinal disorders and subcutaneous tissue disorders. They appeared to be mild and at the lower limits of the range reported in other studies. Health surveys covering the use of a diverse range of drugs might be suitable for computing ADR prevalence and for identifying risk factors among non-institutionalized children. They should be taken into account together with other pharmacovigilance systems. Little has been reported on the risks of drug use in the general child population. This study investigated perceived adverse drug reactions (ADRs) among non-institutionalized children in Germany. All medicines used in the last 7 days before the medical interview were recorded among the 17 450 children aged 0-17 years who participated in the 2003-06 German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS). Perceived ADRs were reported by the children's parents and confirmed by trained medical professionals during the medical interview. One hundred and fifty-seven medicines were involved in the occurrence of 198 perceived ADRs in 153 patients. This corresponded to 1.1% of total used drugs, 0.9% (95% confidence intervals 0.7, 1.1%) of all children, and 1.7% (1.4, 2.1%) of children treated with medications. About 40% of all perceived ADRs involved gastrointestinal disorders and 16% involved skin tissue disorders

  5. Current status of drug use and HIV/AIDS prevention in drug users in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianhua; Li, Xinyue

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the current status of drug use and HIV/AIDS prevention for drug users in China and provide scientific evidence for HIV/AIDS prevention and control in drug users. Literature and articles related to drug abuse in China, as well as the results of prevention efforts and successful cases regarding HIV/AIDS prevention in drug users, are reviewed. Lessons learned are drawn out for the future improvement of work and the sustainable development of treatment programs. The number of drug users in China is increasing. Even though the number of opioid-type drug users is growing more slowly than in the past, the number of amphetamine-type stimulant users has increased sharply. It has been proven that methadone maintenance treatment and syringe exchange programs gradually and successfully control HIV/AIDS transmission in drug users. However, it is necessary to enhance these prevention methods and expand their coverage. In addition, the strengthening of antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment for HIV-infected drug users is crucial for HIV/AIDS prevention and control. The rapidly growing number of amphetamine-type stimulant users, along with their high-risk behavior, poses a hidden danger of greater HIV/AIDS transmission through sexual intercourse in the near future.

  6. Factors Affecting Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting of Healthcare Professionals and Their Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice towards ADR Reporting in Nekemte Town, West Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Gurmesa, Lense Temesgen; Dedefo, Mohammed Gebre

    2016-01-01

    Background. Adverse drug reactions are global problems of major concern. Adverse drug reaction reporting helps the drug monitoring system to detect the unwanted effects of those drugs which are already in the market. Aims. To assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of health care professionals working in Nekemte town towards adverse drug reaction reporting. Methods and Materials. A cross-sectional study design was conducted on a total of 133 health care professionals by interview to asse...

  7. Preventing and managing antiretroviral drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2004-05-01

    Development of resistance to antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) is a major impediment to optimum treatment of HIV-1 infection. Although resistance testing can help to select subsequent regimens when virologic failure occurs, cross-resistance, which affects all classes of ARVs, may make it more difficult to achieve optimum control of HIV. We have known for some time that our first choice of antiretroviral therapy offers the best chance to control HIV replication and that initial therapy should be selected with an eye on future options. Potency is the first line of defense against the development of resistance. Other factors that affect resistance development include: tolerability, potential for optimum adherence, and genetic and pharmacologic barriers to development of resistance. If resistance emerges, only a single drug may be affected initially, and a rapid change in ARVs may preserve the efficacy of other components. One cautionary note is that we can no longer assume that a patient's HIV is fully susceptible to all ARVs even in the initial regimen. Transmission of drug-resistant HIV means that the genetic composition may be that of an "experienced" virus with reduced susceptibility to ARVs. Resistance testing at the time of transmission is most likely to reveal this resistance, but over time the dominant genetic pattern may revert to wild-type, and be missed by resistance testing. Because "archived" resistant HIV may emerge quickly once treatment is initiated, we need to keep this in mind when selecting initial therapy.

  8. Oxidative stress and leukocyte migration inhibition response in cutaneous adverse drug reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Verma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADRs may either be immunological or non-immunological. The precise mechanisms, however, are largely obscure. Other concomitant mechanisms may amplify and/or contribute to the severity and duration of a reaction. One such mechanism could be oxidative stress, a state of imbalance between reactive oxygen species, and their subsequent detoxification by antioxidants. Aims: (a to assess the oxidative stress status in the blood of cutaneous drug reaction patients by assaying for reduced glutathione (GSH and malondialdehyde (MDA levels, (b to determine the leukocyte migration inhibition (LMI response in these patients in response to the suspected drug (s, and (c to look for the association between oxidative stress parameters and LMI. Methods: Ethical committee approval was obtained for this study. Fresh venous blood samples were obtained from the patients of CADRs (group A during the acute phase of reaction and healthy control subjects (group B. MDA levels, a measure of oxidative lipid damage, and reduced GSH levels, a measure of anti-oxidant capacity, were assayed in the blood samples of both groups using spectrophotometry. LMI response was measured by challenging the patients′ peripheral blood mononuclear cells with the suspected drug to confirm immunological perturbation. Results: Totally 66 participants, 33 cases in group A and equal number of controls in group B, were studied. The mean MDA levels were found to be raised (P < 0.001, but GSH levels were significantly reduced in group A when compared with group B (P = <0.001. LMI response against drug(s was performed in 33 cases (group A, out of which 25 cases showed a positive LMI response as follows: fixed drug eruption (10/25, SJS (5/25, urticaria (3/25, exfoliative dermatitis (2/25, morbilliform rash (2/25, erythroderma (1/25, vasculitis (1/25, and dapsone syndrome (1/25. The mean MDA levels were found to be significantly higher in the LMI positive

  9. A systematic review of observational studies evaluating costs of adverse drug reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batel Marques F

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Batel Marques,1,2 Ana Penedones,1,2 Diogo Mendes,1,2 Carlos Alves,1,2 1CHAD – Centre for Health Technology Assessment and Drug Research, AIBILI – Association for Innovation and Biomedical Research on Light and Image, 2School of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal Introduction: The growing evidence of the increased frequency and severity of adverse drug events (ADEs, besides the negative impact on patient’s health status, indicates that costs due to ADEs may be steadily rising. Observational studies are an important tool in pharmacovigilance. Despite these studies being more susceptible to bias than experimental designs, they are more competent in assessing ADEs and their associated costs.Objective: To identify and characterize the best available evidence on ADE-associated costs.Methods: MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Embase were searched from 1995 to 2015. Observational studies were included. The methodological quality of selected studies was assessed by Cochrane Collaboration tool for experimental and observational studies. Studies were classified according to the setting analyzed in “ambulatory”, “hospital”, or both. Costs were classified as “direct” and “indirect”. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The total incremental cost per patient with ADE was estimated.Results: Twenty-nine (94% longitudinal observational studies and two (7% cross-sectional studies were included. Twenty-three (74% studies were assessed with the highest methodological quality score. The studies were mainly conducted in the US (61%. Twenty (65% studies evaluated any therapeutic group. Twenty (65% studies estimated costs of ADEs leading to or prolonging hospitalization. The “direct costs” were evaluated in all studies, whereas only two (7% also estimated the “indirect costs”. The “direct costs” in ambulatory ranged from €702.21 to €40,273.08, and the in hospital from €943.40 to €7

  10. Factors Influencing the Use of a Mobile App for Reporting Adverse Drug Reactions and Receiving Safety Information : A Qualitative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Sieta T.; Wong, Lisa; Sutcliffe, Alastair; Houyez, Francois; Ruiz, Carmen Lasheras; Mol, Peter G.M.

    Introduction A mobile app may increase the reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and improve the communication of new drug safety information. Factors that influence the use of an app for such two-way risk communication need to be considered at the development stage. Objective Our aim was to

  11. The Quality of Clinical Information in Adverse Drug Reaction Reports by Patients and Healthcare Professionals : A Retrospective Comparative Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolfes, Leàn; van Hunsel, Florence; van der Linden, Laura; Taxis, Katja; van Puijenbroek, Eugène

    Introduction Clinical information is needed to assess the causal relationship between a drug and an adverse drug reaction (ADR) in a reliable way. Little is known about the level of relevant clinical information about the ADRs reported by patients. Objectives The aim was to determine to what extent

  12. Distant Supervision with Transductive Learning for Adverse Drug Reaction Identification from Electronic Medical Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriwon Taewijit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Information extraction and knowledge discovery regarding adverse drug reaction (ADR from large-scale clinical texts are very useful and needy processes. Two major difficulties of this task are the lack of domain experts for labeling examples and intractable processing of unstructured clinical texts. Even though most previous works have been conducted on these issues by applying semisupervised learning for the former and a word-based approach for the latter, they face with complexity in an acquisition of initial labeled data and ignorance of structured sequence of natural language. In this study, we propose automatic data labeling by distant supervision where knowledge bases are exploited to assign an entity-level relation label for each drug-event pair in texts, and then, we use patterns for characterizing ADR relation. The multiple-instance learning with expectation-maximization method is employed to estimate model parameters. The method applies transductive learning to iteratively reassign a probability of unknown drug-event pair at the training time. By investigating experiments with 50,998 discharge summaries, we evaluate our method by varying large number of parameters, that is, pattern types, pattern-weighting models, and initial and iterative weightings of relations for unlabeled data. Based on evaluations, our proposed method outperforms the word-based feature for NB-EM (iEM, MILR, and TSVM with F1 score of 11.3%, 9.3%, and 6.5% improvement, respectively.

  13. [Adverse drug reactions in pediatrics: Experience of a regional pharmacovigilance center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Martin, Caroline; Kanagaratnam, Lukshe; de Boissieu, Paul; Azzouz, Brahim; Abou Taam, Malak; Trenque, Thierry

    2016-10-01

    To describe the adverse drug reactions (ADR) and the drugs involved in pediatrics. An observational study on all ADR notifications recorded in the French pharmacovigilance database by the Regional Pharmacovigilance Center of Champagne-Ardenne between 1 January 1985 and 31 December 2014 involving children from 0 to 17 years inclusive was performed. For all notifications, we studied the patient and the ADR characteristics. During the study period, 632 notifications were collected. The most frequently reported ATC (anatomical, therapeutic and chemical) classes were vaccines (15.9%), antineoplastics (12%) and antibiotics (11.1%). Forty-six percent of the notifications were serious. For serious ADRs, the most involved drugs were paracetamol, asparaginase and ibuprofen. Skin reactions were the most often reported ADRs. The most common lowest level terms (LLT) were urticaria (4.9%), hypersensitivity (4.1%), fever (2.9%) and vomiting (2.8%). ADR reporting to the pharmacovigilance system, in particular pediatric ADRs, should be encouraged. Information on the use of medicinal products, especially on self-medication use, need to be improve. Copyright © 2016 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Estimation of the prevalence of adverse drug reactions from social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thin; Larsen, Mark E; O'Dea, Bridianne; Phung, Dinh; Venkatesh, Svetha; Christensen, Helen

    2017-06-01

    This work aims to estimate the degree of adverse drug reactions (ADR) for psychiatric medications from social media, including Twitter, Reddit, and LiveJournal. Advances in lightning-fast cluster computing was employed to process large scale data, consisting of 6.4 terabytes of data containing 3.8 billion records from all the media. Rates of ADR were quantified using the SIDER database of drugs and side-effects, and an estimated ADR rate was based on the prevalence of discussion in the social media corpora. Agreement between these measures for a sample of ten popular psychiatric drugs was evaluated using the Pearson correlation coefficient, r, with values between 0.08 and 0.50. Word2vec, a novel neural learning framework, was utilized to improve the coverage of variants of ADR terms in the unstructured text by identifying syntactically or semantically similar terms. Improved correlation coefficients, between 0.29 and 0.59, demonstrates the capability of advanced techniques in machine learning to aid in the discovery of meaningful patterns from medical data, and social media data, at scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Preventing Prescription Drug Overdose PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-01

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from an overdose of prescription opioid painkillers. Learn what can be done to make painkiller prescribing safer and help prevent overdoses.  Created: 7/1/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/1/2014.

  16. Vital Signs-Preventing Prescription Drug Overdose

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-01

    This podcast is based on the July 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from an overdose of prescription opioid painkillers. Learn what can be done to make painkiller prescribing safer and help prevent overdoses.  Created: 7/1/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/1/2014.

  17. Effect of bar-code technology on the incidence of medication dispensing errors and potential adverse drug events in a hospital pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Eric G; Cina, Jennifer L; Churchill, William W; Mitton, Patricia; McCrea, Michelle L; Featherstone, Erica; Keohane, Carol A; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Bates, David W; Gandhi, Tejal K

    2005-01-01

    We performed a direct observation prepost study to evaluate the impact of barcode technology on medication dispensing errors and potential adverse drug events in the pharmacy of a tertiary-academic medical center. We found that barcode technology significantly reduced the rate of target dispensing errors leaving the pharmacy by 85%, from 0.37% to 0.06%. The rate of potential adverse drug events (ADEs) due to dispensing errors was also significantly reduced by 63%, from 0.19%to 0.069%. In a 735-bed hospital where 6 million doses of medications are dispensed per year, this technology is expected to prevent about 13,000 dispensing errors and 6,000 potential ADEs per year.

  18. Interpreting adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports as hospital patient safety incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Emma C; Green, Christopher F; Mottram, David R; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2010-07-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a reporting category in the National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) incident reporting system, though the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) pharmacovigilance system is the more established method for collecting ADR data. The majority of ADRs were shown to be of moderate risk to the patient, though some have a severe or catastrophic impact. Classification and reporting of ADRs according to NPSA guidance is possible but offers limited additional value to efforts to improve patient safety over and above the Yellow Card Scheme. In the UK, the National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) includes adverse drug reactions as a reporting category, while the MHRA Yellow Card Scheme also collects data regarding adverse drug reactions (ADRs). In this study, we aimed to assess ADRs using NPSA criteria and discuss the resulting implications. ADRs identified in a 6-month prospective study of 3695 inpatient episodes were assessed according to their impact on the patient and on the organization, using tools developed by the NPSA. Seven hundred and thirty-three (100%) ADRs were assessed. In terms of impact on the patient, 537 (73.3%) were categorized as 'low' (minor treatment), 181 (24.7%) as 'moderate' (moderate increase in treatment, no permanent harm), 14 (1.91%) as 'severe' (permanent harm) and 1 (0.14%) was categorized as 'catastrophic' (direct cause of death). In terms of impact on the organization, none was categorized as 'no harm/no risk', 508 (69.3%) as 'insignificant', 188 (25.6%) as 'minor', 25 (3.4%) as 'moderate', 12 (1.6%) as 'major' and none was classed as 'catastrophic'. Less than 2% of ADRs would be eligible for detailed analysis according to the NPSA guidance. The ADRs that cause incidents of greater significance relate to bleeding, renal impairment and Clostridium difficile infection. Classification of ADRs according to NPSA guidance offers limited additional value over and above that offered by the Yellow Card

  19. The importance of monitoring adverse drug reactions in elderly patients: the results of a long-term pharmacovigilance programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnovale, Carla; Gentili, Marta; Fortino, Ida; Merlino, Luca; Clementi, Emilio; Radice, Sonia; ViGer Group

    2016-01-01

    To recognise and prevent ADRs (including DDIs) in the elderly through a 4-year post-marketing active pharmacovigilance programme. The programme was designed to enhance high quality spontaneous reporting of ADRs in elderly patients by sampling the Italian population and was termed 'Pharmacovigilance in Geriatry (ViGer)'. ADRs were collected for adults aged over 65 years of age treated in nursing homes, continuing care retirement communities and territorial health services in Lombardy. ADRs were evaluated using the Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale (Naranjo) and analysed with respect to time, sex, category of ADR, seriousness, suspected medicines, notoriety. We analysed all the potential DDIs. We detected 1073 cases reports corresponding to 2110 ADRs. Vaccines, antibacterials for systemic use and antineoplastic agents were the pharmacotherapeutic subgroups most frequently involved. 18% of ADRs reports were classified as serious. In 752 reports patients were described as in polytherapy; in 55 patients (7.3%) the reported ADR were probably preventable because of DDIs involvement. The ViGer project demonstrated that active pos-marketing pharmacovigilance programmes are a valid strategy to increase awareness on geriatrics pharmacology, reduce underreporting and provide important information on previous unknown ADRs and DDIs, resulting in a therapy optimisation in clinical practice in the geriatric setting.

  20. Extent of poly-pharmacy, occurrence and associated factors of drug-drug interaction and potential adverse drug reactions in Gondar Teaching Referral Hospital, North West Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endalkachew Admassie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the extent of poly-pharmacy, occurrence, and associated factors for the occurrence of drug-drug interaction (DDI and potential adverse drug reaction (ADR in Gondar University Teaching Referral Hospital. Institutional-based retrospective cross-sectional study. This study was conducted on prescriptions of both in and out-patients for a period of 3 months at Gondar University Hospital. Both bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify risk factors for the occurrence of DDI and possible ADRs. All the statistical calculations were performed using SPSS; software. A total of 12,334 prescriptions were dispensed during the study period of which, 2,180 prescriptions were containing two or more drugs per prescription. A total of 21,210 drugs were prescribed and the average number of drugs per prescription was 1.72. Occurrences of DDI of all categories (Major, Moderate, and Minor were analyzed and DDI were detected in 711 (32.6% prescriptions. Sex was not found to be a risk factor for the occurrence of DDI and ADR, while age and number of medications per prescription were found to be significant risk factors for the occurrence of DDI and ADR. The mean number of drugs per prescription was 1.72 and hence with regard to the WHO limit of drugs per prescription, Gondar hospital was able to maintain the limit and prescriptions containing multiple drugs supposed to be taken systemically. Numbers of drugs per prescription as well as older age were found to be predisposing factors for the occurrence of DDI and potential ADRs while sex was not a risk factor.

  1. Use of the Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) to Help Predict the Occurrence of Idiosyncratic Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions Associated with Antiepileptic Drug Usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Rosa; Wei, Chun-Yu; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Benet, Leslie Z

    2016-05-01

    Cutaneous adverse reactions (CARs) from antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are common, ranging from mild to life-threatening, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). The identification of subjects carrying the HLA-B*15:02, an inherited allelic variant of the HLA-B gene, and the avoidance of carbamazepine (CBZ) therapy in these subjects are strongly associated with a decrease in the incidence of carbamazepine-induced SJS/TEN. In spite of the strong genetic associations, the initiation of hypersensitivity for AEDs is still not very well characterized. Predicting the potential for other AEDs to cause adverse reactions will be undoubtedly beneficial to avoid CARs, which is the focus of this report. Here, we explore the use of the Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) to distinguish AEDs associated with and without CARs by examining the binding relationship of AEDs to HLA-B*15:02 and data from extensive reviews of medical records. We also evaluate the lack of benefit from a Hong Kong population policy on the effects of screening for HLA-B*15:02 and previous incorrect structure-activity hypotheses. Our analysis concludes that BDDCS class 2 AEDs are more prone to cause adverse cutaneous reactions than certain BDDCS class 1 AEDs and that BDDCS Class 3 drugs have the lowest levels of cutaneous adverse reactions. We propose that BDDCS Class 3 AEDs should be preferentially used for patients with Asian backgrounds (i.e., Han Chinese, Thai, and Malaysian populations) if possible and in patients predisposed to skin rashes.

  2. Idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity: strategy for prevention and proposed mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug toxicity has led to the market withdrawal of many drugs in the past. Since animal experiments are not predictive of such toxicity, the pharmaceutical industry continues to seek new methodologies for the prevention of such effects. Although the mechanism of idiosyncratic drug toxicity remains unclear, immune reactions are likely involved. Although drugs with low molecular weights are typically not themselves immunogenic, these drugs may become haptens after being converted to chemically reactive metabolites and becoming covalently cross-linked to proteins. Therefore, screening tests to detect chemically reactive metabolites, most typically by trapping with glutathione, are carried out at early stages of drug development. More quantitative methods are used in later stages of drug development; radioassays for covalent binding (using (14)Cor (3)H-labeled compounds) are most frequently employed. A zone classification system created by combining previous assessment criteria for the chemically reactive metabolites in vitro (assessment of drug candidates. A mechanism for idiosyncratic, drug-induced hepatotoxicity is proposed by analogy to virus-induced hepatitis, where cytotoxic T lymphocytes play an important role; we suggest that idiosyncrasy reflects the involvement of polymorphisms in the human leucocyte antigen-encoding loci. In fact, a strong correlation has been found between of idiosyncratic drug toxicity and specific human leucocyte antigen genotypes. Therefore, screening of patients for gene biomarkers is expected to reduce the clinical risk of idiosyncratic drug toxicity, thereby prolonging the life cycle of otherwise useful drugs.

  3. Polypharmacy and adverse drug reactions in Japanese elderly taking antihypertensives: a retrospective database study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato I

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Izumi Sato,1 Manabu Akazawa21Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo, JapanBackground: The concomitant use of multiple medications by elderly patients with hypertension is a relatively common and growing phenomenon in Japan. This has been attributed to several factors, including treatment guidelines recommending prescription of multiple medications and a continuing increase in the elderly population with multiple comorbidities.Objective: This study was aimed at investigating the association between polypharmacy, defined as the concomitant use of five or more medications, and risk of adverse drug reaction (ADR in elderly Japanese hypertensive patients to examine the hypothesis that risk of ADR increases with the administration of an increasing number of co-medications.Methods: Using a retrospective cohort design, the data regarding all hypertensive patients aged 65 years or older were extracted from the Risk/Benefit Assessment of Drugs – Analysis and Response Council antihypertensive medication database. The data were reviewed for classification of patients into one of three groups according to drug use at the initiation of therapy – a monotherapy group composed of patients who had taken the investigated drug only, a co-medication group composed of patients who had taken the investigated drug and a maximum of three other medications, and a polypharmacy group composed of patients who had taken the investigated drug and four or more other medications – and determination of the number of ADR events experienced. Estimated rate ratios (RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated using a Poisson regression model adjusted for drug category and patient age and sex. Various sensitivity analyses were performed to confirm the robustness of the study findings.Results: Of 61,661 elderly

  4. [Analysis of adverse drug reaction of gatifloxacin in Hunan province from Aug. 2003 to Jul. 2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Sheng; He, Yanchun; Yin, Tao; Long, Liping; Zhang, Wei

    2009-01-01

    To summarize the occurrences of adverse drug reactions (ADR) of gatifloxacin, and to guide the rational usage of antibacterial agents in clinical practice in the future. A total of 1 077 ADR patient who received gatifloxacin were retrospectively studied in Hunan province from August 2003 to July 2007. Gatifloxacin could cause multi-system and multi-organ ADRs with wide variety of clinical manifestations. Of the 1 077 ADR patients, ADR incidence rate was slightly lower in males than that in females, the age of 821 (76.23%) ADR patients were 20 approximately 59 years; 905 (84.03%) were administered intravenously; and 682 (33.07%) had severe lesions of the digestive system, followed by lesions of the skin and the appendants (490 cases, 23.76%) and the nervous system (298 cases, 14.45%). ADR caused by gatifloxacin should be monitored and reported so as to reduce or avoid ADR.

  5. Detection of Adverse Reaction to Drugs in Elderly Patients through Predictive Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael San-Miguel Carrasco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Geriatrics Medicine constitutes a clinical research field in which data analytics, particularly predictive modeling, can deliver compelling, reliable and long-lasting benefits, as well as non-intuitive clinical insights and net new knowledge. The research work described in this paper leverages predictive modeling to uncover new insights related to adverse reaction to drugs in elderly patients. The differentiation factor that sets this research exercise apart from traditional clinical research is the fact that it was not designed by formulating a particular hypothesis to be validated. Instead, it was data-centric, with data being mined to discover relationships or correlations among variables. Regression techniques were systematically applied to data through multiple iterations and under different configurations. The obtained results after the process was completed are explained and discussed next.

  6. Text mining for adverse drug events: the promise, challenges, and state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpaz, Rave; Callahan, Alison; Tamang, Suzanne; Low, Yen; Odgers, David; Finlayson, Sam; Jung, Kenneth; LePendu, Paea; Shah, Nigam H

    2014-10-01

    Text mining is the computational process of extracting meaningful information from large amounts of unstructured text. It is emerging as a tool to leverage underutilized data sources that can improve pharmacovigilance, including the objective of adverse drug event (ADE) detection and assessment. This article provides an overview of recent advances in pharmacovigilance driven by the application of text mining, and discusses several data sources-such as biomedical literature, clinical narratives, product labeling, social media, and Web search logs-that are amenable to text mining for pharmacovigilance. Given the state of the art, it appears text mining can be applied to extract useful ADE-related information from multiple textual sources. Nonetheless, further research is required to address remaining technical challenges associated with the text mining methodologies, and to conclusively determine the relative contribution of each textual source to improving pharmacovigilance.

  7. Adverse drug reactions of systemic antihistamines in children in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Tjalling W; van Hunsel, Florence

    2016-10-01

    Antihistamines are used for the treatment of allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, chronic spontaneous urticaria and atopic eczema. To study the reports of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in children using antihistamines to provide prescribers with an overview of the possible toxicity. We studied ADRs in children reported to the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre Lareb in the years 1991-2014, assessed the Naranjo score and, when possible, computed the reporting OR. Serious ADRs included one death (malignant neuroleptic syndrome), cardiac arrhythmia (one case) and convulsions (three cases). Skin eruptions, headache and somnolence were the most frequently reported ADRs. Aggression and agitation were also reported. Toxicity can occur with second-generation antihistamines. The main toxicity relates to skin eruptions and central nervous system problems. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Detecting associations between behavioral addictions and dopamine agonists in the Food & Drug Administration's Adverse Event database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Katherine E; Potenza, Marc N

    2014-03-01

    Studies have reported higher prevalences of four behavioral addictions (binge eating, compulsive shopping, hypersexuality, and pathological gambling) in dopamine agonist-treated Parkinson's disease relative to non-dopamine agonist-treated Parkinson's. However, recent case-control and epidemiological studies suggest that prevalences of behavioral addictions in dopamine agonist-treated Parkinson's may be similar to background population rates. This study tests that hypothesis by examining the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) for evidence of these associations, taking into account the potential impact of publicity on reporting rates. FAERS reports in 2004 (pre-publicity for all but pathological gambling) and 2007 (post-publicity for all four behaviors) were analyzed. A threshold consisting of ≥3 cases, proportional reporting ratio ≥2, and χ (2) with Yates' correction ≥4 was used to detect signals (drug-associated adverse reactions) involving any of five dopamine agonists and any of four behavioral addictions. No reports containing compulsive shopping and no signal for binge eating and dopamine agonists were found in either year. A weak signal was found for hypersexuality in 2004, with a stronger signal in 2007. A robust signal was found for pathological gambling in 2004, with a more robust signal in 2007. These results suggest that publicity may increase reporting rates in the FAERS. Findings for binge eating, compulsive shopping, and hypersexuality suggest that prevalences of these behaviors among those treated with dopamine agonists may be similar to background population rates and thus may not reflect an adverse safety signal. Further investigation of the relationship between dopamine agonists and behavioral addictions is warranted.

  9. Building a time-saving and adaptable tool to report adverse drug events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parès, Yves; Declerck, Gunnar; Hussain, Sajjad; Ng, Romain; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2013-01-01

    The difficult task of detecting adverse drug events (ADEs) and the tedious process of building manual reports of ADE occurrences out of patient profiles result in a majority of adverse reactions not being reported to health regulatory authorities. The SALUS individual case safety report (ICSR) reporting tool, a component currently developed within the SALUS project, aims to support semi-automatic reporting of ADEs to regulatory authorities. In this paper, we present an initial design and current state of of our ICSR reporting tool that features: (i) automatic pre-population of reporting forms through extraction of the patient data contained in an Electronic Health Record (EHR); (ii) generation and electronic submission of the completed ICSRs by the physician to regulatory authorities; and (iii) integration of the reporting process into the physician's work-flow to limit the disturbance. The objective is to increase the rates of ADE reporting and the quality of the reported data. The SALUS interoperability platform supports patient data extraction independently of the EHR data model in use and allows generation of reports using the format expected by regulatory authorities.

  10. Safety aspects of protease inhibitors for chronic hepatitis C: adverse events and drug-to-drug interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosângela Teixeira

    Full Text Available The standard of care therapy of chronic hepatitis C with the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin for 24 or 48 weeks was a remarkable accomplishment of the past decade. However, sustained virological responses rates of about 80% (genotypes 2-3 and 50% (geno 3 type 1 were not satisfactory especially for patients infected with genotype 1. Important advances in the biology of HCV have made possible the development of the direct-acting antiviral agents boceprevir and telaprevir with substantial increase in the rates of sustained virological response with shorter duration of therapy for a large number of patients. However, the complexity of triple therapy is higher and several new side effects are expected suggesting greater expertise in the patient management. Anemia and disgeusia are frequent with boceprevir while cutaneous rash, ranging from mild to severe, is expected with telaprevir. Higher risk of drug-drug interactions demand further clinical consideration of the previous well-known adverse events of pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Identification and prompt management of these potential new problems with boceprevir and telaprevir are crucial in clinical practice for optimizing treatment and assuring safety outcomes to HCV-genotype 1 patients.

  11. Safety aspects of protease inhibitors for chronic hepatitis C: adverse events and drug-to-drug interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosângela Teixeira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The standard of care therapy of chronic hepatitis C with the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin for 24 or 48 weeks was a remarkable accomplishment of the past decade. However, sustained virological responses rates of about 80% (genotypes 2-3 and 50% (geno 3 type 1 were not satisfactory especially for patients infected with genotype 1. Important advances in the biology of HCV have made possible the development of the direct-acting antiviral agents boceprevir and telaprevir with substantial increase in the rates of sustained virological response with shorter duration of therapy for a large number of patients. However, the complexity of triple therapy is higher and several new side effects are expected suggesting greater expertise in the patient management. Anemia and disgeusia are frequent with boceprevir while cutaneous rash, ranging from mild to severe, is expected with telaprevir. Higher risk of drug-drug interactions demand further clinical consideration of the previous well-known adverse events of pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Identification and prompt management of these potential new problems with boceprevir and telaprevir are crucial in clinical practice for optimizing treatment and assuring safety outcomes to HCV-genotype 1 patients.

  12. Adverse event management in mass drug administration for neglected tropical diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Arthur; Zink, Amanda

    2014-03-01

    The ethical challenges of reporting and managing adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) in the context of mass drug administration (MDA) for the treatment of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) require reassessment of domestic and international policies on a global scale. Although the World Health Organization has set forth AE/SAE guidelines specifically for NTD MDA that incorporate suspected causality, and recommends that only SAEs get reported in this setting, most regulatory agencies continue to require the reporting of all SAEs exhibiting even a merely temporal relationship to activities associated with an MDA program. This greatly increases the potential for excess "noise" and undue risk aversion and is not only impractical but arguably unethical where huge proportions of populations are being treated for devastating diseases, and no good baseline exists against which to compare possible AE/SAE reports. Other population-specific variables that might change the way drug safety ought to be assessed include differing efficacy rates of a drug, background morbidity/mortality rates of the target disease in question, the growth rate of the incidence of disease, the availability of rescue or salvage therapies, and the willingness of local populations to take risks that other populations might not. The fact that NTDs are controllable and potentially eradicable with well-tolerated, effective, existing drugs might further alter our assessment of MDA safety and AE/SAE tolerability. At the same time, diffuseness of population, communication barriers, lack of resources, and other difficult surveillance challenges may present in NTD-affected settings. These limitations could impair the ability to monitor an MDA program's success, as well as hinder efforts to obtain informed consent or provide rescue therapy. Denying beneficial research interventions and MDA programs intended to benefit millions requires sound ethical justification based on more than the identification of

  13. Knowledge of adverse drug reaction reporting in first year postgraduate doctors in a medical college

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upadhyaya P

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Prerna Upadhyaya,1 Vikas Seth,2 Vijay V Moghe,1 Monika Sharma,1 Mushtaq Ahmed11Department of Pharmacology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College, Sitapura, Jaipur, Rajasthan, 2Department of Pharmacology, Hind Institute of Medical Sciences, Safedabad, Barabanki, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, IndiaIntroduction: Poor reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs by doctors is a major hindrance to successful pharmacovigilance. The present study was designed to assess first-year residents’ knowledge of ADR reporting.Methods: First-year postgraduate doctors at a private medical college completed a structured questionnaire. The responses were analyzed by nonparametric methods.Results: All doctors were aware of the term “adverse drug reactions.” Fifty percent of the doctors reported being taught about ADR reporting during their undergraduate teaching, and 50% had witnessed ADRs in their internship training. Ten percent of patients suffering an ADR observed and reported by doctors required prolonged hospitalization for treatment as a result. Only 40% of interns reported the ADRs that they observed, while 60% did not report them. Twenty-eight percent reported ADRs to the head of the department, 8% to an ADR monitoring committee, and 4% to the pharmacovigilance center. Eighty-six percent of the doctors surveyed felt that a good knowledge of undergraduate clinical pharmacology therapeutics would have improved the level of ADR reporting.Conclusion: The knowledge of first-year doctors regarding ADR reporting is quite poor. There is a dire need to incorporate ADR reporting into undergraduate teaching, and to reinforce this during internships and periodically thereafter.Keywords: ADR reporting, pharmacovigilance, first-year postgraduate doctors

  14. Drugs with potential cardiac adverse effects: Retrospective study in a large cohort of parkinsonian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heranval, A; Lefaucheur, R; Fetter, D; Rouillé, A; Le Goff, F; Maltête, D

    2016-01-01

    Drugs with potential cardiac adverse effects are commonly prescribed in Parkinson's disease (PD). To describe demographic and clinical characteristics in a group of PD patients with cardiac events and to evaluate risk factors. We sampled 506 consecutive PD patients (211 women/295 men), median age 68.3±10.6 years (range 36-95) and median disease duration 11.2±6.5 years (range 1-49). Medications with potential cardiac effects, i.e. QT prolongation (citalopram, escitalopram, venlafaxine, sertraline, domperidone, amantadine, solifenacin), ventricular arrhythmia (rivastigmine, clozapine, midodrine, sildenafil, tadalafil) and ischemic heart disease (rasagiline, entacapone, tadalafil) were recorded. Demographic and clinical data were collected prospectively; cardiac events were obtained retrospectively. Twenty-four patients (4.7%) (9 women/15 men) presented a cardiac event. Fifteen (62.5%) patients had dysautonomia, 4 (16.6%) a history of heart disease and 8 (33.3%) were taking one or more drugs with a definite potential cardiac adverse effect. Age (75.9±6.6 yr vs. 67.8±11 yr), disease duration (14.7±3.6 yr vs. 11±6.5 yr), dysautonomia (62.5% vs. 24.5%) and dementia associated with PD (37.5% vs. 14.6%) were significantly higher in the group with cardiac events (Pdysautonomia. Our results indicate that the neurodegenerative process in Parkinson's disease is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Consequences of the exclusion of known adverse drug reactions in a spontaneous reporting system on the possibility to detect unknown drug/ADR combinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgsteede, Sander; Van Puijenbroek, Eugene; Van Grootheest, Kees

    Background: The Reporting Odds Ratio (ROR) is one of the expressions to analyse disproportionallity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in a spontaneous reporting system. The ROR is defined as the extent to which the association between a suspected drug and ADR stands out against the background

  16. Computerized surveillance of opioid-related adverse drug events in perioperative care: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gattis Katherine G

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the complexity of surgical care, perioperative patients are at high risk of opioid-related adverse drug events. Existing methods of detection, such as trigger tools and manual chart review, are time-intensive which makes sustainability challenging. Using strategic rule design, computerized surveillance may be an efficient, pharmacist-driven model for event detection that leverages existing staff resources. Methods Computerized adverse drug event surveillance uses a logic-based rules engine to identify potential adverse drug events or evolving unsafe clinical conditions. We extended an inpatient rule (administration of naloxone to detect opioid-related oversedation and respiratory depression to perioperative care at a large academic medical center. Our primary endpoint was the adverse drug event rate. For all patients with a naloxone alert, manual chart review was performed by a perioperative clinical pharmacist to assess patient harm. In patients with confirmed oversedation, other patient safety event databases were queried to determine if they could detect duplicate, prior, or subsequent opioid-related events. Results We identified 419 cases of perioperative naloxone administration. Of these, 101 were given postoperatively and 69 were confirmed as adverse drug events after chart review yielding a rate of 1.89 adverse drug events/1000 surgical encounters across both the inpatient and ambulatory settings. Our ability to detect inpatient opioid adverse drug events increased 22.7% by expanding surveillance into perioperative care. Analysis of historical surveillance data as well as a voluntary reporting database revealed that 11 of our perioperative patients had prior or subsequent harmful oversedation. Nine of these cases received intraoperative naloxone, and 2 had received naloxone in the post-anesthesia care unit. Pharmacist effort was approximately 3 hours per week to evaluate naloxone alerts and confirm adverse drug

  17. Efficacy of an adverse drug reaction electronic reporting system integrated into a hospital information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Ana; Aguinagalde, Aránzazu; Lacasa, Carlos; Aquerreta, Irene; Fernández-Benítez, Margarita; Fernández, Luis M

    2008-10-01

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) spontaneous reporting is the primary method of postmarketing drug surveillance; although it is an important part of postmarketing drug surveillance, it is underused. Before 2004, almost no ADRs were reported in our 400-bed hospital. As an electronic hospital information system was available in our hospital, we developed a tool (ADR-RS-IHIS) for ADR reporting integrated into the hospital information system to facilitate reporting through easy use, automatic input of certain information, increased accessibility, real-time review, and intervention. To analyze the efficacy of the ADR-RS-IHIS in increasing ADR reporting to the national drug surveillance system, propose and implement improvements to increase ADR reporting, and evaluate the impact of these improvements. Every ADR reported through the ADR-RS-IHIS was evaluated retrospectively. Two study phases for evaluating ADR-RS-IHIS efficacy were identified. Phase I took place April 2004-August 2006; in April 2006, an interim analysis was performed to propose improvements. Phase II took place September 2006-April 2007 for evaluation of the impact made by the proposed improvements. Efficacy in the phase I and improvement impact on phase II were measured as the number of ADRs reported to the national drug surveillance system. The rate of ADRs reported per month to the national system increased from 0 before 2004 to 0.91 in phase I and 1.62 in phase II (2.25 if delayed reporting was considered). Improvement measures included: allowing nurses to report ADRs in the same way as physicians and pharmacists, automatic form filling of certain information from the electronic hospital information system, easier ADR report analysis, and automatic notification to the allergy department regarding suspected allergies. An ADR reporting system integrated into the electronic hospital information system is effective for increasing the number of ADRs reported to the national drug surveillance system. Allowing

  18. A Comparative Analysis Between Antibiotic- and Nonantibiotic-Associated Delayed Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubiano, Jason A; Aung, Ar Kar; Nguyen, Mary; Fehily, Sasha R; Graudins, Linda; Cleland, Heather; Padiglione, Alex; Peleg, Anton Y

    The difference in clinical presentation, causality assessments, and outcomes of patients with delayed antibiotic-associated cutaneous adverse drug reactions (AA-cADR) and nonantibiotic-associated (NA)-cADR is ill defined. We examined the etiology of AA-cADR, with regard to the type of antibiotic exposure, allergy labeling, and patient outcomes, in comparison with NA-cADR. A retrospective observational inpatient cohort study of cADR was performed from January 2004 to August 2014. Patients were divided into AA-cADR and NA-cADR groups for analysis. cADR was defined as erythema multiforme, fixed drug eruption, acute generalized erythematous pustulosis, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), drug-associated linear IgA disease, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Of the 84 patients with cADR, 48% were AA-cADR. Male sex (60% vs 32%, P = .004), median length of stay (14.5 vs 11 days, P = .05), median Charlson comorbidity index (3 vs 1, P = .03), and inpatient mortality (20% vs 5%, P = .04) were higher in AA-cADR compared with NA-cADR. The median drug latency was lower in AA-cADR (6 vs 20 days, P = .001). Sulfonamide antibiotics and glycopeptides were implicated in 20% of AA-cADR. DRESS was more frequently reported in AA-cADR. After cADR diagnosis, further antibiotic therapy was administered in 64% of patients, higher in AA-cADR (75%, 30 of 40) compared with NA-cADR (55%, 24 of 44) (P = .06). Fluoroquinolones (53% vs 21%, P = .02), glycopeptides (vancomycin and teicoplanin; 70% vs 38%, P = .05), and carbapenems (33% vs 13%, P = .11) were used more commonly in AA-cADR. Antibiotics were the cause of cADR requiring hospital admission in 48% of episodes, and were associated with longer length of stay, higher age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index, shorter drug latency, and mortality. In AA-cADR, glycopeptide and sulfonamide antibiotic exposure predominated. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

  19. Five typologies of alcohol and drug prevention programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Jakob Johan; Laura Marie, Schierff

    2018-01-01

    Adolescents exhibit a high rate of use of alcohol and illicit drugs. Effect studies rarely describe the actual content of the interventions in detail. Less is known about what was actually done in the prevention than about their effects. Aim: This study is a review study grouping the qualitatively...... for analysis. The sample consisted of 33 peer-reviewed articles published between January 2010 and December 2014. Findings: Five categories of intervention and prevention programmes were identified: ‘Information-based or testing-based primary prevention approaches’, ‘Primary prevention approaches incorporating...

  20. Impact of regionalized care on concordance of plan and preventable adverse events on general medicine services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Stephanie K; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Giannelli, Kyla; Roy, Christopher L; Boxer, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Dispersion of inpatient care teams across different medical units impedes effective team communication, potentially leading to adverse events (AEs). To regionalize 3 inpatient general medical teams to nursing units and examine the association with communication and preventable AEs. Pre-post cohort analysis. A 700-bed academic medical center. General medicine patients on any of the participating nursing units before and after implementation of regionalized care. Regionalizing 3 general medical physician teams to 3 corresponding nursing units. Concordance of patient care plan between nurse and intern, and adjusted odds of preventable AEs. Of the 414 included nurse and intern paired surveys, there were no significant differences pre- versus postregionalization in total mean concordance scores (0.65 vs 0.67, P = 0.26), but there was significant improvement in agreement on expected discharge date (0.56 vs 0.68, P = 0.003), knowledge of the other provider's name (0.56 vs 0.86,P communication and lead to patient safety improvements. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:620-627. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  1. Antibiotic-Related Adverse Drug Reactions at a Tertiary Care Hospital in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Young Jung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs are any unwanted/uncomfortable effects from medication resulting in physical, mental, and functional injuries. Antibiotics account for up to 40.9% of ADRs and are associated with several serious outcomes. However, few reports on ADRs have evaluated only antimicrobial agents. In this study, we investigated antibiotic-related ADRs at a tertiary care hospital in South Korea. Methods. This is a retrospective cohort study that evaluated ADRs to antibiotics that were reported at a 2400-bed tertiary care hospital in 2015. ADRs reported by physicians, pharmacists, and nurses were reviewed. Clinical information reported ADRs, type of antibiotic, causality assessment, and complications were evaluated. Results. 1,277 (62.8% patients were considered antibiotic-related ADRs based on the World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Center criteria (certain, 2.2%; probable, 35.7%; and possible, 62.1%. Totally, 44 (3.4% patients experienced serious ADRs. Penicillin and quinolones were the most common drugs reported to induce ADRs (both 16.0%, followed by third-generation cephalosporins (14.9%. The most frequently experienced side effects were skin manifestations (45.1% followed by gastrointestinal disorders (32.6%. Conclusion. Penicillin and quinolones are the most common causative antibiotics for ADRs and skin manifestations were the most frequently experienced symptom.

  2. An Evaluation of Indian Consumers' Reporting of Suspected Adverse Drug Reactions with a Designated Reporting Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan, Harmeet Singh; Sah, Ravinder; Gupta, Anubhuti; Nagar, Parvesh

    2017-01-01

    The Pharmacovigilance Program of India recently initiated a process for direct patient reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) with a designated form. A survey of 200 patients reporting ADRs filling the form. Forms were analysed for patient data, the suspected medication(s), ADRs and possible causality. 54.3% of respondents provided their contact information; the implicated medicine was mentioned in 60% and the description of ADRs in 80% although 46.2% were not interpretable. The severity of ADRs was mentioned in 73.5%. No responder filled the expiry date component of the implicated modification and a causality assessment from most forms was unclassifiable (57%) or unclassified (26%). Details of concomitant drugs were missing. Missing information was a deterrent in analysing the consumer ADR reports for signal detection. It is recommended that the following fields are highlighted in the form: consumer's initials, address, date suspected reaction started, description of event, name, dose, and the reason for the use the medication as well as its expiry date. These should be mandatory in the existing form and new fields added for weight and height, batch number for vaccines and biological products, de challenge and rechallenge results to the suspected medicine and concomitantly used medicines. To improve the quality of information in the consumer reporting form an awareness campaign is also suggested. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. [Adverse reactions to drugs reported by the primary care physicians of Andalusia. Analysis of underreporting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torelló Iserte, J; Castillo Ferrando, J R; Laínez, M M; García Morillas, M; Arias González, A

    1994-04-15

    To discover the sort of adverse reactions to medication (ARM) notified by Primary Care doctors and identify the under-notification of those cases having special clinical-epidemiological interest. Retrospective study in which 2,597 ARM corresponding to 1,467 Yellow Cards (YC) were analysed. These were notified by Primary Care doctors to the Centro Andaluz de Farmacovigilancia (Andalusian Drug-watch centre) during the period from 1/6/90 to 31/12/92. To assess the seriousness of the ARM, their terminological classification and imputability, the criteria used in the WHO's international "Yellow Card" programme of spontaneous notification were followed. 77.2% of all notifications were from Primary Care, of which 7.4% were of special interest due to their serious or novel character. However an undernotification of serious and well-known ARM was detected, such as digestive haemorrhages (1.07/10(6) inhibitants per year), anaphylactic shock (0.34/10(6) inhab/year), agranulocytosis (0.23/10(6) inhab/year) and aplastic anaemia (0.05/10(6) inhab/year), among others. Most of the main under-notified ARM are generated in the community but treated in hospital Casualty departments. Therefore it would be useful to develop specific Drug-watch programmes in the hospitals themselves.

  4. A web resource for mining HLA associations with adverse drug reactions: HLA-ADR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghattaoraya, Gurpreet S; Dundar, Yenal; González-Galarza, Faviel F; Maia, Maria Helena Thomaz; Santos, Eduardo José Melo; da Silva, Andréa Luciana Soares; McCabe, Antony; Middleton, Derek; Alfirevic, Ana; Dickson, Rumona; Jones, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are an important family of genes involved in the immune system. Their primary function is to allow the host immune system to be able to distinguish between self and non-self peptides-e.g. derived from invading pathogens. However, these genes have also been implicated in immune-mediated adverse drug reactions (ADRs), presenting a problem to patients, clinicians and pharmaceutical companies. We have previously developed the Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND) that captures the allelic and haplotype frequencies for these HLA genes across many healthy populations from around the world. Here, we report the development and release of the HLA-ADR database that captures data from publications where HLA alleles and haplotypes have been associated with ADRs (e.g. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis and drug-induced liver injury). HLA-ADR was created by using data obtained through systematic review of the literature and semi-automated literature mining. The database also draws on data already present in AFND allowing users to compare and analyze allele frequencies in both ADR patients and healthy populations. The HLA-ADR database provides clinicians and researchers with a centralized resource from which to investigate immune-mediated ADRs.Database URL: http://www.allelefrequencies.net/hla-adr/. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Direct costs of managing adverse drug reactions during rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis treatment in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnippel, K; Firnhaber, C; Berhanu, R; Page-Shipp, L; Sinanovic, E

    2018-04-01

    To estimate the provider costs of managing adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to standard long-course treatment for multidrug- and rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/RR-TB) according to South African guidelines. We parameterised a published Markov health state model for MDR/RR-TB with guidelines-based, bottom-up public-sector provider costing of ADR management. Frequency of ADR occurrence was extracted from the literature. Costs were estimated over 10 years, discounted 3% annually and tested using probabilistic sensitivity analysis. On average, guidelines-based costing of moderate ADRs weighted by the frequency of occurrence was US$135.76 (standard deviation [SD] US$17.18) and the cost of serious ADRs was US$521.29 (SD US$55.99). We estimated that the incremental costs of ADR management were US$380.17 annually per patient initiating MDR/RR-TB treatment. The incremental costs of ADR management for the public health sector in South Africa was US$4.76 million, 8.3% of the estimated cohort costs of MDR/RR-TB treatment ($57.55 million) for the 2015 cohort of 12 527 patients. Management of multiple ADRs and serious ADRs, which are common during the first 6 months of standard, long-course MDR/RR-TB treatment, substantially increases provider treatment costs. These results need to be taken into account when comparing regimen costs, and highlight the urgent need to identify drug regimens with improved safety profiles.

  6. Exploring sociodemographic and economic factors that promote adverse drug reactions reporting by patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, Pedro; Gomes, João José; Airaksinen, Marja; Cavaco, Afonso

    2018-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are recognized as a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and an important cost factor to health systems. Patient reporting of ADRs has emerged as an important topic in recent years but reporting rates are still low in many countries. To explore different countries' sociodemographic and economic features as explanatory factors for population ADRs reporting, including the propensity of patients' reporting to pharmacovigilance authorities. Cross-sectional observational design. A data set of 42 global sociodemographic and economic factors for 44 countries were retrieved, as to analyse statistical associations between these factors and the patient reporting rate of ADRs. Multivariate logistic regression models were designed to identify the predictive covariables. Health investment indicators, such as per capita public health expenditure, hospital bed density and under five mortality rate were the relevant factors responsible to discriminate between countries that have higher patient reporting rates. This study shows that healthcare investment-related factors help explain the propensity of patients to report suspected ADRs, while pharmacovigilance features were not directly associated with higher patient participation in drug safety mechanisms. Although general, these results point a direction in further policy making to improve resources allocation concerning the promotion of patients' participation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Reporting of adverse drug reactions: predictors of under-reporting in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Zoriah; Siang, Tan Ching; Badarudin, Nurul Suhaida

    2007-02-01

    Malaysia like many other countries worldwide uses spontaneous reporting systems as a mean of collecting data on suspected adverse drug reaction (ADR). However, compared to other countries, which use the system, the reporting rate in Malaysia is very low. Why some physicians do not report ADRs is not well understood. To identify factors, which would predict physicians' failure to send ADR reports. Face-to-face interview using a structured questionnaire involving physicians working at the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia. About a third of the physicians in the Centre participated. Sixty-five of the 415 approached refused to participate. A high proportion of the respondents (81.4%) indicated that they had suspected an ADR but did not report it, while about 40% of the respondents were not aware of the existence of the national reporting system in Malaysia. Logistic regression modelling identified the variable 'ADR considered to be too trivial or too well known to report' as the strongest predictor of not reporting, followed by physicians' category and uncertainty that the reaction had been definitely caused by a drug. Important predictor variables, which limit physicians from reporting ADR in Malaysia, were related to uncertainty of types of reaction to report, lack of awareness about the existence, function and purpose of national ADR reporting. The findings could be useful for planning strategies to improve the reporting rate.

  8. Pharmacovigilance in oncology: pattern of spontaneous notifications, incidence of adverse drug reactions and under-reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Berlofa Visacri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The high toxicity and narrow therapeutic window of antineoplastic agents makes pharmacovigilance studies essential in oncology. The objectives of the current study were to analyze the pattern of spontaneous notifications of adverse drug reactions (ADRs in oncology patients and to analyze the incidence of ADRs reported by outpatients on antineoplastic treatment in a tertiary care teaching hospital. To compose the pattern of ADR, the notification forms of reactions in oncology patients in 2010 were reviewed, and the reactions were classified based on the drug involved, mechanism, causality, and severity. To evaluate the incidence of reactions, a questionnaire at the time of chemotherapy was included, and the severity was classified based on the Common Terminology Criteria. The profiles of the 10 responses reported to the Pharmacovigilance Sector were type B, severe, possible, and they were primarily related to platinum compounds and taxanes. When the incidence of reactions was analyzed, it was observed that nausea, alopecia, fatigue, diarrhea, and taste disturbance were the most frequently reported reactions by oncology patients, and the grade 3 and 4 reactions were not reported. Based on this analysis, it is proposed that health professionals should be trained regarding notifications and clinical pharmacists should increasingly be brought on board to reduce under-reporting of ADRs.

  9. Dose-Specific Adverse Drug Reaction Identification in Electronic Patient Records: Temporal Data Mining in an Inpatient Psychiatric Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Robert; Werge, Thomas; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2014-01-01

    all indication areas.The aim of this study was to take advantage of techniques for temporal data mining of EPRs in order to detect ADRs in a patient- and dose-specific manner.We used a psychiatric hospital’s EPR system to investigate undesired drug effects. Within one workflow the method identified...... patient-specific adverse events (AEs) and links these to specific drugs and dosages in a temporal manner, based on integration of text mining results and structured data. The structured data contained precise information on drug identity, dosage and strength.When applying the method to the 3,394 patients......Data collected for medical, filing and administrative purposes in electronic patient records (EPRs) represent a rich source of individualised clinical data, which has great potential for improved detection of patients experiencing adverse drug reactions (ADRs), across all approved drugs and across...

  10. DL-ADR: a novel deep learning model for classifying genomic variants into adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhaohui; Huang, Jimmy Xiangji; Zeng, Xing; Zhang, Gang

    2016-08-10

    Genomic variations are associated with the metabolism and the occurrence of adverse reactions of many therapeutic agents. The polymorphisms on over 2000 locations of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP) due to many factors such as ethnicity, mutations, and inheritance attribute to the diversity of response and side effects of various drugs. The associations of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the internal pharmacokinetic patterns and the vulnerability of specific adverse reactions become one of the research interests of pharmacogenomics. The conventional genomewide association studies (GWAS) mainly focuses on the relation of single or multiple SNPs to a specific risk factors which are a one-to-many relation. However, there are no robust methods to establish a many-to-many network which can combine the direct and indirect associations between multiple SNPs and a serial of events (e.g. adverse reactions, metabolic patterns, prognostic factors etc.). In this paper, we present a novel deep learning model based on generative stochastic networks and hidden Markov chain to classify the observed samples with SNPs on five loci of two genes (CYP2D6 and CYP1A2) respectively to the vulnerable population of 14 types of adverse reactions. A supervised deep learning model is proposed in this study. The revised generative stochastic networks (GSN) model with transited by the hidden Markov chain is used. The data of the training set are collected from clinical observation. The training set is composed of 83 observations of blood samples with the genotypes respectively on CYP2D6*2, *10, *14 and CYP1A2*1C, *1 F. The samples are genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. A hidden Markov chain is used as the transition operator to simulate the probabilistic distribution. The model can perform learning at lower cost compared to the conventional maximal likelihood method because the transition distribution is conditional on the previous state of the hidden Markov

  11. A research framework for pharmacovigilance in health social media: Identification and evaluation of patient adverse drug event reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Chen, Hsinchun

    2015-12-01

    Social media offer insights of patients' medical problems such as drug side effects and treatment failures. Patient reports of adverse drug events from social media have great potential to improve current practice of pharmacovigilance. However, extracting patient adverse drug event reports from social media continues to be an important challenge for health informatics research. In this study, we develop a research framework with advanced natural language processing techniques for integrated and high-performance patient reported adverse drug event extraction. The framework consists of medical entity extraction for recognizing patient discussions of drug and events, adverse drug event extraction with shortest dependency path kernel based statistical learning method and semantic filtering with information from medical knowledge bases, and report source classification to tease out noise. To evaluate the proposed framework, a series of experiments were conducted on a test bed encompassing about postings from major diabetes and heart disease forums in the United States. The results reveal that each component of the framework significantly contributes to its overall effectiveness. Our framework significantly outperforms prior work. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Antiplatelet Drugs for Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases : Drug Utilization, Effectiveness, and Safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorsyahdy, A.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Antiplatelet drugs are recommended for secondary prevention of recurrent cardiovascular events in patients who experience diseases in which the pathophysiology is associated with platelet aggregation and atherosclerosis, including acute coronary syndrome, transient ischemic attack, ischemic stroke,

  13. Systematic drug safety evaluation based on public genomic expression (Connectivity Map) data: Myocardial and infectious adverse reactions as application cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Kejian; Weng, Zuquan; Sun, Liya; Sun, Jiazhi; Zhou, Shu-Feng; He, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is of great importance to both regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. Various techniques, such as quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) and animal toxicology, are widely used to identify potential risks during the preclinical stage of drug development. Despite these efforts, drugs with safety liabilities can still pass through safety checkpoints and enter the market. This situation raises the concern that conventional chemical structure analysis and phenotypic screening are not sufficient to avoid all clinical adverse events. Genomic expression data following in vitro drug treatments characterize drug actions and thus have become widely used in drug repositioning. In the present study, we explored prediction of ADRs based on the drug-induced gene-expression profiles from cultured human cells in the Connectivity Map (CMap) database. The results showed that drugs inducing comparable ADRs generally lead to similar CMap expression profiles. Based on such ADR-gene expression association, we established prediction models for various ADRs, including severe myocardial and infectious events. Drugs with FDA boxed warnings of safety liability were effectively identified. We therefore suggest that drug-induced gene expression change, in combination with effective computational methods, may provide a new dimension of information to facilitate systematic drug safety evaluation. - Highlights: • Drugs causing common toxicity lead to similar in vitro gene expression changes. • We built a model to predict drug toxicity with drug-specific expression profiles. • Drugs with FDA black box warnings were effectively identified by our model. • In vitro assay can detect severe toxicity in the early stage of drug development

  14. Systematic drug safety evaluation based on public genomic expression (Connectivity Map) data: Myocardial and infectious adverse reactions as application cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kejian, E-mail: kejian.wang.bio@gmail.com [Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Weng, Zuquan [Japan National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Kawasaki (Japan); Sun, Liya [Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Sun, Jiazhi; Zhou, Shu-Feng [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); He, Lin, E-mail: helin@Bio-X.com [Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-02-13

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is of great importance to both regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. Various techniques, such as quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) and animal toxicology, are widely used to identify potential risks during the preclinical stage of drug development. Despite these efforts, drugs with safety liabilities can still pass through safety checkpoints and enter the market. This situation raises the concern that conventional chemical structure analysis and phenotypic screening are not sufficient to avoid all clinical adverse events. Genomic expression data following in vitro drug treatments characterize drug actions and thus have become widely used in drug repositioning. In the present study, we explored prediction of ADRs based on the drug-induced gene-expression profiles from cultured human cells in the Connectivity Map (CMap) database. The results showed that drugs inducing comparable ADRs generally lead to similar CMap expression profiles. Based on such ADR-gene expression association, we established prediction models for various ADRs, including severe myocardial and infectious events. Drugs with FDA boxed warnings of safety liability were effectively identified. We therefore suggest that drug-induced gene expression change, in combination with effective computational methods, may provide a new dimension of information to facilitate systematic drug safety evaluation. - Highlights: • Drugs causing common toxicity lead to similar in vitro gene expression changes. • We built a model to predict drug toxicity with drug-specific expression profiles. • Drugs with FDA black box warnings were effectively identified by our model. • In vitro assay can detect severe toxicity in the early stage of drug development.

  15. Facilitating prediction of adverse drug reactions by using knowledge graphs and multi-label learning models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Emir; Novácek, Vít; Vandenbussche, Pierre-Yves

    2017-08-18

    Timely identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is highly important in the domains of public health and pharmacology. Early discovery of potential ADRs can limit their effect on patient lives and also make drug development pipelines more robust and efficient. Reliable in silico prediction of ADRs can be helpful in this context, and thus, it has been intensely studied. Recent works achieved promising results using machine learning. The presented work focuses on machine learning methods that use drug profiles for making predictions and use features from multiple data sources. We argue that despite promising results, existing works have limitations, especially regarding flexibility in experimenting with different data sets and/or predictive models. We suggest to address these limitations by generalization of the key principles used by the state of the art. Namely, we explore effects of: (1) using knowledge graphs-machine-readable interlinked representations of biomedical knowledge-as a convenient uniform representation of heterogeneous data; and (2) casting ADR prediction as a multi-label ranking problem. We present a specific way of using knowledge graphs to generate different feature sets and demonstrate favourable performance of selected off-the-shelf multi-label learning models in comparison with existing works. Our experiments suggest better suitability of certain multi-label learning methods for applications where ranking is preferred. The presented approach can be easily extended to other feature sources or machine learning methods, making it flexible for experiments tuned toward specific requirements of end users. Our work also provides a clearly defined and reproducible baseline for any future related experiments. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The Role of ARV Associated Adverse Drug Reactions in Influencing Adherence Among HIV-Infected Individuals: A Systematic Review and Qualitative Meta-Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haochu; Marley, Gifty; Ma, Wei; Wei, Chongyi; Lackey, Mellanye; Ma, Qingyan; Renaud, Françoise; Vitoria, Marco; Beanland, Rachel; Doherty, Meg; Tucker, Joseph D

    2017-02-01

    Poor adherence remains a major barrier to achieving the clinical and public health benefits of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs). A systematic review and qualitative meta-synthesis was conduct to evaluate how ARV adverse drug reactions may influence ARV adherence. Thirty-nine articles were identified, and 33 reported that ARV adverse drug reactions decreased adherence and six studies found no influence. Visually noticeable adverse drug reactions and psychological adverse reactions were reported as more likely to cause non-adherence compared to other adverse drug reactions. Six studies reported a range of adverse reactions associated with EFV-containing regimens contributing to decreased adherence. Informing HIV-infected individuals about ARV adverse drug reactions prior to initiation, counselling about coping mechanisms, and experiencing the effectiveness of ARVs on wellbeing may improve ARV adherence.

  17. Mechanisms of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Asad; Steele, Vernon E; Menter, David G; Hawk, Ernest T

    2016-02-01

    Various clinical and epidemiologic studies show that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin and cyclooxygenase inhibitors (COXIBs) help prevent cancer. Since eicosanoid metabolism is the main inhibitory targets of these drugs the resulting molecular and biological impact is generally accepted. As our knowledge base and technology progress we are learning that additional targets may be involved. This review attempts to summarize these new developments in the field. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Extravasational side effects of cytotoxic drugs: A preventable catastrophe

    OpenAIRE

    Thakur, Jagdeep S.; Chauhan, C. G. S.; Diwana, Vijay K.; Chauhan, Dayal C.; Thakur, Anamika

    2008-01-01

    In addition to their therapeutic effects on malignant cells, cytotoxic agents have the potential of causing destruction of healthy, normal cells. Extravasation of the drug can produce extensive necrosis of the skin and subcutaneous tissue. Management of these extravasational effects differs from one centre to another and prevention is usually strongly emphasized. We analyzed our management of 12 patients referred to us over five years with extravasation of cytotoxic drugs and reviewed the lit...

  19. Treating periodontal disease for preventing adverse birth outcomes in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iheozor-Ejiofor, Zipporah; Middleton, Philippa; Esposito, Marco; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2017-06-12

    Periodontal disease has been linked with a number of conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes and adverse pregnancy outcomes, all likely through systemic inflammatory pathways. It is common in women of reproductive age and gum conditions tend to worsen during pregnancy. Some evidence from observational studies suggests that periodontal intervention may reduce adverse pregnancy outcomes. There is need for a comprehensive Cochrane review of randomised trials to assess the effect of periodontal treatment on perinatal and maternal health. To assess the effects of treating periodontal disease in pregnant women in order to prevent or reduce perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 6 October 2016), Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register (to 7 October 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 9) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 6 October 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 6 October 2016), and LILACS BIREME Virtual Health Library (Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Information database; 1982 to 6 October 2016). ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials on 6 October 2016. We placed no restrictions on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of periodontal treatment in preventing or reducing perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality. We excluded studies where obstetric outcomes were not reported. Two review authors independently screened titles and abstracts and extracted data using a prepiloted data extraction form. Missing data were obtained by contacting authors and risk of bias was assessed using Cochrane's 'Risk of bias' tool. Where appropriate

  20. 34 CFR 86.100 - What must the IHE's drug prevention program include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must the IHE's drug prevention program include? 86.100 Section 86.100 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Institutions of Higher Education § 86.100 What must the IHE's drug prevention program include? The IHE's drug prevention program must, a...

  1. Differences in reproductive toxicology between alopecia drugs: an analysis on adverse events among female and male cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia is a dermatological condition with limited therapeutic options. Only two drugs, finasteride and minoxidil, are approved by FDA for alopecia treatment. However, little is known about the differences in adverse effects between these two drugs. We examined the clinical reports submitted to the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) from 2004 to 2014. For both female and males, finasteride was found to be more associated with reproductive toxicity as compared to minoxidil. Among male alopecia cases, finasteride was significantly more concurrent with several forms of sexual dysfunction. Among female alopecia cases, finasteride was significantly more concurrent with harm to fetus and disorder of uterus. In addition, drug-gene network analysis indicated that finasteride could profoundly disturb pathways related to sex hormone signaling and oocyte maturation. These findings could provide clues for subsequent toxicological research. Taken together, this analysis suggested that finasteride could be more liable to various reproductive adverse effects. Some of these adverse effects have yet to be warned in FDA-approved drug label. This information can help improve the treatment regimen of alopecia and post-marketing regulation of drug products. PMID:27738338

  2. Methodological framework to identify possible adverse drug reactions using population-based administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Brian; Nebeker, Jonathan; Shen, Shuying; Rupper, Randall; West, Suzanne; Shinogle, Judith A; Xu, Wu; Lohr, Kathleen N; Samore, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    We present a framework for detecting possible adverse drug reactions (ADRs) using the Utah Medicaid administrative data. We examined four classes of ADRs associated with treatment of dementia by acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs): known reactions (gastrointestinal, psychological disturbances), potential reactions (respiratory disturbance), novel reactions (hepatic, hematological disturbances), and death. Our cohort design linked drug utilization data to medical claims from Utah Medicaid recipients. We restricted the analysis to 50 years-old and older beneficiaries diagnosed with dementia-related diseases. We compared patients treated with AChEI to patients untreated with anti-dementia medication therapy. We attempted to remove confounding by establishing propensity-score-matched cohorts for each outcome investigated; we then evaluated the effects of drug treatment by conditional multivariable Cox-proportional-hazard regression. Acute and transient effects were evaluated by a crossover design using conditional logistic regression. Propensity-matched analysis of expected reactions revealed that AChEI treatment was associated with gastrointestinal episodes (Hazard Ratio [HR]: 2.02; 95%CI: 1.28-3.2), but not psychological episodes, respiratory disturbance, or death. Among the unexpected reactions, the risk of hematological episodes was higher (HR: 2.32; 95%CI: 1.47-3.6) in patients exposed to AChEI. AChEI exposure was not associated with an increase in hepatic episodes. We also noted a trend, identified in the case-crossover design, toward increase odds of experiencing acute hematological events during AChEI exposure (Odds Ratio: 3.0; 95% CI: 0.97 - 9.3). We observed an expected association between AChEIs treatment and gastrointestinal disturbances and detected a signal of possible hematological ADR after treatment with AChEIs in this pilot study. Using this analytic framework may raise awareness of potential ADEs and generate hypotheses for future investigations

  3. FarmaREL: An Italian pharmacovigilance project to monitor and evaluate adverse drug reactions in haematologic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracchiolla, Nicola S; Artuso, Silvia; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Pelizzari, Anna M; Tozzi, Paola; Bonfichi, Maurizio; Bocchio, Federica; Gargantini, Livio; De Rosa, Elisa; Vighi, Giuseppe D; Prestini, Lucia; Sammassimo, Simona; Frungillo, Niccolò; Pasquini, Maria C; Ragazzi, Alessandra; Boghi, Daniele; Pastore, Alessia; Lanzi, Eraldo; Gritti, Giuseppe; Quaresmini, Giulia; Voltolini, Simone; Gaiardoni, Roberta; Corti, Consuelo; Vilardo, Maria C; La Targia, Maria L; Berini, Giacomo; Magagnoli, Massimo; Bacci, Claudia; Consonni, Dario; Rivolta, Alma L; Muti, Giuliana

    2018-02-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reduce patients' quality of life, increase mortality and morbidity, and have a negative economic impact on healthcare systems. Nevertheless, the importance of ADR reporting is often underestimated. The project "FarmaREL" has been developed to monitor and evaluate ADRs in haematological patients and to increase pharmacovigilance culture among haematology specialists. In 13 haematology units, based in Lombardy, Italy, a dedicated specialist with the task of encouraging ADRs reporting and sensitizing healthcare professionals to pharmacovigilance has been assigned. The ADRs occurring in haematological patients were collected electronically and then analysed with multiple logistic regression. Between January 2009 and December 2011, 887 reports were collected. The number of ADRs was higher in older adults (528; 59%), in male (490; 55%), and in non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients (343; 39%). Most reactions were severe (45% required or prolonged hospitalization), but in most cases, they were fully resolved at the time of reporting. According to Schumock and Thornton criteria, a percentage of ADRs as high as 7% was found to be preventable versus 2% according to reporter opinion. Patients' haematological diagnosis, not age or gender, resulted to be the variable that most influenced ADR, in particular severity and outcome. The employment of personnel specifically dedicated to pharmacovigilance is a successful strategy to improve the number and quality of ADR reports. "FarmaREL", the first programme of active pharmacovigilance in oncohaematologic patients, significantly contributed to reach the WHO "Gold Standard" for pharmacovigilance in Lombardy, Italy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Cypermethrin induced toxicities in fish and adverse health outcomes: Its prevention and control measure adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Sana; Zuberi, Amina; Alagawany, Mahmoud; Farag, Mayada Ragab; Dadar, Maryam; Karthik, Kumaragurubaran; Tiwari, Ruchi; Dhama, Kuldeep; Iqbal, Hafiz M N

    2018-01-15

    Pesticides are being widely employed in the modern agriculture, though in different quantities, across the globe. Although it is useful for crops yield enhancement, however, there are the serious environment, health and safety related concerns for aquatic and terrestrial living biomes that include humans, animals, and plants. Various in practice and emerging pesticides adversely affect the survival, development and biological systems stability. Several research efforts have been made to highlight the bio-safety and toxicological features of toxicants through risk assessment studies using different animal models, e.g., different fish species. Among several pesticides, cypermethrin is extensively used in agriculture and households, and the reported concentrations of this pesticide in different water bodies including rivers and streams, soil and even in rainwater are threatening. Consequently, cypermethrin is considered for risk assessment studies to know about its deep and different level of toxicological effects subject to its dose, exposure time and route. The cypermethrin existence/persistence in the environment is posing a severe threat to humans as well as another non-target terrestrial and aquatic organism. Herein, the toxic effects of pesticides, with special reference to cypermethrin, on fish, the mode of toxicity, concerns regarding public health and harmful impacts on human beings are comprehensively reviewed. The information is also given on their appropriate control and prevention strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Profile of rheumatology patients willing to report adverse drug reactions: bias from selective reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protić D

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dragana Protić,1 Nada Vujasinović-Stupar,2 Zoran Bukumirić,3 Slavica Pavlov-Dolijanović,4 Snežana Baltić,5 Slavica Mutavdžin,6 Ljiljana Markovic-Denić,7 Marija Zdravković,8 Zoran Todorović1 1Department of Pharmacology, Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 2Department 2, Institute of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 3Institute for Medical Statistics and Informatics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 4Department 5, Institute of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 5Department 5, Institute of Rheumatology, Belgrade, Serbia; 6Institute of Physiology “Rihard Burjan”, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 7Institute of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 8Department of Cardiology, Medical Center “Bežanijska kosa”, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia Background: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs have a significant impact on human health and health care costs. The aims of our study were to determine the profile of rheumatology patients willing to report ADRs and to identify bias in such a reporting system. Methods: Semi-intensive ADRs reporting system was used in our study. Patients willing to participate (N=261 completed the questionnaire designed for the purpose of the study at the hospital admission. They were subsequently classified into two groups according to their ability to identify whether they had experienced ADRs during the previous month. Group 1 included 214 out of 261 patients who were able to identify ADRs, and group 2 consisted of 43 out of 261 patients who were not able to identify ADRs in their recent medical history. Results: Group 1 patients were more significantly aware of their diagnosis than the patients from group 2. Marginal significance was found

  6. [A systematic review of decided litigated cases on adverse drug events in Japan: classification of decided cases appearing in law reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Rika; Kato, Masahisa; Kaneko, Erina; Kusaba, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Manabu; Yamano, Toru; Seo, Takashi; Hagihara, Akihito

    2015-01-01

    Much of the damage to health caused by drugs could be prevented by appropriate care. A well-defined duty of care and further information are required for healthcare professionals. Although there are many litigation cases to use as references, neither the extent of the duty of care nor the obligation to explain medication according to the type of drug prescribed has yet been fully established. Thus, we systematically collected decided cases of adverse drug events, and assessed the degree of the duties of care and information. Specifically, we collected decided cases in which physicians, dentists, pharmacists, nurses, or hospitals had been sued. Data were derived from Bessatsu Jurist Iryo-kago Hanrei Hyakusen, Hanrei Jihou, and Hanrei Times from 1989 to November 2013, and information on precedents in the records of the Supreme Court of Japan from 2001 to November 2013. We analyzed the cases, and assessed the following according to the type of drug: (1) standards and explanations when dealing with drugs that were critical issues in litigation, and (2) the degree of the physician's or pharmacist's duties of care and information. In total, 126 cases were collected. The number of drug categories classified was 27, and 9 were considered of practical importance. After this systematic review, we found a trend in the degree of the required level of care and information on several drugs. With respect to duties of care and information, the gap between the required level and actual practice suggests that healthcare professionals must improve their care and explanations.

  7. Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention on College Campuses: Model Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In response to recent alcohol-related tragedies and to ongoing concern about unacceptable levels of alcohol and other drug use on college campuses, Congress authorized the U.S. Department of Education to identify and promote effective campus-based prevention programs. Since 1999, the U.S. Department of Education has awarded approximately $3.5…

  8. [High activity antiretroviral therapy change associated to adverse drug reactions in a specialized center in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subiela, José D; Dapena, Elida

    2016-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent the first cause of change of the first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen, therefore, they constitute the main limiting factor in the long-term follow up of HIV patients in treatment. A retrospective study was carried out in a specialized center in Lara State, Venezuela, including 99 patients over 18 years of age who had change of first-line HAART regimen due to ADRs, between 2010 and 2013. The aims of this research were to describe the sociodemographic and clinical variables, frequency of ADRs related to change of HAART, duration of the first-line HAART regimen, to determine the drugs associated with ARVs and to identify the risk factors. The ADRs constituted 47.5% of all causes of change of first-line HAART regimen, the median duration was 1.08±0.28 years. The most frequent ADRs were anemia (34.3%), hypersensitivity reactions (20.2%) and gastrointestinal intolerance (13.1%). The most frequent ARV regimen type was the protease inhibitors-based regimen (59.6%), but zidovudine was the ARV most linked to ADRs (41.4%). The regression analysis showed increased risk of ADRs in singles and students in the univariate analysis and heterosexuals and homosexuals in multivariate analysis; and decreased risk in active workers. The present work shows the high prevalence of ADRs in the studied population and represents the first case-based study that describes the pharmacoepidemiology of a cohort of HIV-positive patients treated in Venezuela.

  9. The Clinical Manifestations, Treatment Efficacy and Adverse Drug Reactions in 62 Iranian Child with Wilson Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Najafi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Wilson disease is an autosomal recessive disease in which the liver, central nervous system, eyes, blood and other parts of the body involved. Timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the disease requires awareness of the clinical presentations of this disease in children.Methods: This case series study included 62 patients with Wilson disease who admitted to children's Medical Center in the years 2012-2003.Results: 56% of patients were male. The average age of diagnosis was 9.73 years old (5-17 years and this was higher in patients with early neurologic symptoms (P = 0.85.( 64.5% of the patients had the hepatic symptoms at the time of diagnosis and the most common type of hepatic involvement was cirrhosis (39.3% and hepatitis (17.5% respectively. 17.7% of the patients also had early neurological symptoms. A positive family history for the Wilson Disease were found in 27.4% of patients. 74.2% of patients had KF ring and the frequency of these symptom was higher in patients with early neurological involvement. 83.9% of patients were treated successfully with D-penicillamine and In 30% of patients, adverse drug reactions were seen.Conclusion: Children with unknown liver disease should be evaluated for Wilson disease and the first-degree relatives of patients should be screened. . D-penicillamine have important side effects, but due to the low cost and the availability is an appropriate drug to treat the Wilson disease..Key words: Wilson Disease, Hepatic Involvement, Neurologic Involvement , KF ring ,D-Penicillamine.

  10. More than skin deep. Ten year follow-up of delayed cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graudins, Linda Velta; Ly, Jenny; Trubiano, Jason; Aung, Ar Kar

    2016-10-01

    To determine the gaps in practice regarding appropriate ADR documentation and risk communication for patients diagnosed with severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR). This was a retrospective observational cohort study conducted using hospital coding and databases to identify inpatients diagnosed with CADR from January 2004 to August 2014. Hospital discharge summaries, ADR reports and pharmacy dispensing records were reviewed for ADR documentation. Patients still living in Australia and who did not opt out of being contacted were invited to be surveyed by telephone to determine their understanding of recommendations, re-exposure rates and long-term effects. Of 85 patients identified, median age was 59 (IQR 44-72) years and 47.1% were male. The most common diagnosis was TENS (49.4%). Ten patients (11.8%) died as inpatients. Of the 81 patients with a drug-related causality, 47 (58%) had appropriate documentation in all three required medical record platforms. Of the 56 eligible patients, 38 (67.9%) were surveyed; 13% had no information provided upon discharge and 26.3% patients had a mismatch in knowledge of implicated medications. No surveyed patient had a relapse of CADR, but 23.7% had a subsequent unrelated allergic reaction. Thirteen patients (34.2%) reported long-term effects. We found gaps in the accuracy of ADR documentation and communication of risk at discharge, which indicated risks to patient safety. Electronic systems are being developed to improve documentation. Written information about CADR is being provided at discharge to improve patient understanding and knowledge. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Evaluation of the Case-Crossover (CCO) Study Design for Adverse Drug Event Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burningham, Zachary; He, Tao; Teng, Chia-Chen; Zhou, Xi; Nebeker, Jonathan; Sauer, Brian C

    2017-09-01

    The case-crossover (CCO) design was originally intended to study exposures characterized as intermittent with acute effects. The performance of the CCO design is not well characterized under alternative exposure and outcome relationships. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of the CCO to identify simulated treatment effects under different drug exposures and outcomes relationships while varying the duration of the 1:1 matched risk and control windows. The simulated data were obtained from the Observational Medical Dataset Simulator, version 2 (OSIM2). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated to compare CCO performance across outcome types, simulated relative risk (RR), and duration of risk and control windows. The AUC for acute outcomes was higher for shorter risk and control windows and improved with higher simulated RR. For example, the AUC for the simulated RR of 4 was 0.95 for a 30-day window length and 0.78 for a 360-day window length. The AUC for the accumulative outcomes increased with longer risk and control windows and stronger simulated RR. For example, the AUC for the simulated RR of 4 was 0.85 for a 360-day window length and 0.23 for a 30-day window length. Risk and control window lengths did not appear to sufficiently alter the AUC for insidious onset outcomes. The CCO performed best for acute-onset outcomes, but may be useful for exploring adverse outcomes with accumulative effects. Careful consideration must be given to the hypothesized drug exposure and outcome distribution because specification of risk and control window duration affects CCO performance.

  12. Bridging data models and terminologies to support adverse drug event reporting using EHR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declerck, G; Hussain, S; Daniel, C; Yuksel, M; Laleci, G B; Twagirumukiza, M; Jaulent, M-C

    2015-01-01

    This article is part of the Focus Theme of METHODs of Information in Medicine on "Managing Interoperability and Complexity in Health Systems". SALUS project aims at building an interoperability platform and a dedicated toolkit to enable secondary use of electronic health records (EHR) data for post marketing drug surveillance. An important component of this toolkit is a drug-related adverse events (AE) reporting system designed to facilitate and accelerate the reporting process using automatic prepopulation mechanisms. To demonstrate SALUS approach for establishing syntactic and semantic interoperability for AE reporting. Standard (e.g. HL7 CDA-CCD) and proprietary EHR data models are mapped to the E2B(R2) data model via SALUS Common Information Model. Terminology mapping and terminology reasoning services are designed to ensure the automatic conversion of source EHR terminologies (e.g. ICD-9-CM, ICD-10, LOINC or SNOMED-CT) to the target terminology MedDRA which is expected in AE reporting forms. A validated set of terminology mappings is used to ensure the reliability of the reasoning mechanisms. The percentage of data elements of a standard E2B report that can be completed automatically has been estimated for two pilot sites. In the best scenario (i.e. the available fields in the EHR have actually been filled), only 36% (pilot site 1) and 38% (pilot site 2) of E2B data elements remain to be filled manually. In addition, most of these data elements shall not be filled in each report. SALUS platform's interoperability solutions enable partial automation of the AE reporting process, which could contribute to improve current spontaneous reporting practices and reduce under-reporting, which is currently one major obstacle in the process of acquisition of pharmacovigilance data.

  13. Treatments that generate higher number of adverse drug reactions and their symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Fernández-López

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs are an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and generate high health costs. Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine the treatments which produce more ADRs in general population and the main symptoms they generate. Methods: An observational, cross-sectional study consisting in performing a self-rated questionnaire was carried out. 510 patients were asked about the treatments, illnesses and ADRs, they had suffered from. Results: 26.7% of patients had suffered from some ADR. Classifying patients according to the type of prescribed treatment and studying the number of ADR that they had, we obtained significant differences (p ≤ 0.05 for treatments against arthrosis, anemia and nervous disorders (anxiety, depression, insomnia. Moreover, determining absolute frequencies of these ADRs appearance in each treatment, higher frequencies were again for drugs against arthrosis (22.6% of patients treated for arthrosis suffered some ADR, anemia (14.28%, nerve disorders (13.44% and also asthma (16%. Regarding the symptoms produced by ADRs, the most frequent were gastrointestinal (60% of patients who suffered an ADR, had gastrointestinal symptoms and nervous alterations (dizziness, headache, sleep disturbances etc (24.6%. Conclusion: Therapeutic groups which produce more commonly ADRs are those for arthrosis, anemia, nervous disorders and asthma. In addition, symptoms which are generated more frequently are gastrointestinal and nervous problems. This is in accordance with the usual side effects of mentioned treatments. Health professionals should be informed about it, so that they would be more alert about a possible emergence of an ADR in these treatments. They also could provide enough information to empower patients and thus, they probably could detect ADR events. This would facilitate ADR detection and would avoid serious consequences generated to both patients' health and health economics.

  14. Incidence and cost estimate of treating pediatric adverse drug reactions in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazeem Adeola Oshikoya

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs may cause prolonged hospital admissions with high treatment costs. The burden of ADRs in children has never been evaluated in Nigeria. The incidence of pediatric ADRs and the estimated cost of treatment over an 18-month period were determined in this study. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective observational study on children admitted to the pediatric wards of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH in Nigeria, between July 2006 and December 2007. METHODS: Each patient was assessed for ADRs throughout admission. Medical and non-medical costs to the hospital and patient were estimated for each ADR by reviewing the medical and pharmacy bills, medical charts and diagnostic request forms and by interviewing the parents. Cost estimates were performed in 2007 naira (Nigeria currency from the perspectives of the hospital (government, service users (patients and society (bearers of the total costs attributable to treating ADRs. The total estimated cost was expressed in 2007 United States dollars (USD. RESULTS: Two thousand and four children were admitted during the study; 12 (0.6% were admitted because of ADRs and 23 (1.2% developed ADR(s during admission. Forty ADRs were suspected in these 35 patients and involved 53 medicines. Antibiotics (50% were the most suspected medicines. Approximately 1.83 million naira (USD 15,466.60 was expended to manage all the patients admitted due to ADRs. CONCLUSIONS: Treating pediatric ADRs was very expensive. Pediatric drug use policies in Nigeria need to be reviewed so as to discourage self-medication, polypharmacy prescription and sales of prescription medicines without prescription.

  15. Factors Associated with the Reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions by Health Workers in Nnewi Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeuko, Amaka Y.; Ebenebe, Uzo E.; Nnebue, Chinomnso C; Ugoji, John O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Under-reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) by the prescribers is a common public health problem. Monitoring of factors that influence ADR reporting will reduce risks associated with drug use; improve patients care, safety and treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with the reporting of ADRs by health workers in Nnewi Nigeria. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 372 health workers in different health facilities in Nnewi North Local Government Area of Anambra state, selected using multistage sampling technique was done. Data collection employed pretested, self-administered structured questionnaires. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 17. Tests of statistical significance were carried out using Chi-square tests for proportions. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Out of the 372 respondents studied, 255 (68.5%) were females, and 117 (31.5%) were males. The modal age range (37.6%) was 31–40 years. Factors related by the respondents to influence ADR reporting include: Unavailability of electronic reporting (83.6%), unavailability of reporting forms (66.4%) and ignorance (58.2%). The difference among medical practitioners who related unavailability of electronic reporting process as obstacle to ADR reporting was not significant (P = 0.18). Conclusions: The study results revealed the factors associated with the reporting of ADRs among health workers in Nnewi Nigeria. It is desirable to initiate electronic reporting process, training programs on ADR reporting and make reporting forms/guidelines available to relevant health workers. PMID:25949775

  16. Public awareness and perception toward Adverse Drug Reactions reporting in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Ibrahim; Aljadhey, Hisham; Albogami, Yasser; Mahmoud, Mansour A

    2017-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the general public awareness and perception about Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) reporting and pharmacovigilance. Method: A cross-sectional study conducted on June 2012 during awareness campaign held in two malls in Riyadh city for two days. A self-administered questionnaire consisting of three parts was distributed to the attendees who accepted to participate in the study. Results: A total of 204 questionnaires were collected with a response rate of 68%. Twenty-three percent could correctly define ADRs. Only 13(15.7%) of responders were familiar with the term "Pharmacovigilance" and only 78.6% were aware about the Saudi Pharmacovigilance Center. Sixty-seventy percent indicated that their physicians or pharmacists don't actively encourage them to report ADRs that may occur when they take their medications. The majority of responders (73.2%) believed that the medical team, rather than consumers, should report ADRs. When asked why patients do not report ADRs, 19.1(48.5%) believed that patients do not know whether the ADR is from the medication or not, 18.1(46.1%) stated that the reason was because patients don't know about the Pharmacovigilance Center, 16(40.7%) think that patients don't know about the importance of ADRs reporting, and 14(36.3%) responded that patients probably don't know how to report ADRs. Conclusion: The general public in Saudi Arabia are not aware about ADRs reporting and the pharmacovigilance system. The Saudi Food and Drug Authorities (FDA) need to put more efforts to increasing public awareness about the importance of ADRs reporting process and the importance of pharmacovigilance system in promoting patient safety.

  17. Prevention of Renal Complications Induced by Non- Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ković, Sonja Vuč; Vujović, Katarina Savić; Srebro, Dragana; Medić, Branislava; Ilic-Mostic, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed for the treatment of pain, inflamation and fever. They are usually well tolerated in healthy persons, but in patients with risk factors (advanced age, renal impairment, heart failure, liver disease, concurrent medications with antihypertensive drugs), NSAIDs can induce serious renal adverse effects. They include sodium and water retention with edema, worsening of heart failure, hypertension, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, renal papillary necrosis and acute interstitial nephritis. The majority of these adverse effects are due to the inhibition of prostaglandins synthesis and they are dose and duration-dependent. Acute forms of kidney injuries are transient and often reversible upon drug withdrawal. Chronic use of NSAIDs in some patients may result in chronic kidney disease. It is recommended that patients at risk should have preventative strategies in place, including the use of the "lowest effective dose" of NSAID for the "shortest possible time" and monitoring renal function, fluid retention and electrolyte abnormalities. Patients who are taking antihypertensive medications should be monitored for high blood pressure and the doses of antihypertensive medications should be adjusted if needed. In general, the combination of NSAIDs and angiotensin inhibitors should be avoided. Some other preventive measures are dietary salt restriction, use of topical NSAIDs/non-pharmacological therapies and use of calcium channel blockers for treating hypertension.

  18. Time-to-Onset Analysis of Drug-Induced Long QT Syndrome Based on a Spontaneous Reporting System for Adverse Drug Events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayaka Sasaoka

    Full Text Available Long QT syndrome (LQTS is a disorder of the heart's electrical activity that infrequently causes severe ventricular arrhythmias such as a type of ventricular tachycardia called torsade de pointes (TdP and ventricular fibrillation, which can be fatal. There have been no previous reports on the time-to-onset for LQTS based on data from spontaneous reporting systems. The aim of this study was to assess the time-to-onset of LQTS according to drug treatment. We analyzed the association between 113 drugs in 37 therapeutic categories and LQTS including TdP using data obtained from the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report database. For signal detection, we used the reporting odds ratio (ROR. Furthermore, we analyzed the time-to-onset data and assessed the hazard type using the Weibull shape parameter. The RORs (95% confidence interval for bepridil, amiodarone, pilsicainide, nilotinib, disopyramide, arsenic trioxide, clarithromycin, cibenzoline, donepezil, famotidine, sulpiride, and nifekalant were 174.4 (148.6-204.6, 17.3 (14.7-20.4, 52.0 (43.4-62.4, 13.9 (11.5-16.7, 69.3 (55.3-86.8, 54.2 (43.2-68.0, 4.7 (3.8-5.8, 19.9 (15.9-25.0, 8.1 (6.5-10.1, 3.2 (2.5-4.1, 7.1 (5.5-9.2, and 254.8 (168.5-385.4, respectively. The medians and quartiles of time-to-onset for aprindine (oral and bepridil were 20.0 (11.0-35.8 and 18.0 (6.0-43.0 days, respectively. The lower 95% confidence interval of the shape parameter β of bepridil was over 1 and the hazard was considered to increase over time.Our study indicated that the pattern of LQTS onset might differ among drugs. Based on these results, careful long-term observation is recommended, especially for specific drugs such as bepridil and aprindine. This information may be useful for the prevention of sudden death following LQTS and for efficient therapeutic planning.

  19. Incidence of adverse drug reactions in human immune deficiency virus-positive patients using highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Akshaya Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs in Human immune deficiency virus (HIV patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. To identify the risk factors associated with ADRs in HIV patients. To analyze reported ADRs based on various parameters like causality, severity, predictability, and preventability. Retrospective case-control study. An 18-month retrospective case-control study of 208 patients newly registered in ART center, RIMS hospital, Kadapa, were intensively monitored for ADRs to HAART. Predictability was calculated based on the history of previous exposure to drug. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify the risk factors for ADRs. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test for estimating the correlation between ADRs and different variables. All statistical calculations were performed using EpiInfo version 3.5.3. Monitoring of 208 retrospective patients by active Pharmacovigilance identified 105 ADRs that were identified in 71 patients. Skin rash and anemia were the most commonly observed ADRs. The organ system commonly affected by ADR was skin and appendages (31.57%. The ADRs that were moderate were 90.14% of cases. The incidence of ADRs (53.52% was higher with Zidovudine + Lamivudine + Nevirapine combination. CD4 cell count less than <250 cells/μl were 80.28%, male gender were observed to be the risk factors for ADRs. Our study finding showed that there is a need of active pharmaceutical care with intensive monitoring for ADRs in Indian HIV-positive patients who are illiterate, of male and female gender, with CD4 count ≤250 cells/mm 3 with comorbid conditions.

  20. Healthcare professionals’ awareness and knowledge of adverse drug reactions and pharmacovigilance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almandil, Noor B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To document the knowledge of, attitudes toward, and practices of adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting and pharmacovigilance systems among healthcare professionals. Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using a questionnaire. This study took place at King Fahd Hospital of the University (KFHU), Khobar, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between April 2015 and April 2016. Healthcare professionals, including physicians, pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and nurses, were considered eligible and invited to take part in the study. A link to the online questionnaire was sent to each participant via E-mail, and a hard copy was circulated at the hospital after the objectives of the study were explained. The questionnaire comprised items regarding knowledge/awareness of pharmacovigilance and ADRs, perception/attitude towards pharmacovigilance and ADR reporting, and practices of ADR reporting. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Results A total of 400 questionnaires were distributed to the healthcare professionals and 331 participants responded, providing a response rate of 82.75%. The healthcare professionals comprised 161 physicians, 39 pharmacists, 21 pharmacist technicians, and 110 nurses. Most of the participants were female (n=198) and Saudi (61.9%). Most healthcare professionals (62.5%) were unaware of the term pharmacovigilance; the pharmacists and pharmacist technicians had the highest rate of pharmacovigilance awareness (60.5% of the pharmacists and 40% of pharmacist technicians). Conclusion There is a lack of awareness and knowledge of pharmacovigilance and ADR reporting among healthcare professionals working at KFHU. PMID:27874152

  1. [Do pediatricians identify adverse drug reactions even when they do not report them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Ríos, Olga; Jasso-Gutiérrez, Luis; Garduño-Espinosa, Juan; Olivar-López, Víctor; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre

    Spontaneous notification depends on the ability of pediatricians to identify adverse drug reactions (ADRs) along with their habit of reporting these incidents. During the years 2008 and 2009, the frequency of reports of ADRs to the Electronic Program of Pharmacovigilance (SISFAR) in the Hospital Infantil of Mexico Federico Gomez (HIMFG) was low (0.44% and 0.20%, respectively). Because of the above, the ability of pediatricians from the Emergency Department (ED) to identify ADRs using the clinical chart review was evaluated in 2010 in this study. A descriptive, observational, cross-sectional retrospective study was conducted in the ED from March 1 to August 31. ADRs were classified and quantified as "ADRs identified by pediatricians" when there was evidence in the clinical chart that pediatricians associated a clinical sign, symptom and laboratory value with an ADR. The numbers of notifications reported in SISFAR were quantified. Descriptive analysis was done using SPSS v.18. Considering patients who were admitted to the ED, the frequency of ADRs was 21.8%. The frequency of ADRs identified by physicians in clinical charts was 86%. The pharmacist detected 14% of ADRs. The frequency of ADRs reported by physicians was 6.1%. Although identification of ADRs in the clinical charts by pediatricians was high, it is possible that some ADRs were undetected. Because underreporting was very high, it is necessary to take actions to improve the reporting process. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A.

  2. Factors that influence spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions: a model centralized in the medical professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdeiro, María T; Polonia, Jorge; Gestal-Otero, Juan J; Figueiras, Adolfo

    2004-11-01

    The spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) through the yellow card and made concrete by the knowledge and attitudes of doctors, has been rousing a great deal of bibliographical interest in recent years. However, there does not seem to be any actual revision in the theme on which the theoretical models that explain the process of decision in reporting are proposed. In this work an explanatory model of the factors that condition reporting is proposed and a revision of the literature on the subject has also been carried out. The proposed model is centralized in the medical professional and it considers the habit of reporting as the result of the doctor's formation and his interaction with the environment. The combination of knowledge-attitudes-practices and the theory of the satisfaction of needs seemed very adequate for ADR systematization. The results also indicate that, to improve the participation of health professionals in surveillance systems through spontaneous reporting, it might be necessary to design combined strategies that modify both intrinsic (knowledge, attitudes) and extrinsic (relationship between health professionals and their patients, the national health system and pharmaceutical companies) factors.

  3. [Systematic review of studies assessing the cost of adverse drug reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallano Ferraz, Antonio; Agustí Escasany, Antonia; Pedrós Xolvi, Consuelo; Arnau de Bolós, Josep M

    2012-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important healthcare problem. The objective of this study was to review published articles analyzing the cost of ADRs in any healthcare setting. We conducted a search of articles published on the cost of ADRs in the bibliographic databases from 1970 to 2010. We identified 28 studies and selected 16 that included cases of ADR fitting the World Health Organization's definition of these events. The information on the characteristics of the study design, the types of costs analyzed and the reported results were reviewed. The design features and populations included in the studies were heterogeneous. Only two studies explicitly defined the perspective adopted. Only five studies compared cases of ADR with matched controls without ADRs. All studies analyzed direct healthcare costs, but none analyzed indirect or intangible costs. Fourteen publications analyzed the costs of length of hospital stay. The average (SD) percentage of ADRs was 3.04% (0.2) [median 2.4%, range 0.7% to 26.1%]. The median length of hospital stay in patients with ADRs was 8.8 days (range: 0.15 to 19.2 days). Accounting systems and monetary costs varied widely. Studies on the costs of ADRs are highly heterogeneous and have evaluated direct healthcare costs in hospitals. Their results indicate that ADRs generate substantial costs. More studies using appropriate methodology are needed on the costs of ADRs. Copyright © 2011 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. In vitro assessment of the adverse effects of antiretroviral drugs on the human male gamete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, G; Moinard, N; Jouanolou, V; Daudin, M; Gandia, P; Bujan, L

    2011-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the in vitro effects of didanosine, zidovudine, saquinavir and indinavir, commonly used in highly active antiretroviral therapy, on human sperm fertility parameters. Thirty semen samples from healthy men were collected and prepared by gradient density method. Aliquots of 90% fractions with >80% motile spermatozoa were incubated for 1, 3, and 6h with different concentrations of the antiretroviral drugs (20, 40, and 80 μg/ml). Sperm motility was evaluated by computer assisted sperm analysis system. Sperm mitochondrial potential was evaluated using 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide (DIOC(6)) and the acrosome reaction was examined using pisum sativum agglutinin method. A dose-dependent decrease in sperm motility was observed with saquinavir. Saquinavir also induced a significant time and dose-dependent decrease in mitochondrial potential and an increase in spontaneous acrosome reaction. These findings indicate that, in vitro, higher doses of saquinavir have adverse effects on sperm motility, mitochondrial potential and acrosome reaction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Adverse drug reaction profile of anti-snake venom in a rural tertiary care teaching hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Rushikesh Prabhakar; Motghare, Vijay Motiram; Padwal, Sudhir Laxman; Pore, Rakesh Ramkrishna; Bhamare, Chetanraj Ghanshyam; Deshmukh, Vinod Shivaji; Pise, Harshal Nutan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The study was carried out with the aim of evaluation of the adverse drug reaction profile of anti-snake venom serum (ASV) in a rural tertiary care hospital. Methods An observational study was conducted in SRTR Medical College, Ambajogai, Maharashtra, India. A total number of 296 indoor case papers of snake bite from February to September 2011 and June to August 2012 were retrieved from the record section and the antivenom reactions were assessed. In addition, basic epidemiological data and prescribing practices of ASV were also analyzed. Results Vasculotoxic snake bites were more common (50.61%) than neuroparalytic ones (22.56%). Mild envenomation was the commonest presentation. A total of 92 (56.10%) patients who received ASV suffered from antivenom reactions. The most common nature of reaction was chills, rigors (69.56%) followed by nausea and vomiting (34.8%). 10-15% patients suffered from moderate to severe reactions like hypotension and sudden respiratory arrest. We did not find any dose response relationship of ASV to risk of reactions (odds ratio 0.37). Intradermal sensitivity test was performed in about 72% cases. Conclusion Our study showed a higher incidence of reactions to ASV at our institute. PMID:24396245

  6. The importance of monitoring adverse drug reactions in pediatric patients: the results of a national surveillance program in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnovale, Carla; Brusadelli, Tatiana; Zuccotti, GianVincenzo; Beretta, Silvia; Sullo, Maria Giuseppa; Capuano, Annalisa; Rossi, Francesco; Moschini, Martina; Mugelli, Alessandro; Vannacci, Alfredo; Laterza, Marcella; Clementi, Emilio; Radice, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    To gain information on safety of drugs used in pediatrics through a 4-year post-marketing active pharmacovigilance program. The program sampled the Italian population and was termed 'Monitoring of the Adverse Effects in Pediatric population' (MEAP). Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were collected for individuals aged 0 - 17 years treated in hospitals and territorial health services in Lombardy, Tuscany, Apulia and Campania; located to gain an appropriate sampling of the population. ADRs were evaluated using the Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale (Naranjo) and analyzed with respect to time, age, sex, category of ADR, seriousness, suspected medicines, type of reporter and off-label use. We collected and analyzed reports from 3539 ADRs. Vaccines, antineoplastic and psychotropic drugs were the most frequently pharmacotherapeutic subgroups involved. Seventeen percent of reported ADRs were serious; of them fever, vomiting and angioedema were the most frequently reported. Eight percent of ADRs were associated with off-label use, and 10% were unknown ADRs. Analysis of these revealed possible strategies of therapy optimization. The MEAP project demonstrated that active post-marketing pharmacovigilance programs are a valid strategy to increase awareness on pediatric pharmacology, reduce underreporting and provide information on drug actions in pediatrics. This information enhances drug therapy optimization in the pediatric patients.

  7. EVALUATION OF THE ADVERSE REACTIONS OF ANTIRETROVIRAL DRUG REGIMENS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN KOLKATA: A PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avishek Banerjea

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART has led to a significant decrease in AIDS-related mortality and morbidity. However, adverse reactions to these drugs, being inevitable, have led to major obstacles in its success, especially in developing nations like India. Moreover, the latest changes made by W.H.O. in the treatment guidelines of ART naive patients would expectedly lead to changes in the Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR patterns as well. Hence, this study aimed at evaluating the ADRs of currently prescribed ART regimens in a tertiary care hospital in Kolkata (WB. METHODOLOGY 168 ART naive patients enrolled initially were studied prospectively over a period of 1 year; each patient being followed up individually for 6 months. All patients were asked to visit the ART centre once a month or whenever they developed any symptom. They were screened clinically and investigated suitably by the physician according to the latest NACO guidelines. RESULTS Majority were males (56% with an M:F ratio of 1:0.774; 93.3% patients belonging to the 15-49 yrs. age group. TDF+3TC+EFV (56% was the commonest 1st line regimen prescribed. 76.6% patients experienced ADRs. Total 184 ADRs were noted, of which, GIT contributed the most (27.17%. Majority (66.67% of neurological ADRs was contributed by neuropsychiatric manifestations. Rash (10.3% was the commonest cutaneous ADR. Anaemia (13.6% was the commonest haematological ADR with a statistically significant female preponderance. Most ADRs were grade 1 (63.04%. Majority ADRs were “possible” (65.76% while 34.24% were “probable” by Naranjo scale. Maximal ADRs (48.37% were noted from patients under AZT+3TC+NVP regime. IRIS was observed as a paradoxical reaction to ART in 10% cases. CONCLUSION It should not be forgotten that ADRs are the inevitable consequence of pharmacotherapy. Hence, proper implementation of current protocols designed for screening of patients especially during

  8. Methodological Considerations for Comparison of Brand Versus Generic Versus Authorized Generic Adverse Event Reports in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Motiur; Alatawi, Yasser; Cheng, Ning; Qian, Jingjing; Peissig, Peggy L; Berg, Richard L; Page, David C; Hansen, Richard A

    2017-12-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS), a post-marketing safety database, can be used to differentiate brand versus generic safety signals. To explore the methods for identifying and analyzing brand versus generic adverse event (AE) reports. Public release FAERS data from January 2004 to March 2015 were analyzed using alendronate and carbamazepine as examples. Reports were classified as brand, generic, and authorized generic (AG). Disproportionality analyses compared reporting odds ratios (RORs) of selected known labeled serious adverse events stratifying by brand, generic, and AG. The homogeneity of these RORs was compared using the Breslow-Day test. The AG versus generic was the primary focus since the AG is identical to brand but marketed as a generic, therefore minimizing generic perception bias. Sensitivity analyses explored how methodological approach influenced results. Based on 17,521 US event reports involving alendronate and 3733 US event reports involving carbamazepine (immediate and extended release), no consistently significant differences were observed across RORs for the AGs versus generics. Similar results were obtained when comparing reporting patterns over all time and just after generic entry. The most restrictive approach for classifying AE reports yielded smaller report counts but similar results. Differentiation of FAERS reports as brand versus generic requires careful attention to risk of product misclassification, but the relative stability of findings across varying assumptions supports the utility of these approaches for potential signal detection.

  9. [Adverse Event Trends Associated with Over-the-counter Combination Cold Remedy: Data Mining of the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaoka, Sayaka; Hatahira, Haruna; Hasegawa, Shiori; Motooka, Yumi; Fukuda, Akiho; Naganuma, Misa; Umetsu, Ryogo; Nakao, Satoshi; Shimauchi, Akari; Ueda, Natsumi; Hirade, Kouseki; Iguchi, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2018-01-01

     OTC combination cold remedies are widely used in Japan. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the adverse event profiles of OTC combination cold remedy based on the components using the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER) database. The JADER database contained 430587 reports between April 2004 and November 2016. 1084 adverse events associated with the use of OTC combination cold remedy were reported. Reporting odds ratio (ROR) was used to detect safety signals. The ROR values for "skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders", "hepatobiliary disorders", and "immune system disorders" stratified by system organ class of the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) were 9.82 (8.71-11.06), 2.63 (2.25-3.07), and 3.13 (2.63-3.74), respectively. OTC combination cold remedy containing acetaminophen exhibited a significantly higher reporting ratio for "hepatobiliary disorders" than OTC combination cold remedy without acetaminophen. We demonstrated the potential risk of OTC combination cold remedy in a real-life setting. Our results suggested that the monitoring of individuals using OTC combination cold remedy is important.

  10. Adverse Drug Reaction Identification and Extraction in Social Media: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardon, Jérémy; Abdellaoui, Redhouane; Bellet, Florelle; Asfari, Hadyl; Souvignet, Julien; Texier, Nathalie; Jaulent, Marie-Christine; Beyens, Marie-Noëlle; Burgun, Anita; Bousquet, Cédric

    2015-07-10

    The underreporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) through traditional reporting channels is a limitation in the efficiency of the current pharmacovigilance system. Patients' experiences with drugs that they report on social media represent a new source of data that may have some value in postmarketing safety surveillance. A scoping review was undertaken to explore the breadth of evidence about the use of social media as a new source of knowledge for pharmacovigilance. Daubt et al's recommendations for scoping reviews were followed. The research questions were as follows: How can social media be used as a data source for postmarketing drug surveillance? What are the available methods for extracting data? What are the different ways to use these data? We queried PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar to extract relevant articles that were published before June 2014 and with no lower date limit. Two pairs of reviewers independently screened the selected studies and proposed two themes of review: manual ADR identification (theme 1) and automated ADR extraction from social media (theme 2). Descriptive characteristics were collected from the publications to create a database for themes 1 and 2. Of the 1032 citations from PubMed and Embase, 11 were relevant to the research question. An additional 13 citations were added after further research on the Internet and in reference lists. Themes 1 and 2 explored 11 and 13 articles, respectively. Ways of approaching the use of social media as a pharmacovigilance data source were identified. This scoping review noted multiple methods for identifying target data, extracting them, and evaluating the quality of medical information from social media. It also showed some remaining gaps in the field. Studies related to the identification theme usually failed to accurately assess the completeness, quality, and reliability of the data that were analyzed from social media. Regarding extraction, no study proposed a generic approach to easily

  11. Impact of drug cost sharing on service use and adverse clinical outcomes in elderly receiving antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Philip S; Patrick, Amanda R; Dormuth, Colin; Maclure, Malcolm; Avorn, Jerry; Canning, Claire F; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2010-03-01

    physicians or psychiatrists for depression, hospitalizations with a depression diagnosis, or long-term care admissions. The cost-sharing policies studied may have contained non-essential antidepressant use without substantially increasing mental health service utilization. However, it is possible that the policies had effects that we were unable to detect, such as increasing rates of visits to social workers or psychologists or forcing patients to reduce other spending. Further, the sequential implementation of the policy changes, makes it difficult to estimate the effect of a direct change from full coverage to a coinsurance/income-based deductible policy. It may be possible to design policies to contain non-essential antidepressant use without substantially increasing other service utilization or adverse events. However, because undertreatment remains a serious problem among depressed elderly, well-designed prescription drug policies should be coupled with interventions to address under-treatment.

  12. Adverse cutaneous drug reactions: Clinical pattern and causative agents in a tertiary care center in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pudukadan David

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDRs are caused by a wide variety of agents. Aims: Our objective was to ascertain the clinical spectrum of ACDRs and the causative drugs in this part of India and to find any risk factors. Methods: Ninety patients with adverse cutaneous drug reactions were recruited for this study during 2001-2003. Hematological and biochemical investigations were done in all of them. The VDRL and HIV (ELISA tests were performed where the underlying risk factors were present. Patch testing, intradermal testing and oral provocation tests were done wherever feasible. Results: The mean age of the patients with cutaneous drug eruptions was 37.06 years. Most of them (52.2% were in the age group of 20-39 years. The male to female ratio was 0.87: 1. The most common eruptions observed were fixed drug eruption (31.1% and maculopapular rash (12.2%, and the most common causes were co-trimoxazole (22.2% and dapsone (17.7%. Conclusion: The pattern of ACDRs and the drugs causing them is remarkably different in our population. Knowledge of these drug eruptions, the causative drugs and the prognostic indicators is essential for the clinician.

  13. Empirical estimation of under-reporting in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatawi, Yasser M; Hansen, Richard A

    2017-07-01

    To examine how closely reporting rates in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) reflect expected rates of known adverse drug events (ADEs). We selected three groups of drugs to reflect hypothesized variation in sensitivity to reporting, including statins, biologics, and narrow therapeutics index drugs (NTI). The numbers of ADEs in FAERS were divided by utilization estimates from ambulatory health care data (NAMCS/NHAMCS) to calculate a reported proportion. One sample z-test for proportions compared the proportion of ADEs reported to an expected ADE proportion derived from drug labels, reference databases, and peer-reviewed papers. The majority of drug-ADE pairs showed significant under-reporting. For example, roughly 0.01% to 44% of statin events were reported (z-test p 100%) and NTI (20% to >100%) drugs had relatively higher reporting rates. Roughly 20% to 33% of the minimum number of expected serious events were reported with biologics and NTI drugs. This study supports previous evidence of under-reporting of ADEs in spontaneous reporting data. But, under-reporting varies considerably by the type of drug and the type of ADEs, and this variability in under-reporting should be considered when interpreting safety signals.

  14. AOP: An R Package For Sufficient Causal Analysis in Pathway-based Screening of Drugs and Chemicals for Adversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary: How can I quickly find the key events in a pathway that I need to monitor to predict that a/an beneficial/adverse event/outcome will occur? This is a key question when using signaling pathways for drug/chemical screening in pharma-cology, toxicology and risk assessment. ...

  15. Potentially inappropriate medications defined by STOPP criteria and the risk of adverse drug events in older hospitalized patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hamilton, Hilary

    2011-06-13

    Previous studies have not demonstrated a consistent association between potentially inappropriate medicines (PIMs) in older patients as defined by Beers criteria and avoidable adverse drug events (ADEs). This study aimed to assess whether PIMs defined by new STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Persons\\' potentially inappropriate Prescriptions) criteria are significantly associated with ADEs in older people with acute illness.

  16. On the assessment of adverse drug reactions from spontaneous reporting systems: The influence of under-reporting on odds ratios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, P.G.M. van der; Puijenbroek, E.P. van; Buuren, S. van; Hofstede, J.W. van der

    2002-01-01

    A well-known problem in spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) for adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is under-reporting, that is, the problem that not all occurrences of ADRs are reported to the SRS. We look at the question of how to draw statistical conclusions from analyses of SRS data using reporting

  17. Antiplatelet drug selection in PCI to vein grafts in patients with acute coronary syndrome and adverse clinical outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sirker, Alex; Kwok, Chun Shing; Kontopantelis, Evangelos

    2018-01-01

    with the use of potent P2Y12 blocking drugs, Prasugrel and Ticagrelor, in SVG PCI are unknown. METHODS: Patients included in the study underwent SVG PCI in the United Kingdom between 2007 and 2014 for acute coronary syndrome and were grouped by P2Y12 antiplatelet use. In-hospital major adverse cardiac events...

  18. [Active surveillance of adverse drug reaction in the era of big data: challenge and opportunity for control selection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S F; Zhan, S Y

    2016-07-01

    Electronic healthcare databases have become an important source for active surveillance of drug safety in the era of big data. The traditional epidemiology research designs are needed to confirm the association between drug use and adverse events based on these datasets, and the selection of the comparative control is essential to each design. This article aims to explain the principle and application of each type of control selection, introduce the methods and parameters for method comparison, and describe the latest achievements in the batch processing of control selection, which would provide important methodological reference for the use of electronic healthcare databases to conduct post-marketing drug safety surveillance in China.

  19. REBAMIPIDE: EFFECTIVE DRUG PREVENTION OF NSAID ENTEROPATHY IS POSSIBLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Moroz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of gastrointestinal tract (GIT complications is the most important element for the rational use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin (LDA. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs have long been the only medication to prevent these complications. However, PPIs are only effective in preventing and treating upper GIT diseases (NSAID gastropathy rather than small intestinal injury (NSAID enteropathy. Rebamipide has emerged as a novel agent to protect the gastrointestinal mucosa today. The effect of the drug differs from that of PPIs: it is a typical gastroand enteroprotector that enhances the synthesis of endogenous prostaglandins and possesses a significant anti-inflammatory potential. Rebamipide has long been widely used by doctors inJapan,South Korea, andChinaas an effective and safe agent for the treatment of many diseases of the digestive system. There is a strong evidence base for the efficacy of rebamipide in preventing and treating NSAID gastropathy and NSAID enteropathy (including LDA-induced injuries. Controlled studies have found that the drug is not inferior to the classic gastroprotective agent misoprostol, significantly outperforming the latter in its tolerability. This review describes the mechanism of action of rebamipide and main clinical trials of its therapeutic effect in NSAID gastropathy and NSAID enteropathy. 

  20. 25 CFR 170.110 - How can State and local governments prevent discrimination or adverse impacts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and adverse effects on tribes and Native American populations. (b) Examples of adverse effects include..., trust resources, tribal businesses, religious, and cultural sites; (4) Harming indigenous plants and animals; and (5) Impairing the ability of tribal members to engage in commercial, cultural, and religious...

  1. Adverse effects produced by different drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease: A mixed treatment comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-Dong; Bi, Zhen-Yun; Liu, Jing-Feng; Si, Wei-Jun; Shi, Qian-Qian; Xue, Li-Peng; Bai, Jing

    2017-10-01

    This mixed treatment comparison is used to compare the adverse effects of eleven different drugs used to treat Parkinson's disease (PD). The drugs that we compare include the following: ropinirole, rasagiline, rotigotine, entacapone, apomorphine, pramipexole, sumanirole, bromocriptine, piribedil, pergolide, and levodopa. PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library were searched from the inception to December 2015. Our analysis combines the evidences of direct comparison and indirect comparison between various literatures. We evaluated the merging odds ratios (OR) value and surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) of each of the drugs and used this as a mode of comparison. Twenty-four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in this study. Our results demonstrated that the incidence of adverse reactions of ropinirole, rotigotine, entacapone, and sumanirole were obviously higher in terms of nausea compared to the placebo. Ropinirole produced the highest incidence rates of dyskinesia side effects, whereas pramipexole was significantly higher in terms of patients' hallucination. In addition, the SUCRA values of all the drugs showed that the incidence of adverse reaction of pergolide was relatively high (nausea: 83.5%; hallucination: 79.8%); for dyskinesia and somnolence, the incidence of ropinirole was higher (dyskinesia: 80.5%; somnolence: 69.4%); the incidence of adverse reaction of piribedil was higher on PD in terms of dizziness (67.0%); and the incidence of bromocriptine was relatively high in terms of constipation (62.3%). This mixed treatment comparison showed that the drugs ropinirole, bromocriptine, and piribedil produced the highest incidence rates of nausea, dyskinesia, hallucination, dizziness, constipation, and somnolence symptoms. Thus, we conclude that as these three drugs produced the most frequent symptoms, they are not recommended for the treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Healthcare professionals' awareness and knowledge of adverse drug reactions and pharmacovigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almandil, Noor B

    2016-12-01

    To document the knowledge of, attitudes toward, and practices of adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting and pharmacovigilance systems among healthcare professionals. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using a questionnaire. This study took place at King Fahd Hospital of the University (KFHU), Khobar, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia,  between  April 2015 and  April 2016. Healthcare professionals, including physicians, pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and nurses, were considered eligible and invited to take part in the study. A link to the online questionnaire was sent to each participant via E-mail, and a hard copy was circulated at the hospital after the objectives of the study were explained. The questionnaire comprised items regarding knowledge/awareness of pharmacovigilance and ADRs, perception/attitude towards pharmacovigilance and ADR reporting, and practices of ADR reporting. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Results: A total of 400 questionnaires were distributed to the healthcare professionals and 331 participants responded, providing a response rate of 82.75%. The healthcare professionals comprised 161 physicians, 39 pharmacists, 21 pharmacist technicians, and 110 nurses. Most of the participants were female (n=198) and Saudi (61.9%). Most healthcare professionals (62.5%) were unaware of the term pharmacovigilance; the pharmacists and pharmacist technicians had the highest rate of pharmacovigilance awareness (60.5% of the pharmacists and 40% of pharmacist technicians). Conclusion: There is a lack of awareness and knowledge of pharmacovigilance and ADR reporting among healthcare professionals working at KFHU.

  3. Adverse Drug Event Discovery Using Biomedical Literature: A Big Data Neural Network Adventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    P Tafti, Ahmad; Badger, Jonathan; LaRose, Eric; Shirzadi, Ehsan; Mahnke, Andrea; Mayer, John; Ye, Zhan; Page, David; Peissig, Peggy

    2017-12-08

    The study of adverse drug events (ADEs) is a tenured topic in medical literature. In recent years, increasing numbers of scientific articles and health-related social media posts have been generated and shared daily, albeit with very limited use for ADE study and with little known about the content with respect to ADEs. The aim of this study was to develop a big data analytics strategy that mines the content of scientific articles and health-related Web-based social media to detect and identify ADEs. We analyzed the following two data sources: (1) biomedical articles and (2) health-related social media blog posts. We developed an intelligent and scalable text mining solution on big data infrastructures composed of Apache Spark, natural language processing, and machine learning. This was combined with an Elasticsearch No-SQL distributed database to explore and visualize ADEs. The accuracy, precision, recall, and area under receiver operating characteristic of the system were 92.7%, 93.6%, 93.0%, and 0.905, respectively, and showed better results in comparison with traditional approaches in the literature. This work not only detected and classified ADE sentences from big data biomedical literature but also scientifically visualized ADE interactions. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first to investigate a big data machine learning strategy for ADE discovery on massive datasets downloaded from PubMed Central and social media. This contribution illustrates possible capacities in big data biomedical text analysis using advanced computational methods with real-time update from new data published on a daily basis. ©Ahmad P Tafti, Jonathan Badger, Eric LaRose, Ehsan Shirzadi, Andrea Mahnke, John Mayer, Zhan Ye, David Page, Peggy Peissig. Originally published in JMIR Medical Informatics (http://medinform.jmir.org), 08.12.2017.

  4. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Adverse Drug Reactions Reporting Among Healthcare Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddeshwara M.G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:  This study was conducted to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practice of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADR reporting among Healthcare Professionals.Methods: A cross-sectional study was done by survey using questionnaire. Questionnaire was distributed to 260 healthcare professionals working at M.R. Medical College and S Nijalingappa Institute of Dental Sciences, Kalaburagi, India.Results: Out 260 people 221 provided the response, giving a response rate of 85%. Among respondents 69.68% were Doctors, 23.53% were Nurses and 6.78% were Pharmacists. 71% of the healthcare professionals knew what are ADRs, 62.4% knew what is pharmacovigilance, 35.7% were aware of Pharmacovigilance Programme of India (PvPI and 21.7% knew nearest pharmacovigilance center. 50.2% had seen patients experiencing ADR out of which only 8.1% of them have reported ADR to the concerned unit. 72.4% feel that all the cases of ADR should be reported irrespective of seriousness. Concern that report may be wrong and fear of legal liability were the main factors discouraging them for reporting ADR. Local coordination, Financial Support, ADR reporting awareness programmes were the major expectations from respondents.Conclusion: Healthcare professionals working at HKE Society’s M.R. Medical College and S Nijalingappa Institute of Dental Sciences have positive attitudes towards ADR reporting. However knowledge regarding ADR reporting among Doctors is superior to that of Nurses and Pharmacists, awareness programmes can overcome this problem. But the practice of ADR reporting is poor among all Healthcare professionals.

  5. Deep learning for pharmacovigilance: recurrent neural network architectures for labeling adverse drug reactions in Twitter posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocos, Anne; Fiks, Alexander G; Masino, Aaron J

    2017-07-01

    Social media is an important pharmacovigilance data source for adverse drug reaction (ADR) identification. Human review of social media data is infeasible due to data quantity, thus natural language processing techniques are necessary. Social media includes informal vocabulary and irregular grammar, which challenge natural language processing methods. Our objective is to develop a scalable, deep-learning approach that exceeds state-of-the-art ADR detection performance in social media. We developed a recurrent neural network (RNN) model that labels words in an input sequence with ADR membership tags. The only input features are word-embedding vectors, which can be formed through task-independent pretraining or during ADR detection training. Our best-performing RNN model used pretrained word embeddings created from a large, non-domain-specific Twitter dataset. It achieved an approximate match F-measure of 0.755 for ADR identification on the dataset, compared to 0.631 for a baseline lexicon system and 0.65 for the state-of-the-art conditional random field model. Feature analysis indicated that semantic information in pretrained word embeddings boosted sensitivity and, combined with contextual awareness captured in the RNN, precision. Our model required no task-specific feature engineering, suggesting generalizability to additional sequence-labeling tasks. Learning curve analysis showed that our model reached optimal performance with fewer training examples than the other models. ADR detection performance in social media is significantly improved by using a contextually aware model and word embeddings formed from large, unlabeled datasets. The approach reduces manual data-labeling requirements and is scalable to large social media datasets. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Adverse Drug Reactions Associated with Ceftaroline Use: A 2-Center Retrospective Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G; Kuhlen, James L; Weil, Ana A; Varughese, Christy A; Kubiak, David W; Banerji, Aleena; Shenoy, Erica S

    2016-01-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil is a cephalosporin approved for treating skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), including those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We aimed to study ceftaroline use and associated adverse drug reactions (ADRs), including hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), among inpatients. We performed a retrospective electronic health record review of inpatients from Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital who received ceftaroline between May 2012 and February 2015. ADRs diagnosed by clinical providers during the course of clinical care were subsequently verified and classified. Risk factors for ADRs were identified. Among 96 patients (median age, 57 years; 54% females) who received a median of 28 (interquartile range, 6-63) ceftaroline doses, 54% were being treated for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and treatment indications other than SSTI and CAP comprised 59% of care. There were 31 ADRs observed in 20 (21%) patients; hematologic (n = 15) and cutaneous (n = 9) findings were most common. Observed HSRs included rash with mucosal lesions (n = 1), rash with skin desquamation (n = 1), and possible organ-specific HSRs (n = 2). Patients who suffered an ADR received more doses of ceftaroline (median, 46 vs 21; P = .013). There was no increased risk of ceftaroline ADR among patients with reported beta-lactam allergy history (P > .5). Ceftaroline is used to treat a range of infections beyond SSTI and CAP. We observed a high rate of ADRs from ceftaroline, including signs of severe HSRs. More data are needed to understand the frequency and predictors of ceftaroline ADRs and HSRs. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Adverse drug reactions associated with ceftaroline use: A two-center retrospective cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G.; Kuhlen, James L.; Weil, Ana A.; Varughese, Christy A.; Kubiak, David W.; Banerji, Aleena; Shenoy, Erica S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ceftaroline fosamil is a cephalosporin approved for treating skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), including those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and community acquired pneumonia (CAP). Objective We aimed to study ceftaroline use and associated adverse drug reactions (ADRs), including hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), among inpatients. Methods We performed a retrospective electronic health record review of inpatients from Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital who received ceftaroline between May 2012 and February 2015. ADRs diagnosed by clinical providers during the course of clinical care were subsequently verified and classified. Risk factors for ADRs were identified. Results Among 96 patients (median age 57 years, 54% female) who received a median of 28 [IQR 6, 63] ceftaroline doses, 54% were being treated for MRSA and treatment indications other than SSTI and CAP comprised 59% of care. There were 31 ADRs observed in 20 (21%) of patients; hematologic (n=15) and cutaneous (n=9) findings were most common. Observed HSRs included rash with mucosal lesions (n=1), rash with skin desquamation (n=1) and possible organ specific HSRs (n=2). Patients who suffered an ADR received more doses of ceftaroline (median 46 vs. 21, p=0.013). There was no increased risk of ceftaroline ADR among patients with prior reported beta-lactam allergy (p >0.5). Conclusions Ceftaroline is used to treat a range of infections beyond SSTI and CAP. We observed a high rate of ADRs from ceftaroline, including signs of severe HSRs. More data are needed to understand the frequency and predictors of ceftaroline ADRs and HSRs. PMID:27130709

  8. The attitudes of pharmacists and physicians in Bosnia and Herzegovina towards adverse drug reaction reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Catic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs are threat to the patient’s safety and the quality of life, and they increase the cost of health care. Spontaneous ADR reporting system mainly relies on physicians, but also pharmacists, nurses, and even patients. The aim of this study was to explore attitudes, barriers, and possible improvements to ADR reporting practices in Bosnia and Herzegovina.Methods: A self-reported questionnaire was developed to collect data on the perception of pharmacovigilance practice and ADR reporting. The survey was conducted in the period between September, 2014 and October, 2014.Results: The response rate was 73% (44 of 60 and 93% (148 of 160 among the pharmacist and family medicine physician groups, respectively. Regarding the attitudes to pharmacovigilance practice and reporting, both the pharmacists and physicians found the practices important. The majority of pharmacists and physicians in year 2014 did not report any ADR, while 18% of the pharmacists and 12% of the physicians, who participated in this study, reported one ADR. Reporting procedure, uncertainty, and their exposure were the main barriers to reporting ADRs for the pharmacists. The physicians claimed lack of knowledge to whom to report an ADR as the main barrier. A significant number of the respondents thought that additional education in ADR reporting would have a positive impact, and would increase the ADR reporting rate.Conclusions: Despite the overall positive attitude towards ADR reporting, the reporting rate in Bosnia and Herzegovina is still low. Different barriers to the ADR reporting have been identified, and there is also the need for improvements in the traditional education in this field.

  9. Herbal medicine use and linked suspected adverse drug reactions in a prospective cohort of Ugandan inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiguba, Ronald; Ononge, Sam; Karamagi, Charles; Bird, Sheila M

    2016-05-26

    Clinical history-taking can be employed as a standardized approach to elucidate the use of herbal medicines and their linked suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) among hospitalized patients. We sought to identify herbal medicines nominated by Ugandan inpatients; compare nomination rates by ward and gender; confirm the herbs' known pharmacological properties from published literature; and identify ADRs linked to pre-admission use of herbal medicines. Prospective cohort of consented adult inpatients designed to assess medication use and ADRs on one gynaecological and three medical wards of 1790-bed Mulago National Referral Hospital. Baseline and follow-up data were obtained on patients' characteristics, including pre-admission use of herbal medicines. Fourteen percent (26/191) of females in Gynaecology nominated at least one specific herbal medicine compared with 20 % (114/571) of inpatients on medical wards [20 % (69/343) of females; 20 % (45/228) of males]. Frequent nominations were Persea americana (30), Mumbwa/multiple-herb clay rods (23), Aloe barbadensis (22), Beta vulgaris (12), Vernonia amygdalina (11), Commelina africana (7), Bidens pilosa (7), Hoslundia opposita (6), Mangifera indica (4), and Dicliptera laxata (4). Four inpatients experienced 10 suspected ADRs linked to pre-admission herbal medicine use including Commelina africana (4), multiple-herb-mumbwa (1), or unspecified local-herbs (5): three ADR-cases were abortion-related and one kidney-related. The named herbal medicines and their nomination rates generally differed by specialized ward, probably guided by local folklore knowledge of their use. Clinical elicitation from inpatients can generate valuable safety data on herbal medicine use. However, larger routine studies might increase the utility of our method to assess herbal medicine use and detect herb-linked ADRs. Future studies should take testable samples of ADR-implicated herbal medicines for further analysis.

  10. Meaningful use of health information technology and declines in in-hospital adverse drug events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Michael F; Spector, William D; Rhona Limcangco, M; Encinosa, William E

    2017-07-01

    Nationwide initiatives have promoted greater adoption of health information technology as a means to reduce adverse drug events (ADEs). Hospital adoption of electronic health records with Meaningful Use (MU) capabilities expected to improve medication safety has grown rapidly. However, evidence that MU capabilities are associated with declines in in-hospital ADEs is lacking. Data came from the 2010-2013 Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System and the 2008-2013 Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) Analytics Database. Two-level random intercept logistic regression was used to estimate the association of MU capabilities and occurrence of ADEs, adjusting for patient characteristics, hospital characteristics, and year of observation. Rates of in-hospital ADEs declined by 19% from 2010 to 2013. Adoption of MU capabilities was associated with 11% lower odds of an ADE (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-0.96). Interoperability capability was associated with 19% lower odds of an ADE (95% CI, 0.67- 0.98). Adoption of MU capabilities explained 22% of the observed reduction in ADEs, or 67,000 fewer ADEs averted by MU. Concurrent with the rapid uptake of MU and interoperability, occurrence of in-hospital ADEs declined significantly from 2010 to 2013. MU capabilities and interoperability were associated with lower occurrence of ADEs, but the effects did not vary by experience with MU. About one-fifth of the decline in ADEs from 2010 to 2013 was attributable to MU capabilities. Findings support the contention that adoption of MU capabilities and interoperability spurred by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act contributed in part to the recent decline in ADEs. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  11. Interventions to combat or prevent drug counterfeiting: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jardali, Fadi; Akl, Elie A; Fadlallah, Racha; Oliver, Sandy; Saleh, Nadine; El-Bawab, Lamya; Rizk, Rana; Farha, Aida; Hamra, Rasha

    2015-03-18

    Drug counterfeiting has serious public health and safety implications. The objective of this study was to systematically review the evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to combat or prevent drug counterfeiting. We searched multiple electronic databases and the grey literature up to March 2014. Two reviewers completed, in duplicate and independently, the study selection, data abstraction and risk of bias assessment. We included randomised trials, non-randomised studies, and case studies examining any intervention at the health system-level to combat or prevent drug counterfeiting. Outcomes of interest included changes in failure rates of tested drugs and changes in prevalence of counterfeit medicines. We excluded studies that focused exclusively on substandard, degraded or expired drugs, or that focused on medication errors. We assessed the risk of bias in each included study. We reported the results narratively and, where applicable, we conducted meta-analyses. We included 21 studies representing 25 units of analysis. Overall, we found low quality evidence suggesting positive effects of drug registration (OR=0.23; 95% CI 0.08 to 0.67), and WHO-prequalification of drugs (OR=0.06; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.35) in reducing the prevalence of counterfeit and substandard drugs. Low quality evidence suggests that licensing of drug outlets is probably ineffective (OR=0.66; 95% CI 0.41 to 1.05). For multifaceted interventions (including a mix of regulations, training of inspectors, public-private collaborations and legal actions), low quality evidence suggest they may be effective. The single RCT provided moderate quality evidence of no effect of 'two extra inspections' in improving drug quality. Policymakers and stakeholders would benefit from registration and WHO-prequalification of drugs and may also consider multifaceted interventions. Future effectiveness studies should address the methodological limitations of the available evidence. PROSPERO CRD42014009269

  12. A prospective three-step intervention study to prevent medication errors in drug handling in paediatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Dorothee; Bertsche, Astrid; Meyrath, David; Koepf, Ellen D; Traiser, Carolin; Seebald, Katja; Schmitt, Claus P; Hoffmann, Georg F; Haefeli, Walter E; Bertsche, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    To prevent medication errors in drug handling in a paediatric ward. One in five preventable adverse drug events in hospitalised children is caused by medication errors. Errors in drug prescription have been studied frequently, but data regarding drug handling, including drug preparation and administration, are scarce. A three-step intervention study including monitoring procedure was used to detect and prevent medication errors in drug handling. After approval by the ethics committee, pharmacists monitored drug handling by nurses on an 18-bed paediatric ward in a university hospital prior to and following each intervention step. They also conducted a questionnaire survey aimed at identifying knowledge deficits. Each intervention step targeted different causes of errors. The handout mainly addressed knowledge deficits, the training course addressed errors caused by rule violations and slips, and the reference book addressed knowledge-, memory- and rule-based errors. The number of patients who were subjected to at least one medication error in drug handling decreased from 38/43 (88%) to 25/51 (49%) following the third intervention, and the overall frequency of errors decreased from 527 errors in 581 processes (91%) to 116/441 (26%). The issue of the handout reduced medication errors caused by knowledge deficits regarding, for instance, the correct 'volume of solvent for IV drugs' from 49-25%. Paediatric drug handling is prone to errors. A three-step intervention effectively decreased the high frequency of medication errors by addressing the diversity of their causes. Worldwide, nurses are in charge of drug handling, which constitutes an error-prone but often-neglected step in drug therapy. Detection and prevention of errors in daily routine is necessary for a safe and effective drug therapy. Our three-step intervention reduced errors and is suitable to be tested in other wards and settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Ontology-based systematical representation and drug class effect analysis of package insert-reported adverse events associated with cardiovascular drugs used in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liwei; Li, Mei; Xie, Jiangan; Cao, Yuying; Liu, Hongfang; He, Yongqun

    2017-10-23

    With increased usage of cardiovascular drugs (CVDs) for treating cardiovascular diseases, it is important to analyze CVD-associated adverse events (AEs). In this study, we systematically collected package insert-reported AEs associated with CVDs used in China, and developed and analyzed an Ontology of Cardiovascular Drug AEs (OCVDAE). Extending the Ontology of AEs (OAE) and NDF-RT, OCVDAE includes 194 CVDs, CVD ingredients, mechanisms of actions (MoAs), and CVD-associated 736 AEs. An AE-specific drug class effect is defined to exist when all the drugs (drug chemical ingredients or drug products) in a drug class are associated with an AE, which is formulated as a new proportional class level ratio ("PCR") = 1. Our PCR-based heatmap analysis identified many class level drug effects on different AE classes such as behavioral and neurological AE and digestive system AE. Additional drug-AE correlation tests (i.e., class-level PRR, Chi-squared, and minimal case reports) were also modified and applied to further detect statistically significant drug class effects. Two drug ingredient classes and three CVD MoA classes were found to have statistically significant class effects on 13 AEs. For example, the CVD Active Transporter Interactions class (including reserpine, indapamide, digoxin, and deslanoside) has statistically significant class effect on anorexia and diarrhea AEs.

  14. Prospective observational study of adverse drug reactions to diclofenac in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standing, Joseph F; Ooi, Kuan; Keady, Simon; Howard, Richard F; Savage, Imogen; Wong, Ian C K

    2009-01-01

    AIM The aim of this study was to investigate the type of common (occurring in >1% of patients) adverse reactions caused by diclofenac when given to children for acute pain. METHODS A prospective observational study was undertaken on paediatric surgical patents aged ≤12 years at Great Ormond Street and University College London Hospitals. All adverse events were recorded, and causality assessment used to judge the likelihood of them being due to diclofenac. Prospective recruitment meant not all patients were prescribed diclofenac, allowing an analysis of utilization. Causality of all serious adverse events was reviewed by an expert panel. RESULTS Children prescribed diclofenac were significantly older, and stayed in hospital for shorter periods than those who were not. Diclofenac was not avoided in asthmatic patients. Data on 380 children showed they suffer similar types of nonserious adverse reactions to adults. The incidence (95% confidence interval) of rash was 0.8% (0.016, 2.3); minor central nervous system disturbance 0.5% (0.06, 1.9); rectal irritation with suppositories 0.3% (0.009, 1.9); and diarrhoea 0.3% (0.007, 1.5). No serious adverse event was judged to be caused by diclofenac, meaning the incidence of serious adverse reactions to diclofenac in children is Children given diclofenac for acute pain appeared to suffer similar types of adverse reactions to adults; the incidence of serious adverse reaction is <0.8%. PMID:19694745

  15. SOCIAL ATTITUDES TO DRUGS ABUSE AMONG YOUTH AND DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Nakhimova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The formation of responsibility for one’s health in the youth environment is one of the tasks of the institution of education that determines the process of socialization. The future of sustainable development of country is determined, among other things, by the formation of negative social attitudes towards drug use.The aim of the publication is to study the specifics of the social orientation among young people on drug use and to justify the need for prevention in the educational environment.Methodology and research methods. Methodological basis of work involves classical theories of social installation; anomies; cultural conflict; subcultures; stigmatizations; social control; social space. The analysis and synthesis of scientific publications and data of the government statistics, including results of a number of social researches of 2010–2015 conducted in the Tyumen region are used. Sociological methods, including poll, questioning and the formalized interviews are applied at an experimental investigation phase. Data processing is carried out in technique of the factorial and classification analysis.Results and scientific novelty. Drug abuse among young people is a result of the contradiction between youth attitudes and social norms. It is shown that the prevention of drug abuse in Russia is institutionally ineffective. The social attitudes and motives connected with drug abuse among young people aged 18–30 years are revealed. It is established that acceptance of drug abuse experience is not defined by a gender, social and/or material status. The main types of the attitude to drug abuse experience are designated: 1 complete negation of a possibility of drug abuse; 2 refusal of drug abuse, but indifference or loyal attitude to drug abuse by others; 3 readiness for periodic drug usage; 4 steady stereotype of regular use of narcotic substances.The necessity of flexible forms of influence on youth for formation of sustainable

  16. OpenVigil FDA - Inspection of U.S. American Adverse Drug Events Pharmacovigilance Data and Novel Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Ruwen; von Hehn, Leocadie; Herdegen, Thomas; Klein, Hans-Joachim; Bruhn, Oliver; Petri, Holger; Höcker, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance contributes to health care. However, direct access to the underlying data for academic institutions and individual physicians or pharmacists is intricate, and easily employable analysis modes for everyday clinical situations are missing. This underlines the need for a tool to bring pharmacovigilance to the clinics. To address these issues, we have developed OpenVigil FDA, a novel web-based pharmacovigilance analysis tool which uses the openFDA online interface of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to access U.S. American and international pharmacovigilance data from the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS). OpenVigil FDA provides disproportionality analyses to (i) identify the drug most likely evoking a new adverse event, (ii) compare two drugs concerning their safety profile, (iii) check arbitrary combinations of two drugs for unknown drug-drug interactions and (iv) enhance the relevance of results by identifying confounding factors and eliminating them using background correction. We present examples for these applications and discuss the promises and limits of pharmacovigilance, openFDA and OpenVigil FDA. OpenVigil FDA is the first public available tool to apply pharmacovigilance findings directly to real-life clinical problems. OpenVigil FDA does not require special licenses or statistical programs.

  17. Building a knowledge base of severe adverse drug events based on AERS reporting data using semantic web technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoqian; Wang, Liwei; Liu, Hongfang; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    A semantically coded knowledge base of adverse drug events (ADEs) with severity information is critical for clinical decision support systems and translational research applications. However it remains challenging to measure and identify the severity information of ADEs. The objective of the study is to develop and evaluate a semantic web based approach for building a knowledge base of severe ADEs based on the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) reporting data. We utilized a normalized AERS reporting dataset and extracted putative drug-ADE pairs and their associated outcome codes in the domain of cardiac disorders. We validated the drug-ADE associations using ADE datasets from SIDe Effect Resource (SIDER) and the UMLS. We leveraged the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event (CTCAE) grading system and classified the ADEs into the CTCAE in the Web Ontology Language (OWL). We identified and validated 2,444 unique Drug-ADE pairs in the domain of cardiac disorders, of which 760 pairs are in Grade 5, 775 pairs in Grade 4 and 2,196 pairs in Grade 3.

  18. Drug treatments in the secondary prevention of ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Ursula G

    2013-11-01

    Stroke is an important cause of death and disability. However, about two thirds of cerebrovascular events are initially minor. They carry a high risk of potentially severe recurrent events, but they also offer an opportunity for secondary prevention to avoid such recurrences. As most recurrent events occur within a short time after the initial presentation, secondary prevention has to be started as soon as possible. Dramatic risk reduction can be achieved with well-established drugs if used in a timely manner. A standard secondary preventive regimen will address multiple vascular risk factors and will usually consist of an antiplatelet agent, a lipid lowering drug, and an antihypertensive agent. Depending on the risk factor profile of each patient, this will have to be adjusted individually, for example, taking into account the presence of cardioembolism or of stenotic disease of the brain-supplying arteries. In recent years, the approach to treating these risk factors has evolved. In addition to absolute blood pressure, blood pressure variability has emerged as an important contributing factor to stroke risk, which is affected differently by different antihypertensive agents. New oral anticoagulants reduce the risk of cerebral haemorrhage and the need for regular blood checks. The best antiplatelet regimen for stroke prevention is still uncertain, and treatment of dyslipidaemia may change if trials with cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors, which increase levels of HDL-cholesterol, are successful. This article reviews the current evidence for drug treatments in the secondary prevention of ischaemic stroke. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effectiveness of HIV prevention social marketing with injecting drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, David R; Zhang, Guili; Cassady, Diana; Pappas, Les; Mitchell, Joyce; Kegeles, Susan M

    2010-10-01

    Social marketing involves applying marketing principles to promote social goods. In the context of health behavior, it has been used successfully to reduce alcohol-related car crashes, smoking among youths, and malaria transmission, among other goals. Features of social marketing, such as audience segmentation and repeated exposure to prevention messages, distinguish it from traditional health promotion programs. A recent review found 8 of 10 rigorously evaluated social marketing interventions responsible for changes in HIV-related behavior or behavioral intentions. We studied 479 injection drug users to evaluate a community-based social marketing campaign to reduce injection risk behavior among drug users in Sacramento, California. Injecting drugs is associated with HIV infection in more than 130 countries worldwide.

  20. Are adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs different in symptomatic partial and idiopathic generalized epilepsies? The Portuguese-Brazilian validation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, H H; Alonso, N B; Vidal-Dourado, M; Carbonel, T D; de Araújo Filho, G M; Caboclo, L O; Yacubian, E M; Guilhoto, L M

    2011-11-01

    We report the results of administration of the Portuguese-Brazilian translation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP) to 100 patients (mean age=34.5, SD=12.12; 56 females), 61 with symptomatic partial epilepsy (SPE) and 39 with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) (ILAE, 1989) who were on a stable antiepileptic drug (AED) regimen and being treated in a Brazilian tertiary epilepsy center. Carbamazepine was the most commonly used AED (43.0%), followed by valproic acid (32.0%). Two or more AEDs were used by 69.0% of patients. The mean LAEP score (19 questions) was 37.6 (SD=13.35). The most common adverse effects were sleepiness (35.0%), memory problems (35.0%), and difficulty in concentrating (25.0%). Higher LAEP scores were associated with polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.005), female gender (P0.001) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Depression: r=0.637, P<0.001; Anxiety: r=0.621, P<0.001) dimensions. LAEP overall scores were similar in people with SPE and IGE and were not helpful in differentiating adverse effects in these two groups. Clinical variables that influenced global LAEP were seizure frequency (P=0.050) and generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the last month (P=0.031) in the IGE group, and polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.003 and P=0.003) in both IGE and SPE groups. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 21 CFR 310.305 - Records and reports concerning adverse drug experiences on marketed prescription drugs for human...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... convulsions that do not result in inpatient hospitalization, or the development of drug dependency or drug... are available on the Internet at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/index.html. (e) Patient privacy...

  2. Potential Mechanisms of Hematological Adverse Drug Reactions in Patients Receiving Clozapine in Combination With Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiciński, Michał; Węclewicz, Mateusz M; Miętkiewicz, Mateusz; Malinowski, Bartosz; Grześk, Elżbieta; Klonowska, Joanna

    2017-03-01

    Clozapine is a second-generation antipsychotic which has proven efficacy in treating the symptoms of schizophrenia. Although clozapine therapy is associated with a number of adverse drug reactions, it is frequently used. One of the most common adverse drug reactions is gastroesophageal reflux disease which is an indication for treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Coadministration of clozapine and PPIs increases the risk of hematological adverse drug reactions, including neutropenia and agranulocytosis. The mechanism in idiosyncratic agranulocytosis is not dose related and involves either a direct toxic or an immune-allergic effect. It is suspected that the clozapine metabolites nitrenium ion and N-desmethylclozapine may cause apoptosis or impair growth of granulocytes. Formation of N-desmethylclozapine is correlated with activity of the cytochrome P450 enzymes 1A2 and 3A4 (CYP1A2 and CYP3A4). Nitrenium ion is produced by the flavin-containing monooxygenase system of leukocytes. A drug interaction between clozapine and a PPI is a consequence of the induction of common metabolic pathways either by the PPI or clozapine. Findings to date suggest that indirect induction of flavin-containing monooxygenase by omeprazole through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor increases the expression of the enzyme mRNA and in the long term may cause the increase in activity. Moreover, induction of CYP1A2, especially by omeprazole and lansoprazole, may increase the serum concentration of N-desmethylclozapine, which can accumulate in lymphocytes and may achieve toxic levels. Another hypothesis that may explain hematological adverse drug reactions is competitive inhibition of CYP2C19, which may contribute to increased serum concentrations of toxic metabolites.

  3. Adverse event reporting patterns of newly approved drugs in the USA in 2006: an analysis of FDA Adverse Event Reporting System data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Pankdeep; Chen, Xing; Weiss, Sheila R

    2013-11-01

    The Weber effect states that adverse event (AE) reporting tends to increase in the first 2 years after a new drug is placed onto the market, peaks at the end of the second year, and then declines. However, since the Weber effect was originally described, there has been improvement in the communication of safety information and new policies regarding the reporting of AEs by healthcare professionals and consumers, prompting reassessment of the existence of the Weber effect in the current AE reporting scenario. To determine the AE reporting patterns for new molecular entity (NME) drugs and biologics approved in 2006 and to examine these patterns for the existence of the Weber effect. Publicly available FDA Adverse Event Reporting System data were used to assess the AE reporting patterns for a 5-year period from the drug’s approval date. The total number of annual reports from all sources, based on the report date, was plotted against time (in years). In the period from 2006 to 2011, a total of 91,187 AE reports were submitted for 19 NMEs approved in 2006. The highest number of AE reports were submitted for varenicline tartrate (N = 47,158) and the lowest number for anidulafungin (N = 161). Anidulafungin was reported to have the highest proportion of death reports (36 %) and varenicline tartrate the lowest proportion (1.7 %). The classic Weber pattern was not observed for any of the 19 NMEs approved in 2006. While there was no one predominant pattern of AE report volume, we grouped the drugs into four general categories; the majority of drugs had either a continued increase in reports (Category A 31.6 %) or an N-pattern with reporting reaching an initial peak in year 2 or 3, declining and then beginning to climb again (Category B 42.1 %). There have been numerous changes in AE reporting, particularly a huge increase in overall annual report volume, since the Weber effect was first reported. Our results suggest that a Weber-type reporting pattern should not be assumed

  4. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for treating acute ankle sprains in adults: benefits outweigh adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Sjer, Arnout; Somford, Matthijs P; Bulstra, Gythe H; Struijs, Peter A A; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J

    2015-08-01

    In the recent clinical guideline for acute lateral ankle sprain, the current best evidence for diagnosis, treatment and prevention strategies was evaluated. Key findings for treatment included the use of ice and compression in the initial phase of treatment, in combination with rest and elevation. A short period of taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may facilitate a rapid decrease in pain and swelling can also be helpful in the acute phase. The objective was to assess the effectiveness and safety of oral and topical NSAID in the treatment for acute ankle sprains. Randomised controlled trials comparing oral or topic NSAID treatment with placebo or each other were included. Primary outcome measures were pain at rest or at mobilisation and adverse events. Trials were assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Twenty-eight studies were included, and 22 were available for meta-analysis. Superior results were reported for oral NSAIDs when compared with placebo, concerning pain on weight bearing on short term, pain at rest on the short term, and less swelling on short- and intermediate term. For topical NSAIDs, superior results compared with placebo were found for pain at rest (short term), persistent pain (intermediate term), pain on weight bearing (short- and intermediate term) and for swelling (short and intermediate term). No trials were included comparing oral with topic NSAIDs, so conclusions regarding this comparison are not realistic. The current evidence is limited due to the low number of studies, lack of methodological quality of the included studies as well as the small sample size of the included studies. Nevertheless, the findings from this review support the use of NSAIDs for the initial treatment for acute ankle sprains. Meta-analysis of RCTs, Level I.

  5. Prepsychotic treatment for schizophrenia: preventive medicine, social control, or drug marketing strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosden, R

    1999-01-01

    The definition of schizophrenia is currently being extended to include a "prepsychotic" phase. Prepsychosis detection and intervention programs have already been established in Australia. These are intended to identify people "at-risk" for schizophrenia and treat them to prevent their transition into psychosis. However, analysis of leading research in this field shows high levels of arbitrariness in the selection of diagnostic indicators and a lack of convincing evidence about the efficacy of treatments. The favored prophylactic treatment is atypical neuroleptic medication, and sponsorship of research is providing manufacturers of these drugs with a ubiquitous presence in the field. Many risks are associated with atypical neuroleptics and adverse reactions include psychosis. Taken together these factors suggest that prepsychotic intervention may be more concerned with expanding the market for atypical neuroleptics than with preventing schizophrenia.

  6. Prevention That Works! A Guide for Developing School-Based Drug and Violence Prevention Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Cynthia R.

    This book helps educators produce assessments of their schools' drug and violence prevention programs. It contains over 30 separate resources that can be adapted to specific evaluations (e.g., sample youth and adult participant feedback sheets, sample classroom observation sheets and teacher implementation logs, sample en-route participant…

  7. New Technology Tools: Using Social Media for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention. Prevention Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    When it comes to using social media technology for alcohol, drug abuse, and violence prevention, Thomas Workman, at Baylor College of Medicine's John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science, points out that social media is interactive. This means that a person is entering a conversation rather than a declaration, and…

  8. A Review of Adverse Cutaneous Drug Reactions Resulting from the Use of Interferon and Ribavirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Mistry

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced cutaneous eruptions are named among the most common side effects of many medications. Thus, cutaneous drug eruptions are a common cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in hospital settings. The present article reviews different presentations of drug-induced cutaneous eruptions, with a focus on eruptions reported secondary to the use of interferon and ribavirin. Presentations include injection site reactions, psoriasis, eczematous drug reactions, alopecia, sarcoidosis, lupus, fixed drug eruptions, pigmentary changes and lichenoid eruptions. Also reviewed are findings regarding life-threatening systemic drug reactions.

  9. The frequency of anti-infliximab antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated in routine care and the associations with adverse drug reactions and treatment failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krintel, Sophine B; Grunert, Veit Peter; Hetland, Merete L

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of anti-infliximab antibodies in patients with RA and the associations with adverse drug reactions and treatment failure.......To investigate the frequency of anti-infliximab antibodies in patients with RA and the associations with adverse drug reactions and treatment failure....

  10. An ensemble method for extracting adverse drug events from social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Zhao, Songzheng; Zhang, Xiaodi

    2016-06-01

    Because adverse drug events (ADEs) are a serious health problem and a leading cause of death, it is of vital importance to identify them correctly and in a timely manner. With the development of Web 2.0, social media has become a large data source for information on ADEs. The objective of this study is to develop a relation extraction system that uses natural language processing techniques to effectively distinguish between ADEs and non-ADEs in informal text on social media. We develop a feature-based approach that utilizes various lexical, syntactic, and semantic features. Information-gain-based feature selection is performed to address high-dimensional features. Then, we evaluate the effectiveness of four well-known kernel-based approaches (i.e., subset tree kernel, tree kernel, shortest dependency path kernel, and all-paths graph kernel) and several ensembles that are generated by adopting different combination methods (i.e., majority voting, weighted averaging, and stacked generalization). All of the approaches are tested using three data sets: two health-related discussion forums and one general social networking site (i.e., Twitter). When investigating the contribution of each feature subset, the feature-based approach attains the best area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) values, which are 78.6%, 72.2%, and 79.2% on the three data sets. When individual methods are used, we attain the best AUC values of 82.1%, 73.2%, and 77.0% using the subset tree kernel, shortest dependency path kernel, and feature-based approach on the three data sets, respectively. When using classifier ensembles, we achieve the best AUC values of 84.5%, 77.3%, and 84.5% on the three data sets, outperforming the baselines. Our experimental results indicate that ADE extraction from social media can benefit from feature selection. With respect to the effectiveness of different feature subsets, lexical features and semantic features can enhance the ADE extraction

  11. Portable automatic text classification for adverse drug reaction detection via multi-corpus training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Abeed; Gonzalez, Graciela

    2015-02-01

    Automatic detection of adverse drug reaction (ADR) mentions from text has recently received significant interest in pharmacovigilance research. Current research focuses on various sources of text-based information, including social media-where enormous amounts of user posted data is available, which have the potential for use in pharmacovigilance if collected and filtered accurately. The aims of this study are: (i) to explore natural language processing (NLP) approaches for generating useful features from text, and utilizing them in optimized machine learning algorithms for automatic classification of ADR assertive text segments; (ii) to present two data sets that we prepared for the task of ADR detection from user posted internet data; and (iii) to investigate if combining training data from distinct corpora can improve automatic classification accuracies. One of our three data sets contains annotated sentences from clinical reports, and the two other data sets, built in-house, consist of annotated posts from social media. Our text classification approach relies on generating a large set of features, representing semantic properties (e.g., sentiment, polarity, and topic), from short text nuggets. Importantly, using our expanded feature sets, we combine training data from different corpora in attempts to boost classification accuracies. Our feature-rich classification approach performs significantly better than previously published approaches with ADR class F-scores of 0.812 (previously reported best: 0.770), 0.538 and 0.678 for the three data sets. Combining training data from multiple compatible corpora further improves the ADR F-scores for the in-house data sets to 0.597 (improvement of 5.9 units) and 0.704 (improvement of 2.6 units) respectively. Our research results indicate that using advanced NLP techniques for generating information rich features from text can significantly improve classification accuracies over existing benchmarks. Our experiments

  12. Respiratory paradoxical adverse drug reactions associated with acetylcysteine and carbocysteine systemic use in paediatric patients: a national survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Mallet

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report pediatric cases of paradoxical respiratory adverse drug reactions (ADRs after exposure to oral mucolytic drugs (carbocysteine, acetylcysteine that led to the withdrawal of licenses for these drugs for infants in France and then Italy. DESIGN: The study followed the recommendations of the European guidelines of pharmacovigilance for medicines used in the paediatric population. SETTING: Cases voluntarily reported by physicians from 1989 to 2008 were identified in the national French pharmacovigilance public database and in drug company databases. PATIENTS: The definition of paradoxical respiratory ADRs was based on the literature. Exposure to mucolytic drugs was arbitrarily defined as having received mucolytic drugs for at least 2 days (>200 mg and at least until the day before the first signs of the suspected ADR. RESULTS: The non-exclusive paradoxical respiratory ADRs reported in 59 paediatric patients (median age 5 months, range 3 weeks to 34 months, 98% younger than 2 years old were increased bronchorrhea or mucus vomiting (n = 27, worsening of respiratory distress during respiratory tract infection (n = 35, dyspnoea (n = 18, cough aggravation or prolongation (n = 11, and bronchospasm (n = 1. Fifty-one (86% children required hospitalization or extended hospitalization because of the ADR; one patient died of pulmonary oedema after mucus vomiting. CONCLUSION: Parents, physicians, pharmacists, and drug regulatory agencies should know that the benefit risk ratio of mucolytic drugs is at least null and most probably negative in infants according to available evidence.

  13. Patient safety incident reports related to traditional Japanese Kampo medicines: medication errors and adverse drug events in a university hospital for a ten-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yutaka; Fujimoto, Makoto; Nogami, Tatsuya; Watari, Hidetoshi; Kitahara, Hideyuki; Misawa, Hiroki; Kimbara, Yoshiyuki

    2017-12-21

    transiently harmed and required substantial treatment). There are many patient safety issues related to Kampo medicines. Patient safety awareness should be raised to prevent medication errors, especially administration errors, and adverse drug events in Kampo medicine.

  14. Adverse events and treatment failure leading to discontinuation of recently approved antipsychotic drugs in schizophrenia: A network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonin, Fernanda S; Piazza, Thais; Wiens, Astrid; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando; Pontarolo, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Objective:We aimed to gather evidence of the discontinuation rates owing to adverse events or treatment failure for four recently approved antipsychotics (asenapine, blonanserin, iloperidone, and lurasidone).Methods: A systematic review followed by pairwise meta-analysis and mixed treatment comparison meta analysis(MTC) was performed, including randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the use of the above-mentioned drugs versus placebo in patients with schizophrenia. An electronic search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, Scielo, the Cochrane Library, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts(January 2015). The included trials were at least single blinded. The main outcome measures extracted were discontinuation owing to adverse events and discontinuation owing to treatment failure.Results: Fifteen RCTs were identified (n = 5400 participants) and 13 of them were amenable for use in our meta-analyses. No significant differences were observed between any of the four drugs and placebo as regards discontinuation owing to adverse events, whether in pairwise meta-analysis or in MTC. All drugs presented a better profile than placebo on discontinuation owing to treatment failure, both in pairwise meta-analysis and MTC. Asenapine was found to be the best therapy in terms of tolerability owing to failure,while lurasidone was the worst treatment in terms of adverse events. The evidence around blonanserin is weak.Conclusion: MTCs allowed the creation of two different rank orders of these four antipsychotic drugs in two outcome measures. This evidence-generating method allows direct and indirect comparisons, supporting approval and pricing decisions when lacking sufficient, direct, head-to-head trials.

  15. Knowledge, perception, practices and barriers of healthcare professionals in Bosnia and Herzegovina towards adverse drug reaction reporting and pharmacovigilance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maša Amrain

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pharmacovigilance is an arm of patient care. No one wants to harm patients, but unfortunately any medicine will sometimes do just this. Underreporting of adverse drug reactions by healthcare professionals is a major problem in many countries. In order to determine whether our pharmacovigilance system could be improved, and identify reasons for under-reporting, a study to investigate the role of health care professionals in adverse drug reaction (ADR reporting was performed.Methods: A pretested questionnaire comprising of 20 questions was designed for assessment of knowledge, perceptions, practice and barriers toward ADR reporting on a random sample of 1000 healthcare professionals in Bosnia and Herzegovina.Results: Of the 1000 respondents, 870 (87% completed the questionnaire. The survey showed that 62.9% health care professionals would report ADR to the Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Device of Bosnia and Herzegovina (ALMBIH. Most of surveyed respondents has a positive perception towards ADR reporting, and believes that this is part of their professional and legal obligation, and they also recognize the importance of reporting adverse drug reactions. Only small percent (15.4% of surveyed health care professionals reported adverse drug reaction.Conclusions: The knowledge of ADRs and how to report them is inadequate among health care professionals. Perception toward ADR reporting was positive, but it is not reflected in the actual practice of ADRs, probably because of little experience and knowledge regarding pharmacovigilance. Interventions such as education and training, focusing on the aims of pharmacovigilance, completing the ADR form and clarifying the reporting criteria are strongly recommended.

  16. Barriers to reporting of adverse drugs reactions: a cross sectional study among community pharmacists in United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheema E

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs are a major public health problem. Prompt reporting of suspected ADRs is fundamental in the post-marketing surveillance of medicines and helps in ensuring medicine safety. However, fewer ADRs are reported in general and in particular by community pharmacists. There is limited knowledge about the factors which are preventing community pharmacists in the UK from reporting an ADR. Objectives: To identify the barriers to ADR reporting among community pharmacists practicing in the UK. Methods: A cross sectional study using a 25-items questionnaire (both online and paper based including 10 barriers to ADR reporting was conducted from 1st April 2012 to September 2012. Community pharmacists practicing in the West Midlands, UK, were approached for the participation in this study. Chi-Square and regression were applied to identify covariates for the barriers to ADR reporting. A significant value of 0.05 was assigned for analysis. Results: Of the 230 invited community pharmacists, 138 pharmacists responded (response rate 60%. The median age of respondents was 31 years. All pharmacists reported that they would report both serious and mild ADRs from drugs with black triangle among children as well as adults. About 95% (n=131 of the pharmacists were familiar with the paper based ADR reporting system. Store-based pharmacists were more likely to be more confident about which ADRs to report [0.680, 95% Confidence Interval 0.43-3.59]. Lack of time 46.4% (n=64, and pharmacists perception that ADR is not serious enough to report (65.2%; n=90 were identified as barriers to ADR reporting. Majority 63.0% (n=87 of the pharmacists identified training and information about what to report and access to Information Technology (IT (For example access to internet connection 61.6% (n=85 as facilitators to ADR reporting process. Conclusion: Lack of time and ADRs considered not serious enough by pharmacists to report were barriers to ADR